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Sample records for dependent kinases cdks

  1. The regulation of SIRT2 function by cyclin-dependent kinases affects cell motility.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pandithage, R.; Lilischkis, R.; Harting, K.; Wolf, A.; Jedamzik, B.; Luscher-Firzlaff, J.; Vervoorts, J.; Lasonder, E.; Kremmer, E.; Knoll, B.; Luscher, B.

    2008-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) fulfill key functions in many cellular processes, including cell cycle progression and cytoskeletal dynamics. A limited number of Cdk substrates have been identified with few demonstrated to be regulated by Cdk-dependent phosphorylation. We identify on protein express

  2. Cyclin-dependent kinase 9 activity regulates neutrophil spontaneous apoptosis.

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    Keqing Wang

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocyte and play a central role in the immune defense against rapidly dividing bacteria. However, they are also the shortest lived cell in the blood with a lifespan in the circulation of 5.4 days. The mechanisms underlying their short lifespan and spontaneous entry into apoptosis are poorly understood. Recently, the broad range cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK inhibitor R-roscovitine was shown to increase neutrophil apoptosis, implicating CDKs in the regulation of neutrophil lifespan. To determine which CDKs were involved in regulating neutrophil lifespan we first examined CDK expression in human neutrophils and found that only three CDKs: CDK5, CDK7 and CDK9 were expressed in these cells. The use of CDK inhibitors with differing selectivity towards the various CDKs suggested that CDK9 activity regulates neutrophil lifespan. Furthermore CDK9 activity and the expression of its activating partner cyclin T1 both declined as neutrophils aged and entered apoptosis spontaneously. CDK9 is a component of the P-TEFb complex involved in transcriptional regulation and its inhibition will preferentially affect proteins with short half-lives. Treatment of neutrophils with flavopiridol, a potent CDK9 inhibitor, increased apoptosis and caused a rapid decline in the level of the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1, whilst Bcl2A was unaffected. We propose that CDK9 activity is a key regulator of neutrophil lifespan, preventing apoptosis by maintaining levels of short lived anti-apoptotic proteins such as Mcl-1. Furthermore, as inappropriate inhibition of neutrophil apoptosis contributes to chronic inflammatory diseases such as Rheumatoid Arthritis, CDK9 represents a novel therapeutic target in such diseases.

  3. A plant-specific cyclin-dependent kinase is involved in the control of G2/M progression in plants.

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    Porceddu, A; Stals, H; Reichheld, J P; Segers, G; De Veylder, L; Barroco, R P; Casteels, P; Van Montagu, M; Inzé, D; Mironov, V

    2001-09-28

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) control the key transitions in the eukaryotic cell cycle. All the CDKs known to control G(2)/M progression in yeast and animals are distinguished by the characteristic PSTAIRE motif in their cyclin-binding domain and are closely related. Higher plants contain in addition a number of more divergent non-PSTAIRE CDKs with still obscure functions. We show that a plant-specific type of non-PSTAIRE CDKs is involved in the control of the G(2)/M progression. In synchronized tobacco BY-2 cells, the corresponding protein, accumulated in a cell cycle-regulated fashion, peaking at the G(2)/M transition. The associated histone H1 kinase activity reached a maximum in mitosis and required a yet unidentified subunit to be fully active. Down-regulation of the associated kinase activity in transgenic tobacco plants using a dominant-negative mutation delayed G(2)/M transition. These results provide the first evidence that non-PSTAIRE CDKs are involved in the control of the G(2)/M progression in plants.

  4. Cyclin-dependent kinases in C. elegans

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    Boxem Mike

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cell division is an inherent part of organismal development, and defects in this process can lead to developmental abnormalities as well as cancerous growth. In past decades, much of the basic cell-cycle machinery has been identified, and a major challenge in coming years will be to understand the complex interplay between cell division and multicellular development. Inevitably, this requires the use of more complex multicellular model systems. The small nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is an excellent model system to study the regulation of cell division in a multicellular organism, and is poised to make important contributions to this field. The past decade has already seen a surge in cell-cycle research in C. elegans, yielding information on the function of many basic cell-cycle regulators, and making inroads into the developmental control of cell division. This review focuses on the in vivo roles of cyclin-dependent kinases in C. elegans, and highlights novel findings implicating CDKs in coupling development to cell-cycle progression.

  5. Several human cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, structurally related to roscovitine, are new anti-malarial agents.

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    Houzé, Sandrine; Hoang, Nha-Thu; Lozach, Olivier; Le Bras, Jacques; Meijer, Laurent; Galons, Hervé; Demange, Luc

    2014-09-23

    In Africa, malaria kills one child each minute. It is also responsible for about one million deaths worldwide each year. Plasmodium falciparum, is the protozoan responsible for the most lethal form of the disease, with resistance developing against the available anti-malarial drugs. Among newly proposed anti-malaria targets, are the P. falciparum cyclin-dependent kinases (PfCDKs). There are involved in different stages of the protozoan growth and development but share high sequence homology with human cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). We previously reported the synthesis of CDKs inhibitors that are structurally-related to (R)-roscovitine, a 2,6,9-trisubstituted purine, and they showed activity against neuronal diseases and cancers. In this report, we describe the synthesis and the characterization of new CDK inhibitors, active in reducing the in vitro growth of P. falciparum (3D7 and 7G8 strains). Six compounds are more potent inhibitors than roscovitine, and three exhibited IC50 values close to 1 µM for both 3D7 and 7G8 strains. Although, such molecules do inhibit P. falciparum growth, they require further studies to improve their selectivity for PfCDKs.

  6. Several Human Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors, Structurally Related to Roscovitine, As New Anti-Malarial Agents

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    Sandrine Houzé

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In Africa, malaria kills one child each minute. It is also responsible for about one million deaths worldwide each year. Plasmodium falciparum, is the protozoan responsible for the most lethal form of the disease, with resistance developing against the available anti-malarial drugs. Among newly proposed anti-malaria targets, are the P. falciparum cyclin-dependent kinases (PfCDKs. There are involved in different stages of the protozoan growth and development but share high sequence homology with human cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs. We previously reported the synthesis of CDKs inhibitors that are structurally-related to (R-roscovitine, a 2,6,9-trisubstituted purine, and they showed activity against neuronal diseases and cancers. In this report, we describe the synthesis and the characterization of new CDK inhibitors, active in reducing the in vitro growth of P. falciparum (3D7 and 7G8 strains. Six compounds are more potent inhibitors than roscovitine, and three exhibited IC50 values close to 1 µM for both 3D7 and 7G8 strains. Although, such molecules do inhibit P. falciparum growth, they require further studies to improve their selectivity for PfCDKs.

  7. Responses of CDKs and p53 in Delayed Ischemic Neuronal Death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王伏虎

    2002-01-01

    Stroke is a debilitating disease that affects millions each year. While in many cases cerebral ischemic injury can be limited by effective resuscitation or throrrdoolytic treatment, the injured neurons wirher in a process known as delayed neuronal death ( DND ). Mounting evidence indicates that DND is not simply necrosis played out in slow motion but apoptosis istriggered. Of particular interest are two qroups of signal proteins that participate in apoptosis-cyelin dependent kinases (CDKs) and p53-among a myriad of signaling events after an ischemic insult. Recent investigations have shown that CDKs, a family of enzymes initially known for their role in cell cycle regulation, are activated in injured neurons in DND. As for p53, new reports suggest that its up-regulation may represent a failed attempt to rescne injured neurons, although its up-regulation was previously considered an indication of apoptosis. These observations thus rekindle an old quest to identify new neuroprotective targets to minimize the stroke damage. In this review, the authzor will examine the evidence that indicates the participation of CDKs and p53 in DND and then introduce pre-clinical data to explore CDK inhibition as a potential neuroprotective target. Finally, using CDK inhibition as an example, this paper will discuss the pertinent criteria for a viable neuroprotective strategy for ischemic injury.

  8. Cyclin-dependent kinases regulate apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells.

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    Bhattacharya, Sujoy; Ray, Ramesh M; Johnson, Leonard R

    2014-03-01

    Homeostasis of the gastrointestinal epithelium is dependent upon a balance between cell proliferation and apoptosis. Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) are well known for their role in cell proliferation. Previous studies from our group have shown that polyamine-depletion of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) decreases cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) activity, increases p53 and p21Cip1 protein levels, induces G1 arrest, and protects cells from camptothecin (CPT)-induced apoptosis. Although emerging evidence suggests that members of the Cdk family are involved in the regulation of apoptosis, their roles directing apoptosis of IEC-6 cells are not known. In this study, we report that inhibition of Cdk1, 2, and 9 (with the broad range Cdk inhibitor, AZD5438) in proliferating IEC-6 cells triggered DNA damage, activated p53 signaling, inhibited proliferation, and induced apoptosis. By contrast, inhibition of Cdk2 (with NU6140) increased p53 protein and activity, inhibited proliferation, but had no effect on apoptosis. Notably, AZD5438 sensitized, whereas, NU6140 rescued proliferating IEC-6 cells from CPT-induced apoptosis. However, in colon carcinoma (Caco-2) cells with mutant p53, treatment with either AZD5438 or NU6140 blocked proliferation, albeit more robustly with AZD5438. Both Cdk inhibitors induced apoptosis in Caco-2 cells in a p53-independent manner. In serum starved quiescent IEC-6 cells, both AZD5438 and NU6140 decreased TNF-α/CPT-induced activation of p53 and, consequently, rescued cells from apoptosis, indicating that sustained Cdk activity is required for apoptosis of quiescent cells. Furthermore, AZD5438 partially reversed the protective effect of polyamine depletion whereas NU6140 had no effect. Together, these results demonstrate that Cdks possess opposing roles in the control of apoptosis in quiescent and proliferating cells. In addition, Cdk inhibitors uncouple proliferation from apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner.

  9. The inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases and GSK-3β enhance osteoclastogenesis

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    Yosuke Akiba

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Osteoclasts are multinucleated cells with bone resorption activity that is crucial for bone remodeling. RANK‐RANKL (receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand signaling has been shown as a main signal pathway for osteoclast differentiation. However, the molecular mechanism and the factors regulating osteoclastogenesis remain to be fully understood. In this study, we performed a chemical genetic screen, and identified a Cdks/GSK-3β (cyclin-dependent kinases/glycogen synthase kinase 3β inhibitor, kenpaullone, and two Cdks inhibitors, olomoucine and roscovitine, all of which significantly enhance osteoclastogenesis of RAW264.7 cells by upregulating NFATc1 (nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic 1 levels. We also determined that the all three compounds increase the number of osteoclast differentiated from murine bone marrow cells. Furthermore, the three inhibitors, especially kenpaullone, promoted maturation of cathepsin K, suggesting that the resorption activity of the resultant osteoclasts is also activated. Our findings indicate that inhibition of GSK-3β and/or Cdks enhance osteoclastogenesis by modulating the RANK–RANKL signaling pathway.

  10. Identification and structural-functional analysis of cyclin-dependent kinases of the cattle tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus.

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    Helga Gomes

    Full Text Available Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs are a family of serine/threonine kinases essential for cell cycle progression. Herein, we describe the participation of CDKs in the physiology of Rhipicephalus microplus, the southern cattle tick and an important disease vector. Firstly, amino acid sequences homologous with CDKs of other organisms were identified from a R. microplus transcriptome database in silico. The analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences of CDK1 and CDK10 from R. microplus showed that both have caspase-3/7 cleavage motifs despite their differences in motif position and length of encoded proteins. CDK1 has two motifs (DKRGD and SAKDA located opposite to the ATP binding site while CDK10 has only one motif (SLLDN for caspase 3-7 near the ATP binding site. Roscovitine (Rosco, a purine derivative that inhibits CDK/cyclin complexes by binding to the catalytic domain of the CDK molecule at the ATP binding site, which prevents the transfer of ATP's γphosphoryl group to the substrate. To determine the effect of Rosco on tick CDKs, BME26 cells derived from R. microplus embryo cells were utilized in vitro inhibition assays. Cell viability decreased in the Rosco-treated groups after 24 hours of incubation in a concentration-dependent manner and this was observed up to 48 hours following incubation. To our knowledge, this is the first report on characterization of a cell cycle protein in arachnids, and the sensitivity of BME26 tick cell line to Rosco treatment suggests that CDKs are potential targets for novel drug design to control tick infestation.

  11. Identification and Structural-Functional Analysis of Cyclin-Dependent Kinases of the Cattle Tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus

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    Gomes, Helga; Romeiro, Nelilma C.; Braz, Gloria R. C.; de Oliveira, Eduardo Alves Gamosa; Rodrigues, Camilla; da Fonseca, Rodrigo Nunes; Githaka, Naftaly; Isezaki, Masayoshi; Konnai, Satoru; Ohashi, Kazuhiko; da Silva Vaz, Itabajara; Logullo, Carlos; Moraes, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are a family of serine/threonine kinases essential for cell cycle progression. Herein, we describe the participation of CDKs in the physiology of Rhipicephalus microplus, the southern cattle tick and an important disease vector. Firstly, amino acid sequences homologous with CDKs of other organisms were identified from a R. microplus transcriptome database in silico. The analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences of CDK1 and CDK10 from R. microplus showed that both have caspase-3/7 cleavage motifs despite their differences in motif position and length of encoded proteins. CDK1 has two motifs (DKRGD and SAKDA) located opposite to the ATP binding site while CDK10 has only one motif (SLLDN) for caspase 3–7 near the ATP binding site. Roscovitine (Rosco), a purine derivative that inhibits CDK/cyclin complexes by binding to the catalytic domain of the CDK molecule at the ATP binding site, which prevents the transfer of ATP's γphosphoryl group to the substrate. To determine the effect of Rosco on tick CDKs, BME26 cells derived from R. microplus embryo cells were utilized in vitro inhibition assays. Cell viability decreased in the Rosco-treated groups after 24 hours of incubation in a concentration-dependent manner and this was observed up to 48 hours following incubation. To our knowledge, this is the first report on characterization of a cell cycle protein in arachnids, and the sensitivity of BME26 tick cell line to Rosco treatment suggests that CDKs are potential targets for novel drug design to control tick infestation. PMID:24146826

  12. Molecular basis of differential selectivity of cyclobutyl-substituted imidazole inhibitors against CDKs: insights for rational drug design.

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    Soumya Lipsa Rath

    Full Text Available Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs belong to the CMGC subfamily of protein kinases and play crucial roles in eukaryotic cell division cycle. At least seven different CDKs have been reported to be implicated in the cell cycle regulation in vertebrates. These CDKs are highly homologous and contain a conserved catalytic core. This makes the design of inhibitors specific for a particular CDK difficult. There is, however, growing need for CDK5 specific inhibitors to treat various neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, cis-substituted cyclobutyl-4-aminoimidazole inhibitors have been identified as potent CDK5 inhibitors that gave up to 30-fold selectivity over CDK2. Available IC50 values also indicate a higher potency of this class of inhibitors over commercially available drugs, such as roscovitine. To understand the molecular basis of higher potency and selectivity of these inhibitors, here, we present molecular dynamics simulation results of CDK5/p25 and CDK2/CyclinE complexed with a series of cyclobutyl-substituted imidazole inhibitors and roscovitine. The atomic details of the stereospecificity and selectivity of these inhibitors are obtained from energetics and binding characteristics to the CDK binding pocket. The study not only complements the experimental findings, but also provides a wealth of detailed information that could help the structure-based drug designing processes.

  13. Correlation between Cyclin Dependent Kinases and Artemisinin-Induced Dormancy in Plasmodium falciparum In Vitro.

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    Karen-Ann Gray

    Full Text Available Artemisinin-induced dormancy provides a plausible explanation for recrudescence following artemisinin monotherapy. This phenomenon shares similarities with cell cycle arrest where cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs and cyclins play an important role.Transcription profiles of Plasmodium falciparum CDKs and cyclins before and after dihydroartemisinin (DHA treatment in three parasite lines, and the effect of CDK inhibitors on parasite recovery from DHA-induced dormancy were investigated.After DHA treatment, parasites enter a dormancy phase followed by a recovery phase. During the dormancy phase parasites up-regulate pfcrk1, pfcrk4, pfcyc2 and pfcyc4, and down-regulate pfmrk, pfpk5, pfpk6, pfcrk3, pfcyc1 and pfcyc3. When entering the recovery phase parasites immediately up-regulate all CDK and cyclin genes. Three CDK inhibitors, olomoucine, WR636638 and roscovitine, produced distinct effects on different phases of DHA-induced dormancy, blocking parasites recovery.The up-regulation of PfCRK1 and PfCRK4, and down regulation of other CDKs and cyclins correlate with parasite survival in the dormant state. Changes in CDK expression are likely to negatively regulate parasite progression from G1 to S phase. These findings provide new insights into the mechanism of artemisinin-induced dormancy and cell cycle regulation of P. falciparum, opening new opportunities for preventing recrudescence following artemisinin treatment.

  14. Controlling DNA-end resection: a new task for CDKs

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    Lorenza P Ferretti

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs are repaired by two major pathways: homologous recombination (HR and nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ. The choice between HR and NHEJ is highly regulated during the cell cycle. DNA-end resection, an evolutionarily conserved process that generates long stretches of single-stranded DNA, plays a critical role in pathway choice, as it commits cells to HR, while, at the same time, suppressing NHEJ. As erroneous DSB repair is a major source of genomic instability-driven tumorigenesis, DNA-end resection factors, and in particular their regulation by post-translational modifications, have become the subject of extensive research over the past few years. Recent work has implicated phosphorylation at S/T-P motifs by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs as a major regulatory mechanism of DSB repair. Intriguingly, CDK activity was found to be critically important for the coordinated and timely execution of DNA-end resection, and key players in this process were subsequently identified as CDK substrates. In this minireview, we provide an overview of the current understanding of how the DNA-end resection machinery in yeast and human cells is controlled by CDK-mediated phosphorylation.

  15. Targeting CDKs with Roscovitine Increases Sensitivity to DNA Damaging Drugs of Human Osteosarcoma Cells.

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    Vella, Serena; Tavanti, Elisa; Hattinger, Claudia Maria; Fanelli, Marilù; Versteeg, Rogier; Koster, Jan; Picci, Piero; Serra, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) has been reported to be essential for cell proliferation in several human tumours and it has been suggested as an appropriate target to be considered in order to enhance the efficacy of treatment regimens based on the use of DNA damaging drugs. We evaluated the clinical impact of CDK2 overexpression on a series of 21 high-grade osteosarcoma (OS) samples profiled by using cDNA microarrays. We also assessed the in vitro efficacy of the CDKs inhibitor roscovitine in a panel of drug-sensitive and drug-resistant human OS cell lines. OS tumour samples showed an inherent overexpression of CDK2, and high expression levels at diagnosis of this kinase appeared to negatively impact on clinical outcome. CDK2 expression also proved to be relevant for in vitro OS cells growth. These findings indicated CDK2 as a promising candidate therapeutic marker for OS and therefore we assessed the efficacy of the CDKs-inhibitor roscovitine in both drug-sensitive and -resistant OS cell lines. All cell lines resulted to be responsive to roscovitine, which was also able to increase the activity of cisplatin and doxorubicin, the two most active DNA damaging drugs used in OS chemotherapy. Our results indicated that combined treatment with conventional OS chemotherapeutic drugs and roscovitine may represent a new candidate intervention approach, which may be considered to enhance tumour cell sensitivity to DNA damaging drugs.

  16. Crystal structure of a human cyclin-dependent kinase 6 complexwith a flavonol inhibitor, Fisetin

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    Lu, Heshu; Chang, Debbie J.; Baratte, Blandine; Meijer, Laurent; Schulze-Gahmen, Ursula

    2005-01-10

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) play a central role in cell cycle control, apoptosis, transcription and neuronal functions. They are important targets for the design of drugs with anti-mitotic and/or anti-neurodegenerative effects. CDK4 and CDK6 form a subfamily among the CDKs in mammalian cells, as defined by sequence similarities. Compared to CDK2 and CDK5, structural information on CDK4 and CDK6 is sparse. We describe here the crystal structure of human CDK6 in complex with a viral cyclin and a flavonol inhibitor, fisetin. Fisetin binds to the active form of CDK6, forming hydrogen bonds with the side chains of residues in the binding pocket that undergo large conformational changes during CDK activation by cyclin binding. The 4-keto group and the 3-hydroxyl group of fisetin are hydrogen bonded with the backbone in the hinge region between the N-terminal and C-terminal kinase domain, as has been observed for many CDK inhibitors. However, CDK2 and HCK kinase in complex with other flavone inhibitors such as quercetin and flavopiridol showed a different binding mode with the inhibitor rotated by about 180. The structural information of the CDK6-fisetin complex is correlated with the binding affinities of different flavone inhibitors for CDK6. This complex structure is the first description of an inhibitor complex with a kinase from the CDK4/6 subfamily and can provide a basis for selecting and designing inhibitor compounds with higher affinity and specificity.

  17. Cyclin-dependent kinase-activating kinases CDKD;1 and CDKD;3 are essential for preserving mitotic activity in Arabidopsis thaliana.

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    Takatsuka, Hirotomo; Umeda-Hara, Chikage; Umeda, Masaaki

    2015-06-01

    For the full activation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), not only cyclin binding but also CDK phosphorylation is required. This activating phosphorylation is mediated by CDK-activating kinases (CAKs). Arabidopsis has four genes showing similarity to vertebrate-type CAKs, three CDKDs (CDKD;1-CDKD;3) and one CDKF (CDKF;1). We previously found that the cdkf;1 mutant is defective in post-embryonic development, even though the kinase activities of core CDKs remain unchanged relative to the wild type. This raised a question about the involvement of CDKDs in CDK activation in planta. Here we report that the cdkd;1 cdkd;3 double mutant showed gametophytic lethality. Most cdkd;1-1 cdkd;3-1 pollen grains were defective in pollen mitosis I and II, producing one-cell or two-cell pollen grains that lacked fertilization ability. We also found that the double knock-out of CDKD;1 and CDKD;3 caused arrest and/or delay in the progression of female gametogenesis at multiple steps. Our genetic analyses revealed that the functions of CDKF;1 and CDKD;1 or CDKD;3 do not overlap, either during gametophyte and embryo development or in post-embryonic development. Consistent with these analyses, CDKF;1 expression in the cdkd;1-1 cdkd;3-1 mutant could not rescue the gametophytic lethality. These results suggest that, in Arabidopsis, CDKD;1 and CDKD;3 function as CAKs controlling mitosis, whereas CDKF;1 plays a distinct role, mainly in post-embryonic development. We propose that CDKD;1 and CDKD;3 phosphorylate and activate all core CDKs, CDKA, CDKB1 and CDKB2, thereby governing cell cycle progression throughout plant development.

  18. A role for cyclin-dependent kinase(s) in the modulation of fast anterograde axonal transport: effects defined by olomoucine and the APC tumor suppressor protein

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    Ratner, N.; Bloom, G. S.; Brady, S. T.

    1998-01-01

    Proteins that interact with both cytoskeletal and membrane components are candidates to modulate membrane trafficking. The tumor suppressor proteins neurofibromin (NF1) and adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) both bind to microtubules and interact with membrane-associated proteins. The effects of recombinant NF1 and APC fragments on vesicle motility were evaluated by measuring fast axonal transport along microtubules in axoplasm from squid giant axons. APC4 (amino acids 1034-2844) reduced only anterograde movements, whereas APC2 (aa 1034-2130) or APC3 (aa 2130-2844) reduced both anterograde and retrograde transport. NF1 had no effect on organelle movement in either direction. Because APC contains multiple cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) consensus phosphorylation motifs, the kinase inhibitor olomoucine was examined. At concentrations in which olomoucine is specific for cyclin-dependent kinases (5 microM), it reduced only anterograde transport, whereas anterograde and retrograde movement were both affected at concentrations at which other kinases are inhibited as well (50 microM). Both anterograde and retrograde transport also were inhibited by histone H1 and KSPXK peptides, substrates for proline-directed kinases, including CDKs. Our data suggest that CDK-like axonal kinases modulate fast anterograde transport and that other axonal kinases may be involved in modulating retrograde transport. The specific effect of APC4 on anterograde transport suggests a model in which the binding of APC to microtubules may limit the activity of axonal CDK kinase or kinases in restricted domains, thereby affecting organelle transport.

  19. Structural basis of divergent cyclin-dependent kinase activation by Spy1/RINGO proteins

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    McGrath, Denise A.; Fifield, Bre-Anne; Marceau, Aimee H.; Tripathi, Sarvind; Porter, Lisa A.; Rubin, Seth M. (UCSC); (Windsor)

    2017-06-30

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) are principal drivers of cell division and are an important therapeutic target to inhibit aberrant proliferation. Cdk enzymatic activity is tightly controlled through cyclin interactions, posttranslational modifications, and binding of inhibitors such as the p27 tumor suppressor protein. Spy1/RINGO (Spy1) proteins bind and activate Cdk but are resistant to canonical regulatory mechanisms that establish cell-cycle checkpoints. Cancer cells exploit Spy1 to stimulate proliferation through inappropriate activation of Cdks, yet the mechanism is unknown. We have determined crystal structures of the Cdk2-Spy1 and p27-Cdk2-Spy1 complexes that reveal how Spy1 activates Cdk. We find that Spy1 confers structural changes to Cdk2 that obviate the requirement of Cdk activation loop phosphorylation. Spy1 lacks the cyclin-binding site that mediates p27 and substrate affinity, explaining why Cdk-Spy1 is poorly inhibited by p27 and lacks specificity for substrates with cyclin-docking sites. We identify mutations in Spy1 that ablate its ability to activate Cdk2 and to proliferate cells. Our structural description of Spy1 provides important mechanistic insights that may be utilized for targeting upregulated Spy1 in cancer.

  20. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors in yeast, animals, and plants: a functional comparison.

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    De Clercq, Annelies; Inzé, Dirk

    2006-01-01

    The cell cycle is remarkably conserved in yeast, animals, and plants and is controlled by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). CDK activity can be inhibited by binding of CDK inhibitory proteins, designated CKIs. Numerous studies show that CKIs are essential in orchestrating eukaryotic cell proliferation and differentiation. In yeast, animals, and plants, CKIs act as regulators of the G1 checkpoint in response to environmental and developmental cues and assist during mitotic cell cycles by inhibiting CDK activity required to arrest mitosis. Furthermore, CKIs play an important role in regulating cell cycle exit that precedes differentiation and in promoting differentiation in cooperation with transcription factors. Moreover, CKIs are essential to control CDK activity in endocycling cells. So, in yeast, animals, and plants, CKIs share many functional similarities, but their functions are adapted toward the specific needs of the eukaryote.

  1. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor P1446A Induces Apoptosis in a JNK/p38 MAPK-Dependent Manner in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia B-Cells.

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    Cody Paiva

    Full Text Available CDK (cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors have shown remarkable activity in CLL, where its efficacy has been linked to inhibition of the transcriptional CDKs (7 and 9 and deregulation of RNA polymerase and short-lived pro-survival proteins such as MCL1. Furthermore, ER (endoplasmic reticulum stress has been implicated in CDK inhibition in CLL. Here we conducted a pre-clinical study of a novel orally active kinase inhibitor P1446A in CLL B-cells. P1446A inhibited CDKs at nanomolar concentrations and induced rapid apoptosis of CLL cells in vitro, irrespective of chromosomal abnormalities or IGHV mutational status. Apoptosis preceded inactivation of RNA polymerase, and was accompanied by phosphorylation of stress kinases JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase. Pharmacologic inhibitors of JNK/p38 MAPK conferred protection from P1446A-mediated apoptosis. Treatment with P1446A led to a dramatic induction of NOXA in a JNK-dependent manner, and sensitized CLL cells to ABT-737, a BH3-mimetic. We observed concurrent activation of apoptosis stress-inducing kinase 1 (ASK1 and its interaction with inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1 and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2 in CLL cells treated with P1446A, providing insights into upstream regulation of JNK in this setting. Consistent with previous reports on limited functionality of ER stress mechanism in CLL cells, treatment with P1446A failed to induce an extensive unfolded protein response. This study provides rationale for additional investigations of P1446A in CLL.

  2. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor P1446A Induces Apoptosis in a JNK/p38 MAPK-Dependent Manner in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia B-Cells.

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    Paiva, Cody; Godbersen, J Claire; Soderquist, Ryan S; Rowland, Taylor; Kilmarx, Sumner; Spurgeon, Stephen E; Brown, Jennifer R; Srinivasa, Sreesha P; Danilov, Alexey V

    2015-01-01

    CDK (cyclin-dependent kinase) inhibitors have shown remarkable activity in CLL, where its efficacy has been linked to inhibition of the transcriptional CDKs (7 and 9) and deregulation of RNA polymerase and short-lived pro-survival proteins such as MCL1. Furthermore, ER (endoplasmic reticulum) stress has been implicated in CDK inhibition in CLL. Here we conducted a pre-clinical study of a novel orally active kinase inhibitor P1446A in CLL B-cells. P1446A inhibited CDKs at nanomolar concentrations and induced rapid apoptosis of CLL cells in vitro, irrespective of chromosomal abnormalities or IGHV mutational status. Apoptosis preceded inactivation of RNA polymerase, and was accompanied by phosphorylation of stress kinases JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase) and p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase). Pharmacologic inhibitors of JNK/p38 MAPK conferred protection from P1446A-mediated apoptosis. Treatment with P1446A led to a dramatic induction of NOXA in a JNK-dependent manner, and sensitized CLL cells to ABT-737, a BH3-mimetic. We observed concurrent activation of apoptosis stress-inducing kinase 1 (ASK1) and its interaction with inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1) and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2) in CLL cells treated with P1446A, providing insights into upstream regulation of JNK in this setting. Consistent with previous reports on limited functionality of ER stress mechanism in CLL cells, treatment with P1446A failed to induce an extensive unfolded protein response. This study provides rationale for additional investigations of P1446A in CLL.

  3. Cyclin-dependent kinase phosphorylation of RUNX1/AML1 on 3 sites increases transactivation potency and stimulates cell proliferation

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    Zhang, Linsheng; Fried, Florence B.; Guo, Hong

    2008-01-01

    RUNX1/AML1 regulates lineage-specific genes during hematopoiesis and stimulates G1 cell-cycle progression. Within RUNX1, S48, S303, and S424 fit the cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) phosphorylation consensus, (S/T)PX(R/K). Phosphorylation of RUNX1 by cdks on serine 303 was shown to mediate destabilization of RUNX1 in G2/M. We now use an in vitro kinase assay, phosphopeptide-specific antiserum, and the cdk inhibitor roscovitine to demonstrate that S48 and S424 are also phosphorylated by cdk1 or cdk6 in hematopoietic cells. S48 phosphorylation of RUNX1 paralleled total RUNX1 levels during cell-cycle progression, S303 was more effectively phosphorylated in G2/M, and S424 in G1. Single, double, and triple mutation of the cdk sites to the partially phosphomimetic aspartic acid mildly reduced DNA affinity while progressively increasing transactivation of a model reporter. Mutation to alanine increased DNA affinity, suggesting that in other gene or cellular contexts phosphorylation of RUNX1 by cdks may reduce transactivation. The tripleD RUNX1 mutant rescued Ba/F3 cells from inhibition of proliferation by CBFβ-SMMHC more effectively than the tripleA mutant. Together these findings indicate that cdk phosphorylation of RUNX1 potentially couples stem/progenitor proliferation and lineage progression. PMID:18003885

  4. Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 phosphorylates s/t-p sites in the hepadnavirus core protein C-terminal domain and is incorporated into viral capsids.

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    Ludgate, Laurie; Ning, Xiaojun; Nguyen, David H; Adams, Christina; Mentzer, Laura; Hu, Jianming

    2012-11-01

    Phosphorylation of the hepadnavirus core protein C-terminal domain (CTD) is important for viral RNA packaging, reverse transcription, and subcellular localization. Hepadnavirus capsids also package a cellular kinase. The identity of the host kinase that phosphorylates the core CTD or gets packaged remains to be resolved. In particular, both the human hepatitis B virus (HBV) and duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) core CTDs harbor several conserved serine/threonine-proline (S/T-P) sites whose phosphorylation state is known to regulate CTD functions. We report here that the endogenous kinase in the HBV capsids was blocked by chemical inhibitors of the cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), in particular, CDK2 inhibitors. The kinase phosphorylated the HBV CTD at the serine-proline (S-P) sites. Furthermore, we were able to detect CDK2 in purified HBV capsids by immunoblotting. Purified CDK2 phosphorylated the S/T-P sites of the HBV and DHBV CTD in vitro. Inhibitors of CDKs, of CDK2 in particular, decreased both HBV and DHBV CTD phosphorylation in vivo. Moreover, CDK2 inhibitors blocked DHBV CTD phosphorylation, specifically at the S/T-P sites, in a mammalian cell lysate. These results indicate that cellular CDK2 phosphorylates the functionally critical S/T-P sites of the hepadnavirus core CTD and is incorporated into viral capsids.

  5. Kinase Inhibitor Screening Identifies Cyclin-Dependent Kinases and Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 as Potential Modulators of TDP-43 Cytosolic Accumulation during Cell Stress.

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    Diane Moujalled

    Full Text Available Abnormal processing of TAR DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43 has been identified as a major factor in neuronal degeneration during amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS or frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD. It is unclear how changes to TDP-43, including nuclear to cytosolic translocation and subsequent accumulation, are controlled in these diseases. TDP-43 is a member of the heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP RNA binding protein family and is known to associate with cytosolic RNA stress granule proteins in ALS and FTLD. hnRNP trafficking and accumulation is controlled by the action of specific kinases including members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway. However, little is known about how kinase pathways control TDP-43 movement and accumulation. In this study, we used an in vitro model of TDP-43-positve stress granule formation to screen for the effect of kinase inhibitors on TDP-43 accumulation. We found that while a number of kinase inhibitors, particularly of the MAPK pathways modulated both TDP-43 and the global stress granule marker, human antigen R (HuR, multiple inhibitors were more specific to TDP-43 accumulation, including inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3. Close correlation was observed between effects of these inhibitors on TDP-43, hnRNP K and TIAR, but often with different effects on HuR accumulation. This may indicate a potential interaction between TDP-43, hnRNP K and TIAR. CDK inhibitors were also found to reverse pre-formed TDP-43-positive stress granules and both CDK and GSK3 inhibitors abrogated the accumulation of C-terminal TDP-43 (219-414 in transfected cells. Further studies are required to confirm the specific kinases involved and whether their action is through phosphorylation of the TDP-43 binding partner hnRNP K. This knowledge provides a valuable insight into the mechanisms controlling abnormal cytoplasmic TDP-43 accumulation and may herald new

  6. Kinase Inhibitor Screening Identifies Cyclin-Dependent Kinases and Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 as Potential Modulators of TDP-43 Cytosolic Accumulation during Cell Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moujalled, Diane; James, Janine L; Parker, Sarah J; Lidgerwood, Grace E; Duncan, Clare; Meyerowitz, Jodi; Nonaka, Takashi; Hasegawa, Masato; Kanninen, Katja M; Grubman, Alexandra; Liddell, Jeffrey R; Crouch, Peter J; White, Anthony R

    2013-01-01

    Abnormal processing of TAR DNA binding protein 43 (TDP-43) has been identified as a major factor in neuronal degeneration during amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). It is unclear how changes to TDP-43, including nuclear to cytosolic translocation and subsequent accumulation, are controlled in these diseases. TDP-43 is a member of the heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) RNA binding protein family and is known to associate with cytosolic RNA stress granule proteins in ALS and FTLD. hnRNP trafficking and accumulation is controlled by the action of specific kinases including members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. However, little is known about how kinase pathways control TDP-43 movement and accumulation. In this study, we used an in vitro model of TDP-43-positve stress granule formation to screen for the effect of kinase inhibitors on TDP-43 accumulation. We found that while a number of kinase inhibitors, particularly of the MAPK pathways modulated both TDP-43 and the global stress granule marker, human antigen R (HuR), multiple inhibitors were more specific to TDP-43 accumulation, including inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3). Close correlation was observed between effects of these inhibitors on TDP-43, hnRNP K and TIAR, but often with different effects on HuR accumulation. This may indicate a potential interaction between TDP-43, hnRNP K and TIAR. CDK inhibitors were also found to reverse pre-formed TDP-43-positive stress granules and both CDK and GSK3 inhibitors abrogated the accumulation of C-terminal TDP-43 (219-414) in transfected cells. Further studies are required to confirm the specific kinases involved and whether their action is through phosphorylation of the TDP-43 binding partner hnRNP K. This knowledge provides a valuable insight into the mechanisms controlling abnormal cytoplasmic TDP-43 accumulation and may herald new opportunities

  7. Roscovitine blocks leukocyte extravasation by inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases 5 and 9.

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    Berberich, Nina; Uhl, Bernd; Joore, Jos; Schmerwitz, Ulrike K; Mayer, Bettina A; Reichel, Christoph A; Krombach, Fritz; Zahler, Stefan; Vollmar, Angelika M; Fürst, Robert

    2011-07-01

    Roscovitine, a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor that induces tumour cell death, is under evaluation as an anti-cancer drug. By triggering leukocyte apoptosis, roscovitine can also enhance the resolution of inflammation. Beyond death-inducing properties, we tested whether roscovitine affects leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction, a vital step in the onset of inflammation. Leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions were evaluated in venules of mouse cremaster muscle, using intravital microscopy. In primary human endothelial cells, we studied the influence of roscovitine on adhesion molecules and on the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway. A cellular kinome array, in vitro CDK profiling and RNAi methods were used to identify targets of roscovitine. In vivo, roscovitine attenuated the tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-induced leukocyte adherence to and transmigration through, the endothelium. In vitro, roscovitine strongly inhibited TNF-α-evoked expression of endothelial adhesion molecules (E-selectin, intercellular cell adhesion molecule, vascular cell adhesion molecule). Roscovitine blocked NF-κB-dependent gene transcription, but not the NF-κB activation cascade [inhibitor of κB (IκB) kinase activity, IκB-α degradation, p65 translocation]. Using a cellular kinome array and an in vitro CDK panel, we found that roscovitine inhibited protein kinase A, ribosomal S6 kinase and CDKs 2, 5, 7 and 9. Experiments using kinase inhibitors and siRNA showed that the decreased endothelial activation was due solely to blockade of CDK5 and CDK9 by roscovitine. Our study highlights a novel mode of action for roscovitine, preventing endothelial activation and leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction by inhibition of CDK5 and 9. This might expand its usage as a promising anti-inflammatory compound. © 2011 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2011 The British Pharmacological Society.

  8. The Role of Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics in Early Drug Development with reference to the Cyclin-dependent Kinase (Cdk) Inhibitor - Roscovitine.

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    Hassan, Moustapha; Sallam, Hatem; Hassan, Zuzana

    2011-05-01

    Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and pharmacogenetics play an important role in drug discovery and contribute to treatment success. This is an essential issue in cancer treatment due to its high toxicity. During the last decade, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors were recognised as a new class of compounds that was introduced for the treatment of several diseases including cancer. Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) play a key role in the regulation of cell cycle progression and ribonucleic acid transcription. Deregulation of Cdks has been associated with several malignancies, neurodegenerative disorders, viral and protozoa infections, glomerulonephritis and inflammatory diseases. (R)-roscovitine is a synthetic tri-substituted purine that inhibits selectively Cdk1, 2, 5, 7 and 9. Roscovitine has shown promising cytotoxicity in cell lines and tumor xenografts. In this paper, we present several aspects of pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of roscovitine. We present also some of our investigations including bioanalysis, haematotoxicity, age dependent kinetics, PK and effects on Cdks in the brain. Unfavourable kinetic parameters in combination with poor distribution to the bone marrow compartment could explain the absence of myelosuppression in vivo despite the efficacy in vitro. Higher plasma and brain exposure and longer elimination half-life found in rat pups compared to adult rats may indicate that roscovitine can be a potential candidate for the treatment of brain tumours in children. Cdk5 inhibition and Erk1/2 activation that was detected in brain of rat pups may suggest the use of roscovitine in neurodegenerative diseases. Early pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic studies are important issues in drug discovery and may affect further development of promising drug candidates.

  9. Activation of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 Is a Consequence of Cell Death

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    Yixia Ye

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5 is similar to other Cdks but is activated during cell differentiation and cell death rather than cell division. Since activation of Cdk5 has been reported in many situations leading to cell death, we attempted to determine if it was required for any form of cell death. We found that Cdk5 is activated during apoptotic deaths and that the activation can be detected even when the cells continue to secondary necrosis. This activation can occur in the absence of Bim, calpain, or neutral cathepsins. The kinase is typically activated by p25, derived from p35 by calpain-mediated cleavage, but inhibition of calpain does not affect cell death or the activation of Cdk5. Likewise, RNAi-forced suppression of the synthesis of Cdk5 does not affect the incidence or kinetics of cell death. We conclude that Cdk5 is activated as a consequence of metabolic changes that are common to many forms of cell death. Thus its activation suggests processes during cell death that will be interesting or important to understand, but activation of Cdk5 is not necessary for cells to die.

  10. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor roscovitine inhibits kinase activity, cell proliferation, multicellular development, and Cdk5 nuclear translocation in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Robert J; O'Day, Danton H

    2012-03-01

    Roscovitine, a cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor, inhibited kinase activity and the axenic growth of Dictyostelium discoideum at micromolar concentrations. Growth was almost fully rescued in 50 µM and ≈ 50% rescued in 100 µM roscovitine-treated cultures by the over-expression of Cdk5-GFP. This supports the importance of Cdk5 function during cell proliferation in Dictyostelium and indicates that Cdk5 is a primary target of the drug. Roscovitine did not affect the expression of Cdk5 protein during axenic growth but did inhibit its nuclear translocation. This novel result suggests that the effects of roscovitine could be due in part to altering Cdk5 translocation in other systems as well. Kinase activity was inhibited by roscovitine in assays using AX3 whole cell lysates, but not in assays using lysates from Cdk5-GFP over-expressing cells. At higher concentrations, roscovitine impaired slug and fruiting body formation. Fruiting bodies that did form were small and produced relatively fewer spores many of which were round. However, roscovitine did not affect stalk cell differentiation. Together with previous findings, these data reveal that roscovitine inhibits Cdk5 during growth and as yet undefined Cdks during mid-late development. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. The expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p15, p16, p21, and p27 during ovarian follicle growth initiation in the mouse

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    Bayrak Aykut

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyclins regulate the cell cycle in association with cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs. CDKs are under inhibitory control of cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKIs. Method In this study we tested the expression of CDKIs p15, p16, p21 and p27 by immunohistochemistry to determine the role of CDKIs in the initiation of primordial follicle growth. Ovaries were collected from 60-day-old cycling B6D2F1/J mice (n = 16. Results Expression of p15, p16, p21 and p27 did not vary in granulosa and theca cells by the follicle stage. However, p16 staining was stronger (++ in the oocytes of all primordial, and 57.4 ± 3.1% of primary follicles compared to the remaining primary and more advanced follicles (+. Interestingly, primary follicles with weaker (+ oocyte staining for p16 had significantly larger mean follicle diameter compared to the primary and primordial follicles with stronger (++ oocyte staining (55.6 ± 2.1 vs. 32.0 ± 1.0 and 26.5 ± 0.7 μm, respectively, p Conclusions These preliminary findings suggest that the initiation of oocyte growth, which seems to lead follicle growth, is associated with diminished p16 expression in the mouse ovary. Further studies are needed to investigate the factors that regulate the expression of p16 in the oocyte, which might also govern the initiation of primordial follicle growth.

  12. Bimodal lipid substrate dependence of phosphatidylinositol kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, B R

    1990-07-24

    Phosphatidylinositol (PI) kinase activity was solubilized from rat liver microsomes and partially purified by chromatography on hydroxyapatite and Reactive Green 19-Superose. Examination of the ATP dependence using a mixed micellar assay gave a Km of 120 microM. The dependence of reaction rate on PI was more complicated. PI kinase bound a large amount of Triton X-100, and as expected for a micelle-associated enzyme utilizing a micelle-associated lipid substrate, the reaction rate was dependent on the micellar mole fraction, PI/(PI + Triton X-100), with a Km of 0.02 (unitless). Activity showed an additional dependence on bulk PI concentration at high micelle dilution. These results demonstrated two kinetically distinguishable steps leading to formation of a productive PI/enzyme(/ATP) complex. The rate of the first step, which probably represents exchange of PI from the bulk micellar pool into enzyme-containing micelles, depends on bulk PI concentration. The rate of the second step, association of PI with enzyme within a single micelle, depends on the micellar mole fraction of PI. Depression of the apparent Vmax at low ionic strength suggested that electrostatic repulsion between negatively charged PI/Triton X-100 mixed micelles inhibits PI exchange, consistent with a model in which intermicellar PI exchange depends on micellar collisions.

  13. Mitosis-specific promoter of the alfalfa cyclin-dependent kinase gene (Medsa;CDKB2;1) is activated by wounding and ethylene in a non-cell division-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhiponova, Miroslava K; Pettkó-Szandtner, Aladár; Stelkovics, Eva; Neer, Zsuzsanna; Bottka, Sándor; Krenács, Tibor; Dudits, Dénes; Fehér, Attila; Szilák, László

    2006-02-01

    Cyclin-dependent serine/threonine kinases (CDKs) have pivotal roles in regulating the eukaryotic cell cycle. Plants possess a unique class of CDKs (B-type CDKs) with preferential protein accumulation at G2/M-phases; however, their exact functions are still enigmatic. Here we describe the functional characterization of a 360-bp promoter region of the alfalfa (Medicago sativa) CDKB2;1 gene in transgenic plants and cell lines. It is shown that the activity of the analyzed promoter was characteristic for proliferating meristematic regions in planta and specific for cells in the G2/M-phases in synchronized cell cultures. Immunohistochemical analysis of transgenic root sections further confirmed the correlation of the expression of the CDKB2;1 promoter-linked reporter genes with the accumulation of the correspondent kinase. It was found that, in addition to auxin (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) treatment, wounding could also induce both the reporter and endogenous genes in transgenic leaf explants. Furthermore, ethylene, known as a wound-response mediator, had a similar effect. The gene activation in response to wounding or ethephon was faster and occurred without the induction of cell cycle progression in contrast to the control auxin treatment. In silico analysis of this promoter indeed revealed the presence of a set of cis-elements, indicating not only cell cycle- but wound- and ethylene-dependent regulation of this CDK gene. Based on the presented data, we discuss the functional significance of the complex regulation of mitosis-specific CDK genes in plants.

  14. Inhibition of CDKS by roscovitine suppressed LPS-induced *NO production through inhibiting NFkappaB activation and BH4 biosynthesis in macrophages.

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    Du, Jianhai; Wei, Na; Guan, Tongju; Xu, Hao; An, Jianzhong; Pritchard, Kirkwood A; Shi, Yang

    2009-09-01

    In inflammatory diseases, tissue damage is critically associated with nitric oxide ((*)NO) and cytokines, which are overproduced in response to cellular release of endotoxins. Here we investigated the inhibitory effect of roscovitine, a selective inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) on (*)NO production in mouse macrophages. In RAW264.7 cells, we found that roscovitine abolished the production of (*)NO induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Moreover, roscovitine significantly inhibited LPS-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA and protein expression. Our data also showed that roscovitine attenuated LPS-induced phosphorylation of IkappaB kinase beta (IKKbeta), IkappaB, and p65 but enhanced the phosphorylation of ERK, p38, and c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK). In addition, roscovitine dose dependently inhibited LPS-induced expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX)-2, IL-1beta, and IL-6 but not tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha. Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)), an essential cofactor for iNOS, is easily oxidized to 7,8-dihydrobiopterin (BH(2)). Roscovitine significantly inhibited LPS-induced BH(4) biosynthesis and decreased BH(4)-to-BH(2) ratio. Furthermore, roscovitine greatly reduced the upregulation of GTP cyclohydrolase-1 (GCH-1), the rate-limiting enzyme for BH(4) biosynthesis. Using other CDK inhibitors, we found that CDK1, CDK5, and CDK7, but not CDK2, significantly inhibited LPS-induced (*)NO production in macrophages. Similarly, in isolated peritoneal macrophages, roscovitine strongly inhibited (*)NO production, iNOS, and COX-2 upregulation, activation of NFkappaB, and induction of GCH-1 by LPS. Together, our data indicate that roscovitine abolishes LPS-induced (*)NO production in macrophages by suppressing nuclear factor-kappaB activation and BH(4) biosynthesis, which might be mediated by CDK1, CDK5, and CDK7. Our results also suggest that roscovitine may inhibit inflammation and that CDKs may play important roles in the mechanisms by which

  15. Pyrazolo[4,3-d]pyrimidine bioisostere of roscovitine: evaluation of a novel selective inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases with antiproliferative activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorda, Radek; Havlícek, Libor; McNae, Iain W; Walkinshaw, Malcolm D; Voller, Jirí; Sturc, Antonín; Navrátilová, Jana; Kuzma, Marek; Mistrík, Martin; Bártek, Jirí; Strnad, Miroslav; Krystof, Vladimír

    2011-04-28

    Inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) with small molecules has been suggested as a strategy for treatment of cancer, based on deregulation of CDKs commonly found in many types of human tumors. Here, a new potent CDK2 inhibitor with pyrazolo[4,3-d]pyrimidine scaffold has been synthesized, characterized, and evaluated in cellular and biochemical assays. 7-Benzylamino-5(R)-[2-(hydroxymethyl)propyl]amino-3-isopropyl-1(2)H-pyrazolo[4,3-d]pyrimidine, compound 7, was prepared as a bioisostere of the well-known CDK inhibitor roscovitine. An X-ray crystal structure of compound 7 bound to CDK2 has been determined, revealing a binding mode similar to that of roscovitine. Protein kinase selectivity profile of compound 7 and its biological effects (cell cycle arrest, dephosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein, accumulation of the tumor suppressor protein p53, induction of apoptosis, inhibition of homologous recombination) are consistent with CDK inhibition as a primary mode of action. Importantly, as the anticancer activities of the pyrazolo[4,3-d]pyrimidine 7 exceed those of its bioisostere roscovitine, compound 7 reported here may be preferable for cancer therapy.

  16. CR8, a potent and selective, roscovitine-derived inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettayeb, K; Oumata, N; Echalier, A; Ferandin, Y; Endicott, J A; Galons, H; Meijer, L

    2008-10-02

    Among the ten pharmacological inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) currently in clinical trials, the purine roscovitine (CYC202, Seliciclib) is undergoing phase 2 trials against non-small-cell lung and nasopharyngeal cancers. An extensive medicinal chemistry study, designed to generate more potent analogues of roscovitine, led to the identification of an optimal substitution at the N6 position (compound CR8). An extensive selectivity study (108 kinases) highlights the exquisite selectivity of CR8 for CDK1/2/3/5/7/9. CR8 was 2- to 4-fold more potent than (R)-roscovitine at inhibiting these kinases. Cocrystal structures of (R)-CR8 and (R)-roscovitine with pCDK2/cyclin A showed that both inhibitors adopt essentially identical positions. The cellular effects of CR8 and (R)-roscovitine were investigated in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. CR8 inhibited the phosphorylation of CDK1 and 9 substrates, with a 25-50 times higher potency compared to (R)-roscovitine. CR8 was consistently more potent than (R)-roscovitine at inducing apoptotic cell death parameters: 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium reduction (40-fold), lactate dehydrogenase release (35-fold), caspases activation (68-fold) and poly-(ADP-ribose)polymerase cleavage (50-fold). This improved cell death-inducing activity of CR8 over (R)-roscovitine was observed in 25 different cell lines. Altogether these results show that second-generation analogues of (R)-roscovitine can be designed with improved antitumor potential.

  17. Regulation of a Myb transcription factor by cyclin-dependent kinase 2 in Giardia lamblia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Chao-Cheng; Su, Li-Hsin; Huang, Yu-Chang; Pan, Yu-Jiao; Sun, Chin-Hung

    2012-02-03

    The protozoan Giardia lamblia parasitizes the human small intestine to cause diseases. It undergoes differentiation into infectious cysts by responding to intestinal stimulation. How the activated signal transduction pathways relate to encystation stimulation remain largely unknown. During encystation, genes encoding cyst wall proteins (CWPs) are coordinately up-regulated by a Myb2 transcription factor. Because cell differentiation is linked to cell cycle regulation, we tried to understand the role of cell cycle regulators, cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks), in encystation. We found that the recombinant Myb2 was phosphorylated by Cdk-associated complexes and the levels of phosphorylation increased significantly during encystation. We have identified a putative cdk gene (cdk2) by searching the Giardia genome database. Cdk2 was found to localize in the cytoplasm with higher expression during encystation. Interestingly, overexpression of Cdk2 resulted in a significant increase of the levels of cwp gene expression and cyst formation. In addition, the Cdk2-associated complexes can phosphorylate Myb2 and the levels of phosphorylation increased significantly during encystation. Mutations of important catalytic residues of Cdk2 resulted in a significant decrease of kinase activity and ability of inducing cyst formation. Addition of a Cdk inhibitor, purvalanol A, significantly decreased the Cdk2 kinase activity and the levels of cwp gene expression and cyst formation. Our results suggest that the Cdk2 pathway may be involved in phosphorylation of Myb2, leading to activation of the Myb2 function and up-regulation of cwp genes during encystation. The results provide insights into the use of Cdk inhibitory drugs in disruption of Giardia differentiation into cysts.

  18. Cip/Kip cyclin-dependent protein kinase inhibitors and the road to polyploidy

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    DePamphilis Melvin L

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs play a central role in the orderly transition from one phase of the eukaryotic mitotic cell division cycle to the next. In this context, p27Kip1 (one of the CIP/KIP family of CDK specific inhibitors in mammals or its functional analogue in other eukarya prevents a premature transition from G1 to S-phase. Recent studies have revealed that expression of a second member of this family, p57Kip2, is induced as trophoblast stem (TS cells differentiate into trophoblast giant (TG cells. p57 then inhibits CDK1 activity, an enzyme essential for initiating mitosis, thereby triggering genome endoreduplication (multiple S-phases without an intervening mitosis. Expression of p21Cip1, the third member of this family, is also induced in during differentiation of TS cells into TG cells where it appears to play a role in suppressing the DNA damage response pathway. Given the fact that p21 and p57 are unique to mammals, the question arises as to whether one or both of these proteins are responsible for the induction and maintenance of polyploidy during mammalian development.

  19. Virtual Screening for Potential Allosteric Inhibitors of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 2 from Traditional Chinese Medicine

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    Fang Lu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2, a member of Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs, plays an important role in cell division and DNA replication. It is regarded as a desired target to treat cancer and tumor by interrupting aberrant cell proliferation. Compared to lower subtype selectivity of CDK2 ATP-competitive inhibitors, CDK2 allosteric inhibitor with higher subtype selectivity has been used to treat CDK2-related diseases. Recently, the first crystal structure of CDK2 with allosteric inhibitor has been reported, which provides new opportunities to design pure allosteric inhibitors of CDK2. The binding site of the ATP-competition inhibitors and the allosteric inhibitors are partially overlapped in space position, so the same compound might interact with the two binding sites. Thus a novel screening strategy was essential for the discovery of pure CDK2 allosteric inhibitors. In this study, pharmacophore and molecular docking were used to screen potential CDK2 allosteric inhibitors and ATP-competition inhibitors from Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM. In the docking result of the allosteric site, the compounds which can act with the CDK2 ATP site were discarded, and the remaining compounds were regarded as the potential pure allosteric inhibitors. Among the results, prostaglandin E1 and nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA were available and their growth inhibitory effect on human HepG2 cell lines was determined by MTT assay. The two compounds could substantially inhibit the growth of HepG2 cell lines with an estimated IC50 of 41.223 μmol/L and 45.646 μmol/L. This study provides virtual screening strategy of allosteric compounds and a reliable method to discover potential pure CDK2 allosteric inhibitors from TCM. Prostaglandin E1 and NDGA could be regarded as promising candidates for CDK2 allosteric inhibitors.

  20. Cyclin-dependent kinase activity controls the onset of the HCMV lytic cycle.

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    Martin Zydek

    Full Text Available The onset of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV lytic infection is strictly synchronized with the host cell cycle. Infected G0/G1 cells support viral immediate early (IE gene expression and proceed to the G1/S boundary where they finally arrest. In contrast, S/G2 cells can be infected but effectively block IE gene expression and this inhibition is not relieved until host cells have divided and reentered G1. During latent infection IE gene expression is also inhibited, and for reactivation to occur this block to IE gene expression must be overcome. It is only poorly understood which viral and/or cellular activities maintain the block to cell cycle or latency-associated viral IE gene repression and whether the two mechanisms may be linked. Here, we show that the block to IE gene expression during S and G2 phase can be overcome by both genotoxic stress and chemical inhibitors of cellular DNA replication, pointing to the involvement of checkpoint-dependent signaling pathways in controlling IE gene repression. Checkpoint-dependent rescue of IE expression strictly requires p53 and in the absence of checkpoint activation is mimicked by proteasomal inhibition in a p53 dependent manner. Requirement for the cyclin dependent kinase (CDK inhibitor p21 downstream of p53 suggests a pivotal role for CDKs in controlling IE gene repression in S/G2 and treatment of S/G2 cells with the CDK inhibitor roscovitine alleviates IE repression independently of p53. Importantly, CDK inhibiton also overcomes the block to IE expression during quiescent infection of NTera2 (NT2 cells. Thus, a timely block to CDK activity not only secures phase specificity of the cell cycle dependent HCMV IE gene expression program, but in addition plays a hitherto unrecognized role in preventing the establishment of a latent-like state.

  1. Effects of roscovitine, a cell cyclin [correction of cycling]-dependent kinase inhibitor, on intraocular pressure of rabbit and retinal ganglion cell damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Hiroyoshi; Imamura, Tomoyo; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Yuji; Kurasawa, Takashi; Hirata, Haruhisa; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2013-02-22

    Glaucoma is characterized by increased intraocular pressure (IOP) and the death of retinal ganglion cells. Previously, we reported that roscovitine, a cell cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor, strongly induced relaxation of porcine trabecular meshwork cells, implicating an interaction with lowered IOP. In addition, the activity of CDKs is known to increase in response to high IOP, which is linked to retinal ganglion cell damage. However, the effects of roscovitine on IOP and retinal damage have not been investigated. Roscovitine has racemic isomers that differ in their inhibition of CDKs. Therefore, we investigated the effects of both the R-isomer and the S-isomer on the IOP of rabbits and on the death of cultured retinal ganglion cells. In the in vivo rabbit experiment, instillation of both isomers significantly lowered the IOP. In the in vitro cell experiment, the R-isomer amplified the effects of tunicamycin, an endoplasmic reticulum stress inducer, and increased oxygen-glucose deprivation-induced cell death, whereas S-isomer significantly inhibited this cell death. Therefore, both isomers of roscovitine can lower the IOP, but from the perspective of neuroprotective effects, the S-isomer was superior to the R-isomer. The S-isomer of roscovitine may be useful as an agent for lowering IOP and its neuroprotective effects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor roscovitine induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in rabbit retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pei-Chang; Tai, Ming-Hong; Hu, Dan-Ning; Lai, Chien-Hsiung; Chen, Yi-Hao; Wu, Yi-Chen; Tsai, Chia-Ling; Shin, Shyi-Jang; Kuo, Hsi-Kung

    2008-02-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) play essential roles in the intracellular control of the cell cycle. It has been postulated that roscovitine, a potent CDK2, CDK5, and CDC2 inhibitor, might inhibit cellular proliferation by arresting the cell cycle. This in vitro study investigated the antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of roscovitine in cultured rabbit retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Experiments using rabbit RPE from young pigmented rabbits were carried out using roscovitine dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide at concentrations ranging from 1 to 100 micromol. Cell proliferation was measured by an MTT assay. The cell cycle response of RPE cells to roscovitine was analyzed by flow cytometry of propidium iodide-stained nuclei. Proteins related to DNA damage in the RPE cells were then assayed by Western blot. Roscovitine inhibited proliferation of RPE cells in a dose-dependent manner. Cell cycle analysis after treatment demonstrated an accumulation of cells arrested in the S- and G2/M phases. Flow cytometry showed that 40 microM of roscovitine increased the cell population in the sub-G1 peak, which is considered a marker of cell death by apoptosis. Western blot analysis revealed Bcl-2 decreased and Bax increased after treatment of RPE cells with roscovitine. This study of the response of RPE cells to roscovitine demonstrated a bidirectional relationship between cell cycle control and apoptosis.

  3. Inhibition of CDKS by roscovitine suppressed LPS-induced ·NO production through inhibiting NFκB activation and BH4 biosynthesis in macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Na; Guan, Tongju; Xu, Hao; An, Jianzhong; Pritchard, Kirkwood A.

    2009-01-01

    In inflammatory diseases, tissue damage is critically associated with nitric oxide (·NO) and cytokines, which are overproduced in response to cellular release of endotoxins. Here we investigated the inhibitory effect of roscovitine, a selective inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) on ·NO production in mouse macrophages. In RAW264.7 cells, we found that roscovitine abolished the production of ·NO induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Moreover, roscovitine significantly inhibited LPS-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA and protein expression. Our data also showed that roscovitine attenuated LPS-induced phosphorylation of IκB kinase β (IKKβ), IκB, and p65 but enhanced the phosphorylation of ERK, p38, and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK). In addition, roscovitine dose dependently inhibited LPS-induced expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX)-2, IL-1β, and IL-6 but not tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), an essential cofactor for iNOS, is easily oxidized to 7,8-dihydrobiopterin (BH2). Roscovitine significantly inhibited LPS-induced BH4 biosynthesis and decreased BH4-to-BH2 ratio. Furthermore, roscovitine greatly reduced the upregulation of GTP cyclohydrolase-1 (GCH-1), the rate-limiting enzyme for BH4 biosynthesis. Using other CDK inhibitors, we found that CDK1, CDK5, and CDK7, but not CDK2, significantly inhibited LPS-induced ·NO production in macrophages. Similarly, in isolated peritoneal macrophages, roscovitine strongly inhibited ·NO production, iNOS, and COX-2 upregulation, activation of NFκB, and induction of GCH-1 by LPS. Together, our data indicate that roscovitine abolishes LPS-induced ·NO production in macrophages by suppressing nuclear factor-κB activation and BH4 biosynthesis, which might be mediated by CDK1, CDK5, and CDK7. Our results also suggest that roscovitine may inhibit inflammation and that CDKs may play important roles in the mechanisms by which roscovitine attenuates inflammation. PMID:19553566

  4. High throughput screens yield small molecule inhibitors of Leishmania CRK3:CYC6 cyclin-dependent kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roderick G Walker

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leishmania species are parasitic protozoa that have a tightly controlled cell cycle, regulated by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs. Cdc2-related kinase 3 (CRK3, an essential CDK in Leishmania and functional orthologue of human CDK1, can form an active protein kinase complex with Leishmania cyclins CYCA and CYC6. Here we describe the identification and synthesis of specific small molecule inhibitors of bacterially expressed Leishmania CRK3:CYC6 using a high throughput screening assay and iterative chemistry. We also describe the biological activity of the molecules against Leishmania parasites. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to obtain an active Leishmania CRK3:CYC6 protein kinase complex, we developed a co-expression and co-purification system for Leishmania CRK3 and CYC6 proteins. This active enzyme was used in a high throughput screening (HTS platform, utilising an IMAP fluorescence polarisation assay. We carried out two chemical library screens and identified specific inhibitors of CRK3:CYC6 that were inactive against the human cyclin-dependent kinase CDK2:CycA. Subsequently, the best inhibitors were tested against 11 other mammalian protein kinases. Twelve of the most potent hits had an azapurine core with structure activity relationship (SAR analysis identifying the functional groups on the 2 and 9 positions as essential for CRK3:CYC6 inhibition and specificity against CDK2:CycA. Iterative chemistry allowed synthesis of a number of azapurine derivatives with one, compound 17, demonstrating anti-parasitic activity against both promastigote and amastigote forms of L. major. Following the second HTS, 11 compounds with a thiazole core (active towards CRK3:CYC6 and inactive against CDK2:CycA were tested. Ten of these hits demonstrated anti-parasitic activity against promastigote L. major. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The pharmacophores identified from the high throughput screens, and the derivatives synthesised, selectively

  5. Palbociclib can overcome mutations in cyclin dependent kinase 6 that break hydrogen bonds between the drug and the protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez Maganhi, Stella; Jensen, Patrizia; Caracelli, Ignez; Zukerman Schpector, Julio; Fröhling, Stefan; Friedman, Ran

    2017-04-01

    Inhibition of cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) 4 and 6 prevent cells from entering the synthesis phase of the cell cycle. CDK4 and 6 are therefore important drug targets in various cancers. The selective CDK4/6 inhibitor palbociclib is approved for the treatment of breast cancer and has shown activity in a cellular model of mixed lineage leukaemia (MLL)-rearranged acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). We studied the interactions of palbociclib and CDK6 using molecular dynamics simulations. Analysis of the simulations suggested several interactions that stabilized the drug in its binding site and that were not observed in the crystal structure of the protein-drug complex. These included a hydrogen bond to His 100 that was hitherto not reported and several hydrophobic contacts. Evolutionary-based bioinformatic analysis was used to suggest two mutants, D163G and H100L that would potentially yield drug resistance, as they lead to loss of important protein-drug interactions without hindering the viability of the protein. One of the mutants involved a change in the glycine of the well-conserved DFG motif of the kinase. Interestingly, CDK6-dependent human AML cells stably expressing either mutant retained sensitivity to palbociclib, indicating that the protein-drug interactions are not affected by these. Furthermore, the cells were proliferative in the absence of palbociclib, indicating that the Asp to Gly mutation in the DFG motif did not interfere with the catalytic activity of the protein. © 2017 The Authors Protein Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Protein Society.

  6. A current and comprehensive review of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Burak; Sendur, Mehmet A N; Şener Dede, Didem; Akıncı, Muhammed Bülent; Yalçın, Bülent

    2017-09-01

    Resistance to endocrine treatment generally occurs over time, especially in the metastatic stage. In this paper, we aimed to review the mechanisms of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4/6 inhibition and clinical usage of new agents in the light of recent literature updates. A literature search was carried out using PubMed, Medline and ASCO and ESMO annual-meeting abstracts by using the following search keywords; "palbociclib", "abemaciclib", "ribociclib", "cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors" and "CDK 4/6" in metastatic breast cancer (MBC). The last search was on 10 June 2017. CDKs and cyclins are two molecules that have a key role in cell cycle progression. Today, there are three highly selective CDK4/6 inhibitors in clinical development - palbociclib, ribociclib and abemaciclib. Palbociclib and ribociclib were recently approved by the US FDA in combination with letrozole for the treatment of MBC in a first-line setting, as well as palbociclib in combination with fulvestrant for hormone-receptor (HR)-positive MBC that had progressed while on previous endocrine therapy according to the PALOMA-1, MONALEESA-2 and PALOMA-3 trials, respectively. In the recently published randomized phase III MONARCH 2 trial, abemaciclib plus letrozole had longer progression-free survival and higher objective response rates with less serious adverse events in advanced HR-positive breast cancer previously treated with hormonal treatment. CDK4/6 inhibition is a new and promising target for patients with hormone-receptor-positive MBC. Both palbociclib and ribociclib showed significant additive benefit for patients receiving first-line treatment for HR-positive, epidermal growth factor receptor-2-negative advanced breast cancer. Palbociclib and abemaciclib also had significant activity in combination with fulvestrant for patients with MBC that progressed on previous endocrine therapy.

  7. Regulation of the interaction between protein kinase C-related protein kinase 2 (PRK2) and its upstream kinase, 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dettori, Rosalia; Sonzogni, Silvina; Meyer, Lucas;

    2009-01-01

    The members of the AGC kinase family frequently exhibit three conserved phosphorylation sites: the activation loop, the hydrophobic motif (HM), and the zipper (Z)/turn-motif (TM) phosphorylation site. 3-Phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1) phosphorylates the activation loop of numer...

  8. Effects of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor R-roscovitine on eosinophil survival and clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahi, N; Uller, L; Juss, J K; Langton, A J; Cowburn, A S; Gibson, A; Foster, M R; Farrow, S N; Marco-Casanova, P; Sobolewski, A; Condliffe, A M; Chilvers, E R

    2011-05-01

    Eosinophils are pro-inflammatory cells implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma and atopy. Apoptosis has been proposed as a potential mechanism underlying the resolution of eosinophilic inflammation and studies have indicated the ability of interventions that induce human eosinophil apoptosis to promote the resolution of eosinophilic inflammation. Recently, the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor R-roscovitine was shown to enhance neutrophil apoptosis and promote the resolution of neutrophilic inflammation. The purpose of this study was to examine the expression of CDKs in human blood eosinophils, the effects of R-roscovitine on eosinophil survival in vitro and whether R-roscovitine could influence eosinophilic lung inflammation in vivo. Eosinophils were isolated from human peripheral blood and the effects of R-roscovitine on apoptosis, degranulation and phagocytic uptake examined in vitro. The effects of R-roscovitine on eosinophilic lung inflammation in vivo were also assessed using an ovalbumin mouse model. Our data demonstrate that human eosinophils express five known targets for R-roscovitine: CDK1, -2, -5, -7 and -9. R-roscovitine induced eosinophil apoptosis in a time- and concentration-dependent manner but also accelerated transition to secondary necrosis as assessed by microscopy, flow cytometry and caspase activation. In addition, we show that R-roscovitine can override the anti-apoptotic signals of GM-CSF and IL-5. We report that the pro-apoptotic effect of R-roscovitine is associated with suppression of Mcl-1L expression and that this compound enhanced phagocytic clearance of eosinophils by macrophages. Finally, we show that R-roscovitine induces apoptosis in murine peripheral blood and spleen-derived eosinophils; despite this, R-roscovitine did not modulate the tissue and lumen eosinophilia characteristic of the ovalbumin mouse model of airway eosinophilia. These data demonstrate that R-roscovitine is capable of inducing rapid apoptosis and

  9. Protein kinase C-associated kinase can activate NFkappaB in both a kinase-dependent and a kinase-independent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Stewart T; Haider, Khaleda; Ow, Yongkai; Milton, Peter; Chen, Luojing; Pillai, Shiv

    2003-06-13

    Protein kinase C-associated kinase (PKK, also known as RIP4/DIK) activates NFkappaB when overexpressed in cell lines and is required for keratinocyte differentiation in vivo. However, very little is understood about the factors upstream of PKK or how PKK activates NFkappaB. Here we show that certain catalytically inactive mutants of PKK can activate NFkappaB, although to a lesser degree than wild type PKK. The deletion of specific domains of wild type PKK diminishes the ability of this enzyme to activate NFkappaB; the same deletions made on a catalytically inactive PKK background completely ablate NFkappaB activation. PKK may be phosphorylated by two specific mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinases, MEKK2 and MEKK3, and this interaction may in part be mediated through a critical activation loop residue, Thr184. Catalytically inactive PKK mutants that block phorbol ester-induced NFkappaB activation do not interfere with, but unexpectedly enhance, the activation of NFkappaB by these two mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinases. Taken together, these data indicate that PKK may function in both a kinase-dependent as well as a kinase-independent manner to activate NFkappaB.

  10. Nucleoside triphosphate synthesis catalysed by adenylate kinase is ADP dependent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willemoës, Martin; Kilstrup, Mogens

    2005-01-01

    Adenylate kinase (Adk) that catalyses the synthesis of ADP from ATP and AMP has also been shown to perform an ATP dependent phosphorylation of ribo- and deoxynucleoside diphosphates to their corresponding nucleoside triphosphate; ATP+(d)NDPADP+(d)NTP. This reaction, suggested to occur by the tran......Adenylate kinase (Adk) that catalyses the synthesis of ADP from ATP and AMP has also been shown to perform an ATP dependent phosphorylation of ribo- and deoxynucleoside diphosphates to their corresponding nucleoside triphosphate; ATP+(d)NDPADP+(d)NTP. This reaction, suggested to occur...

  11. A novel Toxoplasma gondii calcium-dependent protein kinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzen M.

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that infects all types of cells in humans. A family of calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs, previously identified as important in the development of plants and protists, was recently shown to play a role in the infectivity of apicomplexans, and in motility and host cell invasion in particular. We report here the isolation of a new calcium-dependent protein kinase gene from the human toxoplasmosis parasite, Toxoplasma gondii. The gene consists of 12 exons. The encoded protein, TgCDPK4, consists of the four characteristic domains of members of the CDPK family and is most similar to PfCDPK2 from Plasmodium falciparum. We measured TgCDPK4 activity, induced by calcium influx, using a kinase assay. A calcium chelator (EGTA inhibited this activity. These findings provide evidence of signal transduction involving members of the CDPK family in T. gondii.

  12. Nucleoside triphosphate synthesis catalysed by adenylate kinase is ADP dependent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willemoes, Martin; Kilstrup, M.

    2005-01-01

    Adenylate kinase (Adk) that catalyses the synthesis of ADP from ATP and AMP has also been shown to perform an ATP dependent phosphorylation of ribo- and deoxynucleoside diphosphates to their corresponding nucleoside triphosphate; ATP + (d)NDP ¿ ADP + (d)NTP. This reaction, suggested to occur...

  13. The ability of antigen, but not interleukin-2, to promote n-butyrate-induced T helper 1 cell anergy is associated with increased expression and altered association patterns of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Stephanie K; DeLoose, Annick; Gilbert, Kathleen M

    2002-08-01

    The ability of the cell cycle inhibitor n-butyrate to induce T helper 1 (Th1) cell anergy is dependent upon its ability to block the cell cycle progression of activated Th1 cells in G1. Results reported here show that although both interleukin (IL)-2 and antigen (Ag) push Th1 cells into G1 where they are blocked by n-butyrate, only the Ag-activated Th1 cells demonstrate functional anergy once the n-butyrate has been removed from the culture. Because n-butyrate-induced Th1 cell anergy has been linked to increased expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21Cip1 and p27Kip1, mechanistic experiments focused on the role of these inhibitors. It was found that when Th1 cells were reincubated in Ag-stimulated secondary cultures, the Th1 cells previously exposed to Ag and n-butyrate (anergic Th1 cells) demonstrated a cumulative increase in p21Cip1 and p27Kip1 when compared with Th1 cells previously exposed to recombinant (r)IL-2 and n-butyrate (non-anergic Th1 cells). p27Kip1 in the anergic Th1 cells from the secondary cultures was associated with cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks). In contrast, p21Cip1 in the anergic Th1 cells, although present at high levels, did not associate significantly with cdks, suggesting that p21Cip1 may target some other protein in the anergic Th1 cells. Taken together, these findings suggest that Th1 cell exposure to Ag and n-butyrate, rather than IL-2 and n-butyrate, is needed to induce the cumulative increase in p21Cip1 and p27Kip1 that is associated with the proliferative unresponsiveness in anergic Th1 cells. In addition, p21Cip1 may inhibit proliferation in the anergic Th1 cells by some mechanism other than suppression of cdks that is unique to the induction of Th1 cell anergy.

  14. Estradiol-17beta stimulates proliferation of mouse embryonic stem cells: involvement of MAPKs and CDKs as well as protooncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ho Jae; Heo, Jung Sun; Lee, Yun Jung

    2006-04-01

    Although the importance of estradiol-17beta (E(2)) in many physiological processes has been reported, to date no researchers have investigated the effects of E(2) on embryonic stem (ES) cell proliferation. Therefore, in the present study, we have examined the effect of E(2) on the DNA synthesis of murine ES (ES-E14TG2a) cells and its related signaling pathways. The results of this study show that E(2) (10(-9) M) significantly increased [(3)H]thymidine incorporation at >4 h and that E(2) (>10(-12) M) induced an increase of [(3)H]thymidine incorporation after 8-h incubation. Moreover, E(2) (>10(-12) M) also increased 5'-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and cell number. Indeed, E(2) stimulated estrogen receptor (ER)-alpha and -beta protein levels and increased mRNA expression levels of protooncogenes (c-fos, c-jun, and c-myc). Tamoxifen (antiestrogen) completely inhibited E(2)-induced increases in [(3)H]thymidine incorporation. In addition, estradiol-6-O-carboxymethyl oxime-BSA (E(2)-BSA; 10(-9) M) increased [(3)H]thymidine incorporation at >1 h, and E(2)-BSA (>10(-12) M) increased [(3)H]thymidine incorporation after 1-h incubation. E(2)-BSA-induced increase in BrdU incorporation also occurred in a dose-dependent manner. Tamoxifen had no effect on E(2)-BSA-induced increase of [(3)H]thymidine incorporation. Also, E(2) and E(2)-BSA displayed maximal phosphorylation of p44/42 MAPKs at 10 and 5 min, respectively. E(2) increased cyclins D1 and E as well as cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)2 and CDK4. In contrast, E(2) decreased the levels of p21(cip1) and p27(kip1) (CDK-inhibitory proteins). Increases of these cell cycle regulators were blocked by 10(-5) M PD-98059 (MEK inhibitor). Moreover, E(2)-induced increase of [(3)H]thymidine incorporation was inhibited by PD-98059 or butyrolactone I (CDK2 inhibitor). In conclusion, estradiol-17beta stimulates the proliferation of murine ES cells, and this action is mediated by MAPKs, CDKs, or protooncogenes.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations on the inhibition of Cyclin-Dependent Kinases 2 and 5 in the presence of activators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bing; Tan, Vincent B. C.; Lim, Kian Meng; Tay, Tong Earn

    2006-06-01

    Interests in CDK2 and CDK5 have stemmed mainly from their association with cancer and neuronal migration or differentiation related diseases and the need to design selective inhibitors for these kinases. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have not only become a viable approach to drug design because of advances in computer technology but are increasingly an integral part of drug discovery processes. It is common in MD simulations of inhibitor/CDK complexes to exclude the activator of the CDKs in the structural models to keep computational time tractable. In this paper, we present simulation results of CDK2 and CDK5 with roscovitine using models with and without their activators (cyclinA and p25). While p25 was found to induce slight changes in CDK5, the calculations support that cyclinA leads to significant conformational changes near the active site of CDK2. This suggests that detailed and structure-based inhibitor design targeted at these CDKs should employ activator-included models of the kinases. Comparisons between P/CDK2/cyclinA/roscovitine and CDK5/p25/roscovitine complexes reveal differences in the conformations of the glutamine around the active sites, which may be exploited to find highly selective inhibitors with respect to CDK2 and CDK5.

  16. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase regulates crosstalk between Trk A tyrosine kinase and p75(NTR)-dependent sphingolipid signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilderback, T R; Gazula, V R; Dobrowsky, R T

    2001-03-01

    The mechanism of crosstalk between signaling pathways coupled to the Trk A and p75(NTR) neurotrophin receptors in PC12 cells was examined. In response to nerve growth factor (NGF), Trk A activation inhibited p75(NTR)-dependent sphingomyelin (SM) hydrolysis. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) inhibitor, LY294002, reversed this inhibition suggesting that Trk A activation of PI 3-kinase is necessary to inhibit sphingolipid signaling by p75(NTR). In contrast, SM hydrolysis induced by neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), which did not activate PI-3 kinase, was uneffected by LY294002. However, transient expression of a constituitively active PI 3-kinase inhibited p75(NTR)-dependent SM hydrolysis by both NGF and NT-3. Intriguingly, NGF induced an association of activated PI 3-kinase with acid sphingomyelinase (SMase). This interaction localized to caveolae-related domains and correlated with a 50% decrease in immunoprecipitated acid SMase activity. NGF-stimulated PI 3-kinase activity was necessary for inhibition of acid SMase but was not required for ligand-induced association of the p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase with the phospholipase. Finally, this interaction was specific for NGF since EGF did not induce an association of PI 3-kinase with acid SMase. In summary, our data suggest that PI 3-kinase regulates the inhibitory crosstalk between Trk A tyrosine kinase and p75(NTR)-dependent sphingolipid signaling pathways and that this interaction localizes to caveolae-related domains.

  17. Cyclin-dependent kinases 7 and 9 specifically regulate neutrophil transcription and their inhibition drives apoptosis to promote resolution of inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitch, A E; Lucas, C D; Marwick, J A; Duffin, R; Haslett, C; Rossi, A G

    2012-01-01

    Terminally differentiated neutrophils are short-lived but the key effector cells of the innate immune response, and have a prominent role in the pathogenesis and propagation of many inflammatory diseases. Delayed apoptosis, which is responsible for their extended longevity, is critically dependent on a balance of intracellular survival versus pro-apoptotic proteins. Here, we elucidate the mechanism by which the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor drugs such as R-roscovitine and DRB (5,6-dichloro-1-beta-𝒟-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole) mediate neutrophil apoptosis. We demonstrate (by a combination of microarray, confocal microscopy, apoptosis assays and western blotting) that the phosphorylation of RNA polymerase II by CDKs 7 and 9 is inhibited by R-roscovitine and that specific effects on neutrophil transcriptional capacity are responsible for neutrophil apoptosis. Finally, we show that specific CDK7 and 9 inhibition with DRB drives resolution of neutrophil-dominant inflammation. Thus, we highlight a novel mechanism that controls both primary human neutrophil transcription and apoptosis that could be targeted by selective CDK inhibitor drugs to resolve established inflammation. PMID:22743999

  18. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase CRK9, Required for Spliced Leader trans Splicing of Pre-mRNA in Trypanosomes, Functions in a Complex with a New L-Type Cyclin and a Kinetoplastid-Specific Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badjatia, Nitika; Park, Sung Hee; Ambrósio, Daniela L; Kirkham, Justin K; Günzl, Arthur

    2016-03-01

    In eukaryotes, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) control the cell cycle and critical steps in gene expression. The lethal parasite Trypanosoma brucei, member of the phylogenetic order Kinetoplastida, possesses eleven CDKs which, due to high sequence divergence, were generically termed CDC2-related kinases (CRKs). While several CRKs have been implied in the cell cycle, CRK9 was the first trypanosome CDK shown to control the unusual mode of gene expression found in kinetoplastids. In these organisms, protein-coding genes are arranged in tandem arrays which are transcribed polycistronically. Individual mRNAs are processed from precursor RNA by spliced leader (SL) trans splicing and polyadenylation. CRK9 ablation was lethal in cultured trypanosomes, causing a block of trans splicing before the first transesterification step. Additionally, CRK9 silencing led to dephosphorylation of RNA polymerase II and to hypomethylation of the SL cap structure. Here, we tandem affinity-purified CRK9 and, among potential CRK9 substrates and modifying enzymes, discovered an unusual tripartite complex comprising CRK9, a new L-type cyclin (CYC12) and a protein, termed CRK9-associated protein (CRK9AP), that is only conserved among kinetoplastids. Silencing of either CYC12 or CRK9AP reproduced the effects of depleting CRK9, identifying these proteins as functional partners of CRK9 in vivo. While mammalian cyclin L binds to CDK11, the CRK9 complex deviates substantially from that of CDK11, requiring CRK9AP for efficient CRK9 complex formation and autophosphorylation in vitro. Interference with this unusual CDK rescued mice from lethal trypanosome infections, validating CRK9 as a potential chemotherapeutic target.

  19. Activation of cGMP-dependent protein kinase by protein kinase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yali; Lascola, Judith; Dulin, Nickolai O; Ye, Richard D; Browning, Darren D

    2003-05-09

    The cGMP-dependent protein kinases (PKG) are emerging as important components of mainstream signal transduction pathways. Nitric oxide-induced cGMP formation by stimulation of soluble guanylate cyclase is generally accepted as being the most widespread mechanism underlying PKG activation. In the present study, PKG was found to be a target for phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-responsive protein kinase C (PKC). PKG1alpha became phosphorylated in HEK-293 cells stimulated with PMA and also in vitro using purified components. PKC-dependent phosphorylation was found to activate PKG as measured by phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, and by in vitro kinase assays. Although there are 11 potential PKC substrate recognition sites in PKG1alpha, threonine 58 was examined due to its proximity to the pseudosubstrate domain. Antibodies generated against the phosphorylated form of this region were used to demonstrate phosphorylation in response to PMA treatment of the cells with kinetics similar to vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein phosphorylation. A phospho-mimetic mutation at this site (T58E) generated a partially activated PKG that was more sensitive to cGMP levels. A phospho-null mutation (T58A) revealed that this residue is important but not sufficient for PKG activation by PKC. Taken together, these findings outline a novel signal transduction pathway that links PKC stimulation with cyclic nucleotide-independent activation of PKG.

  20. STO-609, a specific inhibitor of the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokumitsu, Hiroshi; Inuzuka, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Yumi; Ikeda, Masahiko; Saji, Ikutaro; Kobayashi, Ryoji

    2002-05-03

    STO-609, a selective inhibitor of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase (CaM-KK) was synthesized, and its inhibitory properties were investigated both in vitro and in vivo. STO-609 inhibits the activities of recombinant CaM-KK alpha and CaM-KK beta isoforms, with K(i) values of 80 and 15 ng/ml, respectively, and also inhibits their autophosphorylation activities. Comparison of the inhibitory potency of the compound against various protein kinases revealed that STO-609 is highly selective for CaM-KK without any significant effect on the downstream CaM kinases (CaM-KI and -IV), and the IC(50) value of the compound against CaM-KII is approximately 10 microg/ml. STO-609 inhibits constitutively active CaM-KK alpha (glutathione S-transferase (GST)-CaM-KK-(84-434)) as well as the wild-type enzyme. Kinetic analysis indicates that the compound is a competitive inhibitor of ATP. In transfected HeLa cells, STO-609 suppresses the Ca(2+)-induced activation of CaM-KIV in a dose-dependent manner. In agreement with this observation, the inhibitor significantly reduces the endogenous activity of CaM-KK in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells at a concentration of 1 microg/ml (approximately 80% inhibitory rate). Taken together, these results indicate that STO-609 is a selective and cell-permeable inhibitor of CaM-KK and that it may be a useful tool for evaluating the physiological significance of the CaM-KK-mediated pathway in vivo as well as in vitro.

  1. Transforming growth factor-β1 induces cell cycle arrest by activating atypical cyclin-dependent kinase 5 through up-regulation of Smad3-dependent p35 expression in human MCF10A mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seong Ji; Yang, Sun Woo; Kim, Byung-Chul

    2016-04-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) play important roles in control of cell division. Cdk5 is an atypical member of Cdk family with non-cyclin-like regulatory subunit, p35, but its role in cell cycle progression is still unclear. In the present study, we investigated the role of Cdk5/p35 on transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-induced cell cycle arrest. In human MCF10A mammary epithelial cells, TGF-β1 induced cell cycle arrest at G1 phase and increased p27KIP1 expression. Interestingly, pretreatment with roscovitine, an inhibitor of Cdk5, or transfection with small interfering (si) RNAs specific to Cdk5 and p35 significantly attenuated the TGF-β1-induced p27KIP1 expression and cell cycle arrest. TGF-β1 increased Cdk5 activity via up-regulation of p35 gene at transcriptional level, and these effects were abolished by transfection with Smad3 siRNA or infection of adenovirus carrying Smad3 mutant at the C-tail (3SA). Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay further revealed that wild type Smad3, but not mutant Smad3 (3SA), binds to the region of the p35 promoter region (-1000--755) in a TGF-β1-dependent manner. These results for the first time demonstrate a role of Cdk5/p35 in the regulation of cell cycle progression modulated by TGF-β1.

  2. Presenilin dependence of phospholipase C and protein kinase C signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dehvari, Nodi; Cedazo-Minguez, Angel; Isacsson, Ola

    2007-01-01

    -stimulated phospholipase C (PLC) activity which was gamma-secretase dependent. To further evaluate the dependence of PLC on PSs we measured PLC activity and the activation of variant protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking either PS1, PS2, or both. PLC activity and PKCalpha...... and PKCgamma activations were significantly lower in PS1 and PS2 double knockout MEFs after PLC stimulation. Protein levels of PKCalpha and PKCgamma were lower in PS1 and PS2 double knockout MEFs. In contrast, PKCdelta levels were significantly elevated in PS1 and PS2 double knockout as well as in PS1 knockout......). These results show that PLC and PKC activations are modulated by PS and also that PSs differentially regulate the expression of PKC isoforms by both APP/AICD-dependent and independent mechanisms....

  3. A Cyclin Dependent Kinase Regulatory Subunit (CKS) Gene of Pigeonpea Imparts Abiotic Stress Tolerance and Regulates Plant Growth and Development in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamirisa, Srinath; Vudem, Dashavantha R; Khareedu, Venkateswara R

    2017-01-01

    Frequent climatic changes in conjunction with other extreme environmental factors are known to affect growth, development and productivity of diverse crop plants. Pigeonpea, a major grain legume of the semiarid tropics, endowed with an excellent deep-root system, is known as one of the important drought tolerant crop plants. Cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) are core cell cycle regulators and play important role in different aspects of plant growth and development. The cyclin-dependent kinase regulatory subunit gene (CKS) was isolated from the cDNA library of pigeonpea plants subjected to drought stress. Pigeonpea CKS (CcCKS) gene expression was detected in both the root and leaf tissues of pigeonpea and was upregulated by polyethylene glycol (PEG), mannitol, NaCl and abscisic acid (ABA) treatments. The overexpression of CcCKS gene in Arabidopsis significantly enhanced tolerance of transgenics to drought and salt stresses as evidenced by different physiological parameters. Under stress conditions, transgenics showed higher biomass, decreased rate of water loss, decreased MDA levels, higher free proline contents, and glutathione levels. Moreover, under stress conditions transgenics exhibited lower stomatal conductance, lower transpiration, and higher photosynthetic rates. However, under normal conditions, CcCKS-transgenics displayed decreased plant growth rate, increased cell size and decreased stomatal number compared to those of wild-type plants. Real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed that CcCKS could regulate the expression of both ABA-dependent and ABA-independent genes associated with abiotic stress tolerance as well as plant growth and development. As such, the CcCKS seems promising and might serve as a potential candidate gene for enhancing the abiotic stress tolerance of crop plants.

  4. AML1/RUNX1 Phosphorylation by Cyclin-Dependent Kinases Regulates the Degradation of AML1/RUNX1 by the Anaphase-Promoting Complex‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, Joseph R.; Peterson, Luke F.; Zhang, Youhong; Kraft, Andrew S.; Zhang, Dong-Er

    2006-01-01

    AML1 (RUNX1) regulates hematopoiesis, angiogenesis, muscle function, and neurogenesis. Previous studies have shown that phosphorylation of AML1, particularly at serines 276 and 303, affects its transcriptional activation. Here, we report that phosphorylation of AML1 serines 276 and 303 can be blocked in vivo by inhibitors of the cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) Cdk1 and Cdk2. Furthermore, these residues can be phosphorylated in vitro by purified Cdk1/cyclin B and Cdk2/cyclin A. Mutant AML1 protein which cannot be phosphorylated at these sites (AML1-4A) is more stable than wild-type AML1. AML-4A is resistant to degradation mediated by Cdc20, one of the substrate-targeting subunits of the anaphase-promoting complex (APC). However, Cdh1, another targeting subunit used by the APC, can mediate the degradation of AML1-4A. A phospho-mimic protein, AML1-4D, can be targeted by Cdc20 or Cdh1. These observations suggest that both Cdc20 and Cdh1 can target AML1 for degradation by the APC but that AML1 phosphorylation may affect degradation mediated by Cdc20-APC to a greater degree. PMID:17015473

  5. Radioiodination of cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor Olomoucine loaded Fe rate at Au nanoparticle and evaluation of the therapeutic efficacy on cancerous cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takan, Gokhan; Guldu, Ozge Kozgus; Medine, Emin Ilker [Ege Univ., Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Nuclear Applications

    2017-06-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles have promising biomedical applications such as drug delivery, novel therapeutics and diagnostic imaging. Magnetic drug delivery combination works on the delivery of magnetic nanoparticles loaded with drug to the target tissue by means of an external magnetic field. Gold coated iron oxide (Fe rate at Au) nanoparticles can provide useful surface chemistry and biological reactivity. Covalent conjugation to the Fe rate at Au nanoparticles through cleavable linkages can be used to deliver drugs to tumor cells, then the drug can be released by an external. In this paper, purine based cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) inhibitor Olomoucine (Olo) [2-(Hydroxyethylamino)-6-benzylamino-9-methylpurine] was loaded on gold coated iron oxide (Fe rate at Au) nanoparticles and radiolabeled with {sup 131}I to combine magnetic targeted drug delivery and radiotherapy. Fe rate at Au nanoparticles were synthesized by microemulsion method. The characterization of nanoparticles was examined by TEM, VSM and XRD. Amine activation was utilized by cysteamine hydrochloride and then CDI was used for conjugation of Olomoucine. Antiproliferative effect and cytotoxicity of Olomoucine loaded Fe rate at Au nanoparticles (Fe rate at Au-Olo) were investigated on MCF7 and A549 cell lines. Proliferation rate was decreased while uptake of Fe rate at Au-Olo on both cell lines was high in comparison with Olomoucine. Also, enhanced incorporation ratio was observed under external magnetic field.

  6. Bruton Tyrosine Kinase-Dependent Immune Cell Cross-talk Drives Pancreas Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gunderson, Andrew J; Kaneda, Megan M; Tsujikawa, Takahiro; Nguyen, Abraham V; Affara, Nesrine I; Ruffell, Brian; Gorjestani, Sara; Liudahl, Shannon M; Truitt, Morgan; Olson, Peter; Kim, Grace; Hanahan, Douglas; Tempero, Margaret A; Sheppard, Brett; Irving, Bryan; Chang, Betty Y; Varner, Judith A; Coussens, Lisa M

    2016-01-01

    .... Here, we report that targeting Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK), a key B-cell and macrophage kinase, restores T cell-dependent antitumor immune responses, thereby inhibiting PDAC growth and improving responsiveness to standard-of-care chemotherapy...

  7. Calcium calmodulin dependent kinase kinase 2 - a novel therapeutic target for gastric adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Syed, Nazia; Barbhuiya, Mustafa A; Raja, Remya; Marimuthu, Arivusudar; Sahasrabuddhe, Nandini; Pinto, Sneha M; Manda, Srikanth Srinivas; Renuse, Santosh; Manju, HC; Zameer, Mohammed Abdul Lateef; Sharma, Jyoti; Brait, Mariana; Srikumar, Kotteazeth; Roa, Juan Carlos; Vijaya Kumar, M; Kumar, KV Veerendra; Prasad, TS Keshava; Ramaswamy, Girija; Kumar, Rekha Vijay; Pandey, Akhilesh; Gowda, Harsha; Chatterjee, Aditi

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common gastrointestinal malignancies and is associated with poor prognosis. Exploring alterations in the proteomic landscape of gastric cancer is likely to provide potential biomarkers for early detection and molecules for targeted therapeutic intervention. Using iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis, we identified 22 proteins that were overexpressed and 17 proteins that were downregulated in gastric tumor tissues as compared to the adjacent normal tissue. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase 2 (CAMKK2) was found to be 7-fold overexpressed in gastric tumor tissues. Immunohistochemical labeling of tumor tissue microarrays for validation of CAMKK2 overexpression revealed that it was indeed overexpressed in 94% (92 of 98) of gastric cancer cases. Silencing of CAMKK2 using siRNA significantly reduced cell proliferation, colony formation and invasion of gastric cancer cells. Our results demonstrate that CAMKK2 signals in gastric cancer through AMPK activation and suggest that CAMKK2 could be a novel therapeutic target in gastric cancer. PMID:25756516

  8. Tumor suppressor protein C53 antagonizes checkpoint kinases to promote cyclin-dependent kinase 1 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hai; Wu, Jianchun; He, Chen; Yang, Wending; Li, Honglin

    2009-04-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1)/cyclin B1 complex is the driving force for mitotic entry, and its activation is tightly regulated by the G2/M checkpoint. We originally reported that a novel protein C53 (also known as Cdk5rap3 and LZAP) potentiates DNA damage-induced cell death by modulating the G2/M checkpoint. More recently, Wang et al. (2007) found that C53/LZAP may function as a tumor suppressor by way of inhibiting NF-kappaB signaling. We report here the identification of C53 protein as a novel regulator of Cdk1 activation. We found that knockdown of C53 protein causes delayed Cdk1 activation and mitotic entry. During DNA damage response, activation of checkpoint kinase 1 and 2 (Chk1 and Chk2) is partially inhibited by C53 overexpression. Intriguingly, we found that C53 interacts with Chk1 and antagonizes its function. Moreover, a portion of C53 protein is localized at the centrosome, and centrosome-targeting C53 potently promotes local Cdk1 activation. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that C53 is a novel negative regulator of checkpoint response. By counteracting Chk1, C53 promotes Cdk1 activation and mitotic entry in both unperturbed cell-cycle progression and DNA damage response.

  9. Tumor suppressor protein C53 antagonizes checkpoint kinases to promote cyclin-dependent kinase 1 activation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai Jiang; Jianchun Wu; Chen He; Wending Yang; Honglin Li

    2009-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1)/cyclin B1 complex is the driving force for mitotic entry, and its activation is tightly regulated by the G2/M checkpoint. We originally reported that a novel protein C53 (also known as Cdk5rap3 and LZAP) potentiates DNA damage-induced cell death by modulating the G2/M checkpoint. More recently, Wang et al. (2007) found that C53/LZAP may function as a tumor suppressor by way of inhibiting NF-kB signaling. We report here the identification of C53 protein as a novel regulator of Cdk1 activation. We found that knockdown of C53 protein causes delayed Cdkl activation and mitotic entry. During DNA damage response, activation of checkpoint kinase 1 and 2 (Chk1 and Chk2) is partially inhibited by C53 overexpression. Intriguingly, we found that C53 interacts with Chkl and antagonizes its function. Moreover, a portion of C53 protein is localized at the centrosome, and centrosome-targeting C53 potently promotes local Cdk1 activation. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that C53 is a novel negative regulator of checkpoint response. By counteracting Chk1, C53 promotes Cdk1 activation and mitotic entry in both unperturbed cell-cycle progression and DNA damage response.

  10. EGFR kinase-dependent and kinase-independent roles in clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossu-Rocca, Paolo; Muroni, Maria R; Sanges, Francesca; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Asunis, Anna; Tanca, Luciana; Onnis, Daniela; Pira, Giovanna; Manca, Alessandra; Dore, Simone; Uras, Maria G; Ena, Sara; De Miglio, Maria R

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is associated with progression of many epithelial malignancies and represents a significant therapeutic target. Although clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) has been widely investigated for EGFR molecular alterations, genetic evidences of EGFR gene activating mutations and/or gene amplification have been rarely confirmed in the literature. Therefore, until now EGFR-targeted therapies in clinical trials have been demonstrated unsuccessful. New evidence has been given about the interactions between EGFR and the sodium glucose co-transporter-1 (SGLT1) in maintaining the glucose basal intracellular level to favour cancer cell growth and survival; thus a new functional role may be attributed to EGFR, regardless of its kinase activity. To define the role of EGFR in CCRCC an extensive investigation of genetic changes and functional kinase activities was performed in a series of tumors by analyzing the EGFR mutational status and expression profile, together with the protein expression of downstream signaling pathways members. Furthermore, we investigated the co-expression of EGFR and SGLT1 proteins and their relationships with clinic-pathological features in CCRCC. EGFR protein expression was identified in 98.4% of CCRCC. Furthermore, it was described for the first time that SGLT1 is overexpressed in CCRCC (80.9%), and that co-expression with EGFR is appreciable in 79.4% of the tumours. Moreover, the activation of downstream EGFR pathways was found in about 79.4% of SGLT1-positive CCRCCs. The mutational status analysis of EGFR failed to demonstrate mutations on exons 18 to 24 and the presence of EGFR-variantIII (EGFRvIII) in all CCRCCs analyzed. FISH analysis revealed absence of EGFR amplification, and high polysomy of chromosome 7. Finally, the EGFR gene expression profile showed gene overexpression in 38.2% of CCRCCs. Our study contributes to define the complexity of EGFR role in CCRCC, identifying its bivalent kinase-dependent

  11. Cyclin-dependent kinase-mediated phosphorylation of RBP1 and pRb promotes their dissociation to mediate release of the SAP30·mSin3·HDAC transcriptional repressor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryadinata, Randy; Sadowski, Martin; Steel, Rohan; Sarcevic, Boris

    2011-02-18

    Eukaryotic cell cycle progression is mediated by phosphorylation of protein substrates by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). A critical substrate of CDKs is the product of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene, pRb, which inhibits G(1)-S phase cell cycle progression by binding and repressing E2F transcription factors. CDK-mediated phosphorylation of pRb alleviates this inhibitory effect to promote G(1)-S phase cell cycle progression. pRb represses transcription by binding to the E2F transactivation domain and recruiting the mSin3·histone deacetylase (HDAC) transcriptional repressor complex via the retinoblastoma-binding protein 1 (RBP1). RBP1 binds to the pocket region of pRb via an LXCXE motif and to the SAP30 subunit of the mSin3·HDAC complex and, thus, acts as a bridging protein in this multisubunit complex. In the present study we identified RBP1 as a novel CDK substrate. RBP1 is phosphorylated by CDK2 on serines 864 and 1007, which are N- and C-terminal to the LXCXE motif, respectively. CDK2-mediated phosphorylation of RBP1 or pRb destabilizes their interaction in vitro, with concurrent phosphorylation of both proteins leading to their dissociation. Consistent with these findings, RBP1 phosphorylation is increased during progression from G(1) into S-phase, with a concurrent decrease in its association with pRb in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. These studies provide new mechanistic insights into CDK-mediated regulation of the pRb tumor suppressor during cell cycle progression, demonstrating that CDK-mediated phosphorylation of both RBP1 and pRb induces their dissociation to mediate release of the mSin3·HDAC transcriptional repressor complex from pRb to alleviate transcriptional repression of E2F.

  12. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors inspired by roscovitine: purine bioisosteres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorda, Radek; Paruch, Kamil; Krystof, Vladimír

    2012-01-01

    Roscovitine is a synthetic inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases that is currently undergoing clinical trials as a candidate drug for some oncological indications. Its discovery prompted many research teams to further optimize its structure or to initiate their own related but independent studies. This article reviews known roscovitine bioisosteres that have been prepared as CDK inhibitors using different core heterocycles. The individual bioisostere types have been described and explored to a different extent, which complicates direct comparisons of their biochemical activity - only six direct analogs containing different purine bioisosteres have been prepared and evaluated side by side with roscovitine. Only four types of bioisosteres have demonstrated improved biological properties, namely pyrazolo[ 1,5-a]-1,3,5-triazines, pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines, pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyridines and pyrazolo[4,3-d]pyrimidines.

  13. Cyclin Dependent Kinase 9 Inhibitors for Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonawane, Yogesh A; Taylor, Margaret A; Napoleon, John Victor; Rana, Sandeep; Contreras, Jacob I; Natarajan, Amarnath

    2016-10-13

    Cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors have been the topic of intense research for nearly 2 decades due to their widely varied and critical functions within the cell. Recently CDK9 has emerged as a druggable target for the development of cancer therapeutics. CDK9 plays a crucial role in transcription regulation; specifically, CDK9 mediated transcriptional regulation of short-lived antiapoptotic proteins is critical for the survival of transformed cells. Focused chemical libraries based on a plethora of scaffolds have resulted in mixed success with regard to the development of selective CDK9 inhibitors. Here we review the regulation of CDK9, its cellular functions, and common core structures used to target CDK9, along with their selectivity profile and efficacy in vitro and in vivo.

  14. Autophosphorylation-dependent inactivation of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    Chimeric calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) is characterized by the presence of a visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain unlike other known calmodulin- dependent kinases. Ca(2+)-Binding to the visinin-like domain leads to autophosphorylation and changes in the affinity for calmodulin [Sathyanarayanan P.V., Cremo C.R. & Poovaiah B.W. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 30417-30422]. Here, we report that the Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation of CCaMK results in time-dependent loss of enzyme activity. This time-dependent loss of activity or self-inactivation due to autophosphorylation is also dependent on reaction pH and ATP concentration. Inactivation of the enzyme resulted in the formation of a sedimentable enzyme due to self-association. Specifically, autophosphorylation in the presence of 200 microm ATP at pH 7.5 resulted in the formation of a sedimentable enzyme with a 33% loss in enzyme activity. Under similar conditions at pH 6.5, the enzyme lost 67% of its activity and at pH 8.5, 84% enzyme activity was lost. Furthermore, autophosphorylation at either acidic or alkaline reaction pH lead to the formation of a sedimentable enzyme. Transmission electron microscopic studies on autophosphorylated kinase revealed particles that clustered into branched complexes. The autophosphorylation of wild-type kinase in the presence of AMP-PNP (an unhydrolyzable ATP analog) or the autophosphorylation-site mutant, T267A, did not show formation of branched complexes under the electron microscope. Autophosphorylation- dependent self-inactivation may be a mechanism of modulating the signal transduction pathway mediated by CCaMK.

  15. Bisarylmaleimides & the Corresponding Indolocarbazoles as Kinase Inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Guoxin; Cathy Ogg; Bharvin Patel; Richard M. Schultz; Charles D. Spencer; Beverly Teicher; Scou A. Watkins; Scott E. Conner; Zhou Xun; Chuan Shih; Li Tiechao; Harold B. Brooks; Eileen Considine; Jack A. Dempsey; Margaret M. Faul

    2004-01-01

    Cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) have recently raised considerable attention because of their central role in the regulation of cell cycle progression. A high incidence of genetic mutation of CDK substrates and deregulaton of CDK modulators were found in a number of disease states,particularly in cancer. A novel series of unsymmetrical substituted indolocarbazoles were synthesized and their kinase inhibitory capability was evaluated in vitro. 6-Substtuted indolocarbazoles were found to be highly potent and selective D1/CDK4 inhibitors. These indolocarbazoles exhibited ATP competitive D1/CDK4 activity and inhibited tumor cell growth,arrested tumor cell at G1 phase. These molecules demonstrated potent anti-tumor activity and inhibited pRb phosphorylation at S780 in the human lung carcinoma (Calu6) and non-small cell lung carcinoma (NCI-H460) xenograft models. The results indicate that these small molecules have potential as therapeutic agents in cancer chemotherapeutc agents.

  16. Expression of DNA-dependent protein kinase in human granulocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Annahita SALLMYR; Anna MILLER; Aida GABDOULKHAKOVA; Valentina SAFRONOVA; Gunnel HENRIKSSON; Anders BREDBERG

    2004-01-01

    Human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) have been reported to completely lack of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) which is composed of Ku protein and the catalytic subunit DNA-PKcs, needed for nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) of DNA double-strand breaks. Promyelocytic HL-60 cells express a variant form of Ku resulting in enhanced radiation sensitivity. This raises the question if low efficiency of NHEJ, instrumental for the cellular repair of oxidative damage, is a normal characteristic of myeloid differentiation. Here we confirmed the complete lack of DNAPK in P MN protein extracts, and the expression of the truncated Ku86 variant form in HL-60. However, this degradation of DNA-PK was shown to be due to a DNA-PK-degrading protease in PMN and HL-60. In addition, by using a protease-resistant whole cell assay, both Ku86 and DNA-PKcs could be demonstrated in PMN, suggesting the previously reported absence in PMN of DNA-PK to be an artefact. The levels of Ku86 and DNA-PKcs were much reduced in PMN, as compared with that of the lymphocytes, whereas HL-60 displayed a markedly elevated DNA-PK concentration.In conclusion, our findings provide evidence of reduced, not depleted expression of DNA-PK during the mature stages of myeloid differentiation.

  17. N-&-N, a new class of cell death-inducing kinase inhibitors derived from the purine roscovitine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettayeb, Karima; Sallam, Hatem; Ferandin, Yoan; Popowycz, Florence; Fournet, Guy; Hassan, Moustapha; Echalier, Aude; Bernard, Philippe; Endicott, Jane; Joseph, Benoît; Meijer, Laurent

    2008-09-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and their regulators show frequent abnormalities in tumors. Ten low molecular weight pharmacologic inhibitors of CDKs are currently in clinical trials against various cancers, including the 2,6,9-trisubstituted purine (R)-roscovitine (CYC202/Seliciclib). We here report the characterization of N-&-N1, a bioisoster of roscovitine displaying improved antitumoral properties. N-&-N1 shows exquisite selectivity for CDKs, with 2- to 3-fold enhanced potency compared with (R)-roscovitine. Inhibition of retinoblastoma protein phosphorylation and RNA polymerase II Ser2 phosphorylation in neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells exposed to N-&-N1 indicates that N-&-N1 is able to inhibit CDKs in a cellular context. N-&-N1 also down-regulates the expression of RNA polymerase. Cocrystal structures of N-&-N1 and (R)-roscovitine in complex with CDK2/cyclin A reveal that both inhibitors adopt similar binding modes. A competitive assay shows that, compared with (R)-roscovitine, N-&-N1 has reduced affinity for Erk2 and pyridoxal kinase. N-&-N1 triggers cell death in a panel of diverse cell lines. Cell death is accompanied by events characteristic of apoptosis: cytochrome c release, activation of effector caspases, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. Induction of p53 and p21CIP1 and down-regulation of the Mcl-1 antiapoptotic factor were also observed. Studies in mice show that N-&-N1 has pharmacokinetics properties similar to those of (R)-roscovitine. Altogether, these results show that analogues of (R)-roscovitine can be designed with improved antitumor potential.

  18. Induction of anergy in Th1 cells associated with increased levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21Cip1 and p27Kip1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, S K; DeLoose, A; Gilbert, K M

    2001-01-15

    Th1 cells exposed to Ag and the G(1) blocker n-butyrate in primary cultures lose their ability to proliferate in Ag-stimulated secondary cultures. The ability of n-butyrate to induce anergy in Ag-stimulated, but not resting, Th1 cells was shown here to be blocked by cycloheximide. Subsequent experiments to delineate the nature of the protein apparently required for n-butyrate-induced Th1 cell anergy focused on the role of cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) inhibitors p21(Cip1) and p27(Kip1). Normally, entry into S phase by Th1 cells occurs around 24 h after Ag stimulation and corresponds with relatively low levels of both p21(Cip1) and p27(Kip1). However, unlike control Th1 cells, anergic Th1 cells contained high levels of both p21(Cip1) and p27(Kip1) when examined 24 h after Ag stimulation. The increase in p21(Cip1) observed in Ag-stimulated anergic Th1 cells appeared to be initiated in primary cultures. In contrast, the increase in p27(Kip1) observed in these anergic Th1 cells appears to represent a re-expression of the protein much earlier than control cells following Ag stimulation in secondary cultures. The anergic Th1 cells contained functionally active cdk inhibitors capable of inhibiting the activity of both endogenous and exogenous cdks. Consequently, it appears that n-butyrate-induced anergy in Th1 cells correlated with the up-regulation of p21(Cip1) and perhaps the downstream failure to maintain low levels of p27(Kip1). Increased levels of both p21(Cip1) and p27(Kip1) at the end of G(1) could prevent cdk-mediated entry into S phase, and thus help maintain the proliferative unresponsiveness found in the anergic Th1 cells.

  19. Thrombin generation in abdominal sepsis is Rho-kinase-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongzhi; Braun, Oscar Ö; Zhang, Su; Norström, Eva; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2015-05-08

    Sepsis causes severe derangements of the coagulation system. However, the signaling mechanisms regulating sepsis-induced thrombin generation remain elusive. Herein, we hypothesized that Rho-kinase might be an important regulator of thrombin generation in abdominal sepsis. Abdominal sepsis was induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in C57Bl/6 mice. Thrombin generation, coagulation factors, lung histology and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were determined 6 h and 24 h after induction of CLP. Induction of CLP triggered a systemic inflammatory response characterized by neutrophil accumulation and tissue injury in the lung as well as thrombocytopenia and leukocytopenia. Administration of Y-27632, a Rho-kinase inhibitor, attenuated these markers of systemic inflammation in CLP animals. Moreover, peak thrombin formation was decreased by 77% and 81% in plasma from mice 6 h and 24 h after induction of CLP. Total thrombin generation was reduced by 64% and 67% 6 h and 24 h after CLP induction, respectively. Notably, administration of Y-27632 increased peak formation by 99% and total thrombin generation by 66% in plasma from septic animals. In addition, CLP markedly decreased plasma levels of prothrombin, factor V and factor X at 6 h and 24 h. Interestingly, Rho-kinase inhibition significantly enhanced levels of prothrombin, factor V and factor X in plasma from septic mice. In addition, inhibition of Rho-kinase decreased CLP-induced elevations of CXCL2 by 36% and interleukin-6 by 38%. These novel findings suggest that sepsis-induced thrombin generation is regulated by Rho-kinase. Moreover, inhibition of Rho-kinase reverses sepsis-evoked consumption of coagulation factors. Thus, our results show that targeting Rho-kinase signaling might protect against coagulation dysfunction in abdominal sepsis.

  20. Selective anticancer activity of a hexapeptide with sequence homology to a non-kinase domain of Cyclin Dependent Kinase 4

    OpenAIRE

    Agarwala Usha; Blaydes Jeremy P; Maurer Richard I; Essex Jon W; Kilburn Jeremy D; Warenius Hilmar M; Seabra Laurence A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Cyclin-dependent kinases 2, 4 and 6 (Cdk2, Cdk4, Cdk6) are closely structurally homologous proteins which are classically understood to control the transition from the G1 to the S-phases of the cell cycle by combining with their appropriate cyclin D or cyclin E partners to form kinase-active holoenzymes. Deregulation of Cdk4 is widespread in human cancer, CDK4 gene knockout is highly protective against chemical and oncogene-mediated epithelial carcinogenesis, despite the c...

  1. The role of DNA dependent protein kinase in synapsis of DNA ends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.P.W.C. Weterings (Eric); N.S. Verkaik (Nicole); H.T. Brüggenwirth (Hennie); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); D.C. van Gent (Dik)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractDNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) plays a central role in the non-homologous end-joining pathway of DNA double strand break repair. Its catalytic subunit (DNA-PK(CS)) functions as a serine/threonine protein kinase. We show that DNA-PK forms a stable complex at DNA termini that blocks

  2. The role of DNA dependent protein kinase in synapsis of DNA ends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.P.W.C. Weterings (Eric); N.S. Verkaik (Nicole); H.T. Brüggenwirth (Hennie); D.C. van Gent (Dik); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractDNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) plays a central role in the non-homologous end-joining pathway of DNA double strand break repair. Its catalytic subunit (DNA-PK(CS)) functions as a serine/threonine protein kinase. We show that DNA-PK forms a stable complex at DNA termini that blocks

  3. Polo-like kinase-1 controls proteasome-dependent degradation of claspin during checkpoint recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mamely, Ivan; van Vugt, Marcel A. T. M.; Smits, Veronique A. J.; Semple, Jennifer I.; Lemmens, Bennie; Perrakis, Anastassis; Medema, Rene H.; Freire, Raimundo

    2006-01-01

    DNA-damage checkpoints maintain genomic integrity by mediating a cell-cycle delay in response to genotoxic stress or stalled replication forks. In response to damage, the checkpoint kinase ATR phosphorylates and activates its effector kinase Chk1 in a process that critically depends on Claspin [1].

  4. Crystal Structure of the Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase Kinase in Complex with the Inhibitor STO-609*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukimoto-Niino, Mutsuko; Yoshikawa, Seiko; Takagi, Tetsuo; Ohsawa, Noboru; Tomabechi, Yuri; Terada, Takaho; Shirouzu, Mikako; Suzuki, Atsushi; Lee, Suni; Yamauchi, Toshimasa; Okada-Iwabu, Miki; Iwabu, Masato; Kadowaki, Takashi; Minokoshi, Yasuhiko; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2011-01-01

    Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) kinase (CaMKK) is a member of the CaMK cascade that mediates the response to intracellular Ca2+ elevation. CaMKK phosphorylates and activates CaMKI and CaMKIV, which directly activate transcription factors. In this study, we determined the 2.4 Å crystal structure of the catalytic kinase domain of the human CaMKKβ isoform complexed with its selective inhibitor, STO-609. The structure revealed that CaMKKβ lacks the αD helix and that the equivalent region displays a hydrophobic molecular surface, which may reflect its unique substrate recognition and autoinhibition. Although CaMKKβ lacks the activation loop phosphorylation site, the activation loop is folded in an active-state conformation, which is stabilized by a number of interactions between amino acid residues conserved among the CaMKK isoforms. An in vitro analysis of the kinase activity confirmed the intrinsic activity of the CaMKKβ kinase domain. Structure and sequence analyses of the STO-609-binding site revealed amino acid replacements that may affect the inhibitor binding. Indeed, mutagenesis demonstrated that the CaMKKβ residue Pro274, which replaces the conserved acidic residue of other protein kinases, is an important determinant for the selective inhibition by STO-609. Therefore, the present structure provides a molecular basis for clarifying the known biochemical properties of CaMKKβ and for designing novel inhibitors targeting CaMKKβ and the related protein kinases. PMID:21504895

  5. Nuclear Targeting of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 2 Reveals Essential Roles of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 2 Localization and Cyclin E in Vitamin D-Mediated Growth Inhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Flores, Omar; Wang, Zhengying; Knudsen, Karen E; Burnstein, Kerry L.

    2010-01-01

    1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25-(OH)2D3), inhibits proliferation of a variety of cell types including adenocarcinoma of the prostate. We have previously shown that 1,25-(OH)2D3 increases the stability of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27KIP1, decreases cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) activity, and promotes G1 phase accumulation in human prostate cancer cells. These effects correlate with cytoplasmic relocalization of CDK2. In this study, we investigated the role of CDK2 cytoplasmic re...

  6. Immunohistochemical locali- zation of Ca2+/calmodulin- dependent kinase in tobacco

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The existence of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase (CaM kinase, CaMK) in tobacco is verified immuno- logically and its distribution in different tissues of tobacco is studied. It has been demonstrated that CaMK is mainly distributed in early developing anthers, developing ovules and embryos, lateral root primordium, apical meristem and leaf primordium of buds and mesophyll cells and developing vascular bundles of leaves. There is enormous CaM kinase distributed in leaf epidermis fair cells and guard cells of stomas too. Little kinase is found in mature stem or root cells. The distribution properties of CaM kinase in tobacco are consistent with those of CaM, suggesting that there exists the Ca2+ signal transduction pathway mediated by CaM kinase in tobacco and it plays an important role in the plant growth and development.

  7. Structures of apicomplexan calcium-dependent protein kinases reveal mechanism of activation by calcium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wernimont, Amy K; Artz, Jennifer D.; Jr, Patrick Finerty; Lin, Yu-Hui; Amani, Mehrnaz; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Senisterra, Guillermo; Vedadi, Masoud; Tempel, Wolfram; Mackenzie, Farrell; Chau, Irene; Lourido, Sebastian; Sibley, L. David; Hui, Raymond (Toronto); (WU-MED)

    2010-09-21

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) have pivotal roles in the calcium-signaling pathway in plants, ciliates and apicomplexan parasites and comprise a calmodulin-dependent kinase (CaMK)-like kinase domain regulated by a calcium-binding domain in the C terminus. To understand this intramolecular mechanism of activation, we solved the structures of the autoinhibited (apo) and activated (calcium-bound) conformations of CDPKs from the apicomplexan parasites Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum. In the apo form, the C-terminal CDPK activation domain (CAD) resembles a calmodulin protein with an unexpected long helix in the N terminus that inhibits the kinase domain in the same manner as CaMKII. Calcium binding triggers the reorganization of the CAD into a highly intricate fold, leading to its relocation around the base of the kinase domain to a site remote from the substrate binding site. This large conformational change constitutes a distinct mechanism in calcium signal-transduction pathways.

  8. Acetylation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 is mediated by GCN5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Juhyung; Yun, Nuri; Kim, Chiho [Department of Systems Biology, Yonsei University College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Min-Young; Park, Kang-Sik [Department of Physiology and Biomedical Science Institute, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul 130-701 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Young J., E-mail: yjoh@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Systems Biology, Yonsei University College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-25

    Highlights: • Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) is present as an acetylated form. • CDK5 is acetylated by GCN5. • CDK5’s acetylation site is mapped at Lys33. • Its acetylation may affect CDK5’s kinase activity. - Abstract: Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5), a member of atypical serine/threonine cyclin-dependent kinase family, plays a crucial role in pathophysiology of neurodegenerative disorders. Its kinase activity and substrate specificity are regulated by several independent pathways including binding with its activator, phosphorylation and S-nitrosylation. In the present study, we report that acetylation of CDK5 comprises an additional posttranslational modification within the cells. Among many candidates, we confirmed that its acetylation is enhanced by GCN5, a member of the GCN5-related N-acetyl-transferase family of histone acetyltransferase. Co-immunoprecipitation assay and fluorescent localization study indicated that GCN5 physically interacts with CDK5 and they are co-localized at the specific nuclear foci. Furthermore, liquid chromatography in conjunction with a mass spectrometry indicated that CDK5 is acetylated at Lys33 residue of ATP binding domain. Considering this lysine site is conserved among a wide range of species and other related cyclin-dependent kinases, therefore, we speculate that acetylation may alter the kinase activity of CDK5 via affecting efficacy of ATP coordination.

  9. Regulation of MAP kinase-dependent apoptotic pathway: implication of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumbayev, Vadim V; Yasinska, Inna M

    2005-04-15

    Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling cascades are multi-functional signaling networks that influence cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis, and cellular responses to stress. Apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) is a MAP kinase kinase kinase that triggers apoptogenic kinase cascade leading to the phosphorylation/activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases and p38-MAP kinase, which are responsible for inducing apoptotic cell death. This pathway plays a pivotal role in transduction of signals from different apoptotic stimuli. In the present review, we summarized the recent evidence concerning MAP kinase-dependent apoptotic pathway and its regulation in the mammalian cells and organism in vivo. We have shown that the key messengers of regulation of this pathway are the reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. The role of protein oxidation and S-nitrosation in induction of apoptotic cell death via ASK1 is discussed. Also we have outlined other recently discovered signal transduction processes involved in the regulation of ASK1 activity and downstream pathway.

  10. Multiple implications of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 in human cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Keum-Jin; Yang; Jongsun; Park

    2010-01-01

    3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1(PDK1) is a central mediator of cellular signaling between phosphoinositide-3 kinase and various intracellular serine/threonine kinases,including protein kinase B,p70 ribosomal S6 kinase,serum and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase,and protein kinase C.PDK1 activates members of the AGC family of protein kinases by phosphorylating serine/threonine residues in the activation loop.Here,we review the regulatory mechanisms of PDK1 and its roles in cancer.PDK1 is activated by autophosphorylation in the activation loop and other serine residues,as well as by phosphorylation of Tyr-9 and Tyr-373/376.Src appears to recognize PDK1 following tyrosine phosphorylation.The role of heat shock protein 90 in regulating PDK1 stability and PDK1-Src complex formation are also discussed.Furthermore,we summarize the subcellular distribution of PDK1.Finally,an important role for PDK1 in cancer chemotherapy is proposed.In conclusion,a better understanding of its molecular regulatory mechanisms in various signaling pathways will help to explain how PDK1 acts as an oncogenic kinase in various cancers,and will contribute to the development of novel cancer chemotherapies.

  11. Selective anticancer activity of a hexapeptide with sequence homology to a non-kinase domain of Cyclin Dependent Kinase 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agarwala Usha

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyclin-dependent kinases 2, 4 and 6 (Cdk2, Cdk4, Cdk6 are closely structurally homologous proteins which are classically understood to control the transition from the G1 to the S-phases of the cell cycle by combining with their appropriate cyclin D or cyclin E partners to form kinase-active holoenzymes. Deregulation of Cdk4 is widespread in human cancer, CDK4 gene knockout is highly protective against chemical and oncogene-mediated epithelial carcinogenesis, despite the continued presence of CDK2 and CDK6; and overexpresssion of Cdk4 promotes skin carcinogenesis. Surprisingly, however, Cdk4 kinase inhibitors have not yet fulfilled their expectation as 'blockbuster' anticancer agents. Resistance to inhibition of Cdk4 kinase in some cases could potentially be due to a non-kinase activity, as recently reported with epidermal growth factor receptor. Results A search for a potential functional site of non-kinase activity present in Cdk4 but not Cdk2 or Cdk6 revealed a previously-unidentified loop on the outside of the C'-terminal non-kinase domain of Cdk4, containing a central amino-acid sequence, Pro-Arg-Gly-Pro-Arg-Pro (PRGPRP. An isolated hexapeptide with this sequence and its cyclic amphiphilic congeners are selectively lethal at high doses to a wide range of human cancer cell lines whilst sparing normal diploid keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Treated cancer cells do not exhibit the wide variability of dose response typically seen with other anticancer agents. Cancer cell killing by PRGPRP, in a cyclic amphiphilic cassette, requires cells to be in cycle but does not perturb cell cycle distribution and is accompanied by altered relative Cdk4/Cdk1 expression and selective decrease in ATP levels. Morphological features of apoptosis are absent and cancer cell death does not appear to involve autophagy. Conclusion These findings suggest a potential new paradigm for the development of broad-spectrum cancer specific therapeutics with

  12. Cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases and some major substrates in the rat cerebellum after neonatal X-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolphin, A.C.; Detre, J.A.; Schlichter, D.J.; Nairn, A.C.; Yeh, H.H.; Woodward, D.J.; Greengard, P.

    1983-02-01

    The levels of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (type I), or cGMP-dependent protein kinase, or protein I, and of a 23,000 MW substrate for the cGMP-dependent protein kinase were measured in cerebella from normal rats and in the cerebella from rats in which a selective loss of interneurons in the cerebellar cortex had been produced by X-irradiation. A decrease was observed in the concentrations of cAMP-dependent protein kinase and of protein I, whereas an increase was observed in the concentrations of cGMP-dependent protein kinase and of the 23,000 MW substrate. The data, taken together with the results of other studies, support the interpretation that cAMP-dependent protein kinase and protein I are distributed throughout the cerebellum, but that cGMP-dependent protein kinase and the 23,000 MW substrate are highly concentrated in Purkinje cells.

  13. The Catalytic Subunit of DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase Coordinates with Polo-Like Kinase 1 to Facilitate Mitotic Entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung-Jong; Shang, Zeng-Fu; Lin, Yu-Fen; Sun, Jingxin; Morotomi-Yano, Keiko; Saha, Debabrata; Chen, Benjamin P C

    2015-04-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) is the key regulator of the non-homologous end joining pathway of DNA double-strand break repair. We have previously reported that DNA-PKcs is required for maintaining chromosomal stability and mitosis progression. Our further investigations reveal that deficiency in DNA-PKcs activity caused a delay in mitotic entry due to dysregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1), the key driving force for cell cycle progression through G2/M transition. Timely activation of Cdk1 requires polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1), which affects modulators of Cdk1. We found that DNA-PKcs physically interacts with Plk1 and could facilitate Plk1 activation both in vitro and in vivo. Further, DNA-PKcs-deficient cells are highly sensitive to Plk1 inhibitor BI2536, suggesting that the coordination between DNA-PKcs and Plk1 is not only crucial to ensure normal cell cycle progression through G2/M phases but also required for cellular resistance to mitotic stress. On the basis of the current study, it is predictable that combined inhibition of DNA-PKcs and Plk1 can be employed in cancer therapy strategy for synthetic lethality.

  14. The Catalytic Subunit of DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase Coordinates with Polo-Like Kinase 1 to Facilitate Mitotic Entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Jong Lee

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs is the key regulator of the non-homologous end joining pathway of DNA double-strand break repair. We have previously reported that DNA-PKcs is required for maintaining chromosomal stability and mitosis progression. Our further investigations reveal that deficiency in DNA-PKcs activity caused a delay in mitotic entry due to dysregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1, the key driving force for cell cycle progression through G2/M transition. Timely activation of Cdk1 requires polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1, which affects modulators of Cdk1. We found that DNA-PKcs physically interacts with Plk1 and could facilitate Plk1 activation both in vitro and in vivo. Further, DNA-PKcs–deficient cells are highly sensitive to Plk1 inhibitor BI2536, suggesting that the coordination between DNA-PKcs and Plk1 is not only crucial to ensure normal cell cycle progression through G2/M phases but also required for cellular resistance to mitotic stress. On the basis of the current study, it is predictable that combined inhibition of DNA-PKcs and Plk1 can be employed in cancer therapy strategy for synthetic lethality.

  15. The DNA-dependent protein kinase: a multifunctional protein kinase with roles in DNA double strand break repair and mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jette, Nicholas; Lees-Miller, Susan P.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase composed of a large catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and the Ku70/80 heterodimer. Over the past two decades, significant progress has been made in elucidating the role of DNA-PK in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), the major pathway for repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks in human cells and recently, additional roles for DNA-PK have been reported. In this review, we will describe the biochemistry, structure and function of DNA-PK, its roles in DNA double strand break repair and its newly described roles in mitosis and other cellular processes. PMID:25550082

  16. Momilactone B induces apoptosis and G1 arrest of the cell cycle in human monocytic leukemia U937 cells through downregulation of pRB phosphorylation and induction of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21Waf1/Cip1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Cheol; Jeong, Na Young; Kim, Gi-Young; Han, Min Ho; Chung, Ill-Min; Kim, Wun-Jae; Yoo, Young Hyun; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2014-04-01

    Momilactone B, a terpenoid phytoalexin present in rice bran, has been shown to exhibit several biological activities. The present study was conducted using cultured human leukemia U937 cells to elucidate the possible mechanisms by which momilactone B exerts its anticancer activity, which to date has remained poorly understood. Momilactone B treatment of U937 cells resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth and induced apoptotic cell death as detected by chromatin condensation, DNA fragmentation, the cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and Annexin V-FITC staining. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that momilactone B resulted in G1 arrest in cell cycle progression, which was associated with the dephosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (pRB) and enhanced binding of pRB with the E2F transcription factor family proteins. Treatment with momilactone B also increased the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor p21Waf1/Cip1 in a p53-independent manner, without any noticeable changes in G1 cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks), except a slight decrease in cyclin E. Moreover, in vitro kinase assay indicated that momilactone B significantly decreased Cdk4- and Cdk6-associated kinase activities through a notably increased binding of p21 to Cdk4 and Cdk6. Our results demonstrated that momilactone B caused G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in U937 cells through the induction of p21 expression, inhibition of Cdk/cyclin-associated kinase activities, and reduced phosphorylation of pRB, which may be related to anticancer activity.

  17. Schistosoma mansoni c-AMP-dependent Protein Kinase (PKA): A Potential New Drug Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-07

    chloroadenosine 3’,5’-monophosphate in breast cancer patients and xenograft bearing mice. Ann Oncol 7: 291-296. 129. Tortora G, Ciardiello F, Pepe S...cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinases by using cyclic nucleotide analogs. Eur J Biochem 181: 19-31. 47. Yokozaki H, Tortora G, Pepe S, Maronde E...181: 19-31. 150 28. Ally S, Tortora G, Clair T, Grieco D, Merlo G, et al. (1988) Selective modulation of protein kinase isozymes by the site

  18. A tumor suppressor C53 protein antagonizes checkpoint kinases to promote cyclin-dependent kinase 1 activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hai; Wu, Jianchun; He, Chen; Yang, Wending; Li, Honglin

    2009-01-01

    Cyclin dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1)/cyclin B1 complex is the driving force for mitotic entry, and its activation is tightly regulated by the G2/M checkpoint. We originally reported that a novel protein C53 (also known as Cdk5rap3 and LZAP) potentiates DNA damage-induced cell death by modulating the G2/M checkpoint (1). More recently, Wang et al (2007) found that C53/LZAP may function as a tumor suppressor via inhibiting NF-κB signaling (2). We report here identification of C53 protein as a novel regulator of Cdk1 activation. We found that knockdown of C53 protein causes delayed Cdk1 activation and mitotic entry. During DNA damage response, activation of checkpoint kinase 1 and 2 (Chk1 and Chk2) is partially inhibited by C53 overexrepsssion. Intriguingly, we found that C53 interacts with checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) and antagonizes its function. Moreover, a portion of C53 protein is localized at the centrosome, and centrosome-targeting C53 potently promotes local Cdk1 activation. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that C53 is a novel negative regulator of checkpoint response. By counteracting Chk1, C53 promotes Cdk1 activation and mitotic entry in both unperturbed cell cycle progression and DNA damage response. PMID:19223857

  19. Puerarin activates endothelial nitric oxide synthase through estrogen receptor-dependent PI3-kinase and calcium-dependent AMP-activated protein kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Kim, Hyung Gyun [Department of Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hien, Tran Thi [College of Pharmacy, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Myung Ho [Heart Research Center, Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Tae Cheon, E-mail: taecheon@ynu.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Yeungnam University, Gyungsan (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hye Gwang, E-mail: hgjeong@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    The cardioprotective properties of puerarin, a natural product, have been attributed to the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-mediated production of nitric oxide (NO) in EA.hy926 endothelial cells. However, the mechanism by which puerarin activates eNOS remains unclear. In this study, we sought to identify the intracellular pathways underlying eNOS activation by puerarin. Puerarin induced the activating phosphorylation of eNOS on Ser1177 and the production of NO in EA.hy926 cells. Puerarin-induced eNOS phosphorylation required estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling and was reversed by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) inhibition. Importantly, puerarin inhibited the adhesion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}-stimulated monocytes to endothelial cells and suppressed the TNF-{alpha} induced expression of intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1. Puerarin also inhibited the TNF-{alpha}-induced nuclear factor-{kappa}B activation, which was attenuated by pretreatment with N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a NOS inhibitor. These results indicate that puerarin stimulates eNOS phosphorylation and NO production via activation of an estrogen receptor-mediated PI3K/Akt- and CaMKII/AMPK-dependent pathway. Puerarin may be useful for the treatment or prevention of endothelial dysfunction associated with diabetes and cardiovascular disease. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin induced the phosphorylation of eNOS and the production of NO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin activated eNOS through ER-dependent PI3-kinase and Ca{sup 2+}-dependent AMPK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin-induced NO was involved in the inhibition of NF-kB activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin may help for prevention of vascular dysfunction and diabetes.

  20. A calmodulin-dependent protein kinase from lower eukaryote Physarum polycephalum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Akio; Hanyuda, Yuki; Okagaki, Tuyoshi; Takagi, Takashi; Kohama, Kazuhiro

    2005-03-25

    A full-length cDNA coding a calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase gene was cloned from Physarum plasmodia poly(A)-RNA by polymerase chain reaction with the oligonucleotide primers that were designed after the amino acid sequence of highly conserved regions of myosin light-chain kinase. Sequence analysis of the cDNA revealed that this Physarum kinase was a 42,519-Da protein with an ATP-binding domain, Ser/Thr kinase active site signature, and CaM-binding domain. Expression of the cDNA in Escherichia coli demonstrated that the Physarum kinase in the presence of Ca2+ and CaM phosphorylated the recombinant phosphorylatable light chain (PLc) of Physarum myosin II. The peptide analysis after proteolysis of the phosphorylated PLc indicated that Ser 18 was phosphorylated. The site was confirmed by the failure of phosphorylation of PLc, the Ser 18 of which was replaced by Ala. The physiological role of the kinase will be discussed with special reference to the 55-kDa kinase, which had been previously purified from Physarum plasmodia for phosphorylated PLc.

  1. Targeting Cyclin-Dependent Kinases in Human Cancers: From Small Molecules to Peptide Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Peyressatre

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK/Cyclins form a family of heterodimeric kinases that play central roles in regulation of cell cycle progression, transcription and other major biological processes including neuronal differentiation and metabolism. Constitutive or deregulated hyperactivity of these kinases due to amplification, overexpression or mutation of cyclins or CDK, contributes to proliferation of cancer cells, and aberrant activity of these kinases has been reported in a wide variety of human cancers. These kinases therefore constitute biomarkers of proliferation and attractive pharmacological targets for development of anticancer therapeutics. The structural features of several of these kinases have been elucidated and their molecular mechanisms of regulation characterized in depth, providing clues for development of drugs and inhibitors to disrupt their function. However, like most other kinases, they constitute a challenging class of therapeutic targets due to their highly conserved structural features and ATP-binding pocket. Notwithstanding, several classes of inhibitors have been discovered from natural sources, and small molecule derivatives have been synthesized through rational, structure-guided approaches or identified in high throughput screens. The larger part of these inhibitors target ATP pockets, but a growing number of peptides targeting protein/protein interfaces are being proposed, and a small number of compounds targeting allosteric sites have been reported.

  2. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase alpha is expressed by monocytic cells and regulates the activation profile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher B Guest

    Full Text Available Macrophages are capable of assuming numerous phenotypes in order to adapt to endogenous and exogenous challenges but many of the factors that regulate this process are still unknown. We report that Ca(2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase alpha (CaMKKalpha is expressed in human monocytic cells and demonstrate that its inhibition blocks type-II monocytic cell activation and promotes classical activation. Affinity chromatography with paramagnetic beads isolated an approximately 50 kDa protein from nuclear lysates of U937 human monocytic cells activated with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA. This protein was identified as CaMKKalpha by mass spectrometry and Western analysis. The function of CaMKKalpha in monocyte activation was examined using the CaMKKalpha inhibitors (STO-609 and forskolin and siRNA knockdown. Inhibition of CaMKKalpha, enhanced PMA-dependent CD86 expression and reduced CD11b expression. In addition, inhibition was associated with decreased translocation of CaMKKalpha to the nucleus. Finally, to further examine monocyte activation profiles, TNFalpha and IL-10 secretion were studied. CaMKKalpha inhibition attenuated PMA-dependent IL-10 production and enhanced TNFalpha production indicating a shift from type-II to classical monocyte activation. Taken together, these findings indicate an important new role for CaMKKalpha in the differentiation of monocytic cells.

  3. A tumor suppressor C53 protein antagonizes checkpoint kinases to promote cyclin-dependent kinase 1 activation

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Hai; Wu, Jianchun; He, Chen; Yang, Wending; Li, Honglin

    2009-01-01

    Cyclin dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1)/cyclin B1 complex is the driving force for mitotic entry, and its activation is tightly regulated by the G2/M checkpoint. We originally reported that a novel protein C53 (also known as Cdk5rap3 and LZAP) potentiates DNA damage-induced cell death by modulating the G2/M checkpoint (1). More recently, Wang et al (2007) found that C53/LZAP may function as a tumor suppressor via inhibiting NF-κB signaling (2). We report here identification of C53 protein as a novel...

  4. Partial purification and characterization of a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase from pea nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; Dauwalder, M.; Roux, S. J.

    1991-01-01

    Almost all the Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase activity in nuclei purified from etiolated pea (Pisum sativum, L.) plumules is present in a single enzyme that can be extracted from chromatin by 0.3 molar NaCl. This protein kinase can be further purified 80,000-fold by salt fractionation and high performance liquid chromatography, after which it has a high specific activity of about 100 picomoles per minute per microgram in the presence of Ca2+ and reaches half-maximal activation at about 3 x 10(-7) molar free Ca2+, without calmodulin. It is a monomer with a molecular weight near 90,000. It can efficiently use histone III-S, ribosomal S6 protein, and casein as artificial substrates, but it phosphorylates phosvitin only weakly. Its Ca(2+)-dependent kinase activity is half-maximally inhibited by 0.1 millimolar chlorpromazine, by 35 nanomolar K-252a and by 7 nanomolar staurosporine. It is insensitive to sphingosine, an inhibitor of protein kinase C, and to basic polypeptides that block other Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases. It is not stimulated by exogenous phospholipids or fatty acids. In intact isolated pea nuclei it preferentially phosphorylates several chromatin-associated proteins, with the most phosphorylated protein band being near the same molecular weight (43,000) as a nuclear protein substrate whose phosphorylation has been reported to be stimulated by phytochrome in a calcium-dependent fashion.

  5. The cyclin-dependent kinase 8 module sterically blocks Mediator interactions with RNA polymerase II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmlund, Hans; Baraznenok, Vera; Lindahl, Martin

    2006-01-01

    CDK8 (cyclin-dependent kinase 8), along with CycC, Med12, and Med13, form a repressive module (the Cdk8 module) that prevents RNA polymerase II (pol II) interactions with Mediator. Here, we report that the ability of the Cdk8 module to prevent pol II interactions is independent of the Cdk8......-dependent kinase activity. We use electron microscopy and single-particle reconstruction to demonstrate that the Cdk8 module forms a distinct structural entity that binds to the head and middle region of Mediator, thereby sterically blocking interactions with pol II....

  6. Effects of selective inhibition of protein kinase C, cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase, and Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase on neurite development in cultured rat hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabell, L; Audesirk, G

    1993-06-01

    A variety of experimental evidence suggests that calmodulin and protein kinases, especially protein kinase C, may participate in regulating neurite development in cultured neurons, particularly neurite initiation. However, the results are somewhat contradictory. Further, the roles of calmodulin and protein kinases on many aspects of neurite development, such as branching or elongation of axons vs dendrites, have not been extensively studied. Cultured embryonic rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons develop readily identifiable axons and dendrites. We used this culture system and the new generation of highly specific protein kinase inhibitors to investigate the roles of protein kinases and calmodulin in neurite development. Neurons were cultured for 2 days in the continuous presence of calphostin C (a specific inhibitor of protein kinase C), KT5720 (inhibitor of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase), KN62 (inhibitor of Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II), or calmidazolium (inhibitor of calmodulin), each at concentrations from approximately 1 to 10 times the concentration reported in the literature to inhibit each kinase by 50%. The effects of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (an activator of protein kinase C) and 4 alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate (an inactive phorbol ester) were also tested. At concentrations that had no effect on neuronal viability, calphostin C reduced neurite initiation and axon branching without significantly affecting the number of dendrites per neuron, dendrite branching, dendrite length, or axon length. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate increased axon branching and the number of dendrites per cell, compared to the inactive 4 alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate. KT5720 inhibited only axon branching. KN62 reduced axon length, the number of dendrites per neuron, and both axon and dendrite branching. At low concentrations, calmidazolium had no effect on any aspect of neurite development, but at high concentrations, calmidazolium inhibited every

  7. Osmotic stress-dependent serine phosphorylation of the histidine kinase homologue DokA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oehme Felix

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two-component systems consisting of histidine kinases and their corresponding receivers are widespread in bacterial signal transduction. In the past few years, genes coding for homologues of two-component systems were also discovered in eukaryotic organisms. DokA, a homologue of bacterial histidine kinases, is an element of the osmoregulatory pathway in the amoeba Dictyostelium. The work described here addresses the question whether DokA is phosphorylated in vivo in response to osmotic stress. Results We have endogenously overexpressed individual domains of DokA to investigate post-translational modification of the protein in response to osmotic shock in vivo. Dictyostelium cells were labeled with [32P]-orthophosphate, exposed to osmotic stress and DokA fragments were subsequently isolated by immunoprecipitation. Thus, a stress-dependent phosphorylation could be demonstrated, with the site of phosphorylation being located in the kinase domain. We demonstrate biochemically that the phosphorylated amino acid is serine, and by mutational analysis that the phosphorylation reaction is not due to an autophosphorylation of DokA. Furthermore, mutation of the conserved histidine did not affect the osmostress-dependent phosphorylation reaction. Conclusions A stimulus-dependent serine phosphorylation of a eukaryotic histidine kinase homologue was demonstrated for the first time in vivo. That implies that DokA, although showing typical structural features of a bacterial two-component system, might be part of a eukaryotic signal transduction pathway that involves serine/threonine kinases.

  8. Cell cycle-dependent regulation of Aurora kinase B mRNA by the Microprocessor complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Eunsun; Seong, Youngmo; Seo, Jae Hong; Kwon, Young-Soo; Song, Hoseok

    2014-03-28

    Aurora kinase B regulates the segregation of chromosomes and the spindle checkpoint during mitosis. In this study, we showed that the Microprocessor complex, which is responsible for the processing of the primary transcripts during the generation of microRNAs, destabilizes the mRNA of Aurora kinase B in human cells. The Microprocessor-mediated cleavage kept Aurora kinase B at a low level and prevented premature entrance into mitosis. The cleavage was reduced during mitosis leading to the accumulation of Aurora kinase B mRNA and protein. In addition to Aurora kinase B mRNA, the processing of other primary transcripts of miRNAs were also decreased during mitosis. We found that the cleavage was dependent on an RNA helicase, DDX5, and the association of DDX5 and DDX17 with the Microprocessor was reduced during mitosis. Thus, we propose a novel mechanism by which the Microprocessor complex regulates stability of Aurora kinase B mRNA and cell cycle progression.

  9. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 5, 6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole induces nongenotoxic, DNA replication-independent apoptosis of normal and leukemic cells, regardless of their p53 status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amoroso Antonio

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current chemotherapy of human cancers focuses on the DNA damage pathway to induce a p53-mediated cellular response leading to either G1 arrest or apoptosis. However, genotoxic treatments may induce mutations and translocations that result in secondary malignancies or recurrent disease. In addition, about 50% of human cancers are associated with mutations in the p53 gene. Nongenotoxic activation of apoptosis by targeting specific molecular pathways thus provides an attractive therapeutic approach. Methods Normal and leukemic cells were evaluated for their sensitivity to 5, 6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB through cell viability and caspase activation tests. The apoptotic pathway induced by DRB was analysed by immunfluorescence and immunoblot analysis. H2AX phosphorylation and cell cycle analysis were performed to study the dependance of apoptosis on DNA damage and DNA replication, respectively. To investigate the role of p53 in DRB-induced apoptosis, specific p53 inhibitors were used. Statistical analysis on cell survival was performed with the test of independence. Results Here we report that DRB, an inhibitor of the transcriptional cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs 7 and 9, triggers DNA replication-independent apoptosis in normal and leukemic human cells regardless of their p53 status and without inducing DNA damage. Our data indicate that (i in p53-competent cells, apoptosis induced by DRB relies on a cytosolic accumulation of p53 and subsequent Bax activation, (ii in the absence of p53, it may rely on p73, and (iii it is independent of ATM and NBS1 proteins. Notably, even apoptosis-resistant leukemic cells such as Raji were sensitive to DRB. Conclusion Our results indicate that DRB represents a potentially useful cancer chemotherapeutic strategy that employs both the p53-dependent and -independent apoptotic pathways without inducing genotoxic stress, thereby decreasing the risk of secondary malignancies.

  10. Leptin augments coronary vasoconstriction and smooth muscle proliferation via a Rho-kinase-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noblet, Jillian N; Goodwill, Adam G; Sassoon, Daniel J; Kiel, Alexander M; Tune, Johnathan D

    2016-05-01

    Leptin has been implicated as a key upstream mediator of pathways associated with coronary vascular dysfunction and disease. The purpose of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that leptin modifies the coronary artery proteome and promotes increases in coronary smooth muscle contraction and proliferation via influences on Rho kinase signaling. Global proteomic assessment of coronary arteries from lean swine cultured with obese concentrations of leptin (30 ng/mL) for 3 days revealed significant alterations in the coronary artery proteome (68 proteins) and identified an association between leptin treatment and calcium signaling/contraction (four proteins) and cellular growth and proliferation (35 proteins). Isometric tension studies demonstrated that both acute (30 min) and chronic (3 days, serum-free media) exposure to obese concentrations of leptin potentiated depolarization-induced contraction of coronary arteries. Inhibition of Rho kinase significantly reduced leptin-mediated increases in coronary artery contractions. The effects of leptin on the functional expression of Rho kinase were time-dependent, as acute treatment increased Rho kinase activity while chronic (3 day) exposure was associated with increases in Rho kinase protein abundance. Proliferation assays following chronic leptin administration (8 day, serum-containing media) demonstrated that leptin augmented coronary vascular smooth muscle proliferation and increased Rho kinase activity. Inhibition of Rho kinase significantly reduced these effects of leptin. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that leptin promotes increases in coronary vasoconstriction and smooth muscle proliferation and indicate that these phenotypic effects are associated with alterations in the coronary artery proteome and dynamic effects on the Rho kinase pathway.

  11. A short history of cGMP, guanylyl cyclases, and cGMP-dependent protein kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kots, Alexander Y; Martin, Emil; Sharina, Iraida G; Murad, Ferid

    2009-01-01

    Here, we review the early studies on cGMP, guanylyl cyclases, and cGMP-dependent protein kinases to facilitate understanding of development of this exciting but complex field of research encompassing pharmacology, biochemistry, physiology, and molecular biology of these important regulatory molecules.

  12. Spermidine-Induced Improvement of Reconsolidation of Memory Involves Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardi, Bruna Amanda; Ribeiro, Daniela Aymone; Signor, Cristiane; Muller, Michele; Gais, Mayara Ana; Mello, Carlos Fernando; Rubin, Maribel Antonello

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we determined whether the calcium-dependent protein kinase (PKC) signaling pathway is involved in the improvement of fear memory reconsolidation induced by the intrahippocampal administration of spermidine in rats. Male Wistar rats were trained in a fear conditioning apparatus using a 0.4-mA footshock as an unconditioned stimulus.…

  13. 90-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase is phosphorylated and activated by 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Claus Antonio Juel; Buch, M B; Krag, T O;

    1999-01-01

    90-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase-2 (RSK2) belongs to a family of growth factor-activated serine/threonine kinases composed of two kinase domains connected by a regulatory linker region. The N-terminal kinase of RSK2 is involved in substrate phosphorylation. Its activation requires phosphorylation of th...... of Ser(227), Ser(369), and Ser(386). Our study extend recent findings which implicate PDK1 in the activation of protein kinases B and C and p70(S6K), suggesting that PDK1 controls several major growth factor-activated signal transduction pathways.......90-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase-2 (RSK2) belongs to a family of growth factor-activated serine/threonine kinases composed of two kinase domains connected by a regulatory linker region. The N-terminal kinase of RSK2 is involved in substrate phosphorylation. Its activation requires phosphorylation...... of the linker region at Ser(369), catalyzed by extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and at Ser(386), catalyzed by the C-terminal kinase, after its activation by ERK. In addition, the N-terminal kinase must be phosphorylated at Ser(227) in the activation loop by an as yet unidentified kinase. Here, we...

  14. Method of empirical dependences in estimation and prediction of activity of creatine kinase isoenzymes in cerebral ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeeva, Tatiana F.; Moshkova, Albina N.; Erlykina, Elena I.; Khvatova, Elena M.

    2016-04-01

    Creatine kinase is a key enzyme of energy metabolism in the brain. There are known cytoplasmic and mitochondrial creatine kinase isoenzymes. Mitochondrial creatine kinase exists as a mixture of two oligomeric forms - dimer and octamer. The aim of investigation was to study catalytic properties of cytoplasmic and mitochondrial creatine kinase and using of the method of empirical dependences for the possible prediction of the activity of these enzymes in cerebral ischemia. Ischemia was revealed to be accompanied with the changes of the activity of creatine kinase isoenzymes and oligomeric state of mitochondrial isoform. There were made the models of multiple regression that permit to study the activity of creatine kinase system in cerebral ischemia using a calculating method. Therefore, the mathematical method of empirical dependences can be applied for estimation and prediction of the functional state of the brain by the activity of creatine kinase isoenzymes in cerebral ischemia.

  15. Unique Cyclin-Dependent Kinase (CDK) Inhibitors at the ATP-site

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Lin; LUNDGREN Karen; ESCOBAR Jorge; MINNICK Sharon price; HUBER Andrea; KOUDRIAKOVA Tatiana; ARRUDA Jeannie; SISSON Wes; AUST Robert M.; VERKHIVKER Gennady M.; SCHAFFER Lana; CHONG Wesley K. M.; ROSE Peter w.; LEWIS Cristrina T; DUVADIE Rohit K.; CHU Shao Song; YANG Y. Michelle; NONOMIYA Jim; TUCKER Kadthleen D.; KNIGHTON Daniel R.; FERRE RoseAnn

    2001-01-01

    @@ Control of the cell cycle could be applicable in new approaches for cancer chemotherapy. The cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK's) and their corresponding complexes with cyclins are regulatory enzymes for which we have discovered a novel small molecule series of inhibitors, with potencies in the nanomolar range and good selectivity for the CDK's versus other kinases. We will discuss structure-based drug design efforts with crystal structures of complexes with certain CDK's. Cellular effects and some preliminary examination of in vivo cancer efficacy by these inhibitors will also be discussed.

  16. Growth inhibition of human gastric adenocarcinoma cells in vitro by STO-609 is independent of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-beta and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhiming; Wen, Dacheng; Wang, Xudong; Yang, Longfei; Liu, Tianzhou; Liu, Jingjing; Zhu, Jiaming; Fang, Xuedong

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase is a recently identified downstream target of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-beta, and is involved in the regulation of cell metabolism and cell proliferation. STO-609 is a selective antagonist of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-beta. In the present study, we found that STO-609 suppressed AMP-activated protein kinase activity, reduced expression of Akt and ERK, and increased cell apoptosis in SNU-1 and N87 cells but not normal gastric epithelial cells (CCL-241). Interestingly, we found such effects of STO-609 on gastric cancer cells were not affected after the knock-down of CaMKK-β and AMPK. In conclusion, STO-609 is an effective cytotoxic agent for gastric adenocarcinoma in vivo.

  17. FAK dimerization controls its kinase-dependent functions at focal adhesions

    KAUST Repository

    Brami-Cherrier, Karen

    2014-01-30

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) controls adhesion-dependent cell motility, survival, and proliferation. FAK has kinase-dependent and kinase-independent functions, both of which play major roles in embryogenesis and tumor invasiveness. The precise mechanisms of FAK activation are not known. Using x-ray crystallography, small angle x-ray scattering, and biochemical and functional analyses, we show that the key step for activation of FAK\\'s kinase-dependent functions-autophosphorylation of tyrosine-397-requires site-specific dimerization of FAK. The dimers form via the association of the N-terminal FERM domain of FAK and are stabilized by an interaction between FERM and the C-terminal FAT domain. FAT binds to a basic motif on FERM that regulates co-activation and nuclear localization. FAK dimerization requires local enrichment, which occurs specifically at focal adhesions. Paxillin plays a dual role, by recruiting FAK to focal adhesions and by reinforcing the FAT:FERM interaction. Our results provide a structural and mechanistic framework to explain how FAK combines multiple stimuli into a site-specific function. The dimer interfaces we describe are promising targets for blocking FAK activation. © 2014 The Authors.

  18. CDPK1, a calcium-dependent protein kinase, regulates transcriptional activator RSG in response to gibberellins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Masaru; Yuasa, Takashi; Takahashi, Yohsuke; Ishida, Sarahmi

    2009-05-01

    The homeostasis of gibberellins (GAs) is maintained by negative-feedback regulation in plant cells. REPRESSION OF SHOOT GROWTH (RSG) is a transcriptional activator with a basic Leu zipper domain suggested to contribute GA feedback regulation by the transcriptional regulation of genes encoding GA biosynthetic enzymes. The 14-3-3 signaling proteins negatively regulate RSG by sequestering it in the cytoplasm in response to GAs. The phosphorylation on Ser-114 of RSG is essential for 14-3-3 binding of RSG; however, the kinase that catalyzes the reaction is unknown. Recently a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) was identified as an RSG kinase that promotes 14-3-3 binding of RSG by phosphorylation of the Ser-114 of RSG. Our results suggest that CDPK decodes the Ca(2+) signal produced by GAs and regulates the intracellular localization of RSG in plant cells.

  19. Phospho-dependent functional modulation of GABAB receptors by the metabolic sensor AMP-dependent protein kinase

    OpenAIRE

    Kuramoto, Nobuyuki; Wilkins, Megan E.; Fairfax, Benjamin P.; Revilla-Sanchez, Raquel; Terunuma, Miho; Warren, Noel; Tamaki, Keisuke; Iemata, Mika; Couve, Andrés; Calver, Andrew; Horvath, Zsolt; Freeman, Katie; Carling, David; Huang, Lan; Gonzales, Cathleen

    2007-01-01

    GABAB receptors are heterodimeric G-protein coupled receptors composed of R1 and R2 subunits that mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the brain by activating inwardly-rectifying K+ channels (GIRKs) and inhibiting Ca2+ channels. We demonstrate here that GABAB receptors are intimately associated with 5’AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK acts as a metabolic sensor that is potently activated by increases in 5’AMP concentration caused by enhanced metabolic activity, anoxia or ischemia. AMPK...

  20. Pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinoxalines. A new class of cyclin-dependent kinases inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Miguel A; Montoya, María E; Zarranz, Belén; Jaso, Andrés; Aldana, Ignacio; Leclerc, Sophie; Meijer, Laurent; Monge, Antonio

    2002-07-01

    Protein kinases are involved in most physiological processes and in numerous diseases. Therefore, inhibitors of protein kinases have therefore a wide therapeutic potential. While screening for inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK's) and glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3), we identified pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinoxalines as sub-micromolar inhibitors of CDK1/cyclin B. A preliminary structure-activity relationship study suggests that this family of compounds can be optimized to inhibit CDK's and GSK-3. Compounds were tested for their anti-proliferative activity and the results show that several of them displayed a significant inhibitory effect on CDK1/cyclin B. The most active compound (1) was also tested against the brain kinases CDK5/p25 and GSK-3, and proved to be a good inhibitor of both of them. On the contrary, none of the compounds showed any activity in the CDC25 phosphatase assay. As an additional approach, affinity chromatography on immobilized pyrazolo[3,4-b]quinoxalines will be used to identify the intracellular targets of this family of compounds.

  1. Fission yeast Cdk7 controls gene expression through both its CAK and C-terminal domain kinase activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devos, Maxime; Mommaerts, Elise; Migeot, Valerie; van Bakel, Harm; Hermand, Damien

    2015-05-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) activation and RNA polymerase II transcription are linked by the Cdk7 kinase, which phosphorylates Cdks as a trimeric Cdk-activating kinase (CAK) complex, and serine 5 within the polymerase II (Pol II) C-terminal domain (CTD) as transcription factor TFIIH-bound CAK. However, the physiological importance of integrating these processes is not understood. Besides the Cdk7 ortholog Mcs6, fission yeast possesses a second CAK, Csk1. The two enzymes have been proposed to act redundantly to activate Cdc2. Using an improved analogue-sensitive Mcs6-as kinase, we show that Csk1 is not a relevant CAK for Cdc2. Further analyses revealed that Csk1 lacks a 20-amino-acid sequence required for its budding yeast counterpart, Cak1, to bind Cdc2. Transcriptome profiling of the Mcs6-as mutant in the presence or absence of the budding yeast Cak1 kinase, in order to uncouple the CTD kinase and CAK activities of Mcs6, revealed an unanticipated role of the CAK branch in the transcriptional control of the cluster of genes implicated in ribosome biogenesis and cell growth. The analysis of a Cdc2 CAK site mutant confirmed these data. Our data show that the Cdk7 kinase modulates transcription through its well-described RNA Pol II CTD kinase activity and also through the Cdc2-activating kinase activity.

  2. Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Kinases (CaMKKs Effects on AMP-Activated Protein Kinase (AMPK Regulation of Chicken Sperm Functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi Mong Diep Nguyen

    Full Text Available Sperm require high levels of energy to ensure motility and acrosome reaction (AR accomplishment. The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK has been demonstrated to be strongly involved in the control of these properties. We address here the question of the potential role of calcium mobilization on AMPK activation and function in chicken sperm through the Ca(2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinases (CaMKKs mediated pathway. The presence of CaMKKs and their substrates CaMKI and CaMKIV was evaluated by western-blotting and indirect immunofluorescence. Sperm were incubated in presence or absence of extracellular Ca(2+, or of CaMKKs inhibitor (STO-609. Phosphorylations of AMPK, CaMKI, and CaMKIV, as well as sperm functions were evaluated. We demonstrate the presence of both CaMKKs (α and β, CaMKI and CaMKIV in chicken sperm. CaMKKα and CaMKI were localized in the acrosome, the midpiece, and at much lower fluorescence in the flagellum, whereas CaMKKβ was mostly localized in the flagellum and much less in the midpiece and the acrosome. CaMKIV was only present in the flagellum. The presence of extracellular calcium induced an increase in kinases phosphorylation and sperm activity. STO-609 reduced AMPK phosphorylation in the presence of extracellular Ca(2+ but not in its absence. STO-609 did not affect CaMKIV phosphorylation but decreased CaMKI phosphorylation and this inhibition was quicker in the presence of extracellular Ca(2+ than in its absence. STO-609 efficiently inhibited sperm motility and AR, both in the presence and absence of extracellular Ca(2+. Our results show for the first time the presence of CaMKKs (α and β and one of its substrate, CaMKI in different subcellular compartments in germ cells, as well as the changes in the AMPK regulation pathway, sperm motility and AR related to Ca(2+ entry in sperm through the Ca(2+/CaM/CaMKKs/CaMKI pathway. The Ca(2+/CaMKKs/AMPK pathway is activated only under conditions of extracellular Ca(2

  3. Calcium-stimulated autophosphorylation site of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Siems, W. F.; Jones, J. P.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2001-01-01

    The existence of two molecular switches regulating plant chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK), namely the C-terminal visinin-like domain acting as Ca(2+)-sensitive molecular switch and calmodulin binding domain acting as Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation-sensitive molecular switch, has been described (Sathyanarayanan, P. V., Cremo, C. R., and Poovaiah, B. W. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 30417-30422). Here we report the identification of Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site of CCaMK by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight-mass spectrometry. Thr(267) was confirmed as the Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site by post-source decay experiments and by site-directed mutagenesis. The purified T267A mutant form of CCaMK did not show Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation, autophosphorylation-dependent variable calmodulin affinity, or Ca(2+)/calmodulin stimulation of kinase activity. Sequence comparison of CCaMK from monocotyledonous plant (lily) and dicotyledonous plant (tobacco) suggests that the autophosphorylation site is conserved. This is the first identification of a phosphorylation site specifically responding to activation by second messenger system (Ca(2+) messenger system) in plants. Homology modeling of the kinase and calmodulin binding domain of CCaMK with the crystal structure of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 1 suggests that the Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site is located on the surface of the kinase and far from the catalytic site. Analysis of Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation with increasing concentration of CCaMK indicates the possibility that the Ca(2+)-stimulated phosphorylation occurs by an intermolecular mechanism.

  4. Calcium-stimulated autophosphorylation site of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Siems, W. F.; Jones, J. P.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2001-01-01

    The existence of two molecular switches regulating plant chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK), namely the C-terminal visinin-like domain acting as Ca(2+)-sensitive molecular switch and calmodulin binding domain acting as Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation-sensitive molecular switch, has been described (Sathyanarayanan, P. V., Cremo, C. R., and Poovaiah, B. W. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 30417-30422). Here we report the identification of Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site of CCaMK by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight-mass spectrometry. Thr(267) was confirmed as the Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site by post-source decay experiments and by site-directed mutagenesis. The purified T267A mutant form of CCaMK did not show Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation, autophosphorylation-dependent variable calmodulin affinity, or Ca(2+)/calmodulin stimulation of kinase activity. Sequence comparison of CCaMK from monocotyledonous plant (lily) and dicotyledonous plant (tobacco) suggests that the autophosphorylation site is conserved. This is the first identification of a phosphorylation site specifically responding to activation by second messenger system (Ca(2+) messenger system) in plants. Homology modeling of the kinase and calmodulin binding domain of CCaMK with the crystal structure of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 1 suggests that the Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation site is located on the surface of the kinase and far from the catalytic site. Analysis of Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation with increasing concentration of CCaMK indicates the possibility that the Ca(2+)-stimulated phosphorylation occurs by an intermolecular mechanism.

  5. VEGF secretion during hypoxia depends on free radicals-induced Fyn kinase activity in mast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Roman, Jonathan; Ibarra-Sanchez, Alfredo; Lamas, Monica [Departamento de Farmacobiologia, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN (Cinvestav, IPN) (Mexico); Gonzalez Espinosa, Claudia, E-mail: cgonzal@cinvestav.mx [Departamento de Farmacobiologia, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN (Cinvestav, IPN) (Mexico)

    2010-10-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) secrete functional VEGF but do not degranulate after Cobalt chloride-induced hypoxia. {yields} CoCl{sub 2}-induced VEGF secretion in mast cells occurs by a Ca{sup 2+}-insensitive but brefeldin A and Tetanus toxin-sensitive mechanism. {yields} Trolox and N-acetylcysteine inhibit hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion but only Trolox inhibits Fc{epsilon}RI-dependent anaphylactic degranulation in mast cells. {yields} Src family kinase Fyn activation after free radical production is necessary for hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion in mast cells. -- Abstract: Mast cells (MC) have an important role in pathologic conditions such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), where hypoxia conduce to deleterious inflammatory response. MC contribute to hypoxia-induced angiogenesis producing factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), but the mechanisms behind the control of hypoxia-induced VEGF secretion in this cell type is poorly understood. We used the hypoxia-mimicking agent cobalt chloride (CoCl{sub 2}) to analyze VEGF secretion in murine bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). We found that CoCl{sub 2} promotes a sustained production of functional VEGF, able to induce proliferation of endothelial cells in vitro. CoCl{sub 2}-induced VEGF secretion was independent of calcium rise but dependent on tetanus toxin-sensitive vesicle-associated membrane proteins (VAMPs). VEGF exocytosis required free radicals formation and the activation of Src family kinases. Interestingly, an important deficiency on CoCl{sub 2}-induced VEGF secretion was observed in Fyn kinase-deficient BMMCs. Moreover, Fyn kinase was activated by CoCl{sub 2} in WT cells and this activation was prevented by treatment with antioxidants such as Trolox and N-acetylcysteine. Our results show that BMMCs are able to release VEGF under hypoxic conditions through a tetanus toxin-sensitive mechanism, promoted by free radicals-dependent

  6. Contribution of Ca2+ calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase to neural activity-induced neurite outgrowth and survival of cerebellar granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodinsky, Laura N; Coso, Omar A; Fiszman, Mónica L

    2002-03-01

    In this report we describe our studies on intracellular signals that mediate neurite outgrowth and long-term survival of cerebellar granule cells. The effect of voltage-gated calcium channel activation on neurite complexity was evaluated in cultured cerebellar granule cells grown for 48 h at low density; the parameter measured was the fractal dimension of the cell. We explored the contribution of two intracellular pathways, Ca2+ calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK1), to the effects of high [K+ ]e under serum-free conditions. We found that 25 mm KCl (25K) induced an increase in calcium influx through L subtype channels. In neurones grown for 24-48 h under low-density conditions, the activation of these channels induced neurite outgrowth through the activation of Ca2+ calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. This also produced an increase in long-term neuronal survival with a partial contribution from the MEK1 pathway. We also found that the addition of 25K increased the levels of the phosphorylated forms of Ca2+ calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2. Neuronal survival under resting conditions is supported by the MEK1 pathway. We conclude that intracellular calcium oscillations can triggered different biological effects depending on the stage of maturation of the neuronal phenotype. Ca2+ calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II activation determines the growth of neurites and the development of neuronal complexity.

  7. Distinct functions of the dual leucine zipper kinase depending on its subcellular localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallbach, Manuel; Duque Escobar, Jorge; Babaeikelishomi, Rohollah; Stahnke, Marie-Jeannette; Blume, Roland; Schröder, Sabine; Kruegel, Jenny; Maedler, Kathrin; Kluth, Oliver; Kehlenbach, Ralph H; Miosge, Nicolai; Oetjen, Elke

    2016-04-01

    The dual leucine zipper kinase DLK induces β-cell apoptosis by inhibiting the transcriptional activity conferred by the β-cell protective transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein CREB. This action might contribute to β-cell loss and ultimately diabetes. Within its kinase domain DLK shares high homology with the mixed lineage kinase (MLK) 3, which is activated by tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α and interleukin (IL)-1β, known prediabetic signals. In the present study, the regulation of DLK in β-cells by these cytokines was investigated. Both, TNFα and IL-1β induced the nuclear translocation of DLK. Mutations within a putative nuclear localization signal (NLS) prevented basal and cytokine-induced nuclear localization of DLK and binding to the importin receptor importin α, thereby demonstrating a functional NLS within DLK. DLK NLS mutants were catalytically active as they phosphorylated their down-stream kinase c-Jun N-terminal kinase to the same extent as DLK wild-type but did neither inhibit CREB-dependent gene transcription nor transcription conferred by the promoter of the anti-apoptotic protein BCL-xL. In addition, the β-cell apoptosis-inducing effect of DLK was severely diminished by mutation of its NLS. In a murine model of prediabetes, enhanced nuclear DLK was found. These data demonstrate that DLK exerts distinct functions, depending on its subcellular localization and thus provide a novel level of regulating DLK action. Furthermore, the prevention of the nuclear localization of DLK as induced by prediabetic signals with consecutive suppression of β-cell apoptosis might constitute a novel target in the therapy of diabetes mellitus.

  8. A chrysin derivative suppresses skin cancer growth by inhibiting cyclin-dependent kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haidan; Liu, Kangdong; Huang, Zunnan; Park, Chan-Mi; Thimmegowda, N R; Jang, Jae-Hyuk; Ryoo, In-Ja; He, Long; Kim, Sun-Ok; Oi, Naomi; Lee, Ki Won; Soung, Nak-Kyun; Bode, Ann M; Yang, Yifeng; Zhou, Xinmin; Erikson, Raymond L; Ahn, Jong-Seog; Hwang, Joonsung; Kim, Kyoon Eon; Dong, Zigang; Kim, Bo-Yeon

    2013-09-06

    Chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone), a natural flavonoid widely distributed in plants, reportedly has chemopreventive properties against various cancers. However, the anticancer activity of chrysin observed in in vivo studies has been disappointing. Here, we report that a chrysin derivative, referred to as compound 69407, more strongly inhibited EGF-induced neoplastic transformation of JB6 P(+) cells compared with chrysin. It attenuated cell cycle progression of EGF-stimulated cells at the G1 phase and inhibited the G1/S transition. It caused loss of retinoblastoma phosphorylation at both Ser-795 and Ser-807/811, the preferred sites phosphorylated by Cdk4/6 and Cdk2, respectively. It also suppressed anchorage-dependent and -independent growth of A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells. Compound 69407 reduced tumor growth in the A431 mouse xenograft model and retinoblastoma phosphorylation at Ser-795 and Ser-807/811. Immunoprecipitation kinase assay results showed that compound 69407 attenuated endogenous Cdk4 and Cdk2 kinase activities in EGF-stimulated JB6 P(+) cells. Pulldown and in vitro kinase assay results indicated that compound 69407 directly binds with Cdk2 and Cdk4 in an ATP-independent manner and inhibited their kinase activities. A binding model between compound 69407 and a crystal structure of Cdk2 predicted that compound 69407 was located inside the Cdk2 allosteric binding site. The binding was further verified by a point mutation binding assay. Overall results indicated that compound 69407 is an ATP-noncompetitive cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor with anti-tumor effects, which acts by binding inside the Cdk2 allosteric pocket. This study provides new insights for creating a general pharmacophore model to design and develop novel ATP-noncompetitive agents with chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic potency.

  9. Spatial regulation of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase during chemotactic cell migration

    OpenAIRE

    Howe, Alan K.; Baldor, Linda C.; Hogan, Brian P.

    2005-01-01

    Historically, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) has a paradoxical role in cell motility, having been shown to both facilitate and inhibit actin cytoskeletal dynamics and cell migration. In an effort to understand this dichotomy, we show here that PKA is regulated in subcellular space during cell migration. Immunofluorescence microscopy and biochemical enrichment of pseudopodia showed that type II regulatory subunits of PKA and PKA activity are enriched in protrusive cellular structures ...

  10. DNA-dependent protein kinase in nonhomologous end joining: a lock with multiple keys?

    OpenAIRE

    Weterings, Eric; Chen, David J.

    2007-01-01

    The DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is one of the central enzymes involved in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. It facilitates proper alignment of the two ends of the broken DNA molecule and coordinates access of other factors to the repair complex. We discuss the latest findings on DNA-PK phosphorylation and offer a working model for the regulation of DNA-PK during DSB repair.

  11. Characterization of a Toxoplasma gondii calcium calmodulin-dependent protein kinase homolog

    OpenAIRE

    Kato, Kentaro; Sugi, Tatsuki; Takemae, Hitoshi; Takano, Ryo; Gong, Haiyan; Ishiwa, Akiko; Horimoto, Taisuke; Akashi, Hiroomi

    2016-01-01

    Background Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite of the phylum Apicomplexa and a major pathogen of animals and immunocompromised humans, in whom it causes encephalitis. Understanding the mechanism of tachyzoite invasion is important for the discovery of new drug targets and may serve as a model for the study of other apicomplexan parasites. We previously showed that Plasmodium falciparum expresses a homolog of human calcium calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) that is ...

  12. MAPKAP kinase 2 (MK2)-dependent and -independent models of blister formation in pemphigus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xuming; Li, Hong; Sano, Yasuyo; Gaestel, Matthias; Mo Park, Jin; Payne, Aimee S

    2014-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an autoimmune blistering disease characterized by autoantibodies to the keratinocyte adhesion protein desmoglein 3 (Dsg3). Previous studies suggest that PV pathogenesis involves p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent and -independent pathways. However, p38 is a difficult protein to study and therapeutically target because it has four isoforms and multiple downstream effectors. In this study, we identify MAPKAP (mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein) kinase 2 (MK2) as a downstream effector of p38 signaling in PV and describe MK2-dependent and -independent mechanisms of blister formation using passive transfer of human anti-Dsg IgG4 mAbs to neonatal mice. In human keratinocytes, PV mAbs activate MK2 in a dose-dependent manner. MK2 is also activated in human pemphigus skin blisters, causing translocation of MK2 from the nucleus to the cytosol. Small-molecule inhibition of MK2 and silencing of MK2 expression block PV mAb-induced Dsg3 endocytosis in human keratinocytes. In addition, small-molecule inhibition and genetic deletion of p38α and MK2 inhibit spontaneous but not induced suprabasal blisters by PV mAbs in mouse passive transfer models. Collectively, these data suggest that MK2 is a key downstream effector of p38 that can modulate PV autoantibody pathogenicity. MK2 inhibition may be a valuable adjunctive therapy for control of pemphigus blistering.

  13. A Protein Kinase A–Independent Pathway Controlling Aquaporin 2 Trafficking as a Possible Cause for the Syndrome of Inappropriate Antidiuresis Associated with Polycystic Kidney Disease 1 Haploinsufficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasorsa, Domenica; Trimpert, Christiane; Ranieri, Marianna; Di Mise, Annarita; Mola, Maria Grazia; Mastrofrancesco, Lisa; Devuyst, Olivier; Svelto, Maria; Deen, Peter M.T.; Valenti, Giovanna

    2014-01-01

    Renal water reabsorption is controlled by arginine vasopressin (AVP), which binds to V2 receptors, resulting in protein kinase A (PKA) activation, phosphorylation of aquaporin 2 (AQP2) at serine 256, and translocation of AQP2 to the plasma membrane. However, AVP also causes dephosphorylation of AQP2 at S261. Recent studies showed that cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks) can phosphorylate AQP2 peptides at S261 in vitro. We investigated the possible role of cdks in the phosphorylation of AQP2 and identified a new PKA-independent pathway regulating AQP2 trafficking. In ex vivo kidney slices and MDCK-AQP2 cells, R-roscovitine, a specific inhibitor of cdks, increased pS256 levels and decreased pS261 levels. The changes in AQP2 phosphorylation status were paralleled by increases in cell surface expression of AQP2 and osmotic water permeability in the absence of forskolin stimulation. R-Roscovitine did not alter cAMP-dependent PKA activity but specifically reduced protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) expression and activity in MDCK cells. Notably, we found reduced PP2A expression and activity and reduced pS261 levels in Pkd1+/− mice displaying a syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis with high levels of pS256, despite unchanged AVP and cAMP. Similar to previous findings in Pkd1+/− mice, R-roscovitine treatment caused a significant decrease in intracellular calcium in MDCK cells. Our data indicate that reduced activity of PP2A, secondary to reduced intracellular Ca2+ levels, promotes AQP2 trafficking independent of the AVP–PKA axis. This pathway may be relevant for explaining pathologic states characterized by inappropriate AVP secretion and positive water balance. PMID:24700872

  14. A protein kinase A-independent pathway controlling aquaporin 2 trafficking as a possible cause for the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis associated with polycystic kidney disease 1 haploinsufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamma, Grazia; Lasorsa, Domenica; Trimpert, Christiane; Ranieri, Marianna; Di Mise, Annarita; Mola, Maria Grazia; Mastrofrancesco, Lisa; Devuyst, Olivier; Svelto, Maria; Deen, Peter M T; Valenti, Giovanna

    2014-10-01

    Renal water reabsorption is controlled by arginine vasopressin (AVP), which binds to V2 receptors, resulting in protein kinase A (PKA) activation, phosphorylation of aquaporin 2 (AQP2) at serine 256, and translocation of AQP2 to the plasma membrane. However, AVP also causes dephosphorylation of AQP2 at S261. Recent studies showed that cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks) can phosphorylate AQP2 peptides at S261 in vitro. We investigated the possible role of cdks in the phosphorylation of AQP2 and identified a new PKA-independent pathway regulating AQP2 trafficking. In ex vivo kidney slices and MDCK-AQP2 cells, R-roscovitine, a specific inhibitor of cdks, increased pS256 levels and decreased pS261 levels. The changes in AQP2 phosphorylation status were paralleled by increases in cell surface expression of AQP2 and osmotic water permeability in the absence of forskolin stimulation. R-Roscovitine did not alter cAMP-dependent PKA activity but specifically reduced protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) expression and activity in MDCK cells. Notably, we found reduced PP2A expression and activity and reduced pS261 levels in Pkd1(+/-) mice displaying a syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis with high levels of pS256, despite unchanged AVP and cAMP. Similar to previous findings in Pkd1(+/-) mice, R-roscovitine treatment caused a significant decrease in intracellular calcium in MDCK cells. Our data indicate that reduced activity of PP2A, secondary to reduced intracellular Ca(2+) levels, promotes AQP2 trafficking independent of the AVP-PKA axis. This pathway may be relevant for explaining pathologic states characterized by inappropriate AVP secretion and positive water balance. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  15. Serine/Threonine Kinase 3-Phosphoinositide-Dependent Protein Kinase-1 (PDK1 as a Key Regulator of Cell Migration and Cancer Dissemination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Di Blasio

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Dissecting the cellular signaling that governs the motility of eukaryotic cells is one of the fundamental tasks of modern cell biology, not only because of the large number of physiological processes in which cell migration is crucial, but even more so because of the pathological ones, in particular tumor invasion and metastasis. Cell migration requires the coordination of at least four major processes: polarization of intracellular signaling, regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and membrane extension, focal adhesion and integrin signaling and contractile forces generation and rear retraction. Among the molecular components involved in the regulation of locomotion, the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K pathway has been shown to exert fundamental role. A pivotal node of such pathway is represented by the serine/threonine kinase 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDPK1 or PDK1. PDK1, and the majority of its substrates, belong to the AGC family of kinases (related to cAMP-dependent protein kinase 1, cyclic Guanosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase and protein kinase C, and control a plethora of cellular processes, downstream either to PI3K or to other pathways, such as RAS GTPase-MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase. Interestingly, PDK1 has been demonstrated to be crucial for the regulation of each step of cell migration, by activating several proteins such as protein kinase B/Akt (PKB/Akt, myotonic dystrophy-related CDC42-binding kinases alpha (MRCKα, Rho associated coiled-coil containing protein kinase 1 (ROCK1, phospholipase C gamma 1 (PLCγ1 and β3 integrin. Moreover, PDK1 regulates cancer cell invasion as well, thus representing a possible target to prevent cancer metastasis in human patients. The aim of this review is to summarize the various mechanisms by which PDK1 controls the cell migration process, from cell polarization to actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesion regulation, and finally, to discuss the evidence

  16. Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase CPK21 Functions in Abiotic Stress Response in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sandra Franz; Britta Ehlert; Anja Liese; Joachim Kurth; Anne-Claire Cazalé; Tina Romeis

    2011-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases(CDPKs)comprise a family of plant serine/threonine protein kinases in which the calcium sensing domain and the kinase effector domain are combined within one molecule.So far,a biological function in abiotic stress signaling has only been reported for few CDPK isoforms,whereas the underlying biochemical mechanism for these CDPKs is still mainly unknown.Here,we show that CPK21 from Arabidopsis thaliana is biochemically activated in vivo in response to hyperosmotic stress.Loss-of-function seedlings of cpk21 are more tolerant to hyperosmotic stress and mutant plants show increased stress responses with respect to marker gene expression and metabolite accumulation.In transgenic Arabidopsis complementation lines in the cpk21 mutant background,in which either CPK21 wildtype,or a full-length enzyme variant carrying an amino-acid substitution were stably expressed,stress responsitivity was restored by CPK21 but not with the kinase inactive variant.The biochemical characterization of in planta synthesized and purified CPK21 protein revealed that within the calcium-binding domain,N-terminal EF1- and EF2-motifs compared to C-terminal EF3- and EF4-motifs differ in their contribution to calcium-regulated kinase activity,suggesting a crucial role for the N-terminal EF-hand pair.Our data provide evidence for CPK21 contributing in abiotic stress signaling and suggest that the N-terminal EF-hand pair is a calcium-sensing determinant controlling specificity of CPK21 function.

  17. Intermittent hypoxia-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction requires ROS-dependent MAP kinase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarenko, Vladislav V; Usatyuk, Peter V; Yuan, Guoxiang; Lee, May M; Nanduri, Jayasri; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Kumar, Ganesh K; Prabhakar, Nanduri R

    2014-04-15

    The objective of the present study was to determine the impact of simulated apnea with intermittent hypoxia (IH) on endothelial barrier function and assess the underlying mechanism(s). Experiments were performed on human lung microvascular endothelial cells exposed to IH-consisting alternating cycles of 1.5% O2 for 30s followed by 20% O2 for 5 min. IH decreased transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) suggesting attenuated endothelial barrier function. The effect of IH on TEER was stimulus dependent and reversible after reoxygenation. IH-exposed cells exhibited stress fiber formation and redistribution of cortactin, vascular endothelial-cadherins, and zona occludens-1 junction proteins along with increased intercellular gaps at cell-cell boundaries. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and c-jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) were phosphorylated in IH-exposed cells. Inhibiting either ERK or JNK prevented the IH-induced decrease in TEER and the reorganization of the cytoskeleton and junction proteins. IH increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, and manganese (III) tetrakis (1-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphyrin pentachloride, a membrane-permeable antioxidant, prevented ERK and JNK phosphorylation as well as IH-induced changes in endothelial barrier function. These results demonstrate that IH via ROS-dependent activation of MAP kinases leads to reorganization of cytoskeleton and junction proteins resulting in endothelial barrier dysfunction.

  18. NAD kinase controls animal NADP biosynthesis and is modulated via evolutionarily divergent calmodulin-dependent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Nick R; Pollak, Nadine; Dölle, Christian; Niere, Marc; Chen, Yaoyao; Oliveri, Paola; Amaya, Enrique; Patel, Sandip; Ziegler, Mathias

    2015-02-03

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) is a critical cofactor during metabolism, calcium signaling, and oxidative defense, yet how animals regulate their NADP pools in vivo and how NADP-synthesizing enzymes are regulated have long remained unknown. Here we show that expression of Nadk, an NAD(+) kinase-encoding gene, governs NADP biosynthesis in vivo and is essential for development in Xenopus frog embryos. Unexpectedly, we found that embryonic Nadk expression is dynamic, showing cell type-specific up-regulation during both frog and sea urchin embryogenesis. We analyzed the NAD kinases (NADKs) of a variety of deuterostome animals, finding two conserved internal domains forming a catalytic core but a highly divergent N terminus. One type of N terminus (found in basal species such as the sea urchin) mediates direct catalytic activation of NADK by Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM), whereas the other (typical for vertebrates) is phosphorylated by a CaM kinase-dependent mechanism. This work indicates that animal NADKs govern NADP biosynthesis in vivo and are regulated by evolutionarily divergent and conserved CaM-dependent mechanisms.

  19. Protein Kinase C alpha (PKCα) dependent signaling mediates endometrial cancer cell growth and tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haughian, James M.; Reno, Elaine M.; Thorne, Alicia M.; Bradford, Andrew P.

    2009-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common invasive gynecologic malignancy, yet molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways underlying its etiology and pathophysiology remain poorly characterized. We sought to define a functional role for the protein kinase C (PKC) isoform, PKCα, in an established cell model of endometrial adenocarcinoma. Ishikawa cells depleted of PKCα protein grew slower, formed fewer colonies in anchorage-independent growth assays and exhibited impaired xenograft tumor formation in nude mice. Consistent with impaired growth, PKCα knockdown increased levels of the cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors p21Cip1/WAF1 (p21) and p27Kip1 (p27). Despite the absence of functional phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) protein in Ishikawa cells, PKCα knockdown reduced Akt phosphorylation at serine 473 and concomitantly inhibited phosphorylation of the Akt target, glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β). PKCα knockdown also resulted in decreased basal ERK phosphorylation and attenuated ERK activation following EGF stimulation. p21 and p27 expression was not increased by treatment of Ishikawa cells with ERK and Akt inhibitors, suggesting PKCα regulates CDK expression independently of Akt and ERK. Immunohistochemical analysis of grade 1 endometrioid adenocarcinoma revealed aberrant PKCα expression, with foci of elevated PKCα staining, not observed in normal endometrium. These studies demonstrate a critical role for PKCα signaling in endometrial tumorigenesis by regulating expression of CDK inhibitors p21 and p27 and activation of Akt and ERK dependent proliferative pathways. Thus, targeting PKCα may provide novel therapeutic options in endometrial tumors. PMID:19672862

  20. Selective inhibition of Sarcocystis neurona calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 for equine protozoal myeloencephalitis therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojo, Kayode K; Dangoudoubiyam, Sriveny; Verma, Shiv K; Scheele, Suzanne; DeRocher, Amy E; Yeargan, Michelle; Choi, Ryan; Smith, Tess R; Rivas, Kasey L; Hulverson, Matthew A; Barrett, Lynn K; Fan, Erkang; Maly, Dustin J; Parsons, Marilyn; Dubey, Jitender P; Howe, Daniel K; Van Voorhis, Wesley C

    2016-12-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is the most frequent cause of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis, a debilitating neurological disease of horses that can be difficult to treat. We identified SnCDPK1, the S. neurona homologue of calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 (CDPK1), a validated drug target in Toxoplasma gondii. SnCDPK1 shares the glycine "gatekeeper" residue of the well-characterized T. gondii enzyme, which allows the latter to be targeted by bumped kinase inhibitors. This study presents detailed molecular and phenotypic evidence that SnCDPK1 can be targeted for rational drug development. Recombinant SnCDPK1 was tested against four bumped kinase inhibitors shown to potently inhibit both T. gondii (Tg) CDPK1 and T. gondii tachyzoite growth. SnCDPK1 was inhibited by low nanomolar concentrations of these BKIs and S. neurona growth was inhibited at 40-120nM concentrations. Thermal shift assays confirmed these bumped kinase inhibitors bind CDPK1 in S. neurona cell lysates. Treatment with bumped kinase inhibitors before or after invasion suggests that bumped kinase inhibitors interfere with S. neurona mammalian host cell invasion in the 0.5-2.5μM range but interfere with intracellular division at 2.5μM. In vivo proof-of-concept experiments were performed in a murine model of S. neurona infection. The experimental infected groups treated for 30days with compound BKI-1553 (n=10 mice) had no signs of disease, while the infected control group had severe signs and symptoms of infection. Elevated antibody responses were found in 100% of control infected animals, but only 20% of BKI-1553 treated infected animals. Parasites were found in brain tissues of 100% of the control infected animals, but only in 10% of the BKI-1553 treated animals. The bumped kinase inhibitors used in these assays have been chemically optimized for potency, selectivity and pharmacokinetic properties, and hence are good candidates for treatment of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis. Copyright © 2016

  1. The Interaction between Cyclin B1 and Cytomegalovirus Protein Kinase pUL97 is Determined by an Active Kinase Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steingruber, Mirjam; Socher, Eileen; Hutterer, Corina; Webel, Rike; Bergbrede, Tim; Lenac, Tihana; Sticht, Heinrich; Marschall, Manfred

    2015-08-11

    Replication of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is characterized by a tight virus-host cell interaction. Cyclin-dependent protein kinases (CDKs) are functionally integrated into viral gene expression and protein modification. The HCMV-encoded protein kinase pUL97 acts as a CDK ortholog showing structural and functional similarities. Recently, we reported an interaction between pUL97 kinase with a subset of host cyclins, in particular with cyclin T1. Here, we describe an interaction of pUL97 at an even higher affinity with cyclin B1. As a striking feature, the interaction between pUL97 and cyclin B1 proved to be strictly dependent on pUL97 activity, as interaction could be abrogated by treatment with pUL97 inhibitors or by inserting mutations into the conserved kinase domain or the nonconserved C-terminus of pUL97, both producing loss of activity. Thus, we postulate that the mechanism of pUL97-cyclin B1 interaction is determined by an active pUL97 kinase domain.

  2. The Interaction between Cyclin B1 and Cytomegalovirus Protein Kinase pUL97 is Determined by an Active Kinase Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjam Steingruber

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Replication of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is characterized by a tight virus-host cell interaction. Cyclin-dependent protein kinases (CDKs are functionally integrated into viral gene expression and protein modification. The HCMV-encoded protein kinase pUL97 acts as a CDK ortholog showing structural and functional similarities. Recently, we reported an interaction between pUL97 kinase with a subset of host cyclins, in particular with cyclin T1. Here, we describe an interaction of pUL97 at an even higher affinity with cyclin B1. As a striking feature, the interaction between pUL97 and cyclin B1 proved to be strictly dependent on pUL97 activity, as interaction could be abrogated by treatment with pUL97 inhibitors or by inserting mutations into the conserved kinase domain or the nonconserved C-terminus of pUL97, both producing loss of activity. Thus, we postulate that the mechanism of pUL97-cyclin B1 interaction is determined by an active pUL97 kinase domain.

  3. Cyclic Nucleotide-Dependent Protein Kinases, IV. Widespread Occurrence of Adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate-dependent Protein Kinase in Various Tissues and Phyla of the Animal Kingdom

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    J. F. Kuo; Paul Greengard

    1969-01-01

    Adenosine 3 ,5 -monophosphate-dependent protein kinase activity was found in about thirty sources including many mammalian tissues as well as species representative of eight different invertebrate phyla...

  4. Reverse relationship between malignancy and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity in Yoshida rat ascites hepatomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, K; Nakamura, S; Nomura, M; Yamamoto, H; Sanae, F; Hidaka, H

    1993-08-31

    Rat ascites hepatoma (AH) cells (10(6) cells/head) inoculated intraperitoneally into rats had host-killing ability (malignancy) in the order AH66F > AH44 > AH13 > AH7974 > AH109A > AH66 > AH130. The life span of the rats after inoculation closely correlated with the activity of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A) in the tumor cells but not the activity of Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase C). N-[2-[N-[3-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-methyl-2-propenyl]amino]ethyl]-5- isoquinoline-sulfonamide (H-87), a potent, selective inhibitor of protein kinase A, inhibited in vitro growth of these hepatoma cells with a similar potency and, intraperitoneally injected, prolonged the lives of rats bearing less malignant AH66 cells (with high protein kinase A activity) but did not affect the life span of rats bearing highly malignant AH66F cells (with low protein kinase A activity). On the other hand N-(2-methylpiperazyl)-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide (H-7), an inhibitor of protein kinase C, inhibited AH66F cells more than AH66 cells, but did not influence the life span of rats bearing either hepatoma. From these results it is deduced that protein kinase A may be important in the regulation of malignancy and in vivo proliferation of AH cells.

  5. (R)-roscovitine, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, enhances tonic GABA inhibition in rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A; Tyzio, R; Zilberter, Y; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2008-10-02

    Pharmacological agents that mediate a persistent GABAergic conductance are of considerable interest for treatment of epilepsy. (R)-roscovitine is a membrane permeable cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, designed to block cell division. It is currently undergoing a phase II clinical trial as an anticancer drug. We show that (R)-roscovitine increases a tonic GABA-mediated current in rat hippocampal neurons. This enhanced tonic current appears independent of synaptic GABA release and requires functional transmembrane GABA transport. The effect of (R)-roscovitine is associated with neither modification of GABAA receptors nor protein kinase activity, but is associated with a significant increase in intracellular GABA concentration in hippocampal GABAergic neurons. (R)-roscovitine-induced tonic inhibition significantly suppresses spontaneous spiking activity of hippocampal pyramidal cells. Therefore, (R)-roscovitine is a potent modulator of neuronal activity in rat hippocampus and may provide a tool for preventing paroxysmal activity.

  6. EFFECT OF PHORBOL ESTER ON cAMP-DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASE ACTIVITY IN CARDIOMYOCYTES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周文华; 肖殿模; 郑超强; 王小鲁; 张俊保

    1995-01-01

    Cardiomyocytes isolated from neonatal rats were treated with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate(PMA) ranging from 10-11 to 10-7mol/L for 20 min,causing cytosol protein kinase A (PKA) activity to decrease while particulate PKA activity increase in a concentration-dependent manner.The change of PKA activity induced by PMA was abolished completely by pretreatment of polymyxin B or depletion of protein kinase C (PKC).Type Ⅱ PKA activity in particulate fraction was enhanced remarkably,while that of type I PKA was not altered when the cells were treated with 100 nmol/L PMA.The results suggested that subcellular distribution and activity of PKA in cardiomyocytes may be regulated by PKC.

  7. Role of signal transduction crosstalk between adenylyl cyclase and MAP kinase in hippocampus-dependent memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zhengui; Storm, Daniel R

    2012-08-16

    One of the intriguing questions in neurobiology is how long-term memory (LTM) traces are established and maintained in the brain. Memory can be divided into at least two temporally and mechanistically distinct forms. Short-term memory (STM) lasts no longer than several hours, while LTM persists for days or longer. A crucial step in the generation of LTM is consolidation, a process in which STM is converted to LTM. Hippocampus-dependent LTM depends on activation of Ca(2+), Erk/MAP kinase (MAPK), and cAMP signaling pathways, as well as de novo gene expression and translation. One of the transcriptional pathways strongly implicated in LTM is the CREB/CRE (calcium, cAMP response element) transcriptional pathway. Interestingly, this transcriptional pathway may also contribute to other forms of neuroplasticity including adaptive responses to drugs. Evidence discussed in this review indicates that activation of the Erk1/2 MAP Kinase (MAPK)/CRE transcriptional pathway during the formation of hippocampus-dependent memory depends on calmodulin (CaM)-stimulated adenylyl cyclases.

  8. DNA-dependent protein kinase inhibits AID-induced antibody gene conversion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam J L Cook

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Affinity maturation and class switching of antibodies requires activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID-dependent hypermutation of Ig V(DJ rearrangements and Ig S regions, respectively, in activated B cells. AID deaminates deoxycytidine bases in Ig genes, converting them into deoxyuridines. In V(DJ regions, subsequent excision of the deaminated bases by uracil-DNA glycosylase, or by mismatch repair, leads to further point mutation or gene conversion, depending on the species. In Ig S regions, nicking at the abasic sites produced by AID and uracil-DNA glycosylases results in staggered double-strand breaks, whose repair by nonhomologous end joining mediates Ig class switching. We have tested whether nonhomologous end joining also plays a role in V(DJ hypermutation using chicken DT40 cells deficient for Ku70 or the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs. Inactivation of the Ku70 or DNA-PKcs genes in DT40 cells elevated the rate of AID-induced gene conversion as much as 5-fold. Furthermore, DNA-PKcs-deficiency appeared to reduce point mutation. The data provide strong evidence that double-strand DNA ends capable of recruiting the DNA-dependent protein kinase complex are important intermediates in Ig V gene conversion.

  9. A myristoyl/phosphoserine switch controls cAMP-dependent protein kinase association to membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffarogullari, Ece C; Masterson, Larry R; Metcalfe, Emily E; Traaseth, Nathaniel J; Balatri, Erica; Musa, Musa M; Mullen, Daniel; Distefano, Mark D; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2011-08-26

    The cAMP-dependent protein kinase [protein kinase A (PKA)] mediates a myriad of cellular signaling events, and its activity is tightly regulated in both space and time. Among these regulatory mechanisms is N-myristoylation, whose biological role has been elusive. Using a combination of thermodynamics, kinetics, and spectroscopic methods, we analyzed the effects of N-myristoylation and phosphorylation at Ser10 on the interactions of PKA with model membranes. We found that, in the absence of lipids, the myristoyl group is tucked into the hydrophobic binding pocket of the enzyme (myr-in state). Upon association with lipid bilayers, the myristoyl group is extruded and inserts into the hydrocarbon region of the lipid bilayer (myr-out state). NMR data indicate that the enzyme undergoes conformational equilibrium between myr-in and myr-out states, which can be shifted byeither interaction with membranes and/or phosphorylation at Ser10. Our results provide evidence that the membrane binding motif of the myristoylated C-subunit of PKA (PKA-C) steers the enzyme toward lipids independent of its regulatory subunit or an A-kinase anchoring protein, providing an additional mechanism to localize the enzyme near membrane-bound substrates.

  10. Neuronal phosphorylated RNA-dependent protein kinase in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Paquet, Claire

    2009-02-01

    The mechanisms of neuronal apoptosis in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and their relationship to accumulated prion protein (PrP) are unclear. A recent cell culture study showed that intracytoplasmic PrP may induce phosphorylated RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR(p))-mediated cell stress. The double-stranded RNA protein kinase PKR is a proapoptotic and stress kinase that accumulates in degenerating neurons in Alzheimer disease. To determine whether neuronal apoptosis in human CJD is associated with activation of the PKR(p) signaling pathway, we assessed in situ end labeling and immunocytochemistry for PrP, glial fibrillary acidic protein, CD68, activated caspase 3, and phosphorylated PKR (Thr451) in samples of frontal, occipital, and temporal cortex, striatum, and cerebellum from 6 patients with sporadic CJD and 5 controls. Neuronal immunostaining for activated PKR was found in all CJD cases. The most staining was in nuclei and, in contrast to findings in Alzheimer disease, cytoplasmic labeling was not detected. Both the number and distribution of PKR(p)-positive neurons correlated closely with the extent of neuronal apoptosis, spongiosis, astrocytosis, and microglial activation and with the phenotype and disease severity. There was no correlation with the type, topography, or amount of extracellular PrP deposits. These findings suggest that neuronal apoptosis in human CJD may result from PKR(p)-mediated cell stress and are consistent with recent studies supporting a pathogenic role for intracellular or transmembrane PrP.

  11. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5, a node protein in diminished tauopathy: a systems biology approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Fredy Castro-Alvarez

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the most common cause of dementia worldwide. One of the main pathological changes that occurs in AD is the intracellular accumulation of hyperphosphorylated Tau protein in neurons. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5 is one of the major kinases involved in Tau phosphorylation, directly phosphorylating various residues and simultaneously regulating various substrates such as kinases and phosphatases that influence Tau phosphorylation in a synergistic and antagonistic way. It remains unknown how the interaction between CDK5 and its substrates promotes Tau phosphorylation, and systemic approaches are needed that allow an analysis of all the proteins involved. In this review, the role of the CDK5 signaling pathway in Tau hyperphosphorylation is described, an in silico model of the CDK5 signaling pathway is presented. The relationship among these theoretical and computational models shows that the regulation of Tau phosphorylation by PP2A and GSK3β is essential under basal conditions and also describes the leading role of CDK5 under excitotoxic conditions, where silencing of CDK5 can generate changes in these enzymes to reverse a pathological condition that simulates AD.

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ser/Thr protein kinase B mediates an oxygen-dependent replication switch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, Corrie; Liao, Reiling; Anderson, Lindsey N.; Rustad, Tige; Ollodart, Anja R.; Wright, Aaron T.; Sherman, David R.; Grundner, Christoph

    2014-01-07

    In the majority of cases, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infections are clinically latent, characterized by little or no bacterial replication and drug tolerance. Low oxygen tension is a major host factor inducing bacteriostasis, but the molecular mechanisms driving oxygen-dependent replication are poorly understood. Mtb encodes eleven serine/threonine protein kinases, a family of signaling molecules known to regulate similar replicative adaptations in other bacteria. Here, we tested the role of serine/threonine phosphorylation in the Mtb response to altered oxygen status, using an in vitro model of latency (hypoxia) and reactivation (reaeration). Broad kinase inhibition compromised survival of Mtb in hypoxia. Activity-based protein profiling and genetic mutation identified PknB as the kinase critical for surviving hypoxia. Mtb replication was highly sensitive to changes in PknB levels in aerated culture, and even more so in hypoxia. A mutant overexpressing PknB specifically in hypoxia showed a 10-fold loss in viability in low oxygen conditions. In contrast, chemically reducing PknB activity during hypoxia specifically compromised resumption of growth during reaeration. These data support a model in which PknB activity is reduced to achieve bacteriostasis, and elevated when replication resumes. Together, these data show that phosphosignaling controls replicative transitions associated with latency and reactivation, that PknB is a major regulator of these transitions, and that PknB could provide a highly vulnerable therapeutic target at every step of the Mtb life cycle - active disease, latency, and reactivation.

  13. Rho/Rho-dependent kinase affects locomotion and actin-myosin II activity of Amoeba proteus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kłopocka, W; Redowicz, M J

    2004-10-01

    The highly motile free-living unicellular organism Amoeba proteus has been widely used as a model to study cell motility. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying its unique locomotion are still scarcely known. Recently, we have shown that blocking the amoebae's endogenous Rac- and Rho-like proteins led to distinct and irreversible changes in the appearance of these large migrating cells as well as to a significant inhibition of their locomotion. In order to elucidate the mechanism of the Rho pathway, we tested the effects of blocking the endogenous Rho-dependent kinase (ROCK) by anti-ROCK antibodies and Y-27632, (+)-(R)-trans-4-(1-aminoethyl)-N-(4-pyridyl)cyclohexanecarboxamide dihydrochloride, a specific inhibitor of ROCK, on migrating amoebae and the effect of the Rho and ROCK inhibition on the actin-activated Mg-ATPase of the cytosolic fraction of the amoebae. Amoebae microinjected with anti-ROCK inhibitors remained contracted and strongly attached to the glass surface and exhibited an atypical locomotion. Despite protruding many pseudopodia that were advancing in various directions, the amoebae could not effectively move. Immunofluorescence studies showed that ROCK-like protein was dispersed throughout the cytoplasm and was also found in the regions of actin-myosin II interaction during both isotonic and isometric contraction. The Mg-ATPase activity was about two- to threefold enhanced, indicating that blocking the Rho/Rho-dependent kinase activated myosin. It is possible then that in contrast to the vertebrate cells, the inactivation of Rho/Rho-dependent kinase in amoebae leads to the activation of myosin II and to the observed hypercontracted cells which cannot exert effective locomotion.

  14. dsRNA-Dependent Protein Kinase PKR and its Role in Stress, Signaling and HCV Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane F. Meurs

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase PKR plays multiple roles in cells, in response to different stress situations. As a member of the interferon (IFN‑Stimulated Genes, PKR was initially recognized as an actor in the antiviral action of IFN, due to its ability to control translation, through phosphorylation, of the alpha subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2a. As such, PKR participates in the generation of stress granules, or autophagy and a number of viruses have designed strategies to inhibit its action. However, PKR deficient mice resist most viral infections, indicating that PKR may play other roles in the cell other than just acting as an antiviral agent. Indeed, PKR regulates several signaling pathways, either as an adapter protein and/or using its kinase activity. Here we review the role of PKR as an eIF2a kinase, its participation in the regulation of the NF-kB, p38MAPK and insulin pathways, and we focus on its role during infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV. PKR binds the HCV IRES RNA, cooperates with some functions of the HCV core protein and may represent a target for NS5A or E2. Novel data points out for a role of PKR as a pro-HCV agent, both as an adapter protein and as an eIF2a-kinase, and in cooperation with the di-ubiquitin-like protein ISG15. Developing pharmaceutical inhibitors of PKR may help in resolving some viral infections as well as stress-related damages.

  15. The critical roles of cyclic AMP/cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase in platelet physiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong YAN; Suping LI; Kesheng DAI

    2009-01-01

    Platelets are the primary players in both thrombosis and hemostasis.Cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) are important signaling molecules in the regulation of platelet function,such as adhesion,aggregation,and secretion.Elevation of intracellular cAMP,which induces the activation of PKA,results in the inhibition of platelet function.Thus,tight control of the intracellular cAMP/PKA signaling pathway has great implications for platelet-dependent hemostasis and effective cardiovascular therapy.In this review,we summarize the PKA substrates and their contributions to platelet function,especially the advancing understanding of the cAMP/PKA-dependent signaling pathway in platelet physiology.In addition,we suggest the possibility that cAMP/PKA is involved in the platelet procoagulant process and receptor ectodomain shedding.

  16. MAPKAP kinase 2 (MK2)-dependent and independent models of blister formation in pemphigus vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xuming; Li, Hong; Sano, Yasuyo; Gaestel, Matthias; Park, Jin Mo; Payne, Aimee S.

    2013-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an autoimmune blistering disease characterized by autoantibodies to the keratinocyte adhesion protein desmoglein (Dsg) 3. Previous studies suggest that PV pathogenesis involves p38 mitogen activated protein kinase-dependent and -independent pathways. However, p38 is a difficult protein to study and therapeutically target because it has four isoforms and multiple downstream effectors. In the current study, we identify MAPKAP kinase 2 (MK2) as a downstream effector of p38 signaling in PV and describe MK2-dependent and -independent mechanisms of blister formation using passive transfer of human anti-Dsg IgG4 mAbs to neonatal mice. In human keratinocytes, PV mAbs activate MK2 in a dose-dependent manner. MK2 is also activated in human pemphigus skin blisters, causing translocation of MK2 from the nucleus to the cytosol. Small molecule inhibition of MK2 and silencing of MK2 expression block PV mAb-induced Dsg3 endocytosis in human keratinocytes. Additionally, small molecule inhibition and genetic deletion of p38α and MK2 inhibit spontaneous, but not induced, suprabasal blisters by PV mAbs in mouse passive transfer models. Collectively, these data suggest that MK2 is a key downstream effector of p38 that can modulate PV autoantibody pathogenicity. MK2 inhibition may be a valuable adjunctive therapy for control of pemphigus blistering. PMID:23657501

  17. Biochemical similarities between soluble and membrane-bound calcium-dependent protein kinases of barley

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimczak, L.J.; Hind, G. (Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (USA))

    1990-04-01

    The soluble and membrane-bound forms of the calcium-dependent protein kinase from barley leaves (Hordeum vulgare L. cv. Borsoy) have been partially purified and compared. Both forms showed an active polypeptide of 37 kilodaltons on activity gels with incorporated histone as substrate. They eluted from chromatofocusing columns at an identical isoelectric point of pH 4.25 {plus minus} 0.2, and also comigrated on several other chromatographic affinity media including Matrex Gel Blue A, histone-agarose, phenyl-Sepharose, and heparin-agarose. Both activities comigrated with chicken ovalbumin during gel filtration through Sephacryl S-200, indicating a native molecular mass of 45 kilodaltons. The activities share a number of enzymatic properties including salt and pH dependence, free calcium stimulation profile, substrate specificity, and Km values. The soluble activity was shown to bind to artificial lipid vesicles. These data suggest strongly that the soluble and membrane-bound calcium-dependent protein kinases from barley are very closely related or even identical.

  18. cGMP-dependent protein kinase I, the circadian clock, sleep, and learning

    OpenAIRE

    Feil, Robert; Hölter, Sabine M.; Weindl, Karin; Wurst, Wolfgang; Langmesser, Sonja; Gerling, Andrea; Feil, Susanne; Albrecht, Urs

    2009-01-01

    The second messenger cGMP controls cardiovascular and gastrointestinal homeostasis in mammals. However, its physiological relevance in the nervous system is poorly understood.1 Now, we have reported that the cGMP-dependent protein kinase type I (PRKG1) is implicated in the regulation of the timing and quality of sleep and wakefulness.2 Prkg1 mutant mice showed altered distribution of sleep and wakefulness as well as reduction in rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS) duration and in non-REMS consoli...

  19. Identifying allosteric fluctuation transitions between different protein conformational states as applied to Cyclin Dependent Kinase 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Jenny

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms underlying protein function and associated conformational change are dominated by a series of local entropy fluctuations affecting the global structure yet are mediated by only a few key residues. Transitional Dynamic Analysis (TDA is a new method to detect these changes in local protein flexibility between different conformations arising from, for example, ligand binding. Additionally, Positional Impact Vertex for Entropy Transfer (PIVET uses TDA to identify important residue contact changes that have a large impact on global fluctuation. We demonstrate the utility of these methods for Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2, a system with crystal structures of this protein in multiple functionally relevant conformations and experimental data revealing the importance of local fluctuation changes for protein function. Results TDA and PIVET successfully identified select residues that are responsible for conformation specific regional fluctuation in the activation cycle of Cyclin Dependent Kinase 2 (CDK2. The detected local changes in protein flexibility have been experimentally confirmed to be essential for the regulation and function of the kinase. The methodologies also highlighted possible errors in previous molecular dynamic simulations that need to be resolved in order to understand this key player in cell cycle regulation. Finally, the use of entropy compensation as a possible allosteric mechanism for protein function is reported for CDK2. Conclusion The methodologies embodied in TDA and PIVET provide a quick approach to identify local fluctuation change important for protein function and residue contacts that contributes to these changes. Further, these approaches can be used to check for possible errors in protein dynamic simulations and have the potential to facilitate a better understanding of the contribution of entropy to protein allostery and function.

  20. The Golgi apparatus regulates cGMP-dependent protein kinase I compartmentation and proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shin; Chen, Jingsi; Cornog, Katherine H; Zhang, Huili; Roberts, Jesse D

    2015-06-01

    cGMP-dependent protein kinase I (PKGI) is an important effector of cGMP signaling that regulates vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotype and proliferation. PKGI has been detected in the perinuclear region of cells, and recent data indicate that proprotein convertases (PCs) typically resident in the Golgi apparatus (GA) can stimulate PKGI proteolysis and generate a kinase fragment that localizes to the nucleus and regulates gene expression. However, the role of the endomembrane system in PKGI compartmentation and processing is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that PKGI colocalizes with endoplasmic reticulum (ER), ER-Golgi intermediate compartment, GA cisterna, and trans-Golgi network proteins in pulmonary artery SMC and cell lines. Moreover, PKGI localizes with furin, a trans-Golgi network-resident PC known to cleave PKGI. ER protein transport influences PKGI localization because overexpression of a constitutively inactive Sar1 transgene caused PKGI retention in the ER. Additionally, PKGI appears to reside within the GA because PKGI immunoreactivity was determined to be resistant to cytosolic proteinase K treatment in live cells. The GA appears to play a role in PKGI proteolysis because overexpression of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor-associated cGMP kinase substrate, not only tethered heterologous PKGI-β to the ER and decreased its localization to the GA, but also diminished PKGI proteolysis and nuclear translocation. Also, inhibiting intra-GA protein transport with monensin was observed to decrease PKGI cleavage. These studies detail a role for the endomembrane system in regulating PKGI compartmentation and proteolysis. Moreover, they support the investigation of mechanisms regulating PKGI-dependent nuclear cGMP signaling in the pulmonary vasculature with Golgi dysfunction.

  1. MARK/Par1 Kinase Is Activated Downstream of NMDA Receptors through a PKA-Dependent Mechanism.

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    Laura P Bernard

    Full Text Available The Par1 kinases, also known as microtubule affinity-regulating kinases (MARKs, are important for the establishment of cell polarity from worms to mammals. Dysregulation of these kinases has been implicated in autism, Alzheimer's disease and cancer. Despite their important function in health and disease, it has been unclear how the activity of MARK/Par1 is regulated by signals from cell surface receptors. Here we show that MARK/Par1 is activated downstream of NMDA receptors in primary hippocampal neurons. Further, we show that this activation is dependent on protein kinase A (PKA, through the phosphorylation of Ser431 of Par4/LKB1, the major upstream kinase of MARK/Par1. Together, our data reveal a novel mechanism by which MARK/Par1 is activated at the neuronal synapse.

  2. A mechanism for tunable autoinhibition in the structure of a human Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II holoenzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Luke H.; Stratton, Margaret M.; Lee, Il-Hyung; Rosenberg, Oren S.; Levitz, Joshua; Mandell, Daniel J.; Kortemme, Tanja; Groves, Jay T.; Schulman, Howard; Kuriyan, John

    2011-01-01

    Summary Calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) forms a highly conserved dodecameric assembly that is sensitive to the frequency of calcium pulse trains. Neither the structure of the dodecameric assembly nor how it regulates CaMKII are known. We present the crystal structure of an autoinhibited full-length human CaMKII holoenzyme, revealing an unexpected compact arrangement of kinase domains docked against a central hub, with the calmodulin binding sites completely inaccessible. We show that this compact docking is important for the autoinhibition of the kinase domains and for setting the calcium response of the holoenzyme. Comparison of CaMKII isoforms, which differ in the length of the linker between the kinase domain and the hub, demonstrates that these interactions can be strengthened or weakened by changes in linker length. This equilibrium between autoinhibited states provides a simple mechanism for tuning the calcium response without changes in either the hub or the kinase domains. PMID:21884935

  3. Reduced Activity of Mutant Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase 1 Is Compensated in Plasmodium falciparum through the Action of Protein Kinase G

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    Abhisheka Bansal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We used a sensitization approach that involves replacement of the gatekeeper residue in a protein kinase with one with a different side chain. The activity of the enzyme with a bulky gatekeeper residue, such as methionine, cannot be inhibited using bumped kinase inhibitors (BKIs. Here, we have used this approach to study Plasmodium falciparum calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 (PfCDPK1. The methionine gatekeeper substitution, T145M, although it led to a 47% reduction in transphosphorylation, was successfully introduced into the CDPK1 locus using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR/Cas9. As methionine is a bulky residue, BKI 1294 had a 10-fold-greater effect in vitro on the wild-type enzyme than on the methionine mutant. However, in contrast to in vitro data with recombinant enzymes, BKI 1294 had a slightly greater inhibition of the growth of CDPK1 T145M parasites than the wild type. Moreover, the CDPK1 T145M parasites were more sensitive to the action of compound 2 (C2, a specific inhibitor of protein kinase G (PKG. These results suggest that a reduction in the activity of CDPK1 due to methionine substitution at the gatekeeper position is compensated through the direct action of PKG or of another kinase under the regulation of PKG. The transcript levels of CDPK5 and CDPK6 were significantly upregulated in the CDPK1 T145M parasites. The increase in CDPK6 or some other kinase may compensate for decrease in CDPK1 activity during invasion. This study suggests that targeting two kinases may be more effective in chemotherapy to treat malaria so as not to select for mutations in one of the enzymes.

  4. Crystal structure of the Ca²⁺/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase in complex with the inhibitor STO-609.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukimoto-Niino, Mutsuko; Yoshikawa, Seiko; Takagi, Tetsuo; Ohsawa, Noboru; Tomabechi, Yuri; Terada, Takaho; Shirouzu, Mikako; Suzuki, Atsushi; Lee, Suni; Yamauchi, Toshimasa; Okada-Iwabu, Miki; Iwabu, Masato; Kadowaki, Takashi; Minokoshi, Yasuhiko; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2011-06-24

    Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) kinase (CaMKK) is a member of the CaMK cascade that mediates the response to intracellular Ca(2+) elevation. CaMKK phosphorylates and activates CaMKI and CaMKIV, which directly activate transcription factors. In this study, we determined the 2.4 Å crystal structure of the catalytic kinase domain of the human CaMKKβ isoform complexed with its selective inhibitor, STO-609. The structure revealed that CaMKKβ lacks the αD helix and that the equivalent region displays a hydrophobic molecular surface, which may reflect its unique substrate recognition and autoinhibition. Although CaMKKβ lacks the activation loop phosphorylation site, the activation loop is folded in an active-state conformation, which is stabilized by a number of interactions between amino acid residues conserved among the CaMKK isoforms. An in vitro analysis of the kinase activity confirmed the intrinsic activity of the CaMKKβ kinase domain. Structure and sequence analyses of the STO-609-binding site revealed amino acid replacements that may affect the inhibitor binding. Indeed, mutagenesis demonstrated that the CaMKKβ residue Pro(274), which replaces the conserved acidic residue of other protein kinases, is an important determinant for the selective inhibition by STO-609. Therefore, the present structure provides a molecular basis for clarifying the known biochemical properties of CaMKKβ and for designing novel inhibitors targeting CaMKKβ and the related protein kinases.

  5. The Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Ortholog pUL97 of Human Cytomegalovirus Interacts with Cyclins

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    Laura Graf

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV-encoded protein kinase, pUL97, is considered a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK ortholog, due to shared structural and functional characteristics. The primary mechanism of CDK activation is binding to corresponding cyclins, including cyclin T1, which is the usual regulatory cofactor of CDK9. This study provides evidence of direct interaction between pUL97 and cyclin T1 using yeast two-hybrid and co-immunoprecipitation analyses. Confocal immunofluorescence revealed partial colocalization of pUL97 with cyclin T1 in subnuclear compartments, most pronounced in viral replication centres. The distribution patterns of pUL97 and cyclin T1 were independent of HCMV strain and host cell type. The sequence domain of pUL97 responsible for the interaction with cyclin T1 was between amino acids 231–280. Additional co-immunoprecipitation analyses showed cyclin B1 and cyclin A as further pUL97 interaction partners. Investigation of the pUL97-cyclin T1 interaction in an ATP consumption assay strongly suggested phosphorylation of pUL97 by the CDK9/cyclin T1 complex in a substrate concentration-dependent manner. This is the first demonstration of interaction between a herpesviral CDK ortholog and cellular cyclins.

  6. Fatigue resistance of rat extraocular muscles does not depend on creatine kinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, Colleen A; Hayess, Katrin; Andrade, Francisco H

    2005-08-17

    Creatine kinase (CK) links phosphocreatine, an energy storage system, to cellular ATPases. CK activity serves as a temporal and spatial buffer for ATP content, particularly in fast-twitch skeletal muscles. The extraocular muscles are notoriously fast and active, suggesting the need for efficient ATP buffering. This study tested the hypotheses that (1) CK isoform expression and activity in rat extraocular muscles would be higher, and (2) the resistance of these muscles to fatigue would depend on CK activity. We found that mRNA and protein levels for cytosolic and mitochondrial CK isoforms were lower in the extraocular muscles than in extensor digitorum longus (EDL). Total CK activity was correspondingly decreased in the extraocular muscles. Moreover, cytoskeletal components of the sarcomeric M line, where a fraction of CK activity is found, were downregulated in the extraocular muscles as was shown by immunocytochemistry and western blotting. CK inhibition significantly accelerated the development of fatigue in EDL muscle bundles, but had no major effect on the extraocular muscles. Searching for alternative ATP buffers that could compensate for the relative lack of CK in extraocular muscles, we determined that mRNAs for two adenylate kinase (AK) isoforms were expressed at higher levels in these muscles. Total AK activity was similar in EDL and extraocular muscles. These data indicate that the characteristic fatigue resistance of the extraocular muscles does not depend on CK activity.

  7. Fatigue resistance of rat extraocular muscles does not depend on creatine kinase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayeß Katrin

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Creatine kinase (CK links phosphocreatine, an energy storage system, to cellular ATPases. CK activity serves as a temporal and spatial buffer for ATP content, particularly in fast-twitch skeletal muscles. The extraocular muscles are notoriously fast and active, suggesting the need for efficient ATP buffering. This study tested the hypotheses that (1 CK isoform expression and activity in rat extraocular muscles would be higher, and (2 the resistance of these muscles to fatigue would depend on CK activity. Results We found that mRNA and protein levels for cytosolic and mitochondrial CK isoforms were lower in the extraocular muscles than in extensor digitorum longus (EDL. Total CK activity was correspondingly decreased in the extraocular muscles. Moreover, cytoskeletal components of the sarcomeric M line, where a fraction of CK activity is found, were downregulated in the extraocular muscles as was shown by immunocytochemistry and western blotting. CK inhibition significantly accelerated the development of fatigue in EDL muscle bundles, but had no major effect on the extraocular muscles. Searching for alternative ATP buffers that could compensate for the relative lack of CK in extraocular muscles, we determined that mRNAs for two adenylate kinase (AK isoforms were expressed at higher levels in these muscles. Total AK activity was similar in EDL and extraocular muscles. Conclusion These data indicate that the characteristic fatigue resistance of the extraocular muscles does not depend on CK activity.

  8. Morphogenesis signaling components influence cell cycle regulation by cyclin dependent kinase

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    Bevis Brooke J

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The yeast cell cycle is largely controlled by the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK Cdc28. Recent evidence suggests that both CDK complex stability as well as function during mitosis is determined by precise regulation of Swe1, a CDK inhibitory kinase and cyclin binding partner. A model of mitotic progression has been provided by study of filamentous yeast. When facing nutrient-limited conditions, Ras2-mediated PKA and MAPK signaling cascades induce a switch from round to filamentous morphology resulting in delayed mitotic progression. Results To delineate how the dimorphic switch contributes to cell cycle regulation, temperature sensitive cdc28 mutants exhibiting constitutive filamentation were subjected to epistasis analyses with RAS2 signaling effectors. It was found that Swe1-mediated inhibitory tyrosine phosphorylation of Cdc28 during filamentous growth is in part mediated by Ras2 activation of PKA, but not Kss1-MAPK, signaling. This pathway is further influenced by Cks1, a conserved CDK-binding partner of elusive function with multiple proposed roles in CDK activation, transcriptional regulation and ubiquitin-mediated proteasome degradation. Conclusion The dynamic balance between Cks1- and Swe1-dependent regulation of Cdc28 and, thereby, the timing of mitosis during yeast dimorphism is regulated in part by Ras2/cAMP-mediated PKA signaling, a key pathway controlling filamentous growth.

  9. Novel small molecule inhibitors of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Richard I; Wu, James M; Polokoff, Mark A; Kochanny, Monica J; Dinter, Harald; Zhu, Daguang; Biroc, Sandra L; Alicke, Bruno; Bryant, Judi; Yuan, Shendong; Buckman, Brad O; Lentz, Dao; Ferrer, Mike; Whitlow, Marc; Adler, Marc; Finster, Silke; Chang, Zheng; Arnaiz, Damian O

    2005-05-20

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase/3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1)/Akt signaling pathway plays a key role in cancer cell growth, survival, and tumor angiogenesis and represents a promising target for anticancer drugs. Here, we describe three potent PDK1 inhibitors, BX-795, BX-912, and BX-320 (IC(50) = 11-30 nm) and their initial biological characterization. The inhibitors blocked PDK1/Akt signaling in tumor cells and inhibited the anchorage-dependent growth of a variety of tumor cell lines in culture or induced apoptosis. A number of cancer cell lines with elevated Akt activity were >30-fold more sensitive to growth inhibition by PDK1 inhibitors in soft agar than on tissue culture plastic, consistent with the cell survival function of the PDK1/Akt signaling pathway, which is particularly important for unattached cells. BX-320 inhibited the growth of LOX melanoma tumors in the lungs of nude mice after injection of tumor cells into the tail vein. The effect of BX-320 on cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo indicates that PDK1 inhibitors may have clinical utility as anticancer agents.

  10. Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-mediated stimulation of adipocyte differentiation requires the synergistic action of Epac- and cAMP-dependent protein kinase-dependent processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Koefoed; Madsen, Lise; Pedersen, Lone Møller

    2008-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent processes are pivotal during the early stages of adipocyte differentiation. We show that exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), which functions as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the Ras-like GTPases Rap1 and Rap2, was required for cAMP-dependent ......Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent processes are pivotal during the early stages of adipocyte differentiation. We show that exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), which functions as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the Ras-like GTPases Rap1 and Rap2, was required for c......AMP-dependent stimulation of adipocyte differentiation. Epac, working via Rap, acted synergistically with cAMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A [PKA]) to promote adipogenesis. The major role of PKA was to down-regulate Rho and Rho-kinase activity, rather than to enhance CREB phosphorylation. Suppression of Rho...

  11. Partial purification and characterization of a Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase from the green alga, Dunaliella salina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, S. J.

    1990-01-01

    A calcium-dependent protein kinase was partially purified and characterized from the green alga Dunaliella salina. The enzyme was activated at free Ca2+ concentrations above 10(-7) molar. and half-maximal activation was at about 3 x 10(-7) molar. The optimum pH for its Ca(2+)-dependent activity was 7.5. The addition of various phospholipids and diolein had no effects on enzyme activity and did not alter the sensitivity of the enzyme toward Ca2+. The enzyme was inhibited by calmodulin antagonists, N-(6-aminohexyl)-1-naphthalene sulfonamide and N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide in a dose-dependent manner while the protein kinase C inhibitor, sphingosine, had little effect on enzyme activity up to 800 micromolar. Immunoassay showed some calmodulin was present in the kinase preparations. However, it is unlikely the kinase was calmodulin regulated, since it still showed stimulation by Ca2+ in gel assays after being electrophoretically separated from calmodulin by two different methods. This gel method of detection of the enzyme indicated that a protein band with an apparent molecular weight of 40,000 showed protein kinase activity at each one of the several steps in the purification procedure. Gel assay analysis also showed that after native gel isoelectric focusing the partially purified kinase preparations had two bands with calcium-dependent activity, at isoelectric points 6.7 and 7.1. By molecular weight, by isoelectric point, and by a comparative immunoassay, the Dunaliella kinase appears to differ from at least some of the calcium-dependent, but calmodulin and phospholipid independent kinases described from higher plants.

  12. cGMP-dependent protein kinase: linking foraging to energy homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaun, Karla R; Sokolowski, Marla B

    2009-01-01

    Successful foraging is necessary for procurement of nutritional resources essential for an animal's survival. Maintenance of foraging and food acquisition is dependent on the ability to balance food intake and energy expenditure. This review examines the role of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) as a regulator of foraging behaviour, food acquisition, and energy balance. The role of PKG in food-related behaviours is highly conserved among worms, flies, bees, ants, and mammals. A growing body of literature suggests that PKG plays an integral role in the component behaviours and physiologies underlying foraging behaviour. These include energy acquisition, nutrient absorption, nutrient allocation, nutrient storage, and energy use. New evidence suggests that PKG mediates both neural and physiological mechanisms underlying these processes. This review illustrates how investigating the role of PKG in energy homeostasis in a diversity of organisms can offer a broad perspective on the mechanisms mediating energy balance.

  13. Site-specific phosphorylation of the DNA damage response mediator rad9 by cyclin-dependent kinases regulates activation of checkpoint kinase 1.

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    Carla Manuela Abreu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The mediators of the DNA damage response (DDR are highly phosphorylated by kinases that control cell proliferation, but little is known about the role of this regulation. Here we show that cell cycle phosphorylation of the prototypical DDR mediator Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad9 depends on cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK complexes. We find that a specific G2/M form of Cdc28 can phosphorylate in vitro the N-terminal region of Rad9 on nine consensus CDK phosphorylation sites. We show that the integrity of CDK consensus sites and the activity of Cdc28 are required for both the activation of the Chk1 checkpoint kinase and its interaction with Rad9. We have identified T125 and T143 as important residues in Rad9 for this Rad9/Chk1 interaction. Phosphorylation of T143 is the most important feature promoting Rad9/Chk1 interaction, while the much more abundant phosphorylation of the neighbouring T125 residue impedes the Rad9/Chk1 interaction. We suggest a novel model for Chk1 activation where Cdc28 regulates the constitutive interaction of Rad9 and Chk1. The Rad9/Chk1 complex is then recruited at sites of DNA damage where activation of Chk1 requires additional DDR-specific protein kinases.

  14. Activation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 mediates orofacial mechanical hyperalgesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a unique member of the serine/threonine kinase family. This kinase plays an important role in neuronal development, and deregulation of its activity leads to neurodegenerative disorders. Cdk5 also serves an important function in the regulation of nociceptive signaling. Our previous studies revealed that the expression of Cdk5 and its activator, p35, is upregulated in nociceptive neurons during peripheral inflammation. The aim of the present study was to characterize the involvement of Cdk5 in orofacial pain. Since mechanical hyperalgesia is the distinctive sign of many orofacial pain conditions, we adapted an existing orofacial stimulation test to assess the behavioral responses to mechanical stimulation in the trigeminal region of the transgenic mice with either reduced or increased Cdk5 activity. Results Mice overexpressing or lacking p35, an activator of Cdk5, showed altered phenotype in response to noxious mechanical stimulation in the trigeminal area. Mice with increased Cdk5 activity displayed aversive behavior to mechanical stimulation as indicated by a significant decrease in reward licking events and licking time. The number of reward licking/facial contact events was significantly decreased in these mice as the mechanical intensity increased. By contrast, mice deficient in Cdk5 activity displayed mechanical hypoalgesia. Conclusions Collectively, our findings demonstrate for the first time the important role of Cdk5 in orofacial mechanical nociception. Modulation of Cdk5 activity in primary sensory neurons makes it an attractive potential target for the development of novel analgesics that could be used to treat multiple orofacial pain conditions. PMID:24359609

  15. Ca2+-dependent inhibition of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 by calmodulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haga, K; Tsuga, H; Haga, T

    1997-02-11

    Agonist- or light-dependent phosphorylation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor m2 subtypes (m2 receptors) or rhodopsin by G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) was found to be inhibited by calmodulin in a Ca2+-dependent manner. The phosphorylation was fully inhibited in the absence of G protein betagamma subunits and partially inhibited in the presence of betagamma subunits. The dose-response curve for stimulation by betagamma subunits of the m2 and rhodopsin phosphorylation was shifted to the higher concentration of betagamma subunits by addition of Ca2+-calmodulin. The phosphorylation by GRK2 of a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein containing a peptide corresponding to the central part of the third intracellular loop of m2 receptors (I3-GST) was not affected by Ca2+-calmodulin in the presence or absence of betagamma subunits, but the agonist-dependent stimulation of I3-GST phosphorylation by an I3-deleted m2 receptor mutant in the presence of betagamma subunits was suppressed by Ca2+-calmodulin. These results indicate that Ca2+-calmodulin does not directly interact with the catalytic site of GRK2 but inhibits the kinase activity of GRK2 by interfering with the activation of GRK2 by agonist-bound m2 receptors and G protein betagamma subunits. In agreement with the assumption that GRK2 activity is suppressed by the increase in intracellular Ca2+, the sequestration of m2 receptors expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells was found to be attenuated by the treatment with a Ca2+ ionophore, A23187.

  16. The regulatory beta-subunit of protein kinase CK2 accelerates the degradation of CDC25A phosphatase through the checkpoint kinase Chk1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreutzer, Jan Nicolas; Guerra, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Human CDC25 phosphatases play an important role in cell cycle regulation by removing inhibitory phosphate groups on cyclin-CDKs. Chk1 has been shown to phosphorylate CDC25 family members down-regulating their phosphatase activity through distinct mechanisms. The kinase activity of Chk1 is evident...

  17. Incorporation of extracellular fatty acids by a fatty acid kinase-dependent pathway in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Joshua B; Frank, Matthew W; Jackson, Pamela; Subramanian, Chitra; Rock, Charles O

    2014-04-01

    Acyl-CoA and acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) synthetases activate exogenous fatty acids for incorporation into phospholipids in Gram-negative bacteria. However, Gram-positive bacteria utilize an acyltransferase pathway for the biogenesis of phosphatidic acid that begins with the acylation of sn-glycerol-3-phosphate by PlsY using an acyl-phosphate (acyl-PO4 ) intermediate. PlsX generates acyl-PO4 from the acyl-ACP end-products of fatty acid synthesis. The plsX gene of Staphylococcus aureus was inactivated and the resulting strain was both a fatty acid auxotroph and required de novo fatty acid synthesis for growth. Exogenous fatty acids were only incorporated into the 1-position and endogenous acyl groups were channeled into the 2-position of the phospholipids in strain PDJ39 (ΔplsX). Extracellular fatty acids were not elongated. Removal of the exogenous fatty acid supplement led to the rapid accumulation of intracellular acyl-ACP and the abrupt cessation of fatty acid synthesis. Extracts from the ΔplsX strain exhibited an ATP-dependent fatty acid kinase activity, and the acyl-PO4 was converted to acyl-ACP when purified PlsX is added. These data reveal the existence of a novel fatty acid kinase pathway for the incorporation of exogenous fatty acids into S. aureus phospholipids.

  18. Redox regulation of cGMP-dependent protein kinase Iα in the cardiovascular system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksandra ePrysyazhna

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Elevated levels of oxidants in biological systems have been historically referred to as oxidative stress, a choice of words that perhaps conveys an imbalanced view of reactive oxygen species in cell and tissues. The term stress suggests a harmful role, whereas a contemporary view is that oxidants are also crucial for the maintenance of homeostasis or adaptive signaling that can actually limit injury. This regulatory role for oxidants is achieved in part by them inducing oxidative post-translational modifications of proteins which may alter their function or interactions. Such mechanisms allow changes in cell oxidant levels to be coupled to regulated alterations in enzymatic function (i.e. signal transduction, which enables redox signaling. In this review we focus on the role of cGMP-dependent protein kinase Iα (PKG disulfide dimerisation, an oxidative modification that is induced by oxidants that directly activates the enzyme, discussing how this impacts on the cardiovascular system. Additionally, how this oxidative activation of PKG may coordinate with or differ from classical activation of this kinase by cGMP will also be considered.

  19. Comprehensive behavioral analysis of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV knockout mice.

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    Keizo Takao

    Full Text Available Calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV is a protein kinase that activates the transcription factor CREB, the cyclic AMP-response element binding protein. CREB is a key transcription factor in synaptic plasticity and memory consolidation. To elucidate the behavioral effects of CaMKIV deficiency, we subjected CaMKIV knockout (CaMKIV KO mice to a battery of behavioral tests. CaMKIV KO had no significant effects on locomotor activity, motor coordination, social interaction, pain sensitivity, prepulse inhibition, attention, or depression-like behavior. Consistent with previous reports, CaMKIV KO mice exhibited impaired retention in a fear conditioning test 28 days after training. In contrast, however, CaMKIV KO mice did not show any testing performance deficits in passive avoidance, one of the most commonly used fear memory paradigms, 28 days after training, suggesting that remote fear memory is intact. CaMKIV KO mice exhibited intact spatial reference memory learning in the Barnes circular maze, and normal spatial working memory in an eight-arm radial maze. CaMKIV KO mice also showed mildly decreased anxiety-like behavior, suggesting that CaMKIV is involved in regulating emotional behavior. These findings indicate that CaMKIV might not be essential for fear memory or spatial memory, although it is possible that the activities of other neural mechanisms or signaling pathways compensate for the CaMKIV deficiency.

  20. cGMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Inhibitors in Health and Disease

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    Jens Schlossmann

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available cGMP-dependent protein kinases (PKG exhibit diverse physiological functions in the mammalian system e.g., in vascular and gastrointestinal smooth muscles, in platelets, in kidney, in bone growth, nociception and in the central nervous system. Furthermore, PKG were found in insects and in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Two different genes of PKG exist: a the PKG-I gene that is expressed as cytosolic PKG-Iα or PKG-Iβ isoform, and b the PKG-II gene, which expresses the membrane associated PKG-II protein. The enzyme kinetics, the localization and the substrates of these PKG enzymes differ utilizing different physiological functions. Various inhibitors of PKG were developed directed against diverse functional regions of the kinase. These inhibitors of PKG have been used to analyse the specific functions of these enzymes. The review article will summarize these different inhibitors regarding their specificity and their present applications in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, it will be discussed that the distinct inhibition of the PKG enzymes could be used as a valuable pharmacological target e.g., in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, diarrhea, cancer or malaria.

  1. Bcl10 is phosphorylated on Ser138 by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguro, Kazuhiro; Ando, Takafumi; Goto, Hidemi; Xavier, Ramnik

    2007-03-01

    Ordered assembly of scaffold proteins Carma1-Bcl10-Malt1 determines NF-kappaB activation following T cell receptor (TCR) engagement. Carma1-Bcl10 interaction and the signaling pathway are controlled by Carma1 phosphorylation, which are induced by PKCtheta and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). In addition to Carma1 phosphorylation, previous studies have demonstrated that Bcl10 is phosphorylated in the C-terminal Ser/Thr rich region following TCR engagement. However the kinases that phosphorylate Bcl10 are incompletely understood. Here we show that CaMKII phosphorylates Bcl10 on Ser138. Furthermore, a CaMKII inhibitor, KN93, and CaMKII siRNA substantially reduce Bcl10 phosphorylation induced by phorbol myristate acetate/ionomycin. S138A mutation prolongs Bcl10-induced NF-kappaB activation, suggesting that Bcl10 phosphorylation is involved in attenuation of NF-kappaB activation. These findings suggest that CaMKII modulates NF-kappaB activation via phosphorylating Bcl10 as well as Carma1.

  2. RNAi screen reveals an Abl kinase-dependent host cell pathway involved in Pseudomonas aeruginosa internalization.

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    Julia F Pielage

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Internalization of the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa by non-phagocytic cells is promoted by rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton, but the host pathways usurped by this bacterium are not clearly understood. We used RNAi-mediated gene inactivation of approximately 80 genes known to regulate the actin cytoskeleton in Drosophila S2 cells to identify host molecules essential for entry of P. aeruginosa. This work revealed Abl tyrosine kinase, the adaptor protein Crk, the small GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42, and p21-activated kinase as components of a host signaling pathway that leads to internalization of P. aeruginosa. Using a variety of complementary approaches, we validated the role of this pathway in mammalian cells. Remarkably, ExoS and ExoT, type III secreted toxins of P. aeruginosa, target this pathway by interfering with GTPase function and, in the case of ExoT, by abrogating P. aeruginosa-induced Abl-dependent Crk phosphorylation. Altogether, this work reveals that P. aeruginosa utilizes the Abl pathway for entering host cells and reveals unexpected complexity by which the P. aeruginosa type III secretion system modulates this internalization pathway. Our results furthermore demonstrate the applicability of using RNAi screens to identify host signaling cascades usurped by microbial pathogens that may be potential targets for novel therapies directed against treatment of antibiotic-resistant infections.

  3. Phosphorylation-dependent regulation of nuclear localization and functions of integrin-linked kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acconcia, Filippo; Barnes, Christopher J.; Singh, Rajesh R.; Talukder, Amjad H.; Kumar, Rakesh

    2007-01-01

    Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is a phosphorylated protein that regulates physiological processes that overlap with those regulated by p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1). Here we report the possible role of ILK phosphorylation by PAK1 in ILK-mediated signaling and intracellular translocation. We found that PAK1 phosphorylates ILK at threonine-173 and serine-246 in vitro and in vivo. Depletion of PAK1 decreased the levels of endogenous ILK phosphorylation in vivo. Mutation of PAK1 phosphorylation sites on ILK to alanine reduced cell motility and cell proliferation. Biochemical fractionation, confocal microscopy, and chromatin-interaction analyses of human cells revealed that ILK localizes predominantly in the cytoplasm but also resides in the nucleus. Transfection of MCF-7 cells with point mutants ILK-T173A, ILK-S246A, or ILK-T173A; S246A (ILK-DM) altered ILK localization. Selective depletion of PAK1 dramatically increased the nuclear and focal point accumulation of ILK, further demonstrating a role for PAK1 in ILK translocation. We also identified functional nuclear localization sequence and nuclear export sequence motifs in ILK, delineated an apparently integral role for ILK in maintaining normal nuclear integrity, and established that ILK interacts with the regulatory region of the CNKSR3 gene chromatin to negatively modulate its expression. Together, these results suggest that ILK is a PAK1 substrate, undergoes phosphorylation-dependent shuttling between the cell nucleus and cytoplasm, and interacts with gene-regulatory chromatin. PMID:17420447

  4. Spleen Tyrosine Kinase Regulates AP-1 Dependent Transcriptional Response to Minimally Oxidized LDL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Wiesner, Philipp; Almazan, Felicidad; Kim, Jungsu; Miller, Yury I.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative modification of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) turns it into an endogenous ligand recognized by pattern-recognition receptors. We have demonstrated that minimally oxidized LDL (mmLDL) binds to CD14 and mediates TLR4/MD-2-dependent responses in macrophages, many of which are MyD88-independent. We have also demonstrated that the mmLDL activation leads to recruitment of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) to TLR4 and TLR4 and Syk phosphorylation. In this study, we produced a macrophage-specific Syk knockout mouse and used primary Syk−/− macrophages in our studies. We demonstrated that Syk mediated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK, which in turn phosphorylated c-Fos and c-Jun, respectively, as assessed by an in vitro kinase assay. c-Jun phosphorylation was also mediated by IKKε. c-Jun and c-Fos bound to consensus DNA sites and thereby completed an AP-1 transcriptional complex and induced expression of CXCL2 and IL-6. These results suggest that Syk plays a key role in TLR4-mediated macrophage responses to host-generated ligands, like mmLDL, with subsequent activation of an AP-1 transcription program. PMID:22384232

  5. Phosphate-Activated Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Stabilizes G1 Cyclin To Trigger Cell Cycle Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menoyo, S.; Ricco, N.; Bru, S.; Hernández-Ortega, S.; Escoté, X.; Aldea, M.

    2013-01-01

    G1 cyclins, in association with a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK), are universal activators of the transcriptional G1-S machinery during entry into the cell cycle. Regulation of cyclin degradation is crucial for coordinating progression through the cell cycle, but the mechanisms that modulate cyclin stability to control cell cycle entry are still unknown. Here, we show that a lack of phosphate downregulates Cln3 cyclin and leads to G1 arrest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The stability of Cln3 protein is diminished in strains with low activity of Pho85, a phosphate-sensing CDK. Cln3 is an in vitro substrate of Pho85, and both proteins interact in vivo. More interestingly, cells that carry a CLN3 allele encoding aspartic acid substitutions at the sites of Pho85 phosphorylation maintain high levels of Cln3 independently of Pho85 activity. Moreover, these cells do not properly arrest in G1 in the absence of phosphate and they die prematurely. Finally, the activity of Pho85 is essential for accumulating Cln3 and for reentering the cell cycle after phosphate refeeding. Taken together, our data indicate that Cln3 is a molecular target of the Pho85 kinase that is required to modulate cell cycle entry in response to environmental changes in nutrient availability. PMID:23339867

  6. Focal adhesion kinase modulates radial glia-dependent neuronal migration through connexin-26.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiente, Manuel; Ciceri, Gabriele; Rico, Beatriz; Marín, Oscar

    2011-08-10

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is an intracellular kinase and scaffold protein that regulates migration in many different cellular contexts but whose function in neuronal migration remains controversial. Here, we have analyzed the function of FAK in two populations of neurons with very distinct migratory behaviors: cortical interneurons, which migrate tangentially and independently of radial glia; and pyramidal cells, which undergo glial-dependent migration. We found that FAK is dispensable for glial-independent migration but is cell-autonomously required for the normal interaction of pyramidal cells with radial glial fibers. Loss of FAK function disrupts the normal morphology of migrating pyramidal cells, delays migration, and increases the tangential dispersion of neurons arising from the same radial unit. FAK mediates this process by regulating the assembly of Connexin-26 contact points in the membrane of migrating pyramidal cells. These results indicate that FAK plays a fundamental role in the dynamic regulation of Gap-mediated adhesions during glial-guided neuronal migration in the mouse.

  7. Spatial regulation of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase during chemotactic cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Alan K; Baldor, Linda C; Hogan, Brian P

    2005-10-04

    Historically, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) has a paradoxical role in cell motility, having been shown to both facilitate and inhibit actin cytoskeletal dynamics and cell migration. In an effort to understand this dichotomy, we show here that PKA is regulated in subcellular space during cell migration. Immunofluorescence microscopy and biochemical enrichment of pseudopodia showed that type II regulatory subunits of PKA and PKA activity are enriched in protrusive cellular structures formed during chemotaxis. This enrichment correlates with increased phosphorylation of key cytoskeletal substrates for PKA, including the vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) and the protein tyrosine phosphatase containing a PEST motif. Importantly, inhibition of PKA activity or its ability to interact with A kinase anchoring proteins inhibited the activity of the Rac GTPase within pseudopodia. This effect correlated with both decreased guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity and increased GTPase activating protein activity. Finally, inhibition of PKA anchoring, like inhibition of total PKA activity, inhibited pseudopod formation and chemotactic cell migration. These data demonstrate that spatial regulation of PKA via anchoring is an important facet of normal chemotactic cell movement.

  8. Large-Scale Profiling of Kinase Dependencies in Cancer Cell Lines

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    James Campbell

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available One approach to identifying cancer-specific vulnerabilities and therapeutic targets is to profile genetic dependencies in cancer cell lines. Here, we describe data from a series of siRNA screens that identify the kinase genetic dependencies in 117 cancer cell lines from ten cancer types. By integrating the siRNA screen data with molecular profiling data, including exome sequencing data, we show how vulnerabilities/genetic dependencies that are associated with mutations in specific cancer driver genes can be identified. By integrating additional data sets into this analysis, including protein-protein interaction data, we also demonstrate that the genetic dependencies associated with many cancer driver genes form dense connections on functional interaction networks. We demonstrate the utility of this resource by using it to predict the drug sensitivity of genetically or histologically defined subsets of tumor cell lines, including an increased sensitivity of osteosarcoma cell lines to FGFR inhibitors and SMAD4 mutant tumor cells to mitotic inhibitors.

  9. Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) and protein phosphatase 6 (PP6) regulate DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) phosphorylation in mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Pauline; Ye, Ruiqiong; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Neal, Jessica A; De Wever, Veerle; Morrice, Nick A; Meek, Katheryn; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2014-06-25

    The protein kinase activity of the DNA-PKcs (DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit) and its autophosphorylation are critical for DBS (DNA double-strand break) repair via NHEJ (non-homologous end-joining). Recent studies have shown that depletion or inactivation of DNA-PKcs kinase activity also results in mitotic defects. DNA-PKcs is autophosphorylated on Ser2056, Thr2647 and Thr2609 in mitosis and phosphorylated DNA-PKcs localize to centrosomes, mitotic spindles and the midbody. DNA-PKcs also interacts with PP6 (protein phosphatase 6), and PP6 has been shown to dephosphorylate Aurora A kinase in mitosis. Here we report that DNA-PKcs is phosphorylated on Ser3205 and Thr3950 in mitosis. Phosphorylation of Thr3950 is DNA-PK-dependent, whereas phosphorylation of Ser3205 requires PLK1 (polo-like kinase 1). Moreover, PLK1 phosphorylates DNA-PKcs on Ser3205 in vitro and interacts with DNA-PKcs in mitosis. In addition, PP6 dephosphorylates DNA-PKcs at Ser3205 in mitosis and after IR (ionizing radiation). DNA-PKcs also phosphorylates Chk2 on Thr68 in mitosis and both phosphorylation of Chk2 and autophosphorylation of DNA-PKcs in mitosis occur in the apparent absence of Ku and DNA damage. Our findings provide mechanistic insight into the roles of DNA-PKcs and PP6 in mitosis and suggest that DNA-PKcs' role in mitosis may be mechanistically distinct from its well-established role in NHEJ.

  10. Spatial reorganization of the endoplasmic reticulum during mitosis relies on mitotic kinase cyclin A in the early Drosophila embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Zane J; Mclaurin, Justin D; Eritano, Anthony S; Johnson, Brittany M; Sims, Amanda Q; Riggs, Blake

    2015-01-01

    Mitotic cyclin-dependent kinase with their cyclin partners (cyclin:Cdks) are the master regulators of cell cycle progression responsible for regulating a host of activities during mitosis. Nuclear mitotic events, including chromosome condensation and segregation have been directly linked to Cdk activity. However, the regulation and timing of cytoplasmic mitotic events by cyclin:Cdks is poorly understood. In order to examine these mitotic cytoplasmic events, we looked at the dramatic changes in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) during mitosis in the early Drosophila embryo. The dynamic changes of the ER can be arrested in an interphase state by inhibition of either DNA or protein synthesis. Here we show that this block can be alleviated by micro-injection of Cyclin A (CycA) in which defined mitotic ER clusters gathered at the spindle poles. Conversely, micro-injection of Cyclin B (CycB) did not affect spatial reorganization of the ER, suggesting CycA possesses the ability to initiate mitotic ER events in the cytoplasm. Additionally, RNAi-mediated simultaneous inhibition of all 3 mitotic cyclins (A, B and B3) blocked spatial reorganization of the ER. Our results suggest that mitotic ER reorganization events rely on CycA and that control and timing of nuclear and cytoplasmic events during mitosis may be defined by release of CycA from the nucleus as a consequence of breakdown of the nuclear envelope.

  11. Spatial Reorganization of the Endoplasmic Reticulum during Mitosis Relies on Mitotic Kinase Cyclin A in the Early Drosophila Embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Zane J.; Mclaurin, Justin D.; Eritano, Anthony S.; Johnson, Brittany M.; Sims, Amanda Q.; Riggs, Blake

    2015-01-01

    Mitotic cyclin-dependent kinase with their cyclin partners (cyclin:Cdks) are the master regulators of cell cycle progression responsible for regulating a host of activities during mitosis. Nuclear mitotic events, including chromosome condensation and segregation have been directly linked to Cdk activity. However, the regulation and timing of cytoplasmic mitotic events by cyclin:Cdks is poorly understood. In order to examine these mitotic cytoplasmic events, we looked at the dramatic changes in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) during mitosis in the early Drosophila embryo. The dynamic changes of the ER can be arrested in an interphase state by inhibition of either DNA or protein synthesis. Here we show that this block can be alleviated by micro-injection of Cyclin A (CycA) in which defined mitotic ER clusters gathered at the spindle poles. Conversely, micro-injection of Cyclin B (CycB) did not affect spatial reorganization of the ER, suggesting CycA possesses the ability to initiate mitotic ER events in the cytoplasm. Additionally, RNAi-mediated simultaneous inhibition of all 3 mitotic cyclins (A, B and B3) blocked spatial reorganization of the ER. Our results suggest that mitotic ER reorganization events rely on CycA and that control and timing of nuclear and cytoplasmic events during mitosis may be defined by release of CycA from the nucleus as a consequence of breakdown of the nuclear envelope. PMID:25689737

  12. Mechanism of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II regulation of AMPA receptor gating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anders S; Jenkins, Meagan A; Banke, Tue G

    2011-01-01

    The function, trafficking and synaptic signaling of AMPA receptors are tightly regulated by phosphorylation. Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) phosphorylates the GluA1 AMPA receptor subunit at Ser831 to increase single-channel conductance. We show that CaMKII increases the conductance...... of native heteromeric AMPA receptors in mouse hippocampal neurons through phosphorylation of Ser831. In addition, co-expression of transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) with recombinant receptors is required for phospho-Ser831 to increase conductance of heteromeric GluA1-GluA2 receptors...... the frequency of openings to larger conductances rather than altering unitary conductance. Together, these findings suggest that CaMKII phosphorylation of GluA1-Ser831 decreases the activation energy for an intrasubunit conformational change that regulates the conductance of the receptor when the channel pore...

  13. Synaptic roles of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 & its implications in epilepsy

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    Aparna Banerjee Dixit

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There is an urgent need to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying epilepsy to find novel prognostic/diagnostic biomarkers to prevent epilepsy patients at risk. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5 is involved in multiple neuronal functions and plays a crucial role in maintaining homeostatic synaptic plasticity by regulating intracellular signalling cascades at synapses. CDK5 deregulation is shown to be associated with various neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. The association between chronic loss of CDK5 and seizures has been reported in animal models of epilepsy. Genetic expression of CDK5 at transcriptome level has been shown to be abnormal in intractable epilepsy. In this review various possible mechanisms by which deregulated CDK5 may alter synaptic transmission and possibly lead to epileptogenesis have been discussed. Further, CDK5 has been proposed as a potential biomarker as well as a pharmacological target for developing treatments for epilepsy.

  14. The effect of cyclin-dependent kinases inhibitor treatment on experimental herpes simplex encephalitis mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu; Zeng, Yan-Ping; Zhou, Qin; Guan, Jing-Xia; Lu, Zu-Neng

    2016-08-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis(HSE) is the most common and serious viral encephalitis in humans. There is a lack of effective medication to date for HSE. A better understanding of the mediators of tissue damage is essential for finding new targets for therapeutic intervention. In this project, we explored the effect of cyclin-dependent kinases inhibitor olomoucine treatment on experimental HSE mice. The following results were obtained: (1) olomoucine increased survival in HSE mice; (2) olomoucine inhibited microglial activation and reduced HSV-1-induced cytokines release; (3) olomoucine prevented neural cells apoptosis and attenuated brain tissue pathological changes following HSV-1 infection; (4) olomoucine reduced brain edema and improved neurological function in HSE. Overall, olomoucine can induce a blunted inflammatory response, maintain the blood vessel wall intact, improve neurological function and increase survival in HSE mice.

  15. Structure and inhibitor specificity of the PCTAIRE-family kinase CDK16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon-Clarke, Sarah E; Shehata, Saifeldin N; Krojer, Tobias; Sharpe, Timothy D; von Delft, Frank; Sakamoto, Kei; Bullock, Alex N

    2017-02-20

    CDK16 (also known as PCTAIRE1 or PCTK1) is an atypical member of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) family that has emerged as a key regulator of neurite outgrowth, vesicle trafficking and cancer cell proliferation. CDK16 is activated through binding to cyclin Y via a phosphorylation-dependent 14-3-3 interaction and has a unique consensus substrate phosphorylation motif compared with conventional CDKs. To elucidate the structure and inhibitor-binding properties of this atypical CDK, we screened the CDK16 kinase domain against different inhibitor libraries and determined the co-structures of identified hits. We discovered that the ATP-binding pocket of CDK16 can accommodate both type I and type II kinase inhibitors. The most potent CDK16 inhibitors revealed by cell-free and cell-based assays were the multitargeted cancer drugs dabrafenib and rebastinib. An inactive DFG-out binding conformation was confirmed by the first crystal structures of CDK16 in separate complexes with the inhibitors indirubin E804 and rebastinib, respectively. The structures revealed considerable conformational plasticity, suggesting that the isolated CDK16 kinase domain was relatively unstable in the absence of a cyclin partner. The unusual structural features and chemical scaffolds identified here hold promise for the development of more selective CDK16 inhibitors and provide opportunity to better characterise the role of CDK16 and its related CDK family members in various physiological and pathological contexts.

  16. Structure and inhibitor specificity of the PCTAIRE-family kinase CDK16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon-Clarke, Sarah E.; Shehata, Saifeldin N.; Krojer, Tobias; Sharpe, Timothy D.; vonDelft, Frank; Sakamoto, Kei

    2017-01-01

    CDK16 (also known as PCTAIRE1 or PCTK1) is an atypical member of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) family that has emerged as a key regulator of neurite outgrowth, vesicle trafficking and cancer cell proliferation. CDK16 is activated through binding to cyclin Y via a phosphorylation-dependent 14-3-3 interaction and has a unique consensus substrate phosphorylation motif compared with conventional CDKs. To elucidate the structure and inhibitor-binding properties of this atypical CDK, we screened the CDK16 kinase domain against different inhibitor libraries and determined the co-structures of identified hits. We discovered that the ATP-binding pocket of CDK16 can accommodate both type I and type II kinase inhibitors. The most potent CDK16 inhibitors revealed by cell-free and cell-based assays were the multitargeted cancer drugs dabrafenib and rebastinib. An inactive DFG-out binding conformation was confirmed by the first crystal structures of CDK16 in separate complexes with the inhibitors indirubin E804 and rebastinib, respectively. The structures revealed considerable conformational plasticity, suggesting that the isolated CDK16 kinase domain was relatively unstable in the absence of a cyclin partner. The unusual structural features and chemical scaffolds identified here hold promise for the development of more selective CDK16 inhibitors and provide opportunity to better characterise the role of CDK16 and its related CDK family members in various physiological and pathological contexts. PMID:28057719

  17. PTH stimulated growth and decreased Col-X deposition are phosphotidylinositol-3,4,5 triphosphate kinase and mitogen activating protein kinase dependent in avian sterna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Erik Kern; Coon, David J; Kern, Matthew F; Svoboda, Kathy K H

    2010-02-01

    Type X collagen (Col-X) deposition is a marker of terminal differentiation during chondrogenesis, in addition to appositional growth and apoptosis. The parathyroid hormone/parathyroid hormone related peptide (PTH/PTHrP) receptor, or PPR, is a G-Protein coupled receptor (GPCR), which activates several downstream pathways, moderating chondrocyte differentiation, including suppression of Col-X deposition. An Avian sterna model was used to analyze the PPR GPCR downstream kinase role in growth rate and extracellular matrix (ECM) including Col-II, IX, and X. Phosphatidylinositol kinase (PI3K), mitogen activating protein kinase (MAPK) and protein kinase A (PKA) were inhibited with specific established inhibitors LY294002, PD98059, and H89, respectively to test the hypothesis that they could reverse/inhibit the PTH/PTHrP pathway. Excised E14 chick sterna were PTH treated with or without an inhibitor and compared to controls. Sternal length was measured every 24 hr. Cultured sterna were immuno-stained using specific antibodies for Col-II, IX, or X and examined via confocal microscopy. Increased growth in PTH-treated sterna was MAPK, PI3K, and PKA dose dependent, suggesting growth was regulated through multiple pathways. Col-X deposition was rescued in PTH-treated sterna in the presence of PI3K or MAPK inhibitors, but not with the PKA inhibitor. All three inhibitors moderately disrupted Col-II and Col-IX deposition. These results suggest that PTH can activate multiple pathways during chondrocyte differentiation.

  18. Neospora caninum calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 is an effective drug target for neosporosis therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayode K Ojo

    Full Text Available Despite the enormous economic importance of Neospora caninum related veterinary diseases, the number of effective therapeutic agents is relatively small. Development of new therapeutic strategies to combat the economic impact of neosporosis remains an important scientific endeavor. This study demonstrates molecular, structural and phenotypic evidence that N. caninum calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 (NcCDPK1 is a promising molecular target for neosporosis drug development. Recombinant NcCDPK1 was expressed, purified and screened against a select group of bumped kinase inhibitors (BKIs previously shown to have low IC50s against Toxoplasma gondii CDPK1 and T. gondii tachyzoites. NcCDPK1 was inhibited by low concentrations of BKIs. The three-dimensional structure of NcCDPK1 in complex with BKIs was studied crystallographically. The BKI-NcCDPK1 structures demonstrated the structural basis for potency and selectivity. Calcium-dependent conformational changes in solution as characterized by small-angle X-ray scattering are consistent with previous structures in low Calcium-state but different in the Calcium-bound active state than predicted by X-ray crystallography. BKIs effectively inhibited N. caninum tachyzoite proliferation in vitro. Electron microscopic analysis of N. caninum cells revealed ultra-structural changes in the presence of BKI compound 1294. BKI compound 1294 interfered with an early step in Neospora tachyzoite host cell invasion and egress. Prolonged incubation in the presence of 1294 interfered produced observable interference with viability and replication. Oral dosing of BKI compound 1294 at 50 mg/kg for 5 days in established murine neosporosis resulted in a 10-fold reduced cerebral parasite burden compared to untreated control. Further experiments are needed to determine the PK, optimal dosage, and duration for effective treatment in cattle and dogs, but these data demonstrate proof-of-concept for BKIs, and 1294 specifically, for

  19. The phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 inhibitor, UCN-01, induces fragmentation: possible role of metalloproteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcántara-Hernández, Rocío; Hernández-Méndez, Aurelio; García-Sáinz, J Adolfo

    2014-10-05

    Phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1) is a key enzyme, master regulator of cellular proliferation and metabolism; it is considered a key target for pharmacological intervention. Using membranes obtained from DDT1 MF-2 cells, phospho-PDK1 was identified by Western blotting, as two major protein bands of Mr 58-68 kDa. Cell incubation with the PDK1 inhibitor, UCN-01, induced a time- and concentration-dependent decrease in the amount of phospho-PDK1 with a concomitant appearance of a ≈42 kDa phosphorylated fragment. Knocking down PDK1 diminished the amount of phospho-PDK1 detected in membranes, accompanied by similarly decreased fragment generation. UCN-01-induced fragment generation was also observed in membranes from cells stably expressing a myc-tagged PDK1 construct. Other PDK1 inhibitors were also tested: OSU-03012 induced a clear decrease in phospho-PDK1 and increased the presence of the phosphorylated fragment in membrane preparations; in contrast, GSK2334470 and staurosporine induced only marginal increases in the amount of PDK1 fragment. Galardin and batimastat, two metalloproteinase inhibitors, markedly attenuated inhibitor-induced PDK1 fragment generation. Metalloproteinases 2, 3, and 9 co-immunoprecipitated with myc-PDK1 under baseline conditions and this interaction was stimulated by UCN-01; batimastat also markedly diminished this effect of the PDK1 inhibitor. Our results indicate that a series of protein kinase inhibitors, namely UCN-01 and OSU-03012 and to a lesser extent GSK2334470 and staurosporine induce PDK1 fragmentation and suggest that metalloproteinases could participate in this effect. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Protein kinase A-dependent step(s) in hepatitis C virus entry and infectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquhar, Michelle J; Harris, Helen J; Diskar, Mandy; Jones, Sarah; Mee, Christopher J; Nielsen, Søren U; Brimacombe, Claire L; Molina, Sonia; Toms, Geoffrey L; Maurel, Patrick; Howl, John; Herberg, Friedrich W; van Ijzendoorn, Sven C D; Balfe, Peter; McKeating, Jane A

    2008-09-01

    Viruses exploit signaling pathways to their advantage during multiple stages of their life cycle. We demonstrate a role for protein kinase A (PKA) in the hepatitis C virus (HCV) life cycle. The inhibition of PKA with H89, cyclic AMP (cAMP) antagonists, or the protein kinase inhibitor peptide reduced HCV entry into Huh-7.5 hepatoma cells. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer methodology allowed us to investigate the PKA isoform specificity of the cAMP antagonists in Huh-7.5 cells, suggesting a role for PKA type II in HCV internalization. Since viral entry is dependent on the host cell expression of CD81, scavenger receptor BI, and claudin-1 (CLDN1), we studied the role of PKA in regulating viral receptor localization by confocal imaging and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) analysis. Inhibiting PKA activity in Huh-7.5 cells induced a reorganization of CLDN1 from the plasma membrane to an intracellular vesicular location(s) and disrupted FRET between CLDN1 and CD81, demonstrating the importance of CLDN1 expression at the plasma membrane for viral receptor activity. Inhibiting PKA activity in Huh-7.5 cells reduced the infectivity of extracellular virus without modulating the level of cell-free HCV RNA, suggesting that particle secretion was not affected but that specific infectivity was reduced. Viral particles released from H89-treated cells displayed the same range of buoyant densities as did those from control cells, suggesting that viral protein association with lipoproteins is not regulated by PKA. HCV infection of Huh-7.5 cells increased cAMP levels and phosphorylated PKA substrates, supporting a model where infection activates PKA in a cAMP-dependent manner to promote virus release and transmission.

  1. Pyruvate kinase is a dosage-dependent regulator of cellular amino acid homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grüning, Nana-Maria; Feichtinger, René; Krüger, Antje; Wamelink, Mirjam; Lehrach, Hans; Tate, Stephen; Neureiter, Daniel; Kofler, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    The glycolytic enzyme pyruvate kinase (PK) is required for cancer development, and has been implicated in the metabolic transition from oxidative to fermentative metabolism, the Warburg effect. However, the global metabolic response that follows changes in PK activity is not yet fully understood. Using shotgun proteomics, we identified 31 yeast proteins that were regulated in a PK-dependent manner. Selective reaction monitoring confirmed that their expression was dependent on PK isoform, level and activity. Most of the PK targets were amino acid metabolizing enzymes or factors of protein translation, indicating that PK plays a global regulatory role in biosynthethic amino acid metabolism. Indeed, we found strongly altered amino acid profiles when PK levels were changed. Low PK levels increased the cellular glutamine and glutamate concentrations, but decreased the levels of seven amino acids including serine and histidine. To test for evolutionary conservation of this PK function, we quantified orthologues of the identified PK targets in thyroid follicular adenoma, a tumor characterized by high PK levels and low respiratory activity. Aminopeptidase AAP-1 and serine hydroxymethyltransferase SHMT1 both showed PKM2- concentration dependence, and were upregulated in the tumor. Thus, PK expression levels and activity were important for maintaining cellular amino acid homeostasis. Mediating between energy production, ROS clearance and amino acid biosynthesis, PK thus plays a central regulatory role in the metabolism of proliferating cells. PMID:23154538

  2. Hyperexcitability and changes in activities of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II and mitogen-activated protein kinase in the hippocampus of rats exposed to 1-bromopropane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fueta, Yukiko; Fukunaga, Kohji; Ishidao, Toru; Hori, Hajime

    2002-12-20

    Chronic inhalation of 1-bromopropane (1-BP), a substitute of ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons, has been suspected of having central neurotoxicity (Clinical Neurology and Neurosurgery 101 (1999) 199; Journal of Occupational Health 44 (2002) 1) for humans. In animal experiments, 1-BP inhalation (1500 ppm) caused hyperexcitability in the CA1 and the dentate gyrus (DG) [Journal of Occupational Health 42 (2000) 149, Journal of Occupational Health 44 (2002) 156]. We studied whether the hyperexcitability is associated with changes of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and protein kinase C (PKC). Male Wistar rats were exposed to 1-BP for 6 hours in a day in an exposure chamber with a concentration of 700 ppm for 8 weeks. After the inhalation, paired-pulse ratios of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials and population spikes (PSs) were analyzed in the CA1 and DG of hippocampal slices. Control rats were then given fresh air in the inhalation chamber. Semiquantitative immunoblotting analyses of protein kinases using antibodies against active and conventional protein kinases were done using the whole hippocampus. A paired-pulse ratio of PS was increased at the 5 ms interpulse interval in the CA1 and at the 10-20 ms interpulse intervals in the DG. The amount of active MAPK and total amount of CaMKIIalpha and beta were significantly increased by 28, 29, and 46% compared to control, respectively, without any change in PKC activity. In contrast, the amount of active CaMKIIbeta was decreased to 78%. These results suggest that modifications of intracellular signaling cascades are associated with hyperexcitability that occurred in the hippocampal formation of rats exposed to the chronic inhalation of 1-BP.

  3. Activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase during silibinin-protected, isoproterenol-induced apoptosis in rat cardiac myocytes is tyrosine kinase pathway-mediated and protein kinase C-dependent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bei ZHOU; Li-jun WU; Shin-ichi TASHIRO; Satoshi ONODERA; Fumiaki UCHIUMI; Takashi IKEJIMA

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the mechanism of silibinin-protected isoproterenol-induced apoptosis in rat cardiac myocytes.Methods: The viability of rat cardiac myocytes was measured by MTT method. The apoptotic ratio was measured by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling. Protein kinase C (PKC) activity assay was carried out according to the instructions of the PepTag non-radioactive protein kinase C assay kit. Western blot analysis was used to evaluate the level of Ras, Raf-1 and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) expression.Results: The protective effects of silibinin were significantly sup-pressed by inhibitors, including genistein, manumycin A and GW5074 [inhibitors for protein tyrosine kinases (PTK), Ras and Raf- 1, respectively]. The exposure of rat cardiac myocytes to isoproterenol alone caused decreased PKC activity, which was prevented by pretreatment with silibinin dose-dependently. Simultaneously,the increased expression of Ras and Raf-1 activated by silibinin were blocked by the PKC inhibitor, stauroporine. In addition, the extracellularly responsive kinase (ERK) inhibitor, PD98059, suppressed silibinin-protected apoptosis, whereas the p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB203580, protected cardiac myocytes from isoproterenol-induced injury, and the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor, SP600125 had no protective effects. Furthermore, Western blot analysis showed that the expres-sion of phosphorylated ERK was increased by silibinin, the expression of phos-phorylated p38 MAPK was decreased and total ERK, p38, JNK and phosphory-lated JNK MAPK did not change after treatment with both isoproterenol and silibinin. Furthermore, pretreatment of cardiac myocyte with PKC, Ras and Raf inhibitors significantly blocked ERK phosphorylation.Conclusion: Silibinin is suggested to protect isoproterenol-induced rat cardiac myocyte apoptosis by activating the tyrosine kinase pathway, PKC and MAPK pathways.

  4. Phospho-dependent functional modulation of GABA(B) receptors by the metabolic sensor AMP-dependent protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuramoto, Nobuyuki; Wilkins, Megan E; Fairfax, Benjamin P; Revilla-Sanchez, Raquel; Terunuma, Miho; Tamaki, Keisuke; Iemata, Mika; Warren, Noel; Couve, Andrés; Calver, Andrew; Horvath, Zsolt; Freeman, Katie; Carling, David; Huang, Lan; Gonzales, Cathleen; Cooper, Edward; Smart, Trevor G; Pangalos, Menelas N; Moss, Stephen J

    2007-01-18

    GABA(B) receptors are heterodimeric G protein-coupled receptors composed of R1 and R2 subunits that mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the brain by activating inwardly rectifying K(+) channels (GIRKs) and inhibiting Ca(2+) channels. We demonstrate here that GABA(B) receptors are intimately associated with 5'AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK acts as a metabolic sensor that is potently activated by increases in 5'AMP concentration that are caused by enhanced metabolic activity, anoxia, or ischemia. AMPK binds the R1 subunit and directly phosphorylates S783 in the R2 subunit to enhance GABA(B) receptor activation of GIRKs. Phosphorylation of S783 is evident in many brain regions, and is increased dramatically after ischemic injury. Finally, we also reveal that S783 plays a critical role in enhancing neuronal survival after ischemia. Together our results provide evidence of a neuroprotective mechanism, which, under conditions of metabolic stress or after ischemia, increases GABA(B) receptor function to reduce excitotoxicity and thereby promotes neuronal survival.

  5. Phospho-dependent functional modulation of GABAB receptors by the metabolic sensor AMP-dependent protein kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuramoto, Nobuyuki; Wilkins, Megan E; Fairfax, Benjamin P; Revilla-Sanchez, Raquel; Terunuma, Miho; Warren, Noel; Tamaki, Keisuke; Iemata, Mika; Couve, Andrés; Calver, Andrew; Horvath, Zsolt; Freeman, Katie; Carling, David; Huang, Lan; Gonzales, Cathleen; Cooper, Edward; Smart, Trevor G.; Pangalos, Menelas N.; Moss., Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    GABAB receptors are heterodimeric G-protein coupled receptors composed of R1 and R2 subunits that mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the brain by activating inwardly-rectifying K+ channels (GIRKs) and inhibiting Ca2+ channels. We demonstrate here that GABAB receptors are intimately associated with 5’AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK acts as a metabolic sensor that is potently activated by increases in 5’AMP concentration caused by enhanced metabolic activity, anoxia or ischemia. AMPK binds the R1 subunit and directly phosphorylates S783 in the R2 subunit to enhance GABAB receptor activation of GIRKs. Phosphorylation of S783 is evident in many brain regions, and is increased dramatically after ischemic injury. Finally we also reveal that S783 plays a critical role in enhancing neuronal survival after ischemia. Together our results provide evidence of a novel neuroprotective mechanism, which under conditions of metabolic stress or after ischemia increases GABAB receptor function to reduce excitotoxicity and thereby promoting neuronal survival. PMID:17224405

  6. The nondigestible disaccharide epilactose increases paracellular Ca absorption via rho-associated kinase- and myosin light chain kinase-dependent mechanisms in rat small intestines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takuya; Nishimukai, Megumi; Takechi, Maki; Taguchi, Hidenori; Hamada, Shigeki; Yokota, Atsushi; Ito, Susumu; Hara, Hiroshi; Matsui, Hirokazu

    2010-02-10

    We previously showed that epilactose, a nondigestible disaccharide, increased calcium (Ca) absorption in the small intestines of rats. Here, we explored the mechanism(s) underlying the epilactose-mediated promotion of Ca absorption in a ligated intestinal segment of anesthetized rats. The addition of epilactose to the luminal solution increased Ca absorption and chromium (Cr)-EDTA permeability, a paracellular indicator, with a strong correlation (R = 0.93) between these changes. Epilactose induced the phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chains (MLCs), which is known to activate the paracellular route, without any change in the association of tight junction proteins with the actin cytoskeleton. The epilactose-mediated promotion of the Ca absorption was suppressed by specific inhibitors of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and Rho-associated kinase (ROCK). These results indicate that epilactose increases paracellular Ca absorption in the small intestine of rats through the induction of MLC phosphorylation via MLCK- and ROCK-dependent mechanisms.

  7. Lyn tyrosine kinase promotes silencing of ATM-dependent checkpoint signaling during recovery from DNA double-strand breaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukumoto, Yasunori, E-mail: fukumoto@faculty.chiba-u.jp; Kuki, Kazumasa; Morii, Mariko; Miura, Takahito; Honda, Takuya; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Hasegawa, Hitomi; Kubota, Sho; Ide, Yudai; Yamaguchi, Noritaka; Nakayama, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Naoto, E-mail: nyama@faculty.chiba-u.jp

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Inhibition of Src family kinases decreased γ-H2AX signal. • Inhibition of Src family increased ATM-dependent phosphorylation of Chk2 and Kap1. • shRNA-mediated knockdown of Lyn increased phosphorylation of Kap1 by ATM. • Ectopic expression of Src family kinase suppressed ATM-mediated Kap1 phosphorylation. • Src is involved in upstream signaling for inactivation of ATM signaling. - Abstract: DNA damage activates the DNA damage checkpoint and the DNA repair machinery. After initial activation of DNA damage responses, cells recover to their original states through completion of DNA repair and termination of checkpoint signaling. Currently, little is known about the process by which cells recover from the DNA damage checkpoint, a process called checkpoint recovery. Here, we show that Src family kinases promote inactivation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-dependent checkpoint signaling during recovery from DNA double-strand breaks. Inhibition of Src activity increased ATM-dependent phosphorylation of Chk2 and Kap1. Src inhibition increased ATM signaling both in G2 phase and during asynchronous growth. shRNA knockdown of Lyn increased ATM signaling. Src-dependent nuclear tyrosine phosphorylation suppressed ATM-mediated Kap1 phosphorylation. These results suggest that Src family kinases are involved in upstream signaling that leads to inactivation of the ATM-dependent DNA damage checkpoint.

  8. PPARδ activation acts cooperatively with 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 to enhance mammary tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire B Pollock

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptorδ (PPARδ is a transcription factor that is associated with metabolic gene regulation and inflammation. It has been implicated in tumor promotion and in the regulation of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 (PDK1. PDK1 is a key regulator of the AGC protein kinase family, which includes the proto-oncogene AKT/PKB implicated in several malignancies, including breast cancer. To assess the role of PDK1 in mammary tumorigenesis and its interaction with PPARδ, transgenic mice were generated in which PDK1 was expressed in mammary epithelium under the control of the MMTV enhancer/promoter region. Transgene expression increased pT308AKT and pS9GSK3β, but did not alter phosphorylation of mTOR, 4EBP1, ribosomal protein S6 and PKCα. The transgenic mammary gland also expressed higher levels of PPARδ and a gene expression profile resembling wild-type mice maintained on a diet containing the PPARδ agonist, GW501516. Both wild-type and transgenic mice treated with GW501516 exhibited accelerated rates of tumor formation that were more pronounced in transgenic animals. GW501516 treatment was accompanied by a distinct metabolic gene expression and metabolomic signature that was not present in untreated animals. GW501516-treated transgenic mice expressed higher levels of fatty acid and phospholipid metabolites than treated wild-type mice, suggesting the involvement of PDK1 in enhancing PPARδ-driven energy metabolism. These results reveal that PPARδ activation elicits a distinct metabolic and metabolomic profile in tumors that is in part related to PDK1 and AKT signaling.

  9. Bioinformatic survey for new physiological substrates of Cyclin-dependent kinase 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bórquez, Daniel A; Olmos, Cristina; Álvarez, Sebastián; Di Genova, Alex; Maass, Alejandro; González-Billault, Christian

    2013-04-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a proline-directed serine/threonine kinase predominantly active in the nervous system where it regulates several processes such as neuronal migration, cytoskeletal dynamics, axonal guidance, and neurotransmission. We constructed a position specific scoring matrix (PSSM) based on a dataset of sites shown to be phosphorylated both in vivo and in vitro by Cdk5. This dataset was curated manually through an exhaustive search of published experimental data. We then used this PSSM to perform a search in the mouse proteome through Scansite, a web-based tool for matching sequence patterns in large databases. Considering a stringent cut-off score of 0.5, we identified 354 new putative sites present in 291 proteins. In order to assess the robustness of our results, ten random subsets (of 80 sites each) of the original dataset were used to construct new PSSMs, which were then used as input for a new Scansite search, leading to the recovery of 81% of the 354 sites by at least 5 PSSMs. In order to reduce the number of false positives in our sequence-based approach, we evaluated which of these predicted sites were phosphorylated in vivo as determined by multiple phosphoproteomics studies carried out through mass spectrometry and available in the PhosphoSitePlus database. This step resulted in a very promising list of 132 putative phosphorylation sites for Cdk5, of which, 51 are specifically phosphorylated in brain tissue, and some are involved in functions regulated by Cdk5 such as axonal growth, synaptic plasticity and neurotransmission. Other phosphorylation sites in our list suggest that Cdk5 might regulate processes through mechanisms not previously recognized such as the control of mRNA splicing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Lack of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 inhibits c-myc tumorigenic activities in epithelial tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miliani de Marval, Paula L; Macias, Everardo; Rounbehler, Robert; Sicinski, Piotr; Kiyokawa, Hiroaki; Johnson, David G; Conti, Claudio J; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L

    2004-09-01

    The proto-oncogene c-myc encodes a transcription factor that is implicated in the regulation of cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis and that has also been found to be deregulated in several forms of human and experimental tumors. We have shown that forced expression of c-myc in epithelial tissues of transgenic mice (K5-Myc) resulted in keratinocyte hyperproliferation and the development of spontaneous tumors in the skin and oral cavity. Although a number of genes involved in cancer development are regulated by c-myc, the actual mechanisms leading to Myc-induced neoplasia are not known. Among the genes regulated by Myc is the cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) gene. Interestingly, previous studies from our laboratory showed that the overexpression of CDK4 led to keratinocyte hyperproliferation, although no spontaneous tumor development was observed. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that CDK4 may be one of the critical downstream genes involved in Myc carcinogenesis. Our results showed that CDK4 inhibition in K5-Myc transgenic mice resulted in the complete inhibition of tumor development, suggesting that CDK4 is a critical mediator of tumor formation induced by deregulated Myc. Furthermore, a lack of CDK4 expression resulted in marked decreases in epidermal thickness and keratinocyte proliferation compared to the results obtained for K5-Myc littermates. Biochemical analysis of the K5-Myc epidermis showed that CDK4 mediates the proliferative activities of Myc by sequestering p21Cip1 and p27Kip1 and thereby indirectly activating CDK2 kinase activity. These results show that CDK4 mediates the proliferative and oncogenic activities of Myc in vivo through a mechanism that involves the sequestration of specific CDK inhibitors.

  11. cGMP-dependent protein kinase contributes to hydrogen sulfide-stimulated vasorelaxation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariarosaria Bucci

    Full Text Available A growing body of evidence suggests that hydrogen sulfide (H₂S is a signaling molecule in mammalian cells. In the cardiovascular system, H₂S enhances vasodilation and angiogenesis. H₂S-induced vasodilation is hypothesized to occur through ATP-sensitive potassium channels (K(ATP; however, we recently demonstrated that it also increases cGMP levels in tissues. Herein, we studied the involvement of cGMP-dependent protein kinase-I in H₂S-induced vasorelaxation. The effect of H₂S on vessel tone was studied in phenylephrine-contracted aortic rings with or without endothelium. cGMP levels were determined in cultured cells or isolated vessel by enzyme immunoassay. Pretreatment of aortic rings with sildenafil attenuated NaHS-induced relaxation, confirming previous findings that H₂S is a phosphodiesterase inhibitor. In addition, vascular tissue levels of cGMP in cystathionine gamma lyase knockouts were lower than those in wild-type control mice. Treatment of aortic rings with NaHS, a fast releasing H₂S donor, enhanced phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein in a time-dependent manner, suggesting that cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG is activated after exposure to H₂S. Incubation of aortic rings with a PKG-I inhibitor (DT-2 attenuated NaHS-stimulated relaxation. Interestingly, vasodilatory responses to a slowly releasing H₂S donor (GYY 4137 were unaffected by DT-2, suggesting that this donor dilates mouse aorta through PKG-independent pathways. Dilatory responses to NaHS and L-cysteine (a substrate for H₂S production were reduced in vessels of PKG-I knockout mice (PKG-I⁻/⁻. Moreover, glibenclamide inhibited NaHS-induced vasorelaxation in vessels from wild-type animals, but not PKG-I⁻/⁻, suggesting that there is a cross-talk between K(ATP and PKG. Our results confirm the role of cGMP in the vascular responses to NaHS and demonstrate that genetic deletion of PKG-I attenuates NaHS and L

  12. Purification and characterization of a Ca2+ -dependent/calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase from moss chloronema cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jacinta S D’souza; Man Mohan Johri

    2003-03-01

    We have demonstrated the presence of a Ca2+-dependent/calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase (PK) in chloronema cells of the moss Funaria hygrometrica. The kinase, with a molecular mass of 70,000 daltons (PK70), was purified to homogeneity using ammonium sulphate fractionation, DEAE-cellulose chromatography, and calmodulin (CaM)-agarose affinity chromatography. The kinase activity was stimulated at a concentration of 50 M free Ca2+, and was further enhanced 3–5-fold with exogenously added 3–1000 nm moss calmodulin (CaM). Autophosphorylation was also stimulated with Ca2+ and CaM. Under in vitro conditions, PK70 phosphorylated preferentially lysine-rich substrates such as HIIIS and HVS. This PK shares epitopes with the maize Ca2+-dependent/calmodulin-stimulated PK (CCaMK) and also exhibits biochemical properties similar to the maize, lily, and tobacco CCaMK. We have characterized it as a moss CCaMK.

  13. Identification of a protein kinase activity that phosphorylates connexin43 in a pH-dependent manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Yahuaca

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available The carboxyl-terminal (CT domain of connexin43 (Cx43 has been implicated in both hormonal and pH-dependent gating of the gap junction channel. An in vitro assay was utilized to determine whether the acidification of cell extracts results in the activation of a protein kinase that can phosphorylate the CT domain. A glutathione S-transferase (GST-fusion protein was bound to Sephadex beads and used as a target for protein kinase phosphorylation. A protein extract produced from sheep heart was allowed to bind to the fusion protein-coated beads. The bound proteins were washed and then incubated with 32P-ATP. Phosphorylation was assessed after the proteins were resolved by SDS-PAGE. Incubation at pH 7.5 resulted in a minimal amount of phosphorylation while incubation at pH 6.5 resulted in significant phosphorylation reaction. Maximal activity was achieved when both the binding and kinase reactions were performed at pH 6.5. The protein kinase activity was stronger when the incubations were performed with manganese rather than magnesium. Mutants of Cx43 which lack the serines between amino acids 364-374 could not be phosphorylated in the in vitro kinase reaction, indicating that this is a likely target of this reaction. These results indicate that there is a protein kinase activity in cells that becomes more active at lower pH and can phosphorylate Cx43.

  14. Diacylglycerol kinase α controls RCP-dependent integrin trafficking to promote invasive migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainero, Elena; Caswell, Patrick T; Muller, Patricia A J; Grindlay, Joan; McCaffrey, Mary W; Zhang, Qifeng; Wakelam, Michael J O; Vousden, Karen H; Graziani, Andrea; Norman, Jim C

    2012-01-23

    Inhibition of αvβ3 integrin or expression of oncogenic mutants of p53 promote invasive cell migration by enhancing endosomal recycling of α5β1 integrin under control of the Rab11 effector Rab-coupling protein (RCP). In this paper, we show that diacylglycerol kinase α (DGK-α), which phosphorylates diacylglycerol to phosphatidic acid (PA), was required for RCP to be mobilized to and tethered at the tips of invasive pseudopods and to allow RCP-dependent α5β1 recycling and the resulting invasiveness of tumor cells. Expression of a constitutive-active mutant of DGK-α drove RCP-dependent invasion in the absence of mutant p53 expression or αvβ3 inhibition, and conversely, an RCP mutant lacking the PA-binding C2 domain was not capable of being tethered at pseudopod tips. These data demonstrate that generation of PA downstream of DGK-α is essential to connect expression of mutant p53s or inhibition of αvβ3 to RCP and for this Rab11 effector to drive the trafficking of α5β1 that is required for tumor cell invasion through three-dimensional matrices.

  15. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 regulates PSD-95 ubiquitination in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchetta, Michael J; Lam, TuKiet T; Jones, Stephen N; Morabito, Maria A

    2011-08-17

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) and its activator p35 have been implicated in drug addiction, neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, learning and memory, and synapse maturation and plasticity. However, the molecular mechanisms by which Cdk5 regulates synaptic plasticity are still unclear. PSD-95 is a major postsynaptic scaffolding protein of glutamatergic synapses that regulates synaptic strength and plasticity. PSD-95 is ubiquitinated by the ubiquitin E3 ligase Mdm2, and rapid and transient PSD-95 ubiquitination has been implicated in NMDA receptor-induced AMPA receptor endocytosis. Here we demonstrate that genetic or pharmacological reduction of Cdk5 activity increases the interaction of Mdm2 with PSD-95 and enhances PSD-95 ubiquitination without affecting PSD-95 protein levels in vivo in mice, suggesting a nonproteolytic function of ubiquitinated PSD-95 at synapses. We show that PSD-95 ubiquitination correlates with increased interaction with β-adaptin, a subunit of the clathrin adaptor protein complex AP-2. This interaction is increased by genetic reduction of Cdk5 activity or NMDA receptor stimulation and is dependent on Mdm2. Together these results support a function for Cdk5 in regulating PSD-95 ubiquitination and its interaction with AP-2 and suggest a mechanism by which PSD-95 may regulate NMDA receptor-induced AMPA receptor endocytosis.

  16. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p20 controls circadian cell-cycle timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laranjeiro, Ricardo; Tamai, T Katherine; Peyric, Elodie; Krusche, Peter; Ott, Sascha; Whitmore, David

    2013-04-23

    Specific stages of the cell cycle are often restricted to particular times of day because of regulation by the circadian clock. In zebrafish, both mitosis (M phase) and DNA synthesis (S phase) are clock-controlled in cell lines and during embryo development. Despite the ubiquitousness of this phenomenon, relatively little is known about the underlying mechanism linking the clock to the cell cycle. In this study, we describe an evolutionarily conserved cell-cycle regulator, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1d (20 kDa protein, p20), which along with p21, is a strongly rhythmic gene and directly clock-controlled. Both p20 and p21 regulate the G1/S transition of the cell cycle. However, their expression patterns differ, with p20 predominant in developing brain and peak expression occurring 6 h earlier than p21. p20 expression is also p53-independent in contrast to p21 regulation. Such differences provide a unique mechanism whereby S phase is set to different times of day in a tissue-specific manner, depending on the balance of these two inhibitors.

  17. The Role of Rho Kinase in Sex-Dependent Vascular Dysfunction in Type 1 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Nuno, Daniel W.; Kathryn G. Lamping

    2010-01-01

    We hypothesized that rho/rho kinase plays a role in sex differences in vascular dysfunction of diabetics. Contractions to serotonin were greater in isolated aortic rings from nondiabetic males versus females and increased further in streptozotocin-induced diabetic males but not females. The increased contractions to serotonin in males were reduced by inhibitors of rho kinase (fasudil, Y27632 and H1152) despite no change in expression of rhoA or rho kinase. Contractions to U46619 were not alte...

  18. Brain Region-Specific Effects of cGMP-Dependent Kinase II Knockout on AMPA Receptor Trafficking and Animal Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seonil; Pick, Joseph E.; Abera, Sinedu; Khatri, Latika; Ferreira, Danielle D. P.; Sathler, Matheus F.; Morison, Sage L.; Hofmann, Franz; Ziff, Edward B.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation of GluA1, a subunit of AMPA receptors (AMPARs), is critical for AMPAR synaptic trafficking and control of synaptic transmission. cGMP-dependent protein kinase II (cGKII) mediates this phosphorylation, and cGKII knockout (KO) affects GluA1 phosphorylation and alters animal behavior. Notably, GluA1 phosphorylation in the KO…

  19. Membrane targeting of cGMP-dependent protein kinase is required for cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl- channel activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.B. Vaandrager (Arie); A. Smolenski; B.C. Tilly (Bernard); A.B. Houtsmuller (Adriaan); E.M.E. Ehlert (Ehrich); A.G. Bot (Alice); M.J. Edixhoven (Marcel); W.E. Boomaars (Wendy); S.M. Lohmann (Suzanne); H.R. de Jonge (Hugo)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractA recently cloned isoform of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGK), designated type II, was implicated as the mediator of cGMP-provoked intestinal Cl- secretion based on its localization in the apical membrane of enterocytes and on its capacity to activate cys

  20. Activity of cGMP-Dependent Protein Kinase (PKG) Affects Sucrose Responsiveness and Habituation in "Drosophila melanogaster"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiner, Ricarda; Sokolowski, Marla B.; Erber, Joachim

    2004-01-01

    The cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) has many cellular functions in vertebrates and insects that affect complex behaviors such as locomotion and foraging. The "foraging" ("for") gene encodes a PKG in "Drosophila melanogaster." Here, we demonstrate a function for the "for" gene in sensory responsiveness and nonassociative learning. Larvae of the…

  1. Brain Region-Specific Effects of cGMP-Dependent Kinase II Knockout on AMPA Receptor Trafficking and Animal Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seonil; Pick, Joseph E.; Abera, Sinedu; Khatri, Latika; Ferreira, Danielle D. P.; Sathler, Matheus F.; Morison, Sage L.; Hofmann, Franz; Ziff, Edward B.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation of GluA1, a subunit of AMPA receptors (AMPARs), is critical for AMPAR synaptic trafficking and control of synaptic transmission. cGMP-dependent protein kinase II (cGKII) mediates this phosphorylation, and cGKII knockout (KO) affects GluA1 phosphorylation and alters animal behavior. Notably, GluA1 phosphorylation in the KO…

  2. Protein kinase C interaction with calcium: a phospholipid-dependent process.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bazzi, M D

    1990-08-21

    The calcium-binding properties of calcium- and phospholipid-dependent protein kinase C (PKC) were investigated by equilibrium dialysis in the presence and the absence of phospholipids. Calcium binding to PKC displayed striking and unexpected behavior; the free proteins bound virtually no calcium at intracellular calcium concentrations and bound limited calcium (about 1 mol\\/mol of PKC) at 200 microM calcium. However, in the presence of membranes containing acidic phospholipids, PKC bound at least eight calcium ions per protein. The presence of 1 microM phorbol dibutyrate (PDBu) in the dialysis buffer had little effect on these calcium-binding properties. Analysis of PKC-calcium binding by gel filtration under equilibrium conditions gave similar results; only membrane-associated PKC bound significant amounts of calcium. Consequently, PKC is a member of what may be a large group of proteins that bind calcium in a phospholipid-dependent manner. The calcium concentrations needed to induce PKC-membrane binding were similar to those needed for calcium binding (about 40 microM calcium at the midpoint). However, the calcium concentration required for PKC-membrane binding was strongly influenced by the phosphatidylserine composition of the membranes. Membranes with higher percentages of phosphatidylserine required lower concentrations of calcium. These properties suggested that the calcium sites may be generated at the interface between PKC and the membrane. Calcium may function as a bridge between PKC and phospholipids. These studies also suggested that calcium-dependent PKC-membrane binding and PKC function could be regulated by a number of factors in addition to calcium levels and diacylglycerol content of the membrane.

  3. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase II contributes to inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappa B kinase complex activation in Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maubach, Gunter; Sokolova, Olga; Wolfien, Markus; Rothkötter, Hermann-Josef; Naumann, Michael

    2013-09-15

    Helicobacter pylori, a class I carcinogen, induces a proinflammatory response by activating the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in gastric epithelial cells. This inflammatory condition could lead to chronic gastritis, which is epidemiologically and biologically linked to the development of gastric cancer. So far, there exists no clear knowledge on how H. pylori induces the NF-κB-mediated inflammatory response. In our study, we investigated the role of Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CAMKII), calmodulin, protein kinases C (PKCs) and the CARMA3-Bcl10-MALT1 (CBM) complex in conjunction with H. pylori-induced activation of NF-κB via the inhibitor of nuclear factor-kappa B kinase (IKK) complex. We use specific inhibitors and/or RNA interference to assess the contribution of these components. Our results show that CAMKII and calmodulin contribute to IKK complex activation and thus to the induction of NF-κB in response to H. pylori infection, but not in response to TNF-α. Thus, our findings are specific for H. pylori infected cells. Neither the PKCs α, δ, θ, nor the CBM complex itself is involved in the activation of NF-κB by H. pylori. The contribution of CAMKII and calmodulin, but not PKCs/CBM to the induction of an inflammatory response by H. pylori infection augment the understanding of the molecular mechanism involved and provide potential new disease markers for the diagnosis of gastric inflammatory diseases including gastric cancer.

  4. Phosphorylation of purified mitochondrial Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel by c-Jun N-terminal Kinase-3 modifies channel voltage-dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Gupta

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel (VDAC phosphorylated by c-Jun N-terminal Kinase-3 (JNK3 was incorporated into the bilayer lipid membrane. Single-channel electrophysiological properties of the native and the phosphorylated VDAC were compared. The open probability versus voltage curve of the native VDAC displayed symmetry around the voltage axis, whereas that of the phosphorylated VDAC showed asymmetry. This result indicates that phosphorylation by JNK3 modifies voltage-dependence of VDAC.

  5. Protein kinase A-dependent step(s) in hepatitis C virus entry and infectivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farquhar, Michelle J.; Harris, Helen J.; Diskar, Mandy; Jones, Sarah; Mee, Christopher J.; Nielsen, Soren U.; Brimacombe, Claire L.; Molina, Sonia; Toms, Geoffrey L.; Maurel, Patrick; Howl, John; Herberg, Friedrich W.; van Ijzendoorn, Sven C. D.; Balfe, Peter; McKeating, Jane A.

    2008-01-01

    Viruses exploit signaling pathways to their advantage during multiple stages of their life cycle. We demonstrate a role for protein kinase A (PKA) in the hepatitis C virus (HCV) life cycle. The inhibition of PKA with H89, cyclic AMP (cAMP) antagonists, or the protein kinase inhibitor peptide reduced

  6. Bradykinin and vasopressin activate phospholipase D in rat Leydig cells by a protein kinase C-dependent mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Hansen, Harald S.

    1993-01-01

    of PMA and vasopressin (AVP), PMA and bradykinin, or AVP and bradykinin produced no additive phosphatidylethanol or choline response, suggesting that AVP, bradykinin and PMA stimulated phospholipase D catalysed phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis by a similar protein kinase C-dependent mechanism. Furthermore...... resulting in the formation of phosphatidylethanol. This stimulation was abolished after down-regulation of protein kinase C by long-term pretreatment for 22 h with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). The stimulation of phospholipase D by the simultaneous addition for 8 min of maximum concentrations...

  7. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation facilitates GABA(B) receptor-effector coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couve, A; Thomas, P; Calver, A R; Hirst, W D; Pangalos, M N; Walsh, F S; Smart, T G; Moss, S J

    2002-05-01

    GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid)(B) receptors are heterodimeric G protein-coupled receptors that mediate slow synaptic inhibition in the central nervous system. Here we show that the functional coupling of GABA(B)R1/GABA(B)R2 receptors to inwardly rectifying K(+) channels rapidly desensitizes. This effect is alleviated after direct phosphorylation of a single serine residue (Ser892) in the cytoplasmic tail of GABA(B)R2 by cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Basal phosphorylation of this residue is evident in rat brain membranes and in cultured neurons. Phosphorylation of Ser892 is modulated positively by pathways that elevate cAMP concentration, such as those involving forskolin and beta-adrenergic receptors. GABA(B) receptor agonists reduce receptor phosphorylation, which is consistent with PKA functioning in the control of GABA(B)-activated currents. Mechanistically, phosphorylation of Ser892 specifically enhances the membrane stability of GABA(B) receptors. We conclude that signaling pathways that activate PKA may have profound effects on GABA(B) receptor-mediated synaptic inhibition. These results also challenge the accepted view that phosphorylation is a universal negative modulator of G protein-coupled receptors.

  8. Spatiotemporal and functional characterisation of the Plasmodium falciparum cGMP-dependent protein kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine S Hopp

    Full Text Available Signalling by 3'-5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP exists in virtually all eukaryotes. In the apicomplexan parasite Plasmodium, the cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG has previously been reported to play a critical role in four key stages of the life cycle. The Plasmodium falciparum isoform (PfPKG is essential for the initiation of gametogenesis and for blood stage schizont rupture and work on the orthologue from the rodent malaria parasite P. berghei (PbPKG has shown additional roles in ookinete differentiation and motility as well as liver stage schizont development. In the present study, PfPKG expression and subcellular location in asexual blood stages was investigated using transgenic epitope-tagged PfPKG-expressing P. falciparum parasites. In Western blotting experiments and immunofluorescence analysis (IFA, maximal PfPKG expression was detected at the late schizont stage. While IFA suggested a cytosolic location, a degree of overlap with markers of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER was found and subcellular fractionation showed some association with the peripheral membrane fraction. This broad localisation is consistent with the notion that PfPKG, as with the mammalian orthologue, has numerous cellular substrates. This idea is further supported by the global protein phosphorylation pattern of schizonts which was substantially changed following PfPKG inhibition, suggesting a complex role for PfPKG during schizogony.

  9. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 activity controls cell motility and metastatic potential of prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strock, Christopher J; Park, Jong-In; Nakakura, Eric K; Bova, G Steven; Isaacs, John T; Ball, Douglas W; Nelkin, Barry D

    2006-08-01

    We show here that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5), a known regulator of migration in neuronal development, plays an important role in prostate cancer motility and metastasis. P35, an activator of CDK5 that is indicative of its activity, is expressed in a panel of human and rat prostate cancer cell lines, and is also expressed in 87.5% of the human metastatic prostate cancers we examined. Blocking of CDK5 activity with a dominant-negative CDK5 construct, small interfering RNA, or roscovitine resulted in changes in the microtubule cytoskeleton, loss of cellular polarity, and loss of motility. Expression of a dominant-negative CDK5 in the highly metastatic Dunning AT6.3 prostate cancer cell line also greatly impaired invasive capacity. CDK5 activity was important for spontaneous metastasis in vivo; xenografts of AT6.3 cells expressing dominant-negative CDK5 had less than one-fourth the number of lung metastases exhibited by AT6.3 cells expressing the empty vector. These results show that CDK5 activity controls cell motility and metastatic potential in prostate cancer.

  10. The nuclear receptor DHR3 modulates dS6 kinase-dependent growth in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagne, Jacques; Lecerf, Caroline; Parvy, Jean-Philippe; Bennion, Janis M; Radimerski, Thomas; Ruhf, Marie-Laure; Zilbermann, Frederic; Vouilloz, Nicole; Stocker, Hugo; Hafen, Ernst; Kozma, Sara C; Thomas, George

    2010-05-06

    S6 kinases (S6Ks) act to integrate nutrient and insulin signaling pathways and, as such, function as positive effectors in cell growth and organismal development. However, they also have been shown to play a key role in limiting insulin signaling and in mediating the autophagic response. To identify novel regulators of S6K signaling, we have used a Drosophila-based, sensitized, gain-of-function genetic screen. Unexpectedly, one of the strongest enhancers to emerge from this screen was the nuclear receptor (NR), Drosophila hormone receptor 3 (DHR3), a critical constituent in the coordination of Drosophila metamorphosis. Here we demonstrate that DHR3, through dS6K, also acts to regulate cell-autonomous growth. Moreover, we show that the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of DHR3 is essential for mediating this response. Consistent with these findings, we have identified an endogenous DHR3 isoform that lacks the DBD. These results provide the first molecular link between the dS6K pathway, critical in controlling nutrient-dependent growth, and that of DHR3, a major mediator of ecdysone signaling, which, acting together, coordinate metamorphosis.

  11. The nuclear receptor DHR3 modulates dS6 kinase-dependent growth in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Montagne

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available S6 kinases (S6Ks act to integrate nutrient and insulin signaling pathways and, as such, function as positive effectors in cell growth and organismal development. However, they also have been shown to play a key role in limiting insulin signaling and in mediating the autophagic response. To identify novel regulators of S6K signaling, we have used a Drosophila-based, sensitized, gain-of-function genetic screen. Unexpectedly, one of the strongest enhancers to emerge from this screen was the nuclear receptor (NR, Drosophila hormone receptor 3 (DHR3, a critical constituent in the coordination of Drosophila metamorphosis. Here we demonstrate that DHR3, through dS6K, also acts to regulate cell-autonomous growth. Moreover, we show that the ligand-binding domain (LBD of DHR3 is essential for mediating this response. Consistent with these findings, we have identified an endogenous DHR3 isoform that lacks the DBD. These results provide the first molecular link between the dS6K pathway, critical in controlling nutrient-dependent growth, and that of DHR3, a major mediator of ecdysone signaling, which, acting together, coordinate metamorphosis.

  12. cGMP-dependent protein kinase I, the circadian clock, sleep and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feil, Robert; Hölter, Sabine M; Weindl, Karin; Wurst, Wolfgang; Langmesser, Sonja; Gerling, Andrea; Feil, Susanne; Albrecht, Urs

    2009-07-01

    The second messenger cGMP controls cardiovascular and gastrointestinal homeostasis in mammals. However, its physiological relevance in the nervous system is poorly understood.1 Now, we have reported that the cGMP-dependent protein kinase type I (PRKG1) is implicated in the regulation of the timing and quality of sleep and wakefulness.2Prkg1 mutant mice showed altered distribution of sleep and wakefulness as well as reduction in rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS) duration and in non-REMS consolidation. Furthermore, the ability to sustain waking episodes was compromised. These observations were also reflected in wheel-running and drinking activity. A decrease in electroencephalogram power in the delta frequency range (1-4 Hz) under baseline conditions was observed, which was normalized after sleep deprivation. Together with the finding that circadian clock amplitude is reduced in Prkg1 mutants these results indicate a decrease of the wake-promoting output of the circadian system affecting sleep. Because quality of sleep might affect learning we tested Prkg1 mutants in several learning tasks and find normal spatial learning but impaired object recognition memory in these animals. Our findings indicate that Prkg1 impinges on circadian rhythms, sleep and distinct aspects of learning.

  13. Cyclin-dependent kinase 9 links RNA polymerase II transcription to processing of ribosomal RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Kaspar; Mühl, Bastian; Rohrmoser, Michaela; Coordes, Britta; Heidemann, Martin; Kellner, Markus; Gruber-Eber, Anita; Heissmeyer, Vigo; Strässer, Katja; Eick, Dirk

    2013-07-19

    Ribosome biogenesis is a process required for cellular growth and proliferation. Processing of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is highly sensitive to flavopiridol, a specific inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (Cdk9). Cdk9 has been characterized as the catalytic subunit of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). Here we studied the connection between RNAPII transcription and rRNA processing. We show that inhibition of RNAPII activity by α-amanitin specifically blocks processing of rRNA. The block is characterized by accumulation of 3' extended unprocessed 47 S rRNAs and the entire inhibition of other 47 S rRNA-specific processing steps. The transcription rate of rRNA is moderately reduced after inhibition of Cdk9, suggesting that defective 3' processing of rRNA negatively feeds back on RNAPI transcription. Knockdown of Cdk9 caused a strong reduction of the levels of RNAPII-transcribed U8 small nucleolar RNA, which is essential for 3' rRNA processing in mammalian cells. Our data demonstrate a pivotal role of Cdk9 activity for coupling of RNAPII transcription with small nucleolar RNA production and rRNA processing.

  14. Identification of a novel subgroup of melanomas with KIT/cyclin-dependent kinase-4 overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalley, Keiran S M; Contractor, Rooha; Nguyen, Thiennga K; Xiao, Min; Edwards, Robin; Muthusamy, Viswanathan; King, Alastair J; Flaherty, Keith T; Bosenberg, Marcus; Herlyn, Meenhard; Nathanson, Katherine L

    2008-07-15

    Although many melanomas harbor either activating mutations in BRAF or NRAS, there remains a substantial, yet little known, group of tumors without either mutation. Here, we used a genomic strategy to define a novel group of melanoma cell lines with co-overexpression of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and KIT. Although this subgroup lacked any known KIT mutations, they had high phospho-KIT receptor expression, indicating receptor activity. Quantitative PCR confirmed the existence of a similar KIT/CDK4 subgroup in human melanoma samples. Pharmacologic studies showed the KIT/CDK4-overexpressing subgroup to be resistant to BRAF inhibitors but sensitive to imatinib in both in vitro and in vivo melanoma models. Mechanistically, imatinib treatment led to increased apoptosis and G(1) phase cell cycle arrest associated with the inhibition of phospho-ERK and increased expression of p27(KIP). Other melanoma cell lines, which retained some KIT expression but lacked phospho-KIT, were not sensitive to imatinib, suggesting that KIT expression alone is not predictive of response. We suggest that co-overexpression of KIT/CDK4 is a potential mechanism of oncogenic transformation in some BRAF/NRAS wild-type melanomas. This group of melanomas may be a subpopulation for which imatinib or other KIT inhibitors may constitute optimal therapy.

  15. Hunting Increases Phosphorylation of Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Type II in Adult Barn Owls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant S. Nichols

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile barn owls readily adapt to prismatic spectacles, whereas adult owls living under standard aviary conditions do not. We previously demonstrated that phosphorylation of the cyclic-AMP response element-binding protein (CREB provides a readout of the instructive signals that guide plasticity in juveniles. Here we investigated phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (pCaMKII in both juveniles and adults. In contrast to CREB, we found no differences in pCaMKII expression between prism-wearing and control juveniles within the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICX, the major site of plasticity. For prism-wearing adults that hunted live mice and are capable of adaptation, expression of pCaMKII was increased relative to prism-wearing adults that fed passively on dead mice and are not capable of adaptation. This effect did not bear the hallmarks of instructive information: it was not localized to rostral ICX and did not exhibit a patchy distribution reflecting discrete bimodal stimuli. These data are consistent with a role for CaMKII as a permissive rather than an instructive factor. In addition, the paucity of pCaMKII expression in passively fed adults suggests that the permissive default setting is “off” in adults.

  16. Regulation of Ceramide Synthase by Casein Kinase 2-dependent Phosphorylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresques, Tara; Niles, Brad; Aronova, Sofia; Mogri, Huzefa; Rakhshandehroo, Taha; Powers, Ted

    2015-01-01

    Complex sphingolipids are important components of eukaryotic cell membranes and, together with their biosynthetic precursors, including sphingoid long chain bases and ceramides, have important signaling functions crucial for cell growth and survival. Ceramides are produced at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane by a multicomponent enzyme complex termed ceramide synthase (CerS). In budding yeast, this complex is composed of two catalytic subunits, Lac1 and Lag1, as well as an essential regulatory subunit, Lip1. Proper formation of ceramides by CerS has been shown previously to require the Cka2 subunit of casein kinase 2 (CK2), a ubiquitous enzyme with multiple cellular functions, but the precise mechanism involved has remained unidentified. Here we present evidence that Lac1 and Lag1 are direct targets for CK2 and that phosphorylation at conserved positions within the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain of each protein is required for optimal CerS activity. Our data suggest that phosphorylation of Lac1 and Lag1 is important for proper localization and distribution of CerS within the ER membrane and that phosphorylation of these sites is functionally linked to the COP I-dependent C-terminal dilysine ER retrieval pathway. Together, our data identify CK2 as an important regulator of sphingolipid metabolism, and additionally, because both ceramides and CK2 have been implicated in the regulation of cancer, our findings may lead to an enhanced understanding of their relationship in health and disease. PMID:25429105

  17. Regulation of ceramide synthase by casein kinase 2-dependent phosphorylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresques, Tara; Niles, Brad; Aronova, Sofia; Mogri, Huzefa; Rakhshandehroo, Taha; Powers, Ted

    2015-01-16

    Complex sphingolipids are important components of eukaryotic cell membranes and, together with their biosynthetic precursors, including sphingoid long chain bases and ceramides, have important signaling functions crucial for cell growth and survival. Ceramides are produced at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane by a multicomponent enzyme complex termed ceramide synthase (CerS). In budding yeast, this complex is composed of two catalytic subunits, Lac1 and Lag1, as well as an essential regulatory subunit, Lip1. Proper formation of ceramides by CerS has been shown previously to require the Cka2 subunit of casein kinase 2 (CK2), a ubiquitous enzyme with multiple cellular functions, but the precise mechanism involved has remained unidentified. Here we present evidence that Lac1 and Lag1 are direct targets for CK2 and that phosphorylation at conserved positions within the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain of each protein is required for optimal CerS activity. Our data suggest that phosphorylation of Lac1 and Lag1 is important for proper localization and distribution of CerS within the ER membrane and that phosphorylation of these sites is functionally linked to the COP I-dependent C-terminal dilysine ER retrieval pathway. Together, our data identify CK2 as an important regulator of sphingolipid metabolism, and additionally, because both ceramides and CK2 have been implicated in the regulation of cancer, our findings may lead to an enhanced understanding of their relationship in health and disease.

  18. Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase expression and signalling in skeletal muscle during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Adam John; Kiens, Bente; Richter, Erik

    2006-01-01

    Ca2+ signalling is proposed to play an important role in skeletal muscle function during exercise. Here, we examined the expression of multifunctional Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaMK) in human skeletal muscle and show that CaMKII and CaMKK, but not CaMKI or CaMKIV, are expressed....... Furthermore, the effect of exercise duration and intensity on skeletal muscle CaMKII activity and phosphorylation of downstream targets was examined. Eight healthy men exercised at ~67% of peak pulmonary O2 uptake (VO2peak) with muscle samples taken at rest and after 1, 10, 30, 60 and 90 min of exercise. Ten...... other men exercised for three consecutive 10 min bouts at 35%, 60% and 85% VO2peak with muscle samples taken at rest, at the end of each interval and 30 min post-exercise. There was a rapid and transient increase in autonomous CaMKII activity and CaMKII phosphorylation at Thr287 in skeletal muscle...

  19. Calcium-dependent protein kinases in plants: evolution, expression and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valmonte, Gardette R; Arthur, Kieren; Higgins, Colleen M; MacDiarmid, Robin M

    2014-03-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CPKs) are plant proteins that directly bind calcium ions before phosphorylating substrates involved in metabolism, osmosis, hormone response and stress signaling pathways. CPKs are a large multigene family of proteins that are present in all plants studied to date, as well as in protists, oomycetes and green algae, but are not found in animals and fungi. Despite the increasing evidence of the importance of CPKs in developmental and stress responses from various plants, a comprehensive genome-wide analysis of CPKs from algae to higher plants has not been undertaken. This paper describes the evolution of CPKs from green algae to plants using a broadly sampled phylogenetic analysis and demonstrates the functional diversification of CPKs based on expression and functional studies in different plant species. Our findings reveal that CPK sequence diversification into four major groups occurred in parallel with the terrestrial transition of plants. Despite significant expansion of the CPK gene family during evolution from green algae to higher plants, there is a high level of sequence conservation among CPKs in all plant species. This sequence conservation results in very little correlation between CPK evolutionary groupings and functional diversity, making the search for CPK functional orthologs a challenge.

  20. Protein kinase A dependent phosphorylation activates Mg2+ efflux in the basolateral region of the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cefaratti, C; Ruse, Cristian

    2007-03-01

    Isolated hepatocytes in physiological [Na(+)]( 0 ) tightly maintain [Mg(2+)]( i ). Upon beta-adrenergic stimulation or in the presence of permeable cAMP, hepatocytes release 5-10% (1-3 mM Mg(2+)) of their total Mg(2+) content. However, isolated basolateral liver plasma membranes (bLPM), release Mg(2+) in the presence of [Na(+)]( o ) even in the absence of catecholamine stimulation. The data indicate that a physiological brake for Mg(2+) efflux is present in the hepatocyte and is removed upon cellular signaling. In contrast, this regulation "brake" is absent in purified bLPM thus rendering them fully active. The present study was carried out to reconstruct the missing regulatory component. Activation of Mg(2+) extrusion in intact cells is consistent with cAMP dependent phosphorylation of the transporter or a regulatory protein. Treatment of bLPM with a non-specific phosphatase such as alkaline phosphatase (AP), decreased Mg(2+) efflux by 70% compared to untreated bLPM. When AP-treated bLPM were loaded with protein kinase A (PKA), and stimulated with permeable cAMP, Mg(2+) transport fully recovered. These data suggest that phosphorylation of the Na(+)/Mg(2+) exchanger or a nearby protein activates the Mg(2+) transport mechanism in hepatocytes.

  1. TLR-induced activation of neutrophils promotes histamine production via a PI3 kinase dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smuda, Craig; Wechsler, Joshua B; Bryce, Paul J

    2011-12-30

    Histamine is a bioactive amine that exerts immunomodulatory functions, including many allergic symptoms. It is preformed and stored in mast cells and basophils but recent evidence suggests that other cell types produce histamine in an inducible fashion. During infection, it has been suggested that neutrophils may produce histamine. We also observed that histamine is released in a neutrophil-mediated LPS-induced model of acute lung injury. Therefore, we sought to examine whether innate signals promote histamine production by neutrophils. Bone marrow-derived neutrophils stimulated with a range of TLR agonists secreted histamine in response to LPS or R837, suggesting TLR4 or TLR7 are important. LPS-driven histamine was enhanced by coculture with GM-CSF and led to a transient release of histamine that peaked at 8h post stimulation. This was dependent upon de novo synthesis of histamine, since cells derived from histidine decarboxylase (HDC) deficient mice were unable to produce histamine but did generate reactive oxygen species upon stimulation. Using pharmacological inhibitors, we show that histamine production requires PI3 kinase, which has been shown to regulate other neutrophil functions, including activation and selective granule release. However, unlike mast cells, HDC deficiency did not alter the granule structure of neutrophils, suggesting that histamine does not participate in granule integrity in these cells. Consequently, our findings establish that neutrophils generate histamine in response to a select panel of innate immune triggers and that this might contribute to acute lung injury responses.

  2. Genome-wide expression patterns of calcium-dependent protein kinases in Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin-Lei; Huang, Si-Yang; Zhang, Nian-Zhang; Chen, Jia; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2015-06-04

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are found in plants and some Apicomplexan parasites but not in animals or fungi. CDPKs have been shown to play important roles in various calcium-signaling pathways such as host cell invasion, egress and protein secretion in Toxoplasma gondii. The objectives of the present study were to examine the T. gondii CDPK genes expression patterns during different development stages and stress responses. We carried out a comprehensive expression analysis of CDPK genes based on previously published microarray datasets, and we also used real time quantitative RT-PCR to study ten T. gondii CDPK genes expression patterns under acid, alkali, high temperature and low temperature conditions. Microarrays analysis indicated that some TgCDPK genes exhibited different expression levels in IFN-γ stimuli conditions or at different developmental stages, suggesting that CDPK genes may play different roles in these processes. Expression profiles under low temperature, high temperature, acid and alkaline indicated that most CDPK may be involved in regulating high temperature, acid and alkaline signaling pathways. We present a genome-wide expression analysis of CDPK genes in T. gondii for the first time, and the mRNA levels change with abiotic and biotic stresses, suggesting their functional roles in these processes. These results will provide a solid basis for future functional studies of the CDPK gene family in T. gondii.

  3. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors in Maize Endosperm and Their Potential Role in Endoreduplication1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Cintia M.; Dante, Ricardo A.; Sabelli, Paolo A.; Sun, Yuejin; Dilkes, Brian P.; Gordon-Kamm, William J.; Larkins, Brian A.

    2005-01-01

    Two maize (Zea mays) cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors, Zeama;KRP;1 and Zeama;KRP;2, were characterized and shown to be expressed in developing endosperm. Similar to the CDK inhibitors in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), the maize proteins contain a carboxy-terminal region related to the inhibitory domain of the mammalian Cip/Kip inhibitors. Zeama;KRP;1 is present in the endosperm between 7 and 21 d after pollination, a period that encompasses the onset of endoreduplication, while the Zeama;KRP;2 protein declines during this time. Nevertheless, Zeama;KRP;1 accounts for only part of the CDK inhibitory activity that peaks coincident with the endoreduplication phase of endosperm development. In vitro assays showed that Zeama;KRP;1 and Zeama;KRP;2 are able to inhibit endosperm Cdc2-related CKD activity that associates with p13Suc1. They were also shown to specifically inhibit cyclin A1;3- and cyclin D5;1-associated CDK activities, but not cyclin B1;3/CDK. Overexpression of Zeama;KRP;1 in maize embryonic calli that ectopically expressed the wheat dwarf virus RepA protein, which counteracts retinoblastoma-related protein function, led to an additional round of DNA replication without nuclear division. PMID:16055680

  4. An ant-plant mutualism through the lens of cGMP-dependent kinase genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malé, Pierre-Jean G; Turner, Kyle M; Doha, Manjima; Anreiter, Ina; Allen, Aaron M; Sokolowski, Marla B; Frederickson, Megan E

    2017-09-13

    In plant-animal mutualisms, how an animal forages often determines how much benefit its plant partner receives. In many animals, foraging behaviour changes in response to foraging gene expression or activation of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) that foraging encodes. Here, we show that this highly conserved molecular mechanism affects the outcome of a plant-animal mutualism. We studied the two PKG genes of Allomerus octoarticulatus, an Amazonian ant that defends the ant-plant Cordia nodosa against herbivores. Some ant colonies are better 'bodyguards' than others. Working in the field in Peru, we found that colonies fed with a PKG activator recruited more workers to attack herbivores than control colonies. This resulted in less herbivore damage. PKG gene expression in ant workers correlated with whether an ant colony discovered an herbivore and how much damage herbivores inflicted on leaves in a complex way; natural variation in expression levels of the two genes had significant interaction effects on ant behaviour and herbivory. Our results suggest a molecular basis for ant protection of plants in this mutualism. © 2017 The Author(s).

  5. Gametogenesis in malaria parasites is mediated by the cGMP-dependent protein kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louisa McRobert

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Malaria parasite transmission requires differentiation of male and female gametocytes into gametes within a mosquito following a blood meal. A mosquito-derived molecule, xanthurenic acid (XA, can trigger gametogenesis, but the signalling events controlling this process in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum remain unknown. A role for cGMP was revealed by our observation that zaprinast (an inhibitor of phosphodiesterases that hydrolyse cGMP stimulates gametogenesis in the absence of XA. Using cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG inhibitors in conjunction with transgenic parasites expressing an inhibitor-insensitive mutant PKG enzyme, we demonstrate that PKG is essential for XA- and zaprinast-induced gametogenesis. Furthermore, we show that intracellular calcium (Ca2+ is required for differentiation and acts downstream of or in parallel with PKG activation. This work defines a key role for PKG in gametogenesis, elucidates the hierarchy of signalling events governing this process in P. falciparum, and demonstrates the feasibility of selective inhibition of a crucial regulator of the malaria parasite life cycle.

  6. Mapping of protein-protein interactions within the DNA-dependent protein kinase complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, D; Jackson, S P

    1999-01-01

    In mammalian cells, the Ku and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) proteins are required for the correct and efficient repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Ku comprises two tightly-associated subunits of approximately 69 and approximately 83 kDa, which are termed Ku70 and Ku80 (or Ku86), respectively. Previously, a number of regions of both Ku subunits have been demonstrated to be involved in their interaction, but the molecular mechanism of this interaction remains unknown. We have identified a region in Ku70 (amino acid residues 449-578) and a region in Ku80 (residues 439-592) that participate in Ku subunit interaction. Sequence analysis reveals that these interaction regions share sequence homology and suggests that the Ku subunits are structurally related. On binding to a DNA double-strand break, Ku is able to interact with DNA-PKcs, but how this interaction is mediated has not been defined. We show that the extreme C-terminus of Ku80, specifically the final 12 amino acid residues, mediates a highly specific interaction with DNA-PKcs. Strikingly, these residues appear to be conserved only in Ku80 sequences from vertebrate organisms. These data suggest that Ku has evolved to become part of the DNA-PK holo-enzyme by acquisition of a protein-protein interaction motif at the C-terminus of Ku80. PMID:10446239

  7. Plasmodium berghei calcium dependent protein kinase 1 is not required for host cell invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jebiwott, Sylvia; Govindaswamy, Kavitha; Mbugua, Amos; Bhanot, Purnima

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium Calcium Dependent Protein Kinase (CDPK1) is required for the development of sexual stages in the mosquito. In addition, it is proposed to play an essential role in the parasite's invasive stages possibly through the regulation of the actinomyosin motor and micronemal secretion. We demonstrate that Plasmodium berghei CDPK1 is dispensable in the parasite's erythrocytic and pre-erythrocytic stages. We successfully disrupted P. berghei CDPK1 (PbCDPK1) by homologous recombination. The recovery of erythrocytic stage parasites lacking PbCDPK1 (PbCDPK1-) demonstrated that PbCDPK1 is not essential for erythrocytic invasion or intra-erythrocytic development. To study PbCDPK1's role in sporozoites and liver stage parasites, we generated a conditional mutant (CDPK1 cKO). Phenotypic characterization of CDPK1 cKO sporozoites demonstrated that CDPK1 is redundant or dispensable for the invasion of mammalian hepatocytes, the egress of parasites from infected hepatocytes and through the subsequent erythrocytic cycle. We conclude that P. berghei CDPK1 plays an essential role only in the mosquito sexual stages.

  8. Plasmodium berghei calcium dependent protein kinase 1 is not required for host cell invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Jebiwott

    Full Text Available Plasmodium Calcium Dependent Protein Kinase (CDPK1 is required for the development of sexual stages in the mosquito. In addition, it is proposed to play an essential role in the parasite's invasive stages possibly through the regulation of the actinomyosin motor and micronemal secretion. We demonstrate that Plasmodium berghei CDPK1 is dispensable in the parasite's erythrocytic and pre-erythrocytic stages. We successfully disrupted P. berghei CDPK1 (PbCDPK1 by homologous recombination. The recovery of erythrocytic stage parasites lacking PbCDPK1 (PbCDPK1- demonstrated that PbCDPK1 is not essential for erythrocytic invasion or intra-erythrocytic development. To study PbCDPK1's role in sporozoites and liver stage parasites, we generated a conditional mutant (CDPK1 cKO. Phenotypic characterization of CDPK1 cKO sporozoites demonstrated that CDPK1 is redundant or dispensable for the invasion of mammalian hepatocytes, the egress of parasites from infected hepatocytes and through the subsequent erythrocytic cycle. We conclude that P. berghei CDPK1 plays an essential role only in the mosquito sexual stages.

  9. S6 Kinase is essential for MYC-dependent rDNA transcription in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Naomi C; Tchoubrieva, Elissaveta B; Chahal, Arjun; Woods, Simone; Lee, Amanda; Lin, Jane I; Parsons, Linda; Jastrzebski, Katarzyna; Poortinga, Gretchen; Hannan, Katherine M; Pearson, Richard B; Hannan, Ross D; Quinn, Leonie M

    2015-10-01

    Increased rates of ribosome biogenesis and biomass accumulation are fundamental properties of rapidly growing and dividing malignant cells. The MYC oncoprotein drives growth predominantly via its ability to upregulate the ribosome biogenesis program, in particular stimulating the activity of the RNA Polymerase I (Pol I) machinery to increase ribosomal RNA (rRNA) transcription. Although MYC function is known to be highly dependent on the cellular signalling context, the pathways interacting with MYC to regulate transcription of ribosomal genes (rDNA) in vivo in response to growth factor status, nutrient availability and cellular stress are only beginning to be understood. To determine factors critical to MYC-dependent stimulation of rDNA transcription in vivo, we performed a transient expression screen for known oncogenic signalling pathways in Drosophila. Strikingly, from the broad range of pathways tested, we found that ribosomal protein S6 Kinase (S6K) activity, downstream of the TOR pathway, was the only factor rate-limiting for the rapid induction of rDNA transcription due to transiently increased MYC. Further, we demonstrated that one of the mechanism(s) by which MYC and S6K cooperate is through coordinate activation of the essential Pol I transcription initiation factor TIF-1A (RRN 3). As Pol I targeted therapy is now in phase 1 clinical trials in patients with haematological malignancies, including those driven by MYC, these data suggest that therapies dually targeting Pol I transcription and S6K activity may be effective in treating MYC-driven tumours.

  10. Cellular localization and biochemical characterization of a novel calcium-dependent protein kinase from tobacco

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun WANG; Mei ZHANG; Ke KE; Ying Tang LU

    2005-01-01

    By screening tobacco cDNA library with MCK1 as a probe, we isolated a cDNA clone NtCPK5 (accession number AY971376), which encodes a typical calcium-dependent protein kinase. Sequence analyses indicated that NtCPK5 is related to both CPKs and CRKs superfamilies and has all of the three conserved domains of CPKs. The biochemical activity of NtCPK5 was calcium-dependent. NtCPK5 had Vmax and Km of 526 nmol/min/mg and 210 μg/ml respectively with calf thymus histone (fraction Ⅲ, abbreviated to histone Ⅲs) as substrate. For substrate syntide-2, NtCPK5 showed a higher. Vmax of 2008 nmol/min/mg and a lower Km of 30 μM. The K0.5 of calcium activation was 0.04 μM or 0.06 μM for histone Ⅲs or syntide-2 respectively. The putative myristoylation and palmitoylation consensus sequence of NtCPK5 suggests that it could be a membrane-anchoring protein. Indeed, our transient expression experiments with wild type and mutant forms of NtCPK5/GFP fusion proteins showed that NtCPK5 was localized to the plasma membrane of onion epidermal cells and that the localization required the N-terminal acylation sites of NtCPK5/GFP. Taking together, our data have demonstrated the biochemical characteristics of a novel protein NtCPK5 and its subcellular localization as a membrane-anchoring protein.

  11. Casein kinase 1-epsilon deletion increases mu opioid receptor-dependent behaviors and binge eating1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, L R; Kirkpatrick, S L; Yazdani, N; Luttik, K P; Lacki, O A; Keith Babbs, R; Jenkins, D F; Evan Johnson, W; Bryant, C D

    2017-09-01

    Genetic and pharmacological studies indicate that casein kinase 1 epsilon (Csnk1e) contributes to psychostimulant, opioid, and ethanol motivated behaviors. We previously used pharmacological inhibition to demonstrate that Csnk1e negatively regulates the locomotor stimulant properties of opioids and psychostimulants. Here, we tested the hypothesis that Csnk1e negatively regulates opioid and psychostimulant reward using genetic inhibition and the conditioned place preference assay in Csnk1e knockout mice. Similar to pharmacological inhibition, Csnk1e knockout mice showed enhanced opioid-induced locomotor activity with the mu opioid receptor agonist fentanyl (0.2 mg/kg i.p.) as well as enhanced sensitivity to low-dose fentanyl reward (0.05 mg/kg). Interestingly, female knockout mice also showed a markedly greater escalation in consumption of sweetened palatable food - a behavioral pattern consistent with binge eating that also depends on mu opioid receptor activation. No difference was observed in fentanyl analgesia in the 52.5°C hot plate assay (0-0.4 mg/kg), naloxone conditioned place aversion (4 mg/kg), or methamphetamine conditioned place preference (0-4 mg/kg). To identify molecular adaptations associated with increased drug and food behaviors in knockout mice, we completed transcriptome analysis via mRNA sequencing of the striatum. Enrichment analysis identified terms associated with myelination and axon guidance and pathway analysis identified a differentially expressed gene set predicted to be regulated by the Wnt signaling transcription factor, Tcf7l2. To summarize, Csnk1e deletion increased mu opioid receptor-dependent behaviors, supporting previous studies indicating an endogenous negative regulatory role of Csnk1e in opioid behavior. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  12. Increased calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II activity by morphine-sensitization in rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadivar, Mehdi; Farahmandfar, Maryam; Ranjbar, Faezeh Esmaeli; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2014-07-01

    Repeated exposure to drugs of abuse, such as morphine, elicits a progressive enhancement of drug-induced behavioral responses, a phenomenon termed behavioral sensitization. These changes in behavior may reflect long-lasting changes in some of the important molecules involved in memory processing such as calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). In the present study, we investigated the effect of morphine sensitization on mRNA expression of α and β isoforms and activity of CaMKII in the hippocampus of male rats. Animals were treated for 3 days with saline or morphine (20mg/kg) and following a washout period of 5 days, a challenge dose of morphine (5mg/kg) were administered. The results indicate that morphine administration in pre-treated animals produces behavioral sensitization, as determined by significant increase in locomotion and oral stereotypy behavior. In addition, repeated morphine treatment increased mRNA expression of both α and β isoforms of CaMKII in the hippocampus. The present study also showed that induction of morphine sensitization significantly increased both Ca2+/calmodulin-independent and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent activities of CaMK II in the rat hippocampus. However, acute administration of morphine (5mg/kg) did not alter either α and β CaMKII mRNA expression or CaMKII activity in the hippocampus. The stimulation effects of morphine sensitization on mRNA expression and activity of CaMKII were completely abolished by administration of naloxone, 30min prior to s.c. injections of morphine (20mg/kg/day×3 days). Our data demonstrated that induction of morphine sensitization could effectively modulate the activity and the mRNA expression of CaMKII in the hippocampus and this effect of morphine was exerted by the activation of opioid receptors.

  13. Dbf4-dependent kinase and the Rtt107 scaffold promote Mus81-Mms4 resolvase activation during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Princz, Lissa N; Wild, Philipp; Bittmann, Julia; Aguado, F Javier; Blanco, Miguel G; Matos, Joao; Pfander, Boris

    2017-03-01

    DNA repair by homologous recombination is under stringent cell cycle control. This includes the last step of the reaction, disentanglement of DNA joint molecules (JMs). Previous work has established that JM resolving nucleases are activated specifically at the onset of mitosis. In case of budding yeast Mus81-Mms4, this cell cycle stage-specific activation is known to depend on phosphorylation by CDK and Cdc5 kinases. Here, we show that a third cell cycle kinase, Cdc7-Dbf4 (DDK), targets Mus81-Mms4 in conjunction with Cdc5-both kinases bind to as well as phosphorylate Mus81-Mms4 in an interdependent manner. Moreover, DDK-mediated phosphorylation of Mms4 is strictly required for Mus81 activation in mitosis, establishing DDK as a novel regulator of homologous recombination. The scaffold protein Rtt107, which binds the Mus81-Mms4 complex, interacts with Cdc7 and thereby targets DDK and Cdc5 to the complex enabling full Mus81 activation. Therefore, Mus81 activation in mitosis involves at least three cell cycle kinases, CDK, Cdc5 and DDK Furthermore, tethering of the kinases in a stable complex with Mus81 is critical for efficient JM resolution. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY NC ND 4.0 license.

  14. In vitro substrate phosphorylation by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase using guanosine-5′-triphosphate as a phosphate donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurimoto Saki

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase (CaMKK phosphorylates and activates particular downstream protein kinases — including CaMKI, CaMKIV, and AMPK— to stimulate multiple Ca2+-signal transduction pathways. To identify previously unidentified CaMKK substrates, we used various nucleotides as phosphate donors to develop and characterize an in vitro phosphorylation assay for CaMKK. Results Here, we found that the recombinant CaMKK isoforms were capable of utilizing Mg-GTP as a phosphate donor to phosphorylate the Thr residue in the activation-loop of CaMKIα (Thr177 and of AMPK (Thr172 in vitro. Kinetic analysis indicated that the Km values of CaMKK isoforms for GTP (400-500 μM were significantly higher than those for ATP (~15 μM, and a 2- to 4-fold decrease in Vmax was observed with GTP. We also confirmed that an ATP competitive CaMKK inhibitor, STO-609, also competes with GTP to inhibit the activities of CaMKK isoforms. In addition, to detect enhanced CaMKI phosphorylation in brain extracts with Mg-GTP and recombinant CaMKKs, we found potential CaMKK substrates of ~45 kDa and ~35 kDa whose Ca2+/CaM-induced phosphorylation was inhibited by STO-609. Conclusions These results indicated that screens that use STO-609 as a CaMKK inhibitor and Mg-GTP as a CaMKK-dependent phosphate donor might be useful to identify previously unidentified downstream target substrates of CaMKK.

  15. Hydrogen peroxide induces activation of insulin signaling pathway via AMP-dependent kinase in podocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piwkowska, Agnieszka, E-mail: apiwkowska@cmdik.pan.pl [Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Nephrology, Gdansk (Poland); Rogacka, Dorota; Angielski, Stefan [Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Nephrology, Gdansk (Poland); Jankowski, Maciej [Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Nephrology, Gdansk (Poland); Medical University of Gdansk, Department of Therapy Monitoring and Pharmacogenetics (Poland)

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} activates the insulin signaling pathway and glucose uptake in podocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} induces time-dependent changes in AMPK phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} enhances insulin signaling pathways via AMPK activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stimulation of glucose uptake is AMPK-dependent. -- Abstract: Podocytes are cells that form the glomerular filtration barrier in the kidney. Insulin signaling in podocytes is critical for normal kidney function. Insulin signaling is regulated by oxidative stress and intracellular energy levels. We cultured rat podocytes to investigate the effects of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) on the phosphorylation of proximal and distal elements of insulin signaling. We also investigated H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced intracellular changes in the distribution of protein kinase B (Akt). Western blots showed that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (100 {mu}M) induced rapid, transient phosphorylation of the insulin receptor (IR), the IR substrate-1 (IRS1), and Akt with peak activities at 5 min ({Delta} 183%, P < 0.05), 3 min ({Delta} 414%, P < 0.05), and 10 min ({Delta} 35%, P < 0.05), respectively. Immunostaining cells with an Akt-specific antibody showed increased intensity at the plasma membrane after treatment with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}>. Furthermore, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} inhibited phosphorylation of the phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN; peak activity at 10 min; {Delta} -32%, P < 0.05) and stimulated phosphorylation of the AMP-dependent kinase alpha subunit (AMPK{alpha}; 78% at 3 min and 244% at 10 min). The stimulation of AMPK was abolished with an AMPK inhibitor, Compound C (100 {mu}M, 2 h). Moreover, Compound C significantly reduced the effect of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on IR phosphorylation by about 40% (from 2.07 {+-} 0.28 to 1.28 {+-} 0.12, P < 0.05). In addition, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} increased glucose uptake in podocytes

  16. Protein kinase C-dependent activation of P44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase and heat shock protein 70 in signal transduction during hepatocyte ischemic preconditioning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Gao; Yu-Qiang Shan; Ming-Xin Pan; Yu Wang; Li-Jun Tang; Hao Li; Zhi Zhang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the significance of protein kinase C (PKC), P44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKs) and heat shock protein (HSP)70 signal transduction during hepatocyte ischemic preconditioning.METHODS: In this study we used an in vitro ischemic preconditioning (IP) model for hepatocytes and an in vivo model for rat liver to investigate the significance of protein kinase C (PKC), P44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (P44/42 MAPKs) and heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) signal transduction in IP. Through a normal liver cell hypoxic preconditioning (HP) model in which cultured normal liver cells were subjected to 3 cycles of 5 min of incubation under hypoxic conditions followed by 5 min of reoxygenation and subsequently exposed to hypoxia and reoxygenation for 6 h and 9 h respectively. PKC inhibitor, activator and MEK inhibitor were utilized to analyze the phosphorylation of PKC, the expression of P44/42 MAPKs and HSP70.Viability and cellular ultrastructure were also observed. By using rat liver as an in vivo model of liver preconditioning (3 cycles of 10-min occlusion and 10-min reperfusion),in vivo phosphorylation of PKC and P44/42MAPKs, HSP70 expression were further analyzed. AST/ALT concentration,cellular structure and ultrastruture were also observed.All the data were statistically analyzed.RESULTS: Similar results were obtained in both in vivo and in vitro IP models. Compared with the control without IP (or HP), the phosphorylation of PKC and P44/42 MAPKs and the expression of HSP70 were obviously increased in IP (or HP) treated model in which cytoprotection could be found. The effects of preconditioning were mimicked by stimulating PKC with 4β phorobol-12-myristate13-acetate (PMA). Conversely, inhibiting PKC with chelerythrine abolished the protection given by preconditioning. PD98059,inhibitor of MEK (the upstream kinase of P44/42MAPKs),also reverted the cytoprotection exerted by preconditioning.CONCLUSION: The results demonstrate that

  17. The Mammalian Sterile 20-like 1 Kinase Controls Selective CCR7-Dependent Functions in Human Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Bacete, Jesús; Delgado-Martín, Cristina; Gómez-Moreira, Carolina; Simizu, Siro; Rodríguez-Fernández, José Luis

    2015-08-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR7 directs mature dendritic cells (mDCs) to the lymph nodes where these cells control the initiation of the immune response. CCR7 regulates chemotaxis, endocytosis, survival, migratory speed, and cytoarchitecture in mDCs. The molecular mechanisms used by CCR7 to regulate these functions in mDCs are not completely understood. The mammalian sterile 20-like 1 kinase (Mst1) plays a proapoptotic role under stress conditions; however, recently, it has been shown that Mst1 can also control homeostatic cell functions under normal conditions. In this study, we show that stimulation of CCR7 in mDCs induces Gαi-dependent activation of Mst1, suggesting the involvement of this kinase in the control of CCR7-dependent functions. Analysis of the mDCs in which Mst1 expression levels were reduced with small interfering RNA shows that this kinase mediates CCR7-dependent effects on cytoarchitecture, endocytosis and migratory speed but not on chemotaxis or survival. In line with these results, biochemical analysis indicates that Mst1 does not control key signaling regulators of CCR7-dependent chemotaxis or survival. In contrast, Mst1 regulates downstream of CCR7 and, of note, independently of Gα13, the RhoA pathway. Reduction of Mst1 inhibits CCR7-dependent phosphorylation of downstream targets of RhoA, including cofilin, myosin L chain, and myosin L chain phosphatase. Consistent with the role of the latter molecules as modulators of the actin cytoskeleton, mDCs with reduced Mst1 also displayed a dramatic reduction in actin barbed-end formation that could not be recovered by stimulating CCR7. The results indicate that the kinase Mst1 controls selective CCR7-dependent functions in human mDCs.

  18. Panaxynol induces neurite outgrowth in PC12D cells via cAMP- and MAP kinase-dependent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ze-Jian; Nie, Bao-Ming; Chen, Hong-Zhuan; Lu, Yang

    2006-01-05

    Panaxynol, a polyacetylene ((3R)-heptadeca-1,9-diene-4,6-diyn-3-ol; syn. falcarinol), was isolated from the lipophilic fractions of Panax notoginseng, a Chinese traditional medicinal plant. In the present study, we reported the neurotrophic effects of panaxynol on PC12D cells and mechanism involved in neurite outgrowth of the cells. Panaxynol could morphologically promote neurite outgrowth in PC12D cells, concentration-dependently reduce cell division and up-regulate molecular marker (MAP1B) expression in PC12D cells. Panaxynol induces the elevation of intracellular cAMP in PC12D cells. The neurite outgrowth in PC12D cells induced by panaxynol could be inhibited by the protein kinase A inhibitor RpcAMPS and by MAP kinase kinase 1/2 inhibitor U0126. These observations reveal that panaxynol could induce the differentiation of PC12D cells in a process similar to but distinct from that of NGF and the panaxynol's effects were via cAMP- and MAP kinase-dependent mechanisms.

  19. Molecular Modelling of Calcium Dependent Protein Kinase 4 (CDPK4) from Plasmodium falciparum

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tsekoa, Tsepo L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available . Development of new drug targets is of vital importance in this regard. The recent availability of genomic information and the resultant observation that in many instances, protein kinases from parasitic protozoa are phylogenetically distant from those...

  20. Regulation of the G1/S Transition in Hepatocytes: Involvement of the Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Cdk1 in the DNA Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Corlu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A singular feature of adult differentiated hepatocytes is their capacity to proliferate allowing liver regeneration. This review emphasizes the literature published over the last 20 years that established the most important pathways regulating the hepatocyte cell cycle. Our article also aimed at illustrating that many discoveries in this field benefited from the combined use of in vivo models of liver regeneration and in vitro models of primary cultures of human and rodent hepatocytes. Using these models, our laboratory has contributed to decipher the different steps of the progression into the G1 phase and the commitment to S phase of proliferating hepatocytes. We identified the mitogen dependent restriction point located at the two-thirds of the G1 phase and the concomitant expression and activation of both Cdk1 and Cdk2 at the G1/S transition. Furthermore, we demonstrated that these two Cdks contribute to the DNA replication. Finally, we provided strong evidences that Cdk1 expression and activation is correlated to extracellular matrix degradation upon stimulation by the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα leading to the identification of a new signaling pathway regulating Cdk1 expression at the G1/S transition. It also further confirms the well-orchestrated regulation of liver regeneration via multiple extracellular signals and pathways.

  1. Differential regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors in neuroblastoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, Lan [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Paul, Pritha; Lee, Sora [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Qiao, Jingbo [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Wang, Yongsheng [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Chung, Dai H., E-mail: dai.chung@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Pediatric Surgery, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)

    2013-05-31

    Highlights: •GRP-R signaling differentially regulated the expression of p21 and p27. •Silencing GRP/GRP-R downregulated p21, while p27 expression was upregulated. •Inhibition of GRP/GRP-R signaling enhanced PTEN expression, correlative to the increased expression of p27. •PTEN and p27 co-localized in cytoplasm and silencing PTEN decreased p27 expression. -- Abstract: Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) and its receptor (GRP-R) are highly expressed in undifferentiated neuroblastoma, and they play critical roles in oncogenesis. We previously reported that GRP activates the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway to promote DNA synthesis and cell cycle progression in neuroblastoma cells. Conversely, GRP-R silencing induces cell cycle arrest. Here, we speculated that GRP/GRP-R signaling induces neuroblastoma cell proliferation via regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors. Surprisingly, we found that GRP/GRP-R differentially induced expressions of p21 and p27. Silencing GRP/GRP-R decreased p21, but it increased p27 expressions in neuroblastoma cells. Furthermore, we found that the intracellular localization of p21 and p27 in the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments, respectively. In addition, we found that GRP/GRP-R silencing increased the expression and accumulation of PTEN in the cytoplasm of neuroblastoma cells where it co-localized with p27, thus suggesting that p27 promotes the function of PTEN as a tumor suppressor by stabilizing PTEN in the cytoplasm. GRP/GRP-R regulation of CDK inhibitors and tumor suppressor PTEN may be critical for tumoriogenesis of neuroblastoma.

  2. Regulation of μ and δ opioid receptor functions: involvement of cyclin-dependent kinase 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudry, H; Mercier-Blais, A-A; Delaygue, C; Lavoie, C; Parent, J-L; Neugebauer, W; Gendron, L

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Phosphorylation of δ opioid receptors (DOP receptors) by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) was shown to regulate the trafficking of this receptor. Therefore, we aimed to determine the role of CDK5 in regulating DOP receptors in rats treated with morphine or with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). As μ (MOP) and DOP receptors are known to be co-regulated, we also sought to determine if CDK5-mediated regulation of DOP receptors also affects MOP receptor functions. Experimental Approach The role of CDK5 in regulating opioid receptors in CFA- and morphine-treated rats was studied using roscovitine as a CDK inhibitor and a cell-penetrant peptide mimicking the second intracellular loop of DOP receptors (C11-DOPri2). Opioid receptor functions were assessed in vivo in a series of behavioural experiments and correlated by measuring ERK1/2 activity in dorsal root ganglia homogenates. Key Results Chronic roscovitine treatment reduced the antinociceptive and antihyperalgesic effects of deltorphin II (Dlt II) in morphine- and CFA-treated rats respectively. Repeated administrations of C11-DOPri2 also robustly decreased Dlt II-induced analgesia. Interestingly, DAMGO-induced analgesia was significantly increased by roscovitine and C11-DOPri2. Concomitantly, in roscovitine-treated rats the Dlt II-induced ERK1/2 activation was decreased, whereas the DAMGO-induced ERK1/2 activation was increased. An acute roscovitine treatment had no effect on Dlt II- or DAMGO-induced analgesia. Conclusions and Implications Together, our results demonstrate that CDK5 is a key player in the regulation of DOP receptors in morphine- and CFA-treated rats and that the regulation of DOP receptors by CDK5 is sufficient to modulate MOP receptor functions through an indirect process. PMID:25598508

  3. Crystal Structure of Human Cyclin K, A Positive Regulator of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek,K.; Brown, R.; Birrane, G.; Ladias, J.

    2007-01-01

    K and the closely related cyclins T1, T2a, and T2b interact with cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) forming multiple nuclear complexes, referred to collectively as positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb). Through phosphorylation of the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase II largest subunit, distinct P-TEFb species regulate the transcriptional elongation of specific genes that play central roles in human physiology and disease development, including cardiac hypertrophy and human immunodeficiency virus-1 pathogenesis. We have determined the crystal structure of human cyclin K (residues 11-267) at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution, which represents the first atomic structure of a P-TEFb subunit. The cyclin K fold comprises two typical cyclin boxes with two short helices preceding the N-terminal box. A prominent feature of cyclin K is an additional helix (H4a) in the first cyclin box that obstructs the binding pocket for the cell-cycle inhibitor p27{sup Kip1}. Modeling of CDK9 bound to cyclin K provides insights into the structural determinants underlying the formation and regulation of this complex. A homology model of human cyclin T1 generated using the cyclin K structure as a template reveals that the two proteins have similar structures, as expected from their high level of sequence identity. Nevertheless, their CDK9-interacting surfaces display significant structural differences, which could potentially be exploited for the design of cyclin-targeted inhibitors of the CDK9-cyclin K and CDK9-cyclin T1 complexes.

  4. Function of cGMP-dependent protein kinase II in volume load-induced diuresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Andrea; Schinner, Elisabeth; Huettner, Johannes P; Kees, Frieder; Tauber, Philipp; Hofmann, Franz; Schlossmann, Jens

    2014-10-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP)/cGMPs cause diuresis and natriuresis. Their downstream effectors beyond cGMP remain unclear. To elucidate a probable function of cGMP-dependent protein kinase II (cGKII), we investigated renal parameters in different conditions (basal, salt diets, starving, water load) using a genetically modified mouse model (cGKII-KO), but did not detect any striking differences between WT and cGKII-KO. Thus, cGKII is proposed to play only a marginal role in the adjustment of renal concentration ability to varying salt loads without water restriction or starving conditions. When WT mice were subjected to a volume load (performed by application of a 10-mM glucose solution (3% of BW) via feeding needle), they exhibited a potent diuresis. In contrast, urine volume was decreased significantly in cGKII-KO. We showed that AQP2 plasma membrane (PM) abundance was reduced for about 50% in WT upon volume load, therefore, this might be a main cause for the enhanced diuresis. In contrast, cGKII-KO mice almost completely failed to decrease AQP2-PM distribution. This significant difference between both genotypes is not induced by an altered p-Ser256-AQP2 phosphorylation, as phosphorylation at this site decreases similarly in WT and KO. Furthermore, sodium excretion was lowered in cGKII-KO mice during volume load. In summary, cGKII is only involved to a minor extent in the regulation of basal renal concentration ability. By contrast, cGKII-KO mice are not able to handle an acute volume load. Our results suggest that membrane insertion of AQP2 is inhibited by cGMP/cGKII.

  5. Suppression of DNA-dependent protein kinase sensitize cells to radiation without affecting DSB repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Ann-Sofie; Abramenkovs, Andris; Stenerlöw, Bo

    2014-11-01

    Efficient and correct repair of DNA double-strand break (DSB) is critical for cell survival. Defects in the DNA repair may lead to cell death, genomic instability and development of cancer. The catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) is an essential component of the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) which is the major DSB repair pathway in mammalian cells. In the present study, by using siRNA against DNA-PKcs in four human cell lines, we examined how low levels of DNA-PKcs affected cellular response to ionizing radiation. Decrease of DNA-PKcs levels by 80-95%, induced by siRNA treatment, lead to extreme radiosensitivity, similar to that seen in cells completely lacking DNA-PKcs and low levels of DNA-PKcs promoted cell accumulation in G2/M phase after irradiation and blocked progression of mitosis. Surprisingly, low levels of DNA-PKcs did not affect the repair capacity and the removal of 53BP1 or γ-H2AX foci and rejoining of DSB appeared normal. This was in strong contrast to cells completely lacking DNA-PKcs and cells treated with the DNA-PKcs inhibitor NU7441, in which DSB repair were severely compromised. This suggests that there are different mechanisms by which loss of DNA-PKcs functions can sensitize cells to ionizing radiation. Further, foci of phosphorylated DNA-PKcs (T2609 and S2056) co-localized with DSB and this was independent of the amount of DNA-PKcs but foci of DNA-PKcs was only seen in siRNA-treated cells. Our study emphasizes on the critical role of DNA-PKcs for maintaining survival after radiation exposure which is uncoupled from its essential function in DSB repair. This could have implications for the development of therapeutic strategies aiming to radiosensitize tumors by affecting the DNA-PKcs function.

  6. Activation of protein kinase C-mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling in response to inositol starvation triggers Sir2p-dependent telomeric silencing in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sojin; Gaspar, Maria L; Aregullin, Manuel A; Jesch, Stephen A; Henry, Susan A

    2013-09-27

    Depriving wild type yeast of inositol, a soluble precursor for phospholipid, phosphoinositide, and complex sphingolipid synthesis, activates the protein kinase C (PKC)-MAPK signaling pathway, which plays a key role in the activation of NAD(+)-dependent telomeric silencing. We now report that triggering PKC-MAPK signaling by inositol deprivation or by blocking inositol-containing sphingolipid synthesis with aureobasidin A results in increased telomeric silencing regulated by the MAPK, Slt2p, and the NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase, Sir2p. Consistent with the dependence on NAD(+) in Sir2p-regulated silencing, we found that inositol depletion induces the expression of BNA2, which is required for the de novo synthesis of NAD(+). Moreover, telomeric silencing is greatly reduced in bna2Δ and npt1Δ mutants, which are defective in de novo and salvage pathways for NAD(+) synthesis, respectively. Surprisingly, however, omitting nicotinic acid from the growth medium, which reduces cellular NAD(+) levels, leads to increased telomeric silencing in the absence of inositol and/or at high temperature. This increase in telomeric silencing in response to inositol starvation is correlated to chronological life span extension but is Sir2p-independent. We conclude that activation of the PKC-MAPK signaling by interruption of inositol sphingolipid synthesis leads to increased Sir2p-dependent silencing and is dependent upon the de novo and salvage pathways for NAD(+) synthesis but is not correlated with cellular NAD(+) levels.

  7. LRRK2 kinase activity is dependent on LRRK2 GTP binding capacity but independent of LRRK2 GTP binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taymans, Jean-Marc; Vancraenenbroeck, Renée; Ollikainen, Petri; Beilina, Alexandra; Lobbestael, Evy; De Maeyer, Marc; Baekelandt, Veerle; Cookson, Mark R

    2011-01-01

    Leucine rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) is a Parkinson's disease (PD) gene that encodes a large multidomain protein including both a GTPase and a kinase domain. GTPases often regulate kinases within signal transduction cascades, where GTPases act as molecular switches cycling between a GTP bound "on" state and a GDP bound "off" state. It has been proposed that LRRK2 kinase activity may be increased upon GTP binding at the LRRK2 Ras of complex proteins (ROC) GTPase domain. Here we extensively test this hypothesis by measuring LRRK2 phosphorylation activity under influence of GDP, GTP or non-hydrolyzable GTP analogues GTPγS or GMPPCP. We show that autophosphorylation and lrrktide phosphorylation activity of recombinant LRRK2 protein is unaltered by guanine nucleotides, when co-incubated with LRRK2 during phosphorylation reactions. Also phosphorylation activity of LRRK2 is unchanged when the LRRK2 guanine nucleotide binding pocket is previously saturated with various nucleotides, in contrast to the greatly reduced activity measured for the guanine nucleotide binding site mutant T1348N. Interestingly, when nucleotides were incubated with cell lysates prior to purification of LRRK2, kinase activity was slightly enhanced by GTPγS or GMPPCP compared to GDP, pointing to an upstream guanine nucleotide binding protein that may activate LRRK2 in a GTP-dependent manner. Using metabolic labeling, we also found that cellular phosphorylation of LRRK2 was not significantly modulated by nucleotides, although labeling is significantly reduced by guanine nucleotide binding site mutants. We conclude that while kinase activity of LRRK2 requires an intact ROC-GTPase domain, it is independent of GDP or GTP binding to ROC.

  8. LRRK2 kinase activity is dependent on LRRK2 GTP binding capacity but independent of LRRK2 GTP binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marc Taymans

    Full Text Available Leucine rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2 is a Parkinson's disease (PD gene that encodes a large multidomain protein including both a GTPase and a kinase domain. GTPases often regulate kinases within signal transduction cascades, where GTPases act as molecular switches cycling between a GTP bound "on" state and a GDP bound "off" state. It has been proposed that LRRK2 kinase activity may be increased upon GTP binding at the LRRK2 Ras of complex proteins (ROC GTPase domain. Here we extensively test this hypothesis by measuring LRRK2 phosphorylation activity under influence of GDP, GTP or non-hydrolyzable GTP analogues GTPγS or GMPPCP. We show that autophosphorylation and lrrktide phosphorylation activity of recombinant LRRK2 protein is unaltered by guanine nucleotides, when co-incubated with LRRK2 during phosphorylation reactions. Also phosphorylation activity of LRRK2 is unchanged when the LRRK2 guanine nucleotide binding pocket is previously saturated with various nucleotides, in contrast to the greatly reduced activity measured for the guanine nucleotide binding site mutant T1348N. Interestingly, when nucleotides were incubated with cell lysates prior to purification of LRRK2, kinase activity was slightly enhanced by GTPγS or GMPPCP compared to GDP, pointing to an upstream guanine nucleotide binding protein that may activate LRRK2 in a GTP-dependent manner. Using metabolic labeling, we also found that cellular phosphorylation of LRRK2 was not significantly modulated by nucleotides, although labeling is significantly reduced by guanine nucleotide binding site mutants. We conclude that while kinase activity of LRRK2 requires an intact ROC-GTPase domain, it is independent of GDP or GTP binding to ROC.

  9. Genome-wide Identification and Expression Analysis of Calcium-dependent Protein Kinase and Its Closely Related Kinase Genes in Capsicum annuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hanyang ecai

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available As Ca2+ sensors and effectors, calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs play important roles in regulating the downstream components of calcium signaling, which are ubiquitously involved in plant growth, development, and response to environmental cues. However, no CDPKs have been characterized in Capsicum annuum thus far. Herein, a comprehensive analysis of genes encoding pepper CDPKs and CDPK-related protein kinases (CRKs was performed, and 31 CDPK genes and five closely related kinase genes were identified, which were phylogenetically divided into four distinct subfamilies and unevenly distributed across nine chromosomes. Conserved sequence and exon-intron structures were found to be shared by pepper CDPKs within the same subfamily, and the expansion of the CaCPK family in pepper was found to be due to segmental duplication events. Five CDPKs in the Capsicum annuum variety CM334 were found to be mutated in the Chiltepin variety, and one CDPK present in CM334 was lost in Chiltepin. The majority of CDPK and CRK genes were expressed in different pepper tissues and developmental stages, and 10, 12, and eight CDPK genes were transcriptionally modified by salt, heat, and Ralstonia solanacearum stresses, respectively. Furthermore, these genes were found to respond specifically to one stress as well as respond synergistically to two stresses or three stresses, suggesting that these CDPK genes might be involved in the specific or synergistic response of pepper to salt, heat, and R. solanacearum. Our results lay the foundation for future functional characterization of pepper CDPK and its closely related gene families.

  10. Preclinical biomarkers for a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor translate to candidate pharmacodynamic biomarkers in phase I patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkofsky-Fessler, Windy; Nguyen, Tri Q; Delmar, Paul; Molnos, Juliette; Kanwal, Charu; DePinto, Wanda; Rosinski, James; McLoughlin, Patricia; Ritland, Steve; DeMario, Mark; Tobon, Krishna; Reidhaar-Olson, John F; Rueger, Ruediger; Hilton, Holly

    2009-09-01

    A genomics-based approach to identify pharmacodynamic biomarkers was used for a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitory drug. R547 is a potent cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor with a potent antiproliferative effect at pharmacologically relevant doses and is currently in phase I clinical trials. Using preclinical data derived from microarray experiments, we identified pharmacodynamic biomarkers to test in blood samples from patients in clinical trials. These candidate biomarkers were chosen based on several criteria: relevance to the mechanism of action of R547, dose responsiveness in preclinical models, and measurable expression in blood samples. We identified 26 potential biomarkers of R547 action and tested their clinical validity in patient blood samples by quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Based on the results, eight genes (FLJ44342, CD86, EGR1, MKI67, CCNB1, JUN, HEXIM1, and PFAAP5) were selected as dose-responsive pharmacodynamic biomarkers for phase II clinical trials.

  11. Mouse Sphingosine Kinase 1a Is Negatively Regulated through Conventional PKC-Dependent Phosphorylation at S373 Residue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Seok Oh

    Full Text Available Sphingosine kinase is a lipid kinase that converts sphingosine into sphingosine-1-phosphate, an important signaling molecule with intracellular and extracellular functions. Although diverse extracellular stimuli influence cellular sphingosine kinase activity, the molecular mechanisms underlying its regulation remain to be clarified. In this study, we investigated the phosphorylation-dependent regulation of mouse sphingosine kinase (mSK isoforms 1 and 2. mSK1a was robustly phosphorylated in response to extracellular stimuli such as phorbol ester, whereas mSK2 exhibited a high basal level of phosphorylation in quiescent cells regardless of agonist stimulation. Interestingly, phorbol ester-induced phosphorylation of mSK1a correlated with suppression of its activity. Chemical inhibition of conventional PKCs (cPKCs abolished mSK1a phosphorylation, while overexpression of PKCα, a cPKC isoform, potentiated the phosphorylation, in response to phorbol ester. Furthermore, an in vitro kinase assay showed that PKCα directly phosphorylated mSK1a. In addition, phosphopeptide mapping analysis determined that the S373 residue of mSK1a was the only site phosphorylated by cPKC. Interestingly, alanine substitution of S373 made mSK1a refractory to the inhibitory effect of phorbol esters, whereas glutamate substitution of the same residue resulted in a significant reduction in mSK1a activity, suggesting the significant role of this phosphorylation event. Taken together, we propose that mSK1a is negatively regulated through cPKC-dependent phosphorylation at S373 residue.

  12. Biodentine induces human dental pulp stem cell differentiation through mitogen-activated protein kinase and calcium-/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhirong; Kohli, Meetu R; Yu, Qing; Kim, Syngcuk; Qu, Tiejun; He, Wen-xi

    2014-07-01

    Biodentine (Septodont, Saint-Maur-des-Fossès, France), a new tricalcium silicate cement formulation, has been introduced as a bioactive dentine substitute to be used in direct contact with pulp tissue. The aim of this study was to investigate the response of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) to the material and whether mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), and calcium-/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) signal pathways played a regulatory role in Biodentine-induced odontoblast differentiation. hDPCs obtained from impacted third molars were incubated with Biodentine. Odontoblastic differentiation was evaluated by alkaline phosphatase activity, alizarin red staining, and quantitative real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for the analysis of messenger RNA expression of the following differentiation gene markers: osteocalcin (OCN), dentin sialophosprotein (DSPP), dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1), and bone sialoprotein (BSP). Cell cultures in the presence of Biodentine were exposed to specific inhibitors of MAPK (U0126, SB203580, and SP600125), NF-κB (pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate), and CaMKII (KN-93) pathways to evaluate the regulatory effect on the expression of these markers and mineralization assay. Biodentine significantly increased alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralized nodule formation and the expression of OCN, DSPP, DMP1, and BSP. The MAPK inhibitor for extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (U0126) and Jun N-terminal kinase (SP600125) significantly decreased the Biodentine-induced mineralized differentiation of hDPSCs and OCN, DSPP, DMP1, and BSP messenger RNA expression, whereas p38 MAPK inhibitors (SB203580) had no effect. The CaMKII inhibitor KN-93 significantly attenuated and the NF-κB inhibitor pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate further enhanced the up-regulation of Biodentine-induced gene expression and mineralization. Biodentine is a bioactive and biocompatible material capable

  13. Abl tyrosine kinases modulate cadherin-dependent adhesion upstream and downstream of Rho family GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandy, Nicole L; Pendergast, Ann Marie

    2008-02-15

    Formation and dissolution of intercellular adhesions are processes of paramount importance during tissue morphogenesis and for pathological conditions such as tumor metastasis. Cadherin-mediated intercellular adhesion requires dynamic regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. The pathways that link cadherin signaling to cytoskeletal regulation remain poorly defined. We have recently uncovered a novel role for the Abl family of tyrosine kinases linking cadherin-mediated adhesion to actin dynamics via the regulation of Rho family GTPases. Abl kinases are activated by cadherin engagement, localize to cell-cell junctions and are required for the formation of adherens junctions. Notably, we showed that Abl kinases are required for Rac activation during formation of adherens junctions, and also regulate a Rho-ROCK-myosin signaling pathway that is required for the maintenance of intercellular adhesion. Here we show that Abl kinases regulate the formation and strengthening of adherens junctions downstream of active Rac, and that Abl tyrosine kinases are components of a positive feed-back loop that employs the Crk/CrkL adaptor proteins to promote the formation and maturation of adherens junctions.

  14. TRPC3 amplifies B-cell receptor-induced ERK signalling via protein kinase D-dependent Rap1 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numaga-Tomita, Takuro; Nishida, Motohiro; Putney, James W; Mori, Yasuo

    2016-01-15

    Sustained activation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) has an important role in the decision regarding the cell fate of B-lymphocytes. Recently, we demonstrated that the diacylglycerol-activated non-selective cation channel canonical transient receptor potential 3 (TRPC3) is required for the sustained ERK activation induced by the B-cell receptor. However, the signalling mechanism underlying TRPC3-mediated ERK activation remains elusive. In the present study, we have shown that TRPC3 mediates Ca(2+) influx to sustain activation of protein kinase D (PKD) in a protein kinase C-dependent manner in DT40 B-lymphocytes. The later phase of ERK activation depends on the small G-protein Rap1, known as a downstream target of PKD, whereas the earlier phase of ERK activation depends on the Ras protein. It is of interest that sustained ERK phosphorylation is required for the full induction of the immediate early gene Egr-1 (early growth response 1). These results suggest that TRPC3 reorganizes the BCR signalling complex by switching the subtype of small G-proteins to sustain ERK activation in B-lymphocytes.

  15. Raf kinase inhibitory protein function is regulated via a flexible pocket and novel phosphorylation-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granovsky, Alexey E; Clark, Matthew C; McElheny, Dan; Heil, Gary; Hong, Jia; Liu, Xuedong; Kim, Youngchang; Joachimiak, Grazyna; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Koide, Shohei; Rosner, Marsha Rich

    2009-03-01

    Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP/PEBP1), a member of the phosphatidylethanolamine binding protein family that possesses a conserved ligand-binding pocket, negatively regulates the mammalian mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascade. Mutation of a conserved site (P74L) within the pocket leads to a loss or switch in the function of yeast or plant RKIP homologues. However, the mechanism by which the pocket influences RKIP function is unknown. Here we show that the pocket integrates two regulatory signals, phosphorylation and ligand binding, to control RKIP inhibition of Raf-1. RKIP association with Raf-1 is prevented by RKIP phosphorylation at S153. The P74L mutation increases kinase interaction and RKIP phosphorylation, enhancing Raf-1/MAPK signaling. Conversely, ligand binding to the RKIP pocket inhibits kinase interaction and RKIP phosphorylation by a noncompetitive mechanism. Additionally, ligand binding blocks RKIP association with Raf-1. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies reveal that the pocket is highly dynamic, rationalizing its capacity to interact with distinct partners and be involved in allosteric regulation. Our results show that RKIP uses a flexible pocket to integrate ligand binding- and phosphorylation-dependent interactions and to modulate the MAPK signaling pathway. This mechanism is an example of an emerging theme involving the regulation of signaling proteins and their interaction with effectors at the level of protein dynamics.

  16. Spindle-F Is the Central Mediator of Ik2 Kinase-Dependent Dendrite Pruning in Drosophila Sensory Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu Lin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available During development, certain Drosophila sensory neurons undergo dendrite pruning that selectively eliminates their dendrites but leaves the axons intact. How these neurons regulate pruning activity in the dendrites remains unknown. Here, we identify a coiled-coil protein Spindle-F (Spn-F that is required for dendrite pruning in Drosophila sensory neurons. Spn-F acts downstream of IKK-related kinase Ik2 in the same pathway for dendrite pruning. Spn-F exhibits a punctate pattern in larval neurons, whereas these Spn-F puncta become redistributed in pupal neurons, a step that is essential for dendrite pruning. The redistribution of Spn-F from puncta in pupal neurons requires the phosphorylation of Spn-F by Ik2 kinase to decrease Spn-F self-association, and depends on the function of microtubule motor dynein complex. Spn-F is a key component to link Ik2 kinase to dynein motor complex, and the formation of Ik2/Spn-F/dynein complex is critical for Spn-F redistribution and for dendrite pruning. Our findings reveal a novel regulatory mechanism for dendrite pruning achieved by temporal activation of Ik2 kinase and dynein-mediated redistribution of Ik2/Spn-F complex in neurons.

  17. The Bmx tyrosine kinase is activated by IL-3 and G-CSF in a PI-3K dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, N; Arighi, E; Rajantie, I; Saharinen, P; Ristimäki, A; Silvennoinen, O; Alitalo, K

    2000-08-24

    Cytoplasmic protein tyrosine kinases play crucial roles in signaling via a variety of cell surface receptors. The Bmx tyrosine kinase, a member of the Tec family, is expressed in hematopoietic cells of the granulocytic and monocytic lineages. Here we show that Bmx is catalytically activated by interleukin-3 (IL-3) and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) receptors. Activation of Bmx required phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI-3K) as demonstrated by the ability of PI-3K inhibitors to block the activation signal. A green fluorescent protein (GFP) tagged Bmx was translocated to cellular membranes upon co-expression of a constitutively active form of PI-3K, further indicating a role for PI-3K in signaling upstream of Bmx. The expression of wild type Bmx in 32D myeloid progenitor cells resulted in apoptosis in the presence of G-CSF, while cells expressing a kinase dead mutant of Bmx differentiated into mature granulocytes. However, Bmx did not modulate IL-3-dependent proliferation of the cells. These results demonstrate distinct effects of Bmx in cytokine induced proliferation and differentiation of myeloid cells, and suggest that the stage specific expression of Bmx is critical for the differentiation of myeloid cells. Oncogene (2000) 19, 4151 - 4158

  18. Small molecule kinase inhibitors block the ZAK-dependent inflammatory effects of doxorubicin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, John; Smith, Logan B; Magun, Eli A

    2013-01-01

    The adverse side effects of doxorubicin, including cardiotoxicity and cancer treatment-related fatigue, have been associated with inflammatory cytokines, many of which are regulated by mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). ZAK is an upstream kinase of the MAPK cascade. Using mouse primary...... macrophages cultured from ZAK-deficient mice, we demonstrated that ZAK is required for the activation of JNK and p38 MAPK by doxorubicin. Nilotinib, ponatinib and sorafenib strongly suppressed doxorubicin-mediated phosphorylation of JNK and p38 MAPK. In addition, these small molecule kinase inhibitors blocked...... the expression of IL-1β, IL-6 and CXCL1 RNA and the production of these proteins. Co-administration of nilotinib and doxorubicin to mice decreased the expression of IL-1β RNA in the liver and suppressed the level of IL-6 protein in the serum compared with mice that were injected with doxorubicin alone. Therefore...

  19. Interaction of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase with a homolog of eukaryotic elongation factor-1alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1999-01-01

    A chimeric Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) was previously cloned and characterized in this laboratory. To investigate the biological functions of CCaMK, the yeast two-hybrid system was used to isolate genes encoding proteins that interact with CCaMK. One of the cDNA clones obtained from the screening (LlEF-1alpha1) has high similarity with the eukaryotic elongation factor-1alpha (EF-1alpha). CCaMK phosphorylated LlEF-1alpha1 in a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent manner. The phosphorylation site for CCaMK (Thr-257) was identified by site-directed mutagenesis. Interestingly, Thr-257 is located in the putative tRNA-binding region of LlEF-1alpha1. An isoform of Ca2+-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) phosphorylated multiple sites of LlEF-1alpha1 in a Ca2+-dependent but calmodulin-independent manner. Unlike CDPK, CCaMK phosphorylated only one site, and this site is different from CDPK phosphorylation sites. This suggests that the phosphorylation of EF-1alpha by these two kinases may have different functional significance. Although the phosphorylation of LlEF-1alpha1 by CCaMK is Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent, in vitro binding assays revealed that CCaMK binds to LlEF-1alpha1 in a Ca2+-independent manner. This was further substantiated by coimmunoprecipitation of CCaMK and EF-1alpha using the protein extract from lily anthers. Dissociation of CCaMK from EF-1alpha by Ca2+ and phosphorylation of EF-1alpha by CCaMK in a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent manner suggests that these interactions may play a role in regulating the biological functions of EF-1alpha.

  20. Interaction of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase with a homolog of eukaryotic elongation factor-1alpha

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1999-01-01

    A chimeric Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) was previously cloned and characterized in this laboratory. To investigate the biological functions of CCaMK, the yeast two-hybrid system was used to isolate genes encoding proteins that interact with CCaMK. One of the cDNA clones obtained from the screening (LlEF-1alpha1) has high similarity with the eukaryotic elongation factor-1alpha (EF-1alpha). CCaMK phosphorylated LlEF-1alpha1 in a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent manner. The phosphorylation site for CCaMK (Thr-257) was identified by site-directed mutagenesis. Interestingly, Thr-257 is located in the putative tRNA-binding region of LlEF-1alpha1. An isoform of Ca2+-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) phosphorylated multiple sites of LlEF-1alpha1 in a Ca2+-dependent but calmodulin-independent manner. Unlike CDPK, CCaMK phosphorylated only one site, and this site is different from CDPK phosphorylation sites. This suggests that the phosphorylation of EF-1alpha by these two kinases may have different functional significance. Although the phosphorylation of LlEF-1alpha1 by CCaMK is Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent, in vitro binding assays revealed that CCaMK binds to LlEF-1alpha1 in a Ca2+-independent manner. This was further substantiated by coimmunoprecipitation of CCaMK and EF-1alpha using the protein extract from lily anthers. Dissociation of CCaMK from EF-1alpha by Ca2+ and phosphorylation of EF-1alpha by CCaMK in a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent manner suggests that these interactions may play a role in regulating the biological functions of EF-1alpha.

  1. Activation of the Cph1-dependent MAP kinase signaling pathway induces white-opaque switching in Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Ramírez-Zavala

    Full Text Available Depending on the environmental conditions, the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans can undergo different developmental programs, which are controlled by dedicated transcription factors and upstream signaling pathways. C. albicans strains that are homozygous at the mating type locus can switch from the normal yeast form (white to an elongated cell type (opaque, which is the mating-competent form of this fungus. Both white and opaque cells use the Ste11-Hst7-Cek1/Cek2 MAP kinase signaling pathway to react to the presence of mating pheromone. However, while opaque cells employ the transcription factor Cph1 to induce the mating response, white cells recruit a different downstream transcription factor, Tec1, to promote the formation of a biofilm that facilitates mating of opaque cells in the population. The switch from the white to the opaque cell form is itself induced by environmental signals that result in the upregulation of the transcription factor Wor1, the master regulator of white-opaque switching. To get insight into the upstream signaling pathways controlling the switch, we expressed all C. albicans protein kinases from a tetracycline-inducible promoter in a switching-competent strain. Screening of this library of strains showed that a hyperactive form of Ste11 lacking its N-terminal domain (Ste11(ΔN467 efficiently stimulated white cells to switch to the opaque phase, a behavior that did not occur in response to pheromone. Ste11(ΔN467-induced switching specifically required the downstream MAP kinase Cek1 and its target transcription factor Cph1, but not Cek2 and Tec1, and forced expression of Cph1 also promoted white-opaque switching in a Wor1-dependent manner. Therefore, depending on the activation mechanism, components of the pheromone-responsive MAP kinase pathway can be reconnected to stimulate an alternative developmental program, switching of white cells to the mating-competent opaque phase.

  2. Damage to lens fiber cells causes TRPV4-dependent Src family kinase activation in the epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahidullah, M; Mandal, A; Delamere, N A

    2015-11-01

    The bulk of the lens consists of tightly packed fiber cells. Because mature lens fibers lack mitochondria and other organelles, lens homeostasis relies on a monolayer of epithelial cells at the anterior surface. The detection of various signaling pathways in lens epithelial cells suggests they respond to stimuli that influence lens function. Focusing on Src Family Kinases (SFKs) and Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), we tested whether the epithelium can sense and respond to an event that occurs in fiber mass. The pig lens was subjected to localized freeze-thaw (FT) damage to fibers at posterior pole then the lens was incubated for 1-10 min in Krebs solution at 37 °C. Transient SFK activation in the epithelium was detectable at 1 min. Using a western blot approach, the ion channel TRPV4 was detected in the epithelium but was sparse or absent in fiber cells. Even though TRPV4 expression appears low at the actual site of FT damage to the fibers, SFK activation in the epithelium was suppressed in lenses subjected to FT damage then incubated with the TRPV4 antagonist HC067047 (10 μM). Na,K-ATPase activity was examined because previous studies report changes of Na,K-ATPase activity associated with SFK activation. Na,K-ATPase activity doubled in the epithelium removed from FT-damaged lenses and the response was prevented by HC067047 or the SFK inhibitor PP2 (10 μM). Similar changes were observed in response to fiber damage caused by injection of 5 μl hyperosmotic NaCl or mannitol solution beneath the surface of the posterior pole. The findings point to a TRPV4-dependent mechanism that enables the epithelial cells to detect remote damage in the fiber mass and respond within minutes by activating SFK and increasing Na,K-ATPase activity. Because TRPV4 channels are mechanosensitive, we speculate they may be stimulated by swelling of the lens structure caused by damage to the fibers. Increased Na,K-ATPase activity gives the lens greater capacity to

  3. Suppression of DNA-dependent protein kinase sensitize cells to radiation without affecting DSB repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafsson, Ann-Sofie, E-mail: ann-sofie.gustafsson@bms.uu.se; Abramenkovs, Andris; Stenerlöw, Bo

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • We reduced the level of DNA-PKcs with siRNA and examined cells after γ-irradiation. • Low DNA-PKcs levels lead to radiosensitivity but did not affect repair of DSB. • Low DNA-PKcs levels may block progression of mitosis. • DNA-PKcs role in mitotic progression is independent of its role in DSB repair. • We suggest different mechanisms by which loss of DNA-PKcs function sensitize cells. - Abstract: Efficient and correct repair of DNA double-strand break (DSB) is critical for cell survival. Defects in the DNA repair may lead to cell death, genomic instability and development of cancer. The catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) is an essential component of the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) which is the major DSB repair pathway in mammalian cells. In the present study, by using siRNA against DNA-PKcs in four human cell lines, we examined how low levels of DNA-PKcs affected cellular response to ionizing radiation. Decrease of DNA-PKcs levels by 80–95%, induced by siRNA treatment, lead to extreme radiosensitivity, similar to that seen in cells completely lacking DNA-PKcs and low levels of DNA-PKcs promoted cell accumulation in G2/M phase after irradiation and blocked progression of mitosis. Surprisingly, low levels of DNA-PKcs did not affect the repair capacity and the removal of 53BP1 or γ-H2AX foci and rejoining of DSB appeared normal. This was in strong contrast to cells completely lacking DNA-PKcs and cells treated with the DNA-PKcs inhibitor NU7441, in which DSB repair were severely compromised. This suggests that there are different mechanisms by which loss of DNA-PKcs functions can sensitize cells to ionizing radiation. Further, foci of phosphorylated DNA-PKcs (T2609 and S2056) co-localized with DSB and this was independent of the amount of DNA-PKcs but foci of DNA-PKcs was only seen in siRNA-treated cells. Our study emphasizes on the critical role of DNA-PKcs for maintaining survival after radiation exposure

  4. Gene Expression Profile of Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase IIα in Rat's Hippocampus during Morphine Withdrawal

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmadi, Shamseddin; Amiri, Shahin; Rafieenia, Fatemeh; Rostamzadeh, Jalal

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) which is highly expressed in the hippocampus is known to play a pivotal role in reward-related memories and morphine dependence. Methods In the present study, repeated morphine injections once daily for 7 days was done to induce morphine tolerance in male Wistar rats, after which gene expression profile of α-isoform of CaMKII (CaMKIIα) in the hippocampus was evaluated upon discontinuation of morphine injection over 21 days o...

  5. Phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 controls migration and malignant transformation but not cell growth and proliferation in PTEN-null lymphocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finlay, D.K.; Sinclair, L.V.; Feijoo, C.; Waugh, C.M.; Hagenbeek, T.J.; Spits, H.; Cantrell, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    In normal T cell progenitors, phosphoinositide-dependent kinase l (PDK1)-mediated phosphorylation and activation of protein kinase B (PKB) is essential for the phosphorylation and inactivation of Foxo family transcription factors, and also controls T cell growth and proliferation. The current study

  6. Green tea catechins enhance norepinephrine-induced lipolysis via a protein kinase A-dependent pathway in adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu; Osaki, Noriko; Shimotoyodome, Akira

    2015-05-22

    Green tea catechins have been shown to attenuate obesity in animals and humans. The catechins activate adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and thereby increase fatty acid oxidation in liver and skeletal muscles. Green tea catechins have also been shown to reduce body fat in humans. However, the effect of the catechins on lipolysis in adipose tissue has not been fully understood. The aim of this study was to clarify the effect of green tea catechins on lipolysis in adipocytes and to elucidate the underlying mechanism. Differentiated mouse adipocyte cell line (3T3-L1) was stimulated with green tea catechins in the presence or absence of norepinephrine. Glycerol and free fatty acids in the media were measured. Phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) was determined by Western blotting, and the mRNA expression levels of HSL, adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), and perilipin were determined by quantitative RT-PCR. The cells were treated with inhibitors of protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase C (PKC), protein kinase G (PKG), or mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) to determine the responsible pathway. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with green tea catechins increased the level of glycerol and free fatty acids released into the media in the presence, but not absence, of norepinephrine, and increased the level of phosphorylated HSL in the cells. The catechins also increased mRNA and protein levels of HSL and ATGL. PKA inhibitor (H89) attenuated the catechin-induced increase in glycerol release and HSL phosphorylation. The results demonstrate that green tea catechins enhance lipolysis in the presence of norepinephrine via a PKA-dependent pathway in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, providing a potential mechanism by which green tea catechins could reduce body fat.

  7. Structure and Ubiquitination-Dependent Activation of TANK-Binding Kinase 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daqi Tu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Upon stimulation by pathogen-associated inflammatory signals, TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1 induces type I interferon expression and modulates nuclear factor κB (NF-κB signaling. Here, we describe the 2.4 Å-resolution crystal structure of nearly full-length TBK1 in complex with specific inhibitors. The structure reveals a dimeric assembly created by an extensive network of interactions among the kinase, ubiquitin-like, and scaffold/dimerization domains. An intact TBK1 dimer undergoes K63-linked polyubiquitination on lysines 30 and 401, and these modifications are required for TBK1 activity. The ubiquitination sites and dimer contacts are conserved in the close homolog inhibitor of κB kinase ∊ (IKK∊ but not in IKKβ, a canonical IKK that assembles in an unrelated manner. The multidomain architecture of TBK1 provides a structural platform for integrating ubiquitination with kinase activation and IRF3 phosphorylation. The structure of TBK1 will facilitate studies of the atypical IKKs in normal and disease physiology and further the development of more specific inhibitors that may be useful as anticancer or anti-inflammatory agents.

  8. ERK1 and ERK2 mitogen-activated protein kinases affect Ras-dependent cell signaling differentially

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonini Chiara

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinases p44ERK1 and p42ERK2 are crucial components of the regulatory machinery underlying normal and malignant cell proliferation. A currently accepted model maintains that ERK1 and ERK2 are regulated similarly and contribute to intracellular signaling by phosphorylating a largely common subset of substrates, both in the cytosol and in the nucleus. Results Here, we show that ablation of ERK1 in mouse embryo fibroblasts and NIH 3T3 cells by gene targeting and RNA interference results in an enhancement of ERK2-dependent signaling and in a significant growth advantage. By contrast, knockdown of ERK2 almost completely abolishes normal and Ras-dependent cell proliferation. Ectopic expression of ERK1 but not of ERK2 in NIH 3T3 cells inhibits oncogenic Ras-mediated proliferation and colony formation. These phenotypes are independent of the kinase activity of ERK1, as expression of a catalytically inactive form of ERK1 is equally effective. Finally, ectopic expression of ERK1 but not ERK2 is sufficient to attenuate Ras-dependent tumor formation in nude mice. Conclusion These results reveal an unexpected interplay between ERK1 and ERK2 in transducing Ras-dependent cell signaling and proliferation. Whereas ERK2 seems to have a positive role in controlling normal and Ras-dependent cell proliferation, ERK1 probably affects the overall signaling output of the cell by antagonizing ERK2 activity.

  9. The NPM-ALK tyrosine kinase mimics TCR signalling pathways, inducing NFAT and AP-1 by RAS-dependent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Suzanne D; Yeung, Debra; Hadfield, Kathryn; Cook, Simon J; Alexander, Denis R

    2007-04-01

    Nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK) expression is associated with the lymphoid malignancy anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) and results from a t(2;5) chromosomal translocation. We show that NPM-ALK induces Ras activation and phosphorylation of the ERK MAP Kinase consistent with activation of the Ras-MAP Kinase pathway. Furthermore, we demonstrate that activation of Ras is necessary for inducing transcription via NFAT/AP-1 composite transcriptional binding sites. This activity is dependent on NPM-ALK forming complexes with proteins that bind to autophosphorylated tyrosine residues at positions 156, 567 and 664, associated with binding to IRS-1, Shc and PLCgamma, respectively. Specifically, NPM-ALK activates transcription from the TRE promoter element, an AP-1 binding region, an activity dependent on both Ras and Shc activity. Our results show that NPM-ALK mimics activated T-cell receptor signalling by inducing pathways associated with the activation of NFAT/AP-1 transcription factors that bind to promoter elements found in a broad array of cytokine genes.

  10. Toxoplasma DJ-1 Regulates Organelle Secretion by a Direct Interaction with Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A. Child

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Human DJ-1 is a highly conserved and yet functionally enigmatic protein associated with a heritable form of Parkinson’s disease. It has been suggested to be a redox-dependent regulatory scaffold, binding to proteins to modulate their function. Here we present the X-ray crystal structure of the Toxoplasma orthologue Toxoplasma gondii DJ-1 (TgDJ-1 at 2.1-Å resolution and show that it directly associates with calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 (CDPK1. The TgDJ-1 structure identifies an orthologously conserved arginine dyad that acts as a phospho-gatekeeper motif to control complex formation. We determined that the binding of TgDJ-1 to CDPK1 is sensitive to oxidation and calcium, and that this interaction potentiates CDPK1 kinase activity. Finally, we show that genetic deletion of TgDJ-1 results in upregulation of CDPK1 expression and that disruption of the CDPK1/TgDJ-1 complex in vivo prevents normal exocytosis of parasite virulence-associated organelles called micronemes. Overall, our data suggest that TgDJ-1 functions as a noncanonical kinase-regulatory scaffold that integrates multiple intracellular signals to tune microneme exocytosis in T. gondii.

  11. Serine phosphorylation of NPM-ALK, which is dependent on the auto-activation of the kinase activation loop, contributes to its oncogenic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Wu, Fang; Zhang, Jingdong; McMullen, Todd; Young, Leah C; Ingham, Robert J; Li, Liang; Lai, Raymond

    2011-02-01

    It is well established that the tumorigenic potential of nucleophosmin (NPM)-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), an oncogenic tyrosine kinase, is dependent on its tyrosine phosphorylation. Using tandem affinity purification-mass spectrometry, we found evidence of phosphorylation of three serine residues of NPM-ALK (Serine¹³⁵, Serine¹⁶⁴ and Serine⁴⁹⁷) ectopically expressed in GP293 cells. Using a specific anti-phosphoserine antibody and immunoprecipitation, we confirmed the presence of serine phosphorylation of NPM-ALK in all three NPM-ALK-expressing cell lines examined. Similar to the tyrosine phosphorylation, phosphorylation of these serine residues was dependent on the activation status of the kinase activation loop of ALK. All of these three serine residues are biologically important as mutation of any one of these residues resulted in a significant reduction in the tumorigenicity of NPM-ALK (assessed by cell viability and clonogenic assay), which correlated with a substantial reduction in the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, c-jun N-terminal kinase and signal transducer and activator of transcription 6. Serine phosphorylation of NPM-ALK appears to be regulated by multiple serine kinases since it was markedly reduced by pharmacologic inhibitors for glycogen synthase kinase-3, casein kinase I or mitogen-activated protein kinases. In summary, our study is the first to identify serine phosphorylation of NPM-ALK and to provide evidence that it enhances the tumorigenic potential of this oncogenic protein.

  12. MHC-I-induced apoptosis in human B-lymphoma cells is dependent on protein tyrosine and serine/threonine kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders Elm; Bregenholt, S; Johansen, B;

    1999-01-01

    B lymphoma cells, is dependent on protein tyrosine kinases and the phosphatidylinositol 3 (PI-3) kinase. Functional studies showed that MHC-I crosslinking induced almost complete inhibition of the spontaneous proliferation of the B lymphoma cells as early as 6 h post-crosslinking and apoptosis 24 h...... post-crosslinking. Preincubation with either protein tyrosine kinase or protein serine/threonine kinase inhibitors reduced the MHC-I-induced apoptosis to background levels, whereas inhibition of PI-3 kinase had no effect. These data demonstrate a pivotal role for protein tyrosine and serine....../threonine kinases in MHC-I-mediated apoptosis in human B-cells and suggest the presence of several MHC-I signaling pathways leading to diverse effects in these cells....

  13. Expression of serine/threonine protein-kinases and related factors in normal monkey and human retinas: the mechanistic understanding of a CDK2 inhibitor induced retinal toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saturno, Grazia; Pesenti, Manuela; Cavazzoli, Cristiano; Rossi, Anna; Giusti, Anna M; Gierke, Berthold; Pawlak, Michael; Venturi, Miro

    2007-12-01

    Protein-kinase inhibitors are among the most advanced compounds in development using the new drug discovery paradigm of developing small-molecule drugs against specific molecular targets in cancer. After treatment with a cyclin dependent kinase CDK2 inhibitor in monkey, histopathological analysis of the eye showed specific cellular damage in the photoreceptor layer. Since this CDK2 inhibitor showed activity also on other CDKs, in order to investigate the mechanism of toxicity of this compound, we isolated cones and rods from the retina of normal monkey and humans by Laser Capture Microdissection. Using Real-Time PCR we first measured the expression of cyclin dependent protein-kinases (CDK)1, 2, 4, 5, Glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK3beta) and microtubule associated protein TAU. We additionally verified the presence of these proteins in monkey eye sections by immuno-histochemistry and immunofluorescence analysis and afterwards quantified GSK3beta, phospho-GSK3beta and TAU by Reverse Phase Protein Microarrays. With this work we demonstrate how complementary gene expression and protein-based technologies constitute a powerful tool for the understanding of the molecular mechanism of a CDK2 inhibitor induced toxicity. Moreover, this investigative approach is helpful to better understand and characterize the mechanism of species-specific toxicities and further support a rational, molecular mechanism-based safety assessment in humans.

  14. Multiple short windows of calcium-dependent protein kinase 4 activity coordinate distinct cell cycle events during Plasmodium gametogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hanwei; Klages, Natacha; Baechler, Bastien; Hillner, Evelyn; Yu, Lu; Pardo, Mercedes; Choudhary, Jyoti; Brochet, Mathieu

    2017-05-08

    Malaria transmission relies on the production of gametes following ingestion by a mosquito. Here, we show that Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase 4 controls three processes essential to progress from a single haploid microgametocyte to the release of eight flagellated microgametes in Plasmodium berghei. A myristoylated isoform is activated by Ca(2+) to initiate a first genome replication within twenty seconds of activation. This role is mediated by a protein of the SAPS-domain family involved in S-phase entry. At the same time, CDPK4 is required for the assembly of the subsequent mitotic spindle and to phosphorylate a microtubule-associated protein important for mitotic spindle formation. Finally, a non-myristoylated isoform is essential to complete cytokinesis by activating motility of the male flagellum. This role has been linked to phosphorylation of an uncharacterised flagellar protein. Altogether, this study reveals how a kinase integrates and transduces multiple signals to control key cell-cycle transitions during Plasmodium gametogenesis.

  15. Cloning and Characterization of a Homologous Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase PSKH1 from Pearl Oyster Pinctada fucata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Yiping; XIE Liping; XIONG Xunhao; CHEN Lei; FAN Weimin; ZHANG Rongqing

    2005-01-01

    Many of the effects of Ca2+ signaling are mediated through the Ca2+/calmodulin complex and its acceptors, the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, including PSKH1. Studies of the proteins involved in the calcium metabolism in oysters will help elucidate the pearl formation mechanism. This paper describes a full-length PSKH1 cDNA isolated from pearl oyster Pinctada fucata. Oyster PSKH1 shares 65% homology with human PSKH1 and 48% similarity with rat CaM kinase I in the amino acid sequence, and contains a calmodulin-binding domain. The results of semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization revealed that oyster PSKH1 mRNA is highly expressed in the outer epithelial cells of the mantle pallial and in the gill epithelial cells. These studies provide important information describing the complex Ca2+ signaling mechanism in oyster calcium metabolism.

  16. Structure-Based Design of Potent and Selective 3-Phosphoinositide-Dependent Kinase-1 (PDK1) Inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, Jesus R.; Becker, Christopher J.; Blackledge, Charles W.; Duquenne, Celine; Feng, Yanhong; Grant, Seth W.; Heerding, Dirk; Li, William H.; Miller, William H.; Romeril, Stuart P.; Scherzer, Daryl; Shu, Arthur; Bobko, Mark A.; Chadderton, Antony R.; Dumble, Melissa; Gardiner, Christine M.; Gilbert, Seth; Liu, Qi; Rabindran, Sridhar K.; Sudakin, Valery; Xiang, Hong; Brady, Pat G.; Campobasso, Nino; Ward, Paris; Axten, Jeffrey M. (GSKPA)

    2014-10-02

    Phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1(PDK1) is a master regulator of the AGC family of kinases and an integral component of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway. As this pathway is among the most commonly deregulated across all cancers, a selective inhibitor of PDK1 might have utility as an anticancer agent. Herein we describe our lead optimization of compound 1 toward highly potent and selective PDK1 inhibitors via a structure-based design strategy. The most potent and selective inhibitors demonstrated submicromolar activity as measured by inhibition of phosphorylation of PDK1 substrates as well as antiproliferative activity against a subset of AML cell lines. In addition, reduction of phosphorylation of PDK1 substrates was demonstrated in vivo in mice bearing OCl-AML2 xenografts. These observations demonstrate the utility of these molecules as tools to further delineate the biology of PDK1 and the potential pharmacological uses of a PDK1 inhibitor.

  17. Investigation of Neuronal Cell Type-Specific Gene Expression of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mima Kazuko

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The promoter activity of the rat Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II gene was analyzed using the luciferase reporter gene in neuronal and non-neuronal cell lines. Neuronal cell type-specific promoter activity was found in the 5'-flanking region of &agr; and &bgr; isoform genes of the kinase. Silencer elements were also found further upstream of promoter regions. A brain-specific protein bound to the DNA sequence of the 5'-flanking region of the gene was found by gel mobility shift analysis in the nuclear extract of the rat brain, including the cerebellum, forebrain, and brainstem, but not in that of non-neuronal tissues, including liver, kidney and spleen. The luciferase expression system and gel shift analysis can be used as an additional and better index by which to monitor gene expression in most cell types.

  18. Role of Interaction and Nucleoside Diphosphate Kinase B in Regulation of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Function by cAMP-Dependent Protein Kinase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borthwick, Lee A; Kerbiriou, Mathieu; Taylor, Christopher J; Cozza, Giorgio; Lascu, Ioan; Postel, Edith H; Cassidy, Diane; Trouvé, Pascal; Mehta, Anil; Robson, Louise; Muimo, Richmond

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis results from mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) and ATP-regulated chloride channel. Here, we demonstrate that nucleoside diphosphate kinase B (NDPK-B, NM23-H2) forms a functional complex with CFTR. In airway epithelia forskolin/IBMX significantly increases NDPK-B co-localisation with CFTR whereas PKA inhibitors attenuate complex formation. Furthermore, an NDPK-B derived peptide (but not its NDPK-A equivalent) disrupts the NDPK-B/CFTR complex in vitro (19-mers comprising amino acids 36-54 from NDPK-B or NDPK-A). Overlay (Far-Western) and Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) analysis both demonstrate that NDPK-B binds CFTR within its first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1, CFTR amino acids 351-727). Analysis of chloride currents reflective of CFTR or outwardly rectifying chloride channels (ORCC, DIDS-sensitive) showed that the 19-mer NDPK-B peptide (but not its NDPK-A equivalent) reduced both chloride conductances. Additionally, the NDPK-B (but not NDPK-A) peptide also attenuated acetylcholine-induced intestinal short circuit currents. In silico analysis of the NBD1/NDPK-B complex reveals an extended interaction surface between the two proteins. This binding zone is also target of the 19-mer NDPK-B peptide, thus confirming its capability to disrupt NDPK-B/CFTR complex. We propose that NDPK-B forms part of the complex that controls chloride currents in epithelia.

  19. A single amino acid difference between alpha and beta Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase dictates sensitivity to the specific inhibitor, STO-609.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokumitsu, Hiroshi; Inuzuka, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Yumi; Kobayashi, Ryoji

    2003-03-28

    We recently developed STO-609, a selective inhibitor of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase (CaM-KK), and we demonstrated that CaM-KK beta is more sensitive to STO-609 than the CaM-KK alpha isoform (Tokumitsu H., Inuzuka H., Ishikawa Y., Ikeda M., Saji I., and Kobayashi R. (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 15813-15818). By using catalytic chimera and point mutants of both isoforms, we demonstrated that Val(269) in CaM-KK beta/Leu(233) in CaM-KK alpha confers a distinct sensitivity ( approximately 10-fold) to STO-609 on CaM-KK isoforms. Various mutations of Val(269) in CaM-KK beta indicate that substitution by hydrophobic residues with bulky side chains significantly decreases drug sensitivity and that the V269F mutant is the most effective drug-resistant enzyme ( approximately 80-fold higher IC(50) value). These findings are consistent with a result obtained with a full-length mutant expressed in COS-7 cells. Furthermore, suppression of CaM-KK-mediated CaM-KIV activation in transfected HeLa cells by STO-609 treatment was completely abolished by the co-expression of the CaM-KK beta V269F mutant. Based on the results that the distinct sensitivity of CaM-KK isoforms to STO-609 is because of a single amino acid substitution (Val/Leu) in the ATP-binding pocket, we have generated an STO-609-resistant CaM-KK mutant, which might be useful for validating the pharmacological effects and specificity of STO-609 in vivo.

  20. Role of Interaction and Nucleoside Diphosphate Kinase B in Regulation of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Function by cAMP-Dependent Protein Kinase A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee A Borthwick

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis results from mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, a cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA and ATP-regulated chloride channel. Here, we demonstrate that nucleoside diphosphate kinase B (NDPK-B, NM23-H2 forms a functional complex with CFTR. In airway epithelia forskolin/IBMX significantly increases NDPK-B co-localisation with CFTR whereas PKA inhibitors attenuate complex formation. Furthermore, an NDPK-B derived peptide (but not its NDPK-A equivalent disrupts the NDPK-B/CFTR complex in vitro (19-mers comprising amino acids 36-54 from NDPK-B or NDPK-A. Overlay (Far-Western and Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR analysis both demonstrate that NDPK-B binds CFTR within its first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1, CFTR amino acids 351-727. Analysis of chloride currents reflective of CFTR or outwardly rectifying chloride channels (ORCC, DIDS-sensitive showed that the 19-mer NDPK-B peptide (but not its NDPK-A equivalent reduced both chloride conductances. Additionally, the NDPK-B (but not NDPK-A peptide also attenuated acetylcholine-induced intestinal short circuit currents. In silico analysis of the NBD1/NDPK-B complex reveals an extended interaction surface between the two proteins. This binding zone is also target of the 19-mer NDPK-B peptide, thus confirming its capability to disrupt NDPK-B/CFTR complex. We propose that NDPK-B forms part of the complex that controls chloride currents in epithelia.

  1. Trichothecene mycotoxins activate NLRP3 inflammasome through a P2X7 receptor and Src tyrosine kinase dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankkunen, Päivi; Välimäki, Elina; Rintahaka, Johanna; Palomäki, Jaana; Nyman, Tuula; Alenius, Harri; Wolff, Henrik; Matikainen, Sampsa

    2014-02-01

    Inflammasome is an intracellular molecular platform of the innate immunity that is a key mediator of inflammation. The inflammasome complex detects pathogens and different danger signals, and triggers cysteine protease caspase-1-dependent processing of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, and IL-18 in dendritic cells and macrophages. Previously, we have shown that water-damaged building associated trichothecene mycotoxins, including roridin A, trigger IL-1β and IL-18 secretion in human macrophages. However, the molecular basis as well as mechanism behind this trichothecene-induced cytokine secretion has remained uncharacterized. Here, we show that the trichothecene-induced IL-1β secretion is dependent on NLRP3 inflammasome in human primary macrophages. Pharmacological inhibition and small interfering RNA approach showed that the trichothecene-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation is mediated through ATP-gated P2X7 receptor. Moreover, we show that trichothecene-triggered NLRP3 inflammasome activation is dependent on Src tyrosine kinase activity. In addition, gene silencing of c-Cbl, a negative autophagy-related regulator of c-Src, resulted in enhanced secretion of IL-1β and IL-18 in response to trichothecene mycotoxin stimulation in human macrophages. In conclusion, our results suggest that roridin A, a fungal trichothecene mycotoxin, acts as microbial danger signals that trigger activation of NLRP3 inflammasome through P2X7R and Src tyrosine kinase signaling dependent pathway in human primary macrophages.

  2. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV mediates acute nicotine-induced antinociception in acute thermal pain tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Kia J; Damaj, Mohamad I

    2013-12-01

    Calcium-activated second messengers such as calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II have been implicated in drug-induced antinociception. The less abundant calcium-activated second messenger, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV), mediates emotional responses to pain and tolerance to morphine analgesia but its role in nicotine-mediated antinociception is currently unknown. The goal of this study was to evaluate the role of CaMKIV in the acute effects of nicotine, primarily acute nicotine-induced antinociception. CaMKIV knockout (-/-), heterozygote (+/-), and wild-type (+/+) mice were injected with various doses of nicotine and evaluated in a battery of tests, including the tail-flick and hot-plate tests for antinociception, body temperature, and locomotor activity. Our results show a genotype-dependent reduction in tail-flick and hot-plate latency in CaMKIV (+/-) and (-/-) mice after acute nicotine treatment, whereas no difference was observed between genotypes in the body temperature and locomotor activity assessments. The results of this study support a role for CaMKIV in acute nicotine-induced spinal and supraspinal pain mechanisms, and further implicate involvement of calcium-dependent mechanisms in drug-induced antinociception.

  3. The cyclin‐dependent kinase inhibitor R‐roscovitine down‐regulates Mcl‐1 to override pro‐inflammatory signalling and drive neutrophil apoptosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leitch, Andrew E; Riley, Nicola A; A. Sheldrake, Tara; Festa, Michela; Fox, Sarah; Duffin, Rodger; Haslett, Christopher; Rossi, Adriano G

    2010-01-01

    ...‐inflammatory phagocytosis by professional phagocytes. Recently, cyclin‐dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors ( e.g. R‐roscovitine) have been shown to induce neutrophil apoptosis and enhance the resolution of inflammation...

  4. The in vitro phosphorylation of p53 by calcium-dependent protein kinase C--characterization of a protein-kinase-C-binding site on p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delphin, C; Huang, K P; Scotto, C; Chapel, A; Vincon, M; Chambaz, E; Garin, J; Baudier, J

    1997-05-01

    We show that, in vitro, Ca2+-dependent protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylates recombinant murine p53 protein on several residues contained within a conserved basic region of 25 amino acids, located in the C-terminal part of the protein. Accordingly, synthetic p53-(357-381)-peptide is phosphorylated by PKC at multiple Ser and Thr residues, including Ser360, Thr365, Ser370 and Thr377. We also establish that p53-(357-381)-peptide at micromolar concentrations has the ability to stimulate sequence-specific DNA binding by p53. That stimulation is lost upon phosphorylation by PKC. To further characterise the mechanisms that regulate PKC-dependent phosphorylation of p53-(357-381)-peptide, the phosphorylation of recombinant p53 and p53-(357-381)-peptide by PKC were compared. The results suggest that phosphorylation of full-length p53 on the C-terminal PKC sites is highly dependent on the accessibility of the phosphorylation sites and that a domain on p53 distinct from p53-(357-381)-peptide is involved in binding PKC. Accordingly, we have identified a conserved 27-amino-acid peptide, p53-(320-346)-peptide, within the C-terminal region of p53 and adjacent to residues 357-381 that interacts with PKC in vitro. The interaction between p53-(320-346)-peptide and PKC inhibits PKC autophosphorylation and the phosphorylation of substrates, including p53-(357-381)-peptide, neurogranin and histone H1. Conventional Ca2+-dependent PKC alpha, beta and gamma and the catalytic fragment of PKC (PKM) were nearly equally susceptible to inhibition by p53-(320-346)-peptide. The Ca2+-independent PKC delta was much less sensitive to inhibition. The significance of these findings for understanding the in vivo phosphorylation of p53 by PKC are discussed.

  5. Characterization of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase SmcGK1 of Schistosoma mansoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke Leutner

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomes are trematode parasites and of worldwide medical importance for humans and animals. Growth and development of these parasites require a specific host environment, but also permanent communication processes between the two genders. Accumulating molecular evidence indicates that the responsible interactions are mediated by signal transduction processes. Conserved signaling molecules were identified, and first approaches made for their characterization. However, no representative of the conserved family of cGMP-dependent protein kinases (cGKs has been described in this parasite yet. Within the Schistosoma mansoni genome data-set we identified cGK homologs, of which one was investigated in more detail in this study. We present the cloning of SmcGK1, whose sequence shows homology to cGKs of higher eukaryotes. SmcGK1 was found to be gender-independently transcribed in adult schistosomes. The occurrence of SmcGK1 sense and antisense transcripts suggests that the expression of this gene is controlled at the post-transcriptional level. In situ hybridization experiments demonstrated a gonad-preferential expression profile in both genders indicating a role of SmcGK1, at least during sexual development of schistosomes. Using a cGK-specific inhibitor to treat adult schistosomes in vitro finally resulted in a multifaceted phenotype including slow motion, oocyte congestion, and reduced egg production.Esquistossomos são parasitas trematodos de importância médica em todo o mundo para o homem e os animais. O crescimento e o desenvolvimento destes parasitas requerem um ambiente específico do hospedeiro, mas também um processo de comunicação permanente entre parasitas dos dois sexos. Evidência molecular tem se acumulado e indica que as interações são mediadas por processos de transdução de sinal. Moléculas sinalizadoras conservadas foram identificadas, e as primeiras abordagens têm sido feitas para sua caracterização. Contudo, não foi

  6. Stimulation of dihydroxyacetone and glycerol kinase activity in Streptococcus faecalis by phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphorylation catalyzed by enzyme I and HPr of the phosphotransferase systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deutscher, J.; Sauerwald, H.

    1986-06-01

    Recently a report was given of the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP)-dependent phosphorylation of a 55-kilodalton protein of Streptococus faecalis catalyzed by enzyme I and histidine-containing protein (HPr) of the phosphotransferase system. The purified 55-kilodalton protein was found to exhibit dihydroxyacetone kinase activity. Glycerol was six times more slowly phosphorylated than dihydroxyacetone. The K/sub m/s were found to 0.7 mM for ATP, 0.45 mM for dihydroxyacetone, and 0.9 MM for glycerol. PEP-dependent phosphorylation of dihydroxyacetone kinase stimulated phosphorylation of both substrates about 10-fold. Fructose 1,6-diphosphate at concentrations higher than 2 mM inhibited the activity of phosphorylated and unphosphorylated dihydroxyacetone kinase in a noncompetitive manner. The rate of PEP-dependent phosphorylation of dihydroxyacetone kinase was about 200-fold slower than the phosphorylation rate of III proteins (also called enzyme III or factor III), which so far have been considered the only phosphoryl acceptors of histidyl-phosphorylated HPr. P-Dihydroxyacetone kinase was found to be able to transfer its phosphoryl group in a backward reaction to HPr. Following (/sup 32/P)PEP-dependent phosphorylation and tryptic digestion of dihydroxyacetone kinase, the authors isolated a labeled peptide composed of 37 amino acids, as determined by amino acid analysis. The single histidyl residue of this peptide most likely carries the phosphoryl group in phosphorylated dihydroxyacetone kinase.

  7. Reishi immuno-modulation protein induces interleukin-2 expression via protein kinase-dependent signaling pathways within human T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsien-Yeh; Hua, Kuo-Feng; Wu, Wei-Chi; Hsu, Jason; Weng, Shih-Ting; Lin, Tsai-Leng; Liu, Chun-Yi; Hseu, Ruey-Shyang; Huang, Ching-Tsan

    2008-04-01

    Ganoderma lucidum, a medicinal fungus is thought to possess and enhance a variety of human immune functions. An immuno-modulatory protein, Ling Zhi-8 (LZ-8) isolated from G. lucidum exhibited potent mitogenic effects upon human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). However, LZ-8-mediated signal transduction in the regulation of interleukin-2 (IL-2) gene expression within human T cells is largely unknown. Here we cloned the LZ-8 gene of G. lucidum, and expressed the recombinant LZ-8 protein (rLZ-8) by means of a yeast Pichia pastoris protein expression system. We found that rLZ-8 induces IL-2 gene expression via the Src-family protein tyrosine kinase (PTK), via reactive oxygen species (ROS), and differential protein kinase-dependent pathways within human primary T cells and cultured Jurkat T cells. In essence, we have established the nature of the rLZ-8-mediated signal-transduction pathways, such as PTK/protein kinase C (PKC)/ROS, PTK/PLC/PKCalpha/ERK1/2, and PTK/PLC/PKCalpha/p38 pathways in the regulation of IL-2 gene expression within human T cells. Our current results of analyzing rLZ-8-mediated signal transduction in T cells might provide a potential application for rLZ-8 as a pharmacological immune-modulating agent.

  8. STAT5 activation induced by diabetic LDL depends on LDL glycation and occurs via src kinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizzi, Maria Felice; Dentelli, Patrizia; Gambino, Roberto; Cabodi, Sara; Cassader, Maurizio; Castelli, Ada; Defilippi, Paola; Pegoraro, Luigi; Pagano, Gianfranco

    2002-11-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) have been implicated in the accelerated vascular injury occurring in diabetes. We recently reported that LDL prepared from type 2 diabetic patients (dm-LDL), but not normal LDL (n-LDL) triggered signal transducers and activators of transcription STAT5 activation and p21(waf) expression in endothelial cells (ECs). The aims of the present study were to investigate the role of LDL glycation in dm-LDL- mediated signals and to analyze the molecular mechanisms leading to STAT5 activation. We found that glycated LDL (gly-LDL) triggered STAT5 activation, the formation of a prolactin inducible element (PIE)-binding complex containing STAT5, and increased p21(waf) expression through the activation of the receptor for AGE (RAGE). We also demonstrated that dm-LDL and gly-LDL, but not n-LDL treatment induced the formation of a stable complex containing the activated STAT5 and RAGE. Moreover, gly-LDL triggered src but not JAK2 kinase activity. Pretreatment with the src kinase inhibitor PP1 abrogated both STAT5 activation and the expression of p21(waf) induced by gly-LDL. Consistently, gly-LDL failed to activate STAT5 in src(-/-) fibroblasts. Collectively, our results provide evidence for the role of glycation in dm-LDL-mediated effects and for a specific role of src kinase in STAT5-dependent p21(waf) expression.

  9. Mutant LRRK2 toxicity in neurons depends on LRRK2 levels and synuclein but not kinase activity or inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skibinski, Gaia; Nakamura, Ken; Cookson, Mark R; Finkbeiner, Steven

    2014-01-08

    By combining experimental neuron models and mathematical tools, we developed a "systems" approach to deconvolve cellular mechanisms of neurodegeneration underlying the most common known cause of Parkinson's disease (PD), mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2). Neurons ectopically expressing mutant LRRK2 formed inclusion bodies (IBs), retracted neurites, accumulated synuclein, and died prematurely, recapitulating key features of PD. Degeneration was predicted from the levels of diffuse mutant LRRK2 that each neuron contained, but IB formation was neither necessary nor sufficient for death. Genetic or pharmacological blockade of its kinase activity destabilized LRRK2 and lowered its levels enough to account for the moderate reduction in LRRK2 toxicity that ensued. By contrast, targeting synuclein, including neurons made from PD patient-derived induced pluripotent cells, dramatically reduced LRRK2-dependent neurodegeneration and LRRK2 levels. These findings suggest that LRRK2 levels are more important than kinase activity per se in predicting toxicity and implicate synuclein as a major mediator of LRRK2-induced neurodegeneration.

  10. Mutant LRRK2 Toxicity in Neurons Depends on LRRK2 Levels and Synuclein But Not Kinase Activity or Inclusion Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skibinski, Gaia; Nakamura, Ken; Cookson, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    By combining experimental neuron models and mathematical tools, we developed a “systems” approach to deconvolve cellular mechanisms of neurodegeneration underlying the most common known cause of Parkinson's disease (PD), mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2). Neurons ectopically expressing mutant LRRK2 formed inclusion bodies (IBs), retracted neurites, accumulated synuclein, and died prematurely, recapitulating key features of PD. Degeneration was predicted from the levels of diffuse mutant LRRK2 that each neuron contained, but IB formation was neither necessary nor sufficient for death. Genetic or pharmacological blockade of its kinase activity destabilized LRRK2 and lowered its levels enough to account for the moderate reduction in LRRK2 toxicity that ensued. By contrast, targeting synuclein, including neurons made from PD patient-derived induced pluripotent cells, dramatically reduced LRRK2-dependent neurodegeneration and LRRK2 levels. These findings suggest that LRRK2 levels are more important than kinase activity per se in predicting toxicity and implicate synuclein as a major mediator of LRRK2-induced neurodegeneration. PMID:24403142

  11. Functional domains of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase: regulation by autoinhibitory and visinin-like domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandiran, S.; Takezawa, D.; Wang, W.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1997-01-01

    A novel calcium-binding calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) with a catalytic domain, calmodulin-binding domain, and a neural visinin-like domain was cloned and characterized from plants [Patil et al., (1995) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92, 4797-4801; Takezawa et al. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 8126-8132]. The mechanisms of CCaMK activation by calcium and calcium/calmodulin were investigated using various deletion mutants. The use of deletion mutants of CCaMK lacking either one, two, or all three calcium-binding EF hands indicated that all three calcium-binding sites in the visinin-like domain were crucial for the full calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase activity. As each calcium-binding EF hand was deleted, there was a gradual reduction in calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase activity from 100 to 4%. Another mutant (amino acids 1-322) which lacks both the visinin-like domain containing three EF hands and the calmodulin-binding domain was constitutively active, indicating the presence of an autoinhibitory domain around the calmodulin-binding domain. By using various synthetic peptides and the constitutively active mutant, we have shown that CCaMK contains an autoinhibitory domain within the residues 322-340 which overlaps its calmodulin-binding domain. Kinetic studies with both ATP and the GS peptide substrate suggest that the autoinhibitory domain of CCaMK interacts only with the peptide substrate binding motif of the catalytic domain, but not with the ATP-binding motif.

  12. Chimeric Plant Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Gene with a Neural Visinin-Like Calcium-Binding Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Shameekumar; Takezawa, D.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1995-01-01

    Calcium, a universal second messenger, regulates diverse cellular processes in eukaryotes. Ca-2(+) and Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-regulated protein phosphorylation play a pivotal role in amplifying and diversifying the action of Ca-2(+)- mediated signals. A chimeric Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) gene with a visinin-like Ca-2(+)- binding domain was cloned and characterized from lily. The cDNA clone contains an open reading frame coding for a protein of 520 amino acids. The predicted structure of CCaMK contains a catalytic domain followed by two regulatory domains, a calmodulin-binding domain and a visinin-like Ca-2(+)-binding domain. The amino-terminal region of CCaMK contains all 11 conserved subdomains characteristic of serine/threonine protein kinases. The calmodulin-binding region of CCaMK has high homology (79%) to alpha subunit of mammalian Ca-2(+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase. The calmodulin-binding region is fused to a neural visinin-like domain that contains three Ca-2(+)-binding EF-hand motifs and a biotin-binding site. The Escherichia coli-expressed protein (approx. 56 kDa) binds calmodulin in a Ca-2(+)-dependent manner. Furthermore, Ca-45-binding assays revealed that CCaMK directly binds Ca-2(+). The CCaMK gene is preferentially expressed in developing anthers. Southern blot analysis revealed that CCaMK is encoded by a single gene. The structural features of the gene suggest that it has multiple regulatory controls and could play a unique role in Ca-2(+) signaling in plants.

  13. From the cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor celecoxib to a novel class of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiuxiang; Huang, Jui-Wen; Tseng, Ping-Hui; Yang, Ya-Ting; Fowble, Joseph; Shiau, Chung-Wai; Shaw, Yeng-Jeng; Kulp, Samuel K; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2004-06-15

    The blockade of Akt activation through the inhibition of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 (PDK-1) represents a major signaling mechanism whereby celecoxib mediates apoptosis. Celecoxib, however, is a weak PDK-1 inhibitor (IC(50), 48 microM), requiring at least 30 microM to exhibit discernable effects on the growth of tumor cells in vitro. Here, we report the structure-based optimization of celecoxib to develop PDK-1 inhibitors with greater potency in enzyme inhibition and growth inhibition. Kinetics of PDK-1 inhibition by celecoxib with respect to ATP suggest that celecoxib derivatives inhibit PDK-1 by competing with ATP for binding, a mechanism reminiscent to that of many kinase inhibitors. Structure-activity analysis together with molecular modeling was used to generate compounds that were tested for their potency in inhibiting PDK-1 kinase activity and in inducing apoptosis in PC-3 prostate cancer cells. Docking of potent compounds into the ATP-binding site of PDK-1 was performed for lead optimization, leading to two compounds, OSU-03012 and OSU-03013, with IC(50) values in PDK-1 inhibition and apoptosis induction in the low microM range. Exposure of PC-3 cells to these agents led to Akt dephosphorylation and inhibition of p70 S6 kinase activity. Moreover, overexpression of constitutively active forms of PDK-1 and Akt partially protected OSU-03012-induced apoptosis. Screening in a panel of 60 cell lines and more extensive testing in PC-3 cells indicated that the mean concentration for total growth inhibition was approximately 3 microM for both agents. Considering the conserved role of PDK-1/Akt signaling in promoting tumorigenesis, these celecoxib analogs are of translational relevance for cancer prevention and therapy.

  14. The octopamine receptor OAMB mediates ovulation via Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in the Drosophila oviduct epithelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Gwan Lee

    Full Text Available Ovulation is an essential physiological process in sexual reproduction; however, the underlying cellular mechanisms are poorly understood. We have previously shown that OAMB, a Drosophila G-protein-coupled receptor for octopamine (the insect counterpart of mammalian norepinephrine, is required for ovulation induced upon mating. OAMB is expressed in the nervous and reproductive systems and has two isoforms (OAMB-AS and OAMB-K3 with distinct capacities to increase intracellular Ca2+ or intracellular Ca2+ and cAMP in vitro. Here, we investigated tissue specificity and intracellular signals required for OAMB's function in ovulation. Restricted OAMB expression in the adult oviduct epithelium, but not the nervous system, reinstated ovulation in oamb mutant females, in which either OAMB isoform was sufficient for the rescue. Consistently, strong immunoreactivities for both isoforms were observed in the wild-type oviduct epithelium. To delineate the cellular mechanism by which OAMB regulates ovulation, we explored protein kinases functionally interacting with OAMB by employing a new GAL4 driver with restricted expression in the oviduct epithelium. Conditional inhibition of Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII, but not protein kinase A or C, in the oviduct epithelium inhibited ovulation. Moreover, constitutively active CaMKII, but not protein kinase A, expressed only in the adult oviduct epithelium fully rescued the oamb female's phenotype, demonstrating CaMKII as a major downstream molecule conveying the OAMB's ovulation signal. This is consistent with the ability of both OAMB isoforms, whose common intracellular signal in vitro is Ca2+, to reinstate ovulation in oamb females. These observations reveal the critical roles of the oviduct epithelium and its cellular components OAMB and CaMKII in ovulation. It is conceivable that the OAMB-mediated cellular activities stimulated upon mating are crucial for secretory activities suitable for egg

  15. Enhanced expression of a calcium-dependent protein kinase from the moss Funaria hygrometrica under nutritional starvation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Doyel Mitra; Man Mohan Johri

    2000-12-01

    Among the downstream targets of calcium in plants, calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) form an interesting class of kinases which are activated by calcium binding. They have been implicated in a diverse array of responses to hormonal and environmental stimuli. In order to dissect the role of CDPKs in the moss Funaria hygrometrica, a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based approach was adopted to clone the gene. Using degenerate PCR primers against conserved regions of CDPKs, a 900 bp amplicon was obtained from the genomic DNA of Funaria. Southern hybridization under low stringency conditions indicated the presence of several CDPK related sequences in the Funaria genome. This observation is consistent with reports of multigene families of CDPKs in other plants. The 900 bp fragment was subsequently used to isolate a 2.2 kb partial genomic clone of the CDPK gene from Funaria. The genomic clone encodes an open reading frame (ORF) of 518 amino acids. Interestingly, unlike other CDPK genes from plants, the entire 1.5 kb ORF is not interrupted by introns. The deduced amino acid sequence of the Funaria gene shows extensive homology with CDPKs from higher plants, 73% identity with the Fragaria CDPK and 71% identity with CDPK isoform 7 of Arabidopsis. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the Funaria CDPK is closer to the CDPKs from higher plants like strawberry and Arabidopsis as compared to those from lower plants such as the liverwort Marchantia, the green alga Chlamydomonas or another moss Tortula. Northern analysis shows enhanced expression of the CDPK transcript within 24–48 h of starvation for nitrogen, phosphorus or sulphur. So far the only other kinase which is known to be induced by nutrient starvation in plants is the wpk 4 which is a snf-1 related kinase (SnRKs). To our knowledge this is the first report that implicates a CDPK in the starvation response.

  16. Neuronal calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II mediates nicotine reward in the conditioned place preference test in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Kia J; Muldoon, Pretal P; Walters, Carrie; Damaj, Mohamad Imad

    2016-02-01

    Several recent studies have indicated the involvement of calcium-dependent mechanisms, in particular the abundant calcium-activated kinase, calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), in behaviors associated with nicotine dependence in mice. Behavioral and biochemical studies have shown that CaMKII is involved in acute and chronic nicotine behaviors and nicotine withdrawal; however, evidence of a role for CaMKII in nicotine reward is lacking. Thus, the goal of the current study was to examine the role of CaMKII in nicotine reward. Using pharmacological and genetic tools, we tested nicotine conditioned place preference (CPP) in C57Bl/6 mice after administration of CaMKII antagonists and in α-CaMKII wild-type (+/+) and heterozygote (±) mice. CaMKII antagonists blocked expression of nicotine CPP, and the preference score was significantly reduced in α-CaMKII ± mice compared with their +/+ counterparts. Further, we assessed CaMKII activity in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), nucleus accumbens (NAc), prefrontal cortex, and hippocampus after nicotine CPP and found significant increases in CaMKII activity in the mouse VTA and NAc that were blocked by CaMKII antagonists. The findings from this study show that CaMKII mediates nicotine reward and suggest that increases in CaMKII activity in the VTA and NAc are relevant to nicotine reward behaviors.

  17. Hyperactivation of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase promotes escape from hormone dependence in estrogen receptor–positive human breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Todd W.; Hennessy, Bryan T.; González-Angulo, Ana M.; Fox, Emily M.; Mills, Gordon B.; Chen, Heidi; Higham, Catherine; García-Echeverría, Carlos; Shyr, Yu; Arteaga, Carlos L.

    2010-01-01

    Many breast cancers exhibit a degree of dependence on estrogen for tumor growth. Although several therapies have been developed to treat individuals with estrogen-dependent breast cancers, some tumors show de novo or acquired resistance, rendering them particularly elusive to current therapeutic strategies. Understanding the mechanisms by which these cancers develop resistance would enable the development of new and effective therapeutics. In order to determine mechanisms of escape from hormone dependence in estrogen receptor–positive (ER-positive) breast cancer, we established 4 human breast cancer cell lines after long-term estrogen deprivation (LTED). LTED cells showed variable changes in ER levels and sensitivity to 17β-estradiol. Proteomic profiling of LTED cells revealed increased phosphorylation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) substrates p70S6 kinase and p85S6 kinase as well as the PI3K substrate AKT. Inhibition of PI3K and mTOR induced LTED cell apoptosis and prevented the emergence of hormone-independent cells. Using reverse-phase protein microarrays, we identified a breast tumor protein signature of PI3K pathway activation that predicted poor outcome after adjuvant endocrine therapy in patients. Our data suggest that upon adaptation to hormone deprivation, breast cancer cells rely heavily on PI3K signaling. Our findings also imply that acquired resistance to endocrine therapy in breast cancer may be abrogated by combination therapies targeting both ER and PI3K pathways. PMID:20530877

  18. Gene for the catalytic subunit of mouse DNA-dependent protein kinase maps to the scid locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, R D; Hogg, J; Ozaki, J H; Gell, D; Jackson, S P; Riblet, R

    1995-01-01

    The gene encoding the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) has been proposed recently as a candidate gene for the mouse severe combined immune deficiency (scid) locus. We have used a partial cDNA clone for human DNA-PKcs to map the mouse homologue using a large interspecific backcross panel. We found that the mouse gene for DNA-PKcs does not recombine with scid, consistent with the hypothesis that scid is a mutation in the mouse gene for DNA-PKcs. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7479885

  19. Mutating the Conserved Q-loop Glutamine 1291 Selectively Disrupts Adenylate Kinase-dependent Channel Gating of the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Adenylate Kinase Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) and Reduces Channel Function in Primary Human Airway Epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qian; Ernst, Sarah E; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Shah, Viral S; Ver Heul, Amanda R; Welsh, Michael J; Randak, Christoph O

    2015-05-29

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and two other non-membrane-bound ABC proteins, Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) protein, exhibit adenylate kinase activity in the presence of physiologic concentrations of ATP and AMP or ADP (ATP + AMP ⇆ 2 ADP). The crystal structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of an SMC protein in complex with the adenylate kinase bisubstrate inhibitor P(1),P(5)-di(adenosine-5') pentaphosphate (Ap5A) suggests that AMP binds to the conserved Q-loop glutamine during the adenylate kinase reaction. Therefore, we hypothesized that mutating the corresponding residue in CFTR, Gln-1291, selectively disrupts adenylate kinase-dependent channel gating at physiologic nucleotide concentrations. We found that substituting Gln-1291 with bulky side-chain amino acids abolished the effects of Ap5A, AMP, and adenosine 5'-monophosphoramidate on CFTR channel function. 8-Azidoadenosine 5'-monophosphate photolabeling of the AMP-binding site and adenylate kinase activity were disrupted in Q1291F CFTR. The Gln-1291 mutations did not alter the potency of ATP at stimulating current or ATP-dependent gating when ATP was the only nucleotide present. However, when physiologic concentrations of ADP and AMP were added, adenylate kinase-deficient Q1291F channels opened significantly less than wild type. Consistent with this result, we found that Q1291F CFTR displayed significantly reduced Cl(-) channel function in well differentiated primary human airway epithelia. These results indicate that a highly conserved residue of an ABC transporter plays an important role in adenylate kinase-dependent CFTR gating. Furthermore, the results suggest that adenylate kinase activity is important for normal CFTR channel function in airway epithelia.

  20. The apoptosis-inducing protein kinase DRAK2 is inhibited in a calcium-dependent manner by the calcium-binding protein CHP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, Hiroshi; Kamei, Jun-ichi; Nakamura, Norihiro; Matsumoto, Miho; Inoue, Hiroki; Kanazawa, Hiroshi

    2003-08-01

    Calcineurin homologous protein (CHP) is an EF-hand Ca(2+)-binding protein capable of interacting with various cellular proteins including Na(+)/H(+) exchangers, kinesin-related proteins, and apoptosis-inducing protein kinase DRAK2. We investigated the role of CHP on the DRAK2 protein kinase in vitro. CHP significantly reduced (approximately 85% inhibition) the kinase activity of DRAK2 for both autophosphorylation and phosphorylation of exogenous substrate (myosin light chain). The inhibitory effect of CHP was dependent on the presence of Ca(2+), whereas the interaction between CHP and DRAK2 was not Ca(2+)-dependent. These observations suggest that CHP negatively regulates the apoptosis-inducing protein kinase DRAK2 in a manner that depends on intracellular Ca(2+)-concentration.

  1. Spatial memory deficits and motor coordination facilitation in cGMP-dependent protein kinase type II-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wincott, Charlotte M; Kim, Seonil; Titcombe, Roseann F; Tukey, David S; Girma, Hiwot K; Pick, Joseph E; Devito, Loren M; Hofmann, Franz; Hoeffer, Charles; Ziff, Edward B

    2013-01-01

    Activity-dependent trafficking of AMPA receptors to synapses regulates synaptic strength. Activation of the NMDA receptor induces several second messenger pathways that contribute to receptor trafficking-dependent plasticity, including the NO pathway, which elevates cGMP. In turn, cGMP activates the cGMP-dependent protein kinase type II (cGKII), which phosphorylates the AMPA receptor subunit GluA1 at serine 845, a critical step facilitating synaptic delivery in the mechanism of activity-dependent synaptic potentiation. Since cGKII is expressed in the striatum, amygdala, cerebral cortex, and hippocampus, it has been proposed that mice lacking cGKII may present phenotypic differences compared to their wild-type littermates in emotion-dependent tasks, learning and memory, and drug reward salience. Previous studies have shown that cGKII KO mice ingest higher amounts of ethanol as well as exhibit elevated anxiety levels compared to wild-type (WT) littermates. Here, we show that cGKII KO mice are significantly deficient in spatial learning while exhibiting facilitated motor coordination, demonstrating a clear dependence of memory-based tasks on cGKII. We also show diminished GluA1 phosphorylation in the postsynaptic density (PSD) of cGKII KO prefrontal cortex while in hippocampal PSD fractions, phosphorylation was not significantly altered. These data suggest that the role of cGKII may be more robust in particular brain regions, thereby impacting complex behaviors dependent on these regions differently.

  2. Role of focal adhesion tyrosine kinases in GPVI-dependent platelet activation and reactive oxygen species formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naadiya Carrim

    Full Text Available We have previously shown the presence of a TRAF4/p47phox/Hic5/Pyk2 complex associated with the platelet collagen receptor, GPVI, consistent with a potential role of this complex in GPVI-dependent ROS formation. In other cell systems, NOX-dependent ROS formation is facilitated by Pyk2, which along with its closely related homologue FAK are known to be activated and phosphorylated downstream of ligand binding to GPVI.To evaluate the relative roles of Pyk2 and FAK in GPVI-dependent ROS formation and to determine their location within the GPVI signaling pathway.Human and mouse washed platelets (from WT or Pyk2 KO mice were pre-treated with pharmacological inhibitors targeting FAK or Pyk2 (PF-228 and Tyrphostin A9, respectively and stimulated with the GPVI-specific agonist, CRP. FAK, but not Pyk2, was found to be essential for GPVI-dependent ROS production and aggregation. Subsequent human platelet studies with PF-228 confirmed FAK is essential for GPVI-mediated phosphatidylserine exposure, α-granule secretion (P-selectin (CD62P surface expression and integrin αIIbβ3 activation. To determine the precise location of FAK within the GPVI pathway, we analyzed the effect of PF-228 inhibition in CRP-stimulated platelets in conjunction with immunoprecipitation and pulldown analysis to show that FAK is downstream of Lyn, Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk, PI3-K and Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk and upstream of Rac1, PLCγ2, Ca2+ release, PKC, Hic-5, NOX1 and αIIbβ3 activation.Overall, these data suggest a novel role for FAK in GPVI-dependent ROS formation and platelet activation and elucidate a proximal signaling role for FAK within the GPVI pathway.

  3. Identification of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs as a novel target of bisphenol A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Ito

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A (BPA forms the backbone of plastics and epoxy resins used to produce packaging for various foods and beverages. BPA is also an estrogenic disruptor, interacting with human estrogen receptors (ER and other related nuclear receptors. Nevertheless, the effects of BPA on human health remain unclear. The present study identified DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs as a novel BPA-binding protein. DNA-PKcs, in association with the Ku heterodimer (Ku70/80, is a critical enzyme involved in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Low levels of DNA-PK activity are previously reported to be associated with an increased risk of certain types of cancer. Although the Kd for the interaction between BPA and a drug-binding mutant of DNA-PKcs was comparatively low (137 nM, high doses of BPA were required before cellular effects were observed (100-300 μM. The results of an in vitro kinase assay showed that BPA inhibited DNA-PK kinase activity in a concentration-dependent manner. In M059K cells, BPA inhibited the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs at Ser2056 and H2AX at Ser139 in response to ionizing radiation (IR-irradiation. BPA also disrupted DNA-PKcs binding to Ku70/80 and increased the radiosensitivity of M059K cells, but not M059J cells (which are DNA-PKcs-deficient. Taken together, these results provide new evidence of the effects of BPA on DNA repair in mammalian cells, which are mediated via inhibition of DNA-PK activity. This study may warrant the consideration of the possible carcinogenic effects of high doses of BPA, which are mediated through its action on DNA-PK.

  4. Caspase-3-dependent cleavage of Akt modulates tau phosphorylation via GSK3β kinase: implications for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, J; Lauretti, E; Praticò, D

    2017-01-31

    The pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is accumulation of misfolded amyloid-β peptides and hyperphosphorylated tau protein in the brain. Increasing evidence suggests that serine-aspartyl proteases-caspases are activated in the AD brain. Previous studies identified a caspase-3 cleavage site within the amyloid-β precursor protein, and a caspase-3 cleavage of tau as the mechanisms involved in the development of Aβ and tau neuropathology, respectively. However, the potential role that caspase-3 could have on tau metabolism remains unknown. In the current studies, we provide experimental evidence that caspase-3 directly and specifically regulates tau phosphorylation, and demonstrate that this effect is mediated by the GSK3β kinase pathway via a caspase-3-dependent cleavage of the protein kinase B (also known as Akt). In addition, we confirm these results in vivo by using a transgenic mouse model of AD. Collectively, our findings demonstrate a new role for caspase-3 in the neurobiology of tau, and suggest that therapeutic strategies aimed at inhibiting this protease-dependent cleavage of Akt may prove beneficial in preventing tau hyperphosphorylation and subsequent neuropathology in AD and related tauopathies.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 31 January 2017; doi:10.1038/mp.2016.214.

  5. Role of the p21 Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor in Limiting Intimal Cell Proliferation in Response to Arterial Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi-Yong; Simari, Robert D.; Perkins, Neil D.; San, Hong; Gordon, David; Nabel, Gary J.; Nabel, Elizabeth G.

    1996-07-01

    Arterial injury induces a series of proliferative, vasoactive, and inflammatory responses that lead to vascular proliferative diseases, including atherosclerosis and restenosis. Although several factors have been defined which stimulate this process in vivo, the role of specific cellular gene products in limiting this response is not well understood. The p21 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor affects cell cycle progression, senescence, and differentiation in transformed cells, but its expression in injured blood vessels has not been investigated. In this study, we report that p21 protein is induced in porcine arteries following balloon catheter injury and suggest that p21 is likely to play a role in limiting arterial cell proliferation in vivo. Vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cell growth was arrested through the ability of p21 to inhibit progression through the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Following injury to porcine arteries, p21 gene product was detected in the neointima and correlated inversely with the location and kinetics of intimal cell proliferation. Direct gene transfer of p21 using an adenoviral vector into balloon injured porcine arteries inhibited the development of intimal hyperplasia. Taken together, these findings suggest that p21, and possibly related cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, may normally regulate cellular proliferation following arterial injury, and strategies to increase its expression may prove therapeutically beneficial in vascular diseases.

  6. Loss of Ca2+/calmodulin kinase kinase beta affects the formation of some, but not all, types of hippocampus-dependent long-term memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Marco; Mizuno, Keiko; Ris, Laurence; Angelo, Marco; Godaux, Emile; Giese, K Peter

    2003-10-29

    Long-term memory (LTM) requires activation of the transcription factor cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB). Signaling by the Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM) kinase cascade has been implicated in CREB activation and memory consolidation processes in the hippocampus. The CaM kinase kinase beta isoforms belong to the CaM kinase cascade, and we have generated null mutant mice to investigate the role of these kinases in several forms of learning and memory. The null mutants were impaired in spatial training-induced CREB activation and spatial memory formation. Furthermore, the mutants lacked late, but not early, long-term potentiation at the hippocampal CA1 synapse, and they were impaired in LTM, but not short-term memory, for the social transmission of food preferences. We suggest that the CaM kinase kinasebeta isoforms are required for the formation of hippocampal LTM. Surprisingly, however, these kinases were not needed for contextual, trace fear, and passive avoidance LTM. Our results demonstrate that different signaling processes underlie the formation of these types of hippocampal LTM.

  7. Beta 2 subunit-containing nicotinic receptors mediate acute nicotine-induced activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-dependent pathways in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, K J; Walters, C L; Damaj, M I

    2009-08-01

    Nicotine is the addictive component of tobacco, and successful smoking cessation therapies must address the various processes that contribute to nicotine addiction. Thus, understanding the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtypes and subsequent molecular cascades activated after nicotine exposure is of the utmost importance in understanding the progression of nicotine dependence. One possible candidate is the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) pathway. Substrates of this kinase include the vesicle-associated protein synapsin I and the transcription factor cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). The goal of these studies was to examine these postreceptor mechanisms after acute nicotine treatment in vivo. We first show that administration of nicotine increases CaMKII activity in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), nucleus accumbens (NAc), and amygdala. In beta2 nAChR knockout (KO) mice, nicotine does not induce an increase in kinase activity, phosphorylated (p)Synapsin I, or pCREB. In contrast, alpha7 nAChR KO mice show nicotine-induced increases in CaMKII activity and pCREB, similar to their wild-type littermates. Moreover, we show that when animals are pretreated with the CaMKII inhibitors 4-[(2S)-2-[(5-isoquinolinylsulfonyl) methylamino]-3-oxo-3-(4-phenyl-1-piperazinyl)propyl]phenyl isoquinolinesulfonic acid ester (KN-62) and N-[2-[[[3-(4-chlorophenyl)-2 propenyl]methylamino]methyl]phenyl]-N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-4-methoxybenzenesulphonamide (KN-93), nicotine-induced increase in the kinase activity and pCREB was attenuated in the VTA and NAc, whereas pretreatment with (2-[N-(4-methoxybenzenesulfonyl)]amino-N-(4-chlorocinnamyl)-N-methylbenzylamine, phosphate) (KN-92), the inactive analog, did not alter the nicotine-induced increase in pCREB. Taken together, these data suggest that the nicotine-induced increase in CaMKII activity may correlate with the nicotine-induced increase in pSynapsin I and pCREB in the VTA and NAc via beta2

  8. An inhibitor-driven study for enhancing the selectivity of indirubin derivatives towards leishmanial Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 over leishmanial cdc2-related protein kinase 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efstathiou, Antonia; Gaboriaud-Kolar, Nicolas; Smirlis, Despina; Myrianthopoulos, Vassilios; Vougogiannopoulou, Konstantina; Alexandratos, Alexandros; Kritsanida, Marina; Mikros, Emmanuel; Soteriadou, Ketty; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros

    2014-05-20

    In search of new antiparasitic agents for overcoming the limitations of current leishmaniasis chemotherapy, we have previously shown that 6-bromoindirubin-3'-oxime (6BIO) and several other 6-substituted analogues of indirubin, a naturally occurring bis-indole present in mollusks and plants, displayed reverse selectivity from the respective mammalian kinases, targeting more potently the leishmanial Cyclin-Dependent Kinase-1 (CDK1) homologue [cdc2-related protein kinase 3 (LCRK3)] over leishmanial Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3 (LGSK-3). This reversal of selectivity in Leishmania parasites compared to mammalian cells makes the design of specific indirubin-based LGSK-3 inhibitors difficult. In this context, the identification of compounds bearing specific substitutions that shift indirubin inhibition towards LGSK-3, previously found to be a potential drug target, over LCRK3 is imperative for antileishmanial targeted drug discovery. A new in-house indirubin library, composed of 35 compounds, initially designed to target mammalian kinases (CDKs, GSK-3), was tested against Leishmania donovani promastigotes and intracellular amastigotes using the Alamar blue assay. Indirubins with antileishmanial activity were tested against LGSK-3 and LCRK3 kinases, purified from homologous expression systems. Flow cytometry (FACS) was used to measure the DNA content for cell-cycle analysis and the mode of cell death. Comparative structural analysis of the involved kinases was then performed using the Szmap algorithm. We have identified 7 new indirubin analogues that are selective inhibitors of LGSK-3 over LCRK3. These new inhibitors were also found to display potent antileishmanial activity with GI50 values of <1.5 μΜ. Surprisingly, all the compounds that displayed enhanced selectivity towards LGSK-3, were 6BIO analogues bearing an additional 3'-bulky amino substitution, namely a piperazine or pyrrolidine ring. A comparative structural analysis of the two aforementioned leishmanial

  9. Molecular Characterization and Functional Analysis of a Novel Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase 4 from Eimeria tenella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hui; Zhao, Qiping; Zhu, Shunhai; Xia, Weili; Xu, Shuaibin; Xie, Yuxiang; Cui, Xiaoxia; Tang, Min; Men, Qifei; Yang, Zhiyuang; Li, Cong; Zhu, Xuelong; Han, Hongyu

    2016-01-01

    Eimeria tenella is an obligate intracellular parasite that actively invades cecal epithelial cells of chickens. The basis of cell invasion is not completely understood, but some key molecules of host cell invasion have been discovered. This paper investigated the characteristics of calcium-dependent protein kinase 4 (EtCDPK4), a critical molecule in E. tenella invasion of host cells. A full-length EtCDPK4 cDNA was identified from E. tenella using rapid amplification of cDNA ends. EtCDPK4 had an open reading frame of 1803 bp encoding a protein of 600 amino acids. Quantitative real-time PCR and western blotting were used to explore differences in EtCDPK4 transcription and translation in four developmental stages of E. tenella. EtCDPK4 was expressed at higher levels in sporozoites, but translation was higher in second-generation merozoites. In vitro invasion inhibition assays explored whether EtCDPK4 was involved in invasion of DF-1 cells by E. tenella sporozoites. Polyclonal antibodies against recombinant EtCDPK4 (rEtCDPK4) inhibited parasite invasion, decreasing it by approximately 52%. Indirect immunofluorescence assays explored EtCDPK4 distribution during parasite development after E. tenella sporozoite invasion of DF-1 cells in vitro. The results showed that EtCDPK4 might be important in sporozoite invasion and development. To analyze EtCDPK4 functional domains according to the structural characteristics of EtCDPK4 and study the kinase activity of rEtCDPK4, an in vitro phosphorylation system was established. We verified that rEtCDPK4 was a protein kinase that was completely dependent on Ca2+ for enzyme activity. Specific inhibitors of rEtCDPK4 activity were screened by kinase activity in vitro. Some specific inhibitors were applied to assays of DF-1 cell invasion by E. tenella sporozoites to confirm that the inhibitors functioned in vitro. W-7, H-7, H-89, and myristoylated peptide inhibited DF-1 invasion by E. tenella sporozoites. The experimental results showed

  10. Intermittent Hypoxia-Induced Spinal Inflammation Impairs Respiratory Motor Plasticity by a Spinal p38 MAP Kinase-Dependent Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huxtable, Adrianne G; Smith, Stephanie M C; Peterson, Timothy J; Watters, Jyoti J; Mitchell, Gordon S

    2015-04-29

    Inflammation is characteristic of most clinical disorders that challenge the neural control of breathing. Since inflammation modulates neuroplasticity, we studied the impact of inflammation caused by prolonged intermittent hypoxia on an important form of respiratory plasticity, acute intermittent hypoxia (three, 5 min hypoxic episodes, 5 min normoxic intervals) induced phrenic long-term facilitation (pLTF). Because chronic intermittent hypoxia elicits neuroinflammation and pLTF is undermined by lipopolysaccharide-induced systemic inflammation, we hypothesized that one night of intermittent hypoxia (IH-1) elicits spinal inflammation, thereby impairing pLTF by a p38 MAP kinase-dependent mechanism. pLTF and spinal inflammation were assessed in anesthetized rats pretreated with IH-1 (2 min hypoxia, 2 min normoxia; 8 h) or sham normoxia and allowed 16 h for recovery. IH-1 (1) transiently increased IL-6 (1.5 ± 0.2-fold; p = 0.02) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) (2.4 ± 0.4-fold; p = 0.01) mRNA in cervical spinal homogenates, (2) elicited a sustained increase in IL-1β mRNA (2.4 ± 0.2-fold; p < 0.001) in isolated cervical spinal microglia, and (3) abolished pLTF (-1 ± 5% vs 56 ± 10% in controls; p < 0.001). pLTF was restored after IH-1 by systemic NSAID administration (ketoprofen; 55 ± 9%; p < 0.001) or spinal p38 MAP kinase inhibition (58 ± 2%; p < 0.001). IH-1 increased phosphorylated (activated) p38 MAP kinase immunofluorescence in identified phrenic motoneurons and adjacent microglia. In conclusion, IH-1 elicits spinal inflammation and impairs pLTF by a spinal p38 MAP kinase-dependent mechanism. By targeting inflammation, we may develop strategies to manipulate respiratory motor plasticity for therapeutic advantage when the respiratory control system is compromised (e.g., sleep apnea, apnea of prematurity, spinal injury, or motor neuron disease).

  11. Inhibition of thyrotropin-stimulated DNA synthesis by microinjection of inhibitors of cellular Ras and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupperman, E; Wen, W; Meinkoth, J L

    1993-08-01

    Microinjection of a dominant interfering mutant of Ras (N17 Ras) caused a significant reduction in thyrotropin (thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH])-stimulated DNA synthesis in rat thyroid cells. A similar reduction was observed following injection of the heat-stable protein kinase inhibitor of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. Coinjection of both inhibitors almost completely abolished TSH-induced DNA synthesis. In contrast to TSH, overexpression of cellular Ras protein did not stimulate the expression of a cyclic AMP response element-regulated reporter gene. Similarly, injection of N17 Ras had no effect on TSH-stimulated reporter gene expression. Moreover, overexpression of cellular Ras protein stimulated similar levels of DNA synthesis in the presence or absence of the heat-stable protein kinase inhibitor. Together, these results suggest that in Wistar rat thyroid cells, a full mitogenic response to TSH requires both Ras and cyclic APK-dependent protein kinase.

  12. Functional intersection of ATM and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit in coding end joining during V(D)J recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Baeck-Seung; Gapud, Eric J; Zhang, Shichuan

    2013-01-01

    -PKcs deficiency leads to a nearly complete block in coding join formation, as DNA-PKcs is required to activate Artemis, the endonuclease that opens hairpin-sealed coding ends. In contrast to loss of DNA-PKcs protein, here we show that inhibition of DNA-PKcs kinase activity has no effect on coding join formation...... when ATM is present and its kinase activity is intact. The ability of ATM to compensate for DNA-PKcs kinase activity depends on the integrity of three threonines in DNA-PKcs that are phosphorylation targets of ATM, suggesting that ATM can modulate DNA-PKcs activity through direct phosphorylation of DNA...

  13. Type III Transforming Growth Factor-β Receptor Drives Cardiac Hypertrophy Through β-Arrestin2-Dependent Activation of Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Jie; Zhao, Dan; Zhang, Ling-Ling; Song, Shu-Ying; Li, Yan-Chao; Sun, Fei; Ding, Xiao-Qing; Yu, Chang-Jiang; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Liu, Mei-Tong; Dong, Chang-Jiang; Ji, Yong; Li, Hongliang; Chu, Wenfeng; Zhang, Zhi-Ren

    2016-09-01

    The role of type III transforming growth factor-β receptor (TβRIII) in the pathogenesis of heart diseases remains largely unclear. Here, we investigated the functional role and molecular mechanisms of TβRIII in the development of myocardial hypertrophy. Western blot and quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed that the expression of TβRIII was significantly elevated in human cardiac hypertrophic samples. Consistently, TβRIII expression was substantially increased in transverse aortic constriction (TAC)- and isoproterenol-induced mouse cardiac hypertrophy in vivo and in isoproterenol-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in vitro. Overexpression of TβRIII resulted in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, whereas isoproterenol-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy was greatly attenuated by knockdown of TβRIII in vitro. Cardiac-specific transgenic expression of TβRIII independently led to cardiac hypertrophy in mice, which was further aggravated by isoproterenol and TAC treatment. Cardiac contractile function of the mice was not altered in TβRIII transgenic mice; however, TAC led to significantly decreased cardiac contractile function in TβRIII transgenic mice compared with control mice. Conversely, isoproterenol- and TAC-induced cardiac hypertrophy and TAC-induced cardiac contractile function impairment were partially reversed by suppression of TβRIII in vivo. Our data suggest that TβRIII mediates stress-induced cardiac hypertrophy through activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, which requires a physical interaction of β-arrestin2 with both TβRIII and calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II. Our findings indicate that stress-induced increase in TβRIII expression results in cardiac hypertrophy through β-arrestin2-dependent activation of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and that transforming growth factor-β and β-adrenergic receptor signaling are not involved in spontaneous cardiac hypertrophy in cardiac

  14. Genetic activation of ERK5 MAP kinase enhances adult neurogenesis and extends hippocampus-dependent long-term memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenbin; Pan, Yung-Wei; Zou, Junhui; Li, Tan; Abel, Glen M; Palmiter, Richard D; Storm, Daniel R; Xia, Zhengui

    2014-02-05

    Recent studies have shown that inhibition of adult neurogenesis impairs the formation of hippocampus-dependent memory. However, it is not known whether increasing adult neurogenesis affects the persistence of hippocampus-dependent long-term memory. Furthermore, signaling mechanisms that regulate adult neurogenesis are not fully defined. We recently reported that the conditional and targeted knock-out of ERK5 MAP kinase in adult neurogenic regions of the mouse brain attenuates adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus and disrupts several forms of hippocampus-dependent memory. Here, we developed a gain-of-function knock-in mouse model to specifically activate endogenous ERK5 in the neurogenic regions of the adult brain. We report that the selective and targeted activation of ERK5 increases adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus by enhancing cell survival, neuronal differentiation, and dendritic complexity. Conditional ERK5 activation also improves the performance of challenging forms of spatial learning and memory and extends hippocampus-dependent long-term memory. We conclude that enhancing signal transduction of a single signaling pathway within adult neural stem/progenitor cells is sufficient to increase adult neurogenesis and improve the persistence of hippocampus-dependent memory. Furthermore, activation of ERK5 may provide a novel therapeutic target to improve long-term memory.

  15. The catalytic subunit DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) facilitates recovery from radiation-induced inhibition of DNA replication

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Jun; DiBiase, Steven; Iliakis, George

    2000-01-01

    Exposure of cells to ionizing radiation inhibits DNA replication in a dose-dependent manner. The dose response is biphasic and the initial steep component reflects inhibition of replicon initiation thought to be mediated by activation of the S-phase checkpoint. In mammalian cells, inhibition of replicon initiation requires the ataxia telagiectasia mutated (ATM) gene, a member of the phosphatidyl inositol kinase-like (PIKL) family of protein kinases. We studied the effect on replicon initiatio...

  16. cAMP-dependent protein kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase mediate stathmin phosphorylation for the maintenance of interphase microtubules during osmotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Yan Y; Yeap, Yvonne Y C; Bogoyevitch, Marie A; Ng, Dominic C H

    2014-01-24

    Dynamic microtubule changes after a cell stress challenge are required for cell survival and adaptation. Stathmin (STMN), a cytoplasmic microtubule-destabilizing phosphoprotein, regulates interphase microtubules during cell stress, but the signaling mechanisms involved are poorly defined. In this study ectopic expression of single alanine-substituted phospho-resistant mutants demonstrated that STMN Ser-38 and Ser-63 phosphorylation were specifically required to maintain interphase microtubules during hyperosmotic stress. STMN was phosphorylated on Ser-38 and Ser-63 in response to hyperosmolarity, heat shock, and arsenite treatment but rapidly dephosphorylated after oxidative stress treatment. Two-dimensional PAGE and Phos-tag gel analysis of stress-stimulated STMN phospho-isoforms revealed rapid STMN Ser-38 phosphorylation followed by subsequent Ser-25 and Ser-63 phosphorylation. Previously, we delineated stress-stimulated JNK targeting of STMN. Here, we identified cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) signaling as responsible for stress-induced STMN Ser-63 phosphorylation. Increased cAMP levels induced by cholera toxin triggered potent STMN Ser-63 phosphorylation. Osmotic stress stimulated an increase in PKA activity and elevated STMN Ser-63 and CREB (cAMP-response element-binding protein) Ser-133 phosphorylation that was substantially attenuated by pretreatment with H-89, a PKA inhibitor. Interestingly, PKA activity and subsequent phosphorylation of STMN were augmented in the absence of JNK activation, indicating JNK and PKA pathway cross-talk during stress regulation of STMN. Taken together our study indicates that JNK- and PKA-mediated STMN Ser-38 and Ser-63 phosphorylation are required to preserve interphase microtubules in response to hyperosmotic stress.

  17. Dual Roles of Quercetin in Platelets: Phosphoinositide-3-Kinase and MAP Kinases Inhibition, and cAMP-Dependent Vasodilator-Stimulated Phosphoprotein Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won Jun Oh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Progressive diseases including cancer, metabolic, and cardiovascular disorders are marked by platelet activation and chronic inflammation. Studies suggest that dietary flavonoids such as quercetin possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiplatelet properties, which could prevent various chronic diseases including atherosclerosis and thrombosis. However, the mechanism and the signaling pathway that links quercetin's antiplatelet activity with its anti-inflammatory property is limited and thus further exploration is required. The aim of this paper was to examine the link between antiplatelet and anti-inflammatory roles of quercetin in agonist-induced platelet activation. Methods. Quercetin effects on agonist-activated platelet-aggregation, granule-secretion, [Ca2+]i, and glycoprotein-IIb/IIIa activation were examined. Its effects on PI3K/Akt, VASP, and MAPK phosphorylations were also studied on collaged-activated platelets. Results. Quercetin dose dependently suppressed collagen, thrombin, or ADP-induced platelet aggregation. It significantly inhibited collagen-induced ATP release, P-selectin expression, [Ca2+]i mobilization, integrin-αIIbβ3 activation, and augmented cAMP and VASP levels. Moreover, quercetin attenuated PI3K, Akt, ERK2, JNK1, and p38 MAPK activations, which were supported by platelet-aggregation inhibition with the respective kinase inhibitors. Conclusion. Quercetin-mediated antiplatelet activity involves PI3K/Akt inactivation, cAMP elevation, and VASP stimulation that, in turn, suppresses MAPK phosphorylations. This result suggests quercetin may have a potential to treat cardiovascular diseases involving aberrant platelet activation and inflammation.

  18. cGMP stimulation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl- channels co-expressed with cGMP-dependent protein kinase type II but not type Ibeta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.B. Vaandrager (Arie); S.M. Lohmann (Suzanne); H.R. de Jonge (Hugo); W.C. Poller; B.C. Tilly (Bernard); A. Smolenski; S. Schneider-Rasp; A.G. Bot (Alice); M.J. Edixhoven (Marcel); B.J. Scholte (Bob); T. Jarchau; U. Walter

    1997-01-01

    textabstractIn order to investigate the involvement of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGK) type II in cGMP-provoked intestinal Cl- secretion, cGMP-dependent activation and phosphorylation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channels was ana

  19. Phosphorylation-dependent regulation of phospholipase D2 by protein kinase C delta in rat Pheochromocytoma PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jung Min; Kim, Jae Ho; Lee, Byoung Dae; Lee, Sang Do; Kim, Yong; Jung, Yon Woo; Lee, Sukmook; Cho, Wonhwa; Ohba, Motoi; Kuroki, Toshio; Suh, Pann-Ghill; Ryu, Sung Ho

    2002-03-08

    Many studies have shown that protein kinase C (PKC) is an important physiological regulator of phospholipase D (PLD). However, the role of PKC in agonist-induced PLD activation has been mainly investigated with a focus on the PLD1, which is one of the two PLD isoenzymes (PLD1 and PLD2) cloned to date. Since the expression of PLD2 significantly enhanced phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)- or bradykinin-induced PLD activity in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells, we investigated the regulatory mechanism of PLD2 in PC12 cells. Two different PKC inhibitors, GF109203X and Ro-31-8220, completely blocked PMA-induced PLD2 activation. In addition, specific inhibition of PKC delta by rottlerin prevented PLD2 activation in PMA-stimulated PC12 cells. Concomitant with PLD2 activation, PLD2 became phosphorylated upon PMA or bradykinin treatment of PC12 cells. Moreover, rottlerin blocked PMA- or bradykinin-induced PLD2 phosphorylation in PC12 cells. Expression of a kinase-deficient mutant of PKC delta using adenovirus-mediated gene transfer inhibited the phosphorylation and activation of PLD2 induced by PMA in PC12 cells, suggesting the phosphorylation-dependent regulation of PLD2 mediated by PKC delta kinase activity in PC12 cells. PKC delta co-immunoprecipitated with PLD2 from PC12 cell extracts, and associated with PLD2 in vitro in a PMA-dependent manner. Phospho-PLD2 immunoprecipitated from PMA-treated PC12 cells and PLD2 phosphorylated in vitro by PKC delta were resolved by two-dimensional phosphopeptide mapping and compared. At least seven phosphopeptides co-migrated, indicating the direct phosphorylation of PLD2 by PKC delta inside the cells. Immunocytochemical studies of PC12 cells revealed that after treatment with PMA, PKC delta was translocated from the cytosol to the plasma membrane where PLD2 is mainly localized. These results suggest that PKC delta-dependent direct phosphorylation plays an important role in the regulation of PLD2 activity in PC12 cells.

  20. Efficacy of cyclin dependent kinase 4 inhibitors as potent neuroprotective agents against insults relevant to Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyankar Sanphui

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with no cure till today. Aberrant activation of cell cycle regulatory proteins is implicated in neurodegenerative diseases including AD. We and others have shown that Cyclin dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4 is activated in AD brain and is required for neuron death. In this study, we tested the efficiency of commercially available Cdk4 specific inhibitors as well as a small library of synthetic molecule inhibitors targeting Cdk4 as neuroprotective agents in cellular models of neuron death. We found that several of these inhibitors significantly protected neuronal cells against death induced by nerve growth factor (NGF deprivation and oligomeric beta amyloid (Aβ that are implicated in AD. These neuroprotective agents inhibit specifically Cdk4 kinase activity, loss of mitochondrial integrity, induction of pro-apoptotic protein Bim and caspase3 activation in response to NGF deprivation. The efficacies of commercial and synthesized inhibitors are comparable. The synthesized molecules are either phenanthrene based or naphthalene based and they are synthesized by using Pschorr reaction and Buchwald coupling respectively as one of the key steps. A number of molecules of both kinds block neurodegeneration effectively. Therefore, we propose that Cdk4 inhibition would be a therapeutic choice for ameliorating neurodegeneration in AD and these synthetic Cdk4 inhibitors could lead to development of effective drugs for AD.

  1. Phosphorylation of TRPV1 by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 promotes TRPV1 surface localization, leading to inflammatory thermal hyperalgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiao; Du, Junxie; Yang, Yanrui; Wang, Yun

    2015-11-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is an important serine/threonine kinase that plays critical roles in many physiological processes. Recently, Cdk5 has been reported to phosphorylate TRPV1 at threonine 407 (Thr-407) in humans (Thr-406 in rats), which enhances the function of TRPV1 channel and promotes thermal hyperalgesia in the complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory pain rats. However, the underlying mechanisms are still unknown. Here, we demonstrate that Cdk5 phosphorylates TRPV1 at Threonine 406 and promotes the surface localization of TRPV1, leading to inflammatory thermal hyperalgesia. The mutation of Thr-406 of TRPV1 to alanine reduced the interaction of TRPV1 with the cytoskeletal elements and decreased the binding of TRPV1 with the motor protein KIF13B, which led to reduced surface distribution of TRPV1. Disrupting the phosphorylation of TRPV1 at Thr-406 dramatically reduced the surface level of TRPV1 in HEK 293 cells after transient expression and the channel function in cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Notably, intrathecal administration of the interfering peptide against the phosphorylation of Thr-406 alleviated heat hyperalgesia and reduced the surface level of TRPV1 in inflammatory pain rats. Together, these results demonstrate that Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation of TRPV1 at Thr-406 increases the surface level and the function of TRPV1, while the TAT-T406 peptide can effectively attenuate thermal hyperalgesia. Our studies provide a potential therapy for inflammatory pain.

  2. A receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Tyrphostin A9 induces cancer cell death through Drp1 dependent mitochondria fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, So Jung; Park, Young Jun; Shin, Ji Hyun; Kim, Eun Sung [Graduate School of East-West Medical Science, Kyung Hee University, Gyeoggi-Do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Jung Jin; Jin, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Jin Cheon [Institute for Innovative Cancer Research, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Dong-Hyung, E-mail: dhcho@khu.ac.kr [Graduate School of East-West Medical Science, Kyung Hee University, Gyeoggi-Do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} We screened and identified Tyrphostin A9, a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor as a strong mitochondria fission inducer. {yields} Tyrphostin A9 treatment promotes mitochondria dysfunction and contributes to cytotoxicity in cancer cells. {yields} Tyrphostin A9 induces apoptotic cell death through a Drp1-mediated pathway. {yields} Our studies suggest that Tyrphostin A9 induces mitochondria fragmentation and apoptotic cell death via Drp1 dependently. -- Abstract: Mitochondria dynamics controls not only their morphology but also functions of mitochondria. Therefore, an imbalance of the dynamics eventually leads to mitochondria disruption and cell death. To identify specific regulators of mitochondria dynamics, we screened a bioactive chemical compound library and selected Tyrphostin A9, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, as a potent inducer of mitochondrial fission. Tyrphostin A9 treatment resulted in the formation of fragmented mitochondria filament. In addition, cellular ATP level was decreased and the mitochondrial membrane potential was collapsed in Tyr A9-treated cells. Suppression of Drp1 activity by siRNA or over-expression of a dominant negative mutant of Drp1 inhibited both mitochondrial fragmentation and cell death induced by Tyrpohotin A9. Moreover, treatment of Tyrphostin A9 also evoked mitochondrial fragmentation in other cells including the neuroblastomas. Taken together, these results suggest that Tyrphostin A9 induces Drp1-mediated mitochondrial fission and apoptotic cell death.

  3. Anticancer screening of medicinal plant phytochemicals against Cyclin-Dependent Kinase-2 (CDK2: An in-silico approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wajahat Khan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cyclin-Dependent Kinase-2 (CDK2 is a member of serine/threonine protein kinases family and plays an important role in regulation of various eukaryotic cell division events. Over-expression of CDK2 during cell cycle may lead to several cellular functional aberrations including diverse types of cancers (lung cancer, primary colorectal carcinoma, ovarian cancer, melanoma and pancreatic carcinoma in humans. Medicinal plants phytochemicals which have anticancer potential can be used as an alternative drug resource. Methods: This study was designed to find out anticancer phytochemicals from medicinal plants which could inhibit CDK2 with the help of molecular docking technique. Molecular Operating Environment (MOE v2009 software was used to dock 2300 phytochemicals in this study. Results: The outcome of this study shows that four phytochemicals Kushenol T, Remangiflavanone B, Neocalyxins A and Elenoside showed the lowest S-score (-17.83, -17.57, -17.26, -17.17 respectively and binds strongly with all eight active residues Tyr15, Lys33, Ileu52, Lys56, Leu78, phe80, Asp145 and Phe146 of CDK2 binding site. These phytochemicals could successfully inhibit the CDK2. Conclusion: These phytochemicals can be considered as potential anticancer agents and used in drug development against CDK2. We anticipate that this study would pave way for phytochemical based novel small molecules as more efficacious and selective anti-cancer therapeutic compounds.

  4. Novel role for mitochondria: protein kinase Ctheta-dependent oxidative signaling organelles in activation-induced T-cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Marcin; Kiessling, Michael; Süss, Dorothee; Krammer, Peter H; Gülow, Karsten

    2007-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a key role in regulation of activation-induced T-cell death (AICD) by induction of CD95L expression. However, the molecular source and the signaling steps necessary for ROS production are largely unknown. Here, we show that the proximal T-cell receptor-signaling machinery, including ZAP70 (zeta chain-associated protein kinase 70), LAT (linker of activated T cells), SLP76 (SH2 domain-containing leukocyte protein of 76 kDa), PLCgamma1 (phospholipase Cgamma1), and PKCtheta (protein kinase Ctheta), are crucial for ROS production. PKCtheta is translocated to the mitochondria. By using cells depleted of mitochondrial DNA, we identified the mitochondria as the source of activation-induced ROS. Inhibition of mitochondrial electron transport complex I assembly by small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of the chaperone NDUFAF1 resulted in a block of ROS production. Complex I-derived ROS are converted into a hydrogen peroxide signal by the mitochondrial superoxide dismutase. This signal is essential for CD95L expression, as inhibition of complex I assembly by NDUFAF1-specific siRNA prevents AICD. Similar results were obtained when metformin, an antidiabetic drug and mild complex I inhibitor, was used. Thus, we demonstrate for the first time that PKCtheta-dependent ROS generation by mitochondrial complex I is essential for AICD.

  5. The function of Rho-dependent kinases ROCK1 and ROCK2 in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svenja eHartmann

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Rho-associated kinases ROCK1 and ROCK2 are serine/threonine kinases that are downstream targets of the small GTPases RhoA, RhoB, and RhoC. ROCKs are involved in diverse cellular activities including actin cytoskeleton organization, cell adhesion and motility, proliferation and apoptosis, remodeling of the extracellular matrix and smooth muscle cell contraction. The role of ROCK1 and ROCK2 has long been considered to be similar; however, it is now clear that they do not always have the same functions. Moreover, depending on their subcellular localization, activation, and other environmental factors, ROCK signaling can have different effects on cellular function. With respect to the heart, findings in isoform-specific knockout mice argue for a role of ROCK1 and ROCK2 in the pathogenesis of cardiac fibrosis and cardiac hypertrophy, respectively. Increased ROCK activity could play a pivotal role in processes leading to cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, angina pectoris, vasospastic angina, heart failure, and stroke, and thus ROCK activity is a potential new biomarker for heart disease. Pharmacological ROCK inhibition reduces the enhanced ROCK activity in patients, accompanied with a measurable improvement in medical condition. In this review, we focus on recent findings regarding ROCK signaling in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, with a special focus on differences between ROCK1 and ROCK2 function.

  6. VDAC electronics: 3. VDAC-Creatine kinase-dependent generation of the outer membrane potential in respiring mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemeshko, Victor V

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial energy in cardiac cells has been reported to be channeled into the cytosol through the intermembrane contact sites formed by the adenine nucleotide translocator, creatine kinase and VDAC. Computational analysis performed in this study showed a high probability of the outer membrane potential (OMP) generation coupled to such a mechanism of energy channeling in respiring mitochondria. OMPs, positive inside, calculated at elevated concentrations of creatine are high enough to restrict ATP release from mitochondria, to significantly decrease the apparent K(m,ADP) for state 3 respiration and to maintain low concentrations of Ca(2+) in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. An inhibition by creatine of Ca(2+)-induced swelling of isolated mitochondria and other protective effects of creatine reported in the literature might be explained by generated positive OMP. We suggest that VDAC-creatine kinase-dependent generation of OMP represents a novel physiological factor controlling metabolic state of mitochondria, cell energy channeling and resistance to death. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Anti-diabetes drug pioglitazone ameliorates synaptic defects in AD transgenic mice by inhibiting cyclin-dependent kinase5 activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinan Chen

    Full Text Available Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5 is a serine/threonine kinase that is activated by the neuron specific activators p35/p39 and plays many important roles in neuronal development. However, aberrant activation of Cdk5 is believed to be associated with the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD and Parkinson's disease (PD. Here in the present study, enhanced Cdk5 activity was observed in mouse models of AD; whereas soluble amyloid-β oligomers (Aβ, which contribute to synaptic failures during AD pathogenesis, induced Cdk5 hyperactivation in cultured hippocampal neurons. Inhibition of Cdk5 activity by pharmacological or genetic approaches reversed dendritic spine loss caused by soluble amyloid-β oligomers (Aβ treatment. Interestingly, we found that the anti-diabetes drug pioglitazone could inhibit Cdk5 activity by decreasing p35 protein level. More importantly, pioglitazone treatment corrected long-term potentiation (LTP deficit caused by Aβ exposure in cultured slices and pioglitazone administration rescued impaired LTP and spatial memory in AD mouse models. Taken together, our study describes an unanticipated role of pioglitazone in alleviating AD and reveals a potential therapeutic drug for AD curing.

  8. The HTLV-1 Tax protein binding domain of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4 includes the regulatory PSTAIRE helix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grassmann Ralph

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Tax oncoprotein of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 is leukemogenic in transgenic mice and induces permanent T-cell growth in vitro. It is found in active CDK holoenzyme complexes from adult T-cell leukemia-derived cultures and stimulates the G1- to-S phase transition by activating the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK CDK4. The Tax protein directly and specifically interacts with CDK4 and cyclin D2 and binding is required for enhanced CDK4 kinase activity. The protein-protein contact between Tax and the components of the cyclin D/CDK complexes increases the association of CDK4 and its positive regulatory subunit cyclin D and renders the complex resistant to p21CIP inhibition. Tax mutants affecting the N-terminus cannot bind cyclin D and CDK4. Results To analyze, whether the N-terminus of Tax is capable of CDK4-binding, in vitro binding -, pull down -, and mammalian two-hybrid analyses were performed. These experiments revealed that a segment of 40 amino acids is sufficient to interact with CDK4 and cyclin D2. To define a Tax-binding domain and analyze how Tax influences the kinase activity, a series of CDK4 deletion mutants was tested. Different assays revealed two regions which upon deletion consistently result in reduced binding activity. These were isolated and subjected to mammalian two-hybrid analysis to test their potential to interact with the Tax N-terminus. These experiments concurrently revealed binding at the N- and C-terminus of CDK4. The N-terminal segment contains the PSTAIRE helix, which is known to control the access of substrate to the active cleft of CDK4 and thus the kinase activity. Conclusion Since the N- and C-terminus of CDK4 are neighboring in the predicted three-dimensional protein structure, it is conceivable that they comprise a single binding domain, which interacts with the Tax N-terminus.

  9. Retinoic acid increases glucocorticoid receptor phosphorylation via cyclin-dependent kinase 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brossaud, Julie; Roumes, Hélène; Helbling, Jean-Christophe; Moisan, Marie-Pierre; Pallet, Véronique; Ferreira, Guillaume; Biyong, Essi-Fanny; Redonnet, Anabelle; Corcuff, Jean-Benoît

    2017-07-01

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) function is modulated by phosphorylation. As retinoic acid (RA) can activate some cytoplasmic kinases able to phosphorylate GR, we investigated whether RA could modulate GR phosphorylation in neuronal cells in a context of long-term glucocorticoid exposure. A 4-day treatment of dexamethasone (Dex) plus RA, showed that RA potentiated the (Dex)-induced phosphorylation on GR Serine 220 (pSer220GR) in the nucleus of a hippocampal HT22 cell line. This treatment increased the cytoplasmic ratio of p35/p25 proteins, which are major CDK5 cofactors. Roscovitine, a pharmacological CDK5 inhibitor, or a siRNA against CDK5 prevented RA potentiation of GR phosphorylation. Furthermore, roscovitine counter-acted the effect of RA on GR sensitive target proteins such as BDNF or tissue-transglutaminase. These data help understanding the interaction between RA- and glucocorticoid-signalling pathways, both of which have strong influences on the adult brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Palmitoylation controls dopamine transporter kinetics, degradation, and protein kinase C-dependent regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, James D; Vaughan, Roxanne A

    2011-02-18

    Palmitoylation is a lipid modification that confers diverse functions to target proteins and is a contributing factor for many neuronal diseases. In this study, we demonstrate using [(3)H]palmitic acid labeling and acyl-biotinyl exchange that native and expressed dopamine transporters (DATs) are palmitoylated, and using the palmitoyl acyltransferase inhibitor 2-bromopalmitate (2BP), we identify several associated functions. Treatment of rat striatal synaptosomes with 2BP using lower doses or shorter times caused robust inhibition of transport V(max) that occurred with no losses of DAT protein or changes in DAT surface levels, indicating that acute loss of palmitoylation leads to reduction of transport kinetics. Treatment of synaptosomes or cells with 2BP using higher doses or longer times resulted in DAT protein losses and production of transporter fragments, implicating palmitoylation in regulation of transporter degradation. Site-directed mutagenesis indicated that palmitoylation of rat DAT occurs at Cys-580 at the intracellular end of transmembrane domain 12 and at one or more additional unidentified site(s). Cys-580 mutation also led to production of transporter degradation fragments and to increased phorbol ester-induced down-regulation, further supporting palmitoylation in opposing DAT turnover and in opposing protein kinase C-mediated regulation. These results identify S-palmitoylation as a major regulator of DAT properties that could significantly impact acute and long term dopamine transport capacity.

  11. Novel role of c-jun N-terminal kinase in regulating the initiation of cap-dependent translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manish R; Sadiq, Ahad A; Jay-Dixon, Joe; Jirakulaporn, Tanawat; Jacobson, Blake A; Farassati, Faris; Bitterman, Peter B; Kratzke, Robert A

    2012-02-01

    Initiation of protein translation by the 5' mRNA cap is a tightly regulated step in cell growth and proliferation. Aberrant activation of cap-dependent translation is a hallmark of many cancers including non-small cell lung cancer. The canonical signaling mechanisms leading to translation initiation include activation of the Akt/mTOR pathway in response to the presence of nutrients and growth factors. We have previously observed that inhibition of c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) leads to inactivation of cap-dependent translation in mesothelioma cells. Since JNK is involved in the genesis of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), we hypothesized that JNK could also be involved in activating cap-dependent translation in NSCLC cells and could represent an alternative pathway regulating translation. In a series of NSCLC cell lines, inhibition of JNK using SP600125 resulted in inhibition of 4E-BP1 phosphorylation and a decrease in formation of the cap-dependent translation complex, eIF4F. Furthermore, we show that JNK-mediated inhibition of translation is independent of mTOR. Our data provide evidence that JNK is involved in the regulation of translation and has potential as a therapeutic target in NSCLC.

  12. Monoclonal antibody against brain calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type II detects putative conformational changes induced by Ca/sup 2 +/-calmodulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeVine, H. III; Su, J.L.; Sahyoun, N.E.

    1988-08-23

    A mouse monoclonal IgG1 antibody has been generated against the soluble form of the calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type II. This antibody recognizes both the soluble and cytoskeletal forms of the enzyme, requiring Ca/sup 2 +/ for the interaction. Other divalent cations such as Zn/sup 2 +/, Mn/sup 2 +/, Cd/sup 2 +/, Co/sup 2 +/, and Ni/sup 2 +/ will substitute for Ca/sup 2 +/, while Mg/sup 2 +/ and Ba/sup 2 +/ will not. The antibody reacts with both the ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-subunits on Western blots in a similar Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent fashion but with a lower sensitivity. The affinity of the antibody for the kinase is 0.13 nM determined by displacement of /sup 125/I Bolton-Hunter-labeled kinase with unlabeled enzyme. Calmodulin and antibody reciprocally potentiate each other's interaction with the enzyme. This is illustrated both by direct binding studies and by a decrease of the K/sub m app/ for calmodulin and an increase in the V/sub max/ for the autophosphorylation reaction of the enzyme. The antibody thus appears to recognize and stabilize a conformation of the kinase which favors calmodulin binding although it does not itself activate the kinase in the absence of calmodulin. Since the M/sub r/ 30,000 catalytic fragment of the kinase is not immunoreactive, either the antibody combining site of the kinase must be present in the noncatalytic portion of the protein along with the calmodulin binding site or proteolysis interferes with the putative Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent conformational change. Thus, monoclonal antibodies can be useful tools in elucidating the mechanism by which Ca/sup 2 +/ and calmodulin act on the kinase molecule.

  13. Behavioral modulation of neuronal calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II activity: differential effects on nicotine-induced spinal and supraspinal antinociception in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damaj, M Imad

    2007-10-15

    Recent studies have implicated the involvement of Ca(2+)-dependent mechanisms, in particular calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaM kinase II) in nicotine-induced antinociception using the tail-flick test. The spinal cord was suggested as a possible site of this involvement. The present study was undertaken to investigate the hypothesis that similar mechanisms exist for nicotine-induced antinociception in the hot-plate test, a response thought to be centrally mediated. In order to assess these mechanisms, i.c.v. administered CaM kinase II inhibitors were evaluated for their effects on antinociception produced by either i.c.v. or s.c. administration of nicotine in both tests. In addition, nicotine's analgesic effects were tested in mice lacking half of their CaM kinase II (CaM kinase II heterozygous) and compare it to their wild-type counterparts. Our results showed that although structurally unrelated CaM kinase II inhibitors blocked nicotine's effects in the tail-flick test in a dose-related manner, they failed to block the hot-plate responses. In addition, the antinociceptive effects of systemic nicotine in the tail-flick but not the hot-plate test were significantly reduced in CaM kinase II heterozygous mice. These observations indicate that in contrast to the tail-flick response, the mechanism of nicotine-induced antinociception in the hot-plate test is not mediated primarily via CaM kinase II-dependent mechanisms at the supraspinal level.

  14. Phosphoproteomic analysis of protein kinase C signaling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals Slt2 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent phosphorylation of eisosome core components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascaraque, Victoria; Hernáez, María Luisa; Jiménez-Sánchez, María; Hansen, Rasmus; Gil, Concha; Martín, Humberto; Cid, Víctor J; Molina, María

    2013-03-01

    The cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway of the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been thoroughly studied as a paradigm of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. It consists of a classic MAPK module comprising the Bck1 MAPK kinase kinase, two redundant MAPK kinases (Mkk1 and Mkk2), and the Slt2 MAPK. This module is activated under a variety of stimuli related to cell wall homeostasis by Pkc1, the only member of the protein kinase C family in budding yeast. Quantitative phosphoproteomics based on stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture is a powerful tool for globally studying protein phosphorylation. Here we report an analysis of the yeast phosphoproteome upon overexpression of a PKC1 hyperactive allele that specifically activates CWI MAPK signaling in the absence of external stimuli. We found 82 phosphopeptides originating from 43 proteins that showed enhanced phosphorylation in these conditions. The MAPK S/T-P target motif was significantly overrepresented in these phosphopeptides. Hyperphosphorylated proteins provide putative novel targets of the Pkc1-cell wall integrity pathway involved in diverse functions such as the control of gene expression, protein synthesis, cytoskeleton maintenance, DNA repair, and metabolism. Remarkably, five components of the plasma-membrane-associated protein complex known as eisosomes were found among the up-regulated proteins. We show here that Pkc1-induced phosphorylation of the eisosome core components Pil1 and Lsp1 was not exerted directly by Pkc1, but involved signaling through the Slt2 MAPK module.

  15. Loss of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 from parvalbumin interneurons leads to hyperinhibition, decreased anxiety, and memory impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudenko, Andrii; Seo, Jinsoo; Hu, Ji; Su, Susan C; de Anda, Froylan Calderon; Durak, Omer; Ericsson, Maria; Carlén, Marie; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2015-02-11

    Perturbations in fast-spiking parvalbumin (PV) interneurons are hypothesized to be a major component of various neuropsychiatric disorders; however, the mechanisms regulating PV interneurons remain mostly unknown. Recently, cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) has been shown to function as a major regulator of synaptic plasticity. Here, we demonstrate that genetic ablation of Cdk5 in PV interneurons in mouse brain leads to an increase in GABAergic neurotransmission and impaired synaptic plasticity. PVCre;fCdk5 mice display a range of behavioral abnormalities, including decreased anxiety and memory impairment. Our results reveal a central role of Cdk5 expressed in PV interneurons in gating inhibitory neurotransmission and underscore the importance of such regulation during behavioral tasks. Our findings suggest that Cdk5 can be considered a promising therapeutic target in a variety of conditions attributed to inhibitory interneuronal dysfunction, such as epilepsy, anxiety disorders, and schizophrenia.

  16. Neurobehavioral phenotype in cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 syndrome: Case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annio Posar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenotype of cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5 syndrome includes Rett syndrome variant with early onset seizures, early onset epileptic encephalopathy; and severe developmental delay. Autistic features have often been reported in literature, but detailed reports of the behavior of these individuals are lacking. We describe the clinical picture of a girl aged 15 years 9 months affected by CDKL5 syndrome, with special attention to the neurobehavioral phenotype. The evaluation showed, apart from a profound intellectual disability, the presence of atypical features of behavior, mainly in relating to people, in imitation, and in verbal and nonverbal communication, thus justifying the diagnosis of comorbid autism spectrum disorder. A formal assessment of the behavior, through appropriate tools, is necessary to choose the most appropriate rehabilitative intervention and to characterize in more detail the CDKL5 syndrome phenotype. We propose a testing protocol for the neurobehavioral assessment of these patients.

  17. MDM2 Inhibitor, Nutlin 3a, Induces p53 Dependent Autophagy in Acute Leukemia by AMP Kinase Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautam Borthakur

    Full Text Available MDM2 (mouse double minute 2 inhibitors that activate p53 and induce apoptosis in a non-genotoxic manner are in clinical development for treatment of leukemias. P53 can modulate other programmed cell death pathways including autophagy both transcriptionally and non-transcriptionally. We investigated autophagy induction in acute leukemia by Nutlin 3a, a first-in-class MDM2 inhibitor. Nutlin 3a induced autophagy in a p53 dependent manner and transcriptional activation of AMP kinase (AMPK is critical, as this effect is abrogated in AMPK -/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Nutlin 3a induced autophagy appears to be pro-apoptotic as pharmacological (bafilomycin or genetic inhibition (BECLIN1 knockdown of autophagy impairs apoptosis induced by Nutlin 3a.

  18. Mutational analysis of the coding regions of the genes encoding protein kinase B-alpha and -beta, phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1, phosphatase targeting to glycogen, protein phosphatase inhibitor-1, and glycogenin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, L; Fjordvang, H; Rasmussen, S K

    1999-01-01

    be caused by genetic variability in the genes encoding proteins shown by biochemical evidence to be involved in insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis in skeletal muscle. In 70 insulin-resistant Danish NIDDM patients, mutational analysis by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction-single strand...... conformation polymorphism-heteroduplex analysis was performed on genomic DNA or skeletal muscle-derived cDNAs encoding glycogenin, protein phosphatase inhibitor-1, phophatase targeting to glycogen, protein kinase B-alpha and -beta, and the phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1. Although a number...

  19. A kinome screen identifies checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1 as a sensitizer for RRM1-dependent gemcitabine efficacy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhou

    Full Text Available Gemcitabine is among the most efficacious and widely used antimetabolite agents. Its molecular targets are ribonucleotide reductase M1 (RRM1 and elongating DNA. Acquired and de novo resistance as a result of RRM1 overexpression are major obstacles to therapeutic efficacy. We deployed a synthetic lethality screen to investigate if knockdown of 87 selected protein kinases by siRNA could overcome RRM1-dependent gemcitabine resistance in high and low RRM1-expressing model systems. The models included genetically RRM1-modified lung and breast cancer cell lines, cell lines with gemcitabine-induced RRM1 overexpression, and a series of naturally gemcitabine-resistant cell lines. Lead molecular targets were validated by determination of differential gemcitabine activity using cell lines with and without target knock down, and by assessing synergistic activity between gemcitabine and an inhibitor of the lead target. CHK1 was identified has the kinase with the most significant and robust interaction, and it was validated using AZD7762, a small-molecule ATP-competitive inhibitor of CHK1 activation. Synergism between CHK1 inhibition and RRM1-dependent gemcitabine efficacy was observed in cells with high RRM1 levels, while antagonism was observed in cells with low RRM1 levels. In addition, four cell lines with natural gemcitabine resistance demonstrated improved gemcitabine efficacy after CHK1 inhibition. In tumor specimens from 187 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer, total CHK1 and RRM1 in situ protein levels were significantly (p = 0.003 and inversely correlated. We conclude that inhibition of CHK1 may have its greatest clinical utility in malignancies where gemcitabine resistance is a result of elevated RRM1 levels. We also conclude that CHK1 inhibition in tumors with low RRM1 levels may be detrimental to gemcitabine efficacy.

  20. Expression of a TGF-{beta} regulated cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor in normal and immortalized airway epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tierney, L.A.; Bloomfield, C.; Johnson, N.F. [and others

    1995-12-01

    Tumors arising from epithelial cells, including lung cancers are frequently resistant to factors that regulate growth and differentiation in normal in normal cells. Once such factor is transforming growth factor-{Beta} (TGF-{Beta}). Escape from the growth-inhibitory effects of TGF-{Beta} is thought to be a key step in the transformation of airway epithelial cells. most lung cancer cell lines require serum for growth. In contrast, normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells are exquisitely sensitive to growth-inhibitory and differentiating effects of TGF-{Beta}. The recent identification of a novel cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p15{sup INK4B}, which is regulated by TGF-{Beta}, suggests a mechanism by which TGF-{Beta} mediates growth arrest in NHBE cells. The purpose of this study was two-fold: (1) to determine if p15{sup INK4B} is induced by TGF-{Beta} in NHBE cells or immortalized bronchial epithelial (R.1) cells and if that induction corresponds to a G1/S cell-cycle arrest; (2) to determine the temporal relationship between p15{sup INK4B} induction, cell-cycle arrest, and the phosphorylation state of the pRB because it is thought that p15{sup INK4B} acts indirectly by preventing phosphorylation of the RB gene product. In this study, expression of p15{sup INK4B} was examined in NHBE cells and R.1 cells at different time intervals following TGF-{Beta} treatment. The expression of this kinase inhibitor and its relationship to the cell and the pRb phosphorylation state were examined in cells that were both sensitive (NHBE) and resistant (R.1) to the effects of TGF-{Beta}. These results suggest that the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p15{sup INK4B}, is involved in airway epithelial cell differentiation and that loss or reduction of expression plays a role in the resistance of transformed or neoplastic cells to the growth-inhibitory effects of TGF-{Beta}.

  1. Bryostatin, an activator of the calcium phospholipid-dependent protein kinase, blocks phorbol ester-induced differentiation of human promyelocytic leukemia cells HL-60

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraft, A.S.; Smith, J.B.; Berkow, R.L.

    1986-03-01

    Phorbol esters bind to and activate a calcium phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (C kinase). Some researchers believe that activation of C kinase is necessary for the induction of phorbol ester biologic effects. The authors' research indicates that bryostatin, a macrocyclic lactone that binds to the phorbol ester receptor in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes, also binds to this receptor in the human promyelocytic leukemia cell line, HL-60. Bryostatin activates partially purified C kinase from HL-60 cells in vitro, and when applied to HL-60 cells in vivo, it decreases measurable cytoplasmic C kinase activity. Unlike the phorbol esters, bryostatin is unable to induce a macrophage-like differentiation of HL-60 cells; however, bryostatin, in a dose-dependent fashion, blocks phorbol ester-induced differentiation of HL-60 cells and, if applied within 48 hr of phorbol esters, halts further differentiation. These results suggest that activation of the C kinase by some agents is not sufficient for induction of HL-60 cell differentiation and imply that some of the biologic effects of phorbol esters may occur through a more complex mechanism than previously thought.

  2. Nicotine reward and affective nicotine withdrawal signs are attenuated in calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV knockout mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kia J Jackson

    Full Text Available The influx of Ca(2+ through calcium-permeable nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs leads to activation of various downstream processes that may be relevant to nicotine-mediated behaviors. The calcium activated protein, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV phosphorylates the downstream transcription factor cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB, which mediates nicotine responses; however the role of CaMKIV in nicotine dependence is unknown. Given the proposed role of CaMKIV in CREB activation, we hypothesized that CaMKIV might be a crucial molecular component in the development of nicotine dependence. Using male CaMKIV genetically modified mice, we found that nicotine reward is attenuated in CaMKIV knockout (-/- mice, but cocaine reward is enhanced in these mice. CaMKIV protein levels were also increased in the nucleus accumbens of C57Bl/6 mice after nicotine reward. In a nicotine withdrawal assessment, anxiety-related behavior, but not somatic signs or the hyperalgesia response are attenuated in CaMKIV -/- mice. To complement our animal studies, we also conducted a human genetic association analysis and found that variants in the CaMKIV gene are associated with a protective effect against nicotine dependence. Taken together, our results support an important role for CaMKIV in nicotine reward, and suggest that CaMKIV has opposing roles in nicotine and cocaine reward. Further, CaMKIV mediates affective, but not physical nicotine withdrawal signs, and has a protective effect against nicotine dependence in human genetic association studies. These findings further indicate the importance of calcium-dependent mechanisms in mediating behaviors associated with drugs of abuse.

  3. Nicotine reward and affective nicotine withdrawal signs are attenuated in calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Kia J; Sanjakdar, Sarah S; Chen, Xiangning; Damaj, M Imad

    2012-01-01

    The influx of Ca(2+) through calcium-permeable nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) leads to activation of various downstream processes that may be relevant to nicotine-mediated behaviors. The calcium activated protein, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV) phosphorylates the downstream transcription factor cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB), which mediates nicotine responses; however the role of CaMKIV in nicotine dependence is unknown. Given the proposed role of CaMKIV in CREB activation, we hypothesized that CaMKIV might be a crucial molecular component in the development of nicotine dependence. Using male CaMKIV genetically modified mice, we found that nicotine reward is attenuated in CaMKIV knockout (-/-) mice, but cocaine reward is enhanced in these mice. CaMKIV protein levels were also increased in the nucleus accumbens of C57Bl/6 mice after nicotine reward. In a nicotine withdrawal assessment, anxiety-related behavior, but not somatic signs or the hyperalgesia response are attenuated in CaMKIV -/- mice. To complement our animal studies, we also conducted a human genetic association analysis and found that variants in the CaMKIV gene are associated with a protective effect against nicotine dependence. Taken together, our results support an important role for CaMKIV in nicotine reward, and suggest that CaMKIV has opposing roles in nicotine and cocaine reward. Further, CaMKIV mediates affective, but not physical nicotine withdrawal signs, and has a protective effect against nicotine dependence in human genetic association studies. These findings further indicate the importance of calcium-dependent mechanisms in mediating behaviors associated with drugs of abuse.

  4. Neural cell adhesion molecule-stimulated neurite outgrowth depends on activation of protein kinase C and the Ras-mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolkova, K; Novitskaya, V; Pedersen, N

    2000-01-01

    transfected with expression plasmids encoding constitutively active forms of Ras, Raf, MAP kinase kinases MEK1 and 2, dominant negative forms of Ras and Raf, and the FAK-related nonkinase. Alternatively, PC12-E2 cells were submitted to treatment with antibodies to the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor....... Arachidonic acid rescued cells treated with antibodies to the FGF receptor or the PLC inhibitor, but not cells in which the activity of PKC, p59(fyn), FAK, Ras, or MEK was inhibited. Interaction of NCAM with a synthetic NCAM peptide ligand, known to induce neurite outgrowth, was shown to stimulate...

  5. Dependence of myosin-ATPase on structure bound creatine kinase in cardiac myfibrils from rainbow trout and freshwater turtle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagensen, L.; Jensen, D.H.; Gesser, Hans

    2008-01-01

    by the pyruvate kinase reaction alone or together with the amount of creatine formed, when myofibrillar bound creatine kinase was activated with phosphocreatine. The steady-state concentration of ADP in the solution was varied through the activity of pyruvate kinase added to the solution. For rainbow trout...... was restored by adding creatine kinase to the solution. Hence, the results suggest that myofibril-bound creatine kinase is needed to fully activate the myosin-ATPase activity in hearts from ectothermic vertebrates despite their low energy turn-over relative to endothermic species....

  6. Chronic ethanol intake-induced changes in open-field behavior and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase Ⅳ expression in nucleus accumbens of rats: naloxone reversal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing LI; Wei-liang BIAN; Gui-qin XIE; Sheng-zhong CUI; Mei-ling WU; Yue-hua LI; Ling-li QUE; Xiao-ru YUAN

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of chronic ethanol intake on the locomotor activity and the levels of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase Ⅳ (CaM kinase Ⅳ) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) of rats. Simultaneously, the effects of non-selective opioid antagonist (naloxone) on the CaM kinase Ⅳ expression in the NAc and ethanol consumption of rats were also observed. Methods: Ethanol was administered in drinking water at the concentrations of 6% (v/v), for 28 d. The locomotor activity of rats was investigated in the open-field apparatus. CaM kinase Ⅳ levels in the NAc were analyzed using Western blotting. Results: Rats consuming ethanol solution exhibited a significant decrease of ambulation activity, accompanied by a reduced frequency of explorative rearing in an open-field task on d 7 and d 14 of chronic ethanol ingestion, whereas presumed adaptation to the neurological effects of ethanol was observed on d 28. Chronic ethanol intake elicited a significant decrease of the CaM kinase Ⅳ expression in the nuclei, but not in the cytoplasm of the NAc on d 28. Naloxone treatment significantly attenu-ated ethanol intake of rats and antagonized the decrease of CaM kinase Ⅳ in the nuclei of NAc neurons. The cytosolic CaM kinase Ⅳ protein levels of the NAc also increased in rats exposed to ethanol plus naloxone. Conclusion: Chronic ethanol intake-induced changes in explorative behavior is mediated at least partly by changes in CaM kinase Ⅳ signaling in the nuclei of the NAc, and naloxone attenuates ethanol consumption through antagonizing the downregulation of CaM kinase Ⅳ in the NAc.

  7. Regulators of cyclin-dependent kinases are crucial for maintaining genome integrity in S phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Halfdan; Nähse, Viola; Larsen, Marie Sofie Yoo;

    2010-01-01

    are important negative regulators of CDK1 and -2. Strikingly, WEE1 depletion rapidly induced DNA damage in S phase in newly replicated DNA, which was accompanied by a marked increase in single-stranded DNA. This DNA damage is dependent on CDK1 and -2 as well as the replication proteins MCM2 and CDT1 but not CDC...

  8. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 Regulates Dendritic Spine Formation and Maintenance of Cortical Neuron in the Mouse Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Naoki; He, Xiaojuan; Sasamoto, Kodai; Mishiba, Tomohide; Ohshima, Toshio

    2016-03-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) activity is dependent on its association with 1 of 2 neuron-specific activators, p35 or p39. Cdk5 and its activators play an important role in brain development as well as higher functions like synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. Reduction in p35 was reported in postmortem schizophrenia brain, in which reduced dendritic spine density was observed. Previous in vitro experiments have shown that Cdk5 is involved in dendritic spine formation, although in vivo evidence is limited. We examined dendritic spine formation in inducible-p35 conditional knockout (p35 cKO); p39 KO mice. When we deleted the p35 gene either during early postnatal days or at adult stage, we observed reduced spine densities of layer V neurons in the cerebral cortex and CA1 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus. We further generated CA1-specific p35 conditional knockout (CA1-p35 cKO) mice and also CA1-p35 cKO; p39 KO mice in which have specific deletion of p35 in the CA1 region of hippocampus. We found a greater reduction in spine densities in CA1 pyramidal neurons in CA1-p35 cKO; p39 KO mice than in CA1-p35 cKO mice. These results indicate that dendritic spine formation and neuronal maintenance are dependent on Cdk5 activity.

  9. D6 PROTEIN KINASE activates auxin transport-dependent growth and PIN-FORMED phosphorylation at the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Inês C R; Zourelidou, Melina; Willige, Björn C; Weller, Benjamin; Schwechheimer, Claus

    2014-06-23

    The directed cell-to-cell transport of the phytohormone auxin by efflux and influx transporters is essential for proper plant growth and development. Like auxin efflux facilitators of the PIN-FORMED (PIN) family, D6 PROTEIN KINASE (D6PK) from Arabidopsis thaliana localizes to the basal plasma membrane of many cells, and evidence exists that D6PK may directly phosphorylate PINs. We find that D6PK is a membrane-bound protein that is associated with either the basal domain of the plasma membrane or endomembranes. Inhibition of the trafficking regulator GNOM leads to a rapid internalization of D6PK to endomembranes. Interestingly, the dissociation of D6PK from the plasma membrane is also promoted by auxin. Surprisingly, we find that auxin transport-dependent tropic responses are critically and reversibly controlled by D6PK and D6PK-dependent PIN phosphorylation at the plasma membrane. We conclude that D6PK abundance at the plasma membrane and likely D6PK-dependent PIN phosphorylation are prerequisites for PIN-mediated auxin transport.

  10. Pavlovian fear conditioning regulates Thr286 autophosphorylation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II at lateral amygdala synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Sarina M; Farb, Claudia R; Bauer, Elizabeth P; LeDoux, Joseph E; Schafe, Glenn E

    2004-03-31

    Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) plays a critical role in synaptic plasticity and memory formation in a variety of learning systems and species. The present experiments examined the role of CaMKII in the circuitry underlying pavlovian fear conditioning. First, we reveal by immunocytochemical and tract-tracing methods that alphaCaMKII is postsynaptic to auditory thalamic inputs and colocalized with the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor. Furthermore, we show that fear conditioning results in an increase of the autophosphorylated (active) form of alphaCaMKII in lateral amygdala (LA) spines. Next, we demonstrate that intra-amygdala infusion of a CaMK inhibitor, 1-[NO-bis-1,5-isoquinolinesulfonyl]-N-methyl-l-tyrosyl-4-phenylpiperazine, KN-62, dose-dependently impairs the acquisition, but not the expression, of auditory and contextual fear conditioning. Finally, in electrophysiological experiments, we demonstrate that an NMDA receptor-dependent form of long-term potentiation at thalamic input synapses to the LA is impaired by bath application of KN-62 in vitro. Together, the results of these experiments provide the first comprehensive view of the role of CaMKII in the amygdala during fear conditioning.

  11. JNK mitogen-activated protein kinase limits calcium-dependent chloride secretion across colonic epithelial cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donnellan, Fergal

    2010-01-01

    Neuroimmune agonists induce epithelial Cl(-) secretion through elevations in intracellular Ca2+ or cAMP. Previously, we demonstrated that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) transactivation and subsequent ERK MAPK activation limits secretory responses to Ca2+-dependent, but not cAMP-dependent, agonists. Although JNK MAPKs are also expressed in epithelial cells, their role in regulating transport function is unknown. Here, we investigated the potential role for JNK in regulating Cl(-) secretion in T(84) colonic epithelial cells. Western blot analysis revealed that a prototypical Ca2+-dependent secretagogue, carbachol (CCh; 100 microM), induced phosphorylation of both the 46-kDa and 54-kDa isoforms of JNK. This effect was mimicked by thapsigargin (TG), which specifically elevates intracellular Ca2+, but not by forskolin (FSK; 10 microM), which elevates cAMP. CCh-induced JNK phosphorylation was attenuated by the EGFR inhibitor, tyrphostin-AG1478 (1 microM). Pretreatment of voltage-clamped T(84) cells with SP600125 (2 microM), a specific JNK inhibitor, potentiated secretory responses to both CCh and TG but not to FSK. The effects of SP600125 on CCh-induced secretion were not additive with those of the ERK inhibitor, PD98059. Finally, in apically permeabilized T(84) cell monolayers, SP600125 potentiated CCh-induced K+ conductances but not Na+\\/K+ATPase activity. These data demonstrate a novel role for JNK MAPK in regulating Ca2+ but not cAMP-dependent epithelial Cl(-) secretion. JNK activation is mediated by EGFR transactivation and exerts its antisecretory effects through inhibition of basolateral K+ channels. These data further our understanding of mechanisms regulating epithelial secretion and underscore the potential for exploitation of MAPK-dependent signaling in treatment of intestinal transport disorders.

  12. cGMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Type I Is Implicated in the Regulation of the Timing and Quality of Sleep and Wakefulness

    OpenAIRE

    Sonja Langmesser; Paul Franken; Susanne Feil; Yann Emmenegger; Urs Albrecht; Robert Feil

    2009-01-01

    Many effects of nitric oxide (NO) are mediated by the activation of guanylyl cyclases and subsequent production of the second messenger cyclic guanosine-3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP). cGMP activates cGMP-dependent protein kinases (PRKGs), which can therefore be considered downstream effectors of NO signaling. Since NO is thought to be involved in the regulation of both sleep and circadian rhythms, we analyzed these two processes in mice deficient for cGMP-dependent protein kinase type I (PRKG1) ...

  13. Calcium-dependent protein kinases responsible for the phosphorylation of a bZIP transcription factor FD crucial for the florigen complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Nozomi; Sasabe, Michiko; Endo, Motomu; Machida, Yasunori; Araki, Takashi

    2015-02-09

    Appropriate timing of flowering is critical for reproductive success and necessarily involves complex genetic regulatory networks. A mobile floral signal, called florigen, is a key molecule in this process, and flowering locus T (FT) protein is its major component in Arabidopsis. FT is produced in leaves, but promotes the floral transition in the shoot apex, where it forms a complex with a basic region/leucine-zipper (bZIP) transcription factor, FD. Formation of the florigen complex depends on the supposed phosphorylation of FD; hitherto, however, the responsible protein kinase(s) have not been identified. In this study, we prepared protein extracts from shoot apices of plants around the floral transition, and detected a protein kinase activity that phosphorylates a threonine residue at position 282 of FD (FD T282), which is a crucial residue for the complex formation with FT via 14-3-3. The kinase activity was calcium-dependent. Subsequent biochemical, cellular, and genetic analyses showed that three calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) efficiently phosphorylate FD T282. Two of them (CPK6 and CPK33) are expressed in shoot apical meristem and directly interact with FD, suggesting they have redundant functions. The loss of function of one CDPK (CPK33) resulted in a weak but significant late-flowering phenotype.

  14. Cardiac hyporesponsiveness in severe sepsis is associated with nitric oxide-dependent activation of G protein receptor kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal-Secco, Daniela; DalBó, Silvia; Lautherbach, Natalia E S; Gava, Fábio N; Celes, Mara R N; Benedet, Patricia O; Souza, Adriana H; Akinaga, Juliana; Lima, Vanessa; Silva, Katiussia P; Kiguti, Luiz Ricardo A; Rossi, Marcos A; Kettelhut, Isis C; Pupo, André S; Cunha, Fernando Q; Assreuy, Jamil

    2017-07-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase isoform 2 (GRK2) has a critical role in physiological and pharmacological responses to endogenous and exogenous substances. Sepsis causes an important cardiovascular dysfunction in which nitric oxide (NO) has a relevant role. The present study aimed to assess the putative effect of inducible NO synthase (NOS2)-derived NO on the activity of GRK2 in the context of septic cardiac dysfunction. C57BL/6 mice were submitted to severe septic injury by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). Heart function was assessed by isolated and perfused heart, echocardiography, and β-adrenergic receptor binding. GRK2 was determined by immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis in the heart and isolated cardiac myocytes. Sepsis increased NOS2 expression in the heart, increased plasma nitrite + nitrate levels, and reduced isoproterenol-induced isolated ventricle contraction, whole heart tension development, and β-adrenergic receptor density. Treatment with 1400W or with GRK2 inhibitor prevented CLP-induced cardiac hyporesponsiveness 12 and 24 h after CLP. Increased labeling of total and phosphorylated GRK2 was detected in hearts after CLP. With treatment of 1400W or in hearts taken from septic NOS2 knockout mice, the activation of GRK2 was reduced. 1400W or GRK2 inhibitor reduced mortality, improved echocardiographic cardiac parameters, and prevented organ damage. Therefore, during sepsis, NOS2-derived NO increases GRK2, which leads to a reduction in β-adrenergic receptor density, contributing to the heart dysfunction. Isolated cardiac myocyte data indicate that NO acts through the soluble guanylyl cyclase/cGMP/PKG pathway. GRK2 inhibition may be a potential therapeutic target in sepsis-induced cardiac dysfunction.NEW & NOTEWORTHY The main novelty presented here is to show that septic shock induces cardiac hyporesponsiveness to isoproterenol by a mechanism dependent on nitric oxide and mediated by G protein-coupled receptor kinase isoform 2. Therefore

  15. Novel mutations in cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) gene in Indian cases of Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Dhanjit Kumar; Mehta, Bhakti; Menon, Shyla R; Raha, Sarbani; Udani, Vrajesh

    2013-03-01

    Rett syndrome is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder, almost exclusively affecting females and characterized by a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. Both the classic and atypical forms of Rett syndrome are primarily due to mutations in the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene. Mutations in the X-linked cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) gene have been identified in patients with atypical Rett syndrome, X-linked infantile spasms sharing common features of generally early-onset seizures and mental retardation. CDKL5 is known as serine/threonine protein kinase 9 (STK9) and is mapped to the Xp22 region. It has a conserved serine/threonine kinase domain within its amino terminus and a large C-terminal region. Disease-causing mutations are distributed in both the amino terminal domain and in the large C-terminal domain. We have screened the CDKL5 gene in 44 patients with atypical Rett syndrome who had tested negative for MECP2 gene mutations and have identified 6 sequence variants, out of which three were novel and three known mutations. Two of these novel mutations p.V966I and p.A1011V were missense and p.H589H a silent mutation. Other known mutations identified were p.V999M, p.Q791P and p.T734A. Sequence homology for all the mutations revealed that the two mutations (p.Q791P and p.T734A) were conserved across species. This indicated the importance of these residues in structure and function of the protein. The damaging effects of these mutations were analysed in silico using PolyPhen-2 online software. The PolyPhen-2 scores of p.Q791P and p.T734A were 0.998 and 0.48, revealing that these mutations could be deleterious and might have potential functional effect. All other mutations had a low score suggesting that they might not alter the activity of CDKL5. We have also analysed the position of the mutations in the CDKL5 protein and found that all the mutations were present in the C-terminal domain of the protein. The C-terminal domain is required for

  16. The calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibitor KN-93 protects rat cerebral cortical neurons from N-methyl-D-aspartic acid-induced injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuewen Liu; Cui Ma; Ruixian Xing; Weiwei Zhang; Buxian Tian; Xidong Li; Qiushi Li; Yanhui Zhang

    2013-01-01

    In this study, primary cultured cerebral cortical neurons of Sprague-Dawley neonatal rats were treated with 0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 μM calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibitor KN-93 after 50 μM N-methyl-D-aspartic acid-induced injury. Results showed that, compared with N-methyl-Daspartic acid-induced injury neurons, the activity of cells markedly increased, apoptosis was significantly reduced, leakage of lactate dehydrogenase decreased, and intracellular Ca2+ concentrations in neurons reduced after KN-93 treatment. The expression of caspase-3, phosphorylated calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and total calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II protein decreased after KN-93 treatment. And the effect was apparent at a dose of 1.0 μM KN-93. Experimental findings suggest that KN-93 can induce a dose-dependent neuroprotective effect, and that the underlying mechanism may be related to the down-regulation of caspase-3 and calmodulin- dependent protein kinase II expression.

  17. Protein kinase C-dependent signaling controls the midgut epithelial barrier to malaria parasite infection in anopheline mosquitoes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazzy Pakpour

    Full Text Available Anopheline mosquitoes are the primary vectors of parasites in the genus Plasmodium, the causative agents of malaria. Malaria parasites undergo a series of complex transformations upon ingestion by the mosquito host. During this process, the physical barrier of the midgut epithelium, along with innate immune defenses, functionally restrict parasite development. Although these defenses have been studied for some time, the regulatory factors that control them are poorly understood. The protein kinase C (PKC gene family consists of serine/threonine kinases that serve as central signaling molecules and regulators of a broad spectrum of cellular processes including epithelial barrier function and immunity. Indeed, PKCs are highly conserved, ranging from 7 isoforms in Drosophila to 16 isoforms in mammals, yet none have been identified in mosquitoes. Despite conservation of the PKC gene family and their potential as targets for transmission-blocking strategies for malaria, no direct connections between PKCs, the mosquito immune response or epithelial barrier integrity are known. Here, we identify and characterize six PKC gene family members--PKCδ, PKCε, PKCζ, PKD, PKN, and an indeterminate conventional PKC--in Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles stephensi. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses of the anopheline PKCs support most subfamily assignments. All six PKCs are expressed in the midgut epithelia of A. gambiae and A. stephensi post-blood feeding, indicating availability for signaling in a tissue that is critical for malaria parasite development. Although inhibition of PKC enzymatic activity decreased NF-κB-regulated anti-microbial peptide expression in mosquito cells in vitro, PKC inhibition had no effect on expression of a panel of immune genes in the midgut epithelium in vivo. PKC inhibition did, however, significantly increase midgut barrier integrity and decrease development of P. falciparum oocysts in A. stephensi, suggesting that PKC-dependent

  18. WP1066 disrupts Janus kinase-2 and induces caspase-dependent apoptosis in acute myelogenous leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Faderl, Stefan; Van, Quin; Koch, Patricia; Harris, David; Liu, Zhiming; Hazan-Halevy, Inbal; Wang, Yongtao; Kantarjian, Hagop M; Priebe, Waldemar; Estrov, Zeev

    2007-12-01

    Several cytokines and growth factors that stimulate the proliferation of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells transduce their signals by activating the transcription factor Janus-activated kinase 2 (JAK2). Accordingly, the inhibition of JAK2 or of its downstream signaling pathways suppresses the proliferation of AML cells. Because (E)-3(6-bromopyridin-2-yl)-2-cyano-N-((S0-1-phenylethyl)acrylamide) (WP1066) is a novel analogue of the JAK2 inhibitor AG490, we tested its activity in AML cells and investigated its mechanism of action. Using clonogenic assays, we found that although WP1066 had a marginal effect on normal marrow progenitors, it inhibited the proliferation of AML colony-forming cells obtained from patients with newly diagnosed AML and that of the AML cell lines OCIM2 and K562. WP1066 inhibited OCIM2 cell multiplication by inducing accumulation of cells at the G(0)-G(1) phase of the cell cycle. Similar to its parent compound AG490, WP1066 inhibited the phosphorylation of JAK2, but unlike AG490, WP1066 also degraded JAK2 protein, thereby blocking its downstream signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) and phosphoinositide-3-kinase pathways. These effects resulted in the activation of the caspase pathway. Incubation of both OCIM2 and K562 cells with WP1066 activated caspase-3, induced cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and caused caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death. Thus, WP1066 is a potent JAK2 inhibitor whose effects in AML and other hematologic malignancies merit further investigation.

  19. A nonsense mutation in cGMP-dependent type II protein kinase (PRKG2) causes dwarfism in American Angus cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koltes, James E; Mishra, Bishnu P; Kumar, Dinesh; Kataria, Ranjit S; Totir, Liviu R; Fernando, Rohan L; Cobbold, Rowland; Steffen, David; Coppieters, Wouter; Georges, Michel; Reecy, James M

    2009-11-17

    Historically, dwarfism was the major genetic defect in U.S. beef cattle. Aggressive culling and sire testing were used to minimize its prevalence; however, neither of these practices can eliminate a recessive genetic defect. We assembled a 4-generation pedigree to identify the mutation underlying dwarfism in American Angus cattle. An adaptation of the Elston-Steward algorithm was used to overcome small pedigree size and missing genotypes. The dwarfism locus was fine-mapped to BTA6 between markers AFR227 and BM4311. Four candidate genes were sequenced, revealing a nonsense mutation in exon 15 of cGMP-dependant type II protein kinase (PRKG2). This C/T transition introduced a stop codon (R678X) that truncated 85 C-terminal amino acids, including a large portion of the kinase domain. Of the 75 mutations discovered in this region, only this mutation was 100% concordant with the recessive pattern of inheritance in affected and carrier individuals (log of odds score = 6.63). Previous research has shown that PRKG2 regulates SRY (sex-determining region Y) box 9 (SOX9)-mediated transcription of collagen 2 (COL2). We evaluated the ability of wild-type (WT) or R678X PRKG2 to regulate COL2 expression in cell culture. Real-time PCR results confirmed that COL2 is overexpressed in cells that overexpressed R678X PRKG2 as compared with WT PRKG2. Furthermore, COL2 and COL10 mRNA expression was increased in dwarf cattle compared with unaffected cattle. These experiments indicate that the R678X mutation is functional, resulting in a loss of PRKG2 regulation of COL2 and COL10 mRNA expression. Therefore, we present PRKG2 R678X as a causative mutation for dwarfism cattle.

  20. ErbB3 ablation impairs phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT-dependent mammary tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Rebecca S.; Garrett, Joan T.; Sánchez, Violeta; Stanford, Jamie C.; Young, Christian; Chakravarty, Anindita; Rinehart, Cammie; Zhang, Yixian; Wu, Yaming; Greenberger, Lee; Horak, Ivan D.; Arteaga, Carlos L.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The ErbB receptor family member ErbB3 has been implicated in breast cancer growth but it has yet to be determined whether its disruption is therapeutically valuable. In a mouse model of mammary carcinoma driven by the polyomavirus middle T (PyVmT) oncogene, the ErbB2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor lapatinib reduced the activation of ErbB3 and Akt along with tumor cell growth. In this phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)-dependent tumor model, ErbB2 is part of a complex containing PyVmT, p85 (PI3K), ErbB3, and Src, that is disrupted by treatment with lapatinib. Thus, full engagement of PI3K/Akt by ErbB2 in this oncogene-induced mouse tumor model may involve its ability to dimerize with and phosphorylate ErbB3, which itself directly binds PI3K. Here we report that ErbB3 is critical for PI3K/AKT-driven tumor formation triggered by the PyVmT oncogene. Tissue-specific, Cre-mediated deletion of ErbB3 reduced Akt phosphorylation, primary tumor growth and pulmonary metastasis. Further EZN-3920, a chemically stabilized antisense oligonucleotide that targets the ErbB3 mRNA in vivo, produced similar effects while causing no mouse toxicity. Our findings offer further preclinical evidence that ErbB3 ablation may be therapeutically effective in tumors where ErbB3 engages PI3K/Akt signaling. PMID:21482676

  1. SGK1-Sensitive Regulation of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor 1B (p27 in Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Voelkl

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase SGK1 participates in the orchestration of cardiac hypertrophy and remodeling. Signaling linking SGK1 activity to cardiac remodeling is, however, incompletely understood. SGK1 phosphorylation targets include cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (p27, a protein which suppresses cardiac hypertrophy. The present study explored how effects of SGK1 on nuclear p27 localization might modulate the hypertrophic response in cardiomyocytes. Methods: Experiments were performed in HL-1 cardiomyocytes and in SGK1-deficient (sgk1-/- and corresponding wild-type (sgk1+/+ mice following pressure overload by transverse aortic constriction (TAC. Transcript levels were quantified by RT-PCR, protein abundance by Western blotting and protein localization by confocal microscopy. Results: In HL-1 cardiomyocytes, overexpression of constitutively active SGK1 (SGK1S422D but not of inactive SGK1 (SGK1K127N increased significantly the cell size and transcript levels encoding Acta1, a molecular marker of hypertrophy. Those effects were paralleled by almost complete relocation of p27 in the cytoplasm. Treatment of HL-1 cardiomyocytes with isoproterenol was followed by up-regulation of SGK1 expression. Moreover, isoproterenol treatment stimulated the hypertrophic response and was followed by disappearance of p27 from the nuclei, effects prevented by the SGK1 inhibitor EMD638683. The effect of SGK1S422D overexpression on Acta1 mRNA levels was disrupted by overexpression of p27 and of the p27T197A mutant lacking the SGK1 phosphorylation site, but not of the phosphomimetic p27T197D mutant. In sgk1+/+ mice, TAC increased significantly SGK1 and Acta1 mRNA levels and decreased the nuclear to cytoplasmic protein ratio of p27 in cardiac tissue, effects blunted in the sgk1-/- mice. Conclusion: SGK1-induced hypertrophy of cardiomyocytes involves p27 phosphorylation at T197, which fosters cytoplasmic p27 localization.

  2. The Arabidopsis DREB2 genetic pathway is constitutively repressed by basal phosphoinositide-dependent phospholipase C coupled to diacylglycerol kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djafi, Nabila; Vergnolle, Chantal; Cantrel, Catherine; Wietrzyñski, Wojciech; Delage, Elise; Cochet, Françoise; Puyaubert, Juliette; Soubigou-Taconnat, Ludivine; Gey, Delphine; Collin, Sylvie; Balzergue, Sandrine; Zachowski, Alain; Ruelland, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Phosphoinositide-dependent phospholipases C (PI-PLCs) are activated in response to various stimuli. They utilize substrates provided by type III-Phosphatidylinositol-4 kinases (PI4KIII) to produce inositol triphosphate and diacylglycerol (DAG) that is phosphorylated into phosphatidic acid (PA) by DAG-kinases (DGKs). The roles of PI4KIIIs, PI-PLCs, and DGKs in basal signaling are poorly understood. We investigated the control of gene expression by basal PI-PLC pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cells. A transcriptome-wide analysis allowed the identification of genes whose expression was altered by edelfosine, 30 μM wortmannin, or R59022, inhibitors of PI-PLCs, PI4KIIIs, and DGKs, respectively. We found that a gene responsive to one of these molecules is more likely to be similarly regulated by the other two inhibitors. The common action of these agents is to inhibit PA formation, showing that basal PI-PLCs act, in part, on gene expression through their coupling to DGKs. Amongst the genes up-regulated in presence of the inhibitors, were some DREB2 genes, in suspension cells and in seedlings. The DREB2 genes encode transcription factors with major roles in responses to environmental stresses, including dehydration. They bind to C-repeat motifs, known as Drought-Responsive Elements that are indeed enriched in the promoters of genes up-regulated by PI-PLC pathway inhibitors. PA can also be produced by phospholipases D (PLDs). We show that the DREB2 genes that are up-regulated by PI-PLC inhibitors are positively or negatively regulated, or indifferent, to PLD basal activity. Our data show that the DREB2 genetic pathway is constitutively repressed in resting conditions and that DGK coupled to PI-PLC is active in this process, in suspension cells and seedlings. We discuss how this basal negative regulation of DREB2 genes is compatible with their stress-triggered positive regulation.

  3. AM fungal exudates activate MAP kinases in plant cells in dependence from cytosolic Ca(2+) increase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, Doriana; Chiltz, Annick; Lo Schiavo, Fiorella; Pugin, Alain; Bonfante, Paola; Cardinale, Francesca

    2011-09-01

    The molecular dialogue occurring prior to direct contact between the fungal and plant partners of arbuscular-mycorrhizal (AM) symbioses begins with the release of fungal elicitors, so far only partially identified chemically, which can activate specific signaling pathways in the host plant. We show here that the activation of MAPK is also induced by exudates of germinating spores of Gigaspora margarita in cultured cells of the non-leguminous species tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), as well as in those of the model legume Lotus japonicus. MAPK activity peaked about 15 min after the exposure of the host cells to the fungal exudates (FE). FE were also responsible for a rapid and transient increase in free cytosolic Ca(2+) in Nicotiana plumbaginifolia and tobacco cells, and pre-treatment with a Ca(2+)-channel blocker (La(3+)) showed that in these cells, MAPK activation was dependent on the cytosolic Ca(2+) increase. A partial dependence of MAPK activity on the common Sym pathway could be demonstrated for a cell line of L. japonicus defective for LjSym4 and hence unable to establish an AM symbiosis. Our results show that MAPK activation is triggered by an FE-induced cytosolic Ca(2+) transient, and that a Sym genetic determinant acts to modulate the intensity and duration of this activity.

  4. Manassantin A isolated from Saururus chinensis inhibits 5-lipoxygenase-dependent leukotriene C4 generation by blocking mitogen-activated protein kinase activation in mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Su Jeong; Lu, Yue; Kwon, Okyun; Hwangbo, Kyoung; Seo, Chang-Seob; Lee, Seung Ho; Kim, Cheorl-Ho; Chang, Young-Chae; Son, Jong Keun; Chang, Hyeun Wook

    2011-01-01

    In this study, manassantin A (Man A), an herbal medicine isolated from Saururus chinensis (S. chinensis), markedly inhibited 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO)-dependent leukotriene C(4) (LTC(4)) generation in bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) in a concentration-dependent manner. To investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the inhibition of LTC(4) generation by Man A, we assessed the effects of Man A on phosphorylation of cytosolic phospholipase A(2) (cPLA(2)) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Inhibition of LTC(4) generation by Man A was accompanied by a decrease in cPLA(2) phosphorylation, which occurred via the MAPKs including extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase-1/2 (ERK1/2) as well as p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathways. Taken together, the present study suggests the Man A represents a potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of airway allergic-inflammatory diseases.

  5. The catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase induces expression of genes containing cAMP-responsive enhancer elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riabowol, K T; Fink, J S; Gilman, M Z; Walsh, D A; Goodman, R H; Feramisco, J R

    1988-11-03

    Transcriptional regulation of eukaryotic genes by cyclic AMP requires a cAMP-dependent protein kinase (A kinase). Two hypotheses have been proposed to explain how the holoenzyme of the A kinase induces transcription. The regulatory subunits of the A kinase, which bind cAMP and DNA, and have amino-acid homology with the Escherichia coli catabolite activator protein could directly stimulate gene expression. Alternatively, phosphorylation by the catalytic subunits could induce transcription by activating proteins involved in gene transcription. To distinguish between these models, we microinjected purified preparations of the catalytic and regulatory subunits of A kinase into tissue culture cells and monitored expression of a stably integrated fusion gene containing a cAMP-responsive human promoter fused to a bacterial reporter gene, or of the endogenous c-fos gene. The catalytic subunit stimulated expression of these genes, whereas the regulatory subunit did not. These results indicate that the catalytic subunit of A kinase is sufficient to induce expression of two cAMP-responsive genes, without increasing levels of cAMP.

  6. [Phosphodiesterase 3 mediates cross-talk between the protein kinase- and cGMP- dependent pathways and cyclic AMP metabolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makuch, Edyta; Matuszyk, Janusz

    2012-07-20

    PDE3 is a dual-substrate phosphodiesterase responsible for hydrolyzing both cAMP and cGMP whilst being simultaneously inhibited by cGMP. This feature is related to presence of the 44 amino acid insert in the catalytic domain, which determines the mechanism of introduction of the cyclic nucleotide into the catalytic pocket of the enzyme. Once bound in the catalytic site cGMP results in steric hindrance for cAMP to enter the site. The regulatory domain of PDE3 consists of two hydrophobic regions: NHR1 and NHR2. Their presence defines the enzyme's intracellular localization, thus determining its participation in particular signaling cascades. Due to the properties of PDE3 this enzyme has exceptional importance for the cross-talk between cAMP-dependent signaling and other cascades. There are two different mechanisms of action of PDE3 enzymes in cell signaling pathways. In many signaling cascades assembly of a signalosome is necessary for phosphorylation and activation of the PDE3 proteins. In response to certain hormones and growth factors, PDE3 merges the metabolism of cAMP with protein kinase-dependent signaling pathways. PDE3 also controls the level of cAMP with regard to the alternating concentration of cGMP. This effect occurs in signaling cascades activated by natriuretic peptide.

  7. A new class of cyclin dependent kinase in Chlamydomonas is required for coupling cell size to cell division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yubing; Liu, Dianyi; López-Paz, Cristina; Olson, Bradley JSC; Umen, James G

    2016-01-01

    Proliferating cells actively control their size by mechanisms that are poorly understood. The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii divides by multiple fission, wherein a ‘counting’ mechanism couples mother cell-size to cell division number allowing production of uniform-sized daughters. We identified a sizer protein, CDKG1, that acts through the retinoblastoma (RB) tumor suppressor pathway as a D-cyclin-dependent RB kinase to regulate mitotic counting. Loss of CDKG1 leads to fewer mitotic divisions and large daughters, while mis-expression of CDKG1 causes supernumerous mitotic divisions and small daughters. The concentration of nuclear-localized CDKG1 in pre-mitotic cells is set by mother cell size, and its progressive dilution and degradation with each round of cell division may provide a link between mother cell-size and mitotic division number. Cell-size-dependent accumulation of limiting cell cycle regulators such as CDKG1 is a potentially general mechanism for size control. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10767.001 PMID:27015111

  8. Neutrophil development and function critically depend on Bruton tyrosine kinase in a mouse model of X-linked agammaglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Katja; Sindrilaru, Anca; Terszowski, Grzegorz; Kokai, Enikö; Feyerabend, Thorsten B; Bullinger, Lars; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Brunner, Cornelia

    2011-01-27

    Bruton tyrosine kinase (Btk) is essential for B cell development and function and also appears to be important for myeloid cells. The bone marrow of Btk-deficient mice shows enhanced granulopoiesis compared with that of wild-type mice. In purified granulocyte-monocyte-progenitors (GMP) from Btk-deficient mice, the development of granulocytes is favored at the expense of monocytes. However, Btk-deficient neutrophils are impaired in maturation and function. Using bone marrow chimeras, we show that this defect is cell-intrinsic to neutrophils. In GMP and neutrophils, Btk plays a role in GM-CSF- and Toll-like receptor-induced differentiation. Molecular analyses revealed that expression of the lineage-determining transcription factors C/EBPα, C/EBPβ, and PU.1, depends on Btk. In addition, expression of several granule proteins, including myeloperoxidase, neutrophilic granule protein, gelatinase and neutrophil elastase, is Btk-dependent. In the Arthus reaction, an acute inflammatory response, neutrophil migration into tissues, edema formation, and hemorrhage are significantly reduced in Btk-deficient animals. Together, our findings implicate Btk as an important regulator of neutrophilic granulocyte maturation and function in vivo.

  9. Salinomycin activates AMP-activated protein kinase-dependent autophagy in cultured osteoblastoma cells: a negative regulator against cell apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lun-qing Zhu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The malignant osteoblastoma has poor prognosis, thus the search for novel and more efficient chemo-agents against this disease is urgent. Salinomycin induces broad anti-cancer effects both in vivo and in vitro, however, its role in osteoblastoma is still not clear. KEY FINDINGS: Salinomycin induced both apoptosis and autophagy in cultured U2OS and MG-63 osteoblastoma cells. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine (3-MA, or by RNA interference (RNAi of light chain 3B (LC3B, enhanced salinomycin-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis. Salinomycin induced a profound AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK activation, which was required for autophagy induction. AMPK inhibition by compound C, or by AMPKα RNAi prevented salinomycin-induced autophagy activation, while facilitating cancer cell death and apoptosis. On the other hand, the AMPK agonist AICAR promoted autophagy activation in U2OS cells. Salinomycin-induced AMPK activation was dependent on reactive oxygen species (ROS production in osteoblastoma cells. Antioxidant n-acetyl cysteine (NAC significantly inhibited salinomycin-induced AMPK activation and autophagy induction. CONCLUSIONS: Salinomycin activates AMPK-dependent autophagy in osteoblastoma cells, which serves as a negative regulator against cell apoptosis. AMPK-autophagy inhibition might be a novel strategy to sensitize salinomycin's effect in cancer cells.

  10. Arabidopsis MAP kinase 4 regulates salicylic acid- and jasmonic acid/ethylene-dependent responses via EDS1 and PAD4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodersen, Peter; Petersen, Morten; Bjørn Nielsen, Henrik; Zhu, Shijiang; Newman, Mari-Anne; Shokat, Kevan M; Rietz, Steffen; Parker, Jane; Mundy, John

    2006-08-01

    Arabidopsis MPK4 has been implicated in plant defense regulation because mpk4 knockout plants exhibit constitutive activation of salicylic acid (SA)-dependent defenses, but fail to induce jasmonic acid (JA) defense marker genes in response to JA. We show here that mpk4 mutants are also defective in defense gene induction in response to ethylene (ET), and that they are more susceptible than wild-type (WT) to Alternaria brassicicola that induces the ET/JA defense pathway(s). Both SA-repressing and ET/JA-(co)activating functions depend on MPK4 kinase activity and involve the defense regulators EDS1 and PAD4, as mutations in these genes suppress de-repression of the SA pathway and suppress the block of the ET/JA pathway in mpk4. EDS1/PAD4 thus affect SA-ET/JA signal antagonism as activators of SA but as repressors of ET/JA defenses, and MPK4 negatively regulates both of these functions. We also show that the MPK4-EDS1/PAD4 branch of ET defense signaling is independent of the ERF1 transcription factor, and use comparative microarray analysis of ctr1, ctr1/mpk4, mpk4 and WT to show that MPK4 is required for induction of a small subset of ET-regulated genes. The regulation of some, but not all, of these genes involves EDS1 and PAD4.

  11. Characterization of a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase homolog from maize roots showing light-regulated gravitropism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Y. T.; Hidaka, H.; Feldman, L. J.

    1996-01-01

    Roots of many species respond to gravity (gravitropism) and grow downward only if illuminated. This light-regulated root gravitropism is phytochrome-dependent, mediated by calcium, and inhibited by KN-93, a specific inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMK II). A cDNA encoding MCK1, a maize homolog of mammalian CaMK, has been isolated from roots of maize (Zea mays L.). The MCK1 gene is expressed in root tips, the site of perception for both light and gravity. Using the [35S]CaM gel-overlay assay we showed that calmodulin-binding activity of the MCK1 is abolished by 50 microM KN-93, but binding is not affected by 5 microM KN-93, paralleling physiological findings that light-regulated root gravitropism is inhibited by 50 microM KN-93, but not by 5 microM KN-93. KN-93 inhibits light-regulated gravitropism by interrupting transduction of the light signal, not light perception, suggesting that MCK1 may play a role in transducing light. This is the first report suggesting a physiological function for a CaMK homolog in light signal transduction.

  12. Leptin stimulates pituitary prolactin release through an extracellular signal-regulated kinase-dependent pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tipsmark, Christian K; Strom, Christina N; Bailey, Sean T

    2008-01-01

    Leptin was initially identified as a regulator of appetite and weight control centers in the hypothalamus, but appears to be involved in a number of physiological processes. This study was carried out to examine the possible role of leptin in regulating prolactin (PRL) release using the teleost...... pituitary model system. This advantageous system allows isolation of a nearly pure population of lactotropes in their natural, in situ aggregated state. The rostral pars distalis were dissected from tilapia pituitaries and exposed to varying concentrations of leptin (0, 1, 10, 100 nM) for 1 h. Release...... of PRL was stimulated by leptin in a potent and concentration-dependent manner. A time-course experiment showed that the strongest response in PRL release with leptin occurs within the first hour (approximately sixfold), and stimulation was sustained after 16 h (approximately twofold). Many...

  13. Novel Library of Selenocompounds as Kinase Modulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Sanmartín

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Although the causes of cancer lie in mutations or epigenic changes at the genetic level, their molecular manifestation is the dysfunction of biochemical pathways at the protein level. The 518 protein kinases encoded by the human genome play a central role in various diseases, a fact that has encouraged extensive investigations on their biological function and three dimensional structures. Selenium (Se is an important nutritional trace element involved in different physiological functions with antioxidative, antitumoral and chemopreventive properties. The mechanisms of action for selenocompounds as anticancer agents are not fully understood, but kinase modulation seems to be a possible pathway. Various organosulfur compounds have shown antitumoral and kinase inhibition effects but, in many cases, the replacement of sulfur by selenium improves the antitumoral effect of compounds. Although Se atom possesses a larger atomic volume and nucleophilic character than sulfur, Se can also formed interactions with aminoacids of the catalytic centers of proteins. So, we propose a novel chemical library that includes organoselenium compounds as kinase modulators. In this study thirteen selenocompounds have been evaluated at a concentration of 3 or 10 µM in a 24 kinase panel using a Caliper LabChip 3000 Drug Discover Platform. Several receptor (EGFR, IGFR1, FGFR1… and non-receptor (Abl kinases have been selected, as well as serine/threonine/lipid kinases (AurA, Akt, CDKs, MAPKs… implicated in main cancer pathways: cell cycle regulation, signal transduction, angiogenesis regulation among them. The obtained results showed that two compounds presented inhibition values higher than 50% in at least four kinases and seven derivatives selectively inhibited one or two kinases. Furthermore, three compounds selectively activated IGF-1R kinase with values ranging from −98% to −211%. In conclusion, we propose that the replacement of sulfur by selenium seems to be

  14. Endogenous type II cGMP-dependent protein kinase exists as a dimer in membranes and can Be functionally distinguished from the type I isoforms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.B. Vaandrager (Arie); M.J. Edixhoven (Marcel); A.G. Bot (Alice); M.A. Kroos (Marian); T. Jarchau; S. Lohmann; H.G. Genieser; H.R. de Jonge (Hugo)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractIn mammalian tissues two types of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGK) have been identified. In contrast to the dimeric cGK I, cGK II purified from pig intestine was shown previously to behave as a monomer. However, recombinant rat cGK II was found to have hy

  15. Phosphorylation of the PCNA binding domain of the large subunit of replication factor C by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibits DNA synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maga, G; Mossi, R; Fischer, R

    1997-01-01

    that the PCNA binding domain is phosphorylated by the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), an enzyme required for cell cycle progression in eukaryotic cells. The DNA binding domain, on the other hand, is not phosphorylated. Phosphorylation by CaMKII reduces the binding of PCNA to RF...

  16. Isotype-specific activation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator-chloride channels by cGMP-dependent protein kinase II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. French (Pim); J. Bijman (Jan); M.J. Edixhoven (Marcel); A.B. Vaandrager (Arie); B.J. Scholte (Bob); S.M. Lohmann (Suzanne); A.C. Nairn; H.R. de Jonge (Hugo)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractType II cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGKII) isolated from pig intestinal brush borders and type I alpha cGK (cGKI) purified from bovine lung were compared for their ability to activate the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-Cl- channel in excis

  17. A phase i study of the cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 inhibitor ribociclib (LEE011) in patients with advanced solid tumors and lymphomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Infante, Jeffrey R.; Cassier, Philippe A.; Gerecitano, John F.; Witteveen, Petronella O.; Chugh, Rashmi; Ribrag, Vincent; Chakraborty, Abhijit; Matano, Alessandro; Dobson, Jason R.; Crystal, Adam S.; Parasuraman, Sudha; Shapiro, Geoffrey I.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Ribociclib (an oral, highly specific cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 inhibitor) inhibits tumor growth in preclinical models with intact retinoblastoma protein (Rb+). This first-in-human study investigated the MTD, recommended dose for expansion (RDE), safety, preliminary activity, pharmacokinet

  18. Regulation of Serine-Threonine Kinase Akt Activation by NAD+-Dependent Deacetylase SIRT7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Akt pathway is a central regulator that promotes cell survival in response to extracellular signals. Depletion of SIRT7, an NAD+-dependent deacetylase that is the least-studied sirtuin, is known to significantly increase Akt activity in mice through unknown mechanisms. In this study, we demonstrate that SIRT7 depletion in breast cancer cells results in Akt hyper-phosphorylation and increases cell survival following genotoxic stress. Mechanistically, SIRT7 specifically interacts with and deacetylates FKBP51 at residue lysines 28 and 155 (K28 and K155, resulting in enhanced interactions among FKBP51, Akt, and PHLPP, as well as Akt dephosphorylation. Mutating both lysines to arginines abolishes the effect of SIRT7 on Akt activity through FKBP51 deacetylation. Finally, energy stress strengthens SIRT7-mediated effects on Akt dephosphorylation through FKBP51 and thus sensitizes cancer cells to cytotoxic agents. These results reveal a direct role of SIRT7 in Akt regulation and raise the possibility of using the glucose analog 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG as a chemo-sensitizing agent.

  19. The cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor H-89 attenuates the bioluminescence signal produced by Renilla Luciferase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie J Herbst

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Investigations into the regulation and functional roles of kinases such as cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA increasingly rely on cellular assays. Currently, there are a number of bioluminescence-based assays, for example reporter gene assays, that allow the study of the regulation, activity, and functional effects of PKA in the cellular context. Additionally there are continuing efforts to engineer improved biosensors that are capable of detecting real-time PKA signaling dynamics in cells. These cell-based assays are often utilized to test the involvement of PKA-dependent processes by using H-89, a reversible competitive inhibitor of PKA. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present here data to show that H-89, in addition to being a competitive PKA inhibitor, attenuates the bioluminescence signal produced by Renilla luciferase (RLuc variants in a population of cells and also in single cells. Using 10 microM of luciferase substrate and 10 microM H-89, we observed that the signal from RLuc and RLuc8, an eight-point mutation variant of RLuc, in cells was reduced to 50% (+/-15% and 54% (+/-14% of controls exposed to the vehicle alone, respectively. In vitro, we showed that H-89 decreased the RLuc8 bioluminescence signal but did not compete with coelenterazine-h for the RLuc8 active site, and also did not affect the activity of Firefly luciferase. By contrast, another competitive inhibitor of PKA, KT5720, did not affect the activity of RLuc8. SIGNIFICANCE: The identification and characterization of the adverse effect of H-89 on RLuc signal will help deconvolute data previously generated from RLuc-based assays looking at the functional effects of PKA signaling. In addition, for the current application and future development of bioluminscence assays, KT5720 is identified as a more suitable PKA inhibitor to be used in conjunction with RLuc-based assays. These principal findings also provide an important lesson to fully consider all of the potential

  20. Chikungunya virus induces IPS-1-dependent innate immune activation and protein kinase R-independent translational shutoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Laura K; Sali, Tina; Alvarado, David; Gatti, Evelina; Pierre, Philippe; Streblow, Daniel; Defilippis, Victor R

    2011-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is an arthritogenic mosquito-transmitted alphavirus that is undergoing reemergence in areas around the Indian Ocean. Despite the current and potential danger posed by this virus, we know surprisingly little about the induction and evasion of CHIKV-associated antiviral immune responses. With this in mind we investigated innate immune reactions to CHIKV in human fibroblasts, a demonstrable in vivo target of virus replication and spread. We show that CHIKV infection leads to activation of the transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and subsequent transcription of IRF3-dependent antiviral genes, including beta interferon (IFN-β). IRF3 activation occurs by way of a virus-induced innate immune signaling pathway that includes the adaptor molecule interferon promoter stimulator 1 (IPS-1). Despite strong transcriptional upregulation of these genes, however, translation of the corresponding proteins is not observed. We further demonstrate that translation of cellular (but not viral) genes is blocked during infection and that although CHIKV is found to trigger inactivation of the translational molecule eukaryotic initiation factor subunit 2α by way of the double-stranded RNA sensor protein kinase R, this response is not required for the block to protein synthesis. Furthermore, overall diminution of cellular RNA synthesis is also observed in the presence of CHIKV and transcription of IRF3-dependent antiviral genes appears specifically blocked late in infection. We hypothesize that the observed absence of IFN-β and antiviral proteins during infection results from an evasion mechanism exhibited by CHIKV that is dependent on widespread shutoff of cellular protein synthesis and a targeted block to late synthesis of antiviral mRNA transcripts.

  1. 3-Phosphoinositide-dependent Protein Kinase-1 (PDK1 promotes invasion and activation of matrix metalloproteinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng Xiao

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metastasis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in breast cancer with tumor cell invasion playing a crucial role in the metastatic process. PDK1 is a key molecule that couples PI3K to cell proliferation and survival signals in response to growth factor receptor activation, and is oncogenic when expressed in mouse mammary epithelial cells. We now present evidence showing that PDK1-expressing cells exhibit enhanced anchorage-dependent and -independent cell growth and are highly invasive when grown on Matrigel. These properties correlate with induction of MMP-2 activity, increased MT1-MMP expression and a unique gene expression profile. Methods Invasion assays in Matrigel, MMP-2 zymogram analysis, gene microarray analysis and mammary isografts were used to characterize the invasive and proliferative function of cells expressing PDK1. Tissue microarray analysis of human breast cancers was used to measure PDK1 expression in invasive tumors by IHC. Results Enhanced invasion on Matrigel in PDK1-expressing cells was accompanied by increased MMP-2 activity resulting from stabilization against proteasomal degradation. Increased MMP-2 activity was accompanied by elevated levels of MT1-MMP, which is involved in generating active MMP-2. Gene microarray analysis identified increased expression of the ECM-associated genes decorin and type I procollagen, whose gene products are substrates of MT1-MMP. Mammary fat pad isografts of PDK1-expressing cells produced invasive adenocarcinomas. Tissue microarray analysis of human invasive breast cancer indicated that PDK1pSer241 was strongly expressed in 90% of samples. Conclusion These results indicate that PDK1 serves as an important effector of mammary epithelial cell growth and invasion in the transformed phenotype. PDK1 mediates its effect in part by MT1-MMP induction, which in turn activates MMP-2 and modulates the ECM proteins decorin and collagen. The presence of increased PDK1

  2. Vascular endothelial growth factor-induced migration of multiple myeloma cells is associated with beta 1 integrin- and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent PKC alpha activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podar, Klaus; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Lin, Boris K; Narsimhan, Radha P; Sattler, Martin; Kijima, Takashi; Salgia, Ravi; Gupta, Deepak; Chauhan, Dharminder; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2002-03-08

    In multiple myeloma (MM), migration is necessary for the homing of tumor cells to bone marrow (BM), for expansion within the BM microenvironment, and for egress into the peripheral blood. In the present study we characterize the role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and beta(1) integrin (CD29) in MM cell migration. We show that protein kinase C (PKC) alpha is translocated to the plasma membrane and activated by adhesion of MM cells to fibronectin and VEGF. We identify beta(1) integrin modulating VEGF-triggered MM cell migration on fibronectin. We show that transient enhancement of MM cell adhesion to fibronectin triggered by VEGF is dependent on the activity of both PKC and beta(1) integrin. Moreover, we demonstrate that PKC alpha is constitutively associated with beta(1) integrin. These data are consistent with PKC alpha-dependent exocytosis of activated beta(1) integrin to the plasma membrane, where its increased surface expression mediates binding to fibronectin; conversely, catalytically active PKC alpha-driven internalization of beta(1) integrin results in MM cell de-adhesion. We show that the regulatory subunit of phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase (p85) is constitutively associated with FMS-like tyrosine kinase-1 (Flt-1). VEGF stimulates activation of PI 3-kinase, and both MM cell adhesion and migration are PI 3-kinase-dependent. Moreover, both VEGF-induced PI 3-kinase activation and beta(1) integrin-mediated binding to fibronectin are required for the recruitment and activation of PKC alpha. Time-lapse phase contrast video microscopy (TLVM) studies confirm the importance of these signaling components in VEGF-triggered MM cell migration on fibronectin.

  3. Plant chimeric Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase. Role of the neural visinin-like domain in regulating autophosphorylation and calmodulin affinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyanarayanan, P. V.; Cremo, C. R.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2000-01-01

    Chimeric Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) is characterized by a serine-threonine kinase domain, an autoinhibitory domain, a calmodulin-binding domain and a neural visinin-like domain with three EF-hands. The neural visinin-like Ca(2+)-binding domain at the C-terminal end of the CaM-binding domain makes CCaMK unique among all the known calmodulin-dependent kinases. Biological functions of the plant visinin-like proteins or visinin-like domains in plant proteins are not well known. Using EF-hand deletions in the visinin-like domain, we found that the visinin-like domain regulated Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation of CCaMK. To investigate the effects of Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation on the interaction with calmodulin, the equilibrium binding constants of CCaMK were measured by fluorescence emission anisotropy using dansylated calmodulin. Binding was 8-fold tighter after Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation. This shift in affinity did not occur in CCaMK deletion mutants lacking Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation. A variable calmodulin affinity regulated by Ca(2+)-stimulated autophosphorylation mediated through the visinin-like domain is a new regulatory mechanism for CCaMK activation and calmodulin-dependent protein kinases. Our experiments demonstrate the existence of two functional molecular switches in a protein kinase regulating the kinase activity, namely a visinin-like domain acting as a Ca(2+)-triggered switch and a CaM-binding domain acting as an autophosphorylation-triggered molecular switch.

  4. Heterologous expression and biochemical characterization of two calcium-dependent protein kinase isoforms CaCPK1 and CaCPK2 from chickpea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syam Prakash, S R; Jayabaskaran, Chelliah

    2006-11-01

    In plants, calcium-dependent protein kinases (CPKs) constitute a unique family of enzymes consisting of a protein kinase catalytic domain fused to carboxy-terminal autoregulatory and calmodulin-like domains. We isolated two cDNAs encoding calcium-dependent protein kinase isoforms (CaCPK1 and CaCPK2) from chickpea. Both isoforms were expressed as fusion proteins in Escherichia coli. Biochemical analyses have identified CaCPK1 and CaCPK2 as Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases since both enzymes phosphorylated themselves and histone III-S as substrate only in the presence of Ca(2+). The kinase activity of the recombinant enzymes was calmodulin independent and sensitive to CaM antagonists W7 [N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulphonamide] and calmidazoilum. Phosphoamino acid analysis revealed that the isoforms transferred the gamma-phosphate of ATP only to serine residues of histone III-S and their autophosphorylation occurred on serine and threonine residues. These two isoforms showed considerable variations with respect to their biochemical and kinetic properties including Ca(2+) sensitivities. The recombinant CaCPK1 has a pH and temperature optimum of pH 6.8-8.6 and 35-42 degrees C, respectively, whereas CaCPK2 has a pH and temperature optimum of pH 7.2-9 and 35-42 degrees C, respectively. Taken together, our results suggest that CaCPK1 and CaCPK2 are functional serine/threonine kinases and may play different roles in Ca(2+)-mediated signaling in chickpea plants.

  5. The effect of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated kinase-dependent hyperphosphorylation of checkpoint kinase-2 on oligodeoxynucleotide 7909 containing CpG motifs-enhanced sensitivity to X-rays in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu XQ

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Xiaoqun Liu,1,* Xiangdong Liu,2,* Tiankui Qiao,1 Wei Chen,1 Sujuan Yuan1 1Department of Oncology, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Affiliated Jinshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: The aim of the study reported here was to further investigate the potential effect of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM kinase-dependent hyperphosphorylation of checkpoint kinase-2 (Chk2 on radiosensitivity enhanced by oligodeoxynucleotide 7909 containing CpG motifs (CpG ODN7909 in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. Methods: In vitro A549 cells were randomly separated into control, CpG, X-ray, CpG+X-ray, ATM kinase-small interfering RNA (siRNA+CpG+X-ray (ATM-siRNA, and Chk2-siRNA+CpG+X-ray (Chk2-siRNA groups. siRNAs were adopted to silence the ATM and Chk2 genes. Expression and phosphorylation of ATM kinase and Chk2 were detected by Western blot assay. Cell colonies were observed under inverted phase-contrast microscopy. Cellular survival curves were fitted using a multi-target single-hitting model. Cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. Results: Expression of ATM kinase and Chk2 was similar among the control, CpG, X-ray, and CpG+X-ray groups. Phosphorylated ATM kinase and Chk2 were significantly increased in the CpG+X-ray group compared with in the X-ray group (t=6.00, P<0.01 and t=3.13, P<0.05, respectively, though these were hardly detected in the control and CpG groups. However, expression of ATM kinase and Chk2 was clearly downregulated in the ATM-siRNA and Chk2-siRNA groups, respectively. Similarly, their phosphorylation levels were also significantly decreased in the ATM-siRNA group (t=14.35, P<0.01 and t=8.46, P<0.01, respectively and a significant decrease in phosphorylated Chk2 was observed in the Chk2-siRNA group (t=7.28, P<0.01 when compared with the CpG+X-ray group. Further, the number of A549 cells at Gap 2/mitotic phase and the apoptosis

  6. Activation of protein kinase C or cAMP-dependent protein kinase increases phosphorylation of the c-erbA-encoded thyroid hormone receptor and of the v-erbA-encoded protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldberg, Y; Glineur, C; Gesquière, J C;

    1988-01-01

    of this nuclear receptor. The v-erbA product inhibits terminal differentiation of avian erythroblasts, presumably by affecting the transcription of specific genes. We show here that the c-erbA-encoded nuclear receptor (p46c-erbA) is phosphorylated on serine residues on two distinct sites. One of these sites......The c-erbA proto-oncogene encodes a nuclear receptor for thyroid hormone (T3), which is believed to stimulate transcription from specific target promoters upon binding to cis-acting DNA sequence elements. The v-erbA oncogene of avian erythroblastosis virus (AEV) encodes a ligand-independent version......-v-erbA is enhanced 10-fold following treatment of cells with activators of either protein kinase C or cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Since cAMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylates both p46c-erbA and P75gag-v-erbA in vitro at the same site as that observed in vivo, at least part of the cAMP-dependent...

  7. Inhibition of polo-like kinase-1 by DNA damage occurs in an ATM- or ATR-dependent fashion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vugt, MATM; Smits, VAJ; Klompmaker, R; Medema, RH

    2001-01-01

    Polo-like kinases play multiple roles in different phases of mitosis. We have recently shown that the mammalian polo-like kinase, Plk1, is inhibited in response to DNA damage and that this inhibition may lead to cell cycle arrests at multiple points in mitosis. Here we have investigated the role of

  8. The calcium-dependent protein kinase 3 of toxoplasma influences basal calcium levels and functions beyond egress as revealed by quantitative phosphoproteome analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Moritz Treeck; Sanders, John L.; Rajshekhar Y Gaji; Kacie A LaFavers; Child, Matthew A.; Gustavo Arrizabalaga; Elias, Joshua E.; John C Boothroyd

    2014-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are conserved in plants and apicomplexan parasites. In Toxoplasma gondii, TgCDPK3 regulates parasite egress from the host cell in the presence of a calcium-ionophore. The targets and the pathways that the kinase controls, however, are not known. To identify pathways regulated by TgCDPK3, we measured relative phosphorylation site usage in wild type and TgCDPK3 mutant and knock-out parasites by quantitative mass-spectrometry using stable isotope-labelin...

  9. Evidence for an inositol hexakisphosphate-dependent role for Ku in mammalian nonhomologous end joining that is independent of its role in the DNA-dependent protein kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Joyce C.Y.; Salerno, Brenda; Hanakahi, Les A.

    2008-01-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) is an important pathway for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and plays a critical role in maintaining genomic stability in mammalian cells. While Ku70/80 (Ku) functions in NHEJ as part of the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), genetic evidence indicates that the role of Ku in NHEJ goes beyond its participation in DNA-PK. Inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6) was previously found to stimulate NHEJ in vitro and Ku was identified as an IP6-binding factor. Through mutational analysis, we identified a bipartite IP6-binding site in Ku and generated IP6-binding mutants that ranged from 1.22% to 58.48% of wild-type binding. Significantly, these Ku IP6-binding mutants were impaired for participation in NHEJ in vitro and we observed a positive correlation between IP6 binding and NHEJ. Ku IP6-binding mutants were separation-of-function mutants that bound DNA and activated DNA-PK as well as wild-type Ku. Our observations identify a hitherto undefined IP6-binding site in Ku and show that this interaction is important for DSB repair by NHEJ in vitro. Moreover, these data indicate that in addition to binding of exposed DNA termini and activation of DNA-PK, the Ku heterodimer plays a role in mammalian NHEJ that is regulated by binding of IP6. PMID:18776215

  10. The evolutionary history and diverse physiological roles of the grapevine calcium-dependent protein kinase gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fei; Fasoli, Marianna; Tornielli, Giovanni Battista; Dal Santo, Silvia; Pezzotti, Mario; Zhang, Liangsheng; Cai, Bin; Cheng, Zong-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are molecular switches that bind Ca(2+), ATP, and protein substrates, acting as sensor relays and responders that convert Ca(2+) signals, created by developmental processes and environmental stresses, into phosphorylation events. The precise functions of the CDPKs in grapevine (Vitis vinifera) are largely unknown. We therefore investigated the phylogenetic relationships and expression profiles of the 17 CDPK genes identified in the 12x grapevine genome sequence, resolving them into four subfamilies based on phylogenetic tree topology and gene structures. The origins of the CDPKs during grapevine evolution were characterized, involving 13 expansion events. Transcriptomic analysis using 54 tissues and developmental stages revealed three types of CDPK gene expression profiles: constitutive (housekeeping CDPKs), partitioned functions, and prevalent in pollen/stamen. We identified two duplicated CDPK genes that had evolved from housekeeping to pollen-prevalent functions and whose origin correlated with that of seed plants, suggesting neofunctionalization with an important role in pollen development and also potential value in the breeding of seedless varieties. We also found that CDPKs were involved in three abiotic stress signaling pathways and could therefore be used to investigate the crosstalk between stress responses.

  11. Herbal therapeutics that block the oncogenic kinase PAK1: a practical approach towards PAK1-dependent diseases and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruta, Hiroshi

    2014-05-01

    Over 35 years research on PAKs, RAC/CDC42(p21)-activated kinases, comes of age, and in particular PAK1 has been well known to be responsible for a variety of diseases such as cancer (mainly solid tumors), Alzheimer's disease, acquired immune deficiency syndrome and other viral/bacterial infections, inflammatory diseases (asthma and arthritis), diabetes (type 2), neurofibromatosis, tuberous sclerosis, epilepsy, depression, schizophrenia, learning disability, autism, etc. Although several distinct synthetic PAK1-blockers have been recently developed, no FDA-approved PAK1 blockers are available on the market as yet. Thus, patients suffering from these PAK1-dependent diseases have to rely on solely a variety of herbal therapeutics such as propolis and curcumin that block PAK1 without affecting normal cell growth. Furthermore, several recent studies revealed that some of these herbal therapeutics significantly extend the lifespan of nematodes (C. elegans) and fruit flies (Drosophila), and PAK1-deficient worm lives longer than the wild type. Here, I outline mainly pathological phenotypes of hyper-activated PAK1 and a list of herbal therapeutics that block PAK1, but cause no side (harmful) effect on healthy people or animals. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Efflux of Creatine Kinase from Isolated Soleus Muscle Depends on Age, Sex and Type of Exercise in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juozas Baltusnikas, Tomas Venckunas, Audrius Kilikevicius, Andrej Fokin, Aivaras Ratkevicius

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Elevated plasma creatine kinase (CK activity is often used as an indicator of exercise-induced muscle damage. Our aim was to study effects of contraction type, sex and age on CK efflux from isolated skeletal muscles of mice. The soleus muscle (SOL of adult (7.5-month old female C57BL/6J mice was subjected to either 100 passive stretches, isometric contractions or eccentric contractions, and muscle CK efflux was assessed after two-hour incubation in vitro. SOL of young (3-month old male and female mice was studied after 100 eccentric contractions. For adult females, muscle CK efflux was larger (p < 0.05 after eccentric contractions than after incubation without exercise (698 ± 344 vs. 268 ± 184 mU·h−1, respectively, but smaller (p < 0.05 than for young females after the same type of exercise (1069 ± 341 mU·h−1. Eccentric exercise-induced CK efflux was larger in muscles of young males compared to young females (2046 ± 317 vs 1069 ± 341 mU · h−1, respectively, p < 0.001. Our results show that eccentric contractions induce a significant increase in muscle CK efflux immediately after exercise. Isolated muscle resistance to exercise-induced CK efflux depends on age and sex of mice.

  13. Polo-like kinase 2-dependent phosphorylation of NPM/B23 on serine 4 triggers centriole duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Annekatrin; Hoffmann, Ingrid

    2010-03-24

    Duplication of the centrosome is well controlled during faithful cell division while deregulation of this process leads to supernumary centrosomes, chromosome missegregation and aneuploidy, a hallmark of many cancer cells. We previously reported that Polo-like kinase 2 (Plk2) is activated near the G1/S phase transition, and regulates the reproduction of centrosomes. In search for Plk2 interacting proteins we have identified NPM/B23 (Nucleophosmin) as a novel Plk2 binding partner. We find that Plk2 and NPM/B23 interact in vitro in a Polo-box dependent manner. An association between both proteins was also observed in vivo. Moreover, we show that Plk2 phosphorylates NPM/B23 on serine 4 in vivo in S-phase. Notably, expression of a non-phosphorylatable NPM/B23 S4A mutant interferes with centriole reduplication in S-phase arrested cells and leads to a dilution of centriole numbers in unperturbed U2OS cells. The corresponding phospho-mimicking mutants have the opposite effect and their expression leads to the accumulation of centrioles. These findings suggest that NPM/B23 is a direct target of Plk2 in the regulation of centriole duplication and that phosphorylation on serine 4 can trigger this process.

  14. Polo-like kinase 2-dependent phosphorylation of NPM/B23 on serine 4 triggers centriole duplication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annekatrin Krause

    Full Text Available Duplication of the centrosome is well controlled during faithful cell division while deregulation of this process leads to supernumary centrosomes, chromosome missegregation and aneuploidy, a hallmark of many cancer cells. We previously reported that Polo-like kinase 2 (Plk2 is activated near the G1/S phase transition, and regulates the reproduction of centrosomes. In search for Plk2 interacting proteins we have identified NPM/B23 (Nucleophosmin as a novel Plk2 binding partner. We find that Plk2 and NPM/B23 interact in vitro in a Polo-box dependent manner. An association between both proteins was also observed in vivo. Moreover, we show that Plk2 phosphorylates NPM/B23 on serine 4 in vivo in S-phase. Notably, expression of a non-phosphorylatable NPM/B23 S4A mutant interferes with centriole reduplication in S-phase arrested cells and leads to a dilution of centriole numbers in unperturbed U2OS cells. The corresponding phospho-mimicking mutants have the opposite effect and their expression leads to the accumulation of centrioles. These findings suggest that NPM/B23 is a direct target of Plk2 in the regulation of centriole duplication and that phosphorylation on serine 4 can trigger this process.

  15. Gliadins induce TNFalpha production through cAMP-dependent protein kinase A activation in intestinal cells (Caco-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laparra Llopis, José Moisés; Sanz Herranz, Yolanda

    2010-06-01

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune enteropathy caused by a permanent intolerance to gliadins. In this study the effects of two gliadin-derived peptides (PA2, PQPQLPYPQPQLP and PA9, QLQPFPQPQLPY) on TNFalpha production by intestinal epithelial cells (Caco-2) and whether these effects were related to protein kinase A (PKA) and/or -C (PKC) activities have been evaluated. Caco-2 cell cultures were challenged with several sets of gliadin peptides solutions (0.25 mg/mL), with/without different activators of PKA or PKC, bradykinin (Brdkn) and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC). The gliadin-derived peptides assayed represent the two major immunodominant epitopes of the peptide 33-mer of alpha-gliadin (56-88) (LQLQPFPQPQLPYPQPQLPYPQPQLPYPQPQPF). Both peptides induced the TNFalpha production triggering the inflammatory cell responses, the PA2 being more effective. The addition of the peptides in the presence of dibutyril cyclic AMP (cAMP), Brdkn or PDTC, inhibited the TNFalpha production. The PKC-activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-diacetate additionally increased the PA2- and PA9-induced TNFalpha production. These results link the gliadin-derived peptides induced TNFalpha production through cAMP-dependent PKA activation, where ion channels controlling calcium influx into cells could play a protective role, and requires NF-kappaB activation.

  16. Efflux of creatine kinase from isolated soleus muscle depends on age, sex and type of exercise in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltusnikas, Juozas; Venckunas, Tomas; Kilikevicius, Audrius; Fokin, Andrej; Ratkevicius, Aivaras

    2015-06-01

    Elevated plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity is often used as an indicator of exercise-induced muscle damage. Our aim was to study effects of contraction type, sex and age on CK efflux from isolated skeletal muscles of mice. The soleus muscle (SOL) of adult (7.5-month old) female C57BL/6J mice was subjected to either 100 passive stretches, isometric contractions or eccentric contractions, and muscle CK efflux was assessed after two-hour incubation in vitro. SOL of young (3-month old) male and female mice was studied after 100 eccentric contractions. For adult females, muscle CK efflux was larger (p resistance to exercise-induced CK efflux depends on age and sex of mice. Key pointsMuscle lengthening contractions induce the highest CK efflux in vitro compared with similar protocol of isometric contractions or passive stretches.Muscle CK efflux in vitro is applicable in studying changes of sarcolemma permeability/integrity, a proxy of muscle damage, in response to muscle contractile activity.Isolated muscle resistance to exercise-induced CK efflux is greater in female compared to male mice of young age and is further increased in adult female mice.

  17. Down-regulating cyclin-dependent kinase 9 of alloreactive CD4+ T cells prolongs allograft survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Yang; Han, Yeming; Sun, Hukui; Liang, Ting; Zhang, Chao; Song, Jing; Hou, Guihua

    2016-01-01

    CDK9 (Cyclin-dependent kinase 9)/Cyclin T1/RNA polymerase II pathway has been demonstrated to promote the development of several inflammatory diseases, such as arthritis or atherosclerosis, however, its roles in allotransplantation rejection have not been addressed. Here, we found that CDK9/Cyclin T1 were apparently up-regulated in the allogeneic group, which was positively correlated with allograft damage. CDK9 was inhibited obviously in naive splenic CD4+ T cells treated 6 h with 3 μM PHA767491 (a CDK9 inhibitor), and adoptive transfer of these CD4+ T cells into allografted SCID mice resulted in prolonged survival compared with the group without PHA767491 pretreated. Decelerated rejection was correlated with enhanced IL-4 and IL-10 production and with decreased IFN-γ production by alloreactive T cells. More interestingly, we found that CDK942, not CDK955, was high expressed in allorejection group, which could be prominently dampened with PHA767491 treatment. The expression of CDK942 was consistent with its downstream molecule RNA polymerase II. Altogether, our findings revealed the crucial role of CDK9/Cyclin T1/Pol II pathway in promoting allorejection at multiple levels and may provide a new approach for transplantation tolerance induction through targeting CDK9. PMID:27102157

  18. Deficiency of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, CDKN1B, results in overgrowth and neurodevelopmental delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grey, William; Izatt, Louise; Sahraoui, Wafa; Ng, Yiu-Ming; Ogilvie, Caroline; Hulse, Anthony; Tse, Eric; Holic, Roman; Yu, Veronica

    2013-06-01

    Germline mutations in the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, CDKN1B, have been described in patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN), a cancer predisposition syndrome with adult onset neoplasia and no additional phenotypes. Here, we describe the first human case of CDKN1B deficiency, which recapitulates features of the murine CDKN1B knockout mouse model, including gigantism and neurodevelopmental defects. Decreased mRNA and protein expression of CDKN1B were confirmed in the proband's peripheral blood, which is not seen in MEN syndrome patients. We ascribed the decreased protein level to a maternally derived deletion on chromosome 12p13 encompassing the CDKN1B locus (which reduced mRNA expression) and a de novo allelic variant (c.-73G>A) in the CDKN1B promoter (which reduced protein translation). We propose a recessive model where decreased dosage of CDKN1B during development in humans results in a neuronal phenotype akin to that described in mice, placing CDKN1B as a candidate gene involved in developmental delay.

  19. Identification of calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK): A multi-functional gene family in Rafflesia cantleyi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Safoora; Goh, Hoe-Han; Wan, Kiew-Lian

    2016-11-01

    Rafflesia, a parasitic plant that belongs to the Rafflesiaceae family, is notable for producing the largest flowers in the world. This study focused on identification of Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) due to their vital roles in plant growth and development, biotic and abiotic stress responses, and hormone signaling. RNA-seq data generated from three bud stages of Rafflesia cantleyi ie BS1, BS2, and BS3 and were assembled. Based on the BLAST searches of Rafflesia unique transcripts (UTs) to Arabidopsis TAIR database, a total of 14 unique transcripts (UTs) were identified as CDPK1 to CDPK5, CDPK7 to CDPK11, CDPK16, CDPK18, CDPK19, and CDPK28. These genes are expressed at all three bud stages of R. cantleyi with up-regulation pattern at BS1 vs. BS2 and BS2 vs. BS3. This result shows that the expression of CDPK gene family increases by developmental progress in Rafflesia in order to regulate biochemical and molecular changes at the cellular level in response to exposure to environmental changes. However, CDPKs functions in plants growth and defense process still need more experimental evidence to deeply understand their biological roles in R. cantleyi.

  20. Malaria parasite cGMP-dependent protein kinase regulates blood stage merozoite secretory organelle discharge and egress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine R Collins

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The malaria parasite replicates within an intraerythrocytic parasitophorous vacuole (PV. Eventually, in a tightly regulated process called egress, proteins of the PV and intracellular merozoite surface are modified by an essential parasite serine protease called PfSUB1, whilst the enclosing PV and erythrocyte membranes rupture, releasing merozoites to invade fresh erythrocytes. Inhibition of the Plasmodium falciparum cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PfPKG prevents egress, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here we show that PfPKG activity is required for PfSUB1 discharge into the PV, as well as for release of distinct merozoite organelles called micronemes. Stimulation of PfPKG by inhibiting parasite phosphodiesterase activity induces premature PfSUB1 discharge and egress of developmentally immature, non-invasive parasites. Our findings identify the signalling pathway that regulates PfSUB1 function and egress, and raise the possibility of targeting PfPKG or parasite phosphodiesterases in therapeutic approaches to dysregulate critical protease-mediated steps in the parasite life cycle.

  1. Discovery of pyrrolospirooxindole derivatives as novel cyclin dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) inhibitors by catalyst-free, green approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Ahmed; Mahesh, Rasala; Nayak, V Lakshma; Babu, Korrapati Suresh; Kumar, G Bharath; Shaik, Anver Basha; Kapure, Jeevak Sopanrao; Alarifi, Abdullah

    2016-01-27

    Aiming to develop a new target for the anticancer treatment, a series of 5'H-spiro[indoline-3,4'-pyrrolo [1,2-a]quinoxalin]-2-ones has been synthesized by simple, highly efficient and environmentally friendly method in excellent yields under catalyst-free conditions using ethanol as a green solvent. A simple filtration of the reaction mixture and subsequent drying affords analytically pure products. The synthesized derivatives were evaluated for their antiproliferative activity against five different human cancer cell lines, among the congeners compound 3n showed significant cytotoxicity against the human prostate cancer (DU-145). Flow cytometric analysis revealed that this compound induces cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase and Western blot analysis suggested that reduction in Cdk4 expression level leads to apoptotic cell death. This was further confirmed by mitochondrial membrane potential ((ΔΨm), Annexin V-FITC assay and docking experiments. Furthermore, it was observed that there is an increase in expression levels of cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors like Cip1/p21 and Kip1/p27.

  2. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 controls adult neural stem cell expansion by regulating Sox2 gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marqués-Torrejón, M Ángeles; Porlan, Eva; Banito, Ana; Gómez-Ibarlucea, Esther; Lopez-Contreras, Andrés J; Fernández-Capetillo, Oscar; Vidal, Anxo; Gil, Jesús; Torres, Josema; Fariñas, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    In the adult brain, continual neurogenesis of olfactory neurons is sustained by the existence of neural stem cells (NSCs) in the subependymal niche. Elimination of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (p21) leads to premature exhaustion of the subependymal NSC pool, suggesting a relationship between cell cycle control and long-term self-renewal, but the molecular mechanisms underlying NSC maintenance by p21 remain unexplored. Here we identify a function of p21 in the direct regulation of the expression of pluripotency factor Sox2, a key regulator of the specification and maintenance of neural progenitors. We observe that p21 directly binds a Sox2 enhancer and negatively regulates Sox2 expression in NSCs. Augmented levels of Sox2 in p21 null cells induce replicative stress and a DNA damage response that leads to cell growth arrest mediated by increased levels of p19(Arf) and p53. Our results show a regulation of NSC expansion driven by a p21/Sox2/p53 axis.

  3. Aurora A Kinase Regulates Mammary Epithelial Cell Fate by Determining Mitotic Spindle Orientation in a Notch-Dependent Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph L. Regan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cell fate determination in the progeny of mammary epithelial stem/progenitor cells remains poorly understood. Here, we have examined the role of the mitotic kinase Aurora A (AURKA in regulating the balance between basal and luminal mammary lineages. We find that AURKA is highly expressed in basal stem cells and, to a lesser extent, in luminal progenitors. Wild-type AURKA expression promoted luminal cell fate, but expression of an S155R mutant reduced proliferation, promoted basal fate, and inhibited serial transplantation. The mechanism involved regulation of mitotic spindle orientation by AURKA and the positioning of daughter cells after division. Remarkably, this was NOTCH dependent, as NOTCH inhibitor blocked the effect of wild-type AURKA expression on spindle orientation and instead mimicked the effect of the S155R mutant. These findings directly link AURKA, NOTCH signaling, and mitotic spindle orientation and suggest a mechanism for regulating the balance between luminal and basal lineages in the mammary gland.

  4. Natural variation in the thermotolerance of neural function and behavior due to a cGMP-dependent protein kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Dawson-Scully

    Full Text Available Although it is acknowledged that genetic variation contributes to individual differences in thermotolerance, the specific genes and pathways involved and how they are modulated by the environment remain poorly understood. We link natural variation in the thermotolerance of neural function and behavior in Drosophila melanogaster to the foraging gene (for, which encodes a cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG as well as to its downstream target, protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A. Genetic and pharmacological manipulations revealed that reduced PKG (or PP2A activity caused increased thermotolerance of synaptic transmission at the larval neuromuscular junction. Like synaptic transmission, feeding movements were preserved at higher temperatures in larvae with lower PKG levels. In a comparative assay, pharmacological manipulations altering thermotolerance in a central circuit of Locusta migratoria demonstrated conservation of this neuroprotective pathway. In this circuit, either the inhibition of PKG or PP2A induced robust thermotolerance of neural function. We suggest that PKG and therefore the polymorphism associated with the allelic variation in for may provide populations with natural variation in heat stress tolerance. for's function in behavior is conserved across most organisms, including ants, bees, nematodes, and mammals. PKG's role in thermotolerance may also apply to these and other species. Natural variation in thermotolerance arising from genes involved in the PKG pathway could impact the evolution of thermotolerance in natural populations.

  5. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric assay for the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor AT7519 in mouse plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolman, M Emmy M; den Hartog, Ilona J M; Molenaar, Jan J; Schellens, Jan H M; Beijnen, Jos H; Sparidans, Rolf W

    2014-01-01

    A quantitative bioanalytical liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) assay for the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor AT7519 in mouse plasma was developed and validated. Plasma samples were pre-treated using protein precipitation with acetonitrile containing rucaparib as internal standard. After dilution with water, the extract was directly injected into the reversed-phase LC system. The eluate was transferred into the electrospray interface with positive ionization and the analyte was detected in the selected reaction monitoring mode of a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The assay was validated in a 5-10,000ng/ml calibration range using double logarithmic calibration, 5ng/ml was the lower limit of quantification. Within day precisions (n=6) were 2.9-5.6%, between day (3 days; n=18) precisions 3.2-7.2%. Accuracies were between 95.9 and 99.0% for the whole calibration range. The drug was stable under all relevant analytical conditions. Finally, the assay was successfully used to determine plasma pharmacokinetics after intraperitoneal administration of AT7519 in mice with neuroblastoma xenografts. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Cancer Cell-derived Exosomes Induce Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase-dependent Monocyte Survival by Transport of Functional Receptor Tyrosine Kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiao; Ding, Yanping; Liu, Gang; Yang, Xiao; Zhao, Ruifang; Zhang, Yinlong; Zhao, Xiao; Anderson, Gregory J; Nie, Guangjun

    2016-04-15

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) play pivotal roles in cancer initiation and progression. Monocytes, the precursors of TAMs, normally undergo spontaneous apoptosis within 2 days, but can subsist in the inflammatory tumor microenvironment for continuous survival and generation of sufficient TAMs. The mechanisms underlying tumor-driving monocyte survival remain obscure. Here we report that cancer cell-derived exosomes were crucial mediators for monocyte survival in the inflammatory niche. Analysis of the survival-promoting molecules in monocytes revealed that cancer cell-derived exosomes activated Ras and extracellular signal-regulated kinases in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, resulting in the prevention of caspase cleavage. Phosphorylated receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), such as phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2), were abundantly expressed in cancer cell-derived exosomes. Knock-out of EGFR or/and HER-2, or alternatively, inhibitors against their phosphorylation significantly disturbed the exosome-mediated activation of the MAPK pathway, inhibition of caspase cleavage, and increase in survival rate in monocytes. Moreover, the deprived survival-stimulating activity of exosomes due to null expression of EGFR and HER-2 could be restored by activation of another RTK, insulin receptor. Overall, our study uncovered a mechanism of tumor-associated monocyte survival and demonstrated that cancer cell-derived exosomes can stimulate the MAPK pathway in monocytes through transport of functional RTKs, leading to inactivation of apoptosis-related caspases. This work provides insights into the long sought question on monocyte survival prior to formation of plentiful TAMs in the tumor microenvironment.

  7. Characterization and distribution of a maize cDNA encoding a peptide similar to the catalytic region of second messenger dependent protein kinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biermann, B.; Johnson, E. M.; Feldman, L. J.

    1990-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays) roots respond to a variety of environmental stimuli which are perceived by a specialized group of cells, the root cap. We are studying the transduction of extracellular signals by roots, particularly the role of protein kinases. Protein phosphorylation by kinases is an important step in many eukaryotic signal transduction pathways. As a first phase of this research we have isolated a cDNA encoding a maize protein similar to fungal and animal protein kinases known to be involved in the transduction of extracellular signals. The deduced sequence of this cDNA encodes a polypeptide containing amino acids corresponding to 33 out of 34 invariant or nearly invariant sequence features characteristic of protein kinase catalytic domains. The maize cDNA gene product is more closely related to the branch of serine/threonine protein kinase catalytic domains composed of the cyclic-nucleotide- and calcium-phospholipid-dependent subfamilies than to other protein kinases. Sequence identity is 35% or more between the deduced maize polypeptide and all members of this branch. The high structural similarity strongly suggests that catalytic activity of the encoded maize protein kinase may be regulated by second messengers, like that of all members of this branch whose regulation has been characterized. Northern hybridization with the maize cDNA clone shows a single 2400 base transcript at roughly similar levels in maize coleoptiles, root meristems, and the zone of root elongation, but the transcript is less abundant in mature leaves. In situ hybridization confirms the presence of the transcript in all regions of primary maize root tissue.

  8. ATR-Chk1-APC/C-dependent stabilization of Cdc7-ASK (Dbf4) kinase is required for DNA lesion bypass under replication stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamada, M.; Watanabe, K.; Mistrik, M.

    2013-01-01

    Cdc7 kinase regulates DNA replication. However, its role in DNA repair and recombination is poorly understood. Here we describe a pathway that stabilizes the human Cdc7-ASK (activator of S-phase kinase; also called Dbf4), its regulation, and its function in cellular responses to compromised DNA...... replication. Stalled DNA replication evoked stabilization of the Cdc7-ASK (Dbf4) complex in a manner dependent on ATR-Chk1-mediated checkpoint signaling and its interplay with the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosomeCdh1 (APC/C) ubiquitin ligase. Mechanistically, Chk1 kinase inactivates APC/C through......) with RAD18 disables foci formation by RAD18 and hinders chromatin loading of translesion DNA polymerase h. These findings define a novel mechanism that orchestrates replication checkpoint signaling and ubiquitin-proteasome machinery with the DNA damage bypass pathway to guard against replication collapse...

  9. Canonical and Alternative Pathways in Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 1/Cyclin B Inactivation upon M-Phase Exit in Xenopus laevis Cell-Free Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Z. Kubiak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 1 (CDK1 is the major M-phase kinase known also as the M-phase Promoting Factor or MPF. Studies performed during the last decade have shown many details of how CDK1 is regulated and also how it regulates the cell cycle progression. Xenopus laevis cell-free extracts were widely used to elucidate the details and to obtain a global view of the role of CDK1 in M-phase control. CDK1 inactivation upon M-phase exit is a primordial process leading to the M-phase/interphase transition during the cell cycle. Here we discuss two closely related aspects of CDK1 regulation in Xenopus laevis cell-free extracts: firstly, how CDK1 becomes inactivated and secondly, how other actors, like kinases and phosphatases network and/or specific inhibitors, cooperate with CDK1 inactivation to assure timely exit from the M-phase.

  10. Age-dependent targeting of protein phosphatase 1 to Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II by spinophilin in mouse striatum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J Baucum

    Full Text Available Mechanisms underlying age-dependent changes of dendritic spines on striatal medium spiny neurons are poorly understood. Spinophilin is an F-actin- and protein phosphatase 1 (PP1-binding protein that targets PP1 to multiple downstream effectors to modulate dendritic spine morphology and function. We found that calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII directly and indirectly associates with N- and C-terminal domains of spinophilin, but F-actin can displace CaMKII from the N-terminal domain. Spinophilin co-localizes PP1 with CaMKII on the F-actin cytoskeleton in heterologous cells, and spinophilin co-localizes with synaptic CaMKII in neuronal cultures. Thr286 autophosphorylation enhances the binding of CaMKII to spinophilin in vitro and in vivo. Although there is no change in total levels of Thr286 autophosphorylation, maturation from postnatal day 21 into adulthood robustly enhances the levels of CaMKII that co-immunoprecipitate with spinophilin from mouse striatal extracts. Moreover, N- and C-terminal domain fragments of spinophilin bind more CaMKII from adult vs. postnatal day 21 striatal lysates. Total levels of other proteins that interact with C-terminal domains of spinophilin decrease during maturation, perhaps reducing competition for CaMKII binding to the C-terminal domain. In contrast, total levels of α-internexin and binding of α-internexin to the spinophilin N-terminal domain increases with maturation, perhaps bridging an indirect interaction with CaMKII. Moreover, there is an increase in the levels of myosin Va, α-internexin, spinophilin, and PP1 in striatal CaMKII immune complexes isolated from adult and aged mice compared to those from postnatal day 21. These changes in spinophilin/CaMKII interactomes may contribute to changes in striatal dendritic spine density, morphology, and function during normal postnatal maturation and aging.

  11. Cardioprotection by H2S engages a cGMP-dependent protein kinase G/phospholamban pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibli, Sofia-Iris; Andreadou, Ioanna; Chatzianastasiou, Athanasia; Tzimas, Christos; Sanoudou, Despina; Kranias, Evangelia; Brouckaert, Peter; Coletta, Ciro; Szabo, Csaba; Kremastinos, Dimitrios Th.; Iliodromitis, Efstathios K.; Papapetropoulos, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Aims H2S is known to confer cardioprotection; however, the pathways mediating its effects in vivo remain incompletely understood. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the contribution of cGMP-regulated pathways in the infarct-limiting effect of H2S in vivo. Methods and results Anaesthetized rabbits were subjected to myocardial ischaemia (I)/reperfusion (R), and infarct size was determined in control or H2S-exposed groups. The H2S donor sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, an agent that generates H2S) increased cardiac cGMP and reduced the infarct size. The cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG)-I inhibitor DT2 abrogated the protective effect of NaHS, whereas the control peptide TAT or l-nitroarginine methyl ester (l-NAME) did not alter the effect of NaHS. Moreover, the KATP channel inhibitor, glibenclamide, partially reversed the effects of NaHS, whereas inhibition of mitochondrial KATP did not modify the NaHS response. NaHS enhanced phosphorylation of phospholamban (PLN), in a PKG-dependent manner. To further investigate the role of PLN in H2S-mediated cardioprotection, wild-type and PLN KO mice underwent I/R. NaHS did not exert cardioprotection in PLN KO mice. Unlike what was observed in rabbits, genetic or pharmacological inhibition of eNOS abolished the infarct-limiting effect of NaHS in mice. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate (i) that administration of NaHS induces cardioprotection via a cGMP/PKG/PLN pathway and (ii) contribution of nitric oxide to the H2S response is species-specific. PMID:25870184

  12. Fibronectin upregulates cGMP-dependent protein kinase type Iβ through C/EBP transcription factor activation in contractile cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamorro-Jorganes, Aranzazu; Calleros, Laura; Griera, Mercedes; Saura, Marta; Luengo, Alicia; Rodriguez-Puyol, D; Rodriguez-Puyol, M

    2011-03-01

    The nitric oxide (NO)-soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) pathway exerts most of its cellular actions through the activation of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG). Accumulation of extracellular matrix is one of the main structural changes in pathological conditions characterized by a decreased activity of this pathway, such as hypertension, diabetes, or aging, and it is a well-known fact that extracellular matrix proteins modulate cell phenotype through the interaction with membrane receptors such as integrins. The objectives of this study were 1) to evaluate whether extracellular matrix proteins, particularly fibronectin (FN), modulate PKG expression in contractile cells, 2) to analyze the mechanisms involved, and 3) to evaluate the functional consequences. FN increased type I PKG (PKG-I) protein content in human mesangial cells, an effect dependent on the interaction with β(1)-integrin. The FN upregulation of PKG-I protein content was due to increased mRNA expression, determined by augmented transcriptional activity of the PKG-I promoter region. Akt and the transcription factor CCAAT enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) mediated the genesis of these changes. FN also increased PKG-I in another type of contractile cell, rat vascular smooth muscle cells (RVSMC). Tirofiban, a pharmacological analog of FN, increased PKG-I protein content in RVSMC and rat aortic walls and magnified the hypotensive effect of dibutyryl cGMP in conscious Wistar rats. The present results provide evidence of a mechanism able to increase PKG-I protein content in contractile cells. Elucidation of this novel mechanism provides a rationale for future pharmacotherapy in certain vascular diseases.

  13. Integrin-linked kinase mediates the hydrogen peroxide-dependent transforming growth factor-β1 up-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Ramos, M; de Frutos, S; Griera, M; Luengo, A; Olmos, G; Rodriguez-Puyol, D; Calleros, L; Rodriguez-Puyol, M

    2013-08-01

    Transforming growth factor type-β1 (TGF-β1) has been recognized as a central mediator in many pathological events related to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins accumulation, where their locally increased expression has been implicated in the fibrosis process of numerous organs, including glomerular fibrosis in the kidney. We and others have reported the TGF-β1 synthesis regulation by reactive oxygen species (ROS), and moreover we also described the implication of integrin-linked kinase (ILK) in the AP-1-dependent TGF-β1 up-regulation. Thus, we propose here that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-dependent TGF-β1 regulation may be mediated by ILK activation. First we confirmed the increase in TGF-β1 expression in human mesangial cells (HMC) after treatment with H2O2 or with an alternative H2O2-generating system such as the glucose-oxidase enzyme (GOX). By using immunoblotting, immunofluorescence, and ELISA techniques, we demonstrate that extracellular H2O2 up-regulates TGF-β1 transcription, as well as increases TGF-β1 promoter activity. Furthermore, catalase-decreased intracellular H2O2 abolished TGF-β1 up-regulation. The use of pharmacological inhibitors as well as knockdown of ILK with small interfering RNA (siRNA) demonstrated the implication of a PI3K/ILK/AKT/ERK MAPK signaling pathway axis in the H2O2-induced TGF-β1 overexpression. Finally, we explored the physiological relevance of these findings by treating HMC with angiotensin II, a known stimuli of H2O2 synthesis. Our results confirm the relevance of previous findings after a more physiological stimulus. In summary, our results provide evidence that ILK activity changes may act as a mechanism in response to different stimuli such as H2O2 in the induced TGF-β1 up-regulation in pathological or even physiological conditions.

  14. Involvement of PI 3 kinase/Akt-dependent Bad phosphorylation in Toxoplasma gondii-mediated inhibition of host cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Juan-Hua; Cha, Guang-Ho; Zhou, Wei; Chu, Jia-Qi; Nishikawa, Yoshifumi; Lee, Young-Ha

    2013-04-01

    Toxoplasma gondii-infected cells are resistant to various apoptotic stimuli, however, the role of the pro-apoptotic BH3-only Bad protein in T. gondii-imposed inhibition of host cell apoptosis in connection with the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-PKB/Akt pathway was not well delineated. Here, we investigated the signaling patterns of Bad, Bax and PKB/Akt in T. gondii-infected and uninfected THP-1 cells treated with staurosporine (STS) or PI3K inhibitors. STS treatment, without T. gondii infection, reduced the viability of THP-1 cells in proportion to STS concentration and triggered many cellular death events such as caspase-3 and -9 activation, Bax translocation, cytochrome c release from host cell mitochondria into cytosol, and PARP cleavage in the host cell. However, T. gondii infection eliminated the STS-triggered mitochondrial apoptotic events described above. Additionally, T. gondii infection in vitro and in vivo induced the phosphorylation of PKB/Akt and Bad in a parasite-load-dependent manner which subsequently inhibited Bax translocation. The PI3K inhibitors, LY294002 and Wortmannin, both blocked parasite-induced phosphorylation of PKB/Akt and Bad. Furthermore, THP-1 cells pretreated with these PI3K inhibitors showed reduced phosphorylation of Bad in a dose-dependent manner and subsequently failed to inhibit the Bax translocation, also these cells also failed to overcome the T. gondii-imposed inhibition of host cell apoptosis. These data demonstrate that the PI3K-PKB/Akt pathway may be one of the major route for T. gondii in the prevention of host cell apoptosis and T. gondii phosphorylates the pro-apoptotic Bad protein to prevent apoptosis.

  15. Rab8 modulates metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 1 intracellular trafficking and signaling in a protein kinase C-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esseltine, Jessica L; Ribeiro, Fabiola M; Ferguson, Stephen S G

    2012-11-21

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that are activated by glutamate, the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in the CNS. Alterations in glutamate receptor signaling are implicated in neuropathologies such as Alzheimer's disease, ischemia, and Huntington's disease among others. Group 1 mGluRs (mGluR1 and mGluR5) are primarily coupled to Gα(q/11) leading to the activation of phospholipase C and the formation of diacylglycerol and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, which results in the release of intracellular calcium stores and protein kinase C (PKC) activation. Desensitization, endocytosis, and recycling are major mechanisms of GPCR regulation, and the intracellular trafficking of GPCRs is linked to the Rab family of small G proteins. Rab8 is a small GTPase that is specifically involved in the regulation of secretory/recycling vesicles, modulation of the actin cytoskeleton, and cell polarity. Rab8 has been shown to regulate the synaptic delivery of AMPA receptors during long-term potentiation and during constitutive receptor recycling. We show here that Rab8 interacts with the C-terminal tail of mGluR1a in an agonist-dependent manner and plays a role in regulating of mGluR1a signaling and intracellular trafficking in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Specifically, Rab8 expression attenuates mGluR1a-mediated inositol phosphate formation and calcium release from mouse neurons in a PKC-dependent manner, while increasing cell surface mGluR1a expression via decreased receptor endocytosis. These experiments provide us with an understanding of the role Rabs play in coordinated regulation of mGluR1a and how this impacts mGluR1a signaling.

  16. Cardioprotection by H2S engages a cGMP-dependent protein kinase G/phospholamban pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibli, Sofia-Iris; Andreadou, Ioanna; Chatzianastasiou, Athanasia; Tzimas, Christos; Sanoudou, Despina; Kranias, Evangelia; Brouckaert, Peter; Coletta, Ciro; Szabo, Csaba; Kremastinos, Dimitrios Th; Iliodromitis, Efstathios K; Papapetropoulos, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    H2S is known to confer cardioprotection; however, the pathways mediating its effects in vivo remain incompletely understood. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the contribution of cGMP-regulated pathways in the infarct-limiting effect of H2S in vivo. Anaesthetized rabbits were subjected to myocardial ischaemia (I)/reperfusion (R), and infarct size was determined in control or H2S-exposed groups. The H2S donor sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, an agent that generates H2S) increased cardiac cGMP and reduced the infarct size. The cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG)-I inhibitor DT2 abrogated the protective effect of NaHS, whereas the control peptide TAT or l-nitroarginine methyl ester (l-NAME) did not alter the effect of NaHS. Moreover, the KATP channel inhibitor, glibenclamide, partially reversed the effects of NaHS, whereas inhibition of mitochondrial KATP did not modify the NaHS response. NaHS enhanced phosphorylation of phospholamban (PLN), in a PKG-dependent manner. To further investigate the role of PLN in H2S-mediated cardioprotection, wild-type and PLN KO mice underwent I/R. NaHS did not exert cardioprotection in PLN KO mice. Unlike what was observed in rabbits, genetic or pharmacological inhibition of eNOS abolished the infarct-limiting effect of NaHS in mice. Our findings demonstrate (i) that administration of NaHS induces cardioprotection via a cGMP/PKG/PLN pathway and (ii) contribution of nitric oxide to the H2S response is species-specific. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Activation of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase inhibits proliferation of pancreatic β-cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shan-Shan [Key Laboratory of Human Functional Genomics of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Jiang, Teng [Department of Neurology, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Wang, Yi; Gu, Li-Ze [Key Laboratory of Human Functional Genomics of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Wu, Hui-Wen [Laboratory Center for Basic Medical Sciences, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Tan, Lan [Department of Neurology, Qingdao Municipal Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Guo, Jun, E-mail: Guoj@njmu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Human Functional Genomics of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China)

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •PKR can be activated by glucolipitoxicity and pro-inflammatory cytokines in β-cells. •Activated PKR inhibited β-cell proliferation by arresting cell cycle at G1 phase. •Activated PKR fully abrogated the pro-proliferative effects of IGF-I on β-cells. -- Abstract: Double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR) is revealed to participate in the development of insulin resistance in peripheral tissues in type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Meanwhile, PKR is also characterized as a critical regulator of cell proliferation. To date, no study has focused on the impact of PKR on the proliferation of pancreatic β-cells. Here, we adopted insulinoma cell lines and mice islet β-cells to investigate: (1) the effects of glucolipotoxicity and pro-inflammatory cytokines on PKR activation; (2) the effects of PKR on proliferation of pancreatic β-cells and its underlying mechanisms; (3) the actions of PKR on pro-proliferative effects of IGF-I and its underlying pathway. Our results provided the first evidence that PKR can be activated by glucolipitoxicity and pro-inflammatory cytokines in pancreatic β-cells, and activated PKR significantly inhibited cell proliferation by arresting cell cycle at G1 phase. Reductions in cyclin D1 and D2 as well as increases in p27 and p53 were associated with the anti-proliferative effects of PKR, and proteasome-dependent degradation took part in the reduction of cyclin D1 and D2. Besides, PKR activation abrogated the pro-proliferative effects of IGF-I by activating JNK and disrupting IRS1/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. These findings indicate that the anti-proliferative actions of PKR on pancreatic β-cells may contribute to the pathogenesis of T2DM.

  18. InsP3R-associated cGMP kinase substrate determines inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor susceptibility to phosphoregulation by cyclic nucleotide-dependent kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Wataru; Betzenhauser, Matthew J; Yule, David I

    2010-11-26

    Ca(2+) release through inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (InsP(3)R) can be modulated by numerous factors, including input from other signal transduction cascades. These events shape the spatio-temporal characteristics of the Ca(2+) signal and provide fidelity essential for the appropriate activation of effectors. In this study, we investigate the regulation of Ca(2+) release via InsP(3)R following activation of cyclic nucleotide-dependent kinases in the presence and absence of expression of a binding partner InsP(3)R-associated cGMP kinase substrate (IRAG). cGMP-dependent kinase (PKG) phosphorylation of only the S2+ InsP(3)R-1 subtype resulted in enhanced Ca(2+) release in the absence of IRAG expression. In contrast, IRAG bound to each InsP(3)R subtype, and phosphorylation of IRAG by PKG attenuated Ca(2+) release through all InsP(3)R subtypes. Surprisingly, simply the expression of IRAG attenuated phosphorylation and inhibited the enhanced Ca(2+) release through InsP(3)R-1 following cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activation. In contrast, IRAG expression did not influence the PKA-enhanced activity of the InsP(3)R-2. Phosphorylation of IRAG resulted in reduced Ca(2+) release through all InsP(3)R subtypes during concurrent activation of PKA and PKG, indicating that IRAG modulation is dominant under these conditions. These studies yield mechanistic insight into how cells with various complements of proteins integrate and prioritize signals from ubiquitous signaling pathways.

  19. Increased synaptophysin is involved in inflammation-induced heat hyperalgesia mediated by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Hai Zhang

    Full Text Available Mechanisms associated with cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5-mediated heat hyperalgesia induced by inflammation remain undefined. This study was designed to examine whether Cdk5 mediates heat hyperalgesia resulting from peripheral injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA in the spinal dorsal horns of rats by interacting with synaptophysin, a well known membrane protein mediating the endocytosis-exocytosis cycle of synaptic vesicles as a molecular marker associated with presynaptic vesicle membranes. The role of Cdk5 in mediating synaptophysin was examined through the combined use of behavioral approaches, imaging studies, and immunoprecipitation following CFA-induced inflammatory pain. Results showed that Cdk5 colocalized with both synaptophysin and soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF attachment protein receptors (SNAREs consisting of VAMP-2, SNAP-25, and syntaxin 1A in spinal dorsal horn of rats. Increased synaptophysin expression of spinal cord horn neurons post intraplantar injection of CFA coincided with increased duration of heat hyperalgesia lasting from 6 h to 3 d. Intrathecal administration of roscovitine, a Cdk5 specific inhibitor, significantly depressed synaptophysin expression during peak heat hyperalgesia and heat hyperalgesia induced by peripheral injection of CFA. Data presented in this report indicated that calpain activity was transiently upregulated 6 h post CFA-treatment despite previous reports suggesting that calpain was capable of cleaving p35 into p25. Results from previous studies obtained by other laboratories demonstrated that significant changes in p35 expression levels within spinal cord horn neurons were not observed in the CFA-treated inflammatory pain model although significant upregulation of Cdk5 kinase was observed between 2 h to 7 d. Therefore, generation of p25 occurred in a calpain-independent fashion in a CFA-treated inflammatory pain model. Our results demonstrated that increased synaptophysin

  20. Phosphoinositide dependent protein kinase 1 is required for exercise-induced cardiac hypertrophy but not the associated mitochondrial adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Junghyun; Wende, Adam R; Olsen, Curtis D; Kim, Bumjun; Bevins, Jack; Zhu, Yi; Zhang, Quan-Jiang; Riehle, Christian; Abel, E Dale

    2015-12-01

    Phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDPK1) is an important mediator of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling. We previously reported that PI3K but not Akt signaling mediates the increase in mitochondrial oxidative capacity following physiological cardiac hypertrophy. To determine if PDPK1 regulates these metabolic adaptations we examined mice with cardiomyocyte-specific heterozygous knockout of PDPK1 (cPDPK1(+/-)) after 5 wk. exercise swim training. Akt phosphorylation at Thr308 increased by 43% in wildtype (WT) mice but not in cPDPK1(+/-) mice following exercise training. Ventricular contractile function was not different between WT and cPDPK1(+/-) mice at baseline. In addition, exercise did not influence ventricular function in WT or cPDPK1(+/-) mice. Heart weight normalized to tibia length ratios increased by 13.8% in WT mice (6.2±0.2 vs. 7.1±0.2, P=0.001), but not in cPDPK1(+/-) (6.2±0.3 vs. 6.5±0.2, P=0.20) mice after swim training. Diastolic LV dimension increased in WT mice (3.7±0.1 vs. 4.0±0.1 mm, P=0.01) but not in cPDPK1(+/-) (3.8±0.1 vs. 3.7±0.1 mm, P=0.56) following swim training. Maximal mitochondrial oxygen consumption (VADP, nmol/min/mg) using palmitoyl carnitine as a substrate was significantly increased in mice of all genotypes following swim training (WT: 13.6±0.6 vs.16.1±0.9, P=0.04; cPDPK1(+/-): 12.4±0.6 vs.15.9±1.2, P=0.04). These findings suggest that PDPK1 is required for exercise-induced cardiac hypertrophy but does not contribute to exercise-induced increases in mitochondrial function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Ligand-based pharmacophore modeling; atom-based 3D-QSAR analysis and molecular docking studies of phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Kirubakaran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 plays a vital role in the PI3-kinase signaling pathway that regulates gene expression, cell cycle growth and proliferation. The common human cancers include lung, breast, blood and prostate possess over stimulation of the phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 signaling and making phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 an interesting therapeutic target in oncology. A ligand-based pharmacophore and atom-based 3D-QSAR studies were carried out on a set of 82 inhibitors of PDK1. A six point pharmacophore with two hydrogen bond acceptors (A, three hydrogen bond donors (D and one hydrophobic group (H was obtained. The pharmacophore hypothesis yielded a 3D-QSAR model with good partial least square statistics results. The training set correlation is characterized by partial least square factors (R2 = 0.9557, SD = 0.2334, F = 215.5, P = 1.407e-32. The test set correlation is characterized by partial least square factors (Q2 ext = 0.7510, RMSE = 0.5225, Pearson-R =0.8676. The external validation indicated that our QSAR model possess high predictive power with good value of 0.99 and value of 0.88. The docking results show the binding orientations of these inhibitors at active site amino acid residues (Ala162, Thr222, Glu209 and Glu166 of phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 protein. The binding free energy interactions of protein-ligand complex have been calculated, which plays an important role in molecular recognition and drug design approach.

  2. Development of a transgenic Plasmodium berghei line (Pb pfpkg expressing the P. falciparum cGMP-dependent protein kinase, a novel antimalarial drug target.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Tewari

    Full Text Available With the inevitable selection of resistance to antimalarial drugs in treated populations, there is a need for new medicines to enter the clinic and new targets to progress through the drug discovery pipeline. In this study we set out to develop a transgenic rodent model for testing inhibitors of the Plasmodium falciparum cyclic GMP-dependent kinase in vivo. A model was needed that would allow us to investigate whether differences in amino acid sequence of this enzyme between species influences in vivo efficacy. Here we report the successful development of a transgenic P. berghei line in which the cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG was replaced by the P. falciparum orthologue. We demonstrate that the P. falciparum orthologue was able to functionally complement the endogenous P. berghei pkg gene throughout blood stage development and early sexual development. However, subsequent development in the mosquito was severely compromised. We show that this is due to a defect in the female lineage of the transgenic by using genetic crosses with both male and female deficient P. berghei lines. This defect could be due to expression of a female-specific target in the mosquito stages of P. berghei that cannot be phosphorylated by the P. falciparum kinase. Using a previously reported anti-coccidial inhibitor of the cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase, we show no difference in in vivo efficacy between the transgenic and control P. berghei lines. This in vivo model will be useful for screening future generations of cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitors and allowing us to overcome any species-specific differences in the enzyme primary sequence that would influence in vivo efficacy in the rodent model. The approach will also be applicable to in vivo testing of other antimalarial compounds where the target is known.

  3. Development of a transgenic Plasmodium berghei line (Pb pfpkg) expressing the P. falciparum cGMP-dependent protein kinase, a novel antimalarial drug target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, Rita; Patzewitz, Eva-Maria; Poulin, Benoit; Stewart, Lindsay; Baker, David A

    2014-01-01

    With the inevitable selection of resistance to antimalarial drugs in treated populations, there is a need for new medicines to enter the clinic and new targets to progress through the drug discovery pipeline. In this study we set out to develop a transgenic rodent model for testing inhibitors of the Plasmodium falciparum cyclic GMP-dependent kinase in vivo. A model was needed that would allow us to investigate whether differences in amino acid sequence of this enzyme between species influences in vivo efficacy. Here we report the successful development of a transgenic P. berghei line in which the cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) was replaced by the P. falciparum orthologue. We demonstrate that the P. falciparum orthologue was able to functionally complement the endogenous P. berghei pkg gene throughout blood stage development and early sexual development. However, subsequent development in the mosquito was severely compromised. We show that this is due to a defect in the female lineage of the transgenic by using genetic crosses with both male and female deficient P. berghei lines. This defect could be due to expression of a female-specific target in the mosquito stages of P. berghei that cannot be phosphorylated by the P. falciparum kinase. Using a previously reported anti-coccidial inhibitor of the cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase, we show no difference in in vivo efficacy between the transgenic and control P. berghei lines. This in vivo model will be useful for screening future generations of cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitors and allowing us to overcome any species-specific differences in the enzyme primary sequence that would influence in vivo efficacy in the rodent model. The approach will also be applicable to in vivo testing of other antimalarial compounds where the target is known.

  4. Bacterial cyclomodulin Cif blocks the host cell cycle by stabilizing the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21 and p27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samba-Louaka, Ascel; Nougayrède, Jean-Philippe; Watrin, Claude; Jubelin, Grégory; Oswald, Eric; Taieb, Frédéric

    2008-12-01

    The cycle inhibiting factor (Cif) is a cyclomodulin produced by enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli. Upon injection into the host cell by the bacterial type III secretion system, Cif inhibits the G2/M transition via sustained inhibition of the mitosis inducer CDK1 independently of the DNA damage response. In this study, we show that Cif induces not only G2, but also G1 cell cycle arrest depending on the stage of cells in the cell cycle during the infection. In various cell lines including differentiated and untransformed enterocytes, the cell cycle arrests are correlated with the accumulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21(waf1/cip1) and p27(kip1). Cif-induced cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor accumulation is independent of the p53 pathway but occurs through inhibition of their proteasome-mediated degradation. Our results provide a direct link between the mode of action of Cif and the host cell cycle control.

  5. Mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway-dependent tumor-specific survival signaling in melanoma cells through inactivation of the proapoptotic protein bad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenmann, Kathryn M; VanBrocklin, Matthew W; Staffend, Nancy A; Kitchen, Susan M; Koo, Han-Mo

    2003-12-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling regulates fundamental cellular functions including proliferation, differentiation, and survival. We have demonstrated previously that inhibiting MAPK signaling induces apoptosis in melanoma cells but not in normal melanocytes, suggesting that the MAPK pathway propagates essential survival signals in melanoma cells. Here, we report that the 90-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK), a downstream effector in the MAPK signaling cascade, phosphorylates and inactivates the Bcl-2 homology 3-only proapoptotic protein Bad, thereby mediating a MAPK-dependent tumor-specific survival signal in melanoma cells. The MAPK kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/RSK MAPK signaling module is constitutively hyperactivated, and Bad is maintained in its inactive state by phosphorylation at Ser(75) in a MEK/ERK/RSK-dependent manner in melanoma cells. In contrast, in normal melanocytes, Bad is highly phosphorylated at multiple residues (Ser(75), Ser(99), and Ser(118)) in a MAPK pathway-independent manner. Importantly, ectopic expression of a constitutively activated RSK mutant abrogates Bad activation and renders melanoma cells resistant to apoptosis induced by a MEK inhibitor. Furthermore, overexpressing alanine-substituted (S75A) Bad further sensitizes melanoma cells to MEK inhibitor-induced apoptosis. Our results suggest that the MAPK pathway mediates melanoma-specific survival signaling by differentially regulating RSK-mediated phosphorylation of the proapoptotic protein Bad and may present potentially selective therapeutic targets for the treatment of melanomas.

  6. Alternaric acid stimulates phosphorylation of His-tagged RiCDPK2, a calcium-dependent protein kinase in potato plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, A; Okuta, T; Kato, M; Hatsugai, N; Sano, Y; Ishimori, T; Okazaki, K; Doullah, M A; Shah, M M

    2012-08-16

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPK) are an essential component of plant defense mechanisms against pathogens. We investigated the effect of alternaric acid, a host-specific toxin produced by the plant fungal pathogen Alternaria solani (Pleosporaceae), on a putative plasma membrane and cytosolic kinase RiCDPK2 of potato (Solanum tuberosum) and on hypersensitive cell death of host potato cells. Alternaric acid, in the presence of Ca²⁺ and Mg²⁺, stimulated in vitro phosphorylation of His-tagged RiCDPK2, a Ca²⁺-dependent protein kinase found in potato plants. We concluded that Ca²⁺ and Mg²⁺ play an important role in the interaction between alternaric acid and RiCDPK2. Based on our observations, alternaric acid regulates RiCDPK2 kinase during the infection process in an interaction between host and A. solani, leading to the inhibition of hypersensitive cell death in the host. We suggest that alternaric acid is a primary determinant by which A. solani stimulates CDPK activity in the host, suppressing hypersensitive cell death.

  7. Protein Kinase CK2 Expression Predicts Relapse Survival in ERα Dependent Breast Cancer, and Modulates ERα Expression in Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The heterotetrameric protein kinase CK2 has been associated with oncogenic transformation, and our previous studies have shown that it may affect estrogenic signaling. Here, we investigate the role of the protein kinase CK2 in regulating ERα (estrogen receptor α) signaling in breast cancer. We determined the correlation of CK2α expression with relapse free breast cancer patient survival utilizing Kaplan Meier Plotter (kmplot.com/analysis/) to mine breast cancer microarrays repositories. Patie...

  8. Insulin induces the release of vasodilator compounds from platelets by a nitric oxide-G kinase-VAMP-3-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randriamboavonjy, Voahanginirina; Schrader, Jürgen; Busse, Rudi; Fleming, Ingrid

    2004-02-01

    Insulin-induced vasodilatation is sensitive to nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) inhibitors. However, insulin is unable to relax isolated arteries or to activate endothelial NOS in endothelial cells. Since insulin can enhance platelet endothelial NOS activity, we determined whether insulin-induced vasodilatation can be attributed to a NO-dependent, platelet-mediated process. Insulin failed to relax endothelium-intact rings of porcine coronary artery. The supernatant from insulin-stimulated human platelets induced complete relaxation, which was prevented by preincubation of platelets with a NOS inhibitor, the soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor, NS 2028, or the G kinase inhibitor, KT 5823, and was abolished by an adenosine A2A receptor antagonist. Insulin induced the release of adenosine trisphosphate (ATP), adenosine, and serotonin from platelet-dense granules in a NO-dependent manner. This response was not detected using insulin-stimulated platelets from endothelial NOS-/- mice, although a NO donor elicited ATP release. Insulin-induced ATP release from human platelets correlated with the association of syntaxin 2 with the vesicle-associated membrane protein 3 but was not associated with the activation of alphaIIbbeta3 integrin. Thus, insulin elicits the release of vasoactive concentrations of ATP and adenosine from human platelets via a NO-G kinase-dependent signaling cascade. The mechanism of dense granule secretion involves the G kinase-dependent association of syntaxin 2 with vesicle-associated membrane protein 3.

  9. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 activity is required for allogeneic T-cell responses after hematopoietic cell transplantation in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareek, Tej K.; Eid, Saada; Ganguly, Sudipto; Tyler, Megan; Huang, Alex Y.; Letterio, John J.

    2017-01-01

    Molecular intermediates in T-cell activation pathways are crucial targets for the therapy and prevention of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT). We recently identified an essential role for cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) in T-cell activation and effector function, but the contribution of Cdk5 activity to the development of GVHD has not been explored. Using an established, preclinical, murine, GVHD model, we reveal that Cdk5 activity is increased in key target organs early after allo-HCT. We then generated chimeric mice (Cdk5+/+C or Cdk5−/−C) using hematopoietic progenitors from either embryonic day 16.5 Cdk5+/+ or Cdk5−/− embryos to enable analyses of the role of Cdk5 in GVHD, as germ line Cdk5 gene deletion is embryonically lethal. The immunophenotype of adult Cdk5−/−C mice is identical to control Cdk5+/+C mice. However, transplantation of donor Cdk5−/−C bone marrow and T cells dramatically reduced the severity of systemic and target organ GVHD. This phenotype is attributed to decreased T-cell migration to secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs), reduced in vivo proliferation within these organs, and fewer cytokine-producing donor T cells during GVHD development. Moreover, these defects in Cdk5−/− T-cell function are associated with altered CCR7 signaling following ligation by CCL19, a receptor:ligand interaction critical for T-cell migration into SLOs. Although Cdk5 activity in donor T cells contributed to graft-versus-tumor effects, pharmacologic inhibition of Cdk5 preserved leukemia-free survival. Collectively, our data implicate Cdk5 in allogeneic T-cell responses after HCT and as an important new target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:28064242

  10. Synergism of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors with Camptothecin Derivatives in Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Hamilton

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Advanced small cell lung cancer (SCLC has a dismal prognosis. Modulation of the camptothecin topotecan, approved for second-line therapy, may improve response. Our recent finding of synergistic enhancement of the cytotoxic activity of camptothecin (CPT by cyclin-dependent kinase 4 inhibitors is extended here to a panel of camptothecin analogs comprising 10-hydroxy-CPT (HOCPT, topotecan (TPT; 9-[(dimethylamino-methyl]-10-hydroxy-CPT, 9-amino-CPT (9AC, 9-nitrocamptothecin (rubitecan, SN38 (7-ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin and 10-hydroxy-9-nitrocamptothecin (CPT109 in combination with PD0332991, CDK4I, roscovitine and olomoucine. SCLC cell lines employed are chemoresistant NCI-H417 and DMS153 and the chemosensitive SCLC26A line established at our institution. The CPT analogs exhibiting highest cytotoxicity towards the three SCLC lines tested were SN38 and 9AC, followed by rubitecan, HOCPT, TPT and CPT109. NCI-H417 and DMS153 revealed an approximately 25-fold and 7-fold higher resistance compared to the chemosensitive SCLC26A cell line. Whereas the CDK4/6 inhibitor PD0332991 proved less effective to chemosensitize SCLC cells to CPT analogs, the CDK inhibitors CDK4I, roscovitine and olomoucine gave comparable chemosensitization effects in combination with 9AC, SN38, rubitecan and to a lesser extent with TPT and CPT109, not directly related with topoisomerase mRNA expression. In conclusion, small chemical modifications of the parent CPT structure result in differing cytotoxicities and chemomodulatory effects in combination with CDKIs of the resulting analogs.

  11. Reproducibility of creatine kinase reaction kinetics in human heart: a (31) P time-dependent saturation transfer spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Adil; Gropler, Robert

    2014-06-01

    Creatine kinase (CK) is essential for the buffering and rapid regeneration of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in heart tissue. Herein, we demonstrate a (31) P MRS protocol to quantify CK reaction kinetics in human myocardium at 3 T. Furthermore, we sought to quantify the test-retest reliability of the measured metabolic parameters. The method localizes the (31) P signal from the heart using modified one-dimensional image-selected in vivo spectroscopy (ISIS), and a time-dependent saturation transfer (TDST) approach was used to measure CK reaction parameters. Fifteen healthy volunteers (22 measurements in total) were tested. The CK reaction rate constant (kf ) was 0.32 ± 0.05 s(-1) and the coefficient of variation (CV) was 15.62%. The intrinsic T1 for phosphocreatine (PCr) was 7.36 ± 1.79 s with CV = 24.32%. These values are consistent with those reported previously. The PCr/ATP ratio was equal to 1.94 ± 0.15 with CV = 7.73%, which is within the range of healthy subjects. The reproducibility of the technique was tested in seven subjects and inferred parameters, such as kf and T1 , exhibited good reliability [intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) of 0.90 and 0.79 for kf and T1 , respectively). The reproducibility data provided in this study will enable the calculation of the power and sample sizes required for clinical and research studies. The technique will allow for the examination of cardiac energy metabolism in clinical and research studies, providing insight into the relationship between energy deficit and functional deficiency in the heart.

  12. Characterization and expression analysis of calcium-dependent protein kinase genes in rice(Oryza sativa L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jiaojiao; GUO Li; XIAO Kai

    2007-01-01

    Un