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Sample records for dependent bold signal

  1. NMDA-dependent mechanisms only affect the BOLD response in the rat dentate gyrus by modifying local signal processing

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    Tiede, Regina; Krautwald, Karla; Fincke, Anja; Angenstein, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The role of N-methyl--aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated mechanisms in the formation of a blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) response was studied using electrical stimulation of the right perforant pathway. Stimulation of this fiber bundle triggered BOLD responses in the right hippocampal formation and in the left entorhinal cortex. The perforant pathway projects to and activates the dentate gyrus monosynaptically, activation in the contralateral entorhinal cortex is multisynaptic and requires forwarding and processing of signals. Application of the NMDA receptor antagonist MK801 during stimulation had no effect on BOLD responses in the right dentate gyrus, but reduced the BOLD responses in the left entorhinal cortex. In contrast, application of MK801 before the first stimulation train reduced the BOLD response in both regions. Electrophysiological recordings revealed that the initial stimulation trains changed the local processing of the incoming signals in the dentate gyrus. This altered electrophysiological response was not further changed by a subsequent application of MK801, which is in agreement with an unchanged BOLD response. When MK801 was present during the first stimulation train, a dissimilar electrophysiological response pattern was observed and corresponds to an altered BOLD response, indicating that NMDA-dependent mechanisms indirectly affect the BOLD response, mainly via modifying local signal processing and subsequent propagation. PMID:22167232

  2. Fractal Analysis of Brain Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) Signals from Children with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI)

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    Dona, Olga; DeMatteo, Carol; Connolly, John F.

    2017-01-01

    Background Conventional imaging techniques are unable to detect abnormalities in the brain following mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Yet patients with mTBI typically show delayed response on neuropsychological evaluation. Because fractal geometry represents complexity, we explored its utility in measuring temporal fluctuations of brain resting state blood oxygen level dependent (rs-BOLD) signal. We hypothesized that there could be a detectable difference in rs-BOLD signal complexity between healthy subjects and mTBI patients based on previous studies that associated reduction in signal complexity with disease. Methods Fifteen subjects (13.4 ± 2.3 y/o) and 56 age-matched (13.5 ± 2.34 y/o) healthy controls were scanned using a GE Discovery MR750 3T MRI and 32-channel RF-coil. Axial FSPGR-3D images were used to prescribe rs-BOLD (TE/TR = 35/2000ms), acquired over 6 minutes. Motion correction was performed and anatomical and functional images were aligned and spatially warped to the N27 standard atlas. Fractal analysis, performed on grey matter, was done by estimating the Hurst exponent using de-trended fluctuation analysis and signal summation conversion methods. Results and Conclusions Voxel-wise fractal dimension (FD) was calculated for every subject in the control group to generate mean and standard deviation maps for regional Z-score analysis. Voxel-wise validation of FD normality across controls was confirmed, and non-Gaussian voxels (3.05% over the brain) were eliminated from subsequent analysis. For each mTBI patient, regions where Z-score values were at least 2 standard deviations away from the mean (i.e. where |Z| > 2.0) were identified. In individual patients the frequently affected regions were amygdala (p = 0.02), vermis(p = 0.03), caudate head (p = 0.04), hippocampus(p = 0.03), and hypothalamus(p = 0.04), all previously reported as dysfunctional after mTBI, but based on group analysis. It is well known that the brain is best modeled as a complex

  3. Spatiotopic coding of BOLD signal in human visual cortex depends on spatial attention.

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    Sofia Crespi

    Full Text Available The neural substrate of the phenomenological experience of a stable visual world remains obscure. One possible mechanism would be to construct spatiotopic neural maps where the response is selective to the position of the stimulus in external space, rather than to retinal eccentricities, but evidence for these maps has been inconsistent. Here we show, with fMRI, that when human subjects perform concomitantly a demanding attentive task on stimuli displayed at the fovea, BOLD responses evoked by moving stimuli irrelevant to the task were mostly tuned in retinotopic coordinates. However, under more unconstrained conditions, where subjects could attend easily to the motion stimuli, BOLD responses were tuned not in retinal but in external coordinates (spatiotopic selectivity in many visual areas, including MT, MST, LO and V6, agreeing with our previous fMRI study. These results indicate that spatial attention may play an important role in mediating spatiotopic selectivity.

  4. One pair of hands is not like another: caudate BOLD response in dogs depends on signal source and canine temperament

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    Cook, Peter F.; Spivak, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Having previously used functional MRI to map the response to a reward signal in the ventral caudate in awake unrestrained dogs, here we examined the importance of signal source to canine caudate activation. Hand signals representing either incipient reward or no reward were presented by a familiar human (each dog’s respective handler), an unfamiliar human, and via illustrated images of hands on a computer screen to 13 dogs undergoing voluntary fMRI. All dogs had received extensive training with the reward and no-reward signals from their handlers and with the computer images and had minimal exposure to the signals from strangers. All dogs showed differentially higher BOLD response in the ventral caudate to the reward versus no reward signals, and there was a robust effect at the group level. Further, differential response to the signal source had a highly significant interaction with a dog’s general aggressivity as measured by the C-BARQ canine personality assessment. Dogs with greater aggressivity showed a higher differential response to the reward signal versus no-reward signal presented by the unfamiliar human and computer, while dogs with lower aggressivity showed a higher differential response to the reward signal versus no-reward signal from their handler. This suggests that specific facets of canine temperament bear more strongly on the perceived reward value of relevant communication signals than does reinforcement history, as each of the dogs were reinforced similarly for each signal, regardless of the source (familiar human, unfamiliar human, or computer). A group-level psychophysiological interaction (PPI) connectivity analysis showed increased functional coupling between the caudate and a region of cortex associated with visual discrimination and learning on reward versus no-reward trials. Our findings emphasize the sensitivity of the domestic dog to human social interaction, and may have other implications and applications pertinent to the training

  5. One pair of hands is not like another: caudate BOLD response in dogs depends on signal source and canine temperament

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    Peter F. Cook

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Having previously used functional MRI to map the response to a reward signal in the ventral caudate in awake unrestrained dogs, here we examined the importance of signal source to canine caudate activation. Hand signals representing either incipient reward or no reward were presented by a familiar human (each dog’s respective handler, an unfamiliar human, and via illustrated images of hands on a computer screen to 13 dogs undergoing voluntary fMRI. All dogs had received extensive training with the reward and no-reward signals from their handlers and with the computer images and had minimal exposure to the signals from strangers. All dogs showed differentially higher BOLD response in the ventral caudate to the reward versus no reward signals, and there was a robust effect at the group level. Further, differential response to the signal source had a highly significant interaction with a dog’s general aggressivity as measured by the C-BARQ canine personality assessment. Dogs with greater aggressivity showed a higher differential response to the reward signal versus no-reward signal presented by the unfamiliar human and computer, while dogs with lower aggressivity showed a higher differential response to the reward signal versus no-reward signal from their handler. This suggests that specific facets of canine temperament bear more strongly on the perceived reward value of relevant communication signals than does reinforcement history, as each of the dogs were reinforced similarly for each signal, regardless of the source (familiar human, unfamiliar human, or computer. A group-level psychophysiological interaction (PPI connectivity analysis showed increased functional coupling between the caudate and a region of cortex associated with visual discrimination and learning on reward versus no-reward trials. Our findings emphasize the sensitivity of the domestic dog to human social interaction, and may have other implications and applications

  6. A hemodynamic model for layered BOLD signals

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    Heinzle, J.; Koopmans, P.J.; Ouden, H.E.M. den; Raman, S.; Stephan, K.E.

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at the sub-millimeter scale has become feasible with recent advances in MR technology. In principle, this would enable the study of layered cortical circuits, one of the fundaments of cortical

  7. Characteristics of fMRI BOLD signal and its neurophysiological mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Xiaohu; Wu Yigen; Guo Shengli

    2007-01-01

    The functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) based on blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) contrast has emerged as one of the most potent noninvasive tools for mapping brain function and has been widely used to explore physiological, pathological changes and mental activity in the brain. Exploring the nature and property of BOLD signal has recently attracted more attentions. Despite that great progress has been made in investigation of the characteristics and neurophysiological basis, the exact nature of BOLD signal remains unclear. In this paper we discuss the characteristics of BOLD signals, the nonlinear BOLD response to external stimuli and the relation between BOLD signals and neural electrophysiological recordings. Furthermore, we develop our new opinions regarding nonlinear BOLD response and make some perspectives on future study.

  8. Variability in blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD signal in patients with stroke-induced and primary progressive aphasia

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    B. Bonakdarpour

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although fMRI is increasingly used to assess language-related brain activation in patients with aphasia, few studies have examined the hemodynamic response function (HRF in perilesional, and contralesional areas of the brain. In addition, the relationship between HRF abnormalities and other variables such as lesion size and severity of aphasia has not been explored. The objective of this study was to investigate changes in HRF signal during language-related neural activation in patients with stroke-induced aphasia (SA. We also examined the status of the HRF in patients with aphasia due to nonvascular etiology, namely, primary progressive aphasia (PPA. Five right handed SA patients, three PPA patients, and five healthy individuals participated in the study. Structural damage was quantified with T1-weighted MR images. Functional MR imaging was performed with long trial event-related design and an overt naming task to measure BOLD signal time to peak (TTP and percent signal change (ΔS. In SA patients, the average HRF TTP was significantly delayed in the left hemisphere regions involved in naming compared to healthy participants and PPA patients. However, ΔS was not different in SA patients compared to the other two groups. Delay in HRF TTP in the left hemisphere naming network of SA patients was correlated with lesion size and showed a negative correlation with global language function. There were no significant differences in the HRF TTP and ΔS in the right hemisphere homologues of the naming network or in the left and the right occipital control regions across the three groups. In PPA patients, HRF had a normal pattern. Our results indicate that abnormal task-related HRF is primarily found in the left hemisphere language network of SA patients and raise the possibility that abnormal physiology superimposed on structural damage may contribute to the clinical deficit. Follow-up investigations in a larger sample of age-matched healthy individuals

  9. FMRI, antipsychotics and schizophrenia. Influence of different antipsychotics on BOLD-signal.

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    Röder, Christian H; Hoogendam, Janna Marie; van der Veen, Frederik M

    2010-01-01

    In the last decade, functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (FMRI) has been increasingly used to investigate the neurobiology of schizophrenia. This technique relies on changes in the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) - signal, which changes in response to neural activity. Many FMRI studies on schizophrenia have examined medicated patients, but little is known about the effects of antipsychotic medication on the BOLD-signal. In this review we investigated to what extent studies in patients with schizophrenia (SC), who were treated with different antipsychotics, could give insight in the effects of antipsychotics on the BOLD-signal. A PubMed search was performed using the search items "schizophrenia", "FMRI", "antipsychotics" and "schizophrenia", "BOLD", "antipsychotics". Only articles in which there were at least two groups of patients with different treatments or in which patients were scanned twice with different treatments were selected. 18 articles, published between 1999 and 2009, fulfilled these criteria. Paradigms and results of these studies were compared regarding differences induced by the administered antipsychotics. This analysis showed no general effect of antipsychotics on the BOLD-signal. However, there is some evidence that the extent of blockade of the dopamine (DA) D(2) receptor does influence the BOLD-signal. Higher affinity to the dopamine D2 receptor, as expressed by a higher/lower inhibition constant (Ki) seems to cause a decrease in BOLD-signal.

  10. Infraslow LFP correlates to resting-state fMRI BOLD signals.

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    Pan, Wen-Ju; Thompson, Garth John; Magnuson, Matthew Evan; Jaeger, Dieter; Keilholz, Shella

    2013-07-01

    The slow fluctuations of the blood-oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) signal in resting-state fMRI are widely utilized as a surrogate marker of ongoing neural activity. Spontaneous neural activity includes a broad range of frequencies, from infraslow (<0.5 Hz) fluctuations to fast action potentials. Recent studies have demonstrated a correlative relationship between the BOLD fluctuations and power modulations of the local field potential (LFP), particularly in the gamma band. However, the relationship between the BOLD signal and the infraslow components of the LFP, which are directly comparable in frequency to the BOLD fluctuations, has not been directly investigated. Here we report a first examination of the temporal relation between the resting-state BOLD signal and infraslow LFPs using simultaneous fMRI and full-band LFP recording in rat. The spontaneous BOLD signal at the recording sites exhibited significant localized correlation with the infraslow LFP signals as well as with the slow power modulations of higher-frequency LFPs (1-100 Hz) at a delay comparable to the hemodynamic response time under anesthesia. Infraslow electrical activity has been postulated to play a role in attentional processes, and the findings reported here suggest that infraslow LFP coordination may share a mechanism with the large-scale BOLD-based networks previously implicated in task performance, providing new insight into the mechanisms contributing to the resting state fMRI signal.

  11. Negative BOLD signal changes in ipsilateral primary somatosensory cortex are associated with perfusion decreases and behavioral evidence for functional inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schäfer, Katharina; Blankenburg, Felix; Kupers, Ron

    2012-01-01

    -increase for the finger is due to functional inhibition (Kastrup et al., 2008) than to changes in selective attention. In conclusion, our data provide evidence that stimulus-induced reductions in relative rCBF may underlie the negative BOLD signal, which in turn may reflect increments in functional inhibition.......We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) to study the negative blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal and its underlying blood flow changes in healthy human subjects. This was combined with psychophysiological measurements to test...... that the negative BOLD signal is associated with functional inhibition. Electrical stimulation of the median nerve at 7Hz evoked robust negative BOLD signals in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI) ipsilateral to stimulation, and positive BOLD signals in contralateral SI. The negative BOLD signal in ipsilateral SI...

  12. Single-trial EEG-informed fMRI reveals spatial dependency of BOLD signal on early and late IC-ERP amplitudes during face recognition.

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    Wirsich, Jonathan; Bénar, Christian; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Descoins, Médéric; Soulier, Elisabeth; Le Troter, Arnaud; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Liégeois-Chauvel, Catherine; Guye, Maxime

    2014-10-15

    Simultaneous EEG-fMRI has opened up new avenues for improving the spatio-temporal resolution of functional brain studies. However, this method usually suffers from poor EEG quality, especially for evoked potentials (ERPs), due to specific artifacts. As such, the use of EEG-informed fMRI analysis in the context of cognitive studies has particularly focused on optimizing narrow ERP time windows of interest, which ignores the rich diverse temporal information of the EEG signal. Here, we propose to use simultaneous EEG-fMRI to investigate the neural cascade occurring during face recognition in 14 healthy volunteers by using the successive ERP peaks recorded during the cognitive part of this process. N170, N400 and P600 peaks, commonly associated with face recognition, were successfully and reproducibly identified for each trial and each subject by using a group independent component analysis (ICA). For the first time we use this group ICA to extract several independent components (IC) corresponding to the sequence of activation and used single-trial peaks as modulation parameters in a general linear model (GLM) of fMRI data. We obtained an occipital-temporal-frontal stream of BOLD signal modulation, in accordance with the three successive IC-ERPs providing an unprecedented spatio-temporal characterization of the whole cognitive process as defined by BOLD signal modulation. By using this approach, the pattern of EEG-informed BOLD modulation provided improved characterization of the network involved than the fMRI-only analysis or the source reconstruction of the three ERPs; the latter techniques showing only two regions in common localized in the occipital lobe.

  13. Midazolam sedation increases fluctuation and synchrony of the resting brain BOLD signal.

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    Kiviniemi, Vesa J; Haanpää, Hannu; Kantola, Juha-Heikki; Jauhiainen, Jukka; Vainionpää, Vilho; Alahuhta, Seppo; Tervonen, Osmo

    2005-05-01

    The blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance signal of functional brain cortices is dominated by very low frequency (VLF) fluctuations in anesthetized child patients. The temporal synchrony of the BOLD signal is also higher in anesthetized children compared with awake adults. The origin of the synchronous fluctuations can be related to maturation, pathological status or the anesthesia used in the imaging. Two of the three confounding variables (maturation and pathology) were controlled in this study. The effect of midazolam (4+/-0.8 mg) sedation on the BOLD signal was assessed in 12 healthy adults (aged 24+/-1.5 years) at 1.5 T. The VLF fluctuation power and temporal synchrony of the BOLD signal increased significantly after the sedation in the auditory and visual cortices. The fast Fourier transformation power spectral baseline fit parameters of the BOLD signal were also found to change significantly after sedation. It is concluded that the VLF fluctuation and temporal synchrony of the BOLD signal become increased after sedation in functional brain regions.

  14. Infraslow LFP correlates to resting-state fMRI BOLD signals

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The slow fluctuations of the blood-oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) signal in resting-state fMRI are widely utilized as a surrogate marker of ongoing neural activity. Spontaneous neural activity includes a broad range of frequencies, from infraslow (< 0.5 Hz) fluctuations to fast action potentials. Recent studies have demonstrated a correlative relationship between the BOLD fluctuations and power modulations of the local field potential (LFP), particularly in the gamma band. However, the re...

  15. Age-related differences in cerebral blood flow underlie the BOLD FMRI signal in childhood

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    Pamela eMoses

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI has become a premiere technique for studying the development and neural mediation of a wide range of typical and atypical behaviors in children. While the mechanism of the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD FMRI signal has been a focus of investigation in the mature brain, it has been largely unexamined in the developing brain. One critical component of the BOLD signal that has been noted to change with age is cerebral blood flow (CBF. Reports of CBF in children based on clinical radioactive tracing methods have found elevated CBF in childhood relative to adulthood, which could affect the BOLD response. This study used noninvasive arterial spin labeling (ASL MRI to study resting state and activity-driven CBF in conjunction with the functional BOLD response in healthy children 8 and 12 years of age and in adults. Participants performed a finger tapping task to generate robust activation measured in the motor cortex. Quantification of resting state CBF demonstrated higher CBF in 8 year olds and in 12 year olds relative to adults. The absolute increase in CBF between baseline rest and peak response during the motor task was also higher in children compared to adults. In contrast, the relative increase of CBF above baseline, expressed as percent of CBF change, was comparable across groups. The percent of BOLD signal change was also stable across age groups. This set of findings suggest that along with elevated CBF in childhood, other component processes of the BOLD response are also in an elevated state such that together they yield a net BOLD effect that resembles adults. These findings are consistent with our previous examination hemodynamics in primary sensory cortex. Although the magnitude of the BOLD response appears consistent between childhood and adulthood, the underlying physiology and cerebrovascular dynamics that give rise to the BOLD effect differ between immature and mature brains neural

  16. Dynamic and static contributions of the cerebrovasculature to the resting-state BOLD signal.

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    Tak, Sungho; Wang, Danny J J; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Yan, Lirong; Chen, J Jean

    2014-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in the resting state, particularly fMRI based on the blood-oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal, has been extensively used to measure functional connectivity in the brain. However, the mechanisms of vascular regulation that underlie the BOLD fluctuations during rest are still poorly understood. In this work, using dual-echo pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling and MR angiography (MRA), we assess the spatio-temporal contribution of cerebral blood flow (CBF) to the resting-state BOLD signals and explore how the coupling of these signals is associated with regional vasculature. Using a general linear model analysis, we found that statistically significant coupling between resting-state BOLD and CBF fluctuations is highly variable across the brain, but the coupling is strongest within the major nodes of established resting-state networks, including the default-mode, visual, and task-positive networks. Moreover, by exploiting MRA-derived large vessel (macrovascular) volume fraction, we found that the degree of BOLD-CBF coupling significantly decreased as the ratio of large vessels to tissue volume increased. These findings suggest that the portion of resting-state BOLD fluctuations at the sites of medium-to-small vessels (more proximal to local neuronal activity) is more closely regulated by dynamic regulations in CBF, and that this CBF regulation decreases closer to large veins, which are more distal to neuronal activity.

  17. BOLD signal and functional connectivity associated with loving kindness meditation.

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    Garrison, Kathleen A; Scheinost, Dustin; Constable, R Todd; Brewer, Judson A

    2014-05-01

    Loving kindness is a form of meditation involving directed well-wishing, typically supported by the silent repetition of phrases such as "may all beings be happy," to foster a feeling of selfless love. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to assess the neural substrate of loving kindness meditation in experienced meditators and novices. We first assessed group differences in blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal during loving kindness meditation. We next used a relatively novel approach, the intrinsic connectivity distribution of functional connectivity, to identify regions that differ in intrinsic connectivity between groups, and then used a data-driven approach to seed-based connectivity analysis to identify which connections differ between groups. Our findings suggest group differences in brain regions involved in self-related processing and mind wandering, emotional processing, inner speech, and memory. Meditators showed overall reduced BOLD signal and intrinsic connectivity during loving kindness as compared to novices, more specifically in the posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus (PCC/PCu), a finding that is consistent with our prior work and other recent neuroimaging studies of meditation. Furthermore, meditators showed greater functional connectivity during loving kindness between the PCC/PCu and the left inferior frontal gyrus, whereas novices showed greater functional connectivity during loving kindness between the PCC/PCu and other cortical midline regions of the default mode network, the bilateral posterior insula lobe, and the bilateral parahippocampus/hippocampus. These novel findings suggest that loving kindness meditation involves a present-centered, selfless focus for meditators as compared to novices.

  18. Developmental changes of BOLD signal correlations with global human EEG power and synchronization during working memory.

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    Michels, Lars; Lüchinger, Rafael; Koenig, Thomas; Martin, Ernst; Brandeis, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    In humans, theta band (5-7 Hz) power typically increases when performing cognitively demanding working memory (WM) tasks, and simultaneous EEG-fMRI recordings have revealed an inverse relationship between theta power and the BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent) signal in the default mode network during WM. However, synchronization also plays a fundamental role in cognitive processing, and the level of theta and higher frequency band synchronization is modulated during WM. Yet, little is known about the link between BOLD, EEG power, and EEG synchronization during WM, and how these measures develop with human brain maturation or relate to behavioral changes. We examined EEG-BOLD signal correlations from 18 young adults and 15 school-aged children for age-dependent effects during a load-modulated Sternberg WM task. Frontal load (in-)dependent EEG theta power was significantly enhanced in children compared to adults, while adults showed stronger fMRI load effects. Children demonstrated a stronger negative correlation between global theta power and the BOLD signal in the default mode network relative to adults. Therefore, we conclude that theta power mediates the suppression of a task-irrelevant network. We further conclude that children suppress this network even more than adults, probably from an increased level of task-preparedness to compensate for not fully mature cognitive functions, reflected in lower response accuracy and increased reaction time. In contrast to power, correlations between instantaneous theta global field synchronization and the BOLD signal were exclusively positive in both age groups but only significant in adults in the frontal-parietal and posterior cingulate cortices. Furthermore, theta synchronization was weaker in children and was--in contrast to EEG power--positively correlated with response accuracy in both age groups. In summary we conclude that theta EEG-BOLD signal correlations differ between spectral power and synchronization and that

  19. Developmental changes of BOLD signal correlations with global human EEG power and synchronization during working memory.

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    Lars Michels

    Full Text Available In humans, theta band (5-7 Hz power typically increases when performing cognitively demanding working memory (WM tasks, and simultaneous EEG-fMRI recordings have revealed an inverse relationship between theta power and the BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent signal in the default mode network during WM. However, synchronization also plays a fundamental role in cognitive processing, and the level of theta and higher frequency band synchronization is modulated during WM. Yet, little is known about the link between BOLD, EEG power, and EEG synchronization during WM, and how these measures develop with human brain maturation or relate to behavioral changes. We examined EEG-BOLD signal correlations from 18 young adults and 15 school-aged children for age-dependent effects during a load-modulated Sternberg WM task. Frontal load (in-dependent EEG theta power was significantly enhanced in children compared to adults, while adults showed stronger fMRI load effects. Children demonstrated a stronger negative correlation between global theta power and the BOLD signal in the default mode network relative to adults. Therefore, we conclude that theta power mediates the suppression of a task-irrelevant network. We further conclude that children suppress this network even more than adults, probably from an increased level of task-preparedness to compensate for not fully mature cognitive functions, reflected in lower response accuracy and increased reaction time. In contrast to power, correlations between instantaneous theta global field synchronization and the BOLD signal were exclusively positive in both age groups but only significant in adults in the frontal-parietal and posterior cingulate cortices. Furthermore, theta synchronization was weaker in children and was--in contrast to EEG power--positively correlated with response accuracy in both age groups. In summary we conclude that theta EEG-BOLD signal correlations differ between spectral power and

  20. Fmri, antipsychotics and schizophrenia. influence of different antipsychotics on bold-signal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Röder (Constantin); J.M. Hoogendam (Janna Marie); F.M. van der Veen (Frederik)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIn the last decade, functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (FMRI) has been increasingly used to investigate the neurobiology of schizophrenia. This technique relies on changes in the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) -signal, which changes in response to neural activity. Many FMRI studi

  1. Quantification of fMRI BOLD signal and volume applied to the somatosensory cortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luedemann, L.; Wust, P. [Universitaetsklinikum Charite, CVK, Berlin (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologie, Nuklearmedizin und Strahlenheilkunde; Foerschler, A.; Zimmer, C. [Universitaetsklinikum Leipzig (Germany). Abt. fuer Neuroradiologie

    2007-07-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging based on blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) signal variations is clinically used to investigate the impact of neurological disorders on brain function. Such disorders effect not only the localization but also the amplitude and extent of the BOLD signal. Statistical methods are useful to localize the BOLD signal but fail to quantify functional activity because they rely on arbitrary thresholds. This article presents a method that uses a priori defined VOI (volume of interest) and independently quantifies the mean BOLD signal and extent of the activated volume. The technique is based on the separation of the VOI signal difference distribution into a noise and an activation contribution. The technique does not require any threshold and is nearly independent of the preselected VOI size. The technique was verified in a test group of 17 subjects performing bilateral finger tapping. The results were compared with those of conventional analysis based on statistical tools. A standard imaging technique using FID-EPI (free induction decay echo-planar imaging, TR = 4000 ms, TE = 66 ms, 60 images activation, 60 images rest) was employed. The activated volume, V, and signal difference, {delta}S, of the motor cortex were determined with an accuracy of {sigma}(V)=17.1% and {sigma}({delta}S)=3.6%, respectively. The activated volume of the left hemispheric motor area was significantly greater (P=0.025) then in the right hemispheric, V{sub L} = 7.35 {+-} 2.29 cm{sup 3} versus V{sub L} = 6.39 {+-} 2.34 cm{sup 3}. The result is consistent with the findings obtained by other techniques. On the other hand, the statistical methods did not yield any significant difference in activation between both hemispheres. The VOI-based method presented here is an additional tool to study the extent and amplitude of the BOLD signal. (orig.)

  2. Interictal functional connectivity of human epileptic networks assessed by intracerebral EEG and BOLD signal fluctuations.

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    Gaelle Bettus

    Full Text Available In this study, we aimed to demonstrate whether spontaneous fluctuations in the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD signal derived from resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI reflect spontaneous neuronal activity in pathological brain regions as well as in regions spared by epileptiform discharges. This is a crucial issue as coherent fluctuations of fMRI signals between remote brain areas are now widely used to define functional connectivity in physiology and in pathophysiology. We quantified functional connectivity using non-linear measures of cross-correlation between signals obtained from intracerebral EEG (iEEG and resting-state functional MRI (fMRI in 5 patients suffering from intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. Functional connectivity was quantified with both modalities in areas exhibiting different electrophysiological states (epileptic and non affected regions during the interictal period. Functional connectivity as measured from the iEEG signal was higher in regions affected by electrical epileptiform abnormalities relative to non-affected areas, whereas an opposite pattern was found for functional connectivity measured from the BOLD signal. Significant negative correlations were found between the functional connectivities of iEEG and BOLD signal when considering all pairs of signals (theta, alpha, beta and broadband and when considering pairs of signals in regions spared by epileptiform discharges (in broadband signal. This suggests differential effects of epileptic phenomena on electrophysiological and hemodynamic signals and/or an alteration of the neurovascular coupling secondary to pathological plasticity in TLE even in regions spared by epileptiform discharges. In addition, indices of directionality calculated from both modalities were consistent showing that the epileptogenic regions exert a significant influence onto the non epileptic areas during the interictal period. This study shows that functional

  3. Transfer function between EEG and BOLD signals of epileptic activity

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    Marco eLeite

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous EEG-fMRI recordings have seen growing application in the evaluation of epilepsy, namely in the characterization of brain networks related to epileptic activity. In EEG-correlated fMRI studies, epileptic events are usually described as boxcar signals based on the timing information retrieved from the EEG, and subsequently convolved with a heamodynamic response function to model the associated BOLD changes. Although more flexible approaches may allow a higher degree of complexity for the haemodynamics, the issue of how to model these dynamics based on the EEG remains an open question. In this work, a new methodology for the integration of simultaneous EEG-fMRI data in epilepsy is proposed, which incorporates a transfer function from the EEG to the BOLD signal. Independent component analysis (ICA of the EEG is performed, and a number of metrics expressing different models of the EEG-BOLD transfer function are extracted from the resulting time courses. These metrics are then used to predict the fMRI data and to identify brain areas associated with the EEG epileptic activity. The methodology was tested on both ictal and interictal EEG-fMRI recordings from one patient with a hypothalamic hamartoma. When compared to the conventional analysis approach, plausible, consistent and more significant activations were obtained. Importantly, frequency-weighted EEG metrics yielded superior results than those weighted solely on the EEG power, which comes in agreement with previous literature. Reproducibility, specificity and sensitivity should be addressed in an extended group of patients in order to further validate the proposed methodology and generalize the presented proof of concept.

  4. Increased BOLD sensitivity in the orbitofrontal cortex using slice-dependent echo times at 3 T.

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    Domsch, Sebastian; Linke, Julia; Heiler, Patrick M; Kroll, Alexander; Flor, Herta; Wessa, Michèle; Schad, Lothar R

    2013-02-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) exploits the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect to detect neuronal activation related to various experimental paradigms. Some of these, such as reversal learning, involve the orbitofrontal cortex and its interaction with other brain regions like the amygdala, striatum or dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. These paradigms are commonly investigated with event-related methods and gradient echo-planar imaging (EPI) with short echo time of 27 ms. However, susceptibility-induced signal losses and image distortions in the orbitofrontal cortex are still a problem for this optimized sequence as this brain region consists of several slices with different optimal echo times. An EPI sequence with slice-dependent echo times is suitable to maximize BOLD sensitivity in all slices and might thus improve signal detection in the orbitofrontal cortex. To test this hypothesis, we first optimized echo times via BOLD sensitivity simulation. Second, we measured 12 healthy volunteers using a standard EPI sequence with an echo time of 27 ms and a modified EPI sequence with echo times ranging from 22 ms to 47 ms. In the orbitofrontal cortex, the number of activated voxels increased from 87 ± 44 to 549 ± 83 and the maximal t-value increased from 4.4 ± 0.3 to 5.4 ± 0.3 when the modified EPI was used. We conclude that an EPI with slice-dependent echo times may be a valuable tool to mitigate susceptibility artifacts in event-related whole-brain fMRI studies with a focus on the orbitofrontal cortex.

  5. Frequency of Spontaneous BOLD Signal Differences between Moderate and Late Preterm Newborns and Term Newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiushuang; Wei, Luqing; Wang, Nan; Hu, Zhangxue; Wang, Li; Ma, Juan; Feng, Shuai; Cai, Yue; Song, Xiaopeng; Shi, Yuan

    2016-10-01

    Little is known about the frequency features of spontaneous neural activity in the brains of moderate and late preterm (MLPT) newborns. We used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) and the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) method to investigate the frequency properties of spontaneous blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signals in 26 MLPT and 35 term newborns. Two frequency bands, slow-4 (0.027-0.073 Hz) and slow-5 (0.01-0.027 Hz), were analyzed. Our results showed widespread differences in ALFF between the two bands; differences occurred mainly in the primary sensory and motor cortices and to a lesser extent in association cortices and subcortical areas. Compared with term newborns, MLPT newborns showed significantly altered neural activity predominantly in the primary sensory and motor cortices and in the posterior cingulate gyrus/precuneus. In addition, a significant interaction between frequency bands and groups was observed in the primary somatosensory cortex. Intriguingly, these primary sensory and motor regions have been proven to be the major cortical hubs during the neonatal period. Our results revealed the frequency of spontaneous BOLD signal differences between MLPT and term newborns, which contribute to the understanding of regional development of spontaneous brain rhythms of MLPT newborns.

  6. Nonlinear Bayesian Estimation of BOLD Signal under Non-Gaussian Noise

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    Ali Fahim Khan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Modeling the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD signal has been a subject of study for over a decade in the neuroimaging community. Inspired from fluid dynamics, the hemodynamic model provides a plausible yet convincing interpretation of the BOLD signal by amalgamating effects of dynamic physiological changes in blood oxygenation, cerebral blood flow and volume. The nonautonomous, nonlinear set of differential equations of the hemodynamic model constitutes the process model while the weighted nonlinear sum of the physiological variables forms the measurement model. Plagued by various noise sources, the time series fMRI measurement data is mostly assumed to be affected by additive Gaussian noise. Though more feasible, the assumption may cause the designed filter to perform poorly if made to work under non-Gaussian environment. In this paper, we present a data assimilation scheme that assumes additive non-Gaussian noise, namely, the e-mixture noise, affecting the measurements. The proposed filter MAGSF and the celebrated EKF are put to test by performing joint optimal Bayesian filtering to estimate both the states and parameters governing the hemodynamic model under non-Gaussian environment. Analyses using both the synthetic and real data reveal superior performance of the MAGSF as compared to EKF.

  7. Mapping and correction of vascular hemodynamic latency in the BOLD signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Catie; Thomason, Moriah E; Glover, Gary H

    2008-10-15

    Correlation and causality metrics can be applied to blood-oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal time series in order to infer neural synchrony and directions of information flow from fMRI data. However, the BOLD signal reflects both the underlying neural activity and the vascular response, the latter of which is governed by local vasomotor physiology. The presence of potential vascular latency differences thus poses a confound in the detection of neural synchrony as well as inferences about the causality of neural processes. In the present study, we investigate the use of a breath holding (BH) task for characterizing and correcting for voxel-wise neurovascular latency differences across the whole brain. We demonstrate that BH yields reliable measurements of relative timing differences between voxels, and further show that a BH-derived latency correction can impact both functional connectivity maps of the resting-state default-mode network and activation maps of an event-related working memory (WM) task.

  8. Correlation between MEG and BOLD fMRI signals induced by visual flicker stimuli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chu Renxin; Holroyd Tom; Duyn Jeff

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this work was to investigate how the MEG signal amplitude correlates with that of BOLD fMRI.To investigate the correlation between fMRI and macroscopic electrical activity, BOLD fMRI and MEG was performed on the same subjects (n =5). A visual flicker stimulus of varying temporal frequency was used to elicit neural responses in early visual areas. A strong similarity was observed in frequency tuning curves between both modalities.Although, averaged over subjects, the BOLD tuning curve was somewhat broader than MEG, both BOLD and MEG had maxima at a flicker frequency of 10 Hz. Also, we measured the first and second harmonic components as the stimuli frequency by MEG. In the low stimuli frequency (less than 6 Hz), the second harmonic has comparable amplitude with the first harmonic, which implies that neural frequency response is nonlinear and has more nonlinear components in low frequency than in high frequency.

  9. Improving the precision of fMRI BOLD signal deconvolution with implications for connectivity analysis.

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    Bush, Keith; Cisler, Josh; Bian, Jiang; Hazaroglu, Gokce; Hazaroglu, Onder; Kilts, Clint

    2015-12-01

    An important, open problem in neuroimaging analyses is developing analytical methods that ensure precise inferences about neural activity underlying fMRI BOLD signal despite the known presence of confounds. Here, we develop and test a new meta-algorithm for conducting semi-blind (i.e., no knowledge of stimulus timings) deconvolution of the BOLD signal that estimates, via bootstrapping, both the underlying neural events driving BOLD as well as the confidence of these estimates. Our approach includes two improvements over the current best performing deconvolution approach; 1) we optimize the parametric form of the deconvolution feature space; and, 2) we pre-classify neural event estimates into two subgroups, either known or unknown, based on the confidence of the estimates prior to conducting neural event classification. This knows-what-it-knows approach significantly improves neural event classification over the current best performing algorithm, as tested in a detailed computer simulation of highly-confounded fMRI BOLD signal. We then implemented a massively parallelized version of the bootstrapping-based deconvolution algorithm and executed it on a high-performance computer to conduct large scale (i.e., voxelwise) estimation of the neural events for a group of 17 human subjects. We show that by restricting the computation of inter-regional correlation to include only those neural events estimated with high-confidence the method appeared to have higher sensitivity for identifying the default mode network compared to a standard BOLD signal correlation analysis when compared across subjects.

  10. Time courses of MRI BOLD signals in prolonged visual stimulation. Comparison between colors and orders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashikura, Kenichi; Fujita, Hideaki; Kershaw, J.B.; Matsuura, Tetsuya; Seki, Chie [Akita Laboratory, Japan Science and Technology Corp. (Japan); Kashikura, Akemi; Ardekani, B.A.; Kanno, Iwao

    1998-06-01

    We investigated: the BOLD signal response during 270 second photic stimulation using an EPI pulse sequence; the BOLD signal response for two different color checkerboards; and the BOLD signal response during six consecutive stimulation series. Ten healthy human subjects (age 25{+-}5.5 years) were studied with a 1.5 T MRI system (Siemens Vision, Erlangen, Germany). Black and white (BW) and red and white (RW) checkerboards alternating at 8 Hz were applied in turns for a total series of six. Stimulation timing was: 30 sec. off, 15 sec. on, 15 sec. off, 270 sec. on, 15 sec. off, 15 sec. on, 15 sec. off. Acquired data were analyzed according to color and/or order: color (without considering the order); color and order (1st BW vs. 1st RW, 2nd BW vs. 2nd RW, 3rd BW vs. 3rd RW); and order (without considering the color). A t-test (p<0.001) was used for obtaining the activated areas, and simple regression and two-way repeated-measures ANOVA were used for testing the statistical significance of the BOLD response. Results were: the BOLD signal responses during sustained photic stimulation maintained a constant level for the full duration and all series, suggesting stable levels of oxygen extraction and metabolism during cortical activation; the BOLD signal responses in two colors showed no significant difference in time response, suggesting that the neuronal populations perceiving black and red give a similar time response; and the effect of habituation or fatigue as observed by a signal decrease was not obtained, although the S.D. for each subject greatly increased with time and might be an indicator for evaluation fatigue or attention. (author)

  11. Subject specific BOLD fMRI respiratory and cardiac response functions obtained from global signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falahpour, Maryam; Refai, Hazem; Bodurka, Jerzy

    2013-05-15

    Subtle changes in either breathing pattern or cardiac pulse rate alter blood oxygen level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging signal (BOLD fMRI). This is problematic because such fluctuations could possibly not be related to underlying neuronal activations of interest but instead the source of physiological noise. Several methods have been proposed to eliminate physiological noise in BOLD fMRI data. One such method is to derive a template based on average multi-subject data for respiratory response function (RRF) and cardiac response function (CRF) by simultaneously utilizing an external recording of cardiac and respiratory waveforms with the fMRI. Standard templates can then be used to model, map, and remove respiration and cardiac fluctuations from fMRI data. Utilizing these does not, however, account for intra-subject variations in physiological response. Thus, performing a more individualized approach for single subject physiological noise correction becomes more desirable, especially for clinical purposes. Here we propose a novel approach that employs subject-specific RRF and CRF response functions obtained from the whole brain or brain tissue-specific global signals (GS). Averaging multiple voxels in global signal computation ensures physiological noise dominance over thermal and system noise in even high-spatial-resolution fMRI data, making the GS suitable for deriving robust estimations of both RRF and CRF for individual subjects. Using these individualized response functions instead of standard templates based on multi-subject averages judiciously removes physiological noise from the data, assuming that there is minimal neuronal contribution in the derived individualized filters. Subject-specific physiological response functions obtained from the GS better maps individuals' physiological characteristics.

  12. Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) MRI: A novel technique for the assessment of myocardial ischemia as identified by nuclear imaging SPECT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egred, M; Waiter, G D; Redpath, T W; Semple, S K I; Al-Mohammad, A; Walton, S

    2007-12-01

    The different levels of deoxyhemoglobin in the ischemic myocardium, induced by stressors such as dipyridamole, can be detected by blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) MRI and may be used to diagnose myocardial ischemia. The aim of this study was to assess the signal change in the myocardium on BOLD MRI as well as wall thickening between rest and dipyridamole stress images in ischemic and non-ischemic myocardium as identified on SPECT imaging. Twelve patients with stress-induced myocardial ischemia on SPECT underwent rest and dipyridamole stress MRI using a double breath-hold, T2()-weighted, ECG-gated sequence to produce BOLD contrast images as well as cine-MRI for wall thickening assessment in 10 of the 12 patients. Signal change on BOLD MRI and wall thickening were compared between rest and stress images in ischemic and non-ischemic myocardial segments as identified on SPECT. In each patient, two MRI slices containing 16 segments per slice were analysed. In total, there were 384 segments for BOLD analysis and 320 for wall thickening. For BOLD signal 137 segments correlated to segments with reversible ischemia on SPECT and 247 to normal segments, while for wall thickening 112 segments correlated to segments with reversible ischemia and 208 to normal segments. The average BOLD MRI signal intensity change was -13.8 (+/-16.3)% in the ischemic segments compared to -10.3 (+/-14.7)% in the non-ischemic segments (p=0.05). The average wall thickening was 6.4 (+/-3.4) mm in the ischemic segments compared to 8.7 (+/-3.8) mm in the non-ischemic segments (p<0.0001). Stress-induced ischemic myocardium has a different signal change and wall thickening than non-ischemic myocardium and may be differentiated on BOLD MRI. Larger studies are needed to define a threshold for detection and to determine the sensitivity and specificity of this technique.

  13. Echo-time and field strength dependence of BOLD reactivity in veins and parenchyma using flow-normalized hypercapnic manipulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Triantafyllou

    Full Text Available While the BOLD (Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent contrast mechanism has demonstrated excellent sensitivity to neuronal activation, its specificity with regards to differentiating vascular and parenchymal responses has been an area of ongoing concern. By inducing a global increase in Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF, we examined the effect of magnetic field strength and echo-time (TE on the gradient-echo BOLD response in areas of cortical gray matter and in resolvable veins. In order to define a quantitative index of BOLD reactivity, we measured the percent BOLD response per unit fractional change in global gray matter CBF induced by inhaling carbon dioxide (CO(2. By normalizing the BOLD response to the underlying CBF change and determining the BOLD response as a function of TE, we calculated the change in R(2(* (ΔR(2(* per unit fractional flow change; the Flow Relaxation Coefficient, (FRC for 3T and 1.5T in parenchymal and large vein compartments. The FRC in parenchymal voxels was 1.76±0.54 fold higher at 3T than at 1.5T and was 2.96±0.66 and 3.12±0.76 fold higher for veins than parenchyma at 1.5T and 3T respectively, showing a quantitative measure of the increase in specificity to parenchymal sources at 3T compared to 1.5T. Additionally, the results allow optimization of the TE to prioritize either maximum parenchymal BOLD response or maximum parenchymal specificity. Parenchymal signals peaked at TE values of 62.0±11.5 ms and 41.5±7.5 ms for 1.5T and 3T, respectively, while the response in the major veins peaked at shorter TE values; 41.0±6.9 ms and 21.5±1.0 ms for 1.5T and 3T. These experiments showed that at 3T, the BOLD CNR in parenchymal voxels exceeded that of 1.5T by a factor of 1.9±0.4 at the optimal TE for each field.

  14. Relationship of the BOLD signal with VEP for ultrashort duration visual stimuli (0.1 to 5 ms) in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeşilyurt, Bariş; Whittingstall, Kevin; Uğurbil, Kâmil; Logothetis, Nikos K; Uludağ, Kâmil

    2010-02-01

    There is currently a great interest to combine electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study brain function. Earlier studies have shown different EEG components to correlate well with the fMRI signal arguing for a complex relationship between both measurements. In this study, using separate EEG and fMRI measurements, we show that (1) 0.1 ms visual stimulation evokes detectable hemodynamic and visual-evoked potential (VEP) responses, (2) the negative VEP deflection at approximately 80 ms (N2) co-varies with stimulus duration/intensity such as with blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) response; the positive deflection at approximately 120 ms (P2) does not, and (3) although the N2 VEP-BOLD relationship is approximately linear, deviation is evident at the limit of zero N2 VEP. The latter finding argues that, although EEG and fMRI measurements can co-vary, they reflect partially independent processes in the brain tissue. Finally, it is shown that the stimulus-induced impulse response function (IRF) at 0.1 ms and the intrinsic IRF during rest have different temporal dynamics, possibly due to predominance of neuromodulation during rest as compared with neurotransmission during stimulation. These results extend earlier findings regarding VEP-BOLD coupling and highlight the component- and context-dependency of the relationship between evoked potentials and hemodynamic responses.

  15. Negative blood oxygen level dependent signals during speech comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Moreno, Diana; Schiff, Nicholas D; Hirsch, Joy

    2015-05-01

    Speech comprehension studies have generally focused on the isolation and function of regions with positive blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signals with respect to a resting baseline. Although regions with negative BOLD signals in comparison to a resting baseline have been reported in language-related tasks, their relationship to regions of positive signals is not fully appreciated. Based on the emerging notion that the negative signals may represent an active function in language tasks, the authors test the hypothesis that negative BOLD signals during receptive language are more associated with comprehension than content-free versions of the same stimuli. Regions associated with comprehension of speech were isolated by comparing responses to passive listening to natural speech to two incomprehensible versions of the same speech: one that was digitally time reversed and one that was muffled by removal of high frequencies. The signal polarity was determined by comparing the BOLD signal during each speech condition to the BOLD signal during a resting baseline. As expected, stimulation-induced positive signals relative to resting baseline were observed in the canonical language areas with varying signal amplitudes for each condition. Negative BOLD responses relative to resting baseline were observed primarily in frontoparietal regions and were specific to the natural speech condition. However, the BOLD signal remained indistinguishable from baseline for the unintelligible speech conditions. Variations in connectivity between brain regions with positive and negative signals were also specifically related to the comprehension of natural speech. These observations of anticorrelated signals related to speech comprehension are consistent with emerging models of cooperative roles represented by BOLD signals of opposite polarity.

  16. BOLD fMRI signal characteristics of S1- and S2-SSFP at 7 Tesla

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goa, Pål E; Koopmans, Peter J; Poser, Benedikt A; Barth, Markus; Norris, David G

    2014-01-01

    OBJECT: To compare the BOLD fMRI signal characteristics at in the cortex and on the pial surface for a non-balanced steady-state free precession sequence (nb-SSFP) at 7 T. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A multi-echo nb-SSFP sequence was used for high resolution fMRI at 7 T. Two S1 (S(+)) echoes at different

  17. Deconvolution analyses with tent functions reveal delayed and long-sustained increases of BOLD signals with acupuncture stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, Tomokazu; Umeda, Masahiro; Fukunaga, Masaki; Tanaka, Chuzo; Higuchi, Toshihiro

    2013-01-01

    We used deconvolution analysis to examine temporal changes in brain activity after acupuncture stimulation and assess brain responses without expected reference functions. We also examined temporal changes in brain activity after sham acupuncture (noninsertive) and scrubbing stimulation. We divided 26 healthy right-handed adults into a group of 13 who received real acupuncture with manual manipulation and a group of 13 who received both tactical stimulations. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) sequences consisted of four 15-s stimulation blocks (ON) interspersed between one 30-s and four 45-s rest blocks (OFF) for a total scanning time of 270 s. We analyzed data by using Statistical Parametric Mapping 8 (SPM8), MarsBaR, and Analysis of Functional NeuroImages (AFNI) software. For statistical analysis, we used 3dDeconvolve, part of the AFNI package, to extract the impulse response functions (IRFs) of the fMRI signals on a voxel-wise basis, and we tested the time courses of the extracted IRFs for the stimulations. We found stimulus-specific impulse responses of blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signals in various brain regions. We observed significantly delayed and long-sustained increases of BOLD signals in several brain regions following real acupuncture compared to sham acupuncture and palm scrubbing, which we attribute to peripheral nocireceptors, flare responses, and processing of the central nervous system. Acupuncture stimulation induced continued activity that was stronger than activity after the other stimulations. We used tent function deconvolution to process fMRI data for acupuncture stimulation and found delayed increasing and delayed decreasing changes in BOLD signal in the somatosensory areas and areas related to pain perception. Deconvolution analyses with tent functions are expected to be useful in extracting complicated and associated brain activity that is delayed and sustained for a long period after various stimulations.

  18. Increased BOLD signal in the fusiform gyrus during implicit emotion processing in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonville, Leon; Giampietro, Vincent; Surguladze, Simon; Williams, Steven; Tchanturia, Kate

    2014-01-01

    The behavioural literature in anorexia nervosa (AN) has suggested impairments in psychosocial functioning and studies using facial expression processing tasks (FEPT) have reported poorer recognition and slower identification of emotions. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used alongside a FEPT, depicting neutral, mildly happy and happy faces, to examine the neural correlates of implicit emotion processing in AN. Participants were instructed to specify the gender of the faces. Levels of depression, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive symptoms and eating disorder behaviour were obtained and principal component analysis (PCA) was performed to acquire uncorrelated variables. fMRI analysis revealed a greater blood-oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response in AN in the right fusiform gyrus to all facial expressions. This response showed a linear increase with the happiness of the facial expression and was found to be stronger in those not taking medication. PCA analysis revealed a single component indicating a greater level of general clinical symptoms. Neuroimaging findings would suggest that alterations in implicit emotion processing in AN occur during early perceptual processing of social signals and illustrate greater engagement on the FEPT. The lack of separate components using PCA suggests that the questionnaires used might not be suited as predictive measures.

  19. Cortical depth dependence of the BOLD initial dip and poststimulus undershoot in human visual cortex at 7 Tesla

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siero, JCW; Hendrikse, J; Hoogduin, Hans; Petridou, N; Luijten, Peter; Donahue, Manus J.

    2015-01-01

    PurposeOwing to variability in vascular dynamics across cerebral cortex, blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) spatial and temporal characteristics should vary as a function of cortical-depth. Here, the positive response, initial dip (ID), and post-stimulus undershoot (PSU) of the BOLD response i

  20. Enhancing the Detection of BOLD Signal in fMRI by Reducing the Partial Volume Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiping P. Du

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the advantages of reducing the partial volume effect (PVE to enhance the detection of the BOLD signal in fMRI. Methods. A linear phase term was added in k-space to obtain half-voxel shifting of 64 × 64 T2*-weighted echo-planar images. Three sets of image data shifted in the x, y, and diagonal direction, respectively, are combined with the original 64 × 64 data to form the 128 × 128 voxel-shifted interpolated data. Results. A simulation of a synthetic fMRI dataset shows that the voxel-shifted interpolation (VSI can increase the t-score up to 50% in single-voxel activations. An fMRI study (n=7 demonstrates that 20.4% of the interpolated voxels have higher t-scores than their nearest neighboring voxels in the original maps. The average increase of the t-score in these interpolated voxels is 13.3%. Conclusion. VSI yields increased sensitivity in detecting voxel-size BOLD activations, improved spatial accuracy of activated regions, and improved detection of the peak BOLD signal of an activated region. VSI can potentially be used as an alternative to the high-resolution fMRI studies in which reduction in SNR and increase in imaging time become prohibitive.

  1. A nonlinear BOLD model accounting for refractory effect by applying the longitudinal relaxation in NMR to the linear BOLD model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kwan-Jin

    2009-09-01

    A mathematical model to regress the nonlinear blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI signal has been developed by incorporating the refractory effect into the linear BOLD model of the biphasic gamma variate function. The refractory effect was modeled as a relaxation of two separate BOLD capacities corresponding to the biphasic components of the BOLD signal in analogy with longitudinal relaxation of magnetization in NMR. When tested with the published fMRI data of finger tapping, the nonlinear BOLD model with the refractory effect reproduced the nonlinear BOLD effects such as reduced poststimulus undershoot and saddle pattern in a prolonged stimulation as well as the reduced BOLD signal for repetitive stimulation.

  2. Increased BOLD Signals Elicited by High Gamma Auditory Stimulation of the Left Auditory Cortex in Acute State Schizophrenia

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    Hironori Kuga, M.D.

    2016-10-01

    We acquired BOLD responses elicited by click trains of 20, 30, 40 and 80-Hz frequencies from 15 patients with acute episode schizophrenia (AESZ, 14 symptom-severity-matched patients with non-acute episode schizophrenia (NASZ, and 24 healthy controls (HC, assessed via a standard general linear-model-based analysis. The AESZ group showed significantly increased ASSR-BOLD signals to 80-Hz stimuli in the left auditory cortex compared with the HC and NASZ groups. In addition, enhanced 80-Hz ASSR-BOLD signals were associated with more severe auditory hallucination experiences in AESZ participants. The present results indicate that neural over activation occurs during 80-Hz auditory stimulation of the left auditory cortex in individuals with acute state schizophrenia. Given the possible association between abnormal gamma activity and increased glutamate levels, our data may reflect glutamate toxicity in the auditory cortex in the acute state of schizophrenia, which might lead to progressive changes in the left transverse temporal gyrus.

  3. Increased BOLD Signals Elicited by High Gamma Auditory Stimulation of the Left Auditory Cortex in Acute State Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuga, Hironori; Onitsuka, Toshiaki; Hirano, Yoji; Nakamura, Itta; Oribe, Naoya; Mizuhara, Hiroaki; Kanai, Ryota; Kanba, Shigenobu; Ueno, Takefumi

    2016-10-01

    Recent MRI studies have shown that schizophrenia is characterized by reductions in brain gray matter, which progress in the acute state of the disease. Cortical circuitry abnormalities in gamma oscillations, such as deficits in the auditory steady state response (ASSR) to gamma frequency (>30-Hz) stimulation, have also been reported in schizophrenia patients. In the current study, we investigated neural responses during click stimulation by BOLD signals. We acquired BOLD responses elicited by click trains of 20, 30, 40 and 80-Hz frequencies from 15 patients with acute episode schizophrenia (AESZ), 14 symptom-severity-matched patients with non-acute episode schizophrenia (NASZ), and 24 healthy controls (HC), assessed via a standard general linear-model-based analysis. The AESZ group showed significantly increased ASSR-BOLD signals to 80-Hz stimuli in the left auditory cortex compared with the HC and NASZ groups. In addition, enhanced 80-Hz ASSR-BOLD signals were associated with more severe auditory hallucination experiences in AESZ participants. The present results indicate that neural over activation occurs during 80-Hz auditory stimulation of the left auditory cortex in individuals with acute state schizophrenia. Given the possible association between abnormal gamma activity and increased glutamate levels, our data may reflect glutamate toxicity in the auditory cortex in the acute state of schizophrenia, which might lead to progressive changes in the left transverse temporal gyrus.

  4. Neurophysiological and BOLD signal uncoupling of giant somatosensory evoked potentials in progressive myoclonic epilepsy: a case-series study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storti, Silvia F.; Del Felice, Alessandra; Canafoglia, Laura; Formaggio, Emanuela; Brigo, Francesco; Alessandrini, Franco; Bongiovanni, Luigi G.; Menegaz, Gloria; Manganotti, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    In progressive myoclonic epilepsy (PME), a rare epileptic syndrome caused by a variety of genetic disorders, the combination of peripheral stimulation and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can shed light on the mechanisms underlying cortical dysfunction. The aim of the study is to investigate sensorimotor network modifications in PME by assessing the relationship between neurophysiological findings and blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) activation. Somatosensory-evoked potential (SSEP) obtained briefly before fMRI and BOLD activation during median-nerve electrical stimulation were recorded in four subjects with typical PME phenotype and compared with normative data. Giant scalp SSEPs with enlarger N20-P25 complex compared to normal data (mean amplitude of 26.2 ± 8.2 μV after right stimulation and 27.9 ± 3.7 μV after left stimulation) were detected. Statistical group analysis showed a reduced BOLD activation in response to median nerve stimulation in PMEs compared to controls over the sensorimotor (SM) areas and an increased response over subcortical regions (p  2.3, corrected). PMEs show dissociation between neurophysiological and BOLD findings of SSEPs (giant SSEP with reduced BOLD activation over SM). A direct pathway connecting a highly restricted area of the somatosensory cortex with the thalamus can be hypothesized to support the higher excitability of these areas. PMID:28294187

  5. Exploiting magnetic resonance angiography imaging improves model estimation of BOLD signal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenghui Hu

    Full Text Available The change of BOLD signal relies heavily upon the resting blood volume fraction ([Formula: see text] associated with regional vasculature. However, existing hemodynamic data assimilation studies pretermit such concern. They simply assign the value in a physiologically plausible range to get over ill-conditioning of the assimilation problem and fail to explore actual [Formula: see text]. Such performance might lead to unreliable model estimation. In this work, we present the first exploration of the influence of [Formula: see text] on fMRI data assimilation, where actual [Formula: see text] within a given cortical area was calibrated by an MR angiography experiment and then was augmented into the assimilation scheme. We have investigated the impact of [Formula: see text] on single-region data assimilation and multi-region data assimilation (dynamic cause modeling, DCM in a classical flashing checkerboard experiment. Results show that the employment of an assumed [Formula: see text] in fMRI data assimilation is only suitable for fMRI signal reconstruction and activation detection grounded on this signal, and not suitable for estimation of unobserved states and effective connectivity study. We thereby argue that introducing physically realistic [Formula: see text] in the assimilation process may provide more reliable estimation of physiological information, which contributes to a better understanding of the underlying hemodynamic processes. Such an effort is valuable and should be well appreciated.

  6. Interpreting BOLD: towards a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Catherine N; Howarth, Clare; Kurth-Nelson, Zebulun; Mishra, Anusha

    2016-10-01

    Cognitive neuroscience depends on the use of blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to probe brain function. Although commonly used as a surrogate measure of neuronal activity, BOLD signals actually reflect changes in brain blood oxygenation. Understanding the mechanisms linking neuronal activity to vascular perfusion is, therefore, critical in interpreting BOLD. Advances in cellular neuroscience demonstrating differences in this neurovascular relationship in different brain regions, conditions or pathologies are often not accounted for when interpreting BOLD. Meanwhile, within cognitive neuroscience, the increasing use of high magnetic field strengths and the development of model-based tasks and analyses have broadened the capability of BOLD signals to inform us about the underlying neuronal activity, but these methods are less well understood by cellular neuroscientists. In 2016, a Royal Society Theo Murphy Meeting brought scientists from the two communities together to discuss these issues. Here, we consolidate the main conclusions arising from that meeting. We discuss areas of consensus about what BOLD fMRI can tell us about underlying neuronal activity, and how advanced modelling techniques have improved our ability to use and interpret BOLD. We also highlight areas of controversy in understanding BOLD and suggest research directions required to resolve these issues.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'.

  7. Interpreting BOLD: towards a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howarth, Clare; Kurth-Nelson, Zebulun; Mishra, Anusha

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive neuroscience depends on the use of blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to probe brain function. Although commonly used as a surrogate measure of neuronal activity, BOLD signals actually reflect changes in brain blood oxygenation. Understanding the mechanisms linking neuronal activity to vascular perfusion is, therefore, critical in interpreting BOLD. Advances in cellular neuroscience demonstrating differences in this neurovascular relationship in different brain regions, conditions or pathologies are often not accounted for when interpreting BOLD. Meanwhile, within cognitive neuroscience, the increasing use of high magnetic field strengths and the development of model-based tasks and analyses have broadened the capability of BOLD signals to inform us about the underlying neuronal activity, but these methods are less well understood by cellular neuroscientists. In 2016, a Royal Society Theo Murphy Meeting brought scientists from the two communities together to discuss these issues. Here, we consolidate the main conclusions arising from that meeting. We discuss areas of consensus about what BOLD fMRI can tell us about underlying neuronal activity, and how advanced modelling techniques have improved our ability to use and interpret BOLD. We also highlight areas of controversy in understanding BOLD and suggest research directions required to resolve these issues. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience’. PMID:27574302

  8. Multi-regional investigation of the relationship between functional MRI blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD activation and GABA concentration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley D Harris

    Full Text Available Several recent studies have reported an inter-individual correlation between regional GABA concentration, as measured by MRS, and the amplitude of the functional blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD response in the same region. In this study, we set out to investigate whether this coupling generalizes across cortex. In 18 healthy participants, we performed edited MRS measurements of GABA and BOLD-fMRI experiments using regionally related activation paradigms. Regions and tasks were the: occipital cortex with a visual grating stimulus; auditory cortex with a white noise stimulus; sensorimotor cortex with a finger-tapping task; frontal eye field with a saccade task; and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex with a working memory task. In contrast to the prior literature, no correlation between GABA concentration and BOLD activation was detected in any region. The origin of this discrepancy is not clear. Subtle differences in study design or insufficient power may cause differing results; these and other potential reasons for the discrepant results are discussed. This negative result, although it should be interpreted with caution, has a larger sample size than prior positive results, and suggests that the relationship between GABA and the BOLD response may be more complex than previously thought.

  9. BOLD signal effects of transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) in the alpha range: A concurrent tACS-fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosskuhl, Johannes; Huster, René J; Herrmann, Christoph S

    2016-10-15

    Many studies have proven transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) to manipulate brain activity. Until now it is not known, however, how these manipulations in brain activity are represented in brain metabolism or how spatially specific these changes are. Alpha-tACS has been shown to enhance the amplitude of the individual alpha frequency (IAF) and a negative correlation between alpha amplitude and occipital BOLD signal was reported in numerous EEG/fMRI experiments. Thus, alpha-tACS was chosen to test the effects of tACS on the BOLD signal. A reduction thereof was expected during alpha-tACS which shows the spatial extent of tACS effects beyond modeling studies. Three groups of subjects were measured in an MRI scanner, receiving tACS at either their IAF (N=11), 1Hz (control; N=12) or sham (i.e., no stimulation - a second control; N=11) while responding to a visual vigilance task. Stimulation was administered in an interleaved pattern of tACS-on runs and tACS-free baseline periods. The BOLD signal was analyzed in response to tACS-onset during resting state and in response to seldom target stimuli. Alpha-tACS at 1.0mA reduced the task-related BOLD response to visual targets in the occipital cortex as compared to tACS-free baseline periods. The deactivation was strongest in an area where the BOLD signal was shown to correlate negatively with alpha amplitude. A direct effect of tACS on resting state BOLD signal levels could not be shown. Our findings suggest that tACS-related changes in BOLD activity occur only as a modulation of an existing BOLD response.

  10. Another kind of 'BOLD Response': answering multiple-choice questions via online decoded single-trial brain signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorger, Bettina; Dahmen, Brigitte; Reithler, Joel; Gosseries, Olivia; Maudoux, Audrey; Laureys, Steven; Goebel, Rainer

    2009-01-01

    The term 'locked-in'syndrome (LIS) describes a medical condition in which persons concerned are severely paralyzed and at the same time fully conscious and awake. The resulting anarthria makes it impossible for these patients to naturally communicate, which results in diagnostic as well as serious practical and ethical problems. Therefore, developing alternative, muscle-independent communication means is of prime importance. Such communication means can be realized via brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) circumventing the muscular system by using brain signals associated with preserved cognitive, sensory, and emotional brain functions. Primarily, BCIs based on electrophysiological measures have been developed and applied with remarkable success. Recently, also blood flow-based neuroimaging methods, such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), have been explored in this context. After reviewing recent literature on the development of especially hemodynamically based BCIs, we introduce a highly reliable and easy-to-apply communication procedure that enables untrained participants to motor-independently and relatively effortlessly answer multiple-choice questions based on intentionally generated single-trial fMRI signals that can be decoded online. Our technique takes advantage of the participants' capability to voluntarily influence certain spatio-temporal aspects of the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal: source location (by using different mental tasks), signal onset and offset. We show that healthy participants are capable of hemodynamically encoding at least four distinct information units on a single-trial level without extensive pretraining and with little effort. Moreover, real-time data analysis based on simple multi-filter correlations allows for automated answer decoding with a high accuracy (94.9%) demonstrating the robustness of the presented method. Following our 'proof of concept', the

  11. Multi-echo fMRI: A review of applications in fMRI denoising and analysis of BOLD signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Prantik; Voon, Valerie; Balchandani, Priti; Lombardo, Michael V; Poser, Benedikt A; Bandettini, Peter A

    2017-07-01

    In recent years the field of fMRI research has enjoyed expanded technical abilities related to resolution, as well as use across many fields of brain research. At the same time, the field has also dealt with uncertainty related to many known and unknown effects of artifact in fMRI data. In this review we discuss an emerging fMRI technology, called multi-echo (ME)-fMRI, which focuses on improving the fidelity and interpretability of fMRI. Where the essential problem of standard single-echo fMRI is the indeterminacy of sources of signals, whether BOLD or artifact, this is not the case for ME-fMRI. By acquiring multiple echo images per slice, the ME approach allows T2* decay to be modeled at every voxel at every time point. Since BOLD signals arise by changes in T2* over time, an fMRI experiment sampling the T2* signal decay can be analyzed to distinguish BOLD from artifact signal constituents. While the ME approach has a long history of use in theoretical and validation studies, modern MRI systems enable whole-brain multi-echo fMRI at high resolution. This review covers recent multi-echo fMRI acquisition methods, and the analysis steps for this data to make fMRI at once more principled, straightforward, and powerful. After a brief overview of history and theory, T2* modeling and applications will be discussed. These applications include T2* mapping and combining echoes from ME data to increase BOLD contrast and mitigate dropout artifacts. Next, the modeling of fMRI signal changes to detect signal origins in BOLD-related T2* versus artifact-related S0 changes will be reviewed. A focus is on the use of ME-fMRI data to extract and classify components from spatial ICA, called multi-echo ICA (ME-ICA). After describing how ME-fMRI and ME-ICA lead to a general model for analysis of fMRI signals, applications in animal and human imaging will be discussed. Applications include removing motion artifacts in resting state data at subject and group level. New imaging methods such

  12. MEG and fMRI fusion for nonlinear estimation of neural and BOLD signal changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey M Plis

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The combined analysis of MEG/EEG and functional MRI measurements can lead to improvement in the description of the dynamical and spatial properties of brain activity. In this paper we empirically demonstrate this improvement using simulated and recorded task related MEG and fMRI activity. Neural activity estimates were derived using a dynamic Bayesian network with continuous real valued parameters by means of a sequential Monte Carlo technique. In synthetic data, we show that MEG and fMRI fusion improves estimation of the indirectly observed neural activity and smooths tracking of the BOLD response. In recordings of task related neural activity the combination of MEG and fMRI produces a result with greater SNR, that confirms the expectation arising from the nature of the experiment. The highly nonlinear model of the BOLD response poses a difficult inference problem for neural activity estimation; computational requirements are also high due to the time and space complexity. We show that joint analysis of the data improves the system's behavior by stabilizing the differential equations system and by requiring fewer computational resources.

  13. Effects of glyceryl trinitrate and calcitonin-gene-related peptide on BOLD signal and arterial diameter –methodological studies by fMRI and MRA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asghar, Mohammed Sohail; Ashina, Messoud

    2013-01-01

    of measuring task-related hemodynamic changes. Pharmacological substances that induce hemodynamic changes can therefore potentially alter the BOLD-signal that in turn falsely can be interpreted as changes in neuronal activity. It is therefore important to characterize possible effects of a pharmacological......Over the last decades MRI has proved to be very useful in the field of drug development and discovery. Pharmacological MRI (phMRI) explores the interaction between brain physiology, neuronal activity and drugs[1]. The BOLD-signal is an indirect method to investigate brain activity by way...

  14. To boldly gulp: standard metabolic rate and boldness have context-dependent influences on risk-taking to breathe air in a catfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, David J; Belão, Thiago C; Killen, Shaun S; Rantin, F Tadeu

    2015-12-01

    The African sharptooth catfish Clarias gariepinus has bimodal respiration, it has a suprabranchial air-breathing organ alongside substantial gills. We used automated bimodal respirometry to reveal that undisturbed juvenile catfish (N=29) breathed air continuously in normoxia, with a marked diurnal cycle. Air breathing and routine metabolic rate (RMR) increased in darkness when, in the wild, this nocturnal predator forages. Aquatic hypoxia (20% air saturation) greatly increased overall reliance on air breathing. We investigated whether two measures of risk taking to breathe air, namely absolute rates of aerial O2 uptake (ṀO2,air) and the percentage of RMR obtained from air (%ṀO2,air), were influenced by individual standard metabolic rate (SMR) and boldness. In particular, whether any influence varied with resource availability (normoxia versus hypoxia) or relative fear of predation (day versus night). Individual SMR, derived from respirometry, had an overall positive influence on ṀO2,air across all contexts but a positive influence on %ṀO2,air only in hypoxia. Thus, a pervasive effect of SMR on air breathing became most acute in hypoxia, when individuals with higher O2 demand took proportionally more risks. Boldness was estimated as time required to resume air breathing after a fearful stimulus in daylight normoxia (Tres). Although Tres had no overall influence on ṀO2,air or %ṀO2,air, there was a negative relationship between Tres and %ṀO2,air in daylight, in normoxia and hypoxia. There were two Tres response groups, 'bold' phenotypes with Tres below 75 min (N=13) which, in daylight, breathed proportionally more air than 'shy' phenotypes with Tres above 115 min (N=16). Therefore, individual boldness influenced air breathing when fear of predation was high. Thus, individual energy demand and personality did not have parallel influences on the emergent tendency to take risks to obtain a resource; their influences varied in strength with context. © 2015

  15. Sampling rate dependence of correlation at long time lags in BOLD fMRI measurements on humans and gel phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkelsen, Kaare B; Lund, Torben E

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of sampling rate on Hurst exponents derived from Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (BOLD fMRI) resting state time series. fMRI measurements were performed on 2 human subjects and a selection of gel phantoms. From these, Hurst exponents were calculated. It was found that low sampling rates induced non-trivial exponents at sharp material transitions, and that Hurst exponents of human measurements had a strong TR-dependence. The findings are compared to theoretical considerations regarding the fractional Gaussian noise model and resampling, and it is found that the implications are problematic. This result should have a direct influence on the way future studies of low-frequency variation in BOLD fMRI data are conducted, especially if the fractional Gaussian noise model is considered. We recommend either using a different model (examples of such are referenced in the conclusion), or standardizing experimental procedures along an optimal sampling rate.

  16. Pharmacological modulation of the BOLD response: a study of acetazolamide and glyceryl trinitrate in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asghar, Mohammed Sohail; Hansen, Adam E; Pedersen, Simon;

    2011-01-01

    To examine the effect of acetazolamide, known to increase cerebral blood flow (CBF) and glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), known to increase cerebral blood volume (CBV) on the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) response in humans using 3 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to evaluate how pharm...... pharmacological agents may modulate cerebral hemodynamic and thereby possibly the BOLD signal....

  17. Temporal information entropy of the Blood-Oxygenation Level-Dependent signals increases in the activated human primary visual cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiNuzzo, Mauro; Mascali, Daniele; Moraschi, Marta; Bussu, Giorgia; Maraviglia, Bruno; Mangia, Silvia; Giove, Federico

    2017-02-01

    Time-domain analysis of blood-oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals allows the identification of clusters of voxels responding to photic stimulation in primary visual cortex (V1). However, the characterization of information encoding into temporal properties of the BOLD signals of an activated cluster is poorly investigated. Here, we used Shannon entropy to determine spatial and temporal information encoding in the BOLD signal within the most strongly activated area of the human visual cortex during a hemifield photic stimulation. We determined the distribution profile of BOLD signals during epochs at rest and under stimulation within small (19-121 voxels) clusters designed to include only voxels driven by the stimulus as highly and uniformly as possible. We found consistent and significant increases (2-4% on average) in temporal information entropy during activation in contralateral but not ipsilateral V1, which was mirrored by an expected loss of spatial information entropy. These opposite changes coexisted with increases in both spatial and temporal mutual information (i.e. dependence) in contralateral V1. Thus, we showed that the first cortical stage of visual processing is characterized by a specific spatiotemporal rearrangement of intracluster BOLD responses. Our results indicate that while in the space domain BOLD maps may be incapable of capturing the functional specialization of small neuronal populations due to relatively low spatial resolution, some information encoding may still be revealed in the temporal domain by an increase of temporal information entropy.

  18. Relationship Between Changes in the Temporal Dynamics of the Blood-Oxygen-Level-Dependent Signal and Hypoperfusion in Acute Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Ahmed A; Ostwaldt, Ann-Christin; Nierhaus, Till; Ganeshan, Ramanan; Audebert, Heinrich J; Villringer, Kersten; Villringer, Arno; Fiebach, Jochen B

    2017-04-01

    Changes in the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal provide a noninvasive measure of blood flow, but a detailed comparison with established perfusion parameters in acute stroke is lacking. We investigated the relationship between BOLD signal temporal delay and dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) in stroke patients. In 30 patients with acute (ischemic stroke, we performed Pearson correlation and multiple linear regression between DSC-MRI parameters (time to maximum [Tmax], mean transit time, cerebral blood flow, and cerebral blood volume) and BOLD-based parameters (BOLD delay and coefficient of BOLD variation). Prediction of severe hypoperfusion (Tmax >6 seconds) was assessed using receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) analysis. Correlation was highest between Tmax and BOLD delay (venous sinus reference; time shift range 7; median r=0.60; interquartile range=0.49-0.71). Coefficient of BOLD variation correlated with cerebral blood volume (median r= 0.37; interquartile range=0.24-0.51). Mean R(2) for predicting BOLD delay by DSC-MRI was 0.54 (SD=0.2) and for predicting coefficient of BOLD variation was 0.37 (SD=0.17). BOLD delay (whole-brain reference, time shift range 3) had an area under the curve of 0.76 for predicting severe hypoperfusion (sensitivity=69.2%; specificity=80%), whereas BOLD delay (venous sinus reference, time shift range 3) had an area under the curve of 0.76 (sensitivity=67.3%; specificity=83.5%). BOLD delay is related to macrovascular delay and microvascular hypoperfusion, can identify severely hypoperfused tissue in acute stroke, and is a promising alternative to gadolinium contrast agent-based perfusion assessment in acute stroke. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00715533 and NCT02077582. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Quantitative multi-modal functional MRI with blood oxygenation level dependent exponential decays adjusted for flow attenuated inversion recovery (BOLDED AFFAIR)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hyder, Fahmeed; Renken, Remco; Kennan, Richard P; Rothman, Douglas L

    2000-01-01

    A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method is described that allows interleaved measurements of transverse (R(2)(*) and R(2)) and longitudinal (R(1)) relaxation rates of tissue water in conjunction with spin labeling. The image-contrasts are intrinsically blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) and

  20. Increased BOLD signal in the fusiform gyrus during implicit emotion processing in anorexia nervosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Fonville

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Neuroimaging findings would suggest that alterations in implicit emotion processing in AN occur during early perceptual processing of social signals and illustrate greater engagement on the FEPT. The lack of separate components using PCA suggests that the questionnaires used might not be suited as predictive measures.

  1. Re-examine tumor-induced alterations in hemodynamic responses of BOLD fMRI. Implications in presurgical brain mapping

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    Wang, Liya [Dept. of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory Univ., School of Medicine, Atlanta (United States); Dept. of Radiology, Baoan Hospital, Shenzhen (China); Ali, Shazia; Fa, Tianning; Mao, Hui [Dept. of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory Univ., School of Medicine, Atlanta (United States)], e-mail: hmao@emory.edu; Dandan, Chen [Dept. of Physics, Emory Univ., Atlanta, (United States); School of Radiation Medicine and Protection, Soochow Univ., Suzhou (China); Olson, Jeffrey [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Emory Univ., School of Medicine, Atlanta (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Background: Blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) fMRI is used for presurgical functional mapping of brain tumor patients. Abnormal tumor blood supply may affect hemodynamic responses and BOLD fMRI signals. Purpose: To perform a multivariate and quantitative investigation of the effect of brain tumors on the hemodynamic responses and its impact on BOLD MRI signal time course, data analysis in order to better understand tumor-induced alterations in hemodynamic responses, and accurately mapping cortical regions in brain tumor patients. Material and Methods: BOLD fMRI data from 42 glioma patients who underwent presurgical mapping of the primary motor cortex (PMC) with a block designed finger tapping paradigm were analyzed, retrospectively. Cases were divided into high grade (n = 24) and low grade (n = 18) groups based on pathology. The tumor volume and distance to the activated PMCs were measured. BOLD signal time courses from selected regions of interest (ROIs) in the PMCs of tumor affected and contralateral unaffected hemispheres were obtained from each patient. Tumor-induced changes of BOLD signal intensity and time to peak (TTP) of BOLD signal time courses were analyzed statistically. Results: The BOLD signal intensity and TTP in the tumor-affected PMCs are altered when compared to that of the unaffected hemisphere. The average BOLD signal level is statistically significant lower in the affected PMCs. The average TTP in the affected PMCs is shorter in the high grade group, but longer in the low grade tumor group compared to the contralateral unaffected hemisphere. Degrees of alterations in BOLD signal time courses are related to both the distance to activated foci and tumor volume with the stronger effect in tumor distance to activated PMC. Conclusion: Alterations in BOLD signal time courses are strongly related to the tumor grade, the tumor volume, and the distance to the activated foci. Such alterations may impair accurate mapping of tumor-affected functional

  2. Neuronal activation induced BOLD and CBF responses upon acetazolamide administration in patients with steno-occlusive artery disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siero, JCW; Hartkamp, NS; Donahue, Manus J.; Harteveld, Anita A.; Compter, A; Petersen, Esben T.; Hendrikse, J

    2015-01-01

    Blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) MRI is widely used for inferring neuronal activation and is becoming increasingly popular for assessing cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) when combined with a vasoactive stimulus. The BOLD signal contains changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and thus

  3. Reduced Pain Sensation and Reduced BOLD Signal in Parietofrontal Networks during Religious Prayer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmholdt, Else-Marie; Skewes, Joshua Charles; Dietz, Martin

    2017-01-01

    religious prayer in a large parietofrontal network relative to the secular condition. Naloxone had no significant effect on ratings or neural activity. Our results thus indicate that, under these conditions, pain modulation by prayer is not opioid-dependent. Further studies should employ an optimized design...... to explore whether reduced engagement of the frontoparietal system could indicate that prayer may attenuate pain through a reduction in processing of pain stimulus saliency and prefrontal control rather than through known descending pain inhibitory systems....

  4. Larger Neural Responses Produce BOLD Signals That Begin Earlier in Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena eThompson

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Functional MRI analyses commonly rely on the assumption that the temporal dynamics of hemodynamic response functions (HRFs are independent of the amplitude of the neural signals that give rise to them. The validity of this assumption is particularly important for techniques that use fMRI to resolve sub-second timing distinctions between responses, in order to make inferences about the ordering of neural processes. Whether or not the detailed shape of the HRF is independent of neural response amplitude remains an open question, however. We performed experiments in which we measured responses in primary visual cortex (V1 to large, contrast-reversing checkerboards at a range of contrast levels, which should produce varying amounts of neural activity. Ten subjects (ages 22-52 were studied in each of two experiments using 3 Tesla scanners. We used rapid, 250 msec, temporal sampling (repetition time, or TR and both short and long inter-stimulus interval (ISI stimulus presentations. We tested for a systematic relationship between the onset of the HRF and its amplitude across conditions, and found a strong negative correlation between the two measures when stimuli were separated in time (long- and medium-ISI experiments, but not the short-ISI experiment. Thus, stimuli that produce larger neural responses, as indexed by HRF amplitude, also produced HRFs with shorter onsets. The relationship between amplitude and latency was strongest in voxels with lowest mean-normalized variance (i.e., parenchymal voxels. The onset differences observed in the longer-ISI experiments are likely attributable to mechanisms of neurovascular coupling, since they are substantially larger than reported differences in the onset of action potentials in V1 as a function of response amplitude.

  5. BOLD and its connection to dopamine release in human striatum: a cross-cohort comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohrenz, Terry; Kishida, Kenneth T.

    2016-01-01

    Activity in midbrain dopamine neurons modulates the release of dopamine in terminal structures including the striatum, and controls reward-dependent valuation and choice. This fluctuating release of dopamine is thought to encode reward prediction error (RPE) signals and other value-related information crucial to decision-making, and such models have been used to track prediction error signals in the striatum as encoded by BOLD signals. However, until recently there have been no comparisons of BOLD responses and dopamine responses except for one clear correlation of these two signals in rodents. No such comparisons have been made in humans. Here, we report on the connection between the RPE-related BOLD signal recorded in one group of subjects carrying out an investment task, and the corresponding dopamine signal recorded directly using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in a separate group of Parkinson's disease patients undergoing DBS surgery while performing the same task. The data display some correspondence between the signal types; however, there is not a one-to-one relationship. Further work is necessary to quantify the relationship between dopamine release, the BOLD signal and the computational models that have guided our understanding of both at the level of the striatum. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience’. PMID:27574306

  6. BOLD frequency power indexes working memory performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Henk Balsters

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Electrophysiology studies routinely investigate the relationship between neural oscillations and task performance. However, the sluggish nature of the BOLD response means that few researchers have investigated the spectral properties of the BOLD signal in a similar manner. For the first time we have applied group ICA to fMRI data collected during a standard working memory task (delayed match-to-sample and using a multivariate analysis, we investigate the relationship between working memory performance (accuracy and reaction time and BOLD spectral power within functional networks. Our results indicate that BOLD spectral power within specific networks (visual, temporal-parietal, posterior default-mode network, salience network, basal ganglia correlated with task accuracy. Multivariate analyses show that the relationship between task accuracy and BOLD spectral power is stronger than the relationship between BOLD spectral power and other variables (age, gender, head movement, and neuropsychological measures. A traditional General Linear Model (GLM analysis found no significant group differences, or regions that covaried in signal intensity with task accuracy, suggesting that BOLD spectral power holds unique information that is lost in a standard GLM approach. We suggest that the combination of ICA and BOLD spectral power is a useful novel index of cognitive performance that may be more sensitive to brain-behaviour relationships than traditional approaches.

  7. Analysis of Neural-BOLD Coupling through Four Models of the Neural Metabolic Demand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher W Tyler

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The coupling of the neuronal energetics to the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD response is still incompletely understood. To address this issue, we compared the fits of four plausible models of neurometabolic coupling dynamics to available data for simultaneous recordings of the local field potential (LFP and the local BOLD response recorded from monkey primary visual cortex over a wide range of stimulus durations. The four models of the metabolic demand driving the BOLD response were: direct coupling with the overall LFP; rectified coupling to the LFP; coupling with a slow adaptive component of the implied neural population response; and coupling with the non-adaptive intracellular input signal defined by the stimulus time course. Taking all stimulus durations into account, the results imply that the BOLD response is most closely coupled with metabolic demand derived from the intracellular input waveform, without significant influence from the adaptive transients and nonlinearities exhibited by the LFP waveform.

  8. Dynamic spatiotemporal variability of alpha-BOLD relationships during the resting-state and task-evoked responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayhew, S D; Bagshaw, A P

    2017-07-15

    Accurate characterization of the spatiotemporal relationship between two of the most prominent neuroimaging measures of neuronal activity, the 8-13Hz, occipito-parietal EEG alpha oscillation and the BOLD fMRI signal, must encompass the intrinsically dynamic nature of both alpha power and brain function. Here, during the eyes-open resting state, we use a 16s sliding-window analysis and demonstrate that the mean spatial network of dynamic alpha-BOLD correlations is highly comparable to the static network calculated over six minutes. However, alpha-BOLD correlations showed substantial spatiotemporal variability within-subjects and passed through many different configurations such that the static network was fully represented in only ~10% of 16s epochs, with visual and parietal regions (coherent on average) often opposingly correlated with each other or with alpha. We find that the common assumption of static-alpha BOLD correlations greatly oversimplifies temporal variation in brain network dynamics. Fluctuations in alpha-BOLD coupling significantly depended upon the instantaneous amplitude of alpha power, and primary and lateral visual areas were most strongly negatively correlated with alpha during different alpha power states, possibly suggesting the action of multiple alpha mechanisms. Dynamic alpha-BOLD correlations could not be explained by eye-blinks/movements, head motion or non-neuronal physiological variability. Individual's mean alpha power and frequency were found to contribute to between-subject variability in alpha-BOLD correlations. Additionally, application to a visual stimulation dataset showed that dynamic alpha-BOLD correlations provided functional information pertaining to the brain's response to stimulation by exhibiting spatiotemporal fluctuations related to variability in the trial-by-trial BOLD response magnitude. Significantly weaker visual alpha-BOLD correlations were found both preceding and following small amplitude BOLD response trials

  9. Music reduces pain and increases resting state fMRI BOLD signal amplitude in the left angular gyrus in fibromyalgia patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garza-Villarreal, Eduardo A; Jiang, Zhiguo; Vuust, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Music reduces pain in fibromyalgia (FM), a chronic pain disease, but the functional neural correlates of music-induced analgesia (MIA) are still largely unknown. We recruited FM patients (n = 22) who listened to their preferred relaxing music and an auditory control (pink noise) for 5 min without...... external noise from fMRI image acquisition. Resting state fMRI was then acquired before and after the music and control conditions. A significant increase in the amplitude of low frequency fluctuations of the BOLD signal was evident in the left angular gyrus (lAnG) after listening to music, which in turn......, correlated to the analgesia reports. The post-hoc seed-based functional connectivity analysis of the lAnG showed found higher connectivity after listening to music with right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (rdlPFC), the left caudate (lCau), and decreased connectivity with right anterior cingulate cortex (r...

  10. Neural and vascular variability and the fMRI-BOLD response in normal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannurpatti, Sridhar S; Motes, Michael A; Rypma, Bart; Biswal, Bharat B

    2010-05-01

    Neural, vascular and structural variables contributing to the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal response variability were investigated in younger and older humans. Twelve younger healthy human subjects (six male and six female; mean age: 24 years; range: 19-27 years) and 12 older healthy subjects (five male and seven female; mean age: 58 years; range: 55-71 years) with no history of head trauma and neurological disease were scanned. Functional magnetic resonance imaging measurements using the BOLD contrast were made when participants performed a motor, cognitive or a breath hold (BH) task. Activation volume and the BOLD response amplitude were estimated for the younger and older at both group and subject levels. Mean activation volume was reduced by 45%, 40% and 38% in the elderly group during the motor, cognitive and BH tasks, respectively, compared to the younger. Reduction in activation volume was substantially higher compared to the reduction in the gray matter volume of 14% in the older compared to the younger. A significantly larger variability in the intersubject BOLD signal change occurred during the motor task, compared to the cognitive task. BH-induced BOLD signal change between subjects was significantly less-variable in the motor task-activated areas in the younger compared to older whereas such a difference between age groups was not observed during the cognitive task. Hemodynamic scaling using the BH signal substantially reduced the BOLD signal variability during the motor task compared to the cognitive task. The results indicate that the origin of the BOLD signal variability between subjects was predominantly vascular during the motor task while being principally a consequence of neural variability during the cognitive task. Thus, in addition to gray matter differences, the type of task performed can have different vascular variability weighting that can influence age-related differences in brain functional response.

  11. Differences in aggression, activity and boldness between native and introduced populations of an invasive crayfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintor, L.M.; Sih, A.; Bauer, M.L.

    2008-01-01

    Aggressiveness, along with foraging voracity and boldness, are key behavioral mechanisms underlying the competitive displacement and invasion success of exotic species. However, do aggressiveness, voracity and boldness of the invader depend on the presence of an ecologically similar native competitor in the invaded community? We conducted four behavioral assays to compare aggression, foraging voracity, threat response and boldness to forage under predation risk of multiple populations of exotic signal crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus across its native and invaded range with and without a native congener, the Shasta crayfish P. fortis. We predicted that signal crayfish from the invaded range and sympatric with a native congener (IRS) should be more aggressive to outcompete a close competitor than populations from the native range (NR) or invaded range and allopatric to a native congener (IRA). Furthermore, we predicted that IRS populations of signal crayfish should be more voracious, but less bold to forage under predation risk since native predators and prey likely possess appropriate behavioral responses to the invader. Contrary to our predictions, results indicated that IRA signal crayfish were more aggressive towards conspecifics and more voracious and active foragers, yet also bolder to forage under predation risk in comparison to NR and IRS populations, which did not differ in behavior. Higher aggression/voracity/ boldness was positively correlated with prey consumption rates, and hence potential impacts on prey. We suggest that the positive correlations between aggression/voracity/boldness are the result of an overall aggression syndrome. Results of stream surveys indicated that IRA streams have significantly lower prey biomass than in IRS streams, which may drive invading signal crayfish to be more aggressive/voracious/bold to acquire resources to establish a population. ?? 2008 The Authors.

  12. Transient and sustained BOLD signal time courses affect the detection of emotion-related brain activation in fMRI.

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    Paret, Christian; Kluetsch, Rosemarie; Ruf, Matthias; Demirakca, Traute; Kalisch, Raffael; Schmahl, Christian; Ende, Gabriele

    2014-12-01

    A tremendous amount of effort has been dedicated to unravel the functional neuroanatomy of the processing and regulation of emotion, resulting in a well-described picture of limbic, para-limbic and prefrontal regions involved. Studies applying functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) often use the block-wise presentation of stimuli with affective content, and conventionally model brain activation as a function of stimulus or task duration. However, there is increasing evidence that regional brain responses may not always translate to task duration and rather show stimulus onset-related transient time courses. We assume that brain regions showing transient responses cannot be detected in block designs using a conventional fMRI analysis approach. At the same time, the probability of detecting these regions with conventional analyses may be increased when shorter stimulus timing or a more intense stimulation during a block is used. In a within-subject fMRI study, we presented aversive pictures to 20 healthy subjects and investigated the effect of experimental design (i.e. event-related and block design) on the detection of brain activation in limbic and para-limbic regions of interest of emotion processing. In addition to conventional modeling of sustained activation during blocks of stimulus presentation, we included a second response function into the general linear model (GLM), suited to detect transient time courses at block onset. In the conventional analysis, several regions like the amygdala, thalamus and periaqueductal gray were activated irrespective of design. However, we found a positive BOLD response in the anterior insula (AI) in event-related but not in block-design analyses. GLM analyses suggest that this difference may result from a transient response pattern which cannot be captured by the conventional fMRI analysis approach. Our results indicate that regions with a transient response profile like the AI can be missed in block designs if analyses

  13. Cortical Network Models of Firing Rates in the Resting and Active States Predict BOLD Responses.

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    Maxwell R Bennett

    Full Text Available Measurements of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD signals have produced some surprising observations. One is that their amplitude is proportional to the entire activity in a region of interest and not just the fluctuations in this activity. Another is that during sleep and anesthesia the average BOLD correlations between regions of interest decline as the activity declines. Mechanistic explanations of these phenomena are described here using a cortical network model consisting of modules with excitatory and inhibitory neurons, taken as regions of cortical interest, each receiving excitatory inputs from outside the network, taken as subcortical driving inputs in addition to extrinsic (intermodular connections, such as provided by associational fibers. The model shows that the standard deviation of the firing rate is proportional to the mean frequency of the firing when the extrinsic connections are decreased, so that the mean BOLD signal is proportional to both as is observed experimentally. The model also shows that if these extrinsic connections are decreased or the frequency of firing reaching the network from the subcortical driving inputs is decreased, or both decline, there is a decrease in the mean firing rate in the modules accompanied by decreases in the mean BOLD correlations between the modules, consistent with the observed changes during NREM sleep and under anesthesia. Finally, the model explains why a transient increase in the BOLD signal in a cortical area, due to a transient subcortical input, gives rises to responses throughout the cortex as observed, with these responses mediated by the extrinsic (intermodular connections.

  14. Cortical Network Models of Firing Rates in the Resting and Active States Predict BOLD Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Maxwell R; Farnell, Les; Gibson, William G; Lagopoulos, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signals have produced some surprising observations. One is that their amplitude is proportional to the entire activity in a region of interest and not just the fluctuations in this activity. Another is that during sleep and anesthesia the average BOLD correlations between regions of interest decline as the activity declines. Mechanistic explanations of these phenomena are described here using a cortical network model consisting of modules with excitatory and inhibitory neurons, taken as regions of cortical interest, each receiving excitatory inputs from outside the network, taken as subcortical driving inputs in addition to extrinsic (intermodular) connections, such as provided by associational fibers. The model shows that the standard deviation of the firing rate is proportional to the mean frequency of the firing when the extrinsic connections are decreased, so that the mean BOLD signal is proportional to both as is observed experimentally. The model also shows that if these extrinsic connections are decreased or the frequency of firing reaching the network from the subcortical driving inputs is decreased, or both decline, there is a decrease in the mean firing rate in the modules accompanied by decreases in the mean BOLD correlations between the modules, consistent with the observed changes during NREM sleep and under anesthesia. Finally, the model explains why a transient increase in the BOLD signal in a cortical area, due to a transient subcortical input, gives rises to responses throughout the cortex as observed, with these responses mediated by the extrinsic (intermodular) connections.

  15. Comparing the microvascular specificity of the 3 T and 7 T BOLD response using ICA and Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging

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    Alexander eGeissler

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In functional MRI it is desirable for the blood-oxygenation level dependent (BOLD signal to be localized to the tissue containing activated neurons rather than the veins draining that tissue. This study addresses the dependence of the specificity of the BOLD signal – the relative contribution of the BOLD signal arising from tissue compared to venous vessels – on magnetic field strength. To date, studies of specificity have been based on models or indirect measures of BOLD sensitivity such as signal to noise ratio and relaxation rates, and assessment has been made in isolated vein and tissue voxels. The consensus has been that ultra high field systems not only significantly increase BOLD sensitivity but also specificity, that is, there is a proportionately reduced signal contribution from draining veins. Specificity was not quantified in prior studies, however, due to the difficulty of establishing a reliable network of veins in the activated volume. In this study we use a map of venous vessel networks extracted from 7 T high resolution Susceptibility Weighted Images (SWI to quantify the relative contributions of micro- and macrovasculature to functional MRI (fMRI results obtained at 3 T and 7 T. High resolution measurements made here minimize the contribution of physiological noise and Independent Component Analysis (ICA is used to separate activation from technical, physiological and motion artifacts. ICA also avoids the possibility of timing-dependent bias from different micro- and macrovasculature responses. We find a significant increase in the number of activated voxels at 7 T in both the veins and the microvasculature – a BOLD sensitivity increase - with the increase in the microvasculature being higher. However, the small increase in sensitivity at 7 T was not significant. For the experimental conditions of this study, our findings do not support the hypothesis of an increased specificity of the BOLD response at ultra-high field.

  16. BOLD delay times using group delay in sickle cell disease

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    Coloigner, Julie; Vu, Chau; Bush, Adam; Borzage, Matt; Rajagopalan, Vidya; Lepore, Natasha; Wood, John

    2016-03-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited blood disorder that effects red blood cells, which can lead to vasoocclusion, ischemia and infarct. This disease often results in neurological damage and strokes, leading to morbidity and mortality. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) is a non-invasive technique for measuring and mapping the brain activity. Blood Oxygenation Level-Dependent (BOLD) signals contain also information about the neurovascular coupling, vascular reactivity, oxygenation and blood propagation. Temporal relationship between BOLD fluctuations in different parts of the brain provides also a mean to investigate the blood delay information. We used the induced desaturation as a label to profile transit times through different brain areas, reflecting oxygen utilization of tissue. In this study, we aimed to compare blood flow propagation delay times between these patients and healthy subjects in areas vascularized by anterior, middle and posterior cerebral arteries. In a group comparison analysis with control subjects, BOLD changes in these areas were found to be almost simultaneous and shorter in the SCD patients, because of their increased brain blood flow. Secondly, the analysis of a patient with a stenosis on the anterior cerebral artery indicated that signal of the area vascularized by this artery lagged the MCA signal. These findings suggest that sickle cell disease causes blood propagation modifications, and that these changes could be used as a biomarker of vascular damage.

  17. Music reduces pain and increases resting state fMRI BOLD signal amplitude in the left angular gyrus in fibromyalgia patients

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    Eduardo A. Garza-Villarreal

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Music reduces pain in fibromyalgia (FM, a chronic pain disease, but the functional neural correlates of music-induced analgesia are still largely unknown. We recruited FM patients (n = 22 who listened to their preferred relaxing music and an auditory control (pink noise for 5 minutes without external noise from fMRI image acquisition. Resting state fMRI was then acquired before and after the music and control conditions. A significant increase in the amplitude of low frequency fluctuations of the BOLD signal was evident in the left angular gyrus after listening to music, which in turn, correlated to the analgesia reports. The post-hoc seed-based functional connectivity analysis of the left angular gyrus showed found higher connectivity after listening to music with right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the left caudate, and decreased connectivity with right anterior cingulate cortex, right supplementary motor area, precuneus and right precentral gyrus. Pain intensity analgesia was correlated (r = .61 to the connectivity of the left angular gyrus with the right precentral gyrus. Our results show that music-induced analgesia in FM is related to top-down regulation of the pain modulatory network by the default-mode network.

  18. Music reduces pain and increases resting state fMRI BOLD signal amplitude in the left angular gyrus in fibromyalgia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza-Villarreal, Eduardo A; Jiang, Zhiguo; Vuust, Peter; Alcauter, Sarael; Vase, Lene; Pasaye, Erick H; Cavazos-Rodriguez, Roberto; Brattico, Elvira; Jensen, Troels S; Barrios, Fernando A

    2015-01-01

    Music reduces pain in fibromyalgia (FM), a chronic pain disease, but the functional neural correlates of music-induced analgesia (MIA) are still largely unknown. We recruited FM patients (n = 22) who listened to their preferred relaxing music and an auditory control (pink noise) for 5 min without external noise from fMRI image acquisition. Resting state fMRI was then acquired before and after the music and control conditions. A significant increase in the amplitude of low frequency fluctuations of the BOLD signal was evident in the left angular gyrus (lAnG) after listening to music, which in turn, correlated to the analgesia reports. The post-hoc seed-based functional connectivity analysis of the lAnG showed found higher connectivity after listening to music with right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (rdlPFC), the left caudate (lCau), and decreased connectivity with right anterior cingulate cortex (rACC), right supplementary motor area (rSMA), precuneus and right precentral gyrus (rPreG). Pain intensity (PI) analgesia was correlated (r = 0.61) to the connectivity of the lAnG with the rPreG. Our results show that MIA in FM is related to top-down regulation of the pain modulatory network by the default mode network (DMN).

  19. Regional placental blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) changes with gestational age in normally developing pregnancies using long duration R2* mapping in utero

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dighe, Manjiri; Kim, Yun Jung; Seshamani, Sharmishtaa; Blazejewska, Ania I.; Mckown, Susan; Caucutt, Jason; Gatenby, Christopher; Studholme, Colin

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the use of R2* mapping in maternal and fetal sub-regions of the placenta with the aim of providing a reference for blood oxygenation levels during normative development. There have been a number of MR relaxation studies of placental tissues in-utero, but none have reported R2* value changes with age, or examined differences in sub-regions of the placenta. Here specialized long-duration Multi-frame R2* imaging was used to create a stable estimate for R2* values in different placental regions in healthy pregnant volunteers not imaged for clinical reasons. 27 subjects were recruited and scanned up to 3 times during their pregnancy. A multi-slice dual echo EPI based BOLD acquisition was employed and repeated between 90 and 150 times over 3 to 5 minutes to provide a high accuracy estimate of the R2* signal level. Acquisitions were also repeated in 13 cases within a visit to evaluate reproducibility of the method in a given subject. Experimental results showed R2* measurements were highly repeatable within a visit with standard deviation of (0.76). Plots of all visits against gestational age indicated clear correlations showing decreases in R2* with age. This increase was consistent was also consistent over time in multiple visits of the same volunteer during their pregnancy. Maternal and fetal regional changes with gestational age followed the same trend with increase in R2* over the gestational age.

  20. Spontaneous low frequency BOLD signal variations from resting-state fMRI are decreased in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemifar, Samaneh; Manning, Kathryn Y; Rajakumar, Nagalingam; Gómez, Francisco A; Soddu, Andrea; Borrie, Michael J; Menon, Ravi S; Bartha, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated altered brain activity in Alzheimer's disease using task based functional MRI (fMRI), network based resting-state fMRI, and glucose metabolism from 18F fluorodeoxyglucose-PET (FDG-PET). Our goal was to define a novel indicator of neuronal activity based on a first-order textural feature of the resting state functional MRI (RS-fMRI) signal. Furthermore, we examined the association between this neuronal activity metric and glucose metabolism from 18F FDG-PET. We studied 15 normal elderly controls (NEC) and 15 probable Alzheimer disease (AD) subjects from the AD Neuroimaging Initiative. An independent component analysis was applied to the RS-fMRI, followed by template matching to identify neuronal components (NC). A regional brain activity measurement was constructed based on the variation of the RS-fMRI signal of these NC. The standardized glucose uptake values of several brain regions relative to the cerebellum (SUVR) were measured from partial volume corrected FDG-PET images. Comparing the AD and NEC groups, the mean brain activity metric was significantly lower in the accumbens, while the glucose SUVR was significantly lower in the amygdala and hippocampus. The RS-fMRI brain activity metric was positively correlated with cognitive measures and amyloid β1-42 cerebral spinal fluid levels; however, these did not remain significant following Bonferroni correction. There was a significant linear correlation between the brain activity metric and the glucose SUVR measurements. This proof of concept study demonstrates that this novel and easy to implement RS-fMRI brain activity metric can differentiate a group of healthy elderly controls from a group of people with AD.

  1. Effect of Phase-Encoding Reduction on Geometric Distortion and BOLD Signal Changes in fMRI

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    Golestan karami

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Echo-planar imaging (EPI is a group of fast data acquisition methods commonly used in fMRI studies. It acquires multiple image lines in k-space after a single excitation, which leads to a very short scan time. A well-known problem with EPI is that it is more sensitive to distortions due to the used encoding scheme. Source of distortion is inhomogeneity in the static B0 field that causes more geometric distortion in phase encoding direction. This inhomogeneity is induced mainly by the magnetic susceptibility differences between various structures within the object placed inside the scanner, often at air-tissue or bone-tissue interfaces. Methods of reducing EPI distortion are mainly based on decreasing steps of the phase encoding. Reducing steps of phase encoding can be applied by reducing field of view, slice thickness, and/or the use of parallel acquisition technique. Materials and Methods We obtained three data acquisitions with different FOVs including: conventional low resolution, conventional high resolution, and zoomed high resolution EPIs. Moreover we used SENSE technique for phase encoding reduction. All experiments were carried out on three Tesla scanners (Siemens, TIM, and Germany equipped with 12 channel head coil. Ten subjects participated in the experiments. Results The data were processed by FSL software and were evaluated by ANOVA. Distortion was assessed by obtaining low displacement voxels map, and calculated from a field map image. Conclusion We showed that image distortion can be reduced by decreasing slice thickness and phase encoding steps. Distortion reduction in zoomed technique resulted the lowest level, but at the cost of signal-to-noise loss. Moreover, the SENSE technique was shown to decrease the amount of image distortion, efficiently.

  2. Attention-dependent modulation of cortical taste circuits revealed by Granger causality with signal-dependent noise.

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    Qiang Luo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We show, for the first time, that in cortical areas, for example the insular, orbitofrontal, and lateral prefrontal cortex, there is signal-dependent noise in the fMRI blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD time series, with the variance of the noise increasing approximately linearly with the square of the signal. Classical Granger causal models are based on autoregressive models with time invariant covariance structure, and thus do not take this signal-dependent noise into account. To address this limitation, here we describe a Granger causal model with signal-dependent noise, and a novel, likelihood ratio test for causal inferences. We apply this approach to the data from an fMRI study to investigate the source of the top-down attentional control of taste intensity and taste pleasantness processing. The Granger causality with signal-dependent noise analysis reveals effects not identified by classical Granger causal analysis. In particular, there is a top-down effect from the posterior lateral prefrontal cortex to the insular taste cortex during attention to intensity but not to pleasantness, and there is a top-down effect from the anterior and posterior lateral prefrontal cortex to the orbitofrontal cortex during attention to pleasantness but not to intensity. In addition, there is stronger forward effective connectivity from the insular taste cortex to the orbitofrontal cortex during attention to pleasantness than during attention to intensity. These findings indicate the importance of explicitly modeling signal-dependent noise in functional neuroimaging, and reveal some of the processes involved in a biased activation theory of selective attention.

  3. Altered blood oxygen level-dependent signal variability in chronic post-traumatic stress disorder during symptom provocation

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    Ke J

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Jun Ke,1,* Li Zhang,2,* Rongfeng Qi,1,* Qiang Xu,1 Weihui Li,2 Cailan Hou,3 Yuan Zhong,1 Zhiqiang Zhang,1 Zhong He,4 Lingjiang Li,2,5 Guangming Lu11Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing, 2Mental Health Institute, the Second Xiangya Hospital, National Technology Institute of Psychiatry, Key Laboratory of Psychiatry and Mental Health of Hunan Province, Central South University, Changsha, 3Guangdong Academy of Medical Science, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Mental Health Center, Guangzhou, 4Department of Radiology of the Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, 5Shenzhen Kangning Hospital of Guangdong Province, Shenzhen, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Recent research suggests that variability in brain signal provides important information about brain function in health and disease. However, it is unknown whether blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD signal variability is altered in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. We aimed to identify the BOLD signal variability changes of PTSD patients during symptom provocation and compare the brain patterns of BOLD signal variability with those of brain activation.Methods: Twelve PTSD patients and 14 age-matched controls, who all experienced a mining accident, underwent clinical assessment as well as fMRI scanning while viewing trauma-related and neutral pictures. BOLD signal variability and brain activation were respectively examined with standard deviation (SD and general linear model analysis, and compared between the PTSD and control groups. Multiple regression analyses were conducted to explore the association between PTSD symptom severity and these two brain measures across all subjects as well as in the PTSD group.Results: PTSD patients showed increased activation in the middle occipital gyrus compared with controls, and an inverse correlation was found between PTSD

  4. Matched-filter acquisition for BOLD fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Lars; Haeberlin, Maximilian; Dietrich, Benjamin E; Gross, Simon; Barmet, Christoph; Wilm, Bertram J; Vannesjo, S Johanna; Brunner, David O; Ruff, Christian C; Stephan, Klaas E; Pruessmann, Klaas P

    2014-10-15

    We introduce matched-filter fMRI, which improves BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent) sensitivity by variable-density image acquisition tailored to subsequent image smoothing. Image smoothing is an established post-processing technique used in the vast majority of fMRI studies. Here we show that the signal-to-noise ratio of the resulting smoothed data can be substantially increased by acquisition weighting with a weighting function that matches the k-space filter imposed by the smoothing operation. We derive the theoretical SNR advantage of this strategy and propose a practical implementation of 2D echo-planar acquisition matched to common Gaussian smoothing. To reliably perform the involved variable-speed trajectories, concurrent magnetic field monitoring with NMR probes is used. Using this technique, phantom and in vivo measurements confirm reliable SNR improvement in the order of 30% in a "resting-state" condition and prove robust in different regimes of physiological noise. Furthermore, a preliminary task-based visual fMRI experiment equally suggests a consistent BOLD sensitivity increase in terms of statistical sensitivity (average t-value increase of about 35%). In summary, our study suggests that matched-filter acquisition is an effective means of improving BOLD SNR in studies that rely on image smoothing at the post-processing level. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Bayesian model comparison in nonlinear BOLD fMRI hemodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Danjal Jakup; Hansen, Lars Kai; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard

    2008-01-01

    Nonlinear hemodynamic models express the BOLD (blood oxygenation level dependent) signal as a nonlinear, parametric functional of the temporal sequence of local neural activity. Several models have been proposed for both the neural activity and the hemodynamics. We compare two such combined models......: the original balloon model with a square-pulse neural model (Friston, Mechelli, Turner, & Price, 2000) and an extended balloon model with a more sophisticated neural model (Buxton, Uludag, Dubowitz, & Liu, 2004). We learn the parameters of both models using a Bayesian approach, where the distribution...

  6. Luminance contrast of a visual stimulus modulates the BOLD response more than the cerebral blood flow response in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Christine L; Ances, Beau M; Perthen, Joanna E; Moradi, Farshad; Liau, Joy; Buracas, Giedrius T; Hopkins, Susan R; Buxton, Richard B

    2013-01-01

    The blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) depends on the evoked changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO(2)) in response to changes in neural activity. This response is strongly modulated by the CBF/CMRO(2) coupling relationship with activation, defined as n, the ratio of the fractional changes. The reliability of the BOLD signal as a quantitative reflection of underlying physiological changes depends on the stability of n in response to different stimuli. The effect of visual stimulus contrast on this coupling ratio was tested in 9 healthy human subjects, measuring CBF and BOLD responses to a flickering checkerboard at four visual contrast levels. The theory of the BOLD effect makes a robust prediction-independent of details of the model-that if the CBF/CMRO(2) coupling ratio n remains constant, then the response ratio between the lowest and highest contrast levels should be higher for the BOLD response than the CBF response because of the ceiling effect on the BOLD response. Instead, this response ratio was significantly lower for the BOLD response (BOLD response: 0.23 ± 0.13, mean ± SD; CBF response: 0.42 ± 0.18; p=0.0054). This data is consistent with a reduced dynamic range (strongest/weakest response ratio) of the CMRO(2) response (~1.7-fold) compared to that of the CBF response (~2.4-fold) as luminance contrast increases, corresponding to an increase of n from 1.7 at the lowest contrast level to 2.3 at the highest contrast level. The implication of these results for fMRI studies is that the magnitude of the BOLD response does not accurately reflect the magnitude of underlying physiological processes.

  7. Bold Books for Teenagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Don

    2005-01-01

    "Bold Books for Teenagers" provides dynamic, informative viewpoints on important issues in publishing and teaching contemporary literature, especially literature for adolescents. Reviews of young adult literature also appear in this column. This article examines how English teachers can help students explore their interests without promoting any…

  8. Determinations of renal cortical and medullary oxygenation using BOLD Magnetic Resonance Imaging and selective diuretics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Lizette; Glockner, James F.; Woollard, John; Textor, Stephen C.; Romero, Juan C.; Lerman, Lilach O.

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that blood O2 level dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD MRI) can detect changes in cortical proximal tubule (PT) and medullary thick ascending limb of Henle (TAL) oxygenation consequent to successive administration of furosemide and acetazolamide (Az). Assessment of PT and TAL function could be useful to monitor renal disease states in vivo. Therefore, the adjunct use of diuretics that inhibit Na+ reabsorption selectively in PT and TAL, Az and furosemide, respectively, may help discern tubular function by using BOLD MRI to detect changes in tissue oxygenation. Material and Methods BOLD MRI signal R2* (inversely related to oxygenation) and tissue oxygenation with intrarenal O2 probes were measured in pigs that received either furosemide (0.5mg/kg) or Az (15mg/kg) alone, Az sequentially after furosemide (n=6 each, 15-minute intervals), or only saline vehicle (n=3). Results R2* decreased in the cortex of Az-treated and medulla of furosemide-treated kidneys, corresponding to an increase in their tissue O2 assessed with probes. However, BOLD MRI also showed decreased cortical R2* following furosemide that was additive to the Az-induced decrease. Az administration, both alone and after furosemide, also decreased renal blood flow (−26±3.5 and −29.2±3%, respectively, p<0.01). Conclusion These results suggest that an increase in medullary and cortical tissue O2 elicited by selective diuretics is detectable by BOLD MRI, but may be complicated by hemodynamic effects of the drugs. Therefore, the BOLD MRI signal may reflect functional changes additional to oxygenation, and needs to be interpreted cautiously. PMID:20856128

  9. Abnormal functional MRI BOLD contrast in the vegetative state after severe traumatic brain injury.

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    Heelmann, Volker; Lippert-Grüner, Marcela; Rommel, Thomas; Wedekind, Christoph

    2010-06-01

    For the rehabilitation process, the treatment of patients surviving brain injury in a vegetative state is still a serious challenge. The aim of this study was to investigate patients exhibiting severely disturbed consciousness using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Five cases of posttraumatic vegetative state and one with minimal consciousness close to the vegetative state were studied clinically, electrophysiologically, and by means of functional magnetic resonance imaging. Visual, sensory, and acoustic paradigms were used for stimulation. In three patients examined less than 2 months after trauma, a consistent decrease in blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal ('negative activation') was observed for visual stimulation; one case even showed a decrease in BOLD activation for all three activation paradigms. In the remaining three cases examined more than 6 months after trauma, visual stimulation yielded positive BOLD contrast or no activation. In all cases, sensory stimulation was followed by a decrease in BOLD signal or no activation, whereas auditory stimulation failed to elicit any activation with the exception of one case. Functional magnetic resonance imaging in the vegetative state indicates retained yet abnormal brain function; this abnormality can be attributed to the impairment of cerebral vascular autoregulation or an increase in the energy consumption of activated neocortex in severe traumatic brain injury.

  10. The Stability of the BOLD fMRI Response to Motor Tasks is altered in Patients with Chronic Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzetto-Betti, Kelley C.; Leoni, Renata F.; Pontes-Neto, Octavio M.; Santos, Antonio C.; Leite, Joao P.; Silva, Afonso C.; de Araujo, Draulio B.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) is a powerful tool to investigate recovery of brain function in stroke patients. An inherent assumption in fMRI data analysis is that the Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) signal is stable over the course of the exam. In this study, we evaluated the validity of such assumption in chronic stroke patients. Methods Fifteen patients performed a simple motor task with repeated epochs using the paretic and the unaffected hand in separate runs. The corresponding BOLD signal time courses were extracted from the primary (M1) and supplementary motor areas (SMA) of both hemispheres. Statistical maps were obtained by the conventional General Linear Model (GLM) and by a parametric-GLM (p-GLM). Results Stable BOLD amplitude was observed when the task was executed with the unaffected hand. Conversely, the BOLD signal amplitude in both M1 and SMA was progressively attenuated in every patient when the task was executed with the paretic hand. The conventional GLM analysis failed to detect brain activation during movement of the paretic hand. However, the proposed p-GLM corrected the misdetection problem and showed robust activation in both M1 and SMA. Conclusions The use of data analysis tools that are built upon the premise of a stable BOLD signal may lead to misdetection of functional regions and underestimation of brain activity in stroke patients. The present data urges the use of caution when relying upon the BOLD response as a marker of brain reorganization in stroke patients. PMID:20705926

  11. Searching for Conservation Laws in Brain Dynamics—BOLD Flux and Source Imaging

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    Henning U. Voss

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD imaging is the most important noninvasive tool to map human brain function. It relies on local blood-flow changes controlled by neurovascular coupling effects, usually in response to some cognitive or perceptual task. In this contribution we ask if the spatiotemporal dynamics of the BOLD signal can be modeled by a conservation law. In analogy to the description of physical laws, which often can be derived from some underlying conservation law, identification of conservation laws in the brain could lead to new models for the functional organization of the brain. Our model is independent of the nature of the conservation law, but we discuss possible hints and motivations for conservation laws. For example, globally limited blood supply and local competition between brain regions for blood might restrict the large scale BOLD signal in certain ways that could be observable. One proposed selective pressure for the evolution of such conservation laws is the closed volume of the skull limiting the expansion of brain tissue by increases in blood volume. These ideas are demonstrated on a mental motor imagery fMRI experiment, in which functional brain activation was mapped in a group of volunteers imagining themselves swimming. In order to search for local conservation laws during this complex cognitive process, we derived maps of quantities resulting from spatial interaction of the BOLD amplitudes. Specifically, we mapped fluxes and sources of the BOLD signal, terms that would appear in a description by a continuity equation. Whereas we cannot present final answers with the particular analysis of this particular experiment, some results seem to be non-trivial. For example, we found that during task the group BOLD flux covered more widespread regions than identified by conventional BOLD mapping and was always increasing during task. It is our hope that these results motivate more work towards the search for conservation

  12. Efecto del tamaño kernel en el suavizado de señal BOLD en paradigmas funcionales (RMf (Effect of kernel size for BOLD signal smoothing in functional paradigms (fMRI

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    Laia Farràs-Permanyer

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Smoothing is a filtering technique that is essential for brain signal analysis and consists in calculating and comparing the average activation of a voxel to that of its neighbours. Several authors have proposed alternatives or modifications to this process; nonetheless, articles that compare the effect of different sizes of smoothing remain scarce. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of applying different smoothing sizes and to highlight the importance of choosing the correct smoothing size. Five smoothing criteria were applied to brain images obtained during an easy motor task performed by five adult participants. Significant differences were found between different smoothing sizes, mainly between the non-smoothing application and the smallest smoothing size versus the two largest smoothing sizes. The signals from the most activated brain areas did not disappear with increased smoothing, whereas signals from less active or smaller areas disappeared. Despite the study sample size, the results suggest that smoothing is relevant in functional magnetic resonance image processing and that the optimum smoothing size is 2.5 and 3.

  13. Signal-dependent noise determines motor planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, C M; Wolpert, D M

    1998-08-20

    When we make saccadic eye movements or goal-directed arm movements, there is an infinite number of possible trajectories that the eye or arm could take to reach the target. However, humans show highly stereotyped trajectories in which velocity profiles of both the eye and hand are smooth and symmetric for brief movements. Here we present a unifying theory of eye and arm movements based on the single physiological assumption that the neural control signals are corrupted by noise whose variance increases with the size of the control signal. We propose that in the presence of such signal-dependent noise, the shape of a trajectory is selected to minimize the variance of the final eye or arm position. This minimum-variance theory accurately predicts the trajectories of both saccades and arm movements and the speed-accuracy trade-off described by Fitt's law. These profiles are robust to changes in the dynamics of the eye or arm, as found empirically. Moreover, the relation between path curvature and hand velocity during drawing movements reproduces the empirical 'two-thirds power law. This theory provides a simple and powerful unifying perspective for both eye and arm movement control.

  14. Systematic protocol for assessment of the validity of BOLD MRI in a rabbit model of inflammatory arthritis at 1.5 tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Michael W.; Nathanael, George; Kis, Antonella; Amirabadi, Afsaneh; Zhong, Anguo; Rayner, Tammy; Weiss, Ruth; Detzler, Garry; Gahunia, Harpal [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Jong, Roland [Mount Sinai Hospital, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Toronto (Canada); Moineddin, Rahim [Family and Community Medicine, Department of Public Health, Toronto (Canada); Crawley, Adrian [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Toronto Western Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Doria, Andrea S. [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto (Canada)

    2014-05-15

    Blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) MRI has the potential to identify regions of early hypoxic and vascular joint changes in inflammatory arthritis. There is no standard protocol for analysis of BOLD MRI measurements in musculoskeletal disorders. To optimize the following BOLD MRI reading parameters: (1) statistical threshold values (low, r > 0.01 versus high, r > 0.2); (2) summary measures of BOLD contrast (percentage of activated voxels [PT%] versus percentage signal difference between on-and-off signal intensities [diff{sub o}n{sub o}ff]); and (3) direction of BOLD response (positive, negative and positive + negative). Using BOLD MRI protocols at 1.5 T, arthritic (n = 21) and contralateral (n = 21) knees of 21 juvenile rabbits were imaged at baseline and on days 1, 14 and 28 after a unilateral intra-articular injection of carrageenan. Nine non-injected rabbits served as external control knees (n = 18). By comparing arthritic to contralateral knees, receiver operating characteristic curves were used to determine diagnostic accuracy. Using diff{sub o}n{sub o}ff and positive + negative responses, a threshold of r > 0.01 was more accurate than r > 0.2 (P = 0.03 at day 28). Comparison of summary measures yielded no statistically significant difference (P > 0.05). Although positive + negative (AUC = 0.86 at day 28) and negative responses (AUC = 0.90 at day 28) for PT% were the most diagnostically accurate, positive + negative responses for diff{sub o}n{sub o}ff (AUC = 0.78 at day 28) also had acceptable accuracy. The most clinically relevant reading parameters included a lower threshold of r > 0.01 and a positive + negative BOLD response. We propose that diff{sub o}n{sub o}ff is a more clinically relevant summary measure of BOLD MRI, while PT% can be used as an ancillary measure. (orig.)

  15. Regional differences in the coupling of cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism changes in response to activation: implications for BOLD-fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ances, Beau M; Leontiev, Oleg; Perthen, Joanna E; Liang, Christine; Lansing, Amy E; Buxton, Richard B

    2008-02-15

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) based on blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal changes is a sensitive tool for mapping brain activation, but quantitative interpretation of the BOLD response is problematic. The BOLD response is primarily driven by cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes, but is moderated by M, a scaling parameter reflecting baseline deoxyhemoglobin, and n, the ratio of fractional changes in CBF to cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO(2)). We compared M and n between cortical (visual cortex, VC) and subcortical (lentiform nuclei, LN) regions using a quantitative approach based on calibrating the BOLD response with a hypercapnia experiment. Although M was similar in both regions (~5.8%), differences in n (2.21+/-0.03 in VC and 1.58+/-0.03 in LN; Cohen d=1.71) produced substantially weaker (~3.7x) subcortical than cortical BOLD responses relative to CMRO(2) changes. Because of this strong sensitivity to n, BOLD response amplitudes cannot be interpreted as a quantitative reflection of underlying metabolic changes, particularly when comparing cortical and subcortical regions.

  16. Blood-Oxygenation-Level-Dependent-(BOLD- Based R2′ MRI Study in Monkey Model of Reversible Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion

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    Jing Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the value of BOLD-based reversible transverse relaxation rate (R2′ MRI in detecting ischemic penumbra (IP in a monkey model of reversible middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO and time evolution of relative R2′ (rR2′ in infarcted core, IP, and oligemia. Materials and Methods. 6 monkeys were used to make MCAO by the microcatheter method. MR scans were performed at 0 h (1 h after MCAO, 1 h, 3 h, 6 h, 12 h, 24 h, and 48 h after reperfusion. R2′ was calculated using quantitative T2 and T2∗ maps. Ischemic area was subdivided into infracted core, IP and oligemia. rR2′ was calculated respectively. Results. Reversible MCAO model for 4/6 monkeys was made successfully. rR2′ values were significantly different at each time point, being highest in oligemia followed by IP and infarcted core (<.05. With reperfusion time evolution, rR2′ in infarcted core showed a decreased trend: sharply decreased within 6 hours and maintained at 0 during 6–48 hours (<.05. rR2′ values in IP and oligemia showed similar increased trend: sharply increased within 6 hours, maintained a plateau during 6–24 hours, and slightly increased until 48 hours. Conclusion. BOLD-based R2′ MRI can be used to describe changes of cerebral oxygen extract in acute ischemic stroke, and it can provide additional information in detecting IP. The time evolution rR2′ in infarcted core, IP, and oligemia is in accordance with the underlying pathophysiology.

  17. The longitudinal changes of BOLD response and cerebral hemodynamics from acute to subacute stroke. A fMRI and TCD study

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    Hamzei Farsin

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background By mapping the dynamics of brain reorganization, functional magnetic resonance imaging MRI (fMRI has allowed for significant progress in understanding cerebral plasticity phenomena after a stroke. However, cerebro-vascular diseases can affect blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD signal. Cerebral autoregulation is a primary function of cerebral hemodynamics, which allows to maintain a relatively constant blood flow despite changes in arterial blood pressure and perfusion pressure. Cerebral autoregulation is reported to become less effective in the early phases post-stroke. This study investigated whether any impairment of cerebral hemodynamics that occurs during the acute and the subacute phases of ischemic stroke is related to changes in BOLD response. We enrolled six aphasic patients affected by acute stroke. All patients underwent a Transcranial Doppler to assess cerebral autoregulation (Mx index and fMRI to evaluate the amplitude and the peak latency (time to peak-TTP of BOLD response in the acute (i.e., within four days of stroke occurrence and the subacute (i.e., between five and twelve days after stroke onset stroke phases. Results As patients advanced from the acute to subacute stroke phase, the affected hemisphere presented a BOLD TTP increase (p = 0.04 and a deterioration of cerebral autoregulation (Mx index increase, p = 0.046. A similar but not significant trend was observed also in the unaffected hemisphere. When the two hemispheres were grouped together, BOLD TTP delay was significantly related to worsening cerebral autoregulation (Mx index increase (Spearman's rho = 0.734; p = 0.01. Conclusions The hemodynamic response function subtending BOLD signal may present a delay in peak latency that arises as patients advance from the acute to the subacute stroke phase. This delay is related to the deterioration of cerebral hemodynamics. These findings suggest that remodeling the fMRI hemodynamic response function in the

  18. Reproducibility of BOLD, perfusion, and CMRO2 measurements with calibrated-BOLD fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leontiev, Oleg; Buxton, Richard B

    2007-03-01

    The coupling of changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO(2)) during brain activation can be characterized by an empirical index, n, defined as the ratio between fractional CBF change and fractional CMRO(2) change. The combination of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) imaging with CBF measurements from arterial spin labeling (ASL) provides a potentially powerful experimental approach for measuring n, but the reproducibility of the technique previously has not been assessed. In this study, inter-subject variance and intra-subject reproducibility of the method were determined. Block design %BOLD and %CBF responses to visual stimulation and mild hypercapnia (5% CO(2)) were measured, and these data were used to compute the BOLD scaling factor M, %CMRO(2) change with activation, and the coupling index n. Reproducibility was determined for three approaches to defining regions-of-interest (ROIs): 1) Visual area V1 determined from prior retinotopic maps, 2) BOLD-activated voxels from a separate functional localizer, and 3) CBF-activated voxels from a separate functional localizer. For estimates of %BOLD, %CMRO(2) and n, intra-subject reproducibility was found to be best for regions selected according to CBF activation. Among all fMRI measurements, estimates of n were the most robust and were substantially more stable within individual subjects (coefficient of variation, CV=7.4%) than across the subject pool (CV=36.9%). The stability of n across days, despite wider variability of CBF and CMRO(2) responses, suggests that the reproducibility of blood flow changes is limited by variation in the oxidative metabolic demand. We conclude that the calibrated BOLD approach provides a highly reproducible measurement of n that can serve as a useful quantitative probe of the coupling of blood flow and energy metabolism in the brain.

  19. Feedback to distal dendrites links fMRI signals to neural receptive fields in a spiking network model of the visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, Hanna; Sharifian, Fariba; Vigario, Ricardo; Vanni, Simo

    2015-07-01

    The blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) response has been strongly associated with neuronal activity in the brain. However, some neuronal tuning properties are consistently different from the BOLD response. We studied the spatial extent of neural and hemodynamic responses in the primary visual cortex, where the BOLD responses spread and interact over much longer distances than the small receptive fields of individual neurons would predict. Our model shows that a feedforward-feedback loop between V1 and a higher visual area can account for the observed spread of the BOLD response. In particular, anisotropic landing of inputs to compartmental neurons were necessary to account for the BOLD signal spread, while retaining realistic spiking responses. Our work shows that simple dendrites can separate tuning at the synapses and at the action potential output, thus bridging the BOLD signal to the neural receptive fields with high fidelity.

  20. Distinct BOLD activation profiles following central and peripheral oxytocin administration in awake rats

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    Craig F Ferris

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of literature has suggested that intranasal oxytocin (OT or other systemic routes of administration can alter prosocial behavior, presumably by directly activating OT sensitive neural circuits in the brain. Yet there is no clear evidence that OT given peripherally can cross the blood-brain-barrier at levels sufficient to engage the OT receptor. To address this issue we examined changes in blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD signal intensity in response to peripheral OT injections (0.1, 0.5 or 2.5 mg/kg during functional magnetic resonance (fMRI in awake rats imaged at 7.0 tesla. These data were compared to OT (1ug/5 µl given directly to the brain via the lateral cerebroventricle. Using a 3D annotated MRI atlas of the rat brain segmented into 171 brain areas and computational analysis we reconstructed the distributed integrated neural circuits identified with BOLD fMRI following central and peripheral OT. Both routes of administration caused significant changes in BOLD signal within the first 10 min of administration. As expected, central OT activated a majority of brain areas known to express a high density of OT receptors e.g., lateral septum, subiculum, shell of the accumbens, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. This profile of activation was not matched by peripheral OT. The change in BOLD signal to peripheral OT did not show any discernible dose-response. Interestingly, peripheral OT affected all subdivisions of the olfactory bulb, in addition to the cerebellum and several brainstem areas relevant to the autonomic nervous system, including the solitary tract nucleus. The results from this imaging study do not support a direct central action of peripheral OT on the brain. Instead, the patterns of brain activity suggest that peripheral OT may interact at the level of the olfactory bulb and through sensory afferents from the autonomic nervous system to influence brain activity.

  1. Erythropoietin receptor signaling is membrane raft dependent.

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    Kathy L McGraw

    Full Text Available Upon erythropoietin (Epo engagement, Epo-receptor (R homodimerizes to activate JAK2 and Lyn, which phosphorylate STAT5. Although recent investigations have identified key negative regulators of Epo-R signaling, little is known about the role of membrane localization in controlling receptor signal fidelity. Here we show a critical role for membrane raft (MR microdomains in creation of discrete signaling platforms essential for Epo-R signaling. Treatment of UT7 cells with Epo induced MR assembly and coalescence. Confocal microscopy showed that raft aggregates significantly increased after Epo stimulation (mean, 4.3±1.4(SE vs. 25.6±3.2 aggregates/cell; p≤0.001, accompanied by a >3-fold increase in cluster size (p≤0.001. Raft fraction immunoblotting showed Epo-R translocation to MR after Epo stimulation and was confirmed by fluorescence microscopy in Epo stimulated UT7 cells and primary erythroid bursts. Receptor recruitment into MR was accompanied by incorporation of JAK2, Lyn, and STAT5 and their activated forms. Raft disruption by cholesterol depletion extinguished Epo induced Jak2, STAT5, Akt and MAPK phosphorylation in UT7 cells and erythroid progenitors. Furthermore, inhibition of the Rho GTPases Rac1 or RhoA blocked receptor recruitment into raft fractions, indicating a role for these GTPases in receptor trafficking. These data establish a critical role for MR in recruitment and assembly of Epo-R and signal intermediates into discrete membrane signaling units.

  2. Task-related BOLD responses and resting-state functional connectivity during physiological clamping of end-tidal CO(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madjar, C; Gauthier, C J; Bellec, P; Birn, R M; Brooks, J C W; Hoge, R D

    2012-05-15

    Carbon dioxide (CO(2)), a potent vasodilator, is known to have a significant impact on the blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal. With the growing interest in studying synchronized BOLD fluctuations during the resting state, the extent to which the apparent synchrony is due to variations in the end-tidal pressure of CO(2) (PETCO(2)) is an important consideration. CO(2)-related fluctuations in BOLD signal may also represent a potential confound when studying task-related responses, especially if breathing depth and rate are affected by the task. While previous studies of the above issues have explored retrospective correction of BOLD fluctuations related to arterial PCO(2), here we demonstrate an alternative approach based on physiological clamping of the arterial CO(2) level to a near-constant value. We present data comparing resting-state functional connectivity within the default-mode-network (DMN), as well as task-related BOLD responses, acquired in two conditions in each subject: 1) while subject's PETCO(2) was allowed to vary spontaneously; and 2) while controlling subject's PETCO(2) within a narrow range. Strong task-related responses and areas of maximal signal correlation in the DMN were not significantly altered by suppressing fluctuations in PETCO(2). Controlling PETCO(2) did, however, improve the performance of retrospective physiological noise correction techniques, allowing detection of additional regions of task-related response and resting-state connectivity in highly vascularized regions such as occipital cortex. While these results serve to further rule out systemic physiological fluctuations as a significant source of apparent resting-state network connectivity, they also demonstrate that fluctuations in arterial CO(2) are one of the factors limiting sensitivity in task-based and resting-state fMRI, particularly in regions of high vascular density. This must be considered when comparing subject groups who might exhibit differences in

  3. The BOLD cerebrovascular reactivity response to progressive hypercapnia in young and elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhogal, Alex A.; De Vis, Jill B.; Siero, Jeroen C.W.

    2016-01-01

    to broaden our interpretation of the BOLD-CVR response. Significant age-related differences were observed. Grey matter CVR at 7 mm Hg above resting PetCO2 was lower amongst elderly (0.19 ± 0.06%ΔBOLD/mm Hg) as compared to young subjects (0.26 ± 0.07%ΔBOLD/mm Hg). White matter CVR at 7 mm Hg above baseline...... PetCO2 showed no significant difference between young (0.04 ± 0.02%ΔBOLD/mm Hg) and elderly subjects (0.05 ± 0.03%ΔBOLD/mm Hg). We saw no significant differences in the BOLD signal response to progressive hypercapnia between male and female subjects in either grey or white matter. The observed...

  4. Erythropoietin receptor signaling is membrane raft dependent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.L. McGraw (Kathy); G.M. Fuhler (Gwenny); J.O. Johnson (Joseph); J.A. Clark (Justine); G.C. Caceres (Gisela); L. Sokol (Lubomir); A.F. List (Alan)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractUpon erythropoietin (Epo) engagement, Epo-receptor (R) homodimerizes to activate JAK2 and Lyn, which phosphorylate STAT5. Although recent investigations have identified key negative regulators of Epo-R signaling, little is known about the role of membrane localization in controlling rece

  5. Positive Allosteric Modulator of GABA Lowers BOLD Responses in the Cingulate Cortex.

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    Susanna A Walter

    Full Text Available Knowledge about the neural underpinnings of the negative blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD responses in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI is still limited. We hypothesized that pharmacological GABAergic modulation attenuates BOLD responses, and that blood concentrations of a positive allosteric modulator of GABA correlate inversely with BOLD responses in the cingulate cortex. We investigated whether or not pure task-related negative BOLD responses were co-localized with pharmacologically modulated BOLD responses. Twenty healthy adults received either 5 mg diazepam or placebo in a double blind, randomized design. During fMRI the subjects performed a working memory task. Results showed that BOLD responses in the cingulate cortex were inversely correlated with diazepam blood concentrations; that is, the higher the blood diazepam concentration, the lower the BOLD response. This inverse correlation was most pronounced in the pregenual anterior cingulate cortex and the anterior mid-cingulate cortex. For subjects with diazepam plasma concentration > 0.1 mg/L we observed negative BOLD responses with respect to fixation baseline. There was minor overlap between cingulate regions with task-related negative BOLD responses and regions where the BOLD responses were inversely correlated with diazepam concentration. We interpret that the inverse correlation between the BOLD response and diazepam was caused by GABA-related neural inhibition. Thus, this study supports the hypothesis that GABA attenuates BOLD responses in fMRI. The minimal overlap between task-related negative BOLD responses and responses attenuated by diazepam suggests that these responses might be caused by different mechanisms.

  6. BOLD temporal dynamics of rat superior colliculus and lateral geniculate nucleus following short duration visual stimulation.

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    Condon Lau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The superior colliculus (SC and lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN are important subcortical structures for vision. Much of our understanding of vision was obtained using invasive and small field of view (FOV techniques. In this study, we use non-invasive, large FOV blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD fMRI to measure the SC and LGN's response temporal dynamics following short duration (1 s visual stimulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Experiments are performed at 7 tesla on Sprague Dawley rats stimulated in one eye with flashing light. Gradient-echo and spin-echo sequences are used to provide complementary information. An anatomical image is acquired from one rat after injection of monocrystalline iron oxide nanoparticles (MION, a blood vessel contrast agent. BOLD responses are concentrated in the contralateral SC and LGN. The SC BOLD signal measured with gradient-echo rises to 50% of maximum amplitude (PEAK 0.2±0.2 s before the LGN signal (p<0.05. The LGN signal returns to 50% of PEAK 1.4±1.2 s before the SC signal (p<0.05. These results indicate the SC signal rises faster than the LGN signal but settles slower. Spin-echo results support these findings. The post-MION image shows the SC and LGN lie beneath large blood vessels. This subcortical vasculature is similar to that in the cortex, which also lies beneath large vessels. The LGN lies closer to the large vessels than much of the SC. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The differences in response timing between SC and LGN are very similar to those between deep and shallow cortical layers following electrical stimulation, which are related to depth-dependent blood vessel dilation rates. This combined with the similarities in vasculature between subcortex and cortex suggest the SC and LGN timing differences are also related to depth-dependent dilation rates. This study shows for the first time that BOLD responses in the rat SC and LGN following short duration visual stimulation are

  7. Effects of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty on muscle BOLD-MRI in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huegli, Rolf W. [University Hospital Basel, Department of Radiology, Division of Interventional Radiology, Basel (Switzerland)]|[Kantonsspital Bruderholz, Department of Radiology, Bruderholz (Switzerland); Schulte, Anja-Carina [University of Basel, Biocenter, Basel (Switzerland); Aschwanden, Markus; Thalhammer, Christoph [University Hospital Basel, Department of Angiology, Basel (Switzerland); Kos, Sebastian; Jacob, Augustinus L.; Bilecen, Deniz [University Hospital Basel, Department of Radiology, Division of Interventional Radiology, Basel (Switzerland)

    2009-02-15

    The purpose was to evaluate the effect of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) of the superficial femoral artery (SFA) on the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal change in the calf musculature of patients with intermittent claudication. Ten patients (mean age, 63.4 {+-} 11.6 years) with symptomatic peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) caused by SFA stenoses were investigated before and after PTA. Patients underwent BOLD-MRI 1 day before and 6 weeks after PTA. A T2*-weighted single-shot multi-echo echo-planar MR-imaging technique was applied. The BOLD measurements were acquired at mid-calf level during reactive hyperaemia at 1.5 T. This transient hyperperfusion of the muscle tissue was provoked by suprasystolic cuff compression. Key parameters describing the BOLD signal curve included maximum T2*(T2*{sub max}), time-to-peak to reach T2*{sub max} (TTP) and T2* end value (EV) after 600 s of hyperemia. Paired t-tests were applied for statistic comparison. Between baseline and post-PTA, T2*{sub max} increased from 11.1{+-}3.6% to 12.3{+-}3.8% (p=0.51), TTP decreased from 48.5{+-}20.8 s to 35.3{+-}11.6 s (p=0.11) and EV decreased from 6.1{+-}6.4% to 5.0{+-}4.2% (p=0.69). In conclusion, BOLD-MRI reveals changes of the key parameters T2*{sub max}, TTP, and EV after successful PTA of the calf muscles during reactive hyperaemia. (orig.)

  8. Abnormal striatal BOLD responses to reward anticipation and reward delivery in ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Emi; Bado, Patricia; Tripp, Gail; Mattos, Paulo; Wickens, Jeff R; Bramati, Ivanei E; Alsop, Brent; Ferreira, Fernanda Meireles; Lima, Debora; Tovar-Moll, Fernanda; Sergeant, Joseph A; Moll, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Altered reward processing has been proposed to contribute to the symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The neurobiological mechanism underlying this alteration remains unclear. We hypothesize that the transfer of dopamine release from reward to reward-predicting cues, as normally observed in animal studies, may be deficient in ADHD. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to investigate striatal responses to reward-predicting cues and reward delivery in a classical conditioning paradigm. Data from 14 high-functioning and stimulant-naïve young adults with elevated lifetime symptoms of ADHD (8 males, 6 females) and 15 well-matched controls (8 males, 7 females) were included in the analyses. During reward anticipation, increased blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) responses in the right ventral and left dorsal striatum were observed in controls, but not in the ADHD group. The opposite pattern was observed in response to reward delivery; the ADHD group demonstrated significantly greater BOLD responses in the ventral striatum bilaterally and the left dorsal striatum relative to controls. In the ADHD group, the number of current hyperactivity/impulsivity symptoms was inversely related to ventral striatal responses during reward anticipation and positively associated with responses to reward. The BOLD response patterns observed in the striatum are consistent with impaired predictive dopamine signaling in ADHD, which may explain altered reward-contingent behaviors and symptoms of ADHD.

  9. fMRI at High Spatial Resolution: Implications for BOLD-Models.

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    Goense, Jozien; Bohraus, Yvette; Logothetis, Nikos K

    2016-01-01

    As high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and fMRI of cortical layers become more widely used, the question how well high-resolution fMRI signals reflect the underlying neural processing, and how to interpret laminar fMRI data becomes more and more relevant. High-resolution fMRI has shown laminar differences in cerebral blood flow (CBF), volume (CBV), and neurovascular coupling. Features and processes that were previously lumped into a single voxel become spatially distinct at high resolution. These features can be vascular compartments such as veins, arteries, and capillaries, or cortical layers and columns, which can have differences in metabolism. Mesoscopic models of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response therefore need to be expanded, for instance, to incorporate laminar differences in the coupling between neural activity, metabolism and the hemodynamic response. Here we discuss biological and methodological factors that affect the modeling and interpretation of high-resolution fMRI data. We also illustrate with examples from neuropharmacology and the negative BOLD response how combining BOLD with CBF- and CBV-based fMRI methods can provide additional information about neurovascular coupling, and can aid modeling and interpretation of high-resolution fMRI.

  10. Hypercapnic normalization of BOLD fMRI: comparison across field strengths and pulse sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cohen, Eric R.; Rostrup, Egill; Sidaros, Karam

    2004-01-01

    size, as well as experimental, such as pulse sequence and static magnetic field strength (B(0)). Thus, it is difficult to compare task-induced fMRI signals across subjects, field strengths, and pulse sequences. This problem can be overcome by normalizing the neural activity-induced BOLD fMRI response...... by a global hypercapnia-induced BOLD signal. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the BOLD normalization approach, gradient-echo BOLD fMRI at 1.5, 4, and 7 T and spin-echo BOLD fMRI at 4 T were performed in human subjects. For neural stimulation, subjects performed sequential finger movements at 2 Hz, while...... for global stimulation, subjects breathed a 5% CO(2) gas mixture. Under all conditions, voxels containing primarily large veins and those containing primarily active tissue (i.e., capillaries and small veins) showed distinguishable behavior after hypercapnic normalization. This allowed functional activity...

  11. Hypercapnic normalization of BOLD fMRI: comparison across field strengths and pulse sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cohen, Eric R.; Rostrup, Egill; Sidaros, Karam;

    2004-01-01

    The blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signal response to neural stimulation is influenced by many factors that are unrelated to the stimulus. These factors are physiological, such as the resting venous cerebral blood volume (CBV(v)) and vessel...... for global stimulation, subjects breathed a 5% CO(2) gas mixture. Under all conditions, voxels containing primarily large veins and those containing primarily active tissue (i.e., capillaries and small veins) showed distinguishable behavior after hypercapnic normalization. This allowed functional activity...

  12. Resting state functional connectivity in perfusion imaging: correlation maps with BOLD connectivity and resting state perfusion.

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    Roberto Viviani

    Full Text Available Functional connectivity is a property of the resting state that may provide biomarkers of brain function and individual differences. Classically, connectivity is estimated as the temporal correlation of spontaneous fluctuations of BOLD signal. We investigated differences in connectivity estimated from the BOLD and CBF signal present in volumes acquired with arterial spin labeling technique in a large sample (N = 265 of healthy individuals. Positive connectivity was observable in both BOLD and CBF signal, and was present in the CBF signal also at frequencies lower than 0.009 Hz, here investigated for the first time. Negative connectivity was more variable. The validity of positive connectivity was confirmed by the existence of correlation across individuals in its intensity estimated from the BOLD and CBF signal. In contrast, there was little or no correlation across individuals between intensity of connectivity and mean perfusion levels, suggesting that these two biomarkers correspond to distinct sources of individual differences.

  13. Approaches to brain stress testing: BOLD magnetic resonance imaging with computer-controlled delivery of carbon dioxide.

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    W Alan C Mutch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An impaired vascular response in the brain regionally may indicate reduced vascular reserve and vulnerability to ischemic injury. Changing the carbon dioxide (CO(2 tension in arterial blood is commonly used as a cerebral vasoactive stimulus to assess the cerebral vascular response, changing cerebral blood flow (CBF by up to 5-11 percent/mmHg in normal adults. Here we describe two approaches to generating the CO(2 challenge using a computer-controlled gas blender to administer: i a square wave change in CO(2 and, ii a ramp stimulus, consisting of a continuously graded change in CO(2 over a range. Responses were assessed regionally by blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied 8 patients with known cerebrovascular disease (carotid stenosis or occlusion and 2 healthy subjects. The square wave stimulus was used to study the dynamics of the vascular response, while the ramp stimulus assessed the steady-state response to CO(2. Cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR maps were registered by color coding and overlaid on the anatomical scans generated with 3 Tesla MRI to assess the corresponding BOLD signal change/mmHg change in CO(2, voxel-by-voxel. Using a fractal temporal approach, detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA maps of the processed raw BOLD signal per voxel over the same CO(2 range were generated. Regions of BOLD signal decrease with increased CO(2 (coded blue were seen in all of these high-risk patients, indicating regions of impaired CVR. All patients also demonstrated regions of altered signal structure on DFA maps (Hurst exponents less than 0.5; coded blue indicative of anti-persistent noise. While 'blue' CVR maps remained essentially stable over the time of analysis, 'blue' DFA maps improved. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This combined dual stimulus and dual analysis approach may be complementary in identifying vulnerable brain regions and thus constitute a regional as

  14. Whole-brain three-dimensional T2-weighted BOLD functional magnetic resonance imaging at 7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Jun; Qin, Qin; van Zijl, Peter C M; Pekar, James J; Jones, Craig K

    2014-12-01

    A new acquisition scheme for T2-weighted spin-echo BOLD fMRI is introduced. It uses a T2-preparation module to induce blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) contrast, followed by a single-shot three-dimensional (3D) fast gradient-echo readout with short echo time (TE). It differs from most spin-echo BOLD sequences in that BOLD contrast is generated before the readout, which eliminates the "dead time" due to long TE required for T2 contrast, and substantially improves acquisition efficiency. This approach, termed "3D T2prep-GRE," was implemented at 7 Tesla (T) with a typical spatial (2.5 × 2.5 × 2.5 mm(3) ) and temporal (TR = 2.3 s) resolution for functional MRI (fMRI) and whole-brain coverage (55 slices), and compared with the widely used 2D spin-echo EPI sequence. In fMRI experiments of simultaneous visual/motor activities, 3D T2prep-GRE showed minimal distortion and little signal dropout across the whole brain. Its lower power deposition allowed greater spatial coverage (55 versus 17 slices with identical TR, resolution and power level), temporal SNR (60% higher) and CNR (35% higher) efficiency than 2D spin-echo EPI. It also showed smaller T2* contamination. This approach is expected to be useful for ultra-high field fMRI, especially for regions near air cavities. The concept of using T2-preparation to generate BOLD contrast can be combined with many other sequences at any field strength. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Redox-dependent regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David E. Heppner

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent cell signaling represents a unique feature of multicellular organisms, and is important in regulation of cell differentiation and specialized cell functions. Multicellular organisms also contain a diverse family of NADPH oxidases (NOXs that have been closely linked with tyrosine kinase-based cell signaling and regulate tyrosine phosphorylation via reversible oxidation of cysteine residues that are highly conserved within many proteins involved in this signaling pathway. An example of redox-regulated tyrosine kinase signaling involves the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, a widely studied receptor system with diverse functions in normal cell biology as well as pathologies associated with oxidative stress such as cancer. The purpose of this Graphical Redox Review is to highlight recently emerged concepts with respect to NOX-dependent regulation of this important signaling pathway.

  16. Human cognitive flexibility depends on dopamine D2 receptor signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holstein, M.G.A. van; Aarts, E.; Schaaf, M.E. van der; Geurts, D.E.M.; Verkes, R.J.; Franke, B.; Schouwenburg, M.R. van; Cools, R.

    2011-01-01

    RATIONALE: Accumulating evidence indicates that the cognitive effects of dopamine depend on the subtype of dopamine receptor that is activated. In particular, recent work with animals as well as current theorizing has suggested that cognitive flexibility depends on dopamine D2 receptor signaling.

  17. Asynchronous signal-dependent non-uniform sampler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can-Cimino, Azime; Chaparro, Luis F.; Sejdić, Ervin

    2014-05-01

    Analog sparse signals resulting from biomedical and sensing network applications are typically non-stationary with frequency-varying spectra. By ignoring that the maximum frequency of their spectra is changing, uniform sampling of sparse signals collects unnecessary samples in quiescent segments of the signal. A more appropriate sampling approach would be signal-dependent. Moreover, in many of these applications power consumption and analog processing are issues of great importance that need to be considered. In this paper we present a signal dependent non-uniform sampler that uses a Modified Asynchronous Sigma Delta Modulator which consumes low-power and can be processed using analog procedures. Using Prolate Spheroidal Wave Functions (PSWF) interpolation of the original signal is performed, thus giving an asynchronous analog to digital and digital to analog conversion. Stable solutions are obtained by using modulated PSWFs functions. The advantage of the adapted asynchronous sampler is that range of frequencies of the sparse signal is taken into account avoiding aliasing. Moreover, it requires saving only the zero-crossing times of the non-uniform samples, or their differences, and the reconstruction can be done using their quantized values and a PSWF-based interpolation. The range of frequencies analyzed can be changed and the sampler can be implemented as a bank of filters for unknown range of frequencies. The performance of the proposed algorithm is illustrated with an electroencephalogram (EEG) signal.

  18. Indication of BOLD-specific venous flow-volume changes from precisely controlled hyperoxic vs. hypercapnic calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Clarisse I; Pike, G Bruce

    2012-04-01

    Deriving cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen consumption (CMRO(2)) from blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals involves a flow-volume parameter (α), reflecting total cerebral blood volume changes, and a calibration constant (M). Traditionally, the former is assumed a fixed value and the latter is measured under alterations in fixed inspired fractional concentrations of carbon dioxide. We recently reported on reductions in M-variability via precise control of end-tidal pressures of both hypercapnic (HC) and hyperoxic (HO) gases. In light of these findings, our aim was to apply the improved calibration alternatives to neuronal activation, making use of their distinct vasoactive natures to evaluate the α-value. Nine healthy volunteers were imaged at 3 T while simultaneously measuring BOLD and arterial spin-labeling signals during controlled, graded, HC, and HO, followed by visual (VC) and sensorimotor cortices (SMC) activation. On the basis of low M- and CMRO(2)-variability, the comparison of these calibration alternatives accurately highlighted a reduced venous flow-volume relationship (α=0.16±0.02, with α(VC)=0.12±0.04, and α(SMC)=0.20±0.02), as appropriate for BOLD modeling.

  19. BMP signaling regulates satellite cell-dependent postnatal muscle growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stantzou, Amalia; Schirwis, Elija; Swist, Sandra; Alonso-Martin, Sonia; Polydorou, Ioanna; Zarrouki, Faouzi; Mouisel, Etienne; Beley, Cyriaque; Julien, Anaïs; Le Grand, Fabien; Garcia, Luis; Colnot, Céline; Birchmeier, Carmen; Braun, Thomas; Schuelke, Markus; Relaix, Frédéric; Amthor, Helge

    2017-08-01

    Postnatal growth of skeletal muscle largely depends on the expansion and differentiation of resident stem cells, the so-called satellite cells. Here, we demonstrate that postnatal satellite cells express components of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling machinery. Overexpression of noggin in postnatal mice (to antagonize BMP ligands), satellite cell-specific knockout of Alk3 (the gene encoding the BMP transmembrane receptor) or overexpression of inhibitory SMAD6 decreased satellite cell proliferation and accretion during myofiber growth, and ultimately retarded muscle growth. Moreover, reduced BMP signaling diminished the adult satellite cell pool. Abrogation of BMP signaling in satellite cell-derived primary myoblasts strongly diminished cell proliferation and upregulated the expression of cell cycle inhibitors p21 and p57 In conclusion, these results show that BMP signaling defines postnatal muscle development by regulating satellite cell-dependent myofiber growth and the generation of the adult muscle stem cell pool. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Frequency-dependent signal transmission and modulation by neuromodulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi T Ito

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The brain uses a strategy of labor division, which may allow it to accomplish more elaborate and complicated tasks, but in turn, imposes a requirement for central control to integrate information among different brain areas. Anatomically, the divergence of long-range neuromodulator projections appears well-suited to coordinate communication between brain areas. Oscillatory brain activity is a prominent feature of neural transmission. Thus, the ability of neuromodulators to modulate signal transmission in a frequency-dependent manner adds an additional level of regulation. Here, we review the significance of frequency-dependent signal modulation in brain function and how a neuronal network can possess such properties. We also describe how a neuromodulator, dopamine, changes frequency-dependent signal transmission, controlling information flow from the entorhinal cortex to the hippocampus.

  1. Fourier modeling of the BOLD response to a breath-hold task: Optimization and reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Joana; Jorge, João; Sousa, Inês; Vilela, Pedro; Figueiredo, Patrícia

    2016-07-15

    Cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) reflects the capacity of blood vessels to adjust their caliber in order to maintain a steady supply of brain perfusion, and it may provide a sensitive disease biomarker. Measurement of the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) response to a hypercapnia-inducing breath-hold (BH) task has been frequently used to map CVR noninvasively using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). However, the best modeling approach for the accurate quantification of CVR maps remains an open issue. Here, we compare and optimize Fourier models of the BOLD response to a BH task with a preparatory inspiration, and assess the test-retest reproducibility of the associated CVR measurements, in a group of 10 healthy volunteers studied over two fMRI sessions. Linear combinations of sine-cosine pairs at the BH task frequency and its successive harmonics were added sequentially in a nested models approach, and were compared in terms of the adjusted coefficient of determination and corresponding variance explained (VE) of the BOLD signal, as well as the number of voxels exhibiting significant BOLD responses, the estimated CVR values, and their test-retest reproducibility. The brain average VE increased significantly with the Fourier model order, up to the 3rd order. However, the number of responsive voxels increased significantly only up to the 2nd order, and started to decrease from the 3rd order onwards. Moreover, no significant relative underestimation of CVR values was observed beyond the 2nd order. Hence, the 2nd order model was concluded to be the optimal choice for the studied paradigm. This model also yielded the best test-retest reproducibility results, with intra-subject coefficients of variation of 12 and 16% and an intra-class correlation coefficient of 0.74. In conclusion, our results indicate that a Fourier series set consisting of a sine-cosine pair at the BH task frequency and its two harmonics is a suitable model for BOLD-fMRI CVR measurements

  2. Determination of relative CMRO2 from CBF and BOLD changes: significant increase of oxygen consumption rate during visual stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, S.G.; Rostrup, Egill; Larsson, H.B.;

    1999-01-01

    The blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) effect in functional magnetic resonance imaging depends on at least partial uncoupling between cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) changes. By measuring CBF and BOLD simultaneously, the relative change in CMRO2 can b...

  3. Wavelet entropy of BOLD time series: An application to Rolandic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Lalit; Jansen, Jacobus F A; Hofman, Paul A M; Besseling, René M H; de Louw, Anton J A; Aldenkamp, Albert P; Backes, Walter H

    2017-03-11

    To assess the wavelet entropy for the characterization of intrinsic aberrant temporal irregularities in the time series of resting-state blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal fluctuations. Further, to evaluate the temporal irregularities (disorder/order) on a voxel-by-voxel basis in the brains of children with Rolandic epilepsy. The BOLD time series was decomposed using the discrete wavelet transform and the wavelet entropy was calculated. Using a model time series consisting of multiple harmonics and nonstationary components, the wavelet entropy was compared with Shannon and spectral (Fourier-based) entropy. As an application, the wavelet entropy in 22 children with Rolandic epilepsy was compared to 22 age-matched healthy controls. The images were obtained by performing resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) using a 3T system, an 8-element receive-only head coil, and an echo planar imaging pulse sequence ( T2*-weighted). The wavelet entropy was also compared to spectral entropy, regional homogeneity, and Shannon entropy. Wavelet entropy was found to identify the nonstationary components of the model time series. In Rolandic epilepsy patients, a significantly elevated wavelet entropy was observed relative to controls for the whole cerebrum (P = 0.03). Spectral entropy (P = 0.41), regional homogeneity (P = 0.52), and Shannon entropy (P = 0.32) did not reveal significant differences. The wavelet entropy measure appeared more sensitive to detect abnormalities in cerebral fluctuations represented by nonstationary effects in the BOLD time series than more conventional measures. This effect was observed in the model time series as well as in Rolandic epilepsy. These observations suggest that the brains of children with Rolandic epilepsy exhibit stronger nonstationary temporal signal fluctuations than controls. 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  4. Neuromodulatory signaling in hippocampus-dependent memory retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Steven A

    2015-04-01

    Considerable advances have been made toward understanding the molecular signaling events that underlie memory acquisition and consolidation. In contrast, less is known about memory retrieval, despite its necessity for utilizing learned information. This review focuses on neuromodulatory and intracellular signaling events that underlie memory retrieval mediated by the hippocampus, for which the most information is currently available. Among neuromodulators, adrenergic signaling is required for the retrieval of various types of hippocampus-dependent memory. Although they contribute to acquisition and/or consolidation, cholinergic and dopaminergic signaling are generally not required for retrieval. Interestingly, while not required for retrieval, serotonergic and opioid signaling may actually constrain memory retrieval. Roles for histamine and non-opioid neuropeptides are currently unclear but possible. A critical effector of adrenergic signaling in retrieval is reduction of the slow afterhyperpolarization mediated by β1 receptors, cyclic AMP, protein kinase A, Epac, and possibly ERK. In contrast, stress and glucocorticoids impair retrieval by decreasing cyclic AMP, mediated in part by the activation of β2 -adrenergic receptors. Clinically, alterations in neuromodulatory signaling and in memory retrieval occur in Alzheimer's disease, Down syndrome, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder, and recent evidence has begun to link changes in neuromodulatory signaling with effects on memory retrieval.

  5. Hemodynamic modelling of BOLD fMRI - A machine learning approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Danjal Jakup

    2007-01-01

    This Ph.D. thesis concerns the application of machine learning methods to hemodynamic models for BOLD fMRI data. Several such models have been proposed by different researchers, and they have in common a basis in physiological knowledge of the hemodynamic processes involved in the generation...... of the BOLD signal. The BOLD signal is modelled as a non-linear function of underlying, hidden (non-measurable) hemodynamic state variables. The focus of this thesis work has been to develop methods for learning the parameters of such models, both in their traditional formulation, and in a state space...... formulation. In the latter, noise enters at the level of the hidden states, as well as in the BOLD measurements themselves. A framework has been developed to allow approximate posterior distributions of model parameters to be learned from real fMRI data. This is accomplished with Markov chain Monte Carlo...

  6. Impact of physiological noise correction on detecting blood oxygenation level-dependent contrast in the breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Tess E.; Manavaki, Roido; Graves, Martin J.; Patterson, Andrew J.; Gilbert, Fiona J.

    2017-01-01

    Physiological fluctuations are expected to be a dominant source of noise in blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments to assess tumour oxygenation and angiogenesis. This work investigates the impact of various physiological noise regressors: retrospective image correction (RETROICOR), heart rate (HR) and respiratory volume per unit time (RVT), on signal variance and the detection of BOLD contrast in the breast in response to a modulated respiratory stimulus. BOLD MRI was performed at 3 T in ten volunteers at rest and during cycles of oxygen and carbogen gas breathing. RETROICOR was optimized using F-tests to determine which cardiac and respiratory phase terms accounted for a significant amount of signal variance. A nested regression analysis was performed to assess the effect of RETROICOR, HR and RVT on the model fit residuals, temporal signal-to-noise ratio, and BOLD activation parameters. The optimized RETROICOR model accounted for the largest amount of signal variance ( Δ R\\text{adj}2   =  3.3  ±  2.1%) and improved the detection of BOLD activation (P  =  0.002). Inclusion of HR and RVT regressors explained additional signal variance, but had a negative impact on activation parameter estimation (P  <  0.001). Fluctuations in HR and RVT appeared to be correlated with the stimulus and may contribute to apparent BOLD signal reactivity.

  7. Computing moment-to-moment BOLD activation for real-time neurofeedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinds, Oliver; Ghosh, Satrajit; Thompson, Todd W; Yoo, Julie J; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan; Triantafyllou, Christina; Gabrieli, John D E

    2011-01-01

    Estimating moment-to-moment changes in blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) activation levels from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data has applications for learned regulation of regional activation, brain state monitoring, and brain-machine interfaces. In each of these contexts, accurate estimation of the BOLD signal in as little time as possible is desired. This is a challenging problem due to the low signal-to-noise ratio of fMRI data. Previous methods for real-time fMRI analysis have either sacrificed the ability to compute moment-to-moment activation changes by averaging several acquisitions into a single activation estimate or have sacrificed accuracy by failing to account for prominent sources of noise in the fMRI signal. Here we present a new method for computing the amount of activation present in a single fMRI acquisition that separates moment-to-moment changes in the fMRI signal intensity attributable to neural sources from those due to noise, resulting in a feedback signal more reflective of neural activation. This method computes an incremental general linear model fit to the fMRI time series, which is used to calculate the expected signal intensity at each new acquisition. The difference between the measured intensity and the expected intensity is scaled by the variance of the estimator in order to transform this residual difference into a statistic. Both synthetic and real data were used to validate this method and compare it to the only other published real-time fMRI method. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Medial temporal lobe BOLD activity at rest predicts individual differences in memory ability in healthy young adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wig, Gagan S.; Grafton, Scott T.; Demos, Kathryn E.; Wolford, George L.; Petersen, Steven E.; Kelley, William M.

    2008-01-01

    Human beings differ in their ability to form and retrieve lasting long-term memories. To explore the source of these individual differences, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) activity in healthy young adults (n = 50) during periods of resting fixation that were interleaved with periods of simple cognitive tasks. We report that medial temporal lobe BOLD activity during periods of rest predicts individual differences in memory ability. Specifically, individuals who exhibited greater magnitudes of task-induced deactivations in medial temporal lobe BOLD signal (as compared to periods of rest) demonstrated superior memory during offline testing. This relationship was independent of differences in general cognitive function and persisted across different control tasks (i.e., number judgment versus checkerboard detection) and experimental designs (i.e., blocked versus event-related). These results offer a neurophysiological basis for the variability in mnemonic ability that is present amongst healthy young adults and may help to guide strategies aimed at early detection and intervention of neurological and mnemonic impairment. PMID:19001272

  9. Amplitude of Sensorimotor Mu Rhythm Is Correlated with BOLD from Multiple Brain Regions: A Simultaneous EEG-fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Siyang; Liu, Yuelu; Ding, Mingzhou

    2016-01-01

    The mu rhythm is a field oscillation in the ∼10Hz range over the sensorimotor cortex. For decades, the suppression of mu (event-related desynchronization) has been used to index movement planning, execution, and imagery. Recent work reports that non-motor processes, such as spatial attention and movement observation, also desynchronize mu, raising the possibility that the mu rhythm is associated with the activity of multiple brain regions and systems. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by recording simultaneous resting-state EEG-fMRI from healthy subjects. Independent component analysis (ICA) was applied to extract the mu components. The amplitude (power) fluctuations of mu were estimated as a time series using a moving-window approach, which, after convolving with a canonical hemodynamic response function (HRF), was correlated with blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signals from the entire brain. Two main results were found. First, mu power was negatively correlated with BOLD from areas of the sensorimotor network, the attention control network, the putative mirror neuron system, and the network thought to support theory of mind. Second, mu power was positively correlated with BOLD from areas of the salience network, including anterior cingulate cortex and anterior insula. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that sensorimotor mu rhythm is associated with multiple brain regions and systems. They also suggest that caution should be exercised when attempting to interpret mu modulation in terms of a single brain network. PMID:27499736

  10. Delta- Sigma Modulator with Signal Dependant Feedback Gain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.Diwakar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Higher order Delta-Sigma Modulator (DSM is basically an unstable system. The approximate conditions for stability cannot be used for the design of a DSM for industrial applications where risk is involved. The conventional second order, single stage, single bit, unity feedback gain, discrete DSM cannot be used for the normalized full range (-1 to +1 of input signal since the DSM becomes unstable when the modulus of the input signal is above 0.55. The stability is also not guaranteed for amplitude of input signal less than 0.55. In this proposal, the conventional second order DSM is modified with input signal dependant feedback path gain. The proposed DSM is suitable for industrial applications where one needs the digital representation of the analog input signal, during each sampling period. This first configuration of proposed DSM can operate for the full range of input signal without causing instability. In order to improve the SNR of first configuration, it is combined with conventional second order DSM and proposed the second configuration of DSM.

  11. "Extreme Bold" in the Faculty Ranks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuusisto, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Boldness, defense, and the necessity of talking back remain as central to life with disability in one's time as in Francis Bacon's age. "Therefore all deformed persons are extreme bold," Bacon wrote, "first, as in their own defence, as being exposed to scorn, but in process of time, by a general habit." Perhaps no word carries…

  12. "Extreme Bold" in the Faculty Ranks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuusisto, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Boldness, defense, and the necessity of talking back remain as central to life with disability in one's time as in Francis Bacon's age. "Therefore all deformed persons are extreme bold," Bacon wrote, "first, as in their own defence, as being exposed to scorn, but in process of time, by a general habit." Perhaps no word carries…

  13. Negative blood oxygenation level dependent homunculus and somatotopic information in primary motor cortex and supplementary motor area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeharia, Noa; Hertz, Uri; Flash, Tamar; Amedi, Amir

    2012-11-06

    A crucial attribute in movement encoding is an adequate balance between suppression of unwanted muscles and activation of required ones. We studied movement encoding across the primary motor cortex (M1) and supplementary motor area (SMA) by inspecting the positive and negative blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals in these regions. Using periodic and event-related experiments incorporating the bilateral/axial movements of 20 body parts, we report detailed mototopic imaging maps in M1 and SMA. These maps were obtained using phase-locked analysis. In addition to the positive BOLD, significant negative BOLD was detected in M1 but not in the SMA. The negative BOLD spatial pattern was neither located at the ipsilateral somatotopic location nor randomly distributed. Rather, it was organized somatotopically across the entire homunculus and inversely to the positive BOLD, creating a negative BOLD homunculus. The neuronal source of negative BOLD is unclear. M1 provides a unique system to test whether the origin of negative BOLD is neuronal, because different arteries supply blood to different regions in the homunculus, ruling out blood-stealing explanations. Finally, multivoxel pattern analysis showed that positive BOLD in M1 and SMA and negative BOLD in M1 contain somatotopic information, enabling prediction of the moving body part from inside and outside its somatotopic location. We suggest that the neuronal processes underlying negative BOLD participate in somatotopic encoding in M1 but not in the SMA. This dissociation may emerge because of differences in the activity of these motor areas associated with movement suppression.

  14. Temperature Dependence of GaN HEMT Small Signal Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    original work is properly cited. This study presents the temperature dependence of small signal parameters of GaN /SiC HEMTs across the 0–150◦C range...the performance of GaN /SiC device, two state-of-the-art AlGaN/ GaN HEMT devices were characterized at −25, 25, 75, and 125◦C base plate (on-wafer...number. 1. REPORT DATE NOV 2011 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Temperature Dependence of GaN HEMT

  15. Temperature Dependence of GaN HEMT Small Signal Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali M. Darwish

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the temperature dependence of small signal parameters of GaN/SiC HEMTs across the 0–150°C range. The changes with temperature for transconductance (m, output impedance (ds and ds, feedback capacitance (dg, input capacitance (gs, and gate resistance (g are measured. The variations with temperature are established for m, ds, ds, dg, gs, and g in the GaN technology. This information is useful for MMIC designs.

  16. Morphine dependence and withdrawal induced changes in cholinergic signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, Nichole M.; Einstein, Emily B.; Lopez, Maria B.; McClure-Begley, Tristan D.; Mineur, Yann S.; Picciotto, Marina R.

    2013-01-01

    Cholinergic signaling is thought to be involved in morphine dependence and withdrawal, but the specific mechanisms involved remain unclear. The current study aimed to identify alterations in the cholinergic system that may contribute to the development of morphine dependence and withdrawal. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and [3H]-epibatidine binding were evaluated in order to determine if morphine dependence and withdrawal induces alterations in cholinergic signaling or expression of high affinity nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in the midbrain (MB), medial habenula (MHb) and interpeduncular nucleus (IPN). The effect of cholinergic signaling through nAChRs on morphine-withdrawal induced jumping behavior was then determined. Lastly, the contribution of β4-containing nAChRs receptors in the MHb to morphine-withdrawal induced jumping behavior and neuronal activity as indicated by c-fos expression was assessed. Chronic morphine administration decreased AChE activity in MB and MHb, an effect that was no longer present following precipitated withdrawal. Morphine dependent mice showed increased nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) levels in MB. Further, nicotine (0.4 mg/kg) and lobeline (3 mg/kg) decreased jumping behavior while mecamylamine (1 mg/kg) had no effect. Knock-down of β4 subunit-containing nAChRs in the MHb attenuated c-fos activation, but did not decrease morphine withdrawal-induced jumping. Thus, morphine withdrawal induces cholinergic signaling in the MHb, but this does not appear to be responsible for the effects of cholinergic drugs on somatic signs of opiate withdrawal, as measured by jumping behavior. PMID:23651795

  17. Differential age-dependent import regulation by signal peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Shan Teng

    Full Text Available Gene-specific, age-dependent regulations are common at the transcriptional and translational levels, while protein transport into organelles is generally thought to be constitutive. Here we report a new level of differential age-dependent regulation and show that chloroplast proteins are divided into three age-selective groups: group I proteins have a higher import efficiency into younger chloroplasts, import of group II proteins is nearly independent of chloroplast age, and group III proteins are preferentially imported into older chloroplasts. The age-selective signal is located within the transit peptide of each protein. A group III protein with its transit peptide replaced by a group I transit peptide failed to complement its own mutation. Two consecutive positive charges define the necessary motif in group III signals for older chloroplast preference. We further show that different members of a gene family often belong to different age-selective groups because of sequence differences in their transit peptides. These results indicate that organelle-targeting signal peptides are part of cells' differential age-dependent regulation networks. The sequence diversity of some organelle-targeting peptides is not a result of the lack of selection pressure but has evolved to mediate regulation.

  18. A NO way to BOLD?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aamand, Rasmus; Dalsgaard, Thomas; Ho, Yi Ching Lynn

    2013-01-01

    . On this basis, we hypothesized that dietary nitrate (NO3-) could influence the brain's hemodynamic response to neuronal stimulation. In the present study, 20 healthy male participants were given either sodium nitrate (NaNO3) or sodium chloride (NaCl) (saline placebo) in a crossover study and were shown visual.......9±4%, respectively), and the variation across activated voxels of both measures decreased (12.3±4% and 15.3±7%, respectively). The baseline cerebral blood flow was not affected by nitrate. Our experiments demonstrate, for the first time, that dietary nitrate may modulate the local cerebral hemodynamic response...... to stimuli. A faster and smaller BOLD response, with less variation across local cortex, is consistent with an enhanced hemodynamic coupling during elevated nitrate intake. These findings suggest that dietary patterns, via the nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway, may be a potential way to affect key properties...

  19. BOLD-based Techniques for Quantifying Brain Hemodynamic and Metabolic Properties – Theoretical Models and Experimental Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A.; Sukstanskii, Alexander L.; He, Xiang

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative evaluation of brain hemodynamics and metabolism, particularly the relationship between brain function and oxygen utilization, is important for understanding normal human brain operation as well as pathophysiology of neurological disorders. It can also be of great importance for evaluation of hypoxia within tumors of the brain and other organs. A fundamental discovery by Ogawa and co-workers of the BOLD (Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent) contrast opened a possibility to use this effect to study brain hemodynamic and metabolic properties by means of MRI measurements. Such measurements require developing theoretical models connecting MRI signal to brain structure and functioning and designing experimental techniques allowing MR measurements of salient features of theoretical models. In our review we discuss several such theoretical models and experimental methods for quantification brain hemodynamic and metabolic properties. Our review aims mostly at methods for measuring oxygen extraction fraction, OEF, based on measuring blood oxygenation level. Combining measurement of OEF with measurement of CBF allows evaluation of oxygen consumption, CMRO2. We first consider in detail magnetic properties of blood – magnetic susceptibility, MR relaxation and theoretical models of intravascular contribution to MR signal under different experimental conditions. Then, we describe a “through-space” effect – the influence of inhomogeneous magnetic fields, created in the extravascular space by intravascular deoxygenated blood, on the MR signal formation. Further we describe several experimental techniques taking advantage of these theoretical models. Some of these techniques - MR susceptometry, and T2-based quantification of oxygen OEF – utilize intravascular MR signal. Another technique – qBOLD – evaluates OEF by making use of through-space effects. In this review we targeted both scientists just entering the MR field and more experienced MR researchers

  20. A BOLD signature of eyeblinks in the visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hupé, Jean-Michel; Bordier, Cécile; Dojat, Michel

    2012-05-15

    We are usually unaware of the brief but large illumination changes caused by blinks, presumably because of blink suppression mechanisms. In fMRI however, increase of the BOLD signal was reported in the visual cortex, e.g. during blocks of voluntary blinks (Bristow, Frith and Rees, 2005) or after spontaneous blinks recorded during the prolonged fixation of a static stimulus (Tse, Baumgartner and Greenlee, 2010). We tested whether such activation, possibly related to illumination changes, was also present during standard fMRI retinotopic and visual experiments and was large enough to contaminate the BOLD signal we are interested in. We monitored in a 3T scanner the eyeblinks of 14 subjects who observed three different types of visual stimuli, including periodic rotating wedges and contracting/expanding rings, event-related Mondrians and graphemes, while fixating. We performed event-related analyses on the set of detected spontaneous blinks. We observed large and widespread BOLD responses related to blinks in the visual cortex of every subject and whatever the visual stimulus. The magnitude of the modulation was comparable to visual stimulation. However, blink-related activations lay mostly in the anterior parts of retinotopic visual areas, coding the periphery of the visual field well beyond the extent of our stimuli. Blinks therefore represent an important source of BOLD variations in the visual cortex and a troublesome source of noise since any correlation, even weak, between the distribution of blinks and a tested protocol could trigger artifactual activities. However, the typical signature of blinks along the anterior calcarine and the parieto-occipital sulcus allows identifying, even in the absence of eyetracking, fMRI protocols possibly contaminated by a heterogeneous distribution of blinks.

  1. Task-Related Modulations of BOLD Low-Frequency Fluctuations within the Default Mode Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Tommasin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous low-frequency Blood-Oxygenation Level-Dependent (BOLD signals acquired during resting state are characterized by spatial patterns of synchronous fluctuations, ultimately leading to the identification of robust brain networks. The resting-state brain networks, including the Default Mode Network (DMN, are demonstrated to persist during sustained task execution, but the exact features of task-related changes of network properties are still not well characterized. In this work we sought to examine in a group of 20 healthy volunteers (age 33 ± 6 years, 8 F/12 M the relationship between changes of spectral and spatiotemporal features of one prominent resting-state network, namely the DMN, during the continuous execution of a working memory n-back task. We found that task execution impacted on both functional connectivity and amplitude of BOLD fluctuations within large parts of the DMN, but these changes correlated between each other only in a small area of the posterior cingulate. We conclude that combined analysis of multiple parameters related to connectivity, and their changes during the transition from resting state to continuous task execution, can contribute to a better understanding of how brain networks rearrange themselves in response to a task.

  2. Acetazolamide-augmented dynamic BOLD (aczBOLD imaging for assessing cerebrovascular reactivity in chronic steno-occlusive disease of the anterior circulation: An initial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to measure cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR in chronic steno-occlusive disease using a novel approach that couples BOLD imaging with acetazolamide (ACZ vasoreactivity (aczBOLD, to evaluate dynamic effects of ACZ on BOLD and to establish the relationship between aczBOLD and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC perfusion MRI. Eighteen patients with unilateral chronic steno-occlusive disease of the anterior circulation underwent a 20-min aczBOLD imaging protocol, with ACZ infusion starting at 5 min of scan initiation. AczBOLD reactivity was calculated on a voxel-by-voxel basis to generate CVR maps for subsequent quantitative analyses. Reduced CVR was observed in the diseased vs. the normal hemisphere both by qualitative and quantitative assessment (gray matter (GM: 4.13% ± 1.16% vs. 4.90% ± 0.98%, P = 0.002; white matter (WM: 2.83% ± 1.23% vs. 3.50% ± 0.94%, P = 0.005. In all cases BOLD signal began increasing immediately following ACZ infusion, approaching a plateau at ~8.5 min after infusion, with the tissue volume of reduced augmentation increasing progressively with time, peaking at 2.60 min (time range above 95% of the maximum value: 0–4.43 min for the GM and 1.80 min (time range above 95% of the maximum value: 1.40–3.53 min for the WM. In the diseased hemisphere, aczBOLD CVR significantly correlated with baseline DSC time-to-maximum of the residue function (Tmax (P = 0.008 for the WM and normalized cerebral blood flow (P = 0.003 for the GM, and P = 0.001 for the WM. AczBOLD provides a novel, safe, easily implementable approach to CVR measurement in the routine clinical environments. Further studies can establish quantitative thresholds from aczBOLD towards identification of patients at heightened risk of recurrent ischemia and cognitive decline.

  3. Quantum theory with bold operator tensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Lucien

    2015-08-06

    In this paper, we present a formulation of quantum theory in terms of bold operator tensors. A circuit is built up of operations where an operation corresponds to a use of an apparatus. We associate collections of operator tensors (which together comprise a bold operator) with these apparatus uses. We give rules for combining bold operator tensors such that, for a circuit, they give a probability distribution over the possible outcomes. If we impose certain physicality constraints on the bold operator tensors, then we get exactly the quantum formalism. We provide both symbolic and diagrammatic ways to represent these calculations. This approach is manifestly covariant in that it does not require us to foliate the circuit into time steps and then evolve a state. Thus, the approach forms a natural starting point for an operational approach to quantum field theory.

  4. LDPC Decoding for Signal Dependent Visible Light Communication Channels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Ming; SHA Xiaoshi; LIANG Xiao; JIANG Ming; WANG Jiaheng; ZHAO Chunming

    2016-01-01

    Avalanche photodiodes (APD) are widely employed in visible light communication (VLC) systems. The general signal dependent Gaussian channel is investigated. Experiment results reveal that symbols on different constellation points under official illumi⁃nance inevitably suffer from different levels of noise due to the multiplication process of APDs. In such a case, conventional log likely⁃hood ratio (LLR) calculation for signal independent channels may cause performance loss. The optimal LLR calculation for decoder is then derived because of the existence of non⁃ignorable APD shot noise. To find the decoding thresholds of the optimal and suboptimal detection schemes, the extrinsic information transfer (EXIT) chat is further analyzed. Finally a modified minimum sum algorithm is suggested with reduced complexity and acceptable performance loss. Numerical simulations show that, with a reg⁃ular (3, 6) low⁃density parity check (LDPC) code of block length 20,000, 0.7 dB gain is achieved with our proposed scheme over the LDPC decoder designed for signal independent noise. It is also found that the coding performance is improved for a larger modulation depth.

  5. Reduced error signalling in medication-naive children with ADHD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plessen, Kerstin J; Allen, Elena A; Eichele, Heike

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We examined the blood-oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) activation in brain regions that signal errors and their association with intraindividual behavioural variability and adaptation to errors in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). METHODS: We acquired functio...

  6. Plasticity of boldness in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss: do hunger and predation influence risk-taking behaviour?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Jack S; Watts, Phillip C; Pottinger, Tom G; Sneddon, Lynne U

    2012-05-01

    Boldness, a measure of an individual's propensity for taking risks, is an important determinant of fitness but is not necessarily a fixed trait. Dependent upon an individual's state, and given certain contexts or challenges, individuals may be able to alter their inclination to be bold or shy in response. Furthermore, the degree to which individuals can modulate their behaviour has been linked with physiological responses to stress. Here we attempted to determine whether bold and shy rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, can exhibit behavioural plasticity in response to changes in state (nutritional availability) and context (predation threat). Individual trout were initially assessed for boldness using a standard novel object paradigm; subsequently, each day for one week fish experienced either predictable, unpredictable, or no simulated predator threat in combination with a high (2% body weight) or low (0.15%) food ration, before being reassessed for boldness. Bold trout were generally more plastic, altering levels of neophobia and activity relevant to the challenge, whereas shy trout were more fixed and remained shy. Increased predation risk generally resulted in an increase in the expression of three candidate genes linked to boldness, appetite regulation and physiological stress responses - ependymin, corticotrophin releasing factor and GABA(A) - but did not produce a significant increase in plasma cortisol. The results suggest a divergence in the ability of bold and shy trout to alter their behavioural profiles in response to internal and exogenous factors, and have important implications for our understanding of the maintenance of different behavioural phenotypes in natural populations.

  7. Non-invasive multiparametric qBOLD approach for robust mapping of the oxygen extraction fraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domsch, Sebastian; Mie, Moritz B.; Schad, Lothar R. [Heidelberg Univ., Medical Faculty Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine; Wenz, Frederik [Heidelberg Univ., Medical Faculty Mannheim (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2014-10-01

    Introduction: The quantitative blood oxygenation level-dependent (qBOLD) method has not become clinically established yet because long acquisition times are necessary to achieve an acceptable certainty of the parameter estimates. In this work, a non-invasive multiparametric (nimp) qBOLD approach based on a simple analytical model is proposed to facilitate robust oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) mapping within clinically acceptable acquisition times by using separate measurements. Methods: The protocol consisted of a gradient-echo sampled spin-echo sequence (GESSE), a T{sub 2}-weighted Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence, and a T{sub 2}{sup *}-weighted multi-slice multi-echo gradient echo (MMGE) sequence. The GESSE acquisition time was less than 5 minutes and the extra measurement time for CPMG / MMGE was below 2 minutes each. The proposed nimp-qBOLD approach was validated in healthy subjects (N = 5) and one patient. Results: The proposed nimp-qBOLD approach facilitated more robust OEF mapping with significantly reduced inter- and intra-subject variability compared to the standard qBOLD method. Thereby, an average OEF in all subjects of 27 ± 2 % in white matter (WM) and 29 ± 2 % in gray matter (GM) using the nimp-qBOLD method was more stable compared to 41 ± 10 % (WM) and 46 ± 10 % (GM) with standard qBOLD. Moreover, the spatial variance in the image slice (i.e. standard deviation divided by mean) was on average reduced from 35 % to 25 %. In addition, the preliminary results of the patient are encouraging. Conclusion: The proposed nimp-qBOLD technique provides a promising tool for robust OEF mapping within clinically acceptable acquisition times and could therefore provide an important contribution for analyzing tumors or monitoring the success of radio and chemo therapies. (orig.)

  8. Determination of relative CMRO2 from CBF and BOLD changes: significant increase of oxygen consumption rate during visual stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, S.G.; Rostrup, Egill; Larsson, H.B.

    1999-01-01

    be estimated during neural activity using a reference condition obtained with known CMRO2 change. In this work, nine subjects were studied at a magnetic field of 1.5 T; each subject underwent inhalation of a 5% carbon dioxide gas mixture as a reference and two visual stimulation studies. Relative CBF and BOLD......The blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) effect in functional magnetic resonance imaging depends on at least partial uncoupling between cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) changes. By measuring CBF and BOLD simultaneously, the relative change in CMRO2 can...

  9. Orientation, temperature, and frequency dependence of nonresonant microwave absorption in HTSC powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gould, A.; Huang, M.; Bhagat, S.M. (Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-4111 (USA) Center for Superconductivity Research, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-4111 (USA)); Tyagi, S. (Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 11004 (USA))

    1991-04-15

    Hysteresis in the microwave-power absorption of HTSC powders was studied as a function of temperature ({ital T}), field-sweep amplitude ({ital H}{sub max}), and orientation between the dc field ({bold H}{sub dc}) and the wave vector of the microwaves ({bold k}). It was found that (i) the sizable low-temperature hysteresis effects occur only if {bold H}{sub dc}{parallel}{bold k}, (ii) the temperature and frequency dependence of the hysteresis is strongly affected by {ital H}{sub max}, (iii) the high- and low-temperature virgin curves are quite different, and (iv) the minimum of the absorption signal increases with {ital H}{sub max} and {ital T}. The low-temperature hysteresis loops were found to be similar to loops obtained from nonlinear equations describing cusp catastrophes.

  10. Activity-dependent survival of developing neocortical neurons depends on PI3K signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner-Golbs, Antje; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2012-02-01

    Spontaneous electrical network activity plays a major role in the control of cell survival in the developing brain. Several intracellular pathways are implicated in transducing electrical activity into gene expression dependent and independent survival signals. These include activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and its downstream effector Akt, activation of Ras and subsequently MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase and signalling via calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK). In the present study, we analyzed the role of these pathways for the control of neuronal survival in different extracellular potassium concentrations ([K(+) ](ex) ). Organotypic neocortical slice cultures prepared from newborn mice were kept in 5.3, 8.0 and 25.0mM [K(+) ](ex) and treated with specific inhibitors of PI3K, MEK1, CaMKK and a broad spectrum CaMK inhibitor. After 6h of incubation, slices were immunostained for activated caspase 3 (a-caspase 3) and the number of apoptotic cells was quantified by computer based analysis. We found that in 5.3 and 8.0mM [K(+) ](ex) only PI3K was important for neuronal survival. When [K(+) ](ex) was raised to 25.0mM, a concentration above the depolarization block, we found no influence of PI3K on neuronal survival. Our data demonstrate that only the PI3K pathway, and not the MEK1, CaMKK or CaMKs pathway, plays a central role in the regulation of activity-dependent neuronal survival in the developing cerebral cortex.

  11. The value of blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD MR imaging in differentiation of renal solid mass and grading of renal cell carcinoma (RCC: analysis based on the largest cross-sectional area versus the entire whole tumour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Yu Wu

    Full Text Available To study the value of assessing renal masses using different methods in parameter approaches and to determine whether BOLD MRI is helpful in differentiating RCC from benign renal masses, differentiating clear-cell RCC from renal masses other than clear-cell RCC and determining the tumour grade.Ninety-five patients with 139 renal masses (93 malignant and 46 benign who underwent abdominal BOLD MRI were enrolled. R2* values were derived from the largest cross-section (R2*largest and from the whole tumour (R2*whole. Intra-observer and inter-observer agreements were analysed based on two measurements by the same observer and the first measurement from each observer, respectively, and these agreements are reported with intra-class correlation coefficients and 95% confidence intervals. The diagnostic value of the R2* value in the evaluation was assessed with receiver-operating characteristic analysis.The intra-observer agreement was very good for R2*largest and R2*whole (all > 0.8. The inter-observer agreement of R2*whole (0.75, 95% confidence interval: 0.69~0.79 was good and was significantly improved compared with the R2*largest (0.61, 95% confidence interval: 0.52~0.68, as there was no overlap in the 95% confidence interval of the intra-class correlation coefficients. The diagnostic value in differentiating renal cell carcinoma from benign lesions with R2*whole (AUC=0.79/0.78[observer1/observer2] and R2*largest (AUC=0.75[observer1] was good and significantly higher (p=0.01 for R2*largest[observer2] vs R2*whole[observer2], p 0.7 and were not significantly different (p=0.89/0.93 for R2*largest vs R2*whole[observer1/observer2], 0.96 for R2*whole[observer1] vs R2*largest[observer2] and 0.96 for R2*whole [observer2] vs R2*largest[observer1].BOLD MRI could provide a feasible parameter for differentiating renal cell carcinoma from benign renal masses and for predicting clear-cell renal cell carcinoma grading. Compared with the largest cross

  12. Glycosynapses: microdomains controlling carbohydrate-dependent cell adhesion and signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senitiroh Hakomori

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The concept of microdomains in plasma membranes was developed over two decades, following observation of polarity of membrane based on clustering of specific membrane components. Microdomains involved in carbohydrate-dependent cell adhesion with concurrent signal transduction that affect cellular phenotype are termed "glycosynapse". Three types of glycosynapse have been distinguished: "type 1" having glycosphingolipid associated with signal transducers (small G-proteins, cSrc, Src family kinases and proteolipids; "type 2" having O-linked mucin-type glycoprotein associated with Src family kinases; and "type 3" having N-linked integrin receptor complexed with tetraspanin and ganglioside. Different cell types are characterized by presence of specific types of glycosynapse or their combinations, whose adhesion induces signal transduction to either facilitate or inhibit signaling. E.g., signaling through type 3 glycosynapse inhibits cell motility and differentiation. Glycosynapses are distinct from classically-known microdomains termed "caveolae", "caveolar membrane", or more recently "lipid raft", which are not involved in carbohydrate-dependent cell adhesion. Type 1 and type 3 glycosynapses are resistant to cholesterol-binding reagents, whereas structure and function of "caveolar membrane" or "lipid raft" are disrupted by these reagents. Various data indicate a functional role of glycosynapses during differentiation, development, and oncogenic transformation.O conceito de microdomínios em membrana plasmática foi desenvolvido há mais de duas décadas, após a observação da polaridade da membrana baseada no agrupamento de componentes específicos da membrana. Microdomínios envolvidos na adesão celular dependente de carboidrato, com transdução de sinal que afeta o fenótipo celular são denominados ''glicosinapses''. Três tipos de glicosinapse foram observados: ''tipo 1'' que possue glicoesfingolipídio associado com transdutores de sinal

  13. A predation cost to bold fish in the wild

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulthén, Kaj; Chapman, Ben; Nilsson, Anders P.

    2017-01-01

    in the animal kingdom. Theory predicts that individual behavioural types differ in a cost-benefit trade-off where bolder individuals benefit from greater access to resources while paying higher predation-risk costs. However, explicitly linking predation events to individual behaviour under natural conditions...... evidence of behavioural type-dependent predation vulnerability in the wild, i.e. that there is a predation cost to boldness, which is critical for our understanding of the evolution and maintenance of behavioural diversity in natural populations....

  14. BOLD-MRI of breast invasive ductal carcinoma: correlation of R2* value and the expression of HIF-1{alpha}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Min; Guo, Xiaojuan; Wang, Shuangkun [Capital Medical University, Department of Radiology, Beijing Chao Yang Hospital, Beijing (China); Jin, Mulan; Wang, Ying [Capital Medical University Beijing, Department of Pathology, Beijing Chaoyang Hospital, Beijing (China); Li, Jie; Liu, Jun [Capital Medical University Beijing, Department of Breast Surgery, Beijing Chaoyang Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2013-12-15

    To explore the reliability and feasibility of blood oxygenation level-dependent-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-fMRI) to depict hypoxia in breast invasive ductal carcinoma. A total of 103 women with 104 invasive ductal carcinomas (IDCs) underwent breast BOLD-fMRI at 3.0 T. Histological specimens were analysed for tumour size, grade, axillary lymph nodes and expression of oestrogen receptors, progesterone receptors, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, p53, Ki-67 and hypoxia inducible factor 1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}). The distribution and reliability of R2* were analysed. Correlations of the R2* value with the prognostic factors and HIF-1{alpha} were respectively analysed. The R2* map of IDC demonstrated a relatively heterogeneous signal. The mean R2* value was (53.4 {+-} 18.2) Hz. The Shapiro-Wilk test (W = 0.971, P = 0.020) suggested that the sample did not follow a normal distribution. The inter-rater and intrarater correlation coefficient was 0.967 and 0.959, respectively. The R2* values of IDCs were significantly lower in patients without axillary lymph nodes metastasis. The R2* value had a weak correlation with Ki67 expression (r = 0.208, P = 0.038). The mean R2* value correlated moderately with the level of HIF-1{alpha} (r = 0.516, P = 0.000). BOLD-fMRI is a simple and non-invasive technique that yields hypoxia information on breast invasive ductal carcinomas. (orig.)

  15. Negative BOLD response and serotonin concentration within rostral subgenual portion of the anterior cingulate cortex for long-allele carriers during perceptual processing of emotional tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, Shamil M.; Siadat, Mohamad R.; Babajani-Feremi, Abbas

    2012-03-01

    We investigated the effect of synaptic serotonin concentration on hemodynamic responses. The stimuli paradigm involved the presentation of fearful and threatening facial expressions to a set of 24 subjects who were either5HTTLPR long- or short-allele carriers (12 of each type in each group). The BOLD signals of the rACC from subjects of each group were averaged to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. We used a Bayesian approach to estimate the parameters of the underlying hemodynamic model. Our results, during this perceptual processing of emotional task, showed a negative BOLD signal in the rACC in the subjects with long-alleles. In contrast, the subjects with short-alleles showed positive BOLD signals in the rACC. These results suggest that high synaptic serotonin concentration in the rACC inhibits neuronal activity in a fashion similar to GABA, and a consequent negative BOLD signal ensues.

  16. Engendering bold leadership against HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pates, Michael

    2007-05-01

    The importance of leadership, especially human rights-driven leadership, in the fight against HIV/AIDS is widely recognized. However, argues Michael Pates in this commentary, the type of bold leadership required to really make a difference has been lacking. Pates calls for the development of an AIDS Leadership Initiative and describes how it might happen.

  17. Decreased BOLD responses in audiovisual processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersinga-Post, Esther; Tomaskovic, Sonja; Slabu, Lavinia; Renken, Remco; de Smit, Femke; Duifhuis, Hendrikus

    2010-01-01

    Audiovisual processing was studied in a functional magnetic resonance imaging study using the McGurk effect. Perceptual responses and the brain activity patterns were measured as a function of audiovisual delay. In several cortical and subcortical brain areas, BOLD responses correlated negatively wi

  18. What Is the de-qi-Related Pattern of BOLD Responses? A Review of Acupuncture Studies in fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinbo Sun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available de-qi, comprising mostly subjective sensations during acupuncture, is traditionally considered as a very important component for the possible therapeutic effects of acupuncture. However, the neural correlates of de-qi are still unclear. In this paper, we reviewed previous fMRI studies from the viewpoint of the neural responses of de-qi. We searched on Pubmed and identified 111 papers. Fourteen studies distinguishing de-qi and sharp pain and eight studies with the mixed sensations were included in further discussions. We found that the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD responses associated with de-qi were activation dominated, mainly around cortical areas relevant to the processing of somatosensory or pain signals. More intense and extensive activations were shown for the mixed sensations. Specific activations of sharp pain were also shown. Similar BOLD response patterns between de-qi evoked by acupuncture stimulation and de-qi-like sensations evoked by deep pain stimulation were shown. We reckon that a standardized method of qualification and quantification of de-qi, deeper understanding of grouping strategy of de-qi and sharp pain, and making deep pain stimulation as a control, as well as a series of improvements in the statistical method, are crucial factors for revealing the neural correlates of de-qi and neural mechanisms of acupuncture.

  19. Oxygen Level and LFP in Task-Positive and Task-Negative Areas: Bridging BOLD fMRI and Electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, William J; Li, Jingfeng M; Snyder, Abraham Z; Raichle, Marcus E; Snyder, Lawrence H

    2016-01-01

    The human default mode network (DMN) shows decreased blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signals in response to a wide range of attention-demanding tasks. Our understanding of the specifics regarding the neural activity underlying these "task-negative" BOLD responses remains incomplete. We paired oxygen polarography, an electrode-based oxygen measurement technique, with standard electrophysiological recording to assess the relationship of oxygen and neural activity in task-negative posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), a hub of the DMN, and visually responsive task-positive area V3 in the awake macaque. In response to engaging visual stimulation, oxygen, LFP power, and multi-unit activity in PCC showed transient activation followed by sustained suppression. In V3, oxygen, LFP power, and multi-unit activity showed an initial phasic response to the stimulus followed by sustained activation. Oxygen responses were correlated with LFP power in both areas, although the apparent hemodynamic coupling between oxygen level and electrophysiology differed across areas. Our results suggest that oxygen responses reflect changes in LFP power and multi-unit activity and that either the coupling of neural activity to blood flow and metabolism differs between PCC and V3 or computing a linear transformation from a single LFP band to oxygen level does not capture the true physiological process.

  20. Pharmacological modulation of the BOLD response: a study of acetazolamide and glyceryl trinitrate in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asghar, Mohammed Sohail; Hansen, Adam E; Pedersen, Simon;

    2011-01-01

    To examine the effect of acetazolamide, known to increase cerebral blood flow (CBF) and glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), known to increase cerebral blood volume (CBV) on the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) response in humans using 3 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to evaluate how...

  1. Cerebral blood oxygenation changes during neuronal activation in stroke patients measured by near infrared spectroscopy and BOLD-functional MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, Yoshihiro; Fukaya, Chikashi; Sakatani, Kaoru; Katayama, Yoichi [Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-03-01

    Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD)-fMRI images areas of activation by detecting a reduced concentration of deoxyhemoglobin during neuronal activity, which is caused by a larger increase in O{sub 2} delivery as compared to O{sub 2} consumption in normal adults. In the present study, near infrared spectroscopy demonstrated an increase of deoxyhemoglobin associated with increases of oxyhemoglobin and total hemoglobin in activation areas of stroke patients, whereas BOLD-fMRI failed to image such activation areas. The findings obtained have serious implications for the application of BOLD-fMRI to patients with brain disorders, since BOLD-fMRI may overlook neuronal activities in these patients. (author)

  2. Flow-dependent mass transfer may trigger endothelial signaling cascades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandrangi, Prashanthi; Sosa, Martha; Shyy, John Y-J; Rodgers, Victor G J

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that fluid mechanical forces directly impact endothelial signaling pathways. But while this general observation is clear, less apparent are the underlying mechanisms that initiate these critical signaling processes. This is because fluid mechanical forces can offer a direct mechanical input to possible mechanotransducers as well as alter critical mass transport characteristics (i.e., concentration gradients) of a host of chemical stimuli present in the blood stream. However, it has recently been accepted that mechanotransduction (direct mechanical force input), and not mass transfer, is the fundamental mechanism for many hemodynamic force-modulated endothelial signaling pathways and their downstream gene products. This conclusion has been largely based, indirectly, on accepted criteria that correlate signaling behavior and shear rate and shear stress, relative to changes in viscosity. However, in this work, we investigate the negative control for these criteria. Here we computationally and experimentally subject mass-transfer limited systems, independent of mechanotransduction, to the purported criteria. The results showed that the negative control (mass-transfer limited system) produced the same trends that have been used to identify mechanotransduction-dominant systems. Thus, the widely used viscosity-related shear stress and shear rate criteria are insufficient in determining mechanotransduction-dominant systems. Thus, research should continue to consider the importance of mass transfer in triggering signaling cascades.

  3. Microenvironment Dependent Photobiomodulation on Function-Specific Signal Transduction Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timon Cheng-Yi Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular photobiomodulation on a cellular function has been shown to be homeostatic. Its function-specific pathway mechanism would be further discussed in this paper. The signal transduction pathways maintaining a normal function in its function-specific homeostasis (FSH, resisting the activation of many other irrelative signal transduction pathways, are so sparse that it can be supposed that there may be normal function-specific signal transduction pathways (NSPs. A low level laser irradiation or monochromatic light may promote the activation of partially activated NSP and/or its redundant NSP so that it may induce the second-order phase transition of a function from its dysfunctional one far from its FSH to its normal one in a function-specific microenvironment and may also induce the first-order functional phase transition of the normal function from low level to high level.

  4. Improving the spatial accuracy in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) based on the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect: benefits from parallel imaging and a 32-channel head array coil at 1.5 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellner, C; Doenitz, C; Finkenzeller, T; Jung, E M; Rennert, J; Schlaier, J

    2009-01-01

    Geometric distortions and low spatial resolution are current limitations in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The aim of this study was to evaluate if application of parallel imaging or significant reduction of voxel size in combination with a new 32-channel head array coil can reduce those drawbacks at 1.5 T for a simple hand motor task. Therefore, maximum t-values (tmax) in different regions of activation, time-dependent signal-to-noise ratios (SNR(t)) as well as distortions within the precentral gyrus were evaluated. Comparing fMRI with and without parallel imaging in 17 healthy subjects revealed significantly reduced geometric distortions in anterior-posterior direction. Using parallel imaging, tmax only showed a mild reduction (7-11%) although SNR(t) was significantly diminished (25%). In 7 healthy subjects high-resolution (2 x 2 x 2 mm3) fMRI was compared with standard fMRI (3 x 3 x 3 mm3) in a 32-channel coil and with high-resolution fMRI in a 12-channel coil. The new coil yielded a clear improvement for tmax (21-32%) and SNR(t) (51%) in comparison with the 12-channel coil. Geometric distortions were smaller due to the smaller voxel size. Therefore, the reduction in tmax (8-16%) and SNR(t) (52%) in the high-resolution experiment seems to be tolerable with this coil. In conclusion, parallel imaging is an alternative to reduce geometric distortions in fMRI at 1.5 T. Using a 32-channel coil, reduction of the voxel size might be the preferable way to improve spatial accuracy.

  5. Distinction between Neural and Vascular BOLD Oscillations and Intertwined Heart Rate Oscillations at 0.1 Hz in the Resting State and during Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfurtscheller, Gert; Schwerdtfeger, Andreas; Brunner, Clemens; Aigner, Christoph; Fink, David; Brito, Joana; Carmo, Marciano P.; Andrade, Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    In the resting state, blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) oscillations with a frequency of about 0.1 Hz are conspicuous. Whether their origin is neural or vascular is not yet fully understood. Furthermore, it is not clear whether these BOLD oscillations interact with slow oscillations in heart rate (HR). To address these two questions, we estimated phase-locking (PL) values between precentral gyrus (PCG) and insula in 25 scanner-naïve individuals during rest and stimulus-paced finger movements in both hemispheres. PL was quantified in terms of time delay and duration in the frequency band 0.07 to 0.13 Hz. Results revealed both positive and negative time delays. Positive time delays characterize neural BOLD oscillations leading in the PCG, whereas negative time delays represent vascular BOLD oscillations leading in the insula. About 50% of the participants revealed positive time delays distinctive for neural BOLD oscillations, either with short or long unilateral or bilateral phase-locking episodes. An expected preponderance of neural BOLD oscillations was found in the left hemisphere during right-handed movement and unexpectedly in the right hemisphere during rest. Only neural BOLD oscillations were significantly associated with heart rate variability (HRV) in the 0.1-Hz range in the first resting state. It is well known that participating in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies may be frightening and cause anxiety. In this respect it is important to note that the most significant hemispheric asymmetry (p<0.002) with a right-sided dominance of neural BOLD and a left-sided dominance of vascular BOLD oscillations was found in the first resting session in the scanner-naïve individuals. Whether the enhanced left-sided perfusion (dominance of vascular BOLD) or the right-sided dominance of neural BOLD is related to the increased level of anxiety, attention or stress needs further research. PMID:28052074

  6. Simultaneous Imaging of CBF Change and BOLD with Saturation-Recovery-T1 Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Zhu, Xiao-Hong; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    A neuroimaging technique based on the saturation-recovery (SR)-T1 MRI method was applied for simultaneously imaging blood oxygenation level dependence (BOLD) contrast and cerebral blood flow change (ΔCBF), which is determined by CBF-sensitive T1 relaxation rate change (ΔR1CBF). This technique was validated by quantitatively examining the relationships among ΔR1CBF, ΔCBF, BOLD and relative CBF change (rCBF), which was simultaneously measured by laser Doppler flowmetry under global ischemia and hypercapnia conditions, respectively, in the rat brain. It was found that during ischemia, BOLD decreased 23.1±2.8% in the cortical area; ΔR1CBF decreased 0.020±0.004s-1 corresponding to a ΔCBF decrease of 1.07±0.24 ml/g/min and 89.5±1.8% CBF reduction (n=5), resulting in a baseline CBF value (=1.18 ml/g/min) consistent with the literature reports. The CBF change quantification based on temperature corrected ΔR1CBF had a better accuracy than apparent R1 change (ΔR1app); nevertheless, ΔR1app without temperature correction still provides a good approximation for quantifying CBF change since perfusion dominates the evolution of the longitudinal relaxation rate (R1app). In contrast to the excellent consistency between ΔCBF and rCBF measured during and after ischemia, the BOLD change during the post-ischemia period was temporally disassociated with ΔCBF, indicating distinct CBF and BOLD responses. Similar results were also observed for the hypercapnia study. The overall results demonstrate that the SR-T1 MRI method is effective for noninvasive and quantitative imaging of both ΔCBF and BOLD associated with physiological and/or pathological changes.

  7. Simultaneous Imaging of CBF Change and BOLD with Saturation-Recovery-T1 Method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Wang

    Full Text Available A neuroimaging technique based on the saturation-recovery (SR-T1 MRI method was applied for simultaneously imaging blood oxygenation level dependence (BOLD contrast and cerebral blood flow change (ΔCBF, which is determined by CBF-sensitive T1 relaxation rate change (ΔR1CBF. This technique was validated by quantitatively examining the relationships among ΔR1CBF, ΔCBF, BOLD and relative CBF change (rCBF, which was simultaneously measured by laser Doppler flowmetry under global ischemia and hypercapnia conditions, respectively, in the rat brain. It was found that during ischemia, BOLD decreased 23.1±2.8% in the cortical area; ΔR1CBF decreased 0.020±0.004s-1 corresponding to a ΔCBF decrease of 1.07±0.24 ml/g/min and 89.5±1.8% CBF reduction (n=5, resulting in a baseline CBF value (=1.18 ml/g/min consistent with the literature reports. The CBF change quantification based on temperature corrected ΔR1CBF had a better accuracy than apparent R1 change (ΔR1app; nevertheless, ΔR1app without temperature correction still provides a good approximation for quantifying CBF change since perfusion dominates the evolution of the longitudinal relaxation rate (R1app. In contrast to the excellent consistency between ΔCBF and rCBF measured during and after ischemia, the BOLD change during the post-ischemia period was temporally disassociated with ΔCBF, indicating distinct CBF and BOLD responses. Similar results were also observed for the hypercapnia study. The overall results demonstrate that the SR-T1 MRI method is effective for noninvasive and quantitative imaging of both ΔCBF and BOLD associated with physiological and/or pathological changes.

  8. Neuropilin-1-dependent regulation of EGF-receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzolio, Sabrina; Rabinowicz, Noa; Rainero, Elena; Lanzetti, Letizia; Serini, Guido; Norman, Jim; Neufeld, Gera; Tamagnone, Luca

    2012-11-15

    Neuropilin-1 (NRP1) is a coreceptor for multiple extracellular ligands. NRP1 is widely expressed in cancer cells and in advanced human tumors; however, its functional relevance and signaling mechanisms are unclear. Here, we show that NRP1 expression controls viability and proliferation of different cancer cells, independent of its short intracellular tail. We found that the extracellular domain of NRP1 interacts with the EGF receptor (EGFR) and promotes its signaling cascade elicited upon EGF or TGF-α stimulation. Upon NRP1 silencing, the ability of ligand-bound EGFR to cluster on the cell surface, internalize, and activate the downstream AKT pathway is severely impaired. EGFR is frequently activated in human tumors due to overexpression, mutation, or sustained autocrine/paracrine stimulation. Here we show that NRP1-blocking antibodies and NRP1 silencing can counteract ligand-induced EGFR activation in cancer cells. Thus our findings unveil a novel molecular mechanism by which NRP1 can control EGFR signaling and tumor growth.

  9. Role of CSL-dependent and independent Notch signaling pathways in cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Chong; Xing, Rui; Liu, Jing; Xing, Feiyue

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis is a normally biological phenomenon in various organisms, involving complexly molecular mechanisms with a series of signaling processes. Notch signaling is found evolutionarily conserved in many species, playing a critical role in embryonic development, normal tissue homeostasis, angiogenesis and immunoregulation. The focus of this review is on currently novel advances about roles of CSL-dependent and independent Notch signaling pathways in cell apoptosis. The CSL can bind Notch intracellular domain (NIC) to act as a switch in mediating transcriptional activation or inactivation of the Notch signaling pathway downstream genes in the nucleus. It shows that CSL-dependent signaling regulates the cell apoptosis through Hes-1-PTEN-AKT-mTOR signaling, but rather the CSL-independent signaling mediates the cell apoptosis possibly via NIC-mTORC2-AKT-mTOR signaling, providing a new insight into apoptotic mechanisms.

  10. Presenilin dependence of phospholipase C and protein kinase C signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dehvari, Nodi; Cedazo-Minguez, Angel; Isacsson, Ola

    2007-01-01

    -stimulated phospholipase C (PLC) activity which was gamma-secretase dependent. To further evaluate the dependence of PLC on PSs we measured PLC activity and the activation of variant protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking either PS1, PS2, or both. PLC activity and PKCalpha...... and PKCgamma activations were significantly lower in PS1 and PS2 double knockout MEFs after PLC stimulation. Protein levels of PKCalpha and PKCgamma were lower in PS1 and PS2 double knockout MEFs. In contrast, PKCdelta levels were significantly elevated in PS1 and PS2 double knockout as well as in PS1 knockout......). These results show that PLC and PKC activations are modulated by PS and also that PSs differentially regulate the expression of PKC isoforms by both APP/AICD-dependent and independent mechanisms....

  11. Cardiac Effects of Attenuating Gsα - Dependent Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus R Streit

    Full Text Available Inhibition of β-adrenergic signalling plays a key role in treatment of heart failure. Gsα is essential for β-adrenergic signal transduction. In order to reduce side-effects of beta-adrenergic inhibition diminishing β-adrenergic signalling in the heart at the level of Gsα is a promising option.We analyzed the influence of Gsα on regulation of myocardial function and development of cardiac hypertrophy, using a transgenic mouse model (C57BL6/J mice overexpressing a dominant negative Gsα-mutant under control of the α-MHC-promotor. Cardiac phenotype was characterized in vivo and in vitro and under acute and chronic β-adrenergic stimulation. At rest, Gsα-DN-mice showed bradycardia (602 ± 13 vs. 660 ± 17 bpm, p<0.05 and decreased dp/dtmax (5037 ± 546- vs. 6835 ± 505 mmHg/s, p = 0.02. No significant differences were found regarding ejection fraction, heart weight and cardiomyocyte size. β-blockade by propranolol revealed no baseline differences of hemodynamic parameters between wildtype and Gsα-DN-mice. Acute adrenergic stimulation resulted in decreased β-adrenergic responsiveness in Gsα-DN-mice. Under chronic adrenergic stimulation, wildtype mice developed myocardial hypertrophy associated with increase of LV/BW-ratio by 23% (4.4 ± 0.2 vs. 3.5 ± 0.1 mg/g, p<0.01 and cardiac myocyte size by 24% (14927 ± 442 px vs. 12013 ± 583 px, p<0.001. In contrast, both parameters were unchanged in Gsα-DN-mice after chronic isoproterenol stimulation.Overexpression of a dominant negative mutant of Gsα leads to decreased β-adrenergic responsiveness and is protective against isoproterenol-induced hypertrophy. Thus, Gsα-DN-mice provide novel insights into β-adrenergic signal transduction and its modulation in myocardial overload and failure.

  12. Socially bold personality in the real communication and Internet communication: the analysis of representations of people of the different age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pogodina A. V.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article is concerned with the results of the study, subject of which is the submis- sion of the respondents of the different age groups about the social and bold personality. Required property of the respondents was the presence in the Internet environment and participation in various social networks. They assessed social and bold personal- ity in such contexts of communication, as real communication and Internet communication. Analyses were undertaken to determine the structural and content features of emotional and semantic representations of the phenomenon of the social and bold personality, depending on the context of communication, but also the detection of age-sensitive representations of the young respondents (19—35 years, middle-aged respondents (36-55 years and older respondents (from 56 to 70 years. The concept of the “social and bold personality in real communion” is shown to have a high semantic relevance, strongly marked positive emotional coloration and a similar factor structure for respondents of all age groups. The concept of the “social and bold personality in online communication” with a high semantic significance in the perception of the young respondents moves into a zone of moderate and semantic importance in representations of the middle-aged and older respondents. In representations of the respondents of all age groups, the attractiveness of the "social and bold personality in Internet communication" is less than in comparison with the "social and bold personality in the real communication". The age-specific of the social representations about social and bold personality in the real and virtual communication has been analysed in detail.

  13. Linear motif atlas for phosphorylation-dependent signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Martin Lee; Jensen, LJ; Diella, F;

    2008-01-01

    Systematic and quantitative analysis of protein phosphorylation is revealing dynamic regulatory networks underlying cellular responses to environmental cues. However, matching these sites to the kinases that phosphorylate them and the phosphorylation-dependent binding domains that may subsequently...... sequence models of linear motifs. The atlas is available as a community resource (http://netphorest.info)....

  14. Nox2-dependent ROS signaling protects against skeletal ageing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone remodeling is age-dependently regulated and changes dramatically during the course of development. Progressive accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), including superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radicals, has been suspected to be the leading cause of many inflammatory and degen...

  15. Modelling cardiac signal as a confound in EEG-fMRI and its application in focal epilepsy studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liston, A. D.; Ellegaard Lund, Torben; Salek-Haddadi, A

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac noise has been shown to reduce the sensitivity of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to an experimental effect due to its confounding presence in the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal. Its effect is most severe in particular regions of the brain and a method is yet...

  16. Modelling Cardiac Signal as a Confound in EEG-fMRI and its Application in Focal Epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liston, Adam David; Salek-Haddadi, Afraim; Hamandi, Khalid

    2005-01-01

    Cardiac noise has been shown to reduce the sensitivity of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to an experimental effect due to its confounding presence in the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal. Its effect is most severe in particular regions of the brain and a method is yet...

  17. Vascular Steal Explains Early Paradoxical Blood Oxygen Level-Dependent Cerebrovascular Response in Brain Regions with Delayed Arterial Transit Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Poublanc

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD magnetic resonance imaging (MRI during manipulation of inhaled carbon dioxide (CO2 can be used to measure cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR and map regions of exhausted cerebrovascular reserve. These regions exhibit a reduced or negative BOLD response to inhaled CO2. In this study, we sought to clarify the mechanism behind the negative BOLD response by investigating its time delay (TD. Dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC MRI with the injection of a contrast agent was used as the gold standard in order to provide measurement of the blood arrival time to which CVR TD could be compared. We hypothesize that if negative BOLD responses are the result of a steal phenomenon, they should be synchronized with positive BOLD responses from healthy brain tissue, even though the blood arrival time would be delayed. Methods: On a 3-tesla MRI system, BOLD CVR and DSC images were collected in a group of 19 patients with steno-occlusive cerebrovascular disease. For each patient, we generated a CVR magnitude map by regressing the BOLD signal with the end-tidal partial pressure of CO2 (PETCO2, and a CVR TD map by extracting the time of maximum cross-correlation between the BOLD signal and PETCO2. In addition, a blood arrival time map was generated by fitting the DSC signal with a gamma variate function. ROI masks corresponding to varying degrees of reactivity were constructed. Within these masks, the mean CVR magnitude, CVR TD and DSC blood arrival time were extracted and averaged over the 19 patients. CVR magnitude and CVR TD were then plotted against DSC blood arrival time. Results: The results show that CVR magnitude is highly correlated to DSC blood arrival time. As expected, the most compromised tissues with the longest blood arrival time have the lowest (most negative CVR magnitude. However, CVR TD shows a noncontinuous relationship with DSC blood arrival time. CVR TD is well correlated to DSC blood arrival time

  18. BSS algorithm for dependent signals using Cook s nonGaussianity measure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Based on the generalization of the central limit theorem(CLT) to special dependent variables, this paper shows that maximization of the nonGaussianity(NG) measure can separate the statistically dependent source signals, and the novel NG measure is given by Cook's Euclidean distance using the Chebyshev-Hermite series expansion. Then, a novel blind source separation (BSS) algorithm for linear mixed signals is proposed using Cook's NG measure, which makes it possible to separate statistically dependent source ...

  19. Evaluation of diagnostic thresholds dependability for tribologic signals received in the environment disturbed by vibroacoustic and functional signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindstedt Paweł

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Determination of dependable diagnostic thresholds for tribologic signals received e.g. from antifriction bearings (in particular for insufficient number of measurements, only 4÷5 is a really difficult task due to complexity of working environment where such bearings are operated. Typical working environment for such objects must take account for operation time under various working conditions and accompanying (and disturbing signals, e.g. vibroacoustic ones. The sought assessment of the relationship between diagnostic signals and environmental noise can be determined from convolution of both diagnostic and environments signals that make up the complete set of received information. The convolution of these two series of signals can be obtained from an algorithm based on the Cauchy product. Then one has to find the coherence factor and the square of amplitude gain for the set of diagnostic signals with reference to various sets of signals received from environment, which makes it possible to evaluate cohesion of the investigated series of signals, thus their suitability to determine diagnostic threshold for tribologic signals intended for the analysis.

  20. Identification and quantitation of signal molecule-dependent protein phosphorylation

    KAUST Repository

    Groen, Arnoud J.

    2013-09-03

    Phosphoproteomics is a fast-growing field that aims at characterizing phosphorylated proteins in a cell or a tissue at a given time. Phosphorylation of proteins is an important regulatory mechanism in many cellular processes. Gel-free phosphoproteome technique involving enrichment of phosphopeptide coupled with mass spectrometry has proven to be invaluable to detect and characterize phosphorylated proteins. In this chapter, a gel-free quantitative approach involving 15N metabolic labelling in combination with phosphopeptide enrichment by titanium dioxide (TiO2) and their identification by MS is described. This workflow can be used to gain insights into the role of signalling molecules such as cyclic nucleotides on regulatory networks through the identification and quantification of responsive phospho(proteins). © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  1. Role of autonomous androgen receptor signaling in prostate cancer initiation is dichotomous and depends on the oncogenic signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memarzadeh, Sanaz; Cai, Houjian; Janzen, Deanna M; Xin, Li; Lukacs, Rita; Riedinger, Mireille; Zong, Yang; DeGendt, Karel; Verhoeven, Guido; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N

    2011-05-10

    The steroid hormone signaling axis is thought to play a central role in initiation and progression of many hormonally regulated epithelial tumors. It is unclear whether all cancer-initiating signals depend on an intact hormone receptor signaling machinery. To ascertain whether cell autonomous androgen receptor (AR) is essential for initiation of prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), the response of AR-null prostate epithelia to paracrine and cell autonomous oncogenic signals was assessed in vivo by using the prostate regeneration model system. Epithelial-specific loss of AR blocked paracrine FGF10-induced PIN, whereas the add back of exogenous AR restored this response. In contrast, PIN initiated by cell-autonomous, chronic-activated AKT developed independent of epithelial AR signaling. Our findings demonstrate a selective role for AR in the initiation of PIN, dependent on the signaling pathways driving tumor formation. Insights into the role of hormone receptor signaling in the initiation of epithelial tumors may help define this axis as a target for chemoprevention of carcinomas.

  2. COMPENSATION OF OUTPUT SIGNAL TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE IN HOMODYNE DEMODULATION TECHNIQUE FOR PHASE FIBER-OPTIC SENSORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Mekhrengin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Modified phase-generated carrier homodyne demodulation technique for fiber-optic sensors is presented. Nowadays phase-generated carrier homodyne demodulation technique is one of the most widespread. One of its drawbacks is the temperature dependence of the output signal because of the modulator scale factor temperature dependence. In order to compensate this dependence an automatic adjustment of the phase modulation depth is necessary. To achieve the result, additional harmonics analysis is used with the help of the Bessel functions. For this purpose the known demodulation scheme is added with the branch, where interferometric signal is multiplied by the third harmonic of the modulation signal. The deviation of optimal ratio of odd harmonics is used as a feedback signal for adjusting the modulation depth. Unwanted emissions arise in the feedback signal, when the third harmonic possesses a value close to zero. To eliminate unwanted emission in the feedback signal, the principle scheme is added with one more branch, where interferometric signal is multiplied by the forth harmonic of the modulation signal. The deviation of optimal ratio of even harmonics is used as a feedback signal alternately with the deviation of optimal ratio of odd harmonics. A mathematical model of the algorithm is designed using the MATLAB package. Results of modeling have confirmed that suggested method gives the possibility for an automatic adjustment of the phase modulation depth and makes it possible to compensate temperature dependence for the modulator scale factor and output signal magnitude.

  3. M-ary suprathreshold stochastic resonance in multilevel threshold systems with signal-dependent noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chaojun; Zhou, Bingchang; Gao, Xiao; McDonnell, Mark D.

    2017-08-01

    We investigate multilevel threshold systems with signal-dependent noise that transmit a common random input signal. We demonstrate the occurrence of M-ary suprathreshold stochastic resonance caused by the signal-dependent noise, and quantify the information enhancement that results relative to the absence of noise. We also find that in the case of M-ary threshold systems, the values of mutual information and signal-to-quantization-noise ratio are larger than the corresponding values in the case of binary threshold systems. These results are potentially useful for understanding the encoding mechanism of inner-ear hair cells and other biological sensory systems.

  4. Ghrelin modulates the fMRI BOLD response of homeostatic and hedonic brain centers regulating energy balance in the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miklós Sárvári

    Full Text Available The orexigenic gut-brain peptide, ghrelin and its G-protein coupled receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a (GHS-R1A are pivotal regulators of hypothalamic feeding centers and reward processing neuronal circuits of the brain. These systems operate in a cooperative manner and receive a wide array of neuronal hormone/transmitter messages and metabolic signals. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was employed in the current study to map BOLD responses to ghrelin in different brain regions with special reference on homeostatic and hedonic regulatory centers of energy balance. Experimental groups involved male, ovariectomized female and ovariectomized estradiol-replaced rats. Putative modulation of ghrelin signaling by endocannabinoids was also studied. Ghrelin-evoked effects were calculated as mean of the BOLD responses 30 minutes after administration. In the male rat, ghrelin evoked a slowly decreasing BOLD response in all studied regions of interest (ROI within the limbic system. This effect was antagonized by pretreatment with GHS-R1A antagonist JMV2959. The comparison of ghrelin effects in the presence or absence of JMV2959 in individual ROIs revealed significant changes in the prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens of the telencephalon, and also within hypothalamic centers like the lateral hypothalamus, ventromedial nucleus, paraventricular nucleus and suprachiasmatic nucleus. In the female rat, the ghrelin effects were almost identical to those observed in males. Ovariectomy and chronic estradiol replacement had no effect on the BOLD response. Inhibition of the endocannabinoid signaling by rimonabant significantly attenuated the response of the nucleus accumbens and septum. In summary, ghrelin can modulate hypothalamic and mesolimbic structures controlling energy balance in both sexes. The endocannabinoid signaling system contributes to the manifestation of ghrelin's BOLD effect in a region specific manner. In females, the

  5. Altered Auditory BOLD Response to Conspecific Birdsong in Zebra Finches with Stuttered Syllables

    OpenAIRE

    Voss, Henning U.; Delanthi Salgado-Commissariat; Helekar, Santosh A.

    2010-01-01

    How well a songbird learns a song appears to depend on the formation of a robust auditory template of its tutor's song. Using functional magnetic resonance neuroimaging we examine auditory responses in two groups of zebra finches that differ in the type of song they sing after being tutored by birds producing stuttering-like syllable repetitions in their songs. We find that birds that learn to produce the stuttered syntax show attenuated blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) responses to t...

  6. Large blue isocurvature spectral index signals time-dependent mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Daniel J. H.

    2016-08-01

    We show that if a spectator linear isocurvature dark matter field degree of freedom has a constant mass through its entire evolution history, the maximum measurable isocurvature spectral index that is consistent with the current tensor-to-scalar ratio bound of about r ≲0.1 is about nI≲2.4 , even if experiments can be sensitive to a 10-6 contamination of the predominantly adiabatic power spectrum with an isocurvature power spectrum at the shortest observable length scales. Hence, any foreseeable future measurement of a blue isocurvature spectral index larger than ˜2.4 may provide nontrivial evidence for dynamical degrees of freedom with time-dependent masses during inflation. The bound is not sensitive to the details of the reheating scenario and can be made mildly smaller if r is better constrained in the future.

  7. Negative BOLD in default-mode structures measured with EEG-MREG is larger in temporal than extra-temporal epileptic spikes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia eJacobs

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroduction: EEG-fMRI detects BOLD changes associated with epileptic interictal discharges (IED and can identify epileptogenic networks in epilepsy patients. Besides positive BOLD changes, negative BOLD changes have sometimes been observed in the default-mode network, particularly using group analysis. A new fast fMRI sequence called MREG (Magnetic Resonance Encephalography shows increased sensitivity to detect IED-related BOLD changes compared to the conventional EPI sequence, including frequent occurrence of negative BOLD responses in the DMN. The present study quantifies the concordance between the DMN and negative BOLD related to IEDs of temporal and extra-temporal origin.Methods: Focal epilepsy patients underwent simultaneous EEG-MREG. Areas of overlap were calculated between DMN regions, defined as precuneus, posterior cingulate, bilateral inferior parietal and mesial prefrontal cortices according to a standardized atlas, and significant negative BOLD changes revealed by an event-related analysis based on the timings of IED seen on EEG. Correlation between IED number/lobe of origin and the overlap were calculated. Results: 15 patients were analyzed, some showing IED over more than one location resulting in 30 different IED types. The average overlap between negative BOLD and DMN was significantly larger in temporal (23.7 ± 19.6cm³ than extra-temporal IEDs (7.4 ± 5.1 cm³, p=0.008. There was no significant correlation between the number of IEDs and the overlap between DMN structures and negative BOLD areas.Discussion: MREG results in an increased sensitivity to detect negative BOLD responses related to focal IED in single patients, with responses often occurring in DMN regions. In patients with high overlap with the DMN, this suggests that epileptic IEDs may be associated with a brief decrease in attention and cognitive ability. Interestingly this observation was not dependent on the frequency of IED but more common in IED of

  8. BOLD fMRI in the white matter as a marker of aging and small vessel disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilia Makedonov

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Determine whether white matter signal fluctuation on T2* weighted BOLD contrast images are associated with aging and cerebral small vessel disease (SVD. METHODOLOGY: Resting state BOLD data were collected with a 250 ms repetition time (TR to achieve unaliased, ungated cardiac sampled BOLD (cs-BOLD images on 11 young adult controls, 10 healthy older adult controls and 7 adults with extensive white matter hyperintensities (WMH from SVD. Tissue classes (WM and GM were segmented on T1 images. WMH were identified on FLAIR images in the SVD group. Raw physiological noise (σphysio and cardiac pulsatility (i.e. fluctuations at the cardiac frequency were calculated voxel wise and group differences were tested by ANOVA. It was also possible to calculate σphysio in 2s TR cardiac aliased whole-brain BOLD (wb-BOLD data (N = 84 obtained from the International Consortium for Brain Mapping. RESULTS: CS-BOLD metrics showed an aging and SVD effects (p<0.0005. Covariates such as thermal noise, WM volume and partial volume did not influence the significant aging effect seen on the cardiac pulsatility metric (p<0.017 but did influence the σphysio (p = 0.184. As a verification of the cs-BOLD findings, the wb-BOLD also showed a linear aging effect of σphysio in WM. In the SVD adults, cardiac pulsatility and σphysio were lower in WMH regions compared to normal appearing white matter (NAWM regions (p<0.0013 and p<0.002, respectively. Cardiac pulsatility was better able to distinguish WMH regions from NAWM than σphysio as measured by effect size (Cohen's d 2.2 and 0.88, respectively. CONCLUSION: NAWM was found to have graded increases in cardiac pulsations due to age and SVD, independently. Within SVD participants, WMH lesions had reduced physiological noise compared to NAWM. Cardiac pulsatility in resting BOLD data may provide a complementary dynamic measure of WM integrity to add to static FLAIR anatomical images.

  9. Long-distance nitrate signaling displays cytokinin dependent and independent branches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sandrine Ruffel; Arthur Poitout; Gabriel Krouk; Gloria M Coruzzi; Benoit Lacombe

    2016-01-01

    Summary The long-distance signaling network allowing a plant to properly develop its root system is crucial to optimize root foraging in areas where nutrients are available. Cytokinin is an essential element of the systemic signaling network leading to the enhancement of lateral root proliferation in areas where nitrate is available. Here, we explore more precisely: (i) which particular traits of lateral root growth (density and length of emerged lateral roots) are the targets of systemic signaling in a context of heterogeneous nitrate supply; and (i ) if the systemic signaling depends only on cytokinin or on a combination of several signalings.

  10. Laminar analysis of 7T BOLD using an imposed spatial activation pattern in human V1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polimeni, Jonathan R; Fischl, Bruce; Greve, Douglas N; Wald, Lawrence L

    2010-10-01

    With sufficient image encoding, high-resolution fMRI studies are limited by the biological point-spread of the hemodynamic signal. The extent of this spread is determined by the local vascular distribution and by the spatial specificity of blood flow regulation, as well as by measurement parameters that (i) alter the relative sensitivity of the acquisition to activation-induced hemodynamic changes and (ii) determine the image contrast as a function of vessel size. In particular, large draining vessels on the cortical surface are a major contributor to both the BOLD signal change and to the spatial bias of the BOLD activation away from the site of neuronal activity. In this work, we introduce a laminar surface-based analysis method and study the relationship between spatial localization and activation strength as a function of laminar depth by acquiring 1mm isotropic, single-shot EPI at 7 T and sampling the BOLD signal exclusively from the superficial, middle, or deep cortical laminae. We show that highly-accelerated EPI can limit image distortions to the point where a boundary-based registration algorithm accurately aligns the EPI data to the surface reconstruction. The spatial spread of the BOLD response tangential to the cortical surface was analyzed as a function of cortical depth using our surface-based analysis. Although sampling near the pial surface provided the highest signal strength, it also introduced the most spatial error. Thus, avoiding surface laminae improved spatial localization by about 40% at a cost of 36% in z-statistic, implying that optimal spatial resolution in functional imaging of the cortex can be achieved using anatomically-informed spatial sampling to avoid large pial vessels.

  11. Identification of non-linear models of neural activity in bold fmri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Daniel Jakup; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2006-01-01

    Non-linear hemodynamic models express the BOLD signal as a nonlinear, parametric functional of the temporal sequence of local neural activity. Several models have been proposed for this neural activity. We identify one such parametric model by estimating the distribution of its parameters. These ....... These distributions are themselves stochastic, therefore we estimate their variance by epoch based leave-one-out cross validation, using a Metropolis-Hastings algorithm for sampling of the posterior parameter distribution....

  12. Pitfalls in fractal time series analysis: fMRI BOLD as an exemplary case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andras eEke

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This article will be positioned on our previous work demonstrating the importance of adhering to a carefully selected set of criteria when choosing the suitable method from those available ensuring its adequate performance when applied to real temporal signals, such as fMRI BOLD, to evaluate one important facet of their behavior, fractality.Earlier, we have reviewed on a range of monofractal tools and evaluated their performance. Given the advance in the fractal field, in this article we will discuss the most widely used implementations of multifractal analyses, too.Our recommended flowchart for the fractal characterization of spontaneous, low frequency fluctuations in fMRI BOLD will be used as the framework for this article to make certain that it will provide a hands-on experience for the reader in handling the perplexed issues of fractal analysis. The reason why this particular signal modality and its fractal analysis has been chosen was due to its high impact on today's neuroscience given it had powerfully emerged as a new way of interpreting the complex functioning of the brain (see intrinsic activity.The reader will first be presented with the basic concepts of mono and multifractal time series analyses, followed by some of the most relevant implementations, characterization by numerical approaches. The notion of the dichotomy of fractional Gaussian noise (fGn and fractional Brownian motion (fBm signal classes and their impact on fractal time series analyses will be thoroughly discussed as the central theme of our application strategy. Sources of pitfalls and way how to avoid them will be identified followed by a demonstration on fractal studies of fMRI BOLD taken from the literature and that of our own in an attempt to consolidate the best practice in fractal analysis of empirical fMRI-BOLD signals mapped throughout the brain as an exemplary case of potentially wide interest.

  13. Signaling dependent and independent mechanisms in pemphigus vulgaris blister formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Masataka; Stahley, Sara N; Caughman, Christopher Y; Mao, Xuming; Tucker, Dana K; Payne, Aimee S; Amagai, Masayuki; Kowalczyk, Andrew P

    2012-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an autoimmune epidermal blistering disease caused by autoantibodies directed against the desmosomal cadherin desmoglein-3 (Dsg3). Significant advances in our understanding of pemphigus pathomechanisms have been derived from the generation of pathogenic monoclonal Dsg3 antibodies. However, conflicting models for pemphigus pathogenicity have arisen from studies using either polyclonal PV patient IgG or monoclonal Dsg3 antibodies. In the present study, the pathogenic mechanisms of polyclonal PV IgG and monoclonal Dsg3 antibodies were directly compared. Polyclonal PV IgG cause extensive clustering and endocytosis of keratinocyte cell surface Dsg3, whereas pathogenic mouse monoclonal antibodies compromise cell-cell adhesion strength without causing these alterations in Dsg3 trafficking. Furthermore, tyrosine kinase or p38 MAPK inhibition prevents loss of keratinocyte adhesion in response to polyclonal PV IgG. In contrast, disruption of adhesion by pathogenic monoclonal antibodies is not prevented by these inhibitors either in vitro or in human skin explants. Our results reveal that the pathogenic activity of polyclonal PV IgG can be attributed to p38 MAPK-dependent clustering and endocytosis of Dsg3, whereas pathogenic monoclonal Dsg3 antibodies can function independently of this pathway. These findings have important implications for understanding pemphigus pathophysiology, and for the design of pemphigus model systems and therapeutic interventions.

  14. Thylakoid redox signals are integrated into organellar-gene-expression-dependent retrograde signalling in the prors1-1 mutant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca eTadini

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Perturbations in organellar gene expression (OGE and the thylakoid redox state (TRS activate retrograde signalling pathways that adaptively modify nuclear gene expression (NGE, according to developmental and metabolic needs. The prors1-1 mutation in Arabidopsis down-regulates the expression of the nuclear gene Prolyl-tRNA Synthetase1 (PRORS1 which acts in both plastids and mitochondria, thereby impairing protein synthesis in both organelles and triggering OGE-dependent retrograde signalling. Because the mutation also affects thylakoid electron transport, TRS-dependent signals may likewise have an impact on the changes in NGE observed in this genotype. In this study, we have investigated whether signals related to TRS are actually integrated into the OGE-dependent retrograde signalling pathway. To this end, the chaos mutation (for chlorophyll a/b binding protein harvesting-organelle specific, which shows a partial loss of PSII antennae proteins and thus a reduction in PSII light absorption capability, was introduced into the prors1-1 mutant background. The resulting double mutant displayed a prors1-1-like reduction in plastid translation rate and a chaos-like decrease in PSII antenna size, whereas the hyper-reduction of the thylakoid electron transport chain, caused by the prors1-1 mutation, was alleviated, as determined by monitoring chlorophyll (Chl fluorescence and thylakoid phosphorylation. Interestingly, a substantial fraction of the nucleus-encoded photosynthesis genes down-regulated in the prors1-1 mutant are expressed at nearly wild-type rates in prors1-1 chaos leaves, and this recovery is reflected in the steady-state levels of their protein products in the chloroplast. We therefore conclude that signals related to photosynthetic electron transport and TRS, and indirectly to carbohydrate metabolism and energy balance, are indeed fed into the OGE-dependent retrograde pathway to modulate NGE and adjust the abundance of chloroplast proteins.

  15. Continuous Estimation of Wrist Torque from Surface EMG Signals Using Path-dependent Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Li-zhi; ZHANG Ding-guo; SHENG Xin-jun; ZHU Xiang-yang

    2014-01-01

    Continuous estimation of wrist torque from surface electromyography (EMG) signals has been studied by some research institutes. Hysteresis effect is a phenomenon in EMG force relationship. In this work, a path-dependent model based on hysteresis effect was used for continuously estimating wrist torque from surface EMG signals. The surface EMG signals of the flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) and extensor carpi radialis (ECR) were collected along with wrist torque of flexion/extension degree-of-freedom. EMG signal of FCU was used to estimate the torque of wrist flexion and EMG signal of ECR to estimate the torque of wrist extension. The existence of hysteresis effect has been proven either during wrist flexion or extension on all subjects. And the estimation performance of path-dependent model is much better than the overall model. Thus, the path-dependent model is suitable to improve the wrist torque's estimation accuracy.

  16. Infrared-microwave double resonance: signal dependence on microwave radiation strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vreede, J.P.M. de; Dijkerman, H.A.

    1980-01-01

    The influence of MW radiation on the magnitude of double resonance signals is studied in the case of steady-state 3-level IR-MW double resonance, using IR or MW radiation as probe field. The measurements reveal a strong signal dependence on the microwave power level. Changes in the absorption factor

  17. Frequency dependence of the pump-to-signal RIN transfer in fiber optical parametric amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pakarzadeh Dezfuli Nezhad, Hassan; Rottwitt, Karsten; Zakery, A.

    2009-01-01

    Using a numerical model, the frequency dependence of the pump-to-signal RIN transfer in FOPAs has been investigated. The model includes fiber loss, pump depletion as well as difference in group velocity among interacting beams.......Using a numerical model, the frequency dependence of the pump-to-signal RIN transfer in FOPAs has been investigated. The model includes fiber loss, pump depletion as well as difference in group velocity among interacting beams....

  18. Progression to deep sleep is characterized by changes to BOLD dynamics in sensory cortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Ben; Tagliazucchi, Enzo; Jovicich, Jorge; Laufs, Helmut; Hasson, Uri

    2016-04-15

    Sleep has been shown to subtly disrupt the spatial organization of functional connectivity networks in the brain, but in a way that largely preserves the connectivity within sensory cortices. Here we evaluated the hypothesis that sleep does impact sensory cortices, but through alteration of activity dynamics. We therefore examined the impact of sleep on hemodynamics using a method for quantifying non-random, high frequency signatures of the blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal (amplitude variance asymmetry; AVA). We found that sleep was associated with the elimination of these dynamics in a manner that is restricted to auditory, motor and visual cortices. This elimination was concurrent with increased variance of activity in these regions. Functional connectivity between regions showing AVA during wakefulness maintained a relatively consistent hierarchical structure during wakefulness and N1 and N2 sleep, despite a gradual reduction of connectivity strength as sleep progressed. Thus, sleep is related to elimination of high frequency non-random activity signatures in sensory cortices that are robust during wakefulness. The elimination of these AVA signatures conjointly with preservation of the structure of functional connectivity patterns may be linked to the need to suppress sensory inputs during sleep while still maintaining the capacity to react quickly to complex multimodal inputs.

  19. Boldness predicts social status in zebrafish (Danio rerio.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Josefin Dahlbom

    Full Text Available This study explored if boldness could be used to predict social status. First, boldness was assessed by monitoring individual zebrafish behaviour in (1 an unfamiliar barren environment with no shelter (open field, (2 the same environment when a roof was introduced as a shelter, and (3 when the roof was removed and an unfamiliar object (Lego® brick was introduced. Next, after a resting period of minimum one week, social status of the fish was determined in a dyadic contest and dominant/subordinate individuals were determined as the winner/loser of two consecutive contests. Multivariate data analyses showed that males were bolder than females and that the behaviours expressed by the fish during the boldness tests could be used to predict which fish would later become dominant and subordinate in the ensuing dyadic contest. We conclude that bold behaviour is positively correlated to dominance in zebrafish and that boldness is not solely a consequence of social dominance.

  20. Boldness predicts social status in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlbom, S Josefin; Lagman, David; Lundstedt-Enkel, Katrin; Sundström, L Fredrik; Winberg, Svante

    2011-01-01

    This study explored if boldness could be used to predict social status. First, boldness was assessed by monitoring individual zebrafish behaviour in (1) an unfamiliar barren environment with no shelter (open field), (2) the same environment when a roof was introduced as a shelter, and (3) when the roof was removed and an unfamiliar object (Lego® brick) was introduced. Next, after a resting period of minimum one week, social status of the fish was determined in a dyadic contest and dominant/subordinate individuals were determined as the winner/loser of two consecutive contests. Multivariate data analyses showed that males were bolder than females and that the behaviours expressed by the fish during the boldness tests could be used to predict which fish would later become dominant and subordinate in the ensuing dyadic contest. We conclude that bold behaviour is positively correlated to dominance in zebrafish and that boldness is not solely a consequence of social dominance.

  1. Computational Analysis of Signal Peptide-Dependent Secreted Proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Computer based software such as the SignalP v3.0, TargetP vl.01, big-PI predictor and TMHMM v2.0 were combined to predict the signal peptides, and the signal peptide-dependent secreted proteins among the 6 700 ORFs in genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The results showed that 163 proteins were the secreted ones containing signal peptides, and they were secreted via Sec pathway. Among the 163 predicted secreted proteins, the signal peptides of 47 secreted proteins included only the H-domain and C-domain, without N-domain, but the signal peptides of other 116 secreted proteins included all the three domains. There were differences in the constitution of signal peptides between the secreted proteins of S. cerevisiae and of Candida albicans, but the length and amino acids types of their signal peptides were similar in general. Few of the same signal peptides occurred in the secreted proteins of S. cerevisiae genome, and the homology could be compared among the secreted proteins with the same signal peptides. The BLAST 2 SEQUENECES and CLUSTAL W were used to align the two protein sequences and multi-protein sequences, respectively. The alignment result indicated that homology of these sequences with the same signal peptide was very highly conservative in amino acid of complete gene. The effect of the signal peptides in S. cerevisia on expression of foreign eukaryotic secreted proteins is discussed in this paper.

  2. Correlative BOLD MR imaging of stages of synovitis in a rabbit model of antigen-induced arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doria, Andrea S. [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Crawley, Adrian [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Toronto Western Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Gahunia, Harpal; Rayner, Tammy; Tassos, Vivian; Zhong, Anguo [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Moineddin, Rahim [Family and Community Medicine, Department of Public Health, Toronto (Canada); Pritzker, Kenneth; Mendes, Maria; Jong, Roland [Mount Sinai Hospital, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Toronto (Canada); Salter, Robert B. [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Toronto (Canada)

    2012-01-15

    Because of the ability of blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) MRI to assess blood oxygenation changes within the microvasculature, this technique holds potential for evaluating early perisynovial changes in inflammatory arthritis. To evaluate the feasibility of BOLD MRI to detect interval perisynovial changes in knees of rabbits with inflammatory arthritis. Rabbit knees were injected with albumin (n=9) or saline (n=6) intra-articularly, or were not injected (control knees, n=9). Except for two rabbits (albumin-injected, n=2 knees; saline-injected, n=2 knees) that unexpectedly died on days 7 and 21 of the experiment, respectively, all other animals were scanned with BOLD MRI on days 0, 1, 7, 14, 21 and 28 after induction of arthritis. T2*-weighted gradient-echo MRI was performed during alternate 30 s of normoxia/hyperoxia. BOLD MRI measurements were compared with clinical, laboratory and histological markers. Percentage of activated voxels was significantly greater in albumin-injected knees than in contralateral saline-injected knees (P=0.04). For albumin-injected knees (P < 0.05) and among different categories of knees (P=0.009), the percentage of activated BOLD voxels varied over time. A quadratic curve for on-and-off BOLD difference was delineated for albumin- and saline-injected knees over time (albumin-injected, P=0.047; saline-injected, P=0.009). A trend toward a significant difference in synovial histological scores between albumin-injected and saline-injected knees was noted only for acute scores (P=0.07). As a proof of concept, BOLD MRI can depict perisynovial changes during progression of experimental arthritis. (orig.)

  3. Signaling, Notetaking, and Field Independence-Dependence in Text Comprehension and Recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickards, John P.; Fajen, Brett R.; Sullivan, James F.; Gillespie, Gerald

    1997-01-01

    Two experiments (n=41 and n=166), one in listening and one in reading, examined the relationships among signaling (structural cues), notetaking, and field dependence-independence in college students. Field-independent subjects seemed to use a tacit structure strategy, whereas field-dependent subjects seemed to display structuring skills when…

  4. A generalizable platform for interrogating target- and signal-specific consequences of electrophilic modifications in redox-dependent cell signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hong-Yu; Haegele, Joseph A; Disare, Michael T; Lin, Qishan; Aye, Yimon

    2015-05-20

    Despite the known propensity of small-molecule electrophiles to react with numerous cysteine-active proteins, biological actions of individual signal inducers have emerged to be chemotype-specific. To pinpoint and quantify the impacts of modifying one target out of the whole proteome, we develop a target-protein-personalized "electrophile toolbox" with which specific intracellular targets can be selectively modified at a precise time by specific reactive signals. This general methodology, T-REX (targetable reactive electrophiles and oxidants), is established by (1) constructing a platform that can deliver a range of electronic and sterically different bioactive lipid-derived signaling electrophiles to specific proteins in cells; (2) probing the kinetics of targeted delivery concept, which revealed that targeting efficiency in cells is largely driven by initial on-rate of alkylation; and (3) evaluating the consequences of protein-target- and small-molecule-signal-specific modifications on the strength of downstream signaling. These data show that T-REX allows quantitative interrogations into the extent to which the Nrf2 transcription factor-dependent antioxidant response element (ARE) signaling is activated by selective electrophilic modifications on Keap1 protein, one of several redox-sensitive regulators of the Nrf2-ARE axis. The results document Keap1 as a promiscuous electrophile-responsive sensor able to respond with similar efficiencies to discrete electrophilic signals, promoting comparable strength of Nrf2-ARE induction. T-REX is also able to elicit cell activation in cases in which whole-cell electrophile flooding fails to stimulate ARE induction prior to causing cytotoxicity. The platform presents a previously unavailable opportunity to elucidate the functional consequences of small-molecule-signal- and protein-target-specific electrophilic modifications in an otherwise unaffected cellular background.

  5. A Multifaceted Role for Myd88-Dependent Signaling in Progression of Murine Mammary Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Mary J.; Serrano, Antonio; Boateng, Kofi Y.; Parsons, Victoria A.; Phuong, Tiffany; Seifert, Alyssa; Ricca, Jacob M.; Tucker, Kyle C.; Eidelman, Alec S.; Carey, Maureen A.; Kurt, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Previous data obtained in our laboratory suggested that there may be constitutive signaling through the myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (Myd88)-dependent signaling cascade in murine mammary carcinoma. Here, we extended these findings by showing that, in the absence of an added Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist, the myddosome complex was preformed in 4T1 tumor cells, and that Myd88 influenced cytoplasmic extracellular signal–regulated kinase (Erk)1/Erk2 levels, nuclear levels of nuclear factor-kappaB (NFκB) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5), tumor-derived chemokine (C–C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) expression, and in vitro and in vivo tumor growth. In addition, RNA-sequencing revealed that Myd88-dependent signaling enhanced the expression of genes that could contribute to breast cancer progression and genes previously associated with poor outcome for patients with breast cancer, in addition to suppressing the expression of genes capable of inhibiting breast cancer progression. Yet, Myd88-dependent signaling in tumor cells also suppressed expression of genes that could contribute to tumor progression. Collectively, these data revealed a multifaceted role for Myd88-dependent signaling in murine mammary carcinoma. PMID:27812285

  6. Both membrane-dependent and DNA damage-dependent signal transduction chains are activated following UV irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blattner, C.; Knebel, A.; Bender, K.; Rahmsdorf, H.J.; Herrlich, P. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. fuer Genetik

    1997-03-01

    Irradiation of cultured cells with short wave length ultraviolet light (UVC) activates at least two types of signal transduction chains which ultimately lead to changes in gene expression. One type involves cell surface receptors and is activated with very rapid kinetics. One or several membrane associated protein tyrosine phosphatases are inhibited in less than one minute following UV exposure. Consequently the dephosphorylation of tyrosine-phosphorylated growth factor receptors is impaired. This process is ligand-independent and suggests spontaneous autophosphorylation activity of receptor tyrosine kinases. The UV-induced auto-phosphorylations trigger-signal transduction to the nucleus and activate transcription of immediate early genes such as c-fos. The other type of signal transduction chain has its origin in DNA damage. It occurs with delayed kinetics. We analyzed several human fibroblastic cell lines with distinct deficiencies in nucleotide excision repair mechanisms for the dose dependence of UV-induced late appearing and stable collagenase I mRNA. Several cell lines with deficiencies in the preferential repair of transcribed genes required lower doses of UV than wild type cells or cells solely deficient in the repair of the overall genome. These data suggest the existence of a signal transduction cascade whose stimulation is elicited by lesions in transcribed genes. It appears that similar or identical transcription factors are activated by both types of UV-induced signal transduction. For instance the transcription factor NF{kappa}B is activated by both, a DNA damage independent and a DNA damage dependent signal transduction chain. (authors)

  7. The human adaptor SARM negatively regulates adaptor protein TRIF-dependent Toll-like receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carty, Michael; Goodbody, Rory; Schröder, Martina; Stack, Julianne; Moynagh, Paul N; Bowie, Andrew G

    2006-10-01

    Toll-like receptors discriminate between different pathogen-associated molecules and activate signaling cascades that lead to immune responses. The specificity of Toll-like receptor signaling occurs by means of adaptor proteins containing Toll-interleukin 1 receptor (TIR) domains. Activating functions have been assigned to four TIR adaptors: MyD88, Mal, TRIF and TRAM. Here we characterize a fifth TIR adaptor, SARM, as a negative regulator of TRIF-dependent Toll-like receptor signaling. Expression of SARM blocked gene induction 'downstream' of TRIF but not of MyD88. SARM associated with TRIF, and 'knockdown' of endogenous SARM expression by interfering RNA led to enhanced TRIF-dependent cytokine and chemokine induction. Thus, the fifth mammalian TIR adaptor SARM is a negative regulator of Toll-like receptor signaling.

  8. Substrate-dependent transmembrane signaling in TonB-dependent transporters is not conserved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Miyeon; Fanucci, Gail E; Cafiso, David S

    2007-07-17

    Site-directed spin labeling (SDSL) was used to examine and compare transmembrane signaling events in the bacterial outer-membrane transport proteins BtuB, FecA, and FhuA. These proteins extract energy for transport by coupling to the transperiplasmic protein TonB, an interaction that is thought to be mediated by the Ton box, a highly conserved energy-coupling motif in these transporters. In the ferric citrate transporter, FecA, SDSL indicates that the Ton box undergoes a substrate-induced disorder transition similar to that seen for BtuB, the vitamin B(12) transporter. This conformational change produces an aqueous exposed, highly disordered protein fragment, which likely regulates transporter-TonB interactions. However, in the ferrichrome transporter, FhuA, SDSL does not reveal a substrate-induced unfolding transition. In this protein, with or without substrate, the Ton box conformation is found to be highly dynamic and constitutively unfolded. In addition, SDSL indicates that structural features seen in high-resolution models are not found in membrane-associated FhuA. Taken together, these data indicate that the Ton box of FhuA may always be available for interactions with TonB, implying that transporter-TonB interactions in FhuA are either constitutive or not regulated by the Ton box configuration.

  9. The human adaptor SARM negatively regulates adaptor protein TRIF–dependent Toll-like receptor signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Carty, Michael; Goodbody, Rory; Schröder, Michael; Stack, Julianne; Moynagh, Paul N.; Bowie, Andrew G.

    2006-01-01

    Toll-like receptors discriminate between different pathogen-associated molecules and activate signaling cascades that lead to immune responses. The specificity of Toll-like receptor signaling occurs by means of adaptor proteins containing Toll–interleukin 1 receptor (TIR) domains. Activating functions have been assigned to four TIR adaptors: MyD88, Mal, TRIF and TRAM. Here we characterize a fifth TIR adaptor, SARM, as a negative regulator of TRIF-dependent Toll-like receptor signalin...

  10. Shifted factor analysis for the separation of evoked dependent MEG signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohl, F; Wuebbeler, G; Baer, M; Elster, C [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Abbestrasse 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany); Kolossa, D; Orglmeister, R, E-mail: florian.kohl@ptb.d [Technische Universitaet Berlin, Strasse des 17. Juni 135, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2010-08-07

    Decomposition of evoked magnetoencephalography (MEG) data into their underlying neuronal signals is an important step in the interpretation of these measurements. Often, independent component analysis (ICA) is employed for this purpose. However, ICA can fail as for evoked MEG data the neuronal signals may not be statistically independent. We therefore consider an alternative approach based on the recently proposed shifted factor analysis model, which does not assume statistical independence of the neuronal signals. We suggest the application of this model in the time domain and present an estimation procedure based on a Taylor series expansion. We show in terms of synthetic evoked MEG data that the proposed procedure can successfully separate evoked dependent neuronal signals while standard ICA fails. Latency estimation of neuronal signals is an inherent part of the proposed procedure and we demonstrate that resulting latency estimates are superior to those obtained by a maximum likelihood method.

  11. Regional brain signal variability: a novel indicator of pain sensitivity and coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogachov, Anton; Cheng, Joshua C; Erpelding, Nathalie; Hemington, Kasey S; Crawley, Adrian P; Davis, Karen D

    2016-11-01

    Variability in blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signals reflects the moment-by-moment fluctuations in resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI) activity within specific areas of the brain. Regional BOLD signal variability was recently proposed to serve an important functional role in the efficacy of neural systems because of its relationship to behavioural performance in aging and cognition studies. We previously showed that individuals who better cope with pain have greater fluctuations in interregional functional connectivity, but it is not known whether regional brain signal variability is a mechanism underlying pain coping. We tested the hypothesis that individual pain sensitivity and coping is reflected by regional fMRI BOLD signal variability within dynamic pain connectome-brain systems implicated in the pain experience. We acquired resting-state fMRI and assessed pain threshold, suprathreshold temporal summation of pain, and the impact of pain on cognition in 80 healthy right-handed individuals. We found that regional BOLD signal variability: (1) inversely correlated with an individual's temporal summation of pain within the ascending nociceptive pathway (primary and secondary somatosensory cortex), default mode network, and salience network; (2) was correlated with an individual's ability to cope with pain during a cognitive interference task within the periaqueductal gray, a key opiate-rich brainstem structure for descending pain modulation; and (3) provided information not captured from interregional functional connectivity. Therefore, regional BOLD variability represents a pain metric with potential implications for prediction of chronic pain resilience vs vulnerability.

  12. [Susceptibility weighted magnetic resonance sequences "SWAN, SWI and VenoBOLD": technical aspects and clinical applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodel, J; Rodallec, M; Gerber, S; Blanc, R; Maraval, A; Caron, S; Tyvaert, L; Zuber, M; Zins, M

    2012-05-01

    Susceptibility-weighted MR sequences, T2 star weighted angiography (SWAN, General Electric), Susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI, Siemens) and venous blood oxygen level dependant (VenoBOLD, Philips) are 3D spoiled gradient-echo sequence that provide a high sensitivity for the detection of blood degradation products, calcifications, and iron deposits. For all these sequences, an appropriate echo time allows for the visualization of susceptibility differences between adjacent tissues. However, each of these sequences presents a specific technical background. The purpose of this review was to describe 1/the technical aspects of SWAN, VenoBOLD and SWI sequences, 2/the differences observed in term of contrast within the images, 3/the key imaging findings in neuroimaging using susceptibility-weighted MR sequences.

  13. BOLD MRI of the human cervical spinal cord at 3 tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroman, P W; Nance, P W; Ryner, L N

    1999-09-01

    The feasibility of functional MRI of the spinal cord was investigated by carrying out blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) imaging of the human cervical spinal cord at a field of 3 T. BOLD imaging of the cervical spinal cord showed an average intensity increase of 7.0% during repeated exercise with the dominant hand with a return to baseline during rest periods. The areas of activation were predominantly on the same side of the spinal cord as the hand performing the exercise, between the levels of the sixth cervical and first thoracic spinal cord segments. The direct correspondence between these areas and those involved with the transmission of motor impulses to the hand, and reception of sensory information from the hand, demonstrates that spinal functional magnetic resonance imaging is feasible. Magn Reson Med 42:571-576, 1999. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. A comparison of Gamma and Gaussian dynamic convolution models of the fMRI BOLD response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huafu; Yao, Dezhong; Liu, Zuxiang

    2005-01-01

    Blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been widely utilized to detect brain neural activities and great efforts are now stressed on the hemodynamic processes of different brain regions activated by a stimulus. The focus of this paper is the comparison of Gamma and Gaussian dynamic convolution models of the fMRI BOLD response. The convolutions are between the perfusion function of the neural response to a stimulus and a Gaussian or Gamma function. The parameters of the two models are estimated by a nonlinear least-squares optimal algorithm for the fMRI data of eight subjects collected in a visual stimulus experiment. The results show that the Gaussian model is better than the Gamma model in fitting the data. The model parameters are different in the left and right occipital regions, which indicate that the dynamic processes seem different in various cerebral functional regions.

  15. Functional Connectivity in MRI Is Driven by Spontaneous BOLD Events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W Allan

    Full Text Available Functional brain signals are frequently decomposed into a relatively small set of large scale, distributed cortical networks that are associated with different cognitive functions. It is generally assumed that the connectivity of these networks is static in time and constant over the whole network, although there is increasing evidence that this view is too simplistic. This work proposes novel techniques to investigate the contribution of spontaneous BOLD events to the temporal dynamics of functional connectivity as assessed by ultra-high field functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. The results show that: 1 spontaneous events in recognised brain networks contribute significantly to network connectivity estimates; 2 these spontaneous events do not necessarily involve whole networks or nodes, but clusters of voxels which act in concert, forming transiently synchronising sub-networks and 3 a task can significantly alter the number of localised spontaneous events that are detected within a single network. These findings support the notion that spontaneous events are the main driver of the large scale networks that are commonly detected by seed-based correlation and ICA. Furthermore, we found that large scale networks are manifestations of smaller, transiently synchronising sub-networks acting dynamically in concert, corresponding to spontaneous events, and which do not necessarily involve all voxels within the network nodes oscillating in unison.

  16. Repetition suppression: a means to index neural representations using BOLD?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Timothy E. J.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how the human brain gives rise to complex cognitive processes remains one of the biggest challenges of contemporary neuroscience. While invasive recording in animal models can provide insight into neural processes that are conserved across species, our understanding of cognition more broadly relies upon investigation of the human brain itself. There is therefore an imperative to establish non-invasive tools that allow human brain activity to be measured at high spatial and temporal resolution. In recent years, various attempts have been made to refine the coarse signal available in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), providing a means to investigate neural activity at the meso-scale, i.e. at the level of neural populations. The most widely used techniques include repetition suppression and multivariate pattern analysis. Human neuroscience can now use these techniques to investigate how representations are encoded across neural populations and transformed by relevant computations. Here, we review the physiological basis, applications and limitations of fMRI repetition suppression with a brief comparison to multivariate techniques. By doing so, we show how fMRI repetition suppression holds promise as a tool to reveal complex neural mechanisms that underlie human cognitive function. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience’. PMID:27574308

  17. Comparison of blood-oxygen-level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging and near-infrared spectroscopy recording during functional brain activation in patients with stroke and brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakatani, Kaoru; Murata, Yoshihiro; Fujiwara, Norio; Hoshino, Tatsuya; Nakamura, Shin; Kano, Tsuneo; Katayama, Yoichi

    2007-01-01

    Blood-oxygen-level-dependent contrast functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-fMRI) has been used to perform functional imaging in brain disorders such as stroke and brain tumors. However, recent studies have revealed that BOLD-fMRI does not image activation areas correctly in such patients. To clarify the characteristics of the evoked cerebral blood oxygenation (CBO) changes occurring in stroke and brain tumors, we have been comparing near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and BOLD-fMRI recording during functional brain activation in these patients. We review our recent studies and related functional imaging studies on the brain disorders. In the primary sensorimotor cortex (PSMC) on the nonlesion side, the motor task consistently caused a decrease of deoxyhemoglobin (deoxy-Hb) with increases of oxyhemoglobin (oxy-Hb) and total hemoglobin (t-Hb), which is consistent with the evoked CBO response observed in normal adults. BOLD-fMRI demonstrated robust activation areas on the nonlesion side. In stroke patients, severe cerebral ischemia (i.e., misery perfusion) caused an increase of deoxy-Hb during the task, associated with increases of oxy-Hb and t-Hb, in the PSMC on the lesion side. In addition, the activation volume of BOLD-fMRI was significantly reduced on the lesion side. The BOLD signal did not change in some areas of the PSMC on the lesion side, but it tended to decrease in other areas during the tasks. In brain tumors, BOLD-fMRI clearly demonstrated activation areas in the PSMC on the lesion side in patients who displayed a normal evoked CBO response. However, the activation volume on the lesion side was significantly reduced in patients who exhibited an increase of deoxy-Hb during the task. In both stroke and brain tumors, false-negative activations (i.e., marked reductions of activation volumes) in BOLD imaging were associated with increases of deoxy-Hb, which could cause a reduction in BOLD signal. BOLD-fMRI investigations of patients with brain disorders

  18. Proinflammatory signal suppresses proliferation and shifts macrophage metabolism from Myc-dependent to HIF1α-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lingling; Lu, Yun; Martinez, Jennifer; Bi, Yujing; Lian, Gaojian; Wang, Tingting; Milasta, Sandra; Wang, Jian; Yang, Mao; Liu, Guangwei; Green, Douglas R; Wang, Ruoning

    2016-02-01

    As a phenotypically plastic cellular population, macrophages change their physiology in response to environmental signals. Emerging evidence suggests that macrophages are capable of tightly coordinating their metabolic programs to adjust their immunological and bioenergetic functional properties, as needed. Upon mitogenic stimulation, quiescent macrophages enter the cell cycle, increasing their bioenergetic and biosynthetic activity to meet the demands of cell growth. Proinflammatory stimulation, however, suppresses cell proliferation, while maintaining a heightened metabolic activity imposed by the production of bactericidal factors. Here, we report that the mitogenic stimulus, colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1), engages a myelocytomatosis viral oncogen (Myc)-dependent transcriptional program that is responsible for cell cycle entry and the up-regulation of glucose and glutamine catabolism in bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs). However, the proinflammatory stimulus, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), suppresses Myc expression and cell proliferation and engages a hypoxia-inducible factor alpha (HIF1α)-dependent transcriptional program that is responsible for heightened glycolysis. The acute deletion of Myc or HIF1α selectively impaired the CSF-1- or LPS-driven metabolic activities in BMDM, respectively. Finally, inhibition of glycolysis by 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) or genetic deletion of HIF1α suppressed LPS-induced inflammation in vivo. Our studies indicate that a switch from a Myc-dependent to a HIF1α-dependent transcriptional program may regulate the robust bioenergetic support for an inflammatory response, while sparing Myc-dependent proliferation.

  19. Mutation of sepJ reduces the intercellular signal range of a hetN-dependent paracrine signal, but not of a patS-dependent signal, in the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, Orion S; Videau, Patrick; Callahan, Sean M

    2014-12-01

    Formation and maintenance of a periodic pattern of nitrogen-fixing cells called heterocysts by the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 is dependent on regulators encoded by patS and hetN. In this study, genetic mosaic filaments that consisted of cells engineered to produce one of the developmental regulators flanked by target cells capable of reporting the activity of the developmental regulator were used to investigate the intercellular movement of patS- and hetN-dependent activity. We provide evidence that hetN encodes a paracrine signal with a signal range of several cells. The signal that moved between cells did not include the C-terminus of the annotated HetN protein as indicated by similar signal ranges from source cells expressing either hetN-YFP or hetN alone, despite a lack of intercellular exchange of the HetN-YFP fusion protein. Deletion of sepJ, which has been shown to encode a component of intercellular channels, caused a significant decrease in the signal range of hetN expressed from source cells but not of patS. These results are consistent with symplastic transport of a paracrine hetN-dependent signal between vegetative cells of Anabaena.

  20. Tyrosinase kinetics in epidermal melanocytes: analysis of DAG-PKC-dependent signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolnitz, Mikhail M.; Peshkova, Anna Y.

    2001-05-01

    Tyrosinase is the key enzyme of melanogenesis with unusual enzyme kinetics. Protein kinase C plays an important role in regulating of tyrosinase activity. In the paper the mathematical model of PKC-DAG-dependent signal transduction pathway for UV-radiation is presented.

  1. Carotenoid-dependent signals and the evolution of plasma carotenoid levels in birds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, Mirre J. P.; Maia, Rafael; Leenknegt, Bas; Verhulst, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Sexual selection has resulted in a wide array of ornaments used in mate choice, and such indicator traits signal quality honestly when they bear costs, precluding cheating. Carotenoid-dependent coloration has attracted considerable attention in this context, because investing carotenoids in colorati

  2. Artifact-reduced two-dimensional cine steady state free precession for myocardial blood- oxygen-level-dependent imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiangzhi; Tsaftaris, Sotirios A; Liu, Ying; Tang, Richard; Klein, Rachel; Zuehlsdorff, Sven; Li, Debiao; Dharmakumar, Rohan

    2010-04-01

    To minimize image artifacts in long TR cardiac phase-resolved steady state free precession (SSFP) based blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) imaging. Nine healthy dogs (four male, five female, 20-25 kg) were studied in a clinical 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner to investigate the effect of temporal resolution, readout bandwidth, and motion compensation on long repetition time (TR) SSFP images. Breath-held 2D SSFP cine sequences with various temporal resolutions (10-204 ms), bandwidths (239-930 Hz/pixel), with and without first-order motion compensation were prescribed in the basal, mid-ventricular, and apical along the short axis. Preliminary myocardial BOLD studies in dogs with controllable coronary stenosis were performed to assess the benefits of artifact-reduction strategies. Shortening the readout time by means of increasing readout bandwidth had no observable reduction in image artifacts. However, increasing the temporal resolution in the presence of first-order motion compensation led to significant reduction in image artifacts. Preliminary studies demonstrated that BOLD signal changes can be reliably detected throughout the cardiac cycle. Artifact-reduction methods used in this study provide significant improvement in image quality compared with conventional long TR SSFP BOLD MRI. It is envisioned that the methods proposed here may enable reliable detection of myocardial oxygenation changes throughout the cardiac cycle with long TR SSFP-based myocardial BOLD MRI. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. A simple solution for model comparison in bold imaging: the special case of reward prediction error and reward outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdeniz, Burak; Rohe, Tim; Done, John; Seidler, Rachael D

    2013-01-01

    Conventional neuroimaging techniques provide information about condition-related changes of the BOLD (blood-oxygen-level dependent) signal, indicating only where and when the underlying cognitive processes occur. Recently, with the help of a new approach called "model-based" functional neuroimaging (fMRI), researchers are able to visualize changes in the internal variables of a time varying learning process, such as the reward prediction error or the predicted reward value of a conditional stimulus. However, despite being extremely beneficial to the imaging community in understanding the neural correlates of decision variables, a model-based approach to brain imaging data is also methodologically challenging due to the multicollinearity problem in statistical analysis. There are multiple sources of multicollinearity in functional neuroimaging including investigations of closely related variables and/or experimental designs that do not account for this. The source of multicollinearity discussed in this paper occurs due to correlation between different subjective variables that are calculated very close in time. Here, we review methodological approaches to analyzing such data by discussing the special case of separating the reward prediction error signal from reward outcomes.

  4. Role of the Neuregulin Signaling Pathway in Nicotine Dependence and Co-morbid Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Miranda L.; Loukola, Anu; Kaprio, Jaakko; Turner, Jill R.

    2016-01-01

    Smoking is currently the leading cause of preventable death in the United States and is responsible for over four million deaths annually worldwide. Therefore, there is a vast clinical unmet need with regards to therapeutics targeting smoking cessation. This is even more apparent when examining smokers co-morbid with psychiatric illness, as rates of smoking in this population are ~4× higher than in the general population. Examining common genetic and molecular signaling pathways impinging upon both smoking behavior and psychiatric illness will lead to a better understanding of co-morbid disorders and potential development of novel therapeutics. Studies have implicated the Neuregulin Signaling Pathway in the pathophysiology of a number of psychiatric illnesses. Additionally, recent studies have also shown an association between the Neuregulin Signaling Pathway and smoking behaviors. This review outlines basic mechanisms of the Neuregulin Signaling Pathway and how it may be exploited for precision medicine approaches in treating nicotine dependence and mental illness. PMID:26472527

  5. Loss of Merlin induces metabolomic adaptation that engages dependence on Hedgehog signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Shamik; Jackson, William P.; Prasain, Jeevan K.; Hanna, Ann; Bailey, Sarah K.; Tucker, J. Allan; Bae, Sejong; Wilson, Landon S.; Samant, Rajeev S.; Barnes, Stephen; Shevde, Lalita A.

    2017-01-01

    The tumor suppressor protein Merlin is proteasomally degraded in breast cancer. We undertook an untargeted metabolomics approach to discern the global metabolomics profile impacted by Merlin in breast cancer cells. We discerned specific changes in glutathione metabolites that uncovered novel facets of Merlin in impacting the cancer cell metabolome. Concordantly, Merlin loss increased oxidative stress causing aberrant activation of Hedgehog signaling. Abrogation of GLI-mediated transcription activity compromised the aggressive phenotype of Merlin-deficient cells indicating a clear dependence of cells on Hedgehog signaling. In breast tumor tissues, GLI1 expression enhanced tissue identification and discriminatory power of Merlin, cumulatively presenting a powerful substantiation of the relationship between these two proteins. We have uncovered, for the first time, details of the tumor cell metabolomic portrait modulated by Merlin, leading to activation of Hedgehog signaling. Importantly, inhibition of Hedgehog signaling offers an avenue to target the vulnerability of tumor cells with loss of Merlin. PMID:28112165

  6. Arsenic Attenuates GLI Signaling, Increasing or Decreasing its Transcriptional Program in a Context-Dependent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Giambelli, Camilla; Tang, Bo; Winterbottom, Emily; Long, Jun; Jin, Ke; Wang, Zhiqiang; Fei, Dennis Liang; Nguyen, Dao M; Athar, Mohammad; Wang, Baolin; Subbarayan, Pochi R; Wang, Lily; Rai, Priyamvada; Ardalan, Bach; Capobianco, Anthony J; Robbins, David J

    2016-02-01

    The metalloid arsenic is a worldwide environmental toxicant, exposure to which is associated with many adverse outcomes. Arsenic is also an effective therapeutic agent in certain disease settings. Arsenic was recently shown to regulate the activity of the Hedgehog (HH) signal transduction pathway, and this regulation of HH signaling was proposed to be responsible for a subset of arsenic's biologic effects. Surprisingly, these separate reports proposed contradictory activities for arsenic, as either an agonist or antagonist of HH signaling. Here we provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that arsenic acts as a modulator of the activity of the HH effector protein glioma-associated oncogene family zinc finger (GLI), activating or inhibiting GLI activity in a context-dependent manner. This arsenic-induced modulation of HH signaling is observed in cultured cells, patients with colorectal cancer who have received arsenic-based therapy, and a mouse colorectal cancer xenograft model. Our results show that arsenic activates GLI signaling when the intrinsic GLI activity is low but inhibits signaling in the presence of high-level GLI activity. Furthermore, we show that this modulation occurs downstream of primary cilia, evidenced by experiments in suppressor of fused homolog (SUFU) deficient cells. Combining our findings with previous reports, we present an inclusive model in which arsenic plays dual roles in GLI signaling modulation: when GLIs are primarily in their repressor form, arsenic antagonizes their repression capacity, leading to low-level GLI activation, but when GLIs are primarily in their activator form, arsenic attenuates their activity.

  7. Context-Dependent Effects of Amplified MAPK Signaling during Lung Adenocarcinoma Initiation and Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Cicchini

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Expression of oncogenic KrasG12D initiates lung adenomas in a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signal-dependent manner from only a subset of cell types in the adult mouse lung. Amplification of MAPK signaling is associated with progression to malignant adenocarcinomas, but whether this is a cause or a consequence of disease progression is not known. To better understand the effects of MAPK signaling downstream of KrasG12D expression, we capitalized on the ability of Braf inhibition to selectively amplify MAPK pathway signaling in KrasG12D-expressing epithelial cells. MAPK signal amplification indeed promoted the rapid progression of established adenomas to malignant adenocarcinomas. However, we observed, surprisingly, a greater number of overall tumor-initiating events after MAPK signal amplification, due to induced proliferation of cell types that are normally refractory to KrasG12D-induced transformation. Thus, MAPK signaling in the lung is thresholded not only during malignant progression but also at the moment of tumor initiation.

  8. The use of recurrent signals about adaptation for subsequent saccade programming depends on object structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doré-Mazars, Karine; Vergilino-Perez, Dorine; Collins, Thérèse; Bohacova, Katarina; Beauvillain, Cécile

    2006-10-03

    Executing sequences of accurate saccadic eye movements supposes the use of signals carrying information about the first saccade for updating the predetermined motor plan of the subsequent saccades. The present study examines the signals used in planning a second saccade when subjects made two successive saccades towards one long or two short peripheral objects displayed before the first saccade execution. Different first eye movement signals could be used: desired eye movement signals, representing the movement necessary for attaining the intended target, or actual eye movement signals, representing the movement actually executed. Experimental dissociation of desired and actual eye movement signals is made possible by adaptive modifications of the first saccade, obtained by transfer of single saccade adaptation, during which the motor vector was progressively modified in response to the systematic intra-saccadic step of a single target. Whether the second saccade used the actual eye movement signal to compensate or not for the adaptive changes in the first saccade depended on which object properties were relevant for saccade planning. Compensation was observed for saccades that aimed for a new object (between-object saccades) because adaptation modifies relative object location. No compensation was observed for saccades that explored an extended object (within-object saccades). Implications for the on-line control of subsequent eye movements are discussed.

  9. Hedgehog signalling controls zebrafish neural keel morphogenesis via its level-dependent effects on neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamiya, Masanari; Campos-Ortega, Jose A

    2006-04-01

    We investigated the role of hedgehog (Hh) signalling on zebrafish neurulation, focusing on the intimate relationship between neurogenesis and morphogenesis during the neural keel stage. Through the analyses of Hh loss- and gain-of-function phenotypes, we found that Hh signalling controls the neural keel morphogenesis. To investigate underlying mechanisms, we examined cellular elongation polarity in the neural keel of Hh loss- and gain-of-function phenotypes and compared this with the deficient phenotype of a planar cell polarity (PCP) molecule, Trilobite/Strabismus. We found that Hh signalling controls cell elongation polarity of the neuroepithelium at least in part by means of PCP pathway; however, its effects are not strong enough per se to affect keel morphogenesis; instead Hh signalling mainly controls keel morphogenesis by means of affecting both medial and lateral neurogenesis. We devised a method for precise evaluation of neurogenesis in loss- and gain-of-Hh phenotypes that compensates for its delay caused by disturbed morphogenesis. We present a model that Hh signalling exerts level-dependent and binary-opposite effects on medial neurogenesis, whose modification to explain lateral neurogenesis reveals regional differences of underlying mechanisms between the two proneural domains. Such differences seem to be created in part by regional effector signalling; the effects of high Hh-signalling on medial neurogenesis can be reversed in accordance to medial Tri/Stbm level, in a polarity independent manner.

  10. Carotenoid-dependent signals and the evolution of plasma carotenoid levels in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Mirre J P; Maia, Rafael; Leenknegt, Bas; Verhulst, Simon

    2014-12-01

    Sexual selection has resulted in a wide array of ornaments used in mate choice, and such indicator traits signal quality honestly when they bear costs, precluding cheating. Carotenoid-dependent coloration has attracted considerable attention in this context, because investing carotenoids in coloration has to be traded off against its physiological functions; carotenoids are antioxidants and increase immunocompetence. This trade-off is hypothesized to underlie the honesty of carotenoid-dependent coloration, signaling the "handicap" of allocating carotenoids away from somatic maintenance toward sexual display. Utilizing recent advances in modeling adaptive evolution, we used a comparative approach to investigate the evolution of plasma carotenoid levels using a species-level phylogeny of 178 bird species. We find that the evolutionary optimum for carotenoid levels is higher in lineages that evolved carotenoid-dependent coloration, with strong attraction toward this optimum. Hence, carotenoids do not appear to be limiting, given that higher carotenoid levels readily evolve in response to the evolution of carotenoid-dependent coloration. These findings challenge the assumption that carotenoids are a scarce resource and thus also challenge the hypothesis that physiological resource value of carotenoids underlies honesty of carotenoid-dependent traits. Therefore, the comparative evidence suggests that other factors, such as the acquisition and incorporation of carotenoids, are involved in maintaining signal honesty.

  11. Fluoxetine exposure impacts boldness in female Siamese fighting fish, Betta splendens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzieweczynski, Teresa L; Kane, Jessica L; Campbell, Brennah A; Lavin, Lindsey E

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine, on the behavior of female Siamese fighting fish, Betta splendens, in three different boldness assays (Empty Tank, Novel Environment, Social Tendency). When females were unexposed to fluoxetine, boldness was consistent within a context and correlated across assays. Fluoxetine exposure affected behavior within and among individuals on multiple levels. Exposure reduced overall boldness levels, made females behave in a less consistent manner, and significantly reduced correlations over time and across contexts. Fluoxetine exerted its effects on female Betta splendens behavior in a dose-dependent fashion and these effects persisted even after females were housed in clean water. If fluoxetine exposure impacts behaviors such as exploration that are necessary to an individual’s success, this may yield evolutionary consequences. In conclusion, the results show that fluoxetine exposure alters behavior beyond the level of overall response and highlights the importance of studying the behavioral effects of inadvertent pharmaceutical exposure in multiple contexts and with different dosing regimes.

  12. Compensatory relationship between splice sites and exonic splicing signals depending on the length of vertebrate introns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogozin Igor B

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The signals that determine the specificity and efficiency of splicing are multiple and complex, and are not fully understood. Among other factors, the relative contributions of different mechanisms appear to depend on intron size inasmuch as long introns might hinder the activity of the spliceosome through interference with the proper positioning of the intron-exon junctions. Indeed, it has been shown that the information content of splice sites positively correlates with intron length in the nematode, Drosophila, and fungi. We explored the connections between the length of vertebrate introns, the strength of splice sites, exonic splicing signals, and evolution of flanking exons. Results A compensatory relationship is shown to exist between different types of signals, namely, the splice sites and the exonic splicing enhancers (ESEs. In the range of relatively short introns (approximately, Conclusion Several weak but statistically significant correlations were observed between vertebrate intron length, splice site strength, and potential exonic splicing signals. Taken together, these findings attest to a compensatory relationship between splice sites and exonic splicing signals, depending on intron length.

  13. Constraint-based modeling and kinetic analysis of the Smad dependent TGF-beta signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhike Zi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Investigation of dynamics and regulation of the TGF-beta signaling pathway is central to the understanding of complex cellular processes such as growth, apoptosis, and differentiation. In this study, we aim at using systems biology approach to provide dynamic analysis on this pathway. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We proposed a constraint-based modeling method to build a comprehensive mathematical model for the Smad dependent TGF-beta signaling pathway by fitting the experimental data and incorporating the qualitative constraints from the experimental analysis. The performance of the model generated by constraint-based modeling method is significantly improved compared to the model obtained by only fitting the quantitative data. The model agrees well with the experimental analysis of TGF-beta pathway, such as the time course of nuclear phosphorylated Smad, the subcellular location of Smad and signal response of Smad phosphorylation to different doses of TGF-beta. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The simulation results indicate that the signal response to TGF-beta is regulated by the balance between clathrin dependent endocytosis and non-clathrin mediated endocytosis. This model is useful to be built upon as new precise experimental data are emerging. The constraint-based modeling method can also be applied to quantitative modeling of other signaling pathways.

  14. Signal recognition particle-dependent protein targeting, universal to all kingdoms of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, H-G; Moser, M; Müller, M

    2003-01-01

    The signal recognition particle (SRP) and its membrane-bound receptor represent a ubiquitous protein-targeting device utilized by organisms as different as bacteria and humans, archaea and plants. The unifying concept of SRP-dependent protein targeting is that SRP binds to signal sequences of newly synthesized proteins as they emerge from the ribosome. In eukaryotes this interaction arrests or retards translation elongation until SRP targets the ribosome-nascent chain complexes via the SRP receptor to the translocation channel. Such channels are present in the endoplasmic reticulum of eukaryotic cells, the thylakoids of chloroplasts, or the plasma membrane of prokaryotes. The minimal functional unit of SRP consists of a signal sequence-recognizing protein and a small RNA. The as yet most complex version is the mammalian SRP whose RNA, together with six proteinaceous subunits, undergo an intricate assembly process. The preferential substrates of SRP possess especially hydrophobic signal sequences. Interactions between SRP and its receptor, the ribosome, the signal sequence, and the target membrane are regulated by GTP hydrolysis. SRP-dependent protein targeting in bacteria and chloroplasts slightly deviate from the canonical mechanism found in eukaryotes. Pro- and eukaryotic cells harbour regulatory mechanisms to prevent a malfunction of the SRP pathway.

  15. With you or against you: social orientation dependent learning signals guide actions made for others.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopoulos, George I; King-Casas, Brooks

    2015-01-01

    In social environments, it is crucial that decision-makers take account of the impact of their actions not only for oneself, but also on other social agents. Previous work has identified neural signals in the striatum encoding value-based prediction errors for outcomes to oneself; also, recent work suggests that neural activity in prefrontal cortex may similarly encode value-based prediction errors related to outcomes to others. However, prior work also indicates that social valuations are not isomorphic, with social value orientations of decision-makers ranging on a cooperative to competitive continuum; this variation has not been examined within social learning environments. Here, we combine a computational model of learning with functional neuroimaging to examine how individual differences in orientation impact neural mechanisms underlying 'other-value' learning. Across four experimental conditions, reinforcement learning signals for other-value were identified in medial prefrontal cortex, and were distinct from self-value learning signals identified in striatum. Critically, the magnitude and direction of the other-value learning signal depended strongly on an individual's cooperative or competitive orientation toward others. These data indicate that social decisions are guided by a social orientation-dependent learning system that is computationally similar but anatomically distinct from self-value learning. The sensitivity of the medial prefrontal learning signal to social preferences suggests a mechanism linking such preferences to biases in social actions and highlights the importance of incorporating heterogeneous social predispositions in neurocomputational models of social behavior.

  16. State-dependent firing determines intrinsic dendritic Ca2+ signaling in thalamocortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errington, Adam C; Renger, John J; Uebele, Victor N; Crunelli, Vincenzo

    2010-11-01

    Activity-dependent dendritic Ca(2+) signals play a critical role in multiple forms of nonlinear cellular output and plasticity. In thalamocortical neurons, despite the well established spatial separation of sensory and cortical inputs onto proximal and distal dendrites, respectively, little is known about the spatiotemporal dynamics of intrinsic dendritic Ca(2+) signaling during the different state-dependent firing patterns that are characteristic of these neurons. Here we demonstrate that T-type Ca(2+) channels are expressed throughout the entire dendritic tree of rat thalamocortical neurons and that they mediate regenerative propagation of low threshold spikes, typical of, but not exclusive to, sleep states, resulting in global dendritic Ca(2+) influx. In contrast, actively backpropagating action potentials, typical of wakefulness, result in smaller Ca(2+) influxes that can temporally summate to produce dendritic Ca(2+) accumulations that are linearly related to firing frequency but spatially confined to proximal dendritic regions. Furthermore, dendritic Ca(2+) transients evoked by both action potentials and low-threshold spikes are shaped by Ca(2+) uptake by sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPases but do not rely on Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release. Our data demonstrate that thalamocortical neurons are endowed with intrinsic dendritic Ca(2+) signaling properties that are spatially and temporally modified in a behavioral state-dependent manner and suggest that backpropagating action potentials faithfully inform proximal sensory but not distal corticothalamic synapses of neuronal output, whereas corticothalamic synapses only "detect" Ca(2+) signals associated with low-threshold spikes.

  17. Induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in breast cancer cells is calcium signal dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, F M; Azimi, I; Faville, R A; Peters, A A; Jalink, K; Putney, J W; Goodhill, G J; Thompson, E W; Roberts-Thomson, S J; Monteith, G R

    2014-05-01

    Signals from the tumor microenvironment trigger cancer cells to adopt an invasive phenotype through epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Relatively little is known regarding key signal transduction pathways that serve as cytosolic bridges between cell surface receptors and nuclear transcription factors to induce EMT. A better understanding of these early EMT events may identify potential targets for the control of metastasis. One rapid intracellular signaling pathway that has not yet been explored during EMT induction is calcium. Here we show that stimuli used to induce EMT produce a transient increase in cytosolic calcium levels in human breast cancer cells. Attenuation of the calcium signal by intracellular calcium chelation significantly reduced epidermal growth factor (EGF)- and hypoxia-induced EMT. Intracellular calcium chelation also inhibited EGF-induced activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), while preserving other signal transduction pathways such as Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation. To identify calcium-permeable channels that may regulate EMT induction in breast cancer cells, we performed a targeted siRNA-based screen. We found that transient receptor potential-melastatin-like 7 (TRPM7) channel expression regulated EGF-induced STAT3 phosphorylation and expression of the EMT marker vimentin. Although intracellular calcium chelation almost completely blocked the induction of many EMT markers, including vimentin, Twist and N-cadherin, the effect of TRPM7 silencing was specific for vimentin protein expression and STAT3 phosphorylation. These results indicate that TRPM7 is a partial regulator of EMT in breast cancer cells, and that other calcium-permeable ion channels are also involved in calcium-dependent EMT induction. In summary, this work establishes an important role for the intracellular calcium signal in the induction of EMT in human breast cancer cells. Manipulation of

  18. BOLD Imaging in Awake Wild-Type and Mu-Opioid Receptor Knock-Out Mice Reveals On-Target Activation Maps in Response to Oxycodone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsey Moore

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD imaging in awake mice was used to identify differences in brain activity between wild-type, and Mu (µ opioid receptor knock-outs (MuKO in response to oxycodone (OXY. Using a segmented, annotated MRI mouse atlas and computational analysis, patterns of integrated positive and negative BOLD activity were identified across 122 brain areas. The pattern of positive BOLD showed enhanced activation across the brain in WT mice within 15 min of intraperitoneal administration of 2.5 mg of OXY. BOLD activation was detected in 72 regions out of 122, and was most prominent in areas of high µ opioid receptor density (thalamus, ventral tegmental area, substantia nigra, caudate putamen, basal amygdala and hypothalamus, and focus on pain circuits indicated strong activation in major pain processing centers (central amygdala, solitary tract, parabrachial area, insular cortex, gigantocellularis area, ventral thalamus primary sensory cortex and prelimbic cortex. Importantly, the OXY-induced positive BOLD was eliminated in MuKO mice in most regions, with few exceptions (some cerebellar nuclei, CA3 of the hippocampus, medial amygdala and preoptic areas. This result indicates that most effects of OXY on positive BOLD are mediated by the µ opioid receptor (on-target effects. OXY also caused an increase in negative BOLD in WT mice in few regions (16 out of 122 and, unlike the positive BOLD response the negative BOLD was only partially eliminated in the MuKO mice (cerebellum, and in some case intensified (hippocampus. Negative BOLD analysis therefore shows activation and deactivation events in the absence of the µ receptor for some areas where receptor expression is normally extremely low or absent (off-target effects. Together, our approach permits establishing opioid-induced BOLD activation maps in awake mice. In addition, comparison of WT and MuKO mutant mice reveals both on-target and off-target activation events, and set an OXY

  19. BOLD Imaging in Awake Wild-Type and Mu-Opioid Receptor Knock-Out Mice Reveals On-Target Activation Maps in Response to Oxycodone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Kelsey; Madularu, Dan; Iriah, Sade; Yee, Jason R.; Kulkarni, Praveen; Darcq, Emmanuel; Kieffer, Brigitte L.; Ferris, Craig F.

    2016-01-01

    Blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) imaging in awake mice was used to identify differences in brain activity between wild-type, and Mu (μ) opioid receptor knock-outs (MuKO) in response to oxycodone (OXY). Using a segmented, annotated MRI mouse atlas and computational analysis, patterns of integrated positive and negative BOLD activity were identified across 122 brain areas. The pattern of positive BOLD showed enhanced activation across the brain in WT mice within 15 min of intraperitoneal administration of 2.5 mg of OXY. BOLD activation was detected in 72 regions out of 122, and was most prominent in areas of high μ opioid receptor density (thalamus, ventral tegmental area, substantia nigra, caudate putamen, basal amygdala, and hypothalamus), and focus on pain circuits indicated strong activation in major pain processing centers (central amygdala, solitary tract, parabrachial area, insular cortex, gigantocellularis area, ventral thalamus primary sensory cortex, and prelimbic cortex). Importantly, the OXY-induced positive BOLD was eliminated in MuKO mice in most regions, with few exceptions (some cerebellar nuclei, CA3 of the hippocampus, medial amygdala, and preoptic areas). This result indicates that most effects of OXY on positive BOLD are mediated by the μ opioid receptor (on-target effects). OXY also caused an increase in negative BOLD in WT mice in few regions (16 out of 122) and, unlike the positive BOLD response the negative BOLD was only partially eliminated in the MuKO mice (cerebellum), and in some case intensified (hippocampus). Negative BOLD analysis therefore shows activation and deactivation events in the absence of the μ receptor for some areas where receptor expression is normally extremely low or absent (off-target effects). Together, our approach permits establishing opioid-induced BOLD activation maps in awake mice. In addition, comparison of WT and MuKO mutant mice reveals both on-target and off-target activation events, and set an OXY brain

  20. IGF1R signaling in Ewing sarcoma is shaped by clathrin-/caveolin-dependent endocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Sofia Martins

    Full Text Available Receptor endocytosis is critical for cell signaling. IGF1R mediates an autocrine loop that is de-regulated in Ewing Sarcoma (ES cells. Here we study the impact of IGF1R internalization, mediated by clathrin and caveolin-1 (CAV1, in ES signaling. We used clathrin and CAV1-siRNA to interfere in clathrin- and caveolin-dependent endocytosis. Chlorpromazine (CPMZ and methyl-beta-cyclo-dextrin (MCD were also used in order to inhibit clathrin- and caveolin-dependent endocytosis, respectively. We analyzed IGF1R internalization and co-localization with clathrin and CAV1 upon ligand binding, as well as the status of the IGF1R pathway, cellular proliferation, and the apoptosis of interfered and inhibited ES cells. We performed a high-throughput tyrosine kinase phosphorylation assay to analyze the effects of combining the IGF1R tyrosine kinase inhibitor AEW541 (AEW with CPMZ or MCD on the intracellular phospho-proteome. We observed that IGF1R is internalized upon ligand binding in ES cells and that this process is dependent on clathrin or CAV1. The blockage of receptor internalization inhibited AKT and MAPK phosphorylation, reducing the proliferative rate of ES cells and increasing the levels of apoptosis. Combination of AEW with CPMZ or MCD largely enhanced these effects. CAV1 and clathrin endocytosis controls IGF1R internalization and signaling and has a profound impact on ES IGF1R-promoted survival signaling. We propose the combination of tyrosine-kinase inhibitors with endocytosis inhibitors as a new therapeutic approach to achieve a stronger degree of receptor inhibition in this, or other neoplasms dependent on IGF1R signaling.

  1. Plasticity varies with boldness in a weakly-electric fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kareklas, Kyriacos; Arnott, Gareth; Elwood, Robert W; Holland, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    The expression of animal personality is indicated by patterns of consistency in individual behaviour. Often, the differences exhibited between individuals are consistent across situations. However, between some situations, this can be biased by variable levels of individual plasticity. The interaction between individual plasticity and animal personality can be illustrated by examining situation-sensitive personality traits such as boldness (i.e. risk-taking and exploration tendency). For the weakly electric fish Gnathonemus petersii, light condition is a major factor influencing behaviour. Adapted to navigate in low-light conditions, this species chooses to be more active in dark environments where risk from visual predators is lower. However, G. petersii also exhibit individual differences in their degree of behavioural change from light to dark. The present study, therefore, aims to examine if an increase of motivation to explore in the safety of the dark, not only affects mean levels of boldness, but also the variation between individuals, as a result of differences in individual plasticity. Boldness was consistent between a novel-object and a novel-environment situation in bright light. However, no consistency in boldness was noted between a bright (risky) and a dark (safe) novel environment. Furthermore, there was a negative association between boldness and the degree of change across novel environments, with shier individuals exhibiting greater behavioural plasticity. This study highlights that individual plasticity can vary with personality. In addition, the effect of light suggests that variation in boldness is situation specific. Finally, there appears to be a trade-off between personality and individual plasticity with shy but plastic individuals minimizing costs when perceiving risk and bold but stable individuals consistently maximizing rewards, which can be maladaptive.

  2. Photolysis of caged compounds: studying Ca(2+) signaling and activation of Ca(2+)-dependent ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almassy, Janos; Yule, David I

    2013-01-01

    A wide variety of signaling molecules have been chemically modified by conjugation to a photolabile chromophore to render the substance temporarily biologically inert. Subsequent exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light can release the active moiety from the "caged" precursor in an experimentally controlled manner. This allows the concentration of active molecule to be precisely manipulated in both time and space. These techniques are particularly useful in experimental protocols designed to investigate the mechanisms underlying Ca(2+) signaling and the activation of Ca(2+)-dependent effectors.

  3. Danger signal-dependent activation of human dendritic cells by plasma-derived factor VIII products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, L; Weissmüller, S; Ringler, E; Crauwels, P; van Zandbergen, G; Seitz, R; Waibler, Z

    2015-08-01

    Treatment of haemophilia A by infusions of the clotting factor VIII (FVIII) results in the development of inhibitors/anti-drug antibodies in up to 25 % of patients. Mechanisms leading to immunogenicity of FVIII products are not yet fully understood. Amongst other factors, danger signals as elicited upon infection or surgery have been proposed to play a role. In the present study, we focused on effects of danger signals on maturation and activation of dendritic cells (DC) in the context of FVIII application. Human monocyte-derived DC were treated with FVIII alone, with a danger signal alone or a combination of both. By testing more than 60 different healthy donors, we show that FVIII and the bacterial danger signal lipopolysaccharide synergise in increasing DC activation, as characterised by increased expression of co-stimulatory molecules and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The degree and frequency of this synergistic activation correlate with CD86 expression levels on immature DC prior to stimulation. In our assay system, plasma-derived but not recombinant FVIII products activate human DC in a danger signal-dependent manner. Further tested danger signals, such as R848 also induced DC activation in combination with FVIII, albeit not in every tested donor. In our hands, human DC but not human B cells or macrophages could be activated by FVIII in a danger signal-dependent manner. Our results suggest that immunogenicity of FVIII is a result of multiple factors including the presence of danger, predisposition of the patient, and the choice of a FVIII product for treatment.

  4. PI3Kγ-Dependent Signaling in Mouse Olfactory Receptor Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasen, Katharina; Corey, Elizabeth A.; Ache, Barry W.

    2010-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-dependent signaling couples to receptors for many different ligands in diverse cellular systems. Recent findings suggest that PI3K-dependent signaling also mediates inhibition of odorant responses in rat olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs). Here, we present evidence that murine ORNs show PI3K-dependent calcium responses to odorant stimulation, they express 2 G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-activated isoforms of PI3K, PI3Kβ and PI3Kγ, and they exhibit odorant-induced PI3K activity. These findings support our use of a transgenic mouse model to begin to investigate the mechanisms underlying PI3K-mediated inhibition of odorant responses in mammalian ORNs. Mice deficient in PI3Kγ, a class IB PI3K that is activated via GPCRs, lack detectable odorant-induced PI3K activity in their olfactory epithelium and their ORNs are less sensitive to PI3K inhibition. We conclude that odorant-dependent PI3K signaling generalizes to the murine olfactory system and that PI3Kγ plays a role in mediating inhibition of odorant responses in mammalian ORNs. PMID:20190008

  5. Task-dependent signal variations in EEG error-related potentials for brain-computer interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iturrate, I.; Montesano, L.; Minguez, J.

    2013-04-01

    Objective. A major difficulty of brain-computer interface (BCI) technology is dealing with the noise of EEG and its signal variations. Previous works studied time-dependent non-stationarities for BCIs in which the user’s mental task was independent of the device operation (e.g., the mental task was motor imagery and the operational task was a speller). However, there are some BCIs, such as those based on error-related potentials, where the mental and operational tasks are dependent (e.g., the mental task is to assess the device action and the operational task is the device action itself). The dependence between the mental task and the device operation could introduce a new source of signal variations when the operational task changes, which has not been studied yet. The aim of this study is to analyse task-dependent signal variations and their effect on EEG error-related potentials.Approach. The work analyses the EEG variations on the three design steps of BCIs: an electrophysiology study to characterize the existence of these variations, a feature distribution analysis and a single-trial classification analysis to measure the impact on the final BCI performance.Results and significance. The results demonstrate that a change in the operational task produces variations in the potentials, even when EEG activity exclusively originated in brain areas related to error processing is considered. Consequently, the extracted features from the signals vary, and a classifier trained with one operational task presents a significant loss of performance for other tasks, requiring calibration or adaptation for each new task. In addition, a new calibration for each of the studied tasks rapidly outperforms adaptive techniques designed in the literature to mitigate the EEG time-dependent non-stationarities.

  6. Reversal of hyperactive Wnt signaling-dependent adipocyte defects by peptide boronic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianyi; Hsu, Fu-Ning; Xie, Xiao-Jun; Li, Xiao; Liu, Mengmeng; Gao, Xinsheng; Pei, Xun; Liao, Yang; Du, Wei; Ji, Jun-Yuan

    2017-08-21

    Deregulated Wnt signaling and altered lipid metabolism have been linked to obesity, diabetes, and various cancers, highlighting the importance of identifying inhibitors that can modulate Wnt signaling and aberrant lipid metabolism. We have established a Drosophila model with hyperactivated Wnt signaling caused by partial loss of axin, a key component of the Wnt cascade. The Axin mutant larvae are transparent and have severe adipocyte defects caused by up-regulation of β-catenin transcriptional activities. We demonstrate pharmacologic mitigation of these phenotypes in Axin mutants by identifying bortezomib and additional peptide boronic acids. We show that the suppressive effect of peptide boronic acids on hyperactive Wnt signaling is dependent on α-catenin; the rescue effect is completely abolished with the depletion of α-catenin in adipocytes. These results indicate that rather than targeting the canonical Wnt signaling pathway directly, pharmacologic modulation of β-catenin activity through α-catenin is a potentially attractive approach to attenuating Wnt signaling in vivo.

  7. Real-time automated spectral assessment of the BOLD response for neurofeedback at 3 and 7T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koush, Yury; Elliott, Mark A; Scharnowski, Frank; Mathiak, Klaus

    2013-09-15

    Echo-planar imaging is the dominant functional MRI data acquisition scheme for evaluating the BOLD signal. To date, it remains the only approach providing neurofeedback from spatially localized brain activity. Real-time functional single-voxel proton spectroscopy (fSVPS) may be an alternative for spatially specific BOLD neurofeedback at 7T because it allows for a precise estimation of the local T2* signal, EPI-specific artifacts may be avoided, and the signal contrast may increase. In order to explore and optimize this alternative neurofeedback approach, we tested fully automated real-time fSVPS spectral estimation procedures to approximate T2* BOLD signal changes from the unsuppressed water peak, i.e. lorentzian non-linear complex spectral fit (LNLCSF) in frequency and frequency-time domain. The proposed approaches do not require additional spectroscopic localizers in contrast to conventional T2* approximation based on linear regression of the free induction decay (FID). For methods comparison, we evaluated quality measures for signals from the motor and the visual cortex as well as a real-time feedback condition at high (3T) and at ultra-high (7T) magnetic field strengths. Using these methods, we achieved reliable and fast water peak spectral parameter estimations. At 7T, we observed an absolute increase of spectra line narrowing due to the BOLD effect, but quality measures did not improve due to artifactual line broadening. Overall, the automated fSVPS approach can be used to assess dynamic spectral changes in real-time, and to provide localized T2* neurofeedback at 3 and 7T.

  8. Signaling components of the 1α,25(OH)2D3-dependent Pdia3 receptor complex are required for Wnt5a calcium-dependent signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doroudi, Maryam; Olivares-Navarrete, Rene; Hyzy, Sharon L; Boyan, Barbara D; Schwartz, Zvi

    2014-11-01

    Wnt5a and 1α,25(OH)2D3 are important regulators of endochondral ossification. In osteoblasts and growth plate chondrocytes, 1α,25(OH)2D3 initiates rapid effects via its membrane-associated receptor protein disulfide isomerase A3 (Pdia3) in caveolae, activating phospholipase A2 (PLA2)-activating protein (PLAA), calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), and PLA2, resulting in protein kinase C (PKC) activation. Wnt5a initiates its calcium-dependent effects via intracellular calcium release, activating PKC and CaMKII. We investigated the requirement for components of the Pdia3 receptor complex in Wnt5a calcium-dependent signaling. We determined that Wnt5a signals through a CaMKII/PLA2/PGE2/PKC cascade. Silencing or blocking Pdia3, PLAA, or vitamin D receptor (VDR), and inhibition of calmodulin (CaM), CaMKII, or PLA2 inhibited Wnt5a-induced PKC activity. Wnt5a activated PKC in caveolin-1-silenced cells, but methyl-beta-cyclodextrin reduced its stimulatory effect. 1α,25(OH)2D3 reduced stimulatory effects of Wnt5a on PKC in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, Wnt5a had a biphasic effect on 1α,25(OH)2D3-stimulated PKC activation; 50ng/ml Wnt5a caused a 2-fold increase in 1α,25(OH)2D3-stimulated PKC but higher Wnt5a concentrations reduced 1α,25(OH)2D3-stimulated PKC activation. Western blots showed that Wnt receptors Frizzled2 (FZD2) and Frizzled5 (FZD5), and receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor 2 (ROR2) were localized to caveolae. Blocking ROR2, but not FZD2 or FZD5, abolished the stimulatory effects of 1α,25(OH)2D3 on PKC and CaMKII. 1α,25(OH)2D3 membrane receptor complex components (Pdia3, PLAA, caveolin-1, CaM) interacted with Wnt5a receptors/co-receptors (ROR2, FZD2, FZD5) in immunoprecipitation studies, interactions that changed with either 1α,25(OH)2D3 or Wnt5a treatment. This study demonstrates that 1α,25(OH)2D3 and Wnt5a mediate their effects via similar receptor components and suggests that these pathways may interact.

  9. Time-dependent statistical and correlation properties of neural signals during handwriting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valery I Rupasov

    Full Text Available To elucidate the cortical control of handwriting, we examined time-dependent statistical and correlational properties of simultaneously recorded 64-channel electroencephalograms (EEGs and electromyograms (EMGs of intrinsic hand muscles. We introduced a statistical method, which offered advantages compared to conventional coherence methods. In contrast to coherence methods, which operate in the frequency domain, our method enabled us to study the functional association between different neural regions in the time domain. In our experiments, subjects performed about 400 stereotypical trials during which they wrote a single character. These trials provided time-dependent EMG and EEG data capturing different handwriting epochs. The set of trials was treated as a statistical ensemble, and time-dependent correlation functions between neural signals were computed by averaging over that ensemble. We found that trial-to-trial variability of both the EMGs and EEGs was well described by a log-normal distribution with time-dependent parameters, which was clearly distinguished from the normal (Gaussian distribution. We found strong and long-lasting EMG/EMG correlations, whereas EEG/EEG correlations, which were also quite strong, were short-lived with a characteristic correlation durations on the order of 100 ms or less. Our computations of correlation functions were restricted to the [Formula: see text] spectral range (13-30 Hz of EEG signals where we found the strongest effects related to handwriting. Although, all subjects involved in our experiments were right-hand writers, we observed a clear symmetry between left and right motor areas: inter-channel correlations were strong if both channels were located over the left or right hemispheres, and 2-3 times weaker if the EEG channels were located over different hemispheres. Although we observed synchronized changes in the mean energies of EEG and EMG signals, we found that EEG/EMG correlations were much

  10. Temperature and Pressure Dependence of Signal Amplitudes for Electrostriction Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, Gregory C.

    2015-01-01

    The relative signal strength of electrostriction-only (no thermal grating) laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA) in gas-phase air is reported as a function of temperature T and pressure P. Measurements were made in the free stream of a variable Mach number supersonic wind tunnel, where T and P are varied simultaneously as Mach number is varied. Using optical heterodyning, the measured signal amplitude (related to the optical reflectivity of the acoustic grating) was averaged for each of 11 flow conditions and compared to the expected theoretical dependence of a pure-electrostriction LITA process, where the signal is proportional to the square root of [P*P /( T*T*T)].

  11. Working memory in volunteers and schizophrenics using BOLD fMRI; Das Arbeitsgedaechtnis bei Gesunden und bei Schizophrenen: Untersuchungen mit BOLD-fMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giesel, F.L. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ) Heidelberg, Abteilung Radiologie (Germany); Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Abteilung Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany); Hohmann, N. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ) Heidelberg, Abteilung Radiologie (Germany); Psychiatrische Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg, Sektion Gerontopsychiatrie (Germany); Seidl, U.; Kress, K.R.; Schoenknecht, P.; Schroeder, J. [Psychiatrische Universitaetsklinik Heidelberg, Sektion Gerontopsychiatrie (Germany); Kauczor, H.-U.; Essig, M. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ) Heidelberg, Abteilung Radiologie (Germany)

    2005-02-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging uses the blood oxygen level-dependent effect (BOLD MRI) for noninvasive display of cerebral correlatives of cognitive function. The importance for the understanding of physiological and pathological processes is demonstrated by investigations of working memory in schizophrenics and healthy controls. Working memory is involved in processing rather than storage of information and therefore is linked to complex processes such as learning and problem solving. In schizophrenic psychosis, these functions are clearly restricted. Training effects in the working memory task follow an inverse U-shape function, suggesting that cerebral activation reaches a peak before economics of the brain find a more efficient method and activation decreases. (orig.) [German] Die funktionelle Magnetresonanztomographie (fMRT) nutzt den ''blood oxygen level dependent effect'' (BOLD-Effekt) zur nichtinvasiven Darstellung zerebraler Korrelate kognitiver Funktionen. Die Bedeutung dieses Verfahrens fuer das Verstaendnis physiologischer und pathologischer Prozesse wird anhand von Untersuchungen zum Arbeitsgedaechtnis bei Schizophrenen und gesunden Kontrollpersonen verdeutlicht. Das Arbeitsgedaechtnis dient weniger der Speicherung, sondern vielmehr der Verarbeitung von Informationen und ist deshalb in komplexe Prozesse wie Lernen und Problemloesen eingebunden. Im Rahmen schizophrener Psychosen kommt es zu einer deutlichen Einschraenkung dieser Funktionen. Erwartungsgemaess zeigen sich unter Durchfuehrung eines Arbeitsgedaechtnisparadigmas Unterschiede in der zerebralen Aktivitaet, die jedoch bei den Erkrankten unter Therapie prinzipiell reversibel sind. Von Interesse sind auch Trainingseffekte bei Gesunden, wobei eine verminderte Aktivierung nach Training auf eine ''Oekonomisierung'' schliessen laesst. (orig.)

  12. Frequency dependence of signal power and spatial reach of the local field potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szymon Łęski

    Full Text Available Despite its century-old use, the interpretation of local field potentials (LFPs, the low-frequency part of electrical signals recorded in the brain, is still debated. In cortex the LFP appears to mainly stem from transmembrane neuronal currents following synaptic input, and obvious questions regarding the 'locality' of the LFP are: What is the size of the signal-generating region, i.e., the spatial reach, around a recording contact? How far does the LFP signal extend outside a synaptically activated neuronal population? And how do the answers depend on the temporal frequency of the LFP signal? Experimental inquiries have given conflicting results, and we here pursue a modeling approach based on a well-established biophysical forward-modeling scheme incorporating detailed reconstructed neuronal morphologies in precise calculations of population LFPs including thousands of neurons. The two key factors determining the frequency dependence of LFP are the spatial decay of the single-neuron LFP contribution and the conversion of synaptic input correlations into correlations between single-neuron LFP contributions. Both factors are seen to give low-pass filtering of the LFP signal power. For uncorrelated input only the first factor is relevant, and here a modest reduction (100 Hz compared to the near-DC ([Formula: see text] value of about [Formula: see text]. Much larger frequency-dependent effects are seen when populations of pyramidal neurons receive correlated and spatially asymmetric inputs: the low-frequency ([Formula: see text] LFP power can here be an order of magnitude or more larger than at 60 Hz. Moreover, the low-frequency LFP components have larger spatial reach and extend further outside the active population than high-frequency components. Further, the spatial LFP profiles for such populations typically span the full vertical extent of the dendrites of neurons in the population. Our numerical findings are backed up by an intuitive

  13. Salicylic Acid-Dependent Plant Stress Signaling via Mitochondrial Succinate Dehydrogenase1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, Louise F.

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria are known for their role in ATP production and generation of reactive oxygen species, but little is known about the mechanism of their early involvement in plant stress signaling. The role of mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) in salicylic acid (SA) signaling was analyzed using two mutants: disrupted in stress response1 (dsr1), which is a point mutation in SDH1 identified in a loss of SA signaling screen, and a knockdown mutant (sdhaf2) for SDH assembly factor 2 that is required for FAD insertion into SDH1. Both mutants showed strongly decreased SA-inducible stress promoter responses and low SDH maximum capacity compared to wild type, while dsr1 also showed low succinate affinity, low catalytic efficiency, and increased resistance to SDH competitive inhibitors. The SA-induced promoter responses could be partially rescued in sdhaf2, but not in dsr1, by supplementing the plant growth media with succinate. Kinetic characterization showed that low concentrations of either SA or ubiquinone binding site inhibitors increased SDH activity and induced mitochondrial H2O2 production. Both dsr1 and sdhaf2 showed lower rates of SA-dependent H2O2 production in vitro in line with their low SA-dependent stress signaling responses in vivo. This provides quantitative and kinetic evidence that SA acts at or near the ubiquinone binding site of SDH to stimulate activity and contributes to plant stress signaling by increased rates of mitochondrial H2O2 production, leading to part of the SA-dependent transcriptional response in plant cells. PMID:28209841

  14. An improved temperature-dependent large signal model of microwave GaN HEMTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Changsi, Wang; Yuehang, Xu; Zhang, Wen; Zhikai, Chen; Ruimin, Xu

    2016-07-01

    Accurate modeling of the electrothermal effects of GaN electronic devices is critical for reliability design and assessment. In this paper, an improved temperature-dependent model for large signal equivalent circuit modeling of GaN HEMTs is proposed. To accurately describe the thermal effects, a modified nonlinear thermal sub-circuit which is related not only to power dissipation, but also ambient temperature is used to calculate the variations of channel temperature of the device; the temperature-dependent parasitic and intrinsic elements are also taken into account in this model. The parameters of the thermal sub-circuit are extracted by using the numerical finite element method. The results show that better performance can be achieved by using the proposed large signal model in the range of -55 to 125 °C compared with the conventional model with a linear thermal sub-circuit. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61106115).

  15. Modeling and estimation of signal-dependent noise in hyperspectral imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meola, Joseph; Eismann, Michael T; Moses, Randolph L; Ash, Joshua N

    2011-07-20

    The majority of hyperspectral data exploitation algorithms are developed using statistical models for the data that include sensor noise. Hyperspectral data collected using charge-coupled devices or other photon detectors have sensor noise that is directly dependent on the amplitude of the signal collected. However, this signal dependence is often ignored. Additionally, the statistics of the noise can vary spatially and spectrally as a result of camera characteristics and the calibration process applied to the data. Here, we examine the expected noise characteristics of both raw and calibrated visible/near-infrared hyperspectral data and provide a method for estimating the noise statistics using calibration data or directly from the imagery if calibration data is unavailable.

  16. PKCζ regulates Notch receptor routing and activity in a Notch signaling-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöqvist, Marika; Antfolk, Daniel; Ferraris, Saima; Rraklli, Vilma; Haga, Cecilia; Antila, Christian; Mutvei, Anders; Imanishi, Susumu Y; Holmberg, Johan; Jin, Shaobo; Eriksson, John E; Lendahl, Urban; Sahlgren, Cecilia

    2014-04-01

    Activation of Notch signaling requires intracellular routing of the receptor, but the mechanisms controlling the distinct steps in the routing process is poorly understood. We identify PKCζ as a key regulator of Notch receptor intracellular routing. When PKCζ was inhibited in the developing chick central nervous system and in cultured myoblasts, Notch-stimulated cells were allowed to undergo differentiation. PKCζ phosphorylates membrane-tethered forms of Notch and regulates two distinct routing steps, depending on the Notch activation state. When Notch is activated, PKCζ promotes re-localization of Notch from late endosomes to the nucleus and enhances production of the Notch intracellular domain, which leads to increased Notch activity. In the non-activated state, PKCζ instead facilitates Notch receptor internalization, accompanied with increased ubiquitylation and interaction with the endosomal sorting protein Hrs. Collectively, these data identify PKCζ as a key regulator of Notch trafficking and demonstrate that distinct steps in intracellular routing are differentially modulated depending on Notch signaling status.

  17. Morphogenesis signaling components influence cell cycle regulation by cyclin dependent kinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bevis Brooke J

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The yeast cell cycle is largely controlled by the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK Cdc28. Recent evidence suggests that both CDK complex stability as well as function during mitosis is determined by precise regulation of Swe1, a CDK inhibitory kinase and cyclin binding partner. A model of mitotic progression has been provided by study of filamentous yeast. When facing nutrient-limited conditions, Ras2-mediated PKA and MAPK signaling cascades induce a switch from round to filamentous morphology resulting in delayed mitotic progression. Results To delineate how the dimorphic switch contributes to cell cycle regulation, temperature sensitive cdc28 mutants exhibiting constitutive filamentation were subjected to epistasis analyses with RAS2 signaling effectors. It was found that Swe1-mediated inhibitory tyrosine phosphorylation of Cdc28 during filamentous growth is in part mediated by Ras2 activation of PKA, but not Kss1-MAPK, signaling. This pathway is further influenced by Cks1, a conserved CDK-binding partner of elusive function with multiple proposed roles in CDK activation, transcriptional regulation and ubiquitin-mediated proteasome degradation. Conclusion The dynamic balance between Cks1- and Swe1-dependent regulation of Cdc28 and, thereby, the timing of mitosis during yeast dimorphism is regulated in part by Ras2/cAMP-mediated PKA signaling, a key pathway controlling filamentous growth.

  18. Neurological dysfunctions associated with altered BACE1-dependent Neuregulin-1 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiangyou; Fan, Qingyuan; Hou, Hailong; Yan, Riqiang

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of BACE1 is being pursued as a therapeutic target to treat patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease because BACE1 is the sole β-secretase that generates β-amyloid peptide. Knowledge regarding other cellular functions of BACE1 is therefore critical for the safe use of BACE1 inhibitors in human patients. Neuregulin-1 (Nrg1) is a BACE1 substrate and BACE1 cleavage of Nrg1 is critical for signaling functions in myelination, remyelination, synaptic plasticity, normal psychiatric behaviors, and maintenance of muscle spindles. This review summarizes the most recent discoveries associated with BACE1-dependent Nrg1 signaling in these areas. This body of knowledge will help to provide guidance for preventing unwanted Nrg1-based side effects following BACE1 inhibition in humans. To initiate its signaling cascade, membrane anchored Neuregulin (Nrg), mainly type I and III β1 Nrg1 isoforms and Nrg3, requires ectodomain shedding. BACE1 is one of such indispensable sheddases to release the functional Nrg signaling fragment. The dependence of Nrg on the cleavage by BACE1 is best manifested by disrupting the critical role of Nrg in the control of axonal myelination, schizophrenic behaviors as well as the formation and maintenance of muscle spindles.

  19. Targeting Ligand-Dependent and Ligand-Independent Androgen Receptor Signaling in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0288 TITLE: Targeting Ligand-Dependent and Ligand-Independent Androgen Receptor Signaling in Prostate Cancer...average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed...and completing and reviewing this collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of

  20. Modulation of cognitive control levels via manipulation of saccade trial-type probability assessed with event-related BOLD fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Jordan E; McDowell, Jennifer E

    2016-02-01

    Cognitive control supports flexible behavior adapted to meet current goals and can be modeled through investigation of saccade tasks with varying cognitive demands. Basic prosaccades (rapid glances toward a newly appearing stimulus) are supported by neural circuitry, including occipital and posterior parietal cortex, frontal and supplementary eye fields, and basal ganglia. These trials can be contrasted with complex antisaccades (glances toward the mirror image location of a stimulus), which are characterized by greater functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal in the aforementioned regions and recruitment of additional regions such as dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. The current study manipulated the cognitive demands of these saccade tasks by presenting three rapid event-related runs of mixed saccades with a varying probability of antisaccade vs. prosaccade trials (25, 50, or 75%). Behavioral results showed an effect of trial-type probability on reaction time, with slower responses in runs with a high antisaccade probability. Imaging results exhibited an effect of probability in bilateral pre- and postcentral gyrus, bilateral superior temporal gyrus, and medial frontal gyrus. Additionally, the interaction between saccade trial type and probability revealed a strong probability effect for prosaccade trials, showing a linear increase in activation parallel to antisaccade probability in bilateral temporal/occipital, posterior parietal, medial frontal, and lateral prefrontal cortex. In contrast, antisaccade trials showed elevated activation across all runs. Overall, this study demonstrated that improbable performance of a typically simple prosaccade task led to augmented BOLD signal to support changing cognitive control demands, resulting in activation levels similar to the more complex antisaccade task.

  1. Brain activation by short-term nicotine exposure in anesthetized wild-type and beta2-nicotinic receptors knockout mice: a BOLD fMRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez, S.V.; Changeux, J.P.; Granon, S. [Unite de Neurobiologie Integrative du Systeme Cholinergique, URA CNRS 2182, Institut Pasteur, Departement de Neuroscience, 25 rue du Dr Roux, 75015 Paris (France); Amadon, A.; Giacomini, E.; Le Bihan, D. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, 4 place du general Leclerc, 91400 Orsay (France); Wiklund, A. [Section of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2009-07-01

    Rationale: The behavioral effects of nicotine and the role of the beta2-containing nicotinic receptors in these behaviors are well documented. However, the behaviors altered by nicotine rely on the functioning on multiple brain circuits where the high-affinity {beta}2-containing nicotinic receptors ({beta}2*nAChRs) are located. Objectives We intend to see which brain circuits are activated when nicotine is given in animals naive for nicotine and whether the {beta}2*nAChRs are needed for its activation of the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal in all brain areas. Materials and methods: We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure the brain activation evoked by nicotine (1 mg/kg delivered at a slow rate for 45 min) in anesthetized C57BL/6J mice and {beta}2 knockout (KO) mice. Results: Acute nicotine injection results in a significant increased activation in anterior frontal, motor, and somatosensory cortices and in the ventral tegmental area and the substantia nigra. Anesthetized mice receiving no nicotine injection exhibited a major decreased activation in all cortical and subcortical structures, likely due to prolonged anesthesia. At a global level, {beta}2 KO mice were not rescued from the globally declining BOLD signal. However, nicotine still activated regions of a meso-cortico-limbic circuit likely via {alpha}7 nicotinic receptors. Conclusions: Acute nicotine exposure compensates for the drop in brain activation due to anesthesia through the meso-cortico-limbic network via the action of nicotine on {beta}2*nAChRs. The developed fMRI method is suitable for comparing responses in wild-type and mutant mice. (authors)

  2. Arsenic Alters ATP-Dependent Ca2+ Signaling in Human Airway Epithelial Cell Wound Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Cara L.; Lantz, R. Clark; Burgess, Jefferey L.; Boitano, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic is a natural metalloid toxicant that is associated with occupational inhalation injury and contaminates drinking water worldwide. Both inhalation of arsenic and consumption of arsenic-tainted water are correlated with malignant and nonmalignant lung diseases. Despite strong links between arsenic and respiratory illness, underlying cell responses to arsenic remain unclear. We hypothesized that arsenic may elicit some of its detrimental effects on the airway through limitation of innate immune function and, specifically, through alteration of paracrine ATP (purinergic) Ca2+ signaling in the airway epithelium. We examined the effects of acute (24 h) exposure with environmentally relevant levels of arsenic (i.e., arsenic reduces purinergic Ca2+ signaling in a dose-dependent manner and results in a reshaping of the Ca2+ signaling response to localized wounds. We next examined arsenic effects on two purinergic receptor types: the metabotropic P2Y and ionotropic P2X receptors. Arsenic inhibited both P2Y- and P2X-mediated Ca2+ signaling responses to ATP. Both inhaled and ingested arsenic can rapidly reach the airway epithelium where purinergic signaling is essential in innate immune functions (e.g., ciliary beat, salt and water transport, bactericide production, and wound repair). Arsenic-induced compromise of such airway defense mechanisms may be an underlying contributor to chronic lung disease. PMID:21357385

  3. Context-dependent activation of Wnt signaling by tumor suppressor RUNX3 in gastric cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Xiaoli; Ishikawa, Tomo-o; Naka, Kazuhito; Ito, Kosei; Ito, Yoshiaki; Oshima, Masanobu

    2014-01-01

    RUNX3 is a tumor suppressor for a variety of cancers. RUNX3 suppresses the canonical Wnt signaling pathway by binding to the TCF4/β-catenin complex, resulting in the inhibition of binding of the complex to the Wnt target gene promoter. Here, we confirmed that RUNX3 suppressed Wnt signaling activity in several gastric cancer cell lines; however, we found that RUNX3 increased the Wnt signaling activity in KatoIII and SNU668 gastric cancer cells. Notably, RUNX3 expression increased the ratio of the Wnt signaling-high population in the KatoIII cells. although the maximum Wnt activation level of individual cells was similar to that in the control. As found previously, RUNX3 also binds to TCF4 and β-catenin in KatoIII cells, suggesting that these molecules form a ternary complex. Moreover, the ChIP analyses revealed that TCF4, β-catenin and RUNX3 bind the promoter region of the Wnt target genes, Axin2 and c-Myc, and the occupancy of TCF4 and β-catenin in these promoter regions is increased by the RUNX3 expression. These results suggest that RUNX3 stabilizes the TCF4/β-catenin complex on the Wnt target gene promoter in KatoIII cells, leading to activation of Wnt signaling. Although RUNX3 increased the Wnt signaling activity, its expression resulted in suppression of tumorigenesis of KatoIII cells, indicating that RUNX3 plays a tumor-suppressing role in KatoIII cells through a Wnt-independent mechanism. These results indicate that RUNX3 can either suppress or activate the Wnt signaling pathway through its binding to the TCF4/β-catenin complex by cell context-dependent mechanisms. PMID:24447505

  4. Early diagnosis of cerebral involvement in Sturge-Weber syndrome using high-resolution BOLD MR venography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mentzel, Hans-J.; Fitzek, Clemens; Reichenbach, Juergen R.; Kaiser, Werner A. [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Jena (Germany); Dieckmann, Andrea; Brandl, Ulrich [Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Department of Neuropediatrics, Jena (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    Sturge-Weber syndrome (SWS) is a congenital disorder characterized by a vascular birthmark and neurological abnormalities. Typical imaging findings using MRI or CT are superficial cerebral calcification, atrophy and leptomeningeal enhancement. We present a neonate diagnosed with SWS because of a port-wine stain. In the absence of neurological symptoms the first MRI was performed when he was 4 months old, and follow-up MRI studies were performed after his first seizure at the age of 12 months. MRI was performed using standard sequences before and after administration of IV gadolinium. A high-resolution T2*-weighted, rf-spoiled 3D gradient-echo sequence with first-order flow compensation in all three directions was used for additional venographic imaging [blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) venography]. The initial conventional MRI sequences did not demonstrate any abnormality, but BOLD venography identified leptomeningeal internal veins. Follow-up MRI after the first onset of seizures demonstrated strong leptomeningeal enhancement, while BOLD venography revealed pathological medullary and subependymal veins as well as deep venous structures. At this time there were the first signs of atrophy and CT showed marginal calcifications. This report demonstrates that high-resolution BOLD MR venography allows early diagnosis of venous anomalies in SWS, making early therapeutic intervention possible. (orig.)

  5. Investigation of the physiological basis of the BOLD effect

    CERN Document Server

    Pears, J A

    2001-01-01

    The work described in this thesis is that undertaken by the carried out in the Magnetic Resonance Centre, School of Physics and Astronomy at the University of Nottingham, between October 1997 and September 2001. This thesis describes work performed with the aim of yielding further understanding of the physiological basis behind the BOLD effect. Chapter 1 introduces techniques for monitoring brain function and describes the physiology behind the BOLD effect. Chapter 2 then describes NMR, imaging and the hardware used in the experiments performed in this thesis. A method of measuring cerebral blood volume changes during a visual activation paradigm with high temporal resolution is described in Chapter 3, and the timecourse compared to that of the BOLD response. The slow return to baseline of CBV is discussed. Chapter 4 shows a method of simultaneously measuring blood oxygenation measurements and blood volume changes. The results are shown to be in agreement with published data. The controversial phenomenon know...

  6. Action potential broadening and frequency-dependent facilitation of calcium signals in pituitary nerve terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, M B; Konnerth, A; Augustine, G J

    1991-01-15

    Hormone release from nerve terminals in the neurohypophysis is a sensitive function of action potential frequency. We have investigated the cellular mechanisms responsible for this frequency-dependent facilitation by combining patch clamp and fluorimetric Ca2+ measurements in single neurosecretory terminals in thin slices of the rat posterior pituitary. In these terminals both action potential-induced changes in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and action potential duration were enhanced by high-frequency stimuli, all with a frequency dependence similar to that of hormone release. Furthermore, brief voltage clamp pulses inactivated a K+ current with a very similar frequency dependence. These results support a model for frequency-dependent facilitation in which the inactivation of a K+ current broadens action potentials, leading to an enhancement of [Ca2+]i signals. Further experiments tested for a causal relationship between action potential broadening and facilitation of [Ca2+]i changes. First, increasing the duration of depolarization, either by broadening action potentials with the K(+)-channel blocker tetraethylammonium or by applying longer depolarizing voltage clamp steps, increased [Ca2+]i changes. Second, eliminating frequency-dependent changes in duration, by voltage clamping the terminal with constant duration pulses, substantially reduced the frequency-dependent enhancement of [Ca2+]i changes. These results indicate that action potential broadening contributes to frequency-dependent facilitation of [Ca2+]i changes. However, the small residual frequency dependence of [Ca2+]i changes seen with constant duration stimulation suggests that a second process, distinct from action potential broadening, also contributes to facilitation. These two frequency-dependent mechanisms may also contribute to activity-dependent plasticity in synaptic terminals.

  7. Integrin-dependent activation of the JNK signaling pathway by mechanical stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Maria Pereira

    Full Text Available Mechanical force is known to modulate the activity of the Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK signaling cascade. However, the effect of mechanical stresses on JNK signaling activation has previously only been analyzed by in vitro detection methods. It still remains unknown how living cells activate the JNK signaling cascade in response to mechanical stress and what its functions are in stretched cells.We assessed in real-time the activity of the JNK pathway in Drosophila cells by Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM, using an intramolecular phosphorylation-dependent dJun-FRET (Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer biosensor. We found that quantitative FRET-FLIM analysis and confocal microscopy revealed sustained dJun-FRET biosensor activation and stable morphology changes in response to mechanical stretch for Drosophila S2R+ cells. Further, these cells plated on different substrates showed distinct levels of JNK activity that associate with differences in cell morphology, integrin expression and focal adhesion organization.These data imply that alterations in the cytoskeleton and matrix attachments may act as regulators of JNK signaling, and that JNK activity might feed back to modulate the cytoskeleton and cell adhesion. We found that this dynamic system is highly plastic; at rest, integrins at focal adhesions and talin are key factors suppressing JNK activity, while multidirectional static stretch leads to integrin-dependent, and probably talin-independent, Jun sensor activation. Further, our data suggest that JNK activity has to coordinate with other signaling elements for the regulation of the cytoskeleton and cell shape remodeling associated with stretch.

  8. Rho signaling in Entamoeba histolytica modulates actomyosin-dependent activities stimulated during invasive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Barraza, Janusz; Zamudio-Meza, Horacio; Franco, Elizabeth; del Carmen Domínguez-Robles, M; Villegas-Sepúlveda, Nicolás; Meza, Isaura

    2006-03-01

    Interaction of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites with target cells and substrates activates signaling pathways in the parasite. Phosphorylation cascades triggered by phospho-inositide and adenyl-cyclase-dependent pathways modulate reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton to form structures that facilitate adhesion. In contrast, little is known about participation of Rho proteins and Rho signaling in actin rearrangements. We report here the in vivo expression of at least one Rho protein in trophozoites, whose activation induced actin reorganization and actin-myosin interaction. Antibodies to EhRhoA1 recombinant protein mainly localized Rho in the cytosol of nonactivated amoebae, but it was translocated to vesicular membranes and to some extent to the plasma membrane after treatment with lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a specific agonist of Rho activation. Activated Rho was identified in LPA-treated trophozoites. LPA induced striking polymerization of actin into distinct dynamic structures. Disorganization of these structures by inhibition of Rho effector, Rho-kinase (ROCK), and by ML-7, an inhibitor of myosin light chain kinase dependent phosphorylation of myosin light chain, suggested that the actin structures also contained myosin. LPA stimulated concanavalin-A-mediated formation of caps, chemotaxis, invasion of extracellular matrix substrates, and erythrophagocytosis, but not binding to fibronectin. ROCK inhibition impaired LPA-stimulated functions and to some extent adhesion to fibronectin. Similar results were obtained with ML-7. These data suggest the presence and operation of Rho-signaling pathways in E. histolytica, that together with other, already described, signaling routes modulate actomyosin-dependent motile processes, particularly stimulated during invasive behavior.

  9. Predicting the Multisensory Consequences of One’s Own Action: BOLD Suppression in Auditory and Visual Cortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kemenade, Bianca M.; Arikan, B. Ezgi; Fiehler, Katja; Leube, Dirk T.; Harris, Laurence R.; Kircher, Tilo

    2017-01-01

    Predictive mechanisms are essential to successfully interact with the environment and to compensate for delays in the transmission of neural signals. However, whether and how we predict multisensory action outcomes remains largely unknown. Here we investigated the existence of multisensory predictive mechanisms in a context where actions have outcomes in different modalities. During fMRI data acquisition auditory, visual and auditory-visual stimuli were presented in active and passive conditions. In the active condition, a self-initiated button press elicited the stimuli with variable short delays (0-417ms) between action and outcome, and participants had to detect the presence of a delay for auditory or visual outcome (task modality). In the passive condition, stimuli appeared automatically, and participants had to detect the number of stimulus modalities (unimodal/bimodal). For action consequences compared to identical but unpredictable control stimuli we observed suppression of the blood oxygen level depended (BOLD) response in a broad network including bilateral auditory and visual cortices. This effect was independent of task modality or stimulus modality and strongest for trials where no delay was detected (undetectedbrain regions. These findings support the hypothesis of multisensory predictive mechanisms, which are probably conducted in the left cerebellum. PMID:28060861

  10. TonB-dependent trans-envelope signalling: the exception or the rule?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koebnik, Ralf

    2005-08-01

    TonB-dependent regulatory systems consist of six components, a specialized outer membrane-localized TonB-dependent receptor (TonB-dependent transducer) that interacts with its energizing TonB-ExbBD protein complex, a cytoplasmic membrane-localized anti-sigma factor and an extracytoplasmic function (ECF)-subfamily sigma factor. This sophisticated complex senses signals from outside the bacterial cell and transmits them via two membranes into the cytoplasm, leading to transcriptional activation of target genes. TonB-dependent transducers might be important for pathogenicity; therefore, a survey of their presence in bacteria was aimed. Genome-wide analyses indicate that these systems are commonly found in several environmental bacteria but are only seldom present in human and animal pathogens. Most systems have the same tandem organization of the corresponding genes: sigma factor-anti-sigma factor-TonB-dependent transducer. In the course of these analyses, a novel protein domain of unknown function was identified and four different modular structures of TonB-dependent receptors were detected.

  11. Clustering of Dependent Components: A New Paradigm for fMRI Signal Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hurdal Monica K

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Exploratory data-driven methods such as unsupervised clustering and independent component analysis (ICA are considered to be hypothesis-generating procedures and are complementary to the hypothesis-led statistical inferential methods in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Recently, a new paradigm in ICA emerged, that of finding "clusters" of dependent components. This intriguing idea found its implementation into two new ICA algorithms: tree-dependent and topographic ICA. For fMRI, this represents the unifying paradigm of combining two powerful exploratory data analysis methods, ICA and unsupervised clustering techniques. For the fMRI data, a comparative quantitative evaluation between the two methods, tree-dependent and topographic ICA, was performed. The comparative results were evaluated by (1 task-related activation maps, (2 associated time courses, and (3 ROC study. The most important findings in this paper are that (1 both tree-dependent and topographic ICA are able to identify signal components with high correlation to the fMRI stimulus, and that (2 topographic ICA outperforms all other ICA methods including tree-dependent ICA for 8 and 9 ICs. However for 16 ICs, topographic ICA is outperformed by tree-dependent ICA (KGV using as an approximation of the mutual information the kernel generalized variance. The applicability of the new algorithm is demonstrated on experimental data.

  12. Augmenting NMDA receptor signaling boosts experience-dependent neuroplasticity in the adult human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, Jennifer K; Bachman, Peter; Mathalon, Daniel H; Roach, Brian J; Asarnow, Robert F

    2015-12-15

    Experience-dependent plasticity is a fundamental property of the brain. It is critical for everyday function, is impaired in a range of neurological and psychiatric disorders, and frequently depends on long-term potentiation (LTP). Preclinical studies suggest that augmenting N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) signaling may promote experience-dependent plasticity; however, a lack of noninvasive methods has limited our ability to test this idea in humans until recently. We examined the effects of enhancing NMDAR signaling using d-cycloserine (DCS) on a recently developed LTP EEG paradigm that uses high-frequency visual stimulation (HFvS) to induce neural potentiation in visual cortex neurons, as well as on three cognitive tasks: a weather prediction task (WPT), an information integration task (IIT), and a n-back task. The WPT and IIT are learning tasks that require practice with feedback to reach optimal performance. The n-back assesses working memory. Healthy adults were randomized to receive DCS (100 mg; n = 32) or placebo (n = 33); groups were similar in IQ and demographic characteristics. Participants who received DCS showed enhanced potentiation of neural responses following repetitive HFvS, as well as enhanced performance on the WPT and IIT. Groups did not differ on the n-back. Augmenting NMDAR signaling using DCS therefore enhanced activity-dependent plasticity in human adults, as demonstrated by lasting enhancement of neural potentiation following repetitive HFvS and accelerated acquisition of two learning tasks. Results highlight the utility of considering cellular mechanisms underlying distinct cognitive functions when investigating potential cognitive enhancers.

  13. A Spin-Dependent Interpretation for Possible Signals of Light Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Buckley, Matthew R

    2013-01-01

    Signals broadly compatible with light (7-10 GeV) dark matter have been reported in three direct detection experiments: CoGeNT, DAMA/LIBRA, and CDMS-II silicon. These possible signals have been interpreted in the context of spin-independent interactions between the target nuclei and dark matter, although there is tension with null results, particularly from xenon-based experiments. In this paper, we demonstrate that the CoGeNT and CDMS-II silicon results are also compatible assuming a spin-dependent neutron interaction, though this is in tension with xenon-based experiments and PICASSO. The tension with the null results from XENON100 and XENON10 is approximately the same as for the spin-independent coupling. All three experimental signals can be made compatible through a combination of spin-dependent interactions with both the proton and neutron, although such a scenario increases the conflict with the null results of other experiments.

  14. CNK1 promotes invasion of cancer cells through NF-kappaB-dependent signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Rafael D; Radziwill, Gerald

    2010-03-01

    Hallmarks of cancer cells are uncontrolled proliferation, evasion of apoptosis, angiogenesis, cell invasion, and metastasis, which are driven by oncogenic activation of signaling pathways. Herein, we identify the scaffold protein CNK1 as a mediator of oncogenic signaling that promotes invasion in human breast cancer and cervical cancer cells. Downregulation of CNK1 diminishes the invasiveness of cancer cells and correlates with reduced expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9) and membrane-type 1 MMP (MT1-MMP). Ectopic expression of CNK1 elevates MT1-MMP promoter activity in a NF-kappaB-dependent manner. Moreover, CNK1 cooperates with the NF-kappaB pathway, but not with the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase pathway, to promote cell invasion. Mechanistically, CNK1 regulates the alternative branch of the NF-kappaB pathway because knockdown of CNK1 interferes with processing of NF-kappaB2 p100 to p52 and its localization to the nucleus. In agreement with this, the invasion of CNK1-depleted cells is less sensitive to RelB downregulation compared with the invasion of control cells. Moreover, CNK1-dependent MT1-MMP promoter activation is blocked by RelB siRNA. Thus, CNK1 is an essential mediator of an oncogenic pathway involved in invasion of breast and cervical cancer cells and is therefore a putative target for cancer therapy.

  15. BOLD fMRI of C-Fiber Mediated Nociceptive Processing in Mouse Brain in Response to Thermal Stimulation of the Forepaws.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone C Bosshard

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI in rodents enables non-invasive studies of brain function in response to peripheral input or at rest. In this study we describe a thermal stimulation paradigm using infrared laser diodes to apply noxious heat to the forepaw of mice in order to study nociceptive processing. Stimulation at 45 and 46°C led to robust BOLD signal changes in various brain structures including the somatosensory cortices and the thalamus. The BOLD signal amplitude scaled with the temperature applied but not with the area irradiated by the laser beam. To demonstrate the specificity of the paradigm for assessing nociceptive signaling we administered the quaternary lidocaine derivative QX-314 to the forepaws, which due to its positive charge cannot readily cross biological membranes. However, upon activation of TRPV1 channels following the administration of capsaicin the BOLD signal was largely abolished, indicative of a selective block of the C-fiber nociceptors due to QX-314 having entered the cells via the now open TRPV1 channels. This demonstrates that the cerebral BOLD response to thermal noxious paw stimulation is specifically mediated by C-fibers.

  16. BOLD fMRI of C-Fiber Mediated Nociceptive Processing in Mouse Brain in Response to Thermal Stimulation of the Forepaws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosshard, Simone C; Stuker, Florian; von Deuster, Constantin; Schroeter, Aileen; Rudin, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in rodents enables non-invasive studies of brain function in response to peripheral input or at rest. In this study we describe a thermal stimulation paradigm using infrared laser diodes to apply noxious heat to the forepaw of mice in order to study nociceptive processing. Stimulation at 45 and 46°C led to robust BOLD signal changes in various brain structures including the somatosensory cortices and the thalamus. The BOLD signal amplitude scaled with the temperature applied but not with the area irradiated by the laser beam. To demonstrate the specificity of the paradigm for assessing nociceptive signaling we administered the quaternary lidocaine derivative QX-314 to the forepaws, which due to its positive charge cannot readily cross biological membranes. However, upon activation of TRPV1 channels following the administration of capsaicin the BOLD signal was largely abolished, indicative of a selective block of the C-fiber nociceptors due to QX-314 having entered the cells via the now open TRPV1 channels. This demonstrates that the cerebral BOLD response to thermal noxious paw stimulation is specifically mediated by C-fibers.

  17. BOLD fMRI of C-Fiber Mediated Nociceptive Processing in Mouse Brain in Response to Thermal Stimulation of the Forepaws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosshard, Simone C.; Stuker, Florian; von Deuster, Constantin; Schroeter, Aileen; Rudin, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in rodents enables non-invasive studies of brain function in response to peripheral input or at rest. In this study we describe a thermal stimulation paradigm using infrared laser diodes to apply noxious heat to the forepaw of mice in order to study nociceptive processing. Stimulation at 45 and 46°C led to robust BOLD signal changes in various brain structures including the somatosensory cortices and the thalamus. The BOLD signal amplitude scaled with the temperature applied but not with the area irradiated by the laser beam. To demonstrate the specificity of the paradigm for assessing nociceptive signaling we administered the quaternary lidocaine derivative QX-314 to the forepaws, which due to its positive charge cannot readily cross biological membranes. However, upon activation of TRPV1 channels following the administration of capsaicin the BOLD signal was largely abolished, indicative of a selective block of the C-fiber nociceptors due to QX-314 having entered the cells via the now open TRPV1 channels. This demonstrates that the cerebral BOLD response to thermal noxious paw stimulation is specifically mediated by C-fibers. PMID:25950440

  18. Bone marrow microenvironment-derived signals induce Mcl-1 dependence in multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vikas A; Matulis, Shannon M; Conage-Pough, Jason E; Nooka, Ajay K; Kaufman, Jonathan L; Lonial, Sagar; Boise, Lawrence H

    2017-04-06

    Multiple myeloma is highly dependent on the bone marrow microenvironment until progressing to very advanced extramedullary stages of the disease such as plasma cell leukemia. Stromal cells in the bone marrow secrete a variety of cytokines that promote plasma cell survival by regulating antiapoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family including Mcl-1, Bcl-xL, and Bcl-2. Although the antiapoptotic protein on which a cell depends is typically consistent among normal cells of a particular phenotype, Bcl-2 family dependence is highly heterogeneous in multiple myeloma. Although normal plasma cells and most multiple myeloma cells require Mcl-1 for survival, a subset of myeloma is codependent on Bcl-2 and/or Bcl-xL We investigated the role of the bone marrow microenvironment in determining Bcl-2 family dependence in multiple myeloma. We used the Bcl-2/Bcl-xL inhibitor ABT-737 to study the factors regulating whether myeloma is Mcl-1 dependent, and thus resistant to ABT-737-induced apoptosis, or Bcl-2/Bcl-xL codependent, and thus sensitive to ABT-737. We demonstrate that bone marrow stroma is capable of inducing Mcl-1 dependence through the production of the plasma cell survival cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6). IL-6 upregulates Mcl-1 transcription in a STAT3-dependent manner, although this occurred in a minority of the cells tested. In all cells, IL-6 treatment results in posttranslational modification of the proapoptotic protein Bim. Phosphorylation of Bim shifts its binding from Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL to Mcl-1, an effect reversed by MEK inhibition. Blocking IL-6 or downstream signaling restored Bcl-2/Bcl-xL dependence and may therefore represent a clinically useful strategy to enhance the activity of Bcl-2 inhibitors. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  19. Signal-amplification detection of small molecules by use of Mg2+-dependent DNAzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhijun; Wang, Jiahai; Wang, Erkang

    2013-05-01

    Because small molecules can be beneficial or toxic in biology and the environment, specific and sensitive detection of small molecules is one of the most important objectives of the scientific community. In this study, new signal amplification assays for detection of small molecules based on Mg(2+)-dependent DNAzyme were developed. A cleavable DNA substrate containing a ribonucleotide, the ends of which were labeled with black hole quencher (BHQ) and 6-carboxyfluorescein (FAM), was used for fluorescence detection. When the small molecule of interest is added to the assay solution, the Mg(2+)-dependent DNAzyme is activated, facilitating hybridization between the Mg(2+)-dependent DNAzyme and the DNA substrate. Binding of the substrate to the DNAzyme structure results in hydrolytic cleavage of the substrate in the presence of Mg(2+) ions. The fluorescence signal was amplified by continuous cleavage of the enzyme substrate. Ochratoxin A (OTA) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) were used as model analytes in these experiments. This method can detect OTA specifically with a detection limit as low as 140 pmol L(-1) and detect ATP specifically with a detection limit as low as 13 nmol L(-1). Moreover, this method is potentially extendable to detection of other small molecules which are able to dissociate the aptamer from the DNAzyme, leading to activation of the DNAzyme.

  20. Disease-causing mutations in the XIAP BIR2 domain impair NOD2-dependent immune signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Rune Busk; Fiil, Berthe Katrine; Speckmann, Carsten;

    2013-01-01

    X-linked Inhibitor of Apoptosis (XIAP) is an essential ubiquitin ligase for pro-inflammatory signalling downstream of the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain containing (NOD)-1 and -2 pattern recognition receptors. Mutations in XIAP cause X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome type-2 (XLP2......), an immunodeficiency associated with a potentially fatal deregulation of the immune system, whose aetiology is not well understood. Here, we identify the XIAP baculovirus IAP repeat (BIR)2 domain as a hotspot for missense mutations in XLP2. We demonstrate that XLP2-BIR2 mutations severely impair NOD1/2-dependent...... immune signalling in primary cells from XLP2 patients and in reconstituted XIAP-deficient cell lines. XLP2-BIR2 mutations abolish the XIAP-RIPK2 interaction resulting in impaired ubiquitylation of RIPK2 and recruitment of linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC) to the NOD2-complex. We show...

  1. SEMICONDUCTOR PHYSICS Dose-rate dependence of optically stimulated luminescence signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingqiang, Wei; Zhaoyang, Chen; Yanwei, Fan; Yurun, Sun; Yun, Zhao

    2010-10-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) is the luminescence emitted from a semiconductor during its exposure to light. The OSL intensity is a function of the total dose absorbed by the sample. The dose-rate dependence of the OSL signal of the semiconductor CaS doped Ce and Sm was studied by numerical simulation and experiments. Based on a one-trap/one-center model, the whole OSL process was represented by a series of differential equations. The dose-rate properties of the materials were acquired theoretically by solving the equations. Good coherence was achieved between numerical simulation and experiments, both of which showed that the OSL signal was independent of dose rate. This result validates that when using OSL as a dosimetry technique, the dose-rate effect can be neglected.

  2. Physiologic characterization of inflammatory arthritis in a rabbit model with BOLD and DCE MRI at 1.5 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasui, Otilia C.; Chan, Michael W.; Nathanael, George; Rayner, Tammy; Weiss, Ruth; Detzler, Garry; Zhong, Anguo [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Crawley, Adrian [University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Toronto Western Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Miller, Elka [Children' s Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO), Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Belik, Jaques [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Neonatology, Toronto, ON (Canada); Cheng, Hai-Ling; Kassner, Andrea; Doria, Andrea S. [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Moineddin, Rahim [Department of Public Health, Family and Community Medicine, Toronto, ON (Canada); Jong, Roland; Rogers, Marianne [Mount Sinai Hospital, Department of Pathology, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2014-11-15

    Our aim was to test the feasibility of blood oxygen level dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD MRI) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI to monitor periarticular hypoxic/inflammatory changes over time in a juvenile rabbit model of arthritis. We examined arthritic and contralateral nonarthritic knees of 21 juvenile rabbits at baseline and days 1,14, and 28 after induction of arthritis by unilateral intra-articular injection of carrageenin with BOLD and DCE MRI at 1.5 Tesla (T). Nine noninjected rabbits served as controls. Associations between BOLD and DCE-MRI and corresponding intra-articular oxygen pressure (PO{sub 2}) and blood flow [blood perfusion units (BPU)] (polarographic probes, reference standards) or clinical-histological data were measured by correlation coefficients. Percentage BOLD MRI change obtained in contralateral knees correlated moderately with BPU on day 0 (r = -0.51, p = 0.02) and excellently on day 28 (r = -0.84, p = 0.03). A moderate correlation was observed between peak enhancement DCE MRI (day 1) and BPU measurements in arthritic knees (r = 0.49, p = 0.04). In acute arthritis, BOLD and DCE MRI highly correlated (r = 0.89, p = 0.04; r = 1.0, p < 0.0001) with histological scores in arthritic knees. The proposed techniques are feasible to perform at 1.5 T, and they hold potential as surrogate measures to monitor hypoxic and inflammatory changes over time in arthritis at higher-strength MRI fields. (orig.)

  3. Block Sparse Compressed Sensing of Electroencephalogram (EEG Signals by Exploiting Linear and Non-Linear Dependencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesham Mahrous

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a compressive sensing (CS method for multi-channel electroencephalogram (EEG signals in Wireless Body Area Network (WBAN applications, where the battery life of sensors is limited. For the single EEG channel case, known as the single measurement vector (SMV problem, the Block Sparse Bayesian Learning-BO (BSBL-BO method has been shown to yield good results. This method exploits the block sparsity and the intra-correlation (i.e., the linear dependency within the measurement vector of a single channel. For the multichannel case, known as the multi-measurement vector (MMV problem, the Spatio-Temporal Sparse Bayesian Learning (STSBL-EM method has been proposed. This method learns the joint correlation structure in the multichannel signals by whitening the model in the temporal and the spatial domains. Our proposed method represents the multi-channels signal data as a vector that is constructed in a specific way, so that it has a better block sparsity structure than the conventional representation obtained by stacking the measurement vectors of the different channels. To reconstruct the multichannel EEG signals, we modify the parameters of the BSBL-BO algorithm, so that it can exploit not only the linear but also the non-linear dependency structures in a vector. The modified BSBL-BO is then applied on the vector with the better sparsity structure. The proposed method is shown to significantly outperform existing SMV and also MMV methods. It also shows significant lower compression errors even at high compression ratios such as 10:1 on three different datasets.

  4. 4EBP-Dependent Signaling Supports West Nile Virus Growth and Protein Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine D. Shives

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV is a (+ sense, single-stranded RNA virus in the Flavivirus genus. WNV RNA possesses an m7GpppNm 5′ cap with 2′-O-methylation that mimics host mRNAs preventing innate immune detection and allowing the virus to translate its RNA genome through the utilization of cap-dependent translation initiation effectors in a wide variety of host species. Our prior work established the requirement of the host mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 for optimal WNV growth and protein expression; yet, the roles of the downstream effectors of mTORC1 in WNV translation are unknown. In this study, we utilize gene deletion mutants in the ribosomal protein kinase called S6 kinase (S6K and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein (4EBP pathways downstream of mTORC1 to define the role of mTOR-dependent translation initiation signals in WNV gene expression and growth. We now show that WNV growth and protein expression are dependent on mTORC1 mediated-regulation of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein/eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein (4EBP/eIF4E interaction and eukaryotic initiation factor 4F (eIF4F complex formation to support viral growth and viral protein expression. We also show that the canonical signals of mTORC1 activation including ribosomal protein s6 (rpS6 and S6K phosphorylation are not required for WNV growth in these same conditions. Our data suggest that the mTORC1/4EBP/eIF4E signaling axis is activated to support the translation of the WNV genome.

  5. Connectivity Reveals Sources of Predictive Coding Signals in Early Visual Cortex During Processing of Visual Optic Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Andreas; Bartels, Andreas

    2016-05-24

    Superimposed on the visual feed-forward pathway, feedback connections convey higher level information to cortical areas lower in the hierarchy. A prominent framework for these connections is the theory of predictive coding where high-level areas send stimulus interpretations to lower level areas that compare them with sensory input. Along these lines, a growing body of neuroimaging studies shows that predictable stimuli lead to reduced blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) responses compared with matched nonpredictable counterparts, especially in early visual cortex (EVC) including areas V1-V3. The sources of these modulatory feedback signals are largely unknown. Here, we re-examined the robust finding of relative BOLD suppression in EVC evident during processing of coherent compared with random motion. Using functional connectivity analysis, we show an optic flow-dependent increase of functional connectivity between BOLD suppressed EVC and a network of visual motion areas including MST, V3A, V6, the cingulate sulcus visual area (CSv), and precuneus (Pc). Connectivity decreased between EVC and 2 areas known to encode heading direction: entorhinal cortex (EC) and retrosplenial cortex (RSC). Our results provide first evidence that BOLD suppression in EVC for predictable stimuli is indeed mediated by specific high-level areas, in accord with the theory of predictive coding.

  6. Correlations of the Time Dependent Signal and the State of a Continuously Monitored Quantum System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroozani, N.; Naghiloo, M.; Tan, D.; Mølmer, K.; Murch, K. W.

    2016-03-01

    In quantum physics, measurements give random results and yield a corresponding random backaction on the state of the system subject to measurement. If a quantum system is probed continuously over time, its state evolves along a stochastic quantum trajectory. To investigate the characteristic properties of such dynamics, we perform weak continuous measurements on a superconducting qubit that is driven to undergo Rabi oscillations. From the data we observe a number of striking temporal correlations within the time dependent signals and the quantum trajectories of the qubit, and we discuss their explanation in terms of quantum measurement and photodetection theory.

  7. Control of the neurovascular coupling by nitric oxide-dependent regulation of astrocytic Ca2+ signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Francisco Muñoz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal activity must be tightly coordinated with blood flow to keep proper brain function, which is achieved by a mechanism known as neurovascular coupling. Then, an increase in synaptic activity leads to a dilation of local parenchymal arterioles that matches the enhanced metabolic demand. Neurovascular coupling is orchestrated by astrocytes. These glial cells are located between neurons and the microvasculature, with the astrocytic endfeet ensheathing the vessels, which allows fine intercellular communication. The neurotransmitters released during neuronal activity reach astrocytic receptors and trigger a Ca2+ signaling that propagates to the endfeet, activating the release of vasoactive factors and arteriolar dilation. The astrocyte Ca2+ signaling is coordinated by gap junction channels and hemichannels formed by connexins (Cx43 and Cx30 and channels formed by pannexins (Panx-1. The neuronal activity-initiated Ca2+ waves are propagated among neighboring astrocytes directly via gap junctions or through ATP release via connexin hemichannels or pannexin channels. In addition, Ca2+ entry via connexin hemichannels or pannexin channels may participate in the regulation of the astrocyte signaling-mediated neurovascular coupling. Interestingly, nitric oxide (NO can activate connexin hemichannel by S-nitrosylation and the Ca2+-dependent NO-synthesizing enzymes endothelial NO synthase (eNOS and neuronal NOS (nNOS are expressed in astrocytes. Therefore, the astrocytic Ca2+ signaling triggered in neurovascular coupling may activate NO production, which, in turn, may lead to Ca2+ influx through hemichannel activation. Furthermore, NO release from the hemichannels located at astrocytic endfeet may contribute to the vasodilation of parenchymal arterioles. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms involved in the regulation of the astrocytic Ca2+ signaling that mediates neurovascular coupling, with a special emphasis in the possible participation of NO in

  8. The Boldest New Idea? An End to Bold Ideas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothstein, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The past two decades have proven that bold, single-factor reform ideas have little power to change the face of education. Pundits and policymakers would have schools and school systems make grand changes to accommodate the reform idea du jour--and then profess the incompetence of schools and teachers when those changes prove less than effective.…

  9. Boldness by habituation and social interactions : a model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosten, Johanneke E.; Magnhagen, Carin; Hemelrijk, Charlotte K.

    Most studies of animal personality attribute personality to genetic traits. But a recent study by Magnhagen and Staffan (Behav Ecol Sociobiol 57:295-303, 2005) on young perch in small groups showed that boldness, a central personality trait, is also shaped by social interactions and by previous

  10. Rapid State-Dependent Alteration in Kv3 Channel Availability Drives Flexible Synaptic Signaling Dependent on Somatic Subthreshold Depolarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J.M. Rowan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In many neurons, subthreshold depolarization in the soma can transiently increase action-potential (AP-evoked neurotransmission via analog-to-digital facilitation. The mechanisms underlying this form of short-term synaptic plasticity are unclear, in part, due to the relative inaccessibility of the axon to direct physiological interrogation. Using voltage imaging and patch-clamp recording from presynaptic boutons of cerebellar stellate interneurons, we observed that depolarizing somatic potentials readily spread into the axon, resulting in AP broadening, increased spike-evoked Ca2+ entry, and enhanced neurotransmission strength. Kv3 channels, which drive AP repolarization, rapidly inactivated upon incorporation of Kv3.4 subunits. This leads to fast susceptibility to depolarization-induced spike broadening and analog facilitation independent of Ca2+-dependent protein kinase C signaling. The spread of depolarization into the axon was attenuated by hyperpolarization-activated currents (Ih currents in the maturing cerebellum, precluding analog facilitation. These results suggest that analog-to-digital facilitation is tempered by development or experience in stellate cells.

  11. Rapid State-Dependent Alteration in Kv3 Channel Availability Drives Flexible Synaptic Signaling Dependent on Somatic Subthreshold Depolarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Matthew J M; Christie, Jason M

    2017-02-21

    In many neurons, subthreshold depolarization in the soma can transiently increase action-potential (AP)-evoked neurotransmission via analog-to-digital facilitation. The mechanisms underlying this form of short-term synaptic plasticity are unclear, in part, due to the relative inaccessibility of the axon to direct physiological interrogation. Using voltage imaging and patch-clamp recording from presynaptic boutons of cerebellar stellate interneurons, we observed that depolarizing somatic potentials readily spread into the axon, resulting in AP broadening, increased spike-evoked Ca(2+) entry, and enhanced neurotransmission strength. Kv3 channels, which drive AP repolarization, rapidly inactivated upon incorporation of Kv3.4 subunits. This leads to fast susceptibility to depolarization-induced spike broadening and analog facilitation independent of Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase C signaling. The spread of depolarization into the axon was attenuated by hyperpolarization-activated currents (Ih currents) in the maturing cerebellum, precluding analog facilitation. These results suggest that analog-to-digital facilitation is tempered by development or experience in stellate cells.

  12. NSAID sulindac and its analog bind RXRalpha and inhibit RXRalpha-dependent AKT signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hu; Liu, Wen; Su, Ying; Wei, Zhen; Liu, Jie; Kolluri, Siva Kumar; Wu, Hua; Cao, Yu; Chen, Jiebo; Wu, Yin; Yan, Tingdong; Cao, Xihua; Gao, Weiwei; Molotkov, Andrei; Jiang, Fuquan; Li, Wen-Gang; Lin, Bingzhen; Zhang, Hai-Ping; Yu, Jinghua; Luo, Shi-Peng; Zeng, Jin-Zhang; Duester, Gregg; Huang, Pei-Qiang; Zhang, Xiao-Kun

    2010-06-15

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) exert their anticancer effects through cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-dependent and independent mechanisms. Here, we report that Sulindac, an NSAID, induces apoptosis by binding to retinoid X receptor-alpha (RXRalpha). We identified an N-terminally truncated RXRalpha (tRXRalpha) in several cancer cell lines and primary tumors, which interacted with the p85alpha subunit of phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI3K). Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) promoted tRXRalpha interaction with the p85alpha, activating PI3K/AKT signaling. When combined with TNFalpha, Sulindac inhibited TNFalpha-induced tRXRalpha/p85alpha interaction, leading to activation of the death receptor-mediated apoptotic pathway. We designed and synthesized a Sulindac analog K-80003, which has increased affinity to RXRalpha but lacks COX inhibitory activity. K-80003 displayed enhanced efficacy in inhibiting tRXRalpha-dependent AKT activation and tRXRalpha tumor growth in animals.

  13. The ubiquitin- and SUMO-dependent signaling response to DNA double-strand breaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels

    2011-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) represent the most destructive type of chromosomal lesion and trigger rapid chromatin restructuring accompanied by accumulation of proteins in the vicinity of the DSB. Non-proteolytic ubiquitylation of chromatin surrounding DSBs, mediated by the RNF8/RNF168 ubiquitin...... ligase cascade, has emerged as a key mechanism for restoration of genome integrity by licensing the DSB-modified chromatin to concentrate genome caretaker proteins such as 53BP1 and BRCA1 near the lesions. In parallel, SUMOylation of upstream DSB regulators is also required for execution...... of this ubiquitin-dependent chromatin response, but its molecular basis is currently unclear. Here, we discuss recent insights into how ubiquitin- and SUMO-dependent signaling processes cooperate to orchestrate protein interactions with sites of DNA damage to facilitate DSB repair....

  14. Orientational dependence of optically detected magnetic resonance signals in laser-driven atomic magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Simone; Dolgovskiy, Vladimir; Scholtes, Theo; Grujić, Zoran D.; Lebedev, Victor; Weis, Antoine

    2017-01-01

    We have investigated the dependence of lock-in-demodulated M_x-magnetometer signals on the orientation of the static magnetic field B0 of interest. Magnetic resonance spectra for 2400 discrete orientations of B0 covering a 4π solid angle have been recorded by a PC-controlled steering and data acquisition system. Off-line fits by previously derived lineshape functions allow us to extract the relevant resonance parameters (shape, amplitude, width, and phase) and to represent their dependence on the orientation of B0 with respect to the laser beam propagation direction. We have performed this study for two distinct M_x-magnetometer configurations, in which the rf-field is either parallel or perpendicular to the light propagation direction. The results confirm well the algebraic theoretical model functions. We suggest that small discrepancies are related to hitherto uninvestigated atomic alignment contributions.

  15. Frequency-dependent signal processing in apical dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, H; Tsubokawa, H; Tsukada, M; Aihara, T

    2014-10-10

    Depending on an animal's behavioral state, hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells receive distinct patterns of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. The time-dependent changes in the frequencies of these inputs and the nonuniform distribution of voltage-gated channels lead to dynamic fluctuations in membrane conductance. In this study, using a whole-cell patch-clamp method, we attempted to record and analyze the frequency dependencies of membrane responsiveness in Wistar rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells following noise current injection directly into dendrites and somata under pharmacological blockade of all synaptic inputs. To estimate the frequency-dependent properties of membrane potential, membrane impedance was determined from the voltage response divided by the input current in the frequency domain. The cell membrane of most neurons showed low-pass filtering properties in all regions. In particular, the properties were strongly expressed in the somata or proximal dendrites. Moreover, the data revealed nonuniform distribution of dendritic impedance, which was high in the intermediate segment of the apical dendritic shaft (∼220-260μm from the soma). The low-pass filtering properties in the apical dendrites were more enhanced by membrane depolarization than those in the somata. Coherence spectral analysis revealed high coherence between the input signal and the output voltage response in the theta-gamma frequency range, and large lags emerged in the distal dendrites in the gamma frequency range. Our results suggest that apical dendrites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells integrate synaptic inputs according to the frequency components of the input signal along the dendritic segments receiving the inputs.

  16. Role of signal transduction crosstalk between adenylyl cyclase and MAP kinase in hippocampus-dependent memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zhengui; Storm, Daniel R

    2012-08-16

    One of the intriguing questions in neurobiology is how long-term memory (LTM) traces are established and maintained in the brain. Memory can be divided into at least two temporally and mechanistically distinct forms. Short-term memory (STM) lasts no longer than several hours, while LTM persists for days or longer. A crucial step in the generation of LTM is consolidation, a process in which STM is converted to LTM. Hippocampus-dependent LTM depends on activation of Ca(2+), Erk/MAP kinase (MAPK), and cAMP signaling pathways, as well as de novo gene expression and translation. One of the transcriptional pathways strongly implicated in LTM is the CREB/CRE (calcium, cAMP response element) transcriptional pathway. Interestingly, this transcriptional pathway may also contribute to other forms of neuroplasticity including adaptive responses to drugs. Evidence discussed in this review indicates that activation of the Erk1/2 MAP Kinase (MAPK)/CRE transcriptional pathway during the formation of hippocampus-dependent memory depends on calmodulin (CaM)-stimulated adenylyl cyclases.

  17. Superoxide anion-induced pain and inflammation depends on TNFα/TNFR1 signaling in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamacita-Borin, Fabiane Y; Zarpelon, Ana C; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A; Fattori, Victor; Alves-Filho, Jose C; Cunha, Fernando Q; Cunha, Thiago M; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2015-09-25

    Inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) and superoxide anion production reduces inflammation and pain. The present study investigated whether superoxide anion-induced pain depends on TNFα signaling and the role of superoxide anion in TNFα-induced hyperalgesia to clarify the interrelation between these two mediators in the context of pain. Intraplantar injection of a superoxide anion donor (potassium superoxide) induced mechanical hyperalgesia (0.5-5h after injection), neutrophil recruitment (myeloperoxidase activity), and overt pain-like behaviors (paw flinching, paw licking, and abdominal writhings) in wild-type mice. Tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 deficiency (TNFR1-/-) and treatment of wild-type mice with etanercept (a soluble TNFR2 receptor that inhibits TNFα actions) inhibited superoxide anion-induced pain-like behaviors. TNFR1(-/-) mice were also protected from superoxide anion donor-induced oxidative stress, suggesting the role of this pathway in the maintenance of oxidative stress. Finally, we demonstrated that Apocynin (an NADPH oxidase inhibitor) or Tempol (a superoxide dismutase mimetic) treatment inhibited TNFα-induced paw mechanical hyperalgesia and neutrophil recruitment (myeloperoxidase activity). These results demonstrate that TNFα/TNFR1 signaling is important in superoxide anion-triggered pain and that TNFα/TNFR1 signaling amplifies the oxidative stress triggered by superoxide anion, which contributes to sustaining pain and inflammation.

  18. Vangl-dependent planar cell polarity signalling is not required for neural crest migration in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, Sophie E; Massa, Valentina; Savery, Dawn; Andre, Philipp; Yang, Yingzi; Greene, Nicholas D E; Copp, Andrew J

    2014-08-01

    The role of planar cell polarity (PCP) signalling in neural crest (NC) development is unclear. The PCP dependence of NC cell migration has been reported in Xenopus and zebrafish, but NC migration has not been studied in mammalian PCP mutants. Vangl2(Lp/Lp) mouse embryos lack PCP signalling and undergo almost complete failure of neural tube closure. Here we show, however, that NC specification, migration and derivative formation occur normally in Vangl2(Lp/Lp) embryos. The gene family member Vangl1 was not expressed in NC nor ectopically expressed in Vangl2(Lp/Lp) embryos, and doubly homozygous Vangl1/Vangl2 mutants exhibited normal NC migration. Acute downregulation of Vangl2 in the NC lineage did not prevent NC migration. In vitro, Vangl2(Lp/Lp) neural tube explants generated emigrating NC cells, as in wild type. Hence, PCP signalling is not essential for NC migration in mammals, in contrast to its essential role in neural tube closure. PCP mutations are thus unlikely to mediate NC-related birth defects in humans.

  19. Cell-type dependent modulation of Notch signaling by the amyloid precursor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sun Young; Chen, Ci-Di; Abraham, Carmela R

    2010-04-01

    The amyloid precursor protein is a ubiquitously expressed transmembrane protein that has been long implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease but its normal biological function has remained elusive despite extensive effort. We have previously reported the identification of Notch2 as an amyloid precursor protein interacting protein in E18 rat neurons. Here, we sought to reveal the physiologic consequences of this interaction. We report a functional relationship between amyloid precursor protein and Notch1, which does not affect Delta ligand binding. First, we observed interactions between the amyloid precursor protein and Notch in mouse embryonic stem cells lacking both presenilin 1 and presenilin 2, the active proteolytic components of the gamma-secretase complex, suggesting that these two transmembrane proteins can interact in the absence of presenilin. Next, we demonstrated that the amyloid precursor protein affects Notch signaling by using Notch-dependent luciferase assays in two cell lines, the human embryonic kidney 293 and the monkey kidney, COS7. We found that the amyloid precursor protein exerts opposing effects on Notch signaling in human embryonic kidney 293 vs. COS7 cells. Finally, we show that more Notch Intracellular Domain is found in the nucleus in the presence of exogenous amyloid precursor protein or its intracellular domain, suggesting the mechanism by which the amyloid precursor protein affects Notch signaling in certain cells. Our results provide evidence of potentially important communications between the amyloid precursor protein and Notch.

  20. Satellite single-axis attitude determination based on Automatic Dependent Surveillance - Broadcast signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kaixing; Sun, Xiucong; Huang, Hai; Wang, Xinsheng; Ren, Guangwei

    2017-10-01

    The space-based Automatic Dependent Surveillance - Broadcast (ADS-B) is a new technology for air traffic management. The satellite equipped with spaceborne ADS-B system receives the broadcast signals from aircraft and transfers the message to ground stations, so as to extend the coverage area of terrestrial-based ADS-B. In this work, a novel satellite single-axis attitude determination solution based on the ADS-B receiving system is proposed. This solution utilizes the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measurement of the broadcast signals from aircraft to determine the boresight orientation of the ADS-B receiving antenna fixed on the satellite. The basic principle of this solution is described. The feasibility study of this new attitude determination solution is implemented, including the link budget and the access analysis. On this basis, the nonlinear least squares estimation based on the Levenberg-Marquardt method is applied to estimate the single-axis orientation. A full digital simulation has been carried out to verify the effectiveness and performance of this solution. Finally, the corresponding results are processed and presented minutely.

  1. Actin induction during PMA and cAMP-dependent signal pathway activation in Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, D; del Carmen Dominguez-Robles, M; Villegas-Sepúlveda, N; Meza, I

    2000-10-01

    Activation of PKC or cAMP-dependent signalling pathways in Entamoeba histolytica triggers the phosphorylation of proteins involved in actin rearrangements necessary for adhesion and locomotion. Analogous motifs to SRE and CRE sequences--known to respond to PMA and cAMP--were identified within the 5' regulatory region (5'RR) of one of the parasite actin genes. These sequences could be involved in the actin transcriptional upregulation reported during signalling. To test this hypothesis, a plasmid containing the 5'RR of the actin gene fused to the bacterial neomycin gene (neo) was used for stable transfection. Expression of neo and endogenous actin was measured after stimulation of transfected amoebae by PMA and dcAMP. It was found that both compounds induced neo and actin expression and showed a co-operative effect in the induction of neo. Induction by PMA or dcAMP failed if the directing amoebic 5'RR lacked SRE and CRE motifs. Transfection of amoebae with plasmid constructs, containing either progressive deletions of the actin 5'RR or site-directed mutations of the SRE and CRE-like motifs, corroborated that these sequences and a co-ordinated participation of PKC- and PKA-activated transcription factors are responsible for the increments in neo and actin mRNAs. In vivo, these PMA and cAMP-response elements could play an important role in regulating actin expression and organization in signalling processes activated during tissue invasion.

  2. Estrogen signalling and the DNA damage response in hormone dependent breast cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Elizabeth Caldon

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Estrogen is necessary for the normal growth and development of breast tissue, but high levels of estrogen are a major risk factor for breast cancer. One mechanism by which estrogen could contribute to breast cancer is via the induction of DNA damage. This perspective discusses the mechanisms by which estrogen alters the DNA damage response (DDR and DNA repair through the regulation of key effector proteins including ATM, ATR, CHK1, BRCA1 and p53 and the feedback on estrogen receptor signalling from these proteins. We put forward the hypothesis that estrogen receptor signalling converges to suppress effective DNA repair and apoptosis in favour of proliferation. This is important in hormone-dependent breast cancer as it will affect processing of estrogen-induced DNA damage, as well as other genotoxic insults. DDR and DNA repair proteins are frequently mutated or altered in estrogen responsive breast cancer which will further change the processing of DNA damage. Finally the action of estrogen signalling on DNA damage is also relevant to the therapeutic setting as the suppression of a DNA damage response by estrogen has the potential to alter the response of cancers to anti-hormone treatment or chemotherapy that induces DNA damage.

  3. Lyn tyrosine kinase promotes silencing of ATM-dependent checkpoint signaling during recovery from DNA double-strand breaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukumoto, Yasunori, E-mail: fukumoto@faculty.chiba-u.jp; Kuki, Kazumasa; Morii, Mariko; Miura, Takahito; Honda, Takuya; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Hasegawa, Hitomi; Kubota, Sho; Ide, Yudai; Yamaguchi, Noritaka; Nakayama, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Naoto, E-mail: nyama@faculty.chiba-u.jp

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Inhibition of Src family kinases decreased γ-H2AX signal. • Inhibition of Src family increased ATM-dependent phosphorylation of Chk2 and Kap1. • shRNA-mediated knockdown of Lyn increased phosphorylation of Kap1 by ATM. • Ectopic expression of Src family kinase suppressed ATM-mediated Kap1 phosphorylation. • Src is involved in upstream signaling for inactivation of ATM signaling. - Abstract: DNA damage activates the DNA damage checkpoint and the DNA repair machinery. After initial activation of DNA damage responses, cells recover to their original states through completion of DNA repair and termination of checkpoint signaling. Currently, little is known about the process by which cells recover from the DNA damage checkpoint, a process called checkpoint recovery. Here, we show that Src family kinases promote inactivation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-dependent checkpoint signaling during recovery from DNA double-strand breaks. Inhibition of Src activity increased ATM-dependent phosphorylation of Chk2 and Kap1. Src inhibition increased ATM signaling both in G2 phase and during asynchronous growth. shRNA knockdown of Lyn increased ATM signaling. Src-dependent nuclear tyrosine phosphorylation suppressed ATM-mediated Kap1 phosphorylation. These results suggest that Src family kinases are involved in upstream signaling that leads to inactivation of the ATM-dependent DNA damage checkpoint.

  4. Traitement des Images pour la Reconnaissance de Formes EN Presence de Bruit Dependant du Signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrillon, Jean-Christophe

    En traitement d'images, tres peu de recherches ont jusqu'a present considere le probleme de la reconnaissance de formes en presence de bruit dependant du signal. L'originalite de ce travail reside d'une part dans l'etude de la reconnaissance de formes par correlation, invariante sous translation et invariante simultanement sous rotation et translation, en presence de bruit dependant du signal et, d'autre part, dans le developpement de nouvelles methodes de traitement d'images qui preservent la reconnaissance en presence du bruit lorsque les methodes existantes ont echoure. Nous considerons principalement le speckle, qui peut se manifester dans les correlateurs optiques operant en eclairement coherent. Les nouvelles methodes que nous proposons consistent en un pre-traitement des images bruitees base sur la theorie de l'estimation. Au moyen de simulations numeriques et d'une analyse statistique, nous montrons les avantages du pre-traitement, en particulier pour la reconnaissance avec les filtres de correlation invariants sous rotation et translation.

  5. Morphine- and CaMKII-dependent enhancement of GIRK channel signaling in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassirpour, Rounak; Bahima, Laia; Lalive, Arnaud L; Lüscher, Christian; Luján, Rafael; Slesinger, Paul A

    2010-10-06

    G-protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels, which help control neuronal excitability, are important for the response to drugs of abuse. Here, we describe a novel pathway for morphine-dependent enhancement of GIRK channel signaling in hippocampal neurons. Morphine treatment for ∼20 h increased the colocalization of GIRK2 with PSD95, a dendritic spine marker. Western blot analysis and quantitative immunoelectron microscopy revealed an increase in GIRK2 protein and targeting to dendritic spines. In vivo administration of morphine also produced an upregulation of GIRK2 protein in the hippocampus. The mechanism engaged by morphine required elevated intracellular Ca(2+) and was insensitive to pertussis toxin, implicating opioid receptors that may couple to Gq G-proteins. Met-enkephalin, but not the μ-selective (DAMGO) and δ-selective (DPDPE) opioid receptor agonists, mimicked the effect of morphine, suggesting involvement of a heterodimeric opioid receptor complex. Peptide (KN-93) inhibition of CaMKII prevented the morphine-dependent change in GIRK localization, whereas expression of a constitutively activated form of CaMKII mimicked the effects of morphine. Coincident with an increase in GIRK2 surface expression, functional analyses revealed that morphine treatment increased the size of serotonin-activated GIRK currents and Ba(2+)-sensitive basal K(+) currents in neurons. These results demonstrate plasticity in neuronal GIRK signaling that may contribute to the abusive effects of morphine.

  6. Protein Kinase C alpha (PKCα) dependent signaling mediates endometrial cancer cell growth and tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haughian, James M.; Reno, Elaine M.; Thorne, Alicia M.; Bradford, Andrew P.

    2009-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common invasive gynecologic malignancy, yet molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways underlying its etiology and pathophysiology remain poorly characterized. We sought to define a functional role for the protein kinase C (PKC) isoform, PKCα, in an established cell model of endometrial adenocarcinoma. Ishikawa cells depleted of PKCα protein grew slower, formed fewer colonies in anchorage-independent growth assays and exhibited impaired xenograft tumor formation in nude mice. Consistent with impaired growth, PKCα knockdown increased levels of the cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors p21Cip1/WAF1 (p21) and p27Kip1 (p27). Despite the absence of functional phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) protein in Ishikawa cells, PKCα knockdown reduced Akt phosphorylation at serine 473 and concomitantly inhibited phosphorylation of the Akt target, glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β). PKCα knockdown also resulted in decreased basal ERK phosphorylation and attenuated ERK activation following EGF stimulation. p21 and p27 expression was not increased by treatment of Ishikawa cells with ERK and Akt inhibitors, suggesting PKCα regulates CDK expression independently of Akt and ERK. Immunohistochemical analysis of grade 1 endometrioid adenocarcinoma revealed aberrant PKCα expression, with foci of elevated PKCα staining, not observed in normal endometrium. These studies demonstrate a critical role for PKCα signaling in endometrial tumorigenesis by regulating expression of CDK inhibitors p21 and p27 and activation of Akt and ERK dependent proliferative pathways. Thus, targeting PKCα may provide novel therapeutic options in endometrial tumors. PMID:19672862

  7. Hydrogen peroxide induces activation of insulin signaling pathway via AMP-dependent kinase in podocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piwkowska, Agnieszka, E-mail: apiwkowska@cmdik.pan.pl [Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Nephrology, Gdansk (Poland); Rogacka, Dorota; Angielski, Stefan [Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Nephrology, Gdansk (Poland); Jankowski, Maciej [Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Nephrology, Gdansk (Poland); Medical University of Gdansk, Department of Therapy Monitoring and Pharmacogenetics (Poland)

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} activates the insulin signaling pathway and glucose uptake in podocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} induces time-dependent changes in AMPK phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} enhances insulin signaling pathways via AMPK activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stimulation of glucose uptake is AMPK-dependent. -- Abstract: Podocytes are cells that form the glomerular filtration barrier in the kidney. Insulin signaling in podocytes is critical for normal kidney function. Insulin signaling is regulated by oxidative stress and intracellular energy levels. We cultured rat podocytes to investigate the effects of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) on the phosphorylation of proximal and distal elements of insulin signaling. We also investigated H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced intracellular changes in the distribution of protein kinase B (Akt). Western blots showed that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (100 {mu}M) induced rapid, transient phosphorylation of the insulin receptor (IR), the IR substrate-1 (IRS1), and Akt with peak activities at 5 min ({Delta} 183%, P < 0.05), 3 min ({Delta} 414%, P < 0.05), and 10 min ({Delta} 35%, P < 0.05), respectively. Immunostaining cells with an Akt-specific antibody showed increased intensity at the plasma membrane after treatment with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}>. Furthermore, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} inhibited phosphorylation of the phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN; peak activity at 10 min; {Delta} -32%, P < 0.05) and stimulated phosphorylation of the AMP-dependent kinase alpha subunit (AMPK{alpha}; 78% at 3 min and 244% at 10 min). The stimulation of AMPK was abolished with an AMPK inhibitor, Compound C (100 {mu}M, 2 h). Moreover, Compound C significantly reduced the effect of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on IR phosphorylation by about 40% (from 2.07 {+-} 0.28 to 1.28 {+-} 0.12, P < 0.05). In addition, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} increased glucose uptake in podocytes

  8. Herbivore-specific, density-dependent induction of plant volatiles: honest or "cry wolf" signals?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Shiojiri

    Full Text Available Plants release volatile chemicals upon attack by herbivorous arthropods. They do so commonly in a dose-dependent manner: the more herbivores, the more volatiles released. The volatiles attract predatory arthropods and the amount determines the probability of predator response. We show that seedlings of a cabbage variety (Brassica oleracea var. capitata, cv Shikidori also show such a response to the density of cabbage white (Pieris rapae larvae and attract more (naive parasitoids (Cotesia glomerata when there are more herbivores on the plant. However, when attacked by diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella larvae, seedlings of the same variety (cv Shikidori release volatiles, the total amount of which is high and constant and thus independent of caterpillar density, and naive parasitoids (Cotesia vestalis of diamondback moth larvae fail to discriminate herbivore-rich from herbivore-poor plants. In contrast, seedlings of another cabbage variety of B. oleracea (var. acephala: kale respond in a dose-dependent manner to the density of diamondback moth larvae and attract more parasitoids when there are more herbivores. Assuming these responses of the cabbage cultivars reflect behaviour of at least some genotypes of wild plants, we provide arguments why the behaviour of kale (B. oleracea var acephala is best interpreted as an honest signaling strategy and that of cabbage cv Shikidori (B. oleracea var capitata as a "cry wolf" signaling strategy, implying a conflict of interest between the plant and the enemies of its herbivores: the plant profits from being visited by the herbivore's enemies, but the latter would be better off by visiting other plants with more herbivores. If so, evolutionary theory on alarm signaling predicts consequences of major interest to students of plant protection, tritrophic systems and communication alike.

  9. The plant natriuretic peptide receptor is a guanylyl cyclase and enables cGMP-dependent signaling

    KAUST Repository

    Turek, Ilona

    2016-03-05

    The functional homologues of vertebrate natriuretic peptides (NPs), the plant natriuretic peptides (PNPs), are a novel class of peptidic hormones that signal via guanosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) and systemically affect plant salt and water balance and responses to biotrophic plant pathogens. Although there is increasing understanding of the complex roles of PNPs in plant responses at the systems level, little is known about the underlying signaling mechanisms. Here we report isolation and identification of a novel Leucine-Rich Repeat (LRR) protein that directly interacts with A. thaliana PNP, AtPNP-A. In vitro binding studies revealed that the Arabidopsis AtPNP-A binds specifically to the LRR protein, termed AtPNP-R1, and the active region of AtPNP-A is sufficient for the interaction to occur. Importantly, the cytosolic part of the AtPNP-R1, much like in some vertebrate NP receptors, harbors a catalytic center diagnostic for guanylyl cyclases and the recombinant AtPNP-R1 is capable of catalyzing the conversion of guanosine triphosphate to cGMP. In addition, we show that AtPNP-A causes rapid increases of cGMP levels in wild type (WT) leaf tissue while this response is significantly reduced in the atpnp-r1 mutants. AtPNP-A also causes cGMP-dependent net water uptake into WT protoplasts, and hence volume increases, whereas responses of the protoplasts from the receptor mutant are impaired. Taken together, our results suggest that the identified LRR protein is an AtPNP-A receptor essential for the PNP-dependent regulation of ion and water homeostasis in plants and that PNP- and vertebrate NP-receptors and their signaling mechanisms share surprising similarities. © 2016 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht

  10. Signal peptide-dependent inhibition of MHC class I heavy chain translation by rhesus cytomegalovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Colin J; Früh, Klaus

    2008-10-03

    The US2-11 region of human and rhesus cytomegalovirus encodes a conserved family of glycoproteins that inhibit MHC-I assembly with viral peptides, thus preventing cytotoxic T cell recognition. Since HCMV lacking US2-11 is no longer able to block assembly and transport of MHC-I, we examined whether this is also observed for RhCMV lacking the corresponding region. Unexpectedly, recombinant RhCMV lacking US2-11 was still able to inhibit MHC-I expression in infected fibroblasts, suggesting the presence of an additional MHC-I evasion mechanism. Progressive deletion analysis of RhCMV-specific genomic regions revealed that MHC-I expression is fully restored upon additional deletion of rh178. The protein encoded by this RhCMV-specific open reading frame is anchored in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. In the presence of rh178, RhCMV prevented MHC-I heavy chain (HC) expression, but did not inhibit mRNA transcription or association of HC mRNA with translating ribosomes. Proteasome inhibitors stabilized a HC degradation intermediate in the absence of rh178, but not in its presence, suggesting that rh178 prevents completion of HC translation. This interference was signal sequence-dependent since replacing the signal peptide with that of CD4 or murine HC rendered human HCs resistant to rh178. We have identified an inhibitor of antigen presentation encoded by rhesus cytomegalovirus unique in both its lack of homology to any other known protein and in its mechanism of action. By preventing signal sequence-dependent HC translocation, rh178 acts prior to US2, US3 and US11 which attack MHC-I proteins after protein synthesis is completed. Rh178 is the first viral protein known to interfere at this step of the MHC-I pathway, thus taking advantage of the conserved nature of HC leader peptides, and represents a new mechanism of translational interference.

  11. Genetic Ablation of PDGF-Dependent Signaling Pathways Abolishes Vascular Remodeling and Experimental Pulmonary Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Freyhaus, Henrik; Berghausen, Eva M; Janssen, Wiebke; Leuchs, Maike; Zierden, Mario; Murmann, Kirsten; Klinke, Anna; Vantler, Marius; Caglayan, Evren; Kramer, Tilmann; Baldus, Stephan; Schermuly, Ralph T; Tallquist, Michelle D; Rosenkranz, Stephan

    2015-05-01

    Despite modern therapies, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) harbors a high mortality. Vascular remodeling is a hallmark of the disease. Recent clinical studies revealed that antiremodeling approaches with tyrosine-kinase inhibitors such as imatinib are effective, but its applicability is limited by significant side effects. Although imatinib has multiple targets, expression analyses support a role for platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) in the pathobiology of the disease. However, its precise role and downstream signaling events have not been established. Patients with PAH exhibit enhanced expression and phosphorylation of β PDGF receptor (βPDGFR) in remodeled pulmonary arterioles, particularly at the binding sites for phophatidyl-inositol-3-kinase and PLCγ at tyrosine residues 751 and 1021, respectively. These signaling molecules were identified as critical downstream mediators of βPDGFR-mediated proliferation and migration of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells. We, therefore, investigated mice expressing a mutated βPDGFR that is unable to recruit phophatidyl-inositol-3-kinase and PLCγ (βPDGFR(F3/F3)). PDGF-dependent Erk1/2 and Akt phosphorylation, cyclin D1 induction, and proliferation, migration, and protection against apoptosis were abolished in βPDGFR(F3/F3) pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells. On exposure to chronic hypoxia, vascular remodeling of pulmonary arteries was blunted in βPDGFR(F3/F3) mice compared with wild-type littermates. These alterations led to protection from hypoxia-induced PAH and right ventricular hypertrophy. By means of a genetic approach, our data provide definite evidence that the activated βPDGFR is a key contributor to pulmonary vascular remodeling and PAH. Selective disruption of PDGF-dependent phophatidyl-inositol-3-kinase and PLCγ activity is sufficient to abolish these pathogenic responses in vivo, identifying these signaling events as valuable targets for antiremodeling strategies in PAH. © 2015 American

  12. TGF-β1/SMAD SIGNALING PATHWAY MEDIATES p53-DEPENDENT APOPTOSIS IN HEPATOMA CELL LINES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective To determine whether transforming growth factor betal ( TGF-β1 )/Smad signaling pathway mediates p53-dependent apoptosis in hepatoma cell lines. Methods Three human hepatic carcinoma cell lines, HepG2, Huh-7, and Hep3B, were used in this study. TGF-β31-induced apoptosis in hepatic carcinoma cell lines was analyzed using TUNEL assay. For identifying the mechanism of apoptosis induced by TGF-β1, cell lines were transfected with a TGF-β1-inducible luciferase reportor plasmid containing Smad4 binding elements. After transfection, cells were treated with TGF-β1, then assayed for luciferase activity. Results The apoptosis rate of HepG2 cell lines (48.51% ± 8.21% ) was significantly higher than control (12. 72% ±2. 18%, P <0. 05 ). But TGF-β1 was not able to induce apoptosis of Huh-7 and Hep3B cell lines. The relative luciferase activity of TGF-β1-treated HepG2 cell lines (4. 38) was significantly higher than control (1.00, P <0. 05). But the relative luciferase activity of TGF-β1-treated Huh-7 and Hep3B cell lines less increased compared with control. Conclusions HepG2 cells seem to be highly susceptible to TGF-β1-induced apoptosis compared with Hep3B and Huh-7 cell lines. Smad4 is a central mediator of TGF-β1 signaling transdution pathway. TGF-β1/Smad signaling pathway might mediate p53-dependent apoptosis in hepatoma cell lines.

  13. Resting bold fMRI differentiates dementia with Lewy bodies vs Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, J.L.; Yan, Z.; Morris, J.C.; Sheline, Y.I.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Clinicopathologic phenotypes of dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and Alzheimer disease (AD) often overlap, making discrimination difficult. We performed resting state blood oxygen level–dependent (BOLD) functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI) to determine whether there were differences between AD and DLB. Methods: Participants (n = 88) enrolled in a longitudinal study of memory and aging underwent 3-T fcMRI. Clinical diagnoses of probable DLB (n = 15) were made according to published criteria. Cognitively normal control participants (n = 38) were selected for the absence of cerebral amyloid burden as imaged with Pittsburgh compound B (PiB). Probable AD cases (n = 35) met published criteria and had appreciable amyloid deposits with PiB imaging. Functional images were collected using a gradient spin-echo sequence sensitive to BOLD contrast (T2* weighting). Correlation maps selected a seed region in the combined bilateral precuneus. Results: Participants with DLB had a functional connectivity pattern for the precuneus seed region that was distinct from AD; both the DLB and AD groups had functional connectivity patterns that differed from the cognitively normal group. In the DLB group, we found increased connectivity between the precuneus and regions in the dorsal attention network and the putamen. In contrast, we found decreased connectivity between the precuneus and other task-negative default regions and visual cortices. There was also a reversal of connectivity in the right hippocampus. Conclusions: Changes in functional connectivity in DLB indicate patterns of activation that are distinct from those seen in AD and may improve discrimination of DLB from AD and cognitively normal individuals. Since patterns of connectivity differ between AD and DLB groups, measurements of BOLD functional connectivity can shed further light on neuroanatomic connections that distinguish DLB from AD. PMID:21525427

  14. Dictionary-Driven Ischemia Detection From Cardiac Phase-Resolved Myocardial BOLD MRI at Rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevilacqua, Marco; Dharmakumar, Rohan; Tsaftaris, Sotirios A

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac Phase-resolved Blood-Oxygen-Level Dependent (CP-BOLD) MRI provides a unique opportunity to image an ongoing ischemia at rest. However, it requires post-processing to evaluate the extent of ischemia. To address this, here we propose an unsupervised ischemia detection (UID) method which relies on the inherent spatio-temporal correlation between oxygenation and wall motion to formalize a joint learning and detection problem based on dictionary decomposition. Considering input data of a single subject, it treats ischemia as an anomaly and iteratively learns dictionaries to represent only normal observations (corresponding to myocardial territories remote to ischemia). Anomaly detection is based on a modified version of One-class Support Vector Machines (OCSVM) to regulate directly the margins by incorporating the dictionary-based representation errors. A measure of ischemic extent (IE) is estimated, reflecting the relative portion of the myocardium affected by ischemia. For visualization purposes an ischemia likelihood map is created by estimating posterior probabilities from the OCSVM outputs, thus obtaining how likely the classification is correct. UID is evaluated on synthetic data and in a 2D CP-BOLD data set from a canine experimental model emulating acute coronary syndromes. Comparing early ischemic territories identified with UID against infarct territories (after several hours of ischemia), we find that IE, as measured by UID, is highly correlated (Pearson's r=0.84) with respect to infarct size. When advances in automated registration and segmentation of CP-BOLD images and full coverage 3D acquisitions become available, we hope that this method can enable pixel-level assessment of ischemia with this truly non-invasive imaging technique.

  15. Dopaminergic drug effects during reversal learning depend on anatomical connections between the orbitofrontal cortex and the amygdala.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke E. van der Schaaf

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine in the striatum is known to be important for reversal learning. However, the striatum does not act in isolation and reversal learning is also well accepted to depend on the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC and the amygdala. Here we assessed whether dopaminergic drug effects on human striatal BOLD signalling during reversal learning is associated with anatomical connectivity in an orbitofrontal-limbic-striatal network, as measured with diffusion tensor imaging. By using a fibre-based approach, we demonstrate that dopaminergic drug effects on striatal BOLD signal varied as a function of fractional anisotropy (FA in a pathway connecting the OFC with the amygdala. Moreover, our experimental design allowed us to establish that these white-matter dependent drug effects were mediated via D2 receptors. Thus, white matter dependent effects of the D2 receptor agonist bromocriptine on striatal BOLD signal were abolished by co-administration with the D2 receptor antagonist sulpiride. These data provide fundamental insight into the mechanism of action of dopaminergic drug effects during reversal learning. In addition, they may have important clinical implications by suggesting that white matter integrity can help predict dopaminergic drug effects on brain function, ultimately contributing to individual tailoring of dopaminergic drug treatment strategies in psychiatry.

  16. Breast Cancer Migration and Invasion Depend on Proteasome Degradation of Regulator of G-Protein Signaling 4

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Yan; Wolff, Dennis W.; Wei, Taotao; Wang, Bo; Deng, Caishu; Kirui, Joseph K.; Jiang, Haihong; Qin, Jianbing; Abel, Peter W.; Tu, Yaping

    2009-01-01

    Aberrant signaling through G-protein coupled receptors promotes metastasis, the major cause of breast cancer death. We identified regulator of G-protein signaling 4 (RGS4) as a novel suppressor of breast cancer migration and invasion, important steps of metastatic cascades. By blocking signals initiated through Gi-coupled receptors, such as protease-activated receptor 1 and CXC chemokine receptor 4, RGS4 disrupted Rac1-dependent lamellipodia formation, a key step involved in cancer migration ...

  17. Sex differences in a shoaling-boldness behavioral syndrome, but no link with aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Way, Gregory P; Kiesel, Alexis L; Ruhl, Nathan; Snekser, Jennifer L; McRobert, Scott P

    2015-04-01

    A behavioral syndrome is observed in a population when specific behaviors overlap at the individual level in different contexts. Here, we explore boldness and aggression personality spectra, the repeatability of shoaling, and possible associated correlations between the behaviors in a population of lab-reared zebrafish (Danio rerio). Our findings describe a sex-specific boldness-shoaling behavioral syndrome, as a link between boldness and shoaling behaviors is detected. The results indicate that bold males are likely to have a stronger shoaling propensity than shy males for unfamiliar conspecifics. Conversely, bold females are more likely to shoal than shy females, but only when presented with heterospecific individuals. Additionally, aggression does not correlate with boldness or shoaling propensity for either sex. A positive relationship between boldness and shoaling that differs by sex is contrary to most of the present literature, but could help to explain population dynamics and may also have evolutionary implications.

  18. Signals for transversity and transverse-momentum-dependent quark distribution functions studied at the HERMES experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diefenthaler, Markus

    2010-08-15

    Intention of the present thesis was the study of transverse-momentum dependent quark distribution functions. In the focus stood the Fourier analysis of azimutal single-spin asymmetries of pions and charged kaons performed within the HERMES experiment. These asymmetries were reconstructed from deep-inelastic scattering events on a transversely polarized proton target and decomposed in Fourier components. In the framework of quantum chromodynamics such components can be interpreted as folding of quark distribution and fragmentation functions. By the analysis of the transverse-momentum dependent quark distribution functions the study of spin-orbit correlations in the internal of the nucleon was made possible. By this conclusions on the orbital angular momentum of the quarks can be drawn. The extracted Fourier components extend the hitherto available informations on the transverse-momentum dependent quark distribution functions remarkably. The presented Fourier analysis made not only a detection of the Collins and Sivers effects possible, but beyond the extraction of the signals of the pretzelosity and worm-gear distributions. The so obtained results will conclusively contribute to the understanding of future measurements in this field and furthermore make possible a test of fundamental predictions of quantum chromodynamics.

  19. Resting-state BOLD networks versus task-associated functional MRI for distinguishing Alzheimer's disease risk groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleisher, Adam S; Sherzai, Ayesha; Taylor, Curtis; Langbaum, Jessica B S; Chen, Kewei; Buxton, Richard B

    2009-10-01

    To assess the ability of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging to distinguish known risk factors for AD, we evaluated 17 cognitively normal individuals with a family history of AD and at least one copy of the apolipoprotein e4 allele compared to 12 individuals who were not carriers of the APOE4 gene and did not have a family history of AD. Blood oxygen level dependent fMRI was performed evaluating encoding-associated signal and resting-state default mode network signal differences between the two risk groups. Neurocognitive testing revealed that the high risk group performed worse on category fluency testing, but the groups were equivalent on all other cognitive measures. During encoding of novel face-name pairs, there were no regions of encoding-associated BOLD activations that were different in the high risk group. Encoding-associated deactivations were greater in magnitude in the low risk group in the medial and right lateral parietal cortex, similar to findings in AD studies. The resting-state DMN analysis demonstrated nine regions in the prefrontal, orbital frontal, temporal and parietal lobes that distinguished the two risk groups. Resting-state DMN analysis could distinguish risk groups with an effect size of 3.35, compared to an effect size of 1.39 using encoding-associated fMRI techniques. Imaging of the resting state avoids performance related variability seen in activation fMRI, is less complicated to acquire and standardize, does not require radio-isotopes, and may be more effective at identifying functional pathology associated with AD risk compared to non-resting fMRI techniques.

  20. Targeting of Pollen Tubes to Ovules Is Dependent on Nitric Oxide (NO) Signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ana Margarida Prado; Renato Cola(c)o; Nuno Moreno; Ana Catarina Silva; José A.Feijó

    2008-01-01

    The guidance signals that drive pollen tube navigation inside the pistil and micropyle targeting are still, to a great extent,unknown.Previous studies in vitro showed that nitric oxide (NO) works as a negative chemotropic cue for pollen tube growth in lily(Lilium longiflorum).Furthermore, Arabidopsis thaliana Atnos1 mutant plants,which show defective NO production,have reduced fertility.Here, we focus in the role of NO in the process of pollen-pistil communication, using Arabidopsis in-vivo and lily semi-vivo assays.Cross-pollination between wild-type and Atnos1 plants shows that the mutation affects the pistil tissues in a way that is compatible with abnormal pollen tube guidance.Moreover,DAF-2DA staining for NO in kanadi floral mutants showed the presence of NO in an asymmetric restricted area around the micropyle.The pollen-pistil interaction transcriptome indicates a time-course-specific modulation of transcripts of AtNOS1 and two Nitrate Reductases(nr1 and nr2),which collectively are thought to trigger a putative NO signaling pathway.Semivivo assays with isolated ovules and lily pollen further showed that NO is necessary for micropyle targeting to occur.This evidence is supported by CPTIO treatment with subsequent formation of balloon tips in pollen tubes facing ovules.Activation of calcium influx in pollen tubes partially rescued normal pollen tube morphology,suggesting that this pathway is also dependent on Ca2+ signaling.A role of NO in modulating Ca2+ signaling was further substantiated by direct imaging the cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration during NO-induced re-orientation,where two peaks of Ca2+ occur-one during the slowdown/stop response,the second during re-orientation and growth resumption.Taken together,these results provide evidence for the participation of NO signaling events during pollen-pistil interaction.Of special relevance,NO seems to directly affect the targeting of pollen tubes to the ovule's micropyle by modulating the action of its

  1. A study on asymmetry of spatial visual field by analysis of the fMRI BOLD response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huafu; Yao, Dezhong; Liu, Zuxiang

    2004-01-01

    The asymmetry of the left-right and upper-lower visual field is analyzed in this paper by a model approach based on the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) response. The model consists of the convolution between a Gaussian function and the perfusion function of neural response to stimulus. The model parameters are estimated by a nonlinear optimal algorithm, and te asymmetry of the left-right and upper-lower visual field is investigated by the differences of the model parameters. The results from eight subjects show that reaction time is significant shorter and the response is significant stronger when the lower field is stimulated than that when the upper field is stimulated. For the left and right fields, the response is different. These results provide the fMRI BOLD response evidence of the asymmetry of spatial visual fields.

  2. Neutrophils alter the inflammatory milieu by signal-dependent translation of constitutive messenger RNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindemann, Stephan W.; Yost, Christian C.; Denis, Melvin M.; McIntyre, Thomas M.; Weyrich, Andrew S.; Zimmerman, Guy A.

    2004-05-01

    The mechanisms by which neutrophils, key effector cells of the innate immune system, express new gene products in inflammation are largely uncharacterized. We found that they rapidly translate constitutive mRNAs when activated, a previously unrecognized response. One of the proteins synthesized without a requirement for transcription is the soluble IL-6 receptor , which translocates to endothelial cells and induces a temporal switch to mononuclear leukocyte recruitment. Its synthesis is regulated by a specialized translational control pathway that is inhibited by rapamycin, a bacterial macrolide with therapeutic efficacy in transplantation, inflammatory syndromes, and neoplasia. Signal-dependent translation in activated neutrophils may be a critical mechanism for alteration of the inflammatory milieu and a therapeutic target.

  3. Escaping the nuclear confines: signal-dependent pre-mRNA splicing in anucleate platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, Melvin M; Tolley, Neal D; Bunting, Michaeline; Schwertz, Hansjörg; Jiang, Huimiao; Lindemann, Stephan; Yost, Christian C; Rubner, Frederick J; Albertine, Kurt H; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Fratto, Carolyn M; Tolley, Emilysa; Kraiss, Larry W; McIntyre, Thomas M; Zimmerman, Guy A; Weyrich, Andrew S

    2005-08-12

    Platelets are specialized hemostatic cells that circulate in the blood as anucleate cytoplasts. We report that platelets unexpectedly possess a functional spliceosome, a complex that processes pre-mRNAs in the nuclei of other cell types. Spliceosome components are present in the cytoplasm of human megakaryocytes and in proplatelets that extend from megakaryocytes. Primary human platelets also contain essential spliceosome factors including small nuclear RNAs, splicing proteins, and endogenous pre-mRNAs. In response to integrin engagement and surface receptor activation, platelets precisely excise introns from interleukin-1beta pre-mRNA, yielding a mature message that is translated into protein. Signal-dependent splicing is a novel function of platelets that demonstrates remarkable specialization in the regulatory repertoire of this anucleate cell. While this mechanism may be unique to platelets, it also suggests previously unrecognized diversity regarding the functional roles of the spliceosome in eukaryotic cells.

  4. A generalized description of the time dependent signals in extensive air shower detectors and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ave, M.; Roth, M.; Schulz, A.

    2017-02-01

    The expected signal in extensive air shower (EAS) detectors can be predicted with a 10% accuracy by a parameterization that depends on a set of global shower parameters: the energy, the depth of the electromagnetic shower maximum (Xmax) and the overall muon content. By classifying shower particles in four components (muonic, purely electromagnetic, electromagnetic stemming from muon interactions and decay and electromagnetic-from-low-energy hadrons), shower-to-shower fluctuations are minimized. We follow this scheme to propose a model to describe the arrival time distributions of secondary particles as measured with surface detectors in an EAS experiment. This model is then used to reconstruct Xmax in Monte Carlo data sets. As an example, we show that for the case of the Pierre Auger Observatory Xmax can be reconstructed with an accuracy of about 45 g/cm2 at 1019 eV.

  5. Cell viability modulation through changes of Ca(2+)-dependent signalling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójcik-Piotrowicz, Karolina; Kaszuba-Zwoińska, Jolanta; Rokita, Eugeniusz; Thor, Piotr

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the correlations between intracellular calcium ion level and a cell's ability to survive. The intracellular concentration of Ca(2+) ions, maintained through different mechanisms, plays an important role in signalling in cells. The deregulation of these mechanisms by various cell stressors (e.g. cytotoxic agents) can disturb Ca(2+) homeostasis and influence Ca(2+)-dependent signalling pathways in the cell. Perturbations of intracellular electrochemical equilibrium may lead to changes in cell function or even to cell death. According to some experimental results, one of the cell stressors may be exposure to magnetic fields (MF). Because of the wide distribution of MF sources in our environment, magnetic fields have recently been intensively examined in relation to the occurrence of cancer. Nevertheless, two questions still remain unanswered: Is the influence of MF on cells positive or negative, and what mechanism(s) underlie the effects of MF action on cells? Most studies focus on the influence of MF on Ca(2+) ion fluxes as calcium ions play the role of intracellular second messengers, triggering many signalling cascades. Physical models assuming the mechanisms generating the disturbance of ionic transport and/or the dysfunction of ion-protein complexes in cells due to MF action have been widely discussed in the literature, but a detailed explanation of experimental results is still awaited. The dynamics of the concentration of intracellular calcium ions can be detected by various methods, including optical and non-optical techniques. This review combines an insight into basic intracellular Ca(2+) regulative mechanisms and common techniques used to detect changes in Ca(2+) concentration inside the cell. The emphasis here is on the determination of Ca(2+) regulative mechanisms developed in non-excitable cells (e.g. U937 cells, HeLa, etc.), which are probably mainly involved in cell responses to external stress (e.g. MF stimuli).

  6. Aldosterone-induced brain MAPK signaling and sympathetic excitation are angiotensin II type-1 receptor dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Hua; Yu, Yang; Wei, Shun-Guang; Felder, Robert B

    2012-02-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II)-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling upregulates angiotensin II type-1 receptors (AT(1)R) in hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and contributes to AT(1)R-mediated sympathetic excitation in heart failure. Aldosterone has similar effects to increase AT(1)R expression in the PVN and sympathetic drive. The present study was undertaken to determine whether aldosterone also activates the sympathetic nervous system via MAPK signaling and, if so, whether its effect is independent of ANG II and AT(1)R. In anesthetized rats, a 4-h intravenous infusion of aldosterone induced increases (P < 0.05) in phosphorylated (p-) p44/42 MAPK in PVN, PVN neuronal excitation, renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), mean blood pressure (MBP), and heart rate (HR). Intracerebroventricular or bilateral PVN microinjection of the p44/42 MAPK inhibitor PD-98059 reduced the aldosterone-induced RSNA, HR, and MBP responses. Intracerebroventricular pretreatment (5 days earlier) with pooled small interfering RNAs targeting p44/42 MAPK reduced total and p-p44/42 MAPK, aldosterone-induced c-Fos expression in the PVN, and the aldosterone-induced increases in RSNA, HR, and MBP. Intracerebroventricular infusion of either the mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist RU-28318 or the AT(1)R antagonist losartan blocked aldosterone-induced phosphorylation of p44/42 MAPK and prevented the increases in RSNA, HR, and MBP. These data suggest that aldosterone-induced sympathetic excitation depends upon that AT(1)R-induced MAPK signaling in the brain. The short time course of this interaction suggests a nongenomic mechanism, perhaps via an aldosterone-induced transactivation of the AT(1)R as described in peripheral tissues.

  7. Hedgehog Signaling Overcomes an EZH2-Dependent Epigenetic Barrier to Promote Cholangiocyte Expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jie; Almada, Luciana L.; Lomberk, Gwen; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E.; Urrutia, Raul; Huebert, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Developmental morphogens play an important role in coordinating the ductular reaction and portal fibrosis occurring in the setting of cholangiopathies. However, little is known about how membrane signaling events in ductular reactive cells (DRCs) are transduced into nuclear transcriptional changes to drive cholangiocyte maturation and matrix deposition. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate potential mechanistic links between cell signaling events and epigenetic regulators in DRCs. Methods Using directed differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), isolated DRCs, and in vivo models, we examine the mechanisms whereby sonic hedgehog (Shh) overcomes an epigenetic barrier in biliary precursors and promotes both cholangiocyte maturation and deposition of fibronectin (FN). Results We demonstrate, for the first time, that Gli1 influences the differentiation state and fibrogenic capacity of iPSC-derived hepatic progenitors and isolated DRCs. We outline a novel pathway wherein Shh-mediated Gli1 binding in key cholangiocyte gene promoters overcomes an epigenetic barrier conferred by the polycomb protein, enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) and initiates the transcriptional program of cholangiocyte maturation. We also define previously unknown functional Gli1 binding sites in the promoters of cytokeratin (CK)7, CK19, and FN. Our in vivo results show that EZH2 KO mice fed the choline-deficient, ethanolamine supplemented (CDE) diet have an exaggerated cholangiocyte expansion associated with more robust ductular reaction and increased peri-portal fibrosis. Conclusion We conclude that Shh/Gli1 signaling plays an integral role in cholangiocyte maturation in vitro by overcoming an EZH2-dependent epigenetic barrier and this mechanism also promotes biliary expansion in vivo. PMID:27936185

  8. ErbB2-dependent chemotaxis requires microtubule capture and stabilization coordinated by distinct signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khedidja Benseddik

    Full Text Available Activation of the ErbB2 receptor tyrosine kinase stimulates breast cancer cell migration. Cell migration is a complex process that requires the synchronized reorganization of numerous subcellular structures including cell-to-matrix adhesions, the actin cytoskeleton and microtubules. How the multiple signaling pathways triggered by ErbB2 coordinate, in time and space, the various processes involved in cell motility, is poorly defined. We investigated the mechanism whereby ErbB2 controls microtubules and chemotaxis. We report that activation of ErbB2 increased both cell velocity and directed migration. Impairment of the Cdc42 and RhoA GTPases, but not of Rac1, prevented the chemotactic response. RhoA is a key component of the Memo/ACF7 pathway whereby ErbB2 controls microtubule capture at the leading edge. Upon Memo or ACF7 depletion, microtubules failed to reach the leading edge and cells lost their ability to follow the chemotactic gradient. Constitutive ACF7 targeting to the membrane in Memo-depleted cells reestablished directed migration. ErbB2-mediated activation of phospholipase C gamma (PLCγ also contributed to cell guidance. We further showed that PLCγ signaling, via classical protein kinases C, and Memo signaling converged towards a single pathway controlling the microtubule capture complex. Finally, inhibiting the PI3K/Akt pathway did not affect microtubule capture, but disturbed microtubule stability, which also resulted in defective chemotaxis. PI3K/Akt-dependent stabilization of microtubules involved repression of GSK3 activity on the one hand and inhibition of the microtubule destabilizing protein, Stathmin, on the other hand. Thus, ErbB2 triggers distinct and complementary pathways that tightly coordinate microtubule capture and microtubule stability to control chemotaxis.

  9. Phenotype-dependent apoptosis signalling in mesothelioma cells after selenite exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rundlöf Anna-Klara

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Selenite is a promising anticancer agent which has been shown to induce apoptosis in malignant mesothelioma cells in a phenotype-dependent manner, where cells of the chemoresistant sarcomatoid phenotype are more sensitive. Methods In this paper, we investigate the apoptosis signalling mechanisms in sarcomatoid and epithelioid mesothelioma cells after selenite treatment. Apoptosis was measured with the Annexin-PI assay. The mitochondrial membrane potential, the expression of Bax, Bcl-XL, and the activation of caspase-3 were assayed with flow cytometry and a cytokeratin 18 cleavage assay. Signalling through JNK, p38, p53, and cathepsins B, D, and E was investigated with chemical inhibitors. Furthermore, the expression, nuclear translocation and DNA-binding activity of p53 was investigated using ICC, EMSA and the monitoring of p21 expression as a downstream event. Levels of thioredoxin (Trx were measured by ELISA. Results In both cell lines, 10 μM selenite caused apoptosis and a marked loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. Bax was up-regulated only in the sarcomatoid cell line, while the epithelioid cell line down-regulated Bcl-XL and showed greater caspase-3 activation. Nuclear translocation of p53 was seen in both cell lines, but very little p21 expression was induced. Chemical inhibition of p53 did not protect the cells from apoptosis. p53 lost its DNA binding ability after selenite treatment and was enriched in an inactive form. Levels of thioredoxin decreased after selenite treatment. Chemical inhibition of MAP kinases and cathepsins showed that p38 and cathepsin B had some mediatory effect while JNK had an anti-apoptotic role. Conclusion We delineate pathways of apoptosis signalling in response to selenite, showing differences between epithelioid and sarcomatoid mesothelioma cells. These differences may partly explain why sarcomatoid cells are more sensitive to selenite.

  10. Assessment of peritrochanteric high T2 signal depending on the age and gender of the patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haliloglu, Nuray, E-mail: nurayunsal2@hotmail.co [Ankara University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Inceoglu, Deniz; Sahin, Gulden [Ankara University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Turkey)

    2010-07-15

    Introduction: The aim of this study is to evaluate the incidence of peritrochanteric high T2 signal (peritrochanteric edema, peritendinitis) on routine MR imaging studies and to determine whether reporting peritrochanteric edema is always clinically relevant depending on the age and gender of the patients. Materials and methods: We evaluated 79 consecutive bilateral hip MR images performed in our department between January 2006 and December 2006 (57 female, 22 male patients, mean age 49 years). Each study was evaluated for areas of T2 hyperintensity representing edema around the greater trochanter. Patients with a known fracture, tumor, history of radiation therapy, history of hip surgery and prothesis were excluded from the study. Patients with signal intensity alterations within the thickened gluteus medius/minimus tendons (tendinitis) or peritrochanteric bursal fluid accumulation (bursitis) were also excluded. All patients were scanned with our routine MR imaging protocol for hip imaging. Results: In 55 of the 79 patients (70%) peritrochanteric edema was detected on MR images and 52 of these 55 patients (95%) had these changes on both hips. The median age was 56 years for the patients with peritrochanteric edema and 35.5 years for the patients without peritrochanteric edema. There was statistical significance between the median ages of the patients and a significant increased risk of peritrochanteric edema was found over 40 years of age. There was no significant difference between male and female patients. Conclusion: Bilateral peritrochanteric high T2 signal may be a part of the degeneration process and we suggest that it may not be necessarily reported if the clinical findings do not support greater trochanteric pain syndrome.

  11. Androgens regulate Hedgehog signalling and proliferation in androgen-dependent prostate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirab, Nanor; Terry, Stéphane; Giton, Frank; Caradec, Josselin; Chimingqi, Mihelaiti; Moutereau, Stéphane; Vacherot, Francis; de la Taille, Alexandre; Kouyoumdjian, Jean-Claude; Loric, Sylvain

    2012-09-15

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is androgen sensitive in its development and progression to metastatic disease. Hedgehog (Hh) pathway activation is important in the initiation and growth of various carcinomas including PCa. We and others have observed aberrations of Hh pathway during the progression of PCa to the castration-resistant state. The involvement of androgen signalling in Hh pathway activation, however, remains largely elusive. Here we investigate the direct role of androgen signalling on Hh pathway. We examined the effect of Dihydrosterone (DHT), antiandrogen, bicalutamide, and Hh pathway inhibitor, KAAD-cyclopamine in four human prostate cell lines (two cancerous: LNCaP, VCaP, and two normal: PNT2 and PNT2-ARm which harbours a mutant version of androgen receptor (AR) that is commonly found in LNCaP). Cell proliferation as well as Hh pathway members (SHH, IHH, DHH, GLI, PTCH) mRNA expression levels were assessed. We showed that KAAD-cyclopamine decreased cell proliferation of DHT-stimulated LNCaP, VCaP and PNT2-ARm cells. SHH expression was found to be downregulated by DHT in all AR posititve cells. The negative effect of DHT on SHH expression was counteracted when cells were treated by bicalutamide. Importantly, KAAD-cyclopamine treatment seemed to inhibit AR activity. Moreover, bicalutamide as well as KAAD-cyclopamine treatments induced GLI and PTCH expression in VCaP and PNT2-ARm. Our results suggest that Hh pathway activity can be regulated by androgen signalling. Specifically, we show that the DHT-induced inhibition of Hh pathway is AR dependent. The mutual interaction between these two pathways might be important in the regulation of cell proliferation in PCa.

  12. Cyclic di-GMP-dependent signaling pathways in the pathogenic Firmicute Listeria monocytogenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Hong Chen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We characterized key components and major targets of the c-di-GMP signaling pathways in the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes, identified a new c-di-GMP-inducible exopolysaccharide responsible for motility inhibition, cell aggregation, and enhanced tolerance to disinfectants and desiccation, and provided first insights into the role of c-di-GMP signaling in listerial virulence. Genome-wide genetic and biochemical analyses of c-di-GMP signaling pathways revealed that L. monocytogenes has three GGDEF domain proteins, DgcA (Lmo1911, DgcB (Lmo1912 and DgcC (Lmo2174, that possess diguanylate cyclase activity, and three EAL domain proteins, PdeB (Lmo0131, PdeC (Lmo1914 and PdeD (Lmo0111, that possess c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase activity. Deletion of all phosphodiesterase genes (ΔpdeB/C/D or expression of a heterologous diguanylate cyclase stimulated production of a previously unknown exopolysaccharide. The synthesis of this exopolysaccharide was attributed to the pssA-E (lmo0527-0531 gene cluster. The last gene of the cluster encodes the fourth listerial GGDEF domain protein, PssE, that functions as an I-site c-di-GMP receptor essential for exopolysaccharide synthesis. The c-di-GMP-inducible exopolysaccharide causes cell aggregation in minimal medium and impairs bacterial migration in semi-solid agar, however, it does not promote biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces. The exopolysaccharide also greatly enhances bacterial tolerance to commonly used disinfectants as well as desiccation, which may contribute to survival of L. monocytogenes on contaminated food products and in food-processing facilities. The exopolysaccharide and another, as yet unknown c-di-GMP-dependent target, drastically decrease listerial invasiveness in enterocytes in vitro, and lower pathogen load in the liver and gallbladder of mice infected via an oral route, which suggests that elevated c-di-GMP levels play an overall negative role in listerial virulence.

  13. Cyclic di-GMP-dependent signaling pathways in the pathogenic Firmicute Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Hong; Köseoğlu, Volkan K; Güvener, Zehra T; Myers-Morales, Tanya; Reed, Joseph M; D'Orazio, Sarah E F; Miller, Kurt W; Gomelsky, Mark

    2014-08-01

    We characterized key components and major targets of the c-di-GMP signaling pathways in the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes, identified a new c-di-GMP-inducible exopolysaccharide responsible for motility inhibition, cell aggregation, and enhanced tolerance to disinfectants and desiccation, and provided first insights into the role of c-di-GMP signaling in listerial virulence. Genome-wide genetic and biochemical analyses of c-di-GMP signaling pathways revealed that L. monocytogenes has three GGDEF domain proteins, DgcA (Lmo1911), DgcB (Lmo1912) and DgcC (Lmo2174), that possess diguanylate cyclase activity, and three EAL domain proteins, PdeB (Lmo0131), PdeC (Lmo1914) and PdeD (Lmo0111), that possess c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase activity. Deletion of all phosphodiesterase genes (ΔpdeB/C/D) or expression of a heterologous diguanylate cyclase stimulated production of a previously unknown exopolysaccharide. The synthesis of this exopolysaccharide was attributed to the pssA-E (lmo0527-0531) gene cluster. The last gene of the cluster encodes the fourth listerial GGDEF domain protein, PssE, that functions as an I-site c-di-GMP receptor essential for exopolysaccharide synthesis. The c-di-GMP-inducible exopolysaccharide causes cell aggregation in minimal medium and impairs bacterial migration in semi-solid agar, however, it does not promote biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces. The exopolysaccharide also greatly enhances bacterial tolerance to commonly used disinfectants as well as desiccation, which may contribute to survival of L. monocytogenes on contaminated food products and in food-processing facilities. The exopolysaccharide and another, as yet unknown c-di-GMP-dependent target, drastically decrease listerial invasiveness in enterocytes in vitro, and lower pathogen load in the liver and gallbladder of mice infected via an oral route, which suggests that elevated c-di-GMP levels play an overall negative role in listerial virulence.

  14. Age dependence of spleen- and muscle-corrected hepatic signal enhancement on hepatobiliary phase gadoxetate MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matoori, Simon [Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg, Department of Radiology, Salzburg (Austria); Hirslanden Clinic St. Anna, Clinical Research Group, Lucerne (Switzerland); Froehlich, Johannes M. [Hirslanden Clinic St. Anna, Clinical Research Group, Lucerne (Switzerland); ETH Zurich, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zurich (Switzerland); Cantonal Hospital Winterthur, Department of Radiology, Winterthur (Switzerland); Breitenstein, Stefan [Cantonal Hospital Winterthur, Department of Surgery, Clinic for Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, Winterthur (Switzerland); Doert, Aleksis [Cantonal Hospital Winterthur, Department of Radiology, Winterthur (Switzerland); Pozdniakova, Viktoria [Stavanger University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Stavanger (Norway); Koh, Dow-Mu [Royal Marsden Hospital, Department of Radiology, Surrey, England (United Kingdom); Gutzeit, Andreas [Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg, Department of Radiology, Salzburg (Austria); Hirslanden Clinic St. Anna, Clinical Research Group, Lucerne (Switzerland); Cantonal Hospital Winterthur, Department of Radiology, Winterthur (Switzerland)

    2016-06-15

    To identify correlations of signal enhancements (SE) and SE normalized to reference tissues of the spleen, kidney, liver, musculus erector spinae (MES) and ductus hepatocholedochus (DHC) on hepatobiliary phase gadoxetate-enhanced MRI with patient age in non-cirrhotic patients. A heterogeneous cohort of 131 patients with different clinical backgrounds underwent a standardized 3.0-T gadoxetate-enhanced liver MRI between November 2008 and June 2013. After exclusion of cirrhotic patients, a cohort of 75 patients with no diagnosed diffuse liver disease was selected. The ratio of signal intensity 20 min post- to pre-contrast administration (SE) in the spleen, kidney, liver, MES and DHC, and the SE of the kidney, liver and DHC normalized to the reference tissues spleen or MES were compared to patient age. Patient age was inversely correlated with the liver SE normalized to the spleen and MES SE (both p < 0.001) and proportionally with the SE of the spleen (p = 0.043), the MES (p = 0.030) and the kidney (p = 0.022). No significant correlations were observed for the DHC (p = 0.347) and liver SE (p = 0.606). The age dependence of hepatic SE normalized to the enhancement in the spleen and MES calls for a cautious interpretation of these quantification methods. (orig.)

  15. Ohgata, the Single Drosophila Ortholog of Human Cereblon, Regulates Insulin Signaling-dependent Organismic Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Satoru; Sawamura, Naoya; Voelzmann, André; Broemer, Meike; Asahi, Toru; Hoch, Michael

    2016-11-25

    Cereblon (CRBN) is a substrate receptor of the E3 ubiquitin ligase complex that is highly conserved in animals and plants. CRBN proteins have been implicated in various biological processes such as development, metabolism, learning, and memory formation, and their impairment has been linked to autosomal recessive non-syndromic intellectual disability and cancer. Furthermore, human CRBN was identified as the primary target of thalidomide teratogenicity. Data on functional analysis of CRBN family members in vivo, however, are still scarce. Here we identify Ohgata (OHGT), the Drosophila ortholog of CRBN, as a regulator of insulin signaling-mediated growth. Using ohgt mutants that we generated by targeted mutagenesis, we show that its loss results in increased body weight and organ size without changes of the body proportions. We demonstrate that ohgt knockdown in the fat body, an organ analogous to mammalian liver and adipose tissue, phenocopies the growth phenotypes. We further show that overgrowth is due to an elevation of insulin signaling in ohgt mutants and to the down-regulation of inhibitory cofactors of circulating Drosophila insulin-like peptides (DILPs), named acid-labile subunit and imaginal morphogenesis protein-late 2. The two inhibitory proteins were previously shown to be components of a heterotrimeric complex with growth-promoting DILP2 and DILP5. Our study reveals OHGT as a novel regulator of insulin-dependent organismic growth in Drosophila.

  16. Mitochondrial and chloroplastic targeting signals of NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinnon, David J; Brzezowski, Pawel; Wilson, Kenneth E; Gray, Gordon R

    2009-12-01

    Many mitochondrial and chloroplast proteins are encoded in the nucleus and subsequently imported into the organelles via active protein transport systems. While usually highly specific, some proteins are dual-targeted to both organelles. In tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.), the cDNA encoding the mitochondrial isoform of NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP+-ICDH) contains two translational ATG start sites, suggesting the possibility of tandem targeting signals. In this work, the putative mitochondrial and chloroplastic targeting signals from NADP+-ICDH were fused to a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) reporter to generate a series of constructs and introduced into tobacco leaves by Agrobacterium-mediated transient transformation. The subsequent sub-cellular locations of the ICDH:YFP fusion proteins were then examined using confocal microscopy. Constructs predicted to be targeted to the chloroplast all localized to the chloroplast. However, this was not the case for all of the constructs that were predicted to be mitochondrial targeted. Although some constructs localized to mitochondria as expected, others appeared to be chloroplast localized. This was attributed to an additional 50 amino acid residues of the mature NADP+-ICDH protein that were present in those constructs, generated from either 'Xanthi' or 'Petit Havana' cultivars of tobacco. The results of this study raise interesting questions regarding the targeting and processing of organellar isoforms of NADP+-ICDH.

  17. Transmembrane collagen XVII modulates integrin dependent keratinocyte migration via PI3K/Rac1 signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Löffek

    Full Text Available The hemidesmosomal transmembrane component collagen XVII (ColXVII plays an important role in the anchorage of the epidermis to the underlying basement membrane. However, this adhesion protein seems to be also involved in the regulation of keratinocyte migration, since its expression in these cells is strongly elevated during reepithelialization of acute wounds and in the invasive front of squamous cell carcinoma, while its absence in ColXVII-deficient keratinocytes leads to altered cell motility. Using a genetic model of murine Col17a1⁻/⁻ keratinocytes we elucidated ColXVII mediated signaling pathways in cell adhesion and migration. Col17a1⁻/⁻ keratinocytes exhibited increased spreading on laminin 332 and accelerated, but less directed cell motility. These effects were accompanied by increased expression of the integrin subunits β4 and β1. The migratory phenotype, as evidenced by formation of multiple unstable lamellipodia, was associated with enhanced phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K activity. Dissection of the signaling pathway uncovered enhanced phosphorylation of the β4 integrin subunit and the focal adhesion kinase (FAK as activators of PI3K. This resulted in elevated Rac1 activity as a downstream consequence. These results provide mechanistic evidence that ColXVII coordinates keratinocyte adhesion and directed motility by interfering integrin dependent PI3K activation and by stabilizing lamellipodia at the leading edge of reepithelializing wounds and in invasive squamous cell carcinoma.

  18. Transmembrane Collagen XVII Modulates Integrin Dependent Keratinocyte Migration via PI3K/Rac1 Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löffek, Stefanie; Sigloch, Florian Christoph; Schilling, Oliver; Tasanen, Kaisa; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena; Franzke, Claus-Werner

    2014-01-01

    The hemidesmosomal transmembrane component collagen XVII (ColXVII) plays an important role in the anchorage of the epidermis to the underlying basement membrane. However, this adhesion protein seems to be also involved in the regulation of keratinocyte migration, since its expression in these cells is strongly elevated during reepithelialization of acute wounds and in the invasive front of squamous cell carcinoma, while its absence in ColXVII-deficient keratinocytes leads to altered cell motility. Using a genetic model of murine Col17a1−/− keratinocytes we elucidated ColXVII mediated signaling pathways in cell adhesion and migration. Col17a1−/− keratinocytes exhibited increased spreading on laminin 332 and accelerated, but less directed cell motility. These effects were accompanied by increased expression of the integrin subunits β4 and β1. The migratory phenotype, as evidenced by formation of multiple unstable lamellipodia, was associated with enhanced phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) activity. Dissection of the signaling pathway uncovered enhanced phosphorylation of the β4 integrin subunit and the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) as activators of PI3K. This resulted in elevated Rac1 activity as a downstream consequence. These results provide mechanistic evidence that ColXVII coordinates keratinocyte adhesion and directed motility by interfering integrin dependent PI3K activation and by stabilizing lamellipodia at the leading edge of reepithelializing wounds and in invasive squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:24505282

  19. Autoinducer 2: a concentration-dependent signal for mutualistic bacterial biofilm growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, A.H.; Palmer, R.J.; Blehert, D.S.; Campagna, S.R.; Semmelhack, M.F.; Egland, P.G.; Bassler, B.L.; Kolenbrander, P.E.

    2006-01-01

    4,5-dihydroxy-2,3-pentanedione (DPD), a product of the LuxS enzyme in the catabolism of S-ribosylhomocysteine, spontaneously cyclizes to form autoinducer 2 (AI-2). AI-2 is proposed to be a universal signal molecule mediating interspecies communication among bacteria. We show that mutualistic and abundant biofilm growth in flowing saliva of two human oral commensal bacteria, Actinomyces naeslundii T14V and Streptococcus oralis 34, is dependent upon production of AI-2 by S. oralis 34. A luxS mutant of S. oralis 34 was constructed which did not produce AI-2. Unlike wild-type dual-species biofilms, A. naeslundii T14V and an S. oralis 34 luxS mutant did not exhibit mutualism and generated only sparse biofilms which contained a 10-fold lower biomass of each species. Restoration of AI-2 levels by genetic or chemical (synthetic AI-2 in the form of DPD) complementation re-established the mutualistic growth and high biomass characteristic for the wild-type dual-species biofilm. Furthermore, an optimal concentration of DPD was determined, above and below which biofilm formation was suppressed. The optimal concentration was 100-fold lower than the detection limit of the currently accepted AI-2 assay. Thus, AI-2 acts as an interspecies signal and its concentration is critical for mutualism between two species of oral bacteria grown under conditions that are representative of the human oral cavity. ?? 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Dicer-2-dependent activation of Culex Vago occurs via the TRAF-Rel2 signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad N Paradkar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite their importance as vectors of human and livestock diseases, relatively little is known about innate antiviral immune pathways in mosquitoes and other insects. Previous work has shown that Culex Vago (CxVago, which is induced and secreted from West Nile virus (WNV-infected mosquito cells, acts as a functional homolog of interferon, by activating Jak-STAT pathway and limiting virus replication in neighbouring cells. Here we describe the Dicer-2-dependent pathway leading to WNV-induced CxVago activation. Using a luciferase reporter assay, we show that a NF-κB-like binding site in CxVago promoter region is conserved in mosquito species and is responsible for induction of CxVago expression following WNV infection. Using dsRNA-based gene knockdown, we show that the NF-κB ortholog, Rel2, plays significant role in the signaling pathway that activates CxVago in mosquito cells in vitro and in vivo. Using similar approaches, we also show that TRAF, but not TRAF-3, is involved in activation of Rel2 after viral infection. Overall the study shows that a conserved signaling pathway, which is similar to mammalian interferon activation pathway, is responsible for the induction and antiviral activity of CxVago.

  1. Dicer-2-dependent activation of Culex Vago occurs via the TRAF-Rel2 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradkar, Prasad N; Duchemin, Jean-Bernard; Voysey, Rhonda; Walker, Peter J

    2014-04-01

    Despite their importance as vectors of human and livestock diseases, relatively little is known about innate antiviral immune pathways in mosquitoes and other insects. Previous work has shown that Culex Vago (CxVago), which is induced and secreted from West Nile virus (WNV)-infected mosquito cells, acts as a functional homolog of interferon, by activating Jak-STAT pathway and limiting virus replication in neighbouring cells. Here we describe the Dicer-2-dependent pathway leading to WNV-induced CxVago activation. Using a luciferase reporter assay, we show that a NF-κB-like binding site in CxVago promoter region is conserved in mosquito species and is responsible for induction of CxVago expression following WNV infection. Using dsRNA-based gene knockdown, we show that the NF-κB ortholog, Rel2, plays significant role in the signaling pathway that activates CxVago in mosquito cells in vitro and in vivo. Using similar approaches, we also show that TRAF, but not TRAF-3, is involved in activation of Rel2 after viral infection. Overall the study shows that a conserved signaling pathway, which is similar to mammalian interferon activation pathway, is responsible for the induction and antiviral activity of CxVago.

  2. Cyclic nucleotide dependent dephosphorylation of regulator of G-protein signaling 18 in human platelets.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gegenbauer, Kristina

    2013-11-01

    Regulator of G-protein signaling 18 (RGS18) is a GTPase-activating protein that turns off Gq signaling in platelets. RGS18 is regulated by binding to the adaptor protein 14-3-3 via phosphorylated serine residues S49 and S218 on RGS18. In this study we confirm that thrombin, thromboxane A2, or ADP stimulate the interaction of RGS18 and 14-3-3 by increasing the phosphorylation of S49. Cyclic AMP- and cyclic GMP-dependent kinases (PKA, PKG) inhibit the interaction of RGS18 and 14-3-3 by phosphorylating S216. To understand the effect of S216 phosphorylation we studied the phosphorylation kinetics of S49, S216, and S218 using Phos-tag gels and phosphorylation site-specific antibodies in transfected cells and in platelets. Cyclic nucleotide-induced detachment of 14-3-3 from RGS18 coincides initially with double phosphorylation of S216 and S218. This is followed by dephosphorylation of S49 and S218. Dephosphorylation of S49 and S218 might be mediated by protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) which is linked to RGS18 by the regulatory subunit PPP1R9B (spinophilin). We conclude that PKA and PKG induced S216 phosphorylation triggers the dephosphorylation of the 14-3-3 binding sites of RGS18 in platelets.

  3. Strong position-dependent effects of sequence mismatches on signal ratios measured using long oligonucleotide microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hulme Helen

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarrays are an important and widely used tool. Applications include capturing genomic DNA for high-throughput sequencing in addition to the traditional monitoring of gene expression and identifying DNA copy number variations. Sequence mismatches between probe and target strands are known to affect the stability of the probe-target duplex, and hence the strength of the observed signals from microarrays. Results We describe a large-scale investigation of microarray hybridisations to murine probes with known sequence mismatches, demonstrating that the effect of mismatches is strongly position-dependent and for small numbers of sequence mismatches is correlated with the maximum length of perfectly matched probe-target duplex. Length of perfect match explained 43% of the variance in log2 signal ratios between probes with one and two mismatches. The correlation with maximum length of perfect match does not conform to expectations based on considering the effect of mismatches purely in terms of reducing the binding energy. However, it can be explained qualitatively by considering the entropic contribution to duplex stability from configurations of differing perfect match length. Conclusion The results of this study have implications in terms of array design and analysis. They highlight the significant effect that short sequence mismatches can have upon microarray hybridisation intensities even for long oligonucleotide probes. All microarray data presented in this study are available from the GEO database 1, under accession number [GEO: GSE9669

  4. Neuregulin-1 signaling is essential for nerve-dependent axolotl limb regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Johanna E; Freitas, Polina D; Bryant, Donald M; Whited, Jessica L; Monaghan, James R

    2016-08-01

    The Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) is capable of fully regenerating amputated limbs, but denervation of the limb inhibits the formation of the post-injury proliferative mass called the blastema. The molecular basis behind this phenomenon remains poorly understood, but previous studies have suggested that nerves support regeneration via the secretion of essential growth-promoting factors. An essential nerve-derived factor must be found in the blastema, capable of rescuing regeneration in denervated limbs, and its inhibition must prevent regeneration. Here, we show that the neuronally secreted protein Neuregulin-1 (NRG1) fulfills all these criteria in the axolotl. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization of NRG1 and its active receptor ErbB2 revealed that they are expressed in regenerating blastemas but lost upon denervation. NRG1 was localized to the wound epithelium prior to blastema formation and was later strongly expressed in proliferating blastemal cells. Supplementation by implantation of NRG1-soaked beads rescued regeneration to digits in denervated limbs, and pharmacological inhibition of NRG1 signaling reduced cell proliferation, blocked blastema formation and induced aberrant collagen deposition in fully innervated limbs. Taken together, our results show that nerve-dependent NRG1/ErbB2 signaling promotes blastemal proliferation in the regenerating limb and may play an essential role in blastema formation, thus providing insight into the longstanding question of why nerves are required for axolotl limb regeneration.

  5. The Growth of Malignant Keratinocytes Depends on Signaling Through the PGE2 Receptor EP11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J. Thompson

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent discoveries shed light on the importance of prostaglandin (PG production in the development of skin cancer. Work by Fischer et al. demonstrates that skin tumor promotion caused by ultraviolet B radiation can be decreased by up to 89% by blocking cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 with the drug Celecoxib. A similar study showed that Celecoxib can decrease new tumor formation by 44% in mice that already have tumors. These studies demonstrate the importance of COX-2 and PGs in the development of squamous cell carcinoma. We have explored growth signaling in a model of skin tumor progression. Because changes in PG production have been implicated in skin carcinogenesis, we examined this pathway. We found that malignant cell lines secrete more prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 than the parental cells. We observed increased expression of COX-1 and -2. We also found that these cells express the PGE2 receptors EPi and EP4. When the cells are grown in the presence of indomethacin, the growth rate of the malignant cells is decreased. This effect can be reversed by addition of PGE2 or an EPi agonist to the medium. Thus, we have shown that skin tumor cells depend in part on PGE2 signaling through the EPi prostanoid receptor for their in vitro growth.

  6. Transcriptional Regulation of Cystathionine-γ-Lyase in Endothelial Cells by NADPH Oxidase 4-Dependent Signaling*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Rajesh K.; Murray, Thomas V. A.; Prysyazhna, Oleksandra; Martin, Daniel; Burgoyne, Joseph R.; Santos, Celio; Eaton, Philip; Shah, Ajay M.; Brewer, Alison C.

    2016-01-01

    The gasotransmitter, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is recognized as an important mediator of endothelial cell homeostasis and function that impacts upon vascular tone and blood pressure. Cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) is the predominant endothelial generator of H2S, and recent evidence suggests that its transcriptional expression is regulated by the reactive oxygen species, H2O2. However, the cellular source of H2O2 and the redox-dependent molecular signaling pathway that modulates this is not known. We aimed to investigate the role of Nox4, an endothelial generator of H2O2, in the regulation of CSE in endothelial cells. Both gain- and loss-of-function experiments in human endothelial cells in vitro demonstrated Nox4 to be a positive regulator of CSE transcription and protein expression. We demonstrate that this is dependent upon a heme-regulated inhibitor kinase/eIF2α/activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) signaling module. ATF4 was further demonstrated to bind directly to cis-regulatory sequences within the first intron of CSE to activate transcription. Furthermore, CSE expression was also increased in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells, isolated from endothelial-specific Nox4 transgenic mice, compared with wild-type littermate controls. Using wire myography we demonstrate that endothelial-specific Nox4 transgenic mice exhibit a hypo-contractile phenotype in response to phenylephrine that was abolished when vessels were incubated with a CSE inhibitor, propargylglycine. We, therefore, conclude that Nox4 is a positive transcriptional regulator of CSE in endothelial cells and propose that it may in turn contribute to the regulation of vascular tone via the modulation of H2S production. PMID:26620565

  7. Increased BOLD variability in the parietal cortex and enhanced parieto-occipital connectivity during tactile perception in congenitally blind individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, Andrea; Bernardi, Giulio; Handjaras, Giacomo; Bonino, Daniela; Ricciardi, Emiliano; Pietrini, Pietro

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies in early blind individuals posited a possible role of parieto-occipital connections in conveying nonvisual information to the visual occipital cortex. As a consequence of blindness, parietal areas would thus become able to integrate a greater amount of multimodal information than in sighted individuals. To verify this hypothesis, we compared fMRI-measured BOLD signal temporal variability, an index of efficiency in functional information integration, in congenitally blind and sighted individuals during tactile spatial discrimination and motion perception tasks. In both tasks, the BOLD variability analysis revealed many cortical regions with a significantly greater variability in the blind as compared to sighted individuals, with an overlapping cluster located in the left inferior parietal/anterior intraparietal cortex. A functional connectivity analysis using this region as seed showed stronger correlations in both tasks with occipital areas in the blind as compared to sighted individuals. As BOLD variability reflects neural integration and processing efficiency, these cross-modal plastic changes in the parietal cortex, even if described in a limited sample, reinforce the hypothesis that this region may play an important role in processing nonvisual information in blind subjects and act as a hub in the cortico-cortical pathway from somatosensory cortex to the reorganized occipital areas.

  8. Spatiotemporal properties of the BOLD response in the songbirds' auditory circuit during a variety of listening tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Meir, Vincent; Boumans, Tiny; De Groof, Geert; Van Audekerke, Johan; Smolders, Alain; Scheunders, Paul; Sijbers, Jan; Verhoye, Marleen; Balthazart, Jacques; Van der Linden, Annemie

    2005-05-01

    Auditory fMRI in humans has recently received increasing attention from cognitive neuroscientists as a tool to understand mental processing of learned acoustic sequences and analyzing speech recognition and development of musical skills. The present study introduces this tool in a well-documented animal model for vocal learning, the songbird, and provides fundamental insight in the main technical issues associated with auditory fMRI in these songbirds. Stimulation protocols with various listening tasks lead to appropriate activation of successive relays in the songbirds' auditory pathway. The elicited BOLD response is also region and stimulus specific, and its temporal aspects provide accurate measures of the changes in brain physiology induced by the acoustic stimuli. Extensive repetition of an identical stimulus does not lead to habituation of the response in the primary or secondary telencephalic auditory regions of anesthetized subjects. The BOLD signal intensity changes during a stimulation and subsequent rest period have a very specific time course which shows a remarkable resemblance to auditory evoked BOLD responses commonly observed in human subjects. This observation indicates that auditory fMRI in the songbird may establish a link between auditory related neuro-imaging studies done in humans and the large body of neuro-ethological research on song learning and neuro-plasticity performed in songbirds.

  9. Increased BOLD Variability in the Parietal Cortex and Enhanced Parieto-Occipital Connectivity during Tactile Perception in Congenitally Blind Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Leo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies in early blind individuals posited a possible role of parieto-occipital connections in conveying nonvisual information to the visual occipital cortex. As a consequence of blindness, parietal areas would thus become able to integrate a greater amount of multimodal information than in sighted individuals. To verify this hypothesis, we compared fMRI-measured BOLD signal temporal variability, an index of efficiency in functional information integration, in congenitally blind and sighted individuals during tactile spatial discrimination and motion perception tasks. In both tasks, the BOLD variability analysis revealed many cortical regions with a significantly greater variability in the blind as compared to sighted individuals, with an overlapping cluster located in the left inferior parietal/anterior intraparietal cortex. A functional connectivity analysis using this region as seed showed stronger correlations in both tasks with occipital areas in the blind as compared to sighted individuals. As BOLD variability reflects neural integration and processing efficiency, these cross-modal plastic changes in the parietal cortex, even if described in a limited sample, reinforce the hypothesis that this region may play an important role in processing nonvisual information in blind subjects and act as a hub in the cortico-cortical pathway from somatosensory cortex to the reorganized occipital areas.

  10. Christine Bold, ed. US Popular Print Culture: 1860-1920.

    OpenAIRE

    Feleki, Despoina

    2015-01-01

    US Popular Print Culture 1860-1920 is the sixth volume in The Oxford History of Popular Print Culture series. Edited by Christine Bold, it records as well as critically and historically assesses the most important aspects of popular print culture, spanning from Antebellum America until World War I. This great publishing endeavor follows an encyclopedic approach, without proposing one encompassing cultural theory on which to ground all these essays about the popular. It accepts that “popular c...

  11. Time-dependent regulation of muscle caveolin activation and insulin signalling in response to high-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Ruiz, Ana; de Miguel, Carlos; Campión, Javier; Martínez, J Alfredo; Milagro, Fermín I

    2009-10-06

    We studied the effect of high-fat diet on the expression and activation of the three caveolins in rat skeletal muscle and their association with the insulin signalling cascade. Initial response was characterized by increased signalling through Cav-1 and Cav-3 phosphorylation, suggesting that both participate in an initial acute response to the calorie surplus. Afterwards, Cav-1 signalling was slightly reduced, whereas Cav-3 remained active. Late chronic phase signalling through both proteins was impaired inducing a prediabetic state. Summarizing, caveolins seem to mediate a time-dependent regulation of insulin cascade in response to high-fat diet in muscle.

  12. Muscle RING finger-1 attenuates IGF-I-dependent cardiomyocyte hypertrophy by inhibiting JNK signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadosky, Kristine M; Rodríguez, Jessica E; Hite, Rebecca L; Min, Jin-na; Walton, Bethany L; Willis, Monte S

    2014-04-01

    Recent studies implicate the muscle-specific ubiquitin ligase muscle RING finger-1 (MuRF1) in inhibiting pathological cardiomyocyte growth in vivo by inhibiting the transcription factor SRF. These studies led us to hypothesize that MuRF1 similarly inhibits insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I)-mediated physiological cardiomyocyte growth. We identified two lines of evidence to support this hypothesis: IGF-I stimulation of cardiac-derived cells with MuRF1 knockdown 1) exhibited an exaggerated hypertrophy and, 2) conversely, increased MuRF1 expression-abolished IGF-I-dependent cardiomyocyte growth. Enhanced hypertrophy with MuRF1 knockdown was accompanied by increases in Akt-regulated gene expression. Unexpectedly, MuRF1 inhibition of this gene expression profile was not a result of differences in p-Akt. Instead, we found that MuRF1 inhibits total protein levels of Akt, GSK-3β (downstream of Akt), and mTOR while limiting c-Jun protein expression, a mechanism recently shown to govern Akt, GSK-3β, and mTOR activities and expression. These findings establish that MuRF1 inhibits IGF-I signaling by restricting c-Jun activity, a novel mechanism recently identified in the context of ischemia-reperfusion injury. Since IGF-I regulates exercise-mediated physiological cardiac growth, we challenged MuRF1(-/-) and MuRF1-Tg+ mice and their wild-type sibling controls to 5 wk of voluntary wheel running. MuRF1(-/-) cardiac growth was increased significantly over wild-type control; conversely, the enhanced exercise-induced cardiac growth was lost in MuRF1-Tg+ animals. These studies demonstrate that MuRF1-dependent attenuation of IGF-I signaling via c-Jun is applicable in vivo and establish that further understanding of this novel mechanism may be crucial in the development of therapies targeting IGF-I signaling.

  13. Manganese nanoparticle activates mitochondrial dependent apoptotic signaling and autophagy in dopaminergic neuronal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afeseh Ngwa, Hilary; Kanthasamy, Arthi [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Iowa Center for Advanced Neurotoxicology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Gu, Yan; Fang, Ning [Department of Chemistry, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Anantharam, Vellareddy [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Iowa Center for Advanced Neurotoxicology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Kanthasamy, Anumantha G., E-mail: akanthas@iastate.edu [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Iowa Center for Advanced Neurotoxicology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    The production of man-made nanoparticles for various modern applications has increased exponentially in recent years, but the potential health effects of most nanoparticles are not well characterized. Unfortunately, in vitro nanoparticle toxicity studies are extremely limited by yet unresolved problems relating to dosimetry. In the present study, we systematically characterized manganese (Mn) nanoparticle sizes and examined the nanoparticle-induced oxidative signaling in dopaminergic neuronal cells. Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies revealed that Mn nanoparticles range in size from single nanoparticles ({approx} 25 nM) to larger agglomerates when in treatment media. Manganese nanoparticles were effectively internalized in N27 dopaminergic neuronal cells, and they induced a time-dependent upregulation of the transporter protein transferrin. Exposure to 25-400 {mu}g/mL Mn nanoparticles induced cell death in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Mn nanoparticles also significantly increased ROS, accompanied by a caspase-mediated proteolytic cleavage of proapoptotic protein kinase C{delta} (PKC{delta}), as well as activation loop phosphorylation. Blocking Mn nanoparticle-induced ROS failed to protect against the neurotoxic effects, suggesting the involvement of other pathways. Further mechanistic studies revealed changes in Beclin 1 and LC3, indicating that Mn nanoparticles induce autophagy. Primary mesencephalic neuron exposure to Mn nanoparticles induced loss of TH positive dopaminergic neurons and neuronal processes. Collectively, our results suggest that Mn nanoparticles effectively enter dopaminergic neuronal cells and exert neurotoxic effects by activating an apoptotic signaling pathway and autophagy, emphasizing the need for assessing possible health risks associated with an increased use of Mn nanoparticles in modern applications. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mn nanoparticles

  14. Signal peptide-dependent inhibition of MHC class I heavy chain translation by rhesus cytomegalovirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin J Powers

    Full Text Available The US2-11 region of human and rhesus cytomegalovirus encodes a conserved family of glycoproteins that inhibit MHC-I assembly with viral peptides, thus preventing cytotoxic T cell recognition. Since HCMV lacking US2-11 is no longer able to block assembly and transport of MHC-I, we examined whether this is also observed for RhCMV lacking the corresponding region. Unexpectedly, recombinant RhCMV lacking US2-11 was still able to inhibit MHC-I expression in infected fibroblasts, suggesting the presence of an additional MHC-I evasion mechanism. Progressive deletion analysis of RhCMV-specific genomic regions revealed that MHC-I expression is fully restored upon additional deletion of rh178. The protein encoded by this RhCMV-specific open reading frame is anchored in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. In the presence of rh178, RhCMV prevented MHC-I heavy chain (HC expression, but did not inhibit mRNA transcription or association of HC mRNA with translating ribosomes. Proteasome inhibitors stabilized a HC degradation intermediate in the absence of rh178, but not in its presence, suggesting that rh178 prevents completion of HC translation. This interference was signal sequence-dependent since replacing the signal peptide with that of CD4 or murine HC rendered human HCs resistant to rh178. We have identified an inhibitor of antigen presentation encoded by rhesus cytomegalovirus unique in both its lack of homology to any other known protein and in its mechanism of action. By preventing signal sequence-dependent HC translocation, rh178 acts prior to US2, US3 and US11 which attack MHC-I proteins after protein synthesis is completed. Rh178 is the first viral protein known to interfere at this step of the MHC-I pathway, thus taking advantage of the conserved nature of HC leader peptides, and represents a new mechanism of translational interference.

  15. Operational safety assessment of turbo generators with wavelet Rényi entropy from sensor-dependent vibration signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Wang, Baojian; Chen, Xuefeng

    2015-04-16

    With the rapid development of sensor technology, various professional sensors are installed on modern machinery to monitor operational processes and assure operational safety, which play an important role in industry and society. In this work a new operational safety assessment approach with wavelet Rényi entropy utilizing sensor-dependent vibration signals is proposed. On the basis of a professional sensor and the corresponding system, sensor-dependent vibration signals are acquired and analyzed by a second generation wavelet package, which reflects time-varying operational characteristic of individual machinery. Derived from the sensor-dependent signals' wavelet energy distribution over the observed signal frequency range, wavelet Rényi entropy is defined to compute the operational uncertainty of a turbo generator, which is then associated with its operational safety degree. The proposed method is applied in a 50 MW turbo generator, whereupon it is proved to be reasonable and effective for operation and maintenance.

  16. Sustained negative BOLD response in human fMRI finger tapping task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadong Liu

    Full Text Available In this work, we investigated the sustained negative blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD response (sNBR using functional magnetic resonance imaging during a finger tapping task. We observed that the sNBR for this task was more extensive than has previously been reported. The cortical regions involved in sNBR are divided into the following three groups: frontal, somatosensory and occipital. By investigating the spatial structure, area, amplitude, and dynamics of the sNBR in comparison with those of its positive BOLD response (PBR counterpart, we made the following observations. First, among the three groups, the somatosensory group contained the greatest number of activated voxels and the fewest deactivated voxels. In addition, the amplitude of the sNBR in this group was the smallest among the three groups. Second, the onset and peak time of the sNBR are both larger than those of the PBR, whereas the falling edge time of the sNBR is less than that of the PBR. Third, the long distance between most sNBR foci and their corresponding PBR foci makes it unlikely that they share the same blood supply artery. Fourth, the couplings between the sNBR and its PBR counterpart are distinct among different regions and thus should be investigated separately. These findings imply that the origin of most sNBR foci in the finger-tapping task is much more likely to be neuronal activity suppression rather than "blood steal."

  17. A two-stage cascade model of BOLD responses in human visual cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendrick N Kay

    Full Text Available Visual neuroscientists have discovered fundamental properties of neural representation through careful analysis of responses to controlled stimuli. Typically, different properties are studied and modeled separately. To integrate our knowledge, it is necessary to build general models that begin with an input image and predict responses to a wide range of stimuli. In this study, we develop a model that accepts an arbitrary band-pass grayscale image as input and predicts blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD responses in early visual cortex as output. The model has a cascade architecture, consisting of two stages of linear and nonlinear operations. The first stage involves well-established computations-local oriented filters and divisive normalization-whereas the second stage involves novel computations-compressive spatial summation (a form of normalization and a variance-like nonlinearity that generates selectivity for second-order contrast. The parameters of the model, which are estimated from BOLD data, vary systematically across visual field maps: compared to primary visual cortex, extrastriate maps generally have larger receptive field size, stronger levels of normalization, and increased selectivity for second-order contrast. Our results provide insight into how stimuli are encoded and transformed in successive stages of visual processing.

  18. Latencies in BOLD response during visual attention processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellermann, Thilo; Reske, Martina; Jansen, Andreas; Satrapi, Peyman; Shah, N Jon; Schneider, Frank; Habel, Ute

    2011-04-22

    One well-investigated division of attentional processes focuses on alerting, orienting and executive control, which can be assessed applying the attentional network test (ANT). The goal of the present study was to add further knowledge about the temporal dynamics of relevant neural correlates. As a right hemispheric dominance for alerting and orienting has previously been reported for intrinsic but not for phasic alertness, we additionally addressed a potential impact of this lateralization of attention by employing a lateralized version of the ANT, capturing phasic alertness processes. Sixteen healthy subjects underwent event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while performing the ANT. Analyses of BOLD magnitude replicated the engagement of a fronto-parietal network in the attentional subsystems. The amplitudes of the attentional contrasts interacted with visual field presentation in the sense that the thalamus revealed a greater involvement for spatially cued items presented in the left visual field. Comparisons of BOLD latencies in visual cortices, first, verified faster BOLD responses following contra-lateral stimulus presentation. Second and more importantly, we identified attention-modulated activation in secondary visual and anterior cingulate cortices. Results are discussed in terms of bottom-up and lateralization processes. Although intrinsic and phasic alertness are distinct cognitive processes, we propose that neural substrates of intrinsic alertness may be accessed by phasic alertness provided that the attention-dominant (i.e., the right) hemisphere is activated directly by a warning stimulus.

  19. Osteoblastic regulation of B lymphopoiesis is mediated by Gs{alpha}-dependent signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Joy Y; Purton, Louise E; Rodda, Stephen J; Chen, Min; Weinstein, Lee S; McMahon, Andrew P; Scadden, David T; Kronenberg, Henry M

    2008-11-04

    Osteoblasts play an increasingly recognized role in supporting hematopoietic development and recently have been implicated in the regulation of B lymphopoiesis. Here we demonstrate that the heterotrimeric G protein alpha subunit G(s)alpha is required in cells of the osteoblast lineage for normal postnatal B lymphocyte production. Deletion of G(s)alpha early in the osteoblast lineage results in a 59% decrease in the percentage of B cell precursors in the bone marrow. Analysis of peripheral blood from mutant mice revealed a 67% decrease in the number of circulating B lymphocytes by 10 days of age. Strikingly, other mature hematopoietic lineages are not decreased significantly. Mice lacking G(s)alpha in cells of the osteoblast lineage exhibit a reduction in pro-B and pre-B cells. Furthermore, interleukin (IL)-7 expression is attenuated in G(s)alpha-deficient osteoblasts, and exogenous IL-7 is able to restore B cell precursor populations in the bone marrow of mutant mice. Finally, the defect in B lymphopoiesis can be rescued by transplantation into a WT microenvironment. These findings confirm that osteoblasts are an important component of the B lymphocyte niche and demonstrate in vivo that G(s)alpha-dependent signaling pathways in cells of the osteoblast lineage extrinsically regulate bone marrow B lymphopoiesis, at least partially in an IL-7-dependent manner.

  20. Osteoblastic regulation of B lymphopoiesis is mediated by Gsα-dependent signaling pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Joy Y.; Purton, Louise E.; Rodda, Stephen J.; Chen, Min; Weinstein, Lee S.; McMahon, Andrew P.; Scadden, David T.; Kronenberg, Henry M.

    2008-01-01

    Osteoblasts play an increasingly recognized role in supporting hematopoietic development and recently have been implicated in the regulation of B lymphopoiesis. Here we demonstrate that the heterotrimeric G protein α subunit Gsα is required in cells of the osteoblast lineage for normal postnatal B lymphocyte production. Deletion of Gsα early in the osteoblast lineage results in a 59% decrease in the percentage of B cell precursors in the bone marrow. Analysis of peripheral blood from mutant mice revealed a 67% decrease in the number of circulating B lymphocytes by 10 days of age. Strikingly, other mature hematopoietic lineages are not decreased significantly. Mice lacking Gsα in cells of the osteoblast lineage exhibit a reduction in pro-B and pre-B cells. Furthermore, interleukin (IL)-7 expression is attenuated in Gsα-deficient osteoblasts, and exogenous IL-7 is able to restore B cell precursor populations in the bone marrow of mutant mice. Finally, the defect in B lymphopoiesis can be rescued by transplantation into a WT microenvironment. These findings confirm that osteoblasts are an important component of the B lymphocyte niche and demonstrate in vivo that Gsα-dependent signaling pathways in cells of the osteoblast lineage extrinsically regulate bone marrow B lymphopoiesis, at least partially in an IL-7-dependent manner. PMID:18957542

  1. Neem leaf glycoprotein prophylaxis transduces immune dependent stop signal for tumor angiogenic switch within tumor microenvironment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saptak Banerjee

    Full Text Available We have reported that prophylactic as well as therapeutic administration of neem leaf glycoprotein (NLGP induces significant restriction of solid tumor growth in mice. Here, we investigate whether the effect of such pretreatment (25µg/mice; weekly, 4 times benefits regulation of tumor angiogenesis, an obligate factor for tumor progression. We show that NLGP pretreatment results in vascular normalization in melanoma and carcinoma bearing mice along with downregulation of CD31, VEGF and VEGFR2. NLGP pretreatment facilitates profound infiltration of CD8+ T cells within tumor parenchyma, which subsequently regulates VEGF-VEGFR2 signaling in CD31+ vascular endothelial cells to prevent aberrant neovascularization. Pericyte stabilization, VEGF dependent inhibition of VEC proliferation and subsequent vascular normalization are also experienced. Studies in immune compromised mice confirmed that these vascular and intratumoral changes in angiogenic profile are dependent upon active adoptive immunity particularly those mediated by CD8+ T cells. Accumulated evidences suggest that NLGP regulated immunomodulation is active in tumor growth restriction and normalization of tumor angiogenesis as well, thereby, signifying its clinical translation.

  2. Neem Leaf Glycoprotein Prophylaxis Transduces Immune Dependent Stop Signal for Tumor Angiogenic Switch within Tumor Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Saptak; Ghosh, Tithi; Barik, Subhasis; Das, Arnab; Ghosh, Sarbari; Bhuniya, Avishek

    2014-01-01

    We have reported that prophylactic as well as therapeutic administration of neem leaf glycoprotein (NLGP) induces significant restriction of solid tumor growth in mice. Here, we investigate whether the effect of such pretreatment (25µg/mice; weekly, 4 times) benefits regulation of tumor angiogenesis, an obligate factor for tumor progression. We show that NLGP pretreatment results in vascular normalization in melanoma and carcinoma bearing mice along with downregulation of CD31, VEGF and VEGFR2. NLGP pretreatment facilitates profound infiltration of CD8+ T cells within tumor parenchyma, which subsequently regulates VEGF-VEGFR2 signaling in CD31+ vascular endothelial cells to prevent aberrant neovascularization. Pericyte stabilization, VEGF dependent inhibition of VEC proliferation and subsequent vascular normalization are also experienced. Studies in immune compromised mice confirmed that these vascular and intratumoral changes in angiogenic profile are dependent upon active adoptive immunity particularly those mediated by CD8+ T cells. Accumulated evidences suggest that NLGP regulated immunomodulation is active in tumor growth restriction and normalization of tumor angiogenesis as well, thereby, signifying its clinical translation. PMID:25391149

  3. Transcription-dependent nuclear localization of DAZAP1 requires an N-terminal signal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yi-Tzu; Wen, Wan-Ching [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Yen, Pauline H., E-mail: pyen@ibms.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China)

    2012-11-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DAZAP1 shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DAZAP1 accumulates in the cytoplasm when the nuclear transcription is inhibited. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DAZAP1's transcription-dependent nuclear localization requires N-terminal N42. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SLIRP binds to N42 and may be involved in the process. -- Abstract: Deleted in Azoospermia Associated Protein 1 (DAZAP1) is a ubiquitous hnRNP protein required for normal development and spermatogenesis. It resides predominantly in the nucleus and moves between the nucleus and the cytoplasm via a ZNS shuttling signal at its C-terminus. DAZAP1 accumulates in the cytoplasm when RNA polymerase II activity is inhibited by actinomycin D. Here we report the mapping of a 42-amino acid segment (N42) at the N-terminus of DAZAP1 that is both necessary and sufficient for its transcription-dependent nuclear localization. In addition, using a yeast two-hybrid system, we have identified SLIRP as a N42-binding protein which may regulate DAZAP1 subcellular localization.

  4. Integration of the beta-catenin-dependent Wnt pathway with integrin signaling through the adaptor molecule Grb2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve P Crampton

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: THE COMPLEXITY OF WNT SIGNALING LIKELY STEMS FROM TWO SOURCES: multiple pathways emanating from frizzled receptors in response to wnt binding, and modulation of those pathways and target gene responsiveness by context-dependent signals downstream of growth factor and matrix receptors. Both rac1 and c-jun have recently been implicated in wnt signaling, however their upstream activators have not been identified. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we identify the adapter protein Grb2, which is itself an integrator of multiple signaling pathways, as a modifier of beta-catenin-dependent wnt signaling. Grb2 synergizes with wnt3A, constitutively active (CA LRP6, Dvl2 or CA-beta-catenin to drive a LEF/TCF-responsive reporter, and dominant negative (DN Grb2 or siRNA to Grb2 block wnt3A-mediated reporter activity. MMP9 is a target of beta-catenin-dependent wnt signaling, and an MMP9 promoter reporter is also responsive to signals downstream of Grb2. Both a jnk inhibitor and DN-c-jun block transcriptional activation downstream of Dvl2 and Grb2, as does DN-rac1. Integrin ligation by collagen also synergizes with wnt signaling as does overexpression of Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK, and this is blocked by DN-Grb2. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest that integrin ligation and FAK activation synergize with wnt signaling through a Grb2-rac-jnk-c-jun pathway, providing a context-dependent mechanism for modulation of wnt signaling.

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis eis regulates autophagy, inflammation, and cell death through redox-dependent signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Min Shin

    Full Text Available The "enhanced intracellular survival" (eis gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb is involved in the intracellular survival of M. smegmatis. However, its exact effects on host cell function remain elusive. We herein report that Mtb Eis plays essential roles in modulating macrophage autophagy, inflammatory responses, and cell death via a reactive oxygen species (ROS-dependent pathway. Macrophages infected with an Mtb eis-deletion mutant H37Rv (Mtb-Δeis displayed markedly increased accumulation of massive autophagic vacuoles and formation of autophagosomes in vitro and in vivo. Infection of macrophages with Mtb-Δeis increased the production of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 over the levels produced by infection with wild-type or complemented strains. Elevated ROS generation in macrophages infected with Mtb-Δeis (for which NADPH oxidase and mitochondria were largely responsible rendered the cells highly sensitive to autophagy activation and cytokine production. Despite considerable activation of autophagy and proinflammatory responses, macrophages infected with Mtb-Δeis underwent caspase-independent cell death. This cell death was significantly inhibited by blockade of autophagy and c-Jun N-terminal kinase-ROS signaling, suggesting that excessive autophagy and oxidative stress are detrimental to cell survival. Finally, artificial over-expression of Eis or pretreatment with recombinant Eis abrogated production of both ROS and proinflammatory cytokines, which depends on the N-acetyltransferase domain of the Eis protein. Collectively, these data indicate that Mtb Eis suppresses host innate immune defenses by modulating autophagy, inflammation, and cell death in a redox-dependent manner.

  6. Ligand-dependent inhibition of beta-catenin/TCF signaling by androgen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesire, Dennis R; Isaacs, William B

    2002-12-01

    Beta-catenin signaling may contribute to prostate cancer (CaP) progression. Although beta-catenin is known to upregulate T cell factor (TCF) target gene expression in CaP cells, recent evidence demonstrates its capacity to enhance ligand-dependent androgen receptor (AR) function. Thus, we wished to further understand the interaction between these two pathways. We find in both CaP cells (CWR22-Rv1, LAPC-4, DU145) and non-CaP cells (HEK-293, TSU, SW480, HCT-116) that beta-catenin/TCF-related transcription (CRT), as measured by activation of a synthetic promoter and that of cyclin D1, is inhibited by androgen treatment. This inhibition is AR-dependent, as it only occurs in cells expressing AR endogenously or transiently, and is abrogated by AR antagonists. Additional analyses convey that the ligand-dependent nature of CRT suppression depends on transactivation-competent AR in the nucleus, but not on indirect effects stemming from AR target gene expression. Given the recent work identifying an AR/beta-catenin interaction, and from our finding that liganded AR does not prompt gross changes in the constitutive nuclear localization of TCF4 or mutant beta-catenin, we hypothesized that transcription factor (i.e. AR and TCF) competition for beta-catenin recruitment may explain, in part, androgen-induced suppression of CRT. To address this idea, we expressed an AR mutant lacking its DNA-binding domain (DBD). This receptor could not orchestrate ligand-dependent CRT repression, thereby providing support for those recent data implicating the AR DBD/LBD as necessary for beta-catenin interaction. Further supporting this hypothesis, TCF/LEF over-expression counteracts androgen-induced suppression of CRT, and requires beta-catenin binding activity to do so. Interestingly, TCF4 over-expression potently antagonizes AR function; however, this inhibition may occur independently of beta-catenin/TCF4 interaction. These results from TCF4 over-expression analyses, taken together, provide

  7. Cerebral Asymmetry of fMRI-BOLD Responses to Visual Stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Anders; Jensen, Bettina Hagström; Amin, Faisal Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Hemispheric asymmetry of a wide range of functions is a hallmark of the human brain. The visual system has traditionally been thought of as symmetrically distributed in the brain, but a growing body of evidence has challenged this view. Some highly specific visual tasks have been shown to depend...... on hemispheric specialization. However, the possible lateralization of cerebral responses to a simple checkerboard visual stimulation has not been a focus of previous studies. To investigate this, we performed two sessions of blood-oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (f......MRI) in 54 healthy subjects during stimulation with a black and white checkerboard visual stimulus. While carefully excluding possible non-physiological causes of left-to-right bias, we compared the activation of the left and the right cerebral hemispheres and related this to grey matter volume, handedness...

  8. Pre-stimulus BOLD-network activation modulates EEG spectral activity during working memory retention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara eKottlow

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Working memory (WM processes depend on our momentary mental state and therefore exhibit considerable fluctuations. Here, we investigate the interplay of task-preparatory and task-related brain activity as represented by pre-stimulus BOLD-fluctuations and spectral EEG from the retention periods of a visual WM task. Visual WM is used to maintain sensory information in the brain enabling the performance of cognitive operations and is associated with mental health.We tested 22 subjects simultaneously with EEG and fMRI while performing a visuo-verbal Sternberg task with two different loads, allowing for the temporal separation of preparation, encoding, retention and retrieval periods.Four temporally coherent networks - the default mode network (DMN, the dorsal attention, the right and the left WM network - were extracted from the continuous BOLD data by means of a group ICA. Subsequently, the modulatory effect of these networks’ pre-stimulus activation upon retention-related EEG activity in the theta, alpha and beta frequencies was analyzed. The obtained results are informative in the context of state-dependent information processing.We were able to replicate two well-known load-dependent effects: the frontal-midline theta increase during the task and the decrease of pre-stimulus DMN activity. As our main finding, these two measures seem to depend on each other as the significant negative correlations at frontal-midline channels suggested. Thus, suppressed pre-stimulus DMN levels facilitated later task related frontal midline theta increases. In general, based on previous findings that neuronal coupling in different frequency bands may underlie distinct functions in WM retention, our results suggest that processes reflected by spectral oscillations during retention seem not only to be online synchronized with activity in different attention-related networks but are also modulated by activity in these networks during preparation intervals.

  9. Direct evidence for attention-dependent influences of the frontal eye-fields on feature-responsive visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinen, Klaartje; Feredoes, Eva; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Ruff, Christian C; Driver, Jon

    2014-11-01

    Voluntary selective attention can prioritize different features in a visual scene. The frontal eye-fields (FEF) are one potential source of such feature-specific top-down signals, but causal evidence for influences on visual cortex (as was shown for "spatial" attention) has remained elusive. Here, we show that transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) applied to right FEF increased the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signals in visual areas processing "target feature" but not in "distracter feature"-processing regions. TMS-induced BOLD signals increase in motion-responsive visual cortex (MT+) when motion was attended in a display with moving dots superimposed on face stimuli, but in face-responsive fusiform area (FFA) when faces were attended to. These TMS effects on BOLD signal in both regions were negatively related to performance (on the motion task), supporting the behavioral relevance of this pathway. Our findings provide new causal evidence for the human FEF in the control of nonspatial "feature"-based attention, mediated by dynamic influences on feature-specific visual cortex that vary with the currently attended property.

  10. Ceramides inhibit phospholipase D-dependent insulin signaling in liver cells of old rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babenko, N A; Kharchenko, V S

    2012-02-01

    Ceramides are a novel class of biologically active molecules involved in the regulation of different signaling pathways. Ceramide is involved in regulation of the phospholipase D (PLD) activity and development of cell resistance to insulin. In this work, we have studied age-related features of insulin regulation of PLD activity and glucose metabolism in intact cells and modeled their resistance to insulin by exogenous ceramide and palmitic acid. Contents of ceramides and of free fatty acids (FFA) are found to increase with age, as well as on incubation of liver cells of young rats in the presence of the ceramide precursor palmitic acid. Under these conditions, the ability of insulin to activate PLD, the cell uptake of glucose, and glycogen synthesis sharply decreased. On incubation of hepatocytes of young animals in the presence of exogenous C2-ceramide, the contents of endogenous ceramides increased but not the contents of FFAs and of neutral lipids. These events were accompanied by suppression of the insulin-induced production of phosphatidylethanol (a result of ethanol transphosphatidylation by PLD), glucose uptake, and glycogen synthesis. Incubation of insulin-resistant liver cells of young rats and also of hepatocytes of old rats in the presence of myriocin (an inhibitor of the de novo synthesis of ceramide) was associated with a decrease in ceramide content in the cells and an increase in the cell sensitivity to insulin. The findings indicate an important role of ceramide in disturbance of insulin signaling due to inhibition of the PLD-dependent link in the liver cells of old animals.

  11. Sex- and hormone-dependent alterations in alcohol withdrawal-induced anxiety and corticolimbic endocannabinoid signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henricks, Angela M; Berger, Anthony L; Lugo, Janelle M; Baxter-Potter, Lydia N; Bieniasz, Kennedy V; Petrie, Gavin; Sticht, Martin A; Hill, Matthew N; McLaughlin, Ryan J

    2017-09-15

    Alcohol dependence is associated with anxiety during withdrawal. The endocannabinoid (ECB) system participates in the neuroendocrine and behavioral response to stress and changes in corticolimbic ECB signaling may contribute to alcohol withdrawal-induced anxiety. Moreover, symptoms of alcohol withdrawal differ between sexes and sexual dimorphism in withdrawal-induced ECB recruitment may be a contributing factor. Herein, we exposed intact male and female rats and ovariectomized (OVX) female rats with or without estradiol (E2) replacement to 6 weeks of chronic intermittent alcohol vapor and measured anxiety-like behavior, ECB content, and ECB-related mRNA in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC). Acute alcohol withdrawal increased anxiety-like behavior, produced widespread disturbances in ECB-related mRNA, and reduced anandamide (AEA) content in the BLA and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) content in the vmPFC of male, but not female rats. Similar to males, alcohol-exposed OVX females showed reductions in Napepld mRNA in the BLA, decreased AEA content in the BLA and vmPFC, and reductions in all ECB-related genes measured in the vmPFC. Importantly, E2 replacement prevented withdrawal-induced alterations in ECB content (but not mRNA) in OVX females, and although alcohol-exposed OVX females failed to exhibit more anxiety compared to their respective control, chronic alcohol exposure abolished the anxiolytic properties of E2 in OVX rats. These data indicate that ovarian sex hormones (but not E2 alone) protect against withdrawal-induced alterations in corticolimbic ECB signaling but do not impart resilience to withdrawal-induced anxiety. Thus, the mechanisms implicated in the manifestation of alcohol withdrawal-induced anxiety are most likely sex-specific. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled "A New Dawn in Cannabinoid Neurobiology". Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. ADAR1 deletion induces NFκB and interferon signaling dependent liver inflammation and fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Shoshan, Shirley Oren; Kagan, Polina; Sultan, Maya; Barabash, Zohar; Dor, Chen; Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Harmelin, Alon; Pappo, Orit; Marcu-Malina, Victoria; Ben-Ari, Ziv; Amariglio, Ninette; Rechavi, Gideon; Goldstein, Itamar; Safran, Michal

    2016-06-30

    Adenosine deaminase acting on RNA (ADAR) 1 binds and edits double-stranded (ds) RNA secondary structures found mainly within untranslated regions of many transcripts. In the current research, our aim was to study the role of ADAR1 in liver homeostasis. As previous studies show a conserved immunoregulatory function for ADAR1 in mammalians, we focused on its role in preventing chronic hepatic inflammation and the associated activation of hepatic stellate cells to produce extracellular matrix and promote fibrosis. We show that hepatocytes specific ADAR1 knock out (KO) mice display massive liver damage with multifocal inflammation and fibrogenesis. The bioinformatics analysis of the microarray gene-expression datasets of ADAR1 KO livers reveled a type-I interferons signature and an enrichment for immune response genes compared to control littermate livers. Furthermore, we found that in vitro silencing of ADAR1 expression in HepG2 cells leads to enhanced transcription of NFκB target genes, foremost of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL6 and IL8. We also discovered immune cell-independent paracrine signaling among ADAR1-depleted HepG2 cells and hepatic stellate cells, leading to the activation of the latter cell type to adopt a profibrogenic phenotype. This paracrine communication dependent mainly on the production and secretion of the cytokine IL6 induced by ADAR1 silencing in hepatocytes. Thus, our findings shed a new light on the vital regulatory role of ADAR1 in hepatic immune homeostasis, chiefly its inhibitory function on the crosstalk between the NFκB and type-I interferons signaling cascades, restraining the development of liver inflammation and fibrosis.

  13. Polyoxygenated Cholesterol Ester Hydroperoxide Activates TLR4 and SYK Dependent Signaling in Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soo-Ho; Yin, Huiyong; Ravandi, Amir; Armando, Aaron; Dumlao, Darren; Kim, Jungsu; Almazan, Felicidad; Taylor, Angela M.; McNamara, Coleen A.; Tsimikas, Sotirios; Dennis, Edward A.; Witztum, Joseph L.; Miller, Yury I.

    2013-01-01

    Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is one of the major causative mechanisms in the development of atherosclerosis. In previous studies, we showed that minimally oxidized LDL (mmLDL) induced inflammatory responses in macrophages, macropinocytosis and intracellular lipid accumulation and that oxidized cholesterol esters (OxCEs) were biologically active components of mmLDL. Here we identified a specific OxCE molecule responsible for the biological activity of mmLDL and characterized signaling pathways in macrophages in response to this OxCE. Using liquid chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry and biological assays, we identified an oxidized cholesteryl arachidonate with bicyclic endoperoxide and hydroperoxide groups (BEP-CE) as a specific OxCE that activates macrophages in a TLR4/MD-2-dependent manner. BEP-CE induced TLR4/MD-2 binding and TLR4 dimerization, phosphorylation of SYK, ERK1/2, JNK and c-Jun, cell spreading and uptake of dextran and native LDL by macrophages. The enhanced macropinocytosis resulted in intracellular lipid accumulation and macrophage foam cell formation. Bone marrow-derived macrophages isolated from TLR4 and SYK knockout mice did not respond to BEP-CE. The presence of BEP-CE was demonstrated in human plasma and in the human plaque material captured in distal protection devices during percutaneous intervention. Our results suggest that BEP-CE is an endogenous ligand that activates the TLR4/SYK signaling pathway. Because BEP-CE is present in human plasma and human atherosclerotic lesions, BEP-CE-induced and TLR4/SYK-mediated macrophage responses may contribute to chronic inflammation in human atherosclerosis. PMID:24376657

  14. Polyoxygenated cholesterol ester hydroperoxide activates TLR4 and SYK dependent signaling in macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Ho Choi

    Full Text Available Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL is one of the major causative mechanisms in the development of atherosclerosis. In previous studies, we showed that minimally oxidized LDL (mmLDL induced inflammatory responses in macrophages, macropinocytosis and intracellular lipid accumulation and that oxidized cholesterol esters (OxCEs were biologically active components of mmLDL. Here we identified a specific OxCE molecule responsible for the biological activity of mmLDL and characterized signaling pathways in macrophages in response to this OxCE. Using liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry and biological assays, we identified an oxidized cholesteryl arachidonate with bicyclic endoperoxide and hydroperoxide groups (BEP-CE as a specific OxCE that activates macrophages in a TLR4/MD-2-dependent manner. BEP-CE induced TLR4/MD-2 binding and TLR4 dimerization, phosphorylation of SYK, ERK1/2, JNK and c-Jun, cell spreading and uptake of dextran and native LDL by macrophages. The enhanced macropinocytosis resulted in intracellular lipid accumulation and macrophage foam cell formation. Bone marrow-derived macrophages isolated from TLR4 and SYK knockout mice did not respond to BEP-CE. The presence of BEP-CE was demonstrated in human plasma and in the human plaque material captured in distal protection devices during percutaneous intervention. Our results suggest that BEP-CE is an endogenous ligand that activates the TLR4/SYK signaling pathway. Because BEP-CE is present in human plasma and human atherosclerotic lesions, BEP-CE-induced and TLR4/SYK-mediated macrophage responses may contribute to chronic inflammation in human atherosclerosis.

  15. Matriptase activation connects tissue factor-dependent coagulation initiation to epithelial proteolysis and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gall, Sylvain M; Szabo, Roman; Lee, Melody; Kirchhofer, Daniel; Craik, Charles S; Bugge, Thomas H; Camerer, Eric

    2016-06-23

    The coagulation cascade is designed to sense tissue injury by physical separation of the membrane-anchored cofactor tissue factor (TF) from inactive precursors of coagulation proteases circulating in plasma. Once TF on epithelial and other extravascular cells is exposed to plasma, sequential activation of coagulation proteases coordinates hemostasis and contributes to host defense and tissue repair. Membrane-anchored serine proteases (MASPs) play critical roles in the development and homeostasis of epithelial barrier tissues; how MASPs are activated in mature epithelia is unknown. We here report that proteases of the extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation transactivate the MASP matriptase, thus connecting coagulation initiation to epithelial proteolysis and signaling. Exposure of TF-expressing cells to factors (F) VIIa and Xa triggered the conversion of latent pro-matriptase to an active protease, which in turn cleaved the pericellular substrates protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) and pro-urokinase. An activation pathway-selective PAR2 mutant resistant to direct cleavage by TF:FVIIa and FXa was activated by these proteases when cells co-expressed pro-matriptase, and matriptase transactivation was necessary for efficient cleavage and activation of wild-type PAR2 by physiological concentrations of TF:FVIIa and FXa. The coagulation initiation complex induced rapid and prolonged enhancement of the barrier function of epithelial monolayers that was dependent on matriptase transactivation and PAR2 signaling. These observations suggest that the coagulation cascade engages matriptase to help coordinate epithelial defense and repair programs after injury or infection, and that matriptase may contribute to TF-driven pathogenesis in cancer and inflammation.

  16. Possible Signaling Pathways Mediating Neuronal Calcium Sensor-1-Dependent Spatial Learning and Memory in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tomoe Y.; Nakao, Shu; Nakajo, Yukako; Takahashi, Jun C.; Wakabayashi, Shigeo; Yanamoto, Hiroji

    2017-01-01

    Intracellular Ca2+ signaling regulates diverse functions of the nervous system. Many of these neuronal functions, including learning and memory, are regulated by neuronal calcium sensor-1 (NCS-1). However, the pathways by which NCS-1 regulates these functions remain poorly understood. Consistent with the findings of previous reports, we revealed that NCS-1 deficient (Ncs1-/-) mice exhibit impaired spatial learning and memory function in the Morris water maze test, although there was little change in their exercise activity, as determined via treadmill-analysis. Expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF; a key regulator of memory function) and dopamine was significantly reduced in the Ncs1-/- mouse brain, without changes in the levels of glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor or nerve growth factor. Although there were no gross structural abnormalities in the hippocampi of Ncs1-/- mice, electron microscopy analysis revealed that the density of large dense core vesicles in CA1 presynaptic neurons, which release BDNF and dopamine, was decreased. Phosphorylation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II-α (CaMKII-α, which is known to trigger long-term potentiation and increase BDNF levels, was significantly reduced in the Ncs1-/- mouse brain. Furthermore, high voltage electric potential stimulation, which increases the levels of BDNF and promotes spatial learning, significantly increased the levels of NCS-1 concomitant with phosphorylated CaMKII-α in the hippocampus; suggesting a close relationship between NCS-1 and CaMKII-α. Our findings indicate that NCS-1 may regulate spatial learning and memory function at least in part through activation of CaMKII-α signaling, which may directly or indirectly increase BDNF production. PMID:28122057

  17. Visual, Auditory, and Cross Modal Sensory Processing in Adults with Autism: An EEG Power and BOLD fMRI Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hames, Elizabeth’ C.; Murphy, Brandi; Rajmohan, Ravi; Anderson, Ronald C.; Baker, Mary; Zupancic, Stephen; O’Boyle, Michael; Richman, David

    2016-01-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) and blood oxygen level dependent functional magnetic resonance imagining (BOLD fMRI) assessed the neurocorrelates of sensory processing of visual and auditory stimuli in 11 adults with autism (ASD) and 10 neurotypical (NT) controls between the ages of 20–28. We hypothesized that ASD performance on combined audiovisual trials would be less accurate with observable decreased EEG power across frontal, temporal, and occipital channels and decreased BOLD fMRI activity in these same regions; reflecting deficits in key sensory processing areas. Analysis focused on EEG power, BOLD fMRI, and accuracy. Lower EEG beta power and lower left auditory cortex fMRI activity were seen in ASD compared to NT when they were presented with auditory stimuli as demonstrated by contrasting the activity from the second presentation of an auditory stimulus in an all auditory block vs. the second presentation of a visual stimulus in an all visual block (AA2-VV2).We conclude that in ASD, combined audiovisual processing is more similar than unimodal processing to NTs. PMID:27148020

  18. Visual cortex and auditory cortex activation in early binocularly blind macaques: A BOLD-fMRI study using auditory stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Wu, Lingjie; Tang, Zuohua; Sun, Xinghuai; Feng, Xiaoyuan; Tang, Weijun; Qian, Wen; Wang, Jie; Jin, Lixin; Zhong, Yufeng; Xiao, Zebin

    2017-04-15

    Cross-modal plasticity within the visual and auditory cortices of early binocularly blind macaques is not well studied. In this study, four healthy neonatal macaques were assigned to group A (control group) or group B (binocularly blind group). Sixteen months later, blood oxygenation level-dependent functional imaging (BOLD-fMRI) was conducted to examine the activation in the visual and auditory cortices of each macaque while being tested using pure tones as auditory stimuli. The changes in the BOLD response in the visual and auditory cortices of all macaques were compared with immunofluorescence staining findings. Compared with group A, greater BOLD activity was observed in the bilateral visual cortices of group B, and this effect was particularly obvious in the right visual cortex. In addition, more activated volumes were found in the bilateral auditory cortices of group B than of group A, especially in the right auditory cortex. These findings were consistent with the fact that there were more c-Fos-positive cells in the bilateral visual and auditory cortices of group B compared with group A (p visual cortices of binocularly blind macaques can be reorganized to process auditory stimuli after visual deprivation, and this effect is more obvious in the right than the left visual cortex. These results indicate the establishment of cross-modal plasticity within the visual and auditory cortices.

  19. The ATM signaling cascade promotes recombination-dependent pachytene arrest in mouse spermatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarai Pacheco

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Most mutations that compromise meiotic recombination or synapsis in mouse spermatocytes result in arrest and apoptosis at the pachytene stage of the first meiotic prophase. Two main mechanisms are thought to trigger arrest: one independent of the double-strand breaks (DSBs that initiate meiotic recombination, and another activated by persistent recombination intermediates. Mechanisms underlying the recombination-dependent arrest response are not well understood, so we sought to identify factors involved by examining mutants deficient for TRIP13, a conserved AAA+ ATPase required for the completion of meiotic DSB repair. We find that spermatocytes with a hypomorphic Trip13 mutation (Trip13mod/mod arrest with features characteristic of early pachynema in wild type, namely, fully synapsed chromosomes without incorporation of the histone variant H1t into chromatin. These cells then undergo apoptosis, possibly in response to the arrest or in response to a defect in sex body formation. However, TRIP13-deficient cells that additionally lack the DSB-responsive kinase ATM progress further, reaching an H1t-positive stage (i.e., similar to mid/late pachynema in wild type despite the presence of unrepaired DSBs. TRIP13-deficient spermatocytes also progress to an H1t-positive stage if ATM activity is attenuated by hypomorphic mutations in Mre11 or Nbs1 or by elimination of the ATM-effector kinase CHK2. These mutant backgrounds nonetheless experience an apoptotic block to further spermatogenic progression, most likely caused by failure to form a sex body. DSB numbers are elevated in Mre11 and Nbs1 hypomorphs but not Chk2 mutants, thus delineating genetic requirements for the ATM-dependent negative feedback loop that regulates DSB numbers. The findings demonstrate for the first time that ATM-dependent signaling enforces the normal pachytene response to persistent recombination intermediates. Our work supports the conclusion that recombination defects trigger

  20. The effect of renal denervation on kidney oxygenation as determined by BOLD MRI in patients with hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vink, E.E.; Boer, A.; Blankestijn, P.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Nephrology, P.O. Box 85500, GA, Utrecht (Netherlands); Verloop, W.L.; Voskuil, M. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Cardiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Spiering, W.; Leiner, T. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Vascular Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands); Vonken, E.; Hoogduin, J.M. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Bots, M.L. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-07-15

    Renal denervation (RDN) is a promising therapy for resistant hypertension. RDN is assumed to decrease sympathetic activity. Consequently, RDN can potentially increase renal oxygenation. Blood oxygen level-dependent MRI (BOLD-MRI) provides a non-invasive tool to determine renal oxygenation in humans. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of RDN on renal oxygenation as determined by BOLD-MRI. Patients with resistant hypertension or the inability to follow a stable drug regimen due to unacceptable side effects were included. BOLD-MRI was performed before and 12 months after RDN. Twenty-seven patients were imaged on 3 T and 19 on 1.5 T clinical MRI systems. Fifty-four patients were included, 46 patients (23 men, mean age 57 years) completed the study. Mean 24-h BP changed from 163(±20)/98(±14) mmHg to 154(±22)/92(±13) mmHg (p = 0.001 and p < 0.001). eGFR did not change after RDN [77(±18) vs. 79(±20) mL/min/1.73 m{sup 2}; p = 0.13]. RDN did not affect renal oxygenation [1.5 T: cortical R2*: 12.5(±0.9) vs. 12.5(±0.9), p = 0.94; medullary R2*: 19.6(±1.7) vs. 19.3(1.4), p = 0.40; 3 T: cortical R2*: 18.1(±0.8) vs. 17.8(±1.2), p = 0.47; medullary R2*: 27.4(±1.9) vs. 26.7(±1.8), p = 0.19]. The current study shows that RDN does not lead to changes in renal oxygenation 1 year after RDN as determined by BOLD-MRI. (orig.)

  1. Dynamical properties of BOLD activity from the ventral posteromedial cortex associated with meditation and attentional skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagnoni, Giuseppe

    2012-04-11

    Neuroimaging data suggest a link between the spontaneous production of thoughts during wakeful rest and slow fluctuations of activity in the default mode network (DMN), a set of brain regions with high basal metabolism and a major neural hub in the ventral posteromedial cortex (vPMC). Meta-awareness and regulation of mind-wandering are core cognitive components of most contemplative practices and to study their impact on DMN activity, we collected functional MRI (fMRI) data from a cohort of experienced Zen meditators and meditation-naive controls engaging in a basic attention-to-breathing protocol. We observed a significant group difference in the skewness of the fMRI BOLD signal from the vPMC, suggesting that the relative incidence of states of elevated vPMC activity was lower in meditators; furthermore, the same parameter was significantly correlated with performance on a rapid visual information processing (RVIP) test for sustained attention conducted outside the scanner. Finally, a functional connectivity analysis with the vPMC seed revealed a significant association of RVIP performance with the degree of temporal correlation between vPMC and the right temporoparietal junction (TPJ), a region strongly implicated in stimulus-triggered reorienting of attention. Together, these findings suggest that the vPMC BOLD signal skewness and the temporal relationship of vPMC and TPJ activities reflect the dynamic tension between mind-wandering, meta-awareness, and directed attention, and may represent a useful endophenotype for studying individual differences in attentional abilities and the impairment of the latter in specific clinical conditions.

  2. Observation of two distinct spatial-temporal BOLD clusters during sensory stimulation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goelman, Gadi; Pelled, Galit; Dodd, Steve; Koretsky, Alan

    2007-02-01

    Neuronal activity evokes changes in local CBF and CBV, whose spatial differences are not fully known. We use the Radial Correlation Contrast (RCC) analysis method with high spatial resolution 100 x 100 x 1000 microm3 data collected with an 11.7 T magnet to differentiate two spatial-temporal BOLD clusters during sensory rat forepaw stimulation and hypothesize that each corresponds to either the CBF or the CBV processes. One cluster, obtained during the time segment of stimulation onset, is characterized by a high positive BOLD signal whereas the other, obtained during the simulation decline time segment, is characterized by a lower positive signal and strong post stimulus undershoot. The average volume of stimulation onset clusters is embedded in the stimulation decline clusters with the latter significantly larger and shifted towards deeper cortical layers. Comparison of amplitude-RCC and cross-correlation analyses performed on equivalent time segments (30 s, 40 images) revealed no differences in cluster size or location, demonstrating that temporal locality is more important than spatial locality in distinguishing between stimulation onset and stimulation decline clusters. We hypothesize that clusters characterized by stimulation onset are highly weighted by local changes in CBF whereas clusters characterized by stimulation decline are more CBV weighted. Moreover, the data suggest that the locations of the highest CBF changes are distinct from the locations of the highest CBV changes. While the former located within stimulation decline clusters and its weight is gradually reduced towards cluster's periphery (mainly ventrally), the highest changes in CBV occur in the cluster's periphery with only modest changes towards its center.

  3. cAMP-dependent proteolysis of GATA-6 is linked to JNK-signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ushijima, Hironori [Department of Molecular Biology, School of Pharmacy, Iwate Medical University, 2-1-1, Nishitokuta, Yahaba, Shiwagun, Iwate 028-3694 (Japan); Maeda, Masatomo, E-mail: mmaeda@iwate-med.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Biology, School of Pharmacy, Iwate Medical University, 2-1-1, Nishitokuta, Yahaba, Shiwagun, Iwate 028-3694 (Japan)

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A JNK inhibitor SP600125 inhibited cAMP-dependent proteolysis of GATA-6. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of a JNK activator anisomycin on the proteolysis was examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anisomycin stimulated the export of nuclear GATA-6 into the cytoplasm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer JNK activated the CRM1 mediated nuclear export of GATA-6. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer JNK further stimulated slowly the degradation of GATA-6 by cytoplasmic proteasomes. -- Abstract: A JNK inhibitor SP600125 inhibited cAMP-dependent proteolysis of GATA-6 by proteasomes around its IC50. We further examined the effects of SP600125 on the degradation of GATA-6 in detail, since an activator of JNK (anisomycin) is available. Interestingly, anisomycin immediately stimulated the export of nuclear GATA-6 into the cytoplasm, and then the cytoplasmic content of GATA-6 decreased slowly through degradation by proteasomes. Such an effect of anisomycin was inhibited by SP600125, indicating that the observed phenomenon might be linked to the JNK signaling pathway. The inhibitory effect of SP600125 could not be ascribed to the inhibition of PKA, since phosphorylation of CREB occurred in the presence of dbcAMP and SP600125. The nuclear export of GATA-6 was inhibited by leptomycin B, suggesting that CRM1-mediated export could be activated by anisomycin. Furthermore, it seems likely that the JNK activated by anisomycin may stimulate not only the nuclear export of GATA-6 through CRM1 but also the degradation of GATA-6 by cytoplasmic proteasomes. In contrast, A-kinase might activate only the latter process through JNK.

  4. Characterization of ubiquitination dependent dynamics in growth factor receptor signaling by quantitative proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akimov, Vyacheslav; Rigbolt, Kristoffer T G; Nielsen, Mogens M;

    2011-01-01

    ) for selectively decoding ubiquitination-driven processes involved in the regulation of cellular signaling networks. We applied this approach to characterize the temporal dynamics of ubiquitination events accompanying epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signal transduction. We used recombinant UBDs derived...

  5. Physical inactivity affects skeletal muscle insulin signaling in a birth weight-dependent manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Brynjulf; Friedrichsen, Martin; Andersen, Nicoline Resen

    2014-01-01

    We investigated whether physical inactivity could unmask defects in insulin and AMPK signaling in low birth weight (LBW) subjects.......We investigated whether physical inactivity could unmask defects in insulin and AMPK signaling in low birth weight (LBW) subjects....

  6. Operational Safety Assessment of Turbo Generators with Wavelet Rényi Entropy from Sensor-Dependent Vibration Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoli; Wang, Baojian; Chen, Xuefeng

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of sensor technology, various professional sensors are installed on modern machinery to monitor operational processes and assure operational safety, which play an important role in industry and society. In this work a new operational safety assessment approach with wavelet Rényi entropy utilizing sensor-dependent vibration signals is proposed. On the basis of a professional sensor and the corresponding system, sensor-dependent vibration signals are acquired and analyzed by a second generation wavelet package, which reflects time-varying operational characteristic of individual machinery. Derived from the sensor-dependent signals’ wavelet energy distribution over the observed signal frequency range, wavelet Rényi entropy is defined to compute the operational uncertainty of a turbo generator, which is then associated with its operational safety degree. The proposed method is applied in a 50 MW turbo generator, whereupon it is proved to be reasonable and effective for operation and maintenance. PMID:25894934

  7. Operational Safety Assessment of Turbo Generators with Wavelet Rényi Entropy from Sensor-Dependent Vibration Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Zhang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of sensor technology, various professional sensors are installed on modern machinery to monitor operational processes and assure operational safety, which play an important role in industry and society. In this work a new operational safety assessment approach with wavelet Rényi entropy utilizing sensor-dependent vibration signals is proposed. On the basis of a professional sensor and the corresponding system, sensor-dependent vibration signals are acquired and analyzed by a second generation wavelet package, which reflects time-varying operational characteristic of individual machinery. Derived from the sensor-dependent signals’ wavelet energy distribution over the observed signal frequency range, wavelet Rényi entropy is defined to compute the operational uncertainty of a turbo generator, which is then associated with its operational safety degree. The proposed method is applied in a 50 MW turbo generator, whereupon it is proved to be reasonable and effective for operation and maintenance.

  8. Increased PLEKHO1 within osteoblasts suppresses Smad-dependent BMP signaling to inhibit bone formation during aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin; Liang, Chao; Guo, Baosheng; Wu, Xiaohao; Li, Defang; Zhang, Zongkang; Zheng, Kang; Dang, Lei; He, Xiaojuan; Lu, Changwei; Peng, Songlin; Pan, Xiaohua; Zhang, Bao-Ting; Lu, Aiping; Zhang, Ge

    2017-04-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that the dysregulation of protein ubiquitination plays a crucial role in aging-associated diseases. Smad-dependent canonical BMP signaling pathway is indispensable for osteoblastic bone formation, which could be disrupted by the ubiquitination and subsequent proteasomal degradation of Smad1/5, the key molecules for BMP signaling transduction. However, whether the dysregulation of Smad1/5 ubiquitination and disrupted BMP signaling pathway is responsible for the age-related bone formation reduction is still underexplored. Pleckstrin homology domain-containing family O member 1 (PLEKHO1) is a previously identified ubiquitination-related molecule that could specifically target the linker region between the WW domains of Smurf1 to promote the ubiquitination of Smad1/5. Here, we found an age-related increase in the expression of PLEKHO1 in bone specimens from either fractured patients or aging rodents, which was associated with the age-related reduction in Smad-dependent BMP signaling and bone formation. By genetic approach, we demonstrated that loss of Plekho1 in osteoblasts could promote the Smad-dependent BMP signaling and alleviated the age-related bone formation reduction. In addition, osteoblast-specific Smad1 overexpression had beneficial effect on bone formation during aging, which could be counteracted after overexpressing Plekho1 within osteoblasts. By pharmacological approach, we showed that osteoblast-targeted Plekho1 siRNA treatment could enhance Smad-dependent BMP signaling and promote bone formation in aging rodents. Taken together, it suggests that the increased PLEKHO1 could suppress Smad-dependent BMP signaling to inhibit bone formation during aging, indicating the translational potential of targeting PLEKHO1 in osteoblast as a novel bone anabolic strategy for reversing established osteoporosis during aging. © 2016 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Mycobacterium abscessus-Induced Granuloma Formation Is Strictly Dependent on TNF Signaling and Neutrophil Trafficking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernut, Audrey; Nguyen-Chi, Mai; Kremer, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is considered the most common respiratory pathogen among the rapidly growing non-tuberculous mycobacteria. Infections with M. abscessus are increasingly found in patients with chronic lung diseases, especially cystic fibrosis, and are often refractory to antibiotic therapy. M. abscessus has two morphotypes with distinct effects on host cells and biological responses. The smooth (S) variant is recognized as the initial airway colonizer while the rough (R) is known to be a potent inflammatory inducer associated with invasive disease, but the underlying immunopathological mechanisms of the infection remain unsolved. We conducted a comparative stepwise dissection of the inflammatory response in S and R pathogenesis by monitoring infected transparent zebrafish embryos. Loss of TNFR1 function resulted in increased mortality with both variants, and was associated with unrestricted intramacrophage bacterial growth and decreased bactericidal activity. The use of transgenic zebrafish lines harboring fluorescent macrophages and neutrophils revealed that neutrophils, like macrophages, interact with M. abscessus at the initial infection sites. Impaired TNF signaling disrupted the IL8-dependent neutrophil mobilization, and the defect in neutrophil trafficking led to the formation of aberrant granulomas, extensive mycobacterial cording, unrestricted bacterial growth and subsequent larval death. Our findings emphasize the central role of neutrophils for the establishment and maintenance of the protective M. abscessus granulomas. These results also suggest that the TNF/IL8 inflammatory axis is necessary for protective immunity against M. abscessus and may be of clinical relevance to explain why immunosuppressive TNF therapy leads to the exacerbation of M. abscessus infections. PMID:27806130

  10. Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase expression and signalling in skeletal muscle during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Adam John; Kiens, Bente; Richter, Erik

    2006-01-01

    Ca2+ signalling is proposed to play an important role in skeletal muscle function during exercise. Here, we examined the expression of multifunctional Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaMK) in human skeletal muscle and show that CaMKII and CaMKK, but not CaMKI or CaMKIV, are expressed....... Furthermore, the effect of exercise duration and intensity on skeletal muscle CaMKII activity and phosphorylation of downstream targets was examined. Eight healthy men exercised at ~67% of peak pulmonary O2 uptake (VO2peak) with muscle samples taken at rest and after 1, 10, 30, 60 and 90 min of exercise. Ten...... other men exercised for three consecutive 10 min bouts at 35%, 60% and 85% VO2peak with muscle samples taken at rest, at the end of each interval and 30 min post-exercise. There was a rapid and transient increase in autonomous CaMKII activity and CaMKII phosphorylation at Thr287 in skeletal muscle...

  11. Airway epithelial homeostasis and planar cell polarity signaling depend on multiciliated cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladar, Eszter K.; Nayak, Jayakar V.; Milla, Carlos E.; Axelrod, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    Motile airway cilia that propel contaminants out of the lung are oriented in a common direction by planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling, which localizes PCP protein complexes to opposite cell sides throughout the epithelium to orient cytoskeletal remodeling. In airway epithelia, PCP is determined in a 2-phase process. First, cell-cell communication via PCP complexes polarizes all cells with respect to the proximal-distal tissue axis. Second, during ciliogenesis, multiciliated cells (MCCs) undergo cytoskeletal remodeling to orient their cilia in the proximal direction. The second phase not only directs cilium polarization, but also consolidates polarization across the epithelium. Here, we demonstrate that in airway epithelia, PCP depends on MCC differentiation. PCP mutant epithelia have misaligned cilia, and also display defective barrier function and regeneration, indicating that PCP regulates multiple aspects of airway epithelial homeostasis. In humans, MCCs are often sparse in chronic inflammatory diseases, and these airways exhibit PCP dysfunction. The presence of insufficient MCCs impairs mucociliary clearance in part by disrupting PCP-driven polarization of the epithelium. Consistent with defective PCP, barrier function and regeneration are also disrupted. Pharmacological stimulation of MCC differentiation restores PCP and reverses these defects, suggesting its potential for broad therapeutic benefit in chronic inflammatory disease. PMID:27570836

  12. Deciphering phonemes from syllables in blood oxygenation level-dependent signals in human superior temporal gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingtian; Hu, Xiaolin; Luo, Huan; Li, Jianmin; Zhang, Xiaolu; Zhang, Bo

    2016-03-01

    Linguistic units such as phonemes and syllables are important for speech perception. How the brain encodes these units is not well understood. Many neuroimaging studies have found distinct representations of consonant-vowel syllables that shared one phoneme and differed in the other phoneme (e.g. /ba/ and /da/), but it is unclear whether this discrimination ability is due to the neural coding of phonemes or syllables. We combined functional magnetic resonance imaging with multivariate pattern analysis to explore this question. Subjects listened to nine Mandarin syllables in a consonant-vowel form. We successfully decoded phonemes from the syllables based on the blood oxygenation level-dependent signals in the superior temporal gyrus (STG). Specifically, a classifier trained on the cortical patterns elicited by a set of syllables, which contained two phonemes, could distinguish the cortical patterns elicited by other syllables that contained the two phonemes. The results indicated that phonemes have unique representations in the STG. In addition, there was a categorical effect, i.e. the cortical patterns of consonants were similar, and so were the cortical patterns of vowels. Further analysis showed that phonemes exhibited stronger encoding specificity in the mid-STG than in the anterior STG.

  13. mTORC1-dependent protein synthesis underlying rapid antidepressant effect requires GABABR signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, E R; Niere, Farr; Raab-Graham, Kimberly F

    2013-10-01

    Administration of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) antagonists initiates a rapid anti-depressant response requiring mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) kinase; however the molecular mechanism is unknown. We have determined that upon NMDAR blockade, dendritic γ-amino-butyric acid B receptors (GABABR) facilitate dendritic calcium entry. The GABABR-mediated increase in calcium signal requires the availability of dendritic L-type calcium channels. Moreover, GABABR can activate mTOR and increase mTOR dependent expression of BDNF under the same NMDAR blocked conditions. In vivo, blocking GABABR prevents the fast-acting, anti-depressant effect of the NR2B antagonist, Ro-25-6891, decreases active mTORC1 kinase, and reduces expression of BDNF and the AMPA receptor subunit GluA1. These findings propose a novel role for GABABRs in the antidepressant action of NR2B antagonists and as an initiator/regulator of mTORC1-mediated translation.

  14. Hippo signaling regulates microprocessor and links cell-density-dependent miRNA biogenesis to cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Masaki; Triboulet, Robinson; Mohseni, Morvarid; Schlegelmilch, Karin; Shrestha, Kriti; Camargo, Fernando D; Gregory, Richard I

    2014-02-27

    Global downregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) is commonly observed in human cancers and can have a causative role in tumorigenesis. The mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon remain poorly understood. Here, we show that YAP, the downstream target of the tumor-suppressive Hippo-signaling pathway regulates miRNA biogenesis in a cell-density-dependent manner. At low cell density, nuclear YAP binds and sequesters p72 (DDX17), a regulatory component of the miRNA-processing machinery. At high cell density, Hippo-mediated cytoplasmic retention of YAP facilitates p72 association with Microprocessor and binding to a specific sequence motif in pri-miRNAs. Inactivation of the Hippo pathway or expression of constitutively active YAP causes widespread miRNA suppression in cells and tumors and a corresponding posttranscriptional induction of MYC expression. Thus, the Hippo pathway links contact-inhibition regulation to miRNA biogenesis and may be responsible for the widespread miRNA repression observed in cancer.

  15. Distinct forms of mitochondrial TOM-TIM supercomplexes define signal-dependent states of preprotein sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacinska, Agnieszka; van der Laan, Martin; Mehnert, Carola S; Guiard, Bernard; Mick, David U; Hutu, Dana P; Truscott, Kaye N; Wiedemann, Nils; Meisinger, Chris; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Rehling, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial import of cleavable preproteins occurs at translocation contact sites, where the translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) associates with the presequence translocase of the inner membrane (TIM23) in a supercomplex. Different views exist on the mechanism of how TIM23 mediates preprotein sorting to either the matrix or inner membrane. On the one hand, two TIM23 forms were proposed, a matrix transport form containing the presequence translocase-associated motor (PAM; TIM23-PAM) and a sorting form containing Tim21 (TIM23(SORT)). On the other hand, it was reported that TIM23 and PAM are permanently associated in a single-entity translocase. We have accumulated distinct transport intermediates of preproteins to analyze the translocases in their active, preprotein-carrying state. We identified two different forms of active TOM-TIM23 supercomplexes, TOM-TIM23(SORT) and TOM-TIM23-PAM. These two supercomplexes do not represent separate pathways but are in dynamic exchange during preprotein translocation and sorting. Depending on the signals of the preproteins, switches between the different forms of supercomplex and TIM23 are required for the completion of preprotein import.

  16. Chlorpromazine-induced hepatotoxicity during inflammation is mediated by TIRAP-dependent signaling pathway in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandhi, Adarsh, E-mail: adarsh.gandhi@nih.gov [University of Houston, Department of Pharmacological and Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, 1441 Moursund Street, Room 517, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Guo, Tao, E-mail: tguo4@jhu.edu [University of Houston, Department of Pharmacological and Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, 1441 Moursund Street, Room 517, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Shah, Pranav [University of Houston, Department of Pharmacological and Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, 1441 Moursund Street, Room 517, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Moorthy, Bhagavatula [Baylor College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, 1102 Bates Avenue, Suite 530, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Ghose, Romi, E-mail: rghose@uh.edu [University of Houston, Department of Pharmacological and Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, 1441 Moursund Street, Room 517, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Inflammation is a major component of idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions (IADRs). To understand the molecular mechanism of inflammation-mediated IADRs, we determined the role of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathway in idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity of the anti-psychotic drug, chlorpromazine (CPZ). Activation of TLRs recruits the first adaptor protein, Toll-interleukin 1 receptor domain containing adaptor protein (TIRAP) to the TIR domain of TLRs leading to the activation of the downstream kinase, c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK). Prolonged activation of JNK leads to cell-death. We hypothesized that activation of TLR2 by lipoteichoic acid (LTA) or TLR4 by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) will augment the hepatotoxicity of CPZ by TIRAP-dependent mechanism involving prolonged activation of JNK. Adult male C57BL/6, TIRAP{sup +/+} and TIRAP{sup −/−} mice were pretreated with saline, LPS (2 mg/kg) or LTA (6 mg/kg) for 30 min or 16 h followed by CPZ (5 mg/kg) or saline (vehicle) up to 24 h. We found that treatment of mice with CPZ in presence of LPS or LTA leads to ∼ 3–4 fold increase in serum ALT levels, a marked reduction in hepatic glycogen content, significant induction of serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α and prolonged JNK activation, compared to LPS or LTA alone. Similar results were observed in TIRAP{sup +/+} mice, whereas the effects of LPS or LTA on CPZ-induced hepatotoxicity were attenuated in TIRAP{sup −/−} mice. For the first time, we show that inflammation-mediated hepatotoxicity of CPZ is dependent on TIRAP, and involves prolonged JNK activation in vivo. Thus, TIRAP-dependent pathways may be targeted to predict and prevent inflammation-mediated IADRs. -- Highlights: ► Inflammation augments the toxicity of an idiosyncratic hepatotoxin chlorpromazine. ► Activation of Toll-like receptors by LPS or LTA induces chlorpromazine toxicity. ► Sustained stress kinase (JNK) activation is associated with chlorpromazine toxicity. ► These studies

  17. Radiation quality dependence of signal transmission and bystander induced cell killing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Giuseppe; Bertolotti, Alessia; Facoetti, Angelica; Grande, Sveva; Mariotti, Luca; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Ranza, Elena; Simone, Giustina; Sorrentino, Eugenio; Antonella Tabocchini, Maria

    Low dose radiobiological studies have shown effects, observable in cells that are in the vicinity of irradiated cells, which are due to the release by irradiated cells of several cellular mediators among which Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species (ROS, NRS), and cytokines are likely to play a key role. Despite the large number in the literature of studies on bystander effects induced by ionizing radiation the results are still conflicting, and further studies are therefore needed on the possible underlying mechanisms. The dependence on radiation quality deserve particular attention because bystander mechanisms are probably more important with high-LET irradi-ations, where many cells are not hit (bystander). Moreover, due to the different patterns of energy deposition, the cellular response to low LET and high LET radiation can be different. Understanding whether these cells can contribute to the adverse effects of low radiation doses in a radiation quality-dependent fashion might have important implications in risk estimates for both cancer induction and non-cancer diseases. In this context, we addressed to the study of the bystander induced cell killing after incubation with "conditioned medium" from primary human fibroblasts irradiated with 0.1 and 0.5 Gy of α-particles or γ-rays. Medium transfer was performed after 1h incubation from irradiation. The results have confirmed a reduction in clonogenic survival after incubation with medium from α-irradiated cells, independently of the dose; similar results were obtained after γ-irradiation, although in this case a slight dose depen-dence could be envisaged. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and Interleukin-8 (IL-8) levels were measured in the conditioned medium collected up to 20 hours after irradiation with α-particles and γ-rays in the dose-range of 0.1-1.0 Gy, in parallel with evaluation of their receptor expression in irradi-ated and bystander cells. Concerning IL-6, we observed the strongest modulation of its release

  18. ERK1 and ERK2 mitogen-activated protein kinases affect Ras-dependent cell signaling differentially

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonini Chiara

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinases p44ERK1 and p42ERK2 are crucial components of the regulatory machinery underlying normal and malignant cell proliferation. A currently accepted model maintains that ERK1 and ERK2 are regulated similarly and contribute to intracellular signaling by phosphorylating a largely common subset of substrates, both in the cytosol and in the nucleus. Results Here, we show that ablation of ERK1 in mouse embryo fibroblasts and NIH 3T3 cells by gene targeting and RNA interference results in an enhancement of ERK2-dependent signaling and in a significant growth advantage. By contrast, knockdown of ERK2 almost completely abolishes normal and Ras-dependent cell proliferation. Ectopic expression of ERK1 but not of ERK2 in NIH 3T3 cells inhibits oncogenic Ras-mediated proliferation and colony formation. These phenotypes are independent of the kinase activity of ERK1, as expression of a catalytically inactive form of ERK1 is equally effective. Finally, ectopic expression of ERK1 but not ERK2 is sufficient to attenuate Ras-dependent tumor formation in nude mice. Conclusion These results reveal an unexpected interplay between ERK1 and ERK2 in transducing Ras-dependent cell signaling and proliferation. Whereas ERK2 seems to have a positive role in controlling normal and Ras-dependent cell proliferation, ERK1 probably affects the overall signaling output of the cell by antagonizing ERK2 activity.

  19. Advances in the hydrodynamics solver of CO5BOLD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freytag, Bernd

    Many features of the Roe solver used in the hydrodynamics module of CO5BOLD have recently been added or overhauled, including the reconstruction methods (by adding the new second-order ``Frankenstein's method''), the treatment of transversal velocities, energy-flux averaging and entropy-wave treatment at small Mach numbers, the CTU scheme to combine the one-dimensional fluxes, and additional safety measures. All this results in a significantly better behavior at low Mach number flows, and an improved stability at larger Mach numbers requiring less (or no) additional tensor viscosity, which then leads to a noticeable increase in effective resolution.

  20. In vitro analysis of PDZ-dependent CFTR macromolecular signaling complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanning; Wang, Shuo; Li, Chunying

    2012-08-13

    has been shown to be of functional significance, suggesting that PDZ scaffold proteins may facilitate formation of CFTR macromolecular signaling complexes for specific/selective and efficient signaling in cells(16-18). Multiple biochemical assays have been developed to study CFTR-involving protein interactions, such as co-immunoprecipitation, pull-down assay, pair-wise binding assay, colorimetric pair-wise binding assay, and macromolecular complex assembly assay(16-19,28,29). Here we focus on the detailed procedures of assembling a PDZ motif-dependent CFTR-containing macromolecular complex in vitro, which is used extensively by our laboratory to study protein-protein or domain-domain interactions involving CFTR(16-19,28,29).

  1. Sensory signaling-dependent remodeling of olfactory cilia architecture in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Lu, Yun; Shaham, Shai; Sengupta, Piali

    2008-05-01

    Nonmotile primary cilia are sensory organelles composed of a microtubular axoneme and a surrounding membrane sheath that houses signaling molecules. Optimal cellular function requires the precise regulation of axoneme assembly, membrane biogenesis, and signaling protein targeting and localization via as yet poorly understood mechanisms. Here, we show that sensory signaling is required to maintain the architecture of the specialized AWB olfactory neuron cilia in C. elegans. Decreased sensory signaling results in alteration of axoneme length and expansion of a membraneous structure, thereby altering the topological distribution of a subset of ciliary transmembrane signaling molecules. Signaling-regulated alteration of ciliary structures can be bypassed by modulation of intracellular cGMP or calcium levels and requires kinesin-II-driven intraflagellar transport (IFT), as well as BBS- and RAB8-related proteins. Our results suggest that compensatory mechanisms in response to altered levels of sensory activity modulate AWB cilia architecture, revealing remarkable plasticity in the regulation of cilia structure.

  2. BOLD Magnetic Resonance Imaging identifies cortical hypoxia in severe renovascular disease”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloviczki, Monika L; Glockner, James F; Crane, John A; McKusick, Michael A; Misra, Sanjay; Grande, Joseph P; Lerman, Lilach O; Textor, Stephen C

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis has a range of manifestations depending upon the severity of vascular occlusion. The aim of this study was to examine whether exceeding the limits of adaptation to reduced blood flow ultimately leads to tissue hypoxia as determined by blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) MR imaging. We compared three groups of hypertensive patients (24 with essential hypertension [EH]), 13 with “moderate” (Doppler velocities 200-384 cm/sec) and 17 with “severe” atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis ([ARAS]; velocities above 384 cm/sec and loss of functional renal tissue). Cortical and medullary blood flows and volumes were determined by multi-detector CT. Post-stenotic kidney size and blood flow were reduced with ARAS, and tissue perfusion fell in the most severe lesions. Tissue deoxyhemoglobin, as reflected by R2* values, was higher in medulla as compared to cortex for all groups and did not differ between subjects with renal artery lesions and EH. By contrast, cortical R2* levels were elevated for severe ARAS (21.6 ±9.4 /sec) as compared with either EH (17.8±2.3 /sec, p<.01) or moderate ARAS (15.7± 2.1 /sec, p<.01). Changes in medullary R2* after furosemide administration tended to be blunted in severe ARAS as compared to unaffected (contralateral) kidneys. These results demonstrate that severe vascular occlusion overwhelms the capacity of the kidney to adapt to reduced blood flow, manifest as overt cortical hypoxia as measured by BOLD MRI. The level of cortical hypoxia is out of proportion to medulla and may provide a marker to identify irreversible parenchymal injury. PMID:22042812

  3. dsRNA-Dependent Protein Kinase PKR and its Role in Stress, Signaling and HCV Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane F. Meurs

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase PKR plays multiple roles in cells, in response to different stress situations. As a member of the interferon (IFN‑Stimulated Genes, PKR was initially recognized as an actor in the antiviral action of IFN, due to its ability to control translation, through phosphorylation, of the alpha subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2a. As such, PKR participates in the generation of stress granules, or autophagy and a number of viruses have designed strategies to inhibit its action. However, PKR deficient mice resist most viral infections, indicating that PKR may play other roles in the cell other than just acting as an antiviral agent. Indeed, PKR regulates several signaling pathways, either as an adapter protein and/or using its kinase activity. Here we review the role of PKR as an eIF2a kinase, its participation in the regulation of the NF-kB, p38MAPK and insulin pathways, and we focus on its role during infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV. PKR binds the HCV IRES RNA, cooperates with some functions of the HCV core protein and may represent a target for NS5A or E2. Novel data points out for a role of PKR as a pro-HCV agent, both as an adapter protein and as an eIF2a-kinase, and in cooperation with the di-ubiquitin-like protein ISG15. Developing pharmaceutical inhibitors of PKR may help in resolving some viral infections as well as stress-related damages.

  4. Common elements in interleukin 4 and insulin signaling pathways in factor-dependent hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L M; Keegan, A D; Li, W; Lienhard, G E; Pacini, S; Gutkind, J S; Myers, M G; Sun, X J; White, M F; Aaronson, S A

    1993-05-01

    Interleukin 4 (IL-4), insulin, and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) efficiently induced DNA synthesis in the IL-3-dependent murine myeloid cell lines FDC-P1 and FDC-P2. Although these factors could not individually sustain long-term growth of these lines, a combination of IL-4 with either insulin or IGF-I did support continuous growth. The principal tyrosine-phosphorylated substrate observed in FDC cells stimulated with IL-4, previously designated 4PS, was of the same size (170 kDa) as the major substrate phosphorylated in response to insulin or IGF-I. These substrates had phosphopeptides of the same size when analyzed by digestion with Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease, and each tightly associated with the 85-kDa component of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase after factor stimulation. IRS-1, the principal substrate phosphorylated in response to insulin or IGF-I stimulation in nonhematopoietic cells, is similar in size to 4PS. However, anti-IRS-1 antibodies failed to efficiently precipitate 4PS, and some phosphopeptides generated by V8 protease digestion of IRS-1 were distinct in size from the phosphopeptides of 4PS. Nevertheless, IL-4, insulin, and IGF-I were capable of stimulating tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1 in FDC cells that expressed this substrate as a result of transfection. These findings indicate that (i) IL-4, insulin, and IGF-I use signal transduction pathways in FDC lines that have at least one major feature in common, the rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of 4PS, and (ii) insulin and IGF-I stimulation of hematopoietic cell lines leads to the phosphorylation of a substrate that may be related to but is not identical to IRS-1.

  5. Interneuronal systems of the cervical spinal cord assessed with BOLD imaging at 1.5 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stracke, C.P.; Schoth, F.; Moeller-Hartmann, W.; Krings, T. [University Hospital of the University of Technology, Departments of Neuroradiology and Diagnostic Radiology, Aachen (Germany); Pettersson, L.G. [University of Goeteborg, Department of Physiology, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if functional activity with spinal cord somatosensory stimulation can be visualized using BOLD fMRI. We investigated nine healthy volunteers using a somatosensory stimulus generator. The stimuli were applied in three different runs at the first, third, and fifth finger tip of the right hand, respectively, corresponding to dermatomes c6, c7, and c8. The stimuli gave an increase of BOLD signal (activation) in three different locations of the spinal cord and brain stem. First, activations could be seen in the spinal segment corresponding to the stimulated dermatome in seven out of nine volunteers for c6 stimulation, two out of eight for c7, and three out of eight for c8. These activations were located close to the posterior margin of the spinal cord, presumably reflecting synaptic transmission to dorsal horn interneurons. Second, activation in the medulla oblongata was evident in four subjects, most likely corresponding to the location of the nucleus cuneatus. The third location of activation, which was the strongest and most reliable observed was inside the spinal cord in the c3 and c4 segments. Activation at these spinal levels was almost invariably observed independently of the dermatome stimulated (9/9 for c6, 8/8 for c7, and 7/8 for c8 stimulation). These activations may pertain to an interneuronal system at this spinal level. The results are discussed in relation to neurophysiological studies on cervical spinal interneuronal pathways in animals and humans. (orig.)

  6. Estradiol-Induced Object Recognition Memory Consolidation Is Dependent on Activation of mTOR Signaling in the Dorsal Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortress, Ashley M.; Fan, Lu; Orr, Patrick T.; Zhao, Zaorui; Frick, Karyn M.

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is an important regulator of protein synthesis and is essential for various forms of hippocampal memory. Here, we asked whether the enhancement of object recognition memory consolidation produced by dorsal hippocampal infusion of 17[Beta]-estradiol (E[subscript 2]) is dependent on mTOR…

  7. An appraisal of how the vitamin A-redox hypothesis can maintain honesty of carotenoid-dependent signals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, Mirre J. P.; Groothuis, Ton G. G.; Verhulst, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The vitamin A-redox hypothesis provides an explanation for honest signaling of phenotypic quality by carotenoid-dependent traits. A key aspect of the vitamin A-redox hypothesis, applicable to both yellow and red coloration, is the hypothesized negative feedback of tightly regulated Vitamin A plasma

  8. Igλ+ B cell development but not Igκ editing depends on NF-κB signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derudder, Emmanuel; Cadera, Emily J; Vahl, J Christoph; Wang, Jing; Fox, Casey J.; Zha, Shan; van Loo, Geert; Pasparakis, Manolis; Schlissel, Mark S; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc; Rajewsky, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    By genetically ablating IκB kinase (IKK)-mediated NF-κB activation in the B cell lineage, and by analyzing a mouse mutant in which Igλ+ B cells are generated in the absence of rearrangements in Igk, we define two distinct, consecutive phases of early B cell development that differ in their dependence on IKK-mediated NF-κB signaling. During the first phase, in which NF-κB signaling is dispensable, predominantly Igκ+ B cells are generated and undergo efficient receptor editing. In the second phase, predominantly Igλ+ B cells are generated, whose development is ontogenetically timed to occur after Igk rearrangements. This second phase of development is dependent on NF-κB signals, which can be substituted by transgenic expression of the pro-survival factor Bcl2. PMID:19412180

  9. Cardioprotective actions of Notch1 against myocardial infarction via LKB1-dependent AMPK signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Sun, Wanqing; Quan, Nanhu; Wang, Lin; Chu, Dongyang; Cates, Courtney; Liu, Quan; Zheng, Yang; Li, Ji

    2016-05-15

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway plays a pivotal role in intracellular adaptation to energy stress during myocardial ischemia. Notch1 signaling in the adult myocardium is also activated in response to ischemic stress. However, the relationship between Notch1 and AMPK signaling pathways during ischemia remains unclear. We hypothesize that Notch1 as an adaptive signaling pathway protects the heart from ischemic injury via modulating the cardioprotective AMPK signaling pathway. C57BL/6J mice were subjected to an in vivo ligation of left anterior descending coronary artery and the hearts from C57BL/6J mice were subjected to an ex vivo globe ischemia and reperfusion in the Langendorff perfusion system. The Notch1 signaling was activated during myocardial ischemia. A Notch1 γ-secretase inhibitor, dibenzazepine (DBZ), was intraperitoneally injected into mice to inhibit Notch1 signaling pathway by ischemia. The inhibition of Notch1 signaling by DBZ significantly augmented cardiac dysfunctions caused by myocardial infarction. Intriguingly, DBZ treatment also significantly blunted the activation of AMPK signaling pathway. The immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that an interaction between Notch1 and liver kinase beta1 (LKB1) modulated AMPK activation during myocardial ischemia. Furthermore, a ligand of Notch1 Jagged1 can significantly reduce cardiac damage caused by ischemia via activation of AMPK signaling pathway and modulation of glucose oxidation and fatty acid oxidation during ischemia and reperfusion. But Jagged1 did not have any cardioprotections on AMPK kinase dead transgenic hearts. Taken together, the results indicate that the cardioprotective effect of Notch1 against ischemic damage is mediated by AMPK signaling via an interaction with upstream LKB1.

  10. Pupil diameter covaries with BOLD activity in human locus coeruleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Peter R; O'Connell, Redmond G; O'Sullivan, Michael; Robertson, Ian H; Balsters, Joshua H

    2014-08-01

    The locus coeruleus-noradrenergic (LC-NA) neuromodulatory system has been implicated in a broad array of cognitive processes, yet scope for investigating this system's function in humans is currently limited by an absence of reliable non-invasive measures of LC activity. Although pupil diameter has been employed as a proxy measure of LC activity in numerous studies, empirical evidence for a relationship between the two is lacking. In the present study, we sought to rigorously probe the relationship between pupil diameter and BOLD activity localized to the human LC. Simultaneous pupillometry and fMRI revealed a relationship between continuous pupil diameter and BOLD activity in a dorsal pontine cluster overlapping with the LC, as localized via neuromelanin-sensitive structural imaging and an LC atlas. This relationship was present both at rest and during performance of a two-stimulus oddball task, with and without spatial smoothing of the fMRI data, and survived retrospective image correction for physiological noise. Furthermore, the spatial extent of this pupil/LC relationship guided a volume-of-interest analysis in which we provide the first demonstration in humans of a fundamental characteristic of animal LC activity: phasic modulation by oddball stimulus relevance. Taken together, these findings highlight the potential for utilizing pupil diameter to achieve a more comprehensive understanding of the role of the LC-NA system in human cognition.

  11. Frequency analysis of temperature-dependent interferometric signal for the measurement of the temperature coefficient of refractive index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jianqin; Shen, Jun; Neill, W. Stuart

    2016-07-01

    A method of frequency analysis for the measurement of the temperature coefficient of refractive index (dn/dT) using a Fabry-Perot interferometer was developed and tested against ethanol and water. The temperature-dependent interferometric signal described by Airy's formula was analyzed in both the temperature and frequency domains. By fast Fourier transform, a low-pass filter was designed and employed to eliminate the noise superimposed on the signal. dn/dT was determined accurately from the noise-removed signal by peak analysis. Furthermore, the signal frequency parameters may be utilized for the material thermophysical property characterization. This method lays the foundation for an online dn/dT instrument for monitoring chemical processes.

  12. Physiological Signals based Day-Dependence Analysis with Metric Multidimensional Scaling for Sentiment Classification in Wearable Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of the affective has emerged in implicit human-computer interaction. Given the physiological signals in the recognition process of the affective, the different positions by which the physiological signal sensors are installed in the body, along with the daily habits and moods of human beings, influence the affective physiological signals. The scalar product matrix was calculated in this study based on metric multidimensional scaling with dissimilarity matrix. Subsequently, the matrix of individual attribute reconstructs was obtained using the principal component factor. The method proposed in this study eliminates day dependence, reduces the effect of time in the physiological signals of the affective, and improves the accuracy of affection classification.

  13. Perceptual distortions and delusional thinking following ketamine administration are related to increased pharmacological MRI signal changes in the parietal lobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, James; Kotoula, Vasileia; Dietrich, Craige; De Simoni, Sara; Krystal, John H; Mehta, Mitul A

    2015-09-01

    Ketamine produces effects in healthy humans that resemble the positive, negative and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia. We investigated the effect of ketamine administration on brain activity as indexed by blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal change response, and its relationship to ketamine-induced subjective changes, including perceptual distortion. Thirteen healthy participants volunteered for the study. All underwent a 15-min functional MRI acquisition with a ketamine infusion commencing after 5 min (approx 0.26 mg/kg over 20s followed by an infusion of approx. 0.42 mg/kg/h). Following the scan, participants self-rated ketamine-induced effects using the Psychotomimetic States Inventory. Ketamine led to widespread cortical and subcortical increases in BOLD response (FWE-corrected p parietal cortices reflect ketamine effects on circuits that contribute to its capacity to produce perceptual alterations and delusional interpretations. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Activation of the yeast Hippo pathway by phosphorylation-dependent assembly of signaling complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Jeremy M; Lim, Daniel; Stach, Lasse; Ogrodowicz, Roksana W; Keck, Jamie M; Jones, Michele H; Wong, Catherine C L; Yates, John R; Winey, Mark; Smerdon, Stephen J; Yaffe, Michael B; Amon, Angelika

    2013-05-17

    Scaffold-assisted signaling cascades guide cellular decision-making. In budding yeast, one such signal transduction pathway called the mitotic exit network (MEN) governs the transition from mitosis to the G1 phase of the cell cycle. The MEN is conserved and in metazoans is known as the Hippo tumor-suppressor pathway. We found that signaling through the MEN kinase cascade was mediated by an unusual two-step process. The MEN kinase Cdc15 first phosphorylated the scaffold Nud1. This created a phospho-docking site on Nud1, to which the effector kinase complex Dbf2-Mob1 bound through a phosphoserine-threonine binding domain, in order to be activated by Cdc15. This mechanism of pathway activation has implications for signal transmission through other kinase cascades and might represent a general principle in scaffold-assisted signaling.

  15. mGluR1-mediated excitation of cerebellar GABAergic interneurons requires both G protein-dependent and Src-ERK1/2-dependent signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideo Kubota

    Full Text Available Stimulation of type I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1/5 in several neuronal types induces slow excitatory responses through activation of transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC channels. GABAergic cerebellar molecular layer interneurons (MLIs modulate firing patterns of Purkinje cells (PCs, which play a key role in cerebellar information processing. MLIs express mGluR1, and activation of mGluR1 induces an inward current, but its precise intracellular signaling pathways are unknown. We found that mGluR1 activation facilitated spontaneous firing of mouse cerebellar MLIs through an inward current mediated by TRPC1 channels. This mGluR1-mediated inward current depends on both G protein-dependent and -independent pathways. The nonselective protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and AG490 as well as the selective extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 inhibitors PD98059 and SL327 suppressed the mGluR1-mediated current responses. Following G protein blockade, the residual mGluR1-mediated inward current was significantly reduced by the selective Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor PP2. In contrast to cerebellar PCs, GABAB receptor activation in MLIs did not alter the mGluR1-mediated inward current, suggesting that there is no cross-talk between mGluR1 and GABAB receptors in MLIs. Thus, activation of mGluR1 facilitates firing of MLIs through the TRPC1-mediated inward current, which depends on not only G protein-dependent but also Src-ERK1/2-dependent signaling pathways, and consequently depresses the excitability of cerebellar PCs.

  16. Placental oxygen transport estimated by the hyperoxic placental BOLD MRI response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anne Nødgaard; Sinding, Marianne; Peters, David A;

    2015-01-01

    cases of severe early onset FGR, placental BOLD MRI was performed in a 1.5 Tesla MRI system (TR:8000 msec, TE:50 msec, Flip angle:90). Placental histological examination was performed in the FGR cases. In normal pregnancies, the average hyperoxic placental BOLD response was 12.6 ± 5.4% (mean ± SD...

  17. Type I IFN signaling in CD8– DCs impairs Th1-dependent malaria immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Ashraful; Best, Shannon E.; Montes de Oca, Marcela; James, Kylie R.; Ammerdorffer, Anne; Edwards, Chelsea L.; de Labastida Rivera, Fabian; Amante, Fiona H.; Bunn, Patrick T.; Sheel, Meru; Sebina, Ismail; Koyama, Motoko; Varelias, Antiopi; Hertzog, Paul J.; Kalinke, Ulrich; Gun, Sin Yee; Rénia, Laurent; Ruedl, Christiane; MacDonald, Kelli P.A.; Hill, Geoffrey R.; Engwerda, Christian R.

    2014-01-01

    Many pathogens, including viruses, bacteria, and protozoan parasites, suppress cellular immune responses through activation of type I IFN signaling. Recent evidence suggests that immune suppression and susceptibility to the malaria parasite, Plasmodium, is mediated by type I IFN; however, it is unclear how type I IFN suppresses immunity to blood-stage Plasmodium parasites. During experimental severe malaria, CD4+ Th cell responses are suppressed, and conventional DC (cDC) function is curtailed through unknown mechanisms. Here, we tested the hypothesis that type I IFN signaling directly impairs cDC function during Plasmodium infection in mice. Using cDC-specific IFNAR1-deficient mice, and mixed BM chimeras, we found that type I IFN signaling directly affects cDC function, limiting the ability of cDCs to prime IFN-γ–producing Th1 cells. Although type I IFN signaling modulated all subsets of splenic cDCs, CD8– cDCs were especially susceptible, exhibiting reduced phagocytic and Th1-promoting properties in response to type I IFNs. Additionally, rapid and systemic IFN-α production in response to Plasmodium infection required type I IFN signaling in cDCs themselves, revealing their contribution to a feed-forward cytokine-signaling loop. Together, these data suggest abrogation of type I IFN signaling in CD8– splenic cDCs as an approach for enhancing Th1 responses against Plasmodium and other type I IFN–inducing pathogens. PMID:24789914

  18. miRNAs mediate SnRK1-dependent energy signaling in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana eConfraria

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The SnRK1 protein kinase, the plant ortholog of mammalian AMPK and yeast Snf1, is activated by the energy depletion caused by adverse environmental conditions. Upon activation, SnRK1 triggers extensive transcriptional changes to restore homeostasis and promote stress tolerance and survival partly through the inhibition of anabolism and the activation of catabolism. Despite the identification of a few bZIP transcription factors as downstream effectors, the mechanisms underlying gene regulation, and in particular gene repression by SnRK1, remain mostly unknown. microRNAs (miRNAs are 20-24 nt RNAs that regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally by driving the cleavage and/or translation attenuation of complementary mRNA targets. In addition to their role in plant development, mounting evidence implicates miRNAs in the response to environmental stress. Given the involvement of miRNAs in stress responses and the fact that some of the SnRK1-regulated genes are miRNA targets, we postulated that miRNAs drive part of the transcriptional reprogramming triggered by SnRK1. By comparing the transcriptional response to energy deprivation between WT and dcl1-9, a mutant deficient in miRNA biogenesis, we identified 831 starvation genes misregulated in the dcl1-9 mutant, out of which 155 are validated or predicted miRNA targets. Functional clustering analysis revealed that the main cellular processes potentially co-regulated by SnRK1 and miRNAs are translation and organelle function and uncover TCP transcription factors as one of the most highly enriched functional clusters. TCP repression during energy deprivation was impaired in miR319 knockdown (MIM319 plants, demonstrating the involvement of miR319 in the stress-dependent regulation of TCPs. Altogether, our data indicates that miRNAs are components of the SnRK1 signaling cascade contributing to the regulation of specific mRNA targets and possibly tuning down particular cellular processes during the

  19. A statistical approach for segregating cognitive task stages from multivariate fMRI BOLD time series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charmaine eDemanuele

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Multivariate pattern analysis can reveal new information from neuroimaging data to illuminate human cognition and its disturbances. Here, we develop a methodological approach, based on multivariate statistical/machine learning and time series analysis, to discern cognitive processing stages from fMRI blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD time series. We apply this method to data recorded from a group of healthy adults whilst performing a virtual reality version of the delayed win-shift radial arm maze task. This task has been frequently used to study working memory and decision making in rodents. Using linear classifiers and multivariate test statistics in conjunction with time series bootstraps, we show that different cognitive stages of the task, as defined by the experimenter, namely, the encoding/retrieval, choice, reward and delay stages, can be statistically discriminated from the BOLD time series in brain areas relevant for decision making and working memory. Discrimination of these task stages was significantly reduced during poor behavioral performance in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC, but not in the primary visual cortex (V1. Experimenter-defined dissection of time series into class labels based on task structure was confirmed by an unsupervised, bottom-up approach based on Hidden Markov Models. Furthermore, we show that different groupings of recorded time points into cognitive event classes can be used to test hypotheses about the specific cognitive role of a given brain region during task execution. We found that whilst the DLPFC strongly differentiated between task stages associated with different memory loads, but not between different visual-spatial aspects, the reverse was true for V1. Our methodology illustrates how different aspects of cognitive information processing during one and the same task can be separated and attributed to specific brain regions based on information contained in multivariate patterns of voxel

  20. The mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchanger upregulates glucose dependent Ca2+ signalling linked to insulin secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iulia I Nita

    Full Text Available Mitochondria mediate dual metabolic and Ca(2+ shuttling activities. While the former is required for Ca(2+ signalling linked to insulin secretion, the role of the latter in β cell function has not been well understood, primarily because the molecular identity of the mitochondrial Ca(2+ transporters were elusive and the selectivity of their inhibitors was questionable. This study focuses on NCLX, the recently discovered mitochondrial Na(+/Ca(2+ exchanger that is linked to Ca(2+ signalling in MIN6 and primary β cells. Suppression either of NCLX expression, using a siRNA construct (siNCLX or of its activity, by a dominant negative construct (dnNCLX, enhanced mitochondrial Ca(2+ influx and blocked efflux induced by glucose or by cell depolarization. In addition, NCLX regulated basal, but not glucose-dependent changes, in metabolic rate, mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial resting Ca(2+. Importantly, NCLX controlled the rate and amplitude of cytosolic Ca(2+ changes induced by depolarization or high glucose, indicating that NCLX is a critical and rate limiting component in the cross talk between mitochondrial and plasma membrane Ca(2+ signalling. Finally, knockdown of NCLX expression was followed by a delay in glucose-dependent insulin secretion. These findings suggest that the mitochondrial Na(+/Ca(2+ exchanger, NCLX, shapes glucose-dependent mitochondrial and cytosolic Ca(2+ signals thereby regulating the temporal pattern of insulin secretion in β cells.

  1. Melanin- and carotenoid-dependent signals of great tits (Parus major) relate differently to metal pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauwe, Tom; Eens, Marcel

    2008-10-01

    Due to their high phenotypic plasticity, the expression of secondary sexual characteristics is particularly sensitive to stress. Here, we investigated the expression of two conspicuous visual signals in great tits (Parus major) in a metal pollution gradient. In three study sites with marked differences in metal contamination (mainly lead, cadmium, copper and zinc), we compared melanin and carotenoid colouration of great tits. While carotenoid colouration (yellow breast) was negatively related to metal pollution, the size of a melanin trait (breast stripe) was larger in the most polluted sites. Environmental pollutants not only affect the expression of conspicuous signals but may even enhance, directly or indirectly, a signal of male quality such as breast stripe. Our results also support the multiple messages hypothesis predicting that different signals highlight different aspects of geno- and phenotypic condition of the bearer.

  2. Melanin- and carotenoid-dependent signals of great tits ( Parus major) relate differently to metal pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauwe, Tom; Eens, Marcel

    2008-10-01

    Due to their high phenotypic plasticity, the expression of secondary sexual characteristics is particularly sensitive to stress. Here, we investigated the expression of two conspicuous visual signals in great tits ( Parus major) in a metal pollution gradient. In three study sites with marked differences in metal contamination (mainly lead, cadmium, copper and zinc), we compared melanin and carotenoid colouration of great tits. While carotenoid colouration (yellow breast) was negatively related to metal pollution, the size of a melanin trait (breast stripe) was larger in the most polluted sites. Environmental pollutants not only affect the expression of conspicuous signals but may even enhance, directly or indirectly, a signal of male quality such as breast stripe. Our results also support the multiple messages hypothesis predicting that different signals highlight different aspects of geno- and phenotypic condition of the bearer.

  3. Activity-dependent, stress-responsive BDNF signaling and the quest for optimal brain health and resilience throughout the lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, S M; Mattson, M P

    2013-06-03

    During development of the nervous system, the formation of connections (synapses) between neurons is dependent upon electrical activity in those neurons, and neurotrophic factors produced by target cells play a pivotal role in such activity-dependent sculpting of the neural networks. A similar interplay between neurotransmitter and neurotrophic factor signaling pathways mediates adaptive responses of neural networks to environmental demands in adult mammals, with the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) being particularly prominent regulators of synaptic plasticity throughout the central nervous system. Optimal brain health throughout the lifespan is promoted by intermittent challenges such as exercise, cognitive stimulation and dietary energy restriction, that subject neurons to activity-related metabolic stress. At the molecular level, such challenges to neurons result in the production of proteins involved in neurogenesis, learning and memory and neuronal survival; examples include proteins that regulate mitochondrial biogenesis, protein quality control, and resistance of cells to oxidative, metabolic and proteotoxic stress. BDNF signaling mediates up-regulation of several such proteins including the protein chaperone GRP-78, antioxidant enzymes, the cell survival protein Bcl-2, and the DNA repair enzyme APE1. Insufficient exposure to such challenges, genetic factors may conspire to impair BDNF production and/or signaling resulting in the vulnerability of the brain to injury and neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. Further, BDNF signaling is negatively regulated by glucocorticoids. Glucocorticoids impair synaptic plasticity in the brain by negatively regulating spine density, neurogenesis and long-term potentiation, effects that are potentially linked to glucocorticoid regulation of BDNF. Findings suggest that BDNF signaling in specific brain regions mediates some

  4. Identification of a hydrogen peroxide signalling pathway in the control of light-dependent germination in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lariguet, Patricia; Ranocha, Philippe; De Meyer, Mireille; Barbier, Odile; Penel, Claude; Dunand, Christophe

    2013-08-01

    Germination is controlled by external factors, such as temperature, water, light and by hormone balance. Recently, reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been shown to act as messengers during plant development, stress responses and programmed cell death. We analyzed the role of ROS during germination and demonstrated that ROS in addition to their role as cell wall loosening factor are essential signalling molecules in this process. Indeed, we showed that ROS are released prior to endosperm rupture, that their production is required for germination, and that class III peroxidases, as ROS level regulators, colocalized with ROS production. Among ROS, H2O2 modifies, during germination early steps, the expression of genes encoding for enzymes regulating ROS levels. This pointing out a regulatory feedback loop for ROS production. Measurements of endogenous levels of ROS following application of GA and ABA suggested that ABA inhibits germination by repressing ROS accumulation, and that, conversely, GA triggers germination by promoting an increase of ROS levels. We followed the early visible steps of germination (testa and endosperm rupture) in Arabidopsis seeds treated by specific ROS scavengers and as the light quality perception is necessary for a regular germination, we examined the germination in presence of exogenous H2O2 in different light qualities. H2O2 either promoted germination or repressed germination depending on the light wavelengths, showing that H2O2 acts as a signal molecule regulating germination in a light-dependent manner. Using photoreceptors null-mutants and GA-deficient mutants, we showed that H2O2-dependent promotion of germination relies on phytochrome signalling, but not on cryptochrome signalling, and that ROS signalling requires GA signalling.

  5. FGF-dependent Notch signaling maintains the spinal cord stem zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akai, Jun; Halley, Pam A.; Storey, Kate G.

    2005-01-01

    Generation of the spinal cord relies on proliferation of undifferentiated cells located in a caudal stem zone. Although fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling is required to maintain this cell group, we do not know how it controls cell behavior in this context. Here we characterize an overlooked expression domain of the Notch ligand, Delta1, in the stem zone and demonstrate that this constitutes a proliferative cell group in which Notch signaling is active. We show that FGF signaling is required for expression of the proneural gene cash4 in the stem zone, which in turn induces Delta1. We further demonstrate that Notch signaling is required for cell proliferation within the stem zone; however, it does not regulate cell movement out of this region, nor is loss of Notch signaling sufficient to drive neuronal differentiation within this tissue. These data identify a novel role for the Notch pathway during vertebrate neurogenesis in which signaling between high Delta1-expressing cells maintains the neural precursor pool that generates the spinal cord. Our findings also suggest a mechanism for the establishment of the cell selection process, lateral inhibition: Mutual inhibition between Delta/Notch-expressing stem zone cells switches to single Delta1-presenting neurons as FGF activity declines in the newly formed neuroepithelium. PMID:16287717

  6. Quercetin induces caspase-dependent extrinsic apoptosis through inhibition of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling in HER2-overexpressing BT-474 breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hye-Sook; Ku, Jin Mo; Choi, Han-Seok; Choi, Youn Kyung; Woo, Jong-Kyu; Kim, Minsoo; Kim, Ilhwan; Na, Chang Hyeok; Hur, Hansol; Jang, Bo-Hyoung; Shin, Yong Cheol; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2016-07-01

    Flavonoids are assumed to exert beneficial effects in different types of cancers at high concentrations. Yet, their molecular mechanisms of action remain unknown. The present study aimed to examine the effect of quercetin on proliferation and apoptosis in HER2-expressing breast cancer cells. The anti-proliferative effects of quercetin were examined by proliferation, MTT and clonogenic survival assays. The effect of quercetin on expression of apoptotic molecules was determined by western blotting. Luciferase reporter assay was performed to measure signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) transcriptional activity. ELISA assay was performed to measure intracellular MMP-9 levels. Immunocytochemistry was performed to evaluate the nuclear STAT3 level. The results revealed that quercetin inhibited the proliferation of BT-474 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Quercetin also inhibited clonogenic survival (anchorage-dependent and -independent) of BT-474 cells in a dose-dependent manner. These growth inhibitions were accompanied with an increase in sub-G0/G1 apoptotic populations. Quercetin induced caspase-dependent extrinsic apoptosis upregulating the levels of cleaved caspase-8 and cleaved caspase-3, and inducing the cleavage of poly(ADP‑ribose) polymerase (PARP). In contrast, quercetin did not induce apoptosis via intrinsic mitochondrial apoptosis pathway since this compound did not decrease the mitochondrial membrane potential and did not affect the levels of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and Bcl-2-associated X protein (BAX). Quercetin reduced the expression of phospho-JAK1 and phospho-STAT3 and decreased STAT3-dependent luciferase reporter gene activity in the BT-474 cells. Quercetin inhibited MMP-9 secretion and decreased the nuclear translocation of STAT3. Our study indicates that quercetin induces apoptosis at concentrations >20 µM through inhibition of STAT3 signaling and could serve as a useful compound to prevent or treat HER2

  7. A novel MEK-ERK-AMPK signaling axis controls chemokine receptor CCR7-dependent survival in human mature dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Cotarelo, Pilar; Escribano-Díaz, Cristina; González-Bethencourt, Ivan Luis; Gómez-Moreira, Carolina; Deguiz, María Laura; Torres-Bacete, Jesús; Gómez-Cabañas, Laura; Fernández-Barrera, Jaime; Delgado-Martín, Cristina; Mellado, Mario; Regueiro, José Ramón; Miranda-Carús, María Eugenia; Rodríguez-Fernández, José Luis

    2015-01-09

    Chemokine receptor CCR7 directs mature dendritic cells (mDCs) to secondary lymph nodes where these cells regulate the activation of T cells. CCR7 also promotes survival in mDCs, which is believed to take place largely through Akt-dependent signaling mechanisms. We have analyzed the involvement of the AMP-dependent kinase (AMPK) in the control of CCR7-dependent survival. A pro-apoptotic role for AMPK is suggested by the finding that pharmacological activators induce apoptosis, whereas knocking down of AMPK with siRNA extends mDC survival. Pharmacological activation of AMPK also induces apoptosis of mDCs in the lymph nodes. Stimulation of CCR7 leads to inhibition of AMPK, through phosphorylation of Ser-485, which was mediated by G(i)/Gβγ, but not by Akt or S6K, two kinases that control the phosphorylation of AMPK on Ser-485 in other settings. Using selective pharmacological inhibitors, we show that CCR7-induced phosphorylation of AMPK on Ser-485 is mediated by MEK and ERK. Coimmunoprecipitation analysis and proximity ligation assays indicate that AMPK associates with ERK, but not with MEK. These results suggest that in addition to Akt-dependent signaling mechanisms, CCR7 can also promote survival of mDCs through a novel MEK1/2-ERK1/2-AMPK signaling axis. The data also suggest that AMPK may be a potential target to modulate mDC lifespan and the immune response.

  8. Validity of the “Fall Back” Test for Boldness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saša Veličković

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Synonyms for the word boldness include courage, fearlessness, heroism and bravery. The best examples of courage in sport are athletes who, despite difficult situations, conditions and strong competition, perform very risky elements, break records, etc. The “Fall back” measurement instrument has been used in the selection process for artistic gymnastics. Bearing in mind that this test requires a drop back down an inclined plane, it requires a degree of courage in the realization of this motor task. The aim of this research is to determine the validity of the “fall back” test and to answer the question: Is the “Fall back” test actually a measure of courage among beginners in the sport? In this study, the research sample consisted of 16 boys and 33 girls, third graders from the Jovan Cvijic elementary school in Kostolac, aged nine years (+/- 6 months. The sample of variables represented the results written using two measurement instruments: 1. Psychological survey -test of boldness and courage–PSBC (a test modeled after the–Erikson`s theory of Psyhosocial Development test–About.com Psyhology; 2. Situational motor measuring instrument–Fall back–MFIB. The resulting measurements were analyzed by the appropriate statistical methods, which are congruent with the set objective and task ofthe study. The validity of the “Fall back” situational-motor test is determined by calculating the coefficient of correlation (r between said composite test and a psychological test of courage. The very high coefficients of correlation that resulted in all three cases (total sample r = .846, sample of boys r = .873, a sample of girls r = .845 indicate a high validity level for the test, “Fall back”, that is, the subject of measurement in the test, largely corresponds with the subject of measurement in the PSBC psychological test. The height of the correlation coefficient also justifies the use of the “Fall back” test as a composite test

  9. Signal transduction pathways provide opportunities to enhance HDL and apoAI-dependent reverse cholesterol transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulay, Vishwaroop; Wood, Peta; Rentero, Carles; Enrich, Carlos; Grewal, Thomas

    2012-02-01

    Binding of High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) and its major apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) to cell surface receptors is believed to initiate a plethora of signaling cascades that promote atheroprotective cell behavior, including the removal of excess cholesterol from lipid-loaded macrophages. More specifically, HDL and apoA-I binding to scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter A1 has been shown to activate protein kinase A and C (PKA, PKC), Rac/Rho GTPases, Janus Kinase 2 (JAK2), calmodulin as well as mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). Some of these signaling events upregulate mobilization of cholesterol from cellular pools, while others promote efflux pathways through increased expression, stability, and cell surface localization of SR-BI and ABCA1. This review aims to summarize the current knowledge of HDL- and apoA-I -induced signal transduction pathways that are linked to cholesterol efflux and discusses the underlying mechanisms that could couple ligand binding to SR-BI and ABCA1 with signaling and cholesterol export. Additional focus is given on the potential of pharmacological intervention to modulate the activity of signaling cascades for the inhibition or regression of cholesterol accumulation in atherosclerotic lesions.

  10. Loss of FGF-dependent mesoderm identity and rise of endogenous retinoid signalling determine cessation of body axis elongation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Olivera-Martinez

    Full Text Available The endogenous mechanism that determines vertebrate body length is unknown but must involve loss of chordo-neural-hinge (CNH/axial stem cells and mesoderm progenitors in the tailbud. In early embryos, Fibroblast growth factor (FGF maintains a cell pool that progressively generates the body and differentiation onset is driven by retinoid repression of FGF signalling. This raises the possibility that FGF maintains key tailbud cell populations and that rising retinoid activity underlies cessation of body axis elongation. Here we show that sudden loss of the mesodermal gene (Brachyury from CNH and the mesoderm progenitor domain correlates with FGF signalling decline in the late chick tailbud. This is accompanied by expansion of neural gene expression and a similar change in cell fate markers is apparent in the human tailbud. Fate mapping of chick tailbud further revealed that spread of neural gene expression results from continued ingression of CNH-derived cells into the position of the mesoderm progenitor domain. Using gain and loss of function approaches in vitro and in vivo, we then show that attenuation of FGF/Erk signalling mediates this loss of Brachyury upstream of Wnt signalling, while high-level FGF maintains Brachyury and can induce ectopic CNH-like cell foci. We further demonstrate a rise in endogenous retinoid signalling in the tailbud and show that here FGF no longer opposes retinoid synthesis and activity. Furthermore, reduction of retinoid signalling at late stages elevated FGF activity and ectopically maintained mesodermal gene expression, implicating endogenous retinoid signalling in loss of mesoderm identity. Finally, axis termination is concluded by local cell death, which is reduced by blocking retinoid signalling, but involves an FGFR-independent mechanism. We propose that cessation of body elongation involves loss of FGF-dependent mesoderm identity in late stage tailbud and provide evidence that rising endogenous retinoid

  11. Loss of FGF-Dependent Mesoderm Identity and Rise of Endogenous Retinoid Signalling Determine Cessation of Body Axis Elongation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halley, Pamela A.; Storey, Kate G.

    2012-01-01

    The endogenous mechanism that determines vertebrate body length is unknown but must involve loss of chordo-neural-hinge (CNH)/axial stem cells and mesoderm progenitors in the tailbud. In early embryos, Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) maintains a cell pool that progressively generates the body and differentiation onset is driven by retinoid repression of FGF signalling. This raises the possibility that FGF maintains key tailbud cell populations and that rising retinoid activity underlies cessation of body axis elongation. Here we show that sudden loss of the mesodermal gene (Brachyury) from CNH and the mesoderm progenitor domain correlates with FGF signalling decline in the late chick tailbud. This is accompanied by expansion of neural gene expression and a similar change in cell fate markers is apparent in the human tailbud. Fate mapping of chick tailbud further revealed that spread of neural gene expression results from continued ingression of CNH-derived cells into the position of the mesoderm progenitor domain. Using gain and loss of function approaches in vitro and in vivo, we then show that attenuation of FGF/Erk signalling mediates this loss of Brachyury upstream of Wnt signalling, while high-level FGF maintains Brachyury and can induce ectopic CNH-like cell foci. We further demonstrate a rise in endogenous retinoid signalling in the tailbud and show that here FGF no longer opposes retinoid synthesis and activity. Furthermore, reduction of retinoid signalling at late stages elevated FGF activity and ectopically maintained mesodermal gene expression, implicating endogenous retinoid signalling in loss of mesoderm identity. Finally, axis termination is concluded by local cell death, which is reduced by blocking retinoid signalling, but involves an FGFR-independent mechanism. We propose that cessation of body elongation involves loss of FGF-dependent mesoderm identity in late stage tailbud and provide evidence that rising endogenous retinoid activity mediates this

  12. Thioredoxin-dependent Redox Regulation of Cellular Signaling and Stress Response through Reversible Oxidation of Methionines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigelow, Diana J.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2011-06-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a common feature of many forms of stress to which plants are exposed. Successful adaptation to changing environmental conditions requires sensitive sensors of ROS such as protein-bound methionines that are converted to their corresponding methionine sulfoxides, which in turn can influence cellular signaling pathways. Such a signaling protein is calmodulin, which represents an early and central point in calcium signaling pathways important to stress response in plants. We describe recent work elucidating fundamental mechanisms of reversible methionine oxidation within calmodulin, including the sensitivity of individual methionines within plant and animal calmodulin to ROS, the structural and functional consequences of their oxidation, and the interactions of oxidized calmodulin with methionine sulfoxide reductase enzymes.

  13. Dependence of microwave-excitation signal parameters on frequency stability of caesium atomic clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, A. A.; Davydov, V. V.; Vologdin, V. A.; Zalyotov, D. V.

    2015-11-01

    New scheme of the microwave - excitation signal for the caesium atomic clock is based on method of direct digital synthesis. The theoretical calculations and experimental research showed decrease step frequency tuning by several orders and improvement the spectral characteristics of the output signal of frequency synthesizer. A range of generated output frequencies is expanded, and the possibility of detuning the frequency of the neighboring resonance of spectral line that makes it possible to adjust the C-field in quantum frequency standard is implemented. Experimental research of the metrological characteristics of the quantum frequency standard on the atoms of caesium - 133 with new design scheme of the microwave - excitation signal showed improvement in daily frequency stability on 1.2*10-14.

  14. Power—Law in Depth—Dependence of Signal Speed in Vertical Granular Chain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUAi-Guo; HongJongbae

    2001-01-01

    The signal generated by an initial perturbation dispersively propagates in the vertical granular chain under gravity.For the power-law-type contact force,the signal speed follows power-law with the depth.When the perturbation is very weak,the exponent is 1/2(1-1/p).When the perturbation is very strong,the exponent approaches zero.The transition of the exponent from oscillatory regime with weak nonlinearity to quasi-solitary regime with strong nonlinearity is smooth.

  15. DHHC protein-dependent palmitoylation protects regulator of G-protein signaling 4 from proteasome degradation

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Regulator of G-protein signaling 4 (RGS4), an intracellular modulator of G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR)-mediated signaling, is regulated by multiple processes including palmitoylation and proteasome degradation. We found that co-expression of DHHC acyltransferases (DHHC3 or DHHC7), but not their acyltransferase-inactive mutants, increased expression levels of RGS4 but not its Cys2 to Ser mutant (RGS4C2S). DHHC3 interacts with and palmitoylates RGS4 but not RGS4C2S in vivo. Palmitoylation p...

  16. The Iron-Dependent Regulator Fur Controls Pheromone Signaling Systems and Luminescence in the Squid Symbiont Vibrio fischeri ES114

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septer, Alecia N.; Lyell, Noreen L.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria often use pheromones to coordinate group behaviors in specific environments. While high cell density is required for pheromones to achieve stimulatory levels, environmental cues can also influence pheromone accumulation and signaling. For the squid symbiont Vibrio fischeri ES114, bioluminescence requires pheromone-mediated regulation, and this signaling is induced in the host to a greater extent than in culture, even at an equivalent cell density. Our goal is to better understand this environment-specific control over pheromone signaling and bioluminescence. Previous work with V. fischeri MJ1 showed that iron limitation induces luminescence, and we recently found that ES114 encounters a low-iron environment in its host. Here we show that ES114 induces luminescence at lower cell density and achieves brighter luminescence in low-iron media. This iron-dependent effect on luminescence required ferric uptake regulator (Fur), which we propose influences two pheromone signaling master regulators, LitR and LuxR. Genetic and bioinformatic analyses suggested that under low-iron conditions, Fur-mediated repression of litR is relieved, enabling more LitR to perform its established role as an activator of luxR. Interestingly, Fur may similarly control the LitR homolog SmcR of Vibrio vulnificus. These results reveal an intriguing regulatory link between low-iron conditions, which are often encountered in host tissues, and pheromone-dependent master regulators. PMID:23315731

  17. A petunia ABC protein controls strigolactone-dependent symbiotic signalling and branching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kretzschmar, T.; Kohlen, W.; Sasse, J.; Borghi, L.; Schlegel, M.; Bachelier, J.B.; Reinhardt, D.; Bours, R.M.E.H.; Bouwmeester, H.J.; Martinoia, E.

    2012-01-01

    Strigolactones were originally identified as stimulators of the germination of root-parasitic weeds1 that pose a serious threat to resource-limited agriculture2. They are mostly exuded from roots and function as signalling compounds in the initiation of arbuscular mycorrhizae3, which are

  18. A Density-Dependent Switch Drives Stochastic Clustering and Polarization of Signaling Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jilkine, Alexandra; Angenent, Sigurd B.; Wu, Lani F.; Altschuler, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Positive feedback plays a key role in the ability of signaling molecules to form highly localized clusters in the membrane or cytosol of cells. Such clustering can occur in the absence of localizing mechanisms such as pre-existing spatial cues, diffusional barriers, or molecular cross-linking. What prevents positive feedback from amplifying inevitable biological noise when an un-clustered “off” state is desired? And, what limits the spread of clusters when an “on” state is desired? Here, we show that a minimal positive feedback circuit provides the general principle for both suppressing and amplifying noise: below a critical density of signaling molecules, clustering switches off; above this threshold, highly localized clusters are recurrently generated. Clustering occurs only in the stochastic regime, suggesting that finite sizes of molecular populations cannot be ignored in signal transduction networks. The emergence of a dominant cluster for finite numbers of molecules is partly a phenomenon of random sampling, analogous to the fixation or loss of neutral mutations in finite populations. We refer to our model as the “neutral drift polarity model.” Regulating the density of signaling molecules provides a simple mechanism for a positive feedback circuit to robustly switch between clustered and un-clustered states. The intrinsic ability of positive feedback both to create and suppress clustering is a general mechanism that could operate within diverse biological networks to create dynamic spatial organization. PMID:22102805

  19. Associative, Bidirectional Changes in Neural Signaling Utilizing NMDA Receptor- and Endocannabinoid-Dependent Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qin; Burrell, Brian D.

    2011-01-01

    Persistent, bidirectional changes in synaptic signaling (that is, potentiation and depression of the synapse) can be induced by the precise timing of individual pre- and postsynaptic action potentials. However, far less attention has been paid to the ability of paired trains of action potentials to elicit persistent potentiation or depression. We…

  20. A density-dependent switch drives stochastic clustering and polarization of signaling molecules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Jilkine

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Positive feedback plays a key role in the ability of signaling molecules to form highly localized clusters in the membrane or cytosol of cells. Such clustering can occur in the absence of localizing mechanisms such as pre-existing spatial cues, diffusional barriers, or molecular cross-linking. What prevents positive feedback from amplifying inevitable biological noise when an un-clustered "off" state is desired? And, what limits the spread of clusters when an "on" state is desired? Here, we show that a minimal positive feedback circuit provides the general principle for both suppressing and amplifying noise: below a critical density of signaling molecules, clustering switches off; above this threshold, highly localized clusters are recurrently generated. Clustering occurs only in the stochastic regime, suggesting that finite sizes of molecular populations cannot be ignored in signal transduction networks. The emergence of a dominant cluster for finite numbers of molecules is partly a phenomenon of random sampling, analogous to the fixation or loss of neutral mutations in finite populations. We refer to our model as the "neutral drift polarity model." Regulating the density of signaling molecules provides a simple mechanism for a positive feedback circuit to robustly switch between clustered and un-clustered states. The intrinsic ability of positive feedback both to create and suppress clustering is a general mechanism that could operate within diverse biological networks to create dynamic spatial organization.

  1. Control of Mammary Differentiation by Ras-Dependent Signal Transduction Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-05-01

    include anti-Stat5, sc-835 ( SantaCruz Bio- with EGF reversed the EGF-induced inhibition of the technology, Santa Cruz, CA), anti-phosphoStat5 (Cell...anti-Stat5, sc-835 producible experiment indicated that DIP stimulation ( SantaCruz ), anti-phosphoStat5 (Cell Signaling), anti- in the presence of the

  2. Temporal analysis of phosphotyrosine-dependent signaling networks by quantitative proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blagoev, Blagoy; Ong, S.E.; Kratchmarova, Irina

    2004-01-01

    To study the global dynamics of phosphotyrosine-based signaling events in early growth factor stimulation, we developed a mass spectrometric method that converts temporal changes to differences in peptide isotopic abundance. The proteomes of three cell populations were metabolically encoded with ...

  3. Nutritional status-dependent endocannabinoid signalling regulates the integration of rat visceral information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlaifia, Abdessattar; Matias, Isabelle; Cota, Daniela; Tell, Fabien

    2017-06-01

    Vagal sensory inputs transmit information from the viscera to brainstem neurones located in the nucleus tractus solitarii to set physiological parameters. These excitatory synapses exhibit a CB1 endocannabinoid-induced long-term depression (LTD) triggered by vagal fibre stimulation. We investigated the impact of nutritional status on long-term changes in this long-term synaptic plasticity. Food deprivation prevents LTD induction by disrupting CB1 receptor signalling. Short-term refeeding restores the capacity of vagal synapses to express LTD. Ghrelin and cholecystokinin, respectively released during fasting and refeeding, play a key role in the control of LTD via the activation of energy sensing pathways such as AMPK and the mTOR and ERK pathways. Communication form the viscera to the brain is essential to set physiological homoeostatic parameters but also to drive more complex behaviours such as mood, memory and emotional states. Here we investigated the impact of the nutritional status on long-term changes in excitatory synaptic transmission in the nucleus tractus solitarii, a neural hub integrating visceral signals. These excitatory synapses exhibit a CB1 endocannabinoid (eCB)-induced long-term depression (LTD) triggered by vagal fibre stimulation. Since eCB signalling is known to be an important component of homoeostatic regulation of the body and is regulated during various stressful conditions, we tested the hypothesis that food deprivation alters eCB signalling in central visceral afferent fibres. Food deprivation prevents eCB-LTD induction due to the absence of eCB signalling. This loss was reversed by blockade of ghrelin receptors. Activation of the cellular fuel sensor AMP-activated protein kinase or inhibition of the mechanistic target of rapamycin pathway abolished eCB-LTD in free-fed rats. Signals associated with energy surfeit, such as short-term refeeding, restore eCB-LTD induction, which in turn requires activation of cholecystokinin receptors and

  4. TRPC3 amplifies B-cell receptor-induced ERK signalling via protein kinase D-dependent Rap1 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numaga-Tomita, Takuro; Nishida, Motohiro; Putney, James W; Mori, Yasuo

    2016-01-15

    Sustained activation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) has an important role in the decision regarding the cell fate of B-lymphocytes. Recently, we demonstrated that the diacylglycerol-activated non-selective cation channel canonical transient receptor potential 3 (TRPC3) is required for the sustained ERK activation induced by the B-cell receptor. However, the signalling mechanism underlying TRPC3-mediated ERK activation remains elusive. In the present study, we have shown that TRPC3 mediates Ca(2+) influx to sustain activation of protein kinase D (PKD) in a protein kinase C-dependent manner in DT40 B-lymphocytes. The later phase of ERK activation depends on the small G-protein Rap1, known as a downstream target of PKD, whereas the earlier phase of ERK activation depends on the Ras protein. It is of interest that sustained ERK phosphorylation is required for the full induction of the immediate early gene Egr-1 (early growth response 1). These results suggest that TRPC3 reorganizes the BCR signalling complex by switching the subtype of small G-proteins to sustain ERK activation in B-lymphocytes.

  5. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase regulates crosstalk between Trk A tyrosine kinase and p75(NTR)-dependent sphingolipid signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilderback, T R; Gazula, V R; Dobrowsky, R T

    2001-03-01

    The mechanism of crosstalk between signaling pathways coupled to the Trk A and p75(NTR) neurotrophin receptors in PC12 cells was examined. In response to nerve growth factor (NGF), Trk A activation inhibited p75(NTR)-dependent sphingomyelin (SM) hydrolysis. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) inhibitor, LY294002, reversed this inhibition suggesting that Trk A activation of PI 3-kinase is necessary to inhibit sphingolipid signaling by p75(NTR). In contrast, SM hydrolysis induced by neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), which did not activate PI-3 kinase, was uneffected by LY294002. However, transient expression of a constituitively active PI 3-kinase inhibited p75(NTR)-dependent SM hydrolysis by both NGF and NT-3. Intriguingly, NGF induced an association of activated PI 3-kinase with acid sphingomyelinase (SMase). This interaction localized to caveolae-related domains and correlated with a 50% decrease in immunoprecipitated acid SMase activity. NGF-stimulated PI 3-kinase activity was necessary for inhibition of acid SMase but was not required for ligand-induced association of the p85 subunit of PI 3-kinase with the phospholipase. Finally, this interaction was specific for NGF since EGF did not induce an association of PI 3-kinase with acid SMase. In summary, our data suggest that PI 3-kinase regulates the inhibitory crosstalk between Trk A tyrosine kinase and p75(NTR)-dependent sphingolipid signaling pathways and that this interaction localizes to caveolae-related domains.

  6. SIZ1-Dependent Post-Translational Modification by SUMO Modulates Sugar Signaling and Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Pedro Humberto; Verde, Nuno; Lourenço, Tiago; Magalhães, Alexandre Papadopoulos; Tavares, Rui Manuel; Bejarano, Eduardo Rodríguez; Azevedo, Herlânder

    2015-12-01

    Post-translational modification mechanisms function as switches that mediate the balance between optimum growth and the response to environmental stimuli, by regulating the activity of key proteins. SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) attachment, or sumoylation, is a post-translational modification that is essential for the plant stress response, also modulating hormonal circuits to co-ordinate developmental processes. The Arabidopsis SUMO E3 ligase SAP and Miz 1 (SIZ1) is the major SUMO conjugation enhancer in response to stress, and is implicated in several aspects of plant development. Here we report that known SUMO targets are over-represented in multiple carbohydrate-related proteins, suggesting a functional link between sumoylation and sugar metabolism and signaling in plants. We subsequently observed that SUMO-conjugated proteins accumulate in response to high doses of sugar in a SIZ1-dependent manner, and that the null siz1 mutant displays increased expression of sucrose and starch catabolic genes and shows reduced starch levels. We demonstrated that SIZ1 controls germination time and post-germination growth via osmotic and sugar-dependent signaling, respectively. Glucose was specifically linked to SUMO-sugar interplay, with high levels inducing root growth inhibition and aberrant root hair morphology in siz1. The use of sugar analogs and sugar marker gene expression analysis allowed us to implicate SIZ1 in a signaling pathway dependent on glucose metabolism, probably involving modulation of SNF1-related kinase 1 (SnRK1) activity.

  7. Factors related to the magnitude of T2* MR signal changes during functional imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krings, T. [Department of Neuroradiology, University Hospital of the Technical University Aachen (Germany); Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital of the Technical University Aachen (Germany); Interdisciplinary Centre for Clinical Research - Central Nervous System, University Hospital of the Technical University Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52057 Aachen (Germany); Reinges, M.H.T.; Gilsbach, J.M. [Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital of the Technical University Aachen (Germany); Willmes, K.; Nuerk, H.C. [Section of Neuropsychology, Department of Neurology, University Hospital of the Technical University Aachen (Germany); Meister, I.G. [Department of Neurology, University Hospital of the Technical University Aachen (Germany); Thron, A. [Department of Neuroradiology, University Hospital of the Technical University Aachen (Germany)

    2002-06-01

    Our aim was to determine whether age, sex, the degree of weakness, anticonvulsants, the histology of the underlying lesion(s), the presence of oedema or the distance of the lesion from the motor region have an impact on the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal strength and therefore on the validity of functional MRI (fMRI). We studied 98 patients with masses near the central region imaged for surgical planning at 1.5 tesla, employing a BOLD sequence during a motor task. We calculated percentage signal change in the primary motor cortex between rest and activation and carried out multiple linear regression to examine the impact of the above factors on signal strength. Using a stepwise analysis strategy, the distance of the lesion from the motor region had the strongest influence (r=0.653, P<0.001). The factor with largest uncorrelated additional impact on signal change was the presence of oedema. Both predictors together formed a highly significant multiple r=0.739 (P<0.001). No other predictive factor was identified (all P>0.20). Disturbances of cerebral blood flow and metabolism induced by the tumour were presumed to be the causes of a decrease in signal in the adjacent cortex. (orig.)

  8. Convolution power spectrum analysis for FMRI data based on prior image signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiang; Chen, Huafu; Fang, Fang; Liao, Wei

    2010-02-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) data-processing methods based on changes in the time domain involve, among other things, correlation analysis and use of the general linear model with statistical parametric mapping (SPM). Unlike conventional fMRI data analysis methods, which aim to model the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) response of voxels as a function of time, the theory of power spectrum (PS) analysis focuses completely on understanding the dynamic energy change of interacting systems. We propose a new convolution PS (CPS) analysis of fMRI data, based on the theory of matched filtering, to detect brain functional activation for fMRI data. First, convolution signals are computed between the measured fMRI signals and the image signal of prior experimental pattern to suppress noise in the fMRI data. Then, the PS density analysis of the convolution signal is specified as the quantitative analysis energy index of BOLD signal change. The data from simulation studies and in vivo fMRI studies, including block-design experiments, reveal that the CPS method enables a more effective detection of some aspects of brain functional activation, as compared with the canonical PS SPM and the support vector machine methods. Our results demonstrate that the CPS method is useful as a complementary analysis in revealing brain functional information regarding the complex nature of fMRI time series.

  9. Three-dimensional carotid ultrasound segmentation variability dependence on signal difference and boundary orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Bernard; Krasinski, Adam; Spence, J David; Parraga, Grace; Fenster, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of the progression (or regression) of carotid plaque burden are important in monitoring patients and evaluating new treatment options. We previously developed a quantitative metric to analyze changes in carotid plaque morphology from 3-D ultrasound (US) on a point-by-point basis. This method requires multiple segmentations of the arterial wall and lumen boundaries to obtain the local standard deviation (SD) of vessel-wall-plus-plaque thickness (VWT) so that t-tests could be used to determine whether a change in VWT is statistically significant. However, the requirement for multiple segmentations makes clinical trials laborious and time-consuming. Therefore, this study was designed to establish the relationship between local segmentation SD and local signal difference on the arterial wall and lumen boundaries. We propose metrics to quantify segmentation SD and signal difference on a point-by-point basis, and studied whether the signal difference at arterial wall or lumen boundaries could be used to predict local segmentation SD. The ability to predict the local segmentation SD could eliminate the need of repeated segmentations of a 2-D transverse image to obtain the local segmentation standard deviation, thereby making clinical trials less laborious and saving time. Six subjects involved in this study were associated with different degrees of atherosclerosis: three carotid stenosis subjects with mean plaque area >3 cm(2) and >60% carotid stenosis were involved in a clinical study evaluating the effect of atorvastatin, a cholesterol-lowering and plaque-stabilizing drug; and three subjects with carotid plaque area >0.5 cm(2) were subjects with moderate atherosclerosis. Our results suggest that when local signal difference is higher than 8 greyscale value (GSV), the local segmentation SD stabilizes at 0.05 mm and is thus predictable. This information provides a target value of local signal difference on the arterial boundaries that should be

  10. Galphaq signaling is required for Rho-dependent transcriptional activation of the cyclooxygenase-2 promoter in fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slice, Lee W; Han, Sang-Kyou; Simon, Melvin I

    2003-02-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that the gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) induces cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression through a Rho-dependent, protein kinase C (PKC)-independent signaling pathway in fibroblasts (Slice et al., 1999, J Biol Chem 274:27562-27566). However, the specific role of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide binding regulatory proteins (G-proteins) that are coupled to the GRP receptor in Rho-dependent COX-2 expression has not been elucidated. In this report, we utilize embryonic fibroblasts from transgenic mice containing double gene knock-outs (DKO) for Galpha(q/11) and Galpha(12/13) to demonstrate that COX-2 promoter activation by GRP requires Galpha(q). Furthermore, we show that GRP-dependent COX-2 gene expression, as assessed by a COX-2 reporter luciferase assay, was induced in cells lacking Galpha(12/13) but was blocked in cells that did not express Galpha(q/11). GRP-dependent COX-2 promoter induction in Galpha(q/11) deficient cells was rescued by expression of wild type Galpha(q) but blocked by inhibition of calcium signaling in calcium-free media or in cells treated with 2-aminoethoxydiphenylborate (2-APB). Co-stimulation of transfected Galpha(q/11) deficient cells with GRP and thapsigargin (TG) induced the COX-2 promoter. Activation of endogenous Rho by expression of Onco-lbc or expression of Rho A Q63L resulted in COX-2 promoter activation in Galpha(q/11) deficient cells. Inhibition of Rho by Clostridium botulinum C3 toxin blocked COX-2 promoter induction. Expression of Galpha(q) Q209L in the well-characterized fibroblast cell line, NIH3T3, induced the COX-2 promoter which was blocked by expression of C3 toxin. These results demonstrate that calcium signaling mediated by Galpha(q) and Rho play critical roles in GRP-dependent COX-2 expression in fibroblasts.

  11. Kinome analysis reveals nongenomic glucocorticoid receptor-dependent inhibition of insulin signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loewenberg, M; Tuynman, J; Scheffer, M; Verhaar, A; Vermeulen, L; van Deventer, S; Hommes, D; Peppelenbosch, M

    2006-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are powerful immunosuppressive agents that control genomic effects through GC receptor (GR)-dependent transcriptional changes. A common complication of GC therapy is insulin resistance, but the underlying molecular mechanism remains obscure. Evidence is increasing for rapid gen