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Sample records for dependent electronic structure

  1. Temperature dependence of the electronic structure of semiconductors and insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poncé, S., E-mail: samuel.pon@gmail.com; Gillet, Y.; Laflamme Janssen, J.; Gonze, X. [European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility and Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences, Université catholique de Louvain, Chemin des étoiles 8, bte L07.03.01, B-1348 Louvain-la-neuve (Belgium); Marini, A. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Via Salaria Km 29.3, CP 10, 00016 Monterotondo Stazione (Italy); Verstraete, M. [European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility and Physique des matériaux et nanostructures, Université de Liège, Allée du 6 Août 17, B-4000 Liège (Belgium)

    2015-09-14

    The renormalization of electronic eigenenergies due to electron-phonon coupling (temperature dependence and zero-point motion effect) is sizable in many materials with light atoms. This effect, often neglected in ab initio calculations, can be computed using the perturbation-based Allen-Heine-Cardona theory in the adiabatic or non-adiabatic harmonic approximation. After a short description of the recent progresses in this field and a brief overview of the theory, we focus on the issue of phonon wavevector sampling convergence, until now poorly understood. Indeed, the renormalization is obtained numerically through a slowly converging q-point integration. For non-zero Born effective charges, we show that a divergence appears in the electron-phonon matrix elements at q → Γ, leading to a divergence of the adiabatic renormalization at band extrema. This problem is exacerbated by the slow convergence of Born effective charges with electronic wavevector sampling, which leaves residual Born effective charges in ab initio calculations on materials that are physically devoid of such charges. Here, we propose a solution that improves this convergence. However, for materials where Born effective charges are physically non-zero, the divergence of the renormalization indicates a breakdown of the adiabatic harmonic approximation, which we assess here by switching to the non-adiabatic harmonic approximation. Also, we study the convergence behavior of the renormalization and develop reliable extrapolation schemes to obtain the converged results. Finally, the adiabatic and non-adiabatic theories, with corrections for the slow Born effective charge convergence problem (and the associated divergence) are applied to the study of five semiconductors and insulators: α-AlN, β-AlN, BN, diamond, and silicon. For these five materials, we present the zero-point renormalization, temperature dependence, phonon-induced lifetime broadening, and the renormalized electronic band structure.

  2. Ferromagnetism and temperature-dependent electronic structure in metallic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, T.

    1999-01-01

    In this work the influence of the reduced translational symmetry on the magnetic properties of thin itinerant-electron films and surfaces is investigated within the strongly correlated Hubbard model. Firstly, the possibility of spontaneous ferromagnetism in the Hubbard model is discussed for the case of systems with full translational symmetry. Different approximation schemes for the solution of the many-body problem of the Hubbard model are introduced and discussed in detail. It is found that it is vital for a reasonable description of spontaneous ferromagnetism to be consistent with exact results concerning the general shape of the single-electron spectral density in the limit of strong Coulomb interaction between the electrons. The temperature dependence of the ferromagnetic solutions is discussed in detail by use of the magnetization curves as well as the spin-dependent quasi particle spectrum. For the investigation of thin films and surfaces the approximation schemes for the bulk system have to be generalized to deal with the reduced translational symmetry. The magnetic behavior of thin Hubbard films is investigated by use of the layer dependent magnetization as a function of temperature as well as the thickness of the film. The Curie-temperature is calculated as a function of the film thickness. Further, the magnetic stability at the surface is discussed in detail. Here it is found that for strong Coulomb interaction the magnetic stability at finite temperatures is reduced at the surface compared to the inner layers. This observation clearly contradicts the well-known Stoner picture of band magnetism and can be explained in terms of general arguments which are based on exact results in the limit of strong Coulomb interaction. The magnetic behavior of the Hubbard films can be analyzed in detail by inspecting the local quasi particle density of states as well as the wave vector dependent spectral density. The electronic structure is found to be strongly spin

  3. Electronic structure of free and doped actinides: N and Z dependences of energy levels and electronic structure parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulagin, N.

    2005-01-01

    Theoretical study of electronic structure of antinide ions and its dependence on N and Z are presented in this paper. The main 5f N and excited 5f N n'l' N' configurations of actinides have been studied using Hartree-Fock-Pauli approximation. Results of calculations of radial integrals and the energy of X-ray lines for all 5f ions with electronic state AC +1 -AC +4 show approximate dependence on N and Z. A square of N and cubic of Z are ewalized for the primary electronic parameters of the actinides. Theoretical values of radial integrals for free actinides and for ions in a cluster AC +n :[L] k are compared, too

  4. The Time-Dependent Structure of the Electron Reconnection Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Michael; Zenitani, Seiji; Kuznetsova, Masha; Klimas, Alex

    2009-01-01

    Collisionless magnetic reconnection is often associated with time-dependent behavior. Specifically, current layers in the diffusion region can become unstable to tearing-type instabilities on one hand, or to instabilities with current-aligned wave vectors on the other. In the former case, the growth of tearing instabilities typically leads to the production of magnetic islands, which potentially provide feedback on the reconnection process itself, as well as on the rate of reconnection. The second class of instabilities tend to modulate the current layer along the direction of the current flow, for instance generating kink-type perturbations, or smaller-scale turbulence with the potential to broaden the current layer. All of these processes contribute to rendering magnetic reconnection time-dependent. In this presentation, we will provide a summary of these effects, and a discussion of how much they contribute to the overall magnetic reconnection rate.

  5. Halide-Dependent Electronic Structure of Organolead Perovskite Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Buin, Andrei

    2015-06-23

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Organometal halide perovskites have recently attracted tremendous attention both at the experimental and theoretical levels. These materials, in particular methylammonium triiodide, are still limited by poor chemical and structural stability under ambient conditions. Today this represents one of the major challenges for polycrystalline perovskite-based photovoltaic technology. In addition to this, the performance of perovskite-based devices is degraded by deep localized states, or traps. To achieve better-performing devices, it is necessary to understand the nature of these states and the mechanisms that lead to their formation. Here we show that the major sources of deep traps in the different halide systems have different origin and character. Halide vacancies are shallow donors in I-based perovskites, whereas they evolve into a major source of traps in Cl-based perovskites. Lead interstitials, which can form lead dimers, are the dominant source of defects in Br-based perovskites, in line with recent experimental data. As a result, the optimal growth conditions are also different for the distinct halide perovskites: growth should be halide-rich for Br and Cl, and halide-poor for I-based perovskites. We discuss stability in relation to the reaction enthalpies of mixtures of bulk precursors with respect to final perovskite product. Methylammonium lead triiodide is characterized by the lowest reaction enthalpy, explaining its low stability. At the opposite end, the highest stability was found for the methylammonium lead trichloride, also consistent with our experimental findings which show no observable structural variations over an extended period of time.

  6. Simulation of Probe Position-Dependent Electron Energy-Loss Fine Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oxley, M. P.; Kapetanakis, M. D.; Prange, Micah P.; Varela, M.; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2014-03-31

    We present a theoretical framework for calculating probe-position-dependent electron energy-loss near-edge structure for the scanning transmission electron microscope by combining density functional theory with dynamical scattering theory. We show how simpler approaches to calculating near-edge structure fail to include the fundamental physics needed to understand the evolution of near-edge structure as a function of probe position and investigate the dependence of near-edge structure on probe size. It is within this framework that density functional theory should be presented, in order to ensure that variations of near-edge structure are truly due to local electronic structure and how much from the diffraction and focusing of the electron beam.

  7. Nanoscale spin-dependent transport of electrons and holes in Si-ferromagnet structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ul Haq, E.

    Given the rapid development of magnetic data storage and spin-electronics into the realm of nanotechnology, the understanding of the spin-dependent electronic transport and switching behavior of magnetic structures at the nanoscale is an important issue. We have developed spin-sensitive techniques

  8. Modeling molecule-plasmon interactions using quantized radiation fields within time-dependent electronic structure theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Daniel R.; DePrince, A. Eugene, E-mail: deprince@chem.fsu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306-4390 (United States)

    2015-12-07

    We present a combined cavity quantum electrodynamics/ab initio electronic structure approach for simulating plasmon-molecule interactions in the time domain. The simple Jaynes-Cummings-type model Hamiltonian typically utilized in such simulations is replaced with one in which the molecular component of the coupled system is treated in a fully ab initio way, resulting in a computationally efficient description of general plasmon-molecule interactions. Mutual polarization effects are easily incorporated within a standard ground-state Hartree-Fock computation, and time-dependent simulations carry the same formal computational scaling as real-time time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory. As a proof of principle, we apply this generalized method to the emergence of a Fano-like resonance in coupled molecule-plasmon systems; this feature is quite sensitive to the nanoparticle-molecule separation and the orientation of the molecule relative to the polarization of the external electric field.

  9. Time-Dependent Variations in Structure of Sheep Wool Irradiated by Electron Beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Hanzlíková

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Wool scoured in tap water with no special degreasing and containing a balanced humidity responding to usual laboratory conditions was irradiated by accelerated electron beam in the range of 0–350 kGy dose. Time variations of the wool structure were measured using FTIR, Raman, and EPR spectroscopy. The aim was to determine whether preexposure treatment of the wool, as well as postexposure time, affects the properties of the irradiated wool. Reactive products such as S-sulfonate, cystine monoxide, cystine dioxide, cysteic acid, disulphides, and carboxylates displayed a considerable fluctuation in quantity depending on both the absorbed dose and time. Mutual transformations of S-oxidized products into cysteic acid appeared to be faster than those in dry and degreased wool assuming that the present humidity inside the fibres is decisive as an oxygen source. EPR results indicated a longer lifetime for free radicals induced by lower doses compared with the radicals generated by higher ones. The pattern of the conformational composition of the secondary structure (α-helix, β-sheet, random, and residual conformations also showed a large variability depending on absorbed dose as well as postexposure time. The most stable secondary structure was observed in nonirradiated wool but even this showed a small but observable change after a longer time, too.

  10. Diameter-dependence of the electronic structures of the ZnO nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiou, J.W.; Kumar, K.P.K.; Jan, J.C.; Tsai, H.M.; Bao, C.W.; Pong, W.F.; Tsai, M.-H.; Hong, I.-H.; Klauser, R.; Lee, J.F.; Wu, J.J.; Liu, S.C.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: O K-, Zn L3- and K-edges x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra and scanning photoelectron microscopy (SPEM) spectra were measured for the ZnO nanorods with various diameters to study their electronic structures. Analysis of the XANES spectra revealed that charge transfer from the O 2p to Zn 3d states is enhanced with the decrease of the nanorod diameter. The charge transfer due to O 2p-Zn 3d hybridization is found to be compensated by the Zn 4p to O 2p charge transfer due to O 2p-Zn 4p rehybridization in consistence with the Zn 3d SPEM results. The valence-band photoemission spectra show changes in the electronic structures, especially near to the Fermi level, with the decrease of the nanorod diameter due to surface effect and/or local electrostatic polarization

  11. Layer-dependent anisotropic electronic structure of freestanding quasi-two-dimensional Mo S 2

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Jinhua; Li, Kun; Jin, Chuanhong; Zhang, Xixiang; Zhang, Ze; Yuan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The anisotropy of the electronic transition is a well-known characteristic of low-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides, but their layer-thickness dependence has not been properly investigated experimentally until now. Yet, it not only determines the optical properties of these low-dimensional materials, but also holds the key in revealing the underlying character of the electronic states involved. Here we used both angle-resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy and spectral analysis of angle-integrated spectra to study the evolution of the anisotropic electronic transition involving the low-energy valence electrons in the freestanding MoS2 layers with different thicknesses. We are able to demonstrate that the well-known direct gap at 1.8 eV is only excited by the in-plane polarized field while the out-of-plane polarized optical gap is 2.4 ± 0.2 eV in monolayer MoS2. This contrasts with the much smaller anisotropic response found for the indirect gap in the few-layer MoS2 systems. In addition, we determined that the joint density of states associated with the indirect gap transition in the multilayer systems and the corresponding indirect transition in the monolayer case has a characteristic three-dimensional-like character. We attribute this to the soft-edge behavior of the confining potential and it is an important factor when considering the dynamical screening of the electric field at the relevant excitation energies. Our result provides a logical explanation for the large sensitivity of the indirect transition to thickness variation compared with that for the direct transition, in terms of quantum confinement effect.

  12. Layer-dependent anisotropic electronic structure of freestanding quasi-two-dimensional Mo S 2

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Jinhua

    2016-02-29

    The anisotropy of the electronic transition is a well-known characteristic of low-dimensional transition-metal dichalcogenides, but their layer-thickness dependence has not been properly investigated experimentally until now. Yet, it not only determines the optical properties of these low-dimensional materials, but also holds the key in revealing the underlying character of the electronic states involved. Here we used both angle-resolved electron energy-loss spectroscopy and spectral analysis of angle-integrated spectra to study the evolution of the anisotropic electronic transition involving the low-energy valence electrons in the freestanding MoS2 layers with different thicknesses. We are able to demonstrate that the well-known direct gap at 1.8 eV is only excited by the in-plane polarized field while the out-of-plane polarized optical gap is 2.4 ± 0.2 eV in monolayer MoS2. This contrasts with the much smaller anisotropic response found for the indirect gap in the few-layer MoS2 systems. In addition, we determined that the joint density of states associated with the indirect gap transition in the multilayer systems and the corresponding indirect transition in the monolayer case has a characteristic three-dimensional-like character. We attribute this to the soft-edge behavior of the confining potential and it is an important factor when considering the dynamical screening of the electric field at the relevant excitation energies. Our result provides a logical explanation for the large sensitivity of the indirect transition to thickness variation compared with that for the direct transition, in terms of quantum confinement effect.

  13. Temperature-dependent surface structure, composition, and electronic properties of the clean SrTiO3(111) crystal face: Low-energy-electron diffraction, Auger-electron spectroscopy, electron energy loss, and ultraviolet-photoelectron spectroscopy studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo, W.J.; Somorjai, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    Low-energy-electron diffraction, Auger-electron spectroscopy, electron-energy-loss, and ultraviolet-photoelectron spectroscopies were used to study the structure, composition, and electron energy distribution of a clean single-crystal (111) face of strontium titanate (perovskite). The dependence of the surface chemical composition on the temperature has been observed along with corresponding changes in the surface electronic properties. High-temperature Ar-ion bombardment causes an irreversible change in the surface structure, stoichiometry, and electron energy distribution. In contrast to the TiO 2 surface, there are always significant concentrations of Ti 3+ in an annealed ordered SrTiO 3 (111) surface. This stable active Ti 3+ monolayer on top of a substrate with large surface dipole potential makes SrTiO 3 superior to TiO 2 when used as a photoanode in the photoelectrochemical cell

  14. Temperature Dependent Surface Structures and Electronic Properties of Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Perovskite Single Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jao, M.-H.; Teague, M. L.; Huang, J.-S.; Tseng, W.-S.; Yeh, N.-C.

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites, arising from research of low-cost high performance photovoltaics, have become promising materials not only for solar cells but also for various optoelectronic and spintronic applications. An interesting aspect of the hybrid perovskites is that their material properties, such as the band gap, can be easily tuned by varying the composition, temperature, and the crystalline phases. Additionally, the surface structure is critically important for their optoelectronic applications. It is speculated that different crystalline facets could show different trap densities, thus resulting in microscopically inhomogeneous performance. Here we report direct studies of the surface structures and electronic properties of hybrid perovskite CH3NH3PbI3 single crystals by scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/STS). We found long-range spatially homogeneous tunneling conductance spectra with a well-defined energy gap of (1.55 +/- 0.1) eV at 300 K in the tetragonal phase, suggesting high quality of the single crystals. The energy gap increased to (1.81 +/- 0.1) eV in the orthorhombic phase, below the tetragonal-to-orthorhombic phase transition temperature at 150 K. Detailed studies of the temperature evolution in the spatially resolved surface structures and local density of states will be discussed to elucidate how these properties may influence the optoelectronic performance of the hybrid perovskites. We thank the support from NTU in Taiwan and from NSF in the US.

  15. The pressure dependence of structural, electronic, mechanical, vibrational, and thermodynamic properties of palladium-based Heusler alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coban, Cansu [Balikesir Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Physics

    2017-07-01

    The pressure dependent behaviour of the structural, electronic, mechanical, vibrational, and thermodynamic properties of Pd{sub 2}TiX (X=Ga, In) Heusler alloys was investigated by ab initio calculations. The lattice constant, the bulk modulus and its first pressure derivative, the electronic band structure and the density of states (DOS), mechanical properties such as elastic constants, anisotropy factor, Young's modulus, etc., the phonon dispersion curves and phonon DOS, entropy, heat capacity, and free energy were obtained under pressure. It was determined that the calculated lattice parameters are in good agreement with the literature, the elastic constants obey the stability criterion, and the phonon dispersion curves have no negative frequency which shows that the compounds are stable. The band structures at 0, 50, and 70 GPa showed valence instability at the L point which explains the superconductivity in Pd{sub 2}TiX (X=Ga, In).

  16. Structural and electronic transformations in substituted La-Sr manganites depending on cations and oxygen content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpasyuk, Vladimir; Badelin, Alexey; Merkulov, Denis; Derzhavin, Igor; Estemirova, Svetlana

    2018-05-01

    In the present research experimental data are obtained for the Jahn-Teller O‧ phase formation, phase transformation "orthorhombic-rhombohedral structure" and the change of the conductance type in the systems of manganites La3+1-c+xSr2+c-xMn3+1-c-x-2γMn4+c+2γZn2+xO3+γ, La3+1-c-xSr2+c+xMn3+1-c-x-2γMn4+c+2γGe4+xO3+γ, La3+1-cSr2+cMn3+1-x-c-2γMn4+c+2γ(Zn2+0.5Ge4+0.5)xO3+γ, where Mn4+ ions concentration is independent of "x". Ceramic samples were sintered in air at 1473 K. As-sintered samples had an excess of oxygen content. In order to provide stoichiometric oxygen content, the samples were annealed at 1223 K and partial pressure of oxygen PO2 = 10-1 Pа. Structural characteristics of the O‧ phase were obtained. The position of the phase boundary "orthorhombic-rhombohedral structure" and the temperature of the conductance type change depending on the cation composition of manganites and oxygen content were determined. Possible approaches to the interpretation of experimental results were suggested.

  17. Breaking Symmetry in Time-Dependent Electronic Structure Theory to Describe Spectroscopic Properties of Non-Collinear and Chiral Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goings, Joshua James

    Time-dependent electronic structure theory has the power to predict and probe the ways electron dynamics leads to useful phenomena and spectroscopic data. Here we report several advances and extensions of broken-symmetry time-dependent electronic structure theory in order to capture the flexibility required to describe non-equilibrium spin dynamics, as well as electron dynamics for chiroptical properties and vibrational effects. In the first half, we begin by discussing the generalization of self-consistent field methods to the so-called two-component structure in order to capture non-collinear spin states. This means that individual electrons are allowed to take a superposition of spin-1/2 projection states, instead of being constrained to either spin-up or spin-down. The system is no longer a spin eigenfunction, and is known a a spin-symmetry broken wave function. This flexibility to break spin symmetry may lead to variational instabilities in the approximate wave function, and we discuss how these may be overcome. With a stable non-collinear wave function in hand, we then discuss how to obtain electronic excited states from the non-collinear reference, along with associated challenges in their physical interpretation. Finally, we extend the two-component methods to relativistic Hamiltonians, which is the proper setting for describing spin-orbit driven phenomena. We describe the first implementation of the explicit time propagation of relativistic two-component methods and how this may be used to capture spin-forbidden states in electronic absorption spectra. In the second half, we describe the extension of explicitly time-propagated wave functions to the simulation of chiroptical properties, namely circular dichroism (CD) spectra of chiral molecules. Natural circular dichroism, that is, CD in the absence of magnetic fields, originates in the broken parity symmetry of chiral molecules. This proves to be an efficient method for computing circular dichroism spectra

  18. Spin-dependent hot electron transport and nano-scale magnetic imaging of metal/Si structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaidatzis, A.

    2008-10-01

    In this work, we experimentally study spin-dependent hot electron transport through metallic multilayers (ML), containing single magnetic layers or 'spin-valve' (SV) tri layers. For this purpose, we have set up a ballistic electron emission microscope (BEEM), a three terminal extension of scanning tunnelling microscopy on metal/semiconductor structures. The implementation of the BEEM requirements into the sample fabrication is described in detail. Using BEEM, the hot electron transmission through the ML's was systematically measured in the energy range 1-2 eV above the Fermi level. By varying the magnetic layer thickness, the spin-dependent hot electron attenuation lengths were deduced. For the materials studied (Co and NiFe), they were compared to calculations and other determinations in the literature. For sub-monolayer thickness, a non uniform morphology was observed, with large transmission variations over sub-nano-metric distances. This effect is not yet fully understood. In the imaging mode, the magnetic configurations of SV's were studied under field, focusing on 360 degrees domain walls in Co layers. The effects of the applied field intensity and direction on the DW structure were studied. The results were compared quantitatively to micro-magnetic calculations, with an excellent agreement. From this, it can be shown that the BEEM magnetic resolution is better than 50 nm. (author)

  19. Structural Dependence of Electronic Properties in A-A-D-A-A-Type Organic Solar Cell Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram S. Bhatta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Small conjugated molecules (SCMs are promising candidates for organic photovoltaic (OPV devices because of their structural simplicity, well control over synthetic reproducibility, and low purification cost. However, industrial development of SCM-based OPV devices requires improving their performance, which in turn relies on the fundamental understanding of structural dependence of electronic properties of SCMs. Herein, we report the structural and electronic properties of the BCNDTS molecule as a model system for acceptor-acceptor-donor-acceptor-acceptor (A-A-D-A-A type SCMs, using density functional theory (DFT and time-dependent DFT methods. Systematic calculations of two-dimensional potential energy surfaces, molecular electrostatic potential surfaces, ground state frontier molecular orbital energies, and the vertical excitation energies are performed. We found that the lowest energy conformation of the BCNDTS molecule is planar. The planar conformation favors the lowest ground state and the excited state energies as well as the strongest oscillator strength. The present results suggest that SCMs containing central dithienosilole cores connected with 2,1,3-benzothiadiazole groups have potential to be an efficient electron donor for OPV devices.

  20. Quantum mechanical electronic structure calculation reveals orientation dependence of hydrogen bond energy in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Abhisek; Datta, Saumen

    2017-06-01

    Hydrogen bond plays a unique role in governing macromolecular interactions with exquisite specificity. These interactions govern the fundamental biological processes like protein folding, enzymatic catalysis, molecular recognition. Despite extensive research work, till date there is no proper report available about the hydrogen bond's energy surface with respect to its geometric parameters, directly derived from proteins. Herein, we have deciphered the potential energy landscape of hydrogen bond directly from the macromolecular coordinates obtained from Protein Data Bank using quantum mechanical electronic structure calculations. The findings unravel the hydrogen bonding energies of proteins in parametric space. These data can be used to understand the energies of such directional interactions involved in biological molecules. Quantitative characterization has also been performed using Shannon entropic calculations for atoms participating in hydrogen bond. Collectively, our results constitute an improved way of understanding hydrogen bond energies in case of proteins and complement the knowledge-based potential. Proteins 2017; 85:1046-1055. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. The electronic structures of solids

    CERN Document Server

    Coles, B R

    2013-01-01

    The Electronic Structures of Solids aims to provide students of solid state physics with the essential concepts they will need in considering properties of solids that depend on their electronic structures and idea of the electronic character of particular materials and groups of materials. The book first discusses the electronic structure of atoms, including hydrogen atom and many-electron atom. The text also underscores bonding between atoms and electrons in metals. Discussions focus on bonding energies and structures in the solid elements, eigenstates of free-electron gas, and electrical co

  2. Electronic structure and time-dependent description of rotational predissociation of LiH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jasik, P.; Sienkiewicz, J. E.; Domsta, J.

    2017-01-01

    parameters and the experimental ones. The dynamics of the rotational predissociation process of the 11Π state were studied by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The classical experiment of Velasco [Can. J. Phys., 1957, 35, 1204] on dissociation in the 11Π state is explained for the first time...

  3. Alloy Dependence of Electron-Phonon Interactions in Double Barrier Structures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wallis, Corinne

    1996-01-01

    ...)As double barrier structures as a function of the alloy concentration in the barrier. We have measured current-voltage and conductance-voltage curves associated with phonon-assisted tunneling with magnetic fields from 0 to 6.8 Tesla...

  4. Electron nature of chemically active state of spiropyran with nitro group. Dependence of efficiency of radiation colouring of spiropyrans on their structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kholmanskij, A.S.; Zubkov, A.V.; Dyumaev, K.M.

    1980-01-01

    Using the theory of solvatochromy it is shown that chemically active state of spiropyran with nitro group is its highly polar electron-excitated state. On the basis of the image on the electron nature of chemically active state of spiropyran the dependence of the values of radiation yield of the coloured forms of spiropyrans upon their structure is explained

  5. Spin- and valley-dependent electronic band structure and electronic heat capacity of ferromagnetic silicene in the presence of strain, exchange field and Rashba spin-orbit coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoi, Bui Dinh; Yarmohammadi, Mohsen; Kazzaz, Houshang Araghi

    2017-10-01

    We studied how the strain, induced exchange field and extrinsic Rashba spin-orbit coupling (RSOC) enhance the electronic band structure (EBS) and electronic heat capacity (EHC) of ferromagnetic silicene in presence of external electric field (EF) by using the Kane-Mele Hamiltonian, Dirac cone approximation and the Green's function approach. Particular attention is paid to investigate the EHC of spin-up and spin-down bands at Dirac K and K‧ points. We have varied the EF, strain, exchange field and RSOC to tune the energy of inter-band transitions and consequently EHC, leading to very promising features for future applications. Evaluation of EF exhibits three phases: Topological insulator (TI), valley-spin polarized metal (VSPM) and band insulator (BI) at given aforementioned parameters. As a new finding, we have found a quantum anomalous Hall phase in BI regime at strong RSOCs. Interestingly, the effective mass of carriers changes with strain, resulting in EHC behaviors. Here, exchange field has the same behavior with EF. Finally, we have confirmed the reported and expected symmetry results for both Dirac points and spins with the study of valley-dependent EHC.

  6. Temperature dependent evolution of the local electronic structure of atmospheric plasma treated carbon nanotubes: Near edge x-ray absorption fine structure study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, S. S.; Papakonstantinou, P.; Okpalugo, T. I. T.; Murphy, H.

    2006-01-01

    Near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy has been employed to obtain the temperature dependent evolution of the electronic structure of acid treated carbon nanotubes, which were further modified by dielectric barrier discharge plasma processing in an ammonia atmosphere. The NEXAFS studies were performed from room temperature up to 900 deg. C. The presence of oxygen and nitrogen containing functional groups was observed in C K edge, N K edge, and O K edge NEXAFS spectra of the multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The N K edge spectra revealed three types of π* features, the source of which was decisively identified by their temperature dependent evolution. It was established that these features are attributed to pyridinelike, NO, and graphitelike structures, respectively. The O K edge indicated that both carbonyl (C=O), π*(CO), and ether C-O-C, σ*(CO), functionalities were present. Upon heating in a vacuum to 900 deg. C the π*(CO) resonances disappeared while the σ*(CO) resonances were still present confirming their higher thermal stability. Heating did not produce a significant change in the π* feature of the C K edge spectrum indicating that the tabular structure of the nanotubes is essentially preserved following the thermal decomposition of the functional groups on the nanotube surface

  7. Dependence of secondary electron emission on the incident angle and the energy of primary electrons bombarding bowl-structured beryllium surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawata, Jun; Ohya, Kaoru.

    1994-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation of the secondary electron emission from beryllium is combined with a model of bowl structure for surface roughness, for analyzing the difference between the electron emissions for normal and oblique incidences. At normal incidence, with increasing the roughness parameter H/W, the primary energy E pm at which the maximum electron yield occurs becomes higher, and at more than the E pm , the decrease in the yield is slower; where H and W are the depth and width of the bowl structure, respectively. The dispersion of incident angle to the microscopic surface causes a small increase in the yield at oblique incidence, whereas the blocking of primary electrons from bombarding the bottom of the structure causes an opposite trend. The strong anisotropy in the polar angular distribution with respect to the azimuthal angle is calculated at oblique incidence. (author)

  8. Evidence for momentum-dependent heavy-fermionic electronic structures: Soft x-ray ARPES for the superconductor CeNi2Ge2 in the normal state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatani, Y.; Aratani, H.; Fujiwara, H.; Mori, T.; Tsuruta, A.; Tachibana, S.; Yamaguchi, T.; Kiss, T.; Yamasaki, A.; Yasui, A.; Yamagami, H.; Miyawaki, J.; Ebihara, T.; Saitoh, Y.; Sekiyama, A.

    2018-03-01

    We present clear experimental evidence for the momentum-dependent heavy fermionic electronic structures of the 4 f -based strongly correlated system CeNi2Ge2 by soft x-ray angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. A comparison between the experimental three-dimensional quasiparticle dispersion of LaNi2Ge2 and CeNi2Ge2 has revealed that heavy fermionic electronic structures are seen in the region surrounding a specific momentum. Furthermore, the wave vectors between the observed "heavy spots" are consistent with a result of neutron scattering reflecting magnetic correlations, which could be a trigger for the superconductivity in CeNi2Ge2 .

  9. Orientation dependence in collision induced electronic relaxation studied through van der Waals complexes with isomeric structures. Invited feature article

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, P.Y.; Lapierre, L.; Ju, S.S.; DeRose, P.; Dai, H.L.

    1994-01-01

    Weakly bound molecular complexes with more than one well-defined structures provide us with an unique opportunity to investigate dynamic processes induced by intermolecular interactions with specific orientations. The relative orientation of the two interacting molecules or atoms is defined by the complex structure. The effect of the orientation in the spin changing collisions glyoxal (S 1 ) + Ar → glyoxal (T 1 ) + Ar and acetylene (S 1 ) + Ar → acetylene (T) + Ar have been studied by measuring the intersystem crossing (ISC) rates of the glyoxal(S 1 ).Ar and acetylene(S 1 ).Ar complexes with different isomeric structures. Results show that there is a strong orientation dependence in the ISC of glyoxal(S 1 ) induced by interaction with the Ar atom: the Ar atom positioned in the molecular plane is much more effective than in the out-of-plane position in inducing the S 1 → T 1 transition of glyoxal. On the other hand, studies of acetylene(S 1 ).Ar complexes indicate that the Ar-induced ISC rates are nearly identical for the in-plane and out-of-plane positions. Orientation dependence in the collision induced vibrational relaxation process C 2 H 2 (S 1 , v i ) + Ar → C 2 H 2 (S 1 , v f i ) + Ar is also studied by measuring the vibrational predissociation rates of the acetylene(S 1 ).Ar complex isomers. The results indicate that collisions of C 2 H 2 (S 1 , v 3 = 3, 4) with Ar at two orthogonal orientations are equally effective in causing vibrational relaxation of C 2 H 2 . (orig.)

  10. Temperature dependence of the electronic structure of La2CuO4 in the multielectron LDA+GTB approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarov, I. A.; Ovchinnikov, S. G.

    2015-01-01

    The band structure of La 2 CuO 4 in antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic phases is calculated at finite temperatures by the multielectron LDA+GTB method. The temperature dependence of the band spectrum and the spectral weight of Hubbard fermions is caused by a change in the occupation numbers of local multielectron spin-split terms in the antiferromagnetic phase. A decrease in the magnetization of the sublattice with temperature gives rise to new bands near the bottom of the conduction band and the top of the valence band. It is shown that the band gap decreases with increasing temperature, but La 2 CuO 4 remains an insulator in the paramagnetic phase as well. These results are consistent with measurements of the red shift of the absorption edge in La 2 CuO 4 with increasing temperature

  11. Visualization of Excitonic Structure in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson Photosynthetic Complex by Polarization-Dependent Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, Graham; Read, Elizabeth L.; Schlau-Cohen, Gabriela S.; Engel, Gregory S.; Wen, Jianzhong; Blankenship, Robert E.; Fleming, Graham R.

    2008-01-01

    Photosynthetic light-harvesting proceeds by the collection and highly efficient transfer of energy through a network of pigment-protein complexes. Inter-chromophore electronic couplings and interactions between pigments and the surrounding protein determine energy levels of excitonic states and dictate the mechanism of energy flow. The excitonic structure (orientation of excitonic transition dipoles) of pigment-protein complexes is generally deduced indirectly from x-ray crystallography in combination with predictions of transition energies and couplings in the chromophore site basis. Here, we demonstrate that coarse-grained excitonic structural information in the form of projection angles between transition dipole moments can be obtained from polarization-dependent two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy of an isotropic sample, particularly when the nonrephasing or free polarization decay signal rather than the photon echo signal is considered. The method provides an experimental link between atomic and electronic structure and accesses dynamical information with femtosecond time resolution. In an investigation of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex from green sulfur bacteria, energy transfer connecting two particular exciton states in the protein is isolated as being the primary contributor to a cross peak in the nonrephasing 2D spectrum at 400 fs under a specific sequence of polarized excitation pulses. The results suggest the possibility of designing experiments using combinations of tailored polarization sequences to separate and monitor individual relaxation pathways

  12. Temperature dependent evolution of the electronic and local atomic structure in the cubic colossal magnetoresistive manganite La1-xSrxMnO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenholz, Elke; Mannella, N.; Booth, C.H.; Rosenhahn, A.; Sell, B.C.; Nambu, A.; Marchesini, S.; Mun, B. S.; Yang, S.-H.; Watanabe, M.; Ibrahim, K.; Arenholz, E.; Young, A.; Guo, J.; Tomioka, Y.; Fadley, C.S.

    2007-01-01

    We have studied the temperature-dependent evolution of the electronic and local atomic structure in the cubic colossal magnetoresistive manganite La 1-x Sr x MnO 3 (x= 0.3-0.4) with core and valence level photoemission (PE), x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS), extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and magnetometry. As the temperature is varied across the Curie temperature T c , our PE experiments reveal a dramatic change of the electronic structure involving an increase in the Mn spin moment from ∼ 3 (micro)B to ∼ 4 (micro)B, and a modification of the local chemical environment of the other constituent atoms indicative of electron localization on the Mn atom. These effects are reversible and exhibit a slow-timescale ∼200 K-wide hysteresis centered at T c . Based upon the probing depths accessed in our PE measurements, these effects seem to survive for at least 35-50 (angstrom) inward from the surface, while other consistent signatures for this modification of the electronic structure are revealed by more bulk sensitive spectroscopies like XAS and XES/RIXS. We interpret these effects as spectroscopic fingerprints for polaron formation, consistent with the presence of local Jahn-Teller distortions of the MnO 6 octahedra around the Mn atom, as revealed by the EXAFS data. Magnetic susceptibility measurements in addition show typical signatures of ferro-magnetic clusters formation well above the Curie temperature

  13. Electronic structure of silicene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voon, L. C. Lew Yan

    2015-01-01

    In this topical review, we discuss the electronic structure of free-standing silicene by comparing results obtained using different theoretical methods. Silicene is a single atomic layer of silicon similar to graphene. The interest in silicene is the same as for graphene, in being two-dimensional and possessing a Dirac cone. One advantage of silicene is due to its compatibility with current silicon electronics. Both empirical and first-principles techniques have been used to study the electronic properties of silicene. We will provide a brief overview of the parameter space for first-principles calculations. However, since the theory is standard, no extensive discussion will be included. Instead, we will emphasize what empirical methods can provide to such investigations and the current state of these theories. Finally, we will review the properties computed using both types of theories for free-standing silicene, with emphasis on areas where we have contributed. Comparisons to graphene is provided throughout. (topical review)

  14. Atomic and electronic structure of trilayer graphene/SiC(0001): Evidence of Strong Dependence on Stacking Sequence and charge transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierucci, Debora; Brumme, Thomas; Girard, Jean-Christophe; Calandra, Matteo; Silly, Mathieu G; Sirotti, Fausto; Barbier, Antoine; Mauri, Francesco; Ouerghi, Abdelkarim

    2016-09-15

    The transport properties of few-layer graphene are the directly result of a peculiar band structure near the Dirac point. Here, for epitaxial graphene grown on SiC, we determine the effect of charge transfer from the SiC substrate on the local density of states (LDOS) of trilayer graphene using scaning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy and angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Different spectra are observed and are attributed to the existence of two stable polytypes of trilayer: Bernal (ABA) and rhomboedreal (ABC) staking. Their electronic properties strongly depend on the charge transfer from the substrate. We show that the LDOS of ABC stacking shows an additional peak located above the Dirac point in comparison with the LDOS of ABA stacking. The observed LDOS features, reflecting the underlying symmetry of the two polytypes, were reproduced by explicit calculations within density functional theory (DFT) including the charge transfer from the substrate. These findings demonstrate the pronounced effect of stacking order and charge transfer on the electronic structure of trilayer or few layer graphene. Our approach represents a significant step toward understand the electronic properties of graphene layer under electrical field.

  15. Electronic band structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosso, G.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is to present, in detail, some theoretical methods used to calculate electronic band structures in crystals. The basic strategies employed to attack the problem of electronic-structure calculations are presented. Successive sections present the basic formulations of the tight-binding, orthogonalized-plane-wave, Green'sfunction, and pseudopotential methods with a discussion of their application to perfect solids. Exemplifications in the case of a few selected problems provide further insight by the author into the physical aspects of the different methods and are a guide to the use of their mathematical techniques. A discussion is offered of completely a priori Hartree-Fock calculations and attempts to extend them. Special aspects of the different methods are also discussed in light of recently published related work

  16. Electronic structure of metal clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wertheim, G.K.

    1989-01-01

    Photoemission spectra of valence electrons in metal clusters, together with threshold ionization potential measurements, provide a coherent picture of the development of the electronic structure from the isolated atom to the large metallic cluster. An insulator-metal transition occurs at an intermediate cluster size, which serves to define the boundary between small and large clusters. Although the outer electrons may be delocalized over the entire cluster, a small cluster remains insulating until the density of states near the Fermi level exceeds 1/kT. In large clusters, with increasing cluster size, the band structure approaches that of the bulk metal. However, the bands remain significantly narrowed even in a 1000-atom cluster, giving an indication of the importance of long-range order. The core-electron binding-energy shifts of supported metal clusters depend on changes in the band structure in the initial state, as well as on various final-state effects, including changes in core hole screening and the coulomb energy of the final-state charge. For cluster supported on amorphous carbon, this macroscopic coulomb shift is often dominant, as evidenced by the parallel shifts of the core-electron binding energy and the Fermi edge. Auger data confirm that final-state effects dominate in cluster of Sn and some other metals. Surface atom core-level shifts provide a valuable guide to the contributions of initial-state changes in band structure to cluster core-electron binding energy shifts, especially for Au and Pt. The available data indicate that the shift observed in supported, metallic clusters arise largely from the charge left on the cluster by photoemission. As the metal-insulator transition is approached from above, metallic screening is suppressed and the shift is determined by the local environment. (orig.)

  17. N-representability-driven reconstruction of the two-electron reduced-density matrix for a real-time time-dependent electronic structure method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffcoat, David B.; DePrince, A. Eugene

    2014-01-01

    Propagating the equations of motion (EOM) for the one-electron reduced-density matrix (1-RDM) requires knowledge of the corresponding two-electron RDM (2-RDM). We show that the indeterminacy of this expression can be removed through a constrained optimization that resembles the variational optimization of the ground-state 2-RDM subject to a set of known N-representability conditions. Electronic excitation energies can then be obtained by propagating the EOM for the 1-RDM and following the dipole moment after the system interacts with an oscillating external electric field. For simple systems with well-separated excited states whose symmetry differs from that of the ground state, excitation energies obtained from this method are comparable to those obtained from full configuration interaction computations. Although the optimized 2-RDM satisfies necessary N-representability conditions, the procedure cannot guarantee a unique mapping from the 1-RDM to the 2-RDM. This deficiency is evident in the mean-field-quality description of transitions to states of the same symmetry as the ground state, as well as in the inability of the method to describe Rabi oscillations

  18. N-representability-driven reconstruction of the two-electron reduced-density matrix for a real-time time-dependent electronic structure method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffcoat, David B.; DePrince, A. Eugene

    2014-12-01

    Propagating the equations of motion (EOM) for the one-electron reduced-density matrix (1-RDM) requires knowledge of the corresponding two-electron RDM (2-RDM). We show that the indeterminacy of this expression can be removed through a constrained optimization that resembles the variational optimization of the ground-state 2-RDM subject to a set of known N-representability conditions. Electronic excitation energies can then be obtained by propagating the EOM for the 1-RDM and following the dipole moment after the system interacts with an oscillating external electric field. For simple systems with well-separated excited states whose symmetry differs from that of the ground state, excitation energies obtained from this method are comparable to those obtained from full configuration interaction computations. Although the optimized 2-RDM satisfies necessary N-representability conditions, the procedure cannot guarantee a unique mapping from the 1-RDM to the 2-RDM. This deficiency is evident in the mean-field-quality description of transitions to states of the same symmetry as the ground state, as well as in the inability of the method to describe Rabi oscillations.

  19. Spin dependent photon structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manohar, A.V.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge

    1989-01-01

    Spin dependent structure functions of the photon are studied using the operator product expansion. There are new twist-two photon and gluon operators which contribute. The structure functions g 1 and F 3 are calculable in QCD, but differ from their free quark values. The corrections to F 3 are suppressed by 1/log Q 2 . The calculation is an extension of the analysis of Witten for the spin averaged structure functions F 1 and F 2 . (orig.)

  20. Electronic Structure of the Ferryl Intermediate in the α-Ketoglutarate Dependent Non-Heme Iron Halogenase SyrB2: Contributions to H Atom Abstraction Reactivity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Srnec, Martin; Wong, S. D.; Matthews, M. L.; Krebs, C.; Bollinger, J. M.; Solomon, E. I.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 138, č. 15 (2016), s. 5110-5122 ISSN 0002-7863 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GJ15-10279Y Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Ferryl intermediate * syringomycin halogenase * electronic structure Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 13.858, year: 2016

  1. Electronic structure of superlattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altarelli, M.

    1987-01-01

    Calculations of electronic states in semiconductor superlattices are briefly reviewed, with emphasis on the envelope-function method and on comparison with experiments. The energy levels in presence of external magnetic fields are discussed and compared to magneto-optical experiments. (author) [pt

  2. Dependency Structures for Statistical Machine Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Nguyen

    2012-01-01

    Dependency structures represent a sentence as a set of dependency relations. Normally the dependency structures from a tree connect all the words in a sentence. One of the most defining characters of dependency structures is the ability to bring long distance dependency between words to local dependency structures. Another the main attraction of…

  3. Dependence of the elastic properties of the early-transition-metal monoborides on their electronic structures: A density functional theory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Xuewen, E-mail: xuxuewen@hebut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300130 (China); Fu, Kun [School of Computer Science and Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300130 (China); Li, Lanlan; Lu, Zunming; Zhang, Xinghua; Fan, Ying; Lin, Jing; Liu, Guodong; Luo, Hongzhi; Tang, Chengchun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300130 (China)

    2013-06-15

    We systematically investigated the crystal structure, stability, elastic properties, chemical bonding and electronic properties of the early-transition-metal monoborides (TMBs, where TM=Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Hf, Mo, and W) using the ab initio calculations based on the density functional theory. The results indicated that all 11 TMBs crystallized to a CrB-type structure are thermodynamically and mechanically stable. The elastic constants were calculated using the finite strain method. The correlation between the electronic structure and elastic properties was discussed. YB was found to have high machinability (B/C{sub 44}=1.73) and low hardness (C{sub 44}=43 GPa). The weak interaction between the interleaved yttrium planes and weak pd bonding resulted in the good machinability of YB.

  4. Electronic structure of alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrenreich, H.; Schwartz, L.M.

    1976-01-01

    The description of electronic properties of binary substitutional alloys within the single particle approximation is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on a didactic exposition of the equilibrium properties of the transport and magnetic properties of such alloys. Topics covered include: multiple scattering theory; the single band alloy; formal extensions of the theory; the alloy potential; realistic model state densities; the s-d model; and the muffin tin model. 43 figures, 3 tables, 151 references

  5. Electronics for Piezoelectric Smart Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warkentin, D. J.; Tani, J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper briefly presents work addressing some of the basic considerations for the electronic components used in smart structures incorporating piezoelectric elements. After general remarks on the application of piezoelectric elements to the problem of structural vibration control, three main topics are described. Work to date on the development of techniques for embedding electronic components within structural parts is presented, followed by a description of the power flow and dissipation requirements of those components. Finally current work on the development of electronic circuits for use in an 'active wall' for acoustic noise is introduced.

  6. Temperature dependent electronic conduction in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, G.G.; Munn, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    This review describes the temperature dependence of bulk-controlled electronic currents in semiconductors. The scope of the article is wide in that it contrasts conduction mechanisms in inorganic and organic solids and also single crystal and disordered semiconductors. In many experimental situations it is the metal-semiconductor contact or the interface between two dissimilar semiconductors that governs the temperature dependence of the conductivity. However, in order to keep the length of the review within reasonable bounds, these topics have been largely avoided and emphasis is therefore placed on bulk-limited currents. A central feature of electronic conduction in semiconductors is the concentrations of mobile electrons and holes that contribute to the conductivity. Various statistical approaches may be used to calculate these densities which are normally strongly temperature dependent. Section 1 emphasizes the relationship between the position of the Fermi level, the distribution of quantum states, the total number of electrons available and the absolute temperature of the system. The inclusion of experimental data for several materials is designed to assist the experimentalist in his interpretation of activation energy curves. Sections 2 and 3 refer to electronic conduction in disordered solids and molecular crystals, respectively. In these cases alternative approaches to the conventional band theory approach must be considered. For example, the velocities of the charge carriers are usually substantially lower than those in conventional inorganic single crystal semiconductors, thus introducing the possibility of an activated mobility. Some general electronic properties of these materials are given in the introduction to each of these sections and these help to set the conduction mechanisms in context. (orig.)

  7. Selfsimilar time dependent shock structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, R.; Drury, L.O.

    1985-01-01

    Diffusive shock acceleration as an astrophysical mechanism for accelerating charged particles has the advantage of being highly efficient. This means however that the theory is of necessity nonlinear; the reaction of the accelerated particles on the shock structure and the acceleration process must be self-consistently included in any attempt to develop a complete theory of diffusive shock acceleration. Considerable effort has been invested in attempting, at least partially, to do this and it has become clear that in general either the maximum particle energy must be restricted by introducing additional loss processes into the problem or the acceleration must be treated as a time dependent problem (Drury, 1984). It is concluded that stationary modified shock structures can only exist for strong shocks if additional loss processes limit the maximum energy a particle can attain. This is certainly possible and if it occurs the energy loss from the shock will lead to much greater shock compressions. It is however equally possible that no such processes exist and we must then ask what sort of nonstationary shock structure develops. The same argument which excludes stationary structures also rules out periodic solutions and indeed any solution where the width of the shock remains bounded. It follows that the width of the shock must increase secularly with time and it is natural to examine the possibility of selfsimilar time dependent solutions

  8. Selfsimilar time dependent shock structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, R.; Drury, L. O.

    1985-01-01

    Diffusive shock acceleration as an astrophysical mechanism for accelerating charged particles has the advantage of being highly efficient. This means however that the theory is of necessity nonlinear; the reaction of the accelerated particles on the shock structure and the acceleration process must be self-consistently included in any attempt to develop a complete theory of diffusive shock acceleration. Considerable effort has been invested in attempting, at least partially, to do this and it has become clear that in general either the maximum particle energy must be restricted by introducing additional loss processes into the problem or the acceleration must be treated as a time dependent problem (Drury, 1984). It is concluded that stationary modified shock structures can only exist for strong shocks if additional loss processes limit the maximum energy a particle can attain. This is certainly possible and if it occurs the energy loss from the shock will lead to much greater shock compressions. It is however equally possible that no such processes exist and we must then ask what sort of nonstationary shock structure develops. The ame argument which excludes stationary structures also rules out periodic solutions and indeed any solution where the width of the shock remains bounded. It follows that the width of the shock must increase secularly with time and it is natural to examine the possibility of selfsimilar time dependent solutions.

  9. Effects of Si3N4 passivation on the dc and RF characteristics of metamorphic high-electron-mobility transistors depending on the gate-recess structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, J H; Han, M; Baek, Y H; Moon, S W; Rhee, J K; Kim, S D

    2009-01-01

    Effects of the Si 3 N 4 passivation on the dc and RF characteristics of a 0.1 µm metamorphic high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT) are investigated for narrow and wide gate-recess structures. Maximum drain-source saturation current (I dss,max ) and maximum extrinsic transconductance (g m,max ) are reduced by ∼14.8 and ∼11.6%, respectively, in the wide gate-recess structure after the passivation; on the other hand, only ∼5.7 and ∼4.9% reductions are measured from I dss,max and g m,max , respectively, in the narrow gate-recess structure. We examine the passivation-induced degradation by using a modified charge control model assuming the charged surface states on the Si 3 N 4 interface and a comparative study of the hydrodynamic device simulation with the experimental measurement. From the analysis, it is proposed that the difference of degradation in two different gate structures is due to an approximately three times higher charged surface state density of ∼4.5 × 10 11 cm −2 in the wide gate-recess structure than ∼1.6 × 10 11 cm −2 in the narrow gate-recess structure. The cut-off frequency (f T ) of the wide gate-recess structure also exhibits a greater reduction of ∼14.5%, while the f T of the narrow gate-recess structure is reduced by only ∼6.6% after the passivation. This is mainly due to the passivation-induced surface states of a higher density in the wide gate-recess structure. A great increase of the gate-to-drain parasitic capacitance in the wide gate-recess structure makes a major contribution to ∼13.5% degradation of the maximum frequency of oscillation

  10. Temperature dependent electronic structure and magnetism of metallic systems with localized moments. Application on gadolinium; Temperaturabhaengige elektronische Struktur und Magnetismus von metallischen Systemen mit lokalisierten Momenten. Anwendung auf Gadolinium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, C.A.M. dos

    2005-06-24

    This thesis focuses on the theoretical investigation of the temperature dependent electronic and magnetic properties of metallic 4f-systems with localized magnetic moments. The presented theory is based on the Kondo-lattice model, which describes the interaction between a system of 4f-localized magnetic moments and the itinerant conduction band electrons. This interaction is responsible for a remarkable temperature dependence of the electronic structure mainly induced by the subsystem of 4f-localized moments. The many-body problem provoked by the Kondo-lattice model is solved by using a moment conserving Green function technique, which takes care of several special limiting cases. This method reproduces the T=0-exact solvable limiting case of the ferromagnetically saturated semiconductor. The temperature dependent magnetic properties of the 4f-localized subsystem are evaluated by means of a modified Rudermann-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) type procedure, which together with the solution of the electronic part allows for a self-consistent calculation of all the electronic and magnetic properties of the model. Results of model calculations allow to deduce the conditions for ferromagnetism in dependence of the electron density n, exchange coupling J and temperature T. The self-consistently calculated Curie temperature T{sub C} is presented and discussed in dependence of relevant parameters (J, n, and W) of the model. The second part of the thesis is concerned with the investigation of the temperature dependence of the electronic and magnetic properties of the rare-earth metal Gadolinium (Gd). The original Kondo-lattice model is extended to a multi-band Kondo-lattice model and combined with an ab-initio band structure calculation to take into account for the multi-bands in real systems. The single-particle energies of the model are taken from an augmented spherical wave (ASW) band structure calculation. The proposed method avoids the double counting of relevant

  11. Electronic structure of silicon superlattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamurthy, S.; Moriarty, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    Utilizing a new complex-band-structure technique, the electronic structure of model Si-Si/sub 1-x/Ge/sub x/ and MOS superlattices has been obtained over a wide range of layer thickness d (11 less than or equal to d less than or equal to 110 A). For d greater than or equal to 44 A, it is found that these systems exhibit a direct fundamental band gap. Further calculations of band-edge effective masses and impurity scattering rates suggest the possibility of a band-structure-driven enhancement in electron mobility over bulk silicon

  12. Polarization-dependent pump-probe studies in atomic fine-structure levels: towards the production of spin-polarized electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokell, E.; Zamith, S.; Bouchene, M.A.; Girard, B.

    2000-01-01

    The precession of orbital and spin angular momentum vectors has been observed in a pump-probe study of the 4P fine-structure states of atomic potassium. A femtosecond pump pulse prepared a coherent superposition of the two fine-structure components. A time-delayed probe pulse then ionized the system after it had been allowed to evolve freely. Oscillations recorded in the ion signal reflect the evolution of the orientation of the orbital and spin angular momentum due to spin-orbit coupling. This interpretation gives physical insight into the cause of the half-period phase shift observed when the relative polarizations of the laser pulses were changed from parallel to perpendicular. Finally, it is shown that these changes in the orientation of the spin momentum vector of the system can be utilized to produce highly spin-polarized free electrons on the femtosecond scale. (author)

  13. Electronic structure and correlation effects in actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albers, R.C.

    1998-01-01

    This report consists of the vugraphs given at a conference on electronic structure. Topics discussed are electronic structure, f-bonding, crystal structure, and crystal structure stability of the actinides and how they are inter-related

  14. Ballistic transport and electronic structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schep, Kees M.; Kelly, Paul J.; Bauer, Gerrit E.W.

    1998-01-01

    The role of the electronic structure in determining the transport properties of ballistic point contacts is studied. The conductance in the ballistic regime is related to simple geometrical projections of the Fermi surface. The essential physics is first clarified for simple models. For real

  15. The Electronic Structure of Calcium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jan, J.-P.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1981-01-01

    The electronic structure of calcium under pressure is re-examined by means of self-consistent energy band calculations based on the local density approximation and using the linear muffin-tin orbitals (LMTO) method with corrections to the atomic sphere approximation included. At zero pressure...

  16. The structural and electronical factors that contribute affinity for the time-dependent inhibition of PGHS-1 by indomethacin, diclofenac and fenamates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouplana, R.; Pérez, C.; Sánchez, J.; Lozano, J. J.; Puig-Parellada, P.

    1999-05-01

    PGHS-1 and PGHS-2 are the targets of nonsteroidal anti- inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). It appears that the high degree of selectivity for inhibition of PGHS-2 shown by certain compounds is the result of two mechanisms (time-dependent and time-independent inhibition), by which they interact with each isoform. The fenamic acids can be divided into competitive inhibitors of substrate binding and competitive inhibitors that cause time-dependent losses of cyclooxygenase activity. The cyclooxygenase activity was measured by oxygen consumption following preincubation of the enzyme and the inhibitor for increasing periods of time. The rate constants associated with binding inhibition kinetics and structure-activity relationships were calculated for a large number of fenamates, diclofenac and indomethacin. The KI* values are similar but the individual rate constants are markedly different: KI is two-fold lower, and k2 is six-fold slower for diclofenac than for indomethacin. All the active time-dependent compounds show MEPs with a negative conical surface, with their vertex on the minimum of the carboxyl group, which extends around the first aromatic ring to the central region. The conical surface keeps an open angle of 61° or larger, and a close contact surface with the residues Ala527, Ileu523, Val349, and Ser530, in the zones surrounding the bridging amino group and the chlorine atoms for meclofenamate and diclofenac, or in the region around the carbonyl group for indomethacin. The KI* and IC50 values indicate that the interactions that promote the slow binding kinetics must be examined in relation to the reaction energies of formation (ΔHr) of an ionic bond between the deprotonated carboxylic acid group of acid NSAIDs with the monocationic guanidinum group of Arg120, the free energies of solvation in aqueous solution, and the molecular volumes measured. Presumably indomethacin, diclofenac and meclofenamate cause the enzyme to undergo a subtle conformational change to a

  17. 1/f noise in titanium doped aluminum thin film deposited by electron beam evaporation method and its dependence on structural variation with temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananda, P.; Vedanayakam, S. Victor; Thyagarajan, K.; Nandakumar, N.

    2018-05-01

    A brief review of Titanium doped Aluminum film has many attractive properties such as thermal properties and 1/f noise is highlighted. The thin film devices of Titanium doped alluminium are specially used in aerospace technology, automotive, biomedical fields also in microelectronics. In this paper, we discus on 1/f noise and nonlinear effects in titanium doped alluminium thin films deposited on glass substrate using electron beam evaporation for different current densities on varying temperatures of the film. The plots are dawn for 1/f noise of the films at different temperatures ranging from 300°C to 450°C and the slopes are determined. The studies shows a higher order increment in FFT amplitude of low frequency 1/f noise in thin films at annealing temperature 400°C. In this technology used in aerospace has been the major field of application of titanium doped alluminium, being one of the major challenges of the development of new alloys with improved strength at high temperature, wide chord Titanium doped alluminium fan blades increases the efficiency while reducing 1/f noise. Structural properties of XRD is identified.

  18. Bremsstrahlung of La and its dependence on electron energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riehle, F.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of La-bremsstrahlung isocromates with high resolution for quantum energies between 135 eV and 1867 eV are presented and discussed. In the whole energy range investigated, the isocromate structure, identified with the 4f band of La, is placed 5,45 +- 10,1 eV above the Fermi level. This is in contradiction with a calculation of Gloetzel, which predicts the 4f band maximum about 3eV above the Fermi level. This discrepancy is explained in the present work by the fact that the La electronic density of states depends on the occupation number of the states. The bremsstrahlung isocromate has to be considered as a direct copy of the La ion density of states, consisting of the La-atom and the additional primary electron. Resonance like intensity modulations of the x-ray radiation, resulting from transitions of the primary electron in f-like final states, are observed in an analysis of the La-bremsstrahlung isochromate energy dependence. For transitions of the primary electron in d-like final states, no resonances have been found. The energy dependence of the scattering probability in f-like final states can be explained by a model which assumes the final state as composed by a continuum state and a discrete state. (orig.) [de

  19. Electronic structure of lanthanide scandates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizzi, Christopher A.; Koirala, Pratik; Marks, Laurence D.

    2018-02-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations were used to study the electronic structure of three lanthanide scandates: GdSc O3,TbSc O3 , and DySc O3 . X-ray photoelectron spectra simulated from first-principles calculations using a combination of on-site hybrid and GGA +U methods were found to be in good agreement with experimental x-ray photoelectron spectra. The hybrid method was used to model the ground state electronic structure and the GGA +U method accounted for the shift of valence state energies due to photoelectron emission via a Slater-Janak transition state approach. From these results, the lanthanide scandate valence bands were determined to be composed of Ln 4 f ,O 2 p , and Sc 3 d states, in agreement with previous work. However, contrary to previous work the minority Ln 4 f states were found to be located closer to, and in some cases at, the valence band maximum. This suggests that minority Ln 4 f electrons may play a larger role in lanthanide scandate properties than previously thought.

  20. Reproducing the observed energy-dependent structure of Earth's electron radiation belts during storm recovery with an event-specific diffusion model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ripoll, J.-F.; Reeves, G. D.; Cunningham, G. S.; Loridan, V.; Denton, M.; Santolík, Ondřej; Kurth, W. S.; Kletzing, C. A.; Turner, D. L.; Henderson, M. G.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 11 (2016), s. 5616-5625 ISSN 0094-8276 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH15304 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : radiation belts * slot region * electron losses * wave particle interactions * hiss wave s * electron lifetimes Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 4.253, year: 2016 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2016GL068869/full

  1. Structure of liquid alkali metals as electron-ion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaturvedi, D.K.; Senatore, G.; Tosi, M.P.

    1980-08-01

    The static structure factor of liquid alkali metals near freezing, and its dependence on temperature and pressure, are evaluated in an electron-ion plasma model from an accurate theoretical determination of the structure factor of the one-component classical plasma and electron-screening theory. Very good agreement is obtained with the available experimental data. (author)

  2. Electron scattering and nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frois, B.

    1987-01-01

    The search for the appropriate degrees of freedom to describe nuclei is the central focus of nuclear physics today. Therefore the authors explore in this review their current understanding of nuclear structure as defined by electromagnetic data. The precision of the electromagnetic probe allows us to define accurately the limits of present theoretical descriptions. The authors review here a broad range of subjects that have been addressed by recent experiments, from the study of meson exchange currents and single-particle distributions to collective excitations in heavy nuclei. However, they do not discuss elastic magnetic scattering, inelastic excitation of discrete states, or single-nucleon knockout reactions since these reactions were recently reviewed. The principal aim of this review is to offer a fresh perspective on nuclear structure, based on the new generation of electron scattering data presented here and in the above-mentioned articles

  3. Electronic structure of spin systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha-Dasgupta, Tanusri

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • We review the theoretical modeling of quantum spin systems. • We apply the Nth order muffin-tin orbital electronic structure method. • The method shows the importance of chemistry in the modeling. • CuTe{sub 2}O{sub 5} showed a 2-dimensional coupled spin dimer behavior. • Ti substituted Zn{sub 2}VO(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} showed spin gap behavior. - Abstract: Low-dimensional quantum spin systems, characterized by their unconventional magnetic properties, have attracted much attention. Synthesis of materials appropriate to various classes within these systems has made this field very attractive and a site of many activities. The experimental results like susceptibility data are fitted with the theoretical model to derive the underlying spin Hamiltonian. However, often such a fitting procedure which requires correct guess of the assumed spin Hamiltonian leads to ambiguity in deciding the representative model. In this review article, we will describe how electronic structure calculation within the framework of Nth order muffin-tin orbital (NMTO) based Wannier function technique can be utilized to identify the underlying spin model for a large number of such compounds. We will show examples from compounds belonging to vanadates and cuprates.

  4. Existence of time-dependent density-functional theory for open electronic systems: time-dependent holographic electron density theorem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiao; Yam, ChiYung; Wang, Fan; Chen, GuanHua

    2011-08-28

    We present the time-dependent holographic electron density theorem (TD-HEDT), which lays the foundation of time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) for open electronic systems. For any finite electronic system, the TD-HEDT formally establishes a one-to-one correspondence between the electron density inside any finite subsystem and the time-dependent external potential. As a result, any electronic property of an open system in principle can be determined uniquely by the electron density function inside the open region. Implications of the TD-HEDT on the practicality of TDDFT are also discussed.

  5. Parametric dependencies of JET electron temperature profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schunke, B [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Imre, K; Riedel, K [New York Univ., NY (United States)

    1994-07-01

    The JET Ohmic, L-Mode and H-Mode electron temperature profiles obtained from the LIDAR Thomson Scattering Diagnostic are parameterized in terms of the normalized flux parameter and a set of the engineering parameters like plasma current, toroidal field, line averages electron density... It is shown that the electron temperature profiles fit a log-additive model well. It is intended to use the same model to predict the profile shape for D-T discharges in JET and in ITER. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Electronic structure of semiconductor interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman, F

    1983-02-01

    The study of semiconductor interfaces is one of the most active and exciting areas of current semiconductor research. Because interfaces play a vital role in modern semiconductor technology (integrated circuits, heterojunction lasers, solar cells, infrared detectors, etc.), there is a strong incentive to understand interface properties at a fundamental level and advance existing technology thereby. At the same time, technological advances such as molecular beam epitaxy have paved the way for the fabrication of semiconductor heterojunctions and superlattices of novel design which exhibit unusual electronic, optical, and magnetic properties and offer unique opportunities for fundamental scientific research. A general perspective on this subject is offered treating such topics as the atomic and electronic structure of semiconductor surfaces and interfaces; oxidation and oxide layers; semiconductor heterojunctions and superlattices; rectifying metal-semiconductor contacts; and interface reactions. Recent progress is emphasized and some future directions are indicated. In addition, the role that large-scale scientific computation has played in furthering our theoretical understanding of semiconductor surfaces and interfaces is discussed. Finally, the nature of theoretical models, and the role they play in describing the physical world is considered.

  7. Electronic structure of semiconductor interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herman, F.

    1983-01-01

    The study of semiconductor interfaces is one of the most active and exciting areas of current semiconductor research. Because interfaces play a vital role in modern semiconductor technology (integrated circuits, heterojunction lasers, solar cells, infrared detectors, etc.), there is a strong incentive to understand interface properties at a fundamental level and advance existing technology thereby. At the same time, technological advances such as molecular beam epitaxy have paved the way for the fabrication of semiconductor heterojunctions and superlattices of novel design which exhibit unusual electronic, optical, and magnetic properties and offer unique opportunities for fundamental scientific research. A general perspective on this subject is offered treating such topics as the atomic and electronic structure of semiconductor surfaces and interfaces; oxidation and oxide layers; semiconductor heterojunctions and superlattices; rectifying metal-semiconductor contacts; and interface reactions. Recent progress is emphasized and some future directions are indicated. In addition, the role that large-scale scientific computation has played in furthering our theoretical understanding of semiconductor surfaces and interfaces is discussed. Finally, the nature of theoretical models, and the role they play in describing the physical world is considered. (Author) [pt

  8. Electronic structure and electron dynamics at Si(100)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinelt, M. [Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Lehrstuhl fuer Festkoerperphysik, Erlangen (Germany); Max-Born-Institut, Berlin (Germany); Kutschera, M.; Schmidt, R.; Orth, C.; Fauster, T. [Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Lehrstuhl fuer Festkoerperphysik, Erlangen (Germany); Rohlfing, M. [International University Bremen, School of Engineering and Science, P.O. Box 750 561, Bremen (Germany)

    2005-02-01

    The electronic structure and electron dynamics at a Si(100) surface is studied by two-photon photoemission (2PPE). At 90 K the occupied D{sub up} dangling-bond state is located 150{+-}50 meV below the valence-band maximum (VBM) at the center of the surface Brillouin zone anti {gamma} and exhibits an effective hole mass of (0.5{+-}0.15)m{sub e}. The unoccupied D{sub down} band has a local minimum at anti {gamma} at 650{+-}50 meV above the VBM and shows strong dispersion along the dimer rows of the c(4 x 2) reconstructed surface. At 300 K the D{sub down} position shifts comparable to the Si conduction-band minimum by 40 meV to lower energies but the dispersion of the dangling-bond states is independent of temperature. The surface band bending for p-doped silicon is less than 30 meV, while acceptor-type defects cause significant and preparation-dependent band bending on n-doped samples. 2PPE spectra of Si(100) are dominated by interband transitions between the occupied and unoccupied surface states and emission out of transiently and permanently charged surface defects. Including electron-hole interaction in many-body calculations of the quasi-particle band structure leads us to assign a dangling-bond split-off state to a quasi-one-dimensional surface exciton with a binding energy of 130 meV. Electrons resonantly excited to the unoccupied D{sub down} dangling-bond band with an excess energy of about 350 meV need 1.5{+-}0.2 ps to scatter via phonon emission to the band bottom at anti {gamma} and relax within 5 ps with an excited hole in the occupied surface band to form an exciton living for nanoseconds. (orig.)

  9. Sequence dependence of electron-induced DNA strand breakage revealed by DNA nanoarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Adrian; Rackwitz, Jenny; Cauët, Emilie

    2014-01-01

    The electronic structure of DNA is determined by its nucleotide sequence, which is for instance exploited in molecular electronics. Here we demonstrate that also the DNA strand breakage induced by low-energy electrons (18 eV) depends on the nucleotide sequence. To determine the absolute cross sec...

  10. Size-dependent electronic structure controls activity for ethanol electro-oxidation at Ptn/indium tin oxide (n = 1 to 14).

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Weber, Alexander; Baxter, Eric T; Proch, Sebastian; Kane, Matthew D; Rosenfelder, Michael; White, Henry S; Anderson, Scott L

    2015-07-21

    Understanding the factors that control electrochemical catalysis is essential to improving performance. We report a study of electrocatalytic ethanol oxidation - a process important for direct ethanol fuel cells - over size-selected Pt centers ranging from single atoms to Pt14. Model electrodes were prepared by soft-landing of mass-selected Ptn(+) on indium tin oxide (ITO) supports in ultrahigh vacuum, and transferred to an in situ electrochemical cell without exposure to air. Each electrode had identical Pt coverage, and differed only in the size of Pt clusters deposited. The small Ptn have activities that vary strongly, and non-monotonically with deposited size. Activity per gram Pt ranges up to ten times higher than that of 5 to 10 nm Pt particles dispersed on ITO. Activity is anti-correlated with the Pt 4d core orbital binding energy, indicating that electron rich clusters are essential for high activity.

  11. Temperature dependence of the electronic structure of Sr14Cu24O41 studied by resonant inelastic X-ray scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, M.; Ishii, K.; Ikeuchi, K.; Jarrige, I.; Murakami, Y.; Mizuki, J.; Tsutsui, K.; Tohyama, T.; Maekawa, S.; Kudo, K.; Koike, Y.; Endoh, Y.

    2010-01-01

    We report a resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) study of charge excitations in the two-leg ladder Sr 14 Cu 24 O 41 . RIXS spectra at 1-5 eV are found to be dependent on temperature. An intraband excitation of the ladder, which appears as a continuum intensity below the Mott gap, decreases in intensity with temperature. Because the intraband excitation is related to the dynamics of doped holes in the ladder, its decrease of the intraband excitation is attributed to the reduction of the mobile holes in the ladder at low temperature.

  12. Atomic and electronic structure of trilayer graphene/SiC(0001): Evidence of Strong Dependence on Stacking Sequence and charge transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Pierucci, Debora; Brumme, Thomas; Girard, Jean-Christophe; Calandra, Matteo; Silly, Mathieu G.; Sirotti, Fausto; Barbier, Antoine; Mauri, Francesco; Ouerghi, Abdelkarim

    2016-01-01

    International audience; The transport properties of few-layer graphene are the directly result of a peculiar band structure near the Dirac point. Here, for epitaxial graphene grown on SiC, we determine the effect of charge transfer from the SiC substrate on the local density of states (LDOS) of trilayer graphene using scaning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy and angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). Different spectra are observed and are attributed to the existence of two stable...

  13. Photoelectron spectroscopy bulk and surface electronic structures

    CERN Document Server

    Suga, Shigemasa

    2014-01-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy is now becoming more and more required to investigate electronic structures of various solid materials in the bulk, on surfaces as well as at buried interfaces. The energy resolution was much improved in the last decade down to 1 meV in the low photon energy region. Now this technique is available from a few eV up to 10 keV by use of lasers, electron cyclotron resonance lamps in addition to synchrotron radiation and X-ray tubes. High resolution angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) is now widely applied to band mapping of materials. It attracts a wide attention from both fundamental science and material engineering. Studies of the dynamics of excited states are feasible by time of flight spectroscopy with fully utilizing the pulse structures of synchrotron radiation as well as lasers including the free electron lasers (FEL). Spin resolved studies also made dramatic progress by using higher efficiency spin detectors and two dimensional spin detectors. Polarization depend...

  14. The electronic structure of core states under extreme compressions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straub, G.K.

    1992-01-01

    At normal density and for modest compressions, the electronic structure of a metal can be accurately described by treating the conduction electrons and their interactions with the usual methods of band theory. The core electrons remain essentially the same as for an isolated free atom and do not participate in the bonding forces responsible for creating a condensed phase. As the density increases, the core electrons begin to ''see'' one another as the overlap of the tails of wave functions can no longer be neglected. The electronic structure of the core electrons is responsible for an effective repulsive interaction that eventually becomes free-electron-like at very high compressions. The electronic structure of the interacting core electrons may be treated in a simple manner using the Atomic Surface Method (ASM). The ASM is a first-principles treatment of the electronic structure involving a rigorous integration of the Schroedinger equation within the atomic-sphere approximation. Solid phase wave functions are constructed from isolated atom wave functions and the band width W l and the center of gravity of the band C l are obtained from simple formulas. The ASM can also utilize analytic forms of the atomic wave functions and thus provide direct functional dependence of various aspects of the electronic structure. Of particular use in understanding the behavior of the core electrons, the ASM provides the ability to analytically determine the density dependence of the band widths and positions. The process whereby core states interact with one another is best viewed as the formation of narrow electron bands formed from atomic states. As the core-core overlap increases, the bands increase in width and mean energy. In Sec.3 this picture is further developed and from the ASM one obtains the analytic dependence on density of the relative motion of the different bands. Also in Sec. 3 is a discussion of the transition to free electron bands

  15. Density-dependent electron scattering in photoexcited GaAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mics, Zoltán; D'’Angio, Andrea; Jensen, Søren A.

    2013-01-01

    —In a series of systematic optical pump - terahertz probe experiments we study the density-dependent electron scattering rate in photoexcited GaAs in a large range of carrier densities. The electron scattering time decreases by as much as a factor of 4, from 320 to 60 fs, as the electron density...

  16. Equilibrium and nonequilibrium solvation and solute electronic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H.J.; Hynes, J.T.

    1990-01-01

    When a molecular solute is immersed in a polar and polarizable solvent, the electronic wave function of the solute system is altered compared to its vacuum value; the solute electronic structure is thus solvent-dependent. Further, the wave function will be altered depending upon whether the polarization of the solvent is or is not in equilibrium with the solute charge distribution. More precisely, while the solvent electronic polarization should be in equilibrium with the solute electronic wave function, the much more sluggish solvent orientational polarization need not be. We call this last situation non-equilibrium solvation. We outline a nonlinear Schroedinger equation approach to these issues

  17. Effect of Electronic Monitoring on Social Welfare Dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Højsgaard; Andersen, Signe Hald

    2014-01-01

    Research Summary We studied the effect on unemployment social welfare dependence of serving a sentence under elec-tronic monitoring rather than in prison, using Danish registry data and two policy shifts that extended the use of electronic monitoring in Denmark. We found electronic monitoring...... to experiences from other contexts. The experiences from Denmark are clear: Electronic monitoring is less harmful than imprisonment to the life course out-comes of offenders. Since electronic monitoring could also very well be less costly for the corrections administrations than imprisonment, efforts to extend...... the use of electronic monitoring in the United States could be accelerated....

  18. Electronic structure of A15 compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickett, W.E.

    1980-01-01

    For the past twenty-five years compounds with the A15 crystal structure have dominated the class of high temperature superconductors. The crystal structure of an A15 compound A 3 B is cubic (space group O/sub h/ 3 ). However, the site symmetry (D/sub 2d/) of the A atoms is much lower than cubic, an unusual occurrence in cubic binary compounds. Variations on this theme have supplied the basis of many theoretical models of the anomalous temperature (T) dependence of normal state properties and the low temperature cubic reversible tetragonal structural transformations which accompany high values of T/sub c/ in A15 compounds. In this paper results of self-consistent pseudopotential band structure calculations are used to assess some important aspects of the unique and unusual behavior in A15 compounds: (1) the role of the B atom in determining the overall electronic structure will be shown to be important; (2) the effect of the low site symmetry of the A atom on the charge density and potential will be assessed; and (3) the bonding will be shown to be metallic-covalent with no significant A-B charge transfer

  19. Electronic structure studies of fullerites and fullerides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkel, M.; Sohmen, E.; Masaki, A.; Romberg, H.; Alexander, M.; Knupfer, M.; Golden, M.S.; Adelmann, P.; Renker, B.; Fink, J.

    1993-01-01

    The electronic structure of fullerites and fullerides has been investigated by high-resolution photoemission and by high-energy electron energy-loss spectroscopy in transmission. Information on the occupied Π and σ bands, on the unoccupied Π * and σ * bands, and on the joint density of states has been obtained. In particular, we report on the changes of the electronic structure of fullerides as a function of dopant concentration. (orig.)

  20. Solvated electron structure in glassy matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kevan, L.

    1981-01-01

    Current knowledge of the detailed geometrical structure of solvated electrons in aqueous and organic media is summarized. The geometry of solvated electrons in glassy methanol, ethanol, and 2-methyltetrahydrofuran is discussed. Advanced electron magnetic resonance methods and development of new methods of analysis of electron spin echo modulation patterns, second moment line shapes, and forbidden photon spin-flip transitions for paramagnetic species in these disordered systems are discussed. 66 references are cited

  1. Electronic structure and tautomerism of thioamides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novak, Igor, E-mail: inovak@csu.edu.au [Charles Sturt University, POB 883, Orange, NSW 2800 (Australia); Klasinc, Leo, E-mail: klasinc@irb.hr [Physical Chemistry Department, Ruđer Bošković Institute, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia); McGlynn, Sean P., E-mail: sean.mcglynn@chemgate.chem.lsu.edu [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Electronic structure of thioamide group and its relation to Lewis basicity. • Tautomerism of the (thio)amide groups. • Substituent effects on the electronic structure of (thio)amide group. - Abstract: The electronic structures of several thioamides have been studied by UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). The relative stabilities of keto–enol tautomers have been determined using high-level ab initio calculations and the results were used in the analysis of UPS spectra. The main features of electronic structure and tautomerism of thioamide derivatives are discussed. The predominant tautomers in the gas phase are of keto–(thio)keto form. The addition of cyclohexanone moiety to the thioamide group enhances the Lewis base character of the sulfur atom. The addition of phenyl group to the (thio)amide group significantly affects its electronic structure.

  2. Size-dependent electronic properties of metal nanostructures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Size-dependent electronic properties of metal nanostructures. G.U. Kulkarni. Chemistry and Physics of Materials Unit. Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research. Bangalore, India. kulkarni@jncasr.ac.in.

  3. Electron scattering and nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolynec, E.

    1985-01-01

    A review of the historical development and the theory necessary to the interpretation of the experimental results is made. Some measurement techniques, experimental results and the technique of analysis of these data are presented. Future perspectives, due to the appearence of continous electron current accelerators, in this field of study are discussed. (L.C.) [pt

  4. Electron gun controlled smart structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jeffrey W.; Main, John Alan; Redmond, James M.; Henson, Tammy D.; Watson, Robert D.

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed is a method and system for actively controlling the shape of a sheet of electroactive material; the system comprising: one or more electrodes attached to the frontside of the electroactive sheet; a charged particle generator, disposed so as to direct a beam of charged particles (e.g. electrons) onto the electrode; a conductive substrate attached to the backside of the sheet; and a power supply electrically connected to the conductive substrate; whereby the sheet changes its shape in response to an electric field created across the sheet by an accumulation of electric charge within the electrode(s), relative to a potential applied to the conductive substrate. Use of multiple electrodes distributed across on the frontside ensures a uniform distribution of the charge with a single point of e-beam incidence, thereby greatly simplifying the beam scanning algorithm and raster control electronics, and reducing the problems associated with "blooming". By placing a distribution of electrodes over the front surface of a piezoelectric film (or other electroactive material), this arrangement enables improved control over the distribution of surface electric charges (e.g. electrons) by creating uniform (and possibly different) charge distributions within each individual electrode. Removal or deposition of net electric charge can be affected by controlling the secondary electron yield through manipulation of the backside electric potential with the power supply. The system can be used for actively controlling the shape of space-based deployable optics, such as adaptive mirrors and inflatable antennae.

  5. STRUCTURAL STABILITY AND ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-12-31

    Dec 31, 2012 ... may be applications at high temperature strength and corrosion ... B2 structure, like that found in cesium-chloride (CsCl) and chemical formula RM, where R denotes a rare - earth element and M denotes a late transition metal ...

  6. Electronic structure of metallic glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oelhafen, P.; Lapka, R.; Gubler, U.; Krieg, J.; DasGupta, A.; Guentherodt, H.J.; Mizoguchi, T.; Hague, C.; Kuebler, J.; Nagel, S.R.

    1981-01-01

    This paper is organized in six sections and deals with (1) the glassy transition metal alloys, their d-band structure, the d-band shifts on alloying and their relation to the alloy heat of formation (ΔH) and the glass forming ability, (2) the glass to crystal phase transition viewed by valence band spectroscopy, (3) band structure calculations, (4) metallic glasses prepared by laser glazing, (5) glassy normal metal alloys, and (6) glassy hydrides

  7. Electronic structure and tautomerism of aryl ketones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novak, Igor; Klasinc, Leo; Šket, Boris; McGlynn, S.P.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Photoelectron spectroscopy, tautomerism. - Highlights: • UV photoelectron spectroscopy of aryl ketones. • The relative stability of tautomers and their electronic structures. • The factors influencing tautomerism. - Abstract: The electronic structures of several aryl ketones (AK) and their α-halo derivatives have been studied by UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). The relative stabilities of keto–enol tautomers have been determined using high-level ab initio calculations and the results were used in the analysis of UPS spectra. The main features of electronic structure and tautomerism of the AK derivatives are discussed

  8. Phenomenology of the electron structure function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slominski, W.; Szwed, J.

    2001-01-01

    The advantages of introducing the electron structure function (ESF) in electron induced processes are demonstrated. Contrary to the photon structure function it is directly measured in such processes. At present energies, a simultaneous analysis of both the electron and the photon structure functions gives an important test of the experimentally applied methods. Estimates of the ESF at LEP momenta are given. At very high momenta contributions from W and Z bosons together with γ-Z interference can be observed. Predictions for the next generation of experiments are given. (orig.)

  9. Electronic structure and tautomerism of aryl ketones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novak, Igor, E-mail: inovak@csu.edu.au [Charles Sturt University, POB 883, Orange, NSW 2800 (Australia); Klasinc, Leo, E-mail: klasinc@irb.hr [Physical Chemistry Department, Ruđer Bošković Institute, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Šket, Boris, E-mail: Boris.Sket@fkkt.uni-lj.si [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, University of Ljubljana, SI-1000 (Slovenia); McGlynn, S.P., E-mail: sean.mcglynn@chemgate.chem.lsu.edu [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Graphical abstract: Photoelectron spectroscopy, tautomerism. - Highlights: • UV photoelectron spectroscopy of aryl ketones. • The relative stability of tautomers and their electronic structures. • The factors influencing tautomerism. - Abstract: The electronic structures of several aryl ketones (AK) and their α-halo derivatives have been studied by UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). The relative stabilities of keto–enol tautomers have been determined using high-level ab initio calculations and the results were used in the analysis of UPS spectra. The main features of electronic structure and tautomerism of the AK derivatives are discussed.

  10. On the dependence structure of Gaussian queues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Es-Saghouani, A.; Mandjes, M.R.H.

    2009-01-01

    In this article we study Gaussian queues (that is, queues fed by Gaussian processes, such as fractional Brownian motion (fBm) and the integrated Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (iOU) process), with a focus on the dependence structure of the workload process. The main question is to what extent does the workload

  11. Epitaxial graphene electronic structure and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Heer, Walt A; Berger, Claire; Wu Xiaosong; Sprinkle, Mike; Hu Yike; Ruan Ming; First, Phillip N; Stroscio, Joseph A; Haddon, Robert; Piot, Benjamin; Faugeras, Clement; Potemski, Marek; Moon, Jeong-Sun

    2010-01-01

    Since its inception in 2001, the science and technology of epitaxial graphene on hexagonal silicon carbide has matured into a major international effort and is poised to become the first carbon electronics platform. A historical perspective is presented and the unique electronic properties of single and multilayered epitaxial graphenes on electronics grade silicon carbide are reviewed. Early results on transport and the field effect in Si-face grown graphene monolayers provided proof-of-principle demonstrations. Besides monolayer epitaxial graphene, attention is given to C-face grown multilayer graphene, which consists of electronically decoupled graphene sheets. Production, structure and electronic structure are reviewed. The electronic properties, interrogated using a wide variety of surface, electrical and optical probes, are discussed. An overview is given of recent developments of several device prototypes including resistance standards based on epitaxial graphene quantum Hall devices and new ultrahigh frequency analogue epitaxial graphene amplifiers.

  12. Instructional Approach to Molecular Electronic Structure Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykstra, Clifford E.; Schaefer, Henry F.

    1977-01-01

    Describes a graduate quantum mechanics projects in which students write a computer program that performs ab initio calculations on the electronic structure of a simple molecule. Theoretical potential energy curves are produced. (MLH)

  13. Electronic Structure of Large-Scale Graphene Nanoflakes

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Wei; Lin, Lin; Yang, Chao; Yang, Jinlong

    2014-01-01

    With the help of the recently developed SIESTA-PEXSI method [J. Phys.: Condens. Matter \\textbf{26}, 305503 (2014)], we perform Kohn-Sham density functional theory (DFT) calculations to study the stability and electronic structure of hexagonal graphene nanoflakes (GNFs) with up to 11,700 atoms. We find the electronic properties of GNFs, including their cohesive energy, HOMO-LUMO energy gap, edge states and aromaticity, depend sensitively on the type of edges (ACGNFs and ZZGNFs), size and the n...

  14. Electron transfer in organic glass. Distance and energy dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krongauz, V.V.

    1992-01-01

    The authors have investigated the distance and energy dependence of electron transfer in rigid organic glasses containing randomly dispersed electron donor and electron acceptor molecules. Pulsed radiolysis by an electron beam from a linear accelerator was used for ionization resulting in charge deposition on donor molecules. The disappearance kinetics of donor radical anions due to electron transfer to acceptor was monitored spectroscopically by the change in optical density at the wavelength corresponding to that of donor radical anion absorbance. It was found that the rate of the electron transfer observed experimentally was higher than that computed using the Marcus-Levich theory assuming that the electron-transfer activation barrier is equal to the binding energy of electron on the donor molecule. This discrepancy between the experimental and computed results suggests that the open-quotes inertclose quotes media in which electron-transfer reaction takes place may be participating in the process, resulting in experimentally observed higher electron-transfer rates. 32 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Electron conductance in curved quantum structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willatzen, Morten; Gravesen, Jens

    2010-01-01

    is computationally fast and provides direct (geometrical) parameter insight as regards the determination of the electron transmission coefficient. We present, as a case study, calculations of the electron conductivity of a helically shaped quantum-wire structure and discuss the influence of the quantum......A differential-geometry analysis is employed to investigate the transmission of electrons through a curved quantum-wire structure. Although the problem is a three-dimensional spatial problem, the Schrodinger equation can be separated into three general coordinates. Hence, the proposed method...

  16. Shape dependent electronic properties of wurzite GaN nanowire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Pankaj, E-mail: pankajs@iiitm.ac.in; Kumar, Avaneesh, E-mail: avaneeshk7@ymail.com; Sharma, Varun, E-mail: sunny2013@gmail.com [Nanomaterials Research Group, ABV-Indian Institute of Information Technology and Management (IIITM), Gwalior-474015 (India); Jaiswal, Neeraj K., E-mail: neerajkumar.phd@gmail.com [Discipline of Physics, PDPM-Indian Institute of Information Technology, Design and Manufacturing (IIITDM), Jabalpur-482005 (India)

    2016-05-06

    In the present work, energetic stability and electronic behavior of triangular and square shaped wurzite GaN NW oriented along [1100] and [11 2 0] direction has been investigated by employing ab-initio DFT calculation. Structural analysis suggests that triangular shaped NW undergoes strong surface reconstruction compared to square shaped NW. However, binding energy reveals that square shaped NW is energetically more feasible than triangular NW. Further, from electronic band structure we observe that both structures are metallic with higher metallicity for triangular shaped NW.

  17. Field dependence of the electron spin relaxation in quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calero, Carlos; Chudnovsky, E M; Garanin, D A

    2005-10-14

    The interaction of the electron spin with local elastic twists due to transverse phonons is studied. The universal dependence of the spin-relaxation rate on the strength and direction of the magnetic field is obtained in terms of the electron gyromagnetic tensor and macroscopic elastic constants of the solid. The theory contains no unknown parameters and it can be easily tested in experiment. At high magnetic field it provides a parameter-free lower bound on the electron spin relaxation in quantum dots.

  18. Electronic structure of a graphene superlattice with massive Dirac fermions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Jonas R. F.

    2015-01-01

    We study the electronic and transport properties of a graphene-based superlattice theoretically by using an effective Dirac equation. The superlattice consists of a periodic potential applied on a single-layer graphene deposited on a substrate that opens an energy gap of 2Δ in its electronic structure. We find that extra Dirac points appear in the electronic band structure under certain conditions, so it is possible to close the gap between the conduction and valence minibands. We show that the energy gap E g can be tuned in the range 0 ≤ E g  ≤ 2Δ by changing the periodic potential. We analyze the low energy electronic structure around the contact points and find that the effective Fermi velocity in very anisotropic and depends on the energy gap. We show that the extra Dirac points obtained here behave differently compared to previously studied systems

  19. Modeling of the atomic and electronic structures of interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, A.P.

    1988-01-01

    Recent tight binding and Car-Parrinello simulations of grain boundaries in semiconductors are reviewed. A critique is given of some models of embrittlement that are based on electronic structure considerations. The structural unit model of grain boundary structure is critically assessed using some results for mixed tilt and twist grain boundaries. A new method of characterizing interfacial structure in terms of bond angle distribution functions is described. A new formulation of thermodynamic properties of interfaces is presented which focusses on the local atomic environment. Effective, temperature dependent N-body atomic interactions are derived for studying grain boundary structure at elevated temperature

  20. Molecular alignment dependent electron interference in attosecond ultraviolet photoionization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Jun Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present molecular photoionization processes by intense attosecond ultraviolet laser pulses from numerical solutions of time-dependent Schrödinger equations. Simulations preformed on a single electron diatomic H2+ show minima in molecular photoelectron energy spectra resulting from two center interference effects which depend strongly on molecular alignment. We attribute such sensitivity to the spatial orientation asymmetry of the photoionization process from the two nuclei. A similar influence on photoelectron kinetic energies is also presented.

  1. Molecular alignment dependent electron interference in attosecond ultraviolet photoionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Kai-Jun; Bandrauk, André D.

    2015-01-01

    We present molecular photoionization processes by intense attosecond ultraviolet laser pulses from numerical solutions of time-dependent Schrödinger equations. Simulations preformed on a single electron diatomic H2+ show minima in molecular photoelectron energy spectra resulting from two center interference effects which depend strongly on molecular alignment. We attribute such sensitivity to the spatial orientation asymmetry of the photoionization process from the two nuclei. A similar influence on photoelectron kinetic energies is also presented. PMID:26798785

  2. Size-dependent single electron transfer and semi-metal-to-insulator transitions in molecular metal oxide electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balliou, Angelika; Bouroushian, Mirtat; Douvas, Antonios M; Skoulatakis, George; Kennou, Stella; Glezos, Nikos

    2018-07-06

    All-inorganic self-arranged molecular transition metal oxide hyperstructures based on polyoxometalate molecules (POMs) are fabricated and tested as electronically tunable components in emerging electronic devices. POM hyperstructures reveal great potential as charging nodes of tunable charging level for molecular memories and as enhancers of interfacial electron/hole injection for photovoltaic stacks. STM, UPS, UV-vis spectroscopy and AFM measurements show that this functionality stems from the films' ability to structurally tune their HOMO-LUMO levels and electron localization length at room temperature. By adapting POM nanocluster size in solution, self-doping and current modulation of four orders of magnitude is monitored on a single nanocluster on SiO 2 at voltages as low as 3 Volt. Structurally driven insulator-to-semi-metal transitions and size-dependent current regulation through single electron tunneling are demonstrated and examined with respect to the stereochemical and electronic structure of the molecular entities. This extends the value of self-assembly as a tool for correlation length and electronic properties tuning and demonstrate POM hyperstructures' plausibility for on-chip molecular electronics operative at room temperature.

  3. Size-dependent single electron transfer and semi-metal-to-insulator transitions in molecular metal oxide electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balliou, Angelika; Bouroushian, Mirtat; Douvas, Antonios M.; Skoulatakis, George; Kennou, Stella; Glezos, Nikos

    2018-07-01

    All-inorganic self-arranged molecular transition metal oxide hyperstructures based on polyoxometalate molecules (POMs) are fabricated and tested as electronically tunable components in emerging electronic devices. POM hyperstructures reveal great potential as charging nodes of tunable charging level for molecular memories and as enhancers of interfacial electron/hole injection for photovoltaic stacks. STM, UPS, UV–vis spectroscopy and AFM measurements show that this functionality stems from the films’ ability to structurally tune their HOMO–LUMO levels and electron localization length at room temperature. By adapting POM nanocluster size in solution, self-doping and current modulation of four orders of magnitude is monitored on a single nanocluster on SiO2 at voltages as low as 3 Volt. Structurally driven insulator-to-semi-metal transitions and size-dependent current regulation through single electron tunneling are demonstrated and examined with respect to the stereochemical and electronic structure of the molecular entities. This extends the value of self-assembly as a tool for correlation length and electronic properties tuning and demonstrate POM hyperstructures’ plausibility for on-chip molecular electronics operative at room temperature.

  4. Overview of nuclear structure with electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geesaman, D. F.

    1999-01-01

    Following a broad summary of the author's view of nuclear structure in 1974, he will discuss the key elements they have learned in the past 25 years from the research at the M.I.T. Bates Linear Accelerator center and its sister electron accelerator laboratories. Electron scattering has provided the essential measurements for most of the progress. The future is bright for nuclear structure research as their ability to realistically calculate nuclear structure observables has dramatically advanced and they are increasingly able to incorporate an understanding of quantum chromodynamics into their picture of the nucleus

  5. Direction dependent structures in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herberthson, M.

    1993-01-01

    This thesis deals with, within the theory of general relativity, asymptotic properties of certain types of space-times. Using conformal transformations, it is possible to describe asymptotic properties of a physical space-time in terms of the local behaviour of the new, rescaled space-time. One then uses so called direction dependent structures. We present two such structures and applications to them. One structure is used in the study of spacelike (or spatial) infinity. We discuss the asymptotic conditions on the gravitational and the electromagnetic field, especially the conditions put on directions corresponding to future and past null infinity. It is shown that these fields have desired physical properties. The other structure is used in connection with timelike infinity. Using this structure, we suggest a new definition of timelike infinity. This definition differs significantly from earlier definitions, and leads to the concept of asymptotically stationary space-times. We also suggest a definition of asymptotic flatness at future null infinity, and a definition of a black hole which is, in a sense, local. Both of these definitions fit nicely into the structure. (24 refs.)

  6. Electronically induced nuclear transitions - temperature dependence and Rabi oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niez, J.J.

    2002-01-01

    This paper deals with a nucleus electromagnetically coupled with the bound states of its electronic surroundings. It describes the temperature dependence of its dynamics and the onset of potential Rabi oscillations by means of a Master Equation. The latter is generalized in order to account for possible strong resonances. Throughout the paper the approximation schemes are discussed and tested. (authors)

  7. Temperature dependence of electron concentration in cadmium arsenide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelten, M.J.; Blom, F.A.P.

    1979-01-01

    From measurements of the temperature dependence of the electron concentration in Cd 3 As 2 , we found values for the conduction-band parameters that are in good agreement with those recently reported by Aubin, Caron, and Jay-Gerin. However, in contrast with these authors we found no small overlap,

  8. Influence of soliton distributions on the spin-dependent electronic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Based on Su–Schrieffer–Heeger (SSH) Hamiltonian and using a generalized Green's function formalism, wecalculate the spin-dependent currents, the electronic transmission and tunnelling magnetoresistance (TMR). We found that the presence of a uniform distribution of the soliton centres along the molecular chain ...

  9. Impact-parameter-dependent electronic stopping of swift ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schinner, A.; Sigmund, P.

    2010-01-01

    A computational scheme has been developed to estimate the mean electronic energy loss of an incident swift ion on an atomic target as a function of the impact parameter between the moving nuclei. The theoretical basis is binary stopping theory. In order to extract impact-parameter dependencies it

  10. The dependence of the electronic coupling on energy gap and bridge conformation - Towards prediction of the distance dependence of electron transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eng, Mattias P.; Albinsson, Bo

    2009-01-01

    The attenuation factor, β, for the distance dependence of electron exchange reactions is a sensitive function of the donor-bridge energy gap and bridge conformation. In this work the electronic coupling for electron and triplet excitation energy transfer has been investigated for five commonly used repeating bridge structures. The investigated bridge structures are OF (oligo fluorene), OP (oligo phenylene), OPE (oligo p-phenyleneethynylene), OPV (oligo phenylenevinylene), and OTP (oligo thiophene). Firstly, the impact of the donor-bridge energy gap was investigated by performing calculations with a variety of donors appended onto bridges that were kept in a planar conformation. This resulted in, to our knowledge, the first presented sets of bridge specific parameters to be inserted into the commonly used McConnell model. Secondly, since at experimental conditions large conformational flexibility is expected, a previously developed model that takes conformational disorder of the bridge into account has been applied to the investigated systems [M.P. Eng, T. Ljungdahl, J. Martensson, B. Albinsson, J. Phys. Chem. B 110 (2006) 6483]. This model is based on Boltzmann averaging and has been shown to describe the temperature dependence of the attenuation factor through OPE-bridges. Together, the parameters describing the donor-bridge energy gap dependence, for planar bridge structures, and the Boltzmann averaging procedure, describing the impact of rotational disorder, have the potential to a priori predict attenuation factors for electron and excitation energy transfer reactions through bridged donor-acceptor systems

  11. The effect of oxide shell thickness on the structural, electronic, and optical properties of Si-SiO{sub 2} core-shell nano-crystals: A (time dependent)density functional theory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazemi, Sanaz, E-mail: s.nazemi@ut.ac.ir, E-mail: pourfath@ut.ac.ir; Soleimani, Ebrahim Asl [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran 14395-515 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Pourfath, Mahdi, E-mail: s.nazemi@ut.ac.ir, E-mail: pourfath@ut.ac.ir [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran 14395-515 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Microelectronics, Technische Universität Wien, Wien A-1040 (Austria); Kosina, Hans [Institute for Microelectronics, Technische Universität Wien, Wien A-1040 (Austria)

    2016-04-14

    Due to their tunable properties, silicon nano-crystals (NC) are currently being investigated. Quantum confinement can generally be employed for size-dependent band-gap tuning at dimensions smaller than the Bohr radius (∼5 nm for silicon). At the nano-meter scale, however, increased surface-to-volume ratio makes the surface effects dominant. Specifically, in Si-SiO{sub 2} core-shell semiconductor NCs the interfacial transition layer causes peculiar electronic and optical properties, because of the co-existence of intermediate oxidation states of silicon (Si{sup n+}, n = 0–4). Due to the presence of the many factors involved, a comprehensive understanding of the optical properties of these NCs has not yet been achieved. In this work, Si-SiO{sub 2} NCs with a diameter of 1.1 nm and covered by amorphous oxide shells with thicknesses between 2.5 and 4.75 Å are comprehensively studied, employing density functional theory calculations. It is shown that with increased oxide shell thickness, the low-energy part of the optical transition spectrum of the NC is red shifted and attenuated. Moreover, the absorption coefficient is increased in the high-energy part of the spectrum which corresponds to SiO{sub 2} transitions. Structural examinations indicate a larger compressive stress on the central silicon cluster with a thicker oxide shell. Examination of the local density of states reveals the migration of frontier molecular orbitals from the oxide shell into the silicon core with the increase of silica shell thickness. The optical and electrical properties are explained through the analysis of the density of states and the spatial distribution of silicon sub-oxide species.

  12. Electronic Structure of Eu6C60

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiao-Xiong; LI Hong-Nian; XU Ya-Bo; WANG Peng; ZHANG Wen-Hua; XU Fa-Qiang

    2009-01-01

    We study the valence band of Eu-intercalated C60 by synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy to un-derstand the ferromagnetism (FM) and the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) of Eu6C60. The results reveal the semiconducting property and the remarkable 5d6s-π hybridization. Eu-C60 bonding has both ionic and covalent contributions. No more than half the 5d6s electrons transfer from Eu to the LUMO derived band of C60, and the LUMO+1 derived band is not filled. The remaining valence electrons of Eu, together with some π (LUMO, HOMO and HOMO-1) electrons, constitute the covalent bond. The electronic structure implies that the magnetic coupling in Eu6C60 should be through the intra-atomic f-sd exchange and the medium of the π electrons. The possibility of the GMR being tunnelling magnetoresistance is ruled out.

  13. Angular dependent transport of auroral electrons in the upper atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lummerzheim, D.; Rees, M.H.

    1989-01-01

    The transport of auroral electrons through the upper atmosphere is analyzed. The transport equation is solved using a discrete ordinate method including elastic and inelastic scattering of electrons resulting in changes of pitch angle, and degradation in energy as the electrons penetrate into the atmosphere. The transport equation is solved numerically for the electron intensity as a function of altitude, pitch angle, and energy. In situ measurements of the pitch angle and energy distribution of precipitating electrons over an auroral arc provide boundary conditions for the calculation. The electron spectra from various locations over the aurora present a variety of anisotropic pitch angle distributions and energy spectra. Good agreement is found between the observed backscattered electron energy spectra and model predictions. Differences occur at low energies (below 500 eV) in the structure of the pitch angle distribution. Model calculations were carried out with various different phase functions for elastic and inelastic collisions to attempt changing the angular scattering, but the observed pitch angle distributions remain unexplained. We suggest that mechanisms other than collisional scattering influence the angular distribution of auroral electrons at or below 300 km altitude in the low energy domain. (author)

  14. Atomic and electronic structures of novel silicon surface structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, J.H. Jr.

    1997-03-01

    The modification of silicon surfaces is presently of great interest to the semiconductor device community. Three distinct areas are the subject of inquiry: first, modification of the silicon electronic structure; second, passivation of the silicon surface; and third, functionalization of the silicon surface. It is believed that surface modification of these types will lead to useful electronic devices by pairing these modified surfaces with traditional silicon device technology. Therefore, silicon wafers with modified electronic structure (light-emitting porous silicon), passivated surfaces (H-Si(111), Cl-Si(111), Alkyl-Si(111)), and functionalized surfaces (Alkyl-Si(111)) have been studied in order to determine the fundamental properties of surface geometry and electronic structure using synchrotron radiation-based techniques.

  15. Extremely large magnetoresistance and electronic structure of TmSb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Yan; Zhang, Hongyun; Lu, Xiao-Qin; Sun, Lin-Lin; Xu, Sheng; Lu, Zhong-Yi; Liu, Kai; Zhou, Shuyun; Xia, Tian-Long

    2018-02-01

    We report the magnetotransport properties and the electronic structure of TmSb. TmSb exhibits extremely large transverse magnetoresistance and Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillation at low temperature and high magnetic field. Interestingly, the split of Fermi surfaces induced by the nonsymmetric spin-orbit interaction has been observed from SdH oscillation. The analysis of the angle-dependent SdH oscillation illustrates the contribution of each Fermi surface to the conductivity. The electronic structure revealed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and first-principles calculations demonstrates a gap at the X point and the absence of band inversion. Combined with the trivial Berry phase extracted from SdH oscillation and the nearly equal concentrations of electron and hole from Hall measurements, it is suggested that TmSb is a topologically trivial semimetal and the observed XMR originates from the electron-hole compensation and high mobility.

  16. Structural changes induced by electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koike, J.; Pedraza, D.F.

    1993-01-01

    Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite was irradiated at room temperature with 300 kV electrons. Transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy were employed to study the structural changes produced by irradiation. The occurrence of a continuous ring intensity in the selected area diffraction (SAD) pattern obtained on a specimen irradiated with the electron beam parallel to the c-crystallographic axis indicated that microstructural changes had occurred. However, from the SAD pattern obtained for the specimens tilted relative to the irradiation direction, it was found that up to a fluence of 1.1x10 27 e/m 2 graphite remained crystalline. An SAD pattern of a specimen irradiated with the electron beam perpendicular to the c-axis confirmed the persistence of crystalline order. High resolution electron microscopy showed that ordering along the c-axis direction remained. A density reduction of 8.9% due to irradiation was determined from the plasmon frequency shift. A qualitative model is proposed to explain these observations. A new determination of the threshold displacement energy, Ed, of carbon atoms in graphite was done by examining the appearance of a continuous ring in the SAD pattern at various electron energies. A value of 30 eV was obtained whether the incident electron beam was parallel or perpendicular to the c-axis, demonstrating that Ed is independent of the displacement direction

  17. Structural stability and electronic structure of YCu ductile ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We investigate the structural, elastic and electronic properties of cubic YCu intermetallic compound. Which crystallize in the CsCl- B2 type structure, the investigated using the first principle full potential linearized augmented plane wave method (FP-LAPW) within density functional Theory (DFT). We used generalized ...

  18. Intensity dependence of electron gas kinetics in a laser corona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mašek Martin

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In various experimental situations relevant to the laser fusion, such as plasma near the light entrance holes of hohlraum in the indirect drive experiments or more recently in the shock ignition direct drive a relatively long underdense plasma of corona type is encountered, which is subject to an intense nanosecond laser beam. The plasma is only weakly collisional and thus in the electron phase space a complicated kinetic evolution is going on, which is taking the electron gas fairly far from the thermal equilibrium and contributes to its unstable behaviour. These phenomena impede the absorption and thermalization of the incoming laser energy, create groups of fast electrons and also may lead to a non-linear reflection of the heating laser beam. One of the key processes leading to the electron acceleration is the stimulated Raman scattering (SRS in its non-linear phase. The SRS in the presence of electron-ion collisions requires a certain threshold intensity above which the mentioned non-dissipative phenomena can occur and develop to the stage, where they may become unpleasant for the fusion experiments. To assess this intensity limit a computational model has been developed based on the Vlasov-Maxwell kinetics describing such a plasma in 1D geometry. At a relatively high intensity of 1016 W/cm2 a number of non-linear phenomena are predicted by the code such as a saturation of Landau damping, which is then translated in an unfavourable time dependence of the reflected light intensity and formation of accelerated electron groups due to the electron trapping. The purpose of the present contribution is to map the intensity dependence of this non-linear development with the aim of assessing its weight in fusion relevant situations.

  19. Electron acoustic nonlinear structures in planetary magnetospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, K. H.; Qureshi, M. N. S.; Masood, W.; Shah, H. A.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we have studied linear and nonlinear propagation of electron acoustic waves (EAWs) comprising cold and hot populations in which the ions form the neutralizing background. The hot electrons have been assumed to follow the generalized ( r , q ) distribution which has the advantage that it mimics most of the distribution functions observed in space plasmas. Interestingly, it has been found that unlike Maxwellian and kappa distributions, the electron acoustic waves admit not only rarefactive structures but also allow the formation of compressive solitary structures for generalized ( r , q ) distribution. It has been found that the flatness parameter r , tail parameter q , and the nonlinear propagation velocity u affect the propagation characteristics of nonlinear EAWs. Using the plasmas parameters, typically found in Saturn's magnetosphere and the Earth's auroral region, where two populations of electrons and electron acoustic solitary waves (EASWs) have been observed, we have given an estimate of the scale lengths over which these nonlinear waves are expected to form and how the size of these structures would vary with the change in the shape of the distribution function and with the change of the plasma parameters.

  20. Modeling and Verification of Dependable Electronic Power System Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ling; Fan, Ping; Zhang, Xiao-fang

    The electronic power system can be viewed as a system composed of a set of concurrently interacting subsystems to generate, transmit, and distribute electric power. The complex interaction among sub-systems makes the design of electronic power system complicated. Furthermore, in order to guarantee the safe generation and distribution of electronic power, the fault tolerant mechanisms are incorporated in the system design to satisfy high reliability requirements. As a result, the incorporation makes the design of such system more complicated. We propose a dependable electronic power system architecture, which can provide a generic framework to guide the development of electronic power system to ease the development complexity. In order to provide common idioms and patterns to the system *designers, we formally model the electronic power system architecture by using the PVS formal language. Based on the PVS model of this system architecture, we formally verify the fault tolerant properties of the system architecture by using the PVS theorem prover, which can guarantee that the system architecture can satisfy high reliability requirements.

  1. Structure of conduction electrons on polysilanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichikawa, Tsuneki [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan); Kumagai, Jun

    1998-10-01

    The orbital structures of conduction electrons on permethylated oligosilane, Si{sub 2n}(CH{sub 3}){sub 2n+2}(n = 2 - 8), and poly(cyclohexylmethylsilane) have been determined by the electron spin-echo envelope modulation signals of the radical anions of these silanes in a deuterated rigid matrix at 77 K. The conduction electron on permethylated oligosilane is delocalized over the entire main chain, whereas that on poly(cyclohexylmethylsilane) is localized on a part of the main chain composed of about six Si atoms. Quantum-chemical calculations suggest that Anderson localization due to fluctuation of {sigma} conjugation by conformational disorder of the main chain is responsible for the localization of both the conduction electron and the hole. (author)

  2. Electronic structure of MgB2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Results of ab initio electronic structure calculations on the compound MgB2 using the. FPLAPW method employing GGA for the exchange-correlation energy are presented. Total energy minimization enables us to estimate the equilibrium volume, c/a ratio and the bulk modulus, all of which are in excellent ...

  3. Electronic structure of Fe-based superconductors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Fe-based superconductors have drawn much attention during the last decade due to the presence of superconductivity in materials containing the magnetic element, Fe, and the coexistence of superconductivity and magnetism. Extensive study of the electronic structure of these systems suggested the dominant ...

  4. Electronic structure of Fe-based superconductors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-05-29

    May 29, 2015 ... Fe-based superconductors have drawn much attention during the last decade due to the presence of superconductivity in materials containing the magnetic element, Fe, and the coexistence of superconductivity and magnetism. Extensive study of the electronic structure of these systems suggested the ...

  5. Electronic structure of MgB 2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Results of ab initio electronic structure calculations on the compound MgB2 using the FPLAPW method employing GGA for the exchange-correlation energy are presented. Total energy minimization enables us to estimate the equilibrium volume, / ratio and the bulk modulus, all of which are in excellent agreement with ...

  6. The electronic structure of antiferromagnetic chromium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1981-01-01

    The author has used the local spin density formalism to perform self-consistent calculations of the electronic structure of chromium in the non-magnetic and commensurate antiferromagnetic phases, as a function of the lattice parameter. A change of a few per cent in the atomic radius brings...

  7. Electronic structure calculations of calcium silicate hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterne, P.A.; Meike, A.

    1995-11-01

    Many phases in the calcium-silicate-hydrate system can develop in cement exposed over long periods of time to temperatures above 25 C. As a consequence, chemical reactions involving these phases can affect the relative humidity and water chemistry of a radioactive waste repository that contains significant amounts of cement. In order to predict and simulate these chemical reactions, the authors are developing an internally consistent database of crystalline Ca-Si-hydrate structures. The results of first principles electronic structure calculations on two such phases, wollastonite (CaSiO 3 ) and xonotlite (Ca 6 Si 6 O 17 (OH) 2 ), are reported here. The calculated ground state properties are in very good agreement with experiment, providing equilibrium lattice parameters within about 1--1.4% of the experimentally reported values. The roles of the different types of oxygen atoms, which are fundamental to understanding the energetics of crystalline Ca-Si-hydrates are briefly discussed in terms of their electronic state densities. The good agreement with experiment for the lattice parameters and the consistency of the electronic density of states features for the two structures demonstrate the applicability of these electronic structure methods in calculating the fundamental properties of these phases

  8. Size-dependent electronic properties of metal nanostructures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Table of contents. Size-dependent electronic properties of metal nanostructures · Slide 2 · Slide 3 · Slide 4 · Slide 5 · Slide 6 · Slide 7 · Slide 8 · Slide 9 · Slide 10 · Slide 11 · Slide 12 · Slide 13 · Slide 14 · Slide 15 · Slide 16 · Slide 17 · Slide 18 · Slide 19 · Nanocrystalline film at liquid-liquid interface · Slide 21 · Slide 22.

  9. Orientation-dependent imaging of electronically excited quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duc; Goings, Joshua J.; Nguyen, Huy A.; Lyding, Joseph; Li, Xiaosong; Gruebele, Martin

    2018-02-01

    We previously demonstrated that we can image electronic excitations of quantum dots by single-molecule absorption scanning tunneling microscopy (SMA-STM). With this technique, a modulated laser beam periodically saturates an electronic transition of a single nanoparticle, and the resulting tunneling current modulation ΔI(x0, y0) maps out the SMA-STM image. In this paper, we first derive the basic theory to calculate ΔI(x0, y0) in the one-electron approximation. For near-resonant tunneling through an empty orbital "i" of the nanostructure, the SMA-STM signal is approximately proportional to the electron density |φi) (x0,y0)|nudge quantum dots on the surface and roll them, thus imaging excited state electronic structure of a single quantum dot at different orientations. We use density functional theory to model ODMs at various orientations, for qualitative comparison with the SMA-STM experiment. The model demonstrates that our experimentally observed signal monitors excited states, localized by defects near the surface of an individual quantum dot. The sub-nanometer super-resolution imaging technique demonstrated here could become useful for mapping out the three-dimensional structure of excited states localized by defects within nanomaterials.

  10. Temperature dependent structural and vibrational properties of liquid indium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, A. B.; Bhatt, N. K.

    2018-05-01

    The influence of the temperature effect on both the structure factor and the phonon dispersion relation of liquid indium have been investigated by means of pseudopotential theory. The Percus-Yevick Hard Sphere reference system is applied to describe the structural calculation. The effective electron-ion interaction is explained by using modified empty core potential due to Hasegawa et al. along with a local field correction function due to Ichimaru-Utsumi (IU). The temperature dependence of pair potential needed at higher temperatures was achieved by multiplying the damping factor exp(- π/kBT2k F r ) in the pair potential. Very close agreement of static structure factor, particularly, at elevated temperatures confirms the validity of the local potential. A positive dispersion is found in low-q region and the correct trend of phonon dispersion branches like the experimental; shows all broad features of collective excitations in liquid metals.

  11. Electron Tunneling in Lithium Ammonia Solutions Probed by Frequency-Dependent Electron-Spin Relaxation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Kiminori; Lodge, Matthew T.J.; Harmer, Jeffrey; Freed, Jack H.; Edwards, Peter P.

    2012-01-01

    Electron transfer or quantum tunneling dynamics for excess or solvated electrons in dilute lithium-ammonia solutions have been studied by pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at both X- (9.7 GHz) and W-band (94 GHz) frequencies. The electron spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxation data indicate an extremely fast transfer or quantum tunneling rate of the solvated electron in these solutions which serves to modulate the hyperfine (Fermi-contact) interaction with nitrogen nuclei in the solvation shells of ammonia molecules surrounding the localized, solvated electron. The donor and acceptor states of the solvated electron in these solutions are the initial and final electron solvation sites found before, and after, the transfer or tunneling process. To interpret and model our electron spin relaxation data from the two observation EPR frequencies requires a consideration of a multi-exponential correlation function. The electron transfer or tunneling process that we monitor through the correlation time of the nitrogen Fermi-contact interaction has a time scale of (1–10)×10−12 s over a temperature range 230–290K in our most dilute solution of lithium in ammonia. Two types of electron-solvent interaction mechanisms are proposed to account for our experimental findings. The dominant electron spin relaxation mechanism results from an electron tunneling process characterized by a variable donor-acceptor distance or range (consistent with such a rapidly fluctuating liquid structure) in which the solvent shell that ultimately accepts the transferring electron is formed from random, thermal fluctuations of the liquid structure in, and around, a natural hole or Bjerrum-like defect vacancy in the liquid. Following transfer and capture of the tunneling electron, further solvent-cage relaxation with a timescale of ca. 10−13 s results in a minor contribution to the electron spin relaxation times. This investigation illustrates the great potential

  12. Electron tunneling in lithium-ammonia solutions probed by frequency-dependent electron spin relaxation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Kiminori; Lodge, Matthew T J; Harmer, Jeffrey; Freed, Jack H; Edwards, Peter P

    2012-06-06

    Electron transfer or quantum tunneling dynamics for excess or solvated electrons in dilute lithium-ammonia solutions have been studied by pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at both X- (9.7 GHz) and W-band (94 GHz) frequencies. The electron spin-lattice (T(1)) and spin-spin (T(2)) relaxation data indicate an extremely fast transfer or quantum tunneling rate of the solvated electron in these solutions which serves to modulate the hyperfine (Fermi-contact) interaction with nitrogen nuclei in the solvation shells of ammonia molecules surrounding the localized, solvated electron. The donor and acceptor states of the solvated electron in these solutions are the initial and final electron solvation sites found before, and after, the transfer or tunneling process. To interpret and model our electron spin relaxation data from the two observation EPR frequencies requires a consideration of a multiexponential correlation function. The electron transfer or tunneling process that we monitor through the correlation time of the nitrogen Fermi-contact interaction has a time scale of (1-10) × 10(-12) s over a temperature range 230-290 K in our most dilute solution of lithium in ammonia. Two types of electron-solvent interaction mechanisms are proposed to account for our experimental findings. The dominant electron spin relaxation mechanism results from an electron tunneling process characterized by a variable donor-acceptor distance or range (consistent with such a rapidly fluctuating liquid structure) in which the solvent shell that ultimately accepts the transferring electron is formed from random, thermal fluctuations of the liquid structure in, and around, a natural hole or Bjerrum-like defect vacancy in the liquid. Following transfer and capture of the tunneling electron, further solvent-cage relaxation with a time scale of ∼10(-13) s results in a minor contribution to the electron spin relaxation times. This investigation illustrates the great

  13. Diamond surface: atomic and electronic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pate, B.B.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental studies of the diamond surface (with primary emphasis on the (111) surface) are presented. Aspects of the diamond surface which are addressed include (1) the electronic structure, (2) the atomic structure, and (3) the effect of termination of the lattice by foreign atoms. Limited studies of graphite are discussed for comparison with the diamond results. Experimental results from valence band and core level photoemission spectroscopy (PES), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), low energy electron diffraction (LEED), and carbon 1s near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy (both the total electron yield (TEY) and Auger electron yield (AEY) techniques) are used to study and characterize both the clean and hydrogenated surface. In addition, the interaction of hydrogen with the diamond surface is examined using results from vibrational high resolution low energy electron loss spectroscopy (in collaboration with Waclawski, Pierce, Swanson, and Celotta at the National Bureau of Standards) and photon stimulated ion desorption (PSID) yield at photon energies near the carbon k-edge (hv greater than or equal to 280 eV). Both EELS and PSID verify that the mechanically polished 1 x 1 surface is hydrogen terminated and also that the reconstructed surface is hydrogen free. The (111) 2 x 2/2 x 1 reconstructed surface is obtained from the hydrogenated (111) 1 x 1:H surface by annealing to approx. = 1000 0 C. We observe occupied intrinsic surface states and a surface chemical shift (0.95 +- 0.1 eV) to lower binding energy of the carbon 1s level on the hydrogen-free reconstructed surface. Atomic hydrogen is found to be reactive with the reconstructed surface, while molecular hydrogen is relatively inert. Exposure of the reconstructed surface to atomic hydrogen results in chemisorption of hydrogen and removal of the intrinsic surface state emission in and near the band gap region

  14. Electronic structure and electron momentum density in TiSi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghaleb, A.M. [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Kirkuk, Kirkuk (Iraq); Mohammad, F.M. [Department of Physics, College of Science, University of Tikreet, Tikreet (Iraq); Sahariya, Jagrati [Department of Physics, University College of Science, M.L. Sukhadia University, Udaipur 313001, Rajasthan (India); Sharma, Mukesh [Physics Division, Forensic Science Laboratory, Jaipur, Rajasthan (India); Ahuja, B.L., E-mail: blahuja@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, University College of Science, M.L. Sukhadia University, Udaipur 313001, Rajasthan (India)

    2013-03-01

    We report the electron momentum density in titanium monosilicide using {sup 241}Am Compton spectrometer. Experimental Compton profile has been compared with the theoretical profiles computed using linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO). The energy bands, density of states and Fermi surface structures of TiSi are reported using the LCAO and the full potential linearized augmented plane wave methods. Theoretical anisotropies in directional Compton profiles are interpreted in terms of energy bands. To confirm the conducting behavior, we also report the real space analysis of experimental Compton profile of TiSi.

  15. Bias-dependent oscillatory electron transport of monatomic sulfur chains

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Jing-Xin; Cheng, Yan; Sanvito, Stefano; Chen, Xiang-Rong

    2012-01-01

    The bias-dependent oscillatory electron transport of monatomic sulfur chains sandwiched between gold electrodes is investigated with density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function method. At zero bias, in contrast to the typical odd-even oscillations observed in most metallic chains, we find that the conductance oscillates with a period of four atoms. However, as the bias voltage is increased the current displays a two-atom periodicity. This emerges gradually, first for the longer chains and then, at voltages larger than 0.7 V, for lengths. The oscillatory behaviors are analyzed by the density of states and the energy-dependent and bias-dependent transmission coefficients. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  16. Bias-dependent oscillatory electron transport of monatomic sulfur chains

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Jing-Xin

    2012-01-01

    The bias-dependent oscillatory electron transport of monatomic sulfur chains sandwiched between gold electrodes is investigated with density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green\\'s function method. At zero bias, in contrast to the typical odd-even oscillations observed in most metallic chains, we find that the conductance oscillates with a period of four atoms. However, as the bias voltage is increased the current displays a two-atom periodicity. This emerges gradually, first for the longer chains and then, at voltages larger than 0.7 V, for lengths. The oscillatory behaviors are analyzed by the density of states and the energy-dependent and bias-dependent transmission coefficients. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  17. Density-dependent electron transport and precise modeling of GaN high electron mobility transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajaj, Sanyam, E-mail: bajaj.10@osu.edu; Shoron, Omor F.; Park, Pil Sung; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Akyol, Fatih; Hung, Ting-Hsiang [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Reza, Shahed; Chumbes, Eduardo M. [Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems, Andover, Massachusetts 01810 (United States); Khurgin, Jacob [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Rajan, Siddharth [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Material Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2015-10-12

    We report on the direct measurement of two-dimensional sheet charge density dependence of electron transport in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). Pulsed IV measurements established increasing electron velocities with decreasing sheet charge densities, resulting in saturation velocity of 1.9 × 10{sup 7 }cm/s at a low sheet charge density of 7.8 × 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −2}. An optical phonon emission-based electron velocity model for GaN is also presented. It accommodates stimulated longitudinal optical (LO) phonon emission which clamps the electron velocity with strong electron-phonon interaction and long LO phonon lifetime in GaN. A comparison with the measured density-dependent saturation velocity shows that it captures the dependence rather well. Finally, the experimental result is applied in TCAD-based device simulator to predict DC and small signal characteristics of a reported GaN HEMT. Good agreement between the simulated and reported experimental results validated the measurement presented in this report and established accurate modeling of GaN HEMTs.

  18. Density-dependent electron transport and precise modeling of GaN high electron mobility transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajaj, Sanyam; Shoron, Omor F.; Park, Pil Sung; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Akyol, Fatih; Hung, Ting-Hsiang; Reza, Shahed; Chumbes, Eduardo M.; Khurgin, Jacob; Rajan, Siddharth

    2015-01-01

    We report on the direct measurement of two-dimensional sheet charge density dependence of electron transport in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). Pulsed IV measurements established increasing electron velocities with decreasing sheet charge densities, resulting in saturation velocity of 1.9 × 10 7  cm/s at a low sheet charge density of 7.8 × 10 11  cm −2 . An optical phonon emission-based electron velocity model for GaN is also presented. It accommodates stimulated longitudinal optical (LO) phonon emission which clamps the electron velocity with strong electron-phonon interaction and long LO phonon lifetime in GaN. A comparison with the measured density-dependent saturation velocity shows that it captures the dependence rather well. Finally, the experimental result is applied in TCAD-based device simulator to predict DC and small signal characteristics of a reported GaN HEMT. Good agreement between the simulated and reported experimental results validated the measurement presented in this report and established accurate modeling of GaN HEMTs

  19. Time-dependent aspects of electron degradation: 4, Subexcitation electrons in nitrogen and carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Mineo; Inokuti, Mitio; Kowari, Ken-ichi; Dillon, M.A.; Pagnamenta, A.

    1988-01-01

    We discuss here the temporal behavior of subexcitation electrons and the yields of products due to these subexcitation electrons. Our examples concern cases in which resonance scattering of electrons occurs, such as vibrational and rotational excitation in N 2 and negative-ion formation in CO 2 . One focus of the present work is a test of the continuous-slowing-down-approximation (CSDA) which we compare to the full solution of the time-dependent Spencer-Fano theory, which has been developed recently. 11 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  20. Grid-based electronic structure calculations: The tensor decomposition approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakhuba, M.V., E-mail: rakhuba.m@gmail.com [Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology, Novaya St. 100, 143025 Skolkovo, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Oseledets, I.V., E-mail: i.oseledets@skoltech.ru [Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology, Novaya St. 100, 143025 Skolkovo, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Institute of Numerical Mathematics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Gubkina St. 8, 119333 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-05-01

    We present a fully grid-based approach for solving Hartree–Fock and all-electron Kohn–Sham equations based on low-rank approximation of three-dimensional electron orbitals. Due to the low-rank structure the total complexity of the algorithm depends linearly with respect to the one-dimensional grid size. Linear complexity allows for the usage of fine grids, e.g. 8192{sup 3} and, thus, cheap extrapolation procedure. We test the proposed approach on closed-shell atoms up to the argon, several molecules and clusters of hydrogen atoms. All tests show systematical convergence with the required accuracy.

  1. 3D Printed structural electronics: embedding and connecting electronic components into freeform electronic devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maalderink, H.H.H.; Bruning, F.B.J.; Schipper, M.M.R. de; Werff, J.J.J. van der; Germs, W.W.C.; Remmers, J.J.C.; Meinders, E.R.

    2018-01-01

    The need for personalised and smart products drives the development of structural electronics with mass-customisation capability. A number of challenges need to be overcome in order to address the potential of complete free form manufacturing of electronic devices. One key challenge is the

  2. 3D Printed structural electronics : embedding and connecting electronic components into freeform electronic devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maalderink, H.H.; Bruning, F.B.J.; de Schipper, M.R.; van der Werff, J.J.; Germs, W.C.; Remmers, J.J.C.; Meinders, E.R.

    2018-01-01

    The need for personalised and smart products drives the development of structural electronics with mass-customisation capability. A number of challenges need to be overcome in order to address the potential of complete free form manufacturing of electronic devices. One key challenge is the

  3. Electronic structure of super heavy atoms revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gitman, D M; Levin, A D; Tyutin, I V; Voronov, B L

    2013-01-01

    The electronic structure of an atom with Z ⩽ Z c = 137 can be described by the Dirac equation with the Coulomb field of a point charge Ze. It was believed that the Dirac equation with Z > Z c poses difficulties because the formula for the lower energy level of the Dirac Hamiltonian formally gives imaginary eigenvalues. But a strict mathematical consideration shows that difficulties with the electronic spectrum for Z > Z c do not arise if the Dirac Hamiltonian is correctly defined as a self-adjoint operator. In this paper, we briefly summarize the main physical results of that consideration in a form suitable for physicists with some additional new details and numerical calculations of the electronic spectra. (comment)

  4. Electronic Structure of Strongly Correlated Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Anisimov, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Electronic structure and physical properties of strongly correlated materials containing elements with partially filled 3d, 4d, 4f and 5f electronic shells is analyzed by Dynamical Mean-Field Theory (DMFT). DMFT is the most universal and effective tool used for the theoretical investigation of electronic states with strong correlation effects. In the present book the basics of the method are given and its application to various material classes is shown. The book is aimed at a broad readership: theoretical physicists and experimentalists studying strongly correlated systems. It also serves as a handbook for students and all those who want to be acquainted with fast developing filed of condensed matter physics.

  5. Exact Time-Dependent Exchange-Correlation Potential in Electron Scattering Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yasumitsu; Lacombe, Lionel; Watanabe, Kazuyuki; Maitra, Neepa T.

    2017-12-01

    We identify peak and valley structures in the exact exchange-correlation potential of time-dependent density functional theory that are crucial for time-resolved electron scattering in a model one-dimensional system. These structures are completely missed by adiabatic approximations that, consequently, significantly underestimate the scattering probability. A recently proposed nonadiabatic approximation is shown to correctly capture the approach of the electron to the target when the initial Kohn-Sham state is chosen judiciously, and it is more accurate than standard adiabatic functionals but ultimately fails to accurately capture reflection. These results may explain the underestimation of scattering probabilities in some recent studies on molecules and surfaces.

  6. Electronic band structures of binary skutterudites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Banaras; Aliabad, H.A. Rahnamaye; Saifullah; Jalali-Asadabadi, S.; Khan, Imad; Ahmad, Iftikhar

    2015-01-01

    The electronic properties of complex binary skutterudites, MX 3 (M = Co, Rh, Ir; X = P, As, Sb) are explored, using various density functional theory (DFT) based theoretical approaches including Green's Function (GW) as well as regular and non-regular Tran Blaha modified Becke Jhonson (TB-mBJ) methods. The wide range of calculated bandgap values for each compound of this skutterudites family confirm that they are theoretically as challenging as their experimental studies. The computationally expensive GW method, which is generally assume to be efficient in the reproduction of the experimental bandgaps, is also not very successful in the calculation of bandgaps. In this article, the issue of the theoretical bandgaps of these compounds is resolved by reproducing the accurate experimental bandgaps, using the recently developed non-regular TB-mBJ approach, based on DFT. The effectiveness of this technique is due to the fact that a large volume of the binary skutterudite crystal is empty and hence quite large proportion of electrons lie outside of the atomic spheres, where unlike LDA and GGA which are poor in the treatment of these electrons, this technique properly treats these electrons and hence reproduces the clear electronic picture of these compounds. - Highlights: • Theoretical and experimental electronic band structures of binary skutterudites are reviewed. • The literature reveals that none of the existing theoretical results are consistent with the experiments. • GW, regular and non-regular TB-mBJ methods are used to reproduce the correct results. • The GW and regular TB-mBJ results are better than the available results in literature. • However, non-regular TB-mBJ reproduces the correct experimental band structures

  7. Electronic band structures of binary skutterudites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Banaras [Center for Computational Materials Science, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Department of Physics, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Aliabad, H.A. Rahnamaye [Department of Physics, Hakim Sabzevari University, Sabzevar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Saifullah [Center for Computational Materials Science, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Department of Physics, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Jalali-Asadabadi, S. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Isfahan (UI), 81744 Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khan, Imad [Center for Computational Materials Science, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Department of Physics, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Ahmad, Iftikhar, E-mail: ahma5532@gmail.com [Center for Computational Materials Science, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan); Department of Physics, University of Malakand, Chakdara (Pakistan)

    2015-10-25

    The electronic properties of complex binary skutterudites, MX{sub 3} (M = Co, Rh, Ir; X = P, As, Sb) are explored, using various density functional theory (DFT) based theoretical approaches including Green's Function (GW) as well as regular and non-regular Tran Blaha modified Becke Jhonson (TB-mBJ) methods. The wide range of calculated bandgap values for each compound of this skutterudites family confirm that they are theoretically as challenging as their experimental studies. The computationally expensive GW method, which is generally assume to be efficient in the reproduction of the experimental bandgaps, is also not very successful in the calculation of bandgaps. In this article, the issue of the theoretical bandgaps of these compounds is resolved by reproducing the accurate experimental bandgaps, using the recently developed non-regular TB-mBJ approach, based on DFT. The effectiveness of this technique is due to the fact that a large volume of the binary skutterudite crystal is empty and hence quite large proportion of electrons lie outside of the atomic spheres, where unlike LDA and GGA which are poor in the treatment of these electrons, this technique properly treats these electrons and hence reproduces the clear electronic picture of these compounds. - Highlights: • Theoretical and experimental electronic band structures of binary skutterudites are reviewed. • The literature reveals that none of the existing theoretical results are consistent with the experiments. • GW, regular and non-regular TB-mBJ methods are used to reproduce the correct results. • The GW and regular TB-mBJ results are better than the available results in literature. • However, non-regular TB-mBJ reproduces the correct experimental band structures.

  8. Dependability in electronic systems mitigation of hardware failures, soft errors, and electro-magnetic disturbances

    CERN Document Server

    Kanekawa, Nobuyasu; Suga, Takashi; Uematsu, Yutaka

    2011-01-01

    Dependability in Electronic Systems presents practical applications for dependable electronic systems, such as train control, automotive control systems and network servers/routers. Readers will find an overview of dependability, enabling them to select the best choice for maximum results.

  9. Electronic structure of Pu carbides: photoelectron spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gouder, T.; Havela, L.; Shick, Alexander; Huber, F.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 403, č. 5-9 (2008), s. 852-853 ISSN 0921-4526 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA100100530 Grant - others:EU(XE) RITA -CT-2006-026176 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : photoemission * electronic structure * plutonium Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.822, year: 2008

  10. Structural and electronic properties of thallium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paliwal, Neetu; Srivastava, Vipul

    2016-01-01

    The tight binding linear muffin-tin-orbital (TB-LMTO) method within the local density approximation (LDA has been used to calculate structural and electronic properties of thallium pnictides TlX (X=Sb, Bi) at high pressure. As a function of volume, the total energy is evaluated. Apart from this, the lattice parameter (a_0), bulk modulus (B_0), band structure (BS) and density of states (DOS) are calculated. From energy band diagram we observed metallic behaviour in TlSb and TlBi compounds. The values of equilibrium lattice constants and bulk modulus are agreed well with the available data.

  11. Structural and electronic properties of thallium compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paliwal, Neetu, E-mail: neetumanish@gmail.com [Department of Physics, AISECT University Bhopal, 464993 (India); Srivastava, Vipul [Department of Engineering Physics, NRI Institute of Research & Technology, Raisen Road, Bhopal, 462021 (India)

    2016-05-06

    The tight binding linear muffin-tin-orbital (TB-LMTO) method within the local density approximation (LDA has been used to calculate structural and electronic properties of thallium pnictides TlX (X=Sb, Bi) at high pressure. As a function of volume, the total energy is evaluated. Apart from this, the lattice parameter (a{sub 0}), bulk modulus (B{sub 0}), band structure (BS) and density of states (DOS) are calculated. From energy band diagram we observed metallic behaviour in TlSb and TlBi compounds. The values of equilibrium lattice constants and bulk modulus are agreed well with the available data.

  12. Structural dynamics of electronic and photonic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Suhir, Ephraim; Steinberg, David S

    2011-01-01

    The proposed book will offer comprehensive and versatile methodologies and recommendations on how to determine dynamic characteristics of typical micro- and opto-electronic structural elements (printed circuit boards, solder joints, heavy devices, etc.) and how to design a viable and reliable structure that would be able to withstand high-level dynamic loading. Particular attention will be given to portable devices and systems designed for operation in harsh environments (such as automotive, aerospace, military, etc.)  In-depth discussion from a mechanical engineer's viewpoint will be conducte

  13. The impact parameter dependence of swift electron-matter interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, R.H.

    1988-01-01

    In quantal collision theories, momentum and energy are usually taken to be good quantal variables. Classical collision theory, on the other hand, uses position and time to describe interactions between a probe and a target. In modern physics one may wish to express quantal theories in terms of spacelike variables. For example, experiments are now common in which one measures, by means of a narrowly focused beam of swift electrons, the distribution in energy of losses experienced in a very small region of space. Also, in experiments with channeled ions, and in microdosimetry, one is interested in the spatial coherence of unlocalized excitations created by swift ions and electrons, and their ultimate localization through transfer of energy to, e.g., single-particle excitations. In this lecture the author describes work, done in part in collaboration with Professor Howie, on some aspects of the spatial dependence of inelastic interactions between a charged particle and a condensed matter target. 6 refs., 1 fig

  14. Temperature dependence of electronic transport property in ferroelectric polymer films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, X.L.; Wang, J.L., E-mail: jlwang@mail.sitp.ac.cn; Tian, B.B.; Liu, B.L.; Zou, Y.H.; Wang, X.D.; Sun, S.; Sun, J.L., E-mail: jlsun@mail.sitp.ac.cn; Meng, X.J.; Chu, J.H.

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The ferroelectric polymer was fabricated by Langmuir–Blodgett method. • The electrons as the dominant injected carrier were conformed in the ferroelectric polymer films. • The leakage current conduction mechanisms in ferroelectric polymer were investigated. - Abstract: The leakage current mechanism of ferroelectric copolymer of polyvinylidene fluoride with trifluoroethylene prepared by Langmuir–Blodgett was investigated in the temperature range from 100 K to 350 K. The electron as the dominant injected carrier was observed in the ferroelectric copolymer films. The transport mechanisms in copolymer strongly depend on the temperature and applied voltage. From 100 K to 200 K, Schottky emission dominates the conduction. With temperature increasing, the Frenkel–Poole emission instead of the Schottky emission to conduct the carrier transport. When the temperature gets to 260 K, the leakage current becomes independent of temperature, and the space charge limited current conduction was observed.

  15. Momentum distribution dependence of induced electron-cyclotron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziebell, L.F.; Dillenburg, D.

    1983-01-01

    The dependence of the electron-cyclotron wave amplification in an inhomogeneous plasma slab on the electron momentum distribution is investigated. Two types of distributions are considered, both featuring a loss cone and a Maxwellian component. It is shown that the perpendicular emission at the fundamental frequency is in general greatly reduced by the presence of a Maxwellian component and situations occur in which a layer in the slab very effectively absorbs all the radiation amplified elsewhere. The transition from the pure loss cone to the pure Maxwellian case is accompanied by a peculiar behaviour of the dielectric tensor components, which may invalidate the geometrical optics approximation in the calculation of the emission and the commonly held belief that the real part of the refractive index is insensitive to the shape of the momentum distribution function. (Author) [pt

  16. Precision measurement of the neutron spin dependent structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolomensky, Y.G.

    1997-02-01

    In experiment E154 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center the spin dependent structure function g 1 n (x, Q 2 ) of the neutron was measured by scattering longitudinally polarized 48.3 GeV electrons off a longitudinally polarized 3 He target. The high beam energy allowed the author to extend the kinematic coverage compared to the previous SLAC experiments to 0.014 ≤ x ≤ 0.7 with an average Q 2 of 5 GeV 2 . The author reports the integral of the spin dependent structure function in the measured range to be ∫ 0.014 0.7 dx g 1 n (x, 5 GeV 2 ) = -0.036 ± 0.004(stat.) ± 0.005(syst.). The author observes relatively large values of g 1 n at low x that call into question the reliability of data extrapolation to x → 0. Such divergent behavior disagrees with predictions of the conventional Regge theory, but is qualitatively explained by perturbative QCD. The author performs a Next-to-Leading Order perturbative QCD analysis of the world data on the nucleon spin dependent structure functions g 1 p and g 1 n paying careful attention to the experimental and theoretical uncertainties. Using the parameterizations of the helicity-dependent parton distributions obtained in the analysis, the author evolves the data to Q 2 = 5 GeV 2 , determines the first moments of the polarized structure functions of the proton and neutron, and finds agreement with the Bjorken sum rule

  17. Time dependence of microsecond intense electron beam transport in gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucey, R.F. Jr.; Gilgenback, R.M.; Tucker, J.E.; Brake, M.L.; Enloe, C.L.; Repetti, T.E.

    1987-01-01

    The authors present results of long-pulse (0.5 μs) electron beam propagation in the ion focused regime (IFR). Electron beam parameters are 800 kV with several hundred amperes injected current. For injection into air (from 0.7 mTorr to 75 mTorr) and helium (from 14 mTorr to 227 mTorr) the authors observe a ''time-dependent propagation window'' in which efficient (up to 100%) propagation starts at a time comparable to the electron impact ionization time needed to achieve n/sub i/ -- (1/γ/sup 2/)n/sub eb/. The transport goes abruptly to zero about 50-150 ns after this initial propagation. This is followed by erratic propagation often consisting of numerous narrower pulses 10-40 ns wide. In these pulses the transported current can be 100% of the injected current, but is generally lower. As the fill pressure is increased, there are differences in the propagated beam pulse, which can be summarized as follows: 1) the temporal occurrence of the beam propagation window shifts to earlier times, 2) the propagated beam current has much faster risetimes, 3) a larger portion of the injected beam is propagated. Similar results are observed when the electron beam is propagated in helium. However, at a given pressure, the beam transport window occurs at later times and exhibits a slower risetime. These effects are consistent with electron beam-induced ionization. Experiments are being performed to determine if the observed beam instability is due to the ion hose instability or streaming instability

  18. Correlated electronic structure of CeN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panda, S.K., E-mail: swarup.panda@physics.uu.se [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Di Marco, I. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Delin, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Information and Communication Technology, Department of Materials and Nano Physics, Electrum 229, SE-164 40 Kista (Sweden); KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Swedish e-Science Research Center (SeRC), SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Eriksson, O., E-mail: olle.eriksson@physics.uu.se [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • The electronic structure of CeN is studied within the GGA+DMFT approach using SPTF and Hubbard I approximation. • 4f spectral functions from SPTF and Hubbard I are coupled to explain the various spectroscopic manifestations of CeN. • The calculated XPS and BIS spectra show good agreement with the corresponding experimental spectra. • The contribution of the various l-states and the importance of cross-sections for the photoemission process are analyzed. - Abstract: We have studied in detail the electronic structure of CeN including spin orbit coupling (SOC) and electron–electron interaction, within the dynamical mean-field theory combined with density-functional theory in generalized gradient approximation (GGA+DMFT). The effective impurity problem has been solved through the spin-polarized T-matrix fluctuation-exchange (SPTF) solver and the Hubbard I approximation (HIA). The calculated l-projected atomic partial densities of states and the converged potential were used to obtain the X-ray-photoemission-spectra (XPS) and Bremstrahlung Isochromat spectra (BIS). Following the spirit of Gunnarsson–Schonhammer model, we have coupled the SPTF and HIA 4f spectral functions to explain the various spectroscopic manifestations of CeN. Our computed spectra in such a coupled scheme explain the experimental data remarkably well, establishing the validity of our theoretical model in analyzing the electronic structure of CeN. The contribution of the various l-states in the total spectra and the importance of cross sections are also analyzed in detail.

  19. Electronic structure theory of the superheavy elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliav, Ephraim, E-mail: ephraim@tau.ac.il [School of Chemistry, Tel Aviv University, 6997801 Tel Aviv (Israel); Fritzsche, Stephan, E-mail: s.fritzsche@gsi.de [Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Fröbelstieg 3, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Theoretisch-Physikalisches Institut, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Kaldor, Uzi, E-mail: kaldor@tau.ac.il [School of Chemistry, Tel Aviv University, 6997801 Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2015-12-15

    High-accuracy calculations of atomic properties of the superheavy elements (SHE) up to element 122 are reviewed. The properties discussed include ionization potentials, electron affinities and excitation energies, which are associated with the spectroscopic and chemical behavior of these elements, and are therefore of considerable interest. Accurate predictions of these quantities require high-order inclusion of relativity and electron correlation, as well as large, converged basis sets. The Dirac–Coulomb–Breit Hamiltonian, which includes all terms up to second order in the fine-structure constant α, serves as the framework for the treatment; higher-order Lamb shift terms are considered in some selected cases. Electron correlation is treated by either the multiconfiguration self-consistent-field approach or by Fock-space coupled cluster theory. The latter is enhanced by the intermediate Hamiltonian scheme, allowing the use of larger model (P) spaces. The quality of the calculations is assessed by applying the same methods to lighter homologs of the SHEs and comparing with available experimental information. Very good agreement is obtained, within a few hundredths of an eV, and similar accuracy is expected for the SHEs. Many of the properties predicted for the SHEs differ significantly from what may be expected by straightforward extrapolation of lighter homologs, demonstrating that the structure and chemistry of SHEs are strongly affected by relativity. The major scientific challenge of the calculations is to find the electronic structure and basic atomic properties of the SHE and assign its proper place in the periodic table. Significant recent developments include joint experimental–computational studies of the excitation spectrum of Fm and the ionization energy of Lr, with excellent agreement of experiment and theory, auguring well for the future of research in the field.

  20. Spectral-Product Methods for Electronic Structure Calculations (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Langhoff, P. W; Mills, J. E; Boatz, J. A

    2006-01-01

    .... The spectral-product approach to molecular electronic structure avoids the repeated evaluations of the one- and two-electron integrals required in construction of polyatomic Hamiltonian matrices...

  1. Spectral-Product Methods for Electronic Structure Calculations (Postprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Langhoff, P. W; Hinde, R. J; Mills, J. D; Boatz, J. A

    2007-01-01

    .... The spectral-product approach to molecular electronic structure avoids the repeated evaluations of the one- and two-electron integrals required in construction of polyatomic Hamiltonian matrices...

  2. Size-dependent electronic eigenstates of multilayer organic quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Ba An; Hanamura, E.

    1995-09-01

    A detailed theoretical treatment is given eigenfunctions and eigenenergies of a multilayer organic quantum well sandwiched between two different dielectric media. The abrupt change of dielectric constants at the interfaces distorts the wave function and results in possible surface states in addition to propagating states. The proper boundary conditions are accounted for by the method of image charges. Analytic criteria for existence of surface states are established using the nearest layers approximation, which depend not only on the intralayer parameters but also on the number of layers. The size dependence together with the dependence on signs and relative magnitudes of the structure parameters fully determine the energy spectrum of propagating states as well as the number and the location of surface states. (author). 28 refs, 10 figs, 2 tabs

  3. Electronic structure and superconductivity of europium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nixon, Lane W.; Papaconstantopoulos, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    We have calculated the electronic structure of Eu for the bcc, hcp, and fcc crystal structures for volumes near equilibrium up to a calculated 90 GPa pressure using the augmented-plane-wave method in the local-density approximation. The frozen-core approximation was used with a semi-empirical shift of the f-states energies in the radial Schroedinger equation to move the occupied 4f valence states below the Γ 1 energy and into the core. This shift of the highly localized f-states yields the correct europium phase ordering with lattice parameters and bulk moduli in good agreement with experimental data. The calculated superconductivity properties under pressure for the bcc and hcp structures are also found to agree with and follow a T c trend similar to recent measurement by Debessai et al.

  4. Electromagnetic Radiation of Electrons in Periodic Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Potylitsyn, Alexander Petrovich

    2011-01-01

    Periodic magnetic structures (undulators) are widely used in accelerators to generate monochromatic undulator radiation (UR) in the range from far infrared to the hard X-ray region. Another periodic crystalline structure is used to produce quasimonochromatic polarized photon beams via the coherent bremsstrahlung mechanism (CBS). Due to such characteristics as monochromaticity, polarization and adjustability, these types of radiation is of large interest for applied and basic research of accelerator-emitted radiation. The book provides a detailed overview of the fundamental principles behind electromagnetic radiation emitted from accelerated charged particles (e.g. UR, CBS, radiation of fast electrons in Laser flash fields) as well as a unified description of relatively new radiation mechanisms which attracted great interest in recent years. This are the so-called polarization radiation excited by the Coulomb field of incident particles in periodic structures, parametric X-rays, resonant transition radiation a...

  5. Boson structure functions from inelastic electron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Jager, C.W.

    1986-01-01

    The even /sup 104-110/Pd isotopes and /sup 196/Pt have been investigated at NIKHEF-K by high-resolution inelastic electron scattering. A new IBA-2 calculation has been performed for the Pd isotopes, in which the ratio of the proton and neutron coupling constants is taken from pion scattering. One set of boson structure functions sufficed for the description of the first and second E2-excitations in all Pd isotopes. The data showed no sensitivity for different structure functions for proton and neutron bosons. A preliminary analysis of a number of negative parity states (3/sup -/,5/sup -/ and 7/sup -/), observed in /sup 196/Pt, was performed through the introduction of an f-boson. The first E4-excitation in the palladium isotopes can be reasonably described with a β-structure function, but all other E4-excitations require the introduction of g-boson admixtures

  6. Electronic Structures of LNA Phosphorothioate Oligonucleotides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik G. Bohr

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Important oligonucleotides in anti-sense research have been investigated in silico and experimentally. This involves quantum mechanical (QM calculations and chromatography experiments on locked nucleic acid (LNA phosphorothioate (PS oligonucleotides. iso-potential electrostatic surfaces are essential in this study and have been calculated from the wave functions derived from the QM calculations that provide binding information and other properties of these molecules. The QM calculations give details of the electronic structures in terms of e.g., energy and bonding, which make them distinguish or differentiate between the individual PS diastereoisomers determined by the position of sulfur atoms. Rules are derived from the electronic calculations of these molecules and include the effects of the phosphorothioate chirality and formation of electrostatic potential surfaces. Physical and electrochemical descriptors of the PS oligonucleotides are compared to the experiments in which chiral states on these molecules can be distinguished. The calculations demonstrate that electronic structure, electrostatic potential, and topology are highly sensitive to single PS configuration changes and can give a lead to understanding the activity of the molecules. Keywords: LNA phosphorothioate, DNA/LNA oligonucleotide, diastereoisomers, Hartree-Fock calculations, iso-potential surface, anion chromatograms

  7. Extraordinary electronic properties in uncommon structure types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mazhar Nawaz

    In this thesis I present the results of explorations into several uncommon structure types. In Chapter 1 I go through the underlying idea of how we search for new compounds with exotic properties in solid state chemistry. The ideas of exploring uncommon structure types, building up from the simple to the complex, using chemical intuition and thinking by analogy are discussed. Also, the history and basic concepts of superconductivity, Dirac semimetals, and magnetoresistance are briefly reviewed. In chapter 2, the 1s-InTaS2 structural family is introduced along with the discovery of a new member of the family, Ag0:79VS2; the synthesis, structure, and physical properties of two different polymorphs of the material are detailed. Also in this chapter, we report the observation of superconductivity in another 1s structure, PbTaSe2. This material is especially interesting due to it being very heavy (resulting in very strong spin orbit coulping (SOC)), layered, and noncentrosymmetric. Electronic structure calculations reveal the presence of a bulk 3D Dirac cone (very similar to graphene) that is gapped by SOC originating from the hexagonal Pb layer. In Chapter 3 we show the re-investigation of the crystal structure of the 3D Dirac semimetal, Cd3As2. It is found to be centrosymmetric, rather than noncentrosymmetric, and as such all bands are spin degenerate and there is a 4-fold degenerate bulk Dirac point at the Fermi level, making Cd3As2 a 3D electronic analog to graphene. Also, for the first time, scanning tunneling microscopy experiments identify a 2x2 surface reconstruction in what we identify as the (112) cleavage plane of single crystals; needle crystals grow with a [110] long axis direction. Lastly, in chapter 4 we report the discovery of "titanic" (sadly dubbed ⪉rge, nonsaturating" by Nature editors and given the acronym XMR) magnetoresistance (MR) in the non-magnetic, noncentrosymmetric, layered transition metal dichalcogenide WTe2; over 13 million% at 0.53 K in

  8. Projected quasiparticle theory for molecular electronic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scuseria, Gustavo E.; Jiménez-Hoyos, Carlos A.; Henderson, Thomas M.; Samanta, Kousik; Ellis, Jason K.

    2011-09-01

    We derive and implement symmetry-projected Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) equations and apply them to the molecular electronic structure problem. All symmetries (particle number, spin, spatial, and complex conjugation) are deliberately broken and restored in a self-consistent variation-after-projection approach. We show that the resulting method yields a comprehensive black-box treatment of static correlations with effective one-electron (mean-field) computational cost. The ensuing wave function is of multireference character and permeates the entire Hilbert space of the problem. The energy expression is different from regular HFB theory but remains a functional of an independent quasiparticle density matrix. All reduced density matrices are expressible as an integration of transition density matrices over a gauge grid. We present several proof-of-principle examples demonstrating the compelling power of projected quasiparticle theory for quantum chemistry.

  9. Studies in the electronic structure of matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swarts, C.A.

    1979-01-01

    The results of various theories for the angular distribution of electrons photoemitted from the outermost p-shell of rare gas atoms are compared. The theories compared are the local density theories of Slater (X/sub α/) and of Hohenberg, Kohn and Sham, the pseudopotential method, Hartree-Fock theory as evaluated by Kennedy and Manson, and Amusia's random phase approximation with exchange (RPAE). Extended Huekel theory is applied to GaAs, GaP, and to the nitrogen isoelectronic trap in GaAs and GaP. The computer perfect crystal band structures are found to be in reasonable agreement with those computed with empirical pseudopotentials. Nitrogen impurity levels in GaAs and GaP are calculated using a cluster model. By means of model calculations for an independent electron metal, exact lineshapes are obtained for the photon absorption, emission and photoemission spectra of deep core states. 97 references

  10. Time-dependent quantum chemistry of laser driven many-electron molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen-Dang, Thanh-Tung; Couture-Bienvenue, Étienne; Viau-Trudel, Jérémy; Sainjon, Amaury

    2014-01-01

    A Time-Dependent Configuration Interaction approach using multiple Feshbach partitionings, corresponding to multiple ionization stages of a laser-driven molecule, has recently been proposed [T.-T. Nguyen-Dang and J. Viau-Trudel, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 244102 (2013)]. To complete this development toward a fully ab-initio method for the calculation of time-dependent electronic wavefunctions of an N-electron molecule, we describe how tools of multiconfiguration quantum chemistry such as the management of the configuration expansion space using Graphical Unitary Group Approach concepts can be profitably adapted to the new context, that of time-resolved electronic dynamics, as opposed to stationary electronic structure. The method is applied to calculate the detailed, sub-cycle electronic dynamics of BeH 2 , treated in a 3–21G bound-orbital basis augmented by a set of orthogonalized plane-waves representing continuum-type orbitals, including its ionization under an intense λ = 800 nm or λ = 80 nm continuous-wave laser field. The dynamics is strongly non-linear at the field-intensity considered (I ≃ 10 15 W/cm 2 ), featuring important ionization of an inner-shell electron and strong post-ionization bound-electron dynamics

  11. Studies in the electronic structure of matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.L.

    1979-01-01

    KLL Auger transition rates for helium are computed using simple atomic orbital wavefunctions which take into account the difference in average electron--electron repulsion of initial and final states. The results are consistent with transition rates computed by other authors using a variety of many-electron techniques. It is suggested that wavefunctions determined in the manner described provide a useful representation of the autoionizing state within the first Bohr radius. A method for extracting atomic pseudopotentials from photoelectron angular distributions is described and applied photoionization of the outermost p shells of Ar, Kr, and Xe and to the 4d shell of Xe. The pseudopotentials obtained reproduce the data, and also predict accurate cross sections and phase shifts for photoelectron energies up to 100 eV. It is suggested that the pseudopotentials aptly mimic the effects of intrashell electron--electron correlations in the photoionization process. The extended Hueckel theory is applied to the nitrogen trap in GaAs and GaP. Perfect crystal band structures are computed and are shown to be in reasonable agreement with those computed with empirical pseudopotentials. Nitrogen impurity levels in GaAs and GaP are computed using an extended Hueckel cluster model. In each case the model predicts two states within the band gap, in contrast to experiment which detects one impurity state in GaP and none in GaAs. It is suggested that the choice of cluster used unrealistically concentrates states near the conduction band edge on the central atom

  12. Studies in the electronic structure of matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.L.

    1979-01-01

    KLL Auger transition rates for helium are computed using simple atomic orbital wavefunctions which take into account the difference in average electron-electron repulsion of initial and final states. The results are consistent with transition rates computed by other authors using a variety of many-electron techniques. It is suggested that wavefunctions determined in the manner described provide a useful representation of the autoionizing state within the first Bohr radius. A method for extracting atomic psuedopotentials from photoelectron angular distributions is described and applied photoionization of the outermost p shells of Ar, Kr, and Xe and to the 4d shell of Xe. The pseudopotentials obtained reproduce the data, and also predict accurate cross sections and phase shifts for photoelectron energies up to 100 eV. It is suggested that the pseudopotentials aptly mimic the effects of intrashell electron-electron correlations in the photoionization process. The extended Hueckel theory is applied to the nitrogen trap in GaAs and GaP. Perfect crystal band structures are computed and are shown to be in reasonable agreement with those computed with empirical psuedopotentials. Nitrogen impurity levles in GaAs and GaP are computed using an extended Hueckel cluster model. In each case the model predicts two states within the band gap, in contrast to experiment which detects one impurity state in GaP and none in GaAs. It is suggested that the choice of cluster used unrealistically concentrates states near the conduction band edge on the central atom

  13. Electronic structure of p type Delta doped systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaggero S, L.M.; Perez A, R.

    1998-01-01

    We summarize of the results obtained for the electronic structure of quantum wells that consist in an atomic layer doped with impurities of p type. The calculations are made within the frame worth of the wrapper function approach to independent bands and with potentials of Hartree. We study the cases reported experimentally (Be in GaAs and B in Si). We present the levels of energy, the wave functions and the rate of the electronic population between the different subbands, as well as the dependence of these magnitudes with the density of impurities in the layer. The participation of the bans of heavy holes is analysed, light and split-off band in the total electronic population. The effect of the temperature is discussed and we give a possible qualitative explanation of the experimental optical properties. (Author)

  14. Electronic structure of defects in semiconductor heterojunctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haussy, Bernard; Ganghoffer, Jean Francois

    2002-01-01

    Full text.heterojunctions and semiconductors and superlattices are well known and well used by people interested in optoelectronics communications. Components based on the use of heterojunctions are interesting for confinement of light and increase of quantum efficiency. An heterojunction is the contact zone between two different semiconductors, for example GaAs and Ga 1-x Al x As. Superlattices are a succession of heterojunctions (up to 10 or 20). These systems have been the subjects of many experiments ao analyse the contact between semiconductors. They also have been theoretically studied by different types of approach. The main result of those studies is the prediciton of band discontinuities. Defects in heterojunctions are real traps for charge carriers; they can affect the efficiency of the component decreasing the currents and the fluxes in it. the knowledge of their electronic structure is important, a great density of defects deeply modifies the electronic structure of the whole material creating real new bands of energy in the band structure of the component. in the first part of this work, we will describe the heterostructure and the defect in terms of quantum wells and discrete levels. This approach allows us to show the role of the width of the quantum well describing the structure but induces specific behaviours due to the one dimensional modelling. Then a perturbative treatment is proposed using the Green's functions formalism. We build atomic chains with different types of atoms featuring the heterostructure and the defect. Densities of states of a structure with a defect and levels associated to the defect are obtained. Results are comparable with the free electrons work, but the modelling do not induce problems due to a one dimensional approach. To extend our modelling, a three dimensions approach, based on a cavity model, is investigated. The influence of the defect, - of hydrogenoid type - introduced in the structure, is described by a cavity

  15. Atomic Reference Data for Electronic Structure Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Kotochigova, S; Shirley, E L

    We have generated data for atomic electronic structure calculations, to provide a standard reference for results of specified accuracy under commonly used approximations. Results are presented here for total energies and orbital energy eigenvalues for all atoms from H to U, at microHartree accuracy in the total energy, as computed in the local-density approximation (LDA) the local-spin-density approximation (LSD); the relativistic local-density approximation (RLDA); and scalar-relativistic local-density approximation (ScRLDA).

  16. The electronic structure of impurities in semiconductors

    CERN Multimedia

    Nylandsted larsen, A; Svane, A

    2002-01-01

    The electronic structure of isolated substitutional or interstitial impurities in group IV, IV-IV, and III-V compound semiconductors will be studied. Mössbauer spectroscopy will be used to investigate the incorporation of the implanted isotopes on the proper lattice sites. The data can be directly compared to theoretical calculations using the LMTO scheme. Deep level transient spectroscopy will be used to identify the band gap levels introduced by metallic impurities, mainly in Si~and~Si$ _{x}$Ge$_{1-x}$. \\\\ \\\\

  17. Unoccupied surface electronic structure of Gd(0001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, D.; Dowben, P.A.; Ortega, J.E.; Himpsel, F.J.

    1994-01-01

    The unoccupied surface electronic structure of Gd(0001) was investigated with high-resolution inverse-photoemission spectroscopy. An empty surface state near E F is observed at bar Γ. Two other surface-sensitive features are also revealed at 1.2 and 3.1 eV above the Fermi level. Hydrogen adsorption on Gd surfaces was used to distinguish the surface-sensitive features from the bulk features. The unoccupied bulk-band critical points are determined to be Γ 3 + at 1.9 eV and A 1 at 0.8 eV

  18. Cobalamins uncovered by modern electronic structure calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta; Ryde, Ulf

    2009-01-01

    electronic-structure calculations, in particular density functional methods, the understanding of the molecular mechanism of cobalamins has changed dramatically, going from a dominating view of trans-steric strain effects to a much more complex view involving an arsenal of catalytic strategies. Among...... these are cis-steric distortions, electrostatic stabilization of radical products, the realization that nucleotide units can serve as polar handles, and the careful design of the active sites, with polar residues in the radical enzymes and non-polar residues in the transferases. Together, these strategies...

  19. Electronic golden structure of the periodic chart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinowski, Leonard J. [Interdisciplinary Research Club, Monroeville, PA (United States)], E-mail: LJMalinowski@gmail.com

    2009-11-15

    The golden ratio has been studied since the ancient Greeks due to its inherent symmetry and aesthetic beauty, especially in the five Platonic Solids. The golden mean is now established as a pillar of El Naschie's E infinity where it achieves the physical manifestation of 0.618 034 MeV. The largest atomic electron orbital total energies average to the golden mean energy. This paper examines the golden ratio in order to expand upon a century old attempt to produce a relatively static, visual, geometric model of atomic structure.

  20. Electronic golden structure of the periodic chart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinowski, Leonard J.

    2009-01-01

    The golden ratio has been studied since the ancient Greeks due to its inherent symmetry and aesthetic beauty, especially in the five Platonic Solids. The golden mean is now established as a pillar of El Naschie's E infinity where it achieves the physical manifestation of 0.618 034 MeV. The largest atomic electron orbital total energies average to the golden mean energy. This paper examines the golden ratio in order to expand upon a century old attempt to produce a relatively static, visual, geometric model of atomic structure.

  1. Electronic structure of point defects in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruneval, Fabien

    2014-01-01

    This 'Habilitation a diriger des Recherches' memoir presents most of my scientific activities during the past 7 years, in the field of electronic structure calculations of defects in solids. Point defects (vacancies, interstitials, impurities) in functional materials are a key parameter to determine if these materials will actually fill the role they have been assigned or not. Indeed, the presence of defects cannot be avoided when the temperature is increased or when the material is subjected to external stresses, such as irradiation in the nuclear reactors and in artificial satellites with solar radiations. However, in many cases, defects are introduced in the materials on purpose to tune the electronic transport, optical or even magnetic properties. This procedure is called the doping of semiconductors, which is the foundation technique for transistors, diodes, or photovoltaic cells. However, doping is not always straightforward and unexpected features may occur, such as doping asymmetry or Fermi level pinning, which can only be explained by complex phenomena involving different types of defects or complexes of defects. In this context, the calculations of electronic structure ab initio is an ideal tool to complement the experimental observations, to gain the understanding of phenomena at the atomic level, and even to predict the properties of defects. The power of the ab initio calculations comes from their ability to describe any system of electrons and nuclei without any specific adjustment. But although there is a strong need for numerical simulations in this field, the ab initio calculations for defects are still under development as of today. The work presented in this memoir summarizes my contributions to methodological developments on this subject. These developments have followed two main tracks. The first topic is the better understanding of the unavoidable finite size effects. Indeed, defects in semiconductors or insulators are generally present in

  2. Phase Diagram and Electronic Structure of Praseodymium and Plutonium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Lanatà

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We develop a new implementation of the Gutzwiller approximation in combination with the local density approximation, which enables us to study complex 4f and 5f systems beyond the reach of previous approaches. We calculate from first principles the zero-temperature phase diagram and electronic structure of Pr and Pu, finding good agreement with the experiments. Our study of Pr indicates that its pressure-induced volume-collapse transition would not occur without change of lattice structure—contrarily to Ce. Our study of Pu shows that the most important effect originating the differentiation between the equilibrium densities of its allotropes is the competition between the Peierls effect and the Madelung interaction and not the dependence of the electron correlations on the lattice structure.

  3. Electronic structure of hcp transition metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, O.; Andersen, O. Krogh; Mackintosh, A. R.

    1975-01-01

    Using the linear muffin-tin-orbital method described in the previous paper, we have calculated the electronic structures of the hcp transition metals, Zr, Hf, Ru, and Os. We show how the band structures of these metals may be synthesized from the sp and d bands, and illustrate the effects...... of hybridization, relativistic band shifts, and spin-orbit coupling by the example of Os. By making use of parameters derived from the muffin-tin potential, we discuss trends in the positions and widths of the energy bands, especially the d bands, as a function of the location in the periodic table. The densities...... of states of the four metals are presented, and the calculated heat capacities compared with experiment. The Fermi surfaces of both Ru and Os are found to be in excellent quantitative agreement with de Haas-van Alphen measurements, indicating that the calculated d-band position is misplaced by less than 10...

  4. Experimental Benchmarking of Pu Electronic Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobin, J.G.; Moore, K.T.; Chung, B.W.; Wall, M.A.; Schwartz, A.J.; Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Butterfield, M.T.; Teslich, N.E. Jr.; Bliss, R.A.; Morton, S.A.; Yu, S.W.; Komesu, T.; Waddill, G.D.; van der Laan, G.; Kutepov, A.L.

    2008-01-01

    The standard method to determine the band structure of a condensed phase material is to (1) obtain a single crystal with a well defined surface and (2) map the bands with angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (occupied or valence bands) and inverse photoelectron spectroscopy (unoccupied or conduction bands). Unfortunately, in the case of Pu, the single crystals of Pu are either nonexistent, very small and/or having poorly defined surfaces. Furthermore, effects such as electron correlation and a large spin-orbit splitting in the 5f states have further complicated the situation. Thus, we have embarked upon the utilization of unorthodox electron spectroscopies, to circumvent the problems caused by the absence of large single crystals of Pu with well-defined surfaces. Our approach includes the techniques of resonant photoelectron spectroscopy, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, Fano Effect measurements, and Bremstrahlung Isochromat Spectroscopy, including the utilization of micro-focused beams to probe single-crystallite regions of polycrystalline Pu samples.

  5. Deep learning and the electronic structure problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Kyle; Spanner, Michael; Tamblyn, Isaac

    In the past decade, the fields of artificial intelligence and computer vision have progressed remarkably. Supported by the enthusiasm of large tech companies, as well as significant hardware advances and the utilization of graphical processing units to accelerate computations, deep neural networks (DNN) are gaining momentum as a robust choice for many diverse machine learning applications. We have demonstrated the ability of a DNN to solve a quantum mechanical eigenvalue equation directly, without the need to compute a wavefunction, and without knowledge of the underlying physics. We have trained a convolutional neural network to predict the total energy of an electron in a confining, 2-dimensional electrostatic potential. We numerically solved the one-electron Schrödinger equation for millions of electrostatic potentials, and used this as training data for our neural network. Four classes of potentials were assessed: the canonical cases of the harmonic oscillator and infinite well, and two types of randomly generated potentials for which no analytic solution is known. We compare the performance of the neural network and consider how these results could lead to future advances in electronic structure theory.

  6. Precursor Dependent Structural Properties and Antibacterial Activity ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    71

    10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30 ... absorption spectroscopy, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Zeta ... The antibacterial activity of the synthesized CuO were studied against human .... Sample d : Copper oxide synthesized with cupric sulphate as precursor ...... Chem.4 86.

  7. Structure and navigation for electronic publishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillinghast, John; Beretta, Giordano B.

    1998-01-01

    The sudden explosion of the World Wide Web as a new publication medium has given a dramatic boost to the electronic publishing industry, which previously was a limited market centered around CD-ROMs and on-line databases. While the phenomenon has parallels to the advent of the tabloid press in the middle of last century, the electronic nature of the medium brings with it the typical characteristic of 4th wave media, namely the acceleration in its propagation speed and the volume of information. Consequently, e-publications are even flatter than print media; Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet share the same computer screen with a home-made plagiarized copy of Deep Throat. The most touted tool for locating useful information on the World Wide Web is the search engine. However, due to the medium's flatness, sought information is drowned in a sea of useless information. A better solution is to build tools that allow authors to structure information so that it can easily be navigated. We experimented with the use of ontologies as a tool to formulate structures for information about a specific topic, so that related concepts are placed in adjacent locations and can easily be navigated using simple and ergonomic user models. We describe our effort in building a World Wide Web based photo album that is shared among a small network of people.

  8. Electronic structure and superconductivity of fcc Cr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, J.; Freeman, A.J.; Jarlborg, T.; Brodsky, M.B.

    1984-01-01

    Results of self-consistent electronic structure calculations are reported for metastable fcc Cr metal. Unlike the case of bcc Cr which has E/sub F/ at a minimum in the density of states (DOS), the DOS at E/sub F/ in fcc Cr is at a peak making this one of the higher-DOS metals with the fcc structure (e.g., comparable with that of Ni and Pt). A calculated Stoner factor of 0.82 indicates that ferromagnetic ordering is not expected. Calculations of the electron-phonon coupling parameter lambda and superconducting transition temperature T/sub c/ were made using the rigid-ion approximation and strong-coupling theory with various estimates of the (unknown) phonon contribution. We conclude that T/sub c/'sroughly-equal2.5 K are reasonable, although they are substantially smaller than the T/sub c/roughly-equal10 K derived from measurements on Au-Cr-Au sandwiches

  9. Surface electronic and structural properties of nanostructured titanium oxide grown by pulsed laser deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fusi, M.; Maccallini, E.; Caruso, T.; Casari, C. S.; Bassi, A. Li; Bottani, C. E.; Rudolf, P.; Prince, K. C.; Agostino, R. G.

    Titanium oxide nanostructured thin films synthesized by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) were here characterized with a multi-technique approach to investigate the relation between surface electronic, structural and morphological properties. Depending on the growth parameters, these films present

  10. Electronic structure of Ca, Sr, and Ba under pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Animalu, A. O. E.; Heine, V.; Vasvari, B.

    1967-01-01

    Electronic band structure calculations phase of Ca, Sr and Ba over wide range of atomic volumes under pressure electronic band structure calculations for fcc phase of Ca, Sr and Ba over wide range of atomic volumes under pressure electronic band structure calculations for fcc phase of Ca, Sr and Ba over wide range of atomic volumes under pressure

  11. Deriving the coronal hole electron temperature: electron density dependent ionization / recombination considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, John Gerard; Perez-Suarez, David; Singh, Avninda; Chapman, Steven; Bryans, Paul; Summers, Hugh; Savin, Daniel Wolf

    2010-01-01

    Comparison of appropriate theoretically derived line ratios with observational data can yield estimates of a plasma's physical parameters, such as electron density or temperature. The usual practice in the calculation of the line ratio is the assumption of excitation by electrons/protons followed by radiative decay. Furthermore, it is normal to use the so-called coronal approximation, i.e. one only considers ionization and recombination to and from the ground-state. A more accurate treatment is to include ionization/recombination to and from metastable levels. Here, we apply this to two lines from adjacent ionization stages, Mg IX 368 A and Mg X 625 A, which has been shown to be a very useful temperature diagnostic. At densities typical of coronal hole conditions, the difference between the electron temperature derived assuming the zero density limit compared with the electron density dependent ionization/recombination is small. This, however, is not the case for flares where the electron density is orders of magnitude larger. The derived temperature for the coronal hole at solar maximum is around 1.04 MK compared to just below 0.82 MK at solar minimum.

  12. Electronic structure of hybrid interfaces for polymer-based electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahlman, M; Crispin, A; Crispin, X; Henze, S K M; Jong, M P de; Osikowicz, W; Tengstedt, C; Salaneck, W R

    2007-01-01

    The fundamentals of the energy level alignment at anode and cathode electrodes in organic electronics are described. We focus on two different models that treat weakly interacting organic/metal (and organic/organic) interfaces: the induced density of interfacial states model and the so-called integer charge transfer model. The two models are compared and evaluated, mainly using photoelectron spectroscopy data of the energy level alignment of conjugated polymers and molecules at various organic/metal and organic/organic interfaces. We show that two different alignment regimes are generally observed: (i) vacuum level alignment, which corresponds to the lack of vacuum level offsets (Schottky-Mott limit) and hence the lack of charge transfer across the interface, and (ii) Fermi level pinning where the resulting work function of an organic/metal and organic/organic bilayer is independent of the substrate work function and an interface dipole is formed due to charge transfer across the interface. We argue that the experimental results are best described by the integer charge transfer model which predicts the vacuum level alignment when the substrate work function is above the positive charge transfer level and below the negative charge transfer level of the conjugated material. The model further predicts Fermi level pinning to the positive (negative) charge transfer level when the substrate work function is below (above) the positive (negative) charge transfer level. The nature of the integer charge transfer levels depend on the materials system: for conjugated large molecules and polymers, the integer charge transfer states are polarons or bipolarons; for small molecules' highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals and for crystalline systems, the relevant levels are the valence and conduction band edges. Finally, limits and further improvements to the integer charge transfer model are discussed as well as the impact on device design. (topical review)

  13. Electronic structure of Sr2RuO4 studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasawa, H.; Aiura, Y.; Saitoh, T.; Yoshida, Y.; Hase, I.; Ikeda, S.I.; Bando, H.; Kubota, M.; Ono, K.

    2007-01-01

    Electronic structure of the monolayer strontium ruthenate Sr 2 RuO 4 was investigated by high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We present photon-energy (hν) dependence of the electronic structure near the Fermi level along the ΓM line. The hν dependence has shown a strong spectral weight modulation of the Ru 4d xy and 4d zx bands

  14. Electronic structure of MnSi : The role of electron-electron interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carbone, F; Zangrando, M; Brinkman, A; Nicolaou, A; Bondino, F; Magnano, E; Nugroho, A. A.; Parmigiani, F; Jarlborg, T; van der Marel, D

    We present an experimental study of the electronic structure of MnSi. Using x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), x-ray photoemission, and x-ray fluorescence, we provide experimental evidence that MnSi has a mixed valence ground state. We show that self-consistent local density approximation

  15. Electronic structure of MnSi: The role of electron-electron interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carbone, F.; Zangrando, M.; Brinkman, Alexander; Nicolaou, A.; Bondino, F.; Magnano, E.; Nugroho, A.A.; Parmigiani, F.; Jarlborg, Th.; van der Marel, D.

    2006-01-01

    We present an experimental study of the electronic structure of MnSi. Using x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), x-ray photoemission, and x-ray fluorescence, we provide experimental evidence that MnSi has a mixed valence ground state. We show that self-consistent local density approximation

  16. Fingerprint-based structure retrieval using electron density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Shuangye; Dokholyan, Nikolay V

    2011-03-01

    We present a computational approach that can quickly search a large protein structural database to identify structures that fit a given electron density, such as determined by cryo-electron microscopy. We use geometric invariants (fingerprints) constructed using 3D Zernike moments to describe the electron density, and reduce the problem of fitting of the structure to the electron density to simple fingerprint comparison. Using this approach, we are able to screen the entire Protein Data Bank and identify structures that fit two experimental electron densities determined by cryo-electron microscopy. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Validity and factor structure of the bodybuilding dependence scale

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, D; Hale, B

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the factor structure, validity, and reliability of the bodybuilding dependence scale and to investigate differences in bodybuilding dependence between men and women and competitive and non-competitive bodybuilders.

  18. Electromagnetic radiation of electrons in periodic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potylitsyn, Alexander Petrovich

    2011-01-01

    Periodic magnetic structures (undulators) are widely used in accelerators to generate monochromatic undulator radiation (UR) in the range from far infrared to the hard X-ray region. Another periodic crystalline structure is used to produce quasimonochromatic polarized photon beams via the coherent bremsstrahlung mechanism (CBS). Due to such characteristics as monochromaticity, polarization and adjustability, these types of radiation is of large interest for applied and basic research of accelerator-emitted radiation. The book provides a detailed overview of the fundamental principles behind electromagnetic radiation emitted from accelerated charged particles (e.g. UR, CBS, radiation of fast electrons in Laser flash fields) as well as a unified description of relatively new radiation mechanisms which attracted great interest in recent years. This are the so-called polarization radiation excited by the Coulomb field of incident particles in periodic structures, parametric X-rays, resonant transition radiation and the Smith-Purcell effect. Characteristics of such radiation sources and perspectives of their usage are discussed. The recent experimental results as well as their interpretation are presented. (orig.)

  19. Electronic Band Structure of Helical Polyisocyanides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Benoît; Liégeois, Vincent; Fripiat, Joseph G; Harris, Frank E

    2017-10-19

    Restricted Hartree-Fock computations are reported for a methyl isocyanide polymer (repeating unit -C═N-CH 3 ), whose most stable conformation is expected to be a helical chain. The computations used a standard contracted Gaussian orbital set at the computational levels STO-3G, 3-21G, 6-31G, and 6-31G**, and studies were made for two line-group configurations motivated by earlier work and by studies of space-filling molecular models: (1) A structure of line-group symmetry L9 5 , containing a 9-fold screw axis with atoms displaced in the axial direction by 5/9 times the lattice constant, and (2) a structure of symmetry L4 1 that had been proposed, containing a 4-fold screw axis with translation by 1/4 of the lattice constant. Full use of the line-group symmetry was employed to cause most of the computational complexity to depend only on the size of the asymmetric repeating unit. Data reported include computed bond properties, atomic charge distribution, longitudinal polarizability, band structure, and the convoluted density of states. Most features of the description were found to be insensitive to the level of computational approximation. The work also illustrates the importance of exploiting line-group symmetry to extend the range of polymer structural problems that can be treated computationally.

  20. Fast electronic structure methods for strongly correlated molecular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Head-Gordon, Martin; Beran, Gregory J O; Sodt, Alex; Jung, Yousung

    2005-01-01

    A short review is given of newly developed fast electronic structure methods that are designed to treat molecular systems with strong electron correlations, such as diradicaloid molecules, for which standard electronic structure methods such as density functional theory are inadequate. These new local correlation methods are based on coupled cluster theory within a perfect pairing active space, containing either a linear or quadratic number of pair correlation amplitudes, to yield the perfect pairing (PP) and imperfect pairing (IP) models. This reduces the scaling of the coupled cluster iterations to no worse than cubic, relative to the sixth power dependence of the usual (untruncated) coupled cluster doubles model. A second order perturbation correction, PP(2), to treat the neglected (weaker) correlations is formulated for the PP model. To ensure minimal prefactors, in addition to favorable size-scaling, highly efficient implementations of PP, IP and PP(2) have been completed, using auxiliary basis expansions. This yields speedups of almost an order of magnitude over the best alternatives using 4-center 2-electron integrals. A short discussion of the scope of accessible chemical applications is given

  1. Dose-dependent high-resolution electron ptychography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Alfonso, A. J.; Allen, L. J.; Sawada, H.; Kirkland, A. I.

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports of electron ptychography at atomic resolution have ushered in a new era of coherent diffractive imaging in the context of electron microscopy. We report and discuss electron ptychography under variable electron dose conditions, exploring the prospects of an approach which has considerable potential for imaging where low dose is needed

  2. Modification of electronic structure, magnetic structure, and topological phase of bismuthene by point defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadioglu, Yelda; Kilic, Sevket Berkay; Demirci, Salih; Aktürk, O. Üzengi; Aktürk, Ethem; Ciraci, Salim

    2017-12-01

    This paper reveals how the electronic structure, magnetic structure, and topological phase of two-dimensional (2D), single-layer structures of bismuth are modified by point defects. We first showed that a free-standing, single-layer, hexagonal structure of bismuth, named h-bismuthene, exhibits nontrivial band topology. We then investigated interactions between single foreign adatoms and bismuthene structures, which comprise stability, bonding, electronic structure, and magnetic structures. Localized states in diverse locations of the band gap and resonant states in band continua of bismuthene are induced upon the adsorption of different adatoms, which modify electronic and magnetic properties. Specific adatoms result in reconstruction around the adsorption site. Single vacancies and divacancies can form readily in bismuthene structures and remain stable at high temperatures. Through rebondings, Stone-Whales-type defects are constructed by divacancies, which transform into a large hole at high temperature. Like adsorbed adatoms, vacancies induce also localized gap states, which can be eliminated through rebondings in divacancies. We also showed that not only the optical and magnetic properties, but also the topological features of pristine h-bismuthene can be modified by point defects. The modification of the topological features depends on the energies of localized states and also on the strength of coupling between point defects.

  3. Electron Liquids in Semiconductor Quantum Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinczuk, Aron

    2009-01-01

    The groups led by Stormer and Pinczuk have focused this project on goals that seek the elucidation of novel many-particle effects that emerge in two-dimensional electron systems (2DES) as the result from fundamental quantum interactions. This experimental research is conducted under extreme conditions of temperature and magnetic field. From the materials point of view, the ultra-high mobility systems in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum structures continue to be at the forefront of this research. The newcomer materials are based on graphene, a single atomic layer of graphite. The graphene research is attracting enormous attention from many communities involved in condensed matter research. The investigated many-particle phenomena include the integer and fractional quantum Hall effect, composite fermions, and Dirac fermions, and a diverse group of electron solid and liquid crystal phases. The Stormer group performed magneto-transport experiments and far-infrared spectroscopy, while the Pinczuk group explores manifestations of such phases in optical spectra.

  4. Electrons and photons in periodic structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Goor

    . In particular, the modulation leads to the emergence of band gaps, which are accompanied by a strongly modified density of states near and within the band gap. The main focus is on two applications of such modified densities of states. Firstly, the intentional introduction of defects in an otherwise perfectly...... periodic modulation of an electron gas leads to the emergence of localized defect states with energies within the band gap, where no propagating modes exist. Secondly, the divergence of the photonic density of states near a photonic band gap leads to strongly modified light-matter interactions, which has...... of the density of states near the band gap edge. Using a perturbative approach, we demonstrate certain limits of the attainable slow down factors due to broadening of electromagnetic modes. We discuss the effect of damping due to a finite conductivity as well as structural disorder, and provide a common...

  5. Electronic structure of single crystal C60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, J.; Shen, Z.X.; Dessau, D.S.; Cao, R.; Marshall, D.S.; Pianetta, P.; Lindau, I.; Yang, X.; Terry, J.; King, D.M.; Wells, B.O.; Elloway, D.; Wendt, H.R.; Brown, C.A.; Hunziker, H.; Vries, M.S. de

    1992-01-01

    We report angle-resolved photoemission data from single crystals of C 60 cleaved in UHV. Unlike the other forms of pure carbon, the valence band spectrum of C 60 consists of many sharp features that can be essentially accounted for by the quantum chemical calculations describing individual molecules. This suggests that the electronic structure of solid C 60 is mainly determined by the bonding interactions within the individual molecules. We also observe remarkable intensity modulations of the photoemission features as a function of photon energy, suggesting strong final state effects. Finally, we address the issue of the band width of the HOMO state of C 60 . We assert that the width of the photoemission peak of C 60 does not reflect the intrinsic band width because it is broadened by the non 0-0 transitions via the Franck-Condon principle. Our view point provides a possible reconciliation between these photoemission data and those measured by other techniques. (orig.)

  6. Multilevel domain decomposition for electronic structure calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrault, M.; Cances, E.; Hager, W.W.; Le Bris, C.

    2007-01-01

    We introduce a new multilevel domain decomposition method (MDD) for electronic structure calculations within semi-empirical and density functional theory (DFT) frameworks. This method iterates between local fine solvers and global coarse solvers, in the spirit of domain decomposition methods. Using this approach, calculations have been successfully performed on several linear polymer chains containing up to 40,000 atoms and 200,000 atomic orbitals. Both the computational cost and the memory requirement scale linearly with the number of atoms. Additional speed-up can easily be obtained by parallelization. We show that this domain decomposition method outperforms the density matrix minimization (DMM) method for poor initial guesses. Our method provides an efficient preconditioner for DMM and other linear scaling methods, variational in nature, such as the orbital minimization (OM) procedure

  7. X-ray and photoelectron spectroscopy of the structure, reactivity, and electronic structure of semiconductor nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamad, Kimberly Sue [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals are a system which has been the focus of interest due to their size dependent properties and their possible use in technological applications. Many chemical and physical properties vary systematically with the size of the nanocrystal and thus their study enables the investigation of scaling laws. Due to the increasing surface to volume ratio as size is decreased, the surfaces of nanocrystals are expected to have a large influence on their electronic, thermodynamic, and chemical behavior. In spite of their importance, nanocrystal surfaces are still relatively uncharacterized in terms of their structure, electronic properties, bonding, and reactivity. Investigation of nanocrystal surfaces is currently limited by what techniques to use, and which methods are suitable for nanocrystals is still being determined. This work presents experiments using x-ray and electronic spectroscopies to explore the structure, reactivity, and electronic properties of semiconductor (CdSe, InAs) nanocrystals and how they vary with size. Specifically, x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) in conjunction with multiple scattering simulations affords information about the structural disorder present at the surface of the nanocrystal. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) probe the electronic structure in terms of hole screening, and also give information about band lineups when the nanocrystal is placed in electric contact with a substrate. XPS of the core levels of the nanocrystal as a function of photo-oxidation time yields kinetic data on the oxidation reaction occurring at the surface of the nanocrystal.

  8. Geometric and electronic structures of small GaN clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Bin; Cao Peilin

    2004-08-02

    The geometric and electronic structures of Ga{sub x}N{sub y} (x+y{<=}8) clusters have been calculated using a full-potential linear-muffin-tin-orbital method, combined with molecular dynamics and simulated annealing techniques. It is found that the structures, binding energies and HOMO-LUMO gaps of these clusters strongly depend on their size and composition. The lowest energy structures of these clusters are obtained, and the trends in the geometries are discussed. The binding energy of the cluster increases as the size of cluster increases. N-rich cluster has larger binding energy than Ga-rich ones. The HOMO-LUMO gaps of these clusters are evaluated.

  9. Electronic structures near surfaces of perovskite type oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Toru

    2005-01-01

    This work is intended to draw attention to the origin of the electronic structures near surfaces of perovskite type oxides. Deep states were observed by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopic measurements. The film thickness dependent electronic structures near surfaces of (Ba 0.5 Sr 0.5 )TiO 3 thin films were observed. As for the 117-308 nm thick (Ba 0.5 Sr 0.5 )TiO 3 films, deep states were lying at 0.20, 0.55, and 0.85 eV below the quasi-fermi level, respectively. However, as for the 40 nm thick (Ba 0.5 Sr 0.5 )TiO 3 film, the states were overlapped. The A-site doping affected electronic structures near surfaces of SrTiO 3 single crystals. No evolution of deep states in non-doped SrTiO 3 single crystal was observed. However, the evolution of deep states in La-doped SrTiO 3 single crystal was observed

  10. Composition and carrier-concentration dependence of the electronic structure of InyGa1-yAs1-xNx films with nitrogen mole fraction of less than 0.012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Youn-Seon; Robins, Lawrence H.; Birdwell, Anthony G.; Shapiro, Alexander J.; Thurber, W. Robert; Vaudin, Mark D.; Fahmi, M.M.E.; Bryson, Damian; Mohammad, S. Noor

    2005-01-01

    The electronic structure of Si-doped In y Ga 1-y As 1-x N x films on GaAs substrates, grown by nitrogen-plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy, was examined by photoreflectance (PR) spectroscopy at temperatures between 20 and 300 K. The films were approximately 0.5 μm thick and had nitrogen mole fraction between x=0.0014 and x=0.012, measured indirectly by a secondary-ion-mass spectrometry calibration; indium mole fraction between y=0.052 and y=0.075, measured by electron-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy; and carrier concentration between 2x10 16 and 1.1x10 18 cm -3 , measured by Hall effect. Three critical-point transitions were identified by PR: the fundamental band gap (highest valence band to the lowest conduction band); the spin-orbit split valence band to the lowest conduction band; and the highest valence band to a nitrogen impurity band (above the lowest conduction band). The measured critical-point energies were described by a band anticrossing (BAC) model with the addition of a Burstein-Moss band-filling term. The fitted BAC parameters were similar to previously reported values. The N impurity level was located 0.3004±0.0101 eV above the conduction-band edge at 20 K and 0.3286±0.0089 eV above the conduction-band edge at 295 K. The BAC interaction parameter was 2.588±0.071 eV. From the small magnitude of the Burstein-Moss energy shift with increasing carrier concentration, it was inferred that the carrier concentration probed by PR is reduced from the bulk (Hall-effect) carrier concentration by a reduction factor of 0.266±0.145. The PR lines broadened with increasing carrier concentration; the line broadening tracked the predicted Burstein-Moss energy shift for the bulk carrier concentration. The surface-normal lattice constants of the films were measured by x-ray diffraction. Comparison of the measured lattice constants with Vegard's law showed the presence of tensile strain (in the surface-normal direction) with magnitude between 1.5x10 -3 and 3.0x10

  11. Dependence of Energetic Electron Precipitation on the Geomagnetic Index Kp and Electron Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-Young Park

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It has long been known that the magnetospheric particles can precipitate into the atmosphere of the Earth. In this paper we examine such precipitation of energetic electrons using the data obtained from low-altitude polar orbiting satellite observations. We analyze the precipitating electron flux data for many periods selected from a total of 84 storm events identified for 2001-2012. The analysis includes the dependence of precipitation on the Kp index and the electron energy, for which we use three energies E1 > 30 keV, E2 > 100 keV, E3 > 300 keV. We find that the precipitation is best correlated with Kp after a time delay of < 3 hours. Most importantly, the correlation with Kp is notably tighter for lower energy than for higher energy in the sense that the lower energy precipitation flux increases more rapidly with Kp than does the higher energy precipitation flux. Based on this we suggest that the Kp index reflects excitation of a wave that is responsible for scattering of preferably lower energy electrons. The role of waves of other types should become increasingly important for higher energy, for which we suggest to rely on other indicators than Kp if one can identify such an indicator.

  12. Carbon nanotube on Si(001): structural and electronic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orellana, W.; Fazzio, A.; Miwa, R.W.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The promising nanoscale technology based on carbon nanotubes has attracted much attention due to the unique electronic, chemical and mechanical properties of the nanotubes. Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNs) provide an ideal atomically uniform one dimensional (1D) conductors, having a strong electronic confinement around its circumference, which can be retained up to room temperature[1]. This interesting property may lead one to consider SWCNs as 1D conductors for the development of nanoscale electronic devices. In this work the structural and electronic properties of the contact between a metallic (6,6) SWCN adsorbed on a silicon (001) surface are studied from first-principles total-energy calculations. We consider two adsorption sites for the tube on the Si(001) surface: on the top of the Si-dimer rows and on the surface 'trench' between two consecutive dimer rows. Our results show a chemical bond between the nanotube and Si(001) when the tube is located along the 'trench', which corresponds to the only bound structure. We find a binding energy per tube length of 0.21 eV/angstrom. We also verified that the binding energy depends on the rotation of the tube. Typically, a rotation of 15 deg can reduce the binding energy up to 0.07 eV/angstrom. Our calculated electronic properties indicate that the most stable structure shows a subband associated to the tube/surface bond that cross the Fermi level. This result indicates an enhanced metallic behavior along the tube/surface contact characterizing a 1D quantum wire. The charge transfer between the Si surface and the tube is also discussed. [1] Z. Yao, C. Dekker, and P. Avouris in Carbon Nanotubes, M. S. Dresselhaus, G. Dresselhaus, and P. Avouris Eds., (Springer, Berlin 2001), p. 147. (author)

  13. Electronic structure and superconductivity of FeSe-related superconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xu; Zhao, Lin; He, Shaolong; He, Junfeng; Liu, Defa; Mou, Daixiang; Shen, Bing; Hu, Yong; Huang, Jianwei; Zhou, X J

    2015-05-13

    FeSe superconductors and their related systems have attracted much attention in the study of iron-based superconductors owing to their simple crystal structure and peculiar electronic and physical properties. The bulk FeSe superconductor has a superconducting transition temperature (Tc) of ~8 K and it can be dramatically enhanced to 37 K at high pressure. On the other hand, its cousin system, FeTe, possesses a unique antiferromagnetic ground state but is non-superconducting. Substitution of Se with Te in the FeSe superconductor results in an enhancement of Tc up to 14.5 K and superconductivity can persist over a large composition range in the Fe(Se,Te) system. Intercalation of the FeSe superconductor leads to the discovery of the AxFe2-ySe2 (A = K, Cs and Tl) system that exhibits a Tc higher than 30 K and a unique electronic structure of the superconducting phase. A recent report of possible high temperature superconductivity in single-layer FeSe/SrTiO3 films with a Tc above 65 K has generated much excitement in the community. This pioneering work opens a door for interface superconductivity to explore for high Tc superconductors. The distinct electronic structure and superconducting gap, layer-dependent behavior and insulator-superconductor transition of the FeSe/SrTiO3 films provide critical information in understanding the superconductivity mechanism of iron-based superconductors. In this paper, we present a brief review of the investigation of the electronic structure and superconductivity of the FeSe superconductor and related systems, with a particular focus on the FeSe films.

  14. Diameter dependent electron transfer kinetics in semiconductor-enzyme complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Katherine A; Song, Qing; Mulder, David W; King, Paul W

    2014-10-28

    Excited state electron transfer (ET) is a fundamental step for the catalytic conversion of solar energy into chemical energy. To understand the properties controlling ET between photoexcited nanoparticles and catalysts, the ET kinetics were measured for solution-phase complexes of CdTe quantum dots and Clostridium acetobutylicum [FeFe]-hydrogenase I (CaI) using time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy. Over a 2.0-3.5 nm diameter range of CdTe nanoparticles, the observed ET rate (kET) was sensitive to CaI concentration. To account for diameter effects on CaI binding, a Langmuir isotherm and two geometric binding models were created to estimate maximal CaI affinities and coverages at saturating concentrations. Normalizing the ET kinetics to CaI surface coverage for each CdTe diameter led to k(ET) values that were insensitive to diameter, despite a decrease in the free energy for photoexcited ET (ΔGET) with increasing diameter. The turnover frequency (TOF) of CaI in CdTe-CaI complexes was measured at several molar ratios. Normalization for diameter-dependent changes in CaI coverage showed an increase in TOF with diameter. These results suggest that k(ET) and H2 production for CdTe-CaI complexes are not strictly controlled by ΔG(ET) and that other factors must be considered.

  15. Temperature dependence of electron mobility, electroluminescence and photoluminescence of Alq{sub 3} in OLED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mu Haichuan; White, Dan; Sharpton, Buck [Office of Electronic Miniaturization, University of Alaska at Fairbanks, AK 99701 (United States); Klotzkin, David [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States); De Silva, Ajith; Wagner, Hans Peter [Department of Physics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States)], E-mail: fnhm@uaf.edu

    2008-12-07

    The correlation of electroluminescence (EL), photoluminescence (PL) and electron mobility were investigated over temperature from 60 to 300 K in small-molecule organic light emitting diode (OLED) structures. The devices consisted of ITO/PEDOT(50 nm)/TPD(50 nm)/Alq{sub 3}(60 nm)/LiF(1 nm)/Al(90 nm), and were fabricated with high-vacuum sublimation/evaporation in a cross-linked configuration. Electron mobility was measured using an ac analysis of the device optical modulation characteristics, while PL and EL were measured by measuring optical power out at fixed pump power of 1 mW, and analysis of dc brightness-voltage (L-V) characteristics, respectively. PL intensity and mobility had a clear maximum at around 220 K, while EL efficiency was constant below 220 K and decrease monotonically above. The reason for the temperature dependent EL, PL and electron mobility behaviour will be discussed.

  16. Electronic structure of semiconductor quantum films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, S.B.; Yeh, C.; Zunger, A.

    1993-01-01

    The electronic structure of thin (≤30 A) free-standing ideal films of Si(001), Si(110), and GaAs(110) is calculated using a plane-wave pseudopotential description. Unlike the expectation based on the simple effective-mass model, we find the following. (i) The band gaps of (001) quantum films exhibit even-odd oscillation as a function of the number N of monolayers. (ii) In addition to sine-type envelope functions which vanish at the film boundaries, some states have cosine envelope functions with extrema at boundaries. (iii) Even-layer Si(001) films exhibit at the valence-band maximum a state whose energy does not vary with the film thickness. Such zero confinement states have constant envelope throughout the film. (iv) Optical transitions in films exhibit boundary-imposed selection rules. Furthermore, oscillator strengths for pseudodirect transitions in the vicinity of forbidden direct transitions can be enhanced by several orders of magnitude. These findings, obtained in direct supercell calculations, can be explained in terms of a truncated crystal (TC) analysis. In this approach the film's wave functions are expanded in terms of pairs of bulk wave functions exhibiting a destructive interference at the boundaries. This maps the eigenvalue spectra of a film onto the bulk band structure evaluated at special k points which satisfy the boundary conditions. We find that the TC representation reproduces accurately the above-mentioned results of direct diagonalization of the film's Hamiltonian. This provides a simple alternative to the effective-mass model and relates the properties of quantum structures to those of the bulk material

  17. Direct electron crystallographic determination of zeolite zonal structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorset, Douglas L.; Gilmore, Christopher J.; Jorda, Jose Luis; Nicolopoulos, Stavros

    2007-01-01

    The prospect for improving the success of ab initio zeolite structure investigations with electron diffraction data is evaluated. First of all, the quality of intensities obtained by precession electron diffraction at small hollow cone illumination angles is evaluated for seven representative materials: ITQ-1, ITQ-7, ITQ-29, ZSM-5, ZSM-10, mordenite, and MCM-68. It is clear that, for most examples, an appreciable fraction of a secondary scattering perturbation is removed by precession at small angles. In one case, ZSM-10, it can also be argued that precession diffraction produces a dramatically improved 'kinematical' data set. There seems to no real support for application of a Lorentz correction to these data and there is no reason to expect for any of these samples that a two-beam dynamical scattering relationship between structure factor amplitude and observed intensity should be valid. Removal of secondary scattering by the precession mode appears to facilitate ab initio structure analysis. Most zeolite structures investigated could be solved by maximum entropy and likelihood phasing via error-correcting codes when precession data were used. Examples include the projected structure of mordenite that could not be determined from selected area data alone. One anomaly is the case of ZSM-5, where the best structure determination in projection is made from selected area diffraction data. In a control study, the zonal structure of SSZ-48 could be determined from selected area diffraction data by either maximum entropy and likelihood or traditional direct methods. While the maximum entropy and likelihood approach enjoys some advantages over traditional direct methods (non-dependence on predicted phase invariant sums), some effort must be made to improve the figures of merit used to identify potential structure solutions

  18. Studies in the electronic structure of matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swarts, C.A.

    1979-01-01

    Chapter I: Here the results of various theories for the angular distribution of electrons photoemitted from the outermost p-shell of rare gas atoms are compared. The theories compared are (I) the local density theories of Slater (X/sub α/) and of Hohenberg, Kohn and Sham, (II) the pseudopotential method, (III) Hartree-Fock theory as evaluated by Kennedy and Manson, and (IV) Amusia's Random Phase Approximation with Exchange (RPAE). It is shown that the local density theories, although simple, generally fail to produce reliable cross section; the more complicated Hartree-Fock method is no more reliable; the a priori RPAE method is most reliable, but tedious; and the phenomenological pseudopotential method offers a good combination of reliability and simplicity. The muffin-tin approximation, widely used in molecular and condensed matter physics, is examined and found to be adequate. Chapter II: Extended Hueckel theory is applied to GaAs, GaP and to the nitrogen isoelectronic trap in GaAs and GaP. The computed perfect crystal band structures are found to be in reasonable agreement with those computed with empirical pseudopotentials. Nitrogen impurity levels in GaAs and GaP are calculated using a cluster model. Chapter III: By means of model calculations for an independent electron metal, we obtain exact lineshapes for the photon absorption, emission and photoemission spectra of deep core states. We find in each case an X-ray edge anomaly as pedicted by Nozieres and De Dominicis. Sumrules are used as a general check on the calculations and to explain the deviations of the exact theory from the exciton theory away from threshold

  19. Nonlinearity in structural and electronic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, A.R.; Beardmore, K.M.; Ben-Naim, E.

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project strengthens a nonlinear technology base relevant to a variety of problems arising in condensed matter and materials science, and applies this technology to those problems. In this way the controlled synthesis of, and experiments on, novel electronic and structural materials provide an important focus for nonlinear science, while nonlinear techniques help advance the understanding of the scientific principles underlying the control of microstructure and dynamics in complex materials. This research is primarily focused on four topics: (1) materials microstructure: growth and evolution, and porous media; (2) textures in elastic/martensitic materials; (3) electro- and photo-active polymers; and (4) ultrafast photophysics in complex electronic materials. Accomplishments included the following: organization of a ''Nonlinear Materials'' seminar series and international conferences including ''Fracture, Friction and Deformation,'' ''Nonequilibrium Phase Transitions,'' and ''Landscape Paradigms in Physics and Biology''; invited talks at international conference on ''Synthetic Metals,'' ''Quantum Phase Transitions,'' ''1996 CECAM Euroconference,'' and the 1995 Fall Meeting of the Materials Research Society; large-scale simulations and microscopic modeling of nonlinear coherent energy storage at crack tips and sliding interfaces; large-scale simulation and microscopic elasticity theory for precursor microstructure and dynamics at solid-solid diffusionless phase transformations; large-scale simulation of self-assembling organic thin films on inorganic substrates; analysis and simulation of smoothing of rough atomic surfaces; and modeling and analysis of flux pattern formation in equilibrium and nonequilibrium Josephson junction arrays and layered superconductors

  20. Valence band electronic structure of Pd based ternary chalcogenide superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohani, H. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Training School Complex, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai 400085 (India); Mishra, P. [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India); Goyal, R.; Awana, V.P.S. [National Physical Laboratory(CSIR), Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Sekhar, B.R., E-mail: sekhar@iopb.res.in [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Training School Complex, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • VB Photoemission study and DFT calculations on Pd based ternary superconductors are presented. • Nb{sub 2}Pd{sub 0.95}S{sub 5} shows a temperature dependent pseudogap. • VB spectral features of ternary superconductors are correlated to their structural geometry. - Abstract: We present a comparative study of the valence band electronic structure of Pd based ternary chalcogenide superconductors Nb{sub 2}Pd{sub 0.95}S{sub 5}, Ta{sub 2}Pd{sub 0.97}S{sub 6} and Ta{sub 2}Pd{sub 0.97}Te{sub 6} using experimental photoemission spectroscopy and density functional based theoretical calculations. We observe a qualitatively similarity between valence band (VB) spectra of Nb{sub 2}Pd{sub 0.95}S{sub 5} and Ta{sub 2}Pd{sub 0.97}S{sub 6}. Further, we find a pseudogap feature in Nb{sub 2}Pd{sub 0.95}S{sub 5} at low temperature, unlike other two compounds. We have correlated the structural geometry with the differences in VB spectra of these compounds. The different atomic packing in these compounds could vary the strength of inter-orbital hybridization among various atoms which leads to difference in their electronic structure as clearly observed in our DOS calculations.

  1. Overpotential-induced lability of the electronic overlap factor in long-range electrochemical electron transfer: charge and distance dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornyshev, A. A.; Kuznetsov, A. M.; Nielsen, Jens Ulrik

    2000-01-01

    Long-distance electrochemical electron transfer exhibits approximately exponential dependence on the electron transfer distance. On the basis of a jellium model of the metal surface we show that the slope of the logarithm of the current vs. the transfer distance also depends strongly...

  2. Electron dose dependence of signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and resolution in transmission electron microscope images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Z.; Rose, H.; Lehtinen, O.; Biskupek, J.; Kaiser, U.

    2014-01-01

    In order to achieve the highest resolution in aberration-corrected (AC) high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images, high electron doses are required which only a few samples can withstand. In this paper we perform dose-dependent AC-HRTEM image calculations, and study the dependence of the signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and resolution on electron dose and sampling. We introduce dose-dependent contrast, which can be used to evaluate the visibility of objects under different dose conditions. Based on our calculations, we determine optimum samplings for high and low electron dose imaging conditions. - Highlights: • The definition of dose-dependent atom contrast is introduced. • The dependence of the signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and specimen resolution on electron dose and sampling is explored. • The optimum sampling can be determined according to different dose conditions

  3. Atomistic simulations of divacancy defects in armchair graphene nanoribbons: Stability, electronic structure, and electron transport properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Jun [College of Physical Science and Technology, Yangtze University, Jingzhou, Hubei 434023 (China); Zeng, Hui, E-mail: zenghui@yangtzeu.edu.cn [College of Physical Science and Technology, Yangtze University, Jingzhou, Hubei 434023 (China); Wei, Jianwei [College of Optoelectronic Information, Chongqing University of Technology, Chongqing 400054 (China); Li, Biao; Xu, Dahai [College of Physical Science and Technology, Yangtze University, Jingzhou, Hubei 434023 (China)

    2014-01-17

    Using the first principles calculations associated with nonequilibrium Green's function, we have studied the electronic structures and quantum transport properties of defective armchair graphene nanoribbon (AGNR) in the presence of divacancy defects. The triple pentagon–triple heptagon (555–777) defect in the defective AGNR is energetically more favorable than the pentagon–octagon–pentagon (5–8–5) defect. Our calculated results reveal that both 5–8–5-like defect and 555–777-like defect in AGNR could improve the electron transport. It is anticipated that defective AGNRs can exhibit large range variations in transport behaviors, which are strongly dependent on the distributions of the divacancy defect.

  4. Electronic structure, bonding and chemisorption in metallic hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    Problems that can arise during the cycling steps for a hydride storage system usually involve events at surfaces. Chemisorption and reaction processes can be affected by small amounts of contaminants that may act as catalytic poisons. The nature of the poisoning process can vary greatly for the different metals and alloys that form hydrides. A unifying concept is offered, which satisfactorily correlates many of the properties of transition-metal, rare-earth and actinide hydrides. The metallic hydrides can be differentiated on the basis of electronegativity, metallic radius (valence) and electronic structure. For those systems where there are d (transition metals) or f (early actinides) electrons near the Fermi level a broad range of chemical and catalytic behaviors are found, depending on bandwidth and energy. The more electropositive metals (rare-earths, actinides, transition metals with d > 5) dissolve hydrogen and form hydrides by an electronically somewhat different process, and as a class tend to adsorb electrophobic molecules. The net charge-transfer in either situation is subtle; however, the small differences are responsible for many of the observed structural, chemical, and catalytic properties in these hydride systems

  5. Density dependence of electron mobility in the accumulation mode for fully depleted SOI films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naumova, O. V., E-mail: naumova@isp.nsc.ru; Zaitseva, E. G.; Fomin, B. I.; Ilnitsky, M. A.; Popov, V. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    The electron mobility µ{sub eff} in the accumulation mode is investigated for undepleted and fully depleted double-gate n{sup +}–n–n{sup +} silicon-on-insulator (SOI) metal–oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFET). To determine the range of possible values of the mobility and the dominant scattering mechanisms in thin-film structures, it is proposed that the field dependence of the mobility µ{sub eff} be replaced with the dependence on the density N{sub e} of induced charge carriers. It is shown that the dependences µ{sub eff}(N{sub e}) can be approximated by the power functions µ{sub eff}(N{sub e}) ∝ N{sub e}{sup -n}, where the exponent n is determined by the chargecarrier scattering mechanism as in the mobility field dependence. The values of the exponent n in the dependences µ{sub eff}(N{sub e}) are determined when the SOI-film mode near one of its surfaces varies from inversion to accumulation. The obtained results are explained from the viewpoint of the electron-density redistribution over the SOI-film thickness and changes in the scattering mechanisms.

  6. HREELS to identify electronic structures of organic thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeter, D; Ziegler, C; Göpel, W

    1995-10-01

    The electronic structure of alpha-oligothiophene (alphanT) thin films has been investigated for increasing chain lengths of n= 4-8 thiophene units with high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) in the specular reflection geometry at a primary energy of 15 eV. The great advantage of this technique in contrast to UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy results from the fact, that the impact scattering mechanism of HREELS makes it possible to also detect optically forbidden electronic transitions. On the other hand, the electrons used as probes in HREELS have a wavelength which is two orders of magnitudes smaller if compared to those of photons used in UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy. Therefore individual molecules are excited by HREELS independent from each other and hence the excitation of collective excitons is not possible. As a result, information about the orientation of the molecules cannot be achieved with HREELS, which, however, is possible in polarization-dependent UV/VIS spectroscopy.

  7. III - V semiconductor structures for biosensor and molecular electronics applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luber, S M

    2007-01-15

    The present work reports on the employment of III-V semiconductor structures to biosensor and molecular electronics applications. In the first part a sensor based on a surface-near two dimensional electron gas for a use in biological environment is studied. Such a two dimensional electron gas inherently forms in a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown, doped aluminum gallium arsenide - gallium arsenide (AlGaAs-GaAs) heterostructure. Due to the intrinsic instability of GaAs in aqueous solutions the device is passivated by deposition of a monolayer of 4'-substituted mercaptobiphenyl molecules. The influence of these molecules which bind to the GaAs via a sulfur group is investigated by Kelvin probe measurements in air. They reveal a dependence of GaAs electron affinity on the intrinsic molecular dipole moment of the mercaptobiphenyls. Furthermore, transient surface photovoltage measurements are presented which demonstrate an additional influence of mercaptobiphenyl chemisorption on surface carrier recombination rates. As a next step, the influence of pH-value and salt concentration upon the sensor device is discussed based on the results obtained from sensor conductance measurements in physiological solutions. A dependence of the device surface potential on both parameters due to surface charging is deduced. Model calculations applying Poisson-Boltzmann theory reveal as possible surface charging mechanisms either the adsorption of OH- ions on the surface, or the dissociation of OH groups in surface oxides. A comparison between simulation settings and physical device properties indicate the OH- adsorption as the most probable mechanism. In the second part of the present study the suitability of MBE grown III-V semiconductor structures for molecular electronics applications is examined. In doing so, a method to fabricate nanometer separated, coplanar, metallic electrodes based on the cleavage of a supporting AlGaAs-GaAs heterostructure is presented. This is followed by a

  8. III - V semiconductor structures for biosensor and molecular electronics applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luber, S.M.

    2007-01-15

    The present work reports on the employment of III-V semiconductor structures to biosensor and molecular electronics applications. In the first part a sensor based on a surface-near two dimensional electron gas for a use in biological environment is studied. Such a two dimensional electron gas inherently forms in a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown, doped aluminum gallium arsenide - gallium arsenide (AlGaAs-GaAs) heterostructure. Due to the intrinsic instability of GaAs in aqueous solutions the device is passivated by deposition of a monolayer of 4'-substituted mercaptobiphenyl molecules. The influence of these molecules which bind to the GaAs via a sulfur group is investigated by Kelvin probe measurements in air. They reveal a dependence of GaAs electron affinity on the intrinsic molecular dipole moment of the mercaptobiphenyls. Furthermore, transient surface photovoltage measurements are presented which demonstrate an additional influence of mercaptobiphenyl chemisorption on surface carrier recombination rates. As a next step, the influence of pH-value and salt concentration upon the sensor device is discussed based on the results obtained from sensor conductance measurements in physiological solutions. A dependence of the device surface potential on both parameters due to surface charging is deduced. Model calculations applying Poisson-Boltzmann theory reveal as possible surface charging mechanisms either the adsorption of OH- ions on the surface, or the dissociation of OH groups in surface oxides. A comparison between simulation settings and physical device properties indicate the OH- adsorption as the most probable mechanism. In the second part of the present study the suitability of MBE grown III-V semiconductor structures for molecular electronics applications is examined. In doing so, a method to fabricate nanometer separated, coplanar, metallic electrodes based on the cleavage of a supporting AlGaAs-GaAs heterostructure is presented. This is followed

  9. Graph-based linear scaling electronic structure theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niklasson, Anders M. N., E-mail: amn@lanl.gov; Negre, Christian F. A.; Cawkwell, Marc J.; Swart, Pieter J.; Germann, Timothy C.; Bock, Nicolas [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Mniszewski, Susan M.; Mohd-Yusof, Jamal; Wall, Michael E.; Djidjev, Hristo [Computer, Computational, and Statistical Sciences Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Rubensson, Emanuel H. [Division of Scientific Computing, Department of Information Technology, Uppsala University, Box 337, SE-751 05 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2016-06-21

    We show how graph theory can be combined with quantum theory to calculate the electronic structure of large complex systems. The graph formalism is general and applicable to a broad range of electronic structure methods and materials, including challenging systems such as biomolecules. The methodology combines well-controlled accuracy, low computational cost, and natural low-communication parallelism. This combination addresses substantial shortcomings of linear scaling electronic structure theory, in particular with respect to quantum-based molecular dynamics simulations.

  10. Advanced understanding on electronic structure of molecular semiconductors and their interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akaike, Kouki

    2018-03-01

    Understanding the electronic structure of organic semiconductors and their interfaces is critical to optimizing functionalities for electronics applications, by rational chemical design and appropriate combination of device constituents. The unique electronic structure of a molecular solid is characterized as (i) anisotropic electrostatic fields that originate from molecular quadrupoles, (ii) interfacial energy-level lineup governed by simple electrostatics, and (iii) weak intermolecular interactions that make not only structural order but also energy distributions of the frontier orbitals sensitive to atmosphere and interface growth. This article shows an overview on these features with reference to the improved understanding of the orientation-dependent electronic structure, comprehensive mechanisms of molecular doping, and energy-level alignment. Furthermore, the engineering of ionization energy by the control of the electrostatic fields and work function of practical electrodes by contact-induced doping is briefly described for the purpose of highlighting how the electronic structure impacts the performance of organic devices.

  11. Electronic structure and chemical properties of superheavy elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pershina, V [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung Gmbh (Germany)

    2009-12-31

    Relativistic electronic structure calculations of superheavy elements (Z>=104) are analyzed. Preference is given to those related to experimental research. The role of relativistic effects is discussed.

  12. Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy on Electronic Structure and Electron-Phonon Coupling in Cuprate Superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, X.J.

    2010-04-30

    thought possible only a decade ago. This revolution of the ARPES technique and its scientific impact result from dramatic advances in four essential components: instrumental resolution and efficiency, sample manipulation, high quality samples and well-matched scientific issues. The purpose of this treatise is to go through the prominent results obtained from ARPES on cuprate superconductors. Because there have been a number of recent reviews on the electronic structures of high-T{sub c} materials, we will mainly present the latest results not covered previously, with a special attention given on the electron-phonon interaction in cuprate superconductors. What has emerged is rich information about the anomalous electron-phonon interaction well beyond the traditional views of the subject. It exhibits strong doping, momentum and phonon symmetry dependence, and shows complex interplay with the strong electron-electron interaction in these materials. ARPES experiments have been instrumental in identifying the electronic structure, observing and detailing the electron-phonon mode coupling behavior, and mapping the doping evolution of the high-T{sub c} cuprates. The spectra evolve from the strongly coupled, polaronic spectra seen in underdoped cuprates to the Migdal-Eliashberg like spectra seen in the optimally and overdoped cuprates. In addition to the marked doping dependence, the cuprates exhibit pronounced anisotropy with direction in the Brillouin zone: sharp quasiparticles along the nodal direction that broaden significantly in the anti-nodal region of the underdoped cuprates, an anisotropic electron-phonon coupling vertex for particular modes identified in the optimal and overdoped compounds, and preferential scattering across the two parallel pieces of Fermi surface in the antinodal region for all doping levels. This also contributes to the pseudogap effect. To the extent that the Migdal-Eliashberg picture applies, the spectra of the cuprates bear resemblance to that

  13. Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy on Electronic Structure and Electron-Phonon Coupling in Cuprate Superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, X.J.

    2010-01-01

    only a decade ago. This revolution of the ARPES technique and its scientific impact result from dramatic advances in four essential components: instrumental resolution and efficiency, sample manipulation, high quality samples and well-matched scientific issues. The purpose of this treatise is to go through the prominent results obtained from ARPES on cuprate superconductors. Because there have been a number of recent reviews on the electronic structures of high-T c materials, we will mainly present the latest results not covered previously, with a special attention given on the electron-phonon interaction in cuprate superconductors. What has emerged is rich information about the anomalous electron-phonon interaction well beyond the traditional views of the subject. It exhibits strong doping, momentum and phonon symmetry dependence, and shows complex interplay with the strong electron-electron interaction in these materials. ARPES experiments have been instrumental in identifying the electronic structure, observing and detailing the electron-phonon mode coupling behavior, and mapping the doping evolution of the high-T c cuprates. The spectra evolve from the strongly coupled, polaronic spectra seen in underdoped cuprates to the Migdal-Eliashberg like spectra seen in the optimally and overdoped cuprates. In addition to the marked doping dependence, the cuprates exhibit pronounced anisotropy with direction in the Brillouin zone: sharp quasiparticles along the nodal direction that broaden significantly in the anti-nodal region of the underdoped cuprates, an anisotropic electron-phonon coupling vertex for particular modes identified in the optimal and overdoped compounds, and preferential scattering across the two parallel pieces of Fermi surface in the antinodal region for all doping levels. This also contributes to the pseudogap effect. To the extent that the Migdal-Eliashberg picture applies, the spectra of the cuprates bear resemblance to that seen in established

  14. Relation of high harmonic spectra to electronic structure in N2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrell, J.P.; McFarland, B.K.; Guehr, M.; Bucksbaum, P.H.

    2009-01-01

    High harmonics of N 2 exhibit a number of features that are related to the electronic structure and sub-femtosecond dynamics of the molecule. Through measurements and simulations, we show how the harmonic spectral shape, spectral phase, alignment angle dependence, and intensity dependence can be related to the strong-field ionization and recombination dynamics of the HOMO and HOMO-1 electron orbitals. A field-free static model of the molecule is insufficient to explain the observations.

  15. The Electronic Structure Signature of the Spin Cross-Over Transition of [Co(dpzca)2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Mu, Sai; Liu, Yang; Luo, Jian; Zhang, Jian; N'Diaye, Alpha T.; Enders, Axel; Dowben, Peter A.

    2018-05-01

    The unoccupied electronic structure of the spin crossover molecule cobalt (II) N-(2-pyrazylcarbonyl)-2-pyrazinecarboxamide, [Co(dpzca)2] was investigated, using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and compared with magnetometry (SQUID) measurements. The temperature dependence of the XAS and molecular magnetic susceptibility χmT are in general agreement for [Co(dpzca)2], and consistent with density functional theory (DFT). This agreement of magnetic susceptibility and X-ray absorption spectroscopy provides strong evidence that the changes in magnetic moment can be ascribed to changes in electronic structure. Calculations show the choice of Coulomb correlation energy U has a profound effect on the electronic structure of the low spin state, but has little influence on the electronic structure of the high spin state. In the temperature dependence of the XAS, there is also evidence of an X-ray induced excited state trapping for [Co(dpzca)2] at 15 K.

  16. Density-dependent electron scattering in photoexcited GaAs in strongly diffusive regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mics, Zoltán; D’Angio, Andrea; Jensen, Søren A.

    2013-01-01

    In a series of systematic optical pump–terahertz probe experiments, we study the density-dependent electron scattering rate in photoexcited GaAs in the regime of strong carrier diffusion. The terahertz frequency-resolved transient sheet conductivity spectra are perfectly described by the Drude...... model, directly yielding the electron scattering rates. A diffusion model is applied to determine the spatial extent of the photoexcited electron-hole gas at each moment after photoexcitation, yielding the time-dependent electron density, and hence the density-dependent electron scattering time. We find...

  17. Energy Dependence of Near-relativistic Electron Spectrum at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    chronous altitudes during solar energetic proton events of 2005. ... discussed the radiation belt electron drop outs with respect to their local time, radial and ... number density (Nsw), solar wind speed (Vsw), solar wind pressure (Psw), average.

  18. Electronic structure of shandite Co3Sn2S2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedkov, Y. S.; Holder, M.; Molodtsov, S. L.; Rosner, H.

    2008-03-01

    The electronic structure of shandite Co3Sn2S2 was determined by photoelectron spectroscopy and compared with ab initio band structure calculations. Presented results give evidence that this compound has half-metallic ferromagnetic properties.

  19. Significance tests for functional data with complex dependence structure

    KAUST Repository

    Staicu, Ana-Maria; Lahiri, Soumen N.; Carroll, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    We propose an L (2)-norm based global testing procedure for the null hypothesis that multiple group mean functions are equal, for functional data with complex dependence structure. Specifically, we consider the setting of functional data with a

  20. Organic/metal interfaces. Electronic and structural properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duhm, Steffen

    2008-07-17

    This work addresses several important topics of the field of organic electronics. The focus lies on organic/metal interfaces, which exist in all organic electronic devices. Physical properties of such interfaces are crucial for device performance. Four main topics have been covered: (i) the impact of molecular orientation on the energy levels, (ii) energy level tuning with strong electron acceptors, (iii) the role of thermodynamic equilibrium at organic/ organic homo-interfaces and (iv) the correlation of interfacial electronic structure and bonding distance. To address these issues a broad experimental approach was necessary: mainly ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy was used, supported by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, metastable atom electron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray standing waves, to examine vacuum sublimed thin films of conjugated organic molecules (COMs) in ultrahigh vacuum. (i) A novel approach is presented to explain the phenomenon that the ionization energy in molecular assemblies is orientation dependent. It is demonstrated that this is due to a macroscopic impact of intramolecular dipoles on the ionization energy in molecular assemblies. Furthermore, the correlation of molecular orientation and conformation has been studied in detail for COMs on various substrates. (ii) A new approach was developed to tune hole injection barriers ({delta}{sub h}) at organic/metal interfaces by adsorbing a (sub-) monolayer of an organic electron acceptor on the metal electrode. Charge transfer from the metal to the acceptor leads to a chemisorbed layer, which reduces {delta}{sub h} to the COM overlayer. This concept was tested with three acceptors and a lowering of {delta}{sub h} of up to 1.2 eV could be observed. (iii) A transition from vacuum-level alignment to molecular level pinning at the homo-interface between a lying monolayer and standing multilayers of a COM was observed, which depended on the amount of a pre-deposited acceptor. The

  1. Stacking-dependent electronic property of trilayer graphene epitaxially grown on Ru(0001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Que, Yande; Xiao, Wende, E-mail: wdxiao@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: hjgao@iphy.ac.cn; Chen, Hui; Wang, Dongfei; Du, Shixuan; Gao, Hong-Jun, E-mail: wdxiao@iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: hjgao@iphy.ac.cn [Institute of Physics and University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2015-12-28

    The growth, atomic structure, and electronic property of trilayer graphene (TLG) on Ru(0001) were studied by low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy in combined with tight-binding approximation (TBA) calculations. TLG on Ru(0001) shows a flat surface with a hexagonal lattice due to the screening effect of the bottom two layers and the AB-stacking in the top two layers. The coexistence of AA- and AB-stacking in the bottom two layers leads to three different stacking orders of TLG, namely, ABA-, ABC-, and ABB-stacking. STS measurements combined with TBA calculations reveal that the density of states of TLG with ABC- and ABB-stacking is characterized by one and two sharp peaks near to the Fermi level, respectively, in contrast to the V-shaped feature of TLG with ABA-stacking. Our work demonstrates that TLG on Ru(0001) might be an ideal platform for exploring stacking-dependent electronic properties of graphene.

  2. Electronic conductance of quantum wire with serial periodic potential structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayad, Hisham M.; Shabat, Mohammed M.; Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste

    2000-08-01

    A theory based on the total transfer matrix is presented to investigate the electronic conductance in a quantum wire with serial periodic potentials. We apply the formalism in computation of the electronic conductance in a wire with different physical parameters of the wire structure. The numerical results could be used in designing some future quantum electronic devices. (author)

  3. Selective maintenance of multi-state systems with structural dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dao, Cuong D.; Zuo, Ming J.

    2017-01-01

    This paper studies the selective maintenance problem for multi-state systems with structural dependence. Each component can be in one of multiple working levels and several maintenance actions are possible to a component in a maintenance break. The components structurally form multiple hierarchical levels and dependence groups. A directed graph is used to represent the precedence relations of components in the system. A selective maintenance optimization model is developed to maximize the system reliability in the next mission under time and cost constraints. A backward search algorithm is used to determine the assembly sequence for a selective maintenance scenario. The maintenance model helps maintenance managers in determining the best combination of maintenance activities to maximize the probability of successfully completing the next mission. Examples showing the use of the proposed method are presented. - Highlights: • A selective maintenance model for multi-state systems is proposed considering both economic and structural dependence. • Structural dependence is modeled as precedence relationship when disassembling components for maintenance. • Resources for disassembly and maintenance are evaluated using a backward search algorithm. • Maintenance strategies with and without structural dependence are analyzed. • Ignoring structural dependence may lead to over-estimation of system reliability.

  4. Electronic structure of Mo and W investigated with positron annihilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutschke, Markus [Theoretical Physics III, Center for Electronic Correlations and Magnetism, Institute of Physics, University of Augsburg (Germany); Sekania, Michael [Theoretical Physics III, Center for Electronic Correlations and Magnetism, Institute of Physics, University of Augsburg (Germany); Andronikashvili Institute of Physics, Tbilisi (Georgia); Benea, Diana [Faculty of Physics, Babes-Bolyai University, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Department of Chemistry, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich (Germany); Ceeh, Hubert; Weber, Joseph A.; Hugenschmidt, Christoph [FRM II, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Chioncel, Liviu [Theoretical Physics III, Center for Electronic Correlations and Magnetism, Institute of Physics, University of Augsburg (Germany); Augsburg Center for Innovative Technologies, University of Augsburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    We perform electronic structure calculations to analyze the momentum distribution of the transition metals molybdenum and tungsten. We study the influence of positron-electron and the electron-electron interactions on the shape of the two-dimensional angular correlation of positron annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) spectra. Our analysis is performed within the framework of the combined Density Functional (DFT) and Dynamical Mean-Field Theory (DMFT). Computed spectra are compared with recent experimental investigations.

  5. Electronic structures of elements according to ionization energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadeh, Dariush H

    2017-11-28

    The electronic structures of elements in the periodic table were analyzed using available experimental ionization energies. Two new parameters were defined to carry out the study. The first parameter-apparent nuclear charge (ANC)-quantified the overall charge of the nucleus and inner electrons observed by an outer electron during the ionization process. This parameter was utilized to define a second parameter, which presented the shielding ability of an electron against the nuclear charge. This second parameter-electron shielding effect (ESE)-provided an insight into the electronic structure of atoms. This article avoids any sort of approximation, interpolation or extrapolation. First experimental ionization energies were used to obtain the two aforementioned parameters. The second parameter (ESE) was then graphed against the electron number of each element, and was used to read the corresponding electronic structure. The ESE showed spikes/peaks at the end of each electronic shell, providing insight into when an electronic shell closes and a new one starts. The electronic structures of elements in the periodic table were mapped using this methodology. These graphs did not show complete agreement with the previously known "Aufbau" filling rule. A new filling rule was suggested based on the present observations. Finally, a new way to organize elements in the periodic table is suggested. Two earlier topics of effective nuclear charge, and shielding factor were also briefly discussed and compared numerically to demonstrate the capability of the new approach.

  6. Electronic structure of disordered Cu-Ag alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razee, S.S.A.

    1994-08-01

    We present a self-consistent-field Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker coherent potential approximation study of the electronic structure of disordered Cu x Ag 1-x alloys for x=0.0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75 and 1.0. In particular, we focus on the Fermi surface, density of states, and Bloch spectral density, and study how they evolve as a function of x. We find that, Fermi surface dimensions have a non-linear composition dependence. The disorder-induced smearing of the Fermi surface, as expected, is very high along the direction; both the Cu and Ag Fermi surfaces have a neck in this direction. Whenever possible we have compared our results with the available experimental data. (author). 34 refs, 4 figs

  7. A structure development in electron-irradiated type Ia diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, N.V.; Ositinskaya, T.D.; Tkach, V.N.

    1998-01-01

    A type Ia diamond crystal with nitrogen impurity in different forms was irradiated by 3.5 MeV electrons with increasing doses 5 centre dot 10 16 , 2 centre dot 10 17 , 4 centre dot 10 17 , 2 centre dot 10 18 e/cm 2 and investigated before and after each dose by positron annihilation, EPR, and optical spectroscopy. After irradiation with the highest dose, the effect of development of a visible defective structure of the crystal is revealed. A description of this effect and data of EPR and IR-measurements depending on irradiation doses are presented. First results of cathodoluminescence (CL) studies in the form CL-topograms and CL-spectra for difference zones of the crystal are also given

  8. Correct Brillouin zone and electronic structure of BiPd

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaresko, Alexander; Schnyder, Andreas P.; Benia, Hadj M.; Yim, Chi-Ming; Levy, Giorgio; Damascelli, Andrea; Ast, Christian R.; Peets, Darren C.; Wahl, Peter

    2018-02-01

    A promising route to the realization of Majorana fermions is in noncentrosymmetric superconductors, in which spin-orbit coupling lifts the spin degeneracy of both bulk and surface bands. A detailed assessment of the electronic structure is critical to evaluate their suitability for this through establishing the topological properties of the electronic structure. This requires correct identification of the time-reversal-invariant momenta. One such material is BiPd, a recently rediscovered noncentrosymmetric superconductor which can be grown in large, high-quality single crystals and has been studied by several groups using angular resolved photoemission to establish its surface electronic structure. Many of the published electronic structure studies on this material are based on a reciprocal unit cell which is not the actual Brillouin zone of the material. We show here the consequences of this for the electronic structures and show how the inferred topological nature of the material is affected.

  9. Electron Beam Irradiation Dose Dependently Damages the Bacillus Spore Coat and Spore Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Fiester

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective control of spore-forming bacilli begs suitable physical or chemical methods. While many spore inactivation techniques have been proven effective, electron beam (EB irradiation has been frequently chosen to eradicate Bacillus spores. Despite its widespread use, there are limited data evaluating the effects of EB irradiation on Bacillus spores. To study this, B. atrophaeus spores were purified, suspended in sterile, distilled water, and irradiated with EB (up to 20 kGy. Irradiated spores were found (1 to contain structural damage as observed by electron microscopy, (2 to have spilled cytoplasmic contents as measured by spectroscopy, (3 to have reduced membrane integrity as determined by fluorescence cytometry, and (4 to have fragmented genomic DNA as measured by gel electrophoresis, all in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, cytometry data reveal decreased spore size, increased surface alterations, and increased uptake of propidium iodide, with increasing EB dose, suggesting spore coat alterations with membrane damage, prior to loss of spore viability. The present study suggests that EB irradiation of spores in water results in substantial structural damage of the spore coat and inner membrane, and that, along with DNA fragmentation, results in dose-dependent spore inactivation.

  10. Microwave dependence of subharmonic gap structure in superconducting junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, O. Hoffman; Kofoed, Bent; Pedersen, Niels Falsig

    1974-01-01

    are integers: m=1,2,3,… and n=0,1,2,…. The power dependence of the satellite structure and the microwave-assisted tunneling structure is consistent for all junctions tested with the expression Jn2(m e Vrf / h ν), where Jn(x) is the ordinary Bessel function of order n, Vrf is the amplitude of the induced...

  11. Influence of soliton distributions on the spin-dependent electronic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    interactions, so that spin memory can only be as long as a few seconds [6]. Therefore, spin-flip .... In addition, the term −σ · hβ is the internal exchange energy with hβ .... electrons density of states for short chains containing 100 carbon atoms.

  12. Temperature dependences in electron-stimulated desorption of neutral europium

    CERN Document Server

    Ageev, V N; Madey, T E

    2003-01-01

    The electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) yield for neutral europium (Eu) atoms from Eu layers adsorbed on oxygen-covered tungsten surfaces has been measured as a function of electron energy, europium coverage and degree of oxidation of tungsten, with an emphasis on effects of substrate temperature. The measurements have been carried out using a time-of-flight method and surface ionization detector. We expand on an earlier report, and compare ESD of multivalent Eu with ESD of monovalent alkali atoms, studied previously. The Eu atom ESD is a complicated function of Eu coverage, electron energy and substrate temperature. In the coverage range 0.05-0.35 monolayer (ML), overlapping resonant-like Eu atom yield peaks are observed at electron energies E sub e of 36 and 41 eV that might be associated with Eu or W shallow core level excitations. Additional resonant-like peaks are seen at E sub e of 54 and 84 eV that are associated with W 5p and 5s level excitations. The Eu atom yield peaks at 36 and 41 eV are seen only...

  13. Research Update: Diode performance of the Pt/Al2O3/two-dimensional electron gas/SrTiO3 structure and its time-dependent resistance evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taehwan Moon

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Time domain electric pulse measurements were conducted on a capacitor consisting of a Pt film as the top electrode, atomic-layer-deposited 6.5-nm-thick amorphous Al2O3 as the dielectric layer, and two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG at the interface between Al2O3 and SrTiO3 as the bottom electrode. The sample showed highly useful current-voltage characteristics as the selector in cross-bar array resistance switching random access memory. The long-term (order of second variation in the leakage current when the Pt electrode was positively biased was attributed to the field-induced migration of oxygen vacancies between the interior of the Al2O3 and the 2DEG region. Relaxation of the vacancy concentration occurred even at room temperature.

  14. Temperature dependence of the magnetization of canted spin structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Henrik; Lefmann, Kim; Brok, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Numerous studies of the low-temperature saturation magnetization of ferrimagnetic nanoparticles and diamagnetically substituted ferrites have shown an anomalous temperature dependence. It has been suggested that this is related to freezing of canted magnetic structures. We present models for the ......Numerous studies of the low-temperature saturation magnetization of ferrimagnetic nanoparticles and diamagnetically substituted ferrites have shown an anomalous temperature dependence. It has been suggested that this is related to freezing of canted magnetic structures. We present models...... for the temperature dependence of the magnetization of a simple canted spin structure in which relaxation can take place at finite temperatures between spin configurations with different canting angles. We show that the saturation magnetization may either decrease or increase with decreasing temperature, depending...

  15. Temperature dependence of conductivity in high mobility MIS structures on a base of (001) silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyrodov, E.A.; Dolgopolov, V.T.; Dorozhkin, C.I.; Zhitenev, N.B.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements of the temperature dependence of the conductivity of two-dimensional electrons in silicon MIS structures were carried out. It is shown that the observed dependence is well described by the equation σ(T) = σ(0)(1-Q(kT var-epsilon F )-P(kT/var-epsilon F )3/2 + O[(kT/var-epsilon F ) 2 ]). The variation of the coefficient Q with the density N S of the two-dimensional electrons is determined, and it is shown that the observed trend of the Q(s) curve is described by consideration of the temperature dependence of the dielectric function of a two-dimensional electron gas

  16. Time-dependent first-principles study of angle-resolved secondary electron emission from atomic sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Yasumitsu; Watanabe, Kazuyuki

    2018-02-01

    Angle-resolved secondary electron emission (ARSEE) spectra were analyzed for two-dimensional atomic sheets using a time-dependent first-principles simulation of electron scattering. We demonstrate that the calculated ARSEE spectra capture the unoccupied band structure of the atomic sheets. The excitation dynamics that lead to SEE have also been revealed by the time-dependent Kohn-Sham decomposition scheme. In the present study, the mechanism for the experimentally observed ARSEE from atomic sheets is elucidated with respect to both energetics and the dynamical aspects of SEE.

  17. Time-Dependent Close-Coupling Methods for Electron-Atom/Molecule Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colgan, James

    2014-01-01

    The time-dependent close-coupling (TDCC) method centers on an accurate representation of the interaction between two outgoing electrons moving in the presence of a Coulomb field. It has been extensively applied to many problems of electrons, photons, and ions scattering from light atomic targets. Theoretical Description: The TDCC method centers on a solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for two interacting electrons. The advantages of a time-dependent approach are two-fold; one treats the electron-electron interaction essentially in an exact manner (within numerical accuracy) and a time-dependent approach avoids the difficult boundary condition encountered when two free electrons move in a Coulomb field (the classic three-body Coulomb problem). The TDCC method has been applied to many fundamental atomic collision processes, including photon-, electron- and ion-impact ionization of light atoms. For application to electron-impact ionization of atomic systems, one decomposes the two-electron wavefunction in a partial wave expansion and represents the subsequent two-electron radial wavefunctions on a numerical lattice. The number of partial waves required to converge the ionization process depends on the energy of the incoming electron wavepacket and on the ionization threshold of the target atom or ion.

  18. Orbital Models and Electronic Structure Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linderberg, Jan

    2012-01-01

    This tribute to the work by Carl Johan Ballhausen focuses on the emergence of quantitative means for the study of the electronic properties of complexes and molecules. Development, refinement and application of the orbital picture elucidated electric and magnetic features of ranges of molecules...

  19. Crystal structure from one-electron theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    The authors have studied the crystal structure of all the 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metals at zero pressure and temperature by means of the linear muffin-tin orbital method and Andersen's force theorem. They find that, although the structural energy differences seem to be overestimated by the the......The authors have studied the crystal structure of all the 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metals at zero pressure and temperature by means of the linear muffin-tin orbital method and Andersen's force theorem. They find that, although the structural energy differences seem to be overestimated...

  20. Validity and factor structure of the bodybuilding dependence scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D; Hale, B

    2004-04-01

    To investigate the factor structure, validity, and reliability of the bodybuilding dependence scale and to investigate differences in bodybuilding dependence between men and women and competitive and non-competitive bodybuilders. Seventy two male competitive bodybuilders, 63 female competitive bodybuilders, 87 male non-competitive bodybuilders, and 63 non-competitive female bodybuilders completed the bodybuilding dependence scale (BDS), the exercise dependence questionnaire (EDQ), and the muscle dysmorphia inventory (MDI). Confirmatory factor analysis of the BDS supported a three factor model of bodybuilding dependence, consisting of social dependence, training dependence, and mastery dependence (Q = 3.16, CFI = 0.98, SRMR = 0.04). Internal reliability of all three subscales was high (Cronbach's alpha = 0.92, 0.92, and 0.93 respectively). Significant (pbodybuilders scored significantly (pbodybuilders. However, there were no significant sex differences on any of the BDS subscales (p>0.05). The three factor BDS appears to be a reliable and valid measure of bodybuilding dependence. Symptoms of bodybuilding dependence are more prevalent in competitive bodybuilders than non-competitive ones, but there are no significant sex differences in bodybuilding dependence.

  1. Temperature dependence of electron mean free path in molybdenum from ultrasonic measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almond, D P; Detwiler, D A; Rayne, J A [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, Pa. (USA)

    1975-09-08

    The temperature dependence of the electronic mean free path in molybdenum has been obtained from ultrasonic attenuation measurements.For temperature up to 30 K a T/sup -2/ law is followed suggesting the importance of electron-electron scattering in the attenuation mechanism.

  2. Spin dependence in superelastic electron scattering from Na(3P)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClelland, J.J.; Kelley, M.H.; Celotta, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements are presented of spin asymmetries for superelastic scattering of 10-eV spin polarized electrons from the excited Na(3P/sub 3/2/) state created by linearly polarized laser optical pumping. Asymmetries as large as 16% are observed in scattering from a state which is not spin-polarized. Results are shown both as a function of scattering angle with fixed laser polarization direction, and as a function of the laser polarization direction at a fixed scattering angle

  3. Nanoporous metal film: An energy-dependent transmission device for electron waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grech, S.; Degiovanni, A.; Lapena, L.; Morin, R.

    2011-01-01

    We measure electron transmission through free-standing ultrathin nanoporous gold films, using the coherent electron beam emitted by sharp field emission tips in a low energy electron projection microscope setup. Transmission coefficient versus electron wavelength plots show periodic oscillations between 75 and 850 eV. These oscillations result from the energy dependence of interference between paths through the gold and paths through the nanometer-sized pores of the film. We reveal that these films constitute high transmittance quantum devices acting on electron waves through a wavelength-dependent complex transmittance defined by the porosity and the thickness of the film.

  4. Complex band structure and electronic transmission eigenchannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders; Strange, Mikkel; Smidstrup, Soren

    2017-01-01

    and complex band structure, in this case individual eigenchannel transmissions and different complex bands. We present calculations of decay constants for the two most conductive states as determined by complex band structure and standard DFT Landauer transport calculations for one semi-conductor and two...

  5. Syntheses and electronic structures of decamethylmetallocenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robbins, J.L.

    1981-04-01

    The synthesis of decamethylmanganocene [(eta-C 5 (CH 3 ) 5 ) 2 Mn or (Me 5 Cp) 2 Mn)] is described. Magnetic susceptibility and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies show that (Me 5 Cp) 2 Mn is a low-spin, 17-electron compound with an orbitally degenerate, 2 E/sub 2g/ [e/sub 2g/ 3 a/sub 1g/ 2 ] ground state. An x-ray crystallographic study of (Me 5 Cp) 2 Mn shows that it is a monomeric, D/sub 5d/ decamethylmetallocene with metal to ring carbon distances that are about 0.3 A shorter than those determined for high-spin manganocenes. The syntheses of new (Me 5 Cp) 2 M (M = Mg,V,Cr,Co, and Ni) and [(Me 5 Cp) 2 M]PF 6 (M = Cr,Co, and Ni) compounds are described. In addition, a preparative route to a novel, dicationic decamethylmetallocene, [(Me 5 Cp) 2 Ni](PF 6 ) 2 is reported. Infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance, magnetic susceptibility, and/or x-ray crystallographic studies indicate that all the above compounds are D/sub 5d/ or D/sub 5h/ decamethylmetallocenes with low-spin electronic configurations. Cyclic voltammetry studies verify the reversibility and the one-electron nature of the (Me 5 Cp) 2 M → [(Me 5 Cp) 2 M] + (M = Cr,Mn,Fe,Co,Ni), [(Me 5 Cp) 2 Mn] - → (Me 5 Cp) 2 Mn and [(Me 5 Cp) 2 Ni] + → [Me 5 Cp) 2 Ni] 2+ redox reactions. These studies reveal that the neutral decamethylmetallocenes are much more easily oxidized than their metallocene counterparts. This result attests to the electron-donating properties of the ten substituent methyl groups. Proton and carbon-13 NMR data are reported for the diamagnetic Mg(II), Mn(I), Fe(II), Co(III), and Ni(IV) decamethylmetallocenes and for [(Me 5 Cp) 2 V(CO) 2 ] + . The uv-visible absorption spectra of the 15-, 18- and 20- electron decamethylmetallocenes are also reported

  6. Syntheses and electronic structures of decamethylmetallocenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, J.L.

    1981-04-01

    The synthesis of decamethylmanganocene ((eta-C/sub 5/(CH/sub 3/)/sub 5/)/sub 2/Mn or (Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/Mn)) is described. Magnetic susceptibility and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies show that (Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/Mn is a low-spin, 17-electron compound with an orbitally degenerate, /sup 2/E/sub 2g/ (e/sub 2g//sup 3/ a/sub 1g//sup 2/) ground state. An x-ray crystallographic study of (Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/Mn shows that it is a monomeric, D/sub 5d/ decamethylmetallocene with metal to ring carbon distances that are about 0.3 A shorter than those determined for high-spin manganocenes. The syntheses of new (Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/M (M = Mg,V,Cr,Co, and Ni) and ((Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/M)PF/sub 6/ (M = Cr,Co, and Ni) compounds are described. In addition, a preparative route to a novel, dicationic decamethylmetallocene, ((Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/Ni)(PF/sub 6/)/sub 2/ is reported. Infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance, magnetic susceptibility, and/or x-ray crystallographic studies indicate that all the above compounds are D/sub 5d/ or D/sub 5h/ decamethylmetallocenes with low-spin electronic configurations. Cyclic voltammetry studies verify the reversibility and the one-electron nature of the (Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/M ..-->.. ((Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/M)/sup +/ (M = Cr,Mn,Fe,Co,Ni), ((Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/Mn)/sup -/ ..-->.. (Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/Mn and ((Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/Ni)/sup +/ ..-->.. (Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/Ni)/sup 2 +/ redox reactions. These studies reveal that the neutral decamethylmetallocenes are much more easily oxidized than their metallocene counterparts. This result attests to the electron-donating properties of the ten substituent methyl groups. Proton and carbon-13 NMR data are reported for the diamagnetic Mg(II), Mn(I), Fe(II), Co(III), and Ni(IV) decamethylmetallocenes and for ((Me/sub 5/Cp)/sub 2/V(CO)/sub 2/)/sup +/. The uv-visible absorption spectra of the 15-, 18- and 20- electron decamethylmetallocenes are also reported.

  7. Electronic structure and optical properties of solid C60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattesini, M.; Ahuja, R.; Sa, L.; Hugosson, H.W.; Johansson, B.; Eriksson, O.

    2009-01-01

    The electronic structure and the optical properties of face-centered-cubic C 60 have been investigated by using an all-electron full-potential method. Our ab initio results show that the imaginary dielectric function for high-energy values looks very similar to that of graphite, revealing close electronic structure similarities between the two systems. We have also identified the origin of different peaks in the dielectric function of fullerene by means of the calculated electronic density of states. The computed optical spectrum compares fairly well with the available experimental data for the Vis-UV absorption spectrum of solid C 60 .

  8. Electronic structure engineering in silicene via atom substitution and a new two-dimensional Dirac structure Si3C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Na; Dai, Ying; Wei, Wei; Huang, Baibiao

    2018-04-01

    A lot of efforts have been made towards the band gap opening in two-dimensional silicene, the silicon version of graphene. In the present work, the electronic structures of single atom doped (B, N, Al and P) and codoped (B/N and Al/P) silicene monolayers are systematically examined on the base of density functional electronic calculations. Our results demonstrate that single atom doping can realize electron or hole doping in the silicene; while codoping, due to the syergistic effects, results in finite band gap in silicene at the Dirac point without significantly degrading the electronic properties. In addition, the characteristic of band gap shows dependence on the doping concentration. Importantly, we predict a new two-dimensional Dirac structure, the graphene-like Si3C, which also shows linear band dispersion relation around the Fermi level. Our results demonstrates an important perspective to engineer the electronic and optical properties of silicene.

  9. Electronic structure of fractionally nuclear charged atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavao, Antonio C.; Bastos, Cristiano C.; Ferreira, Joacy V.

    2008-01-01

    Different properties of quark chemistry are studied by performing accurate ab initio Hartree- Fock calculations on fractionally nuclear charged atoms. Ground and first excited states of sodium atoms with quarks attached to the nucleus are obtained using CI calculations. It is suggested that the sodium 2 P -> 2 S electronic transition can be used as a guide in searching for unconfined quarks. Also, the variation of the binding electronic energy with nuclear charge in the isoelectronic series of fractionally nuclear charged atoms A ±2/3 and A ±1/3 (A = H, Li, Na, P and Ca) is analyzed. The present calculations suggest that unconfined colored particles have large appetite for heavy nuclei and that quark-antiquark pairs could be stabilized in presence of the atomic matter. (author)

  10. Electron transport in furfural: dependence of the electron ranges on the cross sections and the energy loss distribution functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis-Gibbings, L.; Krupa, K.; Colmenares, R.; Blanco, F.; Muńoz, A.; Mendes, M.; Ferreira da Silva, F.; Limá Vieira, P.; Jones, D. B.; Brunger, M. J.; García, G.

    2016-09-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental studies have provided a complete set of differential and integral electron scattering cross section data from furfural over a broad energy range. The energy loss distribution functions have been determined in this study by averaging electron energy loss spectra for different incident energies and scattering angles. All these data have been used as input parameters for an event by event Monte Carlo simulation procedure to obtain the electron energy deposition patterns and electron ranges in liquid furfural. The dependence of these results on the input cross sections is then analysed to determine the uncertainty of the simulated values.

  11. Tailoring electronic structure of polyazomethines thin films

    OpenAIRE

    J. Weszka; B. Hajduk; M. Domański; M. Chwastek; J. Jurusik; B. Jarząbek; H. Bednarski; P. Jarka

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work is to show how electronic properties of polyazomethine thin films deposited by chemical vapor deposition method (CVD) can be tailored by manipulating technological parameters of pristine films preparation as well as modifying them while the as-prepared films put into iodine atmosphere.Design/methodology/approach: The recent achievements in the field of designing and preparation methods to be used while preparing polymer photovoltaic solar cells or optoelectronic ...

  12. Electron mobilities of n-type organic semiconductors from time-dependent wavepacket diffusion method: pentacenequinone derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, WeiWei; Zhong, XinXin; Zhao, Yi

    2012-11-26

    The electron mobilities of two n-type pentacenequinone derivative organic semiconductors, 5,7,12,14-tetraaza-6,13-pentacenequinone (TAPQ5) and 1,4,8,11-tetraaza-6,13-pentacenequinone (TAPQ7), are investigated with use of the methods of electronic structure and quantum dynamics. The electronic structure calculations reveal that the two key parameters for the control of electron transfer, reorganization energy and electronic coupling, are similar for these two isomerization systems, and the charge carriers essentially display one-dimensional transport properties. The mobilities are then calculated by using the time-dependent wavepacket diffusion approach in which the dynamic fluctuations of the electronic couplings are incorporated via their correlation functions obtained from molecular dynamics simulations. The predicted mobility of TAPQ7 crystal is about six times larger than that of TAPQ5 crystal. Most interestingly, Fermi's golden rule predicts the mobilities very close to those from the time-dependent wavepacket diffusion method, even though the electronic couplings are explicitly large enough to make the perturbation theory invalid. The possible reason is analyzed from the dynamic fluctuations.

  13. Investigation of the redox-dependent modulation of structure and dynamics in human cytochrome c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Mizue; Saio, Tomohide; Kumeta, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Takeshi; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Ishimori, Koichiro

    2016-01-22

    Redox-dependent changes in the structure and dynamics of human cytochrome c (Cyt c) were investigated by solution NMR. We found significant structural changes in several regions, including residues 23-28 (loop 3), which were further corroborated by chemical shift differences between the reduced and oxidized states of Cyt c. These differences are essential for discriminating redox states in Cyt c by cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) during electron transfer reactions. Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion experiments identified that the region around His33 undergoes conformational exchanges on the μs-ms timescale, indicating significant redox-dependent structural changes. Because His33 is not part of the interaction site for CcO, our data suggest that the dynamic properties of the region, which is far from the interaction site for CcO, contribute to conformational changes during electron transfer to CcO. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Indium antimonide quantum well structures for electronic device applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edirisooriya, Madhavie

    The electron effective mass is smaller in InSb than in any other III-V semiconductor. Since the electron mobility depends inversely on the effective mass, InSb-based devices are attractive for field effect transistors, magnetic field sensors, ballistic transport devices, and other applications where the performance depends on a high mobility or a long mean free path. In addition, electrons in InSb have a large g-factor and strong spin orbit coupling, which makes them well suited for certain spin transport devices. The first n-channel InSb high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) was produced in 2005 with a power-delay product superior to HEMTs with a channel made from any other III-V semiconductor. The high electron mobility in the InSb quantum-well channel increases the switching speed and lowers the required supply voltage. This dissertation focuses on several materials challenges that can further increase the appeal of InSb quantum wells for transistors and other electronic device applications. First, the electron mobility in InSb quantum wells, which is the highest for any semiconductor quantum well, can be further increased by reducing scattering by crystal defects. InSb-based heteroepitaxy is usually performed on semi-insulating GaAs (001) substrates due to the lack of a lattice matched semi-insulating substrate. The 14.6% mismatch between the lattice parameters of GaAs and InSb results in the formation of structural defects such as threading dislocations and microtwins which degrade the electrical and optical properties of InSb-based devices. Chapter 1 reviews the methods and procedures for growing InSb-based heterostructures by molecular beam epitaxy. Chapters 2 and 3 introduce techniques for minimizing the crystalline defects in InSb-based structures grown on GaAs substrates. Chapter 2 discusses a method of reducing threading dislocations by incorporating AlyIn1-ySb interlayers in an AlxIn1-xSb buffer layer and the reduction of microtwin defects by growth

  15. Electronic structure and formation energy of a vacancy in aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, B.; Siegel, R.W.

    1981-11-01

    The electronic structure of a vacancy in Al was calculated self-consistently using norm-conserving ionic pseudopotentials obtained from ab initio atomic calculations. A 27-atom-site supercell containing 1 vacancy and 26 atoms was used to simulate the environment of the vacancy. A vacancy formation energy of 1.5 eV was also calculated (cf. the experimental value of 0.66 eV). The effects of the supercell and the nature of the ionic potential on the resulting electronic structure and formation energy are discussed. Results for the electronic structure of a divacancy are also presented. 3 figures

  16. One-Electron Theory of Metals. Cohesive and Structural Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    The work described in the report r.nd the 16 accompanying publications is based upon a one-electron theory obtained within the local approximation to density-functional theory, and deals with the ground state of metals as obtained from selfconsistent electronic-structure calculations performed...... by means of the Linear Muffin-Tin Orbital (LMTO) method. It has been the goal of the work to establish how well this one-electron approach describes physical properties such as the crystal structures of the transition metals, the structural phase transitions in the alkali, alkaline earth, and rare earth...

  17. Wave function for time-dependent harmonically confined electrons in a time-dependent electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-Qi; Pan, Xiao-Yin; Sahni, Viraht

    2013-09-21

    The many-body wave function of a system of interacting particles confined by a time-dependent harmonic potential and perturbed by a time-dependent spatially homogeneous electric field is derived via the Feynman path-integral method. The wave function is comprised of a phase factor times the solution to the unperturbed time-dependent Schrödinger equation with the latter being translated by a time-dependent value that satisfies the classical driven equation of motion. The wave function reduces to that of the Harmonic Potential Theorem wave function for the case of the time-independent harmonic confining potential.

  18. Structure and electron-ion correlation in liquid Mg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahara, Shuta [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu Chuo-ku, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Fujii, Hiroyuki [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu Chuo-ku, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Yokota, Yukinobu [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu Chuo-ku, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Kawakita, Yukinobu [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu Chuo-ku, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Kohara, Shinji [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Takeda, Shin' ichi [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu Chuo-ku, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan)]. E-mail: takeda@rc.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2006-11-15

    For liquid Mg at 700 deg. C, structure factors were obtained from both neutron and X-ray diffraction measurements. The bond angle and coordination number distributions were derived from the reverse Monte Carlo analysis. By a combination of both structure factors, charge density function and electron-ion partial structure factor were deduced.

  19. Time-dependent approach to electron scattering and ionization in the s-wave model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ihra, W.; Draeger, M.; Handke, G.; Friedrich, H.

    1995-01-01

    The time-dependent Schroedinger equation is integrated for continuum states of two-electron atoms in the framework of the s-wave model, in which both electrons are restricted to having vanishing individual orbital angular momenta. The method is suitable for studying the time evolution of correlations in the two-electron wave functions and yields probabilities for elastic and inelastic electron scattering and for electron-impact ionization. The spin-averaged probabilities for electron-impact ionization of hydrogen in the s-wave model reproduce the shape of the experimentally observed integrated ionization cross section remarkably well for energies near and above the maximum

  20. Structural and electronic parameters of ferroelectric KWOF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atuchin, V. V.; Gavrilova, T. A.; Kesler, V. G.; Molokeev, M. S.; Aleksandrov, K. S.

    2010-11-01

    The low-temperature ferroelectric G2 polymorph of K 3WO 3F 3 oxyfluoride is formed by chemical synthesis. The electronic parameters of G2-K 3WO 3F 3 have been measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy under excitation with Al Kα radiation (1486.6 eV). Detailed spectra have been recorded for all element core levels and Auger lines. The chemical bonding effects in the WO 3F 3 and WO 6 octahedrons are considered by using the binding energy difference ΔBE(O-W)=BE(O 1s)-BE(W 4f).

  1. Nodal Structure of the Electronic Wigner Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmider, Hartmut; Dahl, Jens Peder

    1996-01-01

    On the example of several atomic and small molecular systems, the regular behavior of nodal patterns in the electronic one-particle reduced Wigner function is demonstrated. An expression found earlier relates the nodal pattern solely to the dot-product of the position and the momentum vector......, if both arguments are large. An argument analogous to the ``bond-oscillatory principle'' for momentum densities links the nuclear framework in a molecule to an additional oscillatory term in momenta parallel to bonds. It is shown that these are visible in the Wigner function in terms of characteristic...

  2. Electronic structure of the light actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunlap, B.D.

    1976-01-01

    In the last few years, considerable advances have been made in our understanding of the properties of the light actinides. Although these are 5f transition elements formally equivalent to the lanthanide (4f) elements, these materials show a much more varied behavior due to the larger spatial extent and ionizability of the 5f electrons. A review is given of some areas of current interest, especially where hyperfine measurements have played an active role. These include studies of a variety of magnetic phenomena, systematics of isomer shift measurements, and studies of paramagnetic relaxation

  3. Theoretical aspects of electronic structure of high Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, R.P.

    1990-01-01

    Although the mechanism responsible for the high T c superconductivity is still unknown, it is nevertheless clear that superconductivity in hole doped materials depends sensitively on the number of holes, C h , per CuO 2 plane. A correlation between C h and T c has been established. In this paper we present several examples of the critical dependence of the charge transfer and thus the value of C h on the cristallographic characteristics. For example, our electronic structure investigations of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 6.5 using several configurations of the oxygen atoms on the chains show that the order-disorder phenomena of the oxygen atoms play a crucial role on the value of C h and T c . We have also studied the variation of the charge transfer and C h as a function of hydrostatic pressure for several cuprates: La 1.85 Sr 0.15 CuO 4 (ΔT c /Δp ∼ 0.3 - 0.4 K/kbar); YBa 2 Cu 4 O 8 (ΔT c /Δp ∼ 5.5 K/kbar). We show that the values of C h increase under pressure [fr

  4. The boomerang effect in electron-hydrogen molecule scattering as determined by time-dependent calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Asher, Anael; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2017-05-01

    The appearance of oscillations in the energy-dependent cross sections of the vibrational excitation ν =0 →ν ≥3 of the hydrogen molecule in its electronic ground state as predicted by Mündel, Berman, and Domcke [Phys. Rev. A 32, 181 (1985)] was confirmed in the electron scattering experiments by Allan [J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Phys. 18, L451 (1985)]. These unusual structures were obtained in spite of the extremely short lifetime of H2- in its ro-vibrational states. Based on the standard (Hermitian) time-independent scattering calculations, Horáček et al. [Phys. Rev. A 73, 022701 (2006)] associated these oscillations with the boomerang effect. Here, we show the boomerang effect as developed in time, based on our time-dependent nuclear wavepacket (WP) calculations. The nuclear WP dynamics of H2- is determined using the non-Hermitian quantum mechanics (NH-QM) which enables the use of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation with complex potential energy surfaces. This NH-QM approach, which enables us the association of the nuclear WP dynamics as obtained from the complex potential energy curve of H2- with the evolution of cross section in time, can enlighten the dynamics in other scattering experiments.

  5. Electron beam crosslinked PVC : structure property relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Neeraj K.; Sabharwal, Sunil

    2001-01-01

    PVC is used extensively for its insulating properties for the manufacture of wires and cables and for other applications. Its gradual degradation, oxidation and even dehydro chlorination restricts use for long lasting period in installations such as high temperature zones, underground cables, communication systems, electro-nuclear facilities, etc. The technological properties and performance characteristics of PVC based insulation can be improved via crosslinking by high-energy electrons. PVC is however a polymer, which on irradiation predominantly undergoes degradation. To avoid degradation, it needs to be compounded with sensitizing agents or multifunctional monomers so that crosslinking is the predominant reaction. Radiation cross linkable formulations are complex mixtures of resin and various additives incorporated for achieving desired technological and performance characteristics, ease of processing and improving quality. The proper choice of additives and sensitizing agents enable low dose requirements for efficient crosslinking and improvements in various technological properties. The purposes of this work was to investigate the effect of using a binary sensitizer blend of a trifunctional monomer and a rubber in PVC, and develop suitable electron beam cross linkable formulations for wire insulation. This paper presents some aspects of the investigations and development of insulation demonstrated at industrial scale

  6. Electronic structure and isomer shifts of Sn halides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terra, J.; Guenzburger, D.

    1988-01-01

    The all-electron first-principles Discrete Variational method was employed to study the electronic structure of SnF 4 , SnCl 4 , SnBr 4 and SnI 4 . Values of the electronic density at the Sn nucleus were derived and related to 119 Sn Isomer Shifts to obtain the nuclear constant Δ 2 >. Differences in values of ρ(o) area discussed in terms of the chemical bonding between Sn and halogen atoms. (author) [pt

  7. Electronic structure of graphene beyond the linear dispersion regime

    OpenAIRE

    POWER, STEPHEN; FERREIRA, MAURO

    2011-01-01

    PUBLISHED Among the many interesting features displayed by graphene, one of the most attractive is the simplicity with which its electronic structure can be described. The study of its physical properties is significantly simplified by the linear dispersion relation of electrons in a narrow range around the Fermi level. Unfortunately, the mathematical simplicity of graphene electrons is limited only to this narrow energy region and is not very practical when dealing with problems that invo...

  8. Phase stability and electronic structure of transition-metal aluminides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, A.E.

    1992-01-01

    This paper will describe the interplay between die electronic structure and structural energetics in simple, complex, and quasicrystalline Al-transition metal (T) intermetallics. The first example is the Ll 2 -DO 22 competition in Al 3 T compounds. Ab-initio electronic total-energy calculations reveal surprisingly large structural-energy differences, and show that the phase stability of both stoichiometric and ternary-substituted compounds correlates closely with a quasigap in the electronic density of states (DOS). Secondly, ab-initio calculations for the structural stability of the icosahedrally based Al 12 W structure reveal similar quasigap effects, and provide a simple physical explanation for the stability of the complex aluminide structures. Finally, parametrized tight-binding model calculations for the Al-Mn quasicrystal reveal a large spread in the local Mn DOS behavior, and support a two-site model for the quasicrystal's magnetic behavior

  9. Impact of potassium doping on the electronic structure of tetracene and pentacene: An electron energy-loss study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, Friedrich, E-mail: Friedrich.Roth@cfel.de [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science / DESY, Notkestraße 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Knupfer, Martin, E-mail: M.Knupfer@ifw-dresden.de [IFW Dresden, P.O. Box 270116, D-01171 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-10-21

    We report the doping induced changes of the electronic structure of tetracene and pentacene probed by electron energy-loss spectroscopy in transmission. A comparison between the dynamic response of undoped and potassium-intercalated tetracene and pentacene emphasizes the appearance of a new excitation feature in the former gap upon potassium addition. Interestingly, the momentum dependency of this new excitation shows a negative dispersion. Moreover, the analysis of the C 1s and K 2p core-level excitation results in a significantly lower doping level compared to potassium doped picene, a recently discovered superconductor. Therefore, the present electronic structure investigations open a new pathway to better understand the exceptional differences between acenes and phenacene and their divergent behavior upon alkali doping.

  10. Electronic structure of filled tetrahedral semiconductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wood, D.M.; Zunger, Alex; Groot, R. de

    1985-01-01

    We discuss the susceptibility of zinc-blende semiconductors to band-structure modification by insertion of small atoms at their tetrahedral interstitial states. GaP is found to become a direct-gap semiconductor with two He atoms present at its interstitial sites; Si does not. Analysis of the factors

  11. Electronic structure and ionicity of actinide oxides from first principles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petit, Leon; Svane, Axel; Szotek, Z.

    2010-01-01

    The ground-state electronic structures of the actinide oxides AO, A2O3, and AO2 (A=U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm, Bk, and Cf) are determined from first-principles calculations, using the self-interaction corrected local spin-density approximation. Emphasis is put on the degree of f-electron localization, whi...

  12. On the electronic structure of high Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, J.; Nuecker, N.; Romberg, H.; Alexander, M.; Knupfer, M.; Mante, J.; Claessen, R.; Buslaps, T.; Harm, S.; Manzke, R.; Skibowski, M.

    1992-01-01

    Studies of the electronic structure of high-T c superconductors and related compounds by high-energy spectroscopies are reviewed. In particular, we report on investigations by electron energy-loss, angle-resolved photoemission, and inverse angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. Information on the symmetry and the character of states close to the Fermi level has been obtained. 25 refs., 8 figs

  13. Electronic structure and equilibrium properties of hcp titanium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The electronic structures of hexagonal-close-packed divalent titanium (3-d) and zirconium (4-d) transition metals are studied by using a non-local model potential method. From the present calculation of energy bands, Fermi energy, density of states and the electronic heat capacity of these two metals are determined and ...

  14. Weiss oscillations in the electronic structure of modulated graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir, M; Sabeeh, K; MacKinnon, A

    2007-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the electronic structure of modulated graphene in the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field. The density of states and the bandwidth for the Dirac electrons in this system are determined. The appearance of unusual Weiss oscillations in the bandwidth and density of states is the main focus of this work

  15. Electronic Structure of Au25 Clusters: Between Discrete and Continuous

    KAUST Repository

    Katsiev, Khabiboulakh

    2016-07-15

    Here, an approach based on synchrotron resonant photoemission is emplyed to explore the transition between quantization and hybridization of the electronic structure in atomically precise ligand-stabilized nanoparticles. While the presence of ligands maintains quantization in Au25 clusters, their removal renders increased hybridization of the electronic states at the vicinity of the Fermi level. These observations are supported by DFT studies.

  16. Electronic Structure of Au25 Clusters: Between Discrete and Continuous

    KAUST Repository

    Katsiev, Khabiboulakh; Lozova, Nataliya; Wang, Lu; Katla, Saikrishna; Li, Ruipeng; Mei, Wai Ning; Skrabalak, Sara; Challa, Challa; Losovyj, Yaroslav

    2016-01-01

    Here, an approach based on synchrotron resonant photoemission is emplyed to explore the transition between quantization and hybridization of the electronic structure in atomically precise ligand-stabilized nanoparticles. While the presence of ligands maintains quantization in Au25 clusters, their removal renders increased hybridization of the electronic states at the vicinity of the Fermi level. These observations are supported by DFT studies.

  17. Electronic Structure of Cdse Nanowires Terminated With Gold ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bheema

    Owing to their unusual electronic and structural properties, SC clusters have received considerable attention ... performing molecular dynamics simulations. A similar .... Analysis of the charge density, gap, corresponding to states with energies ...

  18. Structures and electronics of buried and unburied semiconductor interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiya, Itaru

    2011-01-01

    The structure of interfaces plays an important role in determining the electronic properties of semiconductor nanostructures. Here, such examples are shown and discussed using semiconductor nanostructures prepared by molecular beam epitaxy and colloidal synthesis.

  19. Manganites in Perovskite Superlattices: Structural and Electronic Properties

    KAUST Repository

    Jiwuer, Jilili

    2016-01-01

    Perovskite manganites are widely investigated compounds due to the discovery of the colossal magnetoresistance effect in 1994. They have a broad range of structural, electronic, magnetic properties and potential device applications in sensors

  20. Structure and electron-ion correlation of liquid germanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakita, Y. [Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan)]. E-mail: kawakita@rc.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Fujita, S. [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Kohara, S. [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto Mikazuki-cho, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Ohshima, K. [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Fujii, H. [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Yokota, Y. [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Takeda, S. [Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1 Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan)

    2005-08-15

    Structure factor of liquid germanium (Ge) has a shoulder at {theta} = 3.2 A{sup -1} in the high-momentum-transfer region of the first peak. To investigate the origin of such a non-simplicity in the structure, high energy X-ray diffraction measurements have been performed using 113.26 keV incident X-ray, at BL04B2 beamline of SPring-8. By a combination of the obtained structure factor with the reported neutron diffraction data, charge density function and electron-ion partial structure factor have been deduced. The peak position of the charge distribution is located at about 1 A, rather smaller r value than the half value of nearest neighbor distance ({approx}2.7 A), which suggests that valence electrons of liquid Ge play a role of screening electrons around a metallic ion rather than covalently bonding electrons.

  1. Structure functions in electron-nucleon deep inelastic scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleem, M.; Fazal-E-Aleem (University of the Punjab, Lahore (Pakistan). Dept. of Physics)

    1982-06-26

    The phenomenological expressions for the structure functions in electron-nucleon deep inelastic scattering are proposed and are shown to satisfy the experimental data as well as a number of sum rules.

  2. First-principle calculations of structural, electronic, optical, elastic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S CHEDDADI

    2017-11-28

    Nov 28, 2017 ... First-principle calculations on the structural, electronic, optical, elastic and thermal properties of the chalcopyrite ... The Kohn–Sham equations were solved using the ... RMTKmax = 7 was used for all the investigated systems,.

  3. Electronic structure of incident carbon ions on a graphite surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuchi, Masato; Takeuchi, Takae; Yamamoto, Masao.

    1997-01-01

    The electronic structure of an incident carbon ion on a graphite surface is discussed on the basis of ab initio molecular orbital calculations. A carbon cation forms a covalent bond with the graphite, and a carbon nonion is attracted to the graphite surface through van der Waals interaction. A carbon anion has no stable state on a graphite surface. The charge effects of incident ions become clear upon detailed examination of the electronic structure. (author)

  4. Contribution of inner shell electrons to position-dependent stopping powers of a crystal surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narumi, Kazumasa; Fujii, Yoshikazu; Kishine, Keiji; Kurakake, Hiroshi; Kimura, Kenji; Mannami, Michi-hiko

    1994-01-01

    Position-dependent stopping powers of the (001) surface of SnTe single crystal for specularly reflected 15 - 200 keV H + ions are studied. The position dependence of the experimental stopping powers varies with the energy of ions. From the comparison with the theoretical stopping powers based on both the single ion-electron collision and the collective excitation of the valence electrons, it is concluded that the observed change in the position-dependent stopping powers with energy of H + is due to the variation of contribution of inner shell electrons to stopping. (author)

  5. A Structural Equation Approach to Models with Spatial Dependence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oud, Johan H. L.; Folmer, Henk

    We introduce the class of structural equation models (SEMs) and corresponding estimation procedures into a spatial dependence framework. SEM allows both latent and observed variables within one and the same (causal) model. Compared with models with observed variables only, this feature makes it

  6. A structural equation approach to models with spatial dependence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oud, J.H.L.; Folmer, H.

    2008-01-01

    We introduce the class of structural equation models (SEMs) and corresponding estimation procedures into a spatial dependence framework. SEM allows both latent and observed variables within one and the same (causal) model. Compared with models with observed variables only, this feature makes it

  7. A Structural Equation Approach to Models with Spatial Dependence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oud, J.H.L.; Folmer, H.

    2008-01-01

    We introduce the class of structural equation models (SEMs) and corresponding estimation procedures into a spatial dependence framework. SEM allows both latent and observed variables within one and the same (causal) model. Compared with models with observed variables only, this feature makes it

  8. Non-Stationary Dependence Structures for Spatial Extremes

    KAUST Repository

    Huser, Raphaë l; Genton, Marc G.

    2016-01-01

    been developed, and fitted to various types of data. However, a recurrent problem is the modeling of non-stationarity. In this paper, we develop non-stationary max-stable dependence structures in which covariates can be easily incorporated. Inference

  9. Orientation dependent emission properties of columnar quantum dash laser structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hein, S.; Podemski, P.; Sek, G.; Misiewicz, J.; Ridha, P.; Fiore, A.; Patriarche, G.; Höfling, S.; Forchel, A.

    2009-01-01

    InAs columnar quantum dash (CQDash) structures on (100) InP have been realized by gas source molecular beam epitaxy for stacking numbers of up to 24. Laser devices show low threshold current densities between 0.73 and 3.5 kA/ cm2, dependent on the CQDash orientation within the cavity.

  10. Structural study of surfactant-dependent interaction with protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, Vinod K., E-mail: vkaswal@barc.gov.in [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kohlbrecher, Joachim [Laboratory for Neutron Scattering, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 PSI Villigen (Switzerland)

    2015-06-24

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study the complex structure of anionic BSA protein with three different (cationic DTAB, anionic SDS and non-ionic C12E10) surfactants. These systems form very different surfactant-dependent complexes. We show that the structure of protein-surfactant complex is initiated by the site-specific electrostatic interaction between the components, followed by the hydrophobic interaction at high surfactant concentrations. It is also found that hydrophobic interaction is preferred over the electrostatic interaction in deciding the resultant structure of protein-surfactant complexes.

  11. Pressure dependence of the interfacial structure of potassium chloride films on iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, Dustin; Gao, Hongyu; Tang, Chun; Tysoe, Wilfred T.; Martini, Ashlie

    2015-01-01

    Potassium chloride films on a clean iron surface are used as a model system to explore the interfacial structure of the films and the dependence of that structure on film thickness and pressure. The interfacial structure of one-, two-, three- and four-layer films is measured experimentally using low-energy electron diffraction. Those findings are then complemented by molecular dynamics simulations in which the atomic interaction between the film and substrate is tuned to match film thickness-dependent sublimation activation energy obtained from temperature-programmed desorption measurements. The resultant simulation reliably predicts the structure of thicker films and is then used to study the effect of pressure on the distribution of the lattice constant within and between each layer of the potassium chloride films. Findings indicate that both film thickness and pressure affect the structure within the films as well as the degree of registry between the film and adjacent substrate. - Highlights: • KCl films on an Fe surface are used as a model system to explore interfacial structure • Thin film structure is measured using low-energy electron diffraction • An empirical potential is tuned to match sublimation activation energy • Simulations reveal the effect of pressure on the lattice constant within the KCl films • Pressure affects the film structure and registry between film and substrate

  12. Pressure dependence of the interfacial structure of potassium chloride films on iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Dustin [Department of Chemistry and Laboratory for Surface Studies, University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Gao, Hongyu; Tang, Chun [School of Engineering, University of California Merced, Merced CA 95343 (United States); Tysoe, Wilfred T. [Department of Chemistry and Laboratory for Surface Studies, University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Martini, Ashlie [School of Engineering, University of California Merced, Merced CA 95343 (United States)

    2015-10-30

    Potassium chloride films on a clean iron surface are used as a model system to explore the interfacial structure of the films and the dependence of that structure on film thickness and pressure. The interfacial structure of one-, two-, three- and four-layer films is measured experimentally using low-energy electron diffraction. Those findings are then complemented by molecular dynamics simulations in which the atomic interaction between the film and substrate is tuned to match film thickness-dependent sublimation activation energy obtained from temperature-programmed desorption measurements. The resultant simulation reliably predicts the structure of thicker films and is then used to study the effect of pressure on the distribution of the lattice constant within and between each layer of the potassium chloride films. Findings indicate that both film thickness and pressure affect the structure within the films as well as the degree of registry between the film and adjacent substrate. - Highlights: • KCl films on an Fe surface are used as a model system to explore interfacial structure • Thin film structure is measured using low-energy electron diffraction • An empirical potential is tuned to match sublimation activation energy • Simulations reveal the effect of pressure on the lattice constant within the KCl films • Pressure affects the film structure and registry between film and substrate.

  13. Band structure of an electron in a kind of periodic potentials with singularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, Kuo; Yu, Ning; Jia, Jiangping

    2018-06-01

    Noninteracting electrons in some crystals may experience periodic potentials with singularities and the governing Schrödinger equation cannot be defined at the singular points. The band structure of a single electron in such a one-dimensional crystal has been calculated by using an equivalent integral form of the Schrödinger equation. Both the perturbed and exact solutions are constructed respectively for the cases of a general singular weak-periodic system and its an exactly solvable version, Kronig-Penney model. Any one of them leads to a special band structure of the energy-dependent parameter, which results in an effective correction to the previous energy-band structure and gives a new explanation for forming the band structure. The used method and obtained results could be a valuable aid in the study of energy bands in solid-state physics, and the new explanation may trigger investigation to different physical mechanism of electron band structures.

  14. Electronic structure of UCl5: A reexamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soule, E.; Edelstein, N.

    1980-01-01

    On the basis of the absorption spectrum of UCl 5 recorded at 4.2 K, Leung and Poon attempted a determination of both the spin-orbit coupling constant and the crystal field parameters. Their parameters, however, led to a calculated g-tensor at variance with the position of the electron paramagnetic resonance line observed by Miyake et al. It was therefore attempted to simultaneously interpret both spectra (absorption and EPR), assuming the validity of the Newman superposition model, and taking the point symmetry group on each uranium of the (UCl 5 ) 2 dimer as C 2 sub(v). We obtain one and only one satisfactory solution, namely a set of parameters that reasonably reproduce the observed absorption peaks, and lead to the following principal values of the g-tensor: gx = 0.226 (unobservable); gy = 1.187; gz = 1.186. Therefore the paradox stemming from the apparent isotropy of the EPR signal for a species of low point symmetry is resolved. (orig.)

  15. Electronic structure of metal overlayers on rhodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feibelman, P.J.; Hamann, D.R.

    1983-01-01

    We have evaluated work functions, surface core-level shifts, and surface band dispersions for clean, Ag-covered, and Pd-covered Rh(100) surfaces, and for clean and Ag-covered Rh(111). The calculations were performed self-consistently, using the surface-linearized augmented-plane-wave method. As expected from the Pauling electronegativities, Ag adsorption lowers the work function from the clean Rh value, by several tenths of an eV, while Pd has an almost negligible effect. The values calculated for the core-level shifts of various films are shown to correspond to expectations based on surface band narrowing and layerwise charge neutrality. Using the core-level shifts, we predict heat-of-adsorption differences (for Ag on Pd vs Ag on Rh, etc.) that are in quite good agreement with the empirical predictions of Miedema and Dorleijn. Finally, the chemical inactivity of the Ag-covered Rh surface is associated with the fact that, for that system, the outer-layer local density of states is essentially that of Ag, with a characteristically low value at the Fermi energy. On the other hand, the Pd-covered Rh surface should behave much like clean Rh with an extra electron per surface atom. The surface band dispersions for the Pd-covered and clean Rh surfaces are closely similar. This result contrasts sharply with the case of Pd-covered Nb, for which, because of the appreciable electronegativity difference, the Pd overlayer is effectively ''noble.''

  16. Spin-dependent electronic transport properties of transition metal atoms doped α-armchair graphyne nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotoohi, Somayeh; Haji-Nasiri, Saeed

    2018-04-01

    Spin-dependent electronic transport properties of single 3d transition metal (TM) atoms doped α-armchair graphyne nanoribbons (α-AGyNR) are investigated by non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method combined with density functional theory (DFT). It is found that all of the impurity atoms considered in this study (Fe, Co, Ni) prefer to occupy the sp-hybridized C atom site in α-AGyNR, and the obtained structures remain planar. The results show that highly localized impurity states are appeared around the Fermi level which correspond to the 3d orbitals of TM atoms, as can be derived from the projected density of states (PDOS). Moreover, Fe, Co, and Ni doped α-AGyNRs exhibit magnetic properties due to the strong spin splitting property of the energy levels. Also for each case, the calculated current-voltage characteristic per super-cell shows that the spin degeneracy in the system is obviously broken and the current becomes strongly spin dependent. Furthermore, a high spin-filtering effect around 90% is found under the certain bias voltages in Ni doped α-AGyNR. Additionally, the structure with Ni impurity reveals transfer characteristic that is suitable for designing a spin current switch. Our findings provide a high possibility to design the next generation spin nanodevices with novel functionalities.

  17. Electronic structure properties of UO2 as a Mott insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheykhi, Samira; Payami, Mahmoud

    2018-06-01

    In this work using the density functional theory (DFT), we have studied the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of uranium dioxide with antiferromagnetic 1k-, 2k-, and 3k-order structures. Ordinary approximations in DFT, such as the local density approximation (LDA) or generalized gradient approximation (GGA), usually predict incorrect metallic behaviors for this strongly correlated electron system. Using Hubbard term correction for f-electrons, LDA+U method, as well as using the screened Heyd-Scuseria-Ernzerhof (HSE) hybrid functional for the exchange-correlation (XC), we have obtained the correct ground-state behavior as an insulator, with band gaps in good agreement with experiment.

  18. New Insight into Carbon Nanotube Electronic Structure Selectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL; Meunier, Vincent [ORNL; Jiang, Deen [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    The fundamental role of aryl diazonium salts for post synthesis selectivity of carbon nanotubes is investigated using extensive electronic structure calculations. The resulting understanding for diazonium salt based selective separation of conducting and semiconducting carbon nanotubes shows how the primary contributions come from the interplay between the intrinsic electronic structure of the carbon nanotubes and that of the anion of the salt. We demonstrate how the electronic transport properties change upon the formation of charge transfer complexes and upon their conversion into covalently attached functional groups. Our results are found to correlate well with experiments and provide for the first time an atomistic description for diazonium salt based chemical separation of carbon nanotubes

  19. Electronic structure of the copper oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickett, W.E.; Cohen, R.E.; Singh, D.; Krakauer, H.

    1989-01-01

    Since the discovery of the high temperature superconducting copper oxides a great deal has been learned from experiment about their behavior. From the theoretical side, there continues to be developments both within the band picture and from the model Hamiltonian viewpoint emphasizing correlations. In this paper the authors discuss these complementary viewpoints in relation to some of the experimental data. Due to their background in the band structure area, they approach the discussion by evaluating which phenomena can be (or has been) accounted for by the standard band approach, and point out which properties appear to require more intricate treatments of correlation

  20. Electronic and geometric structures of calcium metaborates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranovskij, V.I.; Lopatin, S.I.; Sizov, V.V.

    2000-01-01

    Calculations of geometric structure, vibration frequencies, ionization potentials and atomization energies of CaBO 2 and CaB 2 O 4 molecules were made. It is shown that linear conformations of the molecules are the most stable ones. In the metaborates studied calcium atom coordination with oxygen is a monodentate one, meanwhile CaB 2 O 4 can be considered as a Ca 2+ compound, whereas CaBO 2 - as a Ca + compound, which explains similarity of the molecule (from the viewpoint of its geometry, spectral and energy characteristics) to alkaline metal metaborates [ru

  1. Time-dependent reliability analysis and condition assessment of structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellingwood, B.R.

    1997-01-01

    Structures generally play a passive role in assurance of safety in nuclear plant operation, but are important if the plant is to withstand the effect of extreme environmental or abnormal events. Relative to mechanical and electrical components, structural systems and components would be difficult and costly to replace. While the performance of steel or reinforced concrete structures in service generally has been very good, their strengths may deteriorate during an extended service life as a result of changes brought on by an aggressive environment, excessive loading, or accidental loading. Quantitative tools for condition assessment of aging structures can be developed using time-dependent structural reliability analysis methods. Such methods provide a framework for addressing the uncertainties attendant to aging in the decision process

  2. Structure and electronic properties of azadirachtin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Elton A S; de Oliveira, Daniel A B; Farias, Sergio A S; Gargano, Ricardo; Martins, João B L

    2014-02-01

    We performed a combined DFT and Monte Carlo (13)C NMR chemical-shift study of azadirachtin A, a triterpenoid that acts as a natural insect antifeedant. A conformational search using a Monte Carlo technique based on the RM1 semiempirical method was carried out in order to establish its preferred structure. The B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p), wB97XD/6-311++G(d,p), M06/6-311++G(d,p), M06-2X/6-311++G(d,p), and CAM-B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) levels of theory were used to predict NMR chemical shifts. A Monte Carlo population-weighted average spectrum was produced based on the predicted Boltzmann contributions. In general, good agreement between experimental and theoretical data was obtained using both methods, and the (13)C NMR chemical shifts were predicted highly accurately. The geometry was optimized at the semiempirical level and used to calculate the NMR chemical shifts at the DFT level, and these shifts showed only minor deviations from those obtained following structural optimization at the DFT level, and incurred a much lower computational cost. The theoretical ultraviolet spectrum showed a maximum absorption peak that was mainly contributed by the tiglate group.

  3. Halide-Dependent Electronic Structure of Organolead Perovskite Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Buin, Andrei; Comin, Riccardo; Xu, Jixian; Ip, Alexander H.; Sargent, Edward H.

    2015-01-01

    -based perovskites, in line with recent experimental data. As a result, the optimal growth conditions are also different for the distinct halide perovskites: growth should be halide-rich for Br and Cl, and halide-poor for I-based perovskites. We discuss stability

  4. Spin Dependent Electronic Structure of Doped Manganese Perovskites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.-H.

    1999-01-01

    The spin-resolved photoemission spectra were successfully obtained from La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 190 nm thick epitaxial film on SrTiO3(001). Well below Tc the results clearly manifest the half-metallic nature, i.e., for the majority spin, the photoemission spectrum clearly shows a metallic Fermi cut-off, whereas for the minority spin, it shows an insulating gap with disappearance of the spectral weight at ∼0.6 eV binding energy. On heating through Tc the spectra show no difference for different spins and the spectra weight at the Fermi level (EF disappears, indicating that the Mn 3d spins become disordered) and the system undergoes the ferromagnetic metal to paramagnetic non-metal transition. (c) 2000 American Vacuum Society

  5. Structural complexities in the active layers of organic electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Stephanie S; Loo, Yueh-Lin

    2010-01-01

    The field of organic electronics has progressed rapidly in recent years. However, understanding the direct structure-function relationships between the morphology in electrically active layers and the performance of devices composed of these materials has proven difficult. The morphology of active layers in organic electronics is inherently complex, with heterogeneities existing across multiple length scales, from subnanometer to micron and millimeter range. A major challenge still facing the organic electronics community is understanding how the morphology across all of the length scales in active layers collectively determines the device performance of organic electronics. In this review we highlight experiments that have contributed to the elucidation of structure-function relationships in organic electronics and also point to areas in which knowledge of such relationships is still lacking. Such knowledge will lead to the ability to select active materials on the basis of their inherent properties for the fabrication of devices with prespecified characteristics.

  6. Measuring size dependent electrical properties from nanoneedle structures: Pt/ZnO Schottky diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, Shimin; Anderson, Daniel D.; Shang, Tao; Park, Byoungnam; Dillon, Shen J.

    2014-01-01

    This work reports the fabrication and testing of nanoneedle devices with well-defined interfaces that are amenable to a variety of structural and electrical characterization, including transmission electron microscopy. Single Pt/ZnO nanoneedle Schottky diodes were fabricated by a top down method using a combination of electro-polishing, sputtering, and focused ion beam milling. The resulting structures contained nanoscale planar heterojunctions with low ideality factors, the dimensions of which were tuned to study size-dependent electrical properties. The diameter dependence of the Pt/ZnO diode barrier height is explained by a joule heating effect and/or electronic inhomogeneity in the Pt/ZnO contact area

  7. Electronic Coupling Dependence of Ultrafast Interfacial Electron Transfer on Nanocrystalline Thin Films and Single Crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lian, Tianquan

    2014-04-22

    The long-term goal of the proposed research is to understand electron transfer dynamics in nanoparticle/liquid interface. This knowledge is essential to many semiconductor nanoparticle based devices, including photocatalytic waste degradation and dye sensitized solar cells.

  8. Atomic and electronic structures of divacancy in graphene nanoribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Jun [College of Physical Science and Technology, Yangtze University, Jingzhou, Hubei 434023 (China); Zeng Hui, E-mail: zenghui@yangtzeu.edu.cn [College of Physical Science and Technology, Yangtze University, Jingzhou, Hubei 434023 (China); Wei Jianwei [School of Mathematics and Physics, Chongqing University of Technology, Chongqing 400054 (China)

    2012-01-15

    First principles calculations have been performed to investigate the electronic structures and transport properties of defective graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) in the presence of pentagon-octagon-pentagon (5-8-5) defects. Electronic band structure results reveal that 5-8-5 defects in the defective zigzag graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR) is unfavorable for electronic transport. However, such defects in the defective armchair graphene nanoribbon (AGNR) give rise to smaller band gap than that in the pristine AGNR, and eventually results in semiconductor to metal-like transition. The distinct roles of 5-8-5 defects in two kinds of edged-GNR are attributed to the different coupling between {pi}{sup Low-Asterisk} and {pi} subbands influenced by the defects. Our findings indicate the possibility of a new route to improve the electronic transport properties of graphene nanoribbons via tailoring the atomic structures by ion irradiation.

  9. Effects of Structural Correlations on Electronic Properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastawski, H.M.; Weisz, J.F.

    1984-01-01

    A one dimensional alloy model is treated in the nearest neighbour tight binding approximation in which the correlation of the atoms can be adjusted. The correlation can be changed from a situation in which there is a tendency for atoms to alternate to a situation in which the atoms are randomly located, consistent with a fixed concentration c for A c B 1-c . The results show that when there is short range order, at certain energies there is a tendency for localized states and formation of structure induced minimum in the density of states. The results for the ordered case are similar to those of Charge Density Wave (CDW). A smooth transition is carried out between this case and the randomly disordered case which behaves like the Anderson model for uncorrelated disorder. (M.W.O.) [pt

  10. The surface electronic structure of Y(0001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Searle, C.

    1998-12-01

    Yttrium has been grown epitaxially on W(110). The growth was monitored by using photoemission spectroscopy with a synchrotron radiation source. The film thickness has been gauged by the attenuation of the W 4f 7/2 bulk component. The films have been grown reproducibly and show a prominent surface state which is indicative of good order and low contamination. Angle-Resolved Ultra-Violet Photoemission Spectroscopy has been used to examine the valence band of these ultra-thin films. The films show a very different structure to the valence band of a bulk crystal of yttrium. The differences have been investigated by a series of model calculations using the LMASA-46 tight-binding LMTO program. The calculations suggest that the ultra-thin film surface state may be hybridised with a tungsten orbital having (x 2 - y 2 ) character. (author)

  11. Substrate dependence of electron-stimulated O - yields from dissociative electron attachment to physisorbed O2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huels, M. A.; Parenteau, L.; Sanche, L.

    1994-03-01

    We present measurements of O- electron stimulated desorption yields obtained under identical experimental conditions from 0.15 monolayers (ML) of O2 deposited onto disordered substrates consisting of 4 ML of either Kr, Xe, C2H6, C2H4, N2O, CH3Cl, or H2O, all condensed on Pt (polycrystalline). The resulting O- yield functions, for incident electron energies below 20 eV, are compared to that obtained from the O2/Kr solid; this allows us to assess the order of magnitude effects of the local substrate environment on dissociative electron attachment (DEA) via the 2Πu and gas phase forbidden 2Σ+g,u resonances of O-2. We note that, in addition to electron energy losses in the substrate prior to DEA to O2 and post-dissociation interactions of the O- with the substrate molecules, charge or energy transfer from the O-2 transient anion to a substrate molecule, and capture of the incident electron into a dissociative anion resonance of the substrate molecule may contribute to a reduced O- yield from the physisorbed O2. In the case of O2 deposited on amorphous ice, we find that the O- signal from DEA to O2 is completely absent for electron energies below 14 eV; we attribute this to a complete quenching of the dissociative O-2(2Πu, 2Σ+) resonances by the adjacent water molecules.

  12. Structural stability, electronic structure and mechanical properties of actinide carbides AnC (An = U, Np)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manikandan, M.; Santhosh, M.; Rajeswarapalanichamy, R.

    2016-01-01

    Ab initio calculations are performed to investigate the structural stability, electronic structure and mechanical properties of actinide carbides AnC (An=U, Np) for three different crystal structures, namely NaCl, CsCl and ZnS. Among the considered structures, NaCl structure is found to be the most stable structure for these carbides at normal pressure. A pressure induced structural phase transition from NaCl to ZnS is observed. The electronic structure reveals that these carbides are metals. The calculated elastic constants indicate that these carbides are mechanically stable at normal pressure.

  13. Brain structural connectivity and context-dependent extinction memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Andrea; Stark, Rudolf; Blecker, Carlo R; Milad, Mohammed R; Merz, Christian J

    2017-08-01

    Extinction of conditioned fear represents an important mechanism in the treatment of anxiety disorders. Return of fear after successful extinction or exposure therapy in patients with anxiety disorders might be linked to poor temporal or contextual generalization of extinction due to individual differences in brain structural connectivity. The goal of this magnetic resonance imaging study was therefore to investigate the association of context-dependent extinction recall with brain structural connectivity. Diffusion-tensor imaging was used to determine the fractional anisotropy as a measure of white matter structural integrity of fiber tracts connecting central brain regions of the fear and extinction circuit (uncinate fasciculus, cingulum). Forty-five healthy men participated in a two-day fear conditioning experiment with fear acquisition in context A and extinction learning in context B on the first day. Extinction recall in the extinction context as well as renewal in the acquisition context and a novel context C took place one day later. Renewal of conditioned fear (skin conductance responses) in the acquisition context was associated with higher structural integrity of the hippocampal part of the cingulum. Enhanced structural integrity of the cingulum might be related to stronger hippocampal modulation of the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, a region important for modulating conditioned fear output by excitatory projections to the amygdala. This finding underpins the crucial role of individual differences in the structural integrity of relevant fiber tracts for context-dependent extinction recall and return of fear after exposure therapy in anxiety disorders. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Electronic properties in a quantum well structure of Weyl semimetal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Wen-Long; Zhou, Jiao-Jiao; Wang, Xue-Feng; Oleś, Andrzej M.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the confined states and transport of three-dimensional Weyl electrons around a one-dimensional external rectangular electrostatic potential. The confined states with finite transverse wave vector exist at energies higher than the half well depth or lower than the half barrier height. The rectangular potential appears completely transparent to the normal incident electrons but not otherwise. The tunneling transmission coefficient is sensitive to their incident angle and shows resonant peaks when their energy coincides with the confined spectra. In addition, for the electrons in the conduction (valence) band through a potential barrier (well), the transmission spectrum has a gap of width increasing with the incident angle. Interestingly, the electron linear zero-temperature conductance over the potential can approach zero when the Fermi energy is aligned to the top and bottom energies of the potential, when only electron beams normal to the potential interfaces can pass through. The considered structure can be used to collimate the Weyl electron beams.

  15. Effect of electron emission on an ion sheath structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, M K; Phukan, A; Chakraborty, M

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on the variations of ion sheath structures due to the emission of both hot and cold electrons in the target plasma region of a double plasma device. The ion sheath is produced in front of a negatively biased plate. The plasma is produced by hot filament discharge in the source region, and no discharge is created in the target region of the device. The plate is placed in the target (diffused plasma) region where cold electron emitting filaments are present. These cold electrons are free from maintenance of discharge, which is sustained in the source region. The hot ionizing electrons are present in the source region. Three important parameters are changed by both hot and cold electrons i.e. plasma density, plasma potential and electron temperature. The decrease in plasma potential and the increase in plasma density lead to the contraction of the sheath. (paper)

  16. Spin-dependent Nucleon Structure Studies at MIT/Bates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botto, T.

    2005-01-01

    We present preliminary results from recent measurements of the proton, neutron and deuterium electro-magnetic form factors obtained by the BLAST collaboration at the MIT/Bates Linear Accelerator Facility. BLAST (Bates Large Acceptance Spectrometer Toroid) is a large-acceptance multi-purpose detector dedicated to studies of exclusive spin-dependent electron scattering from internal polarized targets. BLAST makes use of stored electron beam currents in excess of 150 mA with a 60-70% polarization. The electron beam is let through a 15 mm diameter, 60 cm long open-ended storage cell which is fed with ultra-pure, high-polarization H1,D1 gas from an Atomic Beam Source. The target polarization can be rapidly reversed between different vector and tensor target states, thus minimizing systematic uncertainties. The target spin can be oriented to any in-plane direction via a set of Helmholtz coils. Target polarizations in the storage cell of up to 80% (vector) and 70% (tensor) have been routinely achieved over a period of several months. Our data on the D-vector(e-vector,e'n) reaction off vector polarized deuterium allow for a unique extraction of the neutron charge form factor G E n . At same time, complementary measurements of G M n , T20 and the spin-dependent nucleon momentum distributions in deuterium are obtained via the D-vector(e-vector,e'), D (e-vector,e'd) and D (e-vector,e'p) reactions. In addition, BLAST data on vector polarized hydrogen will provide novel measurements of the GE/GM form-factor ratio on the proton as well as of the spin-dependent electro-excitation of the Δ(1232) resonance. Such comprehensive program on few body physics is now well underway and preliminary data will be presented

  17. Electron-beam induced structural and function change of microbial peroxiredoxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, S. H.; An, B. C.; Lee, S. S.; Lee, E. M.; Chung, B. Y. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Pseudomonas aerogenes peroxiredoxin (PaPrx) has dual functions acting as thioredoxin (Trx)-dependent peroxidase and molecular chaperone. The function of PaPrx is controlled by its structural status. In this study, we examined the effect of electron beam on structural modification related to chaperone activity. When irradiated electron beam at 1 kGy, the structural and functional changes of PaPrx were initiated. The enhanced chaperone activity was increased about 3- 40 4-fold at 2 kGy compared with non-irradiated, while the peroxidase activity was decreased. We also investigated the influence of the electron beam on protein physical property factors such as hydrophobicity and secondary structure. The exposure of hydrophobic domains reached a peak at 2 kGy of electron beam and then dose-dependently decreased with increasing electron beam irradiation. In addition, the electron beam irradiated PaPrx significantly increased exposure of {beta}-sheet and random coil elements on the protein surface whereas exposure of {alpha}-helix and turn elements was decreased. Our results suggest that highly enhanced chaperone activity could be applied to use in bio-engineering system and various industrial applications.

  18. Electron-beam induced structural and function change of microbial peroxiredoxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, S. H.; An, B. C.; Lee, S. S.; Lee, E. M.; Chung, B. Y.

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aerogenes peroxiredoxin (PaPrx) has dual functions acting as thioredoxin (Trx)-dependent peroxidase and molecular chaperone. The function of PaPrx is controlled by its structural status. In this study, we examined the effect of electron beam on structural modification related to chaperone activity. When irradiated electron beam at 1 kGy, the structural and functional changes of PaPrx were initiated. The enhanced chaperone activity was increased about 3- 40 4-fold at 2 kGy compared with non-irradiated, while the peroxidase activity was decreased. We also investigated the influence of the electron beam on protein physical property factors such as hydrophobicity and secondary structure. The exposure of hydrophobic domains reached a peak at 2 kGy of electron beam and then dose-dependently decreased with increasing electron beam irradiation. In addition, the electron beam irradiated PaPrx significantly increased exposure of β-sheet and random coil elements on the protein surface whereas exposure of α-helix and turn elements was decreased. Our results suggest that highly enhanced chaperone activity could be applied to use in bio-engineering system and various industrial applications

  19. Temporal Dependency and the Structure of Early Looking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messinger, Daniel S; Mattson, Whitney I; Todd, James Torrence; Gangi, Devon N; Myers, Nicholas D; Bahrick, Lorraine E

    2017-01-01

    Although looking time is used to assess infant perceptual and cognitive processing, little is known about the temporal structure of infant looking. To shed light on this temporal structure, 127 three-month-olds were assessed in an infant-controlled habituation procedure and presented with a pre-recorded display of a woman addressing the infant using infant-directed speech. Previous individual look durations positively predicted subsequent look durations over a six look window, suggesting a temporal dependency between successive infant looks. The previous look duration continued to predict the subsequent look duration after accounting for habituation-linked declines in look duration, and when looks were separated by an inter-trial interval in which no stimulus was displayed. Individual differences in temporal dependency, the strength of associations between consecutive look durations, are distinct from individual differences in mean infant look duration. Nevertheless, infants with stronger temporal dependency had briefer mean look durations, a potential index of stimulus processing. Temporal dependency was evident not only between individual infant looks but between the durations of successive habituation trials (total looking within a trial). Finally, temporal dependency was evident in associations between the last look at the habituation stimulus and the first look at a novel test stimulus. Thus temporal dependency was evident across multiple timescales (individual looks and trials comprised of multiple individual looks) and persisted across conditions including brief periods of no stimulus presentation and changes from a familiar to novel stimulus. Associations between consecutive look durations over multiple timescales and stimuli suggest a temporal structure of infant attention that has been largely ignored in previous work on infant looking.

  20. Reflection of the energy structure of a tungsten monocrystal nearsurface area in the secondary electron spectrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artamonov, O.M.; Smirnov, O.M.; Terekhov, A.N.

    1982-01-01

    Formation of secondary electron energy spectrum during emission from the crystal layer near the surface has been considered, at that layer energy structure can be different from volumetric energy structure. Its thickness depends on the predominant mechanism of electron scattering and is determined by corresponding phenomenological parameters. It is shown that the structure in the secondary electron spectrum appears in the case when energy structure of emitting monocrystal layer can not be described in the approximation of almost free electron gas and, as experimental investigations show, approaches energy zone structure of its volume. It is also show that in the case when the energy structure of the emitting layer is satisfactorily described with the model of almost free electron gas, the SE spectrum is characterized with traditional cascade minimum. Experimental investigation of SE energy distribution was carried out for the W monocrystalline face (110). It was established that distinct structure in the SE spectrum appears only after electrochemical polishing of the specimen surface. It is related to the appearance of ''far'' order in the monocrystal emission layer on initially disturbed tungsten surface during such treatment. Disturbance of tungsten monocrystal surface structure on its oxidation in O 2 atmosphere results in the appearance of the cascade maximum and disappearance of distinct peculiarities in the SE spectrum

  1. Structure Identification in High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopic Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Jacob Schack; Kling, Jens; Dahl, Anders Bjorholm

    2014-01-01

    A connection between microscopic structure and macroscopic properties is expected for almost all material systems. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy is a technique offering insight into the atomic structure, but the analysis of large image series can be time consuming. The present ...

  2. Electronic and chemical properties of graphene-based structures:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vanin, Marco

    In the present thesis several aspects of graphene-based structures have been investigated using density functional theory calculations to solve the electronic structure problem. A review of the implementation of a localized basis-set within the projector augmented wave method - the way of describ...... are attractive candidates although issues regarding the poisoning of the active site remain to be addressed....

  3. Electronic structure of palladium and its relation to uv spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, N.E.

    1976-01-01

    The electronic-energy-band structure of palladium has been calculated by means of the relativistic augmented-plane-wave method covering energies up to 30 eV above the Fermi level. The optical interband transitions producing structure in the dielectric function up to photon energies of 25 eV have ...

  4. The electron irradiation effects in different structures of diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Quanfen; Wang Jiaxu

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the different electron irradiation effects in different structures of diodes and the different results produced by different irradiation ways. From this work, we can know how to choose proper manufacture arts and comprehensive factors according to the structures of diodes and the irradiation conditions

  5. Electron vortex magnetic holes: A nonlinear coherent plasma structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haynes, Christopher T., E-mail: c.t.haynes@qmul.ac.uk; Burgess, David; Sundberg, Torbjorn [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Camporeale, Enrico [Multiscale Dynamics, Centrum Wiskunde and Informatica (CWI), Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-01-15

    We report the properties of a novel type of sub-proton scale magnetic hole found in two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying turbulence with a guide field. The simulations were performed with a realistic value for ion to electron mass ratio. These structures, electron vortex magnetic holes (EVMHs), have circular cross-section. The magnetic field depression is associated with a diamagnetic azimuthal current provided by a population of trapped electrons in petal-like orbits. The trapped electron population provides a mean azimuthal velocity and since trapping preferentially selects high pitch angles, a perpendicular temperature anisotropy. The structures arise out of initial perturbations in the course of the turbulent evolution of the plasma, and are stable over at least 100 electron gyroperiods. We have verified the model for the EVMH by carrying out test particle and PIC simulations of isolated structures in a uniform plasma. It is found that (quasi-)stable structures can be formed provided that there is some initial perpendicular temperature anisotropy at the structure location. The properties of these structures (scale size, trapped population, etc.) are able to explain the observed properties of magnetic holes in the terrestrial plasma sheet. EVMHs may also contribute to turbulence properties, such as intermittency, at short scale lengths in other astrophysical plasmas.

  6. Chemical modulation of electronic structure at the excited state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F.; Song, C.; Gu, Y. D.; Saleem, M. S.; Pan, F.

    2017-12-01

    Spin-polarized electronic structures are the cornerstone of spintronics, and have thus attracted a significant amount of interest; in particular, researchers are looking into how to modulate the electronic structure to enable multifunctional spintronics applications, especially in half-metallic systems. However, the control of the spin polarization has only been predicted in limited two-dimensional systems with spin-polarized Dirac structures and is difficult to achieve experimentally. Here, we report the modulation of the electronic structure in the light-induced excited state in a typical half-metal, L a1 /2S r1 /2Mn O3 -δ . According to the spin-transport measurements, there appears a light-induced increase in magnetoresistance due to the enhanced spin scattering, which is closely associated with the excited spin polarization. Strikingly, the light-induced variation can be enhanced via alcohol processing and reduced by oxygen annealing. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements show that in the chemical process, a redox reaction occurs with a change in the valence of Mn. Furthermore, first-principles calculations reveal that the change in the valence of Mn alters the electronic structure and consequently modulates the spin polarization in the excited state. Our findings thus report a chemically tunable electronic structure, demonstrating interesting physics and the potential for multifunctional applications and ultrafast spintronics.

  7. Electric field dependence of the electron mobility in bulk wurtzite ZnO

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Electric field dependence of the electron mobility in bulk wurtzite ZnO. K ALFARAMAWI ... tion to ultraviolet light emitters, gas sensors, surface acoustic wave devices and ..... Dorkel J M and Leturcq P H 1981 Solid-State Electron. 24 8211.

  8. Orbital approach to the electronic structure of solids

    CERN Document Server

    Canadell, Enric; Iung, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    This book provides an intuitive yet sound understanding of how structure and properties of solids may be related. The natural link is provided by the band theory approach to the electronic structure of solids. The chemically insightful concept of orbital interaction and the essential machinery of band theory are used throughout the book to build links between the crystal and electronic structure of periodic systems. In such a way, it is shown how important tools for understandingproperties of solids like the density of states, the Fermi surface etc. can be qualitatively sketched and used to ei

  9. Design Considerations for Optimized Lateral Spring Structures for Wearable Electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Aftab M.

    2016-03-07

    The market for wearable electronics has been gaining momentum in the recent years. For completely electronic wearable textiles with integrated sensors, actuators, computing units and communication circuitry, it is important that there is significant stretchability. This stretchability can be obtained by introducing periodic stretchable structures between the electronic circuits. In this work, we derive the equations and constraints governing the stretchability in horseshoe lateral spring structures. We have derived the optimum design and the parameters therein, to help develop the best spring structures for a given stretchability. We have also developed a figure of merit, called area efficiency of stretchability, to compare all twodimensional stretchable systems. Finally, we experimentally verify the validity of our equations by fabricating a metal/polymer bilayer thin film based stretchable horseshoe lateral spring structures. We obtain a stretchability of 1.875 which is comparable to the theoretical maxima of 2.01 for the given parameters.

  10. Design Considerations for Optimized Lateral Spring Structures for Wearable Electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Aftab M.; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    The market for wearable electronics has been gaining momentum in the recent years. For completely electronic wearable textiles with integrated sensors, actuators, computing units and communication circuitry, it is important that there is significant stretchability. This stretchability can be obtained by introducing periodic stretchable structures between the electronic circuits. In this work, we derive the equations and constraints governing the stretchability in horseshoe lateral spring structures. We have derived the optimum design and the parameters therein, to help develop the best spring structures for a given stretchability. We have also developed a figure of merit, called area efficiency of stretchability, to compare all twodimensional stretchable systems. Finally, we experimentally verify the validity of our equations by fabricating a metal/polymer bilayer thin film based stretchable horseshoe lateral spring structures. We obtain a stretchability of 1.875 which is comparable to the theoretical maxima of 2.01 for the given parameters.

  11. Studies on electronic structure of GaN(0001) surface

    CERN Document Server

    Xie Chang Kun; Xu Fa Qiang; Deng Rui; Liu Feng; Yibulaxin, K

    2002-01-01

    An electronic structure investigation on GaN(0001) is reported. The authors employ a full-potential linearized augmented plane-wave (FPLAPW) approach to calculate the partial density of state, which is in agreement with previous experimental results. The effects of the Ga3d semi-core levels on the electronic structure of GaN are discussed. The valence-electronic structure of the wurtzite GaN(0001) surface is investigated using synchrotron radiation excited angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The bulk bands dispersion along GAMMA A direction in the Brillouin zones is measured using normal-emission spectra by changing photon-energy. The band structure derived from authors' experimental data is compared well with the results of authors' FPLAPW calculation. Furthermore, off-normal emission spectra are also measured along the GAMMA K and GAMMA M directions. Two surface states are identified, and their dispersions are characterized

  12. First principles based multiparadigm modeling of electronic structures and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hai

    Electronic structures and dynamics are the key to linking the material composition and structure to functionality and performance. An essential issue in developing semiconductor devices for photovoltaics is to design materials with optimal band gaps and relative positioning of band levels. Approximate DFT methods have been justified to predict band gaps from KS/GKS eigenvalues, but the accuracy is decisively dependent on the choice of XC functionals. We show here for CuInSe2 and CuGaSe2, the parent compounds of the promising CIGS solar cells, conventional LDA and GGA obtain gaps of 0.0-0.01 and 0.02-0.24 eV (versus experimental values of 1.04 and 1.67 eV), while the historically first global hybrid functional, B3PW91, is surprisingly the best, with band gaps of 1.07 and 1.58 eV. Furthermore, we show that for 27 related binary and ternary semiconductors, B3PW91 predicts gaps with a MAD of only 0.09 eV, which is substantially better than all modern hybrid functionals, including B3LYP (MAD of 0.19 eV) and screened hybrid functional HSE06 (MAD of 0.18 eV). The laboratory performance of CIGS solar cells (> 20% efficiency) makes them promising candidate photovoltaic devices. However, there remains little understanding of how defects at the CIGS/CdS interface affect the band offsets and interfacial energies, and hence the performance of manufactured devices. To determine these relationships, we use the B3PW91 hybrid functional of DFT with the AEP method that we validate to provide very accurate descriptions of both band gaps and band offsets. This confirms the weak dependence of band offsets on surface orientation observed experimentally. We predict that the CBO of perfect CuInSe2/CdS interface is large, 0.79 eV, which would dramatically degrade performance. Moreover we show that band gap widening induced by Ga adjusts only the VBO, and we find that Cd impurities do not significantly affect the CBO. Thus we show that Cu vacancies at the interface play the key role in

  13. Temperature dependency of silicon structures for magnetic field gradient sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabsch, Alexander; Rosenberg, Christoph; Stifter, Michael; Keplinger, Franz

    2018-02-01

    This work describes the temperature dependence of two sensors for magnetic field gradient sensors and demonstrates a structure to compensate for the drift of resonance frequency over a wide temperature range. The temperature effect of the sensing element is based on internal stresses induced by the thermal expansion of material, therefore FEM is used to determine the change of the eigenvalues of the sensing structure. The experimental setup utilizes a Helmholtz coil system to generate the magnetic field and to excite the MEMS structure with Lorentz forces. The MEMS structure is placed on a plate heated with resistors and cooled by a Peltier element to control the plate temperature. In the second part, we describe how one can exploit temperature sensitivity for temperature measurements and we show the opportunity to include the temperature effect to increase the sensitivity of single-crystal silicon made flux density gradient sensors.

  14. Electronic structure of the high-temperature oxide superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickett, W.E.

    1989-01-01

    Since the discovery of superconductivity above 30 K by Bednorz and Mueller in the La copper oxide system, the critical temperature has been raised to 90 K in YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 and to 110 and 125 K in Bi-based and Tl-based copper oxides, respectively. In the two years since this Nobel-prize-winning discovery, a large number of electronic structure calculations have been carried out as a first step in understanding the electronic properties of these materials. In this paper these calculations (mostly of the density-functional type) are gathered and reviewed, and their results are compared with the relevant experimental data. The picture that emerges is one in which the important electronic states are dominated by the copper d and oxygen p orbitals, with strong hybridization between them. Photon, electron, and positron spectroscopies provide important information about the electronic states, and comparison with electronic structure calculations indicates that, while many features can be interpreted in terms of existing calculations, self-energy corrections (''correlations'') are important for a more detailed understanding. The antiferromagnetism that occurs in some regions of the phase diagram poses a particularly challenging problem for any detailed theory. The study of structural stability, lattice dynamics, and electron-phonon coupling in the copper oxides is also discussed. Finally, a brief review is given of the attempts so far to identify interaction constants appropriate for a model Hamiltonian treatment of many-body interactions in these materials

  15. Standardized structure of electronic records for information exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galabova, Sevdalina; Trencheva, Tereza; Trenchev, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    In the paper is presented the structure of the electronic record whose form is standardized in ISO 2709:2008. This International Standard describes a generalized structure, a framework designed specially for communications between data processing systems and not for use as a processing format within systems.Basic terms are defined as follows: character, data field, directory, directory map, field, field separator etc. It’s presented the general structure of a record. The application analysis of this structure shows the effective information exchange in the widest range.The purpose of this research is to find out advantages and structure of the information exchange format standardized in ISO 2709:2008. Key words: Standardized structure, electronic records, exchange formats, data field, directory, directory map, indicators, identifiers

  16. The stabilities and electron structures of Al-Mg clusters with 18 and 20 valence electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huihui; Chen, Hongshan

    2017-07-01

    The spherical jellium model predicts that metal clusters having 18 and 20 valence electrons correspond to the magic numbers and will show specific stabilities. We explore in detail the geometric structures, stabilities and electronic structures of Al-Mg clusters containing 18 and 20 valence electrons by using genetic algorithm combined with density functional theories. The stabilities of the clusters are governed by the electronic configurations and Mg/Al ratios. The clusters with lower Mg/Al ratios are more stable. The molecular orbitals accord with the shell structures predicted by the jellium model but the 2S level interweaves with the 1D levels and the 2S and 1D orbitals form a subgroup. The clusters having 20 valence electrons form closed 1S21P61D102S2 shells and show enhanced stability. The Al-Mg clusters with a valence electron count of 18 do not form closed shells because one 1D orbital is unoccupied. The ionization potential and electron affinity are closely related to the electronic configurations; their values are determined by the subgroups the HOMO or LUMO belong to. Supplementary material in the form of one pdf file available from the Journal web page at http://https://doi.org/10.1140/epjd/e2017-80042-9

  17. Exploring the Tilt-Angle Dependence of electron tunneling across Molecular junction of Self-Assembled Alkanethiols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Thomas; Munuera, C.; Ocal, C.

    2009-01-01

    Electronic transport mechanisms in molecular junctions are investigated by a combination of first-principles calculations and current−voltage measurements of several well-characterized structures. We study self-assembled layers of alkanethiols grown on Au(111) and form tunnel junctions...... for the longer molecular chains. Our calculations confirm the observed trends and explain them as a result of two mechanisms, namely, a previously proposed intermolecular tunneling enhancement as well as a hitherto overlooked tilt-dependent molecular gate effect....

  18. Temperature-dependent structure evolution in liquid gallium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, L.H.; Wang, X.D.; Yu, Q.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, F.; Sun, Y.; Cao, Q.P.; Xie, H.L.; Xiao, T.Q.; Zhang, D.X.; Wang, C.Z.; Ho, K.M.

    2017-01-01

    Temperature-dependent atomistic structure evolution of liquid gallium (Ga) has been investigated by using in situ high energy X-ray diffraction experiment and ab initio molecular dynamics simulation. Both experimental and theoretical results reveal the existence of a liquid structural change around 1000 K in liquid Ga. Below and above this temperature the liquid exhibits differences in activation energy for self-diffusion, temperature-dependent heat capacity, coordination numbers, density, viscosity, electric resistivity and thermoelectric power, which are reflected from structural changes of the bond-orientational order parameter Q_6, fraction of covalent dimers, averaged string length and local atomic packing. This finding will trigger more studies on the liquid-to-liquid crossover in metallic melts. - Graphical abstract: Atomistic structure evolution of liquid gallium has been investigated by using in situ high energy X-ray diffraction and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, which both demonstrate the existence of a liquid structural change together with reported density, viscosity, electric resistivity and absolute thermoelectric power data.

  19. Polarization dependence in ELNES: Influence of probe convergence, collector aperture and electron beam incidence angle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Bosse, J.C.; Epicier, T.; Jouffrey, B.

    2006-01-01

    The differential scattering cross section in electron energy loss near edge spectroscopy (ELNES) generally depends on the orientation of the Q wave vector transferred from the incident electron to an atomic core electron. In the case where the excited atom belongs to a threefold, fourfold or sixfold main rotation axis, the dipole cross section depends on the angle of Q with respect to this axis. In this paper, we restrict to this situation called dichroism. Furthermore, if we take into account the relativistic effects due to the high incident electron velocity, this dipole cross section also depends on the angle of Q with respect to the electron beam axis. It is due to these dependences that the shape of measured electron energy loss spectra varies with the electron beam incidence, the collector aperture, the incident beam convergence and the incident electron energy. The existence of a particular beam incidence angle for which the scattering cross section becomes independent of collection and beam convergence semi-angles is clearly underscored. Conversely, it is shown that EELS spectra do not depend on the beam incidence angle for a set of particular values of collection and convergence semi-angles. Particularly, in the case of a parallel incident beam, there is a collection semi-angle (often called magic angle) for which the cross section becomes independent of the beam orientation. This magic angle depends on the incident beam kinetic energy. If the incident electron velocity V is small compared with the light velocity c, this magic angle is about 3.975θ E (θ E is the scattering angle). It decreases to 0 when V approaches c. These results are illustrated in the case of the K boron edge in the boron nitride

  20. Measuring spin-dependent structure functions at CEBAF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, A. [Universitaet Frankfurt (Germany)

    1994-04-01

    The author analyses whether CEBAF with a 10 GeV beam could contribute significantly to the understanding of spin-dependent deep-inelastic scattering as well as semi-inclusive reactions. The main advantage of CEBAF is the much better attainable statistics, its great disadvantage its comparably low energy, which limits the accessible x-range to about 0.15 to 0.7. Within these constraints CEBAF could provide (1) high precision data which would be very valuable to understand the Q{sup 2} dependence of the spin-dependent structure functions g{sub 1}(x) and G{sub 2}(x) and (2) the by far most precise determination of the third moments of g{sub 1}(x) and g{sub 2}(x) the latter of which the author argues to be related to a fundamental property of the nucleon.

  1. Measuring spin-dependent structure functions at CEBAF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, A.

    1994-01-01

    The author analyses whether CEBAF with a 10 GeV beam could contribute significantly to the understanding of spin-dependent deep-inelastic scattering as well as semi-inclusive reactions. The main advantage of CEBAF is the much better attainable statistics, its great disadvantage its comparably low energy, which limits the accessible x-range to about 0.15 to 0.7. Within these constraints CEBAF could provide (1) high precision data which would be very valuable to understand the Q 2 dependence of the spin-dependent structure functions g 1 (x) and G 2 (x) and (2) the by far most precise determination of the third moments of g 1 (x) and g 2 (x) the latter of which the author argues to be related to a fundamental property of the nucleon

  2. Founder takes all: density-dependent processes structure biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Jonathan M; Fraser, Ceridwen I; Hewitt, Godfrey M

    2013-02-01

    Density-dependent processes play a key role in the spatial structuring of biodiversity. Specifically, interrelated demographic processes, such as gene surfing, high-density blocking, and competitive exclusion, can generate striking geographic contrasts in the distributions of genes and species. Here, we propose that well-studied evolutionary and ecological biogeographic patterns of postglacial recolonization, progressive island colonization, microbial sectoring, and even the 'Out of Africa' pattern of human expansion, are fundamentally similar, underpinned by a 'founder takes all' density-dependent principle. Additionally, we hypothesize that older historic constraints of density-dependent processes are seen today in the dramatic biogeographic shifts that occur in response to human-mediated extinction events, whereby surviving lineages rapidly expand their ranges to replace extinct sister taxa. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Electronic structure of epitaxial chalcopyrite surfaces and interfaces for photovoltaics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    electron states was observed, which can be understood as a higher localization of electronic states and lower crystal quality. In addition, a strong rearrangement of the copper partial density of states was shown. The intimate knowledge of the electric structure was then exploited to demonstrate the valence band discontinuity between CuInSe 2 and CuIn 3 Se 5 . The analysis by photoemission yielded a valence band offset of 0.28 eV, again in reasonable agreement with theoretical results. The p-n-junction in chalcopyrite solar cells is situated near the absorber-buffer interface, which is therefore crucial for the device performance. In this thesis, ZnO deposited from metal-organic precursors on epitaxial CuInSe 2 was investigated as cadmium-free buffer material. In the course of contact formation, the interfacial region of the absorber becomes depleted of copper. Additionally, a thin intrinsic ZnSe layer is formed, prior to the growth of ZnO. The derived band alignments show no dependence on the surface orientation of the chalcopyrite substrate and are consistent with theoretical results. The conduction band lineup is favorable for the application in solar cells.

  4. Spin-dependent electron emission from metals in the neutralization of He+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alducin, M.; Roesler, M.; Juaristi, J.I.; Muino, R. Diez; Echenique, P.M.

    2005-01-01

    We calculate the spin-polarization of electrons emitted in the neutralization of He + ions interacting with metals. All stages of the emission process are included: the spin-dependent perturbation induced by the projectile, the excitation of electrons in Auger neutralization processes, the creation of a cascade of secondaries, and the escape of the electrons through the surface potential barrier. The model allows us to explain in quantitative terms the measured spin-polarization of the yield in the interaction of spin-polarized He + ions with paramagnetic surfaces, and to disentangle the role played by each of the involved mechanisms. We show that electron-electron scattering processes at the surface determine the spin-polarization of the total yield. High energy emitted electrons are the ones providing direct information on the He + ion neutralization process and on the electronic properties of the surface

  5. Multicomponent Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory: Proton and Electron Excitation Energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Culpitt, Tanner; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2018-04-05

    The quantum mechanical treatment of both electrons and protons in the calculation of excited state properties is critical for describing nonadiabatic processes such as photoinduced proton-coupled electron transfer. Multicomponent density functional theory enables the consistent quantum mechanical treatment of more than one type of particle and has been implemented previously for studying ground state molecular properties within the nuclear-electronic orbital (NEO) framework, where all electrons and specified protons are treated quantum mechanically. To enable the study of excited state molecular properties, herein the linear response multicomponent time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is derived and implemented within the NEO framework. Initial applications to FHF - and HCN illustrate that NEO-TDDFT provides accurate proton and electron excitation energies within a single calculation. As its computational cost is similar to that of conventional electronic TDDFT, the NEO-TDDFT approach is promising for diverse applications, particularly nonadiabatic proton transfer reactions, which may exhibit mixed electron-proton vibronic excitations.

  6. Electron-Spin Precession in Dependence of the Orientation of the External Magnetic Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, M Idrish

    2009-03-13

    Electron-spin dynamics in semiconductor-based heterostructures has been investigated in oblique magnetic fields. Spins are generated optically by a circularly polarized light, and the dynamics of spins in dependence of the orientation (theta) of the magnetic field are studied. The electron-spin precession frequency, polarization amplitude, and decay rate as a function of theta are obtained and the reasons for their dependences are discussed. From the measured data, the values of the longitudinal and transverse components of the electron g-factor are estimated and are found to be in good agreement with those obtained in earlier investigations. The possible mechanisms responsible for the observed effects are also discussed.

  7. SANDYL, 3-D Time-Dependent and Space-Dependent Gamma Electron Cascade Transport by Monte-Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haggmark, L.G.

    1980-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: SANDYL performs three- dimensional, time and space dependent Monte Carlo transport calculations for photon-electron cascades in complex systems. 2 - Method of solution: The problem geometry is divided into zones of homogeneous atomic composition bounded by sections of planes and quadrics. The material of each zone is a specified element or combination of elements. For a photon history, the trajectory is generated by following the photon from scattering to scattering using the various probability distributions to find distances between collisions, types of collisions, types of secondaries, and their energies and scattering angles. The photon interactions are photoelectric absorption (atomic ionization), coherent scattering, incoherent scattering, and pair production. The secondary photons which are followed include Bremsstrahlung, fluorescence photons, and positron-electron annihilation radiation. The condensed-history Monte Carlo method is used for the electron transport. In a history, the spatial steps taken by an electron are pre-computed and may include the effects of a number of collisions. The corresponding scattering angle and energy loss in the step are found from the multiple scattering distributions of these quantities. Atomic ionization and secondary particles are generated with the step according to the probabilities for their occurrence. Electron energy loss is through inelastic electron-electron collisions, Bremsstrahlung generation, and polarization of the medium (density effect). Included in the loss is the fluctuation due to the variation in the number of energy-loss collisions in a given Monte Carlo step (straggling). Scattering angular distributions are determined from elastic nuclear-collision cross sections corrected for electron-electron interactions. The secondary electrons which are followed included knock-on, pair, Auger (through atomic ionizations), Compton, and photoelectric electrons. 3

  8. Dependence of electron inelastic mean free paths on electron energy and materials at low energy region, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanuma, Shigeo; Powell, C.J.; Penn, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    We have proposed a general formula of electron inelastic mean free path (IMFP) to describe the calculated IMFPs over the 50-2000 eV energy range based on the Inokuti's modified Bethe formula for the inelastic scattering cross section. The IMFPs for 50-2000 eV electrons in 27 elements were calculated using Penn's algorithm. The IMFP dependence on electron energy in the range 50-200 eV varies considerably from material to material. These variations are associated with substantial differences in the electron energy-loss functions amongst the material. We also found that the modified Bethe formula by Inokuti could be fitted to the calculated IMFPs in the range 50-2000 eV within 3% relative error. (author)

  9. Size-dependent structure of silver nanoparticles under high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koski, Kristie Jo [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-12-31

    Silver noble metal nanoparticles that are<10 nm often possess multiply twinned grains allowing them to adopt shapes and atomic structures not observed in bulk materials. The properties exhibited by particles with multiply twinned polycrystalline structures are often far different from those of single-crystalline particles and from the bulk. I will present experimental evidence that silver nanoparticles<10 nm undergo a reversible structural transformation under hydrostatic pressures up to 10 GPa. Results for nanoparticles in the intermediate size range of 5 to 10 nm suggest a reversible linear pressure-dependent rhombohedral distortion which has not been previously observed in bulk silver. I propose a mechanism for this transitiion that considers the bond-length distribution in idealized multiply twinned icosahedral particles. Results for nanoparticles of 3.9 nm suggest a reversible linear pressure-dependent orthorhombic distortion. This distortion is interpreted in the context of idealized decahedral particles. In addition, given these size-dependent measurements of silver nanoparticle compression with pressure, we have constructed a pressure calibration curve. Encapsulating these silver nanoparticles in hollow metal oxide nanospheres then allows us to measure the pressure inside a nanoshell using x-ray diffraction. We demonstrate the measurement of pressure gradients across nanoshells and show that these nanoshells have maximum resolved shear strengths on the order of 500 MPa to IGPa.

  10. Electric field effect on the electronic structure of 2D Y2C electride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Youngtek; Lee, Junsu; Park, Jongho; Kwon, Hyeokshin; Jeon, Insu; Wng Kim, Sung; Kim, Gunn; Park, Seongjun; Hwang, Sung Woo

    2018-07-01

    Electrides are ionic compounds in which electrons confined in the interstitial spaces serve as anions and are attractive owing to their exotic physical and chemical properties in terms of their low work function and efficient charge-transfer characteristics. Depending on the topology of the anionic electrons, the surface electronic structures of electrides can be significantly altered. In particular, the electronic structures of two-dimensional (2D) electride surfaces are of interest because the localized anionic electrons at the interlayer space can be naturally exposed to cleaved surfaces. In this paper, we report the electronic structure of 2D Y2C electride surface using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and first-principles calculations, which reveals that anionic electrons at a cleaved surface are absorbed by the surface and subsequently resurged onto the surface due to an applied electric field. We highlight that the estranged anionic electrons caused by the electric field occupy the slightly shifted crystallographic site compared with a bulk Y2C electride. We also measure the work function of the Y2C single crystal, and it shows a slightly lower value than the calculated one, which appears to be due to the electric field from the STM junction.

  11. Investigation of the redox-dependent modulation of structure and dynamics in human cytochrome c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imai, Mizue [Graduate School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Saio, Tomohide [Graduate School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Kumeta, Hiroyuki [Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0021 (Japan); Uchida, Takeshi [Graduate School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Inagaki, Fuyuhiko [Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0021 (Japan); Ishimori, Koichiro, E-mail: koichiro@sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Graduate School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)

    2016-01-22

    Redox-dependent changes in the structure and dynamics of human cytochrome c (Cyt c) were investigated by solution NMR. We found significant structural changes in several regions, including residues 23–28 (loop 3), which were further corroborated by chemical shift differences between the reduced and oxidized states of Cyt c. These differences are essential for discriminating redox states in Cyt c by cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) during electron transfer reactions. Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion experiments identified that the region around His33 undergoes conformational exchanges on the μs-ms timescale, indicating significant redox-dependent structural changes. Because His33 is not part of the interaction site for CcO, our data suggest that the dynamic properties of the region, which is far from the interaction site for CcO, contribute to conformational changes during electron transfer to CcO. - Highlights: • Solution structure and dynamics analysis for human Cyt c by NMR. • Structural changes responsible for the discrimination of the redox state in Cyt c. • Conformational exchange in the region outside of the interaction site for CcO. • Less flexibility and rigid structure of the interaction site on Cyt c for CcO.

  12. Structural dependence of the galvanomagnetic properties of transition-metal aluminide thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, K W; Jeong, M H; Lee, Y P; Rhee, J Y

    1999-01-01

    The structural dependences of the galvanomagnetic properties of Co-Al and Fe-Al alloy films were investigated in this study. Ordered and disordered alloy films with thickness of 150 nm were prepared by using the flash evaporation technique on the heated and cooled substrates, respectively. The temperature dependence of resistance was measured in the range of 2 approx 300 K range with and without a magnetic field of 0.5 T. The influence of the order-disorder structural transition on the temperature dependence of the resistance is discussed in connection with the results for the magnetic properties and is analyzed in the framework of the partial localization of the electronic states and variable-range hopping conductivity.

  13. Electronic computer prediction of properties of binary refractory transition metal compounds on the base of their simplificated electronic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutolin, S.A.; Kotyukov, V.I.

    1979-01-01

    An attempt is made to obtain calculation equations of macroscopic physico-chemical properties of transition metal refractory compounds (density, melting temperature, Debye characteristic temperature, microhardness, standard formation enthalpy, thermo-emf) using the method of the regression analysis. Apart from the compound composition the argument of the regression equation is the distribution of electron bands of d-transition metals, created by the energy electron distribution in the simplified zone structure of transition metals and approximated by Chebishev polynoms, by the position of Fermi energy on the map of distribution of electron band energy depending upon the value of quasi-impulse, multiple to the first, second and third Brillouin zone for transition metals. The maximum relative error of the regressions obtained as compared with the literary data is 15-20 rel.%

  14. Hysteresis loops of spin-dependent electronic current in a paramagnetic resonant tunnelling diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wójcik, P; Spisak, B J; Wołoszyn, M; Adamowski, J

    2012-01-01

    Nonlinear properties of the spin-dependent electronic transport through a semiconductor resonant tunnelling diode with a paramagnetic quantum well are considered. The spin-dependent Wigner–Poisson model of the electronic transport and the two-current Mott’s formula for the independent spin channels are applied to determine the current–voltage curves of the nanodevice. Two types of the electronic current hysteresis loops are found in the current–voltage characteristics for both the spin components of the electronic current. The physical interpretation of these two types of the electronic current hysteresis loops is given based on the analysis of the spin-dependent electron densities and the potential energy profiles. The differences between the current–voltage characteristics for both the spin components of the electronic current allow us to explore the changes of the spin polarization of the current for different electric fields and determine the influence of the electronic current hysteresis on the spin polarization of the current flowing through the paramagnetic resonant tunnelling diode. (paper)

  15. Shape-dependent electronic properties of blue phosphorene nano-flakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatia, Pradeep; Swaroop, Ram; Kumar, Ashok, E-mail: ashok@cup.ac.in [Center for Physical Sciences, School of Basic and Applied Sciences, Central University of Punjab, Bathinda-151001 (India)

    2016-05-06

    In recent year’s considerable attention has been given to the first principles method for modifying and controlling electronic properties of nano-materials. We performed DFT-based calculations on the electronic properties of zigzag-edged nano-flakes of blue phosphorene with three possible shapes namely rectangular, triangular and hexagonal. We observed that HOMO-LUMO gap of zigzag phosphorene nano-flakes with different shapes is ∼2.9 eV with H-passivations and ∼0.7 – 1.2 eV in pristine cases. Electronic properties of blue phosphorene nano-flakes show the strong dependence on their shape. We observed that distributions of molecular orbitals were strongly affected by the different shapes. Zigzag edged considered nanostructures are non-magnetic and semiconducting in nature. The shape dependent electronic properties may find applications in tunable nano-electronics.

  16. Human enamel structure studied by high resolution electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, S.L.

    1989-01-01

    Human enamel structural features are characterized by high resolution electron microscopy. The human enamel consists of polycrystals with a structure similar to Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2. This article describes the structural features of human enamel crystal at atomic and nanometer level. Besides the structural description, a great number of high resolution images are included. Research into the carious process in human enamel is very important for human beings. This article firstly describes the initiation of caries in enamel crystal at atomic and unit-cell level and secondly describes the further steps of caries with structural and chemical demineralization. The demineralization in fact, is the origin of caries in human enamel. The remineralization of carious areas in human enamel has drawn more and more attention as its potential application is realized. This process has been revealed by high resolution electron microscopy in detail in this article. On the other hand, the radiation effects on the structure of human enamel are also characterized by high resolution electron microscopy. In order to reveal this phenomenon clearly, a great number of electron micrographs have been shown, and a physical mechanism is proposed. 26 references

  17. On electronic structure of polymer-derived amorphous silicon carbide ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kewei; Li, Xuqin; Ma, Baisheng; Wang, Yiguang; Zhang, Ligong; An, Linan

    2014-06-01

    The electronic structure of polymer-derived amorphous silicon carbide ceramics was studied by combining measurements of temperature-dependent conductivity and optical absorption. By comparing the experimental results to theoretical models, electronic structure was constructed for a carbon-rich amorphous silicon carbide, which revealed several unique features, such as deep defect energy level, wide band-tail band, and overlap between the band-tail band and defect level. These unique features were discussed in terms of the microstructure of the material and used to explain the electric behavior.

  18. Study of electronic and structural properties of CaS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirfenderski, M.; Akbarzdeh, H.; Mokhtari, A.

    2003-01-01

    The electronic and structural properties of CaS are calculated using full potential linearized augmented plane wave method within the local density approximation and generalized gradient approximation for the exchange -correlation energy. For both structures, NaCl structure (B1) and CsCl structure (B2), the obtained values for lattice parameters, bulk modulus and its pressure derivative and transition pressure are in reasonable agreement with the experimental values. For electronic properties, the obtained value for band gap is smaller than the experimental value as well as other calculated results based on density functional theory. Engel and Vosko calculated an exchange potential for some atoms within the so-called optimize-potential model and then used the virial relation and constructed a new exchange-correlation functional. We used that functional and obtained reasonable results for band gap. Finally we investigated the possibility for a third phase ( Zinc Blend structure) for this crystal

  19. Ceramic materials on perovskite-type structure for electronic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surowiak, Z.

    2003-01-01

    Ceramic materials exhibiting the perovskite-type structure constitute among others, resource base for many fields of widely understood electronics (i.e., piezoelectronics, accustoelectronics, optoelectronics, computer science, tele- and radioelectronics etc.). Most often they are used for fabrication of different type sensors (detectors), transducers, ferroelectric memories, limiters of the electronic current intensity, etc., and hence they are numbered among so-called intelligent materials. Prototype structure of this group of materials is the structure of the mineral called perovskite (CaTiO 3 ). By means of right choice of the chemical composition of ABO 3 and deforming the regular perovskite structure (m3m) more than 5000 different chemical compounds and solid solutions exhibiting the perovskite-type structure have been fabricated. The concept of perovskite functional ceramics among often things ferroelectric ceramics, pyroelectric ceramics, piezoelectric ceramics, electrostrictive ceramics, posistor ceramics, superconductive ceramics and ferromagnetic ceramics. New possibilities of application of the perovskite-type ceramics are opened by nanotechnology. (author)

  20. New formula for dependence of molecular electronic energy on internuclear distance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebane, T.K.

    1988-01-01

    We formulate an integral virial theorem which connects the change in the molecular electronic energy during finite changes in the size of the nuclear core (in the case of a diatomic molecule, during finite changes of the internuclear distance) with a matrix element of the kinetic electronic energy operator and with an overlap integral between wave functions. Our results can be used to calculate the dependence of the molecular electronic energy on the internuclear distance, as well as to check the quality of, and to improve, the approximate electronic wave functions. The theory is illustrated by the simplest example of the approximate MO LCAO wave function for the hydrogen molecular ion

  1. Electron confinement in thin metal films. Structure, morphology and interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dil, J.H.

    2006-05-15

    This thesis investigates the interplay between reduced dimensionality, electronic structure, and interface effects in ultrathin metal layers (Pb, In, Al) on a variety of substrates (Si, Cu, graphite). These layers can be grown with such a perfection that electron confinement in the direction normal to the film leads to the occurrence of quantum well states in their valence bands. These quantum well states are studied in detail, and their behaviour with film thickness, on different substrates, and other parameters of growth are used here to characterise a variety of physical properties of such nanoscale systems. The sections of the thesis deal with a determination of quantum well state energies for a large data set on different systems, the interplay between film morphology and electronic structure, and the influence of substrate electronic structure on their band shape; finally, new ground is broken by demonstrating electron localization and correlation effects, and the possibility to measure the influence of electron-phonon coupling in bulk bands. (orig.)

  2. Atomic and electronic structure of exfoliated black phosphorus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Ryan J.; Topsakal, Mehmet; Jeong, Jong Seok; Wentzcovitch, Renata M.; Mkhoyan, K. Andre; Low, Tony; Robbins, Matthew C.; Haratipour, Nazila; Koester, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Black phosphorus, a layered two-dimensional crystal with tunable electronic properties and high hole mobility, is quickly emerging as a promising candidate for future electronic and photonic devices. Although theoretical studies using ab initio calculations have tried to predict its atomic and electronic structure, uncertainty in its fundamental properties due to a lack of clear experimental evidence continues to stymie our full understanding and application of this novel material. In this work, aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and ab initio calculations are used to study the crystal structure of few-layer black phosphorus. Directly interpretable annular dark-field images provide a three-dimensional atomic-resolution view of this layered material in which its stacking order and all three lattice parameters can be unambiguously identified. In addition, electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) is used to measure the conduction band density of states of black phosphorus, which agrees well with the results of density functional theory calculations performed for the experimentally determined crystal. Furthermore, experimental EELS measurements of interband transitions and surface plasmon excitations are also consistent with simulated results. Finally, the effects of oxidation on both the atomic and electronic structure of black phosphorus are analyzed to explain observed device degradation. The transformation of black phosphorus into amorphous PO 3 or H 3 PO 3 during oxidation may ultimately be responsible for the degradation of devices exposed to atmosphere over time

  3. Atomic and electronic structure of exfoliated black phosphorus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Ryan J.; Topsakal, Mehmet; Jeong, Jong Seok; Wentzcovitch, Renata M.; Mkhoyan, K. Andre, E-mail: mkhoyan@umn.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Low, Tony; Robbins, Matthew C.; Haratipour, Nazila; Koester, Steven J. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Black phosphorus, a layered two-dimensional crystal with tunable electronic properties and high hole mobility, is quickly emerging as a promising candidate for future electronic and photonic devices. Although theoretical studies using ab initio calculations have tried to predict its atomic and electronic structure, uncertainty in its fundamental properties due to a lack of clear experimental evidence continues to stymie our full understanding and application of this novel material. In this work, aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and ab initio calculations are used to study the crystal structure of few-layer black phosphorus. Directly interpretable annular dark-field images provide a three-dimensional atomic-resolution view of this layered material in which its stacking order and all three lattice parameters can be unambiguously identified. In addition, electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) is used to measure the conduction band density of states of black phosphorus, which agrees well with the results of density functional theory calculations performed for the experimentally determined crystal. Furthermore, experimental EELS measurements of interband transitions and surface plasmon excitations are also consistent with simulated results. Finally, the effects of oxidation on both the atomic and electronic structure of black phosphorus are analyzed to explain observed device degradation. The transformation of black phosphorus into amorphous PO{sub 3} or H{sub 3}PO{sub 3} during oxidation may ultimately be responsible for the degradation of devices exposed to atmosphere over time.

  4. Momentum space analysis of the electronic structure of biphenyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morini, F; Shojaei, S H Reza; Deleuze, M S

    2014-01-01

    The results of a yet to come experimental study of the electronic structure of biphenyl employing electron momentum spectroscopy (EMS) have been theoretically predicted, taking into account complications such as structural mobility in the electronic ground state, electronic correlation and relaxation, and a dispersion of the inner-valence ionization intensity to electronically excited (shake-up) configurations in the cation. The main purpose of this work is to explore the current limits of EMS in unraveling details of the molecular structure, namely the torsional characteristics of large and floppy aromatic molecules. At the benchmark ADC(3)/cc-pVDZ level of theory, the influence of the twist angle between the two phenyl rings is found to be extremely limited, except for individual orbital momentum profiles corresponding to ionization lines at electron binding energies ranging from 15 to 18 eV. When taking band overlap effects into account, this influence is deceptively far too limited to allow for any experimental determination of the torsional characteristics of biphenyl by means of EMS. (paper)

  5. Quasiparticle GW calculations within the GPAW electronic structure code

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hüser, Falco

    The GPAW electronic structure code, developed at the physics department at the Technical University of Denmark, is used today by researchers all over the world to model the structural, electronic, optical and chemical properties of materials. They address fundamental questions in material science...... and use their knowledge to design new materials for a vast range of applications. Todays hottest topics are, amongst many others, better materials for energy conversion (e.g. solar cells), energy storage (batteries) and catalysts for the removal of environmentally dangerous exhausts. The mentioned...... properties are to a large extent governed by the physics on the atomic scale, that means pure quantum mechanics. For many decades, Density Functional Theory has been the computational method of choice, since it provides a fairly easy and yet accurate way of determining electronic structures and related...

  6. A multipole acceptability criterion for electronic structure theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwegler, E.; Challacombe, M.; Head-Gordon, M.

    1998-01-01

    Accurate and computationally inexpensive estimates of multipole expansion errors are crucial to the success of several fast electronic structure methods. In this paper, a new nonempirical multipole acceptability criterion is described that is directly applicable to expansions of high order moments. Several model calculations typical of electronic structure theory are presented to demonstrate its performance. For cases involving small translation distances, accuracies are increased by up to five orders of magnitude over an empirical criterion. The new multipole acceptance criterion is on average within an order of magnitude of the exact expansion error. Use of the multipole acceptance criterion in hierarchical multipole based methods as well as in traditional electronic structure methods is discussed. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  7. Structural and electronic properties of L-amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulip, P. R.; Clark, S. J.

    2005-05-01

    The structural and electronic properties of four L-amino acids alanine, leucine, isoleucine, and valine have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT) and the generalized gradient approximation. Within the crystals, it is found that the constituent molecules adopt zwitterionic configurations, in agreement with experimental work. Lattice constants are found to be in good agreement with experimentally determined values, although certain discrepancies do exist due to the description of van der Waals interactions. We find that these materials possess wide DFT band gaps in the region of 5 eV, with electrons highly localized to the constituent molecules. It is found that the main mechanisms behind crystal formation are dipolar interactions and hydrogen bonding of a primarily electrostatic character, in agreement with current biochemical understanding of these systems. The electronic structure suggests that the amine and carboxy functional groups are dominant in determining band structure.

  8. Electron transfer reactions in structural units of copper proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faraggi, M.

    1975-01-01

    In previous pulse radiolysis studies it was suggested that the reduction of the Cu(II) ions in copper proteins by the hydrated electron is a multi-step electron migration process. The technique has been extended to investigate the reduction of some structural units of these proteins. These studies include: the reaction of the hydrated electron with peptides, the reaction of the disulphide bridge with formate radical ion and radicals produced by the reduction of peptides, and the reaction of Cu(II)-peptide complex with esub(aq)sup(-) and CO 2 - . Using these results the reduction mechanism of copper and other proteins will be discussed. (author)

  9. Electronic structure of deep impurity centers in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oosten, A.B. van.

    1989-01-01

    This thesis reports an experimental study of deep level impurity centers in silicon, with much attention for theoretical interpretation of the data. A detailed picture of the electronic structure of several centers was obtained by magnetic resonance techniques, such as electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and field scanned ENDOR (FSE). The thesis consists of two parts. The first part deals with chalcogen (sulfur, selenium and tellurium) related impurities, which are mostly double donors. The second part is about late transition metal (nickel, palladium and platinum) impurities, which are single (Pd,Pt) or double (Ni) acceptor centers. (author). 155 refs.; 51 figs.; 23 tabs

  10. Temperature dependent transport of two dimensional electrons in the integral quantum Hall regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wi, H.P.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the temperature dependent electronic transport properties of a two dimensional electron gas subject to background potential fluctuations and a perpendicular magnetic field. The author carried out an extensive temperature dependent study of the transport coefficients, in the region of an integral quantum plateau, in an In/sub x/Ga/sub 1-x/As/InP heterostructure for 4.2K 10 cm -2 meV -1 ) even at the middle between two Landau levels, which is unexpected from model calculations based on short ranged randomness. In addition, the different T dependent behavior of rho/sub xx/ between the states in the tails and those near the center of a Landau level, indicates the existence of different electron states in a Landau level. Additionally, the author reports T-dependent transport measurements in the transition region between two quantum plateaus in several different materials

  11. Significance tests for functional data with complex dependence structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staicu, Ana-Maria; Lahiri, Soumen N; Carroll, Raymond J

    2015-01-01

    We propose an L 2 -norm based global testing procedure for the null hypothesis that multiple group mean functions are equal, for functional data with complex dependence structure. Specifically, we consider the setting of functional data with a multilevel structure of the form groups-clusters or subjects-units, where the unit-level profiles are spatially correlated within the cluster, and the cluster-level data are independent. Orthogonal series expansions are used to approximate the group mean functions and the test statistic is estimated using the basis coefficients. The asymptotic null distribution of the test statistic is developed, under mild regularity conditions. To our knowledge this is the first work that studies hypothesis testing, when data have such complex multilevel functional and spatial structure. Two small-sample alternatives, including a novel block bootstrap for functional data, are proposed, and their performance is examined in simulation studies. The paper concludes with an illustration of a motivating experiment.

  12. Significance tests for functional data with complex dependence structure

    KAUST Repository

    Staicu, Ana-Maria

    2015-01-01

    We propose an L (2)-norm based global testing procedure for the null hypothesis that multiple group mean functions are equal, for functional data with complex dependence structure. Specifically, we consider the setting of functional data with a multilevel structure of the form groups-clusters or subjects-units, where the unit-level profiles are spatially correlated within the cluster, and the cluster-level data are independent. Orthogonal series expansions are used to approximate the group mean functions and the test statistic is estimated using the basis coefficients. The asymptotic null distribution of the test statistic is developed, under mild regularity conditions. To our knowledge this is the first work that studies hypothesis testing, when data have such complex multilevel functional and spatial structure. Two small-sample alternatives, including a novel block bootstrap for functional data, are proposed, and their performance is examined in simulation studies. The paper concludes with an illustration of a motivating experiment.

  13. Photoelectron spectra and electronic structure of some spiroborate complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vovna, V.I.; Tikhonov, S.A.; Lvov, I.B., E-mail: lvov.ib@dvfu.ru; Osmushko, I.S.; Svistunova, I.V.; Shcheka, O.L.

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • The electronic structure of three spiroborate complexes—boron 1,2-dioxyphenylene β-diketonates has been investigated. • UV and X-ray photoelectron spectra have been interpreted. • DFT calculations have been used for interpretation of spectral bands. • The binding energy of nonequivalent carbon and oxygen atoms were measured. • The structure of X-ray photoelectron spectra of the valence electrons is in good agreement with the energies and composition of Kohn–Sham orbitals. - Abstract: The electronic structure of the valence and core levels of three spiroborate complexes – boron 1,2-dioxyphenylene β-diketonates – has been investigated by methods of UV and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and quantum chemical density functional theory. The ionization energy of π- and n-orbitals of the dioxyphenylene fragment and β-diketonate ligand were measured from UV photoelectron spectra. This made it possible to determine the effect of substitution of one or two methyl groups by the phenyl in diketone on the electronic structure of complexes. The binding energy of nonequivalent carbon and oxygen atoms were measured from X-ray photoelectron spectra. The results of calculations of the energy of the valence orbitals of complexes allowed us to refer bands observed in the spectra of the valence electrons to the 2s-type levels of carbon and oxygen.

  14. Frequency-dependent springs in the seismic analysis of structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyapin, A.G.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a two-step algorithm for the seismic analysis of structure resting on the rigid embedded basement. Frequency-domain analysis of SSI is carried out on the second step for a platform model with special 'soil spring' which is complex, frequency-dependent, wave-dependent and non-balanced. Theory is presented to obtain the parameters of the soil spring on the first step of the analysis, performed without structure (only geometry of the basement is used) using well-known SASSI code (Lysmer et al, 1981) or in some other ways. On the second step in the SASSI analysis the soil spring is included in the model as a special finite element. Thus, the first step enables to save the computer resources on structure, the second step-to save resources on soil. Soil spring is the most general form for a SSI linear analysis: conventional springs and dashpots can be easily represented in such a format. Thus, the presented approach enables to study the impact of various factors (such as the embedment depth and soil-structure separation, the off-diagonal stiffness, various formulas for stiffness and damping, etc.) on the soil spring parameters. These parameters can be studied separately from the structure itself. As an example, the study of the horizontal soil mesh size is presented. Lumped soil spring may be used on the second step to obtain structural response spectra. To get stresses complex stiffness may be distributed over the basement slab and embedded walls. The proposed approach may be considered to be the alternative to the impedance method (see ASCE4-98). (authors)

  15. Electronic structure of ordered and disordered Fe sub 3 Pt

    CERN Document Server

    Major, Z; Jarlborg, T; Bruno, E; Ginatempo, B; Staunton, J B; Poulter, J

    2003-01-01

    The electronic structure of invar alloys (i.e. materials in which the near absence of thermal expansion is observed) has been the focus of much study, owing both to the technological applications of these materials and interest in the fundamental mechanism that is responsible for the effect. Here, calculations of the magnetic Compton profiles are presented for ordered and disordered Fe sub 3 Pt alloys. Using linear muffin-tin orbital and KKR methods, the latter incorporating the coherent potential approximation to describe the substitutional disorder, the electronic band structure and measurable quantities such as the Fermi surface topology are presented.

  16. Band structure and unconventional electronic topology of CoSi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pshenay-Severin, D. A.; Ivanov, Y. V.; Burkov, A. A.; Burkov, A. T.

    2018-04-01

    Semimetals with certain crystal symmetries may possess unusual electronic structure topology, distinct from that of the conventional Weyl and Dirac semimetals. Characteristic property of these materials is the existence of band-touching points with multiple (higher than two-fold) degeneracy and nonzero Chern number. CoSi is a representative of this group of materials exhibiting the so-called ‘new fermions’. We report on an ab initio calculation of the electronic structure of CoSi using density functional methods, taking into account the spin-orbit interactions. The linearized \

  17. Comparison of electronic structure between monolayer silicenes on Ag (111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun-Liang, Lin; Ryuichi, Arafune; Maki, Kawai; Noriaki, Takagi

    2015-08-01

    The electronic structures of monolayer silicenes (4 × 4 and ) grown on Ag (111) surface are studied by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. While both phases have similar electronic structures around the Fermi level, significant differences are observed in the higher energy unoccupied states. The DFT calculations show that the contributions of Si 3pz orbitals to the unoccupied states are different because of their different buckled configurations. Project supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) through Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research (Grant Nos. 24241040 and 25110008) and the World Premier International Research Center Initiative (WPI), MEXT, Japan.

  18. Solving complex and disordered surface structures with electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Hove, M.A.

    1987-10-01

    The past of surface structure determination with low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) will be briefly reviewed, setting the stage for a discussion of recent and future developments. The aim of these developments is to solve complex and disordered surface structures. Some efficient solutions to the theoretical and experimental problems will be presented. Since the theoretical problems dominate, the emphasis will be on theoretical approaches to the calculation of the multiple scattering of electrons through complex and disordered surfaces. 49 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab

  19. Dimers of nineteen-electron sandwich compounds: crystal and electronic structures, and comparison of reducing strengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Swagat K; Fonari, Alexandr; Risko, Chad; Yesudas, Kada; Moudgil, Karttikay; Delcamp, Jared H; Timofeeva, Tatiana V; Brédas, Jean-Luc; Marder, Seth R; Barlow, Stephen

    2014-11-17

    The dimers of some Group 8 metal cyclopentadienyl/arene complexes and Group 9 metallocenes can be handled in air, yet are strongly reducing, making them useful n-dopants in organic electronics. In this work, the X-ray molecular structures are shown to resemble those of Group 8 metal cyclopentadienyl/pentadienyl or Group 9 metal cyclopentadienyl/diene model compounds. Compared to those of the model compounds, the DFT HOMOs of the dimers are significantly destabilized by interactions between the metal and the central CC σ-bonding orbital, accounting for the facile oxidation of the dimers. The lengths of these CC bonds (X-ray or DFT) do not correlate with DFT dissociation energies, the latter depending strongly on the monomer stabilities. Ru and Ir monomers are more reducing than their Fe and Rh analogues, but the corresponding dimers also exhibit much higher dissociation energies, so the estimated monomer cation/neutral dimer potentials are, with the exception of that of [RhCp2 ]2 , rather similar (-1.97 to -2.15 V vs. FeCp2 (+/0) in THF). The consequences of the variations in bond strength and redox potentials for the reactivity of the dimers are discussed. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Dimers of nineteen-electron sandwich compounds: Crystal and electronic structures, and comparison of reducing strengths

    KAUST Repository

    Mohapatra, Swagat Kumar

    2014-10-03

    The dimers of some Group 8 metal cyclopentadienyl/ arene complexes and Group 9 metallocenes can be handled in air, yet are strongly reducing, making them useful n-dopants in organic electronics. In this work, the Xray molecular structures are shown to resemble those of Group 8 metal cyclopentadienyl/pentadienyl or Group 9 metal cyclopentadienyl/diene model compounds. Compared to those of the model compounds, the DFT HOMOs of the dimers are significantly destabilized by interactions between the metal and the central C-C σ-bonding orbital, accounting for the facile oxidation of the dimers. The lengths of these C-C bonds (X-ray or DFT) do not correlate with DFT dissociation energies, the latter depending strongly on the monomer stabilities. Ru and Ir monomers are more reducing than their Fe and Rh analogues, but the corresponding dimers also exhibit much higher dissociation energies, so the estimated monomer cation/neutral dimer potentials are, with the exception of that of [RhCp2]2, rather similar (-1.97 to-2.15 V vs. FeCp2 +/0 in THF). The consequences of the variations in bond strength and redox potentials for the reactivity of the dimers are discussed.

  1. Dimers of nineteen-electron sandwich compounds: Crystal and electronic structures, and comparison of reducing strengths

    KAUST Repository

    Mohapatra, Swagat Kumar; Fonari, Alexandr; Risko, Chad; Yesudas, Kada; Moudgil, Karttikay; Delcamp, Jared Heath; Timofeeva, Tatiana V.; Bredas, Jean-Luc; Marder, Seth R.; Barlow, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    The dimers of some Group 8 metal cyclopentadienyl/ arene complexes and Group 9 metallocenes can be handled in air, yet are strongly reducing, making them useful n-dopants in organic electronics. In this work, the Xray molecular structures are shown to resemble those of Group 8 metal cyclopentadienyl/pentadienyl or Group 9 metal cyclopentadienyl/diene model compounds. Compared to those of the model compounds, the DFT HOMOs of the dimers are significantly destabilized by interactions between the metal and the central C-C σ-bonding orbital, accounting for the facile oxidation of the dimers. The lengths of these C-C bonds (X-ray or DFT) do not correlate with DFT dissociation energies, the latter depending strongly on the monomer stabilities. Ru and Ir monomers are more reducing than their Fe and Rh analogues, but the corresponding dimers also exhibit much higher dissociation energies, so the estimated monomer cation/neutral dimer potentials are, with the exception of that of [RhCp2]2, rather similar (-1.97 to-2.15 V vs. FeCp2 +/0 in THF). The consequences of the variations in bond strength and redox potentials for the reactivity of the dimers are discussed.

  2. High-energy electron irradiation of NdFeB permanent magnets: Dependence of radiation damage on the electron energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bizen, Teruhiko; Asano, Yoshihiro; Marechal, Xavier-Marie; Seike, Takamitsu; Aoki, Tsuyoshi; Fukami, Kenji; Hosoda, Naoyasu; Yonehara, Hiroto; Takagi, Tetsuya; Hara, Toru; Tanaka, Takashi; Kitamura, Hideo

    2007-01-01

    High-energy electron-beam bombardment of Nd 2 Fe 14 B-type permanent magnets induces radiation damage characterized by a drop in the magnetic field. Experiments carried out at the SPring-8 booster synchrotron, with 4, 6, and 8 GeV electrons, show that the drop in magnetic field is energy dependent. Electromagnetic shower simulations suggest that most of the radiation damage happens in a small region around the irradiation axis, and that the contribution of neutrons with large scattering angles or with low energies to the magnetic field change is small

  3. High-energy electron irradiation of NdFeB permanent magnets: Dependence of radiation damage on the electron energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizen, Teruhiko [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)]. E-mail: bizen@spring8.or.jp; Asano, Yoshihiro [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Marechal, Xavier-Marie [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Seike, Takamitsu [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Aoki, Tsuyoshi [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Fukami, Kenji [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Hosoda, Naoyasu [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Yonehara, Hiroto [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Takagi, Tetsuya [JASRI SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Hara, Toru [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Tanaka, Takashi [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Kitamura, Hideo [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2007-05-11

    High-energy electron-beam bombardment of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B-type permanent magnets induces radiation damage characterized by a drop in the magnetic field. Experiments carried out at the SPring-8 booster synchrotron, with 4, 6, and 8 GeV electrons, show that the drop in magnetic field is energy dependent. Electromagnetic shower simulations suggest that most of the radiation damage happens in a small region around the irradiation axis, and that the contribution of neutrons with large scattering angles or with low energies to the magnetic field change is small.

  4. Electromagnetic Structure and Electron Acceleration in Shock–Shock Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanotani, Masaru [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-Koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka, 816-8580 (Japan); Matsukiyo, Shuichi; Hada, Tohru [Faculty of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-Koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka, 816-8580 (Japan); Mazelle, Christian X., E-mail: nakanot@esst.kyushu-u.ac.jp [IRAP, Université Paul Sabatier Toulouse III-CNRS, F-31028 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France)

    2017-09-10

    A shock–shock interaction is investigated by using a one-dimensional full particle-in-cell simulation. The simulation reproduces the collision of two symmetrical high Mach number quasi-perpendicular shocks. The basic structure of the shocks and ion dynamics is similar to that obtained by previous hybrid simulations. The new aspects obtained here are as follows. Electrons are already strongly accelerated before the two shocks collide through multiple reflection. The reflected electrons self-generate waves upstream between the two shocks before they collide. The waves far upstream are generated through the right-hand resonant instability with the anomalous Doppler effect. The waves generated near the shock are due to firehose instability and have much larger amplitudes than those due to the resonant instability. The high-energy electrons are efficiently scattered by the waves so that some of them gain large pitch angles. Those electrons can be easily reflected at the shock of the other side. The accelerated electrons form a power-law energy spectrum. Due to the accelerated electrons, the pressure of upstream electrons increases with time. This appears to cause the deceleration of the approaching shock speed. The accelerated electrons having sufficiently large Larmor radii are further accelerated through the similar mechanism working for ions when the two shocks are colliding.

  5. Anomaly in the Kumakhov radiation temperature dependence at axial channeling of electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komarov, F.F.; Telegin, V.I.; Khokonov, M.Kh.

    1983-01-01

    The results of numerical solution of a kinetic equation for distribution function of axially channelled electrons obtained by Belostritsky and Kumakhov at different temperatures of crystals and calculated for the determined electron distributions spectral density of radiation are given. Analysis of the obtained dependence of the number of channelled 5 GeV electrons in tungsten along the <111> axis on depth Z has revealed that 2% of incidence beam electrons have anomalously large depths of dechannelling. Ratio of electrons with large by modulus cross section energies grows at decreasing crystal temperature from 293 to 40 K and, therefore, radiation intensity increases. Two-fold increase of radiation intensity can be attained at axial channelling of 1 GeV electrons in tungsten <111> at the temperatures of the crystal equal to 40 and 293 K and its thickness equal to 220 ..mu..m.

  6. Test of the electronic structure of Fe(100) by absorbed current spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisker, E.; Kirby, R.E.; Garwin, E.L.; King, F.K.

    1984-10-01

    The absorbed electron current for a clean Fe(100) surface as a function of energy rises step-like at the vacuum-energy cutoff with an absorption close to 1. The smooth decrease of absorbed current at higher electron energy due to secondary electron emission is superimposed by a considerable amount of fine structure, the amplitude of which decreases with increasing energy. These features are found in good agreement with the results of a calculation of the elastic part of the electron reflection coefficient. Further, they are compared with the ferromagnetic electronic bulk bandstructure calculated above the vacuum energy. From the comparison with the experimental data, the energy dependence of the real and imaginary parts of the inner potential is determined

  7. Surface electron structure of short-period semiconductor superlattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartos, I.; Czech Academy Science, Prague,; Strasser, T.; Schattke, W.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Semiconductor superlattices represent man-made crystals with unique physical properties. By means of the directed layer-by-layer molecular epitaxy growth their electric properties can be tailored (band structure engineering). Longer translational periodicity in the growth direction is responsible for opening of new electron energy gaps (minigaps) with surface states and resonances localized at superlattice surfaces. Similarly as for the electron structure of the bulk, a procedure enabling to modify the surface electron structure of superlattices is desirable. Short-period superlattice (GaAs) 2 (AlAs) 2 with unreconstructed (100) surface is investigated in detail. Theoretical description in terms of full eigenfunctions of individual components has to be used. The changes of electron surface state energies governed by the termination of a periodic crystalline potential, predicted on simple models, are confirmed for this system. Large surface state shifts are found in the lowest minigap of the superlattice when this is terminated in four different topmost layer configurations. The changes should be observable in angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy as demonstrated in calculations based on the one step model of photoemission. Surface state in the center of the two dimensional Brillouin zone moves from the bottom of the minigap (for the superlattice terminated by two bilayers of GaAs) to its top (for the superlattice terminated by two bilayers of AlAs) where it becomes a resonance. No surface state/resonance is found for a termination with one bilayer of AlAs. The surface state bands behave similarly in the corresponding gaps of the k-resolved section of the electron band structure. The molecular beam epitaxy, which enables to terminate the superlattice growth with atomic layer precision, provides a way of tuning the superlattice surface electron structure by purely geometrical means. The work was supported by the Grant Agency of the Academy of Sciences

  8. Electronic structure and optical properties of AIN under high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zetao; Dang Suihu; Li Chunxia

    2011-01-01

    We have calculated the electronic structure and optical properties of Wurtzite structure AIN under different high pressure with generalized gradient approximation (GGA) in this paper. The total energy, density of state, energy band structure and optical absorption and reflection properties under high pressure are calculated. By comparing the changes of the energy band structure, we obtained AIN phase transition pressure for 16.7 GPa, which is a direct band structure transforming to an indirect band structure. Meanwhile, according to the density of states distribution and energy band structure, we analyzed the optical properties of AIN under high-pressure, the results showed that the absorption spectra moved from low-energy to high-energy. (authors)

  9. Transport properties of electrons in fractal magnetic-barrier structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lifeng; Fang, Chao; Guo, Yong

    2010-09-01

    Quantum transport properties in fractal magnetically modulated structures are studied by the transfer-matrix method. It is found that the transmission spectra depend sensitively not only on the incident energy and the direction of the wave vector but also on the stage of the fractal structures. Resonance splitting, enhancement, and position shift of the resonance peaks under different magnetic modulation are observed at four different fractal stages, and the relationship between the conductance in the fractal structure and magnetic modulation is also revealed. The results indicate the spectra of the transmission can be considered as fingerprints for the fractal structures, which show the subtle correspondence between magnetic structures and transport behaviors.

  10. Review of time-dependent fatigue behaviour of structural alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenstreet, W.L.

    1978-01-01

    A review and assessment of time-dependent fatigue was needed to provide an understanding of time-dependent fatigue processes, to define the limits of our present knowledge, and to establish bases for the development of verified design methods for structural components and systems for operation at elevated temperatures. This report reviews the present state of understanding of that phenomena, commonly called 'creep fatigue', and separates it into crack-initiation and crack propagation processes. Criteria for describing material behavior for each of these processes are discussed and described within the extent of present knowledge, which is limited largely to experience with one-dimensional loading. Behaviors of types 304 and 316 stainless steel are emphasized. Much of the treatment of time-dependent failure present here is new and of a developing nature; areas of agreement and areas requiring further resolution are enumerated'. These words are from the abstract of the report on a comprehensive study of time-dependent fatigue. This paper briefly reviews some of the contents and discusses important conclusions reached, especially in terms of current status and needs for additional work. (Auth.)

  11. Electronic structure of disordered alloys, surfaces and interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Turek, Ilja; Kudrnovský, Josef; Šob, Mojmír; Weinberger, Peter

    1997-01-01

    At present, there is an increasing interest in the prediction of properties of classical and new materials such as substitutional alloys, their surfaces, and metallic or semiconductor multilayers. A detailed understanding based on a thus of the utmost importance for fu­ microscopic, parameter-free approach is ture developments in solid state physics and materials science. The interrela­ tion between electronic and structural properties at surfaces plays a key role for a microscopic understanding of phenomena as diverse as catalysis, corrosion, chemisorption and crystal growth. Remarkable progress has been made in the past 10-15 years in the understand­ ing of behavior of ideal crystals and their surfaces by relating their properties to the underlying electronic structure as determined from the first principles. Similar studies of complex systems like imperfect surfaces, interfaces, and mul­ tilayered structures seem to be accessible by now. Conventional band-structure methods, however, are of limited use ...

  12. Electronic structure of nitrides PuN and UN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukoyanov, A. V.; Anisimov, V. I.

    2016-11-01

    The electronic structure of uranium and plutonium nitrides in ambient conditions and under pressure is investigated using the LDA + U + SO band method taking into account the spin-orbit coupling and the strong correlations of 5 f electrons of actinoid ions. The parameters of these interactions for the equilibrium cubic structure are calculated additionally. The application of pressure reduces the magnetic moment in PuN due to predominance of the f 6 configuration and the jj-type coupling. An increase in the occupancy of the 5 f state in UN leads to a decrease in the magnetic moment, which is also detected in the trigonal structure of the UN x β phase (La2O3-type structure). The theoretical results are in good agreement with the available experimental data.

  13. Non-Stationary Dependence Structures for Spatial Extremes

    KAUST Repository

    Huser, Raphaël

    2016-03-03

    Max-stable processes are natural models for spatial extremes because they provide suitable asymptotic approximations to the distribution of maxima of random fields. In the recent past, several parametric families of stationary max-stable models have been developed, and fitted to various types of data. However, a recurrent problem is the modeling of non-stationarity. In this paper, we develop non-stationary max-stable dependence structures in which covariates can be easily incorporated. Inference is performed using pairwise likelihoods, and its performance is assessed by an extensive simulation study based on a non-stationary locally isotropic extremal t model. Evidence that unknown parameters are well estimated is provided, and estimation of spatial return level curves is discussed. The methodology is demonstrated with temperature maxima recorded over a complex topography. Models are shown to satisfactorily capture extremal dependence.

  14. Quantitative vs. qualitative approaches to the electronic structure of solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliva, J.M.; Llunell, Miquel; Alemany, Pere; Canadell, Enric

    2003-01-01

    The usefulness of qualitative and quantitative theoretical approaches in solid state chemistry is discussed by considering three different types of problems: (a) the distribution of boron and carbon atoms in MB 2 C 2 (M=Ca, La, etc.) phases, (b) the band structure and Fermi surface of low-dimensional transition metal oxides and bronzes, and (c) the correlation between the crystal and electronic structure of the ternary nitride Ca 2 AuN

  15. Electronic structure of binuclear acetylacetonates of boron difluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, Sergey A.; Svistunova, Irina V.; Samoilov, Ilya S.; Osmushko, Ivan S.; Borisenko, Aleksandr V.; Vovna, Vitaliy I.

    2018-05-01

    The electronic structure of boron difluoride acetylacetonate and its three derivatives was studied using photoelectron and absorption spectroscopy, as well as the density functional theory. In a series of binuclear acetylacetonate complexes containing bridge-moieties of sulfur and selenium atoms, it was found an appreciable mixing of the π3-orbital of the chelate cycle with atomic orbitals S 3p and Se 4p resulting in destabilization of the HOMO levels by 0.4-0.6 eV, in comparison with the monomer. The positively charged fragment C(CH3)-CX-C(CH3) causes the field effect, which leads to stabilization of the LUMO levels by 0.3-0.4 eV and C 1s-levels by 0.5-1.2 eV. An analysis of the research results on the electronic structure made it possible to determine the effect of substituents in the γ position on the absorption spectra, which is mainly determined by the electron density transfer from the chalcogen atoms to the chelate cycles. It is shown that the calculated energy intervals between electron levels correlate well with the structure of the photoelectron spectra of valence and core electrons.

  16. The electronic structure of C60 and its derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichtenberger, D.L.; Rempe, M.E.; Gruhn, N.E.; Wright, L.L.

    1993-01-01

    Molecular orbital calculations are used to examine the electronic structure of C 60 and its interaction with metals and some other atoms. The bonding capabilities of the η 5 , η 6 , and the two possible η 2 sites of C 60 to metals are probed with Fenske-Hall calculations of a silver cation bound in those positions. These results are compared to the bonding capabilities of cyclopentadiene, benzene and ethylene, respectively. It is found that the silver cation bonding to C 60 is favored at the η 2 that is shared between five-membered rings, but that the silver cation bonds more favorably to ethylene than to the η 2 site of C 60 . The electronic structure of the known platinum compound, C 60 Pt(phosphine) 2 , where the bonding is also to this η 2 site, is investigated and compared to the electronic structure of the corresponding ethylene complex. In this more electron-rich metal case, the bonding of the C 60 and ethylene are very similar. A calculation on C 60 OsO 4 (NH 3 ) 2 , where C 60 is bound to two oxygens, shows that the orbital composition correlates with the observed NMR shifts of the carbon atoms. The calculations are used to clarify the interpretations of experimental data obtained from STM, NMR, PES and reactivity. The latest results of these electronic studies will be presented

  17. Effects of interfacial Fe electronic structures on magnetic and electronic transport properties in oxide/NiFe/oxide heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Qianqian; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Jing-Yan; Yang, Meiyin; Li, Xu-Jing; Jiang, Shao-Long; Liu, Yi-Wei; Cao, Yi; Wu, Zheng-Long; Feng, Chun; Ding, Lei; Yu, Guang-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The magnetic and transport properties of oxide/NiFe/oxide films were studied. • The oxide (SiO 2 , MgO and HfO 2 ) has different elemental electronegativity. • Redox reaction at different NiFe/oxide interface is dependent on the oxide layer. • Different interfacial electronic structures shown by XPS influence the properties. - Abstract: We report that the magnetic and electronic transport properties in oxide/NiFe(2 nm)/oxide film (oxide = SiO 2 , MgO or HfO 2 ) are strongly influenced by the electronic structure of NiFe/oxide interface. Magnetic measurements show that there exist magnetic dead layers in the SiO 2 sandwiched film and MgO sandwiched film, whereas there is no magnetic dead layer in the HfO 2 sandwiched film. Furthermore, in the ultrathin SiO 2 sandwiched film no magnetoresistance (MR) is detected, while in the ultrathin MgO sandwiched film and HfO 2 sandwiched film the MR ratios reach 0.35% and 0.88%, respectively. The investigation by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that the distinct interfacial redox reactions, which are dependent on the oxide layers, lead to the variation of magnetic and transport properties in different oxide/NiFe/oxide heterostructures

  18. Nature-Inspired Structural Materials for Flexible Electronic Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yaqing; He, Ke; Chen, Geng; Leow, Wan Ru; Chen, Xiaodong

    2017-10-25

    Exciting advancements have been made in the field of flexible electronic devices in the last two decades and will certainly lead to a revolution in peoples' lives in the future. However, because of the poor sustainability of the active materials in complex stress environments, new requirements have been adopted for the construction of flexible devices. Thus, hierarchical architectures in natural materials, which have developed various environment-adapted structures and materials through natural selection, can serve as guides to solve the limitations of materials and engineering techniques. This review covers the smart designs of structural materials inspired by natural materials and their utility in the construction of flexible devices. First, we summarize structural materials that accommodate mechanical deformations, which is the fundamental requirement for flexible devices to work properly in complex environments. Second, we discuss the functionalities of flexible devices induced by nature-inspired structural materials, including mechanical sensing, energy harvesting, physically interacting, and so on. Finally, we provide a perspective on newly developed structural materials and their potential applications in future flexible devices, as well as frontier strategies for biomimetic functions. These analyses and summaries are valuable for a systematic understanding of structural materials in electronic devices and will serve as inspirations for smart designs in flexible electronics.

  19. Dependent systems reliability estimation by structural reliability approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kostandyan, Erik; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2014-01-01

    Estimation of system reliability by classical system reliability methods generally assumes that the components are statistically independent, thus limiting its applicability in many practical situations. A method is proposed for estimation of the system reliability with dependent components, where...... the leading failure mechanism(s) is described by physics of failure model(s). The proposed method is based on structural reliability techniques and accounts for both statistical and failure effect correlations. It is assumed that failure of any component is due to increasing damage (fatigue phenomena...... identification. Application of the proposed method can be found in many real world systems....

  20. Nonlinear structure formation with the environmentally dependent dilaton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brax, Philippe; Bruck, Carsten van de; Davis, Anne-Christine; Shaw, Douglas J.; Li, Baojiu

    2011-01-01

    We have studied the nonlinear structure formation of the environmentally dependent dilaton model using N-body simulations. We find that the mechanism of suppressing the scalar fifth force in high-density regions works very well. Within the parameter space allowed by the solar-system tests, the dilaton model predicts small deviations of the matter power spectrum and the mass function from their ΛCDM counterparts. The importance of taking full account of the nonlinearity of the model is also emphasized.

  1. Pulse Radiolysis Studies of Temperature Dependent Electron Transfers among Redox Centers in ba(3)-Cytochrome c Oxidase from Thermus thermophilus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Wherland, Scot; Antholine, William E

    2010-01-01

    The functioning of cytochrome c oxidases involves orchestration of long-range electron transfer (ET) events among the four redox active metal centers. We report the temperature dependence of electron transfer from the Cu(A)(r) site to the low-spin heme-(a)b(o) site, i.e., Cu(A)(r) + heme-a(b)(o) ......The functioning of cytochrome c oxidases involves orchestration of long-range electron transfer (ET) events among the four redox active metal centers. We report the temperature dependence of electron transfer from the Cu(A)(r) site to the low-spin heme-(a)b(o) site, i.e., Cu(A)(r) + heme...... in cytochrome ba(3) had no effect on the rate of this reaction whereas the II-Met160Leu Cu(A)-mutation was slower by an amount corresponding to a decreased driving force of ∼0.06 eV. The structures support the presence of a common, electron-conducting "wire" between Cu(A) and heme-a(b). The transfer...

  2. Electronic Structure of GdCuGe Intermetallic Compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukoyanov, A. V.; Knyazev, Yu. V.; Kuz'min, Yu. I.

    2018-04-01

    The electronic structure of GdCuGe intermetallic compound has been studied. Spin-polarized energy spectrum calculations have been performed by the band method with allowance for strong electron correlations in the 4 f-shell of gadolinium ions. Antiferromagnetic ordering of GdCuGe at low temperatures has been obtained in a theoretical calculation, with the value of the effective magnetic moment of gadolinium ions reproduced in fair agreement with experimental data. The electronic density of states has been analyzed. An optical conductivity spectrum has been calculated for GdCuGe; it reveals specific features that are analogous to the ones discovered previously in the GdCuSi compound with a similar hexagonal structure.

  3. First principle calculations of alkali hydride electronic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakovic, N; Radisavljevic, I; Colognesi, D; Ostojic, S; Ivanovic, N

    2007-01-01

    Electronic structure, volume optimization, bulk moduli, elastic constants, and frequencies of the transversal optical vibrations in LiH, NaH, KH, RbH, and CsH are calculated using the full potential augmented plane wave method, extended with local orbitals, and the full potential linearized augmented plane wave method. The obtained results show some common features in the electronic structure of these compounds, but also clear differences, which cannot be explained using simple empirical trends. The differences are particularly prominent in the electronic distributions and interactions in various crystallographic planes. In the light of these findings we have elaborated some selected experimental results and discussed several theoretical approaches frequently used for the description of various alkali hydride properties

  4. Strontium titanate thin film deposition - structural and electronical characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanzig, Florian; Hanzig, Juliane; Stoecker, Hartmut; Mehner, Erik; Abendroth, Barbara; Meyer, Dirk C. [TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Institut fuer Experimentelle Physik (Germany); Franke, Michael [TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Institut fuer Elektronik- und Sensormaterialien (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Strontium titanate is on the one hand a widely-used model oxide for solids which crystallize in perovskite type of structure. On the other hand, with its large band-gap energy and its mixed ionic and electronic conductivity, SrTiO{sub 3} is a promising isolating material in metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structures for resistive switching memory cells. Here, we used physical vapour deposition methods (e. g. electron-beam and sputtering) to produce strontium titanate layers. Sample thicknesses were probed with X-ray reflectometry (XRR) and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). Additionally, layer densities and dielectric functions were quantified with XRR and SE, respectively. Using infrared spectroscopy free electron concentrations were obtained. Phase and element composition analysis was carried out with grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Subsequent temperature treatment of samples lead to crystallization of the initially amorphous strontium titanate.

  5. Electron Heat Flux in Pressure Balance Structures at Ulysses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Yohei; Suess, Steven T.; Sakurai, Takashi; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Pressure balance structures (PBSs) are a common feature in the high-latitude solar wind near solar minimum. Rom previous studies, PBSs are believed to be remnants of coronal plumes and be related to network activity such as magnetic reconnection in the photosphere. We investigated the magnetic structures of the PBSs, applying a minimum variance analysis to Ulysses/Magnetometer data. At 2001 AGU Spring meeting, we reported that PBSs have structures like current sheets or plasmoids, and suggested that they are associated with network activity at the base of polar plumes. In this paper, we have analyzed high-energy electron data at Ulysses/SWOOPS to see whether bi-directional electron flow exists and confirm the conclusions more precisely. As a result, although most events show a typical flux directed away from the Sun, we have obtained evidence that some PBSs show bi-directional electron flux and others show an isotropic distribution of electron pitch angles. The evidence shows that plasmoids are flowing away from the Sun, changing their flow direction dynamically in a way not caused by Alfven waves. From this, we have concluded that PBSs are generated due to network activity at the base of polar plumes and their magnetic structures axe current sheets or plasmoids.

  6. The structure of spinach Photosystem I studied by electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekema, Egbert J.; Wynn, R. Max; Malkin, Richard

    1990-01-01

    The structure of three types of Photosystem I (PS I) complex isolated from spinach chloroplasts was studied by electron microscopy and computer image analysis. Molecular projections (top views and side views) of a native PS I complex (PSI-200), an antenna-depleted PS I complex (PSI-100) and the PS I

  7. Ground-state electronic structure of actinide monocarbides and mononitrides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petit, Leon; Svane, Axel; Szotek, Z.

    2009-01-01

    The self-interaction corrected local spin-density approximation is used to investigate the ground-state valency configuration of the actinide ions in the actinide monocarbides, AC (A=U,Np,Pu,Am,Cm), and the actinide mononitrides, AN. The electronic structure is characterized by a gradually increa...

  8. Effects of thickness on electronic structure of titanium thin films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    using near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) technique at titanium L2,3 edge in total electron yield .... the contribution of titanium L2,3 levels to the absorption co- ... all absorption coefficient of a sample is related to the atomic.

  9. Empirical pseudo-potential studies on electronic structure

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Theoretical investigations of electronic structure of quantum dots is of current interest in nanophase materials. Empirical theories such as effective mass approximation, tight binding methods and empirical pseudo-potential method are capable of explaining the experimentally observed optical properties. We employ the ...

  10. Electronic structure and superconductivity of MgB 2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Results of ab initio electronic structure calculations on the compound, MgB2, using the FPLAPW method employing GGA for the exchange–correlation energy are presented. Total energy minimization enables us to estimate the equilibrium volume, / ratio and the bulk modulus, all of which are in excellent agreement with ...

  11. First principles calculations of structural, electronic and thermal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 37; Issue 5. First principles calculations of structural, electronic and thermal properties of lead chalcogenides PbS, PbSe and PbTe compounds. N Boukhris H Meradji S Amara Korba S Drablia S Ghemid F El Haj Hassan. Volume 37 Issue 5 August 2014 pp 1159-1166 ...

  12. Structural, elastic, electronic and optical properties of bi-alkali ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The structural parameters, elastic constants, electronic and optical properties of the bi-alkali ... and efficient method for the calculation of the ground-state ... Figure 2. Optimization curve (E–V) of the bi-alkali antimonides: (a) Na2KSb, (b) Na2RbSb, (c) Na2CsSb, .... ical shape of the charge distributions in the contour plots.

  13. First-principle calculations of the structural, electronic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First-principle calculations were performed to study the structural, electronic, thermodynamic and thermal properties of ... functional theory (DFT) combined with the quasi-harmonic .... is consistent with Vegard's law which assumes that the lat- tice constant varies .... reflects a charge-transfer effect which is due to the different.

  14. Structural, energetic and electronic properties of intercalated boron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2National Institute for R&D of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, Cluj-Napoca 400 293, Romania. MS received 8 November 2010; revised 28 March 2012. Abstract. The effects of chirality and the intercalation of transitional metal atoms inside single walled BN nano- tubes on structural, energetic and electronic properties ...

  15. Removal of Vesicle Structures from Transmission Electron Microscope Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Katrine Hommelhoff; Sigworth, Fred; Brandt, Sami Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we address the problem of imaging membrane proteins for single-particle cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of the isolated protein structure. More precisely, we propose a method for learning and removing the interfering vesicle signals from the micrograph, prior to reconstruct...

  16. Small round structured viruses (SRSVs) and transmission electron ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    immune-electron microscopy (IEM) from patients' feces. They reported this virus particle as the causative agent of winter vomiting outbreaks in Norwalk (Kapikian et al.,. 1972). This is the remarkable landmark study of non- bacterial gastroenteritis viruses, especially for small round structured viruses (SRSVs). After that, many.

  17. Electronic structure and optical properties of thorium monopnictides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Indian Academy of Sciences. 165. Electronic structure and optical properties of thorium monopnictides. S KUMAR* and S AULUCK†. Physics Department, Institute of Engineering and Technology, M.J.P. Rohilkhand University, Bareilly 243 006,. India. †Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee 247 667, ...

  18. Variational cellular model of the molecular and crystal electronic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, L.G.; Leite, J.R.

    1977-12-01

    A variational version of the cellular method is developed to calculate the electronic structure of molecules and crystals. Due to the simplicity of the secular equation, the method is easy to be implemented. Preliminary calculations on the hydrogen molecular ion suggest that it is also accurate and of fast convergence [pt

  19. CLOPW; a mixed basis set full potential electronic structure method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekker, H.G.; Bekker, Hermie Gerhard

    1997-01-01

    This thesis is about the development of the full potental CLOPW package for electronic structure calculations. Chapter 1 provides the necessary background in the theory of solid state physics. It gives a short overview of the effective one particle model as commonly used in solid state physics. It

  20. The effect of oxygen exposure on pentacene electronic structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollmer, A; Jurchescu, OD; Arfaoui, [No Value; Salzmann, [No Value; Palstra, TTM; Rudolf, P; Niemax, J; Pflaum, J; Rabe, JP; Koch, N; Arfaoui, I.; Salzmann, I.

    We use ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy to investigate the effect of oxygen and air exposure on the electronic structure of pentacene single crystals and thin films. it is found that O-2 and water do not react noticeably with pentacene, whereas singlet oxygen/ozone readily oxidize the organic

  1. Electronic structures and photophysics of d8-d8 complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gray, H. B.; Záliš, Stanislav; Vlček, Antonín

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 345, AUG 2017 (2017), s. 297-317 ISSN 0010-8545 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH13015 Grant - others:COST(XE) CM1405 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : excitation * electronic structures * photophysics Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 13.324, year: 2016

  2. The electronic structure of 4d and 5d silicides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speier, W.; Kumar, L.; Sarma, D.D.; Groot, R.A. de; Fuggle, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    A systematic experimental and theoretical study of the electronic structure of stoichiometric silicides with Nb, Mo, Ta and W is presented. We have employed x-ray photoemission and bremsstrahlung isochromat spectroscopy as experimental techniques and interpreted the measured data by calculation of

  3. Highlighting material structure with transmission electron diffraction correlation coefficient maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Ákos K; Rauch, Edgar F; Lábár, János L

    2016-04-01

    Correlation coefficient maps are constructed by computing the differences between neighboring diffraction patterns collected in a transmission electron microscope in scanning mode. The maps are shown to highlight material structural features like grain boundaries, second phase particles or dislocations. The inclination of the inner crystal interfaces are directly deduced from the resulting contrast. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. First principles calculations of structural, electronic and thermal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    2013-07-28

    Jul 28, 2013 ... The structural, electronic and thermal properties of lead chalcogenides PbS, PbSe and BeTe using .... results for all the systems are presented in table 1, along ... as interatomic bonding, equations of state and phonon spectra.

  5. Electron mean free path from angle-dependent photoelectron spectroscopy of aerosol particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldmann, Maximilian; Miguel-Sánchez, Javier; West, Adam H. C.; Yoder, Bruce L.; Signorell, Ruth, E-mail: rsignorell@ethz.ch [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, ETH Zürich, Vladimir-Prelog-Weg 2, 8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2015-06-14

    We propose angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of aerosol particles as an alternative way to determine the electron mean free path of low energy electrons in solid and liquid materials. The mean free path is obtained from fits of simulated photoemission images to experimental ones over a broad range of different aerosol particle sizes. The principal advantage of the aerosol approach is twofold. First, aerosol photoemission studies can be performed for many different materials, including liquids. Second, the size-dependent anisotropy of the photoelectrons can be exploited in addition to size-dependent changes in their kinetic energy. These finite size effects depend in different ways on the mean free path and thus provide more information on the mean free path than corresponding liquid jet, thin film, or bulk data. The present contribution is a proof of principle employing a simple model for the photoemission of electrons and preliminary experimental data for potassium chloride aerosol particles.

  6. Electronic Structure Evolution across the Peierls Metal-Insulator Transition in a Correlated Ferromagnet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Bhobe

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal compounds often undergo spin-charge-orbital ordering due to strong electron-electron correlations. In contrast, low-dimensional materials can exhibit a Peierls transition arising from low-energy electron-phonon-coupling-induced structural instabilities. We study the electronic structure of the tunnel framework compound K_{2}Cr_{8}O_{16}, which exhibits a temperature-dependent (T-dependent paramagnetic-to-ferromagnetic-metal transition at T_{C}=180  K and transforms into a ferromagnetic insulator below T_{MI}=95  K. We observe clear T-dependent dynamic valence (charge fluctuations from above T_{C} to T_{MI}, which effectively get pinned to an average nominal valence of Cr^{+3.75} (Cr^{4+}∶Cr^{3+} states in a 3∶1 ratio in the ferromagnetic-insulating phase. High-resolution laser photoemission shows a T-dependent BCS-type energy gap, with 2G(0∼3.5(k_{B}T_{MI}∼35  meV. First-principles band-structure calculations, using the experimentally estimated on-site Coulomb energy of U∼4  eV, establish the necessity of strong correlations and finite structural distortions for driving the metal-insulator transition. In spite of the strong correlations, the nonintegral occupancy (2.25 d-electrons/Cr and the half-metallic ferromagnetism in the t_{2g} up-spin band favor a low-energy Peierls metal-insulator transition.

  7. Origin of spin-dependent asymmetries in electron transmission through ultrathin ferromagnetic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gokhale, M.P.; Mills, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    We present theoretical calculations of exchange asymmetries in the transmission of electrons through ultrathin films of ferromagnetic Fe. The results account nicely for the magnitude of the asymmetries observed by Pappas et al. in photoemission studies of Cu covered by an ultrathin film of Fe. We argue that exchange asymmetry in the transmissivity of the Fe film, rather than the spin dependence of the electron mean free path, is responsible for the effects reported by these authors

  8. Shaping inhibition: activity dependent structural plasticity of GABAergic synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen E Flores

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Inhibitory transmission through the neurotransmitter Ɣ-aminobutyric acid (GABA shapes network activity in the mammalian cerebral cortex by filtering synaptic incoming information and dictating the activity of principal cells. The incredibly diverse population of cortical neurons that use GABA as neurotransmitter shows an equally diverse range of mechanisms that regulate changes in the strength of GABAergic synaptic transmission and allow them to dynamically follow and command the activity of neuronal ensembles. Similarly to glutamatergic synaptic transmission, activity-dependent functional changes in inhibitory neurotransmission are accompanied by alterations in GABAergic synapse structure that range from morphological reorganization of postsynaptic density to de novo formation and elimination of inhibitory contacts. Here we review several aspects of structural plasticity of inhibitory synapses, including its induction by different forms of neuronal activity, behavioral and sensory experience and the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways involved. We discuss the functional consequences of GABAergic synapse structural plasticity for information processing and memory formation in view of the heterogenous nature of the structural plasticity phenomena affecting inhibitory synapses impinging on somatic and dendritic compartments of cortical and hippocampal neurons.

  9. Experimental study of parametric dependence of electron-scale turbulence in a spherical tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Y.; Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; Mazzucato, E.; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; LeBlanc, B. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Domier, C. W.; Lee, K. C. [University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Smith, D. R. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Yuh, H. [Nova Photonics, Inc., Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States)

    2012-05-15

    Electron-scale turbulence is predicted to drive anomalous electron thermal transport. However, experimental study of its relation with transport is still in its early stage. On the National Spherical Tokamak Experiment (NSTX), electron-scale density fluctuations are studied with a novel tangential microwave scattering system with high radial resolution of {+-}2 cm. Here, we report a study of parametric dependence of electron-scale turbulence in NSTX H-mode plasmas. The dependence on density gradient is studied through the observation of a large density gradient variation in the core induced by an edge localized mode (ELM) event, where we found the first clear experimental evidence of density gradient stabilization of electron-gyro scale turbulence in a fusion plasma. This observation, coupled with linear gyro-kinetic calculations, leads to the identification of the observed instability as toroidal electron temperature gradient (ETG) modes. It is observed that longer wavelength ETG modes, k{sub Up-Tack }{rho}{sub s} Less-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 10 ({rho}{sub s} is the ion gyroradius at electron temperature and k{sub Up-Tack} is the wavenumber perpendicular to local equilibrium magnetic field), are most stabilized by density gradient, and the stabilization is accompanied by about a factor of two decrease in electron thermal diffusivity. Comparisons with nonlinear ETG gyrokinetic simulations show ETG turbulence may be able to explain the experimental electron heat flux observed before the ELM event. The collisionality dependence of electron-scale turbulence is also studied by systematically varying plasma current and toroidal field, so that electron gyroradius ({rho}{sub e}), electron beta ({beta}{sub e}), and safety factor (q{sub 95}) are kept approximately constant. More than a factor of two change in electron collisionality, {nu}{sub e}{sup *}, was achieved, and we found that the spectral power of electron-scale turbulence appears to increase as {nu}{sub e}{sup *} is

  10. Structural and Electronic Investigations of Complex Intermetallic Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Hyunjin [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    In solid state chemistry, numerous investigations have been attempted to address the relationships between chemical structure and physical properties. Such questions include: (1) How can we understand the driving forces of the atomic arrangements in complex solids that exhibit interesting chemical and physical properties? (2) How do different elements distribute themselves in a solid-state structure? (3) Can we develop a chemical understanding to predict the effects of valence electron concentration on the structures and magnetic ordering of systems by both experimental and theoretical means? Although these issues are relevant to various compound classes, intermetallic compounds are especially interesting and well suited for a joint experimental and theoretical effort. For intermetallic compounds, the questions listed above are difficult to answer since many of the constituent atoms simply do not crystallize in the same manner as in their separate, elemental structures. Also, theoretical studies suggest that the energy differences between various structural alternatives are small. For example, Al and Ga both belong in the same group on the Periodic Table of Elements and share many similar chemical properties. Al crystallizes in the fcc lattice with 4 atoms per unit cell and Ga crystallizes in an orthorhombic unit cell lattice with 8 atoms per unit cell, which are both fairly simple structures (Figure 1). However, when combined with Mn, which itself has a very complex cubic crystal structure with 58 atoms per unit cell, the resulting intermetallic compounds crystallize in a completely different fashion. At the 1:1 stoichiometry, MnAl forms a very simple tetragonal lattice with two atoms per primitive unit cell, while MnGa crystallizes in a complicated rhombohedral unit cell with 26 atoms within the primitive unit cell. The mechanisms influencing the arrangements of atoms in numerous crystal structures have been studied theoretically by calculating electronic

  11. Study of the SEY dependence on the electron beams dose and energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Commisso, M.

    2011-01-01

    During operation, the internal walls of modern particle accelerators are subjected to synchrotron radiation irradiation and/or electron bombardment. Such phenomena do affect surface properties such as the secondary electron yield, (SEY). A low SEY is a key parameter to control and overcome any detrimental effect on the accelerator performance eventually induced by the build-up of an Electron Cloud (E C). In laboratory experiments SEY reduction (called scrubbing) has been studied as a function of dose but the actual kinetic energy dependence has never been considered as an important parameter. For this reason and given the peculiar behavior observed for low-energy electrons, we decided to study this dependence accurately. Here we report results of SEY measurements performed bombarding Cu samples obtained from the Large Hadron Collider (Lhc) with different doses of electron beam with energy in the range 10-500 eV. Our results demonstrate that the potentiality of an electron beam to reduce the SEY does not only depend on its dose, but also on its energy. Furthermore, since E C build-up was predicted and observed also the DAΦNE ring, we report some preliminary measurements on the conditioning of Al samples. An overview of future experiments which we will perform in LNF is then given.

  12. Electronic structures of azafullerene C48N12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brena, Barbara; Luo Yi

    2003-01-01

    Two recently proposed low-energy azafullerene C 48 N 12 isomers have been theoretically characterized using x-ray spectroscopies. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the near-edge absorption fine structure, the x-ray emission spectroscopy, and the ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy for both isomers have been predicted at the gradient-corrected density functional theory level. These spectroscopies together give a comprehensive insight of the electronic structure on the core, valence, and unoccupied orbitals. They have also provided a convincing way for identifying the isomer structures

  13. Energy and integrated dose dependence of MOSFET dosimeter for clinical electron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manigandan, D.; Bharanidharan, G.; Aruna, P.; Ganesan, S.; Tamil Kumar, T.; Rai

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the sensitivity (mV/cGy) and integral dose dependence of a MOSFET detector for different clinical electron beams was studied. Calibrated clinical electron beams (Varian 2100) were used for the exposure. A Markus type parallel plate chamber was used for the absolute dose measurements. In order to study the sensitivity of a MOSFET, the response of the ion chamber and MOSFET for the absorbed dose of 100 cGy was measured. The sensitivity of the MOSFET was then expressed as mV/cGy. Sensitivity was measured for 4-18 MeV electron beams. (author)

  14. Size dependence investigations of hot electron cooling dynamics in metal/adsorbates nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, Christophe; Abid, Jean-Pierre; Girault, Hubert H.

    2005-01-01

    The size dependence of electron-phonon coupling rate has been investigated by femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy for gold nanoparticles (NPs) wrapped in a shell of sulfate with diameter varying from 1.7 to 9.2 nm. Broad-band spectroscopy gives an overview of the complex dynamics of nonequilibrium electrons and permits the choice of an appropriate probe wavelength for studying the electron-phonon coupling dynamics. Ultrafast experiments were performed in the weak perturbation regime (less than one photon in average per nanoparticle), which allows the direct extraction of the hot electron cooling rates in order to compare different NPs sizes under the same conditions. Spectroscopic data reveals a decrease of hot electron energy loss rates with metal/adsorbates nanosystem sizes. Electron-phonon coupling time constants obtained for 9.2 nm NPs are similar to gold bulk materials (∼1 ps) whereas an increase of hot electron cooling time up to 1.9 ps is observed for sizes of 1.7 nm. This is rationalized by the domination of surface effects over size (bulk) effects. The slow hot electron cooling is attributed to the adsorbates-induced long-lived nonthermal regime, which significantly reduces the electron-phonon coupling strength (average rate of phonon emission)

  15. Parameter Dependence of Inward Diffusion on Injected Electrons in Helical Non-Neutral Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakabayashi, H.; Himura, H.; Fukao, M.; Yoshida, Z.

    2003-01-01

    Experimental studies on an electron injection into a helical magnetic field and characteristics of non-neutral plasmas have been performed. It is found that the space potential φs has a weak dependence on the injection angle except for a narrow 'window' region in which φs significantly drops. A calculation shows that because of the electric field Eg of the electron gun (e-gun), the emitted electrons are launched quasi-parallel to the helical magnetic field B, regardless of α. This seems to agree with the observation. The 'window' seen in the data may be attributed to an current-driven instability which might result in the insufficient electron penetration or the degradation of electron confinement in the magnetic surface

  16. Spin dependent transport of hot electrons through ultrathin epitaxial metallic films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heindl, Emanuel

    2010-06-23

    In this work relaxation and transport of hot electrons in thin single crystalline metallic films is investigated by Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy. The electron mean free paths are determined in an energy interval of 1 to 2 eV above the Fermi level. While fcc Au-films appear to be quite transmissive for hot electrons, the scattering lengths are much shorter for the ferromagnetic alloy FeCo revealing, furthermore, a strong spin asymmetry in hot electron transport. Additional information is gained from temperature dependent studies in combination with golden rule approaches in order to disentangle the impact of several relaxation and transport properties. It is found that bcc Fe-films are much less effective in spin filtering than films made of the FeCo-alloy. (orig.)

  17. Electronic structure of graphene on Ni surfaces with different orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pudikov, D.A.; Zhizhin, E.V.; Rybkin, A.G.; Rybkina, A.A.; Zhukov, Y.M.; Vilkov, O. Yu.; Shikin, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    An experimental study of the graphene, synthesized by propylene cracking on Ni surfaces with different orientation: (100) and (111), using angle-resolved photoemission, has been performed. It has been shown that graphene on Ni(111) had a perfect lateral structure due to consistency of their lattices, whereas graphene/Ni(100) consisted of a lot of domains. For both systems electronic structure was quite similar and demonstrated a strong bonding of graphene to the underlying Ni surface. After Au intercalation the electronic structure of graphene in both systems was shifted to the Fermi level and became linear in the vicinity of the K point of the Brillouin zone. - Highlights: • Graphene on Ni(111) is well-ordered, whereas on Ni(100) – multi-domain. • Graphene on Ni(111) and Ni(100) is strongly bonded with substrate. • Intercalation of Au atoms restores the linearity in dispersion and makes graphene quasi-free on both Ni(100) and Ni(111).

  18. Surface morphology and electronic structure of Ni/Ag(100)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hite, D. A.; Kizilkaya, O.; Sprunger, P. T.; Howard, M. M.; Ventrice, C. A. Jr.; Geisler, H.; Zehner, D. M.

    2000-01-01

    The growth morphology and electronic structure of Ni on Ag(100) has been studied with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and synchrotron based angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy. At deposition temperatures at or below 300 K, STM reveals Ni cluster growth on the surface along with some subsurface growth. Upon annealing to 420 K, virtually all Ni segregates into the subsurface region forming embedded nanoclusters. The electronic structure of Ni d bands in the unannealed surface shows dispersion only perpendicular to the surface whereas the annealed surface has Ni d bands that exhibit a three-dimensional-like structure. This is a result of the increased Ni d-Ag sp hybridization bonding and increased coordination of the embedded Ni nanoclusters. (c) 2000 American Vacuum Society

  19. Electronic structure and optical properties of metal doped tetraphenylporphyrins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Esha V.; Roy, Debesh R.

    2018-05-01

    A density functional scrutiny on the structure, electronic and optical properties of metal doped tetraphenylporphyrins MTPP (M=Fe, Co, Ni) is performed. The structural stability of the molecules is evaluated based on the electronic parameters like HOMO-LUMO gap (HLG), chemical hardness (η) and binding energy of the central metal atom to the molecular frame etc. The computed UltraViolet-Visible (UV-Vis) optical absorption spectra for all the compounds are also compared. The molecular structures reported are the lowest energy configurations. The entire calculations are carried out with a widely reliable functional, viz. B3LYP with a popular basis set which includes a scaler relativistic effect, viz. LANL2DZ.

  20. Electronic structure of multi-walled carbon fullerenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doore, Keith; Cook, Matthew; Clausen, Eric; Lukashev, Pavel V; Kidd, Tim E; Stollenwerk, Andrew J

    2017-01-01

    Despite an enormous amount of research on carbon based nanostructures, relatively little is known about the electronic structure of multi-walled carbon fullerenes, also known as carbon onions. In part, this is due to the very high computational expense involved in estimating electronic structure of large molecules. At the same time, experimentally, the exact crystal structure of the carbon onion is usually unknown, and therefore one relies on qualitative arguments only. In this work we present the results of a computational study on a series of multi-walled fullerenes and compare their electronic structures to experimental data. Experimentally, the carbon onions were fabricated using ultrasonic agitation of isopropanol alcohol and deposited onto the surface of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite using a drop cast method. Scanning tunneling microscopy images indicate that the carbon onions produced using this technique are ellipsoidal with dimensions on the order of 10 nm. The majority of differential tunneling spectra acquired on individual carbon onions are similar to that of graphite with the addition of molecular-like peaks, indicating that these particles span the transition between molecules and bulk crystals. A smaller, yet sizable number exhibited a semiconducting gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) levels. These results are compared with the electronic structure of different carbon onion configurations calculated using first-principles. Similar to the experimental results, the majority of these configurations are metallic with a minority behaving as semiconductors. Analysis of the configurations investigated here reveals that each carbon onion exhibiting an energy band gap consisted only of non-metallic fullerene layers, indicating that the interlayer interaction is not significant enough to affect the total density of states in these structures. (paper)

  1. Electronic structure of nitride-based quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkelnkemper, Momme

    2008-11-07

    In the present work the electronic and optical properties of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N/GaN and GaN/AlN QDs are studied by means of eight-band k.p theory. Experimental results are interpreted in detail using the theoretical results. The k.p model for the QD electronicstructure calculations accounts for strain, piezo- and pyroelectric effects, spin-orbit and crystal-field splitting, and is implemented for arbitrarily shaped QDs on a finite differences grid. Few-particle corrections are included using the self-consistent Hartree method. Band parameters for the wurtzite and zinc-blende phases of GaN, AlN, and InN are derived from first-principle G{sub 0}W{sub 0} band-structure calculations. Reliable values are also provided for parameters that have not been determined experimentally yet. The electronic properties of nitride QDs are dominated by the large built-in piezo- and pyroelectric fields, which lead to a pronounced red-shift of excitonic transition energies and extremely long radiative lifetimes in large GaN/AlN QDs. In In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N/GaN QDs these fields induce a pronounced dependence of the radiative excitonic lifetimes on the exact QD shape and composition. It is demonstrated that the resulting variations of the radiative lifetimes in an inhomogeneous QD ensemble are the origin of the multi-exponential luminescence decay frequently observed in time-resolved ensemble measurements on In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N/GaN QDs. A polarization mechanism in nitride QDs based on strain-induced valence-band mixing effects is discovered. Due to the valence-band structure of wurtzite group-III nitrides and the specific strain situation in c-plane QDs, the confined hole states are formed predominantly by the two highest valence bands. In particular, the hole ground state (h{sub 0} {identical_to} h{sub A}) is formed by the A band, and the first excited hole state (h{sub 1} {identical_to} h{sub B}) by the B band. It is shown that the interband transitions involving h{sub A} or h

  2. Electronic and atomic structure at metal-oxide heterointerfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlueter, Christoph Friedrich

    2013-07-01

    The results of a series of investigations on modern oxide materials using hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) combined with the X-ray standing wave (XSW) method are described in this thesis. The combination of hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray standing waves enables the electronic structure to be measured with a spatial resolution in the picometer range. Under suitable preparation conditions, a quasi two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) is formed at the heterointerfaces of strontium titanate (SrTiO{sub 3}) with polar oxides, such as lanthanum aluminate (LaAlO{sub 3}) or lanthanum gallate (LaGaO{sub 3}). Samples were grown at the ESRF and in Naples and surface X-ray diffraction confirmed the excellent epitaxial quality of the films. The XSW-method was used to reconstruct images of the structure of LaAlO{sub 3} layers in real space. These images give evidence of distortions in the LaAlO{sub 3} structure which facilitate the compensation of the potential differences. Furthermore, XSW/HAXPES measurements permit the Ti and Sr,O contributions to the 2DEG close to the Fermi level to be identified unambiguously. The analysis shows that the 3d band crosses the Fermi level and that some density of states is associated with oxygen vacancies. Superlattices of SrTiO{sub 3} with polar calcium cuprate (CaCuO{sub 2}) were investigated by HAXPES. Similar to the case of SrTiO{sub 3}/LaAlO{sub 3}, the polarity of CaCuO{sub 2} should lead to a diverging surface potential. The core level spectra from Ca, Sr, and Ti show that there is a redistribution mechanism for oxygen which compensates the potential differences. When the oxygen concentration is enhanced these superstructures become superconducting (T{sub C} = 40 K). The increased oxidation of the superconducting material is revealed by the additional components in the core level spectra of the metal atoms and in the appearance of a new screening channel in Cu 2p core level spectra, which signals the hole

  3. Electronic and atomic structure at metal-oxide heterointerfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlueter, Christoph Friedrich

    2013-01-01

    The results of a series of investigations on modern oxide materials using hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) combined with the X-ray standing wave (XSW) method are described in this thesis. The combination of hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray standing waves enables the electronic structure to be measured with a spatial resolution in the picometer range. Under suitable preparation conditions, a quasi two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) is formed at the heterointerfaces of strontium titanate (SrTiO 3 ) with polar oxides, such as lanthanum aluminate (LaAlO 3 ) or lanthanum gallate (LaGaO 3 ). Samples were grown at the ESRF and in Naples and surface X-ray diffraction confirmed the excellent epitaxial quality of the films. The XSW-method was used to reconstruct images of the structure of LaAlO 3 layers in real space. These images give evidence of distortions in the LaAlO 3 structure which facilitate the compensation of the potential differences. Furthermore, XSW/HAXPES measurements permit the Ti and Sr,O contributions to the 2DEG close to the Fermi level to be identified unambiguously. The analysis shows that the 3d band crosses the Fermi level and that some density of states is associated with oxygen vacancies. Superlattices of SrTiO 3 with polar calcium cuprate (CaCuO 2 ) were investigated by HAXPES. Similar to the case of SrTiO 3 /LaAlO 3 , the polarity of CaCuO 2 should lead to a diverging surface potential. The core level spectra from Ca, Sr, and Ti show that there is a redistribution mechanism for oxygen which compensates the potential differences. When the oxygen concentration is enhanced these superstructures become superconducting (T C = 40 K). The increased oxidation of the superconducting material is revealed by the additional components in the core level spectra of the metal atoms and in the appearance of a new screening channel in Cu 2p core level spectra, which signals the hole doping of the CaCuO 2 blocks. Magnetoresistive

  4. Characterization of strained semiconductor structures using transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oezdoel, Vasfi Burak

    2011-08-15

    Today's state-of-the-art semiconductor electronic devices utilize the charge transport within very small volumes of the active device regions. The structural, chemical and optical material properties in these small dimensions can critically affect the performance of these devices. The present thesis is focused on the nanometer scale characterization of the strain state in semiconductor structures using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Although high-resolution TEM has shown to provide the required accuracy at the nanometer scale, optimization of imaging conditions is necessary for accurate strain measurements. An alternative HRTEM method based on strain mapping on complex-valued exit face wave functions is developed to reduce the artifacts arising from objective lens aberrations. However, a much larger field of view is crucial for mapping strain in the active regions of complex structures like latest generation metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). To overcome this, a complementary approach based on electron holography is proposed. The technique relies on the reconstruction of the phase shifts in the diffracted electron beams from a focal series of dark-field images using recently developed exit-face wave function reconstruction algorithm. Combining high spatial resolution, better than 1 nm, with a field of view of about 1 {mu}m in each dimension, simultaneous strain measurements on the array of MOSFETs are possible. Owing to the much lower electron doses used in holography experiments when compared to conventional quantitative methods, the proposed approach allows to map compositional distribution in electron beam sensitive materials such as InGaN heterostructures without alteration of the original morphology and chemical composition. Moreover, dark-field holography experiments can be performed on thicker specimens than the ones required for high-resolution TEM, which in turn reduces the thin foil relaxation. (orig.)

  5. Structure determination of modulated structures by powder X-ray diffraction and electron diffraction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zhou, Z.Y.; Palatinus, Lukáš; Sun, J.L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 11 (2016), s. 1351-1362 ISSN 2052-1553 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : electron diffraction * incommensurate structure * powder diffraction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.036, year: 2016

  6. Dependence of electron peak current on hollow cathode dimensions and seed electron energy in a pseudospark discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cetiner, S. O.; Stoltz, P.; Messmer, P.; Cambier, J.-L.

    2008-01-01

    The prebreakdown and breakdown phases of a pseudospark discharge are investigated using the two-dimensional kinetic plasma simulation code OOPIC PRO. Trends in the peak electron current at the anode are presented as function of the hollow cathode dimensions and mean seed injection velocities at the cavity back wall. The plasma generation process by ionizing collisions is examined, showing the effect on supplying the electrons that determine the density of the beam. The mean seed velocities used here are varied between the velocity corresponding to the energy of peak ionization cross section, 15 times this value and no mean velocity (i.e., electrons injected with a temperature of 2.5 eV). The reliance of the discharge characteristics on the penetrating electric field is shown to decrease as the mean seed injection velocity increases because of its ability to generate a surplus plasma independent of the virtual anode. As a result, the peak current increases with the hollow cathode dimensions for the largest average injection velocity, while for the smallest value it increases with the area of penetration of the electric field in the hollow cathode interior. Additionally, for a given geometry an increase in the peak current with the surplus plasma generated is observed. For the largest seed injection velocity used a dependence of the magnitude of the peak current on the ratio of the hole thickness and hollow cathode depth to the hole height is demonstrated. This means similar trends of the peak current are generated when the geometry is resized. Although the present study uses argon only, the variation in the discharge dependencies with the seed injection energy relative to the ionization threshold is expected to apply independently of the gas type. Secondary electrons due to electron and ion impact are shown to be important only for the largest impact areas and discharge development times of the study

  7. Nano-structured thin films : a Lorentz transmission electron microscopy and electron holography study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosson, J.Th.M. de; Raedt, H.A. De; Zhong, ZY; Saka, H; Kim, TH; Holm, EA; Han, YF; Xie, XS

    2005-01-01

    This paper aims at applying advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to functional materials, such as ultra-soft magnetic films for high-frequency inductors, to reveal the structure-property relationship. The ultimate goal is to delineate a more quantitative way to obtain information of the

  8. Electronic structure of a striped nickelate studied by the exact exchange for correlated electrons (EECE) approach

    KAUST Repository

    Schwingenschlö gl, Udo; Schuster, Cosima B.; Fré sard, Raymond

    2009-01-01

    Motivated by a RIXS study of Wakimoto, et al.(Phys. Rev. Lett., 102 (2009) 157001) we use density functional theory to analyze the magnetic order in the nickelate La5/3Sr1/3NiO4 and the details of its crystal and electronic structure. We compare

  9. Slow electron acoustic double layer (SEADL) structures in bi-ion plasma with trapped electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Shaukat Ali; Imtiaz, Nadia

    2018-05-01

    The properties of ion acoustic double layer (IADL) structures in bi-ion plasma with electron trapping are investigated by using the quasi-potential analysis. The κ-distributed trapped electrons number density expression is truncated to some finite order of the electrostatic potential. By utilizing the reductive perturbation method, a modified Schamel equation which describes the evolution of the slow electron acoustic double layer (SEADL) with the modified speed due to the presence of bi-ion species is investigated. The Sagdeev-like potential has been derived which accounts for the effect of the electron trapping and superthermality in a bi-ion plasma. It is found that the superthermality index, the trapping efficiency of electrons, and ion to electron temperature ratio are the inhibiting parameters for the amplitude of the slow electron acoustic double layers (SEADLs). However, the enhanced population of the cold ions is found to play a supportive role for the low frequency DLs in bi-ion plasmas. The illustrations have been presented with the help of the bi-ion plasma parameters in the Earth's ionosphere F-region.

  10. Time-dependent theoretical treatments of the dynamics of electrons and nuclei in molecular systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deumens, E.; Diz, A.; Longo, R.; Oehrn, Y.

    1994-01-01

    An overview is presented of methods for time-dependent treatments of molecules as systems of electrons and nuclei. The theoretical details of these methods are reviewed and contrasted in the light of a recently developed time-dependent method called electron-nuclear dynamics. Electron-nuclear dynamics (END) is a formulation of the complete dynamics of electrons and nuclei of a molecular system that eliminates the necessity of constructing potential-energy surfaces. Because of its general formulation, it encompasses many aspects found in other formulations and can serve as a didactic device for clarifying many of the principles and approximations relevant in time-dependent treatments of molecular systems. The END equations are derived from the time-dependent variational principle applied to a chosen family of efficiently parametrized approximate state vectors. A detailed analysis of the END equations is given for the case of a single-determinantal state for the electrons and a classical treatment of the nuclei. The approach leads to a simple formulation of the fully nonlinear time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory including nuclear dynamics. The nonlinear END equations with the ab initio Coulomb Hamiltonian have been implemented at this level of theory in a computer program, ENDyne, and have been shown feasible for the study of small molecular systems. Implementation of the Austin Model 1 semiempirical Hamiltonian is discussed as a route to large molecular systems. The linearized END equations at this level of theory are shown to lead to the random-phase approximation for the coupled system of electrons and nuclei. The qualitative features of the general nonlinear solution are analyzed using the results of the linearized equations as a first approximation. Some specific applications of END are presented, and the comparison with experiment and other theoretical approaches is discussed

  11. Electronic structure of divacancy-hydrogen complexes in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutinho, J; Torres, V J B; Jones, R; Oeberg, S; Briddon, P R

    2003-01-01

    Divacancy-hydrogen complexes (V 2 H and V 2 H 2 ) in Si are studied by ab initio modelling using large supercells. Here we pay special attention to their electronic structure, showing that these defects produce deep carrier traps. Calculated electrical gap levels indicate that V 2 H 2 is an acceptor, whereas V 2 H is amphoteric, with levels close to those of the well known divacancy. Finally our results are compared with the available data from deep level transient spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance experiments

  12. Structural defects in laser- and electron-beam annealed silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayan, J.

    1979-01-01

    Laser and electron beam pulses provide almost an ideal source of heat by which thin layers of semiconductors can be rapidly melted and solidified with heating and cooling rates exceeding 10 80 C/sec. Microstructural modifications obtained as a function of laser parameters are examined and it is shown that both laser and electron beam pulses can be used to remove displacement damage, dislocations, dislocation loops and precipitates. Annealing of defects underneath the oxide layers in silicon is possible within a narrow energy window. The formation of cellular structure provides a rather clear evidence of melting which leads to segregation and supercooling, and subsequent cell formation

  13. Synthesis, reactivity, and electronic structure of molecular uranium nitrides

    OpenAIRE

    Cleaves, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    The study of metal-ligand multiple bonding offers insight into the electronic structure and bond of metal systems. Until recently, for uranium, such systems were limited to uranyl, and terminal chalcogenide, imide and carbene complexes. In 2012, this was extended to nitrides with the first preparation of a uranium–nitride (U≡N) species isolable under standard conditions, namely [U(TrenTIPS)(N)][Na(12C4)2] (52), which is prepared by the two-electron reduction of sodium azide with a trivalent u...

  14. Electronic structure of superlattices of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.

    2011-11-14

    We study the electronic structure of superlattices consisting of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride slabs, using ab initio density functional theory. We find that the system favors a short C–B bond length at the interface between the two component materials. A sizeable band gap at the Dirac point is opened for superlattices with single graphene layers but not for superlattices with graphene bilayers. The system is promising for applications in electronic devices such as field effect transistors and metal-oxide semiconductors.

  15. Acceptors in cadmium telluride. Identification and electronic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molva, E.

    1983-11-01

    It is shown that electronic properties of CdTe are determined by impurities more than by intrinsic defects like vacancies or interstitials in Cd or Te contrary to classical theories. These results are based on annealing, diffusion, implantation and electron irradiation at 4 K. Centers appearing in treated samples are accurately identified by photoluminescence, cathodoluminescence infra-red absorption, electrical measurements and magneto-optic properties. Acceptors identified are Li, Na, Cu, Ag and Au impurities in Cd and N, P and As in Te. Energy levels of all acceptors and fine structure of excitons are determined [fr

  16. Electronic structure of superlattices of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride

    KAUST Repository

    Kaloni, Thaneshwor P.; Cheng, Yingchun; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2011-01-01

    We study the electronic structure of superlattices consisting of graphene and hexagonal boron nitride slabs, using ab initio density functional theory. We find that the system favors a short C–B bond length at the interface between the two component materials. A sizeable band gap at the Dirac point is opened for superlattices with single graphene layers but not for superlattices with graphene bilayers. The system is promising for applications in electronic devices such as field effect transistors and metal-oxide semiconductors.

  17. Transverse Momentum Dependent Parton Distribution/Fragmentation Functions at an Electron-Ion Collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anselmino, M.; Avakian, H.; Boer, D.; Bradamante, F.; Burkardt, M.; Chen, J.P.; Cisbani, E.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crabb, D.; Dutta, D.; Gamberg, L.; Gao, H.; Hasch, D.; Huang, J.; Huang, M.; Kang, Z.; Keppel, C.; Laskaris, G.; Liang, Z.-T.; Liu, M.X.; Makins, N.; Mckeown, R.D.; Metz, A.; Meziani, Z.-E.; Musch, B.; Peng, J.-C.; Prokudin, A.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Qiu, J.W.; Rossi, P.; Schweitzer, P.; Soffer, J.; Sulkosky, V.; Wang, Y.; Xiao, B.; Ye, Q.; Ye, Q.-J.; Yuan, F.; Zhan, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zheng, W.; Zhou, J.

    2011-01-01

    We present a summary of a recent workshop held at Duke University on Partonic Transverse Momentum in Hadrons: Quark Spin-Orbit Correlations and Quark-Gluon Interactions. The transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs), parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions, and multi-parton correlation functions, were discussed extensively at the Duke workshop. In this paper, we summarize first the theoretical issues concerning the study of partonic structure of hadrons at a future electron-ion collider (EIC) with emphasis on the TMDs. We then present simulation results on experimental studies of TMDs through measurements of single spin asymmetries (SSA) from semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (SIDIS) processes with an EIC, and discuss the requirement of the detector for SIDIS measurements. The dynamics of parton correlations in the nucleon is further explored via a study of SSA in D ((bar D)) production at large transverse momenta with the aim of accessing the unexplored tri-gluon correlation functions. The workshop participants identified the SSA measurements in SIDIS as a golden program to study TMDs in both the sea and valence quark regions and to study the role of gluons, with the Sivers asymmetry measurements as examples. Such measurements will lead to major advancement in our understanding of TMDs in the valence quark region, and more importantly also allow for the investigation of TMDs in the sea quark region along with a study of their evolution.

  18. The energetics and structure of nickel clusters: Size dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleveland, C.L.; Landman, U.

    1991-01-01

    The energetics of nickel clusters over a broad size range are explored within the context of the many-body potentials obtained via the embedded atom method. Unconstrained local minimum energy configurations are found for single crystal clusters consisting of various truncations of the cube or octahedron, with and without (110) faces, as well as some monotwinnings of these. We also examine multitwinned structures such as icosahedra and various truncations of the decahedron, such as those of Ino and Marks. These clusters range in size from 142 to over 5000 atoms. As in most such previous studies, such as those on Lennard-Jones systems, we find that icosahedral clusters are favored for the smallest cluster sizes and that Marks' decahedra are favored for intermediate sizes (all our atomic systems larger than about 2300 atoms). Of course very large clusters will be single crystal face-centered-cubic (fcc) polyhedra: the onset of optimally stable single-crystal nickel clusters is estimated to occur at 17 000 atoms. We find, via comparisons to results obtained via atomistic calculations, that simple macroscopic expressions using accurate surface, strain, and twinning energies can usefully predict energy differences between different structures even for clusters of much smaller size than expected. These expressions can be used to assess the relative energetic merits of various structural motifs and their dependence on cluster size

  19. Electron-Poor Polar Intermetallics: Complex Structures, Novel Clusters, and Intriguing Bonding with Pronounced Electron Delocalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qisheng; Miller, Gordon J

    2018-01-16

    Intermetallic compounds represent an extensive pool of candidates for energy related applications stemming from magnetic, electric, optic, caloric, and catalytic properties. The discovery of novel intermetallic compounds can enhance understanding of the chemical principles that govern structural stability and chemical bonding as well as finding new applications. Valence electron-poor polar intermetallics with valence electron concentrations (VECs) between 2.0 and 3.0 e - /atom show a plethora of unprecedented and fascinating structural motifs and bonding features. Therefore, establishing simple structure-bonding-property relationships is especially challenging for this compound class because commonly accepted valence electron counting rules are inappropriate. During our efforts to find quasicrystals and crystalline approximants by valence electron tuning near 2.0 e - /atom, we observed that compositions close to those of quasicrystals are exceptional sources for unprecedented valence electron-poor polar intermetallics, e.g., Ca 4 Au 10 In 3 containing (Au 10 In 3 ) wavy layers, Li 14.7 Mg 36.8 Cu 21.5 Ga 66 adopting a type IV clathrate framework, and Sc 4 Mg x Cu 15-x Ga 7.5 that is incommensurately modulated. In particular, exploratory syntheses of AAu 3 T (A = Ca, Sr, Ba and T = Ge, Sn) phases led to interesting bonding features for Au, such as columns, layers, and lonsdaleite-type tetrahedral frameworks. Overall, the breadth of Au-rich polar intermetallics originates, in part, from significant relativistics effect on the valence electrons of Au, effects which result in greater 6s/5d orbital mixing, a small effective metallic radius, and an enhanced Mulliken electronegativity, all leading to ultimate enhanced binding with nearly all metals including itself. Two other successful strategies to mine electron-poor polar intermetallics include lithiation and "cation-rich" phases. Along these lines, we have studied lithiated Zn-rich compounds in which structural

  20. Electronic structure and properties of rare earth and actinide intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchmayr, H.R.

    1984-01-01

    There are 188 contributions, experimental and theoretical, a few on rare earth and actinide elements but mostly on rare earth and actinide intermetallic compounds and alloys. The properties dealt with include 1) crystal structure, 2) magnetic properties and magnetic structure, 3) magnetic phase transformations and valence fluctuations, 4) electrical properties and superconductivity and their temperature, pressure and magnetic field dependence. A few papers deal with crystal growth and novel measuring methods. (G.Q.)

  1. Structure and properties of an aluminium alloy welded by electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruzimov, Sh.M.; Palvanov, S.R.; Pogrebnjak, A.D.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In the given work the experimental results on research of influence of electronic beams on structure of an aluminum alloy are submitted. As a basis of samples the alloy Al-Mg-Zn-Cu by the additives Se-0.5 % and Nb-0.15 % is chosen. Samples from a cast aluminum alloy by thickness of 3 mm such as B-96 were welded with an electronic beam in three different modes at radius circle of a root of a welded seam of 5 mm. The welding was carried out by an alloy Amg 63 and Sv-1571 with application electron team welding joint of parts. The basic influence on the given process makes energy - allocation of an electronic beam. For research of phase structure used of X-ray beams (XRD), DRON-2 in copper K α - Cu measurement. For research of structure and morphology of a surface used optical microscope with increase 800-1500 times and electronic microscope with the microanalysis. On figures of optical microscopy the morphology of a seam sharply differs from morphology of an initial part. The microanalysis carried out with a place of a seam, has shown presence of the whole spectrum of elements, such as, Al; Zn; Na; Mg; Cu; and Mn. All measurements carried out in welding zone and in frontier zones that it was possible to carry out the comparative analysis. The element structure of these zones essentially differs in dependence of a condition of welding

  2. Electronic structure and insulating gap in epitaxial VO2 polymorphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinbuhm Lee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Determining the origin of the insulating gap in the monoclinic V O2(M1 is a long-standing issue. The difficulty of this study arises from the simultaneous occurrence of structural and electronic transitions upon thermal cycling. Here, we compare the electronic structure of the M1 phase with that of single crystalline insulating V O2(A and V O2(B thin films to better understand the insulating phase of VO2. As these A and B phases do not undergo a structural transition upon thermal cycling, we comparatively study the origin of the gap opening in the insulating VO2 phases. By x-ray absorption and optical spectroscopy, we find that the shift of unoccupied t2g orbitals away from the Fermi level is a common feature, which plays an important role for the insulating behavior in VO2 polymorphs. The distinct splitting of the half-filled t2g orbital is observed only in the M1 phase, widening the bandgap up to ∼0.6 eV. Our approach of comparing all three insulating VO2 phases provides insight into a better understanding of the electronic structure and the origin of the insulating gap in VO2.

  3. Time-dependent radiolytic yields at room temperature and temperature-dependent absorption spectra of the solvated electrons in polyols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Mingzhang; Mostafavi, M.; Lampre, I.; Muroya, Y.; Katsumura, Y.

    2007-01-01

    The molar extinction coefficients at the absorption maximum of the solvated electron spectrum have been evaluated to be 900, 970, and 1000 mol -1 ·m 2 for 1,2-ethanediol (12ED), 1,2-propanediol (12PD), and 1,3-propanediol (13PD), respectively. These values are two-third or three-fourth of the value usually reported in the published report. Picosecond pulse radiolysis studies have aided in depicting the radiolytic yield of the solvated electron in these solvents as a function of time from picosecond to microsecond. The radiolytic yield in these viscous solvents is found to be strongly different from that of the water solution. The temperature dependent absorption spectra of the solvated electron in 12ED, 12PD, and 13PD have been also investigated. In all the three solvents, the optical spectra shift to the red with increasing temperature. While the shape of the spectra does not change in 13PD, a widening on the blue side of the absorption band is observed in 12ED and 12PD at elevated temperatures. (authors)

  4. Spin-dependent electron many-body effects in GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, P.; Kerachian, Y.; van Driel, H. M.; Smirl, Arthur L.

    2005-12-01

    Time- and polarization-resolved differential transmission measurements employing same and oppositely circularly polarized 150fs optical pulses are used to investigate spin characteristics of conduction band electrons in bulk GaAs at 295K . Electrons and holes with densities in the 2×1016cm-3-1018cm-3 range are generated and probed with pulses whose center wavelength is between 865 and 775nm . The transmissivity results can be explained in terms of the spin sensitivity of both phase-space filling and many-body effects (band-gap renormalization and screening of the Coulomb enhancement factor). For excitation and probing at 865nm , just above the band-gap edge, the transmissivity changes mainly reflect spin-dependent phase-space filling which is dominated by the electron Fermi factors. However, for 775nm probing, the influence of many-body effects on the induced transmission change are comparable with those from reduced phase space filling, exposing the spin dependence of the many-body effects. If one does not take account of these spin-dependent effects one can misinterpret both the magnitude and time evolution of the electron spin polarization. For suitable measurements we find that the electron spin relaxation time is 130ps .

  5. Doping dependence of charge order in electron-doped cuprate superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Yingping; Feng, Shiping

    2017-12-01

    In the recent studies of the unconventional physics in cuprate superconductors, one of the central issues is the interplay between charge order and superconductivity. Here the mechanism of the charge-order formation in the electron-doped cuprate superconductors is investigated based on the t-J model. The experimentally observed momentum dependence of the electron quasiparticle scattering rate is qualitatively reproduced, where the scattering rate is highly anisotropic in momentum space, and is intriguingly related to the charge-order gap. Although the scattering strength appears to be weakest at the hot spots, the scattering in the antinodal region is stronger than that in the nodal region, which leads to the original electron Fermi surface is broken up into the Fermi pockets and their coexistence with the Fermi arcs located around the nodal region. In particular, this electron Fermi surface instability drives the charge-order correlation, with the charge-order wave vector that matches well with the wave vector connecting the hot spots, as the charge-order correlation in the hole-doped counterparts. However, in a striking contrast to the hole-doped case, the charge-order wave vector in the electron-doped side increases in magnitude with the electron doping. The theory also shows the existence of a quantitative link between the single-electron fermiology and the collective response of the electron density.

  6. 2D Spin-Dependent Diffraction of Electrons From Periodical Chains of Nanomagnets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teshome Senbeta

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The scattering of the unpolarized beams of electrons by nanomagnets in the vicinity of some scattering angles leads to complete spin polarized electrons. This result is obtained with the help of the perturbation theory. The dipole-dipole interaction between the magnetic moment of the nanomagnet and the magnetic moment of electron is treated as perturbation. This interaction is not spherically symmetric. Rather it depends on the electron spin variables. It in turn results in spinor character of the scattering amplitudes. Due to the smallness of the magnetic interactions, the scattering length of this process is very small to be proved experimentally. To enhance the relevant scattering lengths, we considered the diffraction of unpolarized beams of electrons by linear chains of nanomagnets. By tuning the distance between the scatterers it is possible to obtain the diffraction maximum of the scattered electrons at scattering angles which corresponds to complete spin polarization of electrons. It is shown that the total differential scattering length is proportional to N2 (N is a number of scatterers. Even small number of nanomagnets in the chain helps to obtain experimentally visible enhancement of spin polarization of the scattered electrons.

  7. Approximate calculation of electronic energy levels of axially symmetric quantum dot and quantum ring by using energy dependent effective mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu-Min, Liu; Zhong-Yuan, Yu; Xiao-Min, Ren

    2009-01-01

    Calculations of electronic structures about the semiconductor quantum dot and the semiconductor quantum ring are presented in this paper. To reduce the calculation costs, for the quantum dot and the quantum ring, their simplified axially symmetric shapes are utilized in our analysis. The energy dependent effective mass is taken into account in solving the Schrödinger equations in the single band effective mass approximation. The calculated results show that the energy dependent effective mass should be considered only for relatively small volume quantum dots or small quantum rings. For large size quantum materials, both the energy dependent effective mass and the parabolic effective mass can give the same results. The energy states and the effective masses of the quantum dot and the quantum ring as a function of geometric parameters are also discussed in detail. (general)

  8. Two-electron Rabi oscillations in real-time time-dependent density-functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habenicht, Bradley F.; Tani, Noriyuki P.; Provorse, Makenzie R.; Isborn, Christine M.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the Rabi oscillations of electrons excited by an applied electric field in several simple molecular systems using time-dependent configuration interaction (TDCI) and real-time time-dependent density-functional theory (RT-TDDFT) dynamics. While the TDCI simulations exhibit the expected single-electron Rabi oscillations at a single resonant electric field frequency, Rabi oscillations in the RT-TDDFT simulations are a two-electron process. The existence of two-electron Rabi oscillations is determined both by full population inversion between field-free molecular orbitals and the behavior of the instantaneous dipole moment during the simulations. Furthermore, the Rabi oscillations in RT-TDDFT are subject to an intensity threshold of the electric field, below which Rabi oscillations do not occur and above which the two-electron Rabi oscillations occur at a broad range of frequencies. It is also shown that at field intensities near the threshold intensity, the field frequency predicted to induce Rabi oscillations by linear response TDDFT only produces detuned Rabi oscillations. Instead, the field frequency that yields the full two-electron population inversion and Rabi oscillation behavior is shown to be the average of single-electron transition frequencies from the ground S 0 state and the doubly-excited S 2 state. The behavior of the two-electron Rabi oscillations is rationalized via two possible models. The first model is a multi-photon process that results from the electric field interacting with the three level system such that three level Rabi oscillations may occur. The second model suggests that the mean-field nature of RT-TDDFT induces paired electron propagation

  9. Electronic structure of germanium selenide investigated using ultra-violet photo-electron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, P.; Lohani, H.; Kundu, A. K.; Patel, R.; Solanki, G. K.; Menon, Krishnakumar S. R.; Sekhar, B. R.

    2015-07-01

    The valence band electronic structure of GeSe single crystals has been investigated using angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The experimentally observed bands from ARPES, match qualitatively with our LDA-based band structure calculations along the Γ-Z, Γ-Y and Γ-T symmetry directions. The valence band maximum occurs nearly midway along the Γ-Z direction, at a binding energy of -0.5 eV, substantiating the indirect band gap of GeSe. Non-dispersive features associated with surface states and indirect transitions have been observed. The difference in hybridization of Se and Ge 4p orbitals leads to the variation of dispersion along the three symmetry directions. The predominance of the Se 4pz orbitals, evidenced from theoretical calculations, may be the cause for highly dispersive bands along the Γ-T direction. Detailed electronic structure analysis reveals the significance of the cation-anion 4p orbitals hybridization in the valence band dispersion of IV-VI semiconductors. This is the first comprehensive report of the electronic structure of a GeSe single crystal using ARPES in conjugation with theoretical band structure analysis.

  10. Electronic structure of germanium selenide investigated using ultra-violet photo-electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, P; Lohani, H; Sekhar, B R; Kundu, A K; Menon, Krishnakumar S R; Patel, R; Solanki, G K

    2015-01-01

    The valence band electronic structure of GeSe single crystals has been investigated using angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The experimentally observed bands from ARPES, match qualitatively with our LDA-based band structure calculations along the Γ–Z, Γ–Y and Γ–T symmetry directions. The valence band maximum occurs nearly midway along the Γ–Z direction, at a binding energy of −0.5 eV, substantiating the indirect band gap of GeSe. Non-dispersive features associated with surface states and indirect transitions have been observed. The difference in hybridization of Se and Ge 4p orbitals leads to the variation of dispersion along the three symmetry directions. The predominance of the Se 4p z orbitals, evidenced from theoretical calculations, may be the cause for highly dispersive bands along the Γ–T direction. Detailed electronic structure analysis reveals the significance of the cation–anion 4p orbitals hybridization in the valence band dispersion of IV–VI semiconductors. This is the first comprehensive report of the electronic structure of a GeSe single crystal using ARPES in conjugation with theoretical band structure analysis. (paper)

  11. Angular Dependence of the Ion-Induced Secondary Electron Emission for He+ and Ga+ Beams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castaldo, V.; Withagen, J.; Hagen, C.; Kruit, P.; Van Veldhoven, E.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, novel ion sources have been designed and developed that have enabled focused ion beam machines to go beyond their use as nano-fabrication tools. Secondary electrons are usually taken to form images, for their yield is high and strongly dependent on the surface characteristics, in

  12. Time-dependent field equations for paraxial relativistic electron beams: Beam Research Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, W.M.; Yu, S.S.; Lee, E.P.

    1987-01-01

    A simplified set of field equations for a paraxial relativistic electron beam is presented. These equations for the beam electrostatic potential phi and pinch potential Phi identical to A/sub z/ - phi retain previously neglected time-dependent terms and for axisymmetric beams reduce exactly to Maxwell's equations

  13. Energy dependence of solar-neutrino--electron scattering as a test of neutral currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwong, W.; Rosen, S.P.

    1992-01-01

    The energy dependence of ν-e scattering of solar neutrinos is investigated in the framework of neutrino oscillations and the nonadiabatic Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein effect. It is shown that, with sufficient data, it will be possible to establish unambiguously whether neutrino oscillations are actually occurring and whether the electron neutrino oscillates into active or inactive (sterile) neutrino flavors

  14. Valence electronic structure of tantalum carbide and nitride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN; ChangZeng

    2007-01-01

    The valence electronic structures of tantalum carbide (TaC) and tantalum nitride (TaN) are studied by using the empirical electronic theory (EET). The results reveal that the bonds of these compounds have covalent, metallic and ionic characters. For a quantitative analysis of the relative strength of these components, their ionicities have been calculated by implanting the results of EET to the PVL model. It has been found that the ionicity of tantalum carbide is smaller than that of tantalum nitride. The EET results also reveal that the covalent electronic number of the strongest bond in the former is larger than that of the latter. All these suggest that the covalent bond of TaC is stronger than that of TaN, which coincides to that deduced from the first-principles method.……

  15. Valence electronic structure of tantalum carbide and nitride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ The valence electronic structures of tantalum carbide (TaC) and tantalum nitride (TaN) are studied by using the empirical electronic theory (EET). The results reveal that the bonds of these compounds have covalent, metallic and ionic characters. For a quantitative analysis of the relative strength of these components, their ionicities have been calculated by implanting the results of EET to the PVL model. It has been found that the ionicity of tantalum carbide is smaller than that of tantalum nitride. The EET results also reveal that the covalent electronic number of the strongest bond in the former is larger than that of the latter. All these suggest that the covalent bond of TaC is stronger than that of TaN, which coincides to that deduced from the first-principles method.

  16. Study of polysilane mainchain electronic structure by picosecond pulse radiolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habara, H.; Saeki, A.; Kunimi, Y.; Seki, S.; Kozawa, T.; Yoshida, Y.; Tagawa, S.

    2000-01-01

    The electronic structure of a charged polysilane molecle is studied. The transient absorption spectroscopy was carried out for charged radicals of poly (methylphenylsilane): PMPS by pico-second and nanosecond pulse radiolysis technique. It was observed that the peak of the transient absorption spectra shifted to longer wavelength region within a few nsec, and an increase was observed in the optical density at 370 nm, which had been already assigned to the radical anions of PMPS. It is ascribed to inter-segment electron transfer (intra-molecular transfer) through polymer chain. The nanosecond pulse radiolysis experiments gave similar kinetic traces in near-UV and IR region. This suggests the presence of an interband level, that is, a polaron level occupied by an excess electron or a hole. (author)

  17. Anomalous electronic structure and magnetoresistance in TaAs2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yongkang; McDonald, R D; Rosa, P F S; Scott, B; Wakeham, N; Ghimire, N J; Bauer, E D; Thompson, J D; Ronning, F

    2016-06-07

    The change in resistance of a material in a magnetic field reflects its electronic state. In metals with weakly- or non-interacting electrons, the resistance typically increases upon the application of a magnetic field. In contrast, negative magnetoresistance may appear under some circumstances, e.g., in metals with anisotropic Fermi surfaces or with spin-disorder scattering and semimetals with Dirac or Weyl electronic structures. Here we show that the non-magnetic semimetal TaAs2 possesses a very large negative magnetoresistance, with an unknown scattering mechanism. Density functional calculations find that TaAs2 is a new topological semimetal [ℤ2 invariant (0;111)] without Dirac dispersion, demonstrating that a negative magnetoresistance in non-magnetic semimetals cannot be attributed uniquely to the Adler-Bell-Jackiw chiral anomaly of bulk Dirac/Weyl fermions.

  18. Two-particle approach to the electronic structure of solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonis, A.

    2007-01-01

    Based on an extension of Hubbard's treatment of the electronic structure of correlated electrons in matter we propose a methodology that incorporates the scattering off the Coulomb interaction through the determination of a two-particle propagator. The Green function equations of motion are then used to obtain single-particle Green functions and related properties such as densities of states. The solutions of the equations of motion in two- and single-particle spaces are accomplished through applications of the coherent potential approximation. The formalism is illustrated by means of calculations for a single-band model system representing a linear arrangement of sites with nearest neighbor hopping and an one-site repulsion when two electrons of opposite spin occupy the same site in the lattice in the manner described by the so-called Hubbard Hamiltonian

  19. Spin structure function measurements with polarized protons and electrons at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, R.D.; Deshpande, A.; Forte, S.; Hughes, V.W.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Ridolfi, G.

    1995-01-01

    Useful insights into the spin structure functions of the nucleon can be achieved by measurements of spin-dependent asymmetries in inclusive scattering of high energy polarized electrons by high energy polarized protons at HERA. Such an experiment would be a natural extension of the polarized lepton-nucleon scattering experiments presently carried out at CERN and SLAC. We present here estimates of possible data in the extended kinematic range of HERA and associated statistical errors. (orig.)

  20. Search for the optimal size of printed circuit boards for mechanical structures for electronic equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yefimenko A. A.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors present a method, an algorithm and a program, designed to determine the optimal size of printed circuit boards (PCB of mechanical structures and different kinds of electronic equipment. The PCB filling factor is taken as an optimization criterion. The method allows one to quickly determine the dependence of the filling factor on the size of the PCB for various components.