WorldWideScience

Sample records for dependent rate constants

  1. Dependence of Reaction Rate Constants on Density in Supercritical Fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGTao; SHENZhongyao

    2002-01-01

    A new method,which correlates rate constants of chemical reactions and density or pressure in supercritical fluids,was developed.Based on the transition state theory and thermodynamic principles, the rate constant can be reasonably correlated with the density of the supercritical fluid,and a correlation equation was obtained. Coupled with the equation of state (EOS) of a supercritical solvent,the effect of pressure on reaction rate constant could be represented.Two typical systems were used to test this method.The result indicates that this method is suitable for dilute supercritical fluid solutions.

  2. Dependence of rate constants on vibrational temperatures - An Arrhenius description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, D. I.; Johnson, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    An interpretation of the variation of rate constants with vibrational temperature is proposed which introduces parameters analogous to those of the classical Arrhenius expression. The constancy of vibrational activation energy is studied for the dissociaton of NO, the ion-molecular reaction of O(+) with N2, and the atom exchange reaction of I with H2. It is found that when a Boltzmann distribution for vibrational states is applicable, the variation of the rate constant with the vibrational temperature can be used to define a vibrational activation energy. The method has application to exchange reactions where a vibrational energy threshold exists.

  3. On the Temperature Dependence of the Rate Constant of the Bimolecular Reaction of two Hydrated Electrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.L. Butarbutar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available It has been a longstanding issue in the radiation chemistry of water that, even though H2 is a molecular product, its “escape” yield g(H2 increases with increasing temperature. A main source of H2 is the bimolecular reaction of two hydrated electrons (eaq. The temperature dependence of the rate constant of this reaction (k1, measured under alkaline conditions, reveals that the rate constant drops abruptly above ~150°C. Recently, it has been suggested that this temperature dependence should be regarded as being independent of pH and used in high-temperature modeling of near-neutral water radiolysis. However, when this drop in the eaq self-reaction rate constant is included in low (isolated spurs and high (cylindrical tracks linear energy transfer (LET modeling calculations, g(H2 shows a marked downward discontinuity at ~150°C which is not observed experimentally. The consequences of the presence of this discontinuity in g(H2 for both low and high LET radiation are briefly discussed in this communication. It is concluded that the applicability of the sudden drop in k1 observed at ~150°C in alkaline water to near-neutral water is questionable and that further measurements of the rate constant in pure water are highly desirable.

  4. Size dependence of surface thermodynamic properties of nanoparticles and its determination method by reaction rate constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wenjiao; Xue, Yongqiang, E-mail: xyqlw@126.com; Cui, Zixiang

    2016-08-15

    Surface thermodynamic properties are the fundamental properties of nanomaterials, and these properties depend on the size of nanoparticles. In this paper, relations of molar surface thermodynamic properties and surface heat capacity at constant pressure of nanoparticles with particle size were derived theoretically, and the method of obtaining the surface thermodynamic properties by reaction rate constant was put forward. The reaction of nano-MgO with sodium bisulfate solution was taken as a research system. The influence regularities of the particle size on the surface thermodynamic properties were discussed theoretically and experimentally, which show that the experimental regularities are in accordance with the corresponding theoretical relations. With the decreasing of nanoparticle size, the molar surface thermodynamic properties increase, while the surface heat capacity decreases (the absolute value increases). In addition, the surface thermodynamic properties are linearly related to the reciprocal of nanoparticle diameter, respectively.

  5. Application of the compensated Arrhenius formalism to explain the dielectric constant dependence of rates for Menschutkin reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrowsky, Matt; Glatzhofer, Daniel T; Frech, Roger

    2013-11-21

    The dependence of the reaction rate on solvent dielectric constant is examined for the reaction of trihexylamine with 1-bromohexane in a series of 2-ketones over the temperature range 25-80 °C. The rate constant data are analyzed using the compensated Arrhenius formalism (CAF), where the rate constant assumes an Arrhenius-like equation that also contains a dielectric constant dependence in the exponential prefactor. The CAF activation energies are substantially higher than those obtained using the simple Arrhenius equation. A master curve of the data is observed by plotting the prefactors against the solvent dielectric constant. The master curve shows that the reaction rate has a weak dependence on dielectric constant for values approximately less than 10 and increases more rapidly for dielectric constant values greater than 10.

  6. Direct evaluation of the temperature dependence of the rate constant based on the quantum instanton approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Buchowiecki, Marcin

    2010-01-01

    A general method for the direct evaluation of the temperature dependence of the quantum-mechanical reaction rate constant in many-dimensional systems is described. The method is based on the quantum instanton approximation for the rate constant, thermodynamic integration with respect to the inverse temperature, and the path integral Monte Carlo evaluation. It can describe deviations from the Arrhenius law due to the coupling of rotations and vibrations, zero-point energy, tunneling, corner-cutting, and other nuclear quantum effects. The method is tested on the Eckart barrier and the full-dimensional H + H_2 -> H_2 + H reaction. In the temperature range from 300K to 1500K, the error of the present method remains within 13% despite the very large deviations from the Arrhenius law. The direct approach makes the calculations much more efficient, and the efficiency is increased even further (by up to two orders of magnitude in the studied reactions) by using optimal estimators for reactant and transition state the...

  7. Temperature dependence of the rate constant of hydrogen isotope interactions with a lithium capillary-porous system under reactor irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tazhibayeva, Irina, E-mail: tazhibayeva@ntsc.kz [Institute of Atomic Energy NNC RK, Kurchatov (Kazakhstan); Kulsartov, Timur; Gordienko, Yuri [Institute of Atomic Energy NNC RK, Kurchatov (Kazakhstan); Mukanova, Aliya [Al’ Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Ponkratov, Yuri; Barsukov, Nikolay; Tulubaev, Evgeniy [Institute of Atomic Energy NNC RK, Kurchatov (Kazakhstan); Platacis, Erik [University of Latvia (IPUL), Riga (Latvia); Kenzhin, Ergazy [Shakarim Semey State University, Semey (Kazakhstan)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • The experiments with Li CPS sample were carried out at reactor IVG-1.M. • The gas absorption technique was used to study hydrogen isotope interaction with lithium CPS. • The temperature dependence of constants of interaction rate was obtained for various power rates of the reactor. • Determination of the activation energies, and pre-exponents of Arrhenius dependence. • The effect of increase of the rate constant under reaction irradiation. -- Abstract: Experiments with a sample of a lithium capillary-porous system (CPS) were performed at the reactor IVG-1.M of the Institute of Atomic Energy NNC RK to study the effects of neutron irradiation on the parameters of hydrogen isotope interactions with a lithium CPS. The absorption technique was used during the experiments, and this technique allowed the temperature dependences of the hydrogen isotope interaction rate constants with the lithium CPS to be obtained under various reactor powers. The obtained dependencies were used to determine the main interaction parameters: the activation energies and the pre-exponents of the Arrhenius dependence of the hydrogen interaction rate constants with lithium and the lithium CPS. An increase of the hydrogen isotope interaction rate with the lithium CPS was observed under reactor irradiation.

  8. [On true and apparent Michaelis constants in enzymology. III. Is it linear dependence between apparent michaelis constant and limiting rate and is it possible to determine the substrate constant value using this dependence?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakhim, S A

    2012-01-01

    The Slater-Bonner method which is used for graphic determination of substrate constant (Ks) by linear dependence of apparent Michaelis constant (Km(app)) on the limiting rate (V(app)) of enzyme-catalysed reactions with activator participation has been critically analysed. It has been shown that although it is possible to record the mechanisms of such reactions as a scheme similar to Michaelis-Menten model which allow to find correlation Km(app) and V(app) as equation Km(app) = Ks + V(app)/k1[E]0 ([E]0 is a total enzyme concentration, k1 is a rate constant of enzyme-substrate complex formation from free enzyme and substrate) in order to calculate Ks and individual rate constants (k1, k(-1)), but this approach for investigation of all reactions with activator participation ought not to be used. The above equation is not obeyed in general, it may be true for some mechanisms only or under certain ratios of kinetic parameters of enzyme-catalysed reactions.

  9. Temperature dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reaction of ozone with dimethyl sulfide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hai-tao; ZHANG Yu-jie; MU Yu-jing

    2007-01-01

    Absolute rate constants for the reaction of ozone with dimethyl sulfide (DMS) were measured in a 200-L Teflon chamber over the temperature range of 283-353 K. Measurements were carried out using DMS in large excess over ozone of 10 to 1 or greater. Over the indicated temperature range,the data could be fit to the simple Arrhenius expression as KDMS = (9.96±3.61)×10-11exp(-(7309.7±1098.2)/T)cm3/(molecule·s). A compared investigation of the reaction between ozone and ethene had a kc2H4 value of(1.35±0.11)×10-18 cm3/(molecule·s) at room temperature.

  10. Theoretical determination of chemical rate constants using novel time-dependent methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dateo, Christopher E.

    1994-01-01

    The work completed within the grant period 10/1/91 through 12/31/93 falls primarily in the area of reaction dynamics using both quantum and classical mechanical methodologies. Essentially four projects have been completed and have been or are in preparation of being published. The majority of time was spent in the determination of reaction rate coefficients in the area of hydrocarbon fuel combustion reactions which are relevant to NASA's High Speed Research Program (HSRP). These reaction coefficients are important in the design of novel jet engines with low NOx emissions, which through a series of catalytic reactions contribute to the deterioration of the earth's ozone layer. A second area of research studied concerned the control of chemical reactivity using ultrashort (femtosecond) laser pulses. Recent advances in pulsed-laser technologies have opened up a vast new field to be investigated both experimentally and theoretically. The photodissociation of molecules adsorbed on surfaces using novel time-independent quantum mechanical methods was a third project. And finally, using state-of-the-art, high level ab initio electronic structure methods in conjunction with accurate quantum dynamical methods, the rovibrational energy levels of a triatomic molecule with two nonhydrogen atoms (HCN) were calculated to unprecedented levels of agreement between theory and experiment.

  11. Pressure dependence of the absolute rate constant for the reaction Cl + C2H2 from 210-361 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunning, J.; Stief, L. J.

    1985-01-01

    In recent years, considerable attention has been given to the role of chlorine compounds in the catalytic destruction of stratospheric ozone. However, while some reactions have been studied extensively, the kinetic data for the reaction of Cl with C2H2 is sparse with only three known determinations of the rate constant k3. The reactions involved are Cl + C2H2 yields reversibly ClC2H2(asterisk) (3a) and ClC2H2(asterisk) + M yields ClC2H2 + M (3b). In the present study, flash photolysis coupled with chlorine atomic resonance fluorescence have been employed to determine the pressure and temperature dependence of k3 with the third body M = Ar. Room temperature values are also reported for M = N2. The pressure dependence observed in the experiments confirms the expectation that the reaction involves addition of Cl to the unsaturated C2H2 molecule followed by collisional stabilization of the resulting adduct radical.

  12. Atmospheric reaction of Cl + methacrolein: a theoretical study on the mechanism, and pressure- and temperature-dependent rate constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Cuihong; Xu, Baoen; Zhang, Shaowen

    2014-05-22

    Methacrolein is a major degradation product of isoprene, the reaction of methacrolein with Cl atoms may play some roles in the degradation of isoprene where these species are relatively abundant. However, the energetics and kinetics of this reaction, which govern the reaction branching, are still not well understood so far. In the present study, two-dimensional potential energy surfaces were constructed to analyze the minimum energy path of the barrierless addition process between Cl and the C═C double bond of methacrolein, which reveals that the terminal addition intermediate is directly formed from the addition reaction. The terminal addition intermediate can further yield different products among which the reaction paths abstracting the aldehyde hydrogen atom and the methyl hydrogen atom are dominant reaction exits. The minimum reaction path for the direct aldehydic hydrogen atom abstraction is also obtained. The reaction kinetics was calculated by the variational transition state theory in conjunction with the master equation method. From the theoretical model we predicted that the overall rate constant of the Cl + methacrolein reaction at 297 K and atmospheric pressure is koverall = 2.3× 10(-10) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), and the branching ratio of the aldehydic hydrogen abstraction is about 12%. The reaction is pressure dependent at P pressure limit at about 100 Torr. The calculated results could well account for the experimental observations.

  13. An optimal policy for deteriorating items with time-proportional deterioration rate and constant and time-dependent linear demand rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Trailokyanath; Mishra, Pandit Jagatananda; Pattanayak, Hadibandhu

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, an economic order quantity (EOQ) inventory model for a deteriorating item is developed with the following characteristics: (i) The demand rate is deterministic and two-staged, i.e., it is constant in first part of the cycle and linear function of time in the second part. (ii) Deterioration rate is time-proportional. (iii) Shortages are not allowed to occur. The optimal cycle time and the optimal order quantity have been derived by minimizing the total average cost. A simple solution procedure is provided to illustrate the proposed model. The article concludes with a numerical example and sensitivity analysis of various parameters as illustrations of the theoretical results.

  14. Naturally Time Dependent Cosmological Constant

    CERN Document Server

    Gregori, A

    2004-01-01

    In the light of the proposal of hep-th/0207195, we discuss in detail the issue of the cosmological constant, explaining how can string theory naturally predict the value which is experimentally observed, without low-energy supersymmetry.

  15. Time-Dependent Quantum Wave Packet Study of the Si + OH → SiO + H Reaction: Cross Sections and Rate Constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero Santamaría, Alejandro; Dayou, Fabrice; Rubayo-Soneira, Jesus; Monnerville, Maurice

    2017-02-15

    The dynamics of the Si((3)P) + OH(X(2)Π) → SiO(X(1)Σ(+)) + H((2)S) reaction is investigated by means of the time-dependent wave packet (TDWP) approach using an ab initio potential energy surface recently developed by Dayou et al. ( J. Chem. Phys. 2013 , 139 , 204305 ) for the ground X(2)A' electronic state. Total reaction probabilities have been calculated for the first 15 rotational states j = 0-14 of OH(v=0,j) at a total angular momentum J = 0 up to a collision energy of 1 eV. Integral cross sections and state-selected rate constants for the temperature range 10-500 K were obtained within the J-shifting approximation. The reaction probabilities display highly oscillatory structures indicating the contribution of long-lived quasibound states supported by the deep SiOH/HSiO wells. The cross sections behave with collision energies as expected for a barrierless reaction and are slightly sensitive to the initial rotational excitation of OH. The thermal rate constants show a marked temperature dependence below 200 K with a maximum value around 15 K. The TDWP results globally agree with the results of earlier quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) calculations carried out by Rivero-Santamaria et al. ( Chem. Phys. Lett. 2014 , 610-611 , 335 - 340 ) with the same potential energy surface. In particular, the thermal rate constants display a similar temperature dependence, with TDWP values smaller than the QCT ones over the whole temperature range.

  16. Reaction dynamics with the multi-layer multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree approach: H + CH4 → H2 + CH3 rate constants for different potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Ralph; Manthe, Uwe

    2012-12-28

    The multi-layer extension of the multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) approach is applied to the investigation of elementary bimolecular chemical reactions. Cumulative reaction probabilities and thermal rate constants of the H + CH(4) → H(2) + CH(3) reaction are calculated using flux correlation functions and the quantum transition state concept. Different coordinate systems and potential energy surfaces (PESs) are studied. The convergence properties of different layerings are investigated and the efficiency of multi-layer MCTDH approach is compared to the standard MCTDH approach. It is found that the multi-layer approach can decrease the numerical effort by more than an order of magnitude. The increased efficiency resulting from the multi-layer MCTDH approach is crucial for quantum dynamical calculations on recent global H + CH(4) → H(2) + CH(3) PESs, e.g., the ZBB3-PES [Z. Xie, J. M. Bowman, and X. Zhang, J. Chem. Phys. 125, 133120 (2006)] based on permutational invariant polynomials, which are numerically more demanding than earlier PESs. The results indicate that an accurate description of all transition state frequencies is important to obtain accurate thermal rate constants.

  17. Coasting cosmologies with time dependent cosmological constant

    CERN Document Server

    Pimentel, L O; Pimentel, Luis O.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of a time dependent cosmological constant is considered in a family of scalar tensor theories. Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmological models for vacumm and perfect fluid matter are found. They have a linear expansion factor, the so called coasting cosmology, the gravitational "constant" decreace inversely with time; this model satisfy the Dirac hipotesis. The cosmological "constant" decreace inversely with the square of time, therefore we can have a very small value for it at present time.

  18. Inflation with a constant rate of roll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motohashi, Hayato; Starobinsky, Alexei A.; Yokoyama, Jun'ichi

    2015-09-01

    We consider an inflationary scenario where the rate of inflaton roll defined by ̈phi/H dot phi remains constant. The rate of roll is small for slow-roll inflation, while a generic rate of roll leads to the interesting case of 'constant-roll' inflation. We find a general exact solution for the inflaton potential required for such inflaton behaviour. In this model, due to non-slow evolution of background, the would-be decaying mode of linear scalar (curvature) perturbations may not be neglected. It can even grow for some values of the model parameter, while the other mode always remains constant. However, this always occurs for unstable solutions which are not attractors for the given potential. The most interesting particular cases of constant-roll inflation remaining viable with the most recent observational data are quadratic hilltop inflation (with cutoff) and natural inflation (with an additional negative cosmological constant). In these cases even-order slow-roll parameters approach non-negligible constants while the odd ones are asymptotically vanishing in the quasi-de Sitter regime.

  19. Temperature dependence of the rate constant for reactions of hydrated electrons with H, OH and H2O2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, H.; Sehested, K.; Løgager, T.

    1994-01-01

    (A) = 14.0 kJ mol-1 (3.3 kcal mol-1). For reaction with OH radicals the corresponding values are, k(20-degrees-C) = 3.1 x 10(10) M-1 s-1 and E(A) = 14.7 kJ mol-1 (3.5 kcal mol-1) determined in the temperature range 5-175-degrees-C. For reaction with H2O2 the values are, k(20-degrees-C) = 1.2 x 10(10) M-1 s......-1 and E(A) = 15.6 kJ mol-1 (3.7 kcal mol-1) measured from 5-150-degrees-C. Thus, the activation energy for all three fast reactions is close to that expected for diffusion controlled reactions. As phosphates were used as buffer system, the rate constant and activation energy for the reaction...

  20. Frequency Dependence of Attenuation Constant of Dielectric Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Zadgaonkar

    1975-01-01

    Full Text Available Different dielectric materials have been studied for frequency dependence of attenuation constant. The sensitive cathode ray oscillograph method has been used to evaluate to the dielectric constant and loss factor, and from these attenuation constants have been calculated. The temperature remaining constant, a regular increase has been observed in attenuation constant, at higher frequencies of electro-magnetic propagating wave.

  1. Environment-Dependent Fundamental Physical Constants

    CERN Document Server

    Terazawa, Hidezumi

    2012-01-01

    A theory of special inconstancy, in which some fundamental physical constants such as the fine-structure and gravitational constants may vary, is proposed in pregeometry. In the special theory of inconstancy, the \\alpha-G relation of \\alpha=3\\pi/[16ln(4\\pi/5GM_W^2)] between the varying fine-structure and gravitaional constants (where M_W is the charged weak boson mass) is derived from the hypothesis that both of these constants are related to the same fundamental length scale in nature. Furthermore, it leads to the prediction of dot{{\\alpha}}/\\alpha=(-0.8\\pm2.5)\\times10^{-14}yr^{-1} from the most precise limit of dot{G}/G=(-0.6\\pm2.0)\\times10^{-12}yr^{-1} by Thorsett, which is not only consistent with the recent observation of dot{{\\alpha}}/\\alpha=(0.5\\pm0.5)\\times10^{-14}yr^{-1} by Webb et al. but also feasible for future experimental tests. Also a theory of general inconstancy, in which any fundamental physical constants may vary, is proposed in "more general relativity", by assuming that the space-time is ...

  2. Kinetic performance limits of constant pressure versus constant flow rate gradient elution separations. Part I: theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broeckhoven, K; Verstraeten, M; Choikhet, K; Dittmann, M; Witt, K; Desmet, G

    2011-02-25

    We report on a general theoretical assessment of the potential kinetic advantages of running LC gradient elution separations in the constant-pressure mode instead of in the customarily used constant-flow rate mode. Analytical calculations as well as numerical simulation results are presented. It is shown that, provided both modes are run with the same volume-based gradient program, the constant-pressure mode can potentially offer an identical separation selectivity (except from some small differences induced by the difference in pressure and viscous heating trajectory), but in a significantly shorter time. For a gradient running between 5 and 95% of organic modifier, the decrease in analysis time can be expected to be of the order of some 20% for both water-methanol and water-acetonitrile gradients, and only weakly depending on the value of V(G)/V₀ (or equivalently t(G)/t₀). Obviously, the gain will be smaller when the start and end composition lie closer to the viscosity maximum of the considered water-organic modifier system. The assumptions underlying the obtained results (no effects of pressure and temperature on the viscosity or retention coefficient) are critically reviewed, and can be inferred to only have a small effect on the general conclusions. It is also shown that, under the adopted assumptions, the kinetic plot theory also holds for operations where the flow rate varies with the time, as is the case for constant-pressure operation. Comparing both operation modes in a kinetic plot representing the maximal peak capacity versus time, it is theoretically predicted here that both modes can be expected to perform equally well in the fully C-term dominated regime (where H varies linearly with the flow rate), while the constant pressure mode is advantageous for all lower flow rates. Near the optimal flow rate, and for linear gradients running from 5 to 95% organic modifier, time gains of the order of some 20% can be expected (or 25-30% when accounting for

  3. Predicting pressure-dependent unimolecular rate constants using variational transition state theory with multidimensional tunneling combined with system-specific quantum RRK theory: a definitive test for fluoroform dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Junwei Lucas; Zhang, Xin; Truhlar, Donald G

    2016-06-22

    Understanding the falloff in rate constants of gas-phase unimolecular reaction rate constants as the pressure is lowered is a fundamental problem in chemical kinetics, with practical importance for combustion, atmospheric chemistry, and essentially all gas-phase reaction mechanisms. In the present work, we use our recently developed system-specific quantum RRK theory, calibrated by canonical variational transition state theory with small-curvature tunneling, combined with the Lindemann-Hinshelwood mechanism, to model the dissociation reaction of fluoroform (CHF3), which provides a definitive test for falloff modeling. Our predicted pressure-dependent thermal rate constants are in excellent agreement with experimental values over a wide range of pressures and temperatures. The present validation of our methodology, which is able to include variational transition state effects, multidimensional tunneling based on the directly calculated potential energy surface along the tunneling path, and torsional and other vibrational anharmonicity, together with state-of-the-art reaction-path-based direct dynamics calculations, is important because the method is less empirical than models routinely used for generating full mechanisms, while also being simpler in key respects than full master equation treatments and the full reduced falloff curve and modified strong collision methods of Troe.

  4. Apparent Rate Constant for Diffusion-Controlled Three molecular (catalytic) reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Burlatsky, S. F.; Moreau, M

    1996-01-01

    We present simple explicit estimates for the apparent reaction rate constant for three molecular reactions, which are important in catalysis. For small concentrations and $d> 1$, the apparent reaction rate constant depends only on the diffusion coefficients and sizes of the particles. For small concentrations and $d\\le 1$, it is also time -- dependent. For large concentrations, it gains the dependence on concentrations.

  5. Time-dependent polymer rheology under constant stress and under constant shear conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K. H.; Brodkey, R. S.

    1971-01-01

    A kinetic rate theory previously presented for describing non-Newtonian phenomena has been further modified to predict the flow behavior of viscoelastic materials under constant stress conditions. The thixotropic shear stress or shear rate is predicted by the kinetic theory, and the experimental stress or shear rate is obtained by modifying the thixotropic value by a stress or shear rate retardation term. The retardation term stems from a Maxwellian approach for stress retardation. In order to test the validity of this approach, transient and steady-state data were obtained for two solutions of polymethylmethacrylate in diethylphthalate. Both constant stress measurements and constant shear rate data were taken over a broad range.

  6. Uniaxial tension test on Rubber at constant true strain rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourne H.L.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Elastomers are widely used for damping parts in different industrial contexts because of their remarkable dissipation properties. Indeed, they can undergo severe mechanical loading conditions, i.e., high strain rates and large strains. Nevertheless, the mechanical response of these materials can vary from purely rubber-like to glassy depending on the strain rate undergone. Classically, uniaxial tension tests are made in order to find a relation between the stress and the strain in the material at various strain rates. However, even if the strain rate is searched to be constant, it is the nominal strain rate that is considered. Here we develop a test at constant true strain rate, i.e. the strain rate that is experienced by the material. In order to do such a test, the displacement imposed by the machine is an exponential function of time. This test has been performed with a high speed hydraulic machine for strain rates between 0.01/s and 100/s. A specific specimen has been designed, yielding a uniform strain field (and so a uniform stress field. Furthermore, an instrumented aluminum bar has been used to take into account dynamic effects in the measurement of the applied force. A high speed camera enables the determination of strain in the sample using point tracking technique. Using this method, the stress-strain curve of a rubber-like material during a loading-unloading cycle has been determined, up to a stretch ratio λ = 2.5. The influence of the true strain rate both on stiffness and on dissipation of the material is then discussed.

  7. DILATANCY BEHAVIOR IN CONSTANT STRAIN RATE CONSOLIDATION TEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berty Sompie

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Subjected to remolded young clay, this paper shows that a lot of time dependent behavior in the standard consolidation (SC and constant strain rate consolidation (CSRC tests is represented systematically by a simple assumption concerning the time dependency of dilatancy. In the SC test, at the first stage of each loading step little dilatancy takes place and dilatancy begins to occur several minutes after step loading. In CSRC test, some time period after the stress state has entered the normally consolidated region, dilatancy tends to occur rapidly with the increase in stress ratio. Since most of dilatancy has taken place at the earlier stage of consolidation, little dilatancy occurs at the latter stage of CSRC process. This tendency makes the specimen stiffer with the passage of time, and makes the vertical pressure and pore pressure increase substantially at the last stage of CSRC process. Consideration to such behavior may be effective to correctly interpret the result of CSRC test.

  8. Dependence of Reaction Rate Constants on Density in Supercritical Fluids%超临界流体中反应速率常数与密度的相互关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王涛; 沈忠耀

    2002-01-01

    A new method, which correlates rate constants of chemical reactions and density or pressure in supercritical fluids, was developed. Based on the transition state theory and thermodynamic principles, the rate constant can be reasonably correlated with the density of the supercritical fluid, and a correlation equation was obtained.Coupled with the equation of state (EOS) of a supercritical solvent, the effect of pressure on reaction rate constant could be represented. Two typical systems were used to test this method. The result indicates that this method is suitable for dilute supercritical fluid solutions.

  9. Temperature and size-dependent Hamaker constants for metal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, K.; Pinchuk, P.

    2016-08-01

    Theoretical values of the Hamaker constant have been calculated for metal nanoparticles using Lifshitz theory. The theory describes the Hamaker constant in terms of the permittivity of the interacting bodies. Metal nanoparticles exhibit an internal size effect that alters the dielectric permittivity of the particle when its size falls below the mean free path of the conducting electrons. This size dependence of the permittivity leads to size-dependence of the Hamaker constant for metal nanoparticles. Additionally, the electron damping and the plasma frequency used to model the permittivity of the particle exhibit temperature-dependence, which lead to temperature dependence of the Hamaker constant. In this work, both the size and temperature dependence for gold, silver, copper, and aluminum nanoparticles is demonstrated. The results of this study might be of interest for studying the colloidal stability of nanoparticles in solution.

  10. Extended temperature dependence of elastic constants in cubic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telichko, A V; Sorokin, B P

    2015-08-01

    To extend the theory of the temperature dependence of the elastic constants in cubic crystals beyond the second- and third-order elastic constants, the fourth-order elastic constants, as well as the non-linearity in the thermal expansion temperature dependence, have been taken into account. Theoretical results were represented as temperature functions of the effective elastic constants and compared with experimental data for a number of cubic crystals, such as alkali metal halides, and elements gold and silver. The relations obtained give a more accurate description of the experimental temperature dependences of second-order elastic constants for a number of cubic crystals, including deviations from linear behavior. A good agreement between theoretical estimates and experimental data has been observed.

  11. Temperature dependence of the dielectric constant of acrylic dielectric elastomer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Junjie; Chen, Hualing; Li, Bo; Chang, Longfei [Xi' an Jiaotong University, State Key Laboratory for Strength and Vibration of Mechanical Structures, Xi' an (China); Xi' an Jiaotong University, School of Mechanical Engineering, Xi' an (China)

    2013-02-15

    The dielectric constant is an essential electrical parameter to the achievable voltage-induced deformation of the dielectric elastomer. This paper primarily focuses on the temperature dependence of the dielectric constant (within the range of 173 K to 373 K) for the most widely used acrylic dielectric elastomer (VHB 4910). First the dielectric constant was investigated experimentally with the broadband dielectric spectrometer (BDS). Results showed that the dielectric constant first increased with temperature up to a peak value and then dropped to a relative small value. Then by analyzing the fitted curves, the Cole-Cole dispersion equation was found better to characterize the rising process before the peak values than the Debye dispersion equation, while the decrease process afterward can be well described by the simple Debye model. Finally, a mathematical model of dielectric constant of VHB 4910 was obtained from the fitted results which can be used to further probe the electromechanical stability of the dielectric elastomers. (orig.)

  12. Evaluation of antioxidants using oxidation reaction rate constants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Yan; ZHAN Xiancheng; MA Lie; LI Linli; LI Chengrong

    2007-01-01

    An evaluation method for the capacity of antioxidants to protect drugs against oxidation is presented.As a new viewpoint,to determine the priority of the competitive oxidations between the antioxidant and the protected drug,and to compare the drug-protection capacity of antioxidants,it is important to determine their oxidation rate constants using chemical kinetics instead of standard oxidation (or reduction) potentials.Sodium sulfite,sodium bisulfite and sodium pyrosulfite were used as models for the determination of oxidation reaction rate constants in aqueous solutions.In the experiments,sufficient air was continually infused into the solution to keep the concentration of dissolved oxygen constant.The residual concentrations of the antioxidants were determined by iodimetry,and the concentration of dissolved oxygen by oxygen electrode.The data were fitted by linear regressions to obtain the reaction rate constants.It was found that the degradation of sodium sulfite,sodium bisulfite or sodium pyrosulfite obeyed pseudo zero-order kinetics in the buffer solutions.Because of the ionization equilibrium,these three antioxidants have the same ion form in solutions at a definite pH value and therefore their apparent rate constants were essentially the same.The average apparent rate constants of the three antioxidants at 25~C are (1.34±0.03)×10-3 at pH 6.8,(1.20±0.02) x 10-3 at pH 4.0 and (6.58±0.02)×10-3 mol.L-1.h-1 at pH 9.2,respectively.

  13. Prediction of Rate Constants for Catalytic Reactions with Chemical Accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catlow, C Richard A

    2016-08-01

    Ex machina: A computational method for predicting rate constants for reactions within microporous zeolite catalysts with chemical accuracy has recently been reported. A key feature of this method is a stepwise QM/MM approach that allows accuracy to be achieved while using realistic models with accessible computer resources.

  14. VMATc: VMAT with constant gantry speed and dose rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Fei; Jiang, Steve B.; Romeijn, H. Edwin; Epelman, Marina A.

    2015-04-01

    This article considers the treatment plan optimization problem for Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) with constant gantry speed and dose rate (VMATc). In particular, we consider the simultaneous optimization of multi-leaf collimator leaf positions and a constant gantry speed and dose rate. We propose a heuristic framework for (approximately) solving this optimization problem that is based on hierarchical decomposition. Specifically, an iterative algorithm is used to heuristically optimize dose rate and gantry speed selection, where at every iteration a leaf position optimization subproblem is solved, also heuristically, to find a high-quality plan corresponding to a given dose rate and gantry speed. We apply our framework to clinical patient cases, and compare the resulting VMATc plans to idealized IMRT, as well as full VMAT plans. Our results suggest that VMATc is capable of producing treatment plans of comparable quality to VMAT, albeit at the expense of long computation time and generally higher total monitor units.

  15. Electron-ion dissociative recombination rate constants relevant to the Titan atmosphere and the Interstellar Medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborne, David; Lawson, Patrick; Adams, Nigel, E-mail: ngadams@uga.edu [University of Georgia, Department of Chemistry, 101 Cedar St., Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States)

    2014-01-21

    Following the arrival of Cassini at Titan in 2004, the Titan atmosphere has been shown to contain large complex polycyclic-aromatic hydrocarbons. Since Cassini has provided a great deal of data, there exists a need for kinetic rate data to help with modeling this atmosphere. One type of kinetic data needed is electron-ion dissociative recombination (e-IDR) rate constants. These data are not readily available for larger compounds, such as naphthalene, or oxygen containing compounds, such as 1,4 dioxane or furan. Here, the rate constants for naphthalene, 1,4 dioxane, and furan have been measured and their temperature dependencies are determined when possible, using the University of Georgia's Variable Temperature Flowing Afterglow. The rate constants are compared with those previously published for other compounds; these show trends which illustrate the effects which multi-rings and oxygen heteroatoms substitutions have upon e-IDR rate constants.

  16. High-temperature rate constant measurements for OH+xylenes

    KAUST Repository

    Elwardani, Ahmed Elsaid

    2015-06-01

    The overall rate constants for the reactions of hydroxyl (OH) radicals with o-xylene (k 1), m-xylene (k 2), and p-xylene (k 3) were measured behind reflected shock waves over 890-1406K at pressures of 1.3-1.8atm using OH laser absorption near 306.7nm. Measurements were performed under pseudo-first-order conditions. The measured rate constants, inferred using a mechanism-fitting approach, can be expressed in Arrhenius form as:k1=2.93×1013exp(-1350.3/T)cm3mol-1s-1(890-1406K)k2=3.49×1013exp(-1449.3/T)cm3mol-1s-1(906-1391K)k3=3.5×1013exp(-1407.5/T)cm3mol-1s-1(908-1383K)This paper presents, to our knowledge, first high-temperature measurements of the rate constants of the reactions of xylene isomers with OH radicals. Low-temperature rate-constant measurements by Nicovich et al. (1981) were combined with the measurements in this study to obtain the following Arrhenius expressions, which are applicable over a wider temperature range:k1=2.64×1013exp(-1181.5/T)cm3mol-1s-1(508-1406K)k2=3.05×109exp(-400/T)cm3mol-1s-1(508-1391K)k3=3.0×109exp(-440/T)cm3mol-1s-1(526-1383K) © 2015 The Combustion Institute.

  17. Insurance Calculation of Bankruptcy Probability of Constant Interest Rate Model under Dependent Negative%负相依下带常数利率模型的破产概率的保险计算

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李明倩

    2014-01-01

    本文研究了负相依索赔条件下带常数利率的风险模型在随机区间上的破产问题,最终得到了该模型破产概率的渐进表达式。%This paper studies the risk model under conditions of constant interest rates negatively correlated claims in the bankruptcy issue random intervals, and finally get the asymptotic expression of the model the probability of bankruptcy.

  18. Reaction rate constant for radiative association of CF{sup +}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Öström, Jonatan, E-mail: jonatan.ostrom@gmail.com; Gustafsson, Magnus, E-mail: magnus.gustafsson@ltu.se [Applied Physics, Division of Materials Science, Department of Engineering Science and Mathematics, Luleå University of Technology, 97187 Luleå (Sweden); Bezrukov, Dmitry S. [Department of Chemistry, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation); Nyman, Gunnar [Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg, 41296 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2016-01-28

    Reaction rate constants and cross sections are computed for the radiative association of carbon cations (C{sup +}) and fluorine atoms (F) in their ground states. We consider reactions through the electronic transition 1{sup 1}Π → X{sup 1}Σ{sup +} and rovibrational transitions on the X{sup 1}Σ{sup +} and a{sup 3}Π potentials. Semiclassical and classical methods are used for the direct contribution and Breit–Wigner theory for the resonance contribution. Quantum mechanical perturbation theory is used for comparison. A modified formulation of the classical method applicable to permanent dipoles of unequally charged reactants is implemented. The total rate constant is fitted to the Arrhenius–Kooij formula in five temperature intervals with a relative difference of <3%. The fit parameters will be added to the online database KIDA. For a temperature of 10–250 K, the rate constant is about 10{sup −21} cm{sup 3} s{sup −1}, rising toward 10{sup −16} cm{sup 3} s{sup −1} for a temperature of 30 000 K.

  19. Reaction Rate Constant for Radiative Association of CF$^+$

    CERN Document Server

    Öström, Jonatan; Nyman, Gunnar; Gustafsson, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Reaction rate constants and cross sections are computed for the radiative association of carbon cations ($\\text{C}^+$) and fluorine atoms ($\\text{F}$) in their ground states. We consider reactions through the electronic transition $1^1\\Pi \\rightarrow X^1\\Sigma^+$ and rovibrational transitions on the $X^1\\Sigma^+$ and $a^3\\Pi$ potentials. Semiclassical and classical methods are used for the direct contribution and Breit--Wigner theory for the resonance contribution. Quantum mechanical perturbation theory is used for comparison. A modified formulation of the classical method applicable to permanent dipoles of unequally charged reactants is implemented. The total rate constant is fitted to the Arrhenius--Kooij formula in five temperature intervals with a relative difference of $<3\\:\\%$. The fit parameters will be added to the online database KIDA. For a temperature of $10$ to $250\\:\\text{K}$, the rate constant is about $10^{-21}\\:\\text{cm}^3\\text{s}^{-1}$, rising toward $10^{-16}\\:\\text{cm}^3\\text{s}^{-1}$ fo...

  20. Development of a group contribution method to predict aqueous phase hydroxyl radical (HO*) reaction rate constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakata, Daisuke; Li, Ke; Westerhoff, Paul; Crittenden, John

    2009-08-15

    rate constants) of the rate constants were within 0.5-2 times the experimental values. This accuracy may be acceptable for model predictions of the advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) performance, depending on how sensitive the model is to the rate constants.

  1. Rate Constant Calculation for Thermal Reactions Methods and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    DaCosta, Herbert

    2011-01-01

    Providing an overview of the latest computational approaches to estimate rate constants for thermal reactions, this book addresses the theories behind various first-principle and approximation methods that have emerged in the last twenty years with validation examples. It presents in-depth applications of those theories to a wide range of basic and applied research areas. When doing modeling and simulation of chemical reactions (as in many other cases), one often has to compromise between higher-accuracy/higher-precision approaches (which are usually time-consuming) and approximate/lower-preci

  2. Quantum Mechanics Rate Constant for the N+ND Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ai-jie Zhang; Guo-zhong He

    2011-01-01

    We present nonadiabatic quantum dynamical calculations on the two coupled potential energy surfaces (12A' and 22A') [J.Theor.Comput.Chem.8,849 (2009)] for the reaction.Initial state-resolved reaction probabilities and cross sections for the N+ND→N2+D reaction and N'+ND→N+N'D reaction for collision energies of 5 meV to 1.0 eV are determined,respectively.It is found that the N+ND→N2+D reaction is dominated in the N+ND reaction.In addition,we obtained the rate constants for the N+ND→N2+D reaction which demand further experimental investigations.

  3. Efficient calculation of rate constants: Downhill versus uphill sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenin, Konstantin V.

    2014-08-01

    The classical transition state theory (TST), together with the notion of transmission coefficient, provides a useful tool for calculation of rate constants for rare events. However, in complex biomolecular reactions, such as protein folding, it is difficult to find a good reaction coordinate, so the transition state is ill-defined. In this case, other approaches are more popular, such as the transition interface sampling (TIS) and the forward flux sampling (FFS). Here, we show that the algorithms developed in the frames of TIS and FFS can be successfully applied, after a modification, for calculation of the transmission coefficient. The new procedure (which we call "downhill sampling") is more efficient in comparison with the traditional TIS and FFS ("uphill sampling") even if the reaction coordinate is bad. We also propose a new computational scheme that combines the advantages of TST, TIS, and FFS.

  4. Structural model for the dynamic buckling of a column under constant rate compression

    CERN Document Server

    Kuzkin, Vitaly A

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic buckling behavior of a column (rod, beam) under constant rate compression is considered. The buckling is caused by prescribed motion of column ends toward each other with constant velocity. Simple model with one degree of freedom simulating static and dynamic buckling of a column is derived. In the case of small initial disturbances the model yields simple analytical dependencies between the main parameters of the problem: critical force, compression rate, and initial disturbance. It is shown that the time required for buckling is inversely proportional to cubic root of compression velocity and logarithmically depends on the initial disturbance. Analytical expression for critical buckling force as a function of compression velocity is derived. It is shown that in a range of compression rates typical for laboratory experiments the dependence is accurately approximated by a power law with exponent equal to $2/3$. Theoretical findings are supported by available results of laboratory experiments. Keywords...

  5. Empirical correlation for prediction of the elutriation rate constant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojkovski Valentino

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In vessels containing fluidized solids, the gas leaving carries some suspended particles. This flux of solids is called entrainment, E or carryover and the bulk density of solids on this leaving gas stream is called the holdup. For design we need to know the rate of this entrainment and the size distribution of these entrained particles Rim in relation to the size distribution in the bed, Rib, as well as the variation of both these quantities with gas and solids properties, gas flow rate, bed geometry and location of the leaving gas stream. Steady-state elutriation experiments have been done in a fluidized bed 0,2 m diameter by 2,94 m high freeboard with superficial gas velocities up to 1 m/s using solids ranging in mean size from 0,15 to 0,58 mm and with particle density 2660 kg/m3. When the fine and coarse particles were mixed, the total entrainment flux above the freeboard was increased. None of the published correlations for estimating the elutriation rate constant were useful. A new simple equation, which is developed on the base of experimental results and theory of dimensional analyses, is presented.

  6. MTR core loading pattern optimization using burnup dependent group constants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iqbal Masood

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A diffusion theory based MTR fuel management methodology has been developed for finding superior core loading patterns at any stage for MTR systems, keeping track of burnup of individual fuel assemblies throughout their history. It is based on using burnup dependent group constants obtained by the WIMS-D/4 computer code for standard fuel elements and control fuel elements. This methodology has been implemented in a computer program named BFMTR, which carries out detailed five group diffusion theory calculations using the CITATION code as a subroutine. The core-wide spatial flux and power profiles thus obtained are used for calculating the peak-to-average power and flux-ratios along with the available excess reactivity of the system. The fuel manager can use the BFMTR code for loading pattern optimization for maximizing the excess reactivity, keeping the peak-to-average power as well as flux-ratio within constraints. The results obtained by the BFMTR code have been found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimental values for the equilibrium core of the Pakistan Research Reactor-1.

  7. Universality of thermodynamic constants governing biological growth rates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross Corkrey

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mathematical models exist that quantify the effect of temperature on poikilotherm growth rate. One family of such models assumes a single rate-limiting 'master reaction' using terms describing the temperature-dependent denaturation of the reaction's enzyme. We consider whether such a model can describe growth in each domain of life. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A new model based on this assumption and using a hierarchical Bayesian approach fits simultaneously 95 data sets for temperature-related growth rates of diverse microorganisms from all three domains of life, Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya. Remarkably, the model produces credible estimates of fundamental thermodynamic parameters describing protein thermal stability predicted over 20 years ago. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The analysis lends support to the concept of universal thermodynamic limits to microbial growth rate dictated by protein thermal stability that in turn govern biological rates. This suggests that the thermal stability of proteins is a unifying property in the evolution and adaptation of life on earth. The fundamental nature of this conclusion has importance for many fields of study including microbiology, protein chemistry, thermal biology, and ecological theory including, for example, the influence of the vast microbial biomass and activity in the biosphere that is poorly described in current climate models.

  8. Hemoglobin glycation rate constant in non-diabetic Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladyżyński, Piotr; Wójcicki, Jan M; Bąk, Marianna I; Sabalińska, Stanisława; Kawiak, Jerzy; Foltyński, Piotr; Krzymień, Janusz; Karnafel, Waldemar

    2011-11-01

    The objectives were as follows: (1) estimating mean value of the overall hemoglobin glycation rate constant (k); (2) analyzing inter-individual variability of k; (3) verifying ability of the hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) formation model to predict changes of HbA1c during red blood cells cultivation in vitro and to reproduce the clinical data. The mean k estimated in a group of 10 non-diabetic subjects was equal to 1.257 ± 0.114 × 10(-9) L mmol(-1) s(-1). The mean k was not affected by a way of estimation of glycemia. The mean k differed less than 20% from values reported earlier and it was almost identical to the mean values calculated on basis of the selected published data. Analysis of variability of k suggests that inter-individual heterogeneity of HbA1c formation is limited or rare. The HbA1c mathematical model was able to predict changes of HbA1c in vitro resulting from different glucose levels and to reproduce a linear relationship of HbA1c and average glucose obtained in the A1C-Derived Average Glucose Study. This study demonstrates that the glycation model with the same k value might be used in majority of individuals as a tool supporting interpretation of HbA1c in different clinical situations.

  9. Time-dependent water permeation behavior of concrete under constant hydraulic pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fang Yonghao; Wang Zhongli; Zhou Yue

    2008-01-01

    In the present work, a concrete permeability testing setup was designed to study the behavior of hydraulic concrete subjected to constant hydraulic pressure. The results show that when concrete is subjected to high enough constant hydraulic pressure, it will be permeated, and after it reaches its maximum permeation rate, the permeability coefficient will gradually decrease towards a stable value. A time-dependent model of permeability coefficient for concrete subjected to hydraulic pressure is proposed. It is indicated that the decrease of the permeability coefficient with permeation time conforms well to the negative-exponential decrease model.

  10. Extraction of elementary rate constants from global network analysis of E. coli central metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broderick Gordon

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As computational performance steadily increases, so does interest in extending one-particle-per-molecule models to larger physiological problems. Such models however require elementary rate constants to calculate time-dependent rate coefficients under physiological conditions. Unfortunately, even when in vivo kinetic data is available, it is often in the form of aggregated rate laws (ARL that do not specify the required elementary rate constants corresponding to mass-action rate laws (MRL. There is therefore a need to develop a method which is capable of automatically transforming ARL kinetic information into more detailed MRL rate constants. Results By incorporating proteomic data related to enzyme abundance into an MRL modelling framework, here we present an efficient method operating at a global network level for extracting elementary rate constants from experiment-based aggregated rate law (ARL models. The method combines two techniques that can be used to overcome the difficult properties in parameterization. The first, a hybrid MRL/ARL modelling technique, is used to divide the parameter estimation problem into sub-problems, so that the parameters of the mass action rate laws for each enzyme are estimated in separate steps. This reduces the number of parameters that have to be optimized simultaneously. The second, a hybrid algebraic-numerical simulation and optimization approach, is used to render some rate constants identifiable, as well as to greatly narrow the bounds of the other rate constants that remain unidentifiable. This is done by incorporating equality constraints derived from the King-Altman and Cleland method into the simulated annealing algorithm. We apply these two techniques to estimate the rate constants of a model of E. coli glycolytic pathways. The simulation and statistical results show that our innovative method performs well in dealing with the issues of high computation cost, stiffness, local

  11. Biodegradation testing of chemicals with high Henry’s constants – separating mass and effective concentration reveals higher rate constants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birch, Heidi; Andersen, Henrik Rasmus; Comber, Mike

    During simulation-type biodegradation tests, volatile chemicals will continuously partition between water phase and headspace. This study addressed how (1) this partitioning affects biodegradation test results and (2) it can be accounted for by combining mass balance and dynamic biodegradation...... Microextraction (HS-SPME) was applied directly on the test systems to measure substrate depletion by biodegradation relative to abiotic controls. HS-SPME was also applied to determine air to water partitioning ratios. Water phase biodegradation rate constants, kwater, were up to 72 times higher than test system...... biodegradation rate constants, ksystem. True water phase degradation rate constants facilitate extrapolation to other air-water systems and are more suitable input parameters for aquatic exposure and fate models. As such, they should be considered more appropriate for risk assessments than test system rate...

  12. Biotransformation of trace organic chemicals during groundwater recharge: How useful are first-order rate constants?

    KAUST Repository

    Regnery, J.

    2015-05-29

    This study developed relationships between the attenuation of emerging trace organic chemicals (TOrC) during managed aquifer recharge (MAR) as a function of retention time, system characteristics, and operating conditions using controlled laboratory-scale soil column experiments simulating MAR. The results revealed that MAR performance in terms of TOrC attenuation is primarily determined by key environmental parameters (i.e. redox, primary substrate). Soil columns with suboxic and anoxic conditions performed poorly (i.e. less than 30% attenuation of moderately degradable TOrC) in comparison to oxic conditions (on average between 70-100% attenuation for the same compounds) within a residence time of three days. Given this dependency on redox conditions, it was investigated if key parameter-dependent rate constants are more suitable for contaminant transport modeling to properly capture the dynamic TOrC attenuation under field-scale conditions. Laboratory-derived first-order removal kinetics were determined for 19 TOrC under three different redox conditions and rate constants were applied to MAR field data. Our findings suggest that simplified first-order rate constants will most likely not provide any meaningful results if the target compounds exhibit redox dependent biotransformation behavior or if the intention is to exactly capture the decline in concentration over time and distance at field-scale MAR. However, if the intention is to calculate the percent removal after an extended time period and subsurface travel distance, simplified first-order rate constants seem to be sufficient to provide a first estimate on TOrC attenuation during MAR.

  13. From State Dependent Diffusion to Constant Diffusion in Stochastic Differential Equations by the Lamperti Transform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jan Kloppenborg; Madsen, Henrik

    This report describes methods to eliminate state dependent diffusion terms in Stochastic Differential Equations (SDEs). Transformations that leave the diffusion term of SDEs constant is important for simulation, and estimation. It is important for simulation because the Euler approximation...... convergence rate is faster, and for estimation because the Extended Kalman Filter equations are easier to implement than higher order filters needed in the case of state dependent diffusion terms. The general class of transformations which leaves the diffusion term independent of the state is called...

  14. Unimolecular reaction rate constants of NO{sub 2} just above D{sub 0}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezel, I.; Stolyarov, D.; Wittig, C.

    1999-12-09

    Photoinitiated unimolecular decomposition on a barrierless potential energy surface (PES) has been studied for the reaction NO{sub 2} {yields} O({sup 3}P{sub 2}) + NO(X{sup 2}{Pi}{sub 1/2}, {nu} = 0) for excess energies up to approximately 17 cm{sup {minus}1} above the dissociation threshold (i.e., D{sub 0} for nonrotating molecules) by using expansion-cooled samples and the time-resolved pump-probe technique. To examine the threshold region with enough energy resolution to discern abrupt changes in the rate constant, should they occur, a pump-probe cross-correlation temporal width of {approximately}25 ps and a pump line width {le}2 cm{sup {minus}1} has been used. These are the first direct observations of the reaction rate constants in this energy regime. The rate constant was found to increase by an order of magnitude, varying from {approximately}2 x 10{sup 10} s{sup {minus}1} to {ge}10{sup 11} s{sup {minus}1}, the latter being a rough lower bound imposed by the experimental arrangement. The rate constant does not display the energy dependence predicted by using phase space theory, at least in detail. Rather, it appears to reflect the highly complex nature of the levels and the multiple PESs that are believed to be responsible for the anomalously high vibronic level density which has been observed just below D{sub 0}. These results bridge the gap between spectroscopic studies which have been carried out at energies just above D{sub 0} and ultrafast experiments which have measured rate constants in this energy region with pump laser spectral widths of {approximately}30 cm{sup {minus}1}.

  15. Experimental determination of monoethanolamine protonation constant and its temperature dependency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma’mun Sholeh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide as one of the major contributors to the global warming problem is produced in large quantities by many important industries and its emission seems to rise from year to year. Aminebased absorption is one of the methods to capture CO2 from its sources. As a reactive system, mass transfer and chemical reaction take place simultaneously. In a vapor-liquid equilibrium model for the CO2-amine-water system, some parameters such as mass transfer coefficients and chemical equilibrium constants need to be known. However, some parameters could be determined experimentally and the rests could be regressed from the model. The protonation constant (pKa, as one of the model parameters, could then be measured experimentally. The purpose of this study is to measure the pKa of monoethanolamine (MEA at a range of temperatures from 303 to 330K by a potentiometric titration method. The experimental data obtained were in a good agreement with the literature data. The pKa data from this work together with those from the literature were then correlated in an empirical correlation to be used for future research.

  16. Exergy analysis of integrated photovoltaic thermal solar water heater under constant flow rate and constant collection temperature modes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiwari, Arvind; Dubey, Swapnil; Sandhu, G.S.; Sodha, M.S.; Anwar, S.I.

    2009-01-01

    In this communication, an analytical expression for the water temperature of an integrated photovoltaic thermal solar (IPVTS) water heater under constant flow rate hot water withdrawal has been obtained. Analysis is based on basic energy balance for hybrid flat plate collector and storage tank, resp

  17. Exergy analysis of integrated photovoltaic thermal solar water heater under constant flow rate and constant collection temperature modes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiwari, A.; Dubey, Swapnil; Sandhu, G.S.; Sodha, M.S.; Anwar, S.I.

    2009-01-01

    In this communication, an analytical expression for the water temperature of an integrated photovoltaic thermal solar (IPVTS) water heater under constant flow rate hot water withdrawal has been obtained. Analysis is based on basic energy balance for hybrid flat plate collector and storage tank, resp

  18. Exergy analysis of integrated photovoltaic thermal solar water heater under constant flow rate and constant collection temperature modes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiwari, A.; Dubey, Swapnil; Sandhu, G.S.; Sodha, M.S.; Anwar, S.I.

    2009-01-01

    In this communication, an analytical expression for the water temperature of an integrated photovoltaic thermal solar (IPVTS) water heater under constant flow rate hot water withdrawal has been obtained. Analysis is based on basic energy balance for hybrid flat plate collector and storage tank,

  19. Biodegradation testing of chemicals with high Henry's constants - Separating mass and effective concentration reveals higher rate constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Heidi; Andersen, Henrik R; Comber, Mike; Mayer, Philipp

    2017-05-01

    During simulation-type biodegradation tests, volatile chemicals will continuously partition between water phase and headspace. This study addressed how (1) this partitioning affects test results and (2) can be accounted for by combining equilibrium partition and dynamic biodegradation models. An aqueous mixture of 9 (semi)volatile chemicals was first generated using passive dosing and then diluted with environmental surface water producing concentrations in the ng/L to μg/L range. After incubation for 2 h to 4 weeks, automated Headspace Solid Phase Microextraction (HS-SPME) was applied directly on the test systems to measure substrate depletion by biodegradation relatively to abiotic controls. HS-SPME was also applied to determine air to water partitioning ratios. Biodegradation rate constants relating to the chemical in the water phase, kwater, were generally a factor 1 to 11 times higher than biodegradation rate constants relating to the total mass of chemical in the test system, ksystem, with one exceptional factor of 72 times for a long chain alkane. True water phase degradation rate constants were found (i) more appropriate for risk assessment than test system rate constants, (ii) to facilitate extrapolation to other air-water systems and (iii) to be better defined input parameters for aquatic exposure and fate models.

  20. Likelihood inference of non-constant diversification rates with incomplete taxon sampling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Höhna

    Full Text Available Large-scale phylogenies provide a valuable source to study background diversification rates and investigate if the rates have changed over time. Unfortunately most large-scale, dated phylogenies are sparsely sampled (fewer than 5% of the described species and taxon sampling is not uniform. Instead, taxa are frequently sampled to obtain at least one representative per subgroup (e.g. family and thus to maximize diversity (diversified sampling. So far, such complications have been ignored, potentially biasing the conclusions that have been reached. In this study I derive the likelihood of a birth-death process with non-constant (time-dependent diversification rates and diversified taxon sampling. Using simulations I test if the true parameters and the sampling method can be recovered when the trees are small or medium sized (fewer than 200 taxa. The results show that the diversification rates can be inferred and the estimates are unbiased for large trees but are biased for small trees (fewer than 50 taxa. Furthermore, model selection by means of Akaike's Information Criterion favors the true model if the true rates differ sufficiently from alternative models (e.g. the birth-death model is recovered if the extinction rate is large and compared to a pure-birth model. Finally, I applied six different diversification rate models--ranging from a constant-rate pure birth process to a decreasing speciation rate birth-death process but excluding any rate shift models--on three large-scale empirical phylogenies (ants, mammals and snakes with respectively 149, 164 and 41 sampled species. All three phylogenies were constructed by diversified taxon sampling, as stated by the authors. However only the snake phylogeny supported diversified taxon sampling. Moreover, a parametric bootstrap test revealed that none of the tested models provided a good fit to the observed data. The model assumptions, such as homogeneous rates across species or no rate shifts, appear

  1. SecA supports a constant rate of preprotein translocation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomkiewicz, D; Nouwen, N; van Leeuwen, R; Tans, S; Driessen, AJM

    2006-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, secretory proteins (preproteins) are translocated across the cytoplasmic membrane by the Sec system composed of a protein-conducting channel, SecYEG, and an ATP-dependent motor protein, SecA. After binding of the preprotein to SecYEG-bound SecA, cycles of ATP binding and hydroly

  2. Mechanism of tension generation in muscle: an analysis of the forward and reverse rate constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Julien S; Epstein, Neal D

    2007-04-15

    Tension generation in muscle occurs during the attached phase of the ATP-powered cyclic interaction of myosin heads with thin filaments. The transient nature of tension-generating intermediates and the complexity of the mechanochemical cross-bridge cycle have impeded a quantitative description of tension generation. Recent experiments performed under special conditions yielded a sigmoidal dependence of fiber tension on temperature--a unique case that simplifies the system to a two-state transition. We have applied this two-state analysis to kinetic data obtained from biexponential laser temperature-jump tension transients. Here we present the forward and reverse rate constants for de novo tension generation derived from analysis of the kinetics of the fast laser temperature-jump phase tau(2) (equivalent of the length-jump phase 2(slow)). The slow phase tau(3) is temperature-independent indicating coupling to rather than a direct role in, de novo tension generation. Increasing temperature accelerates the forward, and slows the reverse, rate constant for the creation of the tension-generating state. Arrhenius behavior of the forward and anti-Arrhenius behavior of the reverse rate constant is a kinetic signature of multistate multipathway protein-folding reactions. We conclude that locally unfolded tertiary and/or secondary structure of the actomyosin cross-bridge mediates the power stroke.

  3. Exergy analysis of integrated photovoltaic thermal solar water heater under constant flow rate and constant collection temperature modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwari, Arvind [Department of Design, Production and Management, University of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Dubey, Swapnil; Sandhu, G.S. [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110016 (India); Sodha, M.S. [Department of Education and Physics, Lucknow University, Lucknow 226007 (India); Anwar, S.I. [Indian Institute of Sugar-cane Research, Lucknow, U.P. (India)

    2009-12-15

    In this communication, an analytical expression for the water temperature of an integrated photovoltaic thermal solar (IPVTS) water heater under constant flow rate hot water withdrawal has been obtained. Analysis is based on basic energy balance for hybrid flat plate collector and storage tank, respectively, in the terms of design and climatic parameters. Further, an analysis has also been extended for hot water withdrawal at constant collection temperature. Numerical computations have been carried out for the design and climatic parameters of the system used by Huang et al. [Huang BJ, Lin TH, Hung WC, Sun FS. Performance evaluation of solar photovoltaic/thermal systems. Sol Energy 2001; 70(5): 443-8]. It is observed that the daily overall thermal efficiency of IPVTS system increases with increase constant flow rate and decrease with increase of constant collection temperature. The exergy analysis of IPVTS system has also been carried out. It is further to be noted that the overall exergy and thermal efficiency of an integrated photovoltaic thermal solar system (IPVTS) is maximum at the hot water withdrawal flow rate of 0.006 kg/s. The hourly net electrical power available from the system has also been evaluated. (author)

  4. TEMPERATURE-DEPENDENT INFRARED OPTICAL CONSTANTS OF OLIVINE AND ENSTATITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeidler, S. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ), 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Mutschke, H. [Astrophysikalisches Institut und Universitäts-Sternwarte, Schillergässchen 2-3, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Posch, Th., E-mail: simon.zeidler@nao.ac.jp, E-mail: harald.mutschke@uni-jena.de, E-mail: thomas.posch@univie.ac.at [Institut für Astrophysik, Türkenschanzstraße 17, A-1180 Wien (Austria)

    2015-01-10

    Since the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) mission, it has become clear that dust in circumstellar disks and outflows consists partly of crystalline silicates of pyroxene and olivine type. An exact mineralogical analysis of the dust infrared emission spectra relies on laboratory spectra, which, however, have been mostly measured at room temperature so far. Given that infrared spectral features depend on the thermal excitation of the crystal's vibrational modes, laboratory spectra measured at various (low and high) temperatures, corresponding to the thermal conditions at different distances from the star, can improve the accuracy of such analyses considerably. We have measured the complex refractive index in a temperature range of 10-973 K for one mineral of each of those types of silicate, i.e., for an olivine and an enstatite of typical (terrestrial) composition. Thus, our data extend the temperature range of previous data to higher values and the compositional range to higher iron contents. We analyze the temperature dependence of oscillator frequencies and damping parameters governing the spectral characteristics of the bands and calculate absorption cross-sectional spectra that can be compared with astronomical emission spectra. We demonstrate the usefulness of our new data by comparing spectra calculated for a 100 K dust temperature with the ISO SWS spectrum of IRAS 09425-6040.

  5. Characteristic thermal constant and dimensionless heating rate. The links to optimum heating rate in GC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumberg; Klee

    2000-09-01

    An initial step in the quest of deriving a generalized approach to optimization of a temperature program in gas chromatography is presented. Central to this is the introduction of a dimensionless heating rate, r. As a first step to defining r, a characteristic thermal constant, thetachar, defined as thetachar = -dT/dk at k = 1, where T and k are, respectively, column temperature and solute retention factor, is introduced and evaluated for our own experimental data and for thermodynamic data from the literature. It was determined that, for silicone stationary phases with a phase ratio of 250, thetachar ranged from about 23 degrees C for low molecular weight hydrocarbons such as dimethylpropane to about 45 degrees C for high molecular weight pesticides such as mirex. It was also found that, for a particular solute and a stationary phase type, a 2 orders of magnitude increase in the film thickness caused only about a 2-fold increase in the characteristic thermal constant. Using thetachar as a fundamental temperature unit in GC and void time as a fundamental time unit, a dimensionless heating rate is introduced and its potential utility for the evaluation of the separation-speed tradeoffs in a temperature-programmed GC is demonstrated.

  6. Rate constants of reactions of {kappa}-carrageenan with hydrated electron and hydroxyl radical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abad, L.V. [Nuclear Professional School, School of Engineering Laboratory, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, Commonwealth Avenue, Diliman, Quezon City (Philippines)], E-mail: lvabad@pnri.dost.gov.ph; Saiki, S.; Kudo, H.; Muroya, Y.; Katsumura, Y. [Nuclear Professional School, School of Engineering Laboratory, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Rosa, A.M. de la [Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, Commonwealth Avenue, Diliman, Quezon City (Philippines)

    2007-12-15

    The rate constants for the reactions of {kappa}-carrageenan with hydrated electron and hydroxyl radical was investigated by pulse radiolysis and laser photolysis. The kinetics of the reaction of hydrated electron indicates no seeming reaction with {kappa}-carrageenan. On the other hand, hydroxyl radical reacts very rapidly with {kappa}-carrageenan at a rate constant of approximately 1.2 x 10{sup 9} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. This rate constant varies with pH.

  7. Effects of Density-Dependent Bag Constant and Strange Star Rotation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Qiao-Er; GUO Hua

    2003-01-01

    With the emphasis on the effects of the density-dependent bag constant and the rotation of strange star the limiting mass of strange star is calculated. The obtained results show that the limiting mass and the corresponding radius of strange star increase as the rotation frequency increases, and tend to be lowered when the density-dependent bag constant is considered.

  8. Dependence of the triple-alpha process on the fundamental constants of nature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik II, Bochum (Germany); Laehde, Timo A. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Institute for Advanced Simulation, Juelich (Germany); Lee, Dean [North Carolina State University, Department of Physics, Raleigh, NC (United States); Meissner, Ulf G. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Institute for Advanced Simulation, Juelich (Germany); Forschungszentrum Juelich, JARA - High Performance Computing, Juelich (Germany); Universitaet Bonn, Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik and Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics, Bonn (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    We present an ab initio calculation of the quark mass dependence of the ground state energies of {sup 4}He, {sup 8}Be and {sup 12}C, and of the energy of the Hoyle state in {sup 12}C. These investigations are performed within the framework of lattice chiral Effective Field Theory. We address the sensitivity of the production rate of carbon and oxygen in red giant stars to the fundamental constants of nature by considering the impact of variations in the light quark masses and the electromagnetic fine-structure constant on the reaction rate of the triple-alpha process. As carbon and oxygen are essential to life as we know it, we also discuss the implications of our findings for an anthropic view of the Universe. We find strong evidence that the physics of the triple-alpha process is driven by alpha clustering, and that shifts in the fundamental parameters at the {approx_equal} 2-3% level are unlikely to be detrimental to the development of life. Tolerance against much larger changes cannot be ruled out at present, given the relatively limited knowledge of the quark mass dependence of the two-nucleon S -wave scattering parameters. Lattice QCD is expected to provide refined estimates of the scattering parameters in the future. (orig.)

  9. Neural estimation of kinetic rate constants from dynamic PET-scans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fog, Torben L.; Nielsen, Lars Hupfeldt; Hansen, Lars Kai;

    1994-01-01

    A feedforward neural net is trained to invert a simple three compartment model describing the tracer kinetics involved in the metabolism of [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose in the human brain. The network can estimate rate constants from positron emission tomography sequences and is about 50 times faster ...... than direct fitting of rate constants using the parametrized transients of the compartment model...

  10. Competitive kinetics as a tool to determine rate constants for reduction of ferrylmyoglobin by food components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jongberg, Sisse; Lund, Marianne Nissen; Pattison, David I.

    2016-01-01

    . This approach allows determination of apparent rate constants for the oxidation of proteins by haem proteins of relevance to food oxidation and should be applicable to other systems. A similar approach has provided approximate apparent rate constants for the reduction of MbFe(IV)=O by catechin and green tea...

  11. Evaluation and comparison of diffusion MR methods for measuring apparent transcytolemmal water exchange rate constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xin; Li, Hua; Jiang, Xiaoyu; Xie, Jingping; Gore, John C.; Xu, Junzhong

    2017-02-01

    Two diffusion-based approaches, CG (constant gradient) and FEXI (filtered exchange imaging) methods, have been previously proposed for measuring transcytolemmal water exchange rate constant kin, but their accuracy and feasibility have not been comprehensively evaluated and compared. In this work, both computer simulations and cell experiments in vitro were performed to evaluate these two methods. Simulations were done with different cell diameters (5, 10, 20 μm), a broad range of kin values (0.02-30 s-1) and different SNR's, and simulated kin's were directly compared with the ground truth values. Human leukemia K562 cells were cultured and treated with saponin to selectively change cell transmembrane permeability. The agreement between measured kin's of both methods was also evaluated. The results suggest that, without noise, the CG method provides reasonably accurate estimation of kin especially when it is smaller than 10 s-1, which is in the typical physiological range of many biological tissues. However, although the FEXI method overestimates kin even with corrections for the effects of extracellular water fraction, it provides reasonable estimates with practical SNR's and more importantly, the fitted apparent exchange rate AXR showed approximately linear dependence on the ground truth kin. In conclusion, either CG or FEXI method provides a sensitive means to characterize the variations in transcytolemmal water exchange rate constant kin, although the accuracy and specificity is usually compromised. The non-imaging CG method provides more accurate estimation of kin, but limited to large volume-of-interest. Although the accuracy of FEXI is compromised with extracellular volume fraction, it is capable of spatially mapping kin in practice.

  12. Dependence of the triple-alpha process on the fundamental constants of nature

    CERN Document Server

    Epelbaum, Evgeny; Lähde, Timo A; Lee, Dean; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2013-01-01

    We present an ab initio calculation of the quark mass dependence of the ground state energies of ^4He, ^8Be and ^{12}C, and of the energy of the Hoyle state in ^{12}C. These investigations are performed within the framework of lattice chiral Effective Field Theory. We address the sensitivity of the production rate of carbon and oxygen in red giant stars to the fundamental constants of nature by considering the impact of variations in the light quark masses and the electromagnetic fine-structure constant on the reaction rate of the triple-alpha process. As carbon and oxygen are essential to life as we know it, we also discuss the implications of our findings for an anthropic view of the Universe. We find strong evidence that the physics of the triple-alpha process is driven by alpha clustering, and that shifts in the fundamental parameters at the \\simeq 2 - 3 % level are unlikely to be detrimental to the development of life. Tolerance against much larger changes cannot be ruled out at present, given the relati...

  13. Rate constants for the reaction of CF3O radicals with hydrocarbons at 298 K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelly, C.; Treacy, J.; Sidebottom, H.W.;

    1993-01-01

    Rate constant ratios of the reactions of CF3O radicals with a number of hydrocarbons have been determined at 298 +/- 2 K and atmospheric pressure using a relative rate method. Using a previously determined value k(CF30 + C2H6) = 1.2 x 10(-12) cm3 molecule-1 s-1 these rate constant ratios provide......-1. The importance of the reactions of CF3O radicals with hydrocarbons under atmospheric conditions is discussed....

  14. Temperature-dependent Henry's law constants of atmospheric organics of biogenic origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Chunbo; Kish, J Duncan; Kelley, Judas; Mach, Mindy; Hiltner, Joseph; Zhang, Yunhong; Liu, Yong

    2013-10-10

    There have been growing interests in modeling studies to understand oxidation of volatile organic compounds in the gas phase and their mass transfer to the aqueous phase for their potential roles in cloud chemistry, formation of secondary organic aerosols, and fate of atmospheric organics. Temperature-dependent Henry's law constants, key parameters in the atmospheric models to account for mass transfer, are often unavailable. In the present work, we investigated gas-liquid equilibriums of isoprene, limonene, α-pinene, and linalool using a bubble column technique. These compounds, originating from biogenic sources, were selected for their implications in atmospheric cloud chemistry and secondary organic aerosol formation. We reported Henry's law constants (K(H)), first order loss rates (k), and gas phase diffusion coefficients over a range of temperatures relevant to the lower atmosphere (278-298 K) for the first time. The measurement results of K(H) values for isoprene, limonene, α-pinene, and linalool at 298 K were 0.036 ± 0.003; 0.048 ± 0.004; 0.029 ± 0.004; and 21.20 ± 0.30 mol L(-1) atm(-1), respectively. The fraction for these compounds in stratocumulus and cumulonimbus clouds at 278 K were also estimated in this work (isoprene, 1.0 × 10(-6), 6.8 × 10(-6); limonene, 1.5 × 10(-6), 1.0 × 10(-5); α-pinene, 4.5 × 10(-7), 3.1 × 10(-6); and linalool, 6.2 × 10(-4), 4.2 × 10(-3)). Our measurements in combination with literature results indicated that noncyclic alkenes could have smaller K(H) values than those of cyclic terpenes and that K(H) values may increase with an increasing number of double bonds. It was also shown that estimated Henry's law constants and their temperature dependence based on model prediction can differ from experimental results considerably and that direct measurements of temperature-dependent Henry's law constants of atmospheric organics are necessary for future work.

  15. Classical reaction probabilities, cross sections and rate constants for the O( 1D) + H2 → OH + H reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, A. J.; Aoiz, F. J.; Bañares, L.; Brouard, M.; Herrero, V. J.; Simons, J. P.

    1997-10-01

    Reaction probabilitiers total reaction cross sections as a function of collision energy, and rate constants have been calculated using the quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) method for the O( 1D) + H 2 reaction on several ab initio potential energy surfaces (PES), including the recent one by Ho, Hollebeck, Rabitz, Harding and Schatz. Detailed QCT results on the Schinke and Lester PES are compared with recent time-dependent wavepacket calculations on the same PES, showing good agreement. The QCT thermal rate constants calculated on the PES of Ho et al. are in better accord with the experimental determinations than those calculated on the Schinke-Lester PES.

  16. Asymptotic solution of nonlinear moment equations for constant-rate aerosol reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. D. Shaw

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear evolution equations based upon moments of the aerosol size distribution function are solved asymptotically for constant-rate aerosol reactors (i.e., where condensible monomer is added at a constant rate operating in the free-molecular limit. The governing equations are nondimensionalized and a large parameter that controls nucleation behavior is identified. Asymptotic analyses are developed in terms of this parameter. Comparison of the asymptotic results with direct numerical integration of the governing equations is favorable. The asymptotic results provide a simplified analytical approach to estimating average particle sizes, particle number densities, and peak supersaturation values for constant-rate aerosol reactors.

  17. Dynamics of Perceived Exertion in Constant-Power Cycling: Time- and Workload-Dependent Thresholds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balagué, Natàlia; Hristovski, Robert; García, Sergi; Aguirre, Cecilia; Vázquez, Pablo; Razon, Selen; Tenenbaum, Gershon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to test the dynamics of perceived exertion shifts (PES) as a function of time and workload during constant-power cycling. Method: Fifty-two participants assigned to 4 groups performed a cycling task at 4 different constant workloads corresponding to their individual rates of perceived exertion (RPEs = 13, 15,…

  18. Dynamics of Perceived Exertion in Constant-Power Cycling: Time- and Workload-Dependent Thresholds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balagué, Natàlia; Hristovski, Robert; García, Sergi; Aguirre, Cecilia; Vázquez, Pablo; Razon, Selen; Tenenbaum, Gershon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to test the dynamics of perceived exertion shifts (PES) as a function of time and workload during constant-power cycling. Method: Fifty-two participants assigned to 4 groups performed a cycling task at 4 different constant workloads corresponding to their individual rates of perceived exertion (RPEs = 13, 15,…

  19. Using the pseudophase kinetic model to interpret chemical reactivity in ionic emulsions: determining antioxidant partition constants and interfacial rate constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Qing; Bravo-Díaz, Carlos; Romsted, Laurence S

    2013-06-15

    Kinetic results obtained in cationic and anionic emulsions show for the first time that pseudophase kinetic models give reasonable estimates of the partition constants of reactants, here t-butylhydroquinone (TBHQ) between the oil and interfacial region, P(O)(I), and the water and interfacial region, P(W)(I), and of the interfacial rate constant, k(I), for the reaction with an arenediazonium ion in emulsions containing a 1:1 volume ratio of a medium chain length triglyceride, MCT, and aqueous acid or buffer. The results provide: (a) an explanation for the large difference in pH, >4 pH units, required to run the reaction in CTAB (pH 1.54, added HBr) and SDS (pH 5.71, acetate buffer) emulsions; (b) reasonable estimates of PO(I) and k(I) in the CTAB emulsions; (c) a sensible interpretation of added counterion effects based on ion exchange in SDS emulsions (Na(+)/H3O(+) ion exchange in the interfacial region) and Donnan equilibrium in CTAB emulsions (Br(-) increasing the interfacial H3O(+)); and (d) the significance of the effect of the much greater solubility of TBHQ in MCT versus octane, 1000/1, as the oil. These results should aid in interpreting the effects of ionic surfactants on chemical reactivity in emulsions in general and in selecting the most efficient antioxidant for particular food applications.

  20. Absolute level-resolved reactive and inelastic rate constants in Li+Li2*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppage, Steven; Matei, Paula; Stewart, Brian

    2008-06-01

    We have used nuclear parity-changing collisions to obtain absolute level-to-level rate constants for reactive scattering in a triatomic system with identical nuclei. We have determined rate constants for the system 7Li2*(A 1Σu+)(vi=2,ji=19)+7Li-->7Li+7Li2*(A 1Σu+)(vf,jf), from laser-induced fluorescence spectra of lithium vapor in a heat pipe oven. Parity-preserving collisions yielded measurements of absolute rotationally and vibrationally inelastic rate constants as well. We compare the reactive rate constants with statistical prior distributions and the inelastic results with previously measured results on the Ne+7Li2* system.

  1. DETERMINATION OF HETEROGENEOUS ELECTRON TRANSFER RATE CONSTANTS AT MICROFABRICATED IRIDIUM ELECTRODES. (R825511C022)

    Science.gov (United States)

    There has been an increasing use of both solid metal and microfabricated iridium electrodes as substrates for various types of electroanalysis. However, investigations to determine heterogeneous electron transfer rate constants on iridium, especially at an electron beam evapor...

  2. DETERMINATION OF HETEROGENEOUS ELECTRON TRANSFER RATE CONSTANTS AT MICROFABRICATED IRIDIUM ELECTRODES. (R825511C022)

    Science.gov (United States)

    There has been an increasing use of both solid metal and microfabricated iridium electrodes as substrates for various types of electroanalysis. However, investigations to determine heterogeneous electron transfer rate constants on iridium, especially at an electron beam evapor...

  3. Determination of rapid chlorination rate constants by a stopped-flow spectrophotometric competition kinetics method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Dean; Liu, Huijuan; Qiang, Zhimin; Qu, Jiuhui

    2014-05-15

    Free chlorine is extensively used for water and wastewater disinfection nowadays. However, it still remains a big challenge to determine the rate constants of rapid chlorination reactions although competition kinetics and stopped-flow spectrophotometric (SFS) methods have been employed individually to investigate fast reaction kinetics. In this work, we proposed an SFS competition kinetics method to determine the rapid chlorination rate constants by using a common colorimetric reagent, N,N-diethyl-p-phenylenediamine (DPD), as a reference probe. A kinetic equation was first derived to estimate the reaction rate constant of DPD towards chlorine under a given pH and temperature condition. Then, on that basis, an SFS competition kinetics method was proposed to determine directly the chlorination rate constants of several representative compounds including tetracycline, ammonia, and four α-amino acids. Although Cl2O is more reactive than HOCl, its contribution to the overall chlorination kinetics of the test compounds could be neglected in this study. Finally, the developed method was validated through comparing the experimentally measured chlorination rate constants of the selected compounds with those obtained or calculated from literature and analyzing with Taft's correlation as well. This study demonstrates that the SFS competition kinetics method can measure the chlorination rate constants of a test compound rapidly and accurately.

  4. Systematic Angle Random Walk Estimation of the Constant Rate Biased Ring Laser Gyro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohu Feng

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available An actual account of the angle random walk (ARW coefficients of gyros in the constant rate biased rate ring laser gyro (RLG inertial navigation system (INS is very important in practical engineering applications. However, no reported experimental work has dealt with the issue of characterizing the ARW of the constant rate biased RLG in the INS. To avoid the need for high cost precise calibration tables and complex measuring set-ups, the objective of this study is to present a cost-effective experimental approach to characterize the ARW of the gyros in the constant rate biased RLG INS. In the system, turntable dynamics and other external noises would inevitably contaminate the measured RLG data, leading to the question of isolation of such disturbances. A practical observation model of the gyros in the constant rate biased RLG INS was discussed, and an experimental method based on the fast orthogonal search (FOS for the practical observation model to separate ARW error from the RLG measured data was proposed. Validity of the FOS-based method was checked by estimating the ARW coefficients of the mechanically dithered RLG under stationary and turntable rotation conditions. By utilizing the FOS-based method, the average ARW coefficient of the constant rate biased RLG in the postulate system is estimated. The experimental results show that the FOS-based method can achieve high denoising ability. This method estimate the ARW coefficients of the constant rate biased RLG in the postulate system accurately. The FOS-based method does not need precise calibration table with high cost and complex measuring set-up, and Statistical results of the tests will provide us references in engineering application of the constant rate biased RLG INS.

  5. Rate-dependent deformation of rocks in the brittle regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baud, P.; Brantut, N.; Heap, M. J.; Meredith, P. G.

    2013-12-01

    Rate-dependent brittle deformation of rocks, a phenomenon relevant for long-term interseismic phases of deformation, is poorly understood quantitatively. Rate-dependence can arise from chemically-activated, subcritical crack growth, which is known to occur in the presence of aqueous fluids. Here we attempt to establish quantitative links between this small scale process and its macroscopic manifestations. We performed a series of brittle deformation experiments in porous sandstones, in creep (constant stress) and constant strain rate conditions, in order to investigate the relationship between their short- and long-term mechanical behaviors. Elastic wave velocities measurements indicate that the amount of microcracking follows the amount of inelastic strain in a trend which does not depend upon the timescale involved. The comparison of stress-strain curves between constant strain rate and creep tests allows us to define a stress difference between the two, which can be viewed as a difference in energy release rate. We empirically show that the creep strain rates are proportional to an exponential function of this stress difference. We then establish a general method to estimate empirical micromechanical functions relating the applied stresses to mode I stress intensity factors at microcrack tips, and we determine the relationship between creep strain rates and stress intensity factors in our sandstone creep experiments. We finally provide an estimate of the sub-critical crack growth law parameters, and find that they match -within the experimental errors and approximations of the method- the typical values observed in independent single crack tests. Our approach provides a comprehensive and unifying explanation for the origin and the macroscopic manifestation of time-dependent brittle deformation in brittle rocks.

  6. Defect-induced change of temperature-dependent elastic constants in BCC iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, N.; Setyawan, W.; Zhang, S. H.; Wang, Z. G.

    2017-07-01

    The effects of radiation-induced defects (randomly distributed vacancies, voids, and interstitial dislocation loops) on temperature-dependent elastic constants, C11, C12, and C44 in BCC iron, are studied with molecular dynamics method. The elastic constants are found to decrease with increasing temperatures for all cases containing different defects. The presence of vacancies, voids, or interstitial loops further decreases the elastic constants. For a given number of point defects, the randomly distributed vacancies show the strongest effect compared to voids or interstitial loops. All these results are expected to provide useful information to combine with experimental results for further understanding of radiation damage.

  7. Heart rate dependency of JT interval sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnatkova, Katerina; Johannesen, Lars; Vicente, Jose; Malik, Marek

    2017-08-09

    Little experience exists with the heart rate correction of J-Tpeak and Tpeak-Tend intervals. In a population of 176 female and 176 male healthy subjects aged 32.3±9.8 and 33.1±8.4years, respectively, curve-linear and linear relationship to heart rate was investigated for different sections of the JT interval defined by the proportions of the area under the vector magnitude of the reconstructed 3D vectorcardiographic loop. The duration of the JT sub-section between approximately just before the T peak and almost the T end was found heart rate independent. Most of the JT heart rate dependency relates to the beginning of the interval. The duration of the terminal T wave tail is only weakly heart rate dependent. The Tpeak-Tend is only minimally heart rate dependent and in studies not showing substantial heart rate changes does not need to be heart rate corrected. For any correction formula that has linear additive properties, heart rate correction of JT and JTpeak intervals is practically the same as of the QT interval. However, this does not apply to the formulas in the form of Int/RR(a) since they do not have linear additive properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Reaction mechanisms and rate constants of waste degradation in landfill bioreactor systems with enzymatic-enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasinghe, P A; Hettiaratchi, J P A; Mehrotra, A K; Kumar, S

    2014-06-01

    Augmenting leachate before recirculation with peroxidase enzymes is a novel method to increase the available carbon, and therefore the food supply to microorganisms at the declining phase of the anaerobic landfill bioreactor operation. In order to optimize the enzyme-catalyzed leachate recirculation process, it is necessary to identify the reaction mechanisms and determine rate constants. This paper presents a kinetic model developed to ascertain the reaction mechanisms and determine the rate constants for enzyme catalyzed anaerobic waste degradation. The maximum rate of reaction (Vmax) for MnP enzyme-catalyzed reactors was 0.076 g(TOC)/g(DS).day. The catalytic turnover number (k(cat)) of the MnP enzyme-catalyzed was 506.7 per day while the rate constant (k) of the un-catalyzed reaction was 0.012 per day.

  9. In vivo Target Residence Time and Kinetic Selectivity: The Association Rate Constant as Determinant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Witte, Wilhelmus E A; Danhof, Meindert; van der Graaf, Piet H; de Lange, Elizabeth C M

    2016-10-01

    It is generally accepted that, in conjunction with pharmacokinetics, the first-order rate constant of target dissociation is a major determinant of the time course and duration of in vivo target occupancy. Here we show that the second-order rate constant of target association can be equally important. On the basis of the commonly used mathematical models for drug-target binding, it is shown that a high target association rate constant can increase the (local) concentration of the drug, which decreases the rate of decline of target occupancy. The increased drug concentration can also lead to increased off-target binding and decreased selectivity. Therefore, the kinetics of both target association and dissociation need to be taken into account in the selection of drug candidates with optimal pharmacodynamic properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Rate constant and reaction coordinate of Trp-cage folding in explicit water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Juraszek, J.; Bolhuis, P.G.

    2008-01-01

    We report rate constant calculations and a reaction coordinate analysis of the rate-limiting folding and unfolding process of the Trp-cage mini-protein in explicit solvent using transition interface sampling. Previous transition path sampling simulations revealed that in this (un)folding process the

  11. ESTIMATION OF PHOSPHATE ESTER HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS. II. ACID AND GENERAL BASE CATALYZED HYDROLYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) chemical reactivity models were extended to calculate acid and neutral hydrolysis rate constants of phosphate esters in water. The rate is calculated from the energy difference between the initial and transition states of a ...

  12. A new method for measuring the oxygen diffusion constant and oxygen consumption rate of arteriolar walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Nobuhiko; Horinouchi, Hirohisa; Ushiyama, Akira; Minamitani, Haruyuki

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen transport is believed to primarily occur via capillaries and depends on the oxygen tension gradient between the vessels and tissues. As blood flows along branching arterioles, the O(2) saturation drops, indicating either consumption or diffusion. The blood flow rate, the O(2) concentration gradient, and Krogh's O(2) diffusion constant (K) of the vessel wall are parameters affecting O(2)delivery. We devised a method for evaluating K of arteriolar wall in vivo using phosphorescence quenching microscopy to measure the partial pressure of oxygen in two areas almost simultaneously. The K value of arteriolar wall (inner diameter, 63.5 ± 11.9 μm; wall thickness, 18.0 ± 1.2 μm) was found to be 6.0 ± 1.2 × 10(-11) (cm(2)/s)(ml O(2)·cm(-3) tissue·mmHg(-1)). The arteriolar wall O(2) consumption rate (M) was 1.5 ± 0.1 (ml O(2)·100 cm(-3) tissue·min(-1)), as calculated using Krogh's diffusion equation. These results suggest that the arteriolar wall consumes a considerable proportion of the O(2) that diffuses through it.

  13. Microscopic Rate Constants of Crystal Growth from Molecular Dynamic Simulations Combined with Metadynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dániel Kozma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atomistic simulation of crystal growth can be decomposed into two steps: the determination of the microscopic rate constants and a mesoscopic kinetic Monte Carlo simulation. We proposed a method to determine kinetic rate constants of crystal growth. We performed classical molecular dynamics on the equilibrium liquid/crystal interface of argon. Metadynamics was used to explore the free energy surface of crystal growth. A crystalline atom was selected at the interface, and it was displaced to the liquid phase by adding repulsive Gaussian potentials. The activation free energy of this process was calculated as the maximal potential energy density of the Gaussian potentials. We calculated the rate constants at different interfacial structures using the transition state theory. In order to mimic real crystallization, we applied a temperature difference in the calculations of the two opposite rate constants, and they were applied in kinetic Monte Carlo simulation. The novelty of our technique is that it can be used for slow crystallization processes, while the simple following of trajectories can be applied only for fast reactions. Our method is a possibility for determination of elementary rate constants of crystal growth that seems to be necessary for the long-time goal of computer-aided crystal design.

  14. A finite horizon production model with variable production rates and constant demand rate

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we present a finite horizon single product single machine production problem. Demand rate and all the cost patterns do not change over time. However, end of horizon effects may require production rate adjustments at the beginning of each cycle. It is found that no such adjustments are required. The machine should be operated either at minimum speed (i.e. production rate = demand rate; shortage is not allowed), avoiding the buildup of any inventory, or at maximum s...

  15. Temperature Dependence of Atomic Decay Rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jian-Jun; CHENG Ze

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the decay rate of an atom in a two-dimensional optical microcavity in which there exists a Bose-Einstein condensation of photons. It is found that below the critical temperature Tc, the atomic decay rate depends on the absolute temperature T. Especially, at absolute zero temperature almost all photons are in the condensate state, and the atom can be approximately treated as if it is in vacuum.%We investigate the decay rate of an atom in a two-dimensional optical microcavity in which there exists a BoseEinstein condensation of photons.It is found that below the critical temperature To,the atomic decay rate depends on the absolute temperature T.Especially,at absolute zero temperature almost all photons are in the condensate state,and the atom can be approximately treated as if it is in vacuum.

  16. Implementation of a microcanonical variational transition state theory for direct dynamics calculations of rate constants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王艳; 钱英; 冯文林; 刘若庄

    2003-01-01

    An implementation of the variational quantum RRKM program is presented to utilize the direct ab initio dynamics approach for calculating k(E, J), k(E) and k(T) within the framework of the microcanonical transition state (μTST) and microcanonical variational TST (μVT) theories. An algorithm including tunneling contributions in Beyer-Swinehart method for calculating microcanonical rate constants is also proposed. An efficient piece-wise interpolation method is developed to evaluate the Boltzmann integral in calculation of thermal rate constants. Calculations on several test reactions, namely the H(D)2CO→H(D)2 + CO, CH2CO→CH2 + CO and CH4 + H→CH3 + H2 reactions, show that the results are in good agreement with the previous rate constants calculations. This approach would require much less computational resource.

  17. Feasibility of constant dose rate VMAT in the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Wenliang; Shang, Haijiao; Xie, Congying; Han, CE; Yi, Jinling; Zhou, Yongqiang; Jin, Xiance

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the feasibility of constant dose rate volumetric modulated arc therapy (CDR-VMAT) in the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients and to introduce rotational arc radiotherapy for linacs incapable of dose rate variation. Materials and methods Twelve NPC patients with various stages treated previously using variable dose rate (VDR) VMAT were enrolled in this study. CDR-VMAT, VDR-VMAT and mutlicriteria optimization (MCO) VMAT plans were generated for each patient ...

  18. Accurate quantum thermal rate constants for the three-dimensional H+H2 reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Tae Jun; Light, J. C.

    1989-07-01

    The rate constants for the three-dimensional H+H2 reaction on the Liu-Siegbahn-Truhlar-Horowitz (LSTH) surface are calculated using Pack-Parker hyperspherical (APH) coordinates and a C2v symmetry adapted direct product discrete variable representation (DVR). The C2v symmetry decomposition and the parity decoupling on the basis are performed for the internal coordinate χ. The symmetry decomposition results in a block diagonal representation of the flux and Hamiltonian operators. The multisurface flux is introduced to represent the multichannel reactive flux. The eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the J=0 internal Hamiltonian are obtained by sequential diagonalization and truncation. The individual symmetry blocks of the flux operator are propagated by the corresponding blocks of the Hamiltonian, and the J=0 rate constant k0(T) is obtained as a sum of the rate constants calculated for each block. k0(T) is compared with the exact k0(T) obtained from thermal averaging of the J=0 reaction probabilities; the errors are within 5%-20% up to T=1500 K. The sequential diagonalization-truncation method reduces the size of the Hamiltonian greatly, but the resulting Hamiltonian matrix still describes the time evolution very accurately. For the J≠0 rate constant calculations, the truncated internal Hamiltonian eigenvector basis is used to construct reduced (JKJ) blocks of the Hamiltonian. The individual (JKJ) blocks are diagonalized neglecting Coriolis coupling and treating the off-diagonal KJ±2 couplings by second order perturbation theory. The full wave function is parity decoupled. The rate constant is obtained as a sum over J of (2J+1)kJ(T). The time evolution of the flux for J≠0 is again very accurately described to give a well converged rate constant.

  19. Prediction and dissection of widely-varying association rate constants of actin-binding proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Pang

    Full Text Available Actin is an abundant protein that constitutes a main component of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton. Its polymerization and depolymerization are regulated by a variety of actin-binding proteins. Their functions range from nucleation of actin polymerization to sequestering G-actin in 1∶1 complexes. The kinetics of forming these complexes, with rate constants varying at least three orders of magnitude, is critical to the distinct regulatory functions. Previously we have developed a transient-complex theory for computing protein association mechanisms and association rate constants. The transient complex refers to an intermediate in which the two associating proteins have near-native separation and relative orientation but have yet to form short-range specific interactions of the native complex. The association rate constant is predicted as k(a = k(a0 e(-ΔG(el*/k(BT, where k(a0 is the basal rate constant for reaching the transient complex by free diffusion, and the Boltzmann factor captures the bias of long-range electrostatic interactions. Here we applied the transient-complex theory to study the association kinetics of seven actin-binding proteins with G-actin. These proteins exhibit three classes of association mechanisms, due to their different molecular shapes and flexibility. The 1000-fold k(a variations among them can mostly be attributed to disparate electrostatic contributions. The basal rate constants also showed variations, resulting from the different shapes and sizes of the interfaces formed by the seven actin-binding proteins with G-actin. This study demonstrates the various ways that actin-binding proteins use physical properties to tune their association mechanisms and rate constants to suit distinct regulatory functions.

  20. Fault Scaling Relationships Depend on the Average Geological Slip Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J. G.; Biasi, G. P.; Wesnousky, S. G.

    2016-12-01

    This study addresses whether knowing the geological slip rates on a fault in addition to the rupture length improves estimates of magnitude (Mw) of continental earthquakes that rupture the surface, based on a database of 80 events that includes 57 strike-slip, 12 reverse, and 11 normal faulting events. Three functional forms are tested to relate rupture length L to magnitude Mw: linear, bilinear, and a shape with constant static stress drop. The slip rate dependence is tested as a perturbation to the estimates of magnitude from rupture length. When the data are subdivided by fault mechanism, magnitude predictions from rupture length are improved for strike-slip faults when slip rate is included, but not for reverse or normal faults. This conclusion is robust, independent of the functional form used to relate L to Mw. Our preferred model is the constant stress drop model, because teleseismic observations of earthquakes favor that result. Because a dependence on slip rate is only significant for strike-slip events, a combined relationship for all rupture mechanisms is not appropriate. The observed effect of slip rate for strike-slip faults implies that the static stress drop, on average, tends to decrease as the fault slip rate increases.

  1. A Possible Interpretation on Distance-Dependent Effect of Gravitational Constant in Newton's Theory of Gravitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Shang-Wu

    2005-01-01

    Based on the new metric theory of gravitation suggested by the author of this article, it gives a possible theoretical interpretation on the famous experiment done by D.R. Long in 1976, i.e. the distance-dependent effect of the gravitational constant in Newton's theory of gravitation.

  2. Solving Ratio-Dependent Predatorprey System with Constant Effort Harvesting Using Variational Iteration Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghotbi, Abdoul R; Barari, Amin

    2009-01-01

    Due to wide range of interest in use of bio-economic models to gain insight in to the scientific management of renewable resources like fisheries and forestry, variational iteration method (VIM) is employed to approximate the solution of the ratio-dependent predator-prey system with constant effort...

  3. How strongly does dating meteorites constrain the time-dependence of the fine-structure constant?

    CERN Document Server

    Fujii, Y; Fujii, Yasunori; Iwamoto, Akira

    2005-01-01

    We review our argument on the nature of the so-called meteorite constraint on the possible time-dependence of the fine-structure constant, emphasizing that dating meteorites at the present time is different in principle from searching directly for the traces in the past, as in the Oklo phenomenon and the QSO absorption lines. In the related literature, we still find some arguments not necessarily consistent with this difference to be taken properly into account. This does not imply that any of the model-dependent approaches are useless in practice, though we cannot help guessing that dating meteorites is no match for the Oklo and the QSO in probing time-dependence of the fine-structure constant, at this moment. Some of the relevance to the QSO data particularly in terms of the scalar field will be discussed.

  4. Dose equivalent rate constants and barrier transmission data for nuclear medicine facility dose calculations and shielding design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusano, Maggie; Caldwell, Curtis B

    2014-07-01

    A primary goal of nuclear medicine facility design is to keep public and worker radiation doses As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). To estimate dose and shielding requirements, one needs to know both the dose equivalent rate constants for soft tissue and barrier transmission factors (TFs) for all radionuclides of interest. Dose equivalent rate constants are most commonly calculated using published air kerma or exposure rate constants, while transmission factors are most commonly calculated using published tenth-value layers (TVLs). Values can be calculated more accurately using the radionuclide's photon emission spectrum and the physical properties of lead, concrete, and/or tissue at these energies. These calculations may be non-trivial due to the polyenergetic nature of the radionuclides used in nuclear medicine. In this paper, the effects of dose equivalent rate constant and transmission factor on nuclear medicine dose and shielding calculations are investigated, and new values based on up-to-date nuclear data and thresholds specific to nuclear medicine are proposed. To facilitate practical use, transmission curves were fitted to the three-parameter Archer equation. Finally, the results of this work were applied to the design of a sample nuclear medicine facility and compared to doses calculated using common methods to investigate the effects of these values on dose estimates and shielding decisions. Dose equivalent rate constants generally agreed well with those derived from the literature with the exception of those from NCRP 124. Depending on the situation, Archer fit TFs could be significantly more accurate than TVL-based TFs. These results were reflected in the sample shielding problem, with unshielded dose estimates agreeing well, with the exception of those based on NCRP 124, and Archer fit TFs providing a more accurate alternative to TVL TFs and a simpler alternative to full spectral-based calculations. The data provided by this paper should assist

  5. Separating the effect of respiration from the heart rate variability for cases of constant harmonic breathing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kircher Michael

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Heart Rate Variability studies are a known measure for the autonomous control of the heart rate. In special situations, its interpretation can be ambiguous, since the respiration has a major influence on the heart rate variability. For this reason it has often been proposed to measure Heart Rate Variability, while the subjects are breathing at a constant respiration rate. That way the spectral influence of the respiration is known. In this work we propose to remove this constant respiratory influence from the heart rate and the Heart Rate Variability parameters to gain respiration free autonomous controlled heart rate signal. The spectral respiratory component in the heart rate signal is detected and characterized. Subsequently the respiratory effect on Heart Rate Variability is removed using spectral filtering approaches, such as the Notch filter or the Raised Cosine filter. As a result new decoupled Heart Variability parameters are gained, which could lead to new additional interpretations of the autonomous control of the heart rate.

  6. Relationship between phenol-induced cytotoxicity and experimental inhibition rate constant or a theoretical parameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, S; Kadoma, Y

    2012-06-01

    We synthesized various dimer forms of 2-methoxyphenols and 2-tert-butylphenols, as dimers such as curcumin exhibit potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. We investigated the QSARs between the cytotoxicity and independent variables; kinetic parameters (inhibition rate constant (kinh/kp), stoichiometric factor (n)) or DFT-based theoretical parameters (i.e. phenolic O-H bond dissociation enthalpy (BDE), ionization potential according to Koopman's theorem (IP), LUMO, absolute hardness (η), electronegativity (χ) and electrophilicity (ω)) for 2-methoxyphenols and 2- tert- or 2,6-di-tert-butylphenols. The cytotoxicity of these phenols against human tumor cells (HSG, HL60) and/or human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) showed a marked negative linear relationship to kinh/kp, suggesting that the cytotoxicity of phenols may be related to radical reactions. By contrast, a linear relationship between the cytotoxicity and η-term was demonstrated; 2-methoxyphenols showed a negative slope, whereas 2-tert- or 2,6-di-tert-butylphenols showed a positive slope. Also, the cytotoxicity of tert-butylphenols was linearly dependent on the LUMO-term, showing a positive slope. The cytotoxicity of methoxy-substituted monophenols toward both HSG and HGF cells was related to both log P and η- terms. Also, that of X-phenols toward murine L-1210 cells was related to both log P and η or IP-terms, determined from a dataset reported by Zhang et al., 1998. It was concluded that the phenol-induced cytotoxicity was attributable to radical reactions resulting from the terms (kinh/kp, IP, η, and LUMO) in QSAR. The LUMO-dependent cytotoxicity of 2-tert- or 2,6-di-tert-butylphenols may be related to their quinone oxidation products. Experimental and theoretical parameters provide a useful approach for analysis of the cytotoxicity for phenolic compounds.

  7. Power consumption analysis of constant bit rate data transmission over 3G mobile wireless networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Le; Ukhanova, Ann; Belyaev, Evgeny

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the analysis of the power consumption of data transmission with constant bit rate over 3G mobile wireless networks. Our work includes the description of the transition state machine in 3G networks, followed by the detailed energy consumption analysis and measurement results...

  8. Estimate Of The Decay Rate Constant of Hydrogen Sulfide Generation From Landfilled Drywall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research was conducted to investigate the impact of particle size on H2S gas emissions and estimate a decay rate constant for H2S gas generation from the anaerobic decomposition of drywall. Three different particle sizes of regular drywall and one particle size of paperless drywa...

  9. Stress relaxation of entangled polystyrene solution after constant-rate, uniaxial elongation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matsumiya, Yumi; Masubuchi, Yuichi; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    For an entangled solution of linear polystyrene (PS 545k; M = 545k) in dibutyl phthalate (DBP), the stress relaxation after constant-rate uniaxial elongation was examined with an extensional viscosity fixture mounted on ARES (TA Instruments). The PS concentration, c = 52 wt%, was chosen in a way...

  10. The Reaction Mechanism and Rate Constants in the Radiolysis of Fe2+-Cu2+ Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjergbakke, Erling; Sehested, Knud; Rasmussen, O. Lang

    1976-01-01

    Pulse radiolysis and gamma radiolysis have been used to study the reaction mechanism in the radiolysis of aqueous solutions of Fe2+ and Cu2+. A reaction scheme has been developed and confirmed by computation of the corresponding complete set of differential equations. The rate constants for some...

  11. Measurements of Creep Internal Stress Based on Constant Strain Rate and Its Application to Engineering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Wen-liang; WEI Tao

    2006-01-01

    This research is carried out on the basis of Constant Strain Rate(CSR) to measure creep internal stress. Measurements of creep internal stress are conducted on the material test machine by using the CSR method. A mathematical model of creep internal stress is also proposed and its application is presented in this paper.

  12. Formulation of a universal first-order rate constant for enzymatic reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imoto, Taiji

    2013-01-01

    It is a common practice to employ k(cat)[E]₀/K(m) as a first-order rate constant for the analysis of an enzymatic reaction, where [E]₀ is the total enzyme concentration. I describe in this report a serious shortcoming in analyzing enzymatic reactions when kcat[E]₀/K(m) is employed and show that k(cat)[E]₀/K(m) can only be applied under very limited conditions. I consequently propose the use of a more universal first-order rate constant, k(cat)[ES](K)/[S]₀, where [ES](K) is the initial equilibrium concentration of the ES-complex derived from [E]₀, [S]₀ and K(m). Employing k(cat)[ES](K)/[S]₀ as the first-order rate constant enables all enzymatic reactions to be reasonably simulated under a wide range of conditions, and the catalytic and binding contributions to the rate constant of any enzyme can be determined under any and all conditions.

  13. Theoretical and Shock Tube Study of the Rate Constants for Hydrogen Abstraction Reactions of Ethyl Formate

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Junjun

    2017-08-03

    We report a systematic chemical kinetics study of the H-atom abstractions from ethyl formate (EF) by H, O(3P), CH3, OH, and HO2 radicals. The geometry optimization and frequency calculation of all the species were conducted using the M06 method and the cc-pVTZ basis set. The one-dimensional hindered rotor treatment of the reactants and transition states and the intrinsic reaction coordinate analysis were also performed at the M06/cc-pVTZ level of theory. The relative electronic energies were calculated at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVXZ (where X = D, T) level of theory and further extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. Rate constants for the tittle reactions were calculated over the temperature range of 500‒2500 K by the transition state theory (TST) in conjunction with asymmetric Eckart tunneling effect. In addition, the rate constants of H-abstraction by hydroxyl radical were measured in shock tube experiments at 900‒1321 K and 1.4‒2.0 atm. Our theoretical rate constants of OH + EF → Products agree well with the experimental results within 15% over the experimental temperature range of 900‒1321 K. Branching ratios for the five types of H-abstraction reactions were also determined from their individual site-specific rate constants.

  14. USE OF ROUGH SETS AND SPECTRAL DATA FOR BUILDING PREDICTIVE MODELS OF REACTION RATE CONSTANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A model for predicting the log of the rate constants for alkaline hydrolysis of organic esters has been developed with the use of gas-phase min-infrared library spectra and a rule-building software system based on the mathematical theory of rough sets. A diverse set of 41 esters ...

  15. The ruin probability of a discrete time risk model under constant interest rate with heavy tails

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, Q.

    2004-01-01

    This paper investigates the ultimate ruin probability of a discrete time risk model with a positive constant interest rate. Under the assumption that the gross loss of the company within one year is subexponentially distributed, a simple asymptotic relation for the ruin probability is derived and co

  16. Stress relaxation of entangled polystyrene solution after constant-rate, uniaxial elongation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matsumiya, Yumi; Masubuchi, Yuichi; Watanabe, Hiroshi;

    For an entangled solution of linear polystyrene (PS 545k; M = 545k) in dibutyl phthalate (DBP), the stress relaxation after constant-rate uniaxial elongation was examined with an extensional viscosity fixture mounted on ARES (TA Instruments). The PS concentration, c = 52 wt%, was chosen in a way...

  17. The Frequency-Dependent Neuronal Length Constant in Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilmoniemi, Risto J.; Mäki, Hanna; Saari, Jukka; Salvador, Ricardo; Miranda, Pedro C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The behavior of the dendritic or axonal membrane voltage due to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is often modeled with the one-dimensional cable equation. For the cable equation, a length constant λ0 is defined; λ0 describes the axial decay of the membrane voltage in the case of constant applied electric field. In TMS, however, the induced electric field waveform is typically a segment of a sinusoidal wave, with characteristic frequencies of the order of several kHz. Objective: To show that the high frequency content of the stimulation pulse causes deviations in the spatial profile of the membrane voltage as compared to the steady state. Methods: We derive the cable equation in complex form utilizing the complex frequency-dependent representation of the membrane conductivity. In addition, we define an effective length constant λeff, which governs the spatial decay of the membrane voltage. We model the behavior of a dendrite in an applied electric field oscillating at 3.9 kHz with the complex cable equation and by solving the traditional cable equation numerically. Results: The effective length constant decreases as a function of frequency. For a model dendrite or axon, for which λ0 = 1.5 mm, the effective length constant at 3.9 kHz is decreased by a factor 10 to 0.13 mm. Conclusion: The frequency dependency of the neuronal length constant has to be taken into account when predicting the spatial behavior of the membrane voltage as a response to TMS. PMID:27555808

  18. The origin dependence of the material constants: the permittivity and the inverse permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anelli, Marco; Jonsson, Dan; Fliegl, Heike; Ruud, Kenneth

    2015-07-01

    New derivations of origin-independent expressions for the electric permittivity are presented, starting either from the response function of the current density that defines the absorption coefficient, or from the off-resonance single-photon scattering amplitude that leads to the Kramers-Heisenberg dispersion formula. The resulting expression for the permittivity is compared with earlier work on the origin dependence of the material constants. Different origin-independent expressions for the permittivity, the inverse permeability and the magnetisability are calculated and discussed. By considering electromagnetic plane waves in the absence of external sources, the macroscopic Maxwell equations are used to describe the response of matter to external fields. In combination with the constitutive relations, a wave equation expressed in terms of the material constants is derived. It is shown that the different definitions of the material constants lead to the same wave equation. The non-uniqueness of the definitions of the material constants is discussed in this context. Finally, based on the discussions, we propose a possible unique, origin-independent definition of the material constants.

  19. Comparison between Cooling Rate Dependence of Macroscopic and Microscopic Quantities in Simulated Aluminium Glass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chang-Song; ZHU Zhen-Gang

    2000-01-01

    Constant-pressure molecular dynamics simulations and an analysis of the local atomic structures have been performed to study the cooling rate dependence of some macroscopic and microscopic quantities in aluminium glass. Macroscopic quantities, enthalpy and density, see an observable but small dependence on the cooling rate. Icosahedral ordering units exhibit strong cooling rate dependence, which is responsible for the dependence of the enthalpy and the density on the cooling rate; while the almost independence of some microstructural units such as the 1541, 1431 and 1421 pairs of the cooling rate may lead to a small dependence of the enthalpy and the density on the cooling rate.

  20. Efficient quantum-classical method for computing thermal rate constant of recombination: application to ozone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Mikhail V; Babikov, Dmitri

    2012-05-14

    Efficient method is proposed for computing thermal rate constant of recombination reaction that proceeds according to the energy transfer mechanism, when an energized molecule is formed from reactants first, and is stabilized later by collision with quencher. The mixed quantum-classical theory for the collisional energy transfer and the ro-vibrational energy flow [M. Ivanov and D. Babikov, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 144107 (2011)] is employed to treat the dynamics of molecule + quencher collision. Efficiency is achieved by sampling simultaneously (i) the thermal collision energy, (ii) the impact parameter, and (iii) the incident direction of quencher, as well as (iv) the rotational state of energized molecule. This approach is applied to calculate third-order rate constant of the recombination reaction that forms the (16)O(18)O(16)O isotopomer of ozone. Comparison of the predicted rate vs. experimental result is presented.

  1. Nuclear Density-Dependent Effective Coupling Constants in the Mean-Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, J H; Lee, S J; Lee, Jae Hwang; Lee, Young Jae; Lee, Suk-Joon

    1996-01-01

    It is shown that the equation of state of nuclear matter can be determined within the mean-field theory of $\\sigma \\omega$ model provided only that the nucleon effective mass curve is given. We use a family of the possible nucleon effective mass curves that reproduce the empirical saturation point in the calculation of the nuclear binding energy curves in order to obtain density-dependent effective coupling constants. The resulting density-dependent coupling constants may be used to study a possible equation of state of nuclear system at high density or neutron matter. Within the constraints used in this paper to $M^*$ of nuclear matter at saturation point and zero density, neutron matter of large incompressibility is strongly bound at high density while soft neutron matter is weakly bound at low density. The study also exhibits the importance of surface vibration modes in the study of nuclear equation of state.

  2. How Strongly does Dating Meteorites Constrain the Time-Dependence of the Fine-Structure Constant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Yasunori; Iwamoto, Akira

    We review our argument on the nature of the so-called meteorite constraint on the possible time-dependence of the fine-structure constant, emphasizing that dating meteorites at the present time is different in principle from searching directly for the traces in the past, as in the Oklo phenomenon and the QSO absorption lines. In the related literature, we still find some arguments not necessarily consistent with this difference to be taken properly into account. It does not immediately follow that any model-dependent approaches are useless in practice, though we cannot help suspecting that dating meteorites is no match for the Oklo and the QSO in probing the time-variability of the fine-structure constant, at this moment. Some of the relevance to the QSO data particularly in terms of the scalar field will be discussed.

  3. Rate constants for H abstraction from benzo(a)pyrene and chrysene: a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenikhin, A S; Savchenkova, A S; Chechet, I V; Matveev, S G; Liu, Z; Frenklach, M; Mebel, A M

    2017-09-12

    Density functional B3LYP/6-31G(d) and ab initio G3(MP2,CC) calculations have been carried out to determine thermal rate constants of direct H abstraction reactions from four- and five-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) chrysene and benzo[a]pyrene by various radicals abundant in combustion flames, such as H, CH3, C3H3, and OH, using transition state theory. The results show that the H abstraction reactions with OH have the lowest barriers of ∼4 kcal mol(-1), followed by those with H and CH3 with barriers of 16-17 kcal mol(-1), and then with propargyl radicals with barriers of 24-26 kcal mol(-1). Thus, the OH radical is predicted to be the fastest H abstractor from PAH. Even at 2500 K, the rate constant for H abstraction by H is still 34% lower than the rate constant for H abstraction by OH. The reaction with H is calculated to have rate constants 35-19 times higher than those for the reaction with CH3 due to a more favorable entropic factor. The reactions of H abstraction by C3H3 are predicted to be orders of magnitude slower than the other reactions considered and their equilibrium is strongly shifted toward the reactants, making propargyl an inefficient H abstractor from the aromatics. The calculations showed strong similarity of the reaction energetics in different H abstraction positions of benzo[a]pyrene and chrysene within armchair and zigzag edges in these molecules, but clear distinction between the armchair and zigzag sites. The zigzag sites appear to be more reactive, with H abstraction rate constants by H, CH3, and OH being respectively 37-42%, a factor of 2.1, and factors of 8-9 higher than the corresponding rate constants for the H abstraction reactions from armchair sites. Although the barrier heights for the two types of edges are similar, the entropic factor makes zigzag sites more favorable for H abstraction. Rate expressions have been generated for all studied reactions with the goal to rectify current combustion kinetics mechanisms.

  4. Determination of the kinetic rate constant of cyclodextrin supramolecular systems by high performance affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiyan; Ge, Jingwen; Guo, Tao; Yang, Shuo; He, Zhonggui; York, Peter; Sun, Lixin; Xu, Xu; Zhang, Jiwen

    2013-08-30

    It is challenging and extremely difficult to measure the kinetics of supramolecular systems with extensive, weak binding (Kahigh performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) was established to determine the dissociation rate constant of cyclodextrin supramolecular systems. The interactions of β-cyclodextrin with acetaminophen and sertraline were used to exemplify the method. The retention times, variances and the plate heights of the peaks for acetaminophen or sertraline, conventional non-retained substance (H2O) on the β-cyclodextrin bonded column and a control column were determined at four flow rates under linear elution conditions. Then, plate heights for the theoretical non-retained substance were estimated by the modified HPAC method, in consideration of the diffusion and stagnant mobile phase mass transfer. As a result, apparent dissociation rate constants of 1.82 (±0.01)s(-1) and 3.55 (±0.37)s(-1) were estimated for acetaminophen and sertraline respectively at pH 6.8 and 25°C with multiple flow rates. Following subtraction of the non-specific binding with the support, dissociation rate constants were estimated as 1.78 (±0.00) and 1.91 (±0.02)s(-1) for acetaminophen and sertraline, respectively. These results for acetaminophen and sertraline were in good agreement with the magnitude of the rate constants for other drugs determined by capillary electrophoresis reported in the literature and the peak fitting method we performed. The method described in this work is thought to be suitable for other supramolecules, with relatively weak, fast and extensive interactions.

  5. Solving Ratio-Dependent Predator-Prey System with Constant Effort Harvesting Using Homotopy Perturbation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdoul R. Ghotbi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to wide range of interest in use of bioeconomic models to gain insight into the scientific management of renewable resources like fisheries and forestry, homotopy perturbation method is employed to approximate the solution of the ratio-dependent predator-prey system with constant effort prey harvesting. The results are compared with the results obtained by Adomian decomposition method. The results show that, in new model, there are less computations needed in comparison to Adomian decomposition method.

  6. Monte Carlo-based revised values of dose rate constants at discrete photon energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Palani Selvam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Absorbed dose rate to water at 0.2 cm and 1 cm due to a point isotropic photon source as a function of photon energy is calculated using the EDKnrc user-code of the EGSnrc Monte Carlo system. This code system utilized widely used XCOM photon cross-section dataset for the calculation of absorbed dose to water. Using the above dose rates, dose rate constants are calculated. Air-kerma strength S k needed for deriving dose rate constant is based on the mass-energy absorption coefficient compilations of Hubbell and Seltzer published in the year 1995. A comparison of absorbed dose rates in water at the above distances to the published values reflects the differences in photon cross-section dataset in the low-energy region (difference is up to 2% in dose rate values at 1 cm in the energy range 30-50 keV and up to 4% at 0.2 cm at 30 keV. A maximum difference of about 8% is observed in the dose rate value at 0.2 cm at 1.75 MeV when compared to the published value. S k calculations based on the compilation of Hubbell and Seltzer show a difference of up to 2.5% in the low-energy region (20-50 keV when compared to the published values. The deviations observed in the values of dose rate and S k affect the values of dose rate constants up to 3%.

  7. A model for turbulent dissipation rate in a constant pressure boundary layer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J DEY; P PHANI KUMAR

    2016-04-01

    Estimation of the turbulent dissipation rate in a boundary layer is a very involved process.Experimental determination of either the dissipation rate or the Taylor microscale, even in isotropic turbulence,which may occur in a portion of the turbulent boundary layer, is known to be a difficult task. For constant pressure boundary layers, a model for the turbulent dissipation rate is proposed here in terms of the local mean flow quantities. Comparable agreement between the estimated Taylor microscale and Kolmogorov length scale with other data in the logarithmic region suggests usefulness of this model in obtaining these quantitiesexperimentally

  8. Constant-load versus heart rate-targeted exercise - Responses of systolic intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lance, V. Q.; Spodick, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Various systolic intervals were measured prior to and during heart rate-targeted bicycle ergometer exercise. There were striking similarities within each matched exercise set for Q-Im, isovolumetric contraction time, preejection period (PEP), and PEP/left ventricular ejection time (LVET). LVET was significantly shorter for rate-targeted exercise. It is concluded that either constant-load or rate-targeted bicycle ergometry may be used with the choice of method determined by the purpose of the protocol, and that systolic intervals (except LVET) should not be much altered owing to the method chosen.

  9. Rate constant for the reaction SO + BrO yields SO2 + Br

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunning, J.; Stief, L.

    1986-01-01

    The rate of the radical-radical reaction SO + BrO yields SO2 + Br has been determined at 298 K in a discharge flow system near 1 torr pressure with detection of SO and BrO via collision-free sampling mass spectrometry. The rate constant was determined using two different methods: measuring the decay of SO radicals in the presence of an excess of BrO and measuring the decay of BrO radicals in excess SO. The results from the two methods are in reasonable agreement and the simple mean of the two values gives the recommended rate constant at 298 K, k = (5.7 + or - 2.0) x 10 to the -11th cu cm/s. This represents the first determination of this rate constant and it is consistent with a previously derived lower limit based on SO2 formation. Comparison is made with other radical-radical reactions involving SO or BrO. The reaction SO + BrO yields SO2 + Br is of interest for models of the upper atmosphere of the earth and provides a potential coupling between atmospheric sulfur and bromine chemistry.

  10. Degradation of bisphenol A by ozonation: rate constants, influence of inorganic anions, and by-products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kheng Soo Tay

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The second-order rate constants for the reaction between bisphenol A (BPA and ozonewere evaluated over the pH range of 2-12. The rate constants showed minimum values (×104 M-1s-1under acidic condition (pH 10. From pH 4 to 7, the second-order rate constants were found to increase by a magnitudeof almost 102 and this was due to the increase in anionic BPA species in the solution. The rateconstants increased almost twofold when pH increased from 9.6 to 10.2. The presence of commoninorganic anions at levels commonly found in the environment did not affect the rate of degradationof BPA.The degradation by-products from the ozonation of BPA were identified as 4-(prop-1-en-2-ylphenol, hydroquinone, 4-hydroxyacetophenone, 2-(2-(4-hydroxyphenylpropan-2-ylsuccinaldehyde,2-(1-(4-hydroxyphenylvinylpent-2-enal, 3-formyl-4-(4-hydroxyphenyl-4-methylpent-2-enoic acid, monohydroxy-BPA and dihydroxy-BPA. In conclusion, ozonation was found to be aneffective method for the removal of BPA even in the presence of common inorganic anions atenvironmental concentrations. However, incomplete treatment of BPA might produce a variety ofdegradation by-products.

  11. Ab-Initio Based Computation of Rate Constants for Spin Forbidden Metalloprotein-Substrate Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkanlar, Abdullah; Rodriguez, Jorge H.

    2007-03-01

    Some chemical and biochemical reactions are non-adiabatic processes whereby the total spin angular momentum, before and after the reaction, is not conserved. These are named spin- forbidden reactions. The application of ab-initio methods, such as spin density functional theory (SDFT), to the prediction of rate constants is a challenging task of fundamental and practical importance. We apply non-adiabatic transition state theory (NA-TST) in conjuntion with SDFT to predict the rate constant of the spin- forbidden recombination of carbon monoxide with iron tetracarbonyl. To model the surface hopping probability between singlet and triplet states, the Landau-Zener formalism is used. The lowest energy point for singlet-triplet crossing, known as minimum energy crossing point (MECP), was located and used to compute, in a semi-quantum approach, reaction rate constants at 300 K. The predicted rates are in very good agreement with experiment. In addition, we present results for the spin- forbidden ligand binding reactions of iron-containing heme proteins such as myoglobin.

  12. Determination of Methane and Carbon Dioxide Formation Rate Constants for Semi-Continuously Fed Anaerobic Digesters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Moestedt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To optimize commercial-scale biogas production, it is important to evaluate the performance of each microbial step in the anaerobic process. Hydrolysis and methanogenesis are usually the rate-limiting steps during digestion of organic waste and by-products. By measuring biogas production and methane concentrations on-line in a semi-continuously fed reactor, gas kinetics can be evaluated. In this study, the rate constants of the fermentative hydrolysis step (kc and the methanogenesis step (km were determined and evaluated in a continuously stirred tank laboratory-scale reactor treating food and slaughterhouse waste and glycerin. A process additive containing Fe2+, Co2+ and Ni2+ was supplied until day 89, after which Ni2+ was omitted. The omission resulted in a rapid decline in the methanogenesis rate constant (km to 70% of the level observed when Ni2+ was present, while kc remained unaffected. This suggests that Ni2+ mainly affects the methanogenic rather than the hydrolytic microorganisms in the system. However, no effect was initially observed when using conventional process monitoring parameters such as biogas yield and volatile fatty acid concentration. Hence, formation rate constants can reveal additional information on process performance and km can be used as a complement to conventional process monitoring tools for semi-continuously fed anaerobic digesters.

  13. Properties of human motor units after prolonged activity at a constant firing rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, K V B; Edwards, S C; Van Tongeren, C; Bawa, P

    2004-02-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine if there are changes in the intrinsic properties of spinal motoneurons after prolonged submaximal contractions. To do this, we assessed whether or not the synaptic drive to motoneurons needs to increase in order to maintain a constant firing rate of a motor unit. Recruitment of new units and an increase in total electromyographic (EMG) activity of the muscle of interest were taken as estimates of an increase in synaptic drive. Subjects were asked to maintain a constant firing rate of a clearly identifiable (targeted) motor unit from the first dorsal interosseous muscle for approximately 10 min, while surface EMG and force were recorded simultaneously. For the 60 units studied, the duration of the constant-firing-rate period ranged from 73 to 1,140 s (448 +/- 227 s; mean +/- SD). There was a significant increase ( t-test, prate suggesting an increase in the net excitatory input to the motoneuron pool. Changes occurring simultaneously in other parameters, namely, variability in interspike interval, magnitude of force fluctuations, the duration of motor unit action potentials, and the median power frequency of surface EMG were also computed. The firing rates of 16 concurrently firing motoneurons, not controlled by the subject, remained constant. The key finding of this study is that after prolonged activity, a motoneuron requires a stronger excitatory input to maintain its firing rate. Additional results are indicative of significant changes in the characteristics of the synaptic inputs, changes at the neuromuscular junction (both pre- and postsynaptic regions) and the sarcolemma.

  14. Calculated third order rate constants for interpreting the mechanisms of hydrolyses of chloroformates, carboxylic Acid halides, sulfonyl chlorides and phosphorochloridates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bentley, T William

    2015-01-01

    .... Third order rate constants (k3) are calculated for solvolytic reactions in a wide range of compositions of acetone-water mixtures, and are shown to be either approximately constant or correlated with the Grunwald-Winstein Y parameter...

  15. Ab Initio Calculation of Rate Constants for Molecule–Surface Reactions with Chemical Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccini, GiovanniMaria; Alessio, Maristella

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The ab initio prediction of reaction rate constants for systems with hundreds of atoms with an accuracy that is comparable to experiment is a challenge for computational quantum chemistry. We present a divide‐and‐conquer strategy that departs from the potential energy surfaces obtained by standard density functional theory with inclusion of dispersion. The energies of the reactant and transition structures are refined by wavefunction‐type calculations for the reaction site. Thermal effects and entropies are calculated from vibrational partition functions, and the anharmonic frequencies are calculated separately for each vibrational mode. This method is applied to a key reaction of an industrially relevant catalytic process, the methylation of small alkenes over zeolites. The calculated reaction rate constants (free energies), pre‐exponential factors (entropies), and enthalpy barriers show that our computational strategy yields results that agree with experiment within chemical accuracy limits (less than one order of magnitude). PMID:27008460

  16. I. Determination of chemical reaction rate constants by numerical nonlinear analysis: differential methods

    CERN Document Server

    Jesudason, Christopher G

    2011-01-01

    The primary emphasis of this work on kinetics is to illustrate the a posteriori approach to applications, where focus on data leads to novel outcomes, rather than the a priori tendencies of applied analysis which imposes constructs on the nature of the observable. The secondary intention is the development of appropriate methods consonant with experimental definitions. By focusing on gradients, it is possible to determine both the average and instantaneous rate constants that can monitor changes in the rate constant with concentration changes as suggested by this theory. Here, methods are developed and discussed utilizing nonlinear analysis which does not require exact knowledge of initial concentrations. These methods are compared with those derived from standard methodology. These gradient methods are shown to be consistent with the ones from standard methods and could readily serve as alternatives for studies where there are limits or unknowns in the initial conditions, such as in the burgeoning fields of ...

  17. Absolute rate constants for the reaction of hypochlorous acid with protein side chains and peptide bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pattison, D I; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    , absolute second-order rate constants for the reactions of HOCl with protein side chains, model compounds, and backbone amide (peptide) bonds have been determined at physiological pH values. The reactivity of HOCl with potential reactive sites in proteins is summarized by the series: Met (3.8 x 10(7) M(-1......) x s(-1)) > backbone amides (10-10(-3) M(-1) x s(-1)) > Gln(0.03 M(-1) x s(-1)) approximately Asn (0.03 M(-1) x s(-1)). The rate constants for reaction of HOCl with backbone amides (peptide bonds) vary by 4 orders of magnitude with uncharged peptide bonds reacting more readily with HOCl than those...

  18. The rate constant for the CO + H2O2 reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glarborg, Peter; Marshall, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The rate constant for the reaction CO + H2O2 -> HOCO + OH (R1) at 713 K is determined based on the batch reactor experiments of Baldwin et al. [ R. R. Baldwin, R. W. Walker, S. J. Webster, Combust. Flame 15 (1970) 167] on decomposition of H2O2 sensitized by CO. The value, k(1) (713 K) = 8.1 x 10...... in combustion. The present analysis reconciles the batch reactor data of Baldwin et al. with recent high-level theoretical work on the CO + HO2 reaction.......(2) cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1), is consistent with spin-unrestricted density functional theory. Extrapolation to a wider temperature range through ab initio calculations yields the rate constant k(1) = 3.6 x 10(4)T(2.5) exp(-14425[K]/T) cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1). The reaction is probably of minor importance...

  19. Reaction rate constants of H-abstraction by OH from large ketones: Measurements and site-specific rate rules

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad

    2014-01-01

    Reaction rate constants of the reaction of four large ketones with hydroxyl (OH) are investigated behind reflected shock waves using OH laser absorption. The studied ketones are isomers of hexanone and include 2-hexanone, 3-hexanone, 3-methyl-2-pentanone, and 4-methl-2-pentanone. Rate constants are measured under pseudo-first-order kinetics at temperatures ranging from 866 K to 1375 K and pressures near 1.5 atm. The reported high-temperature rate constant measurements are the first direct measurements for these ketones under combustion-relevant conditions. The effects of the position of the carbonyl group (CO) and methyl (CH3) branching on the overall rate constant with OH are examined. Using previously published data, rate constant expressions covering, low-to-high temperatures, are developed for acetone, 2-butanone, 3-pentanone, and the hexanone isomers studied here. These Arrhenius expressions are used to devise rate rules for H-abstraction from various sites. Specifically, the current scheme is applied with good success to H-abstraction by OH from a series of n-ketones. Finally, general expressions for primary and secondary site-specific H-abstraction by OH from ketones are proposed as follows (the subscript numbers indicate the number of carbon atoms bonded to the next-nearest-neighbor carbon atom, the subscript CO indicates that the abstraction is from a site next to the carbonyl group (CO), and the prime is used to differentiate different neighboring environments of a methylene group):P1,CO = 7.38 × 10-14 exp(-274 K/T) + 9.17 × 10-12 exp(-2499 K/T) (285-1355 K)S10,CO = 1.20 × 10-11 exp(-2046 K/T) + 2.20 × 10-13 exp(160 K/T) (222-1464 K)S11,CO = 4.50 × 10-11 exp(-3000 K/T) + 8.50 × 10-15 exp(1440 K/T) (248-1302 K)S11′,CO = 3.80 × 10-11 exp(-2500 K/T) + 8.50 × 10-15 exp(1550 K/T) (263-1370 K)S 21,CO = 5.00 × 10-11 exp(-2500 K/T) + 4.00 × 10-13 exp(775 K/T) (297-1376 K) © 2014 the Partner Organisations.

  20. The H2 + CO ↔ H2CO Reaction: Rate Constants and Relevance to Hot and Dense Astrophysical Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vichietti, R. M.; Spada, R. F. K.; da Silva, A. B. F.; Machado, F. B. C.; Haiduke, R. L. A.

    2016-07-01

    A theoretical thermochemical and kinetic investigation of the thermal H2 + CO ↔ H2CO reaction was performed for a temperature range from 200 to 4000 K. Geometries and vibrational frequencies of reactants, product, and transition state (TS) were obtained at CCSD/cc-pVxZ (x = T and Q) levels and scaling factors were employed to consider anharmonicity effects on vibrational frequencies, zero-point energies, and thermal corrections provided by these methodologies. Enthalpies Gibbs energies, and rate constants for this reaction were determined by including a complete basis set extrapolation correction for the electronic properties calculated at CCSD(T)/cc-pVyZ (y = Q and 5) levels. Our study indicates that enthalpy changes for this reaction are highly dependent on temperature. Moreover, forward and reverse (high-pressure limit) rate constants were obtained from variational TS theory with quantum tunneling corrections. Thus, modified Arrhenius’ equations were fitted by means of the best forward and reverse rate constant values, which provide very reliable estimates for these quantities within the temperature range between 700 and 4000 K. To our knowledge, this is the first kinetic study done for the forward H2 + CO \\to H2CO process in a wide temperature range. Finally, these results can be used to explain the formaldehyde abundance in hot and dense interstellar media, possibly providing data about the physical conditions associated with H2CO masers close to massive star-forming regions.

  1. The temperature-dependence of elementary reaction rates: beyond Arrhenius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ian W M

    2008-04-01

    The rates of chemical reactions and the dependence of their rate constants on temperature are of central importance in chemistry. Advances in the temperature-range and accuracy of kinetic measurements, principally inspired by the need to provide data for models of combustion, atmospheric, and astrophysical chemistry, show up the inadequacy of the venerable Arrhenius equation--at least, over wide ranges of temperature. This critical review will address the question of how to reach an understanding of the factors that control the rates of 'non-Arrhenius' reactions. It makes use of a number of recent kinetic measurements and shows how developments in advanced forms of transition state theory provide satisfactory explanations of complex kinetic behaviour (72 references).

  2. Study on improving the turbidity measurement of the absolute coagulation rate constant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhiwei; Liu, Jie; Xu, Shenghua

    2006-05-23

    The existing theories dealing with the evaluation of the absolute coagulation rate constant by turbidity measurement were experimentally tested for different particle-sized (radius = a) suspensions at incident wavelengths (lambda) ranging from near-infrared to ultraviolet light. When the size parameter alpha = 2pi a/lambda > 3, the rate constant data from previous theories for fixed-sized particles show significant inconsistencies at different light wavelengths. We attribute this problem to the imperfection of these theories in describing the light scattering from doublets through their evaluation of the extinction cross section. The evaluations of the rate constants by all previous theories become untenable as the size parameter increases and therefore hampers the applicable range of the turbidity measurement. By using the T-matrix method, we present a robust solution for evaluating the extinction cross section of doublets formed in the aggregation. Our experiments show that this new approach is effective in extending the applicability range of the turbidity methodology and increasing measurement accuracy.

  3. Shock Tube Measurement for the Dissociation Rate Constant of Acetaldehyde Using Sensitive CO Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengkai; Davidson, David F; Hanson, Ronald K

    2016-09-08

    The rate constant of acetaldehyde thermal dissociation, CH3CHO = CH3 + HCO, was measured behind reflected shock waves at temperatures of 1273-1618 K and pressures near 1.6 and 0.34 atm. The current measurement utilized sensitive CO diagnostics to track the dissociation of CH3CHO via oxygen atom balance and inferred the title rate constant (k1) from CO time histories obtained in pyrolysis experiments of 1000 and 50 ppm of CH3CHO/Ar mixtures. By using dilute test mixtures, the current study successfully suppressed the interferences from secondary reactions and directly determined the title rate constant as k1(1.6 atm) = 1.1 × 10(14) exp(-36 700 K/T) s(-1) over 1273-1618 K and k1(0.34 atm) = 5.5 × 10(12) exp(-32 900 K/T) s(-1) over 1377-1571 K, with 2σ uncertainties of approximately ±30% for both expressions. Example simulations of existing reaction mechanisms updated with the current values of k1 demonstrated substantial improvements with regards to the acetaldehyde pyrolysis chemistry.

  4. Shock Tube Measurement of the High-Temperature Rate Constant for OH + CH3 → Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengkai; Li, Sijie; Davidson, David F; Hanson, Ronald K

    2015-08-20

    The reaction between hydroxyl (OH) and methyl radicals (CH3) is critical to hydrocarbon oxidation. Motivated by the sparseness of its high-temperature rate constant data and the large uncertainties in the existing literature values, the current study has remeasured the overall rate constant of the OH + CH3 reaction and extended the measurement temperature range to 1214-1933 K, using simultaneous laser absorption diagnostics for OH and CH3 radicals behind incident and reflected shock waves. tert-Butyl hydroperoxide and azomethane were used as pyrolytic sources for the OH and CH3 radicals, respectively. The current study bridged the temperature ranges of existing experimental data, and good agreement is seen between the current measurement and some previous experimental and theoretical high-temperature studies. A recommendation for the rate constant expression of the title reaction, based on the weighted average of the high-temperature data from selected studies, is given by k1 = 4.19 × 10(1)(T/K)(3.15) exp(5270 K/T) cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1) ±30%, which is valid over 1000-2500 K.

  5. Rate constants for the formation of SiO by radiative association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairnie, M.; Forrey, R. C.; Babb, J. F.; Stancil, P. C.; McLaughlin, B. M.

    2017-10-01

    Accurate molecular data for the low-lying states of SiO are computed and used to calculate rate constants for radiative association (RA) of Si and O. Einstein A-coefficients are also calculated for transitions between all of the bound and quasi-bound levels for each molecular state. The radiative widths are used together with elastic tunnelling widths to define effective RA rate constants which include both direct and indirect (inverse pre-dissociation) formation processes. The indirect process is evaluated for two kinetic models which represent limiting cases for astrophysical environments. The first case scenario assumes an equilibrium distribution of quasi-bound states and would be applicable whenever collisional and/or radiative excitation mechanisms are able to maintain the population. The second case scenario assumes that no excitation mechanisms are available which corresponds to the limit of zero radiation temperature and zero atomic density. Rate constants for SiO formation in realistic astrophysical environments would presumably lie between these two limiting cases.

  6. Calculating rate constants with updated Hessians using variational transition state theory with multidimensional tunneling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Yao-Yuan

    2007-08-01

    Variational transition state theory with multidimensional tunneling (VTST/MT) has been used for calculating the rate constants of reactions. The updated Hessians have been used to reduce the computational costs for both geometry optimization and trajectory following procedures. In this paper, updated Hessians are used to reduce the computational costs while calculating the rate constants applying VTST/MT. Although we found that directly applying the updated Hessians will not generate good vibrational frequencies along the minimum energy path (MEP), however, we can either re-compute the full Hessian matrices at fixed intervals or calculate the Block Hessians, which is constructed by numerical one-side difference for the Hessian elements in the "critical" region and Bofill updating scheme for the rest of the Hessian elements. Due to the numerical instability of the Bofill update method near the saddle point region, we have suggested a simple strategy in which we follow the MEP until certain percentage of the classical barrier height from the barrier top with full Hessians computed and then performing rate constant calculation with the extended MEP using Block Hessians. This strategy results a mean unsigned percentage deviation (MUPD) around 10% with full Hessians computed till the point with 80% classical barrier height for four studied reactions. This proposed strategy is attractive not only it can be implemented as an automatic procedure but also speeds up the VTST/MT calculation via embarrassingly parallelization to a personal computer cluster.

  7. Unusual distance dependences of electron transfer rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuss-Petermann, Martin; Wenger, Oliver S

    2016-07-28

    Usually the rates for electron transfer (kET) decrease with increasing donor-acceptor distance, but Marcus theory predicts a regime in which kET is expected to increase when the transfer distance gets longer. Until recently, experimental evidence for such counter-intuitive behavior had been very limited, and consequently this effect is much less well-known than the Gaussian free energy dependence of electron transfer rates leading to the so-called inverted driving-force effect. This article presents the theoretical concepts that lead to the prediction of electron transfer rate maxima at large donor-acceptor distances, and it discusses conditions that are expected to favor experimental observations of such behavior. It continues with a consideration of specific recent examples in which electron transfer rates were observed to increase with increasing donor-acceptor distance, and it closes with a discussion of the importance of this effect in the context of light-to-chemical energy conversion.

  8. Temperature dependence of (+)-catechin pyran ring proton coupling constants as measured by NMR and modeled using GMMX search methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fred L. Tobiason; Stephen S. Kelley; M. Mark Midland; Richard W. Hemingway

    1997-01-01

    The pyran ring proton coupling constants for (+)-catechin have been experimentally determined in deuterated methanol over a temperature range of 213 K to 313 K. The experimental coupling constants were simulated to 0.04 Hz on the average at a 90 percent confidence limit using a LAOCOON method. The temperature dependence of the coupling constants was reproduced from the...

  9. Comparison of ultrasonic degradation rates constants of methylene blue at 22.8 kHz, 127 kHz, and 490 kHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Honma, Chiemi; Suzuki, Atsushi; Takahashi, Tomoki; Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Kuroda, Chiaki; Otake, Katsuto; Shono, Atsushi

    2012-07-01

    Techniques such as solvent extraction, incineration, chemical dehalogenation, and biodegradation have been investigated for the degradation of hazardous organic compounds. We found ultrasound to be an attractive technology for the degradation of hazardous organic compounds in water. However, the effects of ultrasonic frequency on degradation rate constants were not investigated quantitatively. In this study, the degradation process of a model for hazardous organic compound methylene blue was investigated using ultrasonic irradiation. The study focused on the effects of ultrasonic frequency and ultrasonic power on the degradation rate constant. The apparent degradation rate constants were estimated based on time dependence of methylene blue concentration assuming pseudo-first-order kinetics for the decomposition. A linear relationship between the apparent degradation rate constant and ultrasonic power was identified. In addition, the apparent degradation rate constants at frequencies of 127 and 490 kHz were much larger than those at 22.8 kHz. A relationship between the apparent degradation rate constant and the sonochemical efficiency value (SE value) was also found. Based on these results, a simple model for estimating the apparent degradation rate constant of methylene blue based on the ultrasonic power and the SE value is proposed in this study.

  10. Pressure dependent elastic constants of alpha and gamma cyclotrimethylene trinitramine: A quantum mechanical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, DeCarlos E., E-mail: decarlos.e.taylor.civ@mail.mil [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland 21005 (United States)

    2014-08-07

    The elastic constants of the α and γ polymorphs of cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX) have been computed using dispersion corrected density functional theory (DFT). The DFT results validate the values obtained in several experiments using ultrasonic and impulsive stimulated thermal scattering techniques and disagree with those obtained using Brillouin scattering which, in general, exceed the other experimental and theoretical results. Compressibility diagrams at zero pressure are presented for the ab, ac, and bc crystallographic planes, and the anisotropic linear compressibility within the ac plane of α-RDX at 0 GPa, observed using ultrasonic and impulsive stimulated thermal scattering measurements, is verified using DFT. The pressure dependence of the elastic constants of α-RDX (0–4 GPa) and γ-RDX (4–8 GPa) is also presented.

  11. Constant diversification rates of endemic gastropods in ancient Lake Ohrid: ecosystem resilience likely buffers environmental fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Föller, K.; Stelbrink, B.; Hauffe, T.; Albrecht, C.; Wilke, T.

    2015-12-01

    Ancient lakes represent key ecosystems for endemic freshwater species. This high endemic biodiversity has been shown to be mainly the result of intra-lacustrine diversification. Whereas the principle role of this mode of diversification is generally acknowledged, actual diversification rates in ancient lakes remain little understood. At least four types are conceivable. Diversification rates may be constant over time, they may fluctuate, rates may be higher in the initial phase of diversification, or there may be a pronounced lag phase between colonization and subsequent diversification. As understanding the tempo of diversification in ancient lake environments may help reveal the underlying processes that drive speciation and extinction, we here use the Balkan Lake Ohrid as a model system and the largest species flock in the lake, the non-pyrgulinid Hydrobiidae, as a model taxon to study changes in diversification rates over time together with the respective drivers. Based on phylogenetic, molecular-clock, lineage-through-time plot, and diversification-rate analyses we found that this potentially monophyletic group is comparatively old and that it most likely evolved with a constant diversification rate. Preliminary data of the SCOPSCO (Scientific Collaboration On Past Speciation Conditions in Lake Ohrid) deep-drilling program do indicate signatures of severe environmental/climatic perturbations in Lake Ohrid. However, so far there is no evidence for the occurrence of catastrophic environmental events. We therefore propose that the constant diversification rate observed in endemic gastropods has been caused by two factors: (i) a potential lack of catastrophic environmental events in Lake Ohrid and/or (ii) a probably high ecosystem resilience, buffering environmental changes. Parameters potentially contributing to the lake's high ecosystem resilience are its distinct bathymetry, ongoing tectonic activities, and karst hydrology. The current study not only

  12. A constant air flow rate control of blower for residential applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, S.M. [Tamkang Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1998-03-01

    This paper presents a technique to control a blower for residential applications at constant air flow rate using an induction motor drive. The control scheme combines a variable volt/hertz ratio inverter drive and an average motor current regulation loop to achieve control of the motor torque-speed characteristics, consequently controlling the air flow rate of the blower which the motor is driving. The controller is simple to implement and practical for commercialization. It is also reliable, since no external pressure or air flow sensor is required. Both a theoretical derivation and an experimental verification for the control scheme are presented in this paper.

  13. Binding constants of membrane-anchored receptors and ligands depend strongly on the nanoscale roughness of membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jinglei; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Weikl, Thomas R

    2013-09-17

    Cell adhesion and the adhesion of vesicles to the membranes of cells or organelles are pivotal for immune responses, tissue formation, and cell signaling. The adhesion processes depend sensitively on the binding constant of the membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins that mediate adhesion, but this constant is difficult to measure in experiments. We have investigated the binding of membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins with molecular dynamics simulations. We find that the binding constant of the anchored proteins strongly decreases with the membrane roughness caused by thermally excited membrane shape fluctuations on nanoscales. We present a theory that explains the roughness dependence of the binding constant for the anchored proteins from membrane confinement and that relates this constant to the binding constant of soluble proteins without membrane anchors. Because the binding constant of soluble proteins is readily accessible in experiments, our results provide a useful route to compute the binding constant of membrane-anchored receptor and ligand proteins.

  14. Determination of the alpha-tocopherol inhibition rate constant for peroxidation in low-density lipoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbertson, Sean M; Antunes, Fernando; Havrilla, Christine M; Milne, Ginger L; Porter, Ned A

    2002-06-01

    This work reports an estimate of the inhibition rate constant (k(inh)) for alpha-tocopherol (alpha-TOH) in low-density lipoproteins (LDL) based on cholesteryl linoleate hydroperoxide products formed during autoxidation of intact lipoproteins. The ratio of cis,trans/trans,trans product hydroperoxides was determined during the consumption of the antioxidant. For a reasonable determination of k(inh) in LDL, the pro-oxidant behavior of alpha-TOH was minimized by oxidizing LDL with an unsymmetrical amphiphilic azo initiator which significantly reduces phase-transfer mediated pro-oxidant effects of alpha-TOH. This initiator delivers a more constant flux of initiator radicals into LDL lipid regions and permits determination of alpha-TOH k(inh) in LDL. Development of a tocopherol-mediated peroxidation (TMP) model and analysis of cholesteryl linoleate hydroperoxide cis,trans/trans,trans product ratios provided an estimated value for the inhibition rate constant of alpha-TOH in a lipoprotein of k(inh) = 5.9 +/- 0.5 x 10(5) M(-)(1) s(-)(1)

  15. In situ and laboratory determined first-order degradation rate constants of specific organic compounds in an aerobic aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, P.H.; Bjerg, P.L.; Nielsen, P.;

    1996-01-01

    experiments. First-order degradation rate constants for aromatic and phenolic hydrocarbons ranged between 0.01 and 0.9 day(-1). Local variations in first-order degradation rates and variations between rate constants determined by ISM and LBM were generally with in a factor of 5, but no systematic differences...

  16. Shock tube measurements of the rate constants for seven large alkanes+OH

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad

    2015-01-01

    Reaction rate constants for seven large alkanes + hydroxyl (OH) radicals were measured behind reflected shock waves using OH laser absorption. The alkanes, n-hexane, 2-methyl-pentane, 3-methyl-pentane, 2,2-dimethyl-butane, 2,3-dimethyl-butane, 2-methyl-heptane, and 4-methyl-heptane, were selected to investigate the rates of site-specific H-abstraction by OH at secondary and tertiary carbons. Hydroxyl radicals were monitored using narrow-line-width ring-dye laser absorption of the R1(5) transition of the OH spectrum near 306.7 nm. The high sensitivity of the diagnostic enabled the use of low reactant concentrations and pseudo-first-order kinetics. Rate constants were measured at temperatures ranging from 880 K to 1440 K and pressures near 1.5 atm. High-temperature measurements of the rate constants for OH + n-hexane and OH + 2,2-dimethyl-butane are in agreement with earlier studies, and the rate constants of the five other alkanes with OH, we believe, are the first direct measurements at combustion temperatures. Using these measurements and the site-specific H-abstraction measurements of Sivaramakrishnan and Michael (2009) [1,2], general expressions for three secondary and two tertiary abstraction rates were determined as follows (the subscripts indicate the number of carbon atoms bonded to the next-nearest-neighbor carbon): S20=1.58×10-11exp(-1550K/T)cm3molecule-1s-1(887-1327K)S30=2.37×10-11exp(-1850K/T)cm3molecule-1s-1(887-1327K)S21=4.5×10-12exp(-793.7K/T)cm3molecule-1s-1(833-1440K)T100=2.85×10-11exp(-1138.3K/T)cm3molecule-1s-1(878-1375K)T101=7.16×10-12exp(-993K/T)cm3molecule-1s-1(883-1362K) © 2014 The Combustion Institute.

  17. Acclimation to constant and variable temperatures in plethodontid salamanders--I. Rates of oxygen consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feder, M E

    1985-01-01

    In preliminary experiments, salamanders of three species (Desmognathus ochrophaeus, Plethodon cinereus and Plethodon jordani) required 5-11 days to complete metabolic acclimation to a constant warm temperature; the rate of oxygen consumption (VO2) decreased 16-28% during acclimation. Unfed animals of each species underwent cyclic exposure to 5 and 21 degrees C at three different cycle periods (12 hr, 4-5 days, 51 days), or constant exposure to 14 degrees C for 102 days. The experimental treatments significantly affected the VO2 measured at 5, 14, 17.5 and 21 degrees C. The direction and magnitude of the acclimatory effects upon VO2 were inconsistent among species and among experimental temperatures, and resulted in little energy saving. The VO2 during exposure to cyclic temperatures averaged only 83% of that during preliminary experiments, perhaps as a response to starvation.

  18. Laser Measurements of the H Atom + Ozone Rate Constant at Atmospheric Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Smith, G. P.; Peng, J.; Reppert, K. J.; Callahan, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    The exothermic H + O3 reaction produces OH(v) Meinel band emissions, used to derive mesospheric H concentrations and chemical heating rates. We have remeasured its rate constant to reduce resulting uncertainties and the measurement extend to lower mesospheric temperatures using modern laser techniques. H atoms are produced by pulsed ultraviolet laser trace photolysis of O3, followed by reaction of O(D) with added H2. A second, delayed, frequency-mixed dye laser measures the reaction decay rate with the remaining ozone by laser induced fluorescence. We monitor either the H atom decay by 2 photon excitation at 205 nm and detection of red fluorescence, or the OH(v=9) product time evolution with excitation of the B-X (0,9) band at 237 nm and emission in blue B-A bands. By cooling the enclosed low pressure flow cell we obtained measurements from 146-305 K. Small kinetic modeling corrections are made for secondary regeneration of H atoms. The results fully confirm the current NASA JPL recommendation for this rate constant, and establish its extrapolation down to the lower temperatures of the mesosphere. This work was supported by the NSF Aeronomy Program and an NSF Physics summer REU student grant.

  19. A Method for Achieving Constant Rotation Rates in a Micro-Orthogonal Linkage System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickey, F.M.; Holswade, S.C.; Romero, L.A.

    1999-05-12

    Silicon micromachine designs include engines that consist of orthog- onally oriented linear comb drive actuators mechanically connected to a rotating gear. These gears are as small as 50 {micro}m in diameter and can be driven at rotation rates exceeding 300,000 rpm. Generally, these en- gines will run with non-uniform rotation rates if the drive signals are not properly designed and maintained over a range of system parameters. We present a method for producing constant rotation rates in a micro-engine driven by an orthogonal linkage system. We show that provided the val- ues of certain masses, springs, damping factors, and lever arms are in the right proportions, the system behaves as though it were symmetrical. We will refer to systems built in this way as being quasi-symmetrical. We show that if a system is built quasi-symmetrically , then it is possible to achieve constant rotation rates even if one does not know the form of the friction function, or the value of the friction. We analyze this case in some detail.

  20. Measured dose rate constant from oncology patients administered 18F for positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinn, Brian; Holahan, Brian; Aime, Jean; Humm, John; St Germain, Jean; Dauer, Lawrence T. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065 (United States) and Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065 (United States) and Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: Patient exposure rate measurements verify published patient dose rate data and characterize dose rates near 2-18-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) patients. A specific dose rate constant based on patient exposure rate measurements is a convenient quantity that can be applied to the desired distance, injection activity, and time postinjection to obtain an accurate calculation of cumulative external radiation dose. This study reports exposure rates measured at various locations near positron emission tomography (PET) {sup 18}F-FDG patients prior to PET scanning. These measurements are normalized for the amount of administered activity, measurement distance, and time postinjection and are compared with other published data. Methods: Exposure rates were measured using a calibrated ionization chamber at various body locations from 152 adult oncology patients postvoid after a mean uptake time of 76 min following injection with a mean activity of 490 MBq {sup 18}F-FDG. Data were obtained at nine measurement locations for each patient: three near the head, four near the chest, and two near the feet. Results: On contact with, 30 cm superior to and 30 cm lateral to the head, the mean (75th percentile) dose rates per unit injected activity at 60 min postinjection were 0.482 (0.511), 0.135 (0.155), and 0.193 (0.223) {mu}Sv/MBq h, respectively. On contact with, 30 cm anterior to, 30 cm lateral to and 1 m anterior to the chest, the mean (75th percentile) dose rates per unit injected activity at 60 min postinjection were 0.623 (0.709), 0.254 (0.283), 0.190 (0.218), and 0.067 (0.081) {mu}Sv/MBq h respectively. 30 cm inferior and 30 cm lateral to the feet, the mean (75th percentile) dose rates per unit injected activity at 60 min postinjection were 0.024 (0.022) and 0.039 (0.044) {mu}Sv/MBq h, respectively. Conclusions: The measurements for this study support the use of 0.092 {mu}Sv m{sup 2}/MBq h as a reasonable representation of the dose rate anterior from the chest of

  1. Properties of Super-Poisson Processes and Super-Random Walks with Spatially Dependent Branching Rates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Xia REN

    2008-01-01

    The global supports of super-Poisson processes and super-random walks with a branching mechanism ψ(z)=z2 and constant branching rate are known to be noncompact. It turns out that, for any spatially dependent branching rate, this property remains true. However, the asymptotic extinction property for these two kinds of superprocesses depends on the decay rate of the branching-rate function at infinity.

  2. Thickness-Dependent Dielectric Constant of Few-Layer In 2 Se 3 Nanoflakes

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Di

    2015-11-17

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. The dielectric constant or relative permittivity (εr) of a dielectric material, which describes how the net electric field in the medium is reduced with respect to the external field, is a parameter of critical importance for charging and screening in electronic devices. Such a fundamental material property is intimately related to not only the polarizability of individual atoms but also the specific atomic arrangement in the crystal lattice. In this Letter, we present both experimental and theoretical investigations on the dielectric constant of few-layer In2Se3 nanoflakes grown on mica substrates by van der Waals epitaxy. A nondestructive microwave impedance microscope is employed to simultaneously quantify the number of layers and local electrical properties. The measured εr increases monotonically as a function of the thickness and saturates to the bulk value at around 6-8 quintuple layers. The same trend of layer-dependent dielectric constant is also revealed by first-principles calculations. Our results of the dielectric response, being ubiquitously applicable to layered 2D semiconductors, are expected to be significant for this vibrant research field.

  3. Constant diversification rates of endemic gastropods in ancient Lake Ohrid: ecosystem resilience likely buffers environmental fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Föller

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Ancient lakes represent key ecosystems for endemic freshwater species. This high endemic biodiversity has been shown to be mainly the result of intra-lacustrine diversification. Whereas the principle role of this mode of diversification is generally acknowledged, actual diversification rates in ancient lakes remain little understood. At least four modes are conceivable. Diversification rates may be constant over time, they may fluctuate, rates may be higher in the initial phase of diversification, or there may be a pronounced lag phase between colonization and subsequent diversification. As understanding the tempo of diversification in ancient lake environments may help unrevealing the underlying processes that drive speciation and extinction, we here use the Balkan Lake Ohrid as a model system and the largest species flock in the lake, the non-pyrgulinid Hydrobiidae, as a model taxon to study changes in diversification rates over time together with the respective drivers. Based on phylogenetic, molecular-clock, lineage-through-time plot and diversification-rate analyses we found that this monophyletic group is comparatively old and that it most likely evolved with a constant diversification rate. Preliminary data of the SCOPSCO deep-drilling program do indicate signatures of severe environmental/climatic perturbations in Lake Ohrid. However, so far there is no evidence for the occurrence of catastrophic environmental events. We therefore propose that the rate homogeneity observed in endemic gastropods has been caused by two factors: (i a potential lack of catastrophic environmental events in Lake Ohrid and/or (ii a high ecosystem resilience, buffering environmental changes. Parameters potentially contributing to the lake's high ecosystem resilience are its distinct bathymetry, ongoing tectonic activities, and karst hydrology. The current study not only contributes to one of the overall goals of the SCOPSCO deep-drilling program – inferring

  4. Preference and resistance to change with constant- and variable-duration terminal links: independence of reinforcement rate and magnitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Randolph C; Bedell, Melissa A; Nevin, John A

    2002-05-01

    Pigeons responded in a three-component multiple concurrent-chains procedure in which the variable-interval reinforcement schedules were the same across components but magnitudes differed across components. The terminal links were arranged either as a variable delay followed by presentation of a reinforcer ("variable duration") or as a fixed period of access to the schedule during which a variable number of reinforcers could be earned ("constant duration"). Relative reinforcement rate was varied parametrically across both types of conditions. After baseline training in each condition, resistance to change of terminal-link responding was assessed by delivering food during the initial links according to a variable-time schedule. Both preference and resistance to change were more sensitive to reinforcement-rate differences in the constant-duration conditions. Sensitivities of preference and resistance to change to relative reinforcement rate did not change depending on relative reinforcement magnitude. Taken together, these results confirm and extend those of prior studies, and suggest that reinforcement rate and magnitude combine additively to determine preference and resistance to change. A single structural relation linking preference and resistance to change describes all the data from this and several related studies.

  5. Calorimetric determination of rate constants and enthalpy changes for zero-order reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida e Sousa, Luis; Beezer, Anthony E; Hansen, Lee D; Clapham, David; Connor, Joseph A; Gaisford, Simon

    2012-06-07

    Calorimetry is a general method for determination of the rates of zero-order processes, but analysis of the data for the rate constant and reaction enthalpy is difficult because these occur as a product in the rate equation so evaluation of one requires knowledge of the other. Three methods for evaluation of both parameters, without prior knowledge, are illustrated with examples and compared with literature data. Method 1 requires the reaction to be studied in two buffers with different enthalpies of ionization. Method 2 is based on calculation of reaction enthalpy from group additivity functions. Method 3 applies when reaction progresses to completion. The methods are applied to the enzymatic hydrolysis of urea, the hydrolysis of acetylsalicylic acid, and the photodegradation of nifedipine, respectively.

  6. Dependence of the dielectric constant of electrolyte solutions on ionic concentration

    CERN Document Server

    Gavish, Nir

    2012-01-01

    We study the dependence of the static dielectric constant of aqueous electrolyte solutions upon the concentration of salt in the solution and temperature. The model takes into account the orientation of the solvent dipoles due to the electric field created by ions, the ionic response to an applied field, and the effect of thermal fluctuations. The analysis suggests that the formation of ion pairs by a small fraction of disassociated ions can have a significant effect on the static dielectric constant. The model predicts the dielectric has the functional dependence $\\varepsilon(c)=\\varepsilon_w-\\beta L(3\\alpha c/\\beta)$ where $L$ is the Langevin function, $c$ is the salt concentration, $\\varepsilon_w$ is the dielectric of the pure water, $\\alpha$ is the total excess polarization of the ions and $\\beta$ is the relative difference between the water dipole moment and the effective dipole moment of ion pairs as weighted by the density of ion pairs and their structural rigidity. The functional form gives an extreme...

  7. Shock tube measurements of the rate constant for the reaction ethanol + OH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranic, Ivo; Pang, Genny A; Hanson, Ronald K; Golden, David M; Bowman, Craig T

    2014-02-06

    The overall rate constant for the reaction ethanol + OH → products was determined experimentally from 900 to 1270 K behind reflected shock waves. Ethan(18)ol was utilized for these measurements in order to avoid the recycling of OH radicals following H-atom abstraction at the β-site of ethanol. Similar experiments were also performed with unlabeled ethan(16)ol in order to infer the rate constant that excludes reactivity at the β-site. The two data sets were used to directly infer the branching ratio for the reaction at the β-site. Experimental data in the current study and in previous low-temperature studies for the overall rate constant are best fit by the expression koverall = 5.07 × 10(5) T[K](2.31) exp(608/T[K]) cm(3) mol(-1) s(-1), valid from 300 to 1300 K. Measurements indicate that the branching ratio of the β-site is between 20 and 25% at the conditions studied. Pseudo-first-order reaction conditions were generated using tert-butylhydroperoxide (TBHP) as a fast source of (16)OH with ethanol in excess. (16)OH mole fraction time-histories were measured using narrow-line width laser absorption near 307 nm. Measurements were performed at the linecenter of the R22(5.5) transition in the A-X(0,0) band of (16)OH that does not overlap with any absorption features of (18)OH, thus producing a measurement of the (16)OH mole fraction that is insensitive to the presence of (18)OH.

  8. The constant work rate critical power protocol overestimates ramp incremental exercise performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Matthew I; Jones, Andrew M; Kelly, James A; Bailey, Stephen J; Vanhatalo, Anni

    2016-12-01

    The parameters of the power-duration relationship (i.e., the critical power, CP, and the curvature constant, W') may theoretically predict maximal performance capability for exercise above the CP. The CP and W' are associated with the parameters of oxygen uptake ([Formula: see text]O2) kinetics, which can be altered by manipulation of the work-rate forcing function. We tested the hypothesis that the CP and W' derived from constant work-rate (CWR) prediction trials would overestimate ramp incremental exercise performance. Thirty subjects (males, n = 28; females, n = 2) performed a ramp incremental test, and 3-5 CWR prediction trials for the determination of the CP and W'. Multiple ramp incremental tests and corresponding CP and W' estimates were available for some subjects such that in total 51 ramp test performances were predicted. The ramp incremental test performance (729 ± 113 s) was overestimated by the CP and W' estimates derived from the best (751 ± 114 s, P incremental performance suggests that the CP and W' derived from different work-rate forcing functions, thus resulting in different [Formula: see text]O2 kinetics, cannot be used interchangeably. The present findings highlight a potential source of error in performance prediction that is of importance to both researchers and applied practitioners.

  9. Subcritical crack growth in oxide and non-oxide ceramics using the Constant Stress Rate Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Wojteczko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fracture toughness is one of the most important parameters for ceramics description. In some cases, material failure occurs at lower stresses than described by KIc parameter. In these terms, determination of fracture toughness only, proves to be insufficient. This may be due to environmental factors, such as humidity, which might cause subcritical crack propagation in a material. Therefore, it is very important to estimate crack growth velocities to predict lifetime of ceramics used under specific conditions. Constant Stress Rate Test is an indirect method of subcritical crack growth parameters estimation. Calculations are made by using strength data, thus avoiding crack measurement. The expansion of flaws causes reduction of material strength. If subcritical crack growth phenomenon occurs, critical value of crack lengths increases with decreasing stress rate due to longer time for flaw to grow before the critical crack propagation at KIc takes place. Subcritical crack growth phenomenon is particularly dangerous for oxide ceramics due to chemical interactions occurring as a result of exposure to humidity. This paper presents results of Constant Stress Rate Test performed for alumina, zirconia, silicon carbide and silicon nitride in order to demonstrate the differences in subcritical crack propagation phenomenon course.

  10. Perturbation theory in the catalytic rate constant of the Henri-Michaelis-Menten enzymatic reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakalis, Evangelos; Kosmas, Marios; Papamichael, Emmanouel M

    2012-11-01

    The Henry-Michaelis-Menten (HMM) mechanism of enzymatic reaction is studied by means of perturbation theory in the reaction rate constant k (2) of product formation. We present analytical solutions that provide the concentrations of the enzyme (E), the substrate (S), as well as those of the enzyme-substrate complex (C), and the product (P) as functions of time. For k (2) small compared to k (-1), we properly describe the entire enzymatic activity from the beginning of the reaction up to longer times without imposing extra conditions on the initial concentrations E ( o ) and S ( o ), which can be comparable or much different.

  11. Methane combustion kinetic rate constants determination: an ill-posed inverse problem analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara D. L. Ferreira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Methane combustion was studied by the Westbrook and Dryer model. This well-established simplified mechanism is very useful in combustion science, for computational effort can be notably reduced. In the inversion procedure to be studied, rate constants are obtained from [CO] concentration data. However, when inherent experimental errors in chemical concentrations are considered, an ill-conditioned inverse problem must be solved for which appropriate mathematical algorithms are needed. A recurrent neural network was chosen due to its numerical stability and robustness. The proposed methodology was compared against Simplex and Levenberg-Marquardt, the most used methods for optimization problems.

  12. Application guide for source PM10 measurement with constant sampling rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farthing, W.E.; Dawes, S.S.

    1989-05-01

    The manual presents a method, Constant Sampling Rate (CSR), which allows determination of stationary source PM-10 emissions with hardware similar to that used for Methods 5 or 17. The operating principle of the method is to extract a multipoint sample so that errors due to spatial variation of particle size and anisokinetic sampling are kept within predetermined limits. The manual specifically addresses the use of the CSR methodology for determination of stationary source PM-10 emissions. Material presented in the manual includes calibration of sampling train components, pretest setup calculations, sample recovery, test data reduction, and routine equipment maintenance.

  13. Power consumption analysis of constant bit rate video transmission over 3G networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ukhanova, Ann; Belyaev, Evgeny; Wang, Le

    2012-01-01

    for the 3GPP transition state machine that allows to decrease power consumption on a mobile device taking signaling traffic, buffer size and latency restrictions into account. Furthermore, we discuss the gain in power consumption vs. PSNR for transmitted video and show the possibility of performing power......This paper presents an analysis of the power consumption of video data transmission with constant bit rate over 3G mobile wireless networks. The work includes the description of the radio resource control transition state machine in 3G networks, followed by a detailed power consumption analysis...... consumption management based on the requirements for the video quality....

  14. Electron attachment rate constant measurement by photoemission electron attachment ion mobility spectrometry (PE-EA-IMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Desheng; Niu, Wenqi; Liu, Sheng; Shen, Chengyin; Huang, Chaoqun; Wang, Hongmei; Jiang, Haihe; Chu, Yannan

    2012-12-01

    Photoemission electron attachment ion mobility spectrometry (PE-EA-IMS), with a source of photoelectrons induced by vacuum ultraviolet radiation on a metal surface, has been developed to study electron attachment reaction at atmospheric pressure using nitrogen as the buffer gas. Based on the negative ion mobility spectra, the rate constants for electron attachment to tetrachloromethane and chloroform were measured at ambient temperature as a function of the average electron energy in the range from 0.29 to 0.96 eV. The experimental results are in good agreement with the data reported in the literature.

  15. Rate constants for chemical reactions in high-temperature nonequilibrium air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    In the nonequilibrium atmospheric chemistry regime that will be encountered by the proposed Aeroassisted Orbital Transfer Vehicle in the upper atmosphere, where air density is too low for thermal and chemical equilibrium to be maintained, the detailed high temperature air chemistry plays a critical role in defining radiative and convective heating loads. Although vibrational and electronic temperatures remain low (less than 15,000 K), rotational and translational temperatures may reach 50,000 K. Attention is presently given to the effects of multiple temperatures on the magnitudes of various chemical reaction rate constants, for the cases of both bimolecular exchange reactions and collisional excitation and dissociation reactions.

  16. Feature analysis of the scale factor variation on a constant rate biased ring laser gyro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shiqiao Qin; Zongsheng Huang; Xingshu Wang

    2007-01-01

    Scale factor of a constant rate biased ring laser gyro (RLG) is studied both theoretically and experimentally.By analyzing experimental data, we find that there are three main terms contributing to the scale factor deviation. One of them is independent of time, the second varies linearly with time and the third varies exponentially with time. Theoretical analyses show that the first term is caused by experimental setup,the second and the third are caused by un-uniform thermal expension and cavity loss variation of the RLG.

  17. Rapid estimation of glucosinolate thermal degradation rate constants in leaves of Chinese kale and broccoli (Brassica oleracea) in two seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Kristin; Verkerk, Ruud; Bonnema, Guusje; Dekker, Matthijs

    2012-08-15

    Kinetic modeling was used as a tool to quantitatively estimate glucosinolate thermal degradation rate constants. Literature shows that thermal degradation rates differ in different vegetables. Well-characterized plant material, leaves of broccoli and Chinese kale plants grown in two seasons, was used in the study. It was shown that a first-order reaction is appropriate to model glucosinolate degradation independent from the season. No difference in degradation rate constants of structurally identical glucosinolates was found between broccoli and Chinese kale leaves when grown in the same season. However, glucosinolate degradation rate constants were highly affected by the season (20-80% increase in spring compared to autumn). These results suggest that differences in glucosinolate degradation rate constants can be due to variation in environmental as well as genetic factors. Furthermore, a methodology to estimate rate constants rapidly is provided to enable the analysis of high sample numbers for future studies.

  18. Ion-neutral gas reactions in a collision/reaction cell in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: Correlation of ion signal decrease to kinetic rate constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Patrick J. [Trace Element Research Laboratory, School of Earth Sciences, The Ohio State University, 125 S. Oval Mall, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Department of Chemistry, The Ohio State University, 120 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Olesik, John W., E-mail: olesik.2@osu.edu [Trace Element Research Laboratory, School of Earth Sciences, The Ohio State University, 125 S. Oval Mall, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Reaction gas flow rate dependent Ar{sub 2}{sup +} and Ar{sup +} signals are correlated to fundamental kinetic rate coefficients. A simple calculation, assuming that gas exits the reaction cell due only to effusion, is described to estimate the gas pressure in the reaction cell. The value of the product of the kinetic rate constant and the ion residence time in the reaction cell can be determined from experimental measurement of the decrease in an ion signal as a function of reaction gas flow rate. New kinetic rate constants are determined for the reaction of CH{sub 3}F with Ar{sup +} and Ar{sub 2}{sup +}. - Highlights: • How to determine pressure and the product of the kinetic rate constant times the ion residence time in reaction cell • Relate measured ICP-DRC-MS signals versus gas flow rate to kinetic rate constants measured previously using SIFT-MS • Describe how to determine previously unmeasured kinetic rate constants using ICP-DRC-MS.

  19. Theoretical study of a screened Hartree–Fock exchange potential using position-dependent atomic dielectric constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimazaki, Tomomi; Nakajima, Takahito [RIKEN, Advanced Institute for Computational Science, 7-1-26 Minatojima-minami-machi, Chuo-ku, Kobe, Hyogo 650-0047 (Japan)

    2015-02-21

    Dielectric-dependent screened Hartree–Fock (HF) exchange potential and Slater-formula have been reported, where the ratio of the HF exchange term mixed into potentials is inversely proportional to the dielectric constant of the target semiconductor. This study introduces a position-dependent dielectric constant method in which the dielectric constant is partitioned between the atoms in a semiconductor. These partitioned values differ depending on the electrostatic environment surrounding the atoms and lead to position-dependent atomic dielectric constants. These atomic dielectric constants provide atomic orbital-based matrix elements for the screened exchange potentials. Energy band structures of several semiconductors and insulators are also presented to validate this approach.

  20. Conformational dependence of {sup 13}C shielding and coupling constants for methionine methyl groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butterfoss, Glenn L. [New York University, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences and the Center for Genomics and Systems Biology (United States); DeRose, Eugene F.; Gabel, Scott A.; Perera, Lalith; Krahn, Joseph M.; Mueller, Geoffrey A.; Zheng Xunhai; London, Robert E., E-mail: London@niehs.nih.go [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), NIH, Laboratory of Structural Biology (United States)

    2010-09-15

    Methionine residues fulfill a broad range of roles in protein function related to conformational plasticity, ligand binding, and sensing/mediating the effects of oxidative stress. A high degree of internal mobility, intrinsic detection sensitivity of the methyl group, and low copy number have made methionine labeling a popular approach for NMR investigation of selectively labeled protein macromolecules. However, selective labeling approaches are subject to more limited information content. In order to optimize the information available from such studies, we have performed DFT calculations on model systems to evaluate the conformational dependence of {sup 3}J{sub CSCC}, {sup 3}J{sub CSCH}, and the isotropic shielding, {sigma}{sub iso}. Results have been compared with experimental data reported in the literature, as well as data obtained on [methyl-{sup 13}C]methionine and on model compounds. These studies indicate that relative to oxygen, the presence of the sulfur atom in the coupling pathway results in a significantly smaller coupling constant, {sup 3}J{sub CSCC}/{sup 3}J{sub COCC} {approx} 0.7. It is further demonstrated that the {sup 3}J{sub CSCH} coupling constant depends primarily on the subtended CSCH dihedral angle, and secondarily on the CSCC dihedral angle. Comparison of theoretical shielding calculations with the experimental shift range of the methyl group for methionine residues in proteins supports the conclusion that the intra-residue conformationally-dependent shift perturbation is the dominant determinant of {delta}{sup 13}C{epsilon}. Analysis of calmodulin data based on these calculations indicates that several residues adopt non-standard rotamers characterized by very large {approx}100{sup o} {chi}{sup 3} values. The utility of the {delta}{sup 13}C{epsilon} as a basis for estimating the gauche/trans ratio for {chi}{sup 3} is evaluated, and physical and technical factors that limit the accuracy of both the NMR and crystallographic analyses are

  1. Model system-bath Hamiltonian and nonadiabatic rate constants for proton-coupled electron transfer at electrode-solution interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navrotskaya, Irina; Soudackov, Alexander V; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2008-06-28

    An extension of the Anderson-Newns-Schmickler model for electrochemical proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) is presented. This model describes reactions in which electron transfer between a solute complex in solution and an electrode is coupled to proton transfer within the solute complex. The model Hamiltonian is derived in a basis of electron-proton vibronic states defined within a double adiabatic approximation for the electrons, transferring proton, and bath modes. The interaction term responsible for electronic transitions between the solute complex and the electrode depends on the proton donor-acceptor vibrational mode within the solute complex. This model Hamiltonian is used to derive the anodic and cathodic rate constants for nonadiabatic electrochemical PCET. The derivation is based on the master equations for the reduced density matrix of the electron-proton subsystem, which includes the electrons of the solute complex and the electrode, as well as the transferring proton. The rate constant expressions differ from analogous expressions for electrochemical electron transfer because of the summation over electron-proton vibronic states and the dependence of the couplings on the proton donor-acceptor vibrational motion. These differences lead to additional contributions to the total reorganization energy, an additional exponential temperature-dependent prefactor, and a temperature-dependent term in the effective activation energy that has different signs for the anodic and cathodic processes. This model can be generalized to describe both nonadiabatic and adiabatic electrochemical PCET reactions and provides the framework for the inclusion of additional effects, such as the breaking and forming of other chemical bonds.

  2. Non-steady state mass action dynamics without rate constants: dynamics of coupled reactions using chemical potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, William R.; Baker, Scott E.

    2017-10-01

    Comprehensive and predictive simulation of coupled reaction networks has long been a goal of biology and other fields. Currently, metabolic network models that utilize enzyme mass action kinetics have predictive power but are limited in scope and application by the fact that the determination of enzyme rate constants is laborious and low throughput. We present a statistical thermodynamic formulation of the law of mass action for coupled reactions at both steady states and non-stationary states. The formulation uses chemical potentials instead of rate constants. When used to model deterministic systems, the method corresponds to a rescaling of the time dependent reactions in such a way that steady states can be reached on the same time scale but with significantly fewer computational steps. The relationships between reaction affinities, free energy changes and generalized detailed balance are central to the discussion. The significance for applications in systems biology are discussed as is the concept and assumption of maximum entropy production rate as a biological principle that links thermodynamics to natural selection.

  3. Comments to "Analysis of constant rate period of spray drying of slurry" by Liang et al., 2001

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kåre; Jensen, Anker Degn; Sloth, Jakob;

    2006-01-01

    In the study by Liang et al. [2001. Analysis of constant rate period of spray drying of slurry. Chemical Engineering Science 56, 2205-2213] the Darcy flow of liquid through a pore system of primary particles to the surface of a slurry droplet was applied for the constant rate period. Steep primary...

  4. Comments to ”Analysis of constant rate period of spray drying of slurry” by Liang et al

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kåre; Jensen, Anker; Sloth, Jakob;

    2006-01-01

    In the study by Liang et al. [2001. Analysis of constant rate period of spray drying of slurry. Chemical Engineering Science 56, 2205-2213] the Darcy flow of liquid through a pore system of primary particles to the surface of a slurry droplet was applied for the constant rate period. Steep primary...

  5. Apparent activation energy for densification of -Al2O3 powder at constant heating-rate sintering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    W Q Shao; S O Chen; D Li; H S Cao; Y C Zhang; S S Zhang

    2008-11-01

    The apparent activation energy for densification is a characteristic quantity that elucidates the fundamental diffusion mechanisms during the sintering process. Based on the Arrhenius theory, the activation energy for densification of -Al2O3 at constant heating-rates sintering has been estimated. Sintering of -Al2O3 powder has been executed by the way of a push rod type dilatometer. It is shown that the apparent activation energy does not have a single value but depends directly on the relative density. The apparent activation energy corresponding to lower relative density was higher than that corresponding to higher relative density. In addition, the value of the evaluated activation energy is different at the same density level when the Arrhenius plot involves different heating rates.

  6. Computational study of the rate constants and free energies of intramolecular radical addition to substituted anilines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Gansäuer

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The intramolecular radical addition to aniline derivatives was investigated by DFT calculations. The computational methods were benchmarked by comparing the calculated values of the rate constant for the 5-exo cyclization of the hexenyl radical with the experimental values. The dispersion-corrected PW6B95-D3 functional provided very good results with deviations for the free activation barrier compared to the experimental values of only about 0.5 kcal mol−1 and was therefore employed in further calculations. Corrections for intramolecular London dispersion and solvation effects in the quantum chemical treatment are essential to obtain consistent and accurate theoretical data. For the investigated radical addition reaction it turned out that the polarity of the molecules is important and that a combination of electrophilic radicals with preferably nucleophilic arenes results in the highest rate constants. This is opposite to the Minisci reaction where the radical acts as nucleophile and the arene as electrophile. The substitution at the N-atom of the aniline is crucial. Methyl substitution leads to slower addition than phenyl substitution. Carbamates as substituents are suitable only when the radical center is not too electrophilic. No correlations between free reaction barriers and energies (ΔG‡ and ΔGR are found. Addition reactions leading to indanes or dihydrobenzofurans are too slow to be useful synthetically.

  7. A generalized Forchheimer radial flow model for constant-rate tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming-Ming; Chen, Yi-Feng; Zhan, Hongbin; Hu, Ran; Zhou, Chuang-Bing

    2017-09-01

    Models used for data interpretation of constant-rate tests (CRTs) are commonly derived with the assumption of Darcian flow in an idealized integer flow dimension, where the non-Darcian nature of fluid flow and the complexity of flow geometry are disregarded. In this study, a Forchheimer's law-based analytical model is proposed with the assumption of buildup (or drawdown) decomposition for characterizing the non-Darcian flow in a generalized radial formation where the flow dimension n may become non-integer. The proposed model immediately reduces to Barker's (1988) model for Darcian flow in the generalized radial formation and to Mathias et al.'s (2008) model for non-Darcian flow in a two-dimensional confined aquifer. A comparison with numerical simulations shows that the proposed model behaves well at late times for flow dimension n > 1.5. The proposed model is finally applied for data interpretation of the constant-rate pumping tests performed at Ploemeur (Le Borgne et al., 2004), showing that the intrinsic hydraulic conductivity of formations will be underestimated and the specific storage will be overestimated if the non-Darcian effect is ignored. The proposed model is an extension of the generalized radial flow (GRF) model based on Forchheimer's law, which would be of significance for data interpretation of CRTs in aquifers of complex flow geometry in which non-Darcian flow occurs.

  8. Computational study of the rate constants and free energies of intramolecular radical addition to substituted anilines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddiqzai, Meriam; Dahmen, Tobias; Sure, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Summary The intramolecular radical addition to aniline derivatives was investigated by DFT calculations. The computational methods were benchmarked by comparing the calculated values of the rate constant for the 5-exo cyclization of the hexenyl radical with the experimental values. The dispersion-corrected PW6B95-D3 functional provided very good results with deviations for the free activation barrier compared to the experimental values of only about 0.5 kcal mol−1 and was therefore employed in further calculations. Corrections for intramolecular London dispersion and solvation effects in the quantum chemical treatment are essential to obtain consistent and accurate theoretical data. For the investigated radical addition reaction it turned out that the polarity of the molecules is important and that a combination of electrophilic radicals with preferably nucleophilic arenes results in the highest rate constants. This is opposite to the Minisci reaction where the radical acts as nucleophile and the arene as electrophile. The substitution at the N-atom of the aniline is crucial. Methyl substitution leads to slower addition than phenyl substitution. Carbamates as substituents are suitable only when the radical center is not too electrophilic. No correlations between free reaction barriers and energies (ΔG ‡ and ΔG R) are found. Addition reactions leading to indanes or dihydrobenzofurans are too slow to be useful synthetically. PMID:24062821

  9. Constant rate solutions for a fractured well with an asymmetric fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berumen, S.; Rodriguez, F. [PEMEX E and P and UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria, Postal 70-256, 04510 Coyoacan (Mexico); Tiab, D. [School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering, The University of Oklahoma, 100 East Boyd Street, T301 SEC Norman, OK (United States)

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents solutions for the pressure response on hydraulically fractured wells flowing at constant flow rate through an asymmetric vertical fracture. The pressure behavior of wells intercepting asymmetric fractures of both infinite and finite conductivity was investigated by solving numerically and analytically the mathematical model. The new solutions developed for the dimensionless wellbore pressure under production at constant flow rate are presented in terms of an asymmetry factor {xi}. New curves for these systems were generated and the deviation from the classical solution was readily detected. Some qualitative criteria to interpret the intensity of this effect are provided. Results of our investigation indicated that at early times for fractures of moderate conductivity (C{sub D}<5) the characteristic slope of one fourth is present, except for cases of strong asymmetry (0.85<{xi}{<=}1) where no evidence of straight line having one fourth slope was observed. However, it was also detected that at intermediate fracture conductivities (5

  10. Quantum-instanton evaluation of the isotopic effects on the rate constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanicek, Jiri; Miller, William H.

    2004-03-01

    We present a general quantum-mechanical method suitable for numerical evaluation of the isotopic effects on the rate constants of chemical reactions. Our method is based on the quantum instanton approximation [1-3] and on the path-integral Metropolis Monte-Carlo evaluation of the Boltzmann operator matrix elements. The method is more accurate than existing transition-state theory or semiclassical instanton method since we do not assume a single reaction path and do not use a semiclassical approximation of the Boltzmann operator. In order to calculate the isotopic effect we use a "charging algoritm," whereby the mass of the isotope is continuously changed from the initial to the final value. Direct calculation of the isotopic ratio turns out to be much more efficient than finding the absolute rate constants first and then calculating their ratio. While the Monte-Carlo implementation should make the method accessible to systems with a larger number of atoms, we present numerical results for the Eckart barrier and for the reactions H + H2 arrow H2 + H and H + DH arrow HD + H. [1] W.H. Miller, Y. Zhao, M. Ceotto, and Sandy Yang, J. Chem. Phys. 119, 1329 (2003). [2] T. Yamamoto and W.H. Miller, J. Chem. Phys. (in press). [3] Y. Zhao, T. Yamamoto, and W.H. Miller, J. Chem. Phys. (in press).

  11. Rate constants of chemical reactions from semiclassical transition state theory in full and one dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Samuel M; Shan, Xiao; Clary, David C

    2016-06-28

    Semiclassical Transition State Theory (SCTST), a method for calculating rate constants of chemical reactions, offers gains in computational efficiency relative to more accurate quantum scattering methods. In full-dimensional (FD) SCTST, reaction probabilities are calculated from third and fourth potential derivatives along all vibrational degrees of freedom. However, the computational cost of FD SCTST scales unfavorably with system size, which prohibits its application to larger systems. In this study, the accuracy and efficiency of 1-D SCTST, in which only third and fourth derivatives along the reaction mode are used, are investigated in comparison to those of FD SCTST. Potential derivatives are obtained from numerical ab initio Hessian matrix calculations at the MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory, and Richardson extrapolation is applied to improve the accuracy of these derivatives. Reaction barriers are calculated at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ level. Results from FD SCTST agree with results from previous theoretical and experimental studies when Richardson extrapolation is applied. Results from our implementation of 1-D SCTST, which uses only 4 single-point MP2/cc-pVTZ energy calculations in addition to those for conventional TST, agree with FD results to within a factor of 5 at 250 K. This degree of agreement and the efficiency of the 1-D method suggest its potential as a means of approximating rate constants for systems too large for existing quantum scattering methods.

  12. Stability Analysis of GI/G/c/K Retrial Queue with Constant Retrial Rate

    CERN Document Server

    Avrachenkov, Konstantin

    2010-01-01

    We consider a GI/G/c/K-type retrial queueing system with constant retrial rate. The system consists of a primary queue and an orbit queue. The primary queue has $c$ identical servers and can accommodate the maximal number of $K$ jobs. If a newly arriving job finds the full primary queue, it joins the orbit. The original primary jobs arrive to the system according to a renewal process. The jobs have general i.i.d. service times. A job in front of the orbit queue retries to enter the primary queue after an exponentially distributed time independent of the orbit queue length. Telephone exchange systems, Medium Access Protocols and short TCP transfers are just some applications of the proposed queueing system. For this system we establish minimal sufficient stability conditions. Our model is very general. In addition, to the known particular cases (e.g., M/G/1/1 or M/M/c/c systems), the proposed model covers as particular cases the deterministic service model and the Erlang model with constant retrial rate. The l...

  13. Determination of the epimerization rate constant of amygdalin by microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lishuang; Ye, Hongzhi; Zheng, Lili; Chen, Lidian; Chu, Kedan; Liu, Xianxiang; Xu, Xueqin; Chen, Guonan

    2011-01-01

    A new method for separation and determination of amygdalin and its epimer (neoamygdalin) in the epimerization of amygdalin by MEEKC is proposed. For the chiral separation of amygdalin and neoamygdalin, a running buffer composed of 80 mM sodium cholate, 5.0% v/v butan-1-ol, 0.5% v/v heptane and 94.5% v/v 30 mM Na(2) B(4) O(7) buffer (pH 9.00) is proposed. Under optimum conditions, the basic separation of amygdalin and neoamygdalin can be achieved within 7 min. The calibration curve for amygdalin showed excellent linearity in the concentration range of 20-1000 μg/mL with a detection limit of 5.0 μg/mL (S/N=3). The epimerization rate constant of amygdalin in basic microemulsion was first determined by monitoring the concentration changes of amygdalin, and the epimerization rate constant of amygdalin was found to be 2×10(-3) min(-1) at 25°C under the above optimum microemulsion conditions. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Rate constant for the reaction of atomic oxygen with phosphine at 298 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stief, L. J.; Payne, W. A.; Nava, D. F.

    1987-01-01

    The rate constant for the reaction of atomic oxygen with phosphine has been measured at 298 K using flash photolysis combined with time-resolved detection of O(3P) via resonance fluorescence. Atomic oxygen was produced by flash photolysis of N2O or NO highly diluted in argon. The results were shown to be independent of (PH3), (O), total pressure and the source of O(3P). The mean value of all the experiments is k1 = (3.6 + or -0.8) x 10 to the -11th cu cm/s (1 sigma). Two previous measurements of k1 differed by more than an order of magnitude, and the results support the higher value obtained in a discharge flow-mass spectrometry study. A comparison with rate data for other atomic and free radical reactions with phosphine is presented, and the role of these reactions in the aeronomy or photochemistry of Jupiter and Saturn is briefly considered.

  15. Rate Constant and Branching Fraction for the NH2 + NO2 Reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klippenstein, Stephen J.; Harding, Lawrence B.; Glarborg, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The NH2 + NO2 reaction has been studied experimentally and theoretically. On the basis of laser photolysis/LIF experiments, the total rate constant was determined over the temperature range 295–625 K as k1,exp(T) = 9.5 × 10–7(T/K)−2.05 exp(−404 K/T) cm3 molecule–1 s–1. This value is in the upper...... may facilitate a small flux between the adducts. High- and low-pressure limit rate coefficients for the various product channels of NH2 + NO2 are determined from the ab initio TST-based master equation calculations for the temperature range 300–2000 K. The theoretical predictions are in good agreement...

  16. Protein balance and evaluation of velocity constant k (drained rate on syneresis of milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Migena Hoxha

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The syneresis process is influenced by various factors such as milk pH, curd incubation temperature, fat content, heat treatment of milk, acidity, salt, curd dimension and gel firmness at cutting time. The aim of this study was to investigate balance of protein, the syneresis kinetic of whey drainage and evaluation of velocity constant k (drained rate on curd incubation temperature (25 and 30oC and heat treatment (at 70oC for 5 minutes. Milk was sampled from cow, sheep and goat breeds. The milk samples were analyzed for physical and chemical properties (pH, acidity, protein, casein, fat and lactose, coagulation parameters (R coagulation time in minutes, curd firmness measured in volt after 20 minutes (A20 or 30 minutes (A30 and the rate of firming K20 in minutes as well as for whey volume drained after 30, 50, 70, 90, 110, 130 and 150 minutes. During this study it was observed that the curd incubation temperature is the major factor affecting syneresis. Velocity constant k value (drained rate is increased with higher temperature, but can be decrease significantly at low temperature. The syneresis rate differs between breed’s milk and is influenced by their coagulation properties. Regarding balance of protein, protein recovery and curd yield results to be higher at incubation temperature of 25oC, in spite of breed. Whey protein loss result to be higher for goat’s milk on two incubation temperature (41.05–58.35%, while the whey loss on sheep’s milk result to be lower (14.01–37.61%.

  17. Endo- and exocytic rate constants for spontaneous and protein kinase C-activated T cell receptor cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menné, Charlotte; Møller Sørensen, Tine; Siersma, Volkert

    2002-01-01

    To determine the rate constants of spontaneous and activated TCR cycling, we examined TCR endo- and exocytosis in the human T cell line Jurkat by three different methods. Using a simple kinetic model for TCR cycling and non-linear regression analyses, we found that the spontaneous endocytic rate......)) whereas the exocytic rate constant was unaffected. Thus, the TCR becomes a rapidly cycling receptor with kinetics similar to classical cycling receptors subsequent to PKC activation. This results in a reduction of the half-life of cell surface expressed TCR from approximately 58 to 6 min and allows rapid...... constant of the TCR was low (approximately 0.012 min(-1)) whereas the spontaneous exocytic rate constant was similar to that of other cycling receptors (approximately 0.055 min(-1)). Following protein kinase C activation (PKC) the endocytic rate constant was increased tenfold (to approximately 0.128 min(-1...

  18. Periods of constant and falling-rate for infrared drying of carrot slices Períodos de secagem constante e decrescente de fatias de cenoura por infravermelho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando M. Botelho

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the infrared drying process of carrot slices and to determine coefficients related to the heat and mass transfer of the process. Fresh carrots were used, dried until constant weight in a dryer with infrared heating source. Different models were utilized to fit the experimental data of constant and falling drying rate periods. It was verified that the coefficients of heat and mass transfer, during the constant drying rate, significantly increased with temperature on rise. The Diffusion Approximation, Two Terms, Midili and Verna models satisfactory represented the falling period of drying rate of carrot slices. The effective diffusion coefficient increased with temperature and this relationship can be represented by the Arrhenius equation, obtaining activation energy to the drying process of 29.092 kJ mol-1.Com este trabalho objetivou-se estudar o processo de secagem por infravermelho das fatias de cenoura e determinar alguns coeficientes referentes à transferência de calor e massa do processo. Utilizaram-se cenouras frescas, secadas até massa constante em um secador com fonte de aquecimento por infravermelho. Aos dados experimentais se ajustaram diferentes modelos para os períodos de taxa de secagem constante e decrescentes. Verificou-se que os coeficientes transferência de calor e massa, referentes ao período de secagem constante, aumentaram significativamente com o aumento da temperatura e que os modelos Aproximação da Difusão, Dois Termos, Midili e Verna representaram satisfatoriamente o período de secagem decrescente das fatias de cenoura. O coeficiente de difusão efetivo aumentou com a temperatura e esta relação pode ser representada pela Equação de Arrhenius, obtendo-se uma energia de ativação para o processo de secagem de 29,092 kJ mol-1.

  19. Creatine kinase rate constant in the human heart measured with 3D‐localization at 7 tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Matthew D.; Neubauer, Stefan; Rodgers, Christopher T.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We present a new Bloch‐Siegert four Angle Saturation Transfer (BOAST) method for measuring the creatine kinase (CK) first‐order effective rate constant kf in human myocardium at 7 tesla (T). BOAST combines a variant of the four‐angle saturation transfer (FAST) method using amplitude‐modulated radiofrequency pulses, phosphorus Bloch‐Siegert B1+‐mapping to determine the per‐voxel flip angles, and nonlinear fitting to Bloch simulations for postprocessing. Methods Optimal flip angles and repetition time parameters were determined from Monte Carlo simulations. BOAST was validated in the calf muscle of two volunteers at 3T and 7T. The myocardial CK forward rate constant was then measured in 10 volunteers at 7T in 82 min (after 1H localization). Results BOAST kfCK values were 0.281 ± 0.002 s−1 in the calf and 0.35 ± 0.05 s−1 in myocardium. These are consistent with literature values from lower fields. Using a literature values for adenosine triphosphate concentration, we computed CK flux values of 4.55 ± 1.52 mmol kg−1 s−1. The sensitive volume for BOAST depends on the B1 inhomogeneity of the transmit coil. Conclusion BOAST enables measurement of the CK rate constant in the human heart at 7T, with spatial localization in three dimensions to 5.6 mL voxels, using a 10‐cm loop coil. Magn Reson Med 78:20–32, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:27579566

  20. Parametric interactions of acoustic waves in semiconductor quantum plasmas with strain dependent dielectric constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, N.; Ghosh, S.; Agrawal, A.

    2017-05-01

    Using quantum hydrodynamic model (QHD) of semiconductor plasma for a one-component we present an analytical investigation on parametric interaction of a laser radiation in an unmagnetised material with a strain-dependent dielectric constant. The nonlinear current density and third order susceptibility are analyzed in different wave number regions in presence and absence of quantum effect. We present the qualitative behavior of threshold pump intensity with respect to wave number in presence and absence of quantum effect. The numeric estimates are made for n-BaTiO3 crystals at 77k duly irradiated by pulsed 10.6μm CO2 laser. It is found that the quantum correction through Fermi temperature and Bohm potential terms modifies the threshold characteristics.

  1. Extension of the master sintering curve for constant heating rate modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Tammy Michelle

    The purpose of this work is to extend the functionality of the Master Sintering Curve (MSC) such that it can be used as a practical tool for predicting sintering schemes that combine both a constant heating rate and an isothermal hold. Rather than just being able to predict a final density for the object of interest, the extension to the MSC will actually be able to model a sintering run from start to finish. Because the Johnson model does not incorporate this capability, the work presented is an extension of what has already been shown in literature to be a valuable resource in many sintering situations. A predicted sintering curve that incorporates a combination of constant heating rate and an isothermal hold is more indicative of what is found in real-life sintering operations. This research offers the possibility of predicting the sintering schedule for a material, thereby having advanced information about the extent of sintering, the time schedule for sintering, and the sintering temperature with a high degree of accuracy and repeatability. The research conducted in this thesis focuses on the development of a working model for predicting the sintering schedules of several stabilized zirconia powders having the compositions YSZ (HSY8), 10Sc1CeSZ, 10Sc1YSZ, and 11ScSZ1A. The compositions of the four powders are first verified using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and the particle size and surface area are verified using a particle size analyzer and BET analysis, respectively. The sintering studies were conducted on powder compacts using a double pushrod dilatometer. Density measurements are obtained both geometrically and using the Archimedes method. Each of the four powders is pressed into ¼" diameter pellets using a manual press with no additives, such as a binder or lubricant. Using a double push-rod dilatometer, shrinkage data for the pellets is obtained over several different heating rates. The shrinkage data is then converted to reflect the change in relative

  2. A Theory of Rate-Dependent Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-05-01

    impact conditions, where a considerable amount of plastic work is liberated as heat, this athermal assumption becomes increasingly poor for defining...crystal microplasticity use a variety of parameters, such as mobile dislocation density and velocity, all of which are eventually related in some manner... impact problems and are not generally encountered in structural integrity analyses. Some final observations concerning tests of material at constant

  3. The Influence of Photolysis Rate Constants in Ozone Production for the Paso del Norte Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra, Fernando; Fitzgerald, Rosa

    2012-03-01

    In this research work we are focusing on understanding the relationship between photolysis rates and the photochemical ozone changes observed in the Paso del Norte region. The city of El Paso, Texas together with Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, forms the largest contiguous bi-national metropolitan area. This region suffers year-round ozone pollution events, and a better understanding is needed to mitigate them. Previous studies have found that ambient ozone concentrations tend to be higher on weekends rather than on weekdays, this phenomenon being referred to, as the ``weekend effect.'' If the ozone standard is exceeded more frequently on weekends, then this phenomenon must be considered in the design of ozone control strategies. In this work we investigate some of the most representative weekend ozone episodes at El Paso, TX, during the years 2009, 2010 and 2011 using the ozone photolysis rates. In this research the TUV radiative-transfer model is used to calculate the local photolysis rates and a UV MFRSR instrument is used to obtain experimental parameters. Seasonal variations and the weekday-weekend effect is studied. The results of this research will help to understand the underlying behavior of the photolysis rate constants when different atmospheric conditions are present.

  4. Fast proton exchange in histidine: measurement of rate constants through indirect detection by NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Akansha Ashvani; Duma, Luminita; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Pelupessy, Philippe

    2014-05-19

    Owing to its imidazole side chain, histidine participates in various processes such as enzyme catalysis, pH regulation, metal binding, and phosphorylation. The determination of exchange rates of labile protons for such a system is important for understanding its functions. However, these rates are too fast to be measured directly in an aqueous solution by using NMR spectroscopy. We have obtained the exchange rates of the NH3(+) amino protons and the labile NH(ε2) and NH(δ1) protons of the imidazole ring by indirect detection through nitrogen-15 as a function of temperature (272 KExchange rates up to 8.5×10(4) s(-1) could be determined (i.e., lifetimes as short as 12 μs). The three chemical shifts δH(i) of the invisible exchanging protons H(i) and the three one-bond scalar coupling constants (1)J(N,H(i)) could also be determined accurately.

  5. Combination of poroelasticity theory and constant strain rate test in modelling land subsidence due to groundwater extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Tien Hung; Rühaak, Wolfram; Sass, Ingo

    2017-04-01

    Extensive groundwater extraction leads to a drawdown of the ground water table. Consequently, soil effective stress increases and can cause land subsidence. Analysis of land subsidence generally requires a numerical model based on poroelasticity theory, which was first proposed by Biot (1941). In the review of regional land subsidence accompanying groundwater extraction, Galloway and Burbey (2011) stated that more research and application is needed in coupling of stress-dependent land subsidence process. In geotechnical field, the constant rate of strain tests (CRS) was first introduced in 1969 (Smith and Wahls 1969) and was standardized in 1982 through the designation D4186-82 by American Society for Testing and Materials. From the reading values of CRS tests, the stress-dependent parameters of poroelasticity model can be calculated. So far, there is no research to link poroelasticity theory with CRS tests in modelling land subsidence due to groundwater extraction. One dimensional CRS tests using conventional compression cell and three dimension CRS tests using Rowe cell were performed. The tests were also modelled by using finite element method with mixed elements. Back analysis technique is used to find the suitable values of hydraulic conductivity and bulk modulus that depend on the stress or void ratio. Finally, the obtained results are used in land subsidence models. Biot, M. A. (1941). "General theory of three-dimensional consolidation." Journal of applied physics 12(2): 155-164. Galloway, D. L. and T. J. Burbey (2011). "Review: Regional land subsidence accompanying groundwater extraction." Hydrogeology Journal 19(8): 1459-1486. Smith, R. E. and H. E. Wahls (1969). "Consolidation under constant rates of strain." Journal of Soil Mechanics & Foundations Div.

  6. Deuterium recycling rate constants derived from plasma implantation/desorption shots in a martensitic steel surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedano, L.A. [CIEMAT/DIAE, Madrid (Spain); European Commission/JRC, H-Materials Interaction Sector, Ispra (Italy); Esteban, G.A. [UPV-EHU/ETSIIT, D. Nuc. Eng. and Fluid Mec., Bilbao (Spain); Perujo, A. [European Commission/JRC, H-Materials Interaction Sector, Ispra (Italy)

    2001-12-04

    The recombination (K{sub 2}) and dissociation rate constants (K{sub 1}) are essential magnitudes for the tracking of tritium at the first wall (FW) of fusion reactors (FR). This paper presents our plasma implantation/recycling test, the modelling of the experiment and the results obtained for K{sub 2} and K{sub 1} in the case of a deuterium (D{sub 3}{sup +}/D{sub 2}{sup +}) plasma in the martensitic steel DIN 1.4914 (MANET). Once parasitic contributions were accounted, the D{sub 2} release from the target was seen to be surface limited. The values obtained for K{sub 1} and K{sub 2} show low dispersion on impinging flux and ion energies. For K{sub 1} a roughly constant value of 7 x 10{sup -6} mol Pa{sup -1} m{sup -2} s{sup -1} is derived. The obtained K{sub 2} is written as: K{sub 2} = 2.414 exp (-1571/RT) (m{sup 4} mol{sup -1} s{sup -1}), with R = 8.314 J mol{sup -1} K{sup -1}. Our activation energies agree with those existing in the literature derived from permeation experiments. High reflection coefficients are derived, which are in good agreement with the classical theory of ion scattering at low energy. (orig.)

  7. Uptake rate constants and partition coefficients for vapor phase organic chemicals using semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranor, W.L.; Alvarez, D.A.; Huckins, J.N.; Petty, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    To fully utilize semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) as passive samplers in air monitoring, data are required to accurately estimate airborne concentrations of environmental contaminants. Limited uptake rate constants (kua) and no SPMD air partitioning coefficient (Ksa) existed for vapor-phase contaminants. This research was conducted to expand the existing body of kinetic data for SPMD air sampling by determining kua and Ksa for a number of airborne contaminants including the chemical classes: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, organochlorine pesticides, brominated diphenyl ethers, phthalate esters, synthetic pyrethroids, and organophosphate/organosulfur pesticides. The kuas were obtained for 48 of 50 chemicals investigated and ranged from 0.03 to 3.07??m3??g-1??d-1. In cases where uptake was approaching equilibrium, Ksas were approximated. Ksa values (no units) were determined or estimated for 48 of the chemicals investigated and ranging from 3.84E+5 to 7.34E+7. This research utilized a test system (United States Patent 6,877,724 B1) which afforded the capability to generate and maintain constant concentrations of vapor-phase chemical mixtures. The test system and experimental design employed gave reproducible results during experimental runs spanning more than two years. This reproducibility was shown by obtaining mean kua values (n??=??3) of anthracene and p,p???-DDE at 0.96 and 1.57??m3??g-1??d-1 with relative standard deviations of 8.4% and 8.6% respectively.

  8. The Constant Growth Rate of the Bound-Zone Peculiar Velocity Profile

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Jounghun

    2016-01-01

    We present a numerical evidence that the amplitude and slope of the bound-zone peculiar velocity profile grow at the constant rates in a LambdaCDM universe. Analyzing the friends-of-friends halo catalogs from the Millennium-II simulations at various redshifts, we measure the average peculiar velocity profile of the objects located in the bound zone around massive group-size halos and compare it to an analytic formula characterized by the amplitude and slope parameters. It is shown that the amplitude and slope of the bound-zone peculiar velocity profile remain constant in the dark matter dominated epoch but begin to grow linearly with redshift after the onset of the Lambda-domination. Our explanation for this phenomenon is that as the balance between the gravitational attraction of the massive groups and the repulsive force of the Hubble expansion cracks up in the Lambda-dominated epoch, the gravitational influence on the bound-zone halos diminishes more rapidly with the increment of the radial distances. Spec...

  9. Rate constant and thermochemistry for K + O2 + N2 = KO2 + N2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorvajärvi, Tapio; Viljanen, Jan; Toivonen, Juha;

    2015-01-01

    The addition reaction of potassium atoms with oxygen has been studied using the collinear photofragmentation and atomic absorption spectroscopy (CPFAAS) method. KCl vapor was photolyzed with 266 nm pulses and the absorbance by K atoms at 766.5 nm was measured at various delay times with a narrow...... line width diode laser. Experiments were carried out with O2/N2 mixtures at a total pressure of 1 bar, over 748-1323 K. At the lower temperatures single exponential decays of [K] yielded the third-order rate constant for addition, kR1, whereas at higher temperatures equilibration was observed...... in the form of double exponential decays of [K], which yielded both kR1 and the equilibrium constant for KO2 formation. kR1 can be summarized as 1.07 × 10-30(T/1000 K)-0.733 cm6 molecule-2 s-1. Combination with literature values leads to a recommended kR1 of 5.5 × 10-26T-1.55 exp(-10/T) cm6 molecule-2 s-1...

  10. Rate Constants and Deuterium Kinetic Isotope Effects for Methoxy Radical Reacting with NO_2 and O_2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, J.; Hu, H.; Dibble, T. S.; Tyndall, G. S.; Orlando, J. J.

    2013-06-01

    Alkoxy radicals (RO) are important intermediates in the photooxidation of volatile organic compounds due to their great impacts on ozone formation and gas-particle partitioning of stable oxidation products. Methoxy radical (CH_3O) is the prototype for all alkoxy radicals. The absolute rate constants k_N_O_2(T) for reaction of CH_3O and CD_3O with NO_2 have been measured using laser flash photolysis to generate radicals and laser-induced fluorescence for time-resolved detection. The pressure and temperature dependence for k_N_O_2 have been observed over the range 30-700 Torr and 250-335 K. This will be the first direct measurement of k_N_O_2 for CH_3O near ambient pressure and the first ever for CD_3O.The relative rate constants k_N_O_2/k_O_2(T) have been measured in an environmental chamber with FTIR detection. This combination enables the first determination of k_O_2 (T) for CH_3O and CD_3O for T < 298 K. The results will also help validate theoretical methods for studying alkoxy + O_2 reactions, which are challenging for quantum chemistry.

  11. Universal size dependence of auger constants in direct- and indirect-gap semiconductor nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robel, Istvan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schaller, Richard D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Klimov, Victor I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gresback, Ryan [U OF MINNESOTA; Kortshagen, Uwe [U OF MINNESOTA

    2008-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) spatial confinement of electronic wave functions in semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) results in a significant enhancement of multi-electron phenomena including non radiative Auger recombination. In this process, a conduction-band electron recombines with a valence-band hole by transferring the recombination energy to a third carrier. Significant interest in Auger recombination in NCs has been stimulated by recent studies ofNC lasing, and generation-III photovoltaics enabled by carrier multiplication because in both of these prospective applications Auger recombination represents a dominant carrier-loss mechanism. Here, we perform a side-by-side comparison of Auger recombination rates in NCs of several different compositions including Ge, PbSe, InAs, and CdSe. We observe that the only factor, which has a significant effect on the measured recombination rates, is the size of the NCs but not the details of the material's electronic structure. Most surprisingly, comparable rates are measured for nanocrystals of directand indirect-gap semiconductor NCs despite a dramatic four-to-five orders of magnitude difference in respective bulk-semiconductor Auger constants. This unusual observation can be explained by confinement-induced relaxation of momentum conservation, which smears out the difference between direct- and indirect-gap materials.

  12. Critical evaluation and rate constants of chemoselective ligation reactions for stoichiometric conjugations in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Fumito; Noda, Hidetoshi; Bode, Jeffrey W

    2015-04-17

    Chemoselective ligation reactions have contributed immensely to the development of organic synthesis and chemical biology. However, the ligation of stoichiometric amounts of large molecules for applications such as protein-protein conjugates is still challenging. Conjugation reactions need to be fast enough to proceed under dilute conditions and chemoselective in the presence of unprotected functional groups; the starting materials and products must be stable under the reaction conditions. To compare known ligation reactions for their suitability under these conditions, we determined the second-order rate constants of ligation reactions using peptide substrates with unprotected functional groups. The reaction conditions, the chemoselectivity of the reactions, and the stability of the starting materials and products were carefully evaluated. In some cases, the stability could be improved by modifying the substrate structure. These data obtained under the ligation conditions provide a useful guide to choose an appropriate ligation reaction for synthesis of large molecules by covalent ligation reactions of unprotected substrates in water.

  13. Low-energy electron impact cross-sections and rate constants of $NH_2$

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ANAND BHARADVAJA; SAVINDER KAUR; K L BALUJA

    2017-08-01

    This systematic study reports various electron impact cross-sections, rate constants and transport properties of $NH_2$ radical in the low-energy limit. The collision study is based on $R$-matrix formalism and involves the use of various scattering models employing different active spaces. Both electron excited inelasticcross-sections and resonances are found influenced by correlation and polarization effects. The non-relativistic molecular bremsstrahlung radiation cross-section for soft photons, binary encounter Bethe model-based ionization cross-sections and a few molecular properties of the target radical are also reported. The present calculations are found to be in agreement with the available results. This theoretical study provides a pathway to understand collision dynamics and generates data required in various fields of applied physics.

  14. Determination of ultimate carbonaceous BOD and the specific rate constant (K1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamer, J.K.; Bennett, J.P.; McKenzie, Stuart W.

    1982-01-01

    Ultimate carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand (BODu) and the specific rate constant (K1) at which the demand is exerted are important parameters in designing biological wastewater treatment plants and in assessing the impact of wastewater on receiving streams. An analytical method is presented which uses time-series concentrations of BOD, defined as the calculated sum of dissolved oxygen (DO) losses at each time of measurement, for determining BODu and K1. Time-series DO measurements are obtained from a water sample that is incubated in darkness at 20 degrees Celsius in the presence of nitrapyrin, a chemical nitrification inhibitor. Time-series concentrations of BOD that approximate first order kinetics can be analyzed graphically or mathematically to compute BODu and K1.

  15. CORAL: QSPR modeling of rate constants of reactions between organic aromatic pollutants and hydroxyl radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toropov, A A; Toropova, A P; Rasulev, B F; Benfenati, E; Gini, G; Leszczynska, D; Leszczynski, J

    2012-09-05

    The rate constants (K(OH)) of reactions between 78 organic aromatic pollutants and hydroxyl radical were examined. Simplified molecular input line entry system was used as representation of the molecular structure of the pollutants. Quantitative structure-property relationships was developed using CORAL software (http://www.insilico.eu/CORAL) for four random splits of the data into the subtraining, calibration, and test sets. The obtained results reveal good predictive potential of the applied approach: correlation coefficients (r(2)) for the test sets of the four random splits are 0.75, 0.91, 0.84, and 0.80. Using the Monte Carlo method CORAL software generated the optimal descriptors for one-variable models. The reproducibility of each model was tested performing three runs of the Monte Carlo optimization. The current data were compared to previous results and discussed. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Consideration of demand rate in overall equipment effetiveness (OEE on equipment with constant process time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tay C.C.

    2013-06-01

    research should be conducted to test the possibility and to verify the definition of such performance ratio including Takt time on those processes of which its operating time is possibly to be reduced, especially those are not constant and fixed. This piece of research is temporarily done on the process where its operating time is constant from time to time and there is no ideal cycle time possible.Practical implications: The awareness of the overproduction should be emphasized and raised in the intention of pursuing higher OEE value. As the definition proposed such, the process with constant cycle time could even be defined in different performance ratio from time to time regarding to the customer demands and corresponding production rate. These two variables can be adjusted and balanced to increase the OEE value through optimization of average cycle time. Over this, optimization of average cycle time on equipment with constant operating time can be achieved through the optimization of loading number per each processing.Originality/value: The novelty of the paper is the inclusion of customer demand in obtaining OEE value of any particular equipment. Besides that, the equipment without ideal cycle time, which means those processes carried out in constant cycle time are possibly to be evaluated with performance ratio. As consequence of that, the machine utilization and capability used could be quantified and visualized using the performance ratio data of the OEE proposed.

  17. Quantification of in Situ Biodegradation Rate Constants Using a Novel Combined Isotope Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, P.; Sültenfuß, J.; Martus, P.

    2014-12-01

    Numerous studies have shown the enormous potential of the compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) for studying the biodegradation of organic compounds such as monoaromatic hydrocarbons (BTEX), polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), chlorinated solvents and other organic contaminants and environmental transformation mechanisms in groundwater. In addition, two-dimensional isotope analysis such as carbon and hydrogen have been successfully studied indicating the potential to also investigate site-specific reaction mechanisms. The main objective of the current study however is to quantify real effective in situ biodegradation rate constants in a coal-tar contaminated aquifer by combining compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) and tracer-based (3H-3He) ground-water dating (TGD). Hence, groundwater samples are used to determine groundwater residence times, and carbon and hydrogen stable isotopes are analyzed for selected BTEX and PAH. The results of the hydrogen stable isotopes surprisingly indicate no isotope fractionation and therefore no biodegradation. In contrast, for stable carbon isotopes of selected BTEX such as o-xylene and toluene, isotope shifts are detected indicating active biodegradation under sulfate-reducing conditions. These and previous results of stable carbon isotopes show that only for o-xylene a clear evidence for biodegradation is possible for the studied site. Nevertheless, in combining these results with the groundwater residence times, which range between 1 year for the shallow wells (20 m below surface) and 41 years for the deeper wells (40 m below surface), it is feasible to effectively determine in situ biodegradation rate constants for o-xylene. Conversely, the outcome also evidently demonstrate the major limitations of the novel combined isotope approach for a successful implementation of monitored natural attenuation (MNA) at such field sites.

  18. Bianchi type-I transit cosmological models with time dependent gravitational and cosmological constants

    CERN Document Server

    Pradhan, Anirudh; Rikhvitsky, Victor

    2013-01-01

    The present study deals with the exact solutions of the Einstein's field equations with variable gravitational and cosmological "constants" for a spatially homogeneous and anisotropic Bianchi type-I space-time. To study the transit behaviour of Universe, we consider a law of variation of scale factor $a(t) = \\left(t^{k} e^{t}\\right)^{\\frac{1}{n}}$ which yields a time dependent deceleration parameter (DP) $q = - 1 + \\frac{nk}{(k + t)^{2}}$, comprising a class of models that depicts a transition of the universe from the early decelerated phase to the recent accelerating phase. We find that the time dependent DP is reasonable for the present day Universe and give an appropriate description of the evolution of the universe. For $n = 0.27k$, we obtain $q_{0} = -0.73$ which is similar to observed value of DP at present epoch. It is also observed that for $n \\geq 2$ and $k = 1$, we obtain a class of transit models of the universe from early decelerating to present accelerating phase. For $k = 0$, the universe has no...

  19. Feasibility study of volumetric modulated arc therapy with constant dose rate for endometrial cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Ruijie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing (China); Wang, Junjie, E-mail: junjiewang47@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing (China); Xu, Feng [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing (China); Li, Hua [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing (China); Zhang, Xile [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the feasibility, efficiency, and delivery accuracy of volumetric modulated arc therapy with constant dose rate (VMAT-CDR) for whole-pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) of endometrial cancer. The nine-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), VMAT with variable dose-rate (VMAT-VDR), and VMAT-CDR plans were created for 9 patients with endometrial cancer undergoing WPRT. The dose distribution of planning target volume (PTV), organs at risk (OARs), and normal tissue (NT) were compared. The monitor units (MUs) and treatment delivery time were also evaluated. For each VMAT-CDR plan, a dry run was performed to assess the dosimetric accuracy with MatriXX from IBA. Compared with IMRT, the VMAT-CDR plans delivered a slightly greater V{sub 20} of the bowel, bladder, pelvis bone, and NT, but significantly decreased the dose to the high-dose region of the rectum and pelvis bone. The MUs decreased from 1105 with IMRT to 628 with VMAT-CDR. The delivery time also decreased from 9.5 to 3.2 minutes. The average gamma pass rate was 95.6% at the 3%/3 mm criteria with MatriXX pretreatment verification for 9 patients. VMAT-CDR can achieve comparable plan quality with significant shorter delivery time and smaller number of MUs compared with IMRT for patients with endometrial cancer undergoing WPRT. It can be accurately delivered and be an alternative to IMRT on the linear accelerator without VDR capability.

  20. A sequence-specific threading tetra-intercalator with an extremely slow dissociation rate constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Garen G.; Zewail-Foote, Maha; Smith, Amy Rhoden; Johnson, Kenneth A.; Iverson, Brent L.

    2011-11-01

    A long-lived and sequence-specific ligand-DNA complex would make possible the modulation of biological processes for extended periods. For this purpose, we are investigating a polyintercalation approach to DNA recognition in which flexible chains of aromatic units thread back and forth repeatedly through the double helix. Here we describe the DNA-binding behaviour of a threading tetra-intercalator. Specific binding was observed on a relatively long DNA strand that strongly favoured a predicted 14 base-pair sequence. Kinetic studies revealed a multistep association process, with sequence specificity that primarily derives from large differences in dissociation rates. The rate-limiting dissociation rate constant of the tetra-intercalator complex dissociating from its preferred binding site was extremely slow, corresponding to a half-life of 16 days. This is one of the longest non-covalent complex half-lives yet reported and, to the best of our knowledge, the longest for a DNA-binding molecule.

  1. Microwave and submillimeter molecular transitions and their dependence on fundamental constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlov, Mikhail G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation); St. Petersburg Electrotechnical University ' ' LETI' ' , St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Levshakov, Sergei A. [St. Petersburg Electrotechnical University ' ' LETI' ' , St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-15

    Microwave and submillimeter molecular transition frequencies between nearly degenerated rotational levels, tunneling transitions, and mixed tunneling-rotational transitions show an extremely high sensitivity to the values of the fine-structure constant, {alpha}, and the electron-to-proton mass ratio, {mu}. This review summarizes the theoretical background on quantum-mechanical calculations of the sensitivity coefficients of such transitions to tiny changes in {alpha} and {mu} for a number of molecules which are usually observed in Galactic and extragalactic sources, and discusses the possibility of testing the space- and time-invariance of fundamental constants through comparison between precise laboratory measurements of the molecular rest frequencies and their astronomical counterparts. In particular, diatomic radicals CH, OH, NH{sup +}, and a linear polyatomic radical C{sub 3}H in {Pi} electronic ground state, polyatomic molecules NH{sub 3}, ND{sub 3}, NH{sub 2}D, NHD{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, H{sub 3}O{sup +}, CH{sub 3}OH, and CH{sub 3}NH{sub 2} in their tunneling and tunneling-rotational modes are considered. It is shown that sensitivity coefficients strongly depend on the quantum numbers of the corresponding transitions. This can be used for astrophysical tests of Einstein's Equivalence Principle all over the Universe at an unprecedented level of sensitivity of 10{sup -9}, which is a limit three to two orders of magnitude lower as compared to the current constraints on cosmological variations of {alpha} and {mu}: {Delta}{alpha}/{alpha} < 10{sup -6}, {Delta} {mu} / {mu} < 10{sup -7}. (copyright 2013 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Estimation of the plasma effect site equilibration rate constant of sufentanil in children using the time to peak effect of heart rate and blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, In-Kyung; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Jung, SungAe; Kim, Jin-Tae; Kim, Hee-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Although targeting the effect site concentration may offer advantages over the traditional forms of administering intravenous anesthetics, it is not applicable for sufentanil in children because its plasma effect site equilibration rate constant (ke0) is not known yet. We estimated ke0 of sufentanil in children using the time to peak effect (t peak) method. Under general anesthesia, sufentanil t peak was measured after administration of a submaximal bolus dose by means of the decrease in heart rate, blood pressure and calculated approximate entropy (ApEn) of electroencephalogram in 105 children (age range: 3-11 years). ke0 was estimated using t peak and known sufentanil pharmacokinetic parameters in normal children. The mean t peaks were measured as 44 ± 22 s and 227 ± 91 s by heart rate and by mean blood pressure respectively. The estimated ke0 were 5.16/min and 0.49/min by heart rate and blood pressure respectively. t peak could not be measured using the ApEn, thus ke0 could not be calculated by ApEn in children. Shorter measured sufentanil t peak by heart rate compared to blood pressure indicate that the heart rate decrease faster than decreasing of blood pressure. Moreover, the calculated sufentanil ke0 in children depends on the pharmacodynamics parameters.

  3. An Analytical Formula for Potential Water Vapor in an Atmosphere of Constant Lapse Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Varmaghani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate calculation of precipitable water vapor (PWV in the atmosphere has always been a matter of importance for meteorologists. Potential water vapor (POWV or maximum precipitable water vapor can be an appropriate base for estimation of probable maximum precipitation (PMP in an area, leading to probable maximum flood (PMF and flash flood management systems. PWV and POWV have miscellaneously been estimated by means of either discrete solutions such as tables, diagrams or empirical methods; however, there is no analytical formula for POWV even in a particular atmospherical condition. In this article, fundamental governing equations required for analytical calculation of POWV are first introduced. Then, it will be shown that this POWV calculation relies on a Riemann integral solution over a range of altitude whose integrand is merely a function of altitude. The solution of the integral gives rise to a series function which is bypassed by approximation of saturation vapor pressure in the range of -55 to 55 degrees Celsius, and an analytical formula for POWV in an atmosphere of constant lapse rate is proposed. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the suggested equation, exact calculations of saturated adiabatic lapse rate (SALR at different surface temperatures were performed. The formula was compared with both the diagrams from the US Weather Bureau and SALR. The results demonstrated unquestionable capability of analytical solutions and also equivalent functions.

  4. An Analytical Formula for Potential Water Vapor in an Atmosphere of Constant Lapse Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Varmaghani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate calculation of precipitable water vapor (PWV in the atmosphere has always been a matter of importance for meteorologists. Potential water vapor (POWV or maximum precipitable water vapor can be an appropriate base for estimation of probable maximum precipitation (PMP in an area, leading to probable maximum flood (PMF and flash flood management systems. PWV and POWV have miscellaneously been estimated by means of either discrete solutions such as tables, diagrams or empirical methods; however, there is no analytical formula for POWV even in a particular atmospherical condition. In this article, fundamental governing equations required for analytical calculation of POWV are first introduced. Then, it will be shown that this POWV calculation relies on a Riemann integral solution over a range of altitude whose integrand is merely a function of altitude. The solution of the integral gives rise to a series function which is bypassed by approximation of saturation vapor pressure in the range of -55 to 55 degrees Celsius, and an analytical formula for POWV in an atmosphere of constant lapse rate is proposed. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the suggested equation, exact calculations of saturated adiabatic lapse rate (SALR at different surface temperatures were performed. The formula was compared with both the diagrams from the US Weather Bureau and SALR. The results demonstrated unquestionable capability of analytical solutions and also equivalent functions.

  5. Stress corrosion cracking of alloy 600 using the constant strain rate test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulischeck, T. S.; van Rooyen, D.

    1980-01-01

    The most recent corrosion problems experienced in nuclear steam generators tubed with Inconel alloy 600 is a phenomenon labeled ''denting''. Denting has been found in various degrees of severity in many operating pressurized water reactors. Laboratory investigations have shown that Inconel 600 exhibits intergranular SCC when subjected to high stresses and exposed to deoxygenated water at elevated temperatures. A research project was initiated at Brookhaven National Laboratory in an attempt to improve the qualitative and quantitative understanding of factors influencing SCC in high temperature service-related environments. An effort is also being made to develop an accelerated test method which could be used to predict the service life of tubes which have been deformed or are actively denting. Several heats of commercial Inconel 600 tubing were procured for testing in deaerated pure and primary water at temperatures from 290 to 365/sup 0/C. U-bend type specimens were used to determine crack initiation times which may be expected for tubes where denting has occurred but is arrested and provide baseline data for judging the accelerating effects of the slow strain rate method. Constant extension rate tests were employed to determine the crack velocities experienced in the crack propagation stage and predict failure times of tubes which are actively denting. 8 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Kinetic mechanism of phenylalanine hydroxylase: intrinsic binding and rate constants from single-turnover experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Kenneth M; Pavon, Jorge Alex; Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2013-02-12

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PheH) catalyzes the key step in the catabolism of dietary phenylalanine, its hydroxylation to tyrosine using tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) and O(2). A complete kinetic mechanism for PheH was determined by global analysis of single-turnover data in the reaction of PheHΔ117, a truncated form of the enzyme lacking the N-terminal regulatory domain. Formation of the productive PheHΔ117-BH(4)-phenylalanine complex begins with the rapid binding of BH(4) (K(d) = 65 μM). Subsequent addition of phenylalanine to the binary complex to form the productive ternary complex (K(d) = 130 μM) is approximately 10-fold slower. Both substrates can also bind to the free enzyme to form inhibitory binary complexes. O(2) rapidly binds to the productive ternary complex; this is followed by formation of an unidentified intermediate, which can be detected as a decrease in absorbance at 340 nm, with a rate constant of 140 s(-1). Formation of the 4a-hydroxypterin and Fe(IV)O intermediates is 10-fold slower and is followed by the rapid hydroxylation of the amino acid. Product release is the rate-determining step and largely determines k(cat). Similar reactions using 6-methyltetrahydropterin indicate a preference for the physiological pterin during hydroxylation.

  7. Maximal power output during incremental cycling test is dependent on the curvature constant of the power-time relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Kristopher Mendes; de Lucas, Ricardo Dantas; do Nascimento Salvador, Paulo Cesar; Guglielmo, Luiz Guilherme Antonacci; Caritá, Renato Aparecido Corrêa; Greco, Camila Coelho; Denadai, Benedito Sérgio

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the maximal power output (Pmax) during an incremental test was dependent on the curvature constant (W') of the power-time relationship. Thirty healthy male subjects (maximal oxygen uptake = 3.58 ± 0.40 L·min(-1)) performed a ramp incremental cycling test to determine the maximal oxygen uptake and Pmax, and 4 constant work rate tests to exhaustion to estimate 2 parameters from the modeling of the power-time relationship (i.e., critical power (CP) and W'). Afterwards, the participants were ranked according to their magnitude of W'. The median third was excluded to form a high W' group (HIGH, n = 10), and a low W' group (LOW, n = 10). Maximal oxygen uptake (3.84 ± 0.50 vs. 3.49 ± 0.37 L·min(-1)) and CP (213 ± 22 vs. 200 ± 29 W) were not significantly different between HIGH and LOW, respectively. However, Pmax was significantly greater for the HIGH (337 ± 23 W) than for the LOW (299 ± 40 W). Thus, in physically active individuals with similar aerobic parameters, W' influences the Pmax during incremental testing.

  8. KABAM Version 1.0 User's Guide and Technical Documentation - Appendix H - Methods for Estimating Metabolism Rate Constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appendix H of KABAM Version 1.0 documentation related to estimating the metabolism rate constant. KABAM is a simulation model used to predict pesticide concentrations in aquatic regions for use in exposure assessments.

  9. Localization in inelastic rate dependent shearing deformations

    KAUST Repository

    Katsaounis, Theodoros

    2016-09-04

    Metals deformed at high strain rates can exhibit failure through formation of shear bands, a phenomenon often attributed to Hadamard instability and localization of the strain into an emerging coherent structure. We verify formation of shear bands for a nonlinear model exhibiting strain softening and strain rate sensitivity. The effects of strain softening and strain rate sensitivity are first assessed by linearized analysis, indicating that the combined effect leads to Turing instability. For the nonlinear model a class of self-similar solutions is constructed, that depicts a coherent localizing structure and the formation of a shear band. This solution is associated to a heteroclinic orbit of a dynamical system. The orbit is constructed numerically and yields explicit shear localizing solutions. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd

  10. Does the measured value of the Planck constant depend on the energy of measurements?

    CERN Document Server

    Massa, Enrico; Jentschel, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of the Avogadro constant opened the way to a comparison of the watt-balance measurements of the Planck constant with the values calculated from the quotients of the Planck constant and the mass of a particle or an atom. Since the energy scales of these measurements span nine energy decades, these data provide insight into the consistency of our understanding of physics.

  11. Regularized learning of linear ordered-statistic constant false alarm rate filters (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havens, Timothy C.; Cummings, Ian; Botts, Jonathan; Summers, Jason E.

    2017-05-01

    The linear ordered statistic (LOS) is a parameterized ordered statistic (OS) that is a weighted average of a rank-ordered sample. LOS operators are useful generalizations of aggregation as they can represent any linear aggregation, from minimum to maximum, including conventional aggregations, such as mean and median. In the fuzzy logic field, these aggregations are called ordered weighted averages (OWAs). Here, we present a method for learning LOS operators from training data, viz., data for which you know the output of the desired LOS. We then extend the learning process with regularization, such that a lower complexity or sparse LOS can be learned. Hence, we discuss what 'lower complexity' means in this context and how to represent that in the optimization procedure. Finally, we apply our learning methods to the well-known constant-false-alarm-rate (CFAR) detection problem, specifically for the case of background levels modeled by long-tailed distributions, such as the K-distribution. These backgrounds arise in several pertinent imaging problems, including the modeling of clutter in synthetic aperture radar and sonar (SAR and SAS) and in wireless communications.

  12. Predicting reaction rate constants of ozone with organic compounds from radical structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xinliang; Yi, Bing; Wang, Xueye; Chen, Jianfang

    2012-05-01

    The reaction rate constants of ozone with organic compounds in the atmosphere were predicted by a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations, for the first time, were carried out on the radicals from organic compounds, at the UB3LYP level of theory with 6-31G(d) basis set. A set of quantum chemical descriptors calculated from the radicals, the energy of the highest occupied molecular orbital of beta spin states (EβHOMO), the molecular average polarizability (α), and the total energy (ET), were used to build the general QSAR model for aliphatic compounds, applying the genetic algorithm (GA) technique and support vector machine (SVM) regression. The root mean square errors (RMSE) are 0.680 for the training set (68 compounds), 0.777 for the validation set (36 compounds) and 0.709 for the test set (35 compounds). Investigated results indicate that the SVM model given here has good predictivity for aliphatic compounds.

  13. α-Terpineol reactions with the nitrate radical: Rate constant and gas-phase products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brian T.; Ham, Jason E.

    The bimolecular rate constant of k rad +α-terpineol (16 ± 4) × 10 -12 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 was measured using the relative rate technique for the reaction of the nitrate radical (NO 3rad ) with α-terpineol (2-(4-methyl-1-cyclohex-3-enyl)propan-2-ol) at 297 ± 3 K and 1 atmosphere total pressure. To more clearly define part of α-terpineol's indoor environment degradation mechanism, the products of α-terpineol + NO 3rad reaction were investigated. The identified reaction products were: acetone, glyoxal (HC( dbnd O)C( dbnd O)H), and methylglyoxal (CH 3C( dbnd O)C( dbnd O)H). The use of derivatizing agents O-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl)hydroxylamine (PFBHA) and N, O-bis(trimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (BSTFA) were used to propose the other major reaction products: 6-hydroxyhept-5-en-2-one, 4-(1-hydroxy-1-methylethyl)-1-methyl-2-oxocyclohexyl nitrate, 5-(1-hydroxy-1-methylethyl)-2-oxocyclohexyl nitrate, 1-formyl-5-hydroxy-4-(hydroxymethyl)-1,5-dimethylhexyl nitrate, and 1,4-diformyl-5-hydroxy-1,5-dimethylhexyl nitrate. The elucidation of these products was facilitated by mass spectrometry of the derivatized reaction products coupled with plausible α-terpineol + NO 3rad reaction mechanisms based on previously published volatile organic compound + NO 3rad gas-phase mechanisms. The additional gas-phase products (2,6,6-trimethyltetrahydro-2 H-pyran-2,5-dicarbaldehyde and 2,2-dimethylcyclohexane-1,4-dicarbaldehyde) are proposed to be the result of cyclization through a reaction intermediate.

  14. Photolysis of ketene at 193 nm and the rate constant for H + HCCO at 297 K.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, G. P.; Kumaran, S. S.; Michael, J. V.; Chemistry

    2000-01-01

    The 193 nm photolysis of ketene was studied by measuring the amount of atomic hydrogen produced when very dilute ketene/Ar and ketene/H{sub 2} mixtures were irradiated by a single pulse from an ArF excimer laser. Absolute concentrations of atomic hydrogen were monitored over a time interval of 0-2.5 ms by using Lyman-{alpha} atomic resonance absorption spectroscopy (ARAS). Four different photodissociation channels of ketene were identified: H{sub 2}CCO + hv gives (a) CH{sub 2}({sup 3}B1) + CO; (b) CH{sub 2}({sup 1}A{sub 1}) + CO; (c) HCCO + H; and (d) C{sub 2}O(b{sup -1}{Sigma}{sup +}) + H{sub 2}. The quantum yields for each channel were measured as {phi}{sub a} = 0.628, {phi}{sub b} = 0.193, {phi}{sub 3}= 0.107, and {phi}{sub d} = 0.072, respectively. To explore the secondary chemistry that occurred when using higher pressure H{sub 2}CCO/Ar mixtures, a mechanism was constructed that used well-documented reactions and, for most processes, rate constants that had already been accurately determined. Modeling studies using this mechanism showed the [H] profile to be determined largely by the rate of the reaction H + HCCO {yields} CH{sub 2} + CO. An excellent fit to all of the experimental data was obtained when k{sub 2} = (1.7 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -10} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1}.

  15. Creatine kinase rate constant in the human heart measured with 3D-localization at 7 tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, William T; Robson, Matthew D; Neubauer, Stefan; Rodgers, Christopher T

    2017-07-01

    We present a new Bloch-Siegert four Angle Saturation Transfer (BOAST) method for measuring the creatine kinase (CK) first-order effective rate constant kf in human myocardium at 7 tesla (T). BOAST combines a variant of the four-angle saturation transfer (FAST) method using amplitude-modulated radiofrequency pulses, phosphorus Bloch-Siegert B1+-mapping to determine the per-voxel flip angles, and nonlinear fitting to Bloch simulations for postprocessing. Optimal flip angles and repetition time parameters were determined from Monte Carlo simulations. BOAST was validated in the calf muscle of two volunteers at 3T and 7T. The myocardial CK forward rate constant was then measured in 10 volunteers at 7T in 82 min (after (1) H localization). BOAST kfCK values were 0.281 ± 0.002 s(-1) in the calf and 0.35 ± 0.05 s(-1) in myocardium. These are consistent with literature values from lower fields. Using a literature values for adenosine triphosphate concentration, we computed CK flux values of 4.55 ± 1.52 mmol kg(-1) s(-1) . The sensitive volume for BOAST depends on the B1 inhomogeneity of the transmit coil. BOAST enables measurement of the CK rate constant in the human heart at 7T, with spatial localization in three dimensions to 5.6 mL voxels, using a 10-cm loop coil. Magn Reson Med 78:20-32, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. © 2016 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  16. Variable dose rate single-arc IMAT delivered with a constant dose rate and variable angular spacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Grace; Earl, Matthew A; Yu, Cedric X

    2009-11-07

    Single-arc intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) has gained worldwide interest in both research and clinical implementation due to its superior plan quality and delivery efficiency. Single-arc IMAT techniques such as the Varian RapidArc deliver conformal dose distributions to the target in one single gantry rotation, resulting in a delivery time in the order of 2 min. The segments in these techniques are evenly distributed within an arc and are allowed to have different monitor unit (MU) weightings. Therefore, a variable dose-rate (VDR) is required for delivery. Because the VDR requirement complicates the control hardware and software of the linear accelerators (linacs) and prevents most existing linacs from delivering IMAT, we propose an alternative planning approach for IMAT using constant dose-rate (CDR) delivery with variable angular spacing. We prove the equivalence by converting VDR-optimized RapidArc plans to CDR plans, where the evenly spaced beams in the VDR plan are redistributed to uneven spacing such that the segments with larger MU weighting occupy a greater angular interval. To minimize perturbation in the optimized dose distribution, the angular deviation of the segments was restricted to single gantry sweep as in the VDR plans but each sector was delivered with a different value of CDR. For four patient cases, including two head-and-neck, one brain and one prostate, all CDR plans developed with the variable spacing scheme produced similar dose distributions to the original VDR plans. For plans with complex angular MU distributions, the number of sectors increased up to four in the CDR plans in order to maintain the original plan quality. Since each sector was delivered with a different dose rate, extra mode-up time (xMOT) was needed between the transitions of the successive sectors during delivery. On average, the delivery times of the CDR plans were approximately less than 1 min longer than the treatment times of the VDR plans, with an average of

  17. Three-minute constant rate step test for detecting exertional dyspnea relief after bronchodilation in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borel B

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Benoit Borel,1,2 Courtney A Wilkinson-Maitland,3 Alan Hamilton,4 Jean Bourbeau,5 Hélène Perrault,6 Dennis Jensen,3,5,7 François Maltais2 1Laboratoire HAVAE, Université de Limoges, Limoges, France; 2Centre de Recherche, Institut Universitaire de Cardiologie et de Pneumologie de Québec, Université Laval, Québec, 3Clinical Exercise and Respiratory Physiology Laboratory, Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education, McGill University, Montréal, QC, 4Boehringer Ingelheim (Canada Limited, Burlington, ON, 5Respiratory Epidemiology and Clinical Research Unit, Montreal Chest Institute, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, QC, 6Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, 7Translational Research in Respiratory Diseases Program, Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC, Canada Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the responsiveness of the 3-minute constant rate step test (3-MST to detect the relief of exertional dyspnea (respiratory discomfort after acute bronchodilation in COPD patients. Patients and methods: A total of 40 patients with moderate-to-severe COPD (mean forced expiratory volume in 1 second: 45.7 (±14.7, % predicted performed four 3-MSTs at randomly assigned stepping rates of 14, 16, 20 and 24 steps/min after inhalation of nebulized ipratropium bromide (500 µg/salbutamol (2.5 mg and saline placebo, which were randomized to order. Patients rated their intensity of perceived dyspnea at the end of each 3-MST using Borg 0–10 category ratio scale. Results: A total of 37 (92.5%, 36 (90%, 34 (85% and 27 (67.5% patients completed all 3 minutes of exercise at 14, 16, 20 and 24 steps/min under both treatment conditions, respectively. Compared with placebo, ipratropium bromide/salbutamol significantly decreased dyspnea at the end of the third minute of exercise at 14 steps/min (by 0.6±1.0 Borg 0–10 scale units, P<0.01 and 16 steps/min (by 0.7±1.3 Borg 0–10 scale

  18. Application of an Artificial Neural Network to the Prediction of OH Radical Reaction Rate Constants for Evaluating Global Warming Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Thomas C

    2016-03-03

    Rate constants for reactions of chemical compounds with hydroxyl radical are a key quantity used in evaluating the global warming potential of a substance. Experimental determination of these rate constants is essential, but it can also be difficult and time-consuming to produce. High-level quantum chemistry predictions of the rate constant can suffer from the same issues. Therefore, it is valuable to devise estimation schemes that can give reasonable results on a variety of chemical compounds. In this article, the construction and training of an artificial neural network (ANN) for the prediction of rate constants at 298 K for reactions of hydroxyl radical with a diverse set of molecules is described. Input to the ANN consists of counts of the chemical bonds and bends present in the target molecule. The ANN is trained using 792 (•)OH reaction rate constants taken from the NIST Chemical Kinetics Database. The mean unsigned percent error (MUPE) for the training set is 12%, and the MUPE of the testing set is 51%. It is shown that the present methodology yields rate constants of reasonable accuracy for a diverse set of inputs. The results are compared to high-quality literature values and to another estimation scheme. This ANN methodology is expected to be of use in a wide range of applications for which (•)OH reaction rate constants are required. The model uses only information that can be gathered from a 2D representation of the molecule, making the present approach particularly appealing, especially for screening applications.

  19. Precise Determination of Charge Dependent Pion-Nucleon-Nucleon Coupling Constants

    CERN Document Server

    Perez, R Navarro; Arriola, E Ruiz

    2016-01-01

    We undertake a covariance error analysis of the pion-nucleon-nucleon coupling constants from the Granada-2013 np and pp database comprising a total of 6713 scattering data. Assuming a unique pion-nucleon coupling constant we obtain $f^2=0.0761(3)$. The effects of charge symmetry breaking on the $^3P_0$, $^3P_1$ and $^3P_2$ partial waves are analyzed and we find $f_{p}^2 = 0.0759(4)$, $f_{0}^2 = 0.079(1)$ and $f_{c}^2 = 0.0763(6)$ with minor correlations among the coupling constants. We successfully test normality for the residuals of the fit.

  20. On the ambiguity of the reaction rate constants in multivariate curve resolution for reversible first-order reaction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Henning; Sawall, Mathias; Kubis, Christoph; Selent, Detlef; Hess, Dieter; Franke, Robert; Börner, Armin; Neymeyr, Klaus

    2016-07-13

    If for a chemical reaction with a known reaction mechanism the concentration profiles are accessible only for certain species, e.g. only for the main product, then often the reaction rate constants cannot uniquely be determined from the concentration data. This is a well-known fact which includes the so-called slow-fast ambiguity. This work combines the question of unique or non-unique reaction rate constants with factor analytic methods of chemometrics. The idea is to reduce the rotational ambiguity of pure component factorizations by considering only those concentration factors which are possible solutions of the kinetic equations for a properly adapted set of reaction rate constants. The resulting set of reaction rate constants corresponds to those solutions of the rate equations which appear as feasible factors in a pure component factorization. The new analysis of the ambiguity of reaction rate constants extends recent research activities on the Area of Feasible Solutions (AFS). The consistency with a given chemical reaction scheme is shown to be a valuable tool in order to reduce the AFS. The new methods are applied to model and experimental data.

  1. The Single-Vendor-Single-Buyer Integrated Production-Shipment Model with Stock Dependent Demand Rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In the integrated production-shipment models for the single-vendor-single-buyer system presented hitherto, thedemand rate of items is treated as a constant. However, many researchers have observed that the presence of morequantities of the same product tends to attract more customers. This suggests that the demand rate should depend on thestock level. This paper presents a single-vendor-single-buyer production-shipment model with the stock dependentdemand rate, based on the demand rate linearly depending upon the stock level at any instant of time.

  2. Theoretical study of the mechanism and rate constant of the B + CO2 reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poully, Benjamin; Bergeat, Astrid; Hannachi, Yacine

    2008-09-04

    The different stationary points on the potential energy surface relative to the title reaction have been reinvestigated at the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ level with relative energies computed at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ level with B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ optimized geometries and by using the G3B3 composite method. Two entrance channels have been identified. The first one corresponds to boron addition at one of the oxygen atoms of the CO 2 molecule leading to trans-BOCO, which is found to be about 27 kcal/mol exothermic with a potential energy barrier of 16.4 kcal/mol (G3B3). The second channel, which has not been identified in previous theoretical works, corresponds to a direct insertion of the boron atom into a CO bond and leads to OBCO. The B + CO 2 --> OBCO step is found to be about 84 kcal/mol exothermic and needs to overcome a potential energy barrier of only 3.6 kcal/mol (G3B3). The rate constant at 300 K of the insertion step, calculated by using TST theory with G3B3 calculated activation energy value, is 5.4 10 (-14) cm (3) molecule (-1) s (-1), in very good agreement with the experimental data ((7.0 +/- 2.8) 10 (-14) cm (3) molecule (-1) s (-1), DiGiuseppe, T. G.; Davidovits, P. J. Chem. Phys. 1981, 74, 3287). The one corresponding to the addition process is found to be several orders of magnitude smaller because of a much higher potential energy barrier. The addition channel would not contribute to the title reaction even at high temperature. A modified Arrhenius equation has been fitted in the 300-1000 K temperature range, which might be useful for chemical models.

  3. 100 kV/2A three-phase constant-current repetitive-rate charging equipment

    CERN Document Server

    Tan Yu Gang; Chen Li Dong; Guo Zhi Gang; Zou Xiao Bing; Luo Min; Cao Shao Yun; Chang An Bi

    2002-01-01

    A 100 kV/2A three-phase constant-current repetitive-rate charging equipment was designed and constructed. A three-phase L-C converter is adopted as constant-current power source. Six Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBTs) are connected in parallel to control the stop of charge. A Programmable Logical Controller (PLC) is the central element of the control unit. The equipment is used in the repetitive-rate discharge features test of the switch. It works stably under the conditions of 2A charging current, 10 Hz operating voltage, 100 kV repetitive rate and 1 mu F capacitor

  4. The dependence of electrostatic solvation energy on dielectric constants in Poisson-Boltzmann calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjong, Harianto; Zhou, Huang-Xiang

    2006-11-28

    The Poisson-Boltzmann equation gives the electrostatic free energy of a solute molecule (with dielectric constant epsilon(l)) solvated in a continuum solvent (with dielectric constant epsilon(s)). Here a simple formula is presented that accurately predicts the electrostatic free energy for all combinations of epsilon(l) and epsilon(s) from the calculation on a single set of epsilon(l) and epsilon(s) values.

  5. Selecting Constant Work Rates for Endurance Testing in COPD : The Role of the Power-Duration Relationship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vaart, Hester; Murgatroyd, Scott R.; Rossiter, Harry B.; Chen, Carey; Casaburi, Richard; Porszasz, Janos

    2014-01-01

    Constant work rate (CWR) exercise testing is highly responsive to therapeutic interventions and reveals physiological and functional benefits. No consensus exists, however, regarding optimal methods for selecting the pre-intervention work rate. We postulate that a CWR whose tolerated duration (t(lim

  6. Kinetics analysis for development of a rate constant estimation model for ultrasonic degradation reaction of methylene blue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Honma, Chiemi; Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Tomoki; Kuroda, Chiaki; Otake, Katsuto; Shono, Atsushi

    2014-07-01

    Ultrasound has been used as an advanced oxidation method for wastewater treatment. Sonochemical degradation of organic compounds in aqueous solution occurs by pyrolysis and/or reaction with hydroxyl radicals. Moreover, kinetics of sonochemical degradation has been proposed. However, the effect of ultrasonic frequency on degradation rate has not been investigated. In our previous study, a simple model for estimating the apparent degradation rate of methylene blue was proposed. In this study, sonochemical degradation of methylene blue was performed at various frequencies. Apparent degradation rate constant was evaluated assuming that sonochemical degradation of methylene blue was a first-order reaction. Specifically, we focused on effects of ultrasonic frequency and power on rate constant, and the applicability of our proposed model was demonstrated. Using this approach, maximum sonochemical degradation rate was observed at 490 kHz, which agrees with a previous investigation into the effect of frequency on the sonochemical efficiency value evaluated by KI oxidation dosimetry. Degradation rate increased with ultrasonic power at every frequency. It was also observed that threshold power must be reached for the degradation reaction to progress. The initial methylene blue concentration and the apparent degradation rate constant have a relation of an inverse proportion. Our proposed model for estimating the apparent degradation rate constant using ultrasonic power and sonochemical efficiency value can apply to this study which extended the frequency and initial concentration range.

  7. Concentration dependence of molal conductivity and dielectric constant of 1-alcohol electrolytes using the compensated arrhenius formalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleshman, Allison M; Petrowsky, Matt; Frech, Roger

    2013-05-02

    The molal conductivity of liquid electrolytes with low static dielectric constants (ε(s) Arrhenius formalism (CAF) to the molal conductivity, Λ, of a family of 1-alcohol electrolytes over a broad concentration range. A scaling procedure is applied that results in an energy of activation (E(a)) and an exponential prefactor (Λ0) that are both concentration dependent. It is shown that the increasing molal conductivity in region II results from the combined effect of (1) a decrease in the energy of activation calculated from the CAF, and (2) an inherent concentration dependence in the exponential prefactor that is partly due to the dielectric constant.

  8. Toward an understanding of the turbidity measurement of heterocoagulation rate constants of dispersions containing particles of different sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Xu, Shenghua; Sun, Zhiwei

    2007-11-01

    Our previous studies have shown that the determination of coagulation rate constants by turbidity measurement becomes impossible for a certain operating wavelength (that is, its blind point) because at this wavelength the change in the turbidity of a dispersion completely loses its response to the coagulation process. Therefore, performing the turbidity measurement in the wavelength range near the blind point should be avoided. In this article, we demonstrate that the turbidity measurement of the rate constant for coagulation of a binary dispersion containing particles of two different sizes (heterocoagulation) presents special difficulties because the blind point shifts with not only particle size but also with the component fraction. Some important aspects of the turbidity measurement for the heterocoagulation rate constant are discussed and experimentally tested. It is emphasized that the T-matrix method can be used to correctly evaluate extinction cross sections of doublets formed during the heterocoagulation process, which is the key data determining the rate constant from the turbidity measurement, and choosing the appropriate operating wavelength and component fraction are important to achieving a more accurate rate constant. Finally, a simple scheme in experimentally determining the sensitivity of the turbidity changes with coagulation over a wavelength range is proposed.

  9. Two Optimization Methods to Determine the Rate Constants of a Complex Chemical Reaction Using FORTRAN and MATLAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Latif A. Seoud

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: For chemical reactions, the determination of the rate constants is both very difficult and a time consuming process. The aim of this research was to develop computer programs for determining the rate constants for the general form of any complex reaction at a certain temperature. The development of such program can be very helpful in the control of industrial processes as well as in the study of the reaction mechanisms. Determination of the accurate values of the rate constants would help in establishing the optimum conditions of reactor design including pressure, temperature and other parameters of the chemical reaction. Approach: From the experimental concentration-time data, initial values of rate constants were calculated. Experimental data encountered several types of errors, including temperature variation, impurities in the reactants and human errors. Simulations of a second order consecutive irreversible chemical reaction of the saponification of diethyl ester were presented as an example of the complex reactions. The rate equations (system of simultaneous differential equations of the reaction were solved to get the analytical concentration versus time profiles. The simulation results were compared with experimental results at each measured point. All deviations between experimental and calculated values were squared and summed up to form a new function. This function was fed into a minimizer routine that gave the optimal rate constants. Two optimization techniques were developed using FORTRAN and MATLAB for accurately determining the rate constants of the reaction at certain temperature from the experimental data. Results: Results showed that the two proposed programs were very efficient, fast and accurate tools to determine the true rate constants of the reaction with less 1% error. The use of the MATLAB embedded subroutines for simultaneously solving the differential equations and minimization of the error function

  10. Rate dependence of the magnetocaloric effect in La-Fe-Si compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasso C.P.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic magnetocaloric effect in La(FexCoySi1-x-y13 with x=0.9 and low Co content of y=0.015 was analysed by calorimetric measurements at constant magnetic field and constant temperature as well as magnetisation relaxation measurements. It is shown that the rate dependence of the measurement, which leads to an increased entropy hysteresis with increasing rate of the driving force (temperature or magnetic field, can be mainly attributed to a thermal contact resistance R between sample and thermal bath of the measurement setup.

  11. Rate Constants for Fine-structure Excitations in O-H Collisions with Error Bars Obtained by Machine Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Daniel; Krems, Roman V.

    2017-02-01

    We present an approach using a combination of coupled channel scattering calculations with a machine-learning technique based on Gaussian Process regression to determine the sensitivity of the rate constants for non-adiabatic transitions in inelastic atomic collisions to variations of the underlying adiabatic interaction potentials. Using this approach, we improve the previous computations of the rate constants for the fine-structure transitions in collisions of O({}3{P}j) with atomic H. We compute the error bars of the rate constants corresponding to 20% variations of the ab initio potentials and show that this method can be used to determine which of the individual adiabatic potentials are more or less important for the outcome of different fine-structure changing collisions.

  12. Kinetics of nonstationary chemiluminescence during the inhibited oxidation of hydrocarbons and determination of the rate constants for peroxy radical decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusina, I.F.; Emanuel, N.M.; Gagarina, A.B.

    1986-05-01

    This paper presents the results of a theoretical analysis of the kinetics of the nonstationary inhibited chemiluminescence and suggests a method for determining the absolute value of the rate constants for the recombination of peroxy radicals and for their removal by reaction with an inhibitor. From the rate curve for the chemiluminescence in the nonstationary regime following the introduction of an inhibitor it is possible simultaneously and independently to determine the absolute values of the rate constants for recombination of the peroxy radicals and their destruction by the inhibitor. Equations are obtained for calculating the time to establish the quasistationary concentration of peroxy radicals and of radicals formed from the inhibitor, using known values of the constants.

  13. Atomic force microscopy: Loading position dependence of cantilever spring constants and detector sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakarelski, Ivan U.; Edwards, Scott A.; Dagastine, Raymond R.; Chan, Derek Y. C.; Stevens, Geoffrey W.; Grieser, Franz

    2007-11-01

    A simple and accurate experimental method is described for determining the effective cantilever spring constant and the detector sensitivity of atomic force microscopy cantilevers on which a colloidal particle is attached. By attaching large (approximately 85μm diameter) latex particles at various positions along the V-shaped cantilevers, we demonstrate how the normal and lateral spring constants as well as the sensitivity vary with loading position. Comparison with an explicit point-load theoretical model has also been used to verify the accuracy of the method.

  14. Temperature dependence of Henry's law constants of thirteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons between 4 C and 31 C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bamford, H.A.; Poster, D.L.; Baker, J.E.

    1999-09-01

    An understanding of the temperature dependence of the Henry's law constant for organic contaminant is critical when modeling the transport and fate of these contaminants in the environment. The Henry's law constants for 13 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were experimentally determined between 4 and 31 C using a gas-stripping apparatus. The Henry's law constants ranged between 0.02 {+-} 0.01 Pa m{sup 3}/mol for chrysene at 4 C and 73.3 {+-} 20 Pa m{sup 3}/mol for 2-methylnaphthalene at 31 C. The temperature dependence of each PAH was modeled using the van't Hoff equation to calculate the enthalpy and entropy of phase change. For nine of the PAHs, the present study reports the first experimental measured temperature dependence of their Henry's law constant. The enthalpies of phase change ranged between 35.4 {+-} 1.9 kJ/mol for 1-methylphenanthrene and 100 {+-} 8 kJ/mol for chrysene. These data can be used to extrapolate Henry's law values within the experimental temperature ranges. For all PAHs except benzo[a]fluorene, the temperature dependence can be predicted within a relative standard error {lt}10%.

  15. High-level theoretical study of the reaction between hydroxyl and ammonia: Accurate rate constants from 200 to 2500 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh Lam; Stanton, John F.

    2017-10-01

    Hydrogen abstraction from NH3 by OH to produce H2O and NH2—an important reaction in combustion of NH3 fuel—was studied with a theoretical approach that combines high level quantum chemistry and advanced chemical kinetics methods. Thermal rate constants calculated from first principles agree well (within 5%-20%) with available experimental data over a temperature range that extends from 200 to 2500 K. Quantum mechanical tunneling effects were found to be important; they lead to a decided curvature and non-Arrhenius behavior for the rate constant.

  16. CONCENTRATION DEPENDENCE OF STERN LAYER CAPACITANCES AND SURFACE EQUILIBRIUM CONSTANTS IN SILICA-BASED NANOFLUIDIC CHANNELS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mathias Bækbo; Frey, J.; Bruus, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    ]. The current models used to describe surface phenomena in nanofluidics can differ by orders of magnitude from experimentally measured values [2]. To mitigate the discrepancies, we hypothesize that the Stern-layer capacitance Cs and the surface equilibrium constants pKa, vary with the composition of the solid...

  17. Dynamics of chest wall volume regulation during constant work rate exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takara, L.S.; Cunha, T.M.; Barbosa, P.; Rodrigues, M.K.; Oliveira, M.F.; Nery, L.E. [Setor de Função Pulmonar e Fisiologia Clínica do Exercício, Disciplina de Pneumologia, Departamento de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Neder, J.A. [Setor de Função Pulmonar e Fisiologia Clínica do Exercício, Disciplina de Pneumologia, Departamento de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Division of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    2012-10-15

    This study evaluated the dynamic behavior of total and compartmental chest wall volumes [(V{sub CW}) = rib cage (V{sub RC}) + abdomen (V{sub AB})] as measured breath-by-breath by optoelectronic plethysmography during constant-load exercise in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thirty males (GOLD stages II-III) underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test to the limit of tolerance (Tlim) at 75% of peak work rate on an electronically braked cycle ergometer. Exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation was considered to be present when end-expiratory (EE) V{sub CW} increased in relation to resting values. There was a noticeable heterogeneity in the patterns of V{sub CW} regulation as EEV{sub CW} increased non-linearly in 17/30 “hyperinflators” and decreased in 13/30 “non-hyperinflators” (P < 0.05). EEV{sub AB} decreased slightly in 8 of the “hyperinflators”, thereby reducing and slowing the rate of increase in end-inspiratory (EI) V{sub CW} (P < 0.05). In contrast, decreases in EEV{sub CW} in the “non-hyperinflators” were due to the combination of stable EEV{sub RC} with marked reductions in EEV{sub AB}. These patients showed lower EIV{sub CW} and end-exercise dyspnea scores but longer Tlim than their counterparts (P < 0.05). Dyspnea increased and Tlim decreased non-linearly with a faster rate of increase in EIV{sub CW} regardless of the presence or absence of dynamic hyperinflation (P < 0.001). However, no significant between-group differences were observed in metabolic, pulmonary gas exchange and cardiovascular responses to exercise. Chest wall volumes are continuously regulated during exercise in order to postpone (or even avoid) their migration to higher operating volumes in patients with COPD, a dynamic process that is strongly dependent on the behavior of the abdominal compartment.

  18. Voltage gating by molecular subunits of Na+ and K+ ion channels: higher-dimensional cubic kinetics, rate constants, and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fohlmeister, Jürgen F

    2015-06-01

    The structural similarity between the primary molecules of voltage-gated Na and K channels (alpha subunits) and activation gating in the Hodgkin-Huxley model is brought into full agreement by increasing the model's sodium kinetics to fourth order (m(3) → m(4)). Both structures then virtually imply activation gating by four independent subprocesses acting in parallel. The kinetics coalesce in four-dimensional (4D) cubic diagrams (16 states, 32 reversible transitions) that show the structure to be highly failure resistant against significant partial loss of gating function. Rate constants, as fitted in phase plot data of retinal ganglion cell excitation, reflect the molecular nature of the gating transitions. Additional dimensions (6D cubic diagrams) accommodate kinetically coupled sodium inactivation and gating processes associated with beta subunits. The gating transitions of coupled sodium inactivation appear to be thermodynamically irreversible; response to dielectric surface charges (capacitive displacement) provides a potential energy source for those transitions and yields highly energy-efficient excitation. A comparison of temperature responses of the squid giant axon (apparently Arrhenius) and mammalian channel gating yields kinetic Q10 = 2.2 for alpha unit gating, whose transitions are rate-limiting at mammalian temperatures; beta unit kinetic Q10 = 14 reproduces the observed non-Arrhenius deviation of mammalian gating at low temperatures; the Q10 of sodium inactivation gating matches the rate-limiting component of activation gating at all temperatures. The model kinetics reproduce the physiologically large frequency range for repetitive firing in ganglion cells and the physiologically observed strong temperature dependence of recovery from inactivation. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Dynamics of chest wall volume regulation during constant work rate exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Takara

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the dynamic behavior of total and compartmental chest wall volumes [(V CW = rib cage (V RC + abdomen (V AB] as measured breath-by-breath by optoelectronic plethysmography during constant-load exercise in patients with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thirty males (GOLD stages II-III underwent a cardiopulmonary exercise test to the limit of tolerance (Tlim at 75% of peak work rate on an electronically braked cycle ergometer. Exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation was considered to be present when end-expiratory (EE V CW increased in relation to resting values. There was a noticeable heterogeneity in the patterns of V CW regulation as EEV CW increased non-linearly in 17/30 "hyperinflators" and decreased in 13/30 "non-hyperinflators" (P < 0.05. EEV AB decreased slightly in 8 of the "hyperinflators", thereby reducing and slowing the rate of increase in end-inspiratory (EI V CW (P < 0.05. In contrast, decreases in EEV CW in the "non-hyperinflators" were due to the combination of stable EEV RC with marked reductions in EEV AB. These patients showed lower EIV CW and end-exercise dyspnea scores but longer Tlim than their counterparts (P < 0.05. Dyspnea increased and Tlim decreased non-linearly with a faster rate of increase in EIV CW regardless of the presence or absence of dynamic hyperinflation (P < 0.001. However, no significant between-group differences were observed in metabolic, pulmonary gas exchange and cardiovascular responses to exercise. Chest wall volumes are continuously regulated during exercise in order to postpone (or even avoid their migration to higher operating volumes in patients with COPD, a dynamic process that is strongly dependent on the behavior of the abdominal compartment.

  20. The Influence of Uncompensated Solution Resistance on the Determination and Standard Electrochemical Rate Constants Using Cyclic Voltammetry, and Some Comparisons with AC Voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-25

    rate constants, k2r using cyclic voltametry . The res tss are expressed in terms of systematic deviations oP sapparent measured" rate constants, k~b(app...Classification) The Influence of Uncompensated Solution Resistance on the Determination and Standard Electro- - . chemical Rate Constants Using Cyclic ...Year MonhOy SAGE COUNT FIELD GROUP Sue-GROUP digital simulation analysis, uncompensated solution resis- I A tance, electrochemical rate constants, cyclic

  1. Exponential Bounds for Ruin Probability in Two Moving Average Risk Models with Constant Interest Rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ding Jun YAO; Rong Ming WANG

    2008-01-01

    The authors consider two discrete-time insurance risk models. Two moving average risk models are introduced to model the surplus process, and the probabilities of ruin are examined in models with a constant interest force. Exponential bounds for ruin probabilities of an infinite time horizon are derived by the martingale method.

  2. [The influence of constant lightening on physiological parameters of rats homeostasis depending on time beginning of exposure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotosh, T A; Vinogradova, I A; Iliukha, V A; Khizhkin, E A

    2013-06-01

    The influence of constant lightening on biomarkers of ageing and rates of male rats aging was studied. It was revealed that the maintenance of rats in the constant lightening regime starting from the age of one month results in accelerated ageing of the organism, the reduction of the phases progressive and stable growth, early occurrence of presenile and senile periods, to the earlier occurrence of water-and-salt metabolism imbalance, accelerate the process of "aging" of the antioxidant system in comparison with the rates of the control group. On the contrary, the maintenance of rats in the constant lightening regime starting from the age of fourteen months slows ageing of the organism, increases body growth, delays appearance of pathological changes in the urine, slows down the "aging" of the enzymatic components of the antioxidant system.

  3. Low-pressure effective fluorescence lifetimes and photo-physical rate constants of one- and two-ring aromatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzler, Thorsten; Faust, Stephan; Dreier, Thomas; Schulz, Christof

    2015-12-01

    One- and two-ring aromatics such as toluene and naphthalene are frequently used molecular tracer species in laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging diagnostics. Quantifying LIF signal intensities requires knowledge of the photo-physical processes that determine the fluorescence quantum yield. Collision-induced and intramolecular energy transfer processes in the excited electronic state closely interact under practical conditions. They can be separated through experiments at variable low pressures. Effective fluorescence lifetimes of gaseous toluene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, anisole, naphthalene, and 1-methylnaphthalene diluted in CO2 were measured after picosecond laser excitation at 266 nm and time-resolved detection of fluorescence intensities. Measurements in an optically accessible externally heated cell between 296 and 475 K and 0.010-1 bar showed that effective fluorescence lifetimes generally decrease with temperature, while the influence of the bath-gas pressure depends on the respective target species and temperature. The results provide non-radiative and fluorescence rate constants and experimentally validate the effect of photo-induced cooling.

  4. Impact of electric-field dependent dielectric constants on two-dimensional electron gases in complex oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peelaers, H.; Gordon, L.; Steiauf, D.; Janotti, A.; Van de Walle, C. G. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5050 (United States); Krishnaswamy, K. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-9560 (United States); Sarwe, A. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5050 (United States); Applied Physics Department, Chalmers Institute of Technology, Gothenburg SE 412-96 (Sweden)

    2015-11-02

    High-density two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) can be formed at complex oxide interfaces such as SrTiO{sub 3}/GdTiO{sub 3} and SrTiO{sub 3}/LaAlO{sub 3}. The electric field in the vicinity of the interface depends on the dielectric properties of the material as well as on the electron distribution. However, it is known that electric fields can strongly modify the dielectric constant of SrTiO{sub 3} as well as other complex oxides. Solving the electrostatic problem thus requires a self-consistent approach in which the dielectric constant varies according to the local magnitude of the field. We have implemented the field dependence of the dielectric constant in a Schrödinger-Poisson solver in order to study its effect on the electron distribution in a 2DEG. Using the SrTiO{sub 3}/GdTiO{sub 3} interface as an example, we demonstrate that including the field dependence results in the 2DEG being confined closer to the interface compared to assuming a single field-independent value for the dielectric constant. Our conclusions also apply to SrTiO{sub 3}/LaAlO{sub 3} as well as other similar interfaces.

  5. The temperature dependence of second and higher order elastic constants of NH4Cl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Alpana; Gaur, N. K.

    2016-05-01

    We have incorporated the translational rotational (TR) coupling effects in the framework of three body force shell model (TSM) to develop an extended TSM (ETSM). This ETSM has been applied to reveal the second order elastic constants (C11, C12 and C44) of NH4Cl as a function of temperature for temperature range 240K≤T≤440K. An abrupt decrease in C44 is observed due to disorder present in the crystal as a result of random orientations of tetrahedral ammonium molecule. Our calculated results show similar trend as revealed by experimental data. Besides third order elastic constants have also been studied and discussed as a function of temperature for 240K≤T≤440K.

  6. Van't Hoff law for temperature dependent Langmuir constants in clathrate hydrate nanocavities

    CERN Document Server

    Lakhlifi, Azzedine

    2015-01-01

    This work gives a van't Hoff law expression of Langmuir constants of different species for determining their occupancy in the nanocavities of clathrate hydrates. The van't Hoff law's parameters are derived from a fit with Langmuir constants calculated using a pairwise site-site interaction potential to model the anisotropic potential environment in the cavities, as a function of temperature. The parameters can be used for calculating clathrates compositions. Results are given for nineteen gas species trapped in the small and large cavities of structure types I and II [1]. The accuracy of this approach is based on a comparison with available experimental data for ethane and cyclo- propane clathrate hydrates. The numerical method applied in this work, was recently validated from a comparison with the spherical cell method based on analytical considerations [1

  7. EFRT M-12 Issue Resolution: Caustic Leach Rate Constants from PEP and Laboratory-Scale Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, Lenna A.; Rassat, Scot D.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Aker, Pamela M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Hanson, Brady D.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Huckaby, James L.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.; Sundaram, S. K.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

    2009-08-14

    concentrated to nominally 20 wt% solids using cross-flow ultrafiltration before adding caustic. The work described in this report addresses the kinetics of caustic leach under WTP conditions, based on tests performed with a Hanford waste simulant. The tests were completed at the lab-scale and in the PEP, which is a 1/4.5-scale mock-up of key PTF process equipment. The purpose of this report is to summarize the results from both scales that are related to caustic leach chemistry to support a scale-up factor for the submodels to be used in the G2 model, which predicts WTP operating performance. The scale-up factor will take the form of an adjustment factor for the rate constant in the boehmite leach kinetic equation in the G2 model.

  8. An economic order quantity model with ramp type demand rate, constant deterioration rate and unit production cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manna Prasenjit

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed an order level inventory system for deteriorating items with demand rate as a ramp type function of time. The finite production rate is proportional to the demand rate and the deterioration rate is independent of time. The unit production cost is inversely proportional to the demand rate. The model with no shortages case is discussed considering that: (a the demand rate is stabilized after the production stopping time and (b the demand is stabilized before the production stopping time. Optimal costs are determined for two different cases.

  9. The form of the rate constant for elementary reactions at equilibrium from MD: framework and proposals for thermokinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Jesudason, C G

    2006-01-01

    The rates or formation and concentration distributions of a dimer reaction showing hysteresis behavior are examined in an ab initio chemical reaction designed as elementary and where the hysteresis structure precludes the formation of transition states (TS) with pre-equilibrium and internal sub-reactions. It was discovered that the the reactivity coefficients, defined as a measure of departure from the zero density rate constant for the forward and backward steps had a ratio that was equal to the activity coefficient ratio for the product and reactant species. From the above observations, a theory is developed with the aid of some proven elementary theorems in thermodynamics, and expressions are derived whereby a feasible experimental and computational method for determining the activity coefficients from the rate constants may be obtained The theory developed is applied to ionic reactions where the standard Bronsted-Bjerrum rate equation and exceptions to this are rationalized, and by viewing ion association...

  10. CONCENTRATION DEPENDENCE OF STERN LAYER CAPACITANCES AND SURFACE EQUILIBRIUM CONSTANTS IN SILICA-BASED NANOFLUIDIC CHANNELS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mathias Bækbo; Frey, J.; Bruus, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    ]. The current models used to describe surface phenomena in nanofluidics can differ by orders of magnitude from experimentally measured values [2]. To mitigate the discrepancies, we hypothesize that the Stern-layer capacitance Cs and the surface equilibrium constants pKa, vary with the composition of the solid-liquid......Fundamental understanding of the unique physics at the solid-liquid interface in nanofluidic channels is essential for the advancement of basic scientific knowledge and the development of novel applications for pharmaceuticals, environmental health and safety, energy harvesting and biometrics [1...

  11. Fully Coriolis-coupled quantum studies of the H + O2 (upsilon i = 0-2, j i = 0,1) --> OH + O reaction on an accurate potential energy surface: integral cross sections and rate constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shi Ying; Sun, Zhigang; Guo, Hua; Zhang, Dong Hui; Honvault, Pascal; Xie, Daiqian; Lee, Soo-Y

    2008-01-31

    We present accurate quantum calculations of the integral cross section and rate constant for the H + O2 --> OH + O combustion reaction on a recently developed ab initio potential energy surface using parallelized time-dependent and Chebyshev wavepacket methods. Partial wave contributions up to J = 70 were computed with full Coriolis coupling, which enabled us to obtain the initial state-specified integral cross sections up to 2.0 eV of the collision energy and thermal rate constants up to 3000 K. The integral cross sections show a large reaction threshold due to the quantum endothermicity of the reaction, and they monotonically increase with the collision energy. As a result, the temperature dependence of the rate constant is of the Arrhenius type. In addition, it was found that reactivity is enhanced by reactant vibrational excitation. The calculated thermal rate constant shows a significant improvement over that obtained on the DMBE IV potential, but it still underestimates the experimental consensus.

  12. Online rate control in digital cameras for near-constant distortion based on minimum/maximum criterion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Yong; Ortega, Antonio

    2000-04-01

    We address the problem of online rate control in digital cameras, where the goal is to achieve near-constant distortion for each image. Digital cameras usually have a pre-determined number of images that can be stored for the given memory size and require limited time delay and constant quality for each image. Due to time delay restrictions, each image should be stored before the next image is received. Therefore, we need to define an online rate control that is based on the amount of memory used by previously stored images, the current image, and the estimated rate of future images. In this paper, we propose an algorithm for online rate control, in which an adaptive reference, a 'buffer-like' constraint, and a minimax criterion (as a distortion metric to achieve near-constant quality) are used. The adaptive reference is used to estimate future images and the 'buffer-like' constraint is required to keep enough memory for future images. We show that using our algorithm to select online bit allocation for each image in a randomly given set of images provides near constant quality. Also, we show that our result is near optimal when a minimax criterion is used, i.e., it achieves a performance close to that obtained by applying an off-line rate control that assumes exact knowledge of the images. Suboptimal behavior is only observed in situations where the distribution of images is not truly random (e.g., if most of the 'complex' images are captured at the end of the sequence.) Finally, we propose a T- step delay rate control algorithm and using the result of 1- step delay rate control algorithm, we show that this algorithm removes the suboptimal behavior.

  13. Accelerating universe and the time-dependent fine-structure constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Yasunori

    2010-11-01

    I start with assuming a gravitational scalar field as the dark-energy supposed to be responsible for the accelerating universe. Also from the point of view of unification, a scalar field implies a time-variability of certain “constants” in Nature. In this context I once derived a relation for the time-variability of the fine-structure constant α: Δα/α =ζ Ƶ(α/π) Δσ, where ζ and Ƶ are the constants of the order one, while σ on the right-hand side is the scalar field in action in the accelerating universe. I use the reduced Planckian units with c=ℏ =MP(=(8π G)-1/2)=1. I then compared the dynamics of the accelerating universe, on one hand, and Δα/α derived from the analyses of QSO absorption lines, Oklo phenomenon, also different atomic clocks in the laboratories, on the other hand. I am here going to discuss the theoretical background of the relation, based on the scalar-tensor theory invented first by Jordan in 1955.

  14. Ratiometric analysis in hyperpolarized NMR (I): test of the two-site exchange model and the quantification of reaction rate constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin Z; Kadlececk, Stephen; Xu, He N; Daye, Dania; Pullinger, Benjamin; Profka, Harrilla; Chodosh, Lewis; Rizi, Rahim

    2013-10-01

    Conventional methods for the analysis of in vivo hyperpolarized (13) C NMR data from the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) reaction usually make assumptions on the stability of rate constants and/or the validity of the two-site exchange model. In this study, we developed a framework to test the validity of the assumption of stable reaction rate constants and the two-site exchange model in vivo via ratiometric fitting of the time courses of the signal ratio L(t)/P(t). Our analysis provided evidence that the LDH enzymatic kinetics observed by hyperpolarized NMR are in near-equilibrium and satisfy the two-site exchange model for only a specific time window. In addition, we quantified both the forward and reverse exchange rate constants of the LDH reaction for the transgenic and mouse xenograft models of breast cancer using the ratio fitting method developed, which includes only two modeling parameters and is less sensitive to the influence of instrument settings/protocols, such as flip angles, degree of polarization and tracer dosage. We further compared the ratio fitting method with a conventional two-site exchange modeling method, i.e. the differential equation fitting method, using both the experimental and simulated hyperpolarized NMR data. The ratio fitting method appeared to fit better than the differential equation fitting method for the reverse rate constant on the mouse tumor data, with less relative errors on average, whereas the differential equation fitting method also resulted in a negative reverse rate constant for one tumor. The simulation results indicated that the accuracy of both methods depends on the width of the transport function, noise level and rate constant ratio; one method may be more accurate than the other based on the experimental/biological conditions aforementioned. We were able to categorize our tumor models into specific conditions of the computer simulation and to estimate the errors of rate quantification. We also discussed possible

  15. Site-specific reaction rate constant measurements for various secondary and tertiary H-abstraction by OH radicals

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad

    2015-02-01

    Reaction rate constants for nine site-specific hydrogen atom (H) abstraction by hydroxyl radicals (OH) have been determined using experimental measurements of the rate constants of Alkane+OH→Products reactions. Seven secondary (S 20, S 21, S 22, S 30, S 31, S 32, and S 33) and two tertiary (T 100 and T 101) site-specific rate constants, where the subscripts refer to the number of carbon atoms (C) connected to the next-nearest-neighbor (N-N-N) C atom, were obtained for a wide temperature range (250-1450K). This was done by measuring the reaction rate constants for H abstraction by OH from a series of carefully selected large branched alkanes. The rate constant of OH with four different alkanes, namely 2,2-dimethyl-pentane, 2,4-dimethyl-pentane, 2,2,4-trimethyl-pentane (iso-octane), and 2,2,4,4-tetramethyl-pentane were measured at high temperatures (822-1367K) using a shock tube and OH absorption diagnostic. Hydroxyl radicals were detected using the narrow-line-width ring-dye laser absorption of the R1(5) transition of OH spectrum near 306.69nm.Previous low-temperature rate constant measurements are added to the current data to generate three-parameter rate expressions that successfully represent the available direct measurements over a wide temperature range (250-1450. K). Similarly, literature values of the low-temperature rate constants for the reaction of OH with seven normal and branched alkanes are combined with the recently measured high-temperature rate constants from our group [1]. Subsequent to that, site-specific rate constants for abstractions from various types of secondary and tertiary H atoms by OH radicals are derived and have the following modified Arrhenius expressions:. S20=8.49×10-17T1.52exp(73.4K/T)cm3molecule-1s-1(250-1450K) S21=1.07×10-15T1.07exp(208.3K/T)cm3molecule-1s-1(296-1440K) S22=2.88×10-13T0.41exp(-291.5K/T)cm3molecule-1s-1(272-1311K) S30=3.35×10-18T1.97exp(323.1K/T)cm3molecule-1s-1(250-1366K) S31=1.60×10-18T2.0exp(500.0K/T)cm3

  16. A frame-dependent gravitational effective action mimics a cosmological constant, but modifies the black hole horizon

    CERN Document Server

    Adler, Stephen L

    2016-01-01

    A frame dependent effective action motivated by the postulates of three-space general coordinate invariance and Weyl scaling invariance exactly mimics a cosmological constant in Robertson-Walker spacetimes. However, in a static spherically symmetric Schwarzschild-like geometry it modifies the black hole horizon structure within microscopic distances of the nominal horizon, in such a way that $g_{00}$ never vanishes. This could have important implications for the black hole "information paradox".

  17. Quantum logic gates from time-dependent global magnetic field in a system with constant exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nenashev, A. V., E-mail: nenashev@isp.nsc.ru; Dvurechenskii, A. V. [Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Zinovieva, A. F. [Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Gornov, A. Yu.; Zarodnyuk, T. S. [Institute for System Dynamics and Control Theory SB RAS, 664033 Irkutsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-21

    We propose a method that implements a universal set of one- and two-quantum-bit gates for quantum computation in a system of coupled electron pairs with constant non-diagonal exchange interaction. In our proposal, suppression of the exchange interaction is performed by the continual repetition of single-spin rotations. A small g-factor difference between the electrons allows for addressing qubits and avoiding strong magnetic field pulses. Numerical experiments were performed to show that, to implement the one- and two-qubit operations, it is sufficient to change the strength of the magnetic field by a few Gauss. This introduces one and then the other electron in a resonance. To determine the evolution of the two-qubit system, we use the algorithms of optimal control theory.

  18. Gravitational constant is likely dependent on the absolute velocity of galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-Guang

    ({2) -1}m (({2) -1}\\underline{m}) and only arises when ({2) -1}m(A) and ({2) -1}m(B) to be superposed. Though the turn-advance values U of ({2) -1}m had been counteracted, but when ({2) -1}m(A) superposes with ({2) -1}m (B) the ne(0) (A) of ({2) -1}m (A) and the ne (0) (B) of ({2) -1} m(B) can interact directly. The interaction shows as the piπ exchange force with the short-distance and saturation characters as the covalence. One nucleon has two ({2) -1}m (nuclear valences), the nuclear structure stability is dependent on the conjugation state of nuclear valences (to constitute nucleus). When two nuclear valences of all nucleons are conjugated entirely in the valences saturation state, then it is most stabilization and this element in a large natural abundance. The cubic with 4 angles, hexagon with 6 angles, double floor hexagon with 10 angles and three floor hexagon with 14 angles four kinds formation are all nuclear valences in saturation state, each angle also may be two or four particles, so that these elements: He (4) , Li, Be, B, C (12) , N (14) , O (16) , Ne (20) , Mg (24) , Si (28) , Fe (56) , Ni (58) , Ni (62) , Sn (112) ,Pb (208) are abundance, it accord to the fact. The charge q is the turn quantity U, and the mass m is absolute value of U. From \\underline{P} • \\underline{P} = 0: m (0) = e (0) = ±± (1/2 (1/2) ) (E (0) /c (2) ), q _{0} = e _{0} (nuυ _{0} (0) nuυ) = 2 (1/2) 2 e (0) = 2 (1/2) 2 q (0) . The electromagnetic (weak) interaction constant is alphaα = q _{℮} q _{℮} /h c (betaβ = q (0) q (0) /h c). The electronic outside layer is one _{0}nuυ (1 q (0) ) and one e = 9 e _{0} (nuυ _{0} (0) nuυ) = 9 q _{0}, q _{℮} = 9.5q _{0} = 19*2 (1/2) q (0) . The alphaα / betaβ = (q _{℮} (2) / h c) / (q (0) (2) /h c) = (19 *2 (1/2) ) (2) = 722. To take alphaα = 1/137.0302, then betaβ = alphaα / 722 = 1.010756*10 (-5) , alphaα is about 10 _{0}nuυ /(10 _{0}nuυ + 1359 nuυ _{0}). Because of the ne (0) of nucleon inside layer (5) m, (4) m

  19. Optimal False Discovery Rate Control for Dependent Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jichun; Cai, T. Tony; Maris, John; Li, Hongzhe

    2013-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of optimal false discovery rate control when the test statistics are dependent. An optimal joint oracle procedure, which minimizes the false non-discovery rate subject to a constraint on the false discovery rate is developed. A data-driven marginal plug-in procedure is then proposed to approximate the optimal joint procedure for multivariate normal data. It is shown that the marginal procedure is asymptotically optimal for multivariate normal data with a short-range dependent covariance structure. Numerical results show that the marginal procedure controls false discovery rate and leads to a smaller false non-discovery rate than several commonly used p-value based false discovery rate controlling methods. The procedure is illustrated by an application to a genome-wide association study of neuroblastoma and it identifies a few more genetic variants that are potentially associated with neuroblastoma than several p-value-based false discovery rate controlling procedures. PMID:23378870

  20. Theory and Experiment on the Measurement of Kinetic Rate Constants for Surfactant Exchange at an Air/Water Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan; Green; Maldarelli

    1998-09-15

    The paper focuses on the measurement of the rate constants for the kinetic steps of adsorption and desorption of surfactant between an air/water surface and the aqueous bulk sublayer adjacent to the surface. Kinetic constants are determined in nonequilibrium experiments in which either a clean surface is contacted with a bulk solution and surfactant diffuses toward and adsorbs onto the interface, or the area of an established monolayer in equilibrium with an underlying solution is changed, and surfactant exchanges between the surface and bulk. The dynamic tension change due to the surfactant exchange is measured, and compared to predictions of kinetic-diffusive transport models in order to infer the kinetic coefficients as well the diffusion coefficients. Model comparisons for highly surface active surfactants have resolved only the diffusion coefficient as the transport was found to be diffusion controlled; kinetic constants have only been established for less active materials such as alcohols or bolaform surfactants. In this study, we demonstrate that kinetics can be differentiated from diffusion in clean interface adsorption and re-equilibration if high bulk concentrations of the surfactant are used, or in re-equilibration, if the surface is compressed sufficiently. We first establish theoretically that mass transfer shifts from diffusion-limited to mixed as the bulk concentration increases in clean interface adsorption, or the surface compression is increased in re-equilibration. We then experimentally verify this idea by using the polyethoxylated surfactant C12E6 (C12H25 (OCH2CH2)6-OH) and by measuring dynamic surface tensions in clean interface adsorption and re-equilibration, respectively by the shape analysis of pendant bubbles. We find values of 6 x 10(-10) m2/s for the diffusion coefficient, and 1.4 x 10(-5) m/sec and 1.4 x 10(-4) s-1 for the adsorption and desorption rate constants, respectively, in a Frumkin kinetic formulation. While the adsorption

  1. A generalized Prandtl-Ishlinskii model for characterizing the rate-independent and rate-dependent hysteresis of piezoelectric actuators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Jinqiang; Zhang, Xianmin; Wu, Heng

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a generalized hysteresis model is developed to describe both rate-independent and rate-dependent hysteresis in piezoelectric actuators. Based on the classical Prandtl-Ishlinskii (P-I) model, the developed model adds a quadratic polynomial and makes other small changes. When it is used to describe rate-independent hysteresis, the parameters of the model are constants, which can be identified by self-adaptive particle swarm optimization. The effectiveness of this rate-independent modified P-I model is demonstrated by comparing simulation results of the developed model and the classic Prandtl-Ishlinskii model. Simulation results suggest that the rate-independent modified P-I model can describe hysteresis more precisely. Compared with the classical P-I model, the rate-independent modified P-I model reduces modeling error by more than 50%. When it is used to describe rate-independent hysteresis, a one-side operator is adopted and the parameters are functions with input frequency. The results of the experiments and simulations have shown that the proposed models can accurately describe both rate-independent and rate-dependent hysteresis in piezoelectric actuators.

  2. Analytical calculations of frequency-dependent hypermagnetizabilities and Cotton-Mouton constants using London atomic orbitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorvaldsen, Andreas J.; Ruud, Kenneth; Rizzo, Antonio; Coriani, Sonia

    2008-10-01

    We present the first gauge-origin-independent, frequency-dependent calculations of the hypermagnetizability anisotropy, which determines the temperature-independent contribution to magnetic-field-induced linear birefringence, the so-called Cotton-Mouton effect. A density-matrix-based scheme for analytical calculations of frequency-dependent molecular properties for self-consistent field models has recently been developed, which is also valid with frequency- and field-dependent basis sets. Applying this scheme to Hartree-Fock wave functions and using London atomic orbitals in order to obtain gauge-origin-independent results, we have calculated the hypermagnetizability anisotropy. Our results show that the use of London orbitals leads to somewhat better basis-set convergence for the hypermagnetizability compared to conventional basis sets and that London orbitals are mandatory in order to obtain reliable magnetizability anisotropies.

  3. Strain rate dependence in plasticized and un-plasticized PVC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siviour C.R.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available An experimental and analytical investigation has been made into the mechanical behaviour of two poly (vinyl chloride (PVC polymers – an un-plasticized PVC and a diisononyl phthalate (DINP-plasticized PVC. Measurements of the compressive stress-strain behaviour of the PVCs at strain rates ranging from 10−3 to 103s−1 and temperatures from − 60 to 100∘C are presented. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis was also performed in order to understand the material transitions observed in compression testing as the strain rate is increased. This investigation develops a better understanding of the interplay between the temperature dependence and rate dependence of polymers, with a focus on locating the temperature and rate-dependent material transitions that occur during high rate testing.

  4. Strain rate dependence in plasticized and un-plasticized PVC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, M. J.; Siviour, C. R.

    2012-08-01

    An experimental and analytical investigation has been made into the mechanical behaviour of two poly (vinyl chloride) (PVC) polymers - an un-plasticized PVC and a diisononyl phthalate (DINP)-plasticized PVC. Measurements of the compressive stress-strain behaviour of the PVCs at strain rates ranging from 10-3 to 103s-1 and temperatures from - 60 to 100∘C are presented. Dynamic Mechanical Analysis was also performed in order to understand the material transitions observed in compression testing as the strain rate is increased. This investigation develops a better understanding of the interplay between the temperature dependence and rate dependence of polymers, with a focus on locating the temperature and rate-dependent material transitions that occur during high rate testing.

  5. Dynamics of a Ivlev-type predator-prey system with constant rate harvesting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ling Li [Institute of Nonlinear Analysis, College of Mathematics and Information Science, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou 325035 (China); Wang Weiming [Institute of Nonlinear Analysis, College of Mathematics and Information Science, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou 325035 (China)], E-mail: weimingwang2003@163.com

    2009-08-30

    In this paper, by using the analysis of qualitative method and bifurcation theory, we investigate the dynamical properties of the Ivlev-type predator-prey model with nonzero constant prey harvesting and with or without time delay, respectively. It is shown that the system we considered can exhibit the subcritical and supercritical Hopf bifurcation. We also study the effect of the time delay on the dynamics of the system. By choosing the delay {tau} as a bifurcation parameter, we show that Hopf bifurcation can occur as the delay {tau} crosses some critical values. The direction and stability of the Hopf bifurcation are investigated by following the procedure of deriving normal form given by Faria and Magalhaes. Finally, numerical simulations are performed to illustrate the obtained results.

  6. The saddle-node-transcritical bifurcation in a population model with constant rate harvesting

    CERN Document Server

    Saputra, K V I; Quispel, G R W

    2010-01-01

    We study the interaction of saddle-node and transcritical bifurcations in a Lotka-Volterra model with a constant term representing harvesting or migration. Because some of the equilibria of the model lie on an invariant coordinate axis, both the saddle-node and the transcritical bifurcations are of codimension one. Their interaction can be associated with either a single or a double zero eigenvalue. We show that in the former case, the local bifurcation diagram is given by a nonversal unfolding of the cusp bifurcation whereas in the latter case it is a nonversal unfolding of a degenerate Bogdanov-Takens bifurcation. We present a simple model for each of the two cases to illustrate the possible unfoldings. We analyse the consequences of the generic phase portraits for the Lotka-Volterra system.

  7. Glycaemic responses to different types of bread in insulin-dependent diabetic subjects (IDDM): studies at constant insulinaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, O; Winther, E; Hermansen, K

    1991-02-01

    To study the glycaemic effect of various Danish bread types in insulin-dependent diabetic subjects (IDDM) we looked at the incremental blood glucose areas after isocaloric meals of grained wholemeal rye bread, wholemeal bread (graham bread) and white bread in seven C-peptide negative diabetic subjects. Furthermore, we evaluated the glycaemic potency of dried fruits by exchanging 40 per cent of the starch of grained wholemeal rye bread as dried figs. Prior to the meal intake the patients had attained normoglycaemia and isoinsulinaemia by means of the artificial pancreas. The four test meals containing 50 g of available carbohydrate were taken in random order. The postprandial blood glucose response areas after whole-meal bread (1037 +/- 113 mM X 180 min) and white bread (1021 +/- 100 mM X 180 min) were significantly higher than that to grained wholemeal rye bread (786 +/- 66 mM X 180 min, P less than 0.05). Exchange of 40 per cent of the complex carbohydrate as grained wholemeal rye bread with simple sugars, such as figs, had no influence on the blood glucose response (786 +/- 66 mM X 180 min vs. 766 +/- 56 mM X 180 min). Constant and identical serum-free insulin levels at 30 mU/l and similar amounts of glucose lost in the urine were found after the four test meals. In conclusion, the difference in extraction rate of wheat in the form of white flour (0, 7) and wholemeal flour (1, 0) was not reflected in the glycaemic responses in IDDM subjects. Grained wholemeal rye bread is a fibre-rich, cheap nutrient which elicits a significantly lower glycaemic response compared to wholemeal and white bread and can be recommended to diabetic subjects.

  8. Theoretical Prediction of Rate Constants for Hydrogen Abstraction by OH, H, O, CH3, and HO2 Radicals from Toluene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shu-Hao; Guo, Jun-Jiang; Li, Rui; Wang, Fan; Li, Xiang-Yuan

    2016-05-26

    Hydrogen abstraction from toluene by OH, H, O, CH3, and HO2 radicals are important reactions in oxidation process of toluene. Geometries and corresponding harmonic frequencies of the reactants, transition states as well as products involved in these reactions are determined at the B3LYP/6-31G(2df,p) level. To achieve highly accurate thermochemical data for these stationary points on the potential energy surfaces, the Gaussian-4(G4) composite method was employed. Torsional motions are treated either as free rotors or hindered rotors in calculating partion functions to determine thermodynamic properties. The obtained standard enthalpies of formation for reactants and some prodcuts are shown to be in excellent agreement with experimental data with the largest error of 0.5 kcal mol(-1). The conventional transition state theory (TST) with tunneling effects was adopted to determine rate constants of these hydrogen abstraction reactions based on results from quantum chemistry calculations. To faciliate its application in kinetic modeling, the obtained rate constants are given in Arrhenius expression: k(T) = AT(n) exp(-EaR/T). The obtained reaction rate constants also agree reasonably well with available expermiental data and previous theoretical values. Branching ratios of these reactions have been determined. The present reaction rates for these reactions have been used in a toluene combustion mechanism, and their effects on some combustion properties are demonstrated.

  9. Ab-Initio Based Computation of Rate Constants of Spin Forbidden Transitions in (Bio)inorganic Complexes and Metalloproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkanlar, Abdullah; Rodriguez, Jorge H.

    2009-03-01

    Some (bio)chemical reactions are non-adiabatic processes whereby the total spin angular momentum, before and after the reaction, is not conserved. These are named spin- forbidden reactions. The application of spin density functional theory (SDFT) to the prediction of rate constants is a challenging task of fundamental and practical importance. We apply non-adiabatic transition state theory in conjunction with SDFT to predict the rate constant of the spin- forbidden dihydrogen binding to iron tetracarbonyl. To model the surface hopping probability between singlet and triplet states, the Landau-Zener formalism is used. The lowest energy point for singlet-triplet crossing, known as minimum energy crossing point (MECP), was located and used to compute, in a semi-quantum approach, reaction rate constants at 300 K. The predicted rates are in good agreement with experiment. In addition, we present results which are relevant to the ligand binding reactions of metalloproteins. This work is supported in part by NSF via CAREER award CHE-0349189 (JHR).

  10. Constant growth rate can be supported by decreasing energy flux and increasing aerobic glycolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slavov, Nikolai; Budnik, Bogdan A; Schwab, David; Airoldi, Edoardo M; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Fermenting glucose in the presence of enough oxygen to support respiration, known as aerobic glycolysis, is believed to maximize growth rate. We observed increasing aerobic glycolysis during exponential growth, suggesting additional physiological roles for aerobic glycolysis. We investigated such ro

  11. Constant growth rate can be supported by decreasing energy flux and increasing aerobic glycolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slavov, Nikolai; Budnik, Bogdan A; Schwab, David; Airoldi, Edoardo M; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Fermenting glucose in the presence of enough oxygen to support respiration, known as aerobic glycolysis, is believed to maximize growth rate. We observed increasing aerobic glycolysis during exponential growth, suggesting additional physiological roles for aerobic glycolysis. We investigated such

  12. The effect of concentration- and temperature-dependent dielectric constant on the activity coefficient of NaCl electrolyte solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valiskó, Mónika; Boda, Dezső, E-mail: boda@almos.vein.hu [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Pannonia, P.O. Box 158, H-8201 Veszprém (Hungary)

    2014-06-21

    Our implicit-solvent model for the estimation of the excess chemical potential (or, equivalently, the activity coefficient) of electrolytes is based on using a dielectric constant that depends on the thermodynamic state, namely, the temperature and concentration of the electrolyte, ε(c, T). As a consequence, the excess chemical potential is split into two terms corresponding to ion-ion (II) and ion-water (IW) interactions. The II term is obtained from computer simulation using the Primitive Model of electrolytes, while the IW term is estimated from the Born treatment. In our previous work [J. Vincze, M. Valiskó, and D. Boda, “The nonmonotonic concentration dependence of the mean activity coefficient of electrolytes is a result of a balance between solvation and ion-ion correlations,” J. Chem. Phys. 133, 154507 (2010)], we showed that the nonmonotonic concentration dependence of the activity coefficient can be reproduced qualitatively with this II+IW model without using any adjustable parameter. The Pauling radii were used in the calculation of the II term, while experimental solvation free energies were used in the calculation of the IW term. In this work, we analyze the effect of the parameters (dielectric constant, ionic radii, solvation free energy) on the concentration and temperature dependence of the mean activity coefficient of NaCl. We conclude that the II+IW model can explain the experimental behavior using a concentration-dependent dielectric constant and that we do not need the artificial concept of “solvated ionic radius” assumed by earlier studies.

  13. The effect of concentration- and temperature-dependent dielectric constant on the activity coefficient of NaCl electrolyte solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiskó, Mónika; Boda, Dezső

    2014-06-21

    Our implicit-solvent model for the estimation of the excess chemical potential (or, equivalently, the activity coefficient) of electrolytes is based on using a dielectric constant that depends on the thermodynamic state, namely, the temperature and concentration of the electrolyte, ε(c, T). As a consequence, the excess chemical potential is split into two terms corresponding to ion-ion (II) and ion-water (IW) interactions. The II term is obtained from computer simulation using the Primitive Model of electrolytes, while the IW term is estimated from the Born treatment. In our previous work [J. Vincze, M. Valiskó, and D. Boda, "The nonmonotonic concentration dependence of the mean activity coefficient of electrolytes is a result of a balance between solvation and ion-ion correlations," J. Chem. Phys. 133, 154507 (2010)], we showed that the nonmonotonic concentration dependence of the activity coefficient can be reproduced qualitatively with this II+IW model without using any adjustable parameter. The Pauling radii were used in the calculation of the II term, while experimental solvation free energies were used in the calculation of the IW term. In this work, we analyze the effect of the parameters (dielectric constant, ionic radii, solvation free energy) on the concentration and temperature dependence of the mean activity coefficient of NaCl. We conclude that the II+IW model can explain the experimental behavior using a concentration-dependent dielectric constant and that we do not need the artificial concept of "solvated ionic radius" assumed by earlier studies.

  14. Continuum modeling of rate-dependent granular flows in SPH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Ryan C.; Andrade, José E.

    2016-09-01

    We discuss a constitutive law for modeling rate-dependent granular flows that has been implemented in smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). We model granular materials using a viscoplastic constitutive law that produces a Drucker-Prager-like yield condition in the limit of vanishing flow. A friction law for non-steady flows, incorporating rate-dependence and dilation, is derived and implemented within the constitutive law. We compare our SPH simulations with experimental data, demonstrating that they can capture both steady and non-steady dynamic flow behavior, notably including transient column collapse profiles. This technique may therefore be attractive for modeling the time-dependent evolution of natural and industrial flows.

  15. Continuum modeling of rate-dependent granular flows in SPH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Ryan C.; Andrade, José E.

    2017-01-01

    We discuss a constitutive law for modeling rate-dependent granular flows that has been implemented in smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). We model granular materials using a viscoplastic constitutive law that produces a Drucker-Prager-like yield condition in the limit of vanishing flow. A friction law for non-steady flows, incorporating rate-dependence and dilation, is derived and implemented within the constitutive law. We compare our SPH simulations with experimental data, demonstrating that they can capture both steady and non-steady dynamic flow behavior, notably including transient column collapse profiles. This technique may therefore be attractive for modeling the time-dependent evolution of natural and industrial flows.

  16. Dependency of working temperature and equivalent constant of concentric disk-type piezoelectric transformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, I.-Mu; Lai, Yi-Ying; Wu, Wen-Jong; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents the effect of equivalent constant and output power on working temperature of concentric disk-type piezoelectric transformer. To analyze the energy loss in the piezoelectric transformer, the equivalent circuit model was built. Losses in the piezoelectric transformer are considered generally having two different parts: dielectric loss and mechanical loss. First of all, a measurement circuit based on an impedance analyzer was built. Then, the circuit simulation software PSIM was employed to verify the experimental results obtained. Secondly, according to the experimental results, temperature and input voltage are the two factors which influenced the energy loss in a piezoelectric transformer. As the input voltage and temperature increased, the energy loss rises, as well. In addition, when the input voltage is low, the temperature becomes the main influencing factor for energy loss of the piezoelectric transformer. On the other hand, when the input voltage is high, the main factor for energy loss of the piezoelectric transformer is the input voltage other than the temperature. Furthermore, the control loop that dealt with the energy loss of the piezoelectric transformer was proposed. At different temperatures, the variations of losses of the piezoelectric transformer are presented in this paper. Finally, the dielectric loss and mechanical loss are combined to analyze the losses within piezoelectric transformers. Then, the relationship between the output power of the piezoelectric transformer and the temperature was revealed. The result showed that as the temperature increased, the output power decreased.

  17. Evaluation of the reaction rate constants for the gas-phase Al-CH4-air combustion chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharipov, A. S.; Titova, N. S.; Starik, A. M.

    2012-10-01

    The most likely reaction pathways and reaction products in the Al-CH4-O2-N2 system are investigated using density functional theory and ab initio calculations. The B3LYP functional with extended 6-311+G(3df,2p) basis set as well as the CBS-QB3 composite method are mainly utilised. Theoretical analysis of corresponding reaction rate constants is also performed with the use of simple theoretical models. A critical overview of current knowledge on combustion-relevant reactions with aluminium compounds is given. On the basis of critical comparison of available experimental kinetic data with theoretical calculations, the approximations for rate constants for 44 reversible elementary reactions involving Al-containing species are recommended for use in combustion issues.

  18. Use of Closed Vessel as a Constant Pressure Apparatus for the Measurement of the Rate of Burning of Propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Vittal

    1980-04-01

    Full Text Available A method for the determination of burning rates of propellants whose from function is unknown is introduced. The method consists of burning in the closed vessel, a known charge weight of the test propellant alongwith a known pressure which remains nearly constant during the burning of the test propellant whose web size is the only quantity required for the evaluation of its rate of burning. The test propellants burns at near constant pressure conditions just as in the strand burner technique. This method can be applied to any unknown propellant of any shape whose web size can be measured and very large webs also can be used. In addition, the measurement of the records and the computation are very simple.

  19. Absolute rate constants for the reaction of NO with a series of peroxy radicals in the gas at 295 K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sehested, J.; Nielsen, O.J.; Wallington, T.J.

    1993-01-01

    The rate constants for the reaction of NO with a series of peroxy radicals: CH3O2, C2H5O2, (CH3)3CCH2O2, (CH3)3CC(CH3)2CH2O2, CH2FO2, CH2ClO2, CH2BrO2, CHF2O2, CF2ClO2, CHF2CF2O2, CF3CF2O2, CFCl2CH2O2 and CF2ClCH2O2 were measured at 298 K and a total pressure of 1 atm. The rate constants were obt...... obtained using the absolute technique of pulse radiolysis combined with time-resolved UV-VIS spectroscopy. The results are discussed in terms of reactivity trends and the atmospheric chemistry of peroxy radicals....

  20. Characterization of Full Set Material Constants and Their Temperature Dependence for Piezoelectric Materials Using Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Liguo; Cao, Wenwu

    2016-04-27

    During the operation of high power electromechanical devices, a temperature rise is unavoidable due to mechanical and electrical losses, causing the degradation of device performance. In order to evaluate such degradations using computer simulations, full matrix material properties at elevated temperatures are needed as inputs. It is extremely difficult to measure such data for ferroelectric materials due to their strong anisotropic nature and property variation among samples of different geometries. Because the degree of depolarization is boundary condition dependent, data obtained by the IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) impedance resonance technique, which requires several samples with drastically different geometries, usually lack self-consistency. The resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) technique allows the full set material constants to be measured using only one sample, which can eliminate errors caused by sample to sample variation. A detailed RUS procedure is demonstrated here using a lead zirconate titanate (PZT-4) piezoceramic sample. In the example, the complete set of material constants was measured from room temperature to 120 °C. Measured free dielectric constants and  were compared with calculated ones based on the measured full set data, and piezoelectric constants d15 and d33 were also calculated using different formulas. Excellent agreement was found in the entire range of temperatures, which confirmed the self-consistency of the data set obtained by the RUS.

  1. Different Cooling Rate Dependences of Different Microstructure Units in Aluminium Glass by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chang-Song; ZHU Zhen-Gang; XIA Jun-Chao; SUN De-Yan

    2000-01-01

    Constant-pressure molecular dynamics simulation and the pair analysis technique have been performed to study the microstructural evolution of aluminium during rapid solidification. The microstructure characteristics of icosahedral ordering increase with decrease of the cooling rate, whereas the microstructure unit characteristics of hcp crystalline structure decrease. There are two kinds of microstructure units which are similar to those in the fcc crystal containing interstitialcies. These two kinds of microscopic units are nearly independent of the cooling rate. The microscopic structural unit characteristics of fcc crystalline structure do not depend on the cooling rate either. These results may help us understand the microstructure of glass and its stability.

  2. Long-range dependence in interest rates and monetary policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cajueiro, Daniel O.; Tabak, Benjamin M.

    2008-01-01

    This Letter studies the dynamics of Brazilian interest rates for short-term maturities. The Letter employs developed techniques in the econophysics literature and tests for long-range dependence in the term structure of these interest rates for the last decade. Empirical results suggest that the degree of long-range dependence has changed over time due to changes in monetary policy, specially in the short-end of the term structure of interest rates. Therefore, we show that it is possible to identify monetary arrangements using these techniques from econophysics.

  3. Long-range dependence in Interest Rates and Monetary Policy

    CERN Document Server

    Cajueiro, D O; Cajueiro, Daniel O.; Tabak, Benjamin M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper studies the dynamics of Brazilian interest rates for short-term maturities. The paper employs developed techniques in the econophysics literature and tests for long-range dependence in the term structure of these interest rates for the last decade. Empirical results suggest that the degree of long-range dependence has changed over time due to changes in monetary policy, specially in the short-end of the term structure of interest rates. Therefore, we show that it is possible to identify monetary arrangements using these techniques from econophysics.

  4. The universality of enzymatic rate-temperature dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Mikael; Wieczorek, Grzegorz; Rosenne, Shaked; Tawfik, Dan S

    2014-01-01

    Organismal adaptation to extreme temperatures yields enzymes with distinct configurational stabilities, including thermophilic and psychrophilic enzymes, which are adapted to high and low temperatures, respectively. These enzymes are widely assumed to also have unique rate-temperature dependencies. Thermophilic enzymes, for example, are considered optimal at high temperatures and effectively inactive at low temperatures due to excess rigidity. Surveying published data, we find that thermophilic, mesophilic, and psychrophilic enzymes exhibit indistinguishable rate-temperature dependencies. Furthermore, given the nonenzymatic rate-temperature dependency, all enzymes, regardless of their operation temperatures, become >10-fold less powerful catalysts per 25 °C temperature increase. Among other factors, this loss of rate acceleration may be ascribed to thermally induced vibrations compromising the active-site catalytic configuration, suggesting that many enzymes are in fact insufficiently rigid.

  5. Unified equation for access to rate constants of first-order reactions in dynamic and on-column reaction chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapp, O

    2006-01-01

    A unified equation to evaluate elution profiles of reversible as well as irreversible (pseudo-) first-order reactions in dynamic chromatography and on-column reaction chromatography has been derived. Rate constants k1 and k(-1) and Gibbs activation energies are directly obtained from the chromatographic parameters (retention times tR(A) and tR(B) of the interconverting or reacting species A and B, the peak widths at half-height wA and wB, and the relative plateau height h(p)), the initial amounts A0 and B0 of the reacting species, and the equilibrium constant K(A/B). The calculation of rate constants requires only a few iterative steps without the need of performing a computationally extensive simulation of elution profiles. The unified equation was validated by comparison with a data set of 125,000 simulated elution profiles to confirm the quality of this equation by statistical means and to predict the minimal experimental requirements. Surprisingly, the recovery rate from a defined data set is on average 35% higher using the unified equation compared to the evaluation by iterative computer simulation.

  6. Computational study on the mechanisms and rate constants of the OH-initiated oxidation of ethyl vinyl ether in atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dandan; Cao, Haijie; Li, Jing; Li, Mingyue; He, Maoxia; Hu, Jingtian

    2014-09-01

    The hydroxylation reactions of ethyl vinyl ether (EVE) in the present of O2 and NO are analyzed by using MPWB1K/6-311++G(3df,2p)//MPWB1K/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory. According to the calculated thermodynamic data, the detailed reaction mechanisms of EVE and OH are proposed. All of the ten possible reaction pathways are discussed. The major products of the title reaction are ethyl formate and formaldehyde, which is in accordance with experimental detection. The rate constants of the primary reactions over the temperature of 250-400K and the pressure range of 100-2000Torr are computed by employing MESMER program. At 298K and 760Torr, OH-addition channels are predominate and the total rate constant is ktot=4.53×10(-11)cm(3)molecule(-1)s(-1). The Arrhenius equation is obtained as ktot=6.27×10(-12)exp(611.5/T), according to the rate constants given at different temperatures. Finally, the atmospheric half life of EVE with respect to OH is estimated to be 2.13h.

  7. APPROXIMATION OF BIODEGRADATION RATE CONSTANTS FOR MONOAROMATIC HYDROCARBONS (BTEX) IN GROUND WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two methods were used to approximate site-specific biodegradation rates of monoaromatic hydrocarbons (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes [BTEX]) dissolved in ground water. Both use data from monitoring wells and the hydrologic properties of the quifer to estimate a biode...

  8. The effect of solvation on the radiation damage rate constants for adenine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milhøj, Birgitte Olai; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2016-01-01

    in calculations of Gibbs free energies and reaction rates for the reaction between the OH radical and the DNA nucleobase adenine using Density Functional Theory at the ωB97X-D/6-311++G(2df,2pd) level with the Eckart tunneling correction. The solvent, water, has been included through either the implicit...

  9. Rate Constants and Activation Energies for Gas‐Phase Reactions of Three Cyclic Volatile Methyl Siloxanes with the Hydroxyl Radical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safron, Andreas; Strandell, Michael; Kierkegaard, Amelie

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Reaction with hydroxyl radicals (OH) is the major pathway for removal of cyclic volatile methyl siloxanes (cVMS) from air. We present new measurements of second‐order rate constants for reactions of the cVMS octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5), and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6) with OH determined at temperatures between 313 and 353 K. Our measurements were made using the method of relative rates with cyclohexane as a reference substance and were conducted in a 140‐mL gas‐phase reaction chamber with online mass spectrometry analysis. When extrapolated to 298 K, our measured reaction rate constants of D4 and D5 with the OH radical are 1.9 × 10−12 (95% confidence interval (CI): (1.7–2.2) × 10−12) and 2.6 × 10−12 (CI: (2.3–2.9) × 10−12) cm3 molecule−1 s−1, respectively, which are 1.9× and 1.7× faster than previous measurements. Our measured rate constant for D6 is 2.8 × 10−12 (CI: (2.5–3.2) × 10−12) cm3 molecule−1 s−1 and to our knowledge there are no comparable laboratory measurements in the literature. Reaction rates for D5 were 33% higher than for D4 (CI: 30–37%), whereas the rates for D6 were only 8% higher than for D5 (CI: 5–10%). The activation energies of the reactions of D4, D5, and D6 with OH were not statistically different and had a value of 4300 ± 2800 J/mol. PMID:27708500

  10. Rate Constants and Activation Energies for Gas-Phase Reactions of Three Cyclic Volatile Methyl Siloxanes with the Hydroxyl Radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safron, Andreas; Strandell, Michael; Kierkegaard, Amelie; Macleod, Matthew

    2015-07-01

    Reaction with hydroxyl radicals (OH) is the major pathway for removal of cyclic volatile methyl siloxanes (cVMS) from air. We present new measurements of second-order rate constants for reactions of the cVMS octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5), and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6) with OH determined at temperatures between 313 and 353 K. Our measurements were made using the method of relative rates with cyclohexane as a reference substance and were conducted in a 140-mL gas-phase reaction chamber with online mass spectrometry analysis. When extrapolated to 298 K, our measured reaction rate constants of D4 and D5 with the OH radical are 1.9 × 10(-12) (95% confidence interval (CI): (1.7-2.2) × 10(-12)) and 2.6 × 10(-12) (CI: (2.3-2.9) × 10(-12)) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), respectively, which are 1.9× and 1.7× faster than previous measurements. Our measured rate constant for D6 is 2.8 × 10(-12) (CI: (2.5-3.2) × 10(-12)) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) and to our knowledge there are no comparable laboratory measurements in the literature. Reaction rates for D5 were 33% higher than for D4 (CI: 30-37%), whereas the rates for D6 were only 8% higher than for D5 (CI: 5-10%). The activation energies of the reactions of D4, D5, and D6 with OH were not statistically different and had a value of 4300 ± 2800 J/mol.

  11. Non-Constant Learning Rates in Retrospective Experience Curve Analyses and their Correlation to Deployment Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Max [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Smith, Sarah J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sohn, Michael D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-07-16

    A key challenge for policy-makers and technology market forecasters is to estimate future technology costs and in particular the rate of cost reduction versus production volume. A related, critical question is what role should state and federal governments have in advancing energy efficient and renewable energy technologies? This work provides retrospective experience curves and learning rates for several energy-related technologies, each of which have a known history of federal and state deployment programs. We derive learning rates for eight technologies including energy efficient lighting technologies, stationary fuel cell systems, and residential solar photovoltaics, and provide an overview and timeline of historical deployment programs such as state and federal standards and state and national incentive programs for each technology. Piecewise linear regimes are observed in a range of technology experience curves, and public investments or deployment programs are found to be strongly correlated to an increase in learning rate across multiple technologies. A downward bend in the experience curve is found in 5 out of the 8 energy-related technologies presented here (electronic ballasts, magnetic ballasts, compact fluorescent lighting, general service fluorescent lighting, and the installed cost of solar PV). In each of the five downward-bending experience curves, we believe that an increase in the learning rate can be linked to deployment programs to some degree. This work sheds light on the endogenous versus exogenous contributions to technological innovation and highlights the impact of exogenous government sponsored deployment programs. This work can inform future policy investment direction and can shed light on market transformation and technology learning behavior.

  12. Diffraction plane dependence of elastic constants in residual stress measurement by neutron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okido, Shinobu; Hayashi, Makoto [Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Morii, Yukio; Minakawa, Nobuaki; Tsuchiya, Yoshinori

    1997-06-01

    In a residual stress measurement by x-ray diffraction method and a neutron diffraction method, strictly speaking, the strain measurement of various diffracted surface was conducted and it is necessary to use its elastic modulus to convert from the strain to the stress. Then, in order to establish the residual stress measuring technique using neutron diffraction, it is an aim at first to make clear a diffraction surface dependency of elastic modulus for the stress conversion in various alloys. As a result of investigations the diffraction surface dependency of elastic module on SUS304 and STS410 steels by using RESA (Neutron diffractometer for residual stress analysis) installed at JRR-3M in Tokai Establishment of JAERI, following results are obtained. The elastic modulus of each diffraction surface considering till plastic region could be confirmed to be in a region of {+-}20% of that calculated by Kroner`s model and to be useful for that used on conversion to the stress. And, error of this elastic modulus was thought to cause the transition and defect formed at inner portion of the materials due to a plastic deformation. (G.K.)

  13. Beyond transition state theory: accurate description of nuclear quantum effects on the rate and equilibrium constants of chemical reactions using Feynman path integrals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanícek, Jirí

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear tunneling and other nuclear quantum effects have been shown to play a significant role in molecules as large as enzymes even at physiological temperatures. I discuss how these quantum phenomena can be accounted for rigorously using Feynman path integrals in calculations of the equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects as well as of the temperature dependence of the rate constant. Because these calculations are extremely computationally demanding, special attention is devoted to increasing the computational efficiency by orders of magnitude by employing efficient path integral estimators.

  14. Time-dependent Diffusion Coefficient and Conventional Diffusion Constant of Nanoparticles in Polymer Melts by Mode-coupling Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-yu Lai; Nan-rong Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Time-dependent diffusion coefficient and conventional diffusion constant are calculated and analyzed to study diffusion of nanoparticles in polymer melts.A generalized Langevin equation is adopted to describe the diffusion dynamics.Mode-coupling theory is employed to calculate the memory kernel of friction.For simplicity,only microscopic terms arising from binary collision and coupling to the solvent density fluctuation are included in the formalism.The equilibrium structural information functions of the polymer nanocomposites required by mode-coupling theory are calculated on the basis of polymer reference interaction site model with Percus-Yevick closure.The effect of nanoparticle size and that of the polymer size are clarified explicitly.The structural functions,the friction kernel,as well as the diffusion coefficient show a rich variety with varying nanoparticle radius and polymer chain length.We find that for small nanoparticles or short chain polymers,the characteristic short time non-Markov diffusion dynamics becomes more prominent,and the diffusion coefficient takes longer time to approach asymptotically the conventional diffusion constant.This constant due to the microscopic contributions will decrease with the increase of nanoparticle size,while increase with polymer size.Furthermore,our result of diffusion constant from modecoupling theory is compared with the value predicted from the Stokes-Einstein relation.It shows that the microscopic contributions to the diffusion constant are dominant for small nanoparticles or long chain polymers.Inversely,when nanonparticle is big,or polymer chain is short,the hydrodynamic contribution might play a significant role.

  15. The WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey: constraining the evolution of Newton's constant using the growth rate of structure

    CERN Document Server

    Nesseris, Savvas; Davis, Tamara; Parkinson, David

    2011-01-01

    We constrain the evolution of Newton's constant using the growth rate of large-scale structure measured by the WiggleZ Dark Energy Survey in the redshift range $0.1 < z < 0.9$. We use this data in two ways. Firstly we constrain the matter density of the Universe, $\\Omega_m$ (assuming General Relativity), and use this to construct a diagnostic to detect the presence of an evolving Newton's constant. Secondly we directly measure the evolution of Newton's constant, $G_{eff}$, that appears in Modified Gravity theories, without assuming General Relativity to be true. The novelty of these approaches are that, contrary to other methods, they do not require knowledge of the expansion history of the Universe, $H(z)$, making them model independent tests. Our constraints for the second derivative of Newton's constant at the present day, assuming it is slowly evolving as suggested by Big Bang Nucleosynthesis constraints, using the WiggleZ data is $\\ddotGeff(t_0)=-1.19\\pm 0.95\\cdot 10^{-20}h^2 yr^{-2}$, where $h$ is...

  16. A methodology to study cyclic debond growth at constant mode-mixity and energy release rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quispitupa, Amilcar; Berggreen, Christian; Carlsson, Leif A.

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that face/core debond crack propagation is governed by the critical energy release rate (fracture toughness) and mode-mixity at the crack tip. Thus, the current study focuses on the developing of a methodology to perform fatigue crack growth experiments of debonded sandwich...... and better control of loading conditions at the crack tip will be the most relevant outcomes of using the proposed fatigue test method....

  17. Density Dependence of the Mass and Decay Constant of Pion in Nuclear Matter in the Dyson-Schwinger Equation Approach of QCD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yu-Xin; CHAO Jing-Yi; CHANG Lei; YUAN Wei

    2005-01-01

    @@ With the Dyson-Schwinger equation formalism at finite chemical potential, we study the density dependence of the mass and decay constant of pion in nuclear matter. The calculated results indicate that both the mass and the decay constant remain almost constant at small chemical potential. As the chemical potential gets quite large, the decay constant increases and the mass decreases with the increasing of the chemical potential, and both of them vanish suddenly as a critical value is reached.

  18. Flowing afterglow: construction of an apparatus, measurement of rate constants, and consideration of the diffusive behavior of charges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuoka, Shingo; Nakamura, Hirone; Tamura, Takaaki (Tokyo Univ., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab.); Fujii, Toshihiro

    1984-06-01

    A flowing afterglow apparatus was constructed and the operation of the afterglow system including data analysis was tested by measuring the rate constants for the reactions N/sup +/ + NO, N/sub 2//sup +/ + NO, He/sup +/ + N/sub 2/, and SF/sub 6/ + e; the results were 5.8 x 10/sup -10/, 3.9 x 10/sup -10/, 1.20 x 10/sup -9/, and 2.1 x 10/sup -7/ cm/sup 3/s/sup -1/ respectively. In the measurements an extraction voltage for ion sampling was not applied to the nose cone in order not to introduce an electric field into the reaction region. A ''non-ambipolar'' model developed by us was used for the data analysis of the ion/molecule reactions. For the data analysis of the electron attachment, a typical curve fit mehtod to the product ion signal was used. However, no theoretical curves fit the experimental points. This disagreement is attributed to a change of the ion-sampling efficiency through the nose-cone aperture arising from a change of the electron-dominated plasma to a negative-ion-dominated plasma with an increasing flow rate of SF/sub 6/. Nevertheless, the attachment rate could be determined by fitting the theoretical and experimantal curves in the limited region of the SF/sub 6/ flow rate where the negative-ion-dominated plasma is established at the sampling aperture. All the rate constants obtained here agree reasonably well with literature values. Next, errors in the positive ion/molecule reaction rate constants, which would occur if the diffusion coefficients of the ions and neutrals each have a + 10 % error were calculated for the flow model to be -0.4 and +1.2 % respectively, demonstrating that these parameters are not important in the analysis of data. This insensitivity explains why the nose-cone voltage applied in a typical flowing afterglow operation has not caused a significant error in the published rate constants although it disturbs the ion diffusive behavior.

  19. Implementation of Constant Dose Rate and Constant Angular Spacing Intensity-modulated Arc Therapy for Cervical Cancer by Using a Conventional Linear Accelerator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruo-Hui Zhang; Xiao-Mei Fan; Wen-Wen Bai; Yan-Kun Cao

    2016-01-01

    Background: Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) can only be implemented on the new generation linacs such as the Varian Trilogy(R) and Elekta Synergy(R).This prevents most existing linacs from delivering VMAT.The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using a conventional linear accelerator delivering constant dose rate and constant angular spacing intensity-modulated arc therapy (CDR-CAS-IMAT) for treating cervical cancer.Methods: Twenty patients with cervical cancer previously treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using Varian Clinical 23EX were retreated using CDR-CAS-IMAT.The planning target volume (PTV) was set as 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions.Plans were evaluated based on the ability to meet the dose volume histogram.The homogeneity index (HI), target volume conformity index (CI), the dose to organs at risk, radiation delivery time, and monitor units (MUs) were also compared.The paired t-test was used to analyze the two data sets.All statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 19.0 software.Results: Compared to the IMRT group, the CDR-CAS-IMAT group showed better PTV CI (0.85 ± 0.03 vs.0.81 ± 0.03, P =0.001), clinical target volume CI (0.46 ± 0.05 vs.0.43 ± 0.05, P =0.001), HI (0.09±0.02 vs.0.11 ± 0.02, P =0.005) and D95 (5196.33 ± 28.24 cGy vs.5162.63 ± 31.12 cGy, P =0.000), and cord D2 (3743.8 ± 118.7 cGy vs.3806.2 ± 98.7 cGy, P =0.017) and rectum V40 (41.9 ± 6.1% vs.44.2 ± 4.8%, P =0.026).Treatment time (422.7 ± 46.7 s vs.84.6 ± 7.8 s, P =0.000) and the total plan Mus (927.4 ± 79.1 vs.787.5 ± 78.5, P =0.000) decreased by a factor of 0.8 and 0.15, respectively.The IMRT group plans were superior to the CDR-CAS-IMAT group plans considering decreasing bladder V50 (17.4 ± 4.5% vs.16.6 ± 4.2%, P =0.049), bowel V30 (39.6 ± 6.5% vs.36.6 ± 7.5%, P =0.008), and low-dose irradiation volume;there were no significant differences in other statistical indexes.Conclusions: Patients with cervical

  20. Implementation of Constant Dose Rate and Constant Angular Spacing Intensity-modulated Arc Therapy for Cervical Cancer by Using a Conventional Linear Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruo-Hui; Fan, Xiao-Mei; Bai, Wen-Wen; Cao, Yan-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) can only be implemented on the new generation linacs such as the Varian Trilogy® and Elekta Synergy®. This prevents most existing linacs from delivering VMAT. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using a conventional linear accelerator delivering constant dose rate and constant angular spacing intensity-modulated arc therapy (CDR-CAS-IMAT) for treating cervical cancer. Methods: Twenty patients with cervical cancer previously treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) using Varian Clinical 23EX were retreated using CDR-CAS-IMAT. The planning target volume (PTV) was set as 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. Plans were evaluated based on the ability to meet the dose volume histogram. The homogeneity index (HI), target volume conformity index (CI), the dose to organs at risk, radiation delivery time, and monitor units (MUs) were also compared. The paired t-test was used to analyze the two data sets. All statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 19.0 software. Results: Compared to the IMRT group, the CDR-CAS-IMAT group showed better PTV CI (0.85 ± 0.03 vs. 0.81 ± 0.03, P = 0.001), clinical target volume CI (0.46 ± 0.05 vs. 0.43 ± 0.05, P = 0.001), HI (0.09±0.02 vs. 0.11 ± 0.02, P = 0.005) and D95 (5196.33 ± 28.24 cGy vs. 5162.63 ± 31.12 cGy, P = 0.000), and cord D2 (3743.8 ± 118.7 cGy vs. 3806.2 ± 98.7 cGy, P = 0.017) and rectum V40 (41.9 ± 6.1% vs. 44.2 ± 4.8%, P = 0.026). Treatment time (422.7 ± 46.7 s vs. 84.6 ± 7.8 s, P = 0.000) and the total plan Mus (927.4 ± 79.1 vs. 787.5 ± 78.5, P = 0.000) decreased by a factor of 0.8 and 0.15, respectively. The IMRT group plans were superior to the CDR-CAS-IMAT group plans considering decreasing bladder V50 (17.4 ± 4.5% vs. 16.6 ± 4.2%, P = 0.049), bowel V30 (39.6 ± 6.5% vs. 36.6 ± 7.5%, P = 0.008), and low-dose irradiation volume; there were no significant differences in other statistical indexes. Conclusions

  1. Tempo of Diversification of Global Amphibians: One-Constant Rate, One-Continuous Shift or Multiple-Discrete Shifts?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youhua Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this brief report, alternative time-varying diversification rate models were fitted onto the phylogeny of global amphibians by considering one-constant-rate (OCR, one-continuous-shift (OCS and multiplediscrete- shifts (MDS situations. The OCS diversification model was rejected by γ statistic (γ=-5.556, p⁄ 0.001, implying the existence of shifting diversification rates for global amphibian phylogeny. Through model selection, MDS diversification model outperformed OCS and OCR models using “laser” package under R environment. Moreover, MDS models, implemented using another R package “MEDUSA”, indicated that there were sixteen shifts over the internal nodes for amphibian phylogeny. Conclusively, both OCS and MDS models are recommended to compare so as to better quantify rate-shifting trends of species diversification. MDS diversification models should be preferential for large phylogenies using “MEDUSA” package in which any arbitrary numbers of shifts are allowed to model.

  2. Attaining the rate-independent limit of a rate-dependent strain gradient plasticity theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Naaman, Salim Abdallah; Nielsen, Kim Lau; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2016-01-01

    The existence of characteristic strain rates in rate-dependent material models, corresponding to rate-independent model behavior, is studied within a back stress based rate-dependent higher order strain gradient crystal plasticity model. Such characteristic rates have recently been observed...... for steady-state processes, and the present study aims to demonstrate that the observations in fact unearth a more widespread phenomenon. In this work, two newly proposed back stress formulations are adopted to account for the strain gradient effects in the single slip simple shear case, and characteristic...

  3. The dependence of homogeneous nucleation rate on supersaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girshick, Steven L

    2014-07-14

    The claim that classical nucleation theory (CNT) correctly predicts the dependence on supersaturation of the steady-state rate of homogeneous nucleation is reexamined in light of recent experimental studies of nucleation of a range of substances, including water, argon, nitrogen, and several 1-alcohols. Based on these studies (which include, for water, a compilation of nine different studies), it is concluded that the dependence of nucleation rate on supersaturation is not correctly predicted by CNT. It is shown that CNT's incorrect prediction of the supersaturation dependence of nucleation rate is due to its incorrect prediction of the Gibbs free energy change associated with formation of small clusters from the monomer vapor, evaluated at the substance's equilibrium vapor pressure, even though that free energy change is itself a function only of temperature.

  4. Rate Dependent Deformation and Strength Analysis of Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Stouffer, Donald C.

    1999-01-01

    A research program is being undertaken to develop rate dependent deformation and failure models for the analysis of polymer matrix composite materials. In previous work in this program, strain-rate dependent inelastic constitutive equations used to analyze polymers have been implemented into a mechanics of materials based composite micromechanics method. In the current work, modifications to the micromechanics model have been implemented to improve the calculation of the effective inelastic strain. Additionally, modifications to the polymer constitutive model are discussed in which pressure dependence is incorporated into the equations in order to improve the calculation of constituent and composite shear stresses. The Hashin failure criterion is implemented into the analysis method to allow for the calculation of ply level failure stresses. The deformation response and failure stresses for two representative uniaxial polymer matrix composites, IM7/977-2 and AS4-PEEK, are predicted for varying strain rates and fiber orientations. The predicted results compare favorably to experimentally obtained values.

  5. Pressure-Dependent Rate Rules for Intramolecular H-Migration Reactions of Hydroperoxyalkylperoxy Radicals in Low Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qian; Sun, Xiao-Hui; Li, Ze-Rong; Chen, Fang-Fang; Li, Xiang-Yuan

    2017-04-27

    Intramolecular H-migration reaction of hydroperoxyalkylperoxy radicals ((•)O2QOOH) is one of the most important reaction families in the low-temperature oxidation of hydrocarbon fuels. This reaction family is first divided into classes depending upon H atom transfer from -OOH bonded carbon or non-OOH bonded carbon, and then the two classes are further divided depending upon the ring size of the transition states and the types of the carbons from which the H atom is transferred. High pressure limit rate rules and pressure-dependent rate rules for each class are derived from the rate constants of a representative set of reactions within each class using electronic structure calculations performed at the CBS-QB3 level of theory. For the intramolecular H-migration reactions of (•)O2QOOH radicals for abstraction from an -OOH substituted carbon atom (-OOH bonded case), the result shows that it is acceptable to derive the rate rules by taking the average of the rate constants from a representative set of reactions with different sizes of the substitutes. For the abstraction from a non-OOH substituted carbon atom (non-OOH bonded case), rate rules for each class are also derived and it is shown that the difference between the rate constants calculated by CBS-QB3 method and rate constants estimated from the rate rules may be large; therefore, to get more reliable results for the low-temperature combustion modeling of alkanes, it is better to assign each reaction its CBS-QB3 calculated rate constants, instead of assigning the same values for the same reaction class according to rate rules. The intramolecular H-migration reactions of (•)O2QOOH radicals (a thermally equilibrated system) are pressure-dependent, and the pressure-dependent rate constants of these reactions are calculated by using the Rice-Ramsberger-Kassel-Marcus/master-equation theory at pressures varying from 0.01 to 100 atm. The impact of molecular size on the pressure-dependent rate constants of the

  6. QCD One-Loop Effective Coupling Constant and Quark Mass Given in a Mass-Dependent Renormalization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Jun-Chen; SHAN Lian-You; CAO Ying-Hui

    2001-01-01

    The QCD one-loop renormalization is restudied in a mass-dependent subtraction scheme in which the quark mass is not set to vanish and the renormalization point is chosen to be an arbitrary time-like momentum. The correctness of the subtraction is ensured by the Ward identities which are respected in all the processes of subtraction.By considering the mass effect, the effective coupling constant and the effective quark masses derived by solving the renormalization group equations are given in improved expressions which are different from the previous results.PACS numbers: 11.10.Gh, 11.10.Hi, 12.38.-t, 12.38.Bx

  7. Theoretical study of the pressure dependent rate constants of the thermal decomposition of β-propiolactone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Shiroudi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical study of the thermal decomposition of β-propiolactone is carried out using ab initio molecular orbital (MO methods at the MP2/6-311+G∗∗ level and Rice–Ramsperger–Kassel–Marcus (RRKM theory. The reported experimental results showed that decomposition of β-propiolactone occurred by three competing homogeneous and first order reactions. For the three reactions, the calculation was also performed at the MP2/6-311+G∗∗ level of theory, as well as by single-point calculations at the B3LYP/6-311+G∗∗//MP2/6-311+G∗∗, and MP4/6-311+G∗∗//MP2/6-311+G∗∗ levels of theory. The fall-off pressures for the decomposition in these reactions are found to be 2.415, 9.423 × 10−2 and 3.676 × 10−3 mmHg, respectively.

  8. Strain Rate Dependent Modeling of Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Stouffer, Donald C.

    1999-01-01

    A research program is in progress to develop strain rate dependent deformation and failure models for the analysis of polymer matrix composites subject to high strain rate impact loads. Strain rate dependent inelastic constitutive equations have been developed to model the polymer matrix, and have been incorporated into a micromechanics approach to analyze polymer matrix composites. The Hashin failure criterion has been implemented within the micromechanics results to predict ply failure strengths. The deformation model has been implemented within LS-DYNA, a commercially available transient dynamic finite element code. The deformation response and ply failure stresses for the representative polymer matrix composite AS4/PEEK have been predicted for a variety of fiber orientations and strain rates. The predicted results compare favorably to experimentally obtained values.

  9. Strain rate dependency of laser sintered polyamide 12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cook J.E.T.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Parts processed by Additive Manufacturing can now be found across a wide range of applications, such as those in the aerospace and automotive industry in which the mechanical response must be optimised. Many of these applications are subjected to high rate or impact loading, yet it is believed that there is no prior research on the strain rate dependence in these materials. This research investigates the effect of strain rate and laser energy density on laser sintered polyamide 12. In the study presented here, parts produced using four different laser sintered energy densities were exposed to uniaxial compression tests at strain rates ranging from 10−3 to 10+3 s−1 at room temperature, and the dependence on these parameters is presented.

  10. Effect of microstructure on anomalous strain-rate-dependent behaviour of bacterial cellulose hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xing; Shi, Zhijun; Lau, Andrew; Liu, Changqin; Yang, Guang; Silberschmidt, Vadim V

    2016-05-01

    This study is focused on anomalous strain-rate-dependent behaviour of bacterial cellulose (BC) hydrogel that can be strain-rate insensitive, hardening, softening, or strain-rate insensitive in various ranges of strain rate. BC hydrogel consists of randomly distributed nanofibres and a large content of free water; thanks to its ideal biocompatibility, it is suitable for biomedical applications. Motivated by its potential applications in complex loading conditions of body environment, its time-dependent behaviour was studied by means of in-aqua uniaxial tension tests at constant temperature of 37 °C at various strain rates ranging from 0.000 1s(-1) to 0.3s(-1). Experimental results reflect anomalous strain-rate-dependent behaviour that was not documented before. Micro-morphological observations allowed identification of deformation mechanisms at low and high strain rates in relation to microstructural changes. Unlike strain-rate softening behaviours in other materials, reorientation of nanofibres and kinematics of free-water flow dominate the softening behaviour of BC hydrogel at high strain rates.

  11. Thermal fission rates with temperature dependent fission barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yi; Pei, J. C.

    2016-08-01

    Background: The fission processes of thermal excited nuclei are conventionally studied by statistical models which rely on inputs of phenomenological level densities and potential barriers. Therefore the microscopic descriptions of spontaneous fission and induced fission are very desirable for a unified understanding of various fission processes. Purpose: We propose to study the fission rates, at both low and high temperatures, with microscopically calculated temperature-dependent fission barriers and collective mass parameters. Methods: The fission barriers are calculated by the finite-temperature Skyrme-Hartree-Fock+BCS method. The mass parameters are calculated by the temperature-dependent cranking approximation. The thermal fission rates can be obtained by the imaginary free energy approach at all temperatures, in which fission barriers are naturally temperature dependent. The fission at low temperatures can be described mainly as a barrier-tunneling process. While the fission at high temperatures has to incorporate the reflection above barriers. Results: Our results of spontaneous fission rates reasonably agree with other studies and experiments. The temperature dependencies of fission barrier heights and curvatures have been discussed. The temperature dependent behaviors of mass parameters have also been discussed. The thermal fission rates from low to high temperatures with a smooth connection have been given by different approaches. Conclusions: Since the temperature dependencies of fission barrier heights and curvatures, and the mass parameters can vary rapidly for different nuclei, the microscopic descriptions of thermal fission rates are very valuable. Our studies without free parameters provide a consistent picture to study various fissions such as that in fast-neutron reactors, astrophysical environments, and fusion reactions for superheavy nuclei.

  12. Variational RRKM calculation of thermal rate constant for C–H bond fission reaction of nitro methane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Taghva Manesh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The present work provides quantitative results for the rate constants of unimolecular C–H bond fission reactions in the nitro methane at elevated temperatures up to 2000 K. In fact, there are three different hydrogen atoms in the nitro methane. The potential energy surface for each C–H bond fission reaction of nitro methane was investigated by ab initio calculations. The geometry and vibrational frequencies of the species involved in this process were optimized at the MP2 level of theory, using the cc-pvdz basis set. Since C–H bond fission channel is a barrierless reaction, we have used variational RRKM theory to predict rate coefficients. By means of calculated rate coefficients at different temperatures, the Arrhenius expression of the channel over the temperature range of 100–2000 K is k(T = 5.9E19∗exp(−56274.6/T.

  13. Relativistic mean field theory with density dependent coupling constants for nuclear matter and finite nuclei with large charge asymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Typel, S.; Wolter, H.H. [Sektion Physik, Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany)

    1998-06-01

    Nuclear matter and ground state properties for (proton and neutron) semi-closed shell nuclei are described in relativistic mean field theory with coupling constants which depend on the vector density. The parametrization of the density dependence for {sigma}-, {omega}- and {rho}-mesons is obtained by fitting to properties of nuclear matter and some finite nuclei. The equation of state for symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter is discussed. Finite nuclei are described in Hartree approximation, including a charge and an improved center-of-mass correction. Pairing is considered in the BCS approximation. Special attention is directed to the predictions for properties at the neutron and proton driplines, e.g. for separation energies, spin-orbit splittings and density distributions. (orig.)

  14. ELDRS and dose-rate dependence of vertical NPN transistor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Yu-Zhan; LU Wu; REN Di-Yuan; WANG Gai-Li; YU Xue-Feng; GUO Qi

    2009-01-01

    The enhanced low-dose-rate sensitivity (ELDRS) and dose-rate dependence of vertical NPN transistors are investigated in this article.The results show that the vertical NPN transistors exhibit more degradation at low dose rate,and that this degradation is attributed to the increase on base current.The oxide trapped positive charge near the SiO2-Si interface and interface traps at the interface can contribute to the increase on base current and the two-stage hydrogen mechanism associated with space charge effect can well explain the experimental results.

  15. Velocity of chloroplast avoidance movement is fluence rate dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Takatoshi; Wada, Masamitsu

    2004-06-01

    In Arabidopsis leaves, chloroplast movement is fluence rate dependent. At optimal, lower light fluences, chloroplasts accumulate at the cell surface to maximize photosynthetic potential. Under high fluence rates, chloroplasts avoid incident light to escape photodamage. In this paper, we examine the phenomenon of chloroplast avoidance movement in greater detail and demonstrate a proportional relationship between fluence rate and the velocity of chloroplast avoidance. In addition we show that the amount of light-activated phototropin2, the photoreceptor for the avoidance response, likely plays a role in this phenomenon, as heterozygous mutant plants show a reduced avoidance velocity compared to that of homozygous wild type plants.

  16. [Determination of rate constants of gas-phase reactions of alpha-pinene and beta-pinene with ozone].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z R; Hu, D

    2001-10-01

    alpha-pinene and beta-pinene are the most dominating species among natural terpenes. Terpenes are mainly emitted from forest trees, flowers and grass. In the lower troposphere terpenes can react fast with OH radical, ozone, NO3 radical and ground state oxygen atom. These reactions may contribute to the occurring of aerosols, peroxides (hydrogen peroxide and organic peroxide), carbon cycle (mainly CO), acid rain (organic acids, NO3- and SO4(2-), ozone and active radicals such as OH radical. Reactions with ozone occur both in the daytime and in the night. The study in this field in China began in the late 1980. The main work focus on the source emission and the experimental simulation has just started. It is most of our group's work. In this paper preliminary experimental simulation of the gas-phase reactions of alpha-pinene and beta-pinene with ozone were carried out in the quartz chamber. The rate constants of these reactions were measured using long-path Fourier transform infra-red combined with relative rate constant method. And the rate constants for the gas-phase reactions of alpha-pinene, beta-pinene with ozone were determined as 2.83 x 10(17) cm3.molecule-1.s-1 and 1.48 x 10(17) cm3.molecule-1.s-1 at 1.0 x 10(5) Pa and 296 +/- 3 K. The results are quite similar to the data from Atkinson group. No cyclohexane was added to the reaction system during the measurement to restrain the formation of OH radical. The formation of OH radical could not be quantified, so that the effect of subsidiary reactions induced by OH radical has not been calculated. In the later simulation study and model this effect should be considered.

  17. An independent constraint on the secular rate of variation of the gravitational constant from pulsating white dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Córsico, Alejandro H; García-Berro, Enrique; Romero, Alejandra D

    2013-01-01

    A secular variation of the gravitational constant modifies the structure and evolutionary time scales of white dwarfs. Using an state-of-the-art stellar evolutionary code and an up-to-date pulsational code we compute the effects of a secularly varying $G$ on the pulsational properties of variable white dwarfs. Comparing the the theoretical results obtained taking into account the effects of a running $G$ with the observed periods and measured rates of change of the periods of two well studied pulsating white dwarfs, G117--B15A and R548, we place constraints on the rate of variation of Newton's constant. We derive an upper bound $\\dot G/G\\sim -1.8\\times 10^{-10}$ yr$^{-1}$ using the variable white dwarf G117--B15A, and $\\dot G/G\\sim -1.3\\times 10^{-10}$ yr$^{-1}$ using R548. Although these upper limits are currently less restrictive than those obtained using other techniques, they can be improved in a future measuring the rate of change of the period of massive white dwarfs.

  18. An independent constraint on the secular rate of variation of the gravitational constant from pulsating white dwarfs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Córsico, Alejandro H.; Althaus, Leandro G. [Facultad de Ciencias Astronómicas y Geofísicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque s/n, (1900) La Plata (Argentina); García-Berro, Enrique [Departament de Física Aplicada, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, c/Esteve Terrades, 5, 08860 Castelldefels (Spain); Romero, Alejandra D., E-mail: acorsico@fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar, E-mail: althaus@fcaglp.unlp.edu.ar, E-mail: enrique.garcia-berro@upc.edu, E-mail: alejandra.romero@ufrgs.br [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, Porto Alegre 91501-970, RS (Brazil)

    2013-06-01

    A secular variation of the gravitational constant modifies the structure and evolutionary time scales of white dwarfs. Using an state-of-the-art stellar evolutionary code and an up-to-date pulsational code we compute the effects of a secularly varying G on the pulsational properties of variable white dwarfs. Comparing the the theoretical results obtained taking into account the effects of a running G with the observed periods and measured rates of change of the periods of two well studied pulsating white dwarfs, G117-B15A and R548, we place constraints on the rate of variation of Newton's constant. We derive an upper bound Ġ/G ∼ −1.8 × 10{sup −10} yr{sup −1} using the variable white dwarf G117-B15A, and Ġ/G ∼ −1.3 × 10{sup −10} yr{sup −1} using R548. Although these upper limits are currently less restrictive than those obtained using other techniques, they can be improved in a future measuring the rate of change of the period of massive white dwarfs.

  19. The RNA chain elongation rate in Escherichia coli depends on the growth rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Ulla; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    1994-01-01

    We determined the rates of mRNA and protein chain elongation on the lacZ gene during exponential growth on different carbon sources. The RNA chain elongation rate was calculated from measurements of the time elapsing between induction of lacZ expression and detection of specific hybridization...... with a probe near the 3' end of the mRNA. The elongation rate for the transcripts decreased 40% when the growth rate decreased by a factor of 4, and it always correlated with the rate of translation elongation. A similar growth rate dependency was seen for transcription on the infB gene and on a part...

  20. Thermal fission rates with temperature dependent fission barriers

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    \\item[Background] The fission processes of thermal excited nuclei are conventionally studied by statistical models which rely on inputs of phenomenological level densities and potential barriers. Therefore the microscopic descriptions of spontaneous fission and induced fission are very desirable for a unified understanding of various fission processes. \\item[Purpose] We propose to study the fission rates, at both low and high temperatures, with microscopically calculated temperature-dependent fission barriers and mass parameters. \\item[Methods] The fission barriers are calculated by the finite-temperature Skyrme-Hartree-Fock+BCS method. The mass parameters are calculated by the temperature-dependent cranking approximation. The thermal fission rates can be obtained by the imaginary free energy approach at all temperatures, in which fission barriers are naturally temperature dependent. The fission at low temperatures can be described mainly as a barrier-tunneling process. While the fission at high temperatures ...

  1. [Bundle-branch block depending on the heart rate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolov, L

    1975-01-01

    Five patients are reported, admitted to the hospital, with diseases predominantly of the cardio-vascular system. During the electrocardiographic examinations bundle branch block was established, depending on heart rate. It fluctuated within the physiological limits from 50 to 90/min. In three of the patients, the bundle branch block appeared with the quickening of the heart rate (tachycardia-depending bundle branch block) and in two of the patients--the bundle branch block appeared during the slowing down of the heart action and disappeared with its quickening (bradicardia-depending bundle branch block). A brief literature review is presented and attention is paid to the possible diagnostic errors and the treatment mode of those patients with cardiac tonic and antiarrhythmic medicaments.

  2. Rate constants and isotope effects for the reaction of H-atom abstraction from RH substrates by PINO radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opeida, I. A.; Litvinov, Yu. E.; Kushch, O. V.; Kompanets, M. A.; Shendrik, A. N.; Matvienko, A. G.; Novokhatko, A. A.

    2016-11-01

    The kinetics of the reactions of hydrogen atom abstraction from the C-H bonds of substrates of different structures by phthalimide- N-oxyl radicals is studied. The rate constants of this reaction are measured and the kinetic isotope effects are determined. It is shown that in addition to the thermodynamic factor, Coulomb forces and donor-acceptor interactions affect the reaction between phthalimide- N-oxyl radicals and substrate molecules, altering the shape of the transition state. This favors the tunneling of hydrogen atoms and leads to a substantial reduction in the activation energy of the process.

  3. Measurement of rate constant for gas-phase reaction of DDVP with OH radical by using LP-FTIR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Pollution caused by organic pesticides has received increasing attention. Until now, studies on organic pesticides pollution are mainly focused on soil and water. For reactions of organic pesticides in gas-phase, there are very little research results reported. Using a long path quartz reactor to simulate the atmospheric reaction of dimethyl_dichloro_vinyl_phosphate(DDVP) with OH radicals, the rate constant for the reaction at room temperature is measured at (3.06±0.46)×10-11 cm3 s-1 with Fourier transform infrared spectrograph.The result indicates that DDVP degrades relatively fast in the atmosphere and is unlikely to cause persistent pollution.

  4. Voltage dependence of rate functions for Na+ channel inactivation within a membrane

    CERN Document Server

    Vaccaro, Samuel R

    2015-01-01

    The inactivation of a Na+ channel occurs when the activation of the charged S4 segment of domain IV, with rate functions $\\alpha_{i}$ and $\\beta_{i}$, is followed by the binding of an intracellular hydrophobic motif which blocks conduction through the ion pore, with rate functions $\\gamma_{i}$ and $\\delta_{i}$. During a voltage clamp of the Na+ channel, the solution of the master equation for inactivation reduces to the relaxation of a rate equation when the binding of the inactivation motif is rate limiting ($\\alpha_{i} \\gg \\gamma_{i}$ and $\\beta_{i} \\gg \\delta_{i}$). The voltage dependence of the derived forward rate function for Na+ channel inactivation has an exponential dependence on the membrane potential for small depolarizations and approaches a constant value for larger depolarizations, whereas the voltage dependence of the backward rate function is exponential, and each rate has a similar form to the Hodgkin-Huxley empirical rate functions for Na+ channel inactivation in the squid axon.

  5. Micromechanical modeling of rate-dependent behavior of Connective tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallah, A; Ahmadian, M T; Firozbakhsh, K; Aghdam, M M

    2017-03-07

    In this paper, a constitutive and micromechanical model for prediction of rate-dependent behavior of connective tissues (CTs) is presented. Connective tissues are considered as nonlinear viscoelastic material. The rate-dependent behavior of CTs is incorporated into model using the well-known quasi-linear viscoelasticity (QLV) theory. A planar wavy representative volume element (RVE) is considered based on the tissue microstructure histological evidences. The presented model parameters are identified based on the available experiments in the literature. The presented constitutive model introduced to ABAQUS by means of UMAT subroutine. Results show that, monotonic uniaxial test predictions of the presented model at different strain rates for rat tail tendon (RTT) and human patellar tendon (HPT) are in good agreement with experimental data. Results of incremental stress-relaxation test are also presented to investigate both instantaneous and viscoelastic behavior of connective tissues.

  6. Analysis of the tensile stress-strain behavior of elastomers at constant strain rates. I - Criteria for separability of the time and strain effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, S. D.; Fedors, R. F.; Schwarzl, F.; Moacanin, J.; Landel, R. F.

    1981-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the tensile stress-strain relation of elastomers at constant strain rate is presented which shows that the time and the stress effect are separable if the experimental time scale coincides with a segment of the relaxation modulus that can be described by a single power law. It is also shown that time-strain separability is valid if the strain function is linearly proportional to the Cauchy strain, and that when time-strain separability holds, two strain-dependent quantities can be obtained experimentally. In the case where time and strain effect are not separable, superposition can be achieved only by using temperature and strain-dependent shift factors.

  7. The accretion rate dependence of burst oscillation amplitude

    CERN Document Server

    Ootes, Laura S; Galloway, Duncan K; Wijnands, Rudy

    2016-01-01

    Neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries exhibit oscillations during thermonuclear bursts, attributed to asymmetric brightness patterns on the burning surfaces. All models that have been proposed to explain the origin of these asymmetries (spreading hotspots, surface waves, and cooling wakes) depend on the accretion rate. By analysis of archival RXTE data of six oscillation sources, we investigate the accretion rate dependence of the amplitude of burst oscillations. This more than doubles the size of the sample analysed previously by Muno et al. (2004), who found indications for a relationship between accretion rate and oscillation amplitudes. We find that burst oscillation signals can be detected at all observed accretion rates. Moreover, oscillations at low accretion rates are found to have relatively small amplitudes ($A_\\text{rms}\\leq0.10$) while oscillations detected in bursts observed at high accretion rates cover a broad spread in amplitudes ($0.05\\leq A_\\text{rms}\\leq0.20$). In this paper we present t...

  8. The Effect of Trailing Vortices on the Production of Lift on an Airfoil Undergoing a Constant Rate of Change of Angle of Attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect a trailing vortex wake has on an airfoil undergoing a constant rate of change of angle of...When applied to the constant rate - of - change of angle-of-attack problem, the results showed that a trailing vortex wake has a measurable and

  9. Dependence between temperature and clearance rate of Balanion comatum Wulff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Rychert

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The dependence between temperature and clearance rate of the ciliate Balanion comatum Wulff 1919 was assessed in the coastal zone of the southern Baltic Sea. Five in situ experiments were carried out with the use of wheat starch as a surrogate of food particles. The clearance rate rose from 1.4 to 7.0 µl cell-1 h-1 with a temperature rise from 8 to 19°C. B. comatum preferred particles of size 1.9-4.4 µm, and the clearance rates calculated for the preferred particles were consistently higher than those measured for the whole range of particles ingested (Wilcoxon's signed rank test, p = 0.04. The exponential dependence between temperature and clearance rates for preferred particles was statistically significant (R2 = 0.86, p = 0.02 and enabled the Q10 coefficient to be calculated. This amounted to 2.9 and lay within the range of typical values. The linear dependence (also drawn for preferred particles demonstrated a higher significance (R2 = 0.91, p = 0.02, indicating the linear dynamics of the process.

  10. Optical factors determined by the T-matrix method in turbidity measurement of absolute coagulation rate constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shenghua; Liu, Jie; Sun, Zhiwei

    2006-12-01

    Turbidity measurement for the absolute coagulation rate constants of suspensions has been extensively adopted because of its simplicity and easy implementation. A key factor in deriving the rate constant from experimental data is how to theoretically evaluate the so-called optical factor involved in calculating the extinction cross section of doublets formed during aggregation. In a previous paper, we have shown that compared with other theoretical approaches, the T-matrix method provides a robust solution to this problem and is effective in extending the applicability range of the turbidity methodology, as well as increasing measurement accuracy. This paper will provide a more comprehensive discussion of the physical insight for using the T-matrix method in turbidity measurement and associated technical details. In particular, the importance of ensuring the correct value for the refractive indices for colloidal particles and the surrounding medium used in the calculation is addressed, because the indices generally vary with the wavelength of the incident light. The comparison of calculated results with experiments shows that the T-matrix method can correctly calculate optical factors even for large particles, whereas other existing theories cannot. In addition, the data of the optical factor calculated by the T-matrix method for a range of particle radii and incident light wavelengths are listed.

  11. Hydroxyl-radical-induced degradative oxidation of beta-lactam antibiotics in water: absolute rate constant measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dail, Michelle K; Mezyk, Stephen P

    2010-08-19

    The beta-lactam antibiotics are some of the most prevalent pharmaceutical contaminants currently being detected in aquatic environments. Because the presence of any trace level of antibiotic in water may adversely affect aquatic ecosystems and contribute to the production of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, active removal by additional water treatments, such as using advanced oxidation and reduction processes (AO/RPs), may be required. However, to ensure that any AOP treatment process occurs efficiently and quantitatively, a full understanding of the kinetics and mechanisms of all of the chemical reactions involved under the conditions of use is necessary. In this study, we report on our kinetic measurements for the hydroxyl-radical-induced oxidation of 11 beta-lactam antibiotics obtained using electron pulse radiolysis techniques. For the 5-member ring species, an average reaction rate constant of (7.9 +/- 0.8) x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) was obtained, slightly faster than for the analogous 6-member ring containing antibiotics, (6.6 +/- 1.2) x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). The consistency of these rate constants for each group infers a common reaction mechanism, consisting of the partitioning of the hydroxyl radical between addition to peripheral aromatic rings and reaction with the central double-ring core of these antibiotics.

  12. KiSThelP: a program to predict thermodynamic properties and rate constants from quantum chemistry results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canneaux, Sébastien; Bohr, Frédéric; Henon, Eric

    2014-01-05

    Kinetic and Statistical Thermodynamical Package (KiSThelP) is a cross-platform free open-source program developed to estimate molecular and reaction properties from electronic structure data. To date, three computational chemistry software formats are supported (Gaussian, GAMESS, and NWChem). Some key features are: gas-phase molecular thermodynamic properties (offering hindered rotor treatment), thermal equilibrium constants, transition state theory rate coefficients (transition state theory (TST), variational transition state theory (VTST)) including one-dimensional (1D) tunnelling effects (Wigner, and Eckart) and Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) rate constants, for elementary reactions with well-defined barriers. KiSThelP is intended as a working tool both for the general public and also for more expert users. It provides graphical front-end capabilities designed to facilitate calculations and interpreting results. KiSThelP enables to change input data and simulation parameters directly through the graphical user interface and to visually probe how it affects results. Users can access results in the form of graphs and tables. The graphical tool offers customizing of 2D plots, exporting images and data files. These features make this program also well-suited to support and enhance students learning and can serve as a very attractive courseware, taking the teaching content directly from results in molecular and kinetic modelling. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Tissue vitamin concentrations are maintained constant by changing the urinary excretion rate of vitamins in rats' restricted food intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Katsumi; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that mild food restriction induces a reduction in tryptophan-nicotinamide conversion, which helps to explain why death secondary to pellagra is pandemic during the hungry season. In this study, we investigated the levels of B-group vitamins in the liver, kidney, blood, and urine in rats that underwent gradual restriction of food intake (80, 60, 40, and 20% restriction vs. ad libitum food intake). No significant differences in the B-group vitamin concentrations (mol/g tissue) in the liver and kidney were observed at any level of food restriction. However, the urine excretion rates exhibited some characteristic phenomena that differed by vitamin. These results show that the tissue concentrations of B-group vitamins were kept constant by changing the urinary elimination rates of vitamins under various levels of food restriction. Only vitamin B12 was the only (exception).

  14. Slow Crack Growth of Brittle Materials With Exponential Crack-Velocity Formulation. Part 2; Constant Stress Rate Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung R.; Nemeth, Noel N.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2002-01-01

    The previously determined life prediction analysis based on an exponential crack-velocity formulation was examined using a variety of experimental data on glass and advanced structural ceramics in constant stress rate and preload testing at ambient and elevated temperatures. The data fit to the relation of strength versus the log of the stress rate was very reasonable for most of the materials. Also, the preloading technique was determined equally applicable to the case of slow-crack-growth (SCG) parameter n greater than 30 for both the power-law and exponential formulations. The major limitation in the exponential crack-velocity formulation, however, was that the inert strength of a material must be known a priori to evaluate the important SCG parameter n, a significant drawback as compared with the conventional power-law crack-velocity formulation.

  15. Carbofuran removal in continuous-photocatalytic reactor: Reactor optimization, rate-constant determination and carbofuran degradation pathway analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnuganth, M A; Remya, Neelancherry; Kumar, Mathava; Selvaraju, N

    2017-02-22

    Carbofuran (CBF) removal in a continuous-flow photocatalytic reactor with granular activated carbon supported titanium dioxide (GAC-TiO2) catalyst was investigated. The effects of feed flow rate, TiO2 concentration and addition of supplementary oxidants on CBF removal were investigated. The central composite design (CCD) was used to design the experiments and to estimate the effects of feed flow rate and TiO2 concentration on CBF removal. The outcome of CCD experiments demonstrated that reactor performance was influenced mainly by feed flow rate compared to TiO2 concentration. A second-order polynomial model developed based on CCD experiments fitted the experimental data with good correlation (R(2) ∼ 0.964). The addition of 1 mL min(-1) hydrogen peroxide has shown complete CBF degradation and 76% chemical oxygen demand removal under the following operating conditions of CBF ∼50 mg L(-1), TiO2 ∼5 mg L(-1) and feed flow rate ∼82.5 mL min(-1). Rate constant of the photodegradation process was also calculated by applying the kinetic data in pseudo-first-order kinetics. Four major degradation intermediates of CBF were identified using GC-MS analysis. As a whole, the reactor system and GAC-TiO2 catalyst used could be constructive in cost-effective CBF removal with no impact to receiving environment through getaway of photocatalyst.

  16. Dose rate and SDD dependence of commercially available diode detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Amarjit S; Zhu, Timothy C

    2004-04-01

    The dose-rate dependence of commercially available diode detectors was measured under both high instantaneous dose-rate (pulsed) and low dose rate (continuous, Co-60) radiation. The dose-rate dependence was measured in an acrylic miniphantom at a 5-cm depth in a 10 x 10 cm2 collimator setting, by varying source-to-detector distance (SDD) between at least 80 and 200 cm. The ratio of a normalized diode reading to a normalized ion chamber reading (both at SDD=100 cm) was used to determine diode sensitivity ratio for pulsed and continuous radiation at different SDD. The inverse of the diode sensitivity ratio is defined as the SDD correction factor (SDD CF). The diode sensitivity ratio increased with increasing instantaneous dose rate (or decreasing SDD). The ratio of diode sensitivity, normalized to 4000 cGy/s, varied between 0.988 (1490 cGy/s)-1.023 (38,900 cGy/s) for unirradiated n-type Isorad Gold, 0.981 (1460 cGy/s)-1.026 (39,060 cGy/s) for unirradiated QED Red (n type), 0.972 (1490 cGy/s)-1.068 (38,900 cGy/s) for preirradiated Isorad Red (n type), 0.985 (1490 cGy/s)-1.012 (38,990 cGy/s) for n-type Pt-doped Isorad-3 Gold, 0.995 (1450 cGy/s)-1.020 (21,870 cGy/s) for n-type Veridose Green, 0.978 (1450 cGy/s)-1.066 (21,870 cGy/s) for preirradiated Isorad-p Red, 0.994 (1540 cGy/s)-1.028 (17,870 cGy/s) for p-type preirradiated QED, 0.998 (1450 cGy/s)-1.003 (21,870 cGy/s) for the p-type preirradiated Scanditronix EDP20(3G), and 0.998 (1490 cGy/s)-1.015 (38,880 cGy/s) for Scanditronix EDP10(3G) diodes. The p-type diodes do not always show less dose-rate dependence than the n-type diodes. Preirradiation does not always reduce diode dose-rate dependence. A comparison between the SDD dependence measured at the surface of a full scatter phantom and that in a miniphantom was made. Using a direct adjustment of radiation pulse height, we concluded that the SDD dependence of diode sensitivity can be explained by the instantaneous dose-rate dependence if sufficient buildup is

  17. Kinetics of the transformation of phenyl-urea herbicides during ozonation of natural waters: rate constants and model predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez, F Javier; Real, Francisco J; Acero, Juan L; Garcia, Carolina

    2007-10-01

    Oxidation of four phenyl-urea herbicides (isoproturon, chlortoluron, diuron, and linuron) was studied by ozone at pH=2, and by a combination of O3/H2O2 at pH=9. These experiments allowed the determination of the rate constants for their reactions with ozone and OH radicals. For reactions with ozone, the following rate constants were obtained: 1.9 +/- 0.2, 16.5 +/- 0.6, 393.5 +/- 8.4, and 2191 +/- 259 M(-1) s(-1) for linuron, diuron, chlortoluron, and isoproturon, respectively. The rate constants for the reaction with OH radicals were (7.9 +/- 0.1) x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) for isoproturon, (6.9 +/- 0.2) x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) for chlortoluron, (6.6 +/- 0.1) x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) for diuron, and (5.9 +/- 0.1) x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) for linuron. Furthermore, the simultaneous ozonation of these selected herbicides in some natural water systems (a commercial mineral water, a groundwater, and surface water from a reservoir) was studied. The influence of operating conditions (initial ozone dose, nature of herbicides, and type of water systems) on herbicide removal efficiency was established, and the parameter Rct (proposed by Elovitz, M.S., von Gunten, U., 1999. Hydroxyl radical/ozone ratios during ozonation processes. I. The Rct concept. Ozone Sci. Eng. 21, 239-260) was evaluated from simultaneous measurement of ozone and OH radicals. A kinetic model was proposed for the prediction of the elimination rate of herbicides in these natural waters, and application of this model revealed that experimental results and predicted values agreed fairly well. Finally, the partial contributions of direct ozone and radical pathways were evaluated, and the results showed that reaction with OH radicals was the major pathway for the oxidative transformation of diuron and linuron, even when conventional ozonation was applied, while for chlortoluron and isoproturon, direct ozonation was the major pathway.

  18. Influence of pH and ionic strength on electrostatic properties of ferredoxin, FNR, and hydrogenase and the rate constants of their interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diakonova, A. N.; Khrushchev, S. S.; Kovalenko, I. B.; Riznichenko, G. Yu; Rubin, A. B.

    2016-10-01

    Ferredoxin (Fd) protein transfers electrons from photosystem I (PSI) to ferredoxin:NADP+-reductase (FNR) in the photosynthetic electron transport chain, as well as other metabolic pathways. In some photosynthetic organisms including cyanobacteria and green unicellular algae under anaerobic conditions Fd transfers electrons not only to FNR but also to hydrogenase—an enzyme which catalyzes reduction of atomic hydrogen to H2. One of the questions posed by this competitive relationship between proteins is which characteristics of thylakoid stroma media allow switching of the electron flow between the linear path PSI-Fd-FNR-NADP+ and the path PSI-Fd-hydrogenase-H2. The study was conducted using direct multiparticle simulation approach. In this method protein molecules are considered as individual objects that experience Brownian motion and electrostatic interaction with the surrounding media and each other. Using the model we studied the effects of pH and ionic strength (I) upon complex formation between ferredoxin and FNR and ferredoxin and hydrogenase. We showed that the rate constant of Fd-FNR complex formation is constant in a wide range of physiologically significant pH values. Therefore it can be argued that regulation of FNR activity doesn’t involve pH changes in stroma. On the other hand, in the model rate constant of Fd-hydrogenase interaction dramatically depends upon pH: in the range 7-9 it increases threefold. It may seem that because hydrogenase reduces protons it should be more active when pH is acidic. Apparently, regulation of hydrogenase’s affinity to both her reaction partners (H+ and Fd) is carried out by changes in its electrostatic properties. In the dark, the protein is inactive and in the light it is activated and starts to interact with both Fd and H+. Therefore, we can conclude that in chloroplasts the rate of hydrogen production is regulated by pH through the changes in the affinity between hydrogenase and ferredoxin.

  19. Ataxia rating scales are age-dependent in healthy children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandsma, Rick; Spits, Anne H; Kuiper, Marieke J; Lunsing, Roelinka J; Burger, Huibert; Kremer, Hubertus P; Sival, Deborah A

    2014-06-01

    To investigate ataxia rating scales in children for reliability and the effect of age and sex. Three independent neuropaediatric observers cross-sectionally scored a set of paediatric ataxia rating scales in a group of 52 healthy children (26 males, 26 females) aged 4 to 16 years (mean age 10y 5mo SD 3y 11mo). The investigated scales involved the commonly applied International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale (ICARS), the Scale for Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA), the Brief Ataxia Rating Scale (BARS), and PEG-board tests. We investigated the interrelatedness between individual ataxia scales, the influence of age and sex, inter- and intra-observer agreement, and test-retest reliability. Spearman's rank correlations revealed strong correlations between ICARS, SARA BARS, and PEG-board test (all pataxia rating scales are reliable, but should include age-dependent interpretation in children up to 12 years of age. To enable longitudinal interpretation of quantitative ataxia rating scales in children, European paediatric normative values are necessary. © 2014 Mac Keith Press.

  20. Stereochemical dependence of 3JCH coupling constants in 2-substituted 4-t-butyl-cyclohexanone and their alcohol derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favaro, Denize C; Ducati, Lucas C; dos Santos, Francisco P; Contreras, Rubén H; Tormena, Cláudio F

    2011-12-22

    Theoretical and experimental studies on (3)J(C2H6eq) NMR spin-spin coupling constants in both the 2-X-4-t-butyl-cyclohexanone (X = H, CH(3), F, Cl, and Br) and in their alcohol derivatives series are reported. Results thus found are rationalized in terms of the transmission of the Fermi contact contribution to such couplings. To this end, dependencies of (3)J(C2H6eq) couplings versus the C(2)-C(1)-C(6) angle are compared in both series for equatorial and axial X orientations. The main trend is described in terms of the rear lobes interaction. Besides, for X = halogen atom in equatorial orientation a rather strong interaction between oxygen and halogen lone pairs is observed, and its influence on (3)J(C2H6eq) couplings is discussed and rationalized in terms of different Fermi contact transmission pathways.

  1. Investigation of temperature dependent dielectric constant of a sputtered TiN thin film by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripura Sundari, S.; Ramaseshan, R.; Jose, Feby; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A. K.

    2014-01-01

    The temperature dependence of optical constants of titanium nitride thin film is investigated using Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (SE) between 1.4 and 5 eV in the temperature range of 300 K to 650 K in steps of 50 K. The real and imaginary parts of the dielectric functions ɛ1(E) and ɛ2(E) marginally increase with increase in temperature. A Drude Lorentz dielectric analysis based on free electron and oscillator model are carried out to describe the temperature behavior. With increase in temperature, the unscreened plasma frequency and broadening marginally decreased and increased, respectively. The parameters of the Lorentz oscillator model also showed that the relaxation time decreased with temperature while the oscillator energies increased. This study shows that owing to the marginal change in the refractive index with temperature, titanium nitride can be employed for surface plasmon sensor applications even in environments where rise in temperature is imminent.

  2. Medium-dependent control of the bacterial growth rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenberg, Måns; Bremer, Hans; Dennis, Patrick P

    2013-04-01

    By combining results from previous studies of nutritional up-shifts we here re-investigate how bacteria adapt to different nutritional environments by adjusting their macromolecular composition for optimal growth. We demonstrate that, in contrast to a commonly held view the macromolecular composition of bacteria does not depend on the growth rate as an independent variable, but on three factors: (i) the genetic background (i.e. the strain used), (ii) the physiological history of the bacteria used for inoculation of a given growth medium, and (iii) the kind of nutrients in the growth medium. These factors determine the ribosome concentration and the average rate of protein synthesis per ribosome, and thus the growth rate. Immediately after a nutritional up-shift, the average number of ribosomes in the bacterial population increases exponentially with time at a rate which eventually is attained as the final post-shift growth rate of all cell components. After a nutritional up-shift from one minimal medium to another minimal medium of higher nutritional quality, ribosome and RNA polymerase syntheses are co-regulated and immediately increase by the same factor equal to the increase in the final growth rate. However, after an up-shift from a minimal medium to a medium containing all 20 amino acids, RNA polymerase and ribosome syntheses are no longer coregulated; a smaller rate of synthesis of RNA polymerase is compensated by a gradual increase in the fraction of free RNA polymerase, possibly due to a gradual saturation of mRNA promoters. We have also analyzed data from a recent publication, in which it was concluded that the macromolecular composition in terms of RNA/protein and RNA/DNA ratios is solely determined by the effector molecule ppGpp. Our analysis indicates that this is true only in special cases and that, in general, medium adaptation also depends on factors other than ppGpp.

  3. Controllable deterioration rate for time-dependent demand and time-varying holding cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishra Vinod Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we develop an inventory model for non-instantaneous deteriorating items under the consideration of the facts: deterioration rate can be controlled by using the preservation technology (PT during deteriorating period, and holding cost and demand rate both are linear function of time, which was treated as constant in most of the deteriorating inventory models. So in this paper, we developed a deterministic inventory model for non-instantaneous deteriorating items in which both demand rate and holding cost are a linear function of time, deterioration rate is constant, backlogging rate is variable and depend on the length of the next replenishment, shortages are allowed and partially backlogged. The model is solved analytically by minimizing the total cost of the inventory system. The model can be applied to optimizing the total inventory cost of non-instantaneous deteriorating items inventory for the business enterprises, where the preservation technology is used to control the deterioration rate, and demand & holding cost both are a linear function of time.

  4. Two-level renegotiated constant bit rate algorithm (2RCBR) for scalable MPEG2 video over QoS networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegueroles, Josep R.; Alins, Juan J.; de la Cruz, Luis J.; Mata, Jorge

    2001-07-01

    MPEG family codecs generate variable-bit-rate (VBR) compressed video with significant multiple-time-scale bit rate variability. Smoothing techniques remove the periodic fluctuations generated by the codification modes. However, global efficiency concerning network resource allocation remains low due to scene-time-scale variability. RCBR techniques provide suitable means to achieving higher efficiency. Among all RCBR techniques described in literature, 2RCBR mechanism seems to be especially suitable for video-on demand. The method takes advantage of the knowledge of the stored video to calculate the renegotiation intervals and of the client buffer memory to perform work-ahead buffering techniques. 2RCBR achieves 100% bandwidth global efficiency with only two renegotiation levels. The algorithm is based on the study of the second derivative of the cumulative video sequence to find out sharp-sloped inflection points that point out changes in the scene complexity. Due to its nature, 2RCBR becomes very adequate to deliver MPEG2 scalable sequences into the network cause it can assure a constant bit rate to the base MPEG2 layer and use the higher rate intervals to deliver the enhanced MPEG2 layer. However, slight changes in the algorithm parameters must be introduced to attain an optimal behavior. This is verified by means of simulations on MPEG2 video patterns.

  5. Time-Dependent Behaviors of Granite: Loading-Rate Dependence, Creep, and Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashiba, K.; Fukui, K.

    2016-07-01

    To assess the long-term stability of underground structures, it is important to understand the time-dependent behaviors of rocks, such as their loading-rate dependence, creep, and relaxation. However, there have been fewer studies on crystalline rocks than on tuff, mudstone, and rock salt, because the high strength of crystalline rocks makes the detection of their time-dependent behaviors much more difficult. Moreover, studies on the relaxation, temporal change of stress and strain (TCSS) conditions, and relations between various time-dependent behaviors are scarce for not only granites, but also other rocks. In this study, previous reports on the time-dependent behaviors of granites were reviewed and various laboratory tests were conducted using Toki granite. These tests included an alternating-loading-rate test, creep test, relaxation test, and TCSS test. The results showed that the degree of time dependence of Toki granite is similar to other granites, and that the TCSS resembles the stress-relaxation curve and creep-strain curve. A viscoelastic constitutive model, proposed in a previous study, was modified to investigate the relations between the time-dependent behaviors in the pre- and post-peak regions. The modified model reproduced the stress-strain curve, creep, relaxation, and the results of the TCSS test. Based on a comparison of the results of the laboratory tests and numerical simulations, close relations between the time-dependent behaviors were revealed quantitatively.

  6. Calculated Third Order Rate Constants for Interpreting the Mechanisms of Hydrolyses of Chloroformates, Carboxylic Acid Halides, Sulfonyl Chlorides and Phosphorochloridates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. William Bentley

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hydrolyses of acid derivatives (e.g., carboxylic acid chlorides and fluorides, fluoro- and chloroformates, sulfonyl chlorides, phosphorochloridates, anhydrides exhibit pseudo-first order kinetics. Reaction mechanisms vary from those involving a cationic intermediate (SN1 to concerted SN2 processes, and further to third order reactions, in which one solvent molecule acts as the attacking nucleophile and a second molecule acts as a general base catalyst. A unified framework is discussed, in which there are two reaction channels—an SN1-SN2 spectrum and an SN2-SN3 spectrum. Third order rate constants (k3 are calculated for solvolytic reactions in a wide range of compositions of acetone-water mixtures, and are shown to be either approximately constant or correlated with the Grunwald-Winstein Y parameter. These data and kinetic solvent isotope effects, provide the experimental evidence for the SN2-SN3 spectrum (e.g., for chloro- and fluoroformates, chloroacetyl chloride, p-nitrobenzoyl p-toluenesulfonate, sulfonyl chlorides. Deviations from linearity lead to U- or V-shaped plots, which assist in the identification of the point at which the reaction channel changes from SN2-SN3 to SN1-SN2 (e.g., for benzoyl chloride.

  7. Direct measurements of the total rate constant of the reaction NCN + H and implications for the product branching ratio and the enthalpy of formation of NCN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassheber, Nancy; Dammeier, Johannes; Friedrichs, Gernot

    2014-06-21

    The overall rate constant of the reaction (2), NCN + H, which plays a key role in prompt-NO formation in flames, has been directly measured at temperatures 962 K reaction channel (2a) yielding CH + N2 and channel (2b) yielding HCN + N as the products. A more refined analysis taking into account experimental and theoretical literature data provided a consistent rate constant set for k2a, its reverse reaction k1a (CH + N2 → NCN + H), k2b as well as a value for the controversial enthalpy of formation of NCN, ΔfH = 450 kJ mol(-1). The analysis verifies the expected strong temperature dependence of the branching fraction ϕ = k2b/k2 with reaction channel (2b) dominating at the experimental high-temperature limit. In contrast, reaction (2a) dominates at the low-temperature limit with a possible minor contribution of the HNCN forming recombination channel (2d) at T < 1150 K.

  8. On the Temperature Dependence of Enzyme-Catalyzed Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcus, Vickery L; Prentice, Erica J; Hobbs, Joanne K; Mulholland, Adrian J; Van der Kamp, Marc W; Pudney, Christopher R; Parker, Emily J; Schipper, Louis A

    2016-03-29

    One of the critical variables that determine the rate of any reaction is temperature. For biological systems, the effects of temperature are convoluted with myriad (and often opposing) contributions from enzyme catalysis, protein stability, and temperature-dependent regulation, for example. We have coined the phrase "macromolecular rate theory (MMRT)" to describe the temperature dependence of enzyme-catalyzed rates independent of stability or regulatory processes. Central to MMRT is the observation that enzyme-catalyzed reactions occur with significant values of ΔCp(‡) that are in general negative. That is, the heat capacity (Cp) for the enzyme-substrate complex is generally larger than the Cp for the enzyme-transition state complex. Consistent with a classical description of enzyme catalysis, a negative value for ΔCp(‡) is the result of the enzyme binding relatively weakly to the substrate and very tightly to the transition state. This observation of negative ΔCp(‡) has important implications for the temperature dependence of enzyme-catalyzed rates. Here, we lay out the fundamentals of MMRT. We present a number of hypotheses that arise directly from MMRT including a theoretical justification for the large size of enzymes and the basis for their optimum temperatures. We rationalize the behavior of psychrophilic enzymes and describe a "psychrophilic trap" which places limits on the evolution of enzymes in low temperature environments. One of the defining characteristics of biology is catalysis of chemical reactions by enzymes, and enzymes drive much of metabolism. Therefore, we also expect to see characteristics of MMRT at the level of cells, whole organisms, and even ecosystems.

  9. A molecular copper catalyst for electrochemical water reduction with a large hydrogen-generation rate constant in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peili; Wang, Mei; Yang, Yong; Yao, Tianyi; Sun, Licheng

    2014-12-08

    The copper complex [(bztpen)Cu](BF4)2 (bztpen=N-benzyl-N,N',N'-tris(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)ethylenediamine) displays high catalytic activity for electrochemical proton reduction in acidic aqueous solutions, with a calculated hydrogen-generation rate constant (k(obs)) of over 10000 s(-1). A turnover frequency (TOF) of 7000 h(-1) cm(-2) and a Faradaic efficiency of 96% were obtained from a controlled potential electrolysis (CPE) experiment with [(bztpen)Cu](2+) in pH 2.5 buffer solution at -0.90 V versus the standard hydrogen electrode (SHE) over two hours using a glassy carbon electrode. A mechanism involving two proton-coupled reduction steps was proposed for the dihydrogen generation reaction catalyzed by [(bztpen)Cu](2+).

  10. Multi-scale detection of rate changes in spike trains with weak dependencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messer, Michael; Costa, Kauê M; Roeper, Jochen; Schneider, Gaby

    2017-04-01

    The statistical analysis of neuronal spike trains by models of point processes often relies on the assumption of constant process parameters. However, it is a well-known problem that the parameters of empirical spike trains can be highly variable, such as for example the firing rate. In order to test the null hypothesis of a constant rate and to estimate the change points, a Multiple Filter Test (MFT) and a corresponding algorithm (MFA) have been proposed that can be applied under the assumption of independent inter spike intervals (ISIs). As empirical spike trains often show weak dependencies in the correlation structure of ISIs, we extend the MFT here to point processes associated with short range dependencies. By specifically estimating serial dependencies in the test statistic, we show that the new MFT can be applied to a variety of empirical firing patterns, including positive and negative serial correlations as well as tonic and bursty firing. The new MFT is applied to a data set of empirical spike trains with serial correlations, and simulations show improved performance against methods that assume independence. In case of positive correlations, our new MFT is necessary to reduce the number of false positives, which can be highly enhanced when falsely assuming independence. For the frequent case of negative correlations, the new MFT shows an improved detection probability of change points and thus, also a higher potential of signal extraction from noisy spike trains.

  11. Effects of a constant rate infusion of detomidine on cardiovascular function, isoflurane requirements and recovery quality in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauvliege, Stijn; Marcilla, Miguel Gozalo; Verryken, Kirsten; Duchateau, Luc; Devisscher, Lindsey; Gasthuys, Frank

    2011-11-01

    To examine the influence of a detomidine constant rate infusion (CRI) on cardiovascular function, isoflurane requirements and recovery quality in horses undergoing elective surgery. Prospective, randomized, blinded, clinical trial. Twenty adult healthy horses. After sedation (detomidine, 10 μg kg(-1) intravenously [IV]) and induction of anaesthesia (midazolam 0.06 mg kg(-1) , ketamine 2.2 mg kg(-1) IV), anaesthesia was maintained with isoflurane in oxygen/air (inspiratory oxygen fraction 55%). When indicated, the lungs were mechanically ventilated. Dobutamine was administered when MAPquality and duration were recorded in each horse. For statistical analysis, anova, Pearson chi-square and Wilcoxon rank sum tests were used as relevant. Heart rate (p=0.0176) and ḊO(2) I (p= 0.0084) were lower and SVR higher (p=0.0126) in group D, compared to group S. Heart rate (p=0.0011) and pH (p=0.0187) increased over time. Significant differences in isoflurane requirements were not detected. Recovery quality and duration were comparable between treatments. A detomidine CRI produced cardiovascular effects typical for α(2) -agonists, without affecting isoflurane requirements, recovery duration or recovery quality. © 2011 The Authors. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia. © 2011 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesiologists.

  12. Energy landscape analysis of native folding of the prion protein yields the diffusion constant, transition path time, and rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hao; Gupta, Amar Nath; Liu, Xia; Neupane, Krishna; Brigley, Angela M; Sosova, Iveta; Woodside, Michael T

    2012-09-04

    Protein folding is described conceptually in terms of diffusion over a configurational free-energy landscape, typically reduced to a one-dimensional profile along a reaction coordinate. In principle, kinetic properties can be predicted directly from the landscape profile using Kramers theory for diffusive barrier crossing, including the folding rates and the transition time for crossing the barrier. Landscape theory has been widely applied to interpret the time scales for protein conformational dynamics, but protein folding rates and transition times have not been calculated directly from experimentally measured free-energy profiles. We characterized the energy landscape for native folding of the prion protein using force spectroscopy, measuring the change in extension of a single protein molecule at high resolution as it unfolded/refolded under tension. Key parameters describing the landscape profile were first recovered from the distributions of unfolding and refolding forces, allowing the diffusion constant for barrier crossing and the transition path time across the barrier to be calculated. The full landscape profile was then reconstructed from force-extension curves, revealing a double-well potential with an extended, partially unfolded transition state. The barrier height and position were consistent with the previous results. Finally, Kramers theory was used to predict the folding rates from the landscape profile, recovering the values observed experimentally both under tension and at zero force in ensemble experiments. These results demonstrate how advances in single-molecule theory and experiment are harnessing the power of landscape formalisms to describe quantitatively the mechanics of folding.

  13. Effect of methamphetamine dependence on heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Brook L; Minassian, Arpi; Perry, William

    2012-05-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is an increasing popular and highly addictive stimulant associated with autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction, cardiovascular pathology and neurotoxicity. Heart rate variability (HRV) has been used to assess autonomic function and predict mortality in cardiac disorders and drug intoxication, but has not been characterized in METH use. We recorded HRV in a sample of currently abstinent individuals with a history of METH dependence compared to age- and gender-matched drug-free comparison subjects. HRV was assessed using time domain, frequency domain, and non-linear entropic analyses in 17 previously METH-dependent and 21 drug-free comparison individuals during a 5 minute rest period. The METH-dependent group demonstrated significant reduction in HRV, reduced parasympathetic activity, and diminished heartbeat complexity relative to comparison participants. More recent METH use was associated with increased sympathetic tone. Chronic METH exposure may be associated with decreased HRV, impaired vagal function, and reduction in heart rate complexity as assessed by multiple methods of analysis. We discuss and review evidence that impaired HRV may be related to the cardiotoxic or neurotoxic effects of prolonged METH use.

  14. Predicted Chemical Activation Rate Constants for HO2 + CH2NH: The Dominant Role of a Hydrogen-Bonded Pre-reactive Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mohamad Akbar; Sonk, Jason A; Barker, John R

    2016-09-15

    The reaction of methanimine (CH2NH) with the hydroperoxy (HO2) radical has been investigated by using a combination of ab initio and density functional theory (CCSD(T)/CBSB7//B3LYP+Dispersion/CBSB7) and master equation calculations based on transition state theory (TST). Variational TST was used to compute both canonical (CVTST) and microcanonical (μVTST) rate constants for barrierless reactions. The title reaction starts with the reversible formation of a cyclic prereactive complex (PRC) that is bound by ∼11 kcal/mol and contains hydrogen bonds to both nitrogen and oxygen. The reaction path for the entrance channel was investigated by a series of constrained optimizations, which showed that the reaction is barrierless (i.e., no intrinsic energy barrier along the path). However, the variations in the potential energy, vibrational frequencies, and rotational constants reveal that the two hydrogen bonds are formed sequentially, producing two reaction flux bottlenecks (i.e., two transition states) along the reaction path, which were modeled using W. H. Miller's unified TST approach. The rate constant computed for the formation of the PRC is pressure-dependent and increases at lower temperatures. Under atmospheric conditions, the PRC dissociates rapidly and its lifetime is too short for it to undergo significant bimolecular reaction with other species. A small fraction isomerizes via a cyclic transition state and subsequent reactions lead to products normally expected from hydrogen abstraction reactions. The kinetics of the HO2 + CH2NH reaction system differs substantially from the analogous isoelectronic reaction systems involving C2H4 and CH2O, which have been the subjects of previous experimental and theoretical studies.

  15. Rate Constants of PSII Photoinhibition and its Repair, and PSII Fluorescence Parameters in Field Plants in Relation to their Growth Light Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Kazunori; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Nakaji, Masayoshi; Kanel, Dhana Raj; Terashima, Ichiro

    2015-09-01

    The extent of photoinhibition of PSII is determined by a balance between the rate of photodamage to PSII and that of repair of the damaged PSII. It has already been indicated that the rate constants of photodamage (kpi) and repair (krec) of the leaves differ depending on their growth light environment. However, there are no studies using plants in the field. We examined these rate constants and fluorescence parameters of several field-grown plants to determine inter-relationships between these values and the growth environment. The kpi values were strongly related to the excess energy, EY, of the puddle model and non-regulated energy dissipation, Y(NO), of the lake model, both multiplied by the photosynthetically active photon flux density (PPFD) level during the photoinhibitory treatment. In contrast, the krec values corrected against in situ air temperature were very strongly related to the daily PPFD level. The plants from the fields showed higher NPQ than the chamber-grown plants, probably because these field plants acclimated to stronger lightflecks than the averaged growth PPFD. Comparing chamber-grown plants and the field plants, we showed that kpi is determined by the incident light level and the photosynthetic capacities such as in situ rate of PSII electron transport and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) [e.g. Y(NO)×PPFD] and that krec is mostly determined by the growth light and temperature levels. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Exercise training improves heart rate variability after methamphetamine dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolezal, Brett Andrew; Chudzynski, Joy; Dickerson, Daniel; Mooney, Larissa; Rawson, Richard A; Garfinkel, Alan; Cooper, Christopher B

    2014-06-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) reflects a healthy autonomic nervous system and is increased with physical training. Methamphetamine dependence (MD) causes autonomic dysfunction and diminished HRV. We compared recently abstinent methamphetamine-dependent participants with age-matched, drug-free controls (DF) and also investigated whether HRV can be improved with exercise training in the methamphetamine-dependent participants. In 50 participants (MD = 28; DF = 22), resting heart rate (HR; R-R intervals) was recorded over 5 min while seated using a monitor affixed to a chest strap. Previously reported time domain (SDNN, RMSSD, pNN50) and frequency domain (LFnu, HFnu, LF/HF) parameters of HRV were calculated with customized software. MD were randomized to thrice-weekly exercise training (ME = 14) or equal attention without training (MC = 14) over 8 wk. Groups were compared using paired and unpaired t-tests. Statistical significance was set at P ≤ 0.05. Participant characteristics were matched between groups (mean ± SD): age = 33 ± 6 yr; body mass = 82.7 ± 12 kg, body mass index = 26.8 ± 4.1 kg·min. Compared with DF, the MD group had significantly higher resting HR (P increased SDNN (+14.7 ± 2.0 ms, +34%), RMSSD (+19.6 ± 4.2 ms, +63%), pNN50 (+22.6% ± 2.7%, +173%), HFnu (+14.2 ± 1.9, +60%), and decreased HR (-5.2 ± 1.1 bpm, -7%), LFnu (-9.6 ± 1.5, -16%), and LF/HF (-0.7 ± 0.3, -19%). These measures did not change from baseline in the MC group. HRV, based on several conventional indices, was diminished in recently abstinent, methamphetamine-dependent individuals. Moreover, physical training yielded a marked increase in HRV, representing increased vagal modulation or improved autonomic balance.

  17. Scale dependence of rock friction at high work rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Futoshi; Fukuyama, Eiichi; Mizoguchi, Kazuo; Takizawa, Shigeru; Xu, Shiqing; Kawakata, Hironori

    2015-12-10

    Determination of the frictional properties of rocks is crucial for an understanding of earthquake mechanics, because most earthquakes are caused by frictional sliding along faults. Prior studies using rotary shear apparatus revealed a marked decrease in frictional strength, which can cause a large stress drop and strong shaking, with increasing slip rate and increasing work rate. (The mechanical work rate per unit area equals the product of the shear stress and the slip rate.) However, those important findings were obtained in experiments using rock specimens with dimensions of only several centimetres, which are much smaller than the dimensions of a natural fault (of the order of 1,000 metres). Here we use a large-scale biaxial friction apparatus with metre-sized rock specimens to investigate scale-dependent rock friction. The experiments show that rock friction in metre-sized rock specimens starts to decrease at a work rate that is one order of magnitude smaller than that in centimetre-sized rock specimens. Mechanical, visual and material observations suggest that slip-evolved stress heterogeneity on the fault accounts for the difference. On the basis of these observations, we propose that stress-concentrated areas exist in which frictional slip produces more wear materials (gouge) than in areas outside, resulting in further stress concentrations at these areas. Shear stress on the fault is primarily sustained by stress-concentrated areas that undergo a high work rate, so those areas should weaken rapidly and cause the macroscopic frictional strength to decrease abruptly. To verify this idea, we conducted numerical simulations assuming that local friction follows the frictional properties observed on centimetre-sized rock specimens. The simulations reproduced the macroscopic frictional properties observed on the metre-sized rock specimens. Given that localized stress concentrations commonly occur naturally, our results suggest that a natural fault may lose its

  18. Oxygen consumption and heart rate responses during and after constant load and alternating intensity exercise at 105% of lactate threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanoudaki, S; Karatzanos, E; Baltopoulos, P; Maridaki, M

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was a secondary-analysis of previously published data, in order to compare the acute VO2 responses, the time spent at high percentage of VO2max and total VO2 consumed (TVO2) between constant and alternating intensity exercise of the same intensity and duration. This study also aimed to examine VO2 and heart rate (HR) responses one hour after both exercises. Ten recreationally trained men (24.7±4.7 years) completed the following two exercise tests lasting an hour each and having the same mean intensity at 105% of lactate threshold (70% VO2max): 1) constant load cycling (CON), and 2) alternating intensity exercise (ALT), during which 40 seconds of light exercise (47% VO2max) were alternated with 20 seconds of supramaximal intensity at 120% of VO2max. TVO2 (69.89±7.02 vs. 58.22±9.13 mL/kg/min, P=0.03) and HR (142±16, 128±12, P=0.04) was higher in CON exercise compared to ALT. All participants reached 70% and 80% of VO2max irrespective of the exercise protocol. In ALT exercise the time spent at 90% was higher compared to CON exercise (70.81±21.37 vs. 36.88±11.88 seconds). Also, TVO2 recovery values after ALT exercise was higher compared to CON (11.1 ±2.93 vs. 9.94±3.54 mL/kg/min). ALT exercise allowed participants to spend longer time at 90% of VO2max, even if TVO2 in CON exercise was higher, suggesting that in ALT exercise greater aerobic stress (as based on exercise intensity) is imposed on the athletes. While VO2 recovery values were higher in ALT compared to CON, indicating different substrate utilization during and after exercise.

  19. Rate constants for the thermal decomposition of ethanol and its bimolecular reactions with OH and D: reflected shock tube and theoretical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaramakrishnan, R; Su, M-C; Michael, J V; Klippenstein, S J; Harding, L B; Ruscic, B

    2010-09-09

    The thermal decomposition of ethanol and its reactions with OH and D have been studied with both shock tube experiments and ab initio transition state theory-based master equation calculations. Dissociation rate constants for ethanol have been measured at high T in reflected shock waves using OH optical absorption and high-sensitivity H-atom ARAS detection. The three dissociation processes that are dominant at high T are C2H5OH--> C2H4+H2O (A) -->CH3+CH2OH (B) -->C2H5+OH (C).The rate coefficient for reaction C was measured directly with high sensitivity at 308 nm using a multipass optical White cell. Meanwhile, H-atom ARAS measurements yield the overall rate coefficient and that for the sum of reactions B and C , since H-atoms are instantaneously formed from the decompositions of CH(2)OH and C(2)H(5) into CH(2)O + H and C(2)H(4) + H, respectively. By difference, rate constants for reaction 1 could be obtained. One potential complication is the scavenging of OH by unreacted ethanol in the OH experiments, and therefore, rate constants for OH+C2H5OH-->products (D)were measured using tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBH) as the thermal source for OH. The present experiments can be represented by the Arrhenius expression k=(2.5+/-0.43) x 10(-11) exp(-911+/-191 K/T) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1) over the T range 857-1297 K. For completeness, we have also measured the rate coefficient for the reaction of D atoms with ethanol D+C2H5OH-->products (E) whose H analogue is another key reaction in the combustion of ethanol. Over the T range 1054-1359 K, the rate constants from the present experiments can be represented by the Arrhenius expression, k=(3.98+/-0.76) x10(-10) exp(-4494+/-235 K/T) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1). The high-pressure rate coefficients for reactions B and C were studied with variable reaction coordinate transition state theory employing directly determined CASPT2/cc-pvdz interaction energies. Reactions A , D , and E were studied with conventional transition state theory

  20. ESTIMATION OF HYDROLYSIS RATE CONSTANTS OF CARBOXYLIC ACID ESTER AND PHOSPHATE ESTER COMPOUNDS IN AQUEOUS SYSTEMS FROM MOLECULAR STRUCTURE BY SPARC

    Science.gov (United States)

    SPARC (SPARC Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry) chemical reactivity models were extended to calculate hydrolysis rate constants for carboxylic acid ester and phosphate ester compounds in aqueous non- aqueous and systems strictly from molecular structure. The energy diffe...

  1. Hybrid colored noise process with space-dependent switching rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Lawley, Sean D.

    2017-07-01

    A fundamental issue in the theory of continuous stochastic process is the interpretation of multiplicative white noise, which is often referred to as the Itô-Stratonovich dilemma. From a physical perspective, this reflects the need to introduce additional constraints in order to specify the nature of the noise, whereas from a mathematical perspective it reflects an ambiguity in the formulation of stochastic differential equations (SDEs). Recently, we have identified a mechanism for obtaining an Itô SDE based on a form of temporal disorder. Motivated by switching processes in molecular biology, we considered a Brownian particle that randomly switches between two distinct conformational states with different diffusivities. In each state, the particle undergoes normal diffusion (additive noise) so there is no ambiguity in the interpretation of the noise. However, if the switching rates depend on position, then in the fast switching limit one obtains Brownian motion with a space-dependent diffusivity of the Itô form. In this paper, we extend our theory to include colored additive noise. We show that the nature of the effective multiplicative noise process obtained by taking both the white-noise limit (κ →0 ) and fast switching limit (ɛ →0 ) depends on the order the two limits are taken. If the white-noise limit is taken first, then we obtain Itô, and if the fast switching limit is taken first, then we obtain Stratonovich. Moreover, the form of the effective diffusion coefficient differs in the two cases. The latter result holds even in the case of space-independent transition rates, where one obtains additive noise processes with different diffusion coefficients. Finally, we show that yet another form of multiplicative noise is obtained in the simultaneous limit ɛ ,κ →0 with ɛ /κ2 fixed.

  2. SU-E-T-421: Feasibility Study of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy with Constant Dose Rate for Endometrial Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, R; Wang, J [Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing, Beijing (China)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility, efficiency, and delivery accuracy of volumetric modulated arc therapy with constant dose rate (VMAT-CDR) for whole-pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) of endometrial cancer. Methods: The nine-Field intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), VMAT with variable dose-rate (VMAT-VDR), and VMAT-CDR plans were created for 9 patients with endometrial cancer undergoing WPRT. The dose distribution of planning target volume (PTV), organs at risk (OARs), and normal tissue (NT) were compared. The monitor units (MUs) and treatment delivery time were also evaluated. For each VMAT-CDR plan, a dry Run was performed to assess the dosimetric accuracy with MatriXX from IBA. Results: Compared with IMRT, the VMAT-CDR plans delivered a slightly greater V20 of the bowel, bladder, pelvis bone, and NT, but significantly decreased the dose to the high-dose region of the rectum and pelvis bone. The MUs Decreased from 1105 with IMRT to 628 with VMAT-CDR. The delivery time also decreased from 9.5 to 3.2 minutes. The average gamma pass rate was 95.6% at the 3%/3 mm criteria with MatriXX pretreatment verification for 9 patients. Conclusion: VMAT-CDR can achieve comparable plan quality with significant shorter delivery time and smaller number of MUs compared with IMRT for patients with endometrial cancer undergoing WPRT. It can be accurately delivered and be an alternative to IMRT on the linear accelerator without VDR capability. This work is supported by the grant project, National Natural; Science Foundation of China (No. 81071237)

  3. Investigation of the Flow Rate Effect Upstream of the Constant-Geometry Throttle on the Gas Mass Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. M. Timofeev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The turbulent-flow throttles are used in pneumatic systems and gas-supply ones to restrict or measure gas mass flow. It is customary to install the throttles in joints of pipelines (in teejoints and cross tees or in joints of pipelines with pneumatic automation devices Presently, in designing the pneumatic systems and gas-supply ones a gas mass flow through a throttle is calculated by a known equation derived from the Saint-Venant-Vantсel formula for the adiabatic flow of ideal gas through a nozzle from an unrestrictedly high capacity tank. Neglect of gas velocity at the throttle inlet is one of the assumptions taken in the development of the above equation. As may be seen in practice, in actual systems the diameters of the throttle and the pipe wherein it is mounted can be commensurable. Neglect of the inlet velocity therewith can result in an error when determining the required throttle diameter in design calculation and a flow rate in checking calculation, as well as when measuring a flow rate in the course of the test. The theoretical study has revealed that the flow velocity at the throttle inlet is responsible for two parameter values: the outlet flow velocity and the critical pressure ratio, which in turn determine the gas mass flow value. To calculate the gas mass flow, the dependencies are given in the paper, which allow taking into account the flow rate at the throttle inlet. The analysis of obtained dependencies has revealed that the degree of influence of inlet flow rate upon the mass flow is defined by two parameters: pressure ratio at the throttle and open area ratio of the throttle and the pipe wherein it is mounted. An analytical investigation has been pursued to evaluate the extent to which the gas mass flow through the throttle is affected by the inlet flow rate. The findings of the investigation and the indications for using the present dependencies are given in this paper. By and large the investigation allowed the

  4. Strain rate and temperature dependent mechanical behavior of nanocrystalline gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanjgaokar, Nikhil J.

    Nanocrystalline metal films are candidate materials for microelectronics and Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS). The long term mechanical stability of metal films requires quantitative understanding of their thermo-mechanical behavior in the large range of operating strain rates and temperatures. This dissertation research studied (a) the role of thermally activated processes based on the strain rate and temperature dependent mechanical behavior of nanocrystalline Au thin films, and (b) deformation processes at nominally elastic loads that lead to creep strain over a moderate temperature range that is relevant to MEMS applications. The rate dependent mechanical behavior of nanocrystalline Au thin films was first investigated at room temperature ~ 25 °C and at strain rates between 10-6 to 20 s-1. The use of digital image correlation (DIC) facilitated repeatable and accurate measurements of fullfield strain from free-standing nanocrystalline Au thin films. The experimental stress-strain curves were used to calculate activation volumes for two film thicknesses (0.85 mum, and 1.75 mum), which were 4.5b3 and 8.1b3, at strain rates smaller than 10-4 s-1 and 12.5b3 and 14.6b3 at strain rates higher than 10-4 s-1. The reduced activation volume and increased strain rate sensitivity at slow strain rates were attributed to grain boundary (GB) diffusional processes that result in creep strain. The room temperature strain rate results were augmented with microscale strain rate experiments at temperatures up to 110 °C. Two methods for heating free-standing microscale thin film specimens, namely uniform heating using a custom-built microheater and resistive (Joule) heating, were evaluated using a combination of full-field strain measurements by optical microscopy and full-field temperature measurements by infrared (IR) thermal imaging. It was shown for the first time that the Joule specimen heating method results in large underestimation of the inelastic material properties

  5. Isotope effects and the temperature dependences of the hyperfine coupling constants of muoniated sec-butyl radicals in condensed phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Donald G; Bridges, Michael D; Arseneau, Donald J; Chen, Ya Kun; Wang, Yan Alexander

    2011-04-01

    Reported here is the first μSR study of the muon (A(μ)) and proton (A(p)) β-hyperfine coupling constants (Hfcc) of muoniated sec-butyl radicals, formed by muonium (Mu) addition to 1-butene and to cis- and trans-2-butene. The data are compared with in vacuo spin-unrestricted MP2 and hybrid DFT/B3YLP calculations reported in the previous paper (I), which played an important part in the interpretation of the data. The T-dependences of both the (reduced) muon, A(μ)′(T), and proton, A(p)(T), Hfcc are surprisingly well explained by a simple model, in which the calculated Hfcc from paper I at energy minima of 0 and near ±120° are thermally averaged, assuming an energy dependence given by a basic 2-fold torsional potential. Fitted torsional barriers to A(μ)′(T) from this model are similar (~3 kJ/mol) for all muoniated butyl radicals, suggesting that these are dominated by ZPE effects arising from the C−Mu bond, but for A(p)(T) exhibit wide variations depending on environment. For the cis- and trans-2-butyl radicals formed from 2-butene, A(μ)′(T) exhibits clear discontinuities at bulk butene melting points, evidence for molecular interactions enhancing these muon Hfcc in the environment of the solid state, similar to that found in earlier reports for muoniated tert-butyl. In contrast, for Mu−sec-butyl formed from 1-butene, there is no such discontinuity. The muon hfcc for the trans-2-butyl radical are seemingly very well predicted by B3LYP calculations in the solid phase, but for sec-butyl from 1-butene, showing the absence of further interactions, much better agreement is found with the MP2 calculations across the whole temperature range. Examples of large proton Hfcc near 0 K are also reported, due to eclipsed C−H bonds, in like manner to C−Mu, which then also exhibit clear discontinuities in A(p)(T) at bulk melting points. The data suggest that the good agreement found between theory and experiment from the B3LYP calculations for eclipsed bonds in

  6. Magnetostriction of the rapidly quenched Co80Nb8B12 alloy: Dependence on quenching rate, structural relaxation, and temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madurga, V.; Barandiarán, J. M.; Vázquez, M.

    1987-01-01

    Ribbons of nominal composition Co80Nb8B12 have been prepared by the single roller quenching method using different wheel velocities ranging from 26 to 42 ms−1. X-ray diffraction patterns for ribbons prepared at low velocities show crystalline peaks but characteristic for the amorphous state...... for samples prepared at velocities above 36 ms−1. Room-temperature values of the magnetostriction constant lambdas depend on the quenching rate and changes from 4×10−7 to −1×10−6 as the wheel speed increases. Zero magnetostriction samples are obtained at about 34 ms−1. Thermal treatments change the values...... of the magnetostriction in the same way as a decrease in the quenching rate does. A dependence of the magnetostriction constant on the applied stress has been found. This dependence, fully reversible, is observed at room temperature. Journal of Applied Physics is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  7. Inferring kinetic pathways, rates, and force dependence from nonprocessive optical tweezers experiments: a maximum likelihood approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalafut, Bennett; Visscher, Koen

    2008-10-01

    Optical tweezers experiments allow us to probe the role of force and mechanical work in a variety of biochemical processes. However, observable states do not usually correspond in a one-to-one fashion with the internal state of an enzyme or enzyme-substrate complex. Different kinetic pathways yield different distributions for the dwells in the observable states. Furthermore, the dwell-time distribution will be dependent upon force, and upon where in the biochemical pathway force acts. I will present a maximum-likelihood method for identifying rate constants and the locations of force-dependent transitions in transcription initiation by T7 RNA Polymerase. This method is generalizable to systems with more complicated kinetic pathways in which there are two observable states (e.g. bound and unbound) and an irreversible final transition.

  8. Dose rate constants for the quantity H{sub p}(3) for frequently used radionuclides in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szermerski, Bastian; Bruchmann, Iris; Geworski, Lilli [Medical School Hannover (Germany). Dept. for Radiation Protection and Medical Physics; Behrens, Rolf [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    According to recent studies, the human eye lens is more sensitive to ionising radiation than previously assumed. Therefore, the dose limit for personnel occupationally exposed to ionising radiation will be lowered from currently 150 mSv to 20 mSv per year. Currently, no data base for a reliable estimation of the dose to the lens of the eye is available for nuclear medicine. Furthermore, the dose is usually not monitored. The aim of this work was to determine dose rate constants for the quantity H{sub p}(3), which is supposed to estimate the dose to the lens of the eye. For this, H{sub p}(3)-dosemeters were fixed to an Alderson Phantom at different positions. The dosemeters were exposed to radiation from nuclides typically used in nuclear medicine in their geometries analog to their application in nuclear medicine, e.g. syringe or vial. The results show that the handling of high-energy beta (i.e. electron or positron) emitters may lead to a relevant dose to the lens of the eye. For low-energy beta emitters and gamma emitters, an exceeding of the lowered dose limit seems to be unlikely.

  9. Catalytic antibody light chain capable of cleaving a chemokine receptor CCR-5 peptide with a high reaction rate constant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuda, Yukie; Hifumi, Emi; Tsuruhata, Kumi; Fujinami, Hiroko; Yamamoto, Naoki; Uda, Taizo

    2004-04-20

    A monoclonal antibody (MAb), ECL2B-2, was obtained by immunizing a peptide possessing a part of a sequence of a chemokine receptor, CCR-5, which is present as a membrane protein on the macrophage surface, and which plays an important role in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. From the DNA and the deduced amino acid sequences of the light and heavy chains of ECL2B-2 MAb, molecular modeling was conducted to calculate the steric conformation of the antibody. Modeling suggested that the structure of ECL2B-2 could possess one or two catalytic triad(s), composed of Asp(1), Ser(27a) (or Ser(27e)), and His(93) (or His(27d)), in the light chain of ECL2B-2. The three amino acid residues, Asp(1), Ser(27a), and His(93), are identical to those of catalytic antibody light chains such as VIPase and i41SL1-2. The light chain of ECL2B-2 MAb degraded the antigenic peptide CCR-5 within about 100 h. Surprisingly, the light chain had a very high catalytic reaction rate constant (k(cat)) of 2.23 min(-1), which is greater by factors of tens to hundreds than those of natural catalytic antibodies obtained previously. The heavy chain of ECL2B-2 MAb, which has no catalytic triad because of a lack of His residue, did not degrade the CCR-5 peptide.

  10. Using a Family of Dividing Surfaces Normal to the Minimum EnergyPath for Quantum Instanton Rate Constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yimin; Miller, Wlliam H.

    2006-02-22

    One of the outstanding issues in the quantum instanton (QI) theory (or any transition state-type theory) for thermal rate constants of chemical reactions is the choice of an appropriate ''dividing surface'' (DS) that separates reactants and products. (In the general version of the QI theory, there are actually two dividing surfaces involved.) This paper shows one simple and general way for choosing DS's for use in QI Theory, namely using the family of (hyper) planes normal to the minimum energy path (MEP) on the potential energy surface at various distances s along it. Here the reaction coordinate is not one of the dynamical coordinates of the system (which will in general be the Cartesian coordinates of the atoms), but rather simply a parameter which specifies the DS. It is also shown how this idea can be implemented for an N-atom system in 3d space in a way that preserves overall translational and rotational invariance. Numerical application to a simple system (the colliner H + H{sub 2} reaction) is presented to illustrate the procedure.

  11. Absolute rate constants for hydrogen atom transfer from tertiary amides to the cumyloxyl radical: evaluating the role of stereoelectronic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamone, Michela; Milan, Michela; DiLabio, Gino A; Bietti, Massimo

    2014-08-01

    A time-resolved kinetic study of the hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions from a series of alkanamides to the cumyloxyl radical (CumO(•)) was carried out. With N,N-dialkylformamides HAT preferentially occurs from the formyl C-H bond, while in N-formylpyrrolidine HAT mostly occurs from the ring α-C-H bonds. With the acetamides and the alkanamides almost exclusive HAT from the C-H bonds that are α to nitrogen was observed. The results obtained show that alignment between the C-H bond being broken and the amide π-system can lead to significant increases in the HAT rate constant (kH). This finding points toward the important role of stereoelectronic effects on the HAT reactivity and selectivity. The highest kH values were measured for the reactions of CumO(•) with N-acylpyrrolidines. These substrates have ring α-C-H bonds that are held in a conformation that is optimally aligned with the amide π-system, thus allowing for the relatively facile HAT reaction. The lowest kH value was measured for the reaction of N,N-diisobutylacetamide, wherein the steric bulk associated with the N-isobutyl groups increases the energy barrier required to reach the most suitable conformation for HAT. The experimental results are well supported by the computed BDEs for the C-H bonds of the most representative substrates.

  12. A quasi-QSPR modelling for the photocatalytic decolourization rate constants and cellular viability (CV%) of nanoparticles by CORAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toropova, A P; Toropov, A A; Benfenati, E

    2015-01-01

    Most quantitative structure-property/activity relationships (QSPRs/QSARs) predict various endpoints related to organic compounds. Gradually, the variety of organic compounds has been extended to inorganic, organometallic compounds and polymers. However, the so-called molecular descriptors cannot be defined for super-complex substances such as different nanomaterials and peptides, since there is no simple and clear representation of their molecular structure. Some possible ways to define approaches for a predictive model in the case of super-complex substances are discussed. The basic idea of the approach is to change the traditionally used paradigm 'the endpoint is a mathematical function of the molecular structure' with another paradigm 'the endpoint is a mathematical function of available eclectic information'. The eclectic data can be (i) conditions of a synthesis, (ii) technological attributes, (iii) size of nanoparticles, (iv) concentration, (v) attributes related to cell membranes, and so on. Two examples of quasi-QSPR/QSAR analyses are presented and discussed. These are (i) photocatalytic decolourization rate constants (DRC) (10(-5)/s) of different nanopowders; and (ii) the cellular viability under the effect of nano-SiO(2).

  13. Resonant vibrational-excitation cross sections and rate constants for low-energy electron scattering by molecular oxygen

    CERN Document Server

    Laporta, V; Tennyson, J

    2016-01-01

    Resonant vibrational-excitation cross sections and rate constants for electron scattering by molecular oxygen are presented. Transitions between all 42 vibrational levels of O$_2(\\textrm{X}\\ ^3\\Sigma_g^- $) are considered. Molecular rotations are parameterized by the rotational quantum number $J$ which is considered in the range 1 to 151. The lowest four resonant states of O$_2^-$, $^2\\Pi_g$, $^2\\Pi_u$, $^4\\Sigma_u^-$ and $^2\\Sigma_u^-$, are taken into account. The calculations are performed using the fixed-nuclei R-matrix approach to determine the resonance positions and widths, and the boomerang model to characterize the nuclei motion. Two energy regions below and above 4~eV are investigated: the first one is characterized by sharp structures in the cross section, and the second by a broad resonance peaked at 10~eV. The computed cross sections are compared with theoretical and experimental results available in literature for both the energy regions, and are made available for use by modelers. The effect of ...

  14. Fuzzy economic production quantity model with time dependent demand rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanta Kumar Indrajitsingha

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In this paper, an economic production quantity model is considered under a fuzzy environment. Both the demand cost and holding cost are considered using fuzzy pentagonal numbers. The Signed Distance Method is used to defuzzify the total cost function. Methods: The results obtained by these methods are compared with the help of a numerical example. Sensitivity analysis is also carried out to explore the effect of changes in the values of some of the system parameters. Results and conclusions: The fuzzy EPQ model with time dependent demand rate was presented together with the possible implementation. The behavior of changes in parameters was analyzed. The possible extension of the implementation of this method was presented.

  15. Characterizing heart rate variability by scale-dependent Lyapunov exponent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jing; Gao, Jianbo; Tung, Wen-wen

    2009-06-01

    Previous studies on heart rate variability (HRV) using chaos theory, fractal scaling analysis, and many other methods, while fruitful in many aspects, have produced much confusion in the literature. Especially the issue of whether normal HRV is chaotic or stochastic remains highly controversial. Here, we employ a new multiscale complexity measure, the scale-dependent Lyapunov exponent (SDLE), to characterize HRV. SDLE has been shown to readily characterize major models of complex time series including deterministic chaos, noisy chaos, stochastic oscillations, random 1/f processes, random Levy processes, and complex time series with multiple scaling behaviors. Here we use SDLE to characterize the relative importance of nonlinear, chaotic, and stochastic dynamics in HRV of healthy, congestive heart failure, and atrial fibrillation subjects. We show that while HRV data of all these three types are mostly stochastic, the stochasticity is different among the three groups.

  16. Potential pitfalls of strain rate imaging: angle dependency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, P. L.; Greenberg, N. L.; Drinko, J.; Garcia, M. J.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    Strain Rate Imaging (SRI) is a new echocardiographic technique that allows for the real-time determination of myocardial SR, which may be used for the early and accurate detection of coronary artery disease. We sought to study whether SR is affected by scan line alignment in a computer simulation and an in vivo experiment. Through the computer simulation and the in vivo experiment we generated and validated safe scanning sectors within the ultrasound scan sector and showed that while SRI will be an extremely valuable tool in detecting coronary artery disease there are potential pitfalls for the unwary clinician. Only after accounting for these affects due to angle dependency, can clinicians utilize SRI's potential as a valuable tool in detecting coronary artery disease.

  17. A STELLAR-MASS-DEPENDENT DROP IN PLANET OCCURRENCE RATES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulders, Gijs D.; Pascucci, Ilaria [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Apai, Dániel [Department of Astronomy, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA. (United States)

    2015-01-10

    The Kepler spacecraft has discovered a large number of planets with up to one-year periods and down to terrestrial sizes. While the majority of the target stars are main-sequence dwarfs of spectral type F, G, and K, Kepler covers stars with effective temperatures as low as 2500 K, which corresponds to M stars. These cooler stars allow characterization of small planets near the habitable zone, yet it is not clear if this population is representative of that around FGK stars. In this paper, we calculate the occurrence of planets around stars of different spectral types as a function of planet radius and distance from the star and show that they are significantly different from each other. We further identify two trends. First, the occurrence of Earth- to Neptune-sized planets (1-4 R {sub ⊕}) is successively higher toward later spectral types at all orbital periods probed by Kepler; planets around M stars occur twice as frequently as around G stars, and thrice as frequently as around F stars. Second, a drop in planet occurrence is evident at all spectral types inward of a ∼10 day orbital period, with a plateau further out. By assigning to each spectral type a median stellar mass, we show that the distance from the star where this drop occurs is stellar mass dependent, and scales with semi-major axis as the cube root of stellar mass. By comparing different mechanisms of planet formation, trapping, and destruction, we find that this scaling best matches the location of the pre-main-sequence co-rotation radius, indicating efficient trapping of migrating planets or planetary building blocks close to the star. These results demonstrate the stellar-mass dependence of the planet population, both in terms of occurrence rate and of orbital distribution. The prominent stellar-mass dependence of the inner boundary of the planet population shows that the formation or migration of planets is sensitive to the stellar parameters.

  18. Photoinitiated unimolecular decomposition of NO2: Rotational dependence of the dissociation rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezel, I.; Ionov, P.; Wittig, C.

    1999-11-01

    Photoinitiated unimolecular decomposition rate constants of rotationally excited NO2 molecules have been measured near dissociation threshold (D0) by employing a double resonance technique. Rotational selectivity has been achieved by using narrow-linewidth (0.015 cm-1) infrared excitation to prepare specific rotational levels (N'=1,3,…,15, Ka'=0) of the (1,0,1) vibrational level. The picosecond-resolution pump-probe technique has then been used to photodissociate the molecules thus tagged and to monitor the appearance of the NO product. Data have been obtained for two progressions of average excess energies, -D0: (i) 10 cm-1+E101rot and (ii) 75 cm-1+E101rot, where denotes an average over the pump laser linewidth and E101rot is the rotational energy of the (1,0,1) X˜ 2A1 intermediate vibrational level. The measured rate constants do not display any noticeable dependence on N', which is a reflection of significant rovibronic interaction. Spin-rotation interaction, which has been implicated as the main source of rovibronic coupling for small values of N', is not likely to yield such a result. A model is proposed to describe the influence of rotation on the dissociation rate. The experimental data are consistent with a Coriolis coupling mechanism causing transitions to occur between Ka levels.

  19. Measuring evaporation rates of laser-trapped droplets by use of fluorescent morphology-dependent resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastel, R; Struthers, A

    2001-05-20

    Morphology-dependent resonances (MDRs) are used to measure accurately the evaporation rates of laser-trapped 1- to 2-mum droplets of ethylene glycol. Droplets containing 3 x 10(-5) M Rhodamine-590 laser dye are optically trapped in a 20-mum hollow fiber by two counterpropagating 150-mW, 800-nm laser beams. A weaker 532-nm laser excites the dye, and fluorescence emission is observed near 560 nm as the droplet evaporates. A complete series of first-order TE and TM MDRs dominates the fluorescent output. MDR mode identification sizes the droplets and provides accurate evaporation rates. We verify the automated MDR mode identification by counting fringes in a videotape of the experiment. The longitudinal spring constant of the trap, measured by analysis of the videotaped motion of droplets perturbed from the trap center, provides independent verification of the laser's intensity within the trap.

  20. Interpreting the Dependence of Mutation Rates on Age and Time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyue Gao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations can originate from the chance misincorporation of nucleotides during DNA replication or from DNA lesions that arise between replication cycles and are not repaired correctly. We introduce a model that relates the source of mutations to their accumulation with cell divisions, providing a framework for understanding how mutation rates depend on sex, age, and cell division rate. We show that the accrual of mutations should track cell divisions not only when mutations are replicative in origin but also when they are non-replicative and repaired efficiently. One implication is that observations from diverse fields that to date have been interpreted as pointing to a replicative origin of most mutations could instead reflect the accumulation of mutations arising from endogenous reactions or exogenous mutagens. We further find that only mutations that arise from inefficiently repaired lesions will accrue according to absolute time; thus, unless life history traits co-vary, the phylogenetic "molecular clock" should not be expected to run steadily across species.

  1. Automatic estimation of pressure-dependent rate coefficients

    KAUST Repository

    Allen, Joshua W.

    2012-01-01

    A general framework is presented for accurately and efficiently estimating the phenomenological pressure-dependent rate coefficients for reaction networks of arbitrary size and complexity using only high-pressure-limit information. Two aspects of this framework are discussed in detail. First, two methods of estimating the density of states of the species in the network are presented, including a new method based on characteristic functional group frequencies. Second, three methods of simplifying the full master equation model of the network to a single set of phenomenological rates are discussed, including a new method based on the reservoir state and pseudo-steady state approximations. Both sets of methods are evaluated in the context of the chemically-activated reaction of acetyl with oxygen. All three simplifications of the master equation are usually accurate, but each fails in certain situations, which are discussed. The new methods usually provide good accuracy at a computational cost appropriate for automated reaction mechanism generation. This journal is © the Owner Societies.

  2. Strain rate dependency of oceanic intraplate earthquake b-values at extremely low strain rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasajima, Ryohei; Ito, Takeo

    2016-06-01

    We discovered a clear positive dependence of oceanic intraplate earthquake (OCEQ) b-values on the age of the oceanic lithosphere. OCEQ b-values in the youngest (20 Ma) oceanic lithosphere exceed 1.5, which is significantly higher than the average worldwide earthquake b-value (around 1.0). On the other hand, the b-value of intraplate earthquakes in the Ninety East-Sumatra orogen, where oceanic lithosphere has an anomalously higher strain rate compared with normal oceanic lithosphere, is 0.93, which is significantly lower than the OCEQ b-value (about 1.9) with the same age (50-110 Ma). Thus, the variation in b-values relates to the strain rate of the oceanic lithosphere and is not caused by a difference in thermal structure. We revealed a negative strain rate dependency of the b-value at extremely low strain rates (1.5) in oceanic lithosphere >20 Ma old imply that future improvement in seismic observation will capture many smaller magnitude OCEQs, which will provide valuable information on the evolution of the oceanic lithosphere and the driving mechanism of plate tectonics.

  3. Exercise Training Improves Heart Rate Variability after Methamphetamine Dependency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolezal, Brett A.; Chudzynski, Joy; Dickerson, Daniel; Mooney, Larissa; Rawson, Richard A.; Garfinkel, Alan; Cooper, Christopher B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Heart rate variability (HRV) reflects a healthy autonomic nervous system and is increased with physical training. Methamphetamine dependence (MD) causes autonomic dysfunction and diminished HRV. We compared recently abstinent MD participants with age-matched, drug free controls (DF) and also investigated whether HRV can be improved with exercise training in the MD participants. Methods In 50 participants (MD=28; DF=22) resting heart rate (R-R intervals) was recorded over 5 min while seated using a monitor affixed to a chest strap. Previously reported time-domain (SDNN, RMSSD, pNN50) and frequency-domain (LFnu, HFnu, LF/HF) parameters of HRV were calculated with customized software. MD were randomized to thrice weekly exercise training (ME=14) or equal attention without training (MC=14) over 8 weeks. Groups were compared using paired and unpaired t-tests. Statistical significance was set at P≤0.05. Results Participant characteristics were matched between groups: age 33±6 years; body mass 82.7±12 kg, BMI 26.8±4.1 kg•min−2, mean±SD. Compared with DF, the MD group had significantly higher resting heart rate (P<0.05), LFnu, and LF/HF (P<0.001) as well as lower SDNN, RMSSD, pNN50 and HFnu (all P<0.001). At randomization, HRV indices were similar between ME and MC groups. However, after training, the ME group significantly (all P<0.001) increased SDNN (+14.7±2.0 ms, +34%), RMSSD (+19.6±4.2 ms, +63%), pNN50 (+22.6±2.7%, +173%), HFnu (+14.2±1.9, +60%) and decreased HR (−5.2±1.1 beats·min−1, −7%), LFnu (−9.6±1.5, −16%) and LF/HF (−0.7±0.3, −19%). These measures did not change from baseline in the MC group. Conclusion HRV, based on several conventional indices, was diminished in recently abstinent, methamphetamine dependent individuals. Moreover, physical training yielded a marked increase of HRV representing increased vagal modulation or improved autonomic balance. PMID:24162556

  4. An accurate analytic representation of the temperature dependence of nonresonant nuclear reaction rate coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shizgal, Bernie D.

    2016-12-01

    There has been intense interest for several decades by different research groups to accurately model the temperature dependence of a large number of nuclear reaction rate coefficients for both light and heavy nuclides. The rate coefficient, k(T) , is given by the Maxwellian average of the reactive cross section expressed in terms of the astrophysical factor, S(E) , which for nonresonant reactions is generally written as a power series in the relative energy E. A computationally efficient algorithm for the temperature dependence of nuclear reaction rate coefficients is required for fusion reactor research and for models of nucleosynthesis and stellar evolution. In this paper, an accurate analytical expression for the temperature dependence of nuclear reaction rate coefficients is provided in terms of τ = 3(b / 2) 2/3 or equivalently, T - 1/3 , where b = B /√{kB T }, B is the Gamow factor and kB is the Boltzmann constant. The methodology is appropriate for all nonresonant nuclear reactions for which S(E) can be represented as a power series in E. The explicit expression for the rate coefficient versus temperature is derived with the asymptotic expansions of the moments of w(E) = exp(- E /kB T - B /√{ E }) in terms of τ. The zeroth order moment is the familiar Gaussian approximation to the rate coefficient. Results are reported for the representative reactions D(d, p)T, D(d, n)3He and 7Li(p, α) α and compared with several different fitting procedures reported in the literature.

  5. Superoxide dismutase versus ferricytochrome C: determining rate constants for the spin trapping of superoxide by cyclic nitrones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, John; Tsai, Pei; Pou, Sovitj; Rosen, Gerald M

    2004-11-26

    Given that spin trapping/electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy has become the primary technique to identify important biologically generated free radicals, such as superoxide (O(2)(*-)), in vitro and in vivo models, evaluation of the efficiency of specific spin traps to identify this free radical is paramount. Recently, a family of ester-containing nitrones has been prepared, which appears to have distinct advantages for spin trapping O(2)(*-) compared to the well-studied spin traps 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide 1 and 5-(diethoxyphosphoryl)-5-methyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide 2. An important determinant in the selection of a spin trap is the rate constant (k(app)) for its reaction with O(2)(*-), and several different methods have been employed in estimating this k(app). In this paper, the two most frequently used scavengers of O(2)(*-), ferricytochrome c and Cu/Zn-SOD, were evaluated as competitive inhibitors for spin trapping this free radical. Data presented herein demonstrate that SOD is the preferred compound when determining the k(app) for the reaction of O(2)(*-) with spin traps. Using this model, the k(app) for the reaction of nitrone 1, 5-tert-butoxycarbonyl-5-methyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide 3, and 5-methoxycarbonyl-5-methyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide 4 with O(2)(*)(-) was estimated to be 24.6 +/- 3.1, 73.0 +/- 12, and 89.4 +/- 1.0 M(-1) s(-1) at pH 7.0, respectively. Several other comparative studies between known spin traps were also undertaken.

  6. Spiral growth and dissolution models with rate constants related to the frequency of partial dehydration of cations and to the surface tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffersen, J.; Christoffersen, M. R.

    1988-01-01

    A rate expression is developed for spiral dissolution, similar to the Nielsen expression for spiral growth, with the rate constant expressed in terms of frequencies related to dehydration frequencies. These models for spiral growth and dissolution are applied to growth and dissolution of brushite, DCPD.

  7. Effect of temperature on segmental mobility is reduced, but not eliminated during constant strain rate deformation of poly(methyl methacrylate) glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Kelly; Bending, Benjamin; Ricci, Josh; Ediger, M. D.

    2015-03-01

    Deformation of polymer glasses is typically nonlinear and not understood at a molecular level. During deformation, segmental motion in polymer glasses can be accelerated by over a factor of 1000. While temperature has a big impact on the segmental motion of polymer glasses in the absence of deformation, some workers suggest that segmental mobility in polymer glasses undergoing deformation should be independent of temperature. We have measured segmental mobility in poly(methyl methacrylate) glasses during constant strain rate deformation at four different temperatures using a probe reorientation method. We find that during deformation, the dependence of segmental mobility on temperature is significantly reduced, though not eliminated. This is in qualitative agreement with the work of Chen and Schweizer. We also find that the KWW β parameter increases during deformation, indicating a narrower distribution of segmental relaxation times. At a given strain rate, this increase of the KWW β parameter is larger at lower temperature. We thank the National Science Foundation (DMR-1404614) for support of this research.

  8. The systematic study of the stability of forecasts in the rate- and state-dependent model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gaetano, D.; McCloskey, J.; Nalbant, S.

    2012-04-01

    Numerous observations have shown a general spatial correlation between positive Coulomb failure stress changes due to an earthquake and the locations of aftershocks. However this correlation does not give any indication of the rate from which we can infer the magnitude using the Gutenberg-Richter law. Dieterich's rate- and state-dependent model can be used to obtain a forecast of the observed aftershock rate for the space and time evolution of seismicity caused by stress changes applied to an infinite population of nucleating patches. The seismicity rate changes on this model depend on eight parameters: the stressing rate, the amplitude of the stress perturbation, the physical constitutive properties of faults, the spatial parameters (location and radii of the cells), the start and duration of each of the temporal windows as well as the background seismicity rate. The background seismicity is obtained from the epidemic type aftershock sequence model. We use the 1992 Landers earthquake as a case study, using the Southern California Earthquake Data Centre (SCEDC) catalogue, to examine if Dieterich's rate- and state-dependent model can forecast the aftershock seismicity rate. A systematic study is performed on a range of values on all the parameters to test the forecasting ability of this model. The results obtained suggest variable success in forecasting, when varying the values for the parameters, with the spatial and temporal parameters being the most sensitive. Dieterich's rate- and state-dependent model is compared with a well studied null hypothesis, the Omori-Utsu law. This law describes the aftershock rate as a power law in time following the main shock and depends on only three parameters: the aftershock productivity, the elapsed time since the main shock and the constant time shift, all of which can be estimated in the early part of the aftershock sequence and then extrapolated to give a long term rate forecast. All parameters are estimated using maximum

  9. Celebrating Soft Matter's 10th Anniversary: Chain configuration and rate-dependent mechanical properties in transient networks

    OpenAIRE

    Sing, Michelle K.; Wang, Zhen-Gang; McKinley, Gareth H.; Olsen, Bradley D.

    2015-01-01

    Numerical solution of a coupled set of Smoluchowski convection-diffusion equations of associating polymers modelled as finitely extensible dumbbells enables computation of time-dependent end-to-end distributions for bridged, dangling, and looped chains in three dimensions as a function of associating end-group kinetics. Non-monotonic flow curves which can lead to flow instabilities during shear flow result at low equilibrium constant and high association rate from two complementary phenomena:...

  10. Dynamically Switching among Bundled and Single Tickets with Time-Dependent Demand Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serhan Duran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The most important market segmentation in sports and entertainment industry is the competition between customers that buy bundled and single tickets. A common selling practice is starting the selling season with bundled ticket sales and switching to selling single tickets later on. The aim of this practice is to increase the number of customers that buy bundles, which in return increases the load factor of the events with low demand. In this paper, we investigate the effect of time dependent demand on dynamic switching times from bundled to single ticket sales and the potential revenue gain over the case where the demand rate of events is assumed to be constant with time.

  11. PENENTUAN KONSTANTA LAJU PENURUNAN KADAR IODAT DALAM GARAM BERIODIUM [Determination of the Rate Constant on the Decrease of Iodate Content in Iodized Salt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wisnu Cahyadi

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Potassium iodate used as the source of iodine can be decomposed to become the other species i.e. iodide and iodine during processing and storage. The objective of this research was determination of the rate constant on the decrease of iodate content in iodized salt. The method was used to determine the temperature and the length of storage effects on iodate stability in iodized salt. The research was obtained the rate constant on the decrease of iodate content in iodized salt (K 2.55 x 10-8 ppm day-1 and energy of activation (Ea 12.002 kcal mol-1 K-1.

  12. PENENTUAN KONSTANTA LAJU PENURUNAN KADAR IODAT DALAM GARAM BERIODIUM [Determination of the Rate Constant on the Decrease of Iodate Content in Iodized Salt

    OpenAIRE

    Wisnu Cahyadi

    2006-01-01

    Potassium iodate used as the source of iodine can be decomposed to become the other species i.e. iodide and iodine during processing and storage. The objective of this research was determination of the rate constant on the decrease of iodate content in iodized salt. The method was used to determine the temperature and the length of storage effects on iodate stability in iodized salt. The research was obtained the rate constant on the decrease of iodate content in iodized salt (K) 2.55 x 10-8 ...

  13. Absolute rate constant determinations for the deactivation of O/1D/ by time resolved decay of O/1D/ yields O/3P/ emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, J. A.; Sadowski, C. M.; Schiff, H. I.; Howard, C. J.; Schmeltekopf, A. L.; Jennings, D. A.; Streit, G. E.

    1976-01-01

    Absolute rate constants for the deactivation of O(1D) atoms by some atmospheric gases have been determined by observing the time-resolved emission of O(1D) at 630 nm. O(1D) atoms were produced by the dissociation of ozone via repetitive laser pulses at 266 nm. Absolute rate constants for the relaxation of O(1D) at 298 K are reported for N2, O2, CO2, O3, H2, D2, CH4, HCl, NH3, H2O, N2O, and Ne. The results obtained are compared with previous relative and absolute measurements reported in the literature.

  14. 1,2-Difluoroethane: the angular dependance on 1J(CF) coupling constants is independent of hyperconjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Matheus P; Bühl, Michael; O'Hagan, David

    2012-02-28

    1,2-Difluoroethane is widely recognised to adopt a lower energy gauche rather than anti conformation; this gauche effect has its origin in hyperconjugation; however, surprisingly the (1)J(CF) coupling constant is not influenced by hyperconjugation; instead, its magnitude changes with the overall molecular dipole.

  15. Temperature dependence of the positron diffusion constant in the matrix of an Al-Ca-Zn alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diego, N. de; Rio, J. del [Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Fisica de Mater.; Dupasquier, A.; Folegati, P.; Somoza, A.; Valli, M.

    1997-12-31

    Positron lifetime spectra in fine-grained specimens of an Al-Ca-Zn alloy were measured at temperatures between 15 K and 295 K. The interpretation of the experimental data according to the diffusion trapping model (A. Dupasquier (1993)) leads to the determination of the positron diffusion constant. The diffusion-limiting mechanisms are discussed. (orig.) 6 refs.

  16. Abstinence Rates Following Behavioral Treatments for Marijuana Dependence

    OpenAIRE

    Kadden, Ronald M.; Litt, Mark D.; Kabela-Cormier, Elise; Petry, Nancy M.

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies have noted particular difficulty in achieving abstinence among those who are marijuana dependent. The present study employed a dismantling design to determine whether adding contingency management (ContM) to motivational enhancement therapy plus cognitive behavioral therapy (MET+CBT), an intervention used in prior studies of treatment for marijuana dependence, would enhance abstinence outcomes. 240 marijuana dependent participants were recruited via advertisements and assigne...

  17. Procedures for Static and Constant-Rate Tests on a Single-Degree-of-Freedom (SDF) Strapdown Gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-10-01

    permettant de tester des gyroscopes auto correcteurs A centrale lige et . 1° de libert6. Les tests sont limitgs aux modes statistiques et A taux constants...conventionnels utilisEs sont aussi presentfs, de Seme que les considfrations concernant la r6gulation thermique . iii 5 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Abstract

  18. The Dose Rate Dependence of the Yield of Trapped Electrons in Crystalline Ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Johan Daniel Göran; Pagsberg, Palle Bjørn

    1980-01-01

    for the experimental dose rate dependence observed at −10° C. The reaction with the protons has a negative temperature coefficient while the reaction with the OH radicals has an activation energy of about 14 kcal mole−1. The mobility of the proton was estimated to be about 3 × 10−4 cm2 V−1 S−1 at −10°C.......The yield of localized excess electrons in crystalline H2O ice has been studied as a function of the dose rate at various temperatures in the range −10 to −40°C. The G value was found to decrease significantly with increasing dose rate. Thus it appears that the localization of electrons takes place...... in competition with other reactions and we propose a simple model where we assume that the mobile electrons can undergo bimolecular bulk reactions with protons and OH radicals. Rate constants of 3.0 × 1015 M−1 S−1 and 1.4 × 1014 M−1 S−1 for the two reactions were required in the model in order to account...

  19. Depth dependent modification of optical constants arising from H+ implantation in n-type 4H-SiC measured using coherent acoustic phonons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Baydin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Silicon carbide (SiC is a promising material for new generation electronics including high power/high temperature devices and advanced optical applications such as room temperature spintronics and quantum computing. Both types of applications require the control of defects particularly those created by ion bombardment. In this work, modification of optical constants of 4H-SiC due to hydrogen implantation at 180 keV and at fluences ranging from 1014 to 1016 cm−2 is reported. The depth dependence of the modified optical constants was extracted from coherent acoustic phonon spectra. Implanted spectra show a strong dependence of the 4H-SiC complex refractive index depth profile on H+ fluence. These studies provide basic insight into the dependence of optical properties of 4H silicon carbide on defect densities created by ion implantation, which is of relevance to the fabrication of SiC-based photonic and optoelectronic devices.

  20. Temperature dependence of magnetic anisotropy constant in iron chalcogenide Fe3Se4: Excellent agreement with theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Duan, Hongyan; Lin, Xiong; Aguilar, Victor; Mosqueda, Aaron; Zhao, Guo-meng

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic hysteresis loops were measured for ferrimagnetic iron chalcogenide Fe3Se4 nanoparticles in the whole temperature range below the Curie temperature TC (315 K). The coercivity of the material is huge, reaching about 40 kOe at 10 K. The magnetic anisotropy constant K was determined from the magnetic hysteresis loop using the law of approach to saturation. The deduced anisotropy constant at 10 K is 5.22×106 erg/cm3, which is over one order of magnitude larger than that of Fe3O4. We also demonstrated that the experimental magnetic hysteresis loop is in good agreement with the theoretical curve calculated by Stoner and Wohlfarth for a noninteracting randomly oriented uniaxial single-domain particle system. Moreover, we show that K is proportional to the cube of the saturation magnetization Ms, which confirms earlier theoretical models for uniaxial magnets. PMID:23258940

  1. Temperature dependence of magnetic anisotropy constant in iron chalcogenide Fe(3)Se(4): Excellent agreement with theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Duan, Hongyan; Lin, Xiong; Aguilar, Victor; Mosqueda, Aaron; Zhao, Guo-Meng

    2012-11-15

    Magnetic hysteresis loops were measured for ferrimagnetic iron chalcogenide [Formula: see text] nanoparticles in the whole temperature range below the Curie temperature [Formula: see text] (315 K). The coercivity of the material is huge, reaching about 40 kOe at 10 K. The magnetic anisotropy constant K was determined from the magnetic hysteresis loop using the law of approach to saturation. The deduced anisotropy constant at 10 K is [Formula: see text], which is over one order of magnitude larger than that of [Formula: see text]. We also demonstrated that the experimental magnetic hysteresis loop is in good agreement with the theoretical curve calculated by Stoner and Wohlfarth for a noninteracting randomly oriented uniaxial single-domain particle system. Moreover, we show that K is proportional to the cube of the saturation magnetization [Formula: see text], which confirms earlier theoretical models for uniaxial magnets.

  2. Photochemical properties of trans-1-chloro-3,3,3-trifluoropropene (trans-CHCl═CHCF3): OH reaction rate constant, UV and IR absorption spectra, global warming potential, and ozone depletion potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orkin, Vladimir L; Martynova, Larissa E; Kurylo, Michael J

    2014-07-17

    Measurements of the rate constant for the gas-phase reactions of OH radicals with trans-1-chloro-3,3,3-trifluoropropene (trans-CHCl═CHCF3) were performed using a flash photolysis resonance-fluorescence technique over the temperature range 220-370 K. The reaction rate constant exhibits a noticeable curvature of the temperature dependence in the Arrhenius plot, which can be represented by the following expression: kt-CFP (220-370 K) = 1.025 × 10(-13) × (T/298)(2.29) exp(+384/T) cm(3 )molecule(-1) s(-1). The room-temperature rate constant was determined to be kt-CFP (298 K) = (3.29 ± 0.10) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), where the uncertainty includes both two standard errors (statistical) and the estimated systematic error. For atmospheric modeling purposes, the rate constant below room temperature can be represented by the following expression: kt-CFP (220-298 K) = (7.20 ± 0.46) × 10(-13) exp[-(237 ± 16)/T] cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). There was no difference observed between the rate constants determined at 4 kPa (30 Torr) and 40 kPa (300 Torr) at both 298 and 370 K. The UV and IR absorption cross sections of this compound were measured at room temperature. The atmospheric lifetime, global warming potential, and ozone depletion potential of trans-CHCl═CHCF3 were estimated.

  3. High-accuracy measurements of OH(•) reaction rate constants and IR and UV absorption spectra: ethanol and partially fluorinated ethyl alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orkin, Vladimir L; Khamaganov, Victor G; Martynova, Larissa E; Kurylo, Michael J

    2011-08-11

    Rate constants for the gas phase reactions of OH(•) radicals with ethanol and three fluorinated ethyl alcohols, CH(3)CH(2)OH (k(0)), CH(2)FCH(2)OH (k(1)), CHF(2)CH(2)OH (k(2)), and CF(3)CH(2)OH (k(3)) were measured using a flash photolysis resonance-fluorescence technique over the temperature range 220 to 370 K. The Arrhenius plots were found to exhibit noticeable curvature for all four reactions. The temperature dependences of the rate constants can be represented by the following expressions over the indicated temperature intervals: k(0)(220-370 K) = 5.98 × 10(-13)(T/298)(1.99) exp(+515/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), k(0)(220-298 K) = (3.35 ± 0.06) × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) [for atmospheric modeling purposes, k(0)(T) is essentially temperature-independent below room temperature, k(0)(220-298 K) = (3.35 ± 0.06) × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1)], k(1)(230-370 K) = 3.47 × 10(-14)(T/298)(4.49) exp(+977/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), k(2)(220-370 K) = 3.87 × 10(-14)(T/298)(4.25) exp(+578/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), and k(3)(220-370 K) = 2.48 × 10(-14)(T/298)(4.03) exp(+418/T) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). The atmospheric lifetimes due to reactions with tropospheric OH(•) were estimated to be 4, 16, 62, and 171 days, respectively, under the assumption of a well-mixed atmosphere. UV absorption cross sections of all four ethanols were measured between 160 and 215 nm. The IR absorption cross sections of the three fluorinated ethanols were measured between 400 and 1900 cm(-1), and their global warming potentials were estimated.

  4. Improved Shock Tube Measurement of the CH4 + Ar = CH3 + H + Ar Rate Constant using UV Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy of CH3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengkai; Davidson, David F; Hanson, Ronald K

    2016-07-21

    We report an improved measurement for the rate constant of methane dissociation in argon (CH4 + Ar = CH3 + H + Ar) behind reflected shock waves. The experiment was conducted using a sub-parts per million sensitivity CH3 diagnostic recently developed in our laboratory based on ultraviolet cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy. The high sensitivity of this diagnostic allowed for measurements of quantitatively resolved CH3 time histories during the initial stage of CH4 pyrolysis, where the reaction system is clean and free from influences of secondary reactions and temperature change. This high sensitivity also allowed extension of our measurement range to much lower temperatures (shock measurements were performed at temperatures between 1487 and 1866 K and pressures near 1.7 atm, resulting in the following Arrhenius rate constant expression for the title reaction: k(1.7 atm) = 3.7 × 10(16) exp(-42 200 K/T) cm(3)/mol·s, with a 2σ uncertainty factor of 1.25. The current data are in good consensus with various theoretical and review studies, but at the low temperature end they suggest a slightly higher (up to 35%) rate constant compared to these previous results. A re-evaluation of previous and current experimental data in the falloff region was also performed, yielding updated expressions for both the low-pressure limit and the high-pressure limit rate constants and improved agreement with all existing data.

  5. Determination of first order rate constants by natural logarithm of the slope plot exemplified by analysis of Aspergillus niger in batch culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poulsen, B.R.; Ruiter, G.; Visser, J.; Iversen, J.J.L.

    2003-01-01

    Finding rate constants from experimental data is often difficult because of offset and noise. A computer program was developed to average experimental data points, reducing the effect of noise, and to produce a loge of slope plot - a plot of the natural logarithm of the slope of a curve -

  6. Ataxia rating scales are age-dependent in healthy children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandsma, Rick; Spits, Anne H.; Kuiper, Marieke J.; Lunsing, Roelinka J.; Burger, Huibert; Kremer, Hubertus P.; Sival, Deborah A.

    AIM: To investigate ataxia rating scales in children for reliability and the effect of age and sex. METHOD: Three independent neuropaediatric observers cross-sectionally scored a set of paediatric ataxia rating scales in a group of 52 healthy children (26 males, 26 females) aged 4 to 16 years (mean

  7. Temperature-dependent rate models of vascular cambium cell mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew B. Dickinson; Edward A. Johnson

    2004-01-01

    We use two rate-process models to describe cell mortality at elevated temperatures as a means of understanding vascular cambium cell death during surface fires. In the models, cell death is caused by irreversible damage to cellular molecules that occurs at rates that increase exponentially with temperature. The models differ in whether cells show cumulative effects of...

  8. Ataxia rating scales are age-dependent in healthy children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandsma, Rick; Spits, Anne H.; Kuiper, Marieke J.; Lunsing, Roelinka J.; Burger, Huibert; Kremer, Hubertus P.; Sival, Deborah A.

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate ataxia rating scales in children for reliability and the effect of age and sex. METHOD: Three independent neuropaediatric observers cross-sectionally scored a set of paediatric ataxia rating scales in a group of 52 healthy children (26 males, 26 females) aged 4 to 16 years (mean

  9. Effect of improved TLD dosimetry on the determination of dose rate constants for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd brachytherapy seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, M., E-mail: manuel.rodriguez@rmp.uhn.ca [Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6, Canada and Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Rogers, D. W. O. [Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To more accurately account for the relative intrinsic energy dependence and relative absorbed-dose energy dependence of TLDs when used to measure dose rate constants (DRCs) for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd brachytherapy seeds, to thereby establish revised “measured values” for all seeds and compare the revised values with Monte Carlo and consensus values. Methods: The relative absorbed-dose energy dependence, f{sup rel}, for TLDs and the phantom correction, P{sub phant}, are calculated for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd seeds using the EGSnrc BrachyDose and DOSXYZnrc codes. The original energy dependence and phantom corrections applied to DRC measurements are replaced by calculated (f{sup rel}){sup −1} and P{sub phant} values for 24 different seed models. By comparing the modified measured DRCs to the MC values, an appropriate relative intrinsic energy dependence, k{sub bq}{sup rel}, is determined. The new P{sub phant} values and relative absorbed-dose sensitivities, S{sub AD}{sup rel}, calculated as the product of (f{sup rel}){sup −1} and (k{sub bq}{sup rel}){sup −1}, are used to individually revise the measured DRCs for comparison with Monte Carlo calculated values and TG-43U1 or TG-43U1S1 consensus values. Results: In general, f{sup rel} is sensitive to the energy spectra and models of the brachytherapy seeds. Values may vary up to 8.4% among {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd seed models and common TLD shapes. P{sub phant} values depend primarily on the isotope used. Deduced (k{sub bq}{sup rel}){sup −1} values are 1.074 ± 0.015 and 1.084 ± 0.026 for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd seeds, respectively. For (1 mm){sup 3} chips, this implies an overall absorbed-dose sensitivity relative to {sup 60}Co or 6 MV calibrations of 1.51 ± 1% and 1.47 ± 2% for {sup 125}I and {sup 103}Pd seeds, respectively, as opposed to the widely used value of 1.41. Values of P{sub phant} calculated here have much lower statistical uncertainties than literature values, but

  10. Shear Rate Dependence of the Pāhoehoe to `A`ā Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soule, A.; Cashman, K.

    2003-12-01

    The surface morphology transition from pāhoehoe-to-`a`ā on basaltic lava flows can be used to interpret the emplacement conditions of solidified flows and predict the behavior of active flows. Investigations of this phenomenon have emphasized either the mechanical properties of the solidified crust (e.g., Kilburn, 1981), or the rheologic properties of the liquid interior (e.g., Peterson and Tilling, 1980). In the latter, the boundary separating pāhoehoe and `a`ā is represented qualitatively by an inverse relationship between apparent viscosity and shear rate. Recent investigations of the rheology dependence of the transition have revealed a critical crystallinity range at which pāhoehoe transforms to `a`ā of φ = 0.18 to 0.35 that can vary between flows. Here, we extend this approach to investigate the shear rate dependence of the pāhoehoe-to-`a`ā transition. We use a suspension of corn syrup and rice to represent lava with crystals. Suspensions of varying particle concentration (φ = 0.15 to 0.40) are sheared in a Couette rheometer over a range of constant shear rates (0.1 to 2.0 s-1). We describe three deformation regimes, clumping, shear zone formation, and fluid failure that produce changes in the suspension microstructure and lead to shear localization. The deformation mechanisms are imaged with digital video and quantified by tracking individual particle paths. In the presence of cooling, these shear localization may be the mechanism by which `a`ā flow surfaces form. We find that the onset of each regime follows the expected inverse relationship between shear rate and suspension viscosity. We expect that the results of these experiments apply to the thermal boundary layer of a flow and thus bridge the distinct approaches taken to investigate this phenomenon. The results of these experiments can contribute to more detailed lava flow modeling and better assessment of flow dynamics from solidified lava flows.

  11. Study of the temperature dependence of the elastic constants of natural and deuterated (NH[sub 4])[sub 2]MCl[sub 6] compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, B.R.K.; Kawald, U.; Johannsmann, H.; Pelzl, J. (Bochum Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik AG 6); Xu, Y.C. (Tongji Univ., Shanghai (China). Pohl Inst.)

    1992-08-17

    Experimental and theoretical investigations of the temperature dependence of the elastic constants in the cubic phases of (NH[sub 4])[sub 2]TeCl[sub 6], (ND[sub 4])[sub 2]TeCl[sub 6], (NH[sub 4])[sub 2]SnCl[sub 6] and (ND[sub 4])[sub 2]SnCl[sub 6] have been made in the range of temperatures from 4.2 to 300 K. The temperature variation in the elastic constants has been measured by Brillouin scattering and an interionic potential model has been used to interpret the experimental results. It has been found that the three-body interaction considered in the potential model plays an important and significant role in explaining the characteristic behaviour of the crystals under study. Good agreement between the experimental and theoretical values of the temperature derivatives of the elastic constants at room temperature has been obtained. (author).

  12. On the calculation of nuclear spin-spin coupling constants. The bond length dependence of the Fermi contact term in H 2 and HD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacskay, George B.

    1995-08-01

    A theoretical study of the Fermi contact contribution to the HH and HD spin-spin coupling constant is reported, with special emphasis on its calculation using quantum chemical techniques over a wide range of internuclear distances, that has necessitated an extension of the existing methodology so the effects of near-degeneracy are properly treated. A detailed configuration interaction calculation on H 2 shows that as the molecule is stretched the coupling constant displays a sharp increase before decaying to zero as the molecule dissociates. Such distance dependence is reflected in the calculated vibrational averages of the coupling constant for HD that show a rapid increase with vibrational excitation.

  13. Dependence of the brittle ductile transition on strain-rate-dependent critical homologous temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Paul M.

    2017-05-01

    Earthquakes mainly occur in crust or mantle that is below a critical temperature for the tectonic strain-rate, \\dot{e}_t, such that stress builds up to the breaking point before it can relax due to creep. Then long-range stress correlation gives rise to power law seismicity including large events. The limiting temperature depends on pressure, which is taken into account by finding a critical homologous temperature THc = T/TM above which earthquakes are rarely observed (where T, TM are temperature and average melting temperature of constituent minerals). We find that THc for ocean plates is ∼0.55. For California earthquakes, it is also close to 0.55. The uppermost mantle layer of oceanic plates of thickness ∼50 km is composed of harzburgite and depleted peridotite from which basalt has been removed to form ocean crust. Thus it has a higher melting temperature than the peridotite of the surrounding mantle, or the lower halves of plates. Thicknesses of seismicity in deep subduction zones, determined from 2-D polynomial fits to a relocated catalogue, are ∼50 km, which suggests that the earthquake channel is confined to this layer. We construct models to find homologous temperatures in slabs, and find that seismicity thicknesses are also, on average, confined to TH ≤ 0.55 ± 0.05. The associated rheology is compared with that obtained from flexure models of ocean lithosphere. The brittle-ductile transition occurs where viscosity drops from high values in the cold cores of slabs to values of 1022-1023 Pa s, that is, where creep strain-rates become comparable to tectonic rates. The cut-off for deep earthquakes is not sharp. However they appear unlikely to occur if homologous temperature is high TH > 0.55. Exceptions to the rule are anomalously deep earthquakes such as those beneath the Iceland and the Hawaiian hotspots, and the Newport Inglewood Fault. These are smaller events with short-range stress correlation, and can be explained if strain-rates are two to

  14. Fitting the elementary rate constants of the P-gp transporter network in the hMDR1-MDCK confluent cell monolayer using a particle swarm algorithm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deep Agnani

    Full Text Available P-glycoprotein, a human multidrug resistance transporter, has been extensively studied due to its importance to human health and disease. In order to understand transport kinetics via P-gp, confluent cell monolayers overexpressing P-gp are widely used. The purpose of this study is to obtain the mass action elementary rate constants for P-gp's transport and to functionally characterize members of P-gp's network, i.e., other transporters that transport P-gp substrates in hMDR1-MDCKII confluent cell monolayers and are essential to the net substrate flux. Transport of a range of concentrations of amprenavir, loperamide, quinidine and digoxin across the confluent monolayer of cells was measured in both directions, apical to basolateral and basolateral to apical. We developed a global optimization algorithm using the Particle Swarm method that can simultaneously fit all datasets to yield accurate and exhaustive fits of these elementary rate constants. The statistical sensitivity of the fitted values was determined by using 24 identical replicate fits, yielding simple averages and standard deviations for all of the kinetic parameters, including the efflux active P-gp surface density. Digoxin required additional basolateral and apical transporters, while loperamide required just a basolateral tranporter. The data were better fit by assuming bidirectional transporters, rather than active importers, suggesting that they are not MRP or active OATP transporters. The P-gp efflux rate constants for quinidine and digoxin were about 3-fold smaller than reported ATP hydrolysis rate constants from P-gp proteoliposomes. This suggests a roughly 3∶1 stoichiometry between ATP hydrolysis and P-gp transport for these two drugs. The fitted values of the elementary rate constants for these P-gp substrates support the hypotheses that the selective pressures on P-gp are to maintain a broad substrate range and to keep xenobiotics out of the cytosol, but not out of the

  15. Dependence of O+ escape rate from the Venusian upper atmosphere on IMF directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masunaga, K.; Futaana, Y.; Stenberg, G.; Barabash, S.; Zhang, T. L.; Fedorov, A.; Okano, S.; Terada, N.

    2013-09-01

    We investigate the dependence of the O+ escape rate from the Venusian upper atmosphere on the upstream interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) direction. Using the data obtained from the Analyser of Space Plasma and Energetic Atoms (ASPERA-4) instrument and the magnetometer (MAG) onboard Venus Express, O+ fluxes observed in the night side region is statistically calculated. The data is classified into two cases: the perpendicular IMF case and the parallel IMF case, where IMF is nearly perpendicular to the solar wind velocity and nearly parallel to it. In the period between June 21 2006 and May 31, 2010, the O+ escape rates of (5.8 ± 2.9) × 10^24 s^-1 (perpendicular IMF case) and (4.9 ± 2.2) × 10^24 s^-1 (parallel IMF case) are obtained. Since these values are not significantly different, we conclude that the IMF direction does not affect the total amount of O+ outflow from Venus. Several acceleration mechanisms must balance each other in order to keep the escape rate constant.

  16. A Simple Method for Calculating Quantum Effects on the Temperature Dependence of Bimolecular Reaction Rates An Application to $CH_{4} + H \\rightarrow CH_{3} + H_{2}$

    CERN Document Server

    Goodson, D Z; Chiang, W T; Valone, S M; Doll, J D; Goodson, David Z.; Roelse, Dustin W.; Chiang, Wan-Ting; Valone, Steven M.

    1997-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the rate of the reaction CH_4+H \\to CH_3+H_2 is studied using classical collision theory with a temperature-dependent effective potential derived from a path integral analysis. Analytical expressions are obtained for the effective potential and for the rate constant. The rate constant expressions use a temperature-dependent activation energy. They give better agreement with the available experimental results than do previous empirical fits. Since all but one of the parameters in the present expressions are obtained from theory, rather than by fitting to experimental reaction rates, the expressions can be expected to be more dependable than purely empirical expressions at temperatures above 2000 K or below 350 K, where experimental results are not available.

  17. Acidity constants and its dependence on solvent selection from first-principles calculations using cluster-continuum models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Hieu H.; Taylor, Christopher D.; Henson, Neil J.

    2014-08-01

    Dissociation constants of selected carboxylic acids in aqueous and organic solvents were calculated at quantum chemical level. We considered cases in which trace quantities of water may be present, as well as cases in which water was entirely absent. In the latter cases, alternative proton acceptors need to be considered. For aqueous solvent, short-range solvation effects are considered by adding explicit water molecules as the first solvent shell. In the absence of water, corresponding organic solvents are used directly as the proton acceptors and the resulted pKa are quite comparable to those obtained from previous case of aqueous solvent.

  18. Geometry dependence of RMT-based methods to extract the low-energy constants Sigma and F

    CERN Document Server

    Lehner, Christoph; Hashimoto, Shoji; Wettig, Tilo

    2011-01-01

    The lowest-order low-energy constants $\\Sigma$ and $F$ of chiral pertubation theory can be extracted from lattice data using methods based on the equivalence of random matrix theory (RMT) and QCD in the epsilon regime. We discuss how the choice of the lattice geometry affects such methods. In particular, we show how to minimize systematic deviations from RMT by an optimal choice of the lattice geometry in the case of two light quark flavors. We illustrate our findings by determining $\\Sigma$ and $F$ from lattice configurations with two dynamical overlap fermions generated by JLQCD, using two different lattice geometries.

  19. Rate dependence of swelling in lithium-ion cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, KY; Siegel, JB; Secondo, L; Kim, SU; Samad, NA; Qin, JW; Anderson, D; Garikipati, K; Knobloch, A; Epureanu, BI; Monroe, CW; Stefanopoulou, A

    2014-12-01

    Swelling of a commercial 5 Ah lithium-ion cell with a nickel/manganese/cobalt-oxide cathode is investigated as a function of the charge state and the charge/discharge rate. In combination with sensitive displacement measurements, knowledge of the electrode configuration within this prismatic cell's interior allows macroscopic deformations of the casing to be correlated to electrochemical and mechanical transformations in individual anode/separator/cathode layers. Thermal expansion and interior charge state are both found to cause significant swelling. At low rates, where thermal expansion is negligible, the electrode sandwich dilates by as much as 1.5% as the charge state swings from 0% to 100% because of lithium-ion intercalation. At high rates a comparably large residual swelling was observed at the end of discharge. Thermal expansion caused by joule heating at high discharge rate results in battery swelling. The changes in displacement with respect to capacity at low rate correlate well with the potential changes known to accompany phase transitions in the electrode materials. Although the potential response changes minimally with the C-rate, the extent of swelling varies significantly, suggesting that measurements of swelling may provide a sensitive gauge for characterizing dynamic operating states. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. An inventory model of instantaneous deteriorating items with controllable deterioration rate for time dependent demand and holding cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Kumar Mishra

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this paper to develop an inventory model for instantaneous deteriorating items with the consideration of the facts that the deterioration rate can be controlled by using the preservation technology (PT and the holding cost & demand rate both are linear function of time which was treated as constant in most of the deteriorating inventory model. Design/methodology/approach: Developed the mathematical equation of deterministic deteriorating inventory model in which demand rate and holding cost both is linear function of time, deterioration rate is constant, backlogging rate is variable and depend on the length of the next replenishment, shortages are allowed and partially backlogged and obtain an analytical solution which optimizes the total cost of the proposed inventory model. Findings: The model can be applied for optimizing the total inventory cost of deteriorating items inventory for such business enterprises where they use the preservation technology to control the deterioration rate under other assumptions of the model. Originality/value: The inventory system for deteriorating items has been an object of study for a long time, but little is known about the effect of investing in reducing the rate of product deterioration and their significant impact in the business. The proposed model is effective as well as efficient for the business organization that uses the preservation technology to reduce the deterioration rate of the instantaneous deteriorating items of the inventory.

  1. Determination of elastic constants of a single-crystal topaz and their temperature dependence via sphere resonance method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sema, Fumie; Watanabe, Tohru

    2017-10-01

    Water and halogens in ocean floor sediments transported by a descending slab might play important roles in geodynamic processes. Imaging subducted sediments through seismological observations requires a thorough understanding of elastic properties of sediment origin hydrous minerals. Topaz is a sediment origin hydrous mineral, which is formed at the depth of 250-350 km on a cold subducting slab. We determined elastic constants and their temperature derivatives of a natural single-crystal of topaz (Al1.97SiO4(F1.56, OH0.42)) at the temperature from 271.5 to 312.7 °K by using the sphere-resonance method. Elastic constants at an ambient temperature (T = 291.9 °K) are C11 = 281.21(1) GPa, C22 = 346.23(9) GPa, C33 = 294.99(9) GPa, C44 = 108.49(1) GPa, C55 = 132.47(1) GPa, C66 = 130.32(1) GPa, C12 = 121.48(3) GPa, C13 = 80.94(3) GPa and C23 = 81.77(2) GPa. Since our sample [Al2SiO4(F1.56,OH0.42)] was relatively rich in fluorine, only small differences in elastic constants can be seen between our sample and fluorine end member. Elastic constants of OH-rich topaz should be experimentally investigated to understand the influence of F-OH substitution on elasticity of topaz. All the elastic constants decrease linearly with increasing temperature. The temperature derivatives are dC11/dT = -0.014(3) GPa/°K, dC22/dT = -0.010(7) GPa/°K, dC33/dT = -0.021(5) GPa/°K, dC44/dT = -0.011(1) GPa/°K, dC55/dT = -0.016(2) GPa/°K, dC66/dT = -0.0101(2) GPa/°K, dC12/dT = -0.0041(6) GPa/°K, dC13/dT = -0.001(2) GPa/°K and dC23/dT = -0.002(1) GPa/°K. The isotropic seismic velocities in topaz are distinctly higher than those in olivine at 10 GPa and 300-1400 °K. There should be a strong velocity contrast between the overlying mantle and the thin sediment-origin layer at the depth around 300 km. A seismological technique like the receiver function technique should be applied to detect a thin layer of topaz in a cold subduction zone.

  2. Determination of rate constants and branching ratios for TCE degradation by zero-valent iron using a chain decay multispecies model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hyoun-Tae; Jeen, Sung-Wook; Sudicky, Edward A.; Illman, Walter A.

    2015-06-01

    The applicability of a newly-developed chain-decay multispecies model (CMM) was validated by obtaining kinetic rate constants and branching ratios along the reaction pathways of trichloroethene (TCE) reduction by zero-valent iron (ZVI) from column experiments. Changes in rate constants and branching ratios for individual reactions for degradation products over time for two columns under different geochemical conditions were examined to provide ranges of those parameters expected over the long-term. As compared to the column receiving deionized water, the column receiving dissolved CaCO3 showed higher mean degradation rates for TCE and all of its degradation products. However, the column experienced faster reactivity loss toward TCE degradation due to precipitation of secondary carbonate minerals, as indicated by a higher value for the ratio of maximum to minimum TCE degradation rate observed over time. From the calculated branching ratios, it was found that TCE and cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) were dominantly dechlorinated to chloroacetylene and acetylene, respectively, through reductive elimination for both columns. The CMM model, validated by the column test data in this study, provides a convenient tool to determine simultaneously the critical design parameters for permeable reactive barriers and natural attenuation such as rate constants and branching ratios.

  3. The effect of the magnetic nanoparticle's size dependence of the relaxation time constant on the specific loss power of magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harabech, Mariem; Leliaert, Jonathan; Coene, Annelies; Crevecoeur, Guillaume; Van Roost, Dirk; Dupré, Luc

    2017-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia is a cancer treatment in which magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are subjected to an alternating magnetic field to induce heat in the tumor. The generated heat of MNPs is characterized by the specific loss power (SLP) due to relaxation phenomena of the MNP. Up to now, several models have been proposed to predict the SLP, one of which is the Linear Response Theory. One parameter in this model is the relaxation time constant. In this contribution, we employ a macrospin model based on the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation to investigate the relation between the Gilbert damping parameter and the relaxation time constant. This relaxation time has a pre-factor τ0 which is often taken as a fixed value ranging between 10-8 and 10-12 s. However, in reality it has small size dependence. Here, the influence of this size dependence on the calculation of the SLP is demonstrated, consequently improving the accuracy of this estimate.

  4. Strain rate dependency and fragmentation pattern of expanding warheads

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John F MOXNES; Anne K PRYTZ; yvind FRYLAND; Stian SKRIUDALEN; Steinar BRVE; Gard DEGRDSTUEN

    2015-01-01

    For the characterization of the behaviors of a metal material in events like expanding warheads, it is necessary to know its strength and ductility at high strain rates, around 104e105/s. The flyer plate impact testing produces the uniform stress and strain rates but the testing is expensive. The Taylor test is relatively inexpensive but produces non-uniform stress and strain fields, and the results are not so easily inferred for material modeling. In the split-Hopkinson bar (SHB), which may be used in compression, tension and torsion testing, the strain rates never exceeds 103/s. In the present work, we use the expanding ring test where the strain rate is 104e105/s. A streak camera is used to examine the expanding ring velocity, and a water tank is used to collect the fragments. The experimental results are compared with the numerical simulations using the hydrocodes AUTODYN, IMPETUS Afea and a regularized smooth particle (RSPH) software. The number of fragments increases with the increase in the expansion velocity of the rings. The number of fragments is similar to the experimental results. The RSPH software shows much the same results as the AUTODYN where the Lagrangian solver is used for the ring. The IMPETUS Afea solver shows a somewhat different fragmentation characteristic due to the node splitting algorithm that induces pronounced tensile splitting.

  5. Dependence of paracentric inversion rate on tract length

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    York, Thomas L; Durrett, Rick; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We develop a Bayesian method based on MCMC for estimating the relative rates of pericentric and paracentric inversions from marker data from two species. The method also allows estimation of the distribution of inversion tract lengths. RESULTS: We apply the method to data from Drosoph...

  6. Dependent interest and transition rates in life insurance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchardt, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    For market consistent life insurance liabilities modelled with a multi-state Markov chain, it is of importance to consider the interest and transition rates as stochastic processes, for example in order to consider hedging possibilities of the risks, and for risk measurement. In the literature, t...

  7. Heating rate dependence of anatase to rutile transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Galizia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Commercial titania powders were calcined in order to investigate the influence of the heating history on the thermally stable phase (rutile. Temperatures from 620 to 700 °C and heating rates from 50 to 300 °C/h were used in order to evaluate their influence on the kinetics of transformation and microstructure evolution. The quantitative analysis of anatase-rutile mixtures based on X-ray diffraction intensities was performed. The results were plotted as cumulative transformation rate vs. cumulative coarsening rate in order to address the heating history of the anatase to rutile transformation. As the main result it was found that the amount of anatase transformed into rutile increases with increasing heating rate at fixed soaking time and temperature of calcination. Through linear extrapolation of experimental data obtained from the calcined commercial titania Degussa P25, it was found that 83 nm for the rutile crystallite size is the lowest limit needed for getting 100% of rutile powders. A substantial improvement in the anatase to rutile kinetic transformation was achieved after pressing the starting powders in order to exploit the interface nucleation.

  8. Age-dependent recombination rates in human pedigrees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Hussin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In humans, chromosome-number abnormalities have been associated with altered recombination and increased maternal age. Therefore, age-related effects on recombination are of major importance, especially in relation to the mechanisms involved in human trisomies. Here, we examine the relationship between maternal age and recombination rate in humans. We localized crossovers at high resolution by using over 600,000 markers genotyped in a panel of 69 French-Canadian pedigrees, revealing recombination events in 195 maternal meioses. Overall, we observed the general patterns of variation in fine-scale recombination rates previously reported in humans. However, we make the first observation of a significant decrease in recombination rates with advancing maternal age in humans, likely driven by chromosome-specific effects. The effect appears to be localized in the middle section of chromosomal arms and near subtelomeric regions. We postulate that, for some chromosomes, protection against non-disjunction provided by recombination becomes less efficient with advancing maternal age, which can be partly responsible for the higher rates of aneuploidy in older women. We propose a model that reconciles our findings with reported associations between maternal age and recombination in cases of trisomies.

  9. Strain rate dependency and fragmentation pattern of expanding warheads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Moxnes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available For the characterization of the behaviors of a metal material in events like expanding warheads, it is necessary to know its strength and ductility at high strain rates, around 104–105/s. The flyer plate impact testing produces the uniform stress and strain rates but the testing is expensive. The Taylor test is relatively inexpensive but produces non-uniform stress and strain fields, and the results are not so easily inferred for material modeling. In the split-Hopkinson bar (SHB, which may be used in compression, tension and torsion testing, the strain rates never exceeds 103/s. In the present work, we use the expanding ring test where the strain rate is 104–105/s. A streak camera is used to examine the expanding ring velocity, and a water tank is used to collect the fragments. The experimental results are compared with the numerical simulations using the hydrocodes AUTODYN, IMPETUS Afea and a regularized smooth particle (RSPH software. The number of fragments increases with the increase in the expansion velocity of the rings. The number of fragments is similar to the experimental results. The RSPH software shows much the same results as the AUTODYN where the Lagrangian solver is used for the ring. The IMPETUS Afea solver shows a somewhat different fragmentation characteristic due to the node splitting algorithm that induces pronounced tensile splitting.

  10. Larger rate dependence of late sodium current in cardiac Purkinje cells: A potential link to arrhythmogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Yu, Ying; Hou, Jian-Wen; Zhou, Zhi-Wen; Guo, Kai; Zhang, Peng-Pai; Wang, Zhi-Quan; Yan, Jian-Hua; Sun, Jian; Zhou, Qing; Wang, Yue-Peng; Li, Yi-Gang

    2017-03-01

    Purkinje cells (PCs) have a steeper rate dependence of repolarization and are more susceptible to arrhythmic activity than do ventricular myocytes (VMs). Late sodium current (INaL) is rate dependent and contributes to rate dependence of repolarization. This study sought to test our hypothesis that PCs have a larger rate dependence of INaL, contributing to their steeper rate dependence of repolarization and higher susceptibility to arrhythmic activity, than do VMs. INaL was recorded in isolated rabbit PCs and VMs with the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Action potential was examined using the microelectrode technique. Compared with VMs, PCs exhibited a significantly larger rate dependence of INaL with a larger INaL to basic cycle length (BCL) slope. Moreover, PCs had a larger rate dependence of INaL decay and slower recovery kinetics. Interestingly, the larger rate dependence of INaL matched to a steeper rate dependence of action potential duration (APD) in PCs. The INaL blocker tetrodotoxin significantly blunted, while the INaL enhancer anemone toxin (ATX-II) significantly increased, the rate dependence of INaL and APD in PCs and VMs. In the presence of ATX-II, the rate dependence of INaL in PCs was markedly larger than that in VMs, causing a much steeper rate dependence of APD in PCs. Accordingly, PCs exhibited greater rate-dependent electrical instability and were more prone to ATX-II-induced early afterdepolarizations, which were completely inhibited by the INaL inhibitor ranolazine. PCs have a significantly larger rate dependence of INaL than do VMs because of distinctive INaL decay and recovery kinetics, which contributes to their larger rate adaptation, and simultaneously predisposes them to a higher risk of arrhythmogenesis. Copyright © 2016 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Dependence of bacterial chemotaxis on gradient shape and adaptation rate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikita Vladimirov

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Simulation of cellular behavior on multiple scales requires models that are sufficiently detailed to capture central intracellular processes but at the same time enable the simulation of entire cell populations in a computationally cheap way. In this paper we present RapidCell, a hybrid model of chemotactic Escherichia coli that combines the Monod-Wyman-Changeux signal processing by mixed chemoreceptor clusters, the adaptation dynamics described by ordinary differential equations, and a detailed model of cell tumbling. Our model dramatically reduces computational costs and allows the highly efficient simulation of E. coli chemotaxis. We use the model to investigate chemotaxis in different gradients, and suggest a new, constant-activity type of gradient to systematically study chemotactic behavior of virtual bacteria. Using the unique properties of this gradient, we show that optimal chemotaxis is observed in a narrow range of CheA kinase activity, where concentration of the response regulator CheY-P falls into the operating range of flagellar motors. Our simulations also confirm that the CheB phosphorylation feedback improves chemotactic efficiency by shifting the average CheY-P concentration to fit the motor operating range. Our results suggest that in liquid media the variability in adaptation times among cells may be evolutionary favorable to ensure coexistence of subpopulations that will be optimally tactic in different gradients. However, in a porous medium (agar such variability appears to be less important, because agar structure poses mainly negative selection against subpopulations with low levels of adaptation enzymes. RapidCell is available from the authors upon request.

  12. Cinética de sinterização para sistemas à base de SnO2 por taxa de aquecimento constante Sintering kinetics for SnO2-based systems by constant heating rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Tebcheran

    2003-04-01

    in small concentrations as densifying aids for this oxide. In the present study the sintering kinetics of tin oxide was studied considering the effect of sintering atmosphere and of the MnO2 concentration. SnO2-MnO2 systems were prepared from the polymeric precursors method and the obtained powders were characterized by surface area by the BET method. SnO2 powders with varied MnO2 concentrations were pressed in cylindrical shape, and sintered in a dilatometer furnace with constant heating rate and controlled atmospheres. Sintered samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The influence of atmosphere (argon, air or CO2 as well as of the MnO2 concentrations on the sintering kinetics was determined. The kinetics data of linear shrinkage were analyzed in terms of kinetic models for the initial stage of sintering (Woolfrey and Bannister as well as for the global sintering (Su e Johnson allowing the determination of the apparent activation energy. Following the determination of the master sintering curve the apparent activation energy of all sintering process were determined as well as its dependence with the atmosphere and manganese concentrations. Based on these values and on the n exponent, determined by the classical grain growth equation, it was concluded that the most probable sintering mechanism is grain boundary diffusion with surface redistribution controlling the kinetics.

  13. Space-charge-limited leakage current in high dielectric constant and ferroelectric thin films considering the field-dependent permittivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, J.; Zheng, X. J.; Yin, W.; Tang, M. H.; Li, W.

    2010-12-01

    Distinguishing from the traditional characterization on high-field leakage current density-voltage relationship, the field-dependent permittivity from the polarization derivative is used to solve the space-charge-limited conduction, and the simulated leakage current densities are compared with the previous experimental observations. The influences of the mobility, ferroelectric parameters, and film thickness on the leakage current densities are discussed. The results verify that the high-field quasi-Ohmic region observed experimentally may result from the field-dependent permittivity, and that the leakage current can be influenced by the ferroelectric polarization.

  14. On rate-dependent dissipation effects in electro-elasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Saxena, Prashant; Steinmann, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with the mathematical modelling of large strain electro-viscoelastic deformations in electro-active polymers. Energy dissipation is assumed to occur due to mechanical viscoelasticity of the polymer as well as due to time-dependent effective polarisation of the material. Additive decomposition of the electric field $\\mathbb{E} = \\mathbb{E}_e + \\mathbb{E}_v$ and multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient $\\mathbf{F} = \\mathbf{F}_e \\mathbf{F}_v$ are proposed to model the internal dissipation mechanisms. The theory is illustrated with some numerical examples in the end.

  15. Dependent Types for Multi-Rate Flows in Synchronous Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Blair

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Synchronous programming languages emerged in the 1980s as tools for implementing reactive systems, which interact with events from physical environments and often must do so under strict timing constraints. In this report, we encode inside ATS various real-time primitives in an experimental synchronous language called Prelude, where ATS is a statically typed language with an ML-like functional core that supports both dependent types (of DML-style and linear types. We show that the verification requirements imposed on these primitives can be formally expressed in terms of dependent types in ATS. Moreover, we modify the Prelude compiler to automatically generate ATS code from Prelude source. This modified compiler allows us to solely rely on typechecking in ATS to discharge proof obligations originating from the need to typecheck Prelude code. Whereas ATS is typically used as a general purpose programming language, we hereby demonstrate that it can also be conveniently used to support some forms of advanced static checking in languages equipped with less expressive types.

  16. Rate limit of protein elastic response is tether dependent

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The elastic restoring force of tissues must be able to operate over the very wide range of loading rates experienced by living organisms. It is surprising that even the fastest events involving animal muscle tissues do not surpass a few hundred hertz. We propose that this limit is set in part by the elastic dynamics of tethered proteins extending and relaxing under a changing load. Here we study the elastic dynamics of tethered proteins using a fast force spectrometer with sub-millisecond tim...

  17. Density dependence, whitebark pine, and vital rates of grizzly bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Manen, Frank T.; Haroldson, Mark A.; Bjornlie, Daniel D; Ebinger, Michael R.; Thompson, Daniel J.; Costello, Cecily M; White, Gary C.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding factors influencing changes in population trajectory is important for effective wildlife management, particularly for populations of conservation concern. Annual population growth of the grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) population in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, USA has slowed from 4.2–7.6% during 1983–2001 to 0.3–2.2% during 2002–2011. Substantial changes in availability of a key food source and bear population density have occurred. Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis), the seeds of which are a valuable but variable fall food for grizzly bears, has experienced substantial mortality primarily due to a mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) outbreak that started in the early 2000s. Positive growth rates of grizzly bears have resulted in populations reaching high densities in some areas and have contributed to continued range expansion. We tested research hypotheses to examine if changes in vital rates detected during the past decade were more associated with whitebark pine decline or, alternatively, increasing grizzly bear density. We focused our assessment on known-fate data to estimate survival of cubs-of-the-year (cubs), yearlings, and independent bears (≥2 yrs), and reproductive transition of females from having no offspring to having cubs. We used spatially and temporally explicit indices for grizzly bear density and whitebark pine mortality as individual covariates. Models indicated moderate support for an increase in survival of independent male bears over 1983–2012, whereas independent female survival did not change. Cub survival, yearling survival, and reproductive transition from no offspring to cubs all changed during the 30-year study period, with lower rates evident during the last 10–15 years. Cub survival and reproductive transition were negatively associated with an index of grizzly bear density, indicating greater declines where bear densities were higher. Our analyses did not support a similar relationship for the

  18. The chemistry of bromine in the stratosphere: Influence of a new rate constant for the reaction BrO + HO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirre, Michel; Marceau, Francois J.; Lebras, Georges; Maguin, Francoise; Poulet, Gille; Ramaroson, Radiela

    1994-01-01

    The impact of new laboratory data for the reaction BrO + HO2 yields HOBr + O2 in the depletion of global stratospheric ozone has been estimated using a one-dimensional photochemical model taking into account the heterogeneous reaction on sulphate aerosols which converts N2O5 into HNO3. Assuring an aerosol loading 2 times as large as the 'background' and a reaction probability of 0.1 for the above heterogeneous reaction, the 6 fold increase in the measured rate constant for the reaction of BrO with HO2 increases the computed depletion of global ozone produced by 20 ppt of total bromine from 2.01 percent to 2.36 percent. The use of the higher rate constant increases the HOBr mixing ratio and makes the bromine partitioning and the ozone depletion very sensitive to the branching ratio of the potential channel forming HBr in the BrO + HO2 reaction.

  19. Upper limits for the rate constants of the reactions of CF3O2 and CF3O radicals with ozone at 295 K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O.J.; Sehested, J.

    1993-01-01

    Using the pulse radiolysis UV absorption technique and subsequent simulations of experimental absorption transients at 254 and 276 nm, upper limits of the rate constants for the reactions of CF3O2 and CF3O radicals with ozone were determined at 295 K, CF3O2+O3-->CF3O+2O2 (4), CF3O+O3-->CF3O2+O2 (......). The upper limits were derived as k4 ozone depletion by hydrofluorocarbons.......Using the pulse radiolysis UV absorption technique and subsequent simulations of experimental absorption transients at 254 and 276 nm, upper limits of the rate constants for the reactions of CF3O2 and CF3O radicals with ozone were determined at 295 K, CF3O2+O3-->CF3O+2O2 (4), CF3O+O3-->CF3O2+O2 (5...

  20. Photochemistry of UV-excited trifluoroacetylacetone and hexafluoroacetylacetone II: Quantum yield and rate constants of hydrogen fluoride photoelimination forming fluorinated methylfuranones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disselkoen, Kyle R.; Alsum, Joel R.; Thielke, Timothy A.; Muyskens, Mark A.

    2017-03-01

    The photochemistry of gas-phase 1,1,1-trifluoroacetylacetone (TFAA) and 1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoroacetylacetone (HFAA) excited with ultraviolet light involves a significant photoelimination channel producing HF and difluoromethylfuranone or pentafluoromethylfuranone, respectively. We report collisional self-quenching of the experimentally-determined relative quantum yield, and determine rate constants of 0.27 ± 0.03 and 0.33 ± 0.04 μs-1, for HFAA and TFAA respectively. A strong collision model is consistent with the observed quenching. The data suggest that this elimination is the primary photochemical fate at low pressure in both cases. The TFAA rate constant is larger than that for HFAA, in spite of TFAA having half as many fluorine atoms as HFAA.

  1. Thickness-dependence of optical constants for Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} ultrathin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Dong-Xu; Zheng, Yu-Xiang; Cai, Qing-Yuan; Lin, Wei; Wu, Kang-Ning; Mao, Peng-Hui; Zhang, Rong-Jun; Zhao, Hai-bin; Chen, Liang-Yao [Fudan University, Key Laboratory of Micro and Nano Photonic Structures, Ministry of Education, Department of Optical Science and Engineering, Shanghai (China)

    2012-09-15

    An effective method for determining the optical constants of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} thin films deposited on crystal silicon (c-Si) using spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) measurement with a two-film model (ambient-oxide-interlayer-substrate) was presented. Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} thin films with thickness range of 1-400 nm have been prepared by the electron beam evaporation (EBE) method. We find that the refractive indices of Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} ultrathin films less than 40 nm drop with the decreasing thickness, while the other ones are close to those of bulk Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}. This phenomenon was due to the existence of an interfacial oxide region and the surface roughness of the film, which was confirmed by the measurement of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Optical properties of ultrathin film varying with the thickness are useful for the design and manufacture of nano-scaled thin-film devices. (orig.)

  2. Compositional dependence of the optical constants of amorphous GexAs20Se80-x thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahshan, A.; Amer, H. H.; Aly, K. A.

    2008-11-01

    This paper reports the effect of replacement of selenium by germanium on the optical constants of chalcogenide GexAs20Se80-x (where x = 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 at.%) thin films. Films of GexAs20Se80-x glasses were prepared by thermal evaporation of the bulk samples. The transmission spectra, T(λ), of the films at normal incidence were obtained in the spectral region from 400 to 2500 nm. A straightforward analysis proposed by Swanepoel, based on the use of the maxima and minima of the interference fringes, has been applied to derive the real and imaginary parts of the complex index of refraction and also the film thickness. Increasing germanium content is found to affect the refractive index and the extinction coefficient of the GexAs20Se80-x films. Optical absorption measurements show that the fundamental absorption edge is a function of composition. With increasing germanium content the refractive index decreases while the optical band gap increases.

  3. Enzyme surface rigidity tunes the temperature dependence of catalytic rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksen, Geir Villy; Åqvist, Johan; Brandsdal, Bjørn Olav

    2016-07-12

    The structural origin of enzyme adaptation to low temperature, allowing efficient catalysis of chemical reactions even near the freezing point of water, remains a fundamental puzzle in biocatalysis. A remarkable universal fingerprint shared by all cold-active enzymes is a reduction of the activation enthalpy accompanied by a more negative entropy, which alleviates the exponential decrease in chemical reaction rates caused by lowering of the temperature. Herein, we explore the role of protein surface mobility in determining this enthalpy-entropy balance. The effects of modifying surface rigidity in cold- and warm-active trypsins are demonstrated here by calculation of high-precision Arrhenius plots and thermodynamic activation parameters for the peptide hydrolysis reaction, using extensive computer simulations. The protein surface flexibility is systematically varied by applying positional restraints, causing the remarkable effect of turning the cold-active trypsin into a variant with mesophilic characteristics without changing the amino acid sequence. Furthermore, we show that just restraining a key surface loop causes the same effect as a point mutation in that loop between the cold- and warm-active trypsin. Importantly, changes in the activation enthalpy-entropy balance of up to 10 kcal/mol are almost perfectly balanced at room temperature, whereas they yield significantly higher rates at low temperatures for the cold-adapted enzyme.

  4. Constant harvest rate for the Pacific sardine (Sardinops caeruleus) fishery in the Gulf of California based on catchability-at-length estimations

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Constant harvest rate as a management strategy for the Pacific sardine (Sardinops caeruleus) fishery in the Gulf of California is supported by an analysis of variations in the catchability coefficient (q), stock abundance and commercial catch. Catchability was analyzed based on population length-structured data standard length (SL), expressed as CPUE, for 26 fishing seasons (1972-1973 to 1997-1998). We used a deterministic model of catchability to estimate the catchability-at-length assuming ...

  5. Strain Rate Dependant Material Model for Orthotropic Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignjevic, Rade

    2016-08-01

    In manufacturing processes anisotropic metals are often exposed to the loading with high strain rates in the range from 102 s-1 to 106 s-1 (e.g. stamping, cold spraying and explosive forming). These types of loading often involve generation and propagation of shock waves within the material. The material behaviour under such a complex loading needs to be accurately modelled, in order to optimise the manufacturing process and achieve appropriate properties of the manufactured component. The presented research is related to development and validation of a thermodynamically consistent physically based constitutive model for metals under high rate loading. The model is capable of modelling damage, failure and formation and propagation of shock waves in anisotropic metals. The model has two main parts: the strength part which defines the material response to shear deformation and an equation of state (EOS) which defines the material response to isotropic volumetric deformation [1]. The constitutive model was implemented into the transient nonlinear finite element code DYNA3D [2] and our in house SPH code. Limited model validation was performed by simulating a number of high velocity material characterisation and validation impact tests. The new damage model was developed in the framework of configurational continuum mechanics and irreversible thermodynamics with internal state variables. The use of the multiplicative decomposition of deformation gradient makes the model applicable to arbitrary plastic and damage deformations. To account for the physical mechanisms of failure, the concept of thermally activated damage initially proposed by Tuller and Bucher [3], Klepaczko [4] was adopted as the basis for the new damage evolution model. This makes the proposed damage/failure model compatible with the Mechanical Threshold Strength (MTS) model Follansbee and Kocks [5], 1988; Chen and Gray [6] which was used to control evolution of flow stress during plastic deformation. In

  6. Upper limit on the rate constant for isotope exchange between molecular oxygen and ozone at 298 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, S. M.; Morton, J.; Mauersberger, K.

    1987-01-01

    The gas phase bimolecular isotope exchange reaction between molecular oxygen and ozone has been investigated directly for the first time. Its rate coefficient is found to be less than 2 x 10 to the -25th cu cm/sec at 298 K, over six orders of magnitude below recent estimates. Much faster exchange was observed over condensed ozone at 77 K, suggesting isotopic scrambling is catalyzed under these conditions. The low rate coefficient implies that homogeneous exchange between ground state oxygen and ozone molecules cannot play a significant role in heavy ozone chemistry.

  7. The dependence of cusp ion signatures on the reconnection rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Morley

    Full Text Available The interpretation of structure in cusp ion dispersions is important for helping to understand the temporal and spatial structure of magnetopause reconnection. "Stepped" and "sawtooth" signatures have been shown to be caused by temporal variations in the reconnection rate under the same physical conditions for different satellite trajectories. The present paper shows that even for a single satellite path, a change in the amplitude of any reconnection pulses can alter the observed signature and even turn sawtooth into stepped forms and vice versa. On 20 August 1998, the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP craft F-14 crossed the cusp just to the south of Longyearbyen, returning on the following orbit. The two passes by the DMSP F-14 satellites have very similar trajectories and the open-closed field line boundary (OCB crossings, as estimated from the SSJ/4 precipitating particle data and Polar UVI images, imply a similarly-shaped polar cap, yet the cusp ion dispersion signatures differ substantially. The cusp crossing at 08:54 UT displays a stepped ion dispersion previously considered to be typical of a meridional pass, whereas the crossing at 10:38 UT is a sawtooth form ion dispersion, previously considered typical of a satellite travelling longitudinally with respect to the OCB. It is shown that this change in dispersed ion signature is likely to be due to a change in the amplitude of the pulses in the reconnection rate, causing the stepped signature. Modelling of the low-energy ion cutoff under different conditions has reproduced the forms of signature observed.

    Key words. Ionosphere (particle precipitation Magnetospheric physics (energetic particles, precipitating, magnetopause, cusp and boundary layers

  8. QSAR models for oxidation of organic micropollutants in water based on ozone and hydroxyl radical rate constants and their chemical classification

    KAUST Repository

    Sudhakaran, Sairam

    2013-03-01

    Ozonation is an oxidation process for the removal of organic micropollutants (OMPs) from water and the chemical reaction is governed by second-order kinetics. An advanced oxidation process (AOP), wherein the hydroxyl radicals (OH radicals) are generated, is more effective in removing a wider range of OMPs from water than direct ozonation. Second-order rate constants (kOH and kO3) are good indices to estimate the oxidation efficiency, where higher rate constants indicate more rapid oxidation. In this study, quantitative structure activity relationships (QSAR) models for O3 and AOP processes were developed, and rate constants, kOH and kO3, were predicted based on target compound properties. The kO3 and kOH values ranged from 5 * 10-4 to 105 M-1s-1 and 0.04 to 18 * (109) M-1 s-1, respectively. Several molecular descriptors which potentially influence O3 and OH radical oxidation were identified and studied. The QSAR-defining descriptors were double bond equivalence (DBE), ionisation potential (IP), electron-affinity (EA) and weakly-polar component of solvent accessible surface area (WPSA), and the chemical and statistical significance of these descriptors was discussed. Multiple linear regression was used to build the QSAR models, resulting in high goodness-of-fit, r2 (>0.75). The models were validated by internal and external validation along with residual plots. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. The Luminosity Dependence of the Galaxy Merger Rate

    CERN Document Server

    Patton, D R

    2008-01-01

    We measure the number of companions per galaxy (Nc) as a function of r-band absolute magnitude for both the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Croton et al. (2006) semi-analytic catalog applied to the Millennium Run simulation. For close pairs with projected separations of 5-20 h^{-1} kpc, velocity differences less than 500 km/s, and luminosity ratios between 1:2 and 2:1, we find good agreement between the observations and simulations, with Nc consistently close to 0.02 over the range -22 < M_r < -18. For larger pair separations, Nc(M_r) instead becomes increasingly steep towards the faint end, implying that luminosity-dependent clustering plays an important role on small scales. Using the simulations to assess and correct for projection effects, we infer that the real-space Nc(M_r) for close pairs peaks at about M*, and declines by at least a factor of two as M_r becomes fainter. Conversely, by measuring the number density of close companions, we estimate that at least 90% of all major mergers occur betw...

  10. Determination of temperature dependent Henry's law constants of polychlorinated naphthalenes: Application to air-sea exchange in Izmir Bay, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odabasi, Mustafa; Adali, Mutlu

    2016-12-01

    The Henry's law constant (H) is a crucial variable to investigate the air-water exchange of persistent organic pollutants. H values for 32 polychlorinated naphthalene (PCN) congeners were measured using an inert gas-stripping technique at five temperatures ranging between 5 and 35 °C. H values in deionized water (at 25 °C) varied between 0.28 ± 0.08 Pa m3 mol-1 (PCN-73) and 18.01 ± 0.69 Pa m3 mol-1 (PCN-42). The agreement between the measured and estimated H values from the octanol-water and octanol-air partition coefficients was good (measured/estimated ratio = 1.00 ± 0.41, average ± SD). The calculated phase change enthalpies (ΔHH) were within the interval previously determined for other several semivolatile organic compounds (42.0-106.4 kJ mol-1). Measured H values, paired atmospheric and aqueous concentrations and meteorological variables were also used to reveal the level and direction of air-sea exchange fluxes of PCNs at the coast of Izmir Bay, Turkey. The net PCN air-sea exchange flux varied from -0.55 (volatilization, PCN-24/14) to 2.05 (deposition, PCN-23) ng m-2 day-1. PCN-19, PCN-24/14, PCN-42, and PCN-33/34/37 were mainly volatilized from seawater while the remaining congeners were mainly deposited. The overall number of the cases showing deposition was higher (67.9%) compared to volatilization (21.4%) and near equilibrium (10.7%).

  11. Learning Rates and Known-to-Unknown Flash-Card Ratios: Comparing Effectiveness While Holding Instructional Time Constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Bethany E.; Skinner, Christopher H.; Black, Michelle P.; Yaw, Jared; Booher, Joshua; Delisle, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Using alternating treatments designs, we compared learning rates across 2 computer-based flash-card interventions (3?min each): a traditional drill intervention with 15 unknown words and an interspersal intervention with 12 known words and 3 unknown words. Each student acquired more words under the traditional drill intervention. Discussion…

  12. Discovery of Spin-Rate-Dependent Asteroid Thermal Inertia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Alan; Drube, Line

    2016-10-01

    Knowledge of the surface thermal inertia of an asteroid can provide insight into surface structure: porous material has a lower thermal inertia than rock. Using WISE/NEOWISE data and our new asteroid thermal-inertia estimator we show that the thermal inertia of main-belt asteroids (MBAs) appears to increase with spin period. Similar behavior is found in the case of thermophysically-modeled thermal inertia values of near-Earth objects (NEOs). We interpret our results in terms of rapidly increasing material density and thermal conductivity with depth, and provide evidence that thermal inertia increases by factors of 10 (MBAs) to 20 (NEOs) within a depth of just 10 cm. On the basis of a picture of depth-dependent thermal inertia our results suggest that, in general, thermal inertia values representative of solid rock are reached some tens of centimeters to meters below the surface in the case of MBAs (the median diameter in our dataset = 24 km). In the case of the much smaller (km-sized) NEOs a thinner porous surface layer is indicated, with large pieces of solid rock possibly existing just a meter or less below the surface. These conclusions are consistent with our understanding from in-situ measurements of the surfaces of the Moon, and a few asteroids, and suggest a very general picture of rapidly changing material properties in the topmost regolith layers of asteroids. Our results have important implications for calculations of the Yarkovsky effect, including its perturbation of the orbits of potentially hazardous objects and those of asteroid family members after the break-up event. Evidence of a rapid increase of thermal inertia with depth is also an important result for studies of the ejecta-enhanced momentum transfer of impacting vehicles ("kinetic impactors") in planetary defense.

  13. Strain-rate dependence for Ni/Al hybrid foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Anne

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Shock absorption often needs stiff but lightweight materials that exhibit a large kinetic energy absorption capability. Open-cell metal foams are artificial structures, which due to their plateau stress, including a strong hysteresis, can in principle absorb large amounts of energy. However, their plateau stress is too low for many applications. In this study, we use highly novel and promising Ni/Al hybrid foams which consist of standard, open-cell aluminium foams, where nanocrystalline nickel is deposited by electrodeposition as coating on the strut surface. The mechanical behaviour of cellular materials, including their behaviour under higher strain-rates, is governed by their microstructure due to the properties of the strut material, pore/strut geometry and mass distribution over the struts. Micro-inertia effects are strongly related to the microstructure. For a conclusive model, the exact real microstructure is needed. In this study a micro-focus computer tomography (μCT system has been used for the analysis of the microstructure of the foam samples and for the development of a microstructural Finite Element (micro-FE mesh. The microstructural FE models have been used to model the mechanical behaviour of the Ni/Al hybrid foams under dynamic loading conditions. The simulations are validated by quasi-static compression tests and dynamic split Hopkinson pressure bar tests.

  14. Female promiscuity and maternally dependent offspring growth rates in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garratt, Michael; Brooks, Robert C; Lemaître, Jean-François; Gaillard, Jean-Michel

    2014-04-01

    Conflicts between family members are expected to influence the duration and intensity of parental care. In mammals, the majority of this care occurs as resource transfer from mothers to offspring during gestation and lactation. Mating systems can have a strong influence on the severity of familial conflict--where female promiscuity is prevalent, conflict is expected to be higher between family members, causing offspring to demand more resources. If offspring are capable of manipulating their mothers and receive resources in proportion to their demands, resource transfer should increase with elevated promiscuity. We tested this prediction, unexplored across mammals, using a comparative approach. The total durations of gestation and lactation were not related to testes mass, a reliable proxy of female promiscuity across taxa. Offspring growth during gestation, however, and weaning mass, were positively correlated with testes mass, suggesting that offspring gain resources from their mothers at faster rates when familial conflict is greater. During gestation, the relationship between offspring growth and testes mass was also related to placenta morphology, with a stronger relationship between testes mass and growth observed in species with a less invasive placenta. Familial conflict could have a pervasive influence on patterns of parental care in mammals. © 2013 The Author(s). Evolution © 2013 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  15. Rate limit of protein elastic response is tether dependent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovich, Ronen; Hermans, Rodolfo I.; Popa, Ionel; Stirnemann, Guillaume; Garcia-Manyes, Sergi; Berne, Bruce J.; Fernandez, Julio M.

    2012-01-01

    The elastic restoring force of tissues must be able to operate over the very wide range of loading rates experienced by living organisms. It is surprising that even the fastest events involving animal muscle tissues do not surpass a few hundred hertz. We propose that this limit is set in part by the elastic dynamics of tethered proteins extending and relaxing under a changing load. Here we study the elastic dynamics of tethered proteins using a fast force spectrometer with sub-millisecond time resolution, combined with Brownian and Molecular Dynamics simulations. We show that the act of tethering a polypeptide to an object, an inseparable part of protein elasticity in vivo and in experimental setups, greatly reduces the attempt frequency with which the protein samples its free energy. Indeed, our data shows that a tethered polypeptide can traverse its free-energy landscape with a surprisingly low effective diffusion coefficient Deff ∼ 1,200 nm2/s. By contrast, our Molecular Dynamics simulations show that diffusion of an isolated protein under force occurs at Deff ∼ 108 nm2/s. This discrepancy is attributed to the drag force caused by the tethering object. From the physiological time scales of tissue elasticity, we calculate that tethered elastic proteins equilibrate in vivo with Deff ∼ 104–106 nm2/s which is two to four orders magnitude smaller than the values measured for untethered proteins in bulk. PMID:22895787

  16. Absolute rate constants for the reaction of NO3 radicals with a series of dienes at 295 K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellermann, T.; Nielsen, O.J.; Skov, H.

    1992-01-01

    The rate constants for the reaction of NO3 radicals with a series of 7 dienes, 1,3-butadiene, isoprene, 2,3-dimethyl-1,3-butadiene, trans-1,3-pentadiene, cis-1,3-pentadiene, trans,trans-2,4-hexadiene, and 1,3-cyclohexadiene, were measured at 295 K and at a total pressure of 1 atm. The rate consta...... were obtained using the absolute technique of pulse radiolysis combined with kinetic UV-VIS spectroscopy. The results are discussed in terms of reactivity trends and previous literature data....

  17. Direct determination of rate constants for coupling between aromatic radical anions and alkyl and benzyl radicals by laser-flash photolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, T.; Christensen, P.; Wilbrandt, Robert Walter

    2003-01-01

    Coupling rates between the radicals methyl, n-, sec-, tert-butyl and benzyl (R-.) and the aromatic radical anions of 1,4-dicyanonaphthalene, 9,10-dicyanoanthracene and fluorenone (A(-.)) have been obtained using a new laser-flash photolysis method. The radicals R-. and the radical anions A(-.) were...... generated by a photoinduced electron transfer reaction between the aromatic compound A and the alkyl or benzyl triphenylborate anion RB(Ph)(3)(-). For the first time the rate constants of the coupling reaction between methyl and benzyl radicals with aromatic radical anions have been obtained. For all...... of the radicals and the structure and standard potentials of the aromatic radical anions....

  18. The Transfer of Atoms, Ions and Molecular Groups in Solution. Part 3. Monte Carlo Methods for the Evaluation of Rate Constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-10-31

    tranal. Sykes and Bell) pp. 342-51 12. J. M. McKinley and P. P. Schmidt, Che. Phys. Letters, submitted. and ref. (4) 13. G. Arfken . Mathematical Methods ...Transfer of Atoms, Ions and Molecular Groups Nf in Solution.III. Monte Carlo methods for the evaluation of rate constants I by P. P. Schmidt Prepared...technical Groups in Solution.poilI. Monte Carlo methods for the evaluation of rate a. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER congtant 7, AUTHOR(e) B. CONTRACT Oft

  19. Structural effects on the beta-scission reaction of alkoxyl radicals. Direct measurement of the absolute rate constants for ring opening of benzocycloalken-1-oxyl radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bietti, Massimo; Lanzalunga, Osvaldo; Salamone, Michela

    2005-02-18

    [reaction: see text] The absolute rate constants for beta-scission of a series of benzocycloalken-1-oxyl radicals and of the 2-(4-methylphenyl)-2-butoxyl radical have been measured directly by laser flash photolysis. The benzocycloalken-1-oxyl radicals undergo ring opening with rates which parallel the ring strain of the corresponding cycloalkanes. In the 1-X-indan-1-oxyl radical series, ring opening is observed when X = H, Me, whereas exclusive C-X bond cleavage occurs when X = Et. The factors governing the fragmentation regioselectivity are discussed.

  20. Fracture in Westerly granite under AE feedback and constant strain rate loading: Nucleation, quasi-static propagation, and the transition to unstable fracture propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, B.D.; Young, R.P.; Lockner, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    New observations of fracture nucleation are presented from three triaxial compression experiments on intact samples of Westerly granite, using Acoustic Emission (AE) monitoring. By conducting the tests under different loading conditions, the fracture process is demonstrated for quasi-static fracture (under AE Feedback load), a slowly developing unstable fracture (loaded at a 'slow' constant strain rate of 2.5 ?? 10-6/s) and an unstable fracture that develops near instantaneously (loaded at a 'fast' constant strain rate of 5 ?? 10-5/s). By recording a continuous ultrasonic waveform during the critical period of fracture, the entire AE catalogue can be captured and the exact time of fracture defined. Under constant strain loading, three stages are observed: (1) An initial nucleation or stable growth phase at a rate of ??? 1.3 mm/s, (2) a sudden increase to a constant or slowly accelerating propagation speed of ??? 18 mm/s, and (3) unstable, accelerating propagation. In the ??? 100 ms before rupture, the high level of AE activity (as seen on the continuous record) prevented the location of discrete AE events. A lower bound estimate of the average propagation velocity (using the time-to-rupture and the existing fracture length) suggests values of a few m/s. However from a low gain acoustic record, we infer that in the final few ms, the fracture propagation speed increased to 175 m/s. These results demonstrate similarities between fracture nucleation in intact rock and the nucleation of dynamic instabilities in stick slip experiments. It is suggested that the ability to constrain the size of an evolving fracture provides a crucial tool in further understanding the controls on fracture nucleation. ?? Birkha??user Verlag, Basel, 2006.

  1. Reaction rate constant of CH2O + H = HCO + H2 revisited: a combined study of direct shock tube measurement and transition state theory calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengkai; Dames, Enoch E; Davidson, David F; Hanson, Ronald K

    2014-11-06

    The rate constant of the H-abstraction reaction of formaldehyde (CH2O) by hydrogen atoms (H), CH2O + H = H2 + HCO, has been studied behind reflected shock waves with use of a sensitive mid-IR laser absorption diagnostic for CO, over temperatures of 1304-2006 K and at pressures near 1 atm. C2H5I was used as an H atom precursor and 1,3,5-trioxane as the CH2O precursor, to generate a well-controlled CH2O/H reacting system. By designing the experiments to maintain relatively constant H atom concentrations, the current study significantly boosted the measurement sensitivity of the target reaction and suppressed the influence of interfering reactions. The measured CH2O + H rate constant can be expressed in modified Arrhenius from as kCH2O+H(1304-2006 K, 1 atm) = 1.97 × 10(11)(T/K)(1.06) exp(-3818 K/T) cm(3) mol(-1)s(-1), with uncertainty limits estimated to be +18%/-26%. A transition-state-theory (TST) calculation, using the CCSD(T)-F12/VTZ-F12 level of theory, is in good agreement with the shock tube measurement and extended the temperature range of the current study to 200-3000 K, over which a modified Arrhenius fit of the rate constant can be expressed as kCH2O+H(200-3000 K) = 5.86 × 10(3)(T/K)(3.13) exp(-762 K/T) cm(3) mol(-1)s(-1).

  2. Multi-scale detection of rate changes in spike trains with weak dependencies

    OpenAIRE

    Messer, Michael; Costa, Kauê M.; Roeper, Jochen; Schneider, Gaby

    2015-01-01

    The statistical analysis of neuronal spike trains by models of point processes often relies on the assumption of constant process parameters. However, it is a well-known problem that the parameters of empirical spike trains can be highly variable, such as for example the firing rate. In order to test the null hypothesis of a constant rate and to estimate the change points, a Multiple Filter Test (MFT) and a corresponding algorithm (MFA) have been proposed that can be applied under the assumpt...

  3. The instantaneous rate dependence in low temperature laboratory rock friction and rock deformation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeler, N.M.; Tullis, T.E.; Kronenberg, A.K.; Reinen, L.A.

    2007-01-01

    Earthquake occurrence probabilities that account for stress transfer and time-dependent failure depend on the product of the effective normal stress and a lab-derived dimensionless coefficient a. This coefficient describes the instantaneous dependence of fault strength on deformation rate, and determines the duration of precursory slip. Although an instantaneous rate dependence is observed for fracture, friction, crack growth, and low temperature plasticity in laboratory experiments, the physical origin of this effect during earthquake faulting is obscure. We examine this rate dependence in laboratory experiments on different rock types using a normalization scheme modified from one proposed by Tullis and Weeks [1987]. We compare the instantaneous rate dependence in rock friction with rate dependence measurements from higher temperature dislocation glide experiments. The same normalization scheme is used to compare rate dependence in friction to rock fracture and to low-temperature crack growth tests. For particular weak phyllosilicate minerals, the instantaneous friction rate dependence is consistent with dislocation glide. In intact rock failure tests, for each rock type considered, the instantaneous rate dependence is the same size as for friction, suggesting a common physical origin. During subcritical crack growth in strong quartzofeldspathic and carbonate rock where glide is not possible, the instantaneous rate dependence measured during failure or creep tests at high stress has long been thought to be due to crack growth; however, direct comparison between crack growth and friction tests shows poor agreement. The crack growth rate dependence appears to be higher than the rate dependence of friction and fracture by a factor of two to three for all rock types considered. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Do Insect Populations Die at Constant Rates as They Become Older? Contrasting Demographic Failure Kinetics with Respect to Temperature According to the Weibull Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petros Damos

    Full Text Available Temperature implies contrasting biological causes of demographic aging in poikilotherms. In this work, we used the reliability theory to describe the consistency of mortality with age in moth populations and to show that differentiation in hazard rates is related to extrinsic environmental causes such as temperature. Moreover, experiments that manipulate extrinsic mortality were used to distinguish temperature-related death rates and the pertinence of the Weibull aging model. The Newton-Raphson optimization method was applied to calculate parameters for small samples of ages at death by estimating the maximum likelihoods surfaces using scored gradient vectors and the Hessian matrix. The study reveals for the first time that the Weibull function is able to describe contrasting biological causes of demographic aging for moth populations maintained at different temperature regimes. We demonstrate that at favourable conditions the insect death rate accelerates as age advances, in contrast to the extreme temperatures in which each individual drifts toward death in a linear fashion and has a constant chance of passing away. Moreover, slope of hazard rates shifts towards a constant initial rate which is a pattern demonstrated by systems which are not wearing out (e.g. non-aging since the failure, or death, is a random event independent of time. This finding may appear surprising, because, traditionally, it was mostly thought as rule that in aging population force of mortality increases exponentially until all individuals have died. Moreover, in relation to other studies, we have not observed any typical decelerating aging patterns at late life (mortality leveling-off, but rather, accelerated hazard rates at optimum temperatures and a stabilized increase at the extremes.In most cases, the increase in aging-related mortality was simulated reasonably well according to the Weibull survivorship model that is applied. Moreover, semi log- probability hazard

  5. Review of Rate Constants and Exploration of Correlations of the Halogen Transfer Reaction of Tri-substituted Carbon-centered Radicals with Molecular Halogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poutsma, Marvin L [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Rate constants for the reaction (R 3C + X2 R 3CX + X ; X = F, Cl, Br, and I) are reviewed. Because of curved Arrhenius plots and negative EX values, empirical structure-reactivity correlations are sought for log kX,298 rather than EX. The well-known poor correlation with measures of reaction enthalpy is demonstrated. The best quantitative predictor for R 3C is p, the sum of the Hammett p constants for the three substituents, R . Electronegative substituents with lone pairs, such as halogen or oxygen, thus appear to destabilize the formation of a polarized pre-reaction complex and/or TS ( +R---X---X -) by -inductive/field electron withdrawal while simultaneously stabilizing them by -resonance electron donation. The best quantitative predictor of the reactivity order of the halogens, I2 > Br2 >> Cl2 F2, is the polarizability of the halogen, (X-X). For the data set of 60 rate constants which span 6.5 orders of magnitude, a modestly successful correlation of log kX,298 is achieved with only two parameters, p and (X-X), with a mean unsigned deviation of 0.59 log units. How much of this residual variance is the result of inaccuracies in the data compared with over-simplification of the correlation approach remains to be seen.

  6. Correction of dead-time and pile-up in a detector array for constant and rapidly varying counting rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero, C. [Centro de Investigaciones Medioambientales, Energéticas y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Sevilla (Spain); Cano-Ott, D.; Mendoza, E. [Centro de Investigaciones Medioambientales, Energéticas y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Wright, T. [University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-21

    The effect of dead-time and pile-up in counting experiments may become a significant source of uncertainty if not properly taken into account. Although analytical solutions to this problem have been proposed for simple set-ups with one or two detectors, these are limited when it comes to arrays where time correlation between the detector modules is used, and also in situations of variable counting rates. In this paper we describe the dead-time and pile-up corrections applied to the n-TOF Total Absorption Calorimeter (TAC), a 4π γ-ray detector made of 40 BaF{sub 2} modules operating at the CERN n-TOF facility. Our method is based on the simulation of the complete signal detection and event reconstruction processes and can be applied as well in the case of rapidly varying counting rates. The method is discussed in detail and then we present its successful application to the particular case of the measurement of {sup 238}U(n, γ) reactions with the TAC detector.

  7. Binding of hairpin pyrrole and imidazole polyamides to DNA: relationship between torsion angle and association rate constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yong-Woon; Matsumoto, Tomoko; Yokota, Hiroaki; Kashiwazaki, Gengo; Morinaga, Hironobu; Hashiya, Kaori; Bando, Toshikazu; Harada, Yoshie; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2012-12-01

    N-methylpyrrole (Py)-N-methylimidazole (Im) polyamides are small organic molecules that bind to DNA with sequence specificity and can be used as synthetic DNA-binding ligands. In this study, five hairpin eight-ring Py-Im polyamides 1-5 with different number of Im rings were synthesized, and their binding behaviour was investigated with surface plasmon resonance assay. It was found that association rate (k(a)) of the Py-Im polyamides with their target DNA decreased with the number of Im in the Py-Im polyamides. The structures of four-ring Py-Im polyamides derived from density functional theory revealed that the dihedral angle of the Py amide carbonyl is 14∼18°, whereas that of the Im is significantly smaller. As the minor groove of DNA has a helical structure, planar Py-Im polyamides need to change their conformation to fit it upon binding to the minor groove. The data explain that an increase in planarity of Py-Im polyamide induced by the incorporation of Im reduces the association rate of Py-Im polyamides. This fundamental knowledge of the binding of Py-Im polyamides to DNA will facilitate the design of hairpin Py-Im polyamides as synthetic DNA-binding modules.

  8. Biomolecular Origin of The Rate-Dependent Deformation of Prismatic Enamel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, J; Hsiung, L

    2006-07-05

    Penetration deformation of columnar prismatic enamel was investigated using instrumented nanoindentation testing, carried out at three constant strain rates (0.05 s{sup -1}, 0.005 s{sup -1}, and 0.0005 s{sup -1}). Enamel demonstrated better resistance to penetration deformation and greater elastic modulus values were measured at higher strain rates. The origin of the rate-dependent deformation was rationalized to be the shear deformation of nanoscale protein matrix surrounding each hydroxyapatite crystal rods. And the shear modulus of protein matrix was shown to depend on strain rate in a format: G{sub p} = 0.213 + 0.021 ln {dot {var_epsilon}}. Most biological composites compromise reinforcement mineral components and an organic matrix. They are generally partitioned into multi-level to form hierarchical structures that have supreme resistance to crack growth [1]. The molecular mechanistic origin of toughness is associated with the 'sacrificial chains' between the individual sub-domains in a protein molecule [2]. As the protein molecule is stretched, these 'sacrificial chains' break to protect its backbone and dissipate energy [3]. Such fresh insights are providing new momentum toward updating our understanding of biological materials [4]. Prismatic enamel in teeth is one such material. Prismatic microstructure is frequently observed in the surface layers of many biological materials, as exemplified in mollusk shells [5] and teeth [6]. It is a naturally optimized microstructure to bear impact loading and penetration deformation. In teeth, the columnar prismatic enamel provides mechanical and chemical protection for the relatively soft dentin layer. Its mechanical behavior and reliability are extremely important to ensure normal tooth function and human health. Since enamel generally contains up to 95% hydroxyapatite (HAP) crystals and less than 5% protein matrix, it is commonly believed to be a weak and brittle material with little resistance to

  9. Reinforcer magnitude and rate dependency: evaluation of resistance-to-change mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkston, Jonathan W; Ginsburg, Brett C; Lamb, Richard J

    2014-10-01

    Under many circumstances, reinforcer magnitude appears to modulate the rate-dependent effects of drugs such that when schedules arrange for relatively larger reinforcer magnitudes rate dependency is attenuated compared with behavior maintained by smaller magnitudes. The current literature on resistance to change suggests that increased reinforcer density strengthens operant behavior, and such strengthening effects appear to extend to the temporal control of behavior. As rate dependency may be understood as a loss of temporal control, the effects of reinforcer magnitude on rate dependency may be due to increased resistance to disruption of temporally controlled behavior. In the present experiments, pigeons earned different magnitudes of grain during signaled components of a multiple FI schedule. Three drugs, clonidine, haloperidol, and morphine, were examined. All three decreased overall rates of key pecking; however, only the effects of clonidine were attenuated as reinforcer magnitude increased. An analysis of within-interval performance found rate-dependent effects for clonidine and morphine; however, these effects were not modulated by reinforcer magnitude. In addition, we included prefeeding and extinction conditions, standard tests used to measure resistance to change. In general, rate-decreasing effects of prefeeding and extinction were attenuated by increasing reinforcer magnitudes. Rate-dependent analyses of prefeeding showed rate-dependency following those tests, but in no case were these effects modulated by reinforcer magnitude. The results suggest that a resistance-to-change interpretation of the effects of reinforcer magnitude on rate dependency is not viable.

  10. EVALUATION REINFORCER MAGNITUDE AND RATE DEPENDENCY OF RESISTANCE TO CHANGE MECHANIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkston, Jonathan W.; Ginsburg, Brett C.; Lamb, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    In many circumstances, reinforcer magnitude appears to modulate the rate-dependent effects of drugs, such that when schedules arrange for relatively larger reinforcer magnitude, rate dependency is attenuated compared to behavior maintained by smaller magnitudes. The current literature on resistance to change suggests that increased reinforcer density strengthens operant behavior, and such strengthening effects appear to extend to the temporal control of behavior. As rate dependency may be understood as a loss of temporal control, the effects of reinforcer magnitude on rate dependency may be due to increased resistance to disruption of temporally controlled behavior. In the present experiments, pigeons earned different magnitudes of grain during signaled components of a multiple fixed-interval schedule. Three drugs, clonidine, haloperidol, and morphine, were examined: all three decreased overall rates of key pecking; however, only the effects of clonidine were attenuated as reinforcer magnitude increased. An analysis of within-interval performance found rate-dependent effects for clonidine and morphine, but those effects were not modulated by reinforcer magnitude. Additionally, we included prefeeding and extinction conditions, standard tests used to measure resistance to change. In general, rate-decreasing effects of prefeeding and extinction were attenuated by increasing reinforcer magnitudes. Rate-dependent analyses of prefeeding showed rate-dependency following those tests, but in no case were these effects modulated by reinforcer magnitude. The results suggest a resistance-to-change interpretation of the effects of reinforcer magnitude on rate dependency is not viable. PMID:25115595

  11. New definitions of pointing stability - ac and dc effects. [constant and time-dependent pointing error effects on image sensor performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucke, Robert L.; Sirlin, Samuel W.; San Martin, A. M.

    1992-01-01

    For most imaging sensors, a constant (dc) pointing error is unimportant (unless large), but time-dependent (ac) errors degrade performance by either distorting or smearing the image. When properly quantified, the separation of the root-mean-square effects of random line-of-sight motions into dc and ac components can be used to obtain the minimum necessary line-of-sight stability specifications. The relation between stability requirements and sensor resolution is discussed, with a view to improving communication between the data analyst and the control systems engineer.

  12. Effect of a constant rate infusion of cytosine arabinoside on mortality in dogs with meningoencephalitis of unknown origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowrie, M; Thomson, S; Smith, P; Garosi, L

    2016-07-01

    Administration of cytosine arabinoside (CA) by continuous rate infusion (CRI) has pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic advantages over traditional intermittent dosing. Whether these advantages translate into clinical efficacy remains unknown. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of CRI of CA in dogs with meningoencephalitis of unknown origin (MUO) and to compare outcomes with a group of historical control dogs treated with conventional intermittent subcutaneous (SC) administration of CA; both groups received adjunctive prednisolone. It was hypothesised that a CRI of CA for 24 h at 100 mg/m(2) would improve survival and lesion resolution compared with conventional SC delivery of 50 mg/m(2) every 12 h for 48 h. Eighty dogs with suspected MUO were recruited from consecutive dogs presenting with suspected MUO from 2006 to 2015. All dogs underwent routine clinical evaluation, magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. There were 39 dogs in the SC group and 41 dogs in the CRI group; baseline characteristics were similar in both groups. Survival at 3 months was 22/39 (44%) with SC delivery versus 37/41 (90%) with CRI. No dose-limiting toxicities were noted for either group. The resolution rate of magnetic resonance imaging and cerebrospinal fluid abnormalities at the 3 month re-examination were substantially improved in the CRI group versus the SC group. The CRI regimen produced a survival advantage over the SC route of administration without clinically significant toxicity. These data supports the routine use of CRI at first presentation for the treatment of MUO in dogs. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. pH and urea dependence of amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange rates in the beta-trefoil protein hisactophilin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houliston, R Scott; Liu, Chengsong; Singh, Laila M R; Meiering, Elizabeth M

    2002-01-29

    Amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange rates were measured as a function of pH and urea for 37 slowly exchanging amides in the beta-trefoil protein hisactophilin. The rank order of exchange rates is generally maintained under different solution conditions, and trends in the pH and urea dependence of exchange rates are correlated with the rank order of exchange rates. The observed trends are consistent with the expected behavior for exchange of different amides via global and/or local unfolding. Analysis of the pH dependence of exchange in terms of rate constants for structural opening and closing reveals a wide range of rates in different parts of the hisactophilin structure. The slowest exchanging amides have the slowest opening and closing rates. Many of the slowest exchanging amides are located in trefoil 2, but there are also some slow exchanging amides in trefoils 1 and 3. Slow exchangers tend to be near the interface between the beta-barrel and the beta-hairpin triplet portions of this single-domain structure. The pattern of exchange behaviour in hisactophilin is similar to that observed previously in interleukin-1 beta, indicating that exchange properties may be conserved among beta-trefoil proteins. Comparisons of opening and closing rates in hisactophilin with rates obtained for other proteins reveal clear trends for opening rates; however, trends in closing rates are less apparent, perhaps due to inaccuracies in the values used for intrinsic exchange rates in the data fitting. On the basis of the pH and urea dependence of exchange rates and optical measurements of stability and folding, EX2 is the main exchange mechanism in hisactophilin, but there is also evidence for varying levels of EX1 exchange at low and high pH and high urea concentrations. Equilibrium intermediates in which subglobal portions of structure are cooperatively disrupted are not apparent from analysis of the urea dependence of exchange rates. There is, however, a strong correlation between

  14. Kinetics of rate-dependent shortening of action potential duration in guinea-pig ventricle; effects of IK1 and IKr blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, B A; Dickenson, D R; Beatch, G N

    1999-03-01

    1. The kinetics of shortening of action potential duration (APD) following an increase in pacing rate, from 2 to 3.3 Hz, was characterized in guinea-pig ventricular preparations. Terikalant (RP62719), an inhibitor of the inwardly rectifying K+ current (IK1), and dofetilide, a specific inhibitor of the rapidly activating delayed-rectifier current (IKr), were applied to determine the effect of inhibition of these ion currents on slow APD shortening. 2. Action potentials were recorded from isolated guinea-pig ventricular myocytes using the perforated-patch patch-clamp technique, and monophasic action potentials were recorded from Langendorff-perfused guinea-pig ventricles using a contact epicardial probe. 3. Under control conditions, after an increase in pacing rate, APD immediately decreased, and then shortened slowly with an exponential time course. In ventricular myocytes, the time constant of this exponential shortening was 28+/-4 s and the amount of slow shortening was 21.9+/-0.9 ms (n=8) for an increase in rate from 2 to 3.3 Hz. Similar values were observed in Langendorff-perfused ventricles. 4. Terikalant dose-dependently increased APD and the increase was enhanced by rapid pacing ('positive' rate-dependence). The drug dose-dependently decreased the time constant of shortening and amount of slow APD shortening. In contrast, dofetilide, an inhibitor of IKr, which shows 'reverse' rate-dependent APD widening, had no significant effect on the time constant or amount of slow shortening. 5. These observations suggest that IK1 plays a role in rate-dependent shortening of APD. The results appear to support the hypothesis that 'reverse' rate-dependent effects of IKr blockers are due to these drugs not affecting the ion current(s) mediating intrinsic rate-dependent slow shortening of APD.

  15. Comparison of the effects of xylazine bolus versus medetomidine constant rate infusion on cardiopulmonary function and depth of anesthesia in horses anesthetized with isoflurane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creighton, Catherine M; Lemke, Kip A; Lamont, Leigh A; Horney, Barbara S; Riley, Christopher B

    2012-04-15

    To compare the effects of xylazine bolus versus medetomidine constant rate infusion (MCRI) on cardiopulmonary function and depth of anesthesia in dorsally recumbent, spontaneously breathing, isoflurane-anesthetized horses. Prospective, randomized crossover study. 10 healthy adult Standardbreds. Horses were premedicated with xylazine or medetomidine IV. Anesthesia was induced with diazepam and ketamine and maintained with isoflurane for 150 minutes. For the xylazine treatment, end-tidal isoflurane concentration was maintained at 1.7%, and xylazine (0.2 mg/kg [0.09 mg/lb], IV) was administered as a bolus at the end of anesthesia. For the MCRI treatment, end-tidal isoflurane concentration was maintained at 1.4%, and medetomidine (0.005 mg/kg/h [0.0023 mg/lb/h], IV) was infused throughout anesthesia. Physiologic data (ie, heart rate, respiratory rate, rectal temperature, bispectral index, and electromyographic values) were compared between treatments with xylazine bolus versus MCRI. Heart rate was lower, but mean arterial blood pressure was higher from 20 to 40 minutes with MCRI treatment, compared with conventional treatment with xylazine. Respiratory rate and rectal temperature were greater with MCRI treatment. Bispectral index was lower with MCRI treatment from 80 to 150 minutes, and electromyographic values were lower with MCRI treatment from 30 to 150 minutes. In isoflurane-anesthetized horses, premedication with medetomidine followed by administration of medetomidine as a constant rate infusion resulted in decreased heart rate, higher arterial blood pressure from 20 through 40 minutes after induction of anesthesia, and better preserved body temperature, compared with conventional treatment with xylazine. Greater depth of anesthesia and muscle relaxation were seen with MCRI treatment, despite the lower isoflurane concentration.

  16. 38 CFR 3.10 - Dependency and indemnity compensation rate for a surviving spouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... compensation rate for a surviving spouse. 3.10 Section 3.10 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... General § 3.10 Dependency and indemnity compensation rate for a surviving spouse. (a) General determination of rate. When VA grants a surviving spouse entitlement to DIC, VA will determine the rate of...

  17. Evidence for speed-dependent effects in NH3 self-broadened spectra: towards a new determination of the Boltzmann constant

    CERN Document Server

    Triki, Meriam; Darquié, Benoît; Sow, Papa Lat Tabara; Roncin, Vincent; Chardonnet, Christian; Daussy, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present an accurate analysis of the shape of an isolated rovibrational ammonia line from the strong nu2 band around 10 $\\mu$m, recorded by laser absorption spectroscopy. Experimental spectra obtained under controlled temperature and pressure, are confronted to various models that take into account Dicke narrowing or speed-dependent effects. Our results show clear evidence for speed-dependent broadening and shifting, which had never been demonstrated so far in NH3. Accurate lineshape parameters of the nu2 saQ(6,3) line are obtained. Our current project aiming at measuring the Boltzmann constant, kB, by laser spectroscopy will straight away benefit from such knowledge. We anticipate that a first optical determination of kB with a competitive uncertainty of a few ppm is now reachable.

  18. Policy Decisions for a Price Dependent Demand Rate Inventory Model with Progressive Payments Scheme

    OpenAIRE

    Rajat Kumar; Mukesh Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Problem statement: In this proposed research, we developed an inventory model to formulate an optimal ordering policies for supplier who offers progressive permissible delay periods to the retailer to settle his/her account. We assumed that the annual demand rate as a decreasing function of price with constant rate of deterioration and time-varying holding cost. Shortages in inventory are allowed which is completely backlogged. Approach: The main objective of this study to frame an inventory ...

  19. Flight Test Techniques for Quantifying Pitch Rate and Angle of Attack Rate Dependencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauer, Jared A.; Morelli, Eugene A.; Murri, Daniel G.

    2017-01-01

    Three different types of maneuvers were designed to separately quantify pitch rate and angle of attack rate contributions to the nondimensional aerodynamic pitching moment coefficient. These maneuvers combined pilot inputs and automatic multisine excitations, and were own with the subscale T-2 and Bat-4 airplanes using the NASA AirSTAR flight test facility. Stability and control derivatives, in particular C(sub mq) and C(sub m alpha(.)) were accurately estimated from the flight test data. These maneuvers can be performed with many types of aircraft, and the results can be used to increase simulation prediction fidelity and facilitate more accurate comparisons with wind tunnel experiments or numerical investigations.

  20. Evaluation of a balloon constant rate infusion system for treatment of septic arthritis, septic tenosynovitis, and contaminated synovial wounds: 23 cases (2002-2005).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meagher, Daniel T; Latimer, Federico G; Sutter, W Wes; Saville, William J A

    2006-06-15

    OBJECTIVE-To determine clinical findings and outcome in horses treated by means of a balloon constant rate infusion system. DESIGN-Retrospective case series. ANIMALS-23 horses. PROCEDURES-Medical records of horses examined at The Ohio State University veterinary teaching hospital from 2002 to 2005 that had septic arthritis, septic tenosynovitis, or penetration of a synovial structure and in which treatment involved a balloon constant rate infusion system were searched. Information pertaining to signalment, history, physical examination findings, clinicopathologic data, treatment, and duration of hospitalization was recorded. RESULTS-Mean+/- SD duration of hospitalization was 11.5+/-5.26 days. No correlation between duration of clinical signs and duration of hospitalization or duration of infusion pump use was detected, but correlations between WBC count and duration of hospitalization and WBC and duration of infusion-pump use were observed. All horses survived to discharge. Follow-up information was obtained on 17 horses, 16 of which were alive at the time of follow-up. Twelve of 13 horses for which followup information was available for at least 5 months were alive 5 months or longer after discharge. Thirteen of the 16 horses alive at follow-up were reported by owners as not lame, whereas the remaining 3 were mildly lame or intermittently moderately lame or had developed angular limb deformity in the contralateral limb. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE-Balloon constant rate infusion systems may be used effectively in treatment of septic arthritis, septic tenosynovitis, and contaminated synovial wounds. Clinical response and long-term outcome appeared to be comparable to results obtained with other techniques.