WorldWideScience

Sample records for department working papers

  1. Migration in OECD countries: Labour Market Impact and Integration Issues. OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 562

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Sebastien; Causa, Orsetta; Jimenez, Miguel; Wanner, Isabelle

    2007-01-01

    Immigration pressures are increasing in most OECD countries. This paper investigates the consequences of immigration for natives' labour market outcomes, as well as issues linked to immigrants' integration in the host country labour market. Changes in the share of immigrants in the labour force may have a distributive impact on natives' wages, and…

  2. Labour Market Performance, Income Inequality and Poverty in OECD Countries. OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 500

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burniaux, Jean-Marc; Padrini, Flavio; Brandt, Nicola

    2006-01-01

    There have been concerns that employment-enhancing reforms along the lines of the 1994 OECD Jobs Strategy could inadvertently lead to increased income inequality and poverty. This paper focuses on the impact of institutions and redistributive policies on inequality and poverty with the view of assessing whether a trade-off between better labour…

  3. List of working papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The following working papers are included in this report. The other papers, or the memos of which they consist, are available from the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. WP2001-2 Inventory of TRANS files exchanged since the last meeting; WP2001-4 Data headings and units for wavelength and kT; WP2001-6 Proposed Polarization Quantities; WP2001-7 Correlation / Angular correlation: Clarifications and dictionary cleanup; WP2001-8 Proposed quantity PAR/M-,DA,G; WP2001-14 Units N/PART/SR etc. for Dict. 25; WP2001-15 Coding of differential neutron multiplicity distributions; WP2001-16 Headings E-LVL-INI, E-LVL-FIN as 'additional information'; WP2001-17 Dictionary sorting flags and wildcards; WP2001-18 IAEA/NDS priorities in the EXFOR compilation; WP2001-21 CSISRS Library Statistics (NNDC); WP2001-23 CINDA-2001 Manual (24 May 2001); WP2001-24 Correspondence of quantity codes for CINDA-2001; WP2001-25 EXFOR as a multi-platform relational database: current status of development; WP2001-26 Compilation and Evaluation of Alpha-Induced Nuclear Reaction Cross Sections for Astrophysics; WP2001-28 Journal coverage for CINDA

  4. List of working papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The following working papers are included in this report. The other papers, or the memos of which they consist, are available from the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. WP2001-2 Inventory of TRANS files exchanged since the last meeting; WP2001-4 Data headings and units for wavelength and kT; WP2001-6 Proposed Polarization Quantities; WP2001-7 Correlation / Angular correlation: Clarifications and dictionary cleanup; WP2001-8 Proposed quantity PAR/M-,DA,G; WP2001-14 Units N/PART/SR etc. for Dict. 25; WP2001-15 Coding of differential neutron multiplicity distributions; WP2001-16 Headings E-LVL-INI, E-LVL-FIN as 'additional information'; WP2001-17 Dictionary sorting flags and wildcards; WP2001-18 IAEA/NDS priorities in the EXFOR compilation; WP2001-21 CSISRS Library Statistics (NNDC); WP2001-23 CINDA-2001 Manual (24 May 2001); WP2001-24 Correspondence of quantity codes for CINDA-2001; WP2001-25 EXFOR as a multi-platform relational database: current status of development; WP2001-26 Compilation and Evaluation of Alpha-Induced Nuclear Reaction Cross Sections for Astrophysics; WP2001-28 Journal coverage for CINDA.

  5. Selected working papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The following working papers are included in this report: WP 2002-2, Dictionary Restructuring; WP-2002-4, Page numbers for REFERENCE (CP-C/285); WP-2002-5, Correlation quantities; WP 2002-8, Proposed data heading EN-CM-TOT (memo CP-A/121); WP 2002-9, Proposed high energy quantities (memo CP-A/123); WP 2002-11, Use of nuclide codes in SF 7 (memo CP-C/302); WP 2002-12, Redundant coding, new data heading PART-OUT; WP 2002-16, Zeros in error field (CP-C/306); WP 2002-17, Multiple appearance of the first Reference in EXFOR; WP 2002-18 + Add., EXFOR master file comparisons; WP 2002-19, Measures of Security at the NDS Open Area for EXFOR; WP 2002-20, New and revised entries received at NDS; WP 2002-21, EXFOR transmissions (NNDC); WP 2002-22, CINDA statistics (NNDC); WP 2002-24, CINDA batch exchange information (NDS); WP 2002-25, Journal coverage for CINDA; WP 2002-26, EXFOR-relational as multi-platform database (V. Zerkin); WP 2002-27, Completeness of EXFOR compil. as indexed by CINDA; WP 2002-28, Future NRDC Cooperation on CINDA: see Appendix 9; WP 2002-31, Development of Web Editor for Charged-Particle Nuclear Reaction Data (N. Otuka, H. Noto, A. Ohnishi, K. Kato). The following other papers, or the memos of which they consist, are available from the IAEA Nuclear Data Section: WP 2002-1, Actions of previous meetings (2002, 2001) see INDC(NDS)-427, pp.20-26, and INDC(NDS)-418, pp.26-31; WP 2002-3, Units for particle and product yields: see memos CP-C/294, 286; WP 2002-6, 4-momentum transfer and mom.distr.data: see memos CP-C/295 and CP-D/330; WP 2002-7, Several 'straightforward' new quantities: see memos CP-/C-291, 298 and CP-A/118; WP 2002-10, Quantities proposed by JCPRG (see memos DP-D/337, CP-E/004, 003); WP 2002-13, Clarifications on Product Yields and Thick Target Yields (see memo CP-D/332); WP 2002-14, Clarifications on Polarization quantities (see memo CP-D/320); WP 2002-15, New Legendre polynomial modifier proposed (see CP-C/305); WP 2002-23, see memo 4C-4

  6. ENRM Working Paper Template

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    evidence based policy making. Canada's ... not subject to peer review, nor reviewed or edited for style and content. The views ... This paper develops a simple model to disentangle the effect of education on incomes by .... with prior belief, returns to education were low in agriculture, and resulted from lacking learning ...

  7. Works Technical Department progress report, March 1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1961-04-19

    This document details the activities of the Savannah River Works Technical Department during the month of March 1961. Topics discussed are: Reactor Technology, Separations Technology, Engineering Assistance, Health Physics, Laboratories Overview, and Technical Papers Issued.

  8. Modelling Cooperative Work at a Medical Department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lars Rune; Hildebrandt, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Based on ethnographic fieldwork, and the modelling of work processes at a medical department, this paper considers some of the opportunities and challenges involved in working with models in a complex work setting. The paper introduces a flexible modelling tool to CSCW, called the DCR Portal......, and considers how it may be used to model complex work settings collaboratively. Further, the paper discusses how models created with the DCR portal may potentially play a key role in making a cooperative work ensemble appreciate, discuss and coordinate key interdependencies inherent to their cooperative work...

  9. Working Paper on Social capital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen Hanan, Anne

    This paper outlines the major schools within social capital theory. Contemporary authors such as Coleman, Putnam and Bourdieu are elaborated on. The paper also presents a non-exhaustive review on studies of social capital. Furthermore, a criticial discussion on social capital is reviewed, before...

  10. Street Papers, Work, and Begging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cockburn, Patrick Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Street papers are publications produced specifically for sale by the homeless and other vulnerable people in many countries around the world. Their social status is, however, often conspicuously unstable: ‘Get a job!’ has been reported as a common insult addressed to vendors, and street paper...

  11. CCAA Working papers | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Working papers are published by CCAA staff, consultants, advisers, or interns, and are not part of partner-funded research activities. Each paper is peer reviewed by CCAA staff. They are published and distributed primarily in electronic format via the CCAA site, though hardcopies are available upon request. Working papers ...

  12. 7 CFR 3052.515 - Audit working papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Audit working papers. 3052.515 Section 3052.515 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF THE CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditors § 3052...

  13. WDM Research Series: Working Paper No. 2

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    The other three papers of the Series focus on the issues of institutional structures ... Any approach that relates WDM to poverty and equity requires a set of working ..... If local irrigation system operation and maintenance investments and.

  14. Trabalho e morbidade comum em indústria de celulose e papel: um perfil segundo setor Work and common disease in a pulp and paper industry: a profile by department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anaclaudia Gastal Fassa

    1996-09-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo objetiva identificar as associações das morbidades comuns e dos acidentes de trabalho com setor, descrevendo as cargas de trabalho e realizando um amplo controle de fatores de confusão. Através de delineamento transversal, estudou-se a totalidade dos trabalhadores de uma indústria de celulose e papel (n=671. Realizaram-se entrevistas nesta indústria, caracterizando a percepção dos trabalhadores sobre as exposições ocupacionais e a morbidade. A área industrial caracterizou-se pelo excesso de problemas auditivos (RO>2,5, respiratórios (RO>2,7 e acidentes (RO>4,7, possivelmente relacionados com ruído, poeira, mudanças bruscas de temperatura e exposições a substâncias químicas, além do trabalho físico pesado e exposições a situações de risco. A administração apresentou um aumento de problemas nos olhos, dor nas costas, irritação e nervosismo (RO>1,7, que parecem ter relação com a falta de autonomia e criatividade no trabalho, problemas ergonômicos e esforço visual. Confirmaram-se não só as altas prevalências de morbidades comuns, mas também sua relação com as particularidades do processo de trabalho sintetizadas pela categoria setor.The purpose of this study was to identify associations between common morbidity and work accidents and the respective departments in a pulp and paper industry, describing work loads and performing broad control of potential confounding factors. We studied all the workers from a specific pulp and paper industry, using a cross-sectional design and interviews at the workplace (n=671 with a standardized questionnaire. We characterized workers' perceptions of their occupational exposures and health problems. The industrial area had an excess in auditory problems (OR>2.5 and respiratory problems (OR>2.7 as well as accidents (OR>4.7. These diseases were probably related to the high prevalence of noise, dust, sudden temperature changes, exposure to various chemicals, and

  15. Working in the Finance and Procurement Department

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2010-01-01

    The CERN Finance and Procurement (FP) Department handles around 35,000 internal purchase orders every year. A large number of them are processed by administrative assistant Sarah Pamelard and her two colleagues Dominique Trolliet and Laurence Fol. As you will see, this is not just any old desk job.   Sarah Pamelard in her office. Sarah Pamelard has worked at CERN for 23 years (see box). She began her career as an assistant in the electronics design office and has been an administrative assistant in the FP Department's purchasing service for the last year and a half. Her work involves processing all internal purchase orders for amounts not exceeding 10,000 CHF. "For each order we have to find the supplier who will provide the best services. Our search covers suppliers in all the Member States to ensure the best possible balance of financial return among them", explains Sarah. The skills that the job demands are not confined to the area of finance. Above all, you need to be very w...

  16. Working Hours Flexibility. Background Paper No. 30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staines, Graham L.

    Flexible work schedules offer the promise of a low-cost option for helping people manage work and family responsibilities. Alternative work schedules include part-time work, job sharing, work sharing, shiftwork, compressed work week, flexitime, and flexiplace. Flexitime is the most prevalent full-time flexible schedule and is second in prevalence…

  17. Selected working papers[Nuclear data activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-08-01

    The following working papers are included in this report: WP 2002-2, Dictionary Restructuring; WP-2002-4, Page numbers for REFERENCE (CP-C/285); WP-2002-5, Correlation quantities; WP 2002-8, Proposed data heading EN-CM-TOT (memo CP-A/121); WP 2002-9, Proposed high energy quantities (memo CP-A/123); WP 2002-11, Use of nuclide codes in SF 7 (memo CP-C/302); WP 2002-12, Redundant coding, new data heading PART-OUT; WP 2002-16, Zeros in error field (CP-C/306); WP 2002-17, Multiple appearance of the first Reference in EXFOR; WP 2002-18 + Add., EXFOR master file comparisons; WP 2002-19, Measures of Security at the NDS Open Area for EXFOR; WP 2002-20, New and revised entries received at NDS; WP 2002-21, EXFOR transmissions (NNDC); WP 2002-22, CINDA statistics (NNDC); WP 2002-24, CINDA batch exchange information (NDS); WP 2002-25, Journal coverage for CINDA; WP 2002-26, EXFOR-relational as multi-platform database (V. Zerkin); WP 2002-27, Completeness of EXFOR compil. as indexed by CINDA; WP 2002-28, Future NRDC Cooperation on CINDA: see Appendix 9; WP 2002-31, Development of Web Editor for Charged-Particle Nuclear Reaction Data (N. Otuka, H. Noto, A. Ohnishi, K. Kato). The following other papers, or the memos of which they consist, are available from the IAEA Nuclear Data Section: WP 2002-1, Actions of previous meetings (2002, 2001) see INDC(NDS)-427, pp.20-26, and INDC(NDS)-418, pp.26-31; WP 2002-3, Units for particle and product yields: see memos CP-C/294, 286; WP 2002-6, 4-momentum transfer and mom.distr.data: see memos CP-C/295 and CP-D/330; WP 2002-7, Several 'straightforward' new quantities: see memos CP-/C-291, 298 and CP-A/118; WP 2002-10, Quantities proposed by JCPRG (see memos DP-D/337, CP-E/004, 003); WP 2002-13, Clarifications on Product Yields and Thick Target Yields (see memo CP-D/332); WP 2002-14, Clarifications on Polarization quantities (see memo CP-D/320); WP 2002-15, New Legendre polynomial modifier proposed (see CP-C/305); WP 2002-23, see memo 4C-4

  18. Schools and Work. Discussion Paper No. 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, M.

    Traditionally, education has been expected to both promote equality of opportunity and provide workers for the labor market. In Australia, increasing youth unemployment has led to a greater emphasis on education's function of enhnacing student transition into the work force. There has been an upsurge in work experience programs and incorporation…

  19. The 2015 Academic College of Emergency Experts in India's INDO-US Joint Working Group White Paper on Establishing an Academic Department and Training Pediatric Emergency Medicine Specialists in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Prashant; Batra, Prerna; Shah, Binita R; Saha, Abhijeet; Galwankar, Sagar; Aggrawal, Praveen; Hassoun, Ameer; Batra, Bipin; Bhoi, Sanjeev; Kalra, Om Prakash; Shah, Dheeraj

    2015-01-01

    The concept of pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) is virtually nonexistent in India. Suboptimally, organized prehospital services substantially hinder the evaluation, management, and subsequent transport of the acutely ill and/or injured child to an appropriate facility. Furthermore, the management of the ill child at the hospital level is often provided by overburdened providers who, by virtue of their training, lack experience in the skills required to effectively manage pediatric emergencies. Finally, the care of the traumatized child often requires the involvement of providers trained in different specialities, which further impedes timely access to appropriate care. The recent recognition of Doctor of Medicine (MD) in Emergency Medicine (EM) as an approved discipline of study as per the Indian Medical Council Act provides an unprecedented opportunity to introduce PEM as a formal academic program in India. PEM has to be developed as a 3-year superspeciality course (in PEM) after completion of MD/Diplomate of National Board (DNB) Pediatrics or MD/DNB in EM. The National Board of Examinations (NBE) that accredits and administers postgraduate and postdoctoral programs in India also needs to develop an academic program – DNB in PEM. The goals of such a program would be to impart theoretical knowledge, training in the appropriate skills and procedures, development of communication and counseling techniques, and research. In this paper, the Joint Working Group of the Academic College of Emergency Experts in India (JWG-ACEE-India) gives its recommendations for starting 3-year DM/DNB in PEM, including the curriculum, infrastructure, staffing, and training in India. This is an attempt to provide an uniform framework and a set of guiding principles to start PEM as a structured superspeciality to enhance emergency care for Indian children. PMID:26807394

  20. Machine Distribution. Microcomputing Working Papers Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA. Microcomputing Program.

    During the academic year 1983-84, Drexel University instituted a new policy requiring all incoming students to have access to a microcomputer. The computer chosen to fulfill this requirement was the Macintosh from Apple Computer, Inc. This paper provides a brief description of the process undertaken to select the appropriate computer (i.e.,…

  1. 29 CFR 99.515 - Audit working papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Audit working papers. 99.515 Section 99.515 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditors § 99.515 Audit working papers. (a) Retention of working papers. The auditor shall retain working papers and...

  2. Employee Skill, Occupation, and Work Involvement. Working Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Michael

    Data from the Work History and Attitudes survey of the Social Change and Economic Life research initiative (SCELI) enquiry of 1986-1989 and the first wave of the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS) were analyzed to determine their continuity and comparability with regard to employee attitudes in general and job satisfaction and work centrality…

  3. 38 CFR 41.515 - Audit working papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) AUDITS OF STATES, LOCAL GOVERNMENTS, AND NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Auditors § 41.515 Audit working papers. (a) Retention of working papers. The auditor shall retain working papers and reports for a minimum of three years after the date of issuance of the auditor's report(s) to the auditee, unless the auditor is...

  4. Applicability of the modified Emergency Department Work Index (mEDWIN) at a Dutch Emergency Department

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouns, S.; van der Schuit, K.C.H.; Stassen, P.; Lambooij, S.L.E.; Dieleman, Jeanne P.; Vanderfeesten, I.T.P.; Haak, H.

    2017-01-01

    Background Emergency department (ED) crowding leads to prolonged emergency department length of stay (ED-LOS) and adverse patient outcomes. No uniform definition of ED crowding exists. Several scores have been developed to quantify ED crowding; the best known is the Emergency Department Work Index

  5. Putting your human resource department to work for you.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, C R

    1991-06-01

    As a staff function, human resources is organized as a service activity. Service activities render no patient care; they do not advance the work of the organization. However, they support the performance of the organization's work and in a practical sense become necessary. For example, if a pure service, such as building maintenance, did not exist, the facility's physical plant would gradually self-destruct. Similarly, without human resources to see to the maintenance of the work force, the overall suitability and capability of that work force will steadily erode. Recognize human resources for what it is--an essential service function required to help the organization run as efficiently as possible. Learn what the HR department does, and especially learn why the department does what it does. Provide input to the human resource department. Forge a continuing working relationship with the HR department, making it clear that you expect service from this essential service department. Challenge the HR department to do more, to do better, and to continually improve service--and put the human resource department to work for you and your employees.

  6. Working Paper 4: Institutions for Effective Water Demand ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2012-01-23

    Jan 23, 2012 ... Working Paper 4: Institutions for Effective Water Demand ... This working paper is part of WaDImena 's four Research Series on Water Demand Management ... Improving Water Demand Management Addressing Socioeconomic Inequalities and ... Women's rights and access to water and sanitation in Delhi.

  7. Paperless and paper-based processes in the modern radiotherapy department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middleton, M. [Radiation Oncology Queensland, 280 North Street, Toowoomba 4350 (Australia)], E-mail: mark.middleton@roq.net.au; Bradford, C. [Harley St. Cancer Centre, London (United Kingdom); Frantzis, J. [Radiation Oncology Queensland, 280 North Street, Toowoomba 4350 (Australia); Ambler, A. [Harley St. Cancer Centre, London (United Kingdom); Sisson, T. [Radiation Oncology Queensland, 280 North Street, Toowoomba 4350 (Australia); Montgomerie, D. [Harley St. Cancer Centre, London (United Kingdom); Martin, J. [Radiation Oncology Queensland, 280 North Street, Toowoomba 4350 (Australia)

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To assess the implications on workflow and efficiency in a paperless environment versus a traditional paper-based environment. This paper summarises the comparison of specific workflow practices conducted in a paperless and paper-based approach, comparing time taken, potential advantages and disadvantages of each approach, and the cost-effectiveness of a paperless approach. Methods and materials: A time study was undertaken on three specific workflow areas for 5 patients with breast and prostate cancer respectively, and comparison made between paperless and paper-based methodology. The workflow areas analysed were electronic treatment record (ETR) versus treatment sheet preparation, digital history check process versus paper-based and digital image and trend analysis versus paper-based. The cost-effectiveness of a paperless approach was then analysed. Additionally a staff questionnaire was undertaken, assessing Information Technology (IT) skills of staff and comfort levels pertaining to a paperless environment. Results: There was on average a 50% reduction in workload when comparing an ETR versus a paper-based treatment sheet, a 50% reduction in workload by utilising a paperless history check process and a 70% reduction in workload with a paperless image and trend analysis process. There was also significant cost savings by introducing a paperless workflow. The survey showed a higher level of comfort with information technology in the paperless environment, and less frustration with aspects of working in the paper-based centre. Conclusion: The digital radiotherapy department offers highly significant improvements in efficiency. These potentially translate into major financial savings and increased job satisfaction.

  8. Paperless and paper-based processes in the modern radiotherapy department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleton, M.; Bradford, C.; Frantzis, J.; Ambler, A.; Sisson, T.; Montgomerie, D.; Martin, J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the implications on workflow and efficiency in a paperless environment versus a traditional paper-based environment. This paper summarises the comparison of specific workflow practices conducted in a paperless and paper-based approach, comparing time taken, potential advantages and disadvantages of each approach, and the cost-effectiveness of a paperless approach. Methods and materials: A time study was undertaken on three specific workflow areas for 5 patients with breast and prostate cancer respectively, and comparison made between paperless and paper-based methodology. The workflow areas analysed were electronic treatment record (ETR) versus treatment sheet preparation, digital history check process versus paper-based and digital image and trend analysis versus paper-based. The cost-effectiveness of a paperless approach was then analysed. Additionally a staff questionnaire was undertaken, assessing Information Technology (IT) skills of staff and comfort levels pertaining to a paperless environment. Results: There was on average a 50% reduction in workload when comparing an ETR versus a paper-based treatment sheet, a 50% reduction in workload by utilising a paperless history check process and a 70% reduction in workload with a paperless image and trend analysis process. There was also significant cost savings by introducing a paperless workflow. The survey showed a higher level of comfort with information technology in the paperless environment, and less frustration with aspects of working in the paper-based centre. Conclusion: The digital radiotherapy department offers highly significant improvements in efficiency. These potentially translate into major financial savings and increased job satisfaction.

  9. Evaluating Work-Life Balance in the Department of Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-18

    Evaluating Work - Life Balance in the Department of Defense Erin A. Moeser Defense Equal Opportunity Management Institute (DEOMI) Kizzy M. Parks...for service members’ family lives may increase satisfaction with work - life balance . Examples of family-friendly organizational policies include...1,500 active duty military personnel were surveyed on the value of work / life balance initiates. More specifically, this study assessed respondents

  10. Mathematics education a spectrum of work in mathematical sciences departments

    CERN Document Server

    Hsu, Pao-sheng; Pollatsek, Harriet

    2016-01-01

    Many in the mathematics community in the U.S. are involved in mathematics education in various capacities. This book highlights the breadth of the work in K-16 mathematics education done by members of US departments of mathematical sciences. It contains contributions by mathematicians and mathematics educators who do work in areas such as teacher education, quantitative literacy, informal education, writing and communication, social justice, outreach and mentoring, tactile learning, art and mathematics, ethnomathematics, scholarship of teaching and learning, and mathematics education research. Contributors describe their work, its impact, and how it is perceived and valued. In addition, there is a chapter, co-authored by two mathematicians who have become administrators, on the challenges of supporting, evaluating, and rewarding work in mathematics education in departments of mathematical sciences. This book is intended to inform the readership of the breadth of the work and to encourage discussion of its val...

  11. Travaux Neuchatelois de linguistique (Neuchatel Working Papers in Linguistics).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuchatel Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. de Linguistique.

    This collection of working papers in linguistics includes four works. "Autour de la racine indo-europeenne 'pet-' ('voler') (pour servir a l'histoire des faits latins)" ("Concerning the Indo-European Root 'Pet-' ('To Fly') (To Serve as an Example of Latin Facts)" by Claude Sandoz looks at the Latin manifestations of the root and illustrates the…

  12. Tracking the follow-up of work in progress papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubin, Omar; Arsalan, Mudassar; Al Mahmud, Abdullah

    2018-01-01

    Academic conferences offer numerous submission tracks to support the inclusion of a variety of researchers and topics. Work in progress papers are one such submission type where authors present preliminary results in a poster session. They have recently gained popularity in the area of Human Computer Interaction (HCI) as a relatively easier pathway to attending the conference due to their higher acceptance rate as compared to the main tracks. However, it is not clear if these work in progress papers are further extended or transitioned into more complete and thorough full papers or are simply one-off pieces of research. In order to answer this we explore self-citation patterns of four work in progress editions in two popular HCI conferences (CHI2010, CHI2011, HRI2010 and HRI2011). Our results show that almost 50% of the work in progress papers do not have any self-citations and approximately only half of the self-citations can be considered as true extensions of the original work in progress paper. Specific conferences dominate as the preferred venue where extensions of these work in progress papers are published. Furthermore, the rate of self-citations peaks in the immediate year after publication and gradually tails off. By tracing author publication records, we also delve into possible reasons of work in progress papers not being cited in follow up publications. In conclusion, we speculate on the main trends observed and what they may mean looking ahead for the work in progress track of premier HCI conferences.

  13. The Role of IT in Radical Innovation (working paper)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wit, Camilla Kølsen de

    Radical innovation projects like BPR are closely connected to the use of information technology. The research question posed in this paper is: what is critical for the successful carrying through of the work processes related to proactive IT-use? It is researched using the Critical Incident...... Technique (CIT)....

  14. Interracial Friendships in College. NBER Working Paper No. 15970

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Braz; Stinebrickner, Ralph; Stinebrickner, Todd R.

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by the reality that the benefits of diversity on a college campus will be mitigated if interracial interactions are scarce or superficial, previous work has strived to document the amount of interracial friendship interaction and to examine whether policy can influence this amount. In this paper we take advantage of unique longitudinal…

  15. Mexican-Origin Women's Employment Instability. Working Paper No. 51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Anda, Roberto M.

    This paper compares the causes and consequences of employment instability among Mexican-origin women, White women, and White men. Data came from the work experience supplement in the March 1995 file of the Current Population Survey for a sample that included 1,399 Mexican-origin women, 17,092 White women, and 24,440 White men. All were experienced…

  16. Big Data: Laying the Groundwork. ECAR Working Group Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almes, Guy T.; Hillegas, Curtis W.; Lance, Timothy; Lynch, Clifford A.; Monaco, Gregory E.; Mundrane, Michael R.; Zottola, Ralph J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper is part of series of the EDUCAUSE Center for Analysis and Research Campus Cyberinfrastructure (ECAR-CCI) Working Group. The topic of big data continues to receive a great deal of publicity because of its promise for opening new avenues of scholarly discovery and commercial opportunity. The ability to sift rapidly through massive amounts…

  17. University of New Mexico Working Papers in Linguistics, Volume 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Teresa M., Ed.; Schwenter, Scott A., Ed.

    This volume contains working papers on a variety of topics in linguistics. They include: "A View of Phonology from a Cognitive and Functional Perspective" (Joan Bybee); "The Geography of Language Shift: Distance from the Mexican Border and Spanish Language Claiming in the Southwestern United States" (Garland D. Bills, Eduardo…

  18. The Collected Works of Eugene Paul Wigner the Scientific Papers

    CERN Document Server

    Wigner, Eugene Paul

    1993-01-01

    Eugene Wigner is one of the few giants of 20th-century physics His early work helped to shape quantum mechanics, he laid the foundations of nuclear physics and nuclear engineering, and he contributed significantly to solid-state physics His philosophical and political writings are widely known All his works will be reprinted in Eugene Paul Wigner's Collected Workstogether with descriptive annotations by outstanding scientists The present volume begins with a short biographical sketch followed by Wigner's papers on group theory, an extremely powerful tool he created for theoretical quantum physics They are presented in two parts The first, annotated by B Judd, covers applications to atomic and molecular spectra, term structure, time reversal and spin In the second, G Mackey introduces to the reader the mathematical papers, many of which are outstanding contributions to the theory of unitary representations of groups, including the famous paper on the Lorentz group

  19. [Managing the discharge of diabetic patients from the emergency department: a consensus paper].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuervo Pinto, Rafael; Álvarez-Rodríguez, Esther; González Pérez de Villar, Noemí; Artola-Menéndez, Sara; Girbés Borrás, Juan; Mata-Cases, Manel; Galindo Rubio, Mercedes; Puig Larrosa, Juan; Muñoz Albert, Ricardo; Díaz Pérez, José Ángel

    2017-10-01

    Eighty to 90% of patients attended in emergency departments are discharged to home. Emergency department physicians are therefore responsible for specifying how these patients are treated afterwards. An estimated 30% to 40% of emergency patients have diabetes mellitus that was often decompensated or poorly controlled prior to the emergency. It is therefore necessary to establish antidiabetic treatment protocols that contribute to adequate metabolic control for these patients in the interest of improving the short-term prognosis after discharge. The protocols should also maintain continuity of outpatient care from other specialists and contribute to improving the long-term prognosis. This consensus paper presents the consensus of experts from 3 medical associations whose members are directly involved with treating patients with diabetes. The aim of the paper is to facilitate the assessment of antidiabetic treatment when the patient is discharged from the emergency department and referred to outpatient care teams.

  20. Peer work in Open Dialogue: A discussion paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellingham, Brett; Buus, Niels; McCloughen, Andrea; Dawson, Lisa; Schweizer, Richard; Mikes-Liu, Kristof; Peetz, Amy; Boydell, Katherine; River, Jo

    2018-03-25

    Open Dialogue is a resource-oriented approach to mental health care that originated in Finland. As Open Dialogue has been adopted across diverse international healthcare settings, it has been adapted according to contextual factors. One important development in Open Dialogue has been the incorporation of paid, formal peer work. Peer work draws on the knowledge and wisdom gained through lived experience of distress and hardship to establish mutual, reciprocal, and supportive relationships with service users. As Open Dialogue is now being implemented across mental health services in Australia, stakeholders are beginning to consider the role that peer workers might have in this model of care. Open Dialogue was not, initially, conceived to include a specific role for peers, and there is little available literature, and even less empirical research, in this area. This discussion paper aims to surface some of the current debates and ideas about peer work in Open Dialogue. Examples and models of peer work in Open Dialogue are examined, and the potential benefits and challenges of adopting this approach in health services are discussed. Peer work in Open Dialogue could potentially foster democracy and disrupt clinical hierarchies, but could also move peer work from reciprocal to a less symmetrical relationship of 'giver' and 'receiver' of care. Other models of care, such as lived experience practitioners in Open Dialogue, can be conceived. However, it remains uncertain whether the hierarchical structures in healthcare and current models of funding would support any such models. © 2018 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  1. Qualifying works of the Department of nuclear chemistry (1963 - 2006)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuruc, J.

    2007-01-01

    In this review qualifying works (theses - bachelor, master, PhD., DrSc., habilitation and inauguration theses) elaborated at the Department of nuclear chemistry, Faculty of Natural Chemistry, Comenius University in Bratislava during forty years (from origin of the Section of Nuclear chemistry in 1963 up to 2006 are presented. During this time, in totally, 3 bachelor theses, 265 master theses, 24 PhD. (CSc.) and 10 PhD. dissertanions, 2 DrSc. dissertanions as well as 8 habilitation and one inauguration these were defended (author)

  2. The radiogenic hazards of working in a radiology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, J.G.B.

    1992-01-01

    The author assesses the risks incurred by the medical personnel working in a radiology department with regard to the new estimates of risk levels for ionizing radiation delivered at low dose rates and low doses (UNSCEAR, 1988; NRPB, 1988; ICRP, 1991). It is emphasised that in deciding if the cancer has been caused by an occupational exposure, the factors to be taken into account are the radiosensitivity of the organ involved, the dose the organ has received and the time of the appearance of the cancer. Figures are provided for the radiation doses and risk of fatality of medical workers. A comparison is made with the risk of death from working in various industries. It appears that for the majority of medical radiation workers the radiogenic hazard is slight but that the hazards can be substantial for the higher dose workers. 13 refs., 2 tabs.; 1 fig

  3. Topical and working papers on nuclear power capacity projections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of the overall work programme of WG. 1, Sub-Group 1A/2A was formed jointly with WG. 2 and given the responsibility for estimating the growth of nuclear power up to the year 2025 and the associated demands for nuclear fuels, heavy water, enrichment and other fuel cycle services. In carrying out the first part of its task, the estimation of nuclear power capacity growth, sub-Group 1A/2A prepared 6 working papers which contain the following information: A critique of recent world energy demand forecasts; world energy demand and installed capacity to the year 2025; nuclear power growth projections 1977-2000 for developing countries; long range world nuclear power growth projections; INFCE forecasts of nuclear generating capacity 1985-2025

  4. Working Papers in Acquisition of Knowledge for Image Understanding Research,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-12-15

    Rmvt 112,7,P IM Y. K3p ’Of’ z4-" odK zw Mw; OW, ev 6 "ONO T;I 11; "VI lip, IA wo 44 jo . ... . ...... I I WORKING PAPERS IN ACQUISITION OF...paradigm than any other. They have collected protocolt on subjects verbally describing scenes, after examining them visually. The control variable they... collection of Elements of Control Flow (ECF). To avoid creation of either file, the user presses the return key without typing a name to the respective

  5. Position Paper: Designing Complex Systems to Support Interdisciplinary Cognitive Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Melissa T.; Papalambros, Panos Y.; Mcgowan, Anna-Maria R.

    2016-01-01

    The paper argues that the field we can call cognitive science of interdisciplinary collaboration is an important area of study for improving design of Large-Scale Complex Systems (LaCES) and supporting cognitive work. The paper mostly raised questions that have been documented in earlier qualitative analysis studies, and provided possible avenues of exploration for addressing them. There are likely further contributions from additional disciplines beyond those mentioned in this paper that should be considered and integrated into such a cognitive science framework. Knowledge and awareness of various perspectives will help to inform the types of interventions available for improving LaCES design and functionality. For example, a cognitive interpretation of interdisciplinary collaborations in LaCES elucidated the need for a "translator" or "mediator" in helping subject matter experts to transcend language boundaries, mitigate single discipline bias, support integrative activities, and correct misaligned objectives. Additional research in this direction is likely to uncover similar gaps and opportunities for improvements in practice.

  6. HEP Software Foundation Community White Paper Working Group - Detector Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apostolakis, J; et al.

    2018-03-12

    A working group on detector simulation was formed as part of the high-energy physics (HEP) Software Foundation's initiative to prepare a Community White Paper that describes the main software challenges and opportunities to be faced in the HEP field over the next decade. The working group met over a period of several months in order to review the current status of the Full and Fast simulation applications of HEP experiments and the improvements that will need to be made in order to meet the goals of future HEP experimental programmes. The scope of the topics covered includes the main components of a HEP simulation application, such as MC truth handling, geometry modeling, particle propagation in materials and fields, physics modeling of the interactions of particles with matter, the treatment of pileup and other backgrounds, as well as signal processing and digitisation. The resulting work programme described in this document focuses on the need to improve both the software performance and the physics of detector simulation. The goals are to increase the accuracy of the physics models and expand their applicability to future physics programmes, while achieving large factors in computing performance gains consistent with projections on available computing resources.

  7. 2. biophysical work meeting. Papers; 2. Biophysikalische Arbeitstagung; Vortraege

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-11-01

    The report comprises 18 papers held at the 2nd Biophysical Work Meeting, 11 - 13 September 1991 in Schlema, Germany. The history of biophysics in Germany particularly of radiation biophysics and radon research, measurements of the radiation effects of radon and the derivation of limits, radon balneotherapy and consequences of uranium ore mining are dealt with. (orig.) [Deutsch] Der Report enthaelt 18 Vortraege, die auf der 2. Biophysikalischen Arbeitstagung in Schlema vom 11. bis 13. September 1991 gehalten wurden. Es werden die Geschichte der Biophysik in Deutschland, speziell der Strahlenbiophysik und Radonforschung, Messungen von Radon und seinen Folgeprodukten, Epidemiologie und Strahlenbiologie zur Bestimmung der Strahlenwirkung des Radons und die Ableitung entsprechender Grenzwerte, Radon-Balneotherapie und Folgen des Uranerzbergbaus behandelt. (orig.)

  8. What Works for Disconnected Young People: A Scan of the Evidence. MDRC Working Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treskon, Louisa

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to conduct a scan of the current state of the evidence regarding what works in helping disconnected young people, defined as the population of young people ages 16 to 24 who are not connected to work or school. The following four main research questions were investigated: (1) What local, state, and federal policies…

  9. Applicability of the modified Emergency Department Work Index (mEDWIN at a Dutch emergency department.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffie H A Brouns

    Full Text Available Emergency department (ED crowding leads to prolonged emergency department length of stay (ED-LOS and adverse patient outcomes. No uniform definition of ED crowding exists. Several scores have been developed to quantify ED crowding; the best known is the Emergency Department Work Index (EDWIN. Research on the EDWIN is often applied to limited settings and conducted over a short period of time.To explore whether the EDWIN as a measure can track occupancy at a Dutch ED over the course of one year and to identify fluctuations in ED occupancy per hour, day, and month. Secondary objective is to investigate the discriminatory value of the EDWIN in detecting crowding, as compared with the occupancy rate and prolonged ED-LOS.A retrospective cohort study of all ED visits during the period from September 2010 to August 2011 was performed in one hospital in the Netherlands. The EDWIN incorporates the number of patients per triage level, physicians, treatment beds and admitted patients to quantify ED crowding. The EDWIN was adjusted to emergency care in the Netherlands: modified EDWIN (mEDWIN. ED crowding was defined as the 75th percentile of mEDWIN per hour, which was ≥0.28.In total, 28,220 ED visits were included in the analysis. The median mEDWIN per hour was 0.15 (Interquartile range (IQR 0.05-0.28; median mEDWIN per patient was 0.25 (IQR 0.15-0.39. The EDWIN was higher on Wednesday (0.16 than on other days (0.14-0.16, p<0.001, and a peak in both mEDWIN (0.30-0.33 and ED crowding (52.9-63.4% was found between 13:00-18:00 h. A comparison of the mEDWIN with the occupancy rate revealed an area under the curve (AUC of 0.86 (95%CI 0.85-0.87. The AUC of mEDWIN compared with a prolonged ED-LOS (≥4 hours was 0.50 (95%CI 0.40-0.60.The mEDWIN was applicable at a Dutch ED. The mEDWIN was able to identify fluctuations in ED occupancy. In addition, the mEDWIN had high discriminatory power for identification of a busy ED, when compared with the occupancy rate.

  10. Sustainable housing for oversized works of art on paper  

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Hammer

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Les systèmes de stockage pour les œuvres d'art grand-format sur papier sont examinés en ce qui concerne la protection de l'objet, la satisfaction de l'utilisateur et la durabilité par la voie d’une analyse de cycle de vie des matériaux de fabrication des meubles et une enquête portant sur l’expérience d’une centaine d’institutions dans le monde en matière de stockage des œuvres grands formats. Des recommandations générales en sont tirées ainsi qu’une liste simple de contrôle pour faciliter les achats de meubles grands formats par les professionnels des musées.Storage systems for oversized works of art on paper are examined regarding object protection, user satisfaction and sustainability by way of a life cycle assessment of furniture materials/construction features and a survey of about 100 institutions worldwide on their experience with oversize storage. General recommendations are derived and a simple checklist is developed to facilitate oversize purchase by museum professionals.

  11. Making Federalism Work in Italy. OECD Economics Department Working Papers No. 590

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibbee, Alexandra

    2007-01-01

    Fiscal federalism can be an important complement to structural reforms and budget consolidation. Empowering sub national governments, while at the same time making them accountable to local citizens in the uses of tax money, could improve the allocation of public resources and promote catch up of the lagging regions. Italy has launched itself in…

  12. Knee Society Award Papers Are Highly Cited Works.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroz, Tommy P; Clarke, Henry D; Chang, Yu-Hui H; Scuderi, Giles R

    2016-01-01

    Since 1993, The Knee Society has presented three annual awards recognizing the best research papers presented at the annual meetings. To date, no quantitative evaluation has determined whether the selection process identifies the most meritorious papers based on subsequent citations. In the absence of validation of this process, it is unclear whether the journal readership should view the award-winning papers as those with potentially greater impact for the specialty. (1) Are award papers cited both more than nonaward papers published in the same Knee Society proceedings issue of CORR(®) and more than all other knee research papers published in all issues of CORR(®) during any given year? (2) Does the award selection process identify potentially highly influential knee research? Subsequent citations for each award and nonaward paper published in The Knee Society proceedings issue for 2002 to 2008 were determined using the SCOPUS citation index. The citations for all papers on knee surgery published in CORR(®) during the same years were also determined. Mean citations for an award paper were statistically greater than for a nonaward paper: 86 (SD 95; median 55; 95% confidence interval [CI] of the mean, 44-128) versus 33 (SD 30; median 24; 95% CI of the mean, 28-37; p papers was also higher than for all other knee research papers published in nonproceedings issues of CORR(®): 86 (SD 95; median 55; 95% CI of the mean, 44-128) versus 30 (SD 31; median 20; 95% CI for the mean, 25-35; p papers were in the top five cited papers from the proceedings issue for the respective year versus 24 of the 190 (12.6%) of the nonaward papers (difference in the percentages is 41.9% and the 95% CI for the risk difference is 20.6%-63.3%; p paper was the most cited knee paper published in CORR(®). The selection process for The Knee Society scientific awards identifies potentially influential papers that are likely to be highly cited in future research articles about the knee. The

  13. Working time, health and safety a research synthesis paper

    OpenAIRE

    Tucker, Philip; Folkard, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Outlines contemporary trends, developments and effects with regard to different aspects of working time, such as hours of work and work schedules. Examines the impact of modern working time arrangements on workers' health, well-being and workplace safety. Argues that while long daily hours tend to be associated with acute effects of fatigue, long weekly hours tend to be associated both with acute effects of fatigue as well as chronic fatigue, generating long-term negative health effects. Look...

  14. Replacing Remediation with Readiness. An NCPR Working Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, David T.

    2010-01-01

    This paper critically examines traditional means of assessing college students' need for remediation and suggests as a replacement an expanded definition of college readiness, where readiness is more complex than rudimentary content knowledge and more multifaceted than a single cut point. The paper presents and explains four dimensions of…

  15. The Political Participation of Working Youth and College Students. CIRCLE Working Paper 36

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Sharon E.; Montoya, Lisa; Mulvoy, Emily

    2005-01-01

    Unprecedented attention has gone to researching young voters, and yet one segment of this age group has been largely ignored: non-college (or "working") youth. Because very little is known about them, the following paper advances three fundamental concerns: What types of political activities do young workers engage in? What can be learned about…

  16. Poverty Alleviation and Child Labor. NBER Working Paper No. 15345

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonds, Eric V.; Schady, Norbert

    2009-01-01

    How important are subsistence concerns in a family's decision to send a child to work? We consider this question in Ecuador, where poor families are selected at random to receive a cash transfer that is equivalent to 7 percent of monthly expenditures. Winning the cash transfer lottery is associated with a decline in work for pay away from the…

  17. Working Paper 2: WDM, Poverty & Equity | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-12-08

    Dec 8, 2010 ... This paper shows that WDM can contribute to poverty reduction, defined ... Series contributes to setting the stage for the next phase of WDM research. ... that 20% of the country's population has some form of physical disability.

  18. Working Paper 2: Enhancing the migration experience: gendering ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-12-13

    Dec 13, 2010 ... ... migrant women dominate certain 'sectors,' which have traditionally been outside ... In an effort to contribute to filling this research gap, this paper aims to ... Highlight: Ankara workshop puts minimum wage on the G-20 radar.

  19. The NBER-Rensselaer Scientific Papers Database: Form, Nature, and Function. NBER Working Paper No. 14575

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, James D.; Clemmons, J. Roger

    2008-01-01

    This article is a guide to the NBER-Rensselaer Scientific Papers Database, which includes more than 2.5 million scientific publications and over 21 million citations to those papers. The data cover an important sample of 110 top U.S. universities and 200 top U.S.-based R&D-performing firms during the period 1981-1999. This article describes the…

  20. Estimating Marginal Returns to Education. NBER Working Paper No. 16474

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Pedro; Heckman, James J.; Vytlacil, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper estimates the marginal returns to college for individuals induced to enroll in college by different marginal policy changes. The recent instrumental variables literature seeks to estimate this parameter, but in general it does so only under strong assumptions that are tested and found wanting. We show how to utilize economic theory and…

  1. Taxation and Revenues for Education. Education Partners Working Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crampton, Faith; Whitney, Terry

    Funding education with property taxes has always been controversial. This paper examines taxation and the sources of revenue for education. The historical context in which tax and revenue sources have supported education in the United States is described. Also discussed are state tax-policy goals and education funding, and the embattled role of…

  2. Preferences for Inequality: East vs. West. Innocenti Working Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhrcke, Marc

    Do preferences for income inequality differ systematically between the post-socialist countries of central and eastern Europe and the western established market economies? Analyzing 1999 data from a large international survey to address this question, the paper examines whether attitudes to inequality differ between east and west even after the…

  3. Who Suffers during Recessions? NBER Working Paper No. 17951

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoynes, Hilary W.; Miller, Douglas L.; Schaller, Jessamyn

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we examine how business cycles affect labor market outcomes in the United States. We conduct a detailed analysis of how cycles affect outcomes differentially across persons of differing age, education, race, and gender, and we compare the cyclical sensitivity during the Great Recession to that in the early 1980s recession. We present…

  4. State Options for Supporting Delinquency Prevention: A Working Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croan, Gerald M.; And Others

    A supplement to the related document "Delinquency Prevention: Theories and Strategies," this paper analyzes the options for state agencies (particularly state planning agencies participating in the Law Enforcement Assistance Administration formula grant program) to promote and support program forms recommended in the companion document.…

  5. Topical and working papers on heavy water accountability and safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the following papers: 1) Statement of IAEA concerning safeguarding of heavy water; 2) Preliminary Canadian Comments on IAEA document on heavy water safeguards; 3) Heavy water accountability 03.10.78; 4) Heavy water accountability 05.04.79

  6. Working Paper 2: WDM, Poverty & Equity | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2012-01-23

    Jan 23, 2012 ... Despite the growing practical and policy-level engagement with WDM, there has been little analytical or empirical effort devoted to its potential social implications. Establishing a better foundation for understanding the linkages between WDM and poverty is, therefore, very important. This paper shows that ...

  7. Investing in Our Young People. NBER Working Paper No. 16201

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Flavio; Heckman, James J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent literature on the production of skills of young persons. The literature features the multiplicity of skills that explain success in a variety of life outcomes. Noncognitive skills play a fundamental role in successful lives. The dynamics of skill formation reveal the interplay of cognitive and noncognitive skills, and…

  8. Measuring Discrimination in Education. NBER Working Paper No. 15057

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Rema; Linden. Leigh

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we illustrate a methodology to measure discrimination in educational contexts. In India, we ran an exam competition through which children compete for a large financial prize. We recruited teachers to grade the exams. We then randomly assigned child "characteristics" (age, gender, and caste) to the cover sheets of the…

  9. Menstruation and Education in Nepal. NBER Working Paper No. 14853

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oster, Emily; Thornton, Rebecca

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results from a randomized evaluation that distributed menstrual cups (menstrual sanitary products) to adolescent girls in rural Nepal. Girls in the study were randomly allocated a menstrual cup for use during their monthly period and were followed for fifteen months to measure the effects of having modern sanitary products…

  10. Grade Non-Disclosure. NBER Working Paper No. 17465

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Daniel; Smetters, Kent

    2011-01-01

    This paper documents and explains the existence of grade non-disclosure policies in Masters in Business Administration programs, why these policies are concentrated in highly-ranked programs, and why these policies are not prevalent in most other professional degree programs. Related policies, including honors and minimum grade requirements, are…

  11. The Class Size Policy Debate. Working Paper No. 121.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Alan B.; Hanushek, Eric A.

    These papers examine research on the impact of class size on student achievement. After an "Introduction," (Richard Rothstein), Part 1, "Understanding the Magnitude and Effect of Class Size on Student Achievement" (Alan B. Krueger), presents a reanalysis of Hanushek's 1997 literature review, criticizing Hanushek's vote-counting…

  12. Performance Management and Sourcing Team Behaviour - Working Paper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Peder Lysholm

    The purpose of this development paper is to outline the main ideas of a Ph.d.-project research proposal,which deals with the influence of Performance Management on the behaviour and decisions of Sourcing Category Team members. The background for the project is described, as well as the main theory...

  13. Papers on Morphology. The Ohio State University Working Papers in Linguistics #29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwicky, Arnold M., Ed.; Wallace, Rex E., Ed.

    A collection of papers on morphology in relation to other grammar components and on the morphology-syntax interface includes: "Locative Plural Forms in Classical Sanskrit" (Belinda Brodie); "On Explaining Morpheme Structure" (Donald G. Churma); "Lexical Relatedness, Head of a Word and the Misanalysis of Latin" (Brian D. Joseph and Rex E. Wallace);…

  14. 78 FR 66337 - Request for Comments on Department of Commerce Green Paper, Copyright Policy, Creativity, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-05

    ... Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of Change in Public Meeting Date and Change in Public Comment Periods. SUMMARY: On October 3, 2013, the Department of Commerce's Internet Policy Task Force... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE United States Patent and Trademark Office National Telecommunications and...

  15. Teaching Practices and Social Capital. NBER Working Paper No. 17527

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algan, Yann; Cahuc, Pierre; Shleifer, Andrei

    2011-01-01

    We use several data sets to consider the effect of teaching practices on student beliefs, as well as on organization of firms and institutions. In cross-country data, we show that teaching practices (such as copying from the board versus working on projects together) are strongly related to various dimensions of social capital, from beliefs in…

  16. Working paper on public steering of privately owned sports facilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Evald Bundgård

    This short paper discusses how municipalities can steer privately owned sports facilities. Firstly I analyse why steering of privately owned facilities is an interesting subject. Secondly I discuss what the advantages and drawbacks of using different approaches for steering sports facilities are........ Finally I discuss the methodological challenges of measuring activities in sports facilities – and take a closer look at the advantages and drawbacks of using manual and thermal techniques for registering activity.......This short paper discusses how municipalities can steer privately owned sports facilities. Firstly I analyse why steering of privately owned facilities is an interesting subject. Secondly I discuss what the advantages and drawbacks of using different approaches for steering sports facilities are...

  17. Papers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    The chapters in this Volume 7 of a series of PAPERS are based on papers published in the period 2004 - 2008 authored/co-authored by Palle Thoft-Christensen......The chapters in this Volume 7 of a series of PAPERS are based on papers published in the period 2004 - 2008 authored/co-authored by Palle Thoft-Christensen...

  18. Transaction costs of raising energy efficiency. Working paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostertag, K. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Systemtechnik und Innovationsforschung (ISI), Karlsruhe (Germany); Centre International de Recherche sur l' Environnement et le Developpement (CIRED), 94 - Nogent sur Marne (France)

    1999-05-01

    In the face of the uncertainties concerning the importance and the actual impacts of anthropogeneous climate change the extent to which measures should be adopted to avoid greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) already today and in the near future is highly controversial. More specifically, part of the debate evolves around the existence and importance of energy saving potentials to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions that may be available at negative net costs, implying that the energy cost savings of one specific technology can actually more than offset the costs of investing into this technology and of using it. This so called 'no-regret' potential would comprise measures that from a pure economic efficiency point of view would be 'worth undertaking whether or not there are climate-related reasons for doing so' (Bruce et al. 1996, p. 271). The existence of the no-regret potential is often denied by arguing, that the economic evaluation of the energy saving potentials did not take into account transaction costs (Grubb et al. 1993). This paper will examine in more detail the concept of transaction costs as it is used in the current debate on no-regret potentials (section 1). Four practical examples are presented to illustrate how transaction costs and their determinants can be identified, measured and possibly influenced (section 2). In order to link the presented cases to modelling based evaluation approaches the implications for cost evaluations of energy saving measures especially in the context of energy system modelling will be shown (section 3). (orig.)

  19. Level of occupational exposure during daily work in a Nuclear Medicine Department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarcke, Marcelo, E-mail: mschwarcke@usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica e Matematica; Ferreira, Nadya [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear; Cardoso, Domingos [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Workers of the Nuclear Medicine Department have a very complex geometric exposition. The source of irradiation is not collimated and irradiated for all direction, the interaction with many structural tissue is inside the body before could be detected outside. The professional who works in a Nuclear Medicine Department is exposed to this condition and different energies. This work proposes a good approach to estimate the mensal dose level according to the dose rate during their daily routine. To measure the dose rate, a Babyline 81 ionization chamber was used, and the most frequent exams using {sup 99m}Tc were chosen. A previous study was conducted to determine the most frequent exams made in the Nuclear Medicine Department at the Central Army Hospital in Rio de Janeiro, and previous environment monitoring determine the places with higher exposure that could interfere in the measurement of this paper. The Renal scintigraphy with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) had an average dose rate of (2.50{+-}0.25) {mu}Sv/h; for the Renal scintigraphy with dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), it was of (1.20{+-}0.25) {mu}Sv/h; for Bone scintigraphy using two different protocols, it was (2.63{+-}0.30) {mu}Sv/h and (3.09{+-}0.30) {mu}Sv/h. Exposition during elution, dose preparing and clinical procedure was considered a critical moment in the daily routine of the employee. The dose rate obtained in this study demonstrated that the professional cannot exceed the public dose limit in one day of his work routine. Therefore, for the Radioprotection Department, this is a good approach to make a radioprotection plan in the Nuclear Medicine Department. (author)

  20. Paper works

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Mattias Borg

    2018-01-01

    Resource histories determine how particular parts of the environment come to be defined as valuable. As elsewhere, protected areas in Latin America link the governance of people, territory, and resources by reinterpreting and reclassifying practices and environments. Set in highland Peru, the art......Resource histories determine how particular parts of the environment come to be defined as valuable. As elsewhere, protected areas in Latin America link the governance of people, territory, and resources by reinterpreting and reclassifying practices and environments. Set in highland Peru...... struggles about local development where territorial claims are based on different notions of history and interpretations of the esthetic and productive values of the landscape. While the park officials navigate interests of conservation, tourism, and extraction, the campesino community mobilizes a different...

  1. Department of Energy's regional solar updates 1979. Volume two. Invited papers and appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-01-01

    Twenty-six invited papers for the regional meetings at Dearborn, Michigan; Orlando, Florida; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and Los Angeles, California are included. Separate abstracts were prepared for each paper. (MHR)

  2. 78 FR 61337 - Request for Comments on Department of Commerce Green Paper, Copyright Policy, Creativity, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ... music licensing, the Copyright Office's work on orphan works and mass digitization, and the Intellectual... practices and industry-specific guidelines to help those looking to use existing works make informed choices... primarily driven by the industries involved. But [[Page 61340

  3. Savannah River Plant, Works Technical Department monthly progress report for March 1956

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1956-01-01

    This document details activities of the Works Technical Department during the month of March 1956. It covers reactor technology, separations technology, engineering assistance and heavy water technology

  4. Department

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2016-09-20

    Sep 20, 2016 ... Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, Kibabii University. Abstract. This study ... Key Words: Climate Change, Regional Circulation Model, PRECIS, Bungoma County ... by different computer models is much.

  5. U.S. Department of Energy's Genomics: GTL Bioenergy Research Centers White Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2006-08-01

    The Genomics:GTL Bioenergy Research Centers will be dedicated to fundamental research on microbe and plant systems with the goal of developing knowledge that will advance biotechnology-based strategies for biofuels production. The aim is to spur substantial progress toward cost-effective production of biologically based renewable energy sources. This document describes the rationale for the establishment of the centers and their objectives in light of the U.S. Department of Energy’s mission and goals.

  6. Significant factors for work attractiveness and how these differ from the current work situation among operating department nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björn, Catrine; Lindberg, Magnus; Rissén, Dag

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to examine significant factors for work attractiveness and how these differ from the current work situation among operating department nurses. A second objective was to examine the associations between age, gender, length of employment, work engagement, work ability, self-rated health indicators and attractiveness of the current work situation. The attractiveness of work is rarely taken into account in research on nurse retention. To expand this knowledge, it is relevant to examine factors that make work attractive and their associations with related concepts. Correlational, cross-sectional survey using a convenience sample. Questionnaires were answered by 147 nurses in four operating departments in Sweden. Correlation and regression analyses were conducted. The nurses rated the significance of all factors of work attractiveness higher than they rated those factors in their current work situation; salary, organisation and physical work environment had the largest differences. The most significant attractive factors were relationships, leadership and status. A statistically significant positive correlation between work engagement and attractive work was found. In the multiple regression model, the independent variables work engagement and older age significantly predicted work attractiveness. Several factors should be considered in the effort to increase work attractiveness in operating departments and thereby to encourage nurse retention. Positive aspects of work seem to unite work engagement and attractive work, while work ability and self-rated health indicators are other important dimensions in nurse retention. The great discrepancies between the significance of attractive factors and the current work situation in salary, organisation and physical work environment suggest ways in which work attractiveness may be increased. To discover exactly what needs to be improved may require a deeper look into the construct of the examined factors. © 2015 John

  7. [Position paper from the Department of Ethics of the Chilean College of Physicians about conscientious objection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Sofía P; Besio, Mauricio; Bórquez Estefó, Gladys; Salinas, Rodrigo A; Valenzuela, Carlos Y; Micolich, Constanza; Novoa Sotta, Fernando; Bernier Villarroel, Lioniel; Montt M, Julio; Misseroni Raddatz, Adelio

    2016-03-01

    The Chilean bill that regulates abortion for three cases (Bulletin Nº 9895-11) includes the possibility that health professionals may manifest their conscientious objection (CO) to perform this procedure. Due to the broad impact that the issue of C O had, the Ethics Department of the Chilean College of Physicians considered important to review this concept and its ethical and legal basis, especially in the field of sexual and reproductive health. In the present document, we define the practical limit s of CO, both for the proper fulfillment of the medical profession obligations, and for the due respect and non-discrimination that the professional objector deserves. We analyze the denial of some health institutions to perform abortions if it is legalize d, and we end with recommendations adjusted to the Chilean reality. Specifically, we recognize the right to conscientious objection that all physicians who directly participate in a professional act have. But we a lso recognize that physicians have ineludib le obligations towards their patients, including the obligation to inform about the existence of this service, how to access to it and -as set out in our code of ethics- to ensure that another colleague will continue attending the patient.

  8. Storing and Transmitting Skills: The Expropriation of Working Class Control. NALL Working Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Dorothy E.; Dobson, Stephan

    Researchers explored the relationships between the great working class communities and the industries they sustained and were sustained by in terms of production, storage, and transmission of skills. First, the ethnographic literature on industrial workplaces and the working class communities associated with them was reviewed. Next, lengthy…

  9. Papers from U.S. Department of Energy Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship Program (SULI) 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-06-22

    The solvation sphere of halides in water has been investigated using a combination of extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) analysis techniques. The results have indicated that I{sup -} and Br{sup -} both have an asymmetric, 8 water molecule primary solvation spheres. These spheres are identical, with the Br{sup -} sphere about .3 {angstrom} smaller than the I{sup -} sphere. This study utilized near-edge analysis to supplement EXAFS analysis which suffers from signal dampening/broadening due to thermal noise. This paper has reported on the solvation first sphere of I{sup -} and Br{sup -} in water. Using EXAFS and XANES analysis, strong models which describe the geometric configuration of water molecules coordinated to a central anion have been developed. The combination of these techniques has provided us with a more substantiated argument than relying solely on one or the other. An important finding of this study is that the size of the anion plays a smaller role than previously assumed in determining the number of coordinating water molecules. Further experimental and theoretical investigation is required to understand why the size of the anion plays a minor role in determining the number of water molecules bound.

  10. Papers from U.S. Department of Energy Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship Program (SULI) 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, A.; Majewski, S.; Woods, M.

    2006-01-01

    The BaBar drift chamber (DCH) is used to measure the properties of charged particles created from e + e - collisions in the PEP-II asymmetric-energy storage rings by making precise measurements of position, momentum and ionization energy loss (dE/dx). In October of 2005, the PEP-II storage rings operated with a luminosity of 10 x 10 33 cm -2 s -1 ; the goal for 2007 is a luminosity of 20 x 10 33 cm -2 s -1 , which will increase the readout dead time, causing uncertainty in drift chamber measurements to become more significant in physics results. The research described in this paper aims to reduce position and dE/dx uncertainties by improving our understanding of the BaBar drift chamber performance. A simulation program --called garfield--is used to model the behavior of the drift chamber with adjustable parameters such as gas mixture, wire diameter, voltage, and magnetic field. By exploring the simulation options offered in garfield, we successfully produced a simulation model of the BaBar drift chamber. We compared the time-to-distance calibration from BaBar to that calculated by garfield to validate our model as well as check for discrepancies between the simulated and calibrated time-to-distance functions, and found that for a 0 o entrance angle there is a very good match between calibrations, but at an entrance angle of 90 o the calibration breaks down. Using this model, we also systematically varied the gas mixture to find one that would optimize chamber operation, which showed that the gas mixture of 80:20 Helium:isobutane is a good operating point, though more calculations need to be done to confirm that it is the optimal mixture

  11. Education, Work and Crime: Theory and Evidence. Rochester Center for Economic Research Working Paper No. 465.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochner, Lance

    A dynamic model of decisions to work, invest in human capital, and commit crime was developed and examined. By making all three activities endogenous, the model explains why older, more intelligent, and more educated workers tend to commit fewer property crimes of some types than others. The model includes the following predictions: (1) policies…

  12. Work-Based Learning and Academic Skills. IEE Working Paper No. 15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Katherine L.; Moore, David Thornton; Bailey, Thomas R.

    The claim that work-based experience improves students' academic performance was examined through a study of the academic progress of 25 high school and community college student interns employed in various health care workplaces. Data were collected from the following activities: (1) review of the literature on academic reinforcement and academic…

  13. Adaptation to Work: An Analysis of Employee Health, Withdrawal and Change. Working Paper 82-19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosse, Joseph G.

    According to an employee withdrawal model suggested by Miller and Rosse (1982), workers engage in a variety of integrated behaviors that are intended to place physical and psychological distance between themselves and a noxious work environment. To investigate the relationship of job satisfaction and employee withdrawal behaviors, 48 newly hired,…

  14. Reported time-management of work and managerial activities: Head and department nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Kotrba

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Here the author presents results of a nursing time-management questionnaire research from seven hospitals in the Czech Republic. Target subjects were department and head nurses. Questionnaires were distributed and collected between Nov. 2009 and Dec. 2009 and were completed by 147 respondents. The aim of this study was to evaluate and analyze reported time management by department and head nurses in performing their managerial duties. Nurses were asked about their allocation of regular shift hours versus additional managerial task hours. Findings were compared between hospitals. The research was made possible through the informational system RELA. Questionnaire results were statistically analyzed and compared with the results of working analysis. Work analysis was collected from two Czech hospitals and included work hours from 37 head nurses (357 total work day records and 37 department nurses (363 work day records. Research was made by auto-screening method.

  15. Improving Education Achievement and Attainment in Luxembourg. OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 508

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, David; Ernst, Ekkehard

    2006-01-01

    Improving education achievement in Luxembourg is a priority for strengthening productivity growth and enhancing residents' employment prospects in the private sector, where employers mainly hire cross-border workers. Student achievement in Luxembourg is below the OECD average according to the 2003 OECD PISA study, with the performance gap between…

  16. Fostering Innovation in Chile: OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 454

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavente, Jose-Miguel; de Mello, Luiz; Mulder, Nanno

    2005-01-01

    A good framework for investment in innovation can contribute to increasing Chile's growth potential. Spending on R&D is currently low in relation to GDP and heavily reliant on government financing. Innovation activity in the business sector is also limited by insufficient seed and venture capital and human capital constraints. This is despite…

  17. Reforming Education in England. OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 939

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braconier, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant increases in spending on child care and education during the last decade, PISA scores suggest that educational performance remains static, uneven and strongly related to parents' income and background. Better educational performance could improve labour market outcomes, raise growth, lower the consequences of a disadvantaged…

  18. [Gender influence on health related quality of life among resident physicians working in an emergency department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Prada, María; González-Cabrera, Joaquín; Torres G, Francisco; Iribar-Ibabe, Concepción; María Peinado, José

    2014-02-01

    The high emotional burden of physicians working in emergency departments may affect their quality of life perception. To evaluate health related quality of life among resident physicians performing shifts at an emergency department. Seventy one physicians aged 26,3 ± 1,7 years (47 women), working as residents in an emergency department, answered the short version of the Short-Form Health Survey Questionnaire (SF-36®). This questionnaire analyses eight domains: physical function, body pain, general health, vitality, social function, emotional role and mental health. Women had a significantly worse perception than a reference population in four dimensions of the SF-36, especially mental health and social functioning. Men had scores similar to the reference population. Among women, vitality is the best predictor of mental health and social functioning. Women working as residents in an emergency department have a worse perception of their quality of life than men performing the same job.

  19. What Can Pakeha Learn from Engaging in Kaupapa Maori Educational Research? Working Paper 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Alex

    2013-01-01

    This working paper focuses on how Pakeha have become involved in Maori-determined and controlled educational research, and what issues inhibit and facilitate their work. This paper focuses on the experiences of four Pakeha educational researchers who have been engaged in different forms of kaupapa Maori research since the early 1990s. Placing…

  20. Leadership Style Head of Polytechnic Department and Regard with to Work Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamaludin, Nur Hasliza Binti; Naim, Nor Azlin Binti; Khamis, Nur Azzarina Binti; Zakaria, Normah Binti

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to look at the leadership style of the heads of departments in technical education and its relationship to the work culture among lecturers Polytechnic Sultan Abdul Halim Mu'adzam Shah in Jitra, Kedah. This research is very important to the head of polytechnic and lecture to work in the good condition with the good leadership. This…

  1. Investigation on the use the radioisotopes applications and work conditions in the Antioquia department in 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez Galeano, Maria Piedad; Martinez Galeano, Luis Humberto

    1998-01-01

    The work shows the results the descriptive study realized by means of an applied survey to institutions publish and private located in the Antioquia department, were evaluated the work conditions, security the geographical distribution and the personal exposed occupational to radioisotopes

  2. Work, Train, Win: Work-Based Learning Design and Management for Productivity Gains. OECD Education Working Papers, No. 135

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis, Viktoria

    2016-01-01

    Realising the potential of work-based learning schemes as a driver of productivity requires careful design and support. The length of work-based learning schemes should be adapted to the profile of productivity gains. A scheme that is too long for a given skill set might be unattractive for learners and waste public resources, but a scheme that is…

  3. Quality of work life of rural emergency department nurses and physicians: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragard, Isabelle; Fleet, Richard; Etienne, Anne-Marie; Archambault, Patrick; Légaré, France; Chauny, Jean-Marc; Lévesque, Jean-Frédéric; Ouimet, Mathieu; Poitras, Julien; Dupuis, Gilles

    2015-04-01

    Information about recruitment and retention factors and quality of work life (QWL) in rural emergency departments (EDs) is limited. A pilot study was used to determine the feasibility of a large-scale study of these variables in Quebec EDs. Two EDs, approximately 10,000 and 30,000 patients per year respectively, were selected as convenience samples. An online survey containing the Quality of Work Life Systemic Inventory (QWLSI; 34 items) and the Recruitment and Retention Factors Questionnaire (39 items) was sent to ED nurses and physicians of these two EDs. Descriptive statistics of percentage, mean and standard deviation and correlations were used to analyse the data. Forty out of 64 eligible workers (62%) gave their consent to participate, but only 20 had completed both questionnaires. Participants' mean age was 42 years (SD = 11.6). The average participants satisfaction with their access to continuing education was low (Mean = 1.6, SD = 0.8). However, their satisfaction with technical resources (Mean = 2.4, SD = 0.7), pre-hospital and inter-hospital transfer services (Mean = 2.5, SD = 0.6), relationships with colleagues (Mean = 2.7, SD = 0.6) and managers (Mean = 2.2, SD = 0.7), work-life balance (Mean = 2.4, SD = 0.6) and emergency patient access to other departments (Mean = 3.7, SD = 0.6) was in the average. The impact of several aspects of the rural environment (e.g. tranquility) on quality of life was also in the average (Mean = 2.5, SD = 0.7). QWL was in the average, excepted subscale 'support offered to employee' for which the QWL was lower. Data collection was difficult and the larger study will require strategies to improve recruitment such as a paper alternative. The study showed globally good recruitment and retention factors and QWL for these ED nurses and physicians. These results will help hospital administrations better plan initiatives aimed at improving retention and QWL.

  4. Medical science in the light of the Holocaust: Departing from a post-war paper by Ludwik Fleck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedfors, Eva

    2008-04-01

    In scholarly debates, Ludwik Fleck's post-war paper 'Problemy naukoznawstwa [Problems of the Science of Science]', published in 1946, has been taken unanimously to illustrate the epistemology expounded in his monograph Genesis and Development of a Scientific Fact. The paper has also been seen to support parts of the received view of Fleck, notably that he manufactured an anti-typhus vaccine while imprisoned in Buchenwald. However, a different narrative emerges when comparing Fleck's paper with other accounts, also published in 1946 and written by other prisoners alluded to by Fleck in his paper. The situation is further complicated by four papers, published in prestigious scientific journals between 1942 and 1945, by the German medical leader of the typhus studies accounted for by Fleck. In addition, a thus-far neglected paper by Fleck, published in 1946 and summarizing his observations on typhus, discloses his role in the Buchenwald studies. Despite the obvious difficulties with tracing the history behind these works, notably the one on Nazi science, the contention is that what was attempted in Buchenwald in the name of science amounted to pseudoscience. This conclusion is amply supported not only by the accounts given by Fleck's fellow prisoners, but also by his own post-war paper on typhus. Based on the above findings, it is suggested that the mythology about Fleck, established in the 1980s, has been accomplished by a selective reading of his papers and also that the role played by Fleck was more complex than has so far been contemplated.

  5. Working paper : national costs of the metropolitan ITS infrastructure : updated with 2004 deployment data

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this report, "Working Paper National Costs of the Metropolitan ITS infrastructure: Updated with 2004 Deployment Data," is to update the estimates of the costs remaining to deploy Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) infrastructure ...

  6. [Hierarchical structure of authors collaboration. An analysis of papers on imaging diagnosis published by hospital radiology departments in Comunidad Valenciana (1994-2001)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguel-Dasit, A; Martí-Bonmatí, L; Sanfeliu, P; Aleixandre, R; Valderrama, J C

    2005-06-01

    Analyze the different contribution of hierarchical categories in the papers published by radiologists of hospitals belonging to Comunidad Valenciana along the period 1994-2001, as well as their distribution in the different journals. For the recovery of the papers sample we have designed specific search profiles for EMI and Medline databases. Hierarchical category of the authors was identified through personal interviews. We have analyzed 417 works, with 1,321 authors distributed in the following form: chief of service, 8.8%; chief of section, 12.4%; assistant physician, 50.7%, and resident, 28%. Hierarchical groupings with participation of residents were more consistent for publishing papers along all the study period (1994-2001). Higher percentage of papers (21%) corresponded to grouping. Radiología was the most productive journal (42% papers). All results were statistically significant (p Comunidad Valenciana hospitals showed an active participation in research papers published along the period 1994-2001, in collaboration with the rest of the hierarchical categories, basically with the assistant physician. Assistant physicians contributed most of papers. Chief of section and chief of department contributed fifth of papers.

  7. Direction of the methodological work in the Technical and Professional Education: the department bosses' preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolando Rodríguez Delgado

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The present work deals with the process of preparation of the heads of teaching departments for the direction of methodological work in Technical and Professional Education with the purpose of improving their professional performance with the collective of teachers and specialists in the continuous training of the worker. The results of the diagnosis made on this process revealed shortcomings because it is unsystematic and poorly contextualized, which does not allow to achieve a positive impact on the training of subordinates and students to join the world of work. For the development of the work we used the structural systemic methods, analysis and synthesis, induction and deduction, survey, interview, observation and statistical techniques such as percentage calculation, tables of frequencies and contingencies, which allowed to deepen the object of study and to elaborate a strategy of preparation for the heads of department like main result that is presented in this work. In order to verify the practical effectiveness of the proposed strategy, 12 heads of teaching departments of the polytechnic centers of the municipality of La Palma for the academic year 2014-2015 were studied and 5 managers, 69 teachers and 18 specialists of production and services. The evaluation of the results evidences advances in the preparation of the heads of departments and in their professional performance with teachers and specialist, according to the current requirements of the technical and professional continuing education of the worker in formation.

  8. An Innovation in Morocco's Koranic Pre-Schools. Working Papers in Early Childhood Development, No. 23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzoubaa, Khadija

    This working paper describes the ATFALE project to introduce pedagogical innovation into Moroccan preschools. Following a review of the history of the traditional Muslim Kuttab school for preschool and early elementary school children, the paper discusses the educational reform goals of the ATFALE project. Specifically, the project plans to…

  9. Economic Growth and Poverty Reduction: Measurement and Policy Issues. OECD Development Centre Working Paper No. 246

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasen, Stephan

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this Working Paper is to broaden the debate on "pro-poor growth". An exclusive focus on the income dimension of poverty has neglected the non-income dimensions. After an examination of prominent views on the linkages between economic growth, inequality, and poverty reduction this paper discusses the proper definition and…

  10. Building an autonomous citation index for grey literature : the economics working papers case

    OpenAIRE

    Barrueco Cruz, José Manuel; Krichel, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes an autonomous citation index named CitEc that has been developed by the authors. The system has been tested using a particular type of grey literature: working papers available in the RePEc (Research Papers in Economics) digital library. Both its architecture and performance are analysed in order to determine if the system has the quality required to be used for information retrieval and for the extraction of bibliometric indicators.

  11. Building an autonomous citation index for grey literature: the Economics working papers case

    OpenAIRE

    Barrueco Cruz, José M. (Universitat de València); Krichel, T. (Long Island University); GreyNet, Grey Literature Network Service

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes an autonomous citation index named CitEc that has been developed by the authors. The system has been tested using a particular type of grey literature: working papers available in the RePEc (Research Papers in Economics) digital library. Both its architecture and performance are analysed in order to determine if the system has the quality required to be used for information retrieval and for the extraction of bibliometric indicators. Includes: Conference preprint, Powe...

  12. Personnel and working area monitoring at the Department of Nuclear Science, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amran Abd Majid; Muhamad Samudi Yasir; Che Rosli Che Mat

    1995-01-01

    Personnel (staff and student) and working area absorbed dose monitoring at the Department of Nuclear Science from 1984 until September 1993 is reported. Generally average absorbed dose received by the staff and working area were less than 0.5 and 2.0 mSv/yr respectively. The application of low activity of radioactive materials and complying the UKM (Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia) and LPTA (AELB) - Atomic Energy Licensing Board regulations contributing to the low rate recorded. (author)

  13. Quality of work life of rural emergency department nurses and physicians: a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Bragard, Isabelle; Fleet, Richard; Etienne, Anne-Marie; Archambault, Patrick; L?gar?, France; Chauny, Jean-Marc; L?vesque, Jean-Fr?d?ric; Ouimet, Mathieu; Poitras, Julien; Dupuis, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Background Information about recruitment and retention factors and quality of work life (QWL) in rural emergency departments (EDs) is limited. A pilot study was used to determine the feasibility of a large-scale study of these variables in Quebec EDs. Methods Two EDs, approximately 10,000 and 30,000 patients per year respectively, were selected as convenience samples. An online survey containing the Quality of Work Life Systemic Inventory (QWLSI; 34 items) and the Recruitment and Retention Fa...

  14. An Interpretative Study on Nurses' Perspectives of Working in an Overcrowded Emergency Department in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Chin Chen, MSN

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study aims to gain in-depth understanding of nurses' perspectives of working in an overcrowded emergency. Methods: Symbolic interactionism and Charmaz’s construction of grounded theory were used. Purposive sampling at the start of the study and a further theoretical sampling by snowball technique were used to recruit 40 registered nurses (RN to participate in in-depth, semi-structured interviews between May and November, 2014. Data analysis included analytic techniques of initial, focused and theoretical coding. Results: Study findings showed searching for work role is derived by the themes of Finding the role of positioning in Emergency Department (ED, Recognizing causes of ED overcrowding, and Confined working environment. Nurses' work experience which represents the RNs not gained control over their work, as care actions influenced by the problematic overcrowded circumstance of the ED environment. Conclusion: The findings fill a gap in knowledge about how RNs experience their work role in the context of an overcrowded Emergency Department in Taiwan. Arising from the study result include taking account of nurses' perspectives when planning staff/patient ratios, strategies to reduce waiting time and ensure that clients receive appropriate care. Keywords: crowding, emergency department, grounded theory, nurses

  15. Reducing emergency department waiting times by adjusting work shifts considering patient visits to multiple care providers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinreich, D.; Jabali, O.; Dellaert, N.P.

    2012-01-01

    Reducing Emergency Department (ED) overcrowding in the hope of improving the ED's operational efficiency and health care delivery ranks high on every health care decision maker's wish list. The current study concentrates on developing efficient work shift schedules that make the best use of current

  16. Prominent attractive qualities of nurses' work in operating room departments: A questionnaire study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björn, Catrine; Josephson, Malin; Wadensten, Barbro; Rissén, Dag

    2015-01-01

    The shortage of nurses in operating room departments (ORs) in Sweden and other countries can lead to reduced capacity and quality in healthcare, as well as more intense work for those on the job. Little is known about what nurses in ORs perceive as crucial for their workplace to be attractive. To capture attractive qualities of nurses' work in Swedish ORs and take a first step in the process of adapting the Attractive Work Questionnaire for use in a health care context. The Attractive Work Questionnaire was completed by 147 (67% ) nurses in four Swedish ORs. Principal Component Analyses (PCA) were performed to determine the underlying structure of the data. Factors contributing to job attractiveness identified in the area "work conditions" were: relations, leadership, equipment, salary, organisation, physical work environment, location, and working hours; in the area "work content": mental work, autonomy and work rate; and in the area "job satisfaction": status and acknowledgement. The PCA showed consistency with the original Attractive Work Questionnaire, Cronbach's alpha varied between 0.57-0.90. Prominent attractive qualities for nurses' work in Swedish ORs were possible to identify through the Attractive Work Questionnaire and the results suggest that the questionnaire can be useful in a health care context.

  17. Coyote Papers: The University of Arizona Working Papers in Linguistics, Volume 11. Special Volume on Native American Languages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Jessica P., Ed.; O'Bryan, Erin L., Ed.; Moll, Laura A., Ed.; Haugan, Jason D., Ed.

    The five papers included in this volume approach the study of American Indian languages from a diverse array of methodological and theoretical approaches to linguistics. Two papers focus on approaches that come from the applied linguistics tradition, emphasizing ethnolinguistics and discourse analysis: Sonya Bird's paper "A Cross Cultural…

  18. Equity and Quality? Challenges for Early Childhood and Primary Education in Ethiopia, India and Peru. Working Papers in Early Childhood Development, No. 55. Studies in Early Childhood Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhead, Martin; Ames, Patricia; Vennam, Uma; Abebe, Workneh; Streuli, Natalia

    2009-01-01

    Part of the "Studies in Early Transitions" series, this Working Paper draws on interviews and observations carried out as part of "Young Lives", a 15-year longitudinal study of childhood poverty in Ethiopia, India, Peru and Vietnam based at the University of Oxford's Department of International Development. This paper focuses…

  19. Preparing Master of Public Health Graduates to Work in Local Health Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemans-Henry, Calaine; Blake, Janice; Parton, Hilary; Koppaka, Ram; Greene, Carolyn M

    2016-01-01

    To identify key competencies and skills that all master of public health (MPH) graduates should have to be prepared to work in a local health department. In 2011-2012, the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene administered electronic surveys to 2 categories of staff: current staff with an MPH as their highest degree, and current hiring managers. In all, 312 (77%) staff members with an MPH as their highest degree and 170 (57%) hiring managers responded to the survey. Of the respondents with an MPH as their highest degree, 85% stated that their MPH program prepared them for work at the New York City Health Department. Skills for which MPH graduates most often stated they were underprepared included facility in using SAS® statistical software, quantitative data analysis/statistics, personnel management/leadership, and data collection/database management/data cleaning. Among the skills hiring managers identified as required of MPH graduates, the following were most often cited as those for which newly hired MPH graduates were inadequately prepared: quantitative data analysis, researching/conducting literature reviews, scientific writing and publication, management skills, and working with contracts/requests for proposals. These findings suggest that MPH graduates could be better prepared to work in a local health department upon graduation. To be successful, new MPH graduate hires should possess fundamental skills and knowledge related to analysis, communication, management, and leadership. Local health departments and schools of public health must each contribute to the development of the current and future public health workforce through both formal learning opportunities and supplementary employment-based training to reinforce prior coursework and facilitate practical skill development.

  20. An Interpretative Study on Nurses' Perspectives of Working in an Overcrowded Emergency Department in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Chin; Lin, Chun-Chih; Han, Chin-Yen; Hsieh, Chun-Lan; Wu, Chiung-Jung Jo; Liang, Hwey-Fang

    2018-03-01

    This study aims to gain in-depth understanding of nurses' perspectives of working in an overcrowded emergency. Symbolic interactionism and Charmaz's construction of grounded theory were used. Purposive sampling at the start of the study and a further theoretical sampling by snowball technique were used to recruit 40 registered nurses (RN) to participate in in-depth, semi-structured interviews between May and November, 2014. Data analysis included analytic techniques of initial, focused and theoretical coding. Study findings showed searching for work role is derived by the themes of Finding the role of positioning in Emergency Department (ED), Recognizing causes of ED overcrowding, and Confined working environment. Nurses' work experience which represents the RNs not gained control over their work, as care actions influenced by the problematic overcrowded circumstance of the ED environment. The findings fill a gap in knowledge about how RNs experience their work role in the context of an overcrowded Emergency Department in Taiwan. Arising from the study result include taking account of nurses' perspectives when planning staff/patient ratios, strategies to reduce waiting time and ensure that clients receive appropriate care. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Activities of the work efficiency institute`s department of forestry; Tyoetehoseuran metsaeosaston toiminta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekelae, J

    1997-12-31

    In accordance with the demarcation of tasks among Finnish forest-engineering research institutions, the Work Efficiency Institute`s Department of Forestry is the only one specialising in research and development focusing on forestry work involving low capital investments and done by landowners on their own estate or on a part-time basis outside their estates. This activity also includes the small-scale utilisation of wood and peat in heating. This bulletin presents a review of our recent research and development work. A significant stepping up of the utilisation of bioenerqy is one of the objectives of the Finnish Government. This has been noted in the Work Efficiency Institute`s Department of Forestry`s work programme in recent years by increasing the role of research and development promoting the consumption of bioenergy. As one of the participants in the National Bioenergy research programme (1993-1998), we are looking into the harvesting of small-diameter wood and wood residues, technology employed in the production of wood chips and fuelwood, cost calculations in fuelwood harvesting, energy entrepreneurship, and the development of fireplaces. Other recent topics of research engaged in by the Department of Forestry include possibilities in the mechanisation of tending of young stands, excavator-loaders in timber harvesting, and promoting self-reliance among landowners in carrying out of forestry work. On-going studies include comparison of pruning methods, a survey of co-operation among landowners at the local community level, and a study looking into the quality of wood produced for delivery sales. (orig.)

  2. It is worth 10 million working hours a year to have your toilet paper folded?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljung, Rickard; Ljung, Hedvig; Ljung, Harald

    2016-01-01

    From our experience the toilet paper is folded in the bathrooms in rooms in branded hotels. We aimed to study the total time yearly spent in the world on folding hotel toilet paper. Three investigators clocked 60 folding toilet paper events and calculated the mean time. The mean folding time was 5.73 s (interquartile range 4.50-6.56). Using the calculated extra time it takes to fold the toilet paper and the number of hotel nights spent we estimated the total time spent in the world each year to fold the toilet paper. For sensitivity analyses we used different assumptions on number of hotel beds, occupancy rate and folding time. Assuming an extra 10 s spent on folding toilet paper, approximately 10 million hours are globally spent on folding toilet paper every year. This corresponds to more than 5000 man-years of work. In a hotel with yearly full coverage of 200 beds skipping folding the toilet paper corresponds to around 200 h of time that could be spent elsewhere. To take away unnecessary duties from hotel room cleaners would increase their health and well-being and save time that could be better spent. Is it really defendable and appropriate that someone else has spent time on folding the toilet paper you are just about to use?

  3. Child Labor, Income Shocks, and Access to Credit. Policy Research Working Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beegle, Kathleen; Dehejia, Rajeev H.; Gatti, Roberta

    Although a growing theoretical literature points to credit constraints as an important source of inefficiently high child labor, little work has been done to assess its empirical relevance. This paper examines the direct effect of a transitory income shock on household child labor choices, as well as the extent to which access to credit helps…

  4. Negotiating the Curriculum. Tutors and Students. Coombe Lodge Working Paper. Information Bank Number 1968.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brace, Diane

    This working paper presents guidelines for negotiating learning contracts between tutors and postsecondary students enrolled in a vocational program. The first two sections discuss the general rationale for negotiating curricula and the specific benefits of conducting such negotiations with students over the age of 16. Addressed next is the…

  5. African Diaspora Movement Arts in Philadelphia: A Beginning Resource List. Philadelphia Folklore Project Working Papers #10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown-Danquah, Benita Binta

    This guide provides history, format, contact names, addresses, and phone numbers of some African dance and African American marching units in Philadelphia (Pennsylvania). The working papers are divided into two categories. "Part One: Movements of African Dance in Philadelphia" begins with a sensitive, detailed explanation of the…

  6. Modeling transport pricing with multiple stakeholders. Working paper : Methodology and a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, E.

    2012-01-01

    Pricing measures (e.g., a kilometre charge or cordon toll) are used to improve the external effects of transportation (e.g., congestion or emissions). This working paper presents a planning model for pricing while taking the preferences and interactions of multiple stakeholders (e.g., governments or

  7. Becoming a Woman: Considerations in Educating Adolescents about Menstruation. Revised 1988. Working Paper No. 169.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Margaret L.; And Others

    This paper reports findings that have emerged from several studies conducted concerning young girls' and boys' attitudes toward menstruation. The research work discussed included: (1) cross-sectional data about menarcheal experience and about attitudes toward menstruation from early adolescent girls in grades six through nine; (2) cross-sectional…

  8. Work Papers of the 1990 Summer Institute of Linguistics, University of North Dakota Session. Volume 34.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, Robert A.; Clifton, John

    Five working papers in linguistics are presented. "Case Marking Strategies in Kope" (John Clifton) shows that there are different strategies followed by Kope for marking core as opposed to peripheral arguments, and discusses typological implications. In "Unmarked and Marked Instances of Topicalization in Hebrew" (Stephen H.…

  9. Big Data in the Campus Landscape: Security and Privacy. ECAR Working Group Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, William; Corn, Mike; Hillegas, Curt; Wada, Kent

    2015-01-01

    This paper is part of series of the EDUCAUSE Center for Analysis and Research Campus Cyberinfrastructure (ECAR-CCI) Working Group. The topic of big data continues to receive a great deal of publicity because of its promise for opening new avenues of scholarly discovery and commercial opportunity. The ability to sift rapidly through massive amounts…

  10. Big Data in the Campus Landscape: Curation. ECAR Working Group Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Clifford A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is part of series of the EDUCAUSE Center for Analysis and Research Campus Cyberinfrastructure (ECAR-CCI) Working Group. The topic of big data continues to receive a great deal of publicity because of its promise for opening new avenues of scholarly discovery and commercial opportunity. The ability to sift rapidly through massive amounts…

  11. Big Data in the Campus Landscape: Basic Infrastructure Support. ECAR Working Group Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almes, Guy T.; Zottola, Ralph J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper is part of series of the EDUCAUSE Center for Analysis and Research Campus Cyberinfrastructure (ECAR-CCI) Working Group. The topic of big data continues to receive a great deal of publicity because of its promise for opening new avenues of scholarly discovery and commercial opportunity. The ability to sift rapidly through massive amounts…

  12. Developing Appropriate Workforce Skills for Australia's Emerging Digital Economy: Working Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gekara, Victor; Molla, Alemayehu; Snell, Darryn; Karanasios, Stan; Thomas, Amanda

    2017-01-01

    This working paper is the first publication coming out of a project investigating the role of vocational education and training (VET) in developing digital skills in the Australian workforce, using two sectors as case studies--Transport and Logistics, and Public Safety and Correctional Services. The study employs a mixed method approach, combining…

  13. Opinion paper on innovative approach of biomarkers for infectious diseases and sepsis management in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Somma, Salvatore; Magrini, Laura; Travaglino, Francesco; Lalle, Irene; Fiotti, Nicola; Cervellin, Grianfranco; Avanzi, Gian Carlo; Lupia, Enrico; Maisel, Alan; Hein, Frauke; Wagner, Florian; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2013-06-01

    Sepsis is a leading healthcare problem, accounting for the vast majority of fatal events in critically ill patients. Beyond early diagnosis and appropriate treatment, this condition requires a multifaceted approach for monitoring the severity, the potential organ failure as well as the risk of death. Monitoring of the efficacy of treatment is also a major issue in the emergency department (ED). The assessment of critically ill conditions and the prognosis of patients with sepsis is currently based on some scoring systems, which are, however, inefficient to provide definite clues about organ failure and prognosis in general. The discretionary and appropriate use of some selected biomarkers such as procalcitonin, inducible protein 10 (IP10), Group IV phospholipase A2 type II (PLA2 II), neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), natriuretic peptides, mature adrenomedullin (ADM), mid-regional pro-adrenomedullin (MR-proADM), copeptin, thrombopoietin, Mer receptor and even red blood cell distribution width (RDW) represent thereby an appealing perspective in the diagnosis and management of patients with sepsis. Nevertheless, at the moment, it is not still clear if it is better to use a multimarkers approach or if a single, most appropriate, biomarker exists. This collective opinion paper is aimed at providing an overview about the potential clinical usefulness of some innovative biomarkers of sepsis in its diagnosis and prognosis, but also in the treatment management of the disease. This manuscript represents a synopsis of the lectures of Third Italian GREAT Network Congress, that was hold in Rome, 15-19 October 2012.

  14. Management of water hyacinth: Final meeting and international conference. Working paper submitted by the Regional Coordinator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Full text: Final Meeting. This meeting will essentially make a terminal review of the project and register final records of work done on the various aspects, such as: - biology of the plant; - biological control; - biogas; - wastewater treatment; - papers and boards; - integrated systems, etc. We should have at the meeting a complete account of the work done in the project under each of the above headings. For example, under 'biogas' we should prepare one consolidated account of work carried out in all the three participating countries rather than individual country reports. Likewise on 'papers and boards', and the other items. To enable preparation of reports in this form there should naturally be prior consultations and contacts among the concerned investigators by correspondence and, if necessary, personal visits. These reports will then be edited and compiled by the Regional Coordinator in the form of a book or monograph on the Management of Water Hyacinth project as a whole. Contributors to chapters will be cited. International Conference. Independent of the consolidated reports, national coordinators may prepare papers for presentation at the proposed international conference. These papers could be prepared m the usual form and style for publication in international scientific journals. Although several papers could be prepared out of work done by us, we may consider the desirability of limiting the number, in order to give adequate opportunities for the other invited participants to the conference. There would be no bar on publication of these scientific papers after the conference in appropriate journals irrespective of whether a separate volume on proceedings of the conference is brought out or not. India would be happy to host the terminal review meeting to be followed by the conference. The likely period would be last week of January to first week in February, 1983. (author)

  15. Work-Practice Changes Associated with an Electronic Emergency-Department Whiteboard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Simonsen, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    , existing work practices, and the clinicians’ experience. Another change in the work practices is distributed access to whiteboard information from the computers in patient rooms. A decrease in the mental workload of the coordinating nurse was envisaged but has not emerged. Achieving more changes appears......Electronic whiteboards are introduced at emergency departments (EDs) to improve work practices. This study investigates whether the time physicians and nurses at an ED spend in patient rooms versus at the control desk increases after the introduction of an electronic whiteboard. After using...... this whiteboard for four months nurses, but not physicians, spend more of their time with the patients. With the electronic whiteboard, nurses spend 28% of their time in patient rooms and physicians 20%. Importantly, the changes facilitated by the electronic whiteboard are also dependent on implementation issues...

  16. Working Together to Connect Care: a metropolitan tertiary emergency department and community care program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harcourt, Debra; McDonald, Clancy; Cartlidge-Gann, Leonie; Burke, John

    2017-03-02

    Objective Frequent attendance by people to an emergency department (ED) is a global concern. A collaborative partnership between an ED and the primary and community healthcare sectors has the potential to improve care for the person who frequently attends the ED. The aims of the Working Together to Connect Care program are to decrease the number of presentations by providing focused community support and to integrate all healthcare services with the goal of achieving positive, patient-centred and directed outcomes. Methods A retrospective analysis of ED data for 2014 and 2015 was used to ascertain the characteristics of the potential program cohort. The definition used to identify a 'frequent attendee' was more than four presentations to an ED in 1 month. This analysis was used to develop the processes now known as the Working Together to Connect Care program. This program includes participant identification by applying the definition, flagging of potential participants in the ED IT system, case review and referral to community services by ED staff, case conferencing facilitated within the ED and individualised, patient centred case management provided by government and non-government community services. Results Two months after the date of commencement of the Working Together to Connect Care program there are 31 active participants in the program: 10 are on the Mental Health pathway, and one is on the No Consent pathway. On average there are three people recruited to the program every week. The establishment of a new program for supporting frequent attendees of an ED has had its challenges. Identifying systems that support people in their community has been an early positive outcome of this project. Conclusion It is expected that data regarding the number of ED presentations, potential fiscal savings and client outcomes will be available in 2017. What is known about the topic? Frequent attendance at EDs is a global issue and although the number of 'super users' is

  17. Across the divide: "Primary care departments working together to redesign care to achieve the Triple Aim".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koslov, Steven; Trowbridge, Elizabeth; Kamnetz, Sandra; Kraft, Sally; Grossman, Jeffrey; Pandhi, Nancy

    2016-09-01

    Primary care is considered the foundation of an effective health care system. However, primary care departments at academic health centers have numerous challenges to overcome when trying to achieve the Triple Aim. As part of an organizational initiative to redesign primary care at a large academic health center, departments of internal medicine, general pediatrics and adolescent medicine, and family medicine worked together to comprehensively redesign primary care. This article describes the process of aligning these three primary care departments: defining panel size, developing a common primary care job description, redesigning the primary care compensation plan, redesigning the care model, and developing standardized staffing. Prior to the initiative, the rate of patient satisfaction was 85%, anticoagulation measurement 65%, pneumococcal vaccination 85%, breast cancer screening 79%, and colorectal cancer screening 69%. These rates all improved to 87%, 75%, 88%, 80%, and 80% respectively. Themes around key challenges to departmental integration are identified: (1) implementing effective communication strategies; (2) addressing specialty differences in primary care delivery; (3) working within resource limitations; and (4) developing long-term sustainability. Primary care in this large academic health center was transformed through developing a united primary care leadership team that bridged individual departments to create and adopt a common vision and solutions to shared problems. Our collaboration has achieved improvements across patient satisfaction, clinical safety metrics, and publicly-reported preventive care outcomes. The description of this experience may be useful for other academic health centers or other non-integrated delivery systems undertaking primary care practice transformation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Psycho-cognitive predictors of burnout in healthcare professionals working in emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiero, Marianna; Cutica, Ilaria; Russo, Selena; Mazzocco, Ketti; Pravettoni, Gabriella

    2018-07-01

    Healthcare professionals working in emergency departments commonly experience high work pressure and stress due to witnessing human suffering and the unpredictable nature of the work. Several studies have identified variables that affect burnout syndrome, but poor data are available about the predictors of the different dimensions of burnout (depersonalisation, emotional exhaustion, professional inefficacy and disillusionment). Some research has suggested that alexithymia, coping style and decision-making style may predict burnout. We conducted a noninterventional study to investigate whether and how alexithymia, coping style and decision-making style are associated with the different dimensions of burnout. We recruited a convenience sample of 93 healthcare professionals working in an Italian emergency departments. Participants completed a questionnaire assessing their level of burnout (the Link Burnout Questionnaire), and possible burnout predictors: decision-making style, alexithymia and the coping style. Four bivariate linear regressions were performed to define the predictors that characterised the dimensions of burnout. We found that an avoidant decision-making style and a difficulty to identify and describe feelings (a difficulty close to alexithymia even though not as severe) are strong predictors of some burnout dimensions. Individuals who experience relational depersonalisation are more likely to turn to religion as a way to cope. Our research shows that, to some extent, difficulties in emotion regulation and the attitude to avoid or postpone decisions characterised burnout. These results might be used to develop tailored psycho-educational interventions. This might help healthcare professionals to develop personal skills to cope with the critical conditions that characterise their work and to enable them to recognise potential risk factors that favour burnout. This has pivotal implications for the maintenance of the patient-healthcare professional

  19. Exploring staff willingness to attend work during a disaster: a study of nurses employed in four Australian emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbon, Paul; Cusack, Lynette; Ranse, Jamie; Shaban, Ramon Z; Considine, Julie; Kako, Mayumi; Woodman, Richard J; Mitchell, Belinda; Bahnisch, Laura; Hammad, Karen

    2013-08-01

    Much of the literature about emergency nurses willingness to work during disasters has been from a non-Australian perspective. Despite the many recent disasters, little is known of Australian nurse's willingness to participate in disaster response. This paper presents findings from a study that explored nurses willingness to attend work during a disaster and the factors that influenced this decision. Data were collected consecutively using a combination of focus group and interview methods. Participants in this study, registered nurses from emergency departments, were recruited through convenience sampling from four hospitals in Australia. Participant narrative was electronically recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed. The participants for both the focus groups and interviews compromised a mix of ages, genders and years of experience as emergency nurses from across four jurisdictions within Australia. Three major themes that influenced willingness emerged with a number of subthemes. Theme one reflected the uncertainty of the situation such as the type of disaster. The second theme surrounded the preparedness of the workplace, emergency nurse and colleagues, and the third theme considered personal and professional choice based on home and work circumstances and responsibilities. The decision to attend work or not during a disaster, includes a number of complex personal, work-related and professional factors that can change, depending on the type of disaster, preparedness of the work environment and the emergency nurses' personal responsibilities at that time. Copyright © 2013 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Management of everyday work in Emergency Departments - an exploratory study with Swedish Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Henrik; Wireklint Sundström, Birgitta; Nilsson, Kerstin; Jakobsson Ung, Eva

    2014-10-01

    Through their formal mandate, position and authority, managers are responsible for managing everyday work in Emergency Departments (EDs) as well as striving for excellence and dealing with the individual needs of practitioners and patients. The aim of the present study is to explore managers' experiences of managing everyday work in Swedish EDs. A qualitative and exploratory design has been used in this study. Seven managers were interviewed at two EDs. Data was analysed using qualitative content analysis with focus on latent content. Managers experience everyday work in the ED as lifesaving work. One of the characteristics of their approach to everyday work is their capability for rapidly identifying patients with life-threatening conditions and for treating them accordingly. The practitioners are on stand-by in order to deal with unexpected situations. This implies having to spend time waiting for the physicians' decisions. Management is characterised by a command and control approach. The managers experience difficulties in meeting the expectations of their staff. They strive to be proactive but instead they become reactive since the prevailing medical, bureaucratic and production-orientated systems constrain them. The managers demonstrate full compliance with the organisational systems. This threatens to reduce their freedom of action and influences the way they perform their managerial duties within and outside the EDs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical leadership, structural empowerment and psychological empowerment of registered nurses working in an emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Megan; Jacobs, Stephen; Scott, Karyn

    2018-04-19

    To examine clinical leadership of registered nurses in an emergency department, based on evidence that it is important for nurses to feel psychologically and structurally empowered in order to act as clinical leaders. Every registered nurse has the ability to act as a clinical leader. Clinical leadership is the registered nurse's behaviours that provide direction and support to patients and the team in the delivery of patient care. This study explores the connection between the need for structural and psychological empowerment and clinical leadership behaviours. A mixed method, non-experimental survey design was used to examine the psychological empowerment, structural empowerment and clinical leadership of registered nurses working in an emergency department. Emergency department nurses believe they show clinical leadership behaviours most of the time, even though their sense of being psychologically empowered is only moderate. While registered nurses believe they perform clinical leadership behaviours, it is also clear that improvements in structural and psychological empowerment would improve their ability to act as clinical leaders. The results show that for nurses to be able to provide clinical leadership to their patients and colleagues, management must create empowering environments. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Opinion paper: the role of work in the management of medically unexplained physical symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobback, Els; Mariman, An; Clauwaert, Lies; Godderis, Lode; Heytens, Stefan; Ruppol, Patrick; Spooren, Daniel; Tytgat, Rita; De Muynck, Martine; Vogelaers, Dirk

    2018-05-04

    Patients with medically unexplained physical symptoms suffer from chronic fatigue and/or pain in combination with a variety of other symptoms. A flexible, biopsychosocial approach is needed for diagnostic screening and global management. It is crucial to involve the direct patient environment, including family, friends, colleagues as well as health providers, evaluation, and reintegration sector. The aim of this paper is to review the importance of work in the management of medically unexplained physical symptoms. In this paper, different actors involved explain their views and handling concerning work in the management of MUPS. Symptom severity and lack of understanding from the environment can negatively impact on earning an independent income from labor for years. Work, whether or not paid, is however, an important life domain with positive effects on physical, psychological, and social well-being. Therefore, health actors are pivotal in starting the professional reintegration process as soon as possible and should discuss this item from the early stage onward. Support services can be consulted in mutual interaction as required. A case manager, acting as a central intermediator within this multidisciplinary approach, may promote effective communication and coordination between the patients and their surrounding actors. The professional reintegration process should start as soon as possible within the management of medically unexplained physical symptoms. As such, the care sector, the evaluation sector, and the professional integration sector should collaborate and effectively communicate with each other.

  3. The effects of work on the health of nurses who work in clinical surgery departments at university hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Rosângela Marion da; Zeitoune, Regina Célia Gollner; Beck, Carmem Lúcia Colomé; Martino, Milva Maria Figueiredo de; Prestes, Francine Cassol

    2016-08-08

    to analyze the effects of work on the health of nurses who work in clinical surgery departments at university hospitals in relation to physical, social and psychological suffering and pain. a quantitative transversal study was carried out between 2012 and 2013 in four institutions in a state located in the south of Brazil. We studied 65 nurses who responded to questions on their habits. We also obtained sociodemographical information on them as well as conducting an evaluation on work relational damage using an evaluation scale. Associations were checked through the use of the Chi-Sqaure and Fisher's exact test. Correlations were checked using the Spearmann test. we found that physical ailments persisted and that there were connections between social and psychological pain/suffering and variable physical activities as well as connections with accidents in the work place and the option to work shifts. We noted correlations between social and psychological pain/suffering. nurses had their health compromised due to their work in clinical surgery departments. analisar os efeitos do trabalho na saúde de enfermeiros que atuam em clínicas cirúrgicas de hospitais universitários, relacionando-os aos danos físicos, sociais e psicológicos. estudo quantitativo, transversal, realizado entre 2012 e 2013 em quatro instituições de um Estado da região sul do Brasil. A amostra foi composta por 65 enfermeiros que responderam questões sobre os hábitos de vida e dados sociodemográficos e a Escala de Avaliação de Danos Relacionados ao Trabalho. Associações foram verificadas pelo teste Qui-Quadrado e Exato de Fisher e as correlações pelo teste de Spearmann. prevaleceu o adoecimento físico, encontrando associação entre os fatores Danos Sociais e Psicológicos e as variáveis prática de atividade física, acidente de trabalho e opção pelo turno de trabalho. Evidenciou-se correlação entre Danos Sociais e Psicológicos. o trabalho realizado por enfermeiros que atuam

  4. The post-2015 delivery of universal and sustainable access to infrastructure services. Working Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doczi, Julian, Dorr, Tobias; Mason, Nathaniel; Scott, Andrew

    2013-06-15

    In this new working paper, the authors focus specifically on what would be necessary to achieve High Level Panel-style goals and targets for water, energy and transport, if these were to be eventually adopted by world leaders. In all three cases, much of the advocacy - and the proposed High Level Panel goals - have emphasized the need to strive for universal and sustainable access to at least basic levels of services from these sectors. Many of the proposals for post-2015 goals and targets appear ambitious, but what would it take to achieve them? This paper assesses what is needed to achieve goals for universal and sustainable access to infrastructure, specifically water, energy and transport. Using illustrative goals and targets, the paper reviews the development challenges in each sector, and what will be necessary to overcome the barriers to universal and sustainable access to water, energy and transport infrastructure services, in the areas of governance, finance, capacity development and environmental protection. The paper ends with general conclusions about infrastructure in the post-2015 development agenda.

  5. HEP Software Foundation Community White Paper Working Group - Data Analysis and Interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauerdick, Lothar; et al.

    2018-04-09

    At the heart of experimental high energy physics (HEP) is the development of facilities and instrumentation that provide sensitivity to new phenomena. Our understanding of nature at its most fundamental level is advanced through the analysis and interpretation of data from sophisticated detectors in HEP experiments. The goal of data analysis systems is to realize the maximum possible scientific potential of the data within the constraints of computing and human resources in the least time. To achieve this goal, future analysis systems should empower physicists to access the data with a high level of interactivity, reproducibility and throughput capability. As part of the HEP Software Foundation Community White Paper process, a working group on Data Analysis and Interpretation was formed to assess the challenges and opportunities in HEP data analysis and develop a roadmap for activities in this area over the next decade. In this report, the key findings and recommendations of the Data Analysis and Interpretation Working Group are presented.

  6. arXiv HEP Software Foundation Community White Paper Working Group - Software Development, Deployment and Validation

    CERN Document Server

    Couturier, Benjamin; Grasland, Hadrien; Hegner, Benedikt; Jouvin, Michel; Kane, Meghan; Katz, Daniel S.; Kuhr, Thomas; Lange, David; Mendez Lorenzo, Patricia; Ritter, Martin; Stewart, Graeme Andrew; Valassi, Andrea

    The High Energy Phyiscs community has developed and needs to maintain many tens of millions of lines of code and to integrate effectively the work of thousands of developers across large collaborations. Software needs to be built, validated, and deployed across hundreds of sites. Software also has a lifetime of many years, frequently beyond that of the original developer, it must be developed with sustainability in mind. Adequate recognition of software development as a critical task in the HEP community needs to be fostered and an appropriate publication and citation strategy needs to be developed. As part of the HEP Softare Foundation's Community White Paper process a working group on Software Development, Deployment and Validation was formed to examine all of these issues, identify best practice and to formulare recommendations for the next decade. Its report is presented here.

  7. Turning working papers into articles: An exercise in micro-bibliometrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber Frandsen, Tove; Wouters, Paul

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on the process of scientific and scholarly communication. Data on open access publications on the Internet not only provides a supplement to the traditional citation indexes but also enables analysis of the microprocesses and daily practices that constitute scientific communi...... of a working paper (WP) into a journal article (JA) in the field of economics. The study unveils a fine-grained process of adapting WPs to their new context as JAs by deleting and adding literature references,which perhaps can be best captured by the term sculpting....

  8. Environmental contaminants in food. Volume II-Part B: Working papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This volume contains working papers written for Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) to assist in preparation of the report Environmental Contaminants in Food. The contents include: (1) Toxic substances in food information systems: design and management; (2) Assessment of carcinogenic risks from PCBs in food; (3) Economic analysis of alternative action levels in the regulation of environmental contaminants in food; (4) Analysis of foods for radioactivity; (5) Approaches to monitoring environmental contaminants in food; (6) Analytical systems for the determination of metals in food and water supplies; (7) Assessment of methods for regulating 'unavoidable' contaminants in the food supply; and (8) Consumer risk from environmental contaminants in food

  9. Delivering a Paper (and other works) at #LowTechLabLondon2016

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connell, Micheal

    2016-01-01

    Performance 'Delivering a Paper' and screened/presented/exhibited other works such as 'How to Buy Nothing' related to author's interventionist art practice at this three-day event.\\ud \\ud #LowTechLabLondon2016 is a project developed by Raúl Marroquín and coordinated by Daniela Medina Poch for the Educational Program of the Saatchi Gallery that will take place on January 15th, 16th and 17th of 2016.\\ud \\ud “‘LowTech means technology that is cheap or free.”\\ud James Wallback, LowTech Manifest f...

  10. Design of Work Facilities for Reducing Musculoskeletal Disorders Risk in Paper Pallet Assembly Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardi Safitri, Dian; Arfi Nabila, Zahra; Azmi, Nora

    2018-03-01

    Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSD) is one of the ergonomic risks due to manual activity, non-neutral posture and repetitive motion. The purpose of this study is to measure risk and implement ergonomic interventions to reduce the risk of MSD on the paper pallet assembly work station. Measurements to work posture are done by Ovako Working Posture Analysis (OWAS) methods and Rapid Entire Body Assessment (REBA) method, while the measurement of work repetitiveness was using Strain Index (SI) method. Assembly processes operators are identified has the highest risk level. OWAS score, Strain Index, and REBA values are 4, 20.25, and 11. Ergonomic improvements are needed to reduce that level of risk. Proposed improvements will be developed using the Quality Function Deployment (QFD) method applied with Axiomatic House of Quality (AHOQ) and Morphological Chart. As the result, risk level based on OWAS score & REBA score turn out from 4 & 11 to be 1 & 2. Biomechanics analysis of the operator also shows the decreasing values for L4-L5 moment, compression, joint shear, and joint moment strength.

  11. Morale, stress and coping strategies of staff working in the emergency department: A comparison of two different-sized departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Louisa J; Thom, Ogilvie; Greenslade, Jaimi H; Wallis, Marianne; Johnston, Amy Nb; Carlström, Eric; Mills, Donna; Crilly, Julia

    2018-06-01

    Clinical staff in EDs are subject to a range of stressors. The objective of this study was to describe and compare clinical staff perceptions of their ED's working environment across two different Australian EDs. This was a cross-sectional, descriptive, research design that included distribution of three survey tools to clinical staff in two Australian EDs in 2016. Descriptive statistics were reported to characterise workplace stressors, coping styles and the ED environment. These data were compared by hospital and the employee's clinical role (nurse or physician). In total, 146 ED nurses and doctors completed the survey (response rate: 67%). Despite geographical variation, the staff at the two locations had similar demographic profiles in terms of age, sex and years of experience. Staff reported moderate levels of workload and self-realisation but low levels of conflict or nervousness in the workplace. Nurses and physicians reported similar perceptions of the work environment, although nurses reported slightly higher median levels of workload. Staff rated the death or sexual abuse of a child as most stressful, followed by workplace violence and heavy workload. Staff used a large range of coping strategies, and these were similar across both sites. These findings are the first multi-site and multidisciplinary examinations of Australian ED staff perceptions, improving our understanding of staff stressors and coping strategies and highlighting similarities across different EDs. These data support the development and implementation of strategies to improve ED working environments to help ensure professional longevity of ED staff. © 2018 The Authors. Emergency Medicine Australasia published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  12. Dosimetric evaluation of the staff working in a PET/CT department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalianis, K.; Malamitsi, J.; Gogou, L.; Pagou, M.; Efthimiadou, R.; Andreou, J.; Louizi, A.; Georgiou, E.

    2006-01-01

    The dosimetric literature data concerning the medical personnel working in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) departments are limited. Therefore, we measured the radiation dose of the staff working in the first PET/CT department in Greece at the Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center of Athens HYGEIA-Harvard Medical International. As, for the time being, only 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F]fluoro-d-glucose (FDG) PET studies are performed, radiation dose measurements concern those derived from dispensing of the radiopharmaceutical as well as from the patients undergoing FDG-PET imaging. Our aim is to develop more effective protective measures against radionuclide exposure. To estimate the effective dose from external exposure, all seven members of the staff (two nurses, two medical physicists, two technologists, one secretary) had TLD badges worn at the upper pocket of their overall, TLD rings on the right hand and digital dosimeters at their upper side pocket. In addition, isodose curves were measured with thermoluminescence detectors for distances of 20, 50, 70 and 100 cm away from patients who had been injected with 18 F-FDG. Dose values of the PET/CT staff were measured with digital detectors, TLD badges and TLD rings over the first 8 months for a total of 160 working days of the department's operation, consisting of a workload of about 10-15 patients/week who received 250-420 MBq of 18 F-FDG each. Whole - body collective doses and hand doses for the staff were the following: Nurse no. 1 received 1.6 mSv as a whole body dose and 2,1 as a hand dose, Nurse no. 2 received 1.9 and 2.4 mSv respectively. For medical physicist no. 1 the dose values were 1.45 mSv whole body and 1.7 mSv hand dose, for medical physicist no. 2 1.67 mSv wholebody dose and 1.55 mSv hand dose and for technologists no. 1 and no. 2 the whole body doses were 0.7 and 0.64 mSv respectively. Lastly, the secretary received 0.1 mSv whole body dose. These preliminary data have shown that the dose

  13. Dosimetric evaluation of the staff working in a PET/CT department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalianis, K. [Department of PET/CT, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center of Athens Hygeia-Harvard Medical International, Erythrau Stavrou 4, 5123 Athens (Greece)]. E-mail: k.dalianis@hygeia.gr; Malamitsi, J. [Department of PET/CT, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center of Athens Hygeia-Harvard Medical International, Erythrau Stavrou 4, 5123 Athens (Greece); Gogou, L. [Department of PET/CT, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center of Athens Hygeia-Harvard Medical International, Erythrau Stavrou 4, 5123 Athens (Greece); Pagou, M. [Department of PET/CT, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center of Athens Hygeia-Harvard Medical International, Erythrau Stavrou 4, 5123 Athens (Greece); Efthimiadou, R. [Department of PET/CT, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center of Athens Hygeia-Harvard Medical International, Erythrau Stavrou 4, 5123 Athens (Greece); Andreou, J. [Department of PET/CT, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center of Athens Hygeia-Harvard Medical International, Erythrau Stavrou 4, 5123 Athens (Greece); Louizi, A. [Department of Medical Physics Medical School University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Georgiou, E. [Department of Medical Physics Medical School University of Athens, Athens (Greece)

    2006-12-20

    The dosimetric literature data concerning the medical personnel working in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) departments are limited. Therefore, we measured the radiation dose of the staff working in the first PET/CT department in Greece at the Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center of Athens HYGEIA-Harvard Medical International. As, for the time being, only 2-deoxy-2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-d-glucose (FDG) PET studies are performed, radiation dose measurements concern those derived from dispensing of the radiopharmaceutical as well as from the patients undergoing FDG-PET imaging. Our aim is to develop more effective protective measures against radionuclide exposure. To estimate the effective dose from external exposure, all seven members of the staff (two nurses, two medical physicists, two technologists, one secretary) had TLD badges worn at the upper pocket of their overall, TLD rings on the right hand and digital dosimeters at their upper side pocket. In addition, isodose curves were measured with thermoluminescence detectors for distances of 20, 50, 70 and 100 cm away from patients who had been injected with {sup 18}F-FDG. Dose values of the PET/CT staff were measured with digital detectors, TLD badges and TLD rings over the first 8 months for a total of 160 working days of the department's operation, consisting of a workload of about 10-15 patients/week who received 250-420 MBq of {sup 18}F-FDG each. Whole - body collective doses and hand doses for the staff were the following: Nurse no. 1 received 1.6 mSv as a whole body dose and 2,1 as a hand dose, Nurse no. 2 received 1.9 and 2.4 mSv respectively. For medical physicist no. 1 the dose values were 1.45 mSv whole body and 1.7 mSv hand dose, for medical physicist no. 2 1.67 mSv wholebody dose and 1.55 mSv hand dose and for technologists no. 1 and no. 2 the whole body doses were 0.7 and 0.64 mSv respectively. Lastly, the secretary received 0.1 mSv whole body dose. These preliminary data have

  14. The application of nursing process method in training nurses working in the department of interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Daihui; Wang Hongjuan; Yang Yajuan; Ye Rui; Qu Juan; Li Xinying; Xu Ying

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To describe the training procedure,typical training method and the clinical effect of nursing process method which was used to cultivate nurses working in the interventional ward. Methods: According to the evaluation index, the authors made a detail assessment of each nurse and found out individually the problems which needed to be perfected, then, the practicable measures were made for each individual nurse, after the training course the clinical results were evaluated. Results: After the nurses on different technical levels were cultivated with nursing process method, the comprehensive quality of each nurse was improved in different degree, and the general nursing quality of entire Department was also markedly improved. Conclusion: By using the nursing process method the cultivating period can be effectively shortened, the possible waste of time, manpower, material and energy cause by the blind training plan can be avoided. (authors)

  15. The Organizational Valuation of Valuation Devices: Putting Lean whiteboard management to work in a hospital department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amalie Martinus Hauge

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is about the interplay between multiple modes of valuation. The paper engages with the question of how a valuation device intersects with the working values of an organization. While the many studies of valuation practices have drawn attention to the pervasive effects of valuation devices, only a few studies have taken into account the fact that many spaces, including organizations, are already filled with practices and ideas that constitute what is valuable. Revisiting classical organization theory, this paper shows that organizations comprise multiple, more - or less - integrated modes of valuation. Empirically, the paper draws on an ethnographic study of Lean management at a children's hospital, which is presented through analytical snapshots. The paper suggests that an organizational turn is relevant for valuation studies, as this fi rst allows an analytical expansion to include less 'deviced' valuations, contributes to the ongoing culture vs. device debate offering an alternative to the causal analysis of devices and effects without making the 'ineffable culture' what makes or breaks the causality.

  16. Effects of scanning and eliminating paper-based medical records on hospital physicians' clinical work practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laerum, Hallvard; Karlsen, Tom H; Faxvaag, Arild

    2003-01-01

    It is not automatically given that the paper-based medical record can be eliminated after the introduction of an electronic medical record (EMR) in a hospital. Many keep and update the paper-based counterpart, and this limits the use of the EMR system. The authors have evaluated the physicians' clinical work practices and attitudes toward a system in a hospital that has eliminated the paper-based counterpart using scanning technology. Combined open-ended interviews (8 physicians) and cross-sectional survey (70 physicians) were conducted and compared with reference data from a previous national survey (69 physicians from six hospitals). The hospitals in the reference group were using the same EMR system without the scanning module. The questionnaire (English translation available as an online data supplement at ) covered frequency of use of the EMR system for 19 defined tasks, ease of performing them, and user satisfaction. The interviews were open-ended. The physicians routinely used the system for nine of 11 tasks regarding retrieval of patient data, which the majority of the physicians found more easily performed than before. However, 22% to 25% of the physicians found retrieval of patient data more difficult, particularly among internists (33%). Overall, the physicians were equally satisfied with the part of the system handling the regular electronic data as that of the physicians in the reference group. They were, however, much less satisfied with the use of scanned document images than that of regular electronic data, using the former less frequently than the latter. Scanning and elimination of the paper-based medical record is feasible, but the scanned document images should be considered an intermediate stage toward fully electronic medical records. To our knowledge, this is the first assessment from a hospital in the process of completing such a scanning project.

  17. Work conditions, mental workload and patient care quality: a multisource study in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigl, Matthias; Müller, Andreas; Holland, Stephan; Wedel, Susanne; Woloshynowych, Maria

    2016-07-01

    Workflow interruptions, multitasking and workload demands are inherent to emergency departments (ED) work systems. Potential effects of ED providers' work on care quality and patient safety have, however, been rarely addressed. We aimed to investigate the prevalence and associations of ED staff's workflow interruptions, multitasking and workload with patient care quality outcomes. We applied a mixed-methods design in a two-step procedure. First, we conducted a time-motion study to observe the rate of interruptions and multitasking activities. Second, during 20-day shifts we assessed ED staff's reports on workflow interruptions, multitasking activities and mental workload. Additionally, we assessed two care quality indicators with standardised questionnaires: first, ED patients' evaluations of perceived care quality; second, patient intrahospital transfers evaluated by ward staff. The study was conducted in a medium-sized community ED (16 600 annual visits). ED personnel's workflow was disrupted on average 5.63 times per hour. 30% of time was spent on multitasking activities. During 20 observations days, data were gathered from 76 ED professionals, 239 patients and 205 patient transfers. After aggregating daywise data and controlling for staffing levels, prospective associations revealed significant negative associations between ED personnel's mental workload and patients' perceived quality of care. Conversely, workflow interruptions were positively associated with patient-related information on discharge and overall quality of transfer. Our investigation indicated that ED staff's capability to cope with demanding work conditions was associated with patient care quality. Our findings contribute to an improved understanding of the complex effects of interruptions and multitasking in the ED environment for creating safe and efficient ED work and care systems. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a

  18. Fertility status of males working in radiology departments of teaching hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, O.P.; Jain, A.K.; Sankhla, D.K.; Kothari, L.K.; Agarwal, G.R.

    1985-01-01

    All the 33 male doctors and para-medical staff employed in the radiology departments of two teaching hospitals have been studied for their fertility status. Their mean age was 32.5 years and they had been doing radiological work for 8.6 years on an average. Out of the 33 males, all of whom were married, one had primary infertility with severe oligospermia. He was successfully treated with oral vitamin A and E along with a 3-month off from handling x-ray machines; the child born was healthy and normal. Another 5 subjects had been married for only less than two years and their seminograms were essentially normal. They were classified as 'Unproven fertility'. The remaining 27 persons had fathered 61 children-16 born before the father had started working in radiology and 45 conceived later. There was 1 case of still-birth and 1 of microcephaly. However, the overall incidence of infertility and congenital defects was not significantly different than in the general population. (author)

  19. Occupational exposure at the Department of Nuclear Medicine as a work environment: A 19-year follow-up

    OpenAIRE

    Piwowarska-Bilska, Hanna; Birkenfeld, Bożena; Gwardyś, Aleksandra; Supińska, Aleksandra; Listewnik, Maria H.; Elbl, Bogumiła; Cichoń-Bańkowska, Katarzyna

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background: This study assessed the radiation safety at Nuclear Medicine Department being a work environment. Ionizing radiation exposure of the employees in the last 19 years and the effects of legislative changes in radiological protection were analyzed. Material/Methods: All employees of the investigated department were regularly and individually monitored using chest badges equipped with Kodak film type 2. Overall, 629 annual doses of the employees of nuclear medicine department, ...

  20. Concurrent Engineering Working Group White Paper Distributed Collaborative Design: The Next Step in Aerospace Concurrent Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hihn, Jairus; Chattopadhyay, Debarati; Karpati, Gabriel; McGuire, Melissa; Panek, John; Warfield, Keith; Borden, Chester

    2011-01-01

    As aerospace missions grow larger and more technically complex in the face of ever tighter budgets, it will become increasingly important to use concurrent engineering methods in the development of early conceptual designs because of their ability to facilitate rapid assessments and trades of performance, cost and schedule. To successfully accomplish these complex missions with limited funding, it is essential to effectively leverage the strengths of individuals and teams across government, industry, academia, and international agencies by increased cooperation between organizations. As a result, the existing concurrent engineering teams will need to increasingly engage in distributed collaborative concurrent design. The purpose of this white paper is to identify a near-term vision for the future of distributed collaborative concurrent engineering design for aerospace missions as well as discuss the challenges to achieving that vision. The white paper also documents the advantages of creating a working group to investigate how to engage the expertise of different teams in joint design sessions while enabling organizations to maintain their organizations competitive advantage.

  1. A survey of violence against staff working in the emergency department in ankara, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talas, Melek Serpil; Kocaöz, Semra; Akgüç, Selma

    2011-12-01

    Workplace violence in the emergency department is a significant problem world wide. The aims of this study were to identify the proportion of staff subjected to the types of violence, its sources, factors affecting violence experiences, reporting the incidence and the emotions of the victims after violence. This descriptive study was conducted between March and August 2009 in the the emergency department of six hospitals in Ankara, Turkey. Data were collected from 270 staff working in various emergency settings. The instrument was a 36-item questionnaire on types of violence, its sources, feelings, and ways to cope with violent behaviors. Descriptive statistics and chi-square tests were used for data analysis. The results showed 85.2% of participants had been subjected to at least one kind of violence: 41.1% to physical assault, 79.6% to verbal abuse, 55.5% to verbal threats and 15.9% to sexual harassment. Patients' companions (90.9%) were identified as the primary perpetrators of violence. The rates of violence types were highest towards security officers and housekeepers. The most common reactions to violence were sadness and anger. "Did nothing and keeping silent" was the coping method used most commonly by the staff. Participants exposed to physical assaults and verbal threat did not report the incidence of violence to managers were at 43.3% and 65.3% respectively. Based on results of the study, it is suggested that every hospital institute reliable reporting procedures that staff members feel comfortable using, and also provide a comprehensive program of support services for staff that has been assaulted. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Science as Content, Science as Context: Working in the Science Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildy, Helen; Wallace, John

    2004-01-01

    In this study we explored how the science department shaped the relationship between a science department head, Mr Greg, and a teacher, Ms Horton, as they grappled with their expectations of, and responsibilities for, teaching and leadership in the daily life in the department. We found that, from their life histories and their positions in the…

  3. Key Concepts of Teams in an Organisation. Information Bank Working Paper Number 2541.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, D. T.

    Teams in an organization are more than cooperative working groups. Advantages of group work, as opposed to individual work, include producing a better end result, providing satisfaction for the individual and the organization, and assisting the organization through coordination and work allocation. Disadvantages of group work include producing a…

  4. HR-MAS NMR for rapid identification of illicit substances in tablets and Blotter papers seized by Police Department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Luciano F.; Vieira, Tarcísio S.; Lião, Luciano M., E-mail: lucianoliao@ufg.br [Universidade Federal de Goiás (UFG), Goiânia, GO (Brazil). Instituto de Química; Alcantara, Glaucia B. [Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul (UFMS), Campo Grande, MS (Brazil). Instituto de Química

    2016-07-01

    Illicit substances found in blotter papers and tablets seized by police are traditionally identified and characterized from extracts of these materials. However, the procedures involved in extraction stages can result in artifacts and even contamination of the samples to be analyzed. On the other hand, high-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (HR-MAS NMR) is a technique that requires no pretreatment steps, enabling direct analysis of the material, including the analysis of new illegal synthetic psychoactive substances. This study presents and discusses applications of the HR-MAS NMR in the analysis of tablets and blotter papers seized. Additional analysis in solution of the extracts of these materials was performed to compare the obtained spectral resolution signals. The results demonstrated that the HR-MAS NMR allowed the rapid identification of 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylcathinone (methylone), 4-methylmethcathinone (mephedrone), 2,5-dimethoxy-4-bromoamphetamine (DOB) and 2-(4-bromo-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-N-[(2- methoxyphenyl)methyl]ethanamine (25B-NBOMe) in samples of tablets and blotter papers seized in Goiás State, Brazil. (author)

  5. HR-MAS NMR for rapid identification of illicit substances in tablets and Blotter papers seized by Police Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Luciano F.; Vieira, Tarcísio S.; Lião, Luciano M.; Alcantara, Glaucia B.

    2016-01-01

    Illicit substances found in blotter papers and tablets seized by police are traditionally identified and characterized from extracts of these materials. However, the procedures involved in extraction stages can result in artifacts and even contamination of the samples to be analyzed. On the other hand, high-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (HR-MAS NMR) is a technique that requires no pretreatment steps, enabling direct analysis of the material, including the analysis of new illegal synthetic psychoactive substances. This study presents and discusses applications of the HR-MAS NMR in the analysis of tablets and blotter papers seized. Additional analysis in solution of the extracts of these materials was performed to compare the obtained spectral resolution signals. The results demonstrated that the HR-MAS NMR allowed the rapid identification of 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylcathinone (methylone), 4-methylmethcathinone (mephedrone), 2,5-dimethoxy-4-bromoamphetamine (DOB) and 2-(4-bromo-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-N-[(2- methoxyphenyl)methyl]ethanamine (25B-NBOMe) in samples of tablets and blotter papers seized in Goiás State, Brazil. (author)

  6. Arsenic exposure levels in relation to different working departments in a copper mining and smelting plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qingshan; Song, Yingli; Liu, Shengnan; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Lin; Xi, Shuhua; Sun, Guifan

    2015-10-01

    The investigation was carried out to evaluate arsenic exposure and the urine metabolite profiles of workers with different working departments, including administration (Group1), copper ore mining (Group2), copper ore grinding (Group3), electrolytic procession (Group4) and copper smelting (Group5) in a Copper mining and processing plant in China. Information about characteristics of each subject was obtained by questionnaire and inorganic arsenic (iAs), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) in urine were determined. The highest urinary levels of iAs, MMA and DMA all were found in the Group 5. Group 4 workers had a higher iAs% and a lower PMI compared to Group 3. The urinary total As (TAs) levels of 54.7% subjects exceeded 50 μg/g Cr, and the highest percentage (93.3%) was found in Group 5, smelters. The results of the present study indicate that workers in copper production plant indeed exposed to As, especially for smelters and workers of electrolytic process.

  7. Opinion paper on utility of point-of-care biomarkers in the emergency department pathways decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Somma, Salvatore; Zampini, Giorgio; Vetrone, Francesco; Soto-Ruiz, Karina M; Magrini, Laura; Cardelli, Patrizia; Ronco, Claudio; Maisel, Alan; Peacock, Frank W

    2014-10-01

    Overcrowding of the emergency department (ED) is rapidly becoming a global challenge and a major source of concern for emergency physicians. The evaluation of cardiac biomarkers is critical for confirming diagnoses and expediting treatment decisions to reduce overcrowding, however, physicians currently face the dilemma of choosing between slow and accurate central-based laboratory tests, or faster but imprecise assays. With improvements in technology, point-of-care testing (POCT) systems facilitate the efficient and high-throughput evaluation of biomarkers, such as troponin (cTn), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL). In this context, POCT may help ED physicians to confirm a diagnosis of conditions, such as acute coronary syndrome, heart failure or kidney damage. Compared with classic laboratory methods, the use of cTn, BNP, and NGAL POCT has shown comparable sensitivity, specificity and failure rate, but with the potential to provide prompt and accurate diagnosis, shorten hospital stay, and alleviate the burden on the ED. Despite this potential, the full advantages of rapid delivery results will only be reached if POCT is implemented within hospital standardized procedures and ED staff receive appropriate training.

  8. The psychosocial work environment among physicians employed at Danish oncology departments in 2009. A nationwide cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Christian Nicolaj; Eriksen, Jesper Grau

    2013-01-01

    Working as a physician at an oncology department has some distinctive characteristics that may lead to a stressful work environment. The present study was conducted to provide a nationwide description of the work conditions of all oncologists in Denmark. By comparing the results of the present...... study with those of a similar study carried out in 2006, the aim was furthermore to elucidate changes in the psychosocial work environment over time....

  9. Experiences of reduced work hours for nurses and assistant nurses at a surgical department: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Gyllensten, Kristina; Andersson, Gunnar; Muller, Helena

    2017-01-01

    Background There is a shortage of registered nurses in the European Union (EU), and job dissatisfaction and perceived high work?family conflict have been identified as causes of nursing staff turnover. Reducing work hours is an organisational intervention that could have a positive effect on nurses? and assistant nurses? job satisfaction, work?life balance, and willingness to stay in the job. An orthopaedic surgery department at a large hospital in Sweden introduced reduced work hours for nur...

  10. Bringing Back the Social Affordances of the Paper Memo to Aerospace Systems Engineering Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidoff, Scott; Holloway, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Model-based systems engineering (MBSE) is a relatively new field that brings together the interdisciplinary study of technological components of a project (systems engineering) with a model-based ontology to express the hierarchical and behavioral relationships between the components (computational modeling). Despite the compelling promises of the benefits of MBSE, such as improved communication and productivity due to an underlying language and data model, we observed hesitation to its adoption at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory. To investigate, we conducted a six-month ethnographic field investigation and needs validation with 19 systems engineers. This paper contributes our observations of a generational shift in one of JPL's core technologies. We report on a cultural misunderstanding between communities of practice that bolsters the existing technology drag. Given the high cost of failure, we springboard our observations into a design hypothesis - an intervention that blends the social affordances of the narrative-based work flow with the rich technological advantages of explicit data references and relationships of the model-based approach. We provide a design rationale, and the results of our evaluation.

  11. Experiences of reduced work hours for nurses and assistant nurses at a surgical department: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyllensten, Kristina; Andersson, Gunnar; Muller, Helena

    2017-01-01

    There is a shortage of registered nurses in the European Union (EU), and job dissatisfaction and perceived high work-family conflict have been identified as causes of nursing staff turnover. Reducing work hours is an organisational intervention that could have a positive effect on nurses' and assistant nurses' job satisfaction, work-life balance, and willingness to stay in the job. An orthopaedic surgery department at a large hospital in Sweden introduced reduced work hours for nurses and assistant nurses in order to improve the working situation. The aim of the study was to investigate the experiences of reduced work hours and no lunch breaks among nurses and assistant nurses at an orthopaedic surgery department at a hospital in Sweden, with a particular focus on recovery and psychosocial working environment. A qualitative design was used in the study. Eleven nurses and assistant nurses working at the particular orthopaedic department took part in the study, and semi-structured interviews were used to collect data. The interviews were analysed by interpretative phenomenological analysis. Four main themes were developed in the analysis of the data: A more sustainable working situation, Improved work-life balance, Consequences of being part of a project, and Improved quality of care. Each theme consisted of subthemes. Overall, reduced work hours appeared to have many, mainly positive, effects for the participants in both work and home life.

  12. Color-coding and human factors engineering to improve patient safety characteristics of paper-based emergency department clinical documentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Leo; Boss, Robert M; Gibbs, Frantz J; Goldlust, Eric; Hennedy, Michelle M; Monti, James E; Siegel, Nathan A

    2011-01-01

    Investigators studied an emergency department (ED) physical chart system and identified inconsistent, small font labeling; a single-color scheme; and an absence of human factors engineering (HFE) cues. A case study and description of the methodology with which surrogate measures of chart-related patient safety were studied and subsequently used to reduce latent hazards are presented. Medical records present a challenge to patient safety in EDs. Application of HFE can improve specific aspects of existing medical chart organization systems as they pertain to patient safety in acute care environments. During 10 random audits over 5 consecutive days (573 data points), 56 (9.8%) chart binders (range 0.0-23%) were found to be either misplaced or improperly positioned relative to other chart binders; 12 (21%) were in the critical care area. HFE principles were applied to develop an experimental chart binder system with alternating color-based chart groupings, simple and prominent identifiers, and embedded visual cues. Post-intervention audits revealed significant reductions in chart binder location problems overall (p < 0.01), for Urgent Care A and B pods (6.4% to 1.2%; p < 0.05), Fast Track C pod (19.3% to 0.0%; p < 0.05) and Behavioral/Substance Abuse D pod (15.7% to 0.0%; p < 0.05) areas of the ED. The critical care room area did not display an improvement (11.4% to 13.2%; p = 0.40). Application of HFE methods may aid the development, assessment, and modification of acute care clinical environments through evidence-based design methodologies and contribute to safe patient care delivery.

  13. Department of the Army, FY 1999 Amended Budget Estimates, Army Working Capital Fund

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1998-01-01

    The Department of the Army has historically operated a significant number of its organic commercial and industrial facilities under revolving fund concepts to encourage these activities to function...

  14. The effects of EMR deployment on doctors' work practices: a qualitative study in the emergency department of a teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun Young; Lee, So Young; Chen, Yunan

    2012-03-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the effects of medical notes (MD) in an electronic medical records (EMR) system on doctors' work practices at an Emergency Department (ED). We conducted a six-month qualitative study, including in situ field observations and semi-structured interviews, in an ED affiliated with a large teaching hospital during the time periods of before, after, and during the paper-to-electronic transition of the rollout of an EMR system. Data were analyzed using open coding method and various visual representations of workflow diagrams. The use of the EMR in the ED resulted in both direct and indirect effects on ED doctors' work practices. It directly influenced the ED doctors' documentation process: (i) increasing documentation time four to five fold, which in turn significantly increased the number of incomplete charts, (ii) obscuring the distinction between residents' charting inputs and those of attendings, shifting more documentation responsibilities to the residents, and (iii) leading to the use of paper notes as documentation aids to transfer information from the patient bedside to the charting room. EMR use also had indirect consequences: it increased the cognitive burden of doctors, since they had to remember multiple patients' data; it aggravated doctors' multi-tasking due to flexibility in the system use allowing more interruptions; and it caused ED doctors' work to become largely stationary in the charting room, which further contributed to reducing doctors' time with patients and their interaction with nurses. We suggest three guidelines for designing future EMR systems to be used in teaching hospitals. First, the design of documentation tools in EMR needs to take into account what we called "note-intensive tasks" to support the collaborative nature of medical work. Second, it should clearly define roles and responsibilities. Lastly, the system should provide a balance between flexibility and interruption to better manage the

  15. The psychosocial work environment among physicians employed at Danish oncology departments in 2009. A nationwide cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreassen, Christian Nicolaj; Eriksen, Jesper Grau

    2013-01-01

    Working as a physician at an oncology department has some distinctive characteristics that may lead to a stressful work environment. The present study was conducted to provide a nationwide description of the work conditions of all oncologists in Denmark. By comparing the results of the present study with those of a similar study carried out in 2006, the aim was furthermore to elucidate changes in the psychosocial work environment over time. From May to September 2009, 330 physicians employed at six oncology centres and seven community based oncology departments were invited to participate in a survey based on the short version of the COPSOQ II questionnaire. The results were compared with data from a representative section of Danish employees and with data from the 2006 survey. Two hundred and twenty of the 330 invited physicians returned the questionnaire (response rate 67%). Concerning the aspects quantitative demands, work pace, emotional demands, influence, burnout and stress, the oncologists reported worse work conditions than the average Danish employee. However, with regard to possibilities for development, meaning of work and commitment to workplace, the oncologists reported better work conditions. Between 2006 and 2009, substantial improvement was seen concerning several of the assessed work environment aspects within the group of young physicians at the oncology centres. Though substantial improvement of the work conditions has been achieved between 2006 and 2009, certain aspects of the psychosocial work environment at Danish oncology departments still require attention.

  16. Optimization of working conditions of medical staff of isotopic diagnostic departments. Optimizatsiya uslovij truda meditsinskogo personala radiodiagnosticheskikh otdelenij

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovsyannikov, A S [Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Moscow (USSR). Inst. Gigieny Truda i Professional' nykh Zabolevanij

    1989-01-01

    The study was undertaken to analyze the characteristics of the work of medical staff of isotopic diagnostic departments during use of {sup 99m}Tc isotope generators. The data on the functional load of physicians and paramedical staff were given along with the description of radiation doses and dose rates at various stages of work. The measures on optimization of labour conditions by means of the appropriate department's design, improvement of the regime of nurses' work and adequate allocation and utilization of medical equipment were developed.

  17. Semantic tagging of and semantic enhancements to systematics papers: ZooKeys working examples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penev, L.; Agosti, D.; Georgiev, T.; Catapano, T.; Miller, J.; Blagoderov, V.; Roberts, D.; Smith, V.S.; Brake, I.; Ryrcroft, S.; Scott, B.; Johnson, N.F.; Morris, R.A.; Sautter, G.; Chavan, V.; Robertson, T.; Remsen, D.; Stoev, P.; Parr, C.; Knapp, S.; Kress, W.J.; Thompson, F.C.; Erwin, T.

    2010-01-01

    The concept of semantic tagging and its potential for semantic enhancements to taxonomic papers is outlined and illustrated by four exemplar papers published in the present issue of ZooKeys. The four papers were created in different ways: (i) written in Microsoft Word and submitted as non-tagged

  18. School attendance, health-risk behaviors, and self-esteem in adolescents applying for working papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suss, A L; Tinkelman, B K; Freeman, K; Friedman, S B

    1996-01-01

    Since health-risk behaviors are often encountered in clusters among adolescents, it was hypothesized that adolescents with poor school attendance would be associated with more health-risk behaviors (e.g., substance use, violence) than those who attend school regularly. This study assessed the relationship between poor school attendance and health-risk behaviors, and described health-risk behaviors and self-esteem among adolescents seeking employment. In this cross-sectional study, school attendance (poor vs. regular attendance) was related to health-risk behaviors by asking 122 subjects seen at a New York City Working Papers Clinic to complete both a 72-item questionnaire about their health-risk behaviors and the 58-item Coopersmith Self-Esteem School Form Inventory. Chi-square and Fisher's Exact Tests were performed. The poor and regular attenders of school differed significantly in only 5 out of 44 items pertaining to health-risk behaviors. Self-esteem measures for the two groups did not differ from one another or from national norms. In this sample, depression "in general" (global) and "at home," but not "at school," were associated significantly with suicidal thoughts/attempts and serious past life events (e.g. family conflict, sexual abuse). There were no significant associations between depression or self-esteem and illicit substance or alcohol use. We found few associations between poor school attendance and health-risk behaviors in this sample of employment-seeking adolescents. The poor and regular attenders of school were similar in most aspects of their health-risk behaviors and self-esteem.

  19. Toward creating family-friendly work environments in pediatrics: baseline data from pediatric department chairs and pediatric program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhillips, Heather A; Burke, Ann E; Sheppard, Kate; Pallant, Adam; Stapleton, F Bruder; Stanton, Bonita

    2007-03-01

    The objective was to determine baseline characteristics of pediatric residency training programs and academic departments in regard to family-friendly work environments as outlined in the Report of the Task Force on Women in Pediatrics. We conducted Web-based anonymous surveys of 147 pediatric department chairs and 203 pediatric program directors. The chair's questionnaire asked about child care, lactation facilities, family leave policies, work-life balance, and tenure and promotion policies. The program director's questionnaire asked about family leave, parenting, work-life balance, and perceptions of "family-friendliness." The response rate was 52% for program directors and 51% for chairs. Nearly 60% of chairs reported some access to child care or provided assistance locating child care; however, in half of these departments, demand almost always exceeded supply. Lactation facilities were available to breastfeeding faculty in 74% of departments, although only 57% provided access to breast pumps. A total of 78% of chairs and 90% of program directors reported written maternity leave policies with slightly fewer reporting paternity leave policies. The majority (83%) of chairs reported availability of part-time employment, whereas only 27% of program directors offered part-time residency options. Most departments offered some flexibility in promotion and tenure. Although progress has been made, change still is needed in many areas in pediatric departments and training programs, including better accessibility to quality child care; improved lactation facilities for breastfeeding mothers; clear, written parental leave policies; and flexible work schedules to accommodate changing demands of family life.

  20. Uncertainties in relation to CO2 capture and sequestration. Preliminary results. Working Paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gielen, D.

    2003-03-01

    capture and sequestration. While CO2 capture technology will be important for the future role of coal, the model results suggest that the future role of natural gas is not affected significantly. Model results indicate only limited competition between CO2 capture and renewables. Both CO2 mitigation strategies show a significant growth in case of the 50 USD/t CO2 penalty. In conclusion it is recommended to develop CO2 capture and sequestration technology, to reduce remaining uncertainties regarding the permanence of CO2 storage, and to reduce the costs of this strategy through advanced power plant designs. In a next step, this model will be further developed with CO2 capture in industry and in other parts of the energy sector. A report on CO2 capture and sequestration, building on the work that is described in this paper, is planned for the fall of 2003

  1. Number of papers published in English from the nursing departments of 42 national universities in Japan in the past ten years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameoka, Junichi; Iwazaki, Junya; Takahashi, Fumie; Sato, Fumiko; Sato, Kazuki; Taguchi, Atsuko; Nakamura, Yasuka; Ishii, Seiichi; Kagaya, Yutaka

    2016-03-01

    In Japan, the departments of nursing were established by 2004, and graduate school programs for master's degree were established by 2008, in 42 national universities. With these changes, a more academic mission has been pursued, and the need for writing papers in English has increased. To investigate the numbers of papers published in English from the nursing departments of national universities in Japan over the past ten years. The lists of teachers who have nursing licenses in the departments of nursing in the 42 national universities (n=2292) were obtained from the Japan Association of Nursing Programs in Universities. The number of papers published in English by these teachers from 2004 to 2013 was counted using the SCOPUS database. The average number of total papers, in which at least one of the authors was a nursing teacher, and first-authored papers, in which the first author was a nursing teacher, were 211.4 and 69.9 per year, respectively; both increased approximately two-fold during the past ten years. The means and standard deviations of the number of total papers and first-authored papers were 50.3±63.8 (range: 1-382) and 18.3±23.4 (range: 0-147) according to universities, and 1.39±5.84 (range: 0-140) and 0.33±1.28 (range: 0-21) according to teachers, respectively. When journals with the highest number of papers were analyzed, 12 of the top 20 (total papers) and 12 of the top 16 (first-authored papers) were in journals whose editorial offices are in Japan. The number of papers published in English has increased over the past ten years, varied markedly depending on the universities and teachers, and many papers were published in Japanese journals. To our knowledge, this is the first report anywhere to determine the average number of nursing papers "per teacher" in a specific population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The Impact of Welfare Reform on Academic Outcomes: Does Parental Work Boost Grades? Institute for Policy Research Working Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja, Amber Stitziel, Lewis, Dan A.

    The 1996 welfare reform act forced many poor parents into the labor market, with little understanding of how the parents' workforce participation would affect family life in general and their children in particular. In this paper, researchers examine the relationship between parental workforce participation, welfare receipt, and children's…

  3. DynCorp Tricities Services, Inc. Hanford fire department FY 1998 annual work plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Good, D.E.

    1997-01-01

    The mission of the Hanford Fire Department (HFD) is to support the safe and timely cleanup of the Hanford site by providing fire suppression, fire prevention, emergency rescue, emergency medical service, and hazardous materials response; and to be capable of dealing with and terminating emergency situations which could threaten the operations, employees, or interest of the U.S. Department of Energy operated Hanford site. This includes response to surrounding fire departments/districts under mutual aid and state mobilization agreements and fire fighting, hazardous materials, and ambulance support to Washington Public Power Supply System (Supply System) and various commercial entities operating on site through Requests for Service from DOE-RL. This fire department also provides site fire marshal overview authority, fire system testing and maintenance, respiratory protection services, building tours and inspections, ignitable and reactive waste site inspections, prefire planning, and employee fire prevention education. This plan provides a program overview, program baselines, and schedule baseline

  4. Learning Materials for Open Learning in Further Education. Coombe Lodge Working Paper. Information Bank Number 1606.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latcham, J.

    Arguing that extensive efforts to produce open learning materials should not be undertaken until the possibility of using or adapting existing materials is considered, this paper identifies current sources of materials available in Great Britain for non-advanced further education. The first sections of the paper review common types of open…

  5. Framework for Building an Effective Student Assessment System: READ/SABER Working Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Marguerite

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to help countries understand some of the "key principles and characteristics of an effective student assessment system". The focus is on assessment of student learning and achievement at the K-12 level. The paper extracts principles and guidelines from countries' experiences, professional testing standards,…

  6. Work Papers of the Summer Institute of Linguistics, University of North Dakota Session. Volume 38.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martlett, Stephen A., Ed.; Meyer, Jim, Ed.

    This collection of eight papers and six "data squibs" (short research findings) are based on topics and languages under study by students and staff of the linguistics program of the University of North Dakota. The papers are: (1) "Dakota Sioux Objects" (Thomas M. Pinson); (2) "The Tapir: A Yanomami Text" (Irma…

  7. Performance-based maintenance procurement by Dutch housing associations - Working paper ¿

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straub, A.; van Mossel, H.J.

    2005-01-01

    Maintenance works are component services that are part of the final housing service to the tenant. Because main building maintenance works are designed each time again, it can be compared to product (service) development. With different types of cooperation with maintenance contractors, the degree

  8. Working Paper 7: Why Does Education Pay-Off in Rural Areas ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-12-22

    Dec 22, 2010 ... This paper develops a simple model to disentangle the effect of ... Highlight: Ankara workshop puts minimum wage on the G-20 radar ... Practical and effective innovation and research: IDRC's sixth annual public meeting.

  9. Working Paper 175 - Youth Employment in Africa: New Evidence and Policies from Swaziland

    OpenAIRE

    Zuzana Brixiova; Thierry Kangoye

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on the 2007 and 2010 Swaziland Labor Force Surveys, this paper provides first systematic evidence on recent youth employment challenges in Swaziland, a small, land-locked, middle-income country with one of the highest youth unemployment rates in Africa. The paper first documents the various labor market disadvantages faced by the Swazi youth, such as high unemployment and discouragement, and how they changed from 2007 to 2010. A multinomial logit regression analysis is carried out to ...

  10. The Education Challenge in Mexico: Delivering Good Quality Education to All. OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 447

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guichard, Stephanie

    2005-01-01

    The growth of potential GDP in Mexico is not fast enough to narrow the income gap with other OECD countries at a sufficient pace. The persistent weakness in human capital development contributes to this situation. In particular, Mexicans spend comparatively few years in formal education, and the quality of the education they receive is lower than…

  11. Enhancing Incentives to Improve Performance in the Education System in France. OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 570

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Paul

    2007-01-01

    The French education system has a mixed record. A generally very successful pre-school and primary school level contrasts with underfunded public universities with high dropout rates which exist alongside very successful higher education institutions for elites. Initial education, especially secondary education and the universities, along with…

  12. An overview of the USL/DBMS NASA/PC R and D project working paper series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    An introduction is given to the University of Southwestern Louisiana Data Base Management System (USL/DBMS) NASA/PC R and D Working Paper Series which has been established to provide a foundation for both a formal and informal information dissemination mechanism concerning PC-based research and development activities being performed pursuant to the NASA contract. This entry also serves as an index to the collection of Working Paper Series reports.

  13. Professional Culture Fit and Work-Related Quality of Life in Academic Departments: A Phenomenographic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales Opazo, Tatiana Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Although quality of life (QoL) has been a highly investigated issue over the last decades, there is still little agreement on its definition, and even less information about the validity of its measurements in specific settings. Additionally, in complex institutions like a university, functional units such as academic department usually are more…

  14. Nuclear Research Centre Juelich. 1986 annual work report of the Department for Safety and Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hille, R.; Frenkler, K.L.

    1986-02-01

    The Department for Safety and Radiation Protection continues to be responsible for coordinating radiation protection, safety and protection at the KFA. It supports the other institutes and departments in performing the safety tasks allotted to them. The principal tasks of the Department are in administrative and technical assistance to these organization units and in safeguards. Administrative assistance involves, for example, regulation of the radiation protection organization in the institutes, including the appointment of radiation protection officers (Strahlenschutzbeauftragte). Furthermore, this includes the central handling of the registration system with the authorities and dealing with outside firms thus considerably relieving the institutes of their administrative tasks. Handling licensing procedures and the central accountancy of radioactive materials is also to be mentioned in this context. Technical assistance largely consists of developing, maintaining and repairing radiation measuring instruments and in the monitoring of personnel by evaluating personnel dosimeters and incorporation controls for radioactive sources. The safeguards tasks of the Department concern the very staff-intensive physical protection, as well as environmental protection and industrial safety. (orig./HP) [de

  15. Hanford fire department FY 1999 annual work plan WBS 6.5.7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GOOD, D.E.

    1999-01-01

    The mission of the Hanford Fire Department (HFD) is to support the safe and timely cleanup of the Hanford site by providing a full range of services at the lowest possible cost to customers. These services include fire suppression, fire prevention, emergency rescue, emergency medical service, and hazardous materials response; and to be capable of dealing with and terminating emergency situations which could threaten the operations, employees, the general public, or interest of the U. S. Department of Energy operated Hanford Site. This includes response to surrounding fire departments/districts under mutual aid and state mobilization agreements and fire fighting, hazardous materials, and ambulance support to Washington Public Power Supply System (Supply System) and various commercial entities operating on site through Requests for Service from DOE-RL. The fire department also provides site fire marshal overview authority, fire system testing and maintenance, respiratory protection services, building tours and inspections, ignitable and reactive waste site inspections, prefire planning, and employee fire prevention education

  16. Nuclear Research Centre Juelich. 1987 annual work report of the Department for Safety and Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hille, R.

    1988-03-01

    The Department for Safety and Radiation Protection continues to be responsible for coordinating radiation protection, safety and protection at the KFA. It supports the other institutes and departments in performing the safety tasks allotted to them. The principal tasks of the Department are in administrative and technical assistance to these organization units and in safeguards. Administrative assistance involves, for example, regulation of the radiation protection organization in the institutes, including the appointment of radiation protection officers (Strahlenschutzbeauftragte). Furthermore, this includes the central handling of the registration system with the authorities and dealing with outside firms thus considerably relieving the institutes of their administrative tasks. Handling licensing procedures and the central accountancy of radioactive materials is also to be mentioned in this context. Technical assistance largely consists of developing, maintaining and repairing radiation measuring instruments and in the monitoring of personnel by evaluating personnel dosimeters and incorporation controls for radioactive sources. The safeguards tasks of the Department concern the very staff-intensive physical protection, as well as environmental protection and industrial safety. (orig./HP) [de

  17. Hanford fire department FY 99 annual work plan WBS 6.5.7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GOOD, D.E.

    1999-02-24

    The mission of the Hanford Fire Department (HFD) is to support the safe and timely cleanup of the Hanford site by providing a full range of services at the lowest possible cost to customers. These services include fire suppression, fire prevention, emergency rescue, emergency medical service, and hazardous materials response; and to be capable of dealing with and terminating emergency situations which could threaten the operations, employees, the general public, or interest of the U. S. Department of Energy operated Hanford Site. This includes response to surrounding fire departments/districts under mutual aid and state mobilization agreements and fire fighting, hazardous materials, and ambulance support to Washington Public Power Supply System (Supply System) and various commercial entities operating on site through Requests for Service from DOE-RL. The fire department also provides site fire marshal overview authority, fire system testing and maintenance, respiratory protection services, building tours and inspections, ignitable and reactive waste site inspections, prefire planning, and employee fire prevention education.

  18. 1988 annual work report of the Department for Safety and Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hille, R.

    1989-03-01

    The Department for Safety and Radiation Protection continues to be responsible for coordinating radiation protection, safety and protection at the KFA. It supports the other institutes and departments in performing the safety tasks allotted to them. The principal tasks of the Department are in administrative and technical assistance to these organization units and in safeguards. Administrative assistance involves, for example, regulation of the radiation protection organization in the institutes, including the appointment of radiation protection officers (Strahlenschutzbeauftragte). Furthermore, this includes the central handling of the registration system with the authorities and dealing with outside firms thus considerably relieving the institutes of their administrative tasks. Handling licensing procedures and the central accountancy of radioactive materials is also to be mentioned in this context. Technical assistance largely consists of developing, maintaining and repairing radiation measuring instruments and in the monitoring of personnel by evaluating personnel dosimeters and incorporation controls for radioactive sources. The safeguards tasks of the Department concern the very staff-intensive physical protection, as well as environmental protection and industrial safety. (orig.) [de

  19. 1989 annual work report of the KFA Department for Safety and Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hille, R.; Frenkler, K.L.

    1990-03-01

    The Department for Safety and Radiation Protection continues to be responsible for coordinating radiation protection, safety and protection at the KFA. It supports the other institutes and departments in performing the safety tasks allotted to them. The principal tasks of the Department are in administrative and technical assistance to these organization units and in safeguards. Administrative assistance involves, for example, regulation of the radiation protection organization in the institutes, including the appointment of radiation protection officers (Strahlenschutzbeauftrage). Furthermore, this includes the central handling of the registration system with the authorities and dealing with outside firms thus considerably relieving the institutes of their administrative tasks. Handling licensing procedures and the central accountancy of radioactive materials is also to be mentioned in this context. Technical assistance largely consists of developing, maintaining and repairing radiation measuring instruments and in the monitoring of personnel by evaluating personnel dosimeters and incorporation controls for radioactive sources. The safeguards tasks of the Department concern the very staff-intensive physical protection, as well as environmental protection and industrial safety. (orig.) [de

  20. John Dewey: Su filosofia y filosofia de la educacion (John Dewey: His Philosophy and Philosophy of Education). Working Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoreda, Margaret Lee

    This paper forms part of an investigation about how the philosophy of John Dewey (1859-1952) can illuminate the practice of the teaching of English as a foreign language. The paper seeks to interpret and synthesize John Dewey's philosophical works to construct a "Deweyian lens" with which to analyze and evaluate the field of the teaching…

  1. The Iterative Design Process in Research and Development: A Work Experience Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, George F. III

    2013-01-01

    The iterative design process is one of many strategies used in new product development. Top-down development strategies, like waterfall development, place a heavy emphasis on planning and simulation. The iterative process, on the other hand, is better suited to the management of small to medium scale projects. Over the past four months, I have worked with engineers at Johnson Space Center on a multitude of electronics projects. By describing the work I have done these last few months, analyzing the factors that have driven design decisions, and examining the testing and verification process, I will demonstrate that iterative design is the obvious choice for research and development projects.

  2. Training and Support for Women's Entrepreneurship. ETF Working Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekh, Olena

    2014-01-01

    This paper contributes to the wider efforts of policy makers, experts and practitioners to maximise the contribution of women into the national, regional and global economic growth and competitiveness in the countries neighbouring the European Union (EU). It focuses on actions that can support women's participation in entrepreneurship. The paper…

  3. The Labor Market Returns to Math Courses in Community College. A CAPSEE Working Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfield, Clive; Liu, Vivian Yuen Ting

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the returns to math courses relative to courses in other subjects for students in community college. Using matched college transcript and earnings data on over 80,000 students entering community college during the 2000s, we find that college-level math coursework has an indirect positive effect on award completion that is…

  4. Direct and Indirect Effects of Teenage Body Weight on Adult Wages. NBER Working Paper No. 15027

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Euna; Norton, Edward C.; Powell, Lisa M.

    2009-01-01

    Previous estimates on the association between body weight and wages in the literature have been contingent on education and occupation. This paper examines the direct effect of BMI on wages and the indirect effects operating through education and occupation choice, particularly for late-teen BMI and adult wages. Using the National Longitudinal…

  5. Econometric Methods for Research in Education. NBER Working Paper No. 16003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghir, Costas; Rivkin, Steven G.

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews some of the econometric methods that have been used in the economics of education. The focus is on understanding how the assumptions made to justify and implement such methods relate to the underlying economic model and the interpretation of the results. We start by considering the estimation of the returns to education both…

  6. Linking Costs and Postsecondary Degrees: Key Issues for Policymakers. Working Paper 2011-03

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nate

    2011-01-01

    In this paper the author offers practical advice for decision-makers who are struggling to rein in college costs while improving productivity. He provides a step-by-step guide to different approaches for calculating costs, highlights the tremendous variability in cost across programs within institutions, and documents some of the "hidden costs" of…

  7. Budgeting and Accounting in OECD Education Systems: A Literature Review. OECD Education Working Papers, No. 128

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakharzadeh, Tala

    2016-01-01

    Recent demographic, economic and political trends have drawn attention to the issue of effectiveness and efficiency in the use of resources in the education sector. In the context of the renewed interest for the optimisation of resource use, this paper attempts to review the literature on budgeting and accounting in OECD education systems. The…

  8. Games and Simulations in Informal Science Education. WCER Working Paper No. 2010-14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Kurt; Patterson, Nathan

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the possibilities and challenges games and simulations pose for informal science education. The authors begin with a brief overview of the recent history of games and games research. They then attempt to clarify the distinctions between games and simulations. Next, they examine types of informal learning…

  9. A Look at Simultaneous Interpretation. Working Papers on Bilingualism, No. 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Henri C.

    This paper summarizes the findings of an exploratory study concerned with certain temporal and qualitative aspects of simultaneous interpretation. Six French-English interpreters (2 professionals, 2 students and 2 amateurs) translated tape-recorded passages representing different types of materials from their weaker into their dominant language or…

  10. The Draw of Home: How Teachers' Preferences for Proximity Disadvantage Urban Schools. NBER Working Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Donald; Lankford, Hamilton; Loeb, Susanna; Wyckoff, James

    This paper explores a little-understood aspect of labor markets, their spatial geography. Using data from New York State, it finds teacher labor markets to be geographically very small. Teachers express preferences to teach close to where they grew up, and, controlling for proximity, they prefer areas with characteristics similar to their…

  11. One-Parent Families and Educational Disadvantage. Working Paper No. 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, Don; Headlam, Freya

    This paper presents data and discussions based on two Australian studies of the possible educational problems suffered by children from one-parent homes. The first section describes anticipated problem areas for these children, i.e., financial burden, health problems, change in life style, and the emotional effects of disruption. Data from other…

  12. Recent Developments in Intellectual Capital Reporting and their Policy Implications. OECD Education Working Papers, No. 17

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, W. Richard

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a survey of recent developments in the reporting of intangible assets. It finds that rather than the wholesale restructuring of the accounting model that was proposed years ago, the trend has been to address gaps in reporting with new forms of reporting. New forms of reporting appear better suited to capture the type of…

  13. Paternity Leave: Current Status and Future Prospects. Working Paper No. 157.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleck, Joseph H.

    This paper examines current patterns and trends in the availability and use of parental leave by U.S. fathers. Introductory material focuses on legal and administrative contexts of parental leave and parental leave policies available to employed mothers. The main discussion uses U.S. and Swedish data to explore (1) long-term paid leave at the time…

  14. The Impact of Physical Education on Obesity among Elementary School Children. NBER Working Paper No. 18341

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawley, John; Frisvold, David; Meyerhoefer, Chad

    2012-01-01

    In response to the dramatic rise in childhood obesity, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and other organizations have advocated increasing the time that elementary school children spend in physical education (PE) classes. However, little is known about the effect of PE on child weight. This paper measures that effect by instrumenting for child…

  15. Mechanisms for the Association between Maternal Employment and Child Cognitive Development. NBER Working Paper No. 13609

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawley, John; Liu, Feng

    2007-01-01

    Recent research has found that maternal employment is associated with worse child performance on tests of cognitive ability. This paper explores mechanisms for that correlation. We estimate models of instrumental variables using a unique dataset, the American Time Use Survey, that measure the effect of maternal employment on the mother's…

  16. Ex-Ante Impact Assessment & Value Network Analysis for SI: SIMPACT Working Paper 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dhondt, S.; Ven, H. van de; Ziauberyte, R.; Torre, W. van der; Cressey, P.; Kaderabkova, A.; Luna, Á.; Moghadam Saman, S.; Castro Spila, J.; Terstriep, J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a conceptual framework is presented to conduct an ex-ante impact assessment for social innovation. The building blocks for an ex-ante impact assessment are goal formulation; developing the relationships between inputs, outputs and outcomes; determining the role of stakeholders to

  17. Financial Incentives and Student Achievement: Evidence from Randomized Trials. NBER Working Paper No. 15898

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, Roland G., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a series of school-based randomized trials in over 250 urban schools designed to test the impact of financial incentives on student achievement. In stark contrast to simple economic models, our results suggest that student incentives increase achievement when the rewards are given for inputs to the educational production…

  18. Does Family Structure Affect Children's Educational Outcomes? NBER Working Paper Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollak, Robert A.; Ginther, Donna K.

    This paper examines correlations between children's educational outcomes and family structure. Although popular discussions focus on distinctions between two-parent and single-parent families, earlier research shows that outcomes for stepchildren are similar to outcomes for children in single-parent families, and earlier researchers suggested that…

  19. Revisiting the Link between Poverty and Child Labor: The Ghanaian Experience. Working Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blunch, Niels-Hugo; Verner, Dorte

    The link between poverty and child labor has been regarded as a well established fact, but recent research has questioned the validity of this link. Starting from the premise that child labor is not necessarily harmful, this paper analyzes the determinants of harmful child labor, viewed as labor that directly conflicts with children's human…

  20. The Relationship Between Neighborhood Quality and Obesity among Children. NBER Working Paper No. 14985

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Bisakha; Mennemeyer, Stephen; Gary, Lisa C.

    2009-01-01

    It has long been posited by scientists that we need to have a better understanding in the role that larger contextual factors -- like neighborhood quality and the built environment -- may have on the nation's obesity crisis. This paper explores whether maternal perceptions of neighborhood quality affect children's bodyweight outcomes, and whether…

  1. Learner Flexibility Profiles. Coombe Lodge Working Paper. Information Bank Number 1612.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latcham, J.; Spencer, D. C.

    To help in the exploration of developments in increasing learning flexibility in Great Britain's further education system, this paper suggests the development of learner flexibility profiles as devices for analyzing and recording the nature and extent of student choice or discretion. The introductory section reviews developments in open learning…

  2. Smoke Signals: Adolescent Smoking and School Continuation. Working Papers Series. SAN06-05

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Philip J.; Hutchinson, Rebecca

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an exploratory analysis using NLSY97 data of the relationship between the likelihood of school continuation and the choices of whether to smoke or drink. We demonstrate that in the United States as of the late 1990s, smoking in 11th-grade was a uniquely powerful predictor of whether the student finished high school, and if so…

  3. Does Immigration Crowd Natives into or out of Higher Education? Working Papers. No. 15-18

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Osborne

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of immigration on the college enrollment of U.S. natives. Many studies have focused on the effect of increased demand for schooling by immigrants on the enrollment of natives. However, changes in immigrant labor supply may also affect native enrollment by changing local market prices. Using U.S. Census data from…

  4. Mother's Schooling, Fertility, and Children's Education: Evidence from a Natural Experiment. NBER Working Paper No. 16856

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavy, Victor; Zablotsky, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of mothers' education on their fertility and their children's schooling. We base our evidence on a natural experiment that sharply reduced the cost of attending school and, as a consequence, significantly increased the education of affected cohorts. This natural experiment was the result of the de facto revocation in…

  5. Annotated Bibliography on Koreans in America. Working Papers on Asian American Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Christopher; Takabashi, Michiko, Ed.

    This annotated bibliography lists bibliographies, directories, articles, unpublished papers, manuals, citations, conference reports, and other documents dealing with Koreans in America. Topics considered include general history, immigration history, deportation cases, Korean students, State and Federal legislation affecting Koreans in America,…

  6. Do Principals Fire the Worst Teachers? NBER Working Paper No. 15715

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Brian A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper takes advantage of a unique policy change to examine how principals make decisions regarding teacher dismissal. In 2004, the Chicago Public Schools (CPS) and Chicago Teachers Union (CTU) signed a new collective bargaining agreement that gave principals the flexibility to dismiss probationary teachers for any reason and without the…

  7. Resourse Allocation and Pricing Principles for a University Computer Centre. Working Paper Series Number 6819.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possen, Uri M.; And Others

    As an introduction, this paper presents a statement of the objectives of the university computing center (UCC) from the viewpoint of the university, the government, the typical user, and the UCC itself. The operating and financial structure of a UCC are described. Three main types of budgeting schemes are discussed: time allocation, pseudo-dollar,…

  8. Decomposing the Education Wage Gap: Everything but the Kitchen Sink. Working Paper 2010-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotchkiss, Julie L.; Shiferaw, Menbere

    2010-01-01

    This paper contributes to a large literature concerned with identifying the source of the widening wage gap between high school and college graduates by providing a comprehensive, multidimensional decomposition of wages across both time and educational status. Data from a multitude of sources are brought to bear on the question of the relative…

  9. Older and Wiser? Birth Order and IQ of Young Men. NBER Working Paper No. 13237

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Sandra E.; Devereux, Paul J.; Salvanes, Kjell G.

    2007-01-01

    While recent research finds strong evidence that birth order affects children's outcomes such as education and earnings, the evidence on the effects of birth order on IQ is decidedly mixed. This paper uses a large dataset on the population of Norway that allows us to precisely measure birth order effects on IQ using both cross-sectional and…

  10. Consumer Information in the Electronic Media: Neutral Information, Advertising, Selling. Working Paper No. 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepstrup, Preben; Olander, Folke

    This paper presents a self-contained summary in English of the results of a research project conducted for the Nordic Council of Ministers to define problems, advantages, and disadvantages of the electronic dissemination of information for consumers, and to determine whether consumer organizations should adapt their information activities and…

  11. Class Size and Sorting in Market Equilibrium: Theory and Evidence. NBER Working Paper No. 13303

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquiola, Miguel; Verhoogen, Eric

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines how schools choose class size and how households sort in response to those choices. Focusing on the highly liberalized Chilean education market, we develop a model in which schools are heterogeneous in an underlying productivity parameter, class size is a component of school quality, households are heterogeneous in income and…

  12. Children of Incarcerated Parents: Cumulative Risk and Children's Living Arrangements. JCPR Working Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Elizabeth Inez; Waldfogel, Jane

    This paper examines risk factors that exist in the lives of incarcerated parents and their children, focusing on the living arrangements of the children. It uses data from the 1997 Survey of Inmates in State and Federal Correctional Facilities to address three issues: risk factors present in the lives of incarcerated parents and their children,…

  13. Investment in Indian Education. Uneconomic? World Bank Staff Working Paper No. 327.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyneman, Stephen P.

    Noting that is often assumed that there is a surplus of education in India, where the literacy rate is three in ten, this paper questions the assumption that the economic returns to investment in Indian education are negative. The case of India is reviewed: a circumstance in which the existance of unemployment has led to the unjustified assumption…

  14. Household Composition Change and Economic Welfare Inequality: 1960 to 1980. CDE Working Paper 88-18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtkiewicz, Roger A.

    This paper considers the following dimensions of the change in household composition of the United States population between 1960 and 1980: (1) a decrease in the number of households headed by a couple; and (2) a decrease in the number of children per household. Examination of census figures from 1960, 1970, and 1980 reveals that blacks and whites…

  15. Working Papers in Experimental Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology. Volume VII, 1979.

    Science.gov (United States)

    City Univ. of New York, Flushing, NY. Queens Coll.

    Seven papers review research in speech-language pathology and audiology. K. Polzer et al. describe an investigation of sign language therapy for the severely language impaired. S. Dworetsky and L. Clark analyze the phonemic and nonphonemic error patterns in five nonverbal and five verbal oral apraxic adults. The performance of three language…

  16. Vouchers for Private Schooling in Colombia: Evidence from a Randomized Natural Experiment. NBER Working Paper Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angrist, Joshua D.; Bettinger, Eric; Bloom, Erik; King, Elizabeth; Kremer, Michael

    This paper examines the impact of Colombia's Programa de Ampliacion de Cobertura de la Educacion Secundaria (PACES), which provided over 125,000 poor students with private secondary school vouchers, many of which were awarded by lottery. Researchers surveyed lottery winners and losers to compare educational and other outcomes. Results showed no…

  17. Sex Education and Sex Stereotypes: Theory and Practice. Working Paper No. 198.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Margaret L.

    This paper presents an explanation of practitioners' reactions to sex equitable sex education. Several constraints can prohibit practitioners from engaging in sex equitable sex education: (1) lack of community support; (2) lack of expertise in human sexuality education; (3) vagueness of school committee views; and (4) lack of answers to logistical…

  18. Comparing the Similarities and Differences of PISA 2003 and TIMSS. OECD Education Working Papers, No. 32

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    This paper makes an in-depth comparison of the PISA (OECD) and TIMSS (IEA) mathematics assessments conducted in 2003. First, a comparison of survey methodologies is presented, followed by an examination of the mathematics frameworks in the two studies. The methodologies and the frameworks in the two studies form the basis for providing…

  19. Precarious Slopes? The Great Recession, Federal Stimulus, and New Jersey Schools. Working Paper #02-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Rajashri; Sutherland, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    While sparse literature exists investigating the impact of the Great Recession on various sectors of the economy, there is virtually no research that studies the effect of the Great Recession, or past recessions, on schools. This paper starts to fill the void. Studying school funding during the recession is of paramount importance because schools…

  20. Learning Outcomes and School Cost-Effectiveness in Mexico: The PARE Program. Policy Research Working Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Gladys Lopez

    This paper examines the impact on student learning of the Programa para Abatir el Rezago Educativo (PARE), which aimed to improve the quality and efficiency of primary education in four Mexican states by increasing school resources. PARE was implemented in the states of Oaxaca, Guerrero, Chiapas, and Hidalgo, which have the highest incidence of…

  1. General Education vs. Vocational Training: Evidence from an Economy in Transition. NBER Working Paper No. 14155

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamud, Ofer; Pop-Eleches, Cristian

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the relative benefits of general education and vocational training in Romania, a country which experienced major technological and institutional change during its transition from Communism to a market economy. To avoid the bias caused by non-random selection, we exploit a 1973 educational reform that shifted a large proportion…

  2. Large Industries in Small Towns: Who Benefits? Working Paper RID 73.9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, Frank; Summers, Gene F.

    The impact of a large manufacturing plant on a small village in "middle America" was explored in this paper. Research was conducted in Illinois using Putnam County as an "experimental" region and Iroquois County as a "control." In the spring of 1966, the Jones and Laughlin Steel Corporation began construction of a…

  3. Of Mice and Academics: Examining the Effect of Openness on Innovation. NBER Working Paper No. 14819

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Fiona; Aghion, Philippe; Dewatripont, Mathias; Kolev, Julian; Stern, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Scientific freedom and openness are hallmarks of academia: relative to their counterparts in industry, academics maintain discretion over their research agenda and allow others to build on their discoveries. This paper examines the relationship between openness and freedom, building on recent models emphasizing that, from an economic perspective,…

  4. Estimating the Technology of Cognitive and Noncognitive Skill Formation. NBER Working Paper No. 15664

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Flavio; Heckman, James; Schennach, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    This paper formulates and estimates multistage production functions for childrens' cognitive and noncognitive skills. Skills are determined by parental environments and investments at different stages of childhood. We estimate the elasticity of substitution between investments in one period and stocks of skills in that period to assess the…

  5. Using social media to support cluster development : Working Paper (draft- do not quote)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.J. de Graaf; Anu Manickam

    2012-01-01

    Developing European transnational clusters is a cornerstone in current EU-policies towards a sustainable competitive and open European economy. Within this conceptual paper relates these objectives to new developments in the application of network IT or, in popular terms, the rise of social

  6. Getting to the Right Algebra: The Equity 2000 Initiative in Milwaukee Public Schools. MDRC Working Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Sandra; Walker, Erica

    This paper describes the Milwaukee Public Schools' involvement in Equity 2000, a standards-based reform initiative to enhance mathematics education and achievement among students of color, thereby increasing their likelihood of college enrollment and completion. The study highlights efforts to support and sustain a key component of Equity 2000:…

  7. The Impact of Internet Subsidies in Public Schools. NBER Working Paper Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goolsbee, Austan; Guryan, Jonathan

    As part of the Telecommunications Act of 1996, the U.S. government began subsidizing Internet and telecommunications access in classrooms and libraries through a tax on long-distance services (the E-Rate Program). This paper analyzes the impact of this program on public schools' technology adoption during 1996-2000, examining data on technology…

  8. Minimum Wage Increases and the Working Poor. Changing Domestic Priorities Discussion Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mincy, Ronald B.

    Most economists agree that the difficulties of targeting minimum wage increases to low-income families make such increases ineffective tools for reducing poverty. This paper provides estimates of the impact of minimum wage increases on the poverty gap and the number of poor families, and shows which factors are barriers to decreasing poverty…

  9. Do Trustees and Administrators Matter? Diversifying the Faculty across Gender Lines. NBER Working Paper No. 15606

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenberg, Ronald G.; Jakubson, George H.; Martin, Mirinda L.; Main, Joyce B.; Eisenberg, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Our paper focuses on the role that the gender composition of the leaders of American colleges and universities--trustees, presidents/chancellors, and provosts/academic vice presidents--plays in influencing the rate at which academic institutions diversify their faculty across gender lines. Our analyses make use of institutional level panel data…

  10. The Impact of Children's Public Health Insurance Expansions on Educational Outcomes. NBER Working Paper No. 14671

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Phillip B.; Schanzenbach, Diane Whitmore

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of public health insurance expansions through both Medicaid and SCHIP on children's educational outcomes, measured by 4th and 8th grade reading and math test scores, available from the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). We use a triple difference estimation strategy, taking advantage of the…

  11. Women's Education and Family Behavior: Trends in Marriage, Divorce and Fertility. NBER Working Paper No. 15725

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isen, Adam; Stevenson, Betsey

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines how marital and fertility patterns have changed along racial and educational lines for men and women. Historically, women with more education have been the least likely to marry and have children, but this marriage gap has eroded as the returns to marriage have changed. Marriage and remarriage rates have risen for women with a…

  12. Federal Life Sciences Funding and University R&D. NBER Working Paper No. 15146

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume-Kohout, Margaret E.; Kumar, Krishna B.; Sood, Neeraj

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of federal extramural research funding on total expenditures for life sciences research and development (R&D) at U.S. universities, to determine whether federal R&D funding spurs funding from non-federal (private and state/local government) sources. We use a fixed effects instrumental variable approach…

  13. Breadth vs. Depth: The Timing of Specialization in Higher Education. NBER Working Paper No. 15943

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamud, Ofer

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the tradeoff between early and late specialization in the context of higher education. While some educational systems require students to specialize early by choosing a major field of study prior to entering university, others allow students to postpone this choice. I develop a model in which individuals, by taking courses in…

  14. Public Knowledge, Private Knowledge: The Intellectual Capital of Entrepreneurs. NBER Working Paper No. 14797

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Albert; Ruhm, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    This paper focuses on the innovative actions of entrepreneurs, namely their tendency to reveal the intellectual capital that results from their research efforts either in the form of public knowledge (publications) or private knowledge (patents). Using data collected by the National Research Council within the U.S. National Academies from their…

  15. Secondary Chemistry School Teachers Working in Tertiary Education Chemistry Departments; Critical Reflections on the Positives and Negatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, S. R.; Harrison, T. G.; Shallcross, D. E.

    2016-01-01

    Several UK University Chemistry Departments have former secondary school chemistry teachers employed as School Teacher Fellows (STF) who are heavily involved in outreach work and a range of teaching responsibilities. This study looks at the outreach role from the point of view of several of the STFs; the benefits, and the barriers and how this…

  16. Income Inequality, the Median Voter, and the Support for Public Education. NBER Working Paper No. 16097

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Sean; Evans, William N.

    2010-01-01

    Using a panel of U.S. school districts spanning 1970-2000, we examine the relationship between income inequality and fiscal support for public education. In contrast with recent theoretical and empirical work suggesting a negative relationship between inequality and public spending, we find results consistent with a median voter model, in which…

  17. Non-Production Benefits of Education: Crime, Health, and Good Citizenship. NBER Working Paper No. 16722

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochner, Lance

    2011-01-01

    A growing body of work suggests that education offers a wide-range of benefits that extend beyond increases in labor market productivity. Improvements in education can lower crime, improve health, and increase voting and democratic participation. This chapter reviews recent developments on these "non-production" benefits of education with an…

  18. Can Strategic Management Work in Colleges and Universities? AIR 1989 Annual Forum Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooris, Michael J.; Lozier, G. Gregory

    The wide variety of management approaches (zero-based budgeting, decision support systems, etc.) that have emerged in recent decades are reviewed. The questions of whether strategic management is simply another fad, and whether it can work in colleges and universities, are discussed. The development of strategic management is traced, both in…

  19. New Evidence on Teacher Labor Supply. NBER Working Paper No. 16802

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Mimi; Jacob, Brian A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence on the large variance in teacher effectiveness has spurred renewed interest in teacher labor market policies. A substantial body of prior research documents that more highly qualified teachers tend to work in more advantaged schools, although this literature cannot determine the relative importance of supply versus demand factors…

  20. The Academic Consequences of Employment for Students Enrolled in Community College. CCRC Working Paper No. 46

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadgar, Mina

    2012-01-01

    College students are increasingly combining studying with paid employment, and community college students tend to work even longer hours compared with students at four-year colleges. Yet, there is little evidence on the academic consequences of community college students' term-time employment. Using a rare administrative dataset from Washington…

  1. Stepping Stones: Principal Career Paths and School Outcomes. Working Paper 58

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beteille, Tara; Kalogrides, Demetra; Loeb, Susanna

    2011-01-01

    Principals tend to prefer working in schools with higher-achieving students from more advantaged socioeconomic backgrounds. Principals often use schools with many poor or low-achieving students as stepping stones to what they view as more desirable assignments. District leadership can also exacerbate principal turnover by implementing policies…

  2. Stepping Stones: Principal Career Paths and School Outcomes. NBER Working Paper No. 17243

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beteille, Tara; Kalogrides, Demetra; Loeb, Susanna

    2011-01-01

    More than one out of every five principals leaves their school each year. In some cases, these career changes are driven by the choices of district leadership. In other cases, principals initiate the move, often demonstrating preferences to work in schools with higher achieving students from more advantaged socioeconomic backgrounds. Principals…

  3. Personalized Learning Instructional Staff Survey Results (Spring 2014). Working Paper WR-1062-BMGF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siler-Evans, Kyle; Steiner, Elizabeth D.; Hamilton, Laura S.; Pane, John F.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to descriptively summarize instructional staff responses to a survey administered by RAND in 23 personalized learning (PL) schools in Spring 2014. This work was performed at the request of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF), as part of a multi-year evaluation contract. The 23 schools were selected from a…

  4. Peer Effects and Human Capital Accumulation: the Externalities of ADD. NBER Working Paper No. 14354

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizer, Anna

    2008-01-01

    Although recent work has shown that peers affect human capital accumulation, the mechanisms are not well understood. Knowing why high achieving peers matter, because of their innate ability, disciplined behavior or some other factor, has important implications for our understanding of the education production function and for how we organize…

  5. Methods Used to Estimate Achievement Effects in Personalized Learning Schools. Working Paper WR-1061-BMGF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pane, John F.; Baird, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to describe the methods RAND used to analyze achievement for 23 personalized learning (PL) schools for the 2012-13 through 2013-14 academic years. This work was performed at the request of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF), as part of a multi-year evaluation contract. The 23 schools were selected from a…

  6. Education Policy Implementation: A Literature Review and Proposed Framework. OECD Education Working Papers, No. 162

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viennet, Romane; Pont, Beatriz

    2017-01-01

    This literature review focuses on education policy implementation, its definition, processes and determinants. It aims to clarify what implementing policies involve in complex education systems to support policy work, building on the literature and country examples. An introduction delves into the reasons behind the need to update the concept of…

  7. Work-related fear and the threats of fear among emergency department nursing staff and physicians in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkola, Riitta; Huhtala, Heini; Paavilainen, Eija

    2017-10-01

    To describe fear, the threats causing fear and the occurrence of fear among emergency department nursing staff and physicians. The emergency department is a challenging workplace where the staff is often confronted by factors that cause fear. A cross-sectional study. A survey was conducted in 16 hospitals (n = 544). Nurses, practical nurses, orderlies and physicians from those hospitals participated in the survey. The survey questionnaire was based on the analysis of interviews of 30 nurses from one university hospital and one central hospital. The results of the interviews were analysed using the inductive content analysis method. The analysis of the survey was performed using statistical methods, such as frequencies, cross-tabulation and principal component analysis. The results showed that nearly all of the emergency department personnel had experienced work-related fear. Generally, the fear had been momentary. According to the survey results, fear was most often caused by medication errors, the resuscitation of a child, a catastrophic accident, urgent or violent situations or patients armed with weapons. Threats that caused fear included insecurity, danger in the work environment, threat of loss of one's health and threat of the consequences of one's mistakes and actions. The staff of emergency departments often encountered factors or situations that caused fear. The main threats causing fear that were raised by the respondents were insecurity and danger in the work environment. The data obtained from this study can be utilised in identifying and describing work-related fear and threats of fear among emergency department nursing staff and physicians. Based on the information herein, it will be possible to develop methods to prevent situations that cause fear in emergency departments. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Time to Work or Time to Play: The Effect of Student Employment on Homework, Housework, Screen Time, and Sleep. Working Paper 423

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalenkoski, Charlene Marie; Pabilonia, Sabrina Wulff

    2009-01-01

    Recent research suggests that working while in high school reduces the amount of time students spend doing homework. However, an additional hour of work leads to a reduction in homework by much less than one hour, suggesting a reduction in other activities. This paper uses data from the 2003-2007 American Time Use Surveys (ATUS) to investigate the…

  9. Savannah River Plant Works Technical Department monthly progress report for May 1958: Deleted Version

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1958-06-17

    This progress report by the Atomic Energy Division of the Savannah River Plant covers: Reactor Technology; Separation Technology; Engineering Assistance; Health Physics; and General Laboratory Work. (JT)

  10. The Department of Defense Press Pool: Did in Work in Panama?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    who would physically attack a paper and its printer that did not reflect their opinion (Tebbel, 5). Politicians rarely brought the papers to task...Rico single-handedly and James Creelman , a reporter for Hearst, leading a bayonet charge outside Santiago. Military and press relations were good. The

  11. Optimizing Fire Department Operations Through Work Schedule Analysis, Alternative Staffing, and Nonproductive Time Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    and disadvantages ; for example, although the majority of fire departments in the United States abide by the 24/48- schedule, this schedule also leads...costs. The local bargaining group also falls into these criteria. The local bargaining unit must be agreeable to the policy changes. They cannot... agreeable to the local bargaining group particularly when it is addressed in an article of the current bargaining agreement. Additionally, the local

  12. Emotion management strategies in PR firms: senior level perspectives of professional relationships (working paper)

    OpenAIRE

    Yeomans, L

    2016-01-01

    Much of the PR literature tends to focus on engagement in building relationships between organisations and publics or stakeholders. However, less is known about everyday interpersonal engagement, especially in regard to the professional context of the PR consulting firm (Sissons, 2015). This paper asks what it means to engage with clients and journalists, from the perspectives of managing directors and owners of London-based public relations agencies. What are the “feeling rules” (Hochschild,...

  13. Using computer-assisted process facilitation techniques in government sponsored public meetings and working sessions - a paper addressing the East Fork Poplar Creek Working Group Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, L.D.; Rymer, G.; Perkins, S.

    1994-01-01

    This paper addresses a process facilitation technique using computer hardware and software that assists its users in group decision-making, consensus building, surveying and polling, and strategic planning. The process and equipment has been successfully used by the Department of Energy and Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Community Relations program. The technology is used to solicit and encourage qualitative and documented public feedback in government mandated or sponsored public meetings in Oak Ridge, Tennessee

  14. From networking to next-working: how an academic department "retreated" and advanced at the same time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Joel; Kenna, Heather; Hantke, Mindy

    2015-04-01

    Department-wide retreats conducted at periods of transition can enrich and benefit academic departments in several ways. Here, the authors describe the organization, conduct, and immediate outcomes of a department-wide retreat in a university department of psychiatry intended to (1) foster networking and communication among faculty who often work in "silos" and (2) invite the faculty to provide "internal consultations" regarding aspirational strategic goals and recommendations for short-term actionable tactics to address these goals. The retreat featured an evening networking and socializing poster session followed by a day-long event consisting of small group and large group interactive sessions. Participants were 120 faculty members including 44 new and younger faculty members who prepared and presented posters about themselves and their work. A variety of aspirational goals and specific recommendations for follow-up emerged from small groups were discussed in plenary sessions and were subsequently summarized and distributed to the faculty to be addressed by ongoing workgroups. Immediate informal feedback suggests that conducting and acting on recommendations ensuing from academic department retreats can foster at least a short-term sense of shared community and purpose, network faculty, identify commonly held values and aspirational goals, and potentially stimulate formation of innovative affinity groups and collaborations. Longer-term workgroup efforts and outcome assessments are required to assess the enduring results and value of such undertakings.

  15. Review article: Staff perception of the emergency department working environment: Integrative review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Louisa; Greenslade, Jaimi; Thom, Ogilvie; Carlstrom, Eric; Wallis, Marianne; Crilly, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Employees in EDs report increasing role overload because of critical staff shortages, budgetary cuts and increased patient numbers and acuity. Such overload could compromise staff satisfaction with their working environment. This integrative review identifies, synthesises and evaluates current research around staff perceptions of the working conditions in EDs. A systematic search of relevant databases, using MeSH descriptors ED/EDs, Emergency room/s, ER/s, or A&E coupled with (and) working environment, working condition/s, staff perception/s, as well as reference chaining was conducted. We identified 31 key studies that were evaluated using the mixed methods assessment tool (MMAT). These comprised 24 quantitative‐descriptive studies, four mixed descriptive/comparative (non‐randomised controlled trial) studies and three qualitative studies. Studies included varied widely in quality with MMAT scores ranging from 0% to 100%. A key finding was that perceptions of working environment varied across clinical staff and study location, but that high levels of autonomy and teamwork offset stress around high pressure and high volume workloads. The large range of tools used to assess staff perception of working environment limits the comparability of the studies. A dearth of intervention studies around enhancing working environments in EDs limits the capacity to recommend evidence‐based interventions to improve staff morale. © 2016 The Authors. Emergency Medicine Australasia published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine PMID:26784282

  16. Review on pen-and-paper-based observational methods for assessing ergonomic risk factors of computer work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mohd Nasrull Abdol; Mohamad, Siti Shafika

    2017-01-01

    Computer works are associated with Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSDs). There are several methods have been developed to assess computer work risk factor related to MSDs. This review aims to give an overview of current techniques available for pen-and-paper-based observational methods in assessing ergonomic risk factors of computer work. We searched an electronic database for materials from 1992 until 2015. The selected methods were focused on computer work, pen-and-paper observational methods, office risk factors and musculoskeletal disorders. This review was developed to assess the risk factors, reliability and validity of pen-and-paper observational method associated with computer work. Two evaluators independently carried out this review. Seven observational methods used to assess exposure to office risk factor for work-related musculoskeletal disorders were identified. The risk factors involved in current techniques of pen and paper based observational tools were postures, office components, force and repetition. From the seven methods, only five methods had been tested for reliability. They were proven to be reliable and were rated as moderate to good. For the validity testing, from seven methods only four methods were tested and the results are moderate. Many observational tools already exist, but no single tool appears to cover all of the risk factors including working posture, office component, force, repetition and office environment at office workstations and computer work. Although the most important factor in developing tool is proper validation of exposure assessment techniques, the existing observational method did not test reliability and validity. Futhermore, this review could provide the researchers with ways on how to improve the pen-and-paper-based observational method for assessing ergonomic risk factors of computer work.

  17. Perceptions of Organisational Politics, Frustration with Work and Occupational Commitment in a Sport and Recreation Department in Gauteng

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Radebe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study examinedthe relationship between perceptions of organisationalpolitics, frustration with work and occupational commitment among officers intheSport and Recreation Department in Gauteng, South Africa. A structuredquestionnaire was administered to 152officers in the department and theStatistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS version 23 was used to analysecollected data. A non-probability convenient sampling method was used to selectsample respondents. Statistical techniques utilised included factor analysis,correlation analysis and regression analysis. Correlation analysis results indicatedstatistically significant correlations between general political behaviour and goingalong to get ahead, pay and promotion as well as frustration with work. Negativecorrelation existed between frustration with work and occupational commitment.It was recommended that employees who showed sustained frustration with workbe identified and appropriate interventions such as coaching and mentoring beinstituted. Limitations and implications for further research were explored.

  18. Ultrasonic misting in the treatment of works of art on paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo Dias

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A solution of calcium hydroxide and sodium borohydride was applied using an ultrasonic misting device to a graphite drawing from the artist Guilherme Camarinha. This process allowed the drawing to be washed, reduce its foxing stains and planar distortions without interfering with a fountain pen inscription written by the author in the bottom righthand corner. As there is not much literature regarding this procedure, some practical questions related to the use of ultrasonic dispersions in the treatment of paper are discussed herein.

  19. Does energy labelling on residential housing cause energy savings? Working paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjaerbye, V.H.

    2008-12-15

    More than 80% of energy used in households is dedicated to space heating. Large potential energy savings have been identified in the existing housing stock. Energy labelling of single-family houses is seen as an important instrument to provide new house owners with information on efficient energy saving investments that can be made on the house. This paper evaluates the effects of the Danish Energy Labelling Scheme on energy consumption in existing single-family houses with propensity score matching using actual consumption of energy and register data describing the houses and households. We do not find significant energy savings due to the Danish Energy Labelling Scheme. (Author)

  20. Remotely Piloted Aircraft Systems Panel (RPASP) Working Paper: Autonomy and Automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shively, Jay

    2017-01-01

    A significant level of debate and confusion has surrounded the meaning of the terms "autonomy" and "automation". Automation is a multi-dimensional concept, and we propose that RPAS automation should be described with reference to the specific system and task that has been automated, the context in which the automation functions, and other relevant dimensions. In this paper, we present a definition of "automation". We recommend that autonomy and autonomous operations are out of the scope of the RPAS panel. WG7 proposes to develop, in consultation with other workgroups, a taxonomy of "Levels of Automation" for RPAS.

  1. Papers submitted to the international forum ''one decade after Chernobyl: nuclear safety aspects''. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the forum is to review the remedial measures taken since the Chernobyl accident for improving the safety of RBMK reactors and the Chernobyl containment structure (sarcophagus). The forum will also serve to exchange information on national, bilateral and multilateral efforts for the enhancement of RBMK safety. The conclusions and recommendations will serve as a basis for a background paper to be prepared for presentation, by the forum chairman, at the International Conference ''One decade after Chernobyl'' to held in Vienna from 8-12 April 1996. Refs, figs, tabs

  2. The Collected Works of Eugene Paul Wigner Historical, Philosophical, and Socio-Political Papers

    CERN Document Server

    Wigner, Eugene Paul

    2001-01-01

    Not only was EP Wigner one of the most active creators of 20th century physics, he was also always interested in expressing his opinion in philosophical, political or sociological matters This volume of his collected works covers a wide selection of his essays about science and society, about himself and his colleagues Annotated by J Mehra, this volume will become an important source of reference for historians of science, and it will be pleasant reading for every physicist interested in forming ideas in modern physics

  3. An honest day's work: pay for performance in a pediatric radiology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisset, George S.

    2017-01-01

    Compensation models in radiology take a variety of forms, but regardless of practice type, successful models must reward productivity, be simple, and epitomize fairness. The ideal model should also be flexible enough to transition, based upon the changing strategic goals of a department. The plan should be constructed around rewarding the behaviors that the organization values. In this minisymposium article the author presents the value of different types of compensation plans and discusses advantages and disadvantages. Finally, the author presents a pay-for-performance model that has had long-term success at a private-turned-academic practice in pediatric radiology. (orig.)

  4. An honest day's work: pay for performance in a pediatric radiology department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisset, George S. [Texas Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Compensation models in radiology take a variety of forms, but regardless of practice type, successful models must reward productivity, be simple, and epitomize fairness. The ideal model should also be flexible enough to transition, based upon the changing strategic goals of a department. The plan should be constructed around rewarding the behaviors that the organization values. In this minisymposium article the author presents the value of different types of compensation plans and discusses advantages and disadvantages. Finally, the author presents a pay-for-performance model that has had long-term success at a private-turned-academic practice in pediatric radiology. (orig.)

  5. Compilation of the FY 1999 Department of the Navy Working Capital Fund Financial Statements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    ...) Cleveland Center consistently and accurately compiled and consolidated financial data received from Navy field organizations and other sources to prepare the FY 1999 Navy Working Capital Fund financial statements...

  6. Alison Gill – "To See a World", an exhibition of new sculpture and works on paper

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Wednesday, 11 December 2013 from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. in the Library, bldg. 52 1-052 "Sculpture stories and invisible things" How might the presence of an artist influence the CMS experiment? And how does the LHC change the artist and the work they make? Over the last two decades, I have worked with a wide range of media to create both sculpture and drawing. The interdisciplinary approach that I have taken has often involved engagement and dialogues with scientists. Through my art, I explore the stories we tell to make sense of things that seem beyond our conscious grasp, taking familiar objects and materials and re-purposing, casting or altering the meaning. Underlying themes have included folklore, beliefs and methods used in the pursuit of transcendence. Knots, Klein bottles and Möbius strips have also been used for their topological, emotive and metaphysical associations. I try to scrutinise the world around me to find hidden meanings and use humour to provoke thought, elicit c...

  7. The case for a United Nations verification agency. Disarmament under effective international control. Working paper 26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorn, A.W.

    1990-07-01

    It is now universally recognized that arms control treaties should be effectively verified. The most objective, flexible and cost-effective means to verify the majority of multilateral treaties would be through a new agency under the United Nations. As a cooperative international effort to develop both the technology and the political framework for arms control verification, a United Nations verification agency (UNVA) would speed up and help secure the disarmament process by: verifying a number of existing and future treaties; investigating alleged breaches of treaties; and certifying, upon request, that voluntary arms control and confidence-building measures have been carried out. This paper presents the case for such a proposal, outlines a possible institutional configuration, considers the possibilities for growth and discusses the challenges facing the establishment of such an agency. (author). 16 refs., 1 tab

  8. CO-2 reduction in the Danish transportation sector. Working paper 4: Cargo transport - road pricing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    In this paper other financial control measures than fuel prices are considered for the transportation sector. The main effect discussed is that of the road pricing system. From the point of view of the CO 2 emission there could be introduced a registration tax for trucks over 4 tons as the higher transport expenditure would tend to reduce road transport demand. EU infrastructure tax directive however recommends taxes for trucks exceeding 12 tons. Road pricing will grow within the categories of lighter trucks but it is only a minor fraction of the total truck expenditure, taking into account fuel tax, weight tax and registration tax. Insurance cost is not included in these consideration. (EG) Prepared for Trafikministeriet. 22 refs

  9. The case for a United Nations verification agency. Disarmament under effective international control. Working paper 26

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorn, A W

    1990-07-01

    It is now universally recognized that arms control treaties should be effectively verified. The most objective, flexible and cost-effective means to verify the majority of multilateral treaties would be through a new agency under the United Nations. As a cooperative international effort to develop both the technology and the political framework for arms control verification, a United Nations verification agency (UNVA) would speed up and help secure the disarmament process by: verifying a number of existing and future treaties; investigating alleged breaches of treaties; and certifying, upon request, that voluntary arms control and confidence-building measures have been carried out. This paper presents the case for such a proposal, outlines a possible institutional configuration, considers the possibilities for growth and discusses the challenges facing the establishment of such an agency. (author). 16 refs., 1 tab.

  10. Quality of work life and its association with workplace violence of the nurses in emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslamian, Jalil; Akbarpoor, Ali Akbar; Hoseini, Sayed Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Nurses as the major group of health service providers need to have a satisfactory quality of work life in order to give desirable care to the patients. Workplace violence is one of the most important factors that cause decline in the quality of work life. This study aimed to determine the quality of work life of nurses in selected hospitals of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences and its relationship with workplace violence. This was a descriptive-correlational study. A sample of 186 registered nurses was enrolled in the study using quota sampling method. The research instrument used was a questionnaire consisting of three parts: Demographic information, quality of work life, and workplace violence. Collected data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics by SPSS version 16. The subjects consisted of 26.9% men and 73.1% women, whose mean age was 33.76 (7.13) years. 29.6% were single and 70.4% were married. About 76.9% of the subjects were exposed to verbal violence and 26.9% were exposed to physical violence during past year. Mean score of QNWL was 115.88 (30.98). About 45.7% of the subjects had a low level of quality of work life. There was an inverse correlation between the quality of work and the frequency of exposures to workplace violence. According to the results of this study, it is suggested that the managers and decision makers in health care should plan strategies to reduce violence in the workplace and also develop a program to improve the quality of work life of nurses exposed to workplace violence.

  11. FORECASTING THE CHANGE IN THE TEACHER'S CONTRIBUTION TO THE WORK OF THE DEPARTMENT USING THE METHODS OF DATA MINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksandr Yu. Melnykov

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The existing forms and methods of assessing the work of teachers of higher educational institutions are described. The conclusion is made that the combination of indicators into groups (categories and the introduction of different weight factors depends on the specifics of the institution and the prevailing ideas about the priority of this or that type of activity. Practically all the considered methods do not take into account the change in the contribution share of each teacher in the integral indicator of the work of the whole department (department, faculty. The goal was to predict the change in the contribution of an individual teacher to the indicators of a higher education institution by means of mathematical modeling and intellectual decision-making. The prediction task is identified as a suitable data mining task. Methods for forecasting the assessment of the work of teachers - regression and neural network - were chosen. An object-oriented model of a projected computer system in the language of visual modeling of UML is described. Diagrams of use cases, classes and states are given. The program implementation of the intellectual decision-making system for evaluating the work of teachers of a higher education institution and an example of the system's operation based on real data are described. Conclusions are made about a possible change in the contribution share of each teacher in the indicators of the department.

  12. The Impact of a Health IT Changeover on Medical Imaging Department Work Processes and Turnaround Times: A mixed method study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, A; Prgomet, M; Lymer, S; Hordern, A; Ridley, L; Westbrook, J

    2015-01-01

    To assess the impact of introducing a new Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) and Radiology Information System (RIS) on: (i) Medical Imaging work processes; and (ii) turnaround times (TATs) for x-ray and CT scan orders initiated in the Emergency Department (ED). We employed a mixed method study design comprising: (i) semi-structured interviews with Medical Imaging Department staff; and (ii) retrospectively extracted ED data before (March/April 2010) and after (March/April 2011 and 2012) the introduction of a new PACS/RIS. TATs were calculated as: processing TAT (median time from image ordering to examination) and reporting TAT (median time from examination to final report). Reporting TAT for x-rays decreased significantly after introduction of the new PACS/RIS; from a median of 76 hours to 38 hours per order (pMedical Imaging staff reported that the changeover to the new PACS/RIS led to gains in efficiency, particularly regarding the accessibility of images and patient-related information. Nevertheless, assimilation of the new PACS/RIS with existing Departmental work processes was considered inadequate and in some instances unsafe. Issues highlighted related to the synchronization of work tasks (e.g., porter arrangements) and the material set up of the work place (e.g., the number and location of computers). The introduction of new health IT can be a "double-edged sword" providing improved efficiency but at the same time introducing potential hazards affecting the effectiveness of the Medical Imaging Department.

  13. Work stress and burnout among physicians and nurses in Internal and Emergency Departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Gnerre

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Burnout has been defined as loss of enthusiasm for work, feelings of cynicism, and a low sense of personal accomplishment. Work environment and working conditions exposes the individual to numerous factors of stress. Stress-related diseases are defined as burnout. The increased workload, the repeated reorganizations in the hospital with iterative downsizing suggestions and budget cuts, without any perspective of career progression, with a social culture of bureaucracy and blame, resulting both in subtracting direct care time with patients and in the fear by healthcare professionals from the burden of their responsibility, are the backgrounds on which more and more frequent cases of burnout may develop. We need to establish homogenous standards all over the national territory on workload and about the procedures that have to be implemented for the prevention of burnout in our wards.

  14. Do open access working papers attract more citations compared to printed journal articles from the same research unit?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingwersen, Peter; Elleby, Anita

    2011-01-01

    articles published in the same year (2004) by the same institute and predominantly by the same authors. The study analyzes the total amount of citations and citation impact observed in Web of Science (WoS) and Google Scholar (GS) received during the five-year period 2004-09 (February) by the two...... access working papers publicly accessible through the DIIS e-archive became far less cited than the corresponding sample of DIIS journal articles published in printed form. However, highly cited working papers have higher impact than the average of the lower half of cited articles. Citation time series...... show identical distinct patterns for the articles in WoS and GS and working papers in GS, more than doubling the amount of citations received through the latter source....

  15. Disposal of spent fuel from German nuclear power plants - paper work or technology?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graf, R.; Filbert, W.

    2006-01-01

    The reference concept 'direct disposal of spent fuel' was developed as an alternative to spent fuel reprocessing and vitrified HLW disposal. The technical facilities necessary for the implementation of this reference concept - the so called POLLUX-concept, e.g. interim storages for casks containing spent fuel, a pilot conditioning facility, and a special cask 'POLLUX' for final disposal have been built. With view to a geological salt formation all handling procedures for the repository were tested aboveground in a test facility at a 1:1 scale. To optimise the concept all operational steps are reviewed for possible improvement. Most promising are a concept using canisters (BSK 3) instead of POLLUX casks, and the direct disposal of transport and storage casks (DIREGT-concept) which is the most recent one and has been designed for the direct disposal of large transport and storage casks. The final exploration of the pre-selected repository site is still pending, from the industries point of view due to political reasons only. The present paper describes the main concepts and their status as of today. (author)

  16. A comparative assessment of different options to reduce CO2 emissions. Working paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messner, S.; Nakicenovic, N.

    1992-03-01

    The IIASA research project on Environmentally Compatible Energy Strategies includes the assessment of options and measures for mitigating global CO 2 emissions. The basis of this assessment is the comparative inventory of technological and economic measures including efficiency improvement, conservation, enhanced use of low-carbon fuels, carbon free sources of energy and measures for removing carbon from fuels, flue gases and also from the atmosphere such as afforestation, and finally also measures for enhancement of carbon sinks. To include all potential options, the comparison is based on energy end-use accounting for the fully interlinked energy conversion chain up to energy resources. The analysis is supported by a fully interactive data bank system, CO2DB, that is capable of evaluating full energy chains with respect to their economic, technical and environmental parameters. The paper reports energy requirements, cost and CO 2 emissions for different energy chains providing industrial drives, cooling and air transport services. At additional cost, emissions can be reduced drastically on all these end-use categories. (authors)

  17. Descriptive statistics of occupational employment in nuclear power utilities. Final working paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, J.R.; Johnson, R.C.

    1982-10-01

    The Institute of Nuclear Power Operations conducted a survey of its 58 member utilities during the Spring of 1982. This was the second such survey performed to identify employment trends and to project needs for trained personnel in the industry to 1991. The first was performed in 1981. The 1982 employment survey consisted of four questionnaires, asking for information on: (1) on-site employment; (2) on-site turnover; (3) off-site employment; and (4) off-site turnover. The survey instruments were designed to reflect approaches used by the utilities to meet the labor requirements for operation of nuclear power plants through off-site support personnel, contractors, and holding company personnel, as well as utility employees working at the plant site. On-site information was received from all 83 plants at the 58 utilities. However, employment information from Surry of VEPCO arrived too late to be included in the analysis. Therefore, their numbers are reflected in the adjusted totals. Responses to requests for off-site employment information were received from 55 of the 58 utilities

  18. Drivers` activities and information needs in an automated highway system. Working paper, August 1995-May 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levitan, L.; Bloomfield, J.

    1996-10-01

    In most visions of the AHS--including that of the National Automated Highway System Consortium--it has been assumed that when a vehicle was under automated control, the driver would be allowed to engage in any of a variety of activities not related to driving (e.g, working, reading, sleeping). The objective of the first study reported here--one of the noncommuter studies--was to determine what drivers do when traveling under automated control, and whether the age of and/gender or the driver and/or the intrastring gap have an influence on those activities. One the objectives of the commuter experiment--of relevance for this report--was to determine whether what drivers do when traveling under automated control changes as a function of experience with the AHS (i.e., across trials). As conceptualization of the AHS proceeds, the details of the interface between the driver and the in-vehicle system will become more important. One part of that interface will be information supplied by the AHS to the driver, perhaps about such things as traffic conditions ahead predicted trip time to the driver`s selected exit, and so on. To maximize the utility of that information, it is important to determine what it is that drivers would like to know when traveling under automated control. The objective of the third study reported here--the second of the five noncommuter experiments--was to provide a first investigation of that issue.

  19. Higher Education Faculty in Mexico and the United States: Characteristics and Policy Issues. Understanding the Differences: A Working Paper Series on Higher Education in the U. S. and Mexico. Working Paper Number 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, Cheryl D.; Sanchez, Maria Dolores Soler

    This working paper analyzes higher education faculty characteristics in Mexico and the United States. The first section describes and compares Mexican and U.S. faculty characteristics and conditions, including total number of faculty, student-teacher ratios, full- versus part-time status, rank, tenure, average salaries, gender and ethnicity, and…

  20. Effect of shift work on patient-doctor relationship in emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Shaker

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: The results of this study encouraged that patients′ satisfaction of relationship with doctors was the lowest in the afternoon and it may be better to implement some strategies to reduce residents′ workloads and increase quality of works in the afternoon shifts.

  1. Cardiometabolic risk in Canada: a detailed analysis and position paper by the cardiometabolic risk working group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiter, Lawrence A; Fitchett, David H; Gilbert, Richard E; Gupta, Milan; Mancini, G B John; McFarlane, Philip A; Ross, Robert; Teoh, Hwee; Verma, Subodh; Anand, Sonia; Camelon, Kathryn; Chow, Chi-Ming; Cox, Jafna L; Després, Jean-Pierre; Genest, Jacques; Harris, Stewart B; Lau, David C W; Lewanczuk, Richard; Liu, Peter P; Lonn, Eva M; McPherson, Ruth; Poirier, Paul; Qaadri, Shafiq; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi; Rabkin, Simon W; Sharma, Arya M; Steele, Andrew W; Stone, James A; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Tobe, Sheldon; Ur, Ehud

    2011-01-01

    The concepts of "cardiometabolic risk," "metabolic syndrome," and "risk stratification" overlap and relate to the atherogenic process and development of type 2 diabetes. There is confusion about what these terms mean and how they can best be used to improve our understanding of cardiovascular disease treatment and prevention. With the objectives of clarifying these concepts and presenting practical strategies to identify and reduce cardiovascular risk in multiethnic patient populations, the Cardiometabolic Working Group reviewed the evidence related to emerging cardiovascular risk factors and Canadian guideline recommendations in order to present a detailed analysis and consolidated approach to the identification and management of cardiometabolic risk. The concepts related to cardiometabolic risk, pathophysiology, and strategies for identification and management (including health behaviours, pharmacotherapy, and surgery) in the multiethnic Canadian population are presented. "Global cardiometabolic risk" is proposed as an umbrella term for a comprehensive list of existing and emerging factors that predict cardiovascular disease and/or type 2 diabetes. Health behaviour interventions (weight loss, physical activity, diet, smoking cessation) in people identified at high cardiometabolic risk are of critical importance given the emerging crisis of obesity and the consequent epidemic of type 2 diabetes. Vascular protective measures (health behaviours for all patients and pharmacotherapy in appropriate patients) are essential to reduce cardiometabolic risk, and there is growing consensus that a multidisciplinary approach is needed to adequately address cardiometabolic risk factors. Health care professionals must also consider risk factors related to ethnicity in order to appropriately evaluate everyone in their diverse patient populations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. US energy demand and policies through 2020 : Working Paper No. 4.4.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCracken, M.; Saunders, C.

    2002-01-01

    This paper examined macroeconomic trends regarding US energy demands with reference to the economic effect of Alaska supply and the effect on Canadian producers with the loss of natural gas exports to the US. Prudhoe Bay natural gas is destined for delivery to the lower 48 states via the proposed Alaska Highway Pipeline Project. The proposed amount of natural gas to be shipped from Alaska to California is 4 billion cubic feet per day or nearly 1.5 trillion cubic feet per year for 25 years. Consumption of natural gas in the United States is expected to be between 22.8 tcfy in 2000 to 34.7 tcfy in 2020, with North Slope gas being 5 per cent of total U.S. production by that time. The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) used by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) makes use of a consistent macroeconomic model that determines the energy demands of the economy as a whole, with the major source of energy being coal, natural gas and electricity from renewables such as hydro, nuclear, solar and wind power. This report discussed each energy source briefly with reference to supply and consumption. A more detailed discussion was presented for natural gas. Supply of energy by source was examined along with supply and demand of primary electricity generation by the industrial, transportation, residential and commercial sectors. This US base case scenario can be compared to the macroeconomic inputs for the NEMS to determine if the EIA forecast can be applied. By 2020, inter-regional pipeline capacity in the US will expand by 22 per cent. International trade capacity will expand from 125 billion cubic feet per day in 1999 to 152 billion cubic feet per day by 2020. It was concluded that positive effects, excluding construction benefits, could materialize through increased market size with natural gas available to remote northern markets in both Canada and the United States. Consumers in both Canada and United States could also benefit as excess supply could be sufficient

  3. Communication and Work Development as a Change Management Tool in the In-flight Customer Service Department : Case Finnair

    OpenAIRE

    Hölttä, Katri

    2011-01-01

    The challenges and changes in the air transport sector have increased the need for radical changes also in the airlines organizations. Finnair has chosen to be a quality airline to focus on operations into customer-orientation and delivering improved customer experience to its customers. The objective of this thesis is to find development suggestions to the In-flight customer service department how to develop communication and work development to be used as a change management tool. The study...

  4. From Car Park to Children's Park: A Childcare Centre in Development. Working Papers in Early Childhood Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunschel, Gerda

    This working paper describes the development of a child care center in Berlin, Germany, focusing on how the program's pedagogical principles support children's learning, how respect for diversity is integrated in everyday practice, and how program quality and accessibility are defined within a multicultural context. Chapter 1 describes the…

  5. IFLA General Conference, 1987. Report to the IFLA Council: The Work of the Professional Board and Index to Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    The first of two papers in this document is a report describing the work of the International Federation of Library Association's (IFLA) first professional board functioning under the Chicago rule changes of 1985. Topics include changes in the annual meeting structure; changes in the Medium Term Programme 1986-1991 (MTP); coordination with the…

  6. The Classroom-Kitchen Table Connection: The Effects of Political Discussion on Youth Knowledge and Efficacy. CIRCLE Working Paper #72

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercellotti, Tim; Matto, Elizabeth C.

    2010-01-01

    CIRCLE Working Paper #72 addresses whether efforts to systematically incorporate media into school curricula increases several elements of civic engagement, including students' media use, political knowledge or their sense of being able to understand and influence politics (internal political efficacy). In "The Classroom-Kitchen Table…

  7. Workforce Skills and Innovation: An Overview of Major Themes in the Literature. OECD Education Working Papers, No. 55

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toner, Phillip

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides an account of the main approaches, debates and evidence in the literature on the role of workforce skills in the innovation process in developed economies. It draws on multiple sources including the innovation studies discipline, neoclassical Human Capital theory, institutionalist labour market studies and the work organisation…

  8. Evaluation of the Self-Employment for Gecekondu Women Project, November 1995-June 1998. Working Papers in Early Childhood Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Asu; Schilen, Sandra; Ulgen, Tulu

    This paper stems from an evaluation of Turkey's first microcredit project aimed specifically at women, which was carried out with data derived through the Foundation for the Support of Women's Work (FFSW)'s Management Information System (which tracks credit users and repayment performance), application forms from women who applied for and received…

  9. Experimental Evidence on the Effect of Childhood Investments on Postsecondary Attainment and Degree Completion. NBER Working Paper No. 17533

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynarski, Susan; Hyman, Joshua M.; Schanzenbach, Diane Whitmore

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of early childhood investments on college enrollment and degree completion. We use the random assignment in the Project STAR experiment to estimate the effect of smaller classes in primary school on college entry, college choice, and degree completion. We improve on existing work in this area with unusually detailed…

  10. Working paper on monitoring strategies in the United Kingdom, Federal Republic of Germany and United States of America

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buring, E.; Lanting, R.

    1989-01-01

    This study is a working paper on monitoring strategies used in the U.K., the FRG and the USA to assess exposure to airborne chemical substances. After a brief description of the basic philosophy on monitoring strategies, the requirements formonitoring from the different legal systems in the three

  11. A Professor Like Me: The Influence of Instructor Gender on College Achievement. NBER Working Paper No. 13182

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Florian; Oreopoulos, Philip

    2007-01-01

    Many wonder whether teacher gender plays an important role in higher education by influencing student achievement and subject interest. The data used in this paper helps identify average effects from male and female college students assigned to male or female teachers. In contrast to previous work at the primary and secondary school level, our…

  12. Could inter-agency working reduce emergency department attendances due to alcohol consumption?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benger, J; Carter, R

    2008-06-01

    Excess alcohol consumption and associated harms in terms of health, crime and disorder have been highlighted by the government and media, causing considerable public concern. This study quantified the number of patient attendances at an urban adult and children's emergency department (ED) directly attributable to alcohol intoxication, and investigated ways in which the inter-agency sharing of anonymised information could be used to design, implement and monitor interventions to reduce these harms. Intoxicated patients attending either the adult or children's ED were prospectively identified by qualified nursing staff and anonymised data collected by a dedicated researcher. Collaboration and data sharing between health, police, social services, university experts and local authorities was achieved through the establishment of steering and operational groups with agreed objectives and the formation of a shared anonymised database. The proportion of patients attending the ED as a result of alcohol intoxication was 4% in adults and <1% in children. 70% of patients were male, with a mean age of 30 years, and 72% attended between 20.00 and 08.00 h. The most common reason for ED attendance was accident (34%), followed closely by assault (30%). 27% of patients had done most of their drinking at home, 36% in a pub and 16% in a nightclub. Inter-agency collaboration proved highly successful: pooling of anonymised data created a much clearer picture of the extent of the problem and immediately suggested strategies for intervention. The initiative to achieve inter-agency collaboration and data sharing was highly successful, with clear potential for the development and implementation of interventions that will reduce ED attendance due to excess alcohol consumption.

  13. Lifestyle of Employees working in Hamadan Departments: An Application of the Trans-Theoretical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalal Abdi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Healthy lifestyle is a valuable source to reduce the prevalence of health problems and promoting health. Given the key role of employees as valuable human resources, the aim of this study was to evaluate lifestyle obesity and position of governmental employees in changing process based on the Trans-Theoretical Model (TTM in Hamadan. Materials & Methods: This descriptive-analytical study was performed on 1200 government employees selected using suitable stratified sampling. Data collection was performed using a three-section questionnaire containing demographic characteristics, FANTASTIC lifestyle questionnaire and Marcus et al.’s five-part questionnaire. Data was analyzed by correlation tests, Chi-square, T-test and ANOVA using SPSS-20. Results: Lifestyle status of most employees (61.7 percent was satisfying. About a half of the employees were in the preparatory stage of TTM. Considering the physical activity and healthy eating habits, most employees had a poor condition. Women had higher scores than men in most items. The associations between lifestyle and age, gender, work experience, income satisfaction and marital status were significant. Moreover, the associations between obesity and work experience, marital status, number of children and gender were significant (p<0.05. Conclusion: Planning health education interventions for employees through effective approaches seems to be necessary.

  14. [Investigation on job stress of pediatricians and nurses working in pediatric department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, San-qiao; Tian, Ling; Pang, Bao-dong; Bai, Yu-ping; Fan, Xue-yun; Shen, Fu-hai; Jin, Yu-lan

    2008-09-01

    To investigate the occupational stressors and modifiers of pediatricians and nurses in order to find the measurements for control of the job stress. 427 pediatricians and nurses working in five hospitals of a city served as subjects. Of them, the staff in section of pharmacy and toll offices in each hospital mentioned above served as control group. The General Job Stress Questionnaire was used to investigate the job stress by self-assessment. The scores of job demand, job risk, drug using, daily job stress, positive feelings, patient A behavior, physical environment and feeling balance in pediatricians and nurses were higher than those of control group, but the scores of job-person conflict, environmental control, technology utility, mental health, responsibility on things were lower than those of control group (Pdepression in nurses were higher than those of pediatricians, and non-work activities, job risk and daily life stress were lower than those of doctors (Pwork job, lower job control, more job risk, job future ambiguous, poorer social support, lower job locus control and lower self-esteem. The stress degree of pediatric staff is higher than that of controls. The pediatricians have more job stress than that of nurses. The main stressors of pediatric staff are job monotony, higher job demand, more non-worker activity, lower job control, higher job risk and ambiguous job future. The main modifiers are good social support, external job locus of control and higher self-esteem.

  15. Works on Paper

    OpenAIRE

    Lawson, Gallagher

    2013-01-01

    A novel that tells the story of a young man made of papier mache, who runs away to the city by the sea to reinvent himself, only to discover the city is full of dangers--violence, harsh weather, and manipulative strangers--that threaten his vulnerable body.

  16. ENRM Working Paper Template

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    influence migrant labour workers` political activism takes. International ... Southeast and East Asia and to a lesser extent Europe. Nicola is the ..... the crisis of trade unionism is rooted in the fact that the labour movement is still understood in ...

  17. Light pollution : working paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lechner, Stefan; Arns, Marieke

    2013-01-01

    Light pollution is one of the fastest growing and most pervasive of environmental pollution (Chepesiuk, 2009). In the last couple of years, a lot of research has been done about the effects of light pollution. The interest in light pollution has been growing in many fields of science, extending from

  18. Nanocoating of ionic liquid and polypyrrole for durable electro-active paper actuators working under ambient conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahadeva, Suresha K; Kim, Jaehwan

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports that nanocoating of polypyrrole (PPy) and ionic liquid (IL) on cellulose film improves the electromechanical performance and durability of a cellulose electro-active paper actuator. Cellulose-PPy-IL nanocomposites were fabricated by the polymerization-induced adsorption process of PPy followed by subsequent activation in IL solutions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy analyses validated the successful nanocoating of the PPy and IL layers on the cellulose. The results revealed that the cellulose-PPy-IL nanocomposites are suitable for durable bending actuators working under ambient conditions. Preparation, characterization and performance test of the nanocomposites are explained.

  19. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the department's plutonium storage. Volume II, part 11: Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory working group assessment team report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    President Clinton has directed an Interagency Working Group to initiate a comprehensive review of long-term options for the disposition of surplus plutonium. As part of this initiative, Secretary of Energy, Hazel O'Leary, has directed that a Department of Energy project be initiated to develop options and recommendations for the safe storage of these materials in the interim. A step in the process is a plutonium vulnerability assessment of facilities throughout the Department. The Plutonium Vulnerability Working Group was formed to produce the Project and Assessment Plans, to manage the assessments and to produce a final report for the Secretary by September 30, 1994. The plans established the approach and methodology for the assessment. The Project Plan specifies a Working Group Assessment Team (WGAT) to examine each of the twelve DOE sites with significant holdings of plutonium. The Assessment Plan describes the methodology that the Site Assessment Team (SAT) used to report on the plutonium holdings for each specific site.This report provides results of the assessment of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

  20. Work-related falls from ladders--a follow-back study of US emergency department cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, David A; Smith, Gordon S; Courtney, Theodore K; Brennan, Melanye J; Kim, Jae Young; Perry, Melissa J

    2011-11-01

    Ladder falls comprise 16% of all US workplace fall-related fatalities, and ladder use may be particularly hazardous among older workers. This follow-back study of injured workers from a nationally representative sample of US emergency departments (ED) focused on factors related to ladder falls in three domains of the work environment: work equipment, work practices, and worker-related factors. Risk factors for fractures, the most frequent and severe outcome, were also evaluated. Workers injured from a ladder fall, treated in one of the 65 participating ED in the occupational National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) were asked to participate. The questionnaire included worker demographics, injury, ladder and work equipment and environment characteristics, work tasks, and activities. Multivariate logistic regression models estimated odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals of a work-related fracture. Three-hundred and six workers experiencing an injury from an--on average--7.5-foot-fall from a step, extension, or straight ladder were interviewed primarily from construction, installation, maintenance, and repair professions. Injuries were most frequently to the arm, elbow or shoulder; head, neck, or face with diagnoses were primarily fracture, strain, sprain, contusion or abrasion. Workers were most frequently standing or sitting on the ladder while installing, hanging an item, or performing a repair when they fell. Ladder movement was the mechanism in 40% of falls. Environmental conditions played a role in cases. There was a significant association between fracture risk and fall height while working on the ladder that was also influenced by older work age. This study advances knowledge of falls from ladders to support those who specify means and methods, select equipment, and plan, supervise, or manage the performance of employees working at heights.

  1. Relationships of hospital-based emergency department culture to work satisfaction and intent to leave of emergency physicians and nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Blossom Yen-Ju; Wan, Thomas T H; Hsu, Chung-Ping Cliff; Hung, Feng-Ru; Juan, Chi-Wen; Lin, Cheng-Chieh

    2012-05-01

    Given the limited studies on emergency care management, this study aimed to explore the relationships of emergency department (ED) culture values to certain dimensions of ED physicians' and nurses' work satisfaction and intent to leave. Four hundred and forty-two emergency medical professionals completed the employee satisfaction questionnaire across 119 hospital-based EDs, which had culture value evaluations filed, were used as unit of analysis in this study. Adjusting the personal and employment backgrounds, and the surrounded EDs' unit characteristics and environmental factors, multiple regression analyses revealed that clan and market cultures were related to emergency physicians' work satisfaction and intent to leave. On the other hand, adhocracy, market and hierarchical cultures were related to emergency nurses' work satisfaction. There do exist different patterns among various culture types on various work satisfaction dimensions and intent to leave of emergency physicians and nurses. The findings could offer hospital and ED leaders insights for changes or for building a better atmosphere to enhance the work life of emergency physicians and nurses.

  2. Occupational exposure at the Department of Nuclear Medicine as a work environment: A 19-year follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piwowarska-Bilska, H.; Birkenfeld, B.; Gwardys, A.; Listewnik, M. H.; Elbl, B.; Cichon-Bankowska, K.; Supinska, A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: This study assessed the radiation safety at Nuclear Medicine Department being a work environment. Ionizing radiation exposure of the employees in the last 19 years and the effects of legislative changes in radiological protection were analyzed. Material/Methods: All employees of the investigated department were regularly and individually monitored using chest badges equipped with Kodak film type 2. Overall, 629 annual doses of the employees of nuclear medicine department, registered in the period 1991 - 2009, were analyzed statistically. Results: Technicians were found to be the largest exposed professional group, whereas nurses received the highest annual doses. Physicians received an average annual dose at the border detection methods. Ancillary and administration staff occasionally received doses above the method detection limit (MDL). The average annual dose for all dosimetry records was 0.7 mSv, and that for dosimetry records equal and higher than MDL was 2.2 mSv. Conclusions: There was no case of an exceeded dose limit for a worker. Furthermore, improvement of radiological protection had a significant impact on the reduction of doses for the most exposed employees. (authors)

  3. Experience in working with volunteers as providers of support to victims and witnesses in victim and witness support departments at the courts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamer-Vidmar Nikica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present the results of a survey on the experience of engaging volunteers as providers of support for victims and witnesses in Victim and Witness Support Departments at the courts. The Independent Service for Victim and Witness Support in Ministry of Justice is responsible for the development of the victim and witness support system in Croatia. The Independent Service also coordinates the work of Victim and Witness Support Departments and develops and provides training programs and supervision for support officers and volunteers. A survey was conducted in order to determine volunteer motivation, assess the volunteers’ required qualities, their educational needs, the emotional impact arising from the work with victims and witnesses and the volunteers‘ assessment of the level of acceptance by court officials. In order to improve the level of safety of volunteers and the organization itself, the selection and educational processes for volunteers have been improved, according to both the experience achieved by working with volunteers and the results of the aforementioned survey. Engaging volunteers in the judicial system is a large step forward in the field of co-operation between the judiciary and the community.

  4. Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS): 1995. Selected Papers Presented at the Meeting of the American Statistical Association (Orlando, Florida, August 13-17, 1996). Working Paper Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Education Statistics (ED), Washington, DC.

    The papers were presented at the Social Statistics Section, the Government Statistics Section, and the Section on Survey Research Methods. The following papers are included in the Social Statistics Section and Government Statistics Section, "Overcoming the Bureaucratic Paradigm: Memorial Session in Honor of Roger Herriot": "1995…

  5. Nursing home nurses' experiences of resident transfers to the emergency department: no empathy for our work environment difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsiu-Hsin; Tsai, Yun-Fang; Huang, Hsiu-Li

    2016-03-01

    To explore the experiences of nursing home nurses when they transfer residents from nursing homes to the emergency department in Taiwan. The transfer of residents between nursing homes and emergency departments challenges continuity of care. Understanding nursing home nurses' experiences during these transfers may help to improve residents' continuity of care. However, few empirical data are available on these nurses' transfer experiences worldwide, and none could be found in Asian countries. Qualitative descriptive study. Data were collected from August 2012-June 2013 in audiotaped, individual, in-depth interviews with 25 nurses at five nursing homes in Taiwan. Interview transcripts were analysed by constant comparative analysis. Analysis of interview transcripts revealed that the core theme of nursing home nurses' transfer experience was discontinuity in nursing home to emergency department transitions. This core theme comprised three themes: discontinuity in family involvement, discontinuity in medical resources and expectations, and discontinuity in nurses' professional role. Nursing home nurses need a working environment that is better connected to residents' family members and more immediate and/or easier access to acute care for residents. Communication between nurses and residents' family could be improved by using text messages or social media by mobile phones, which are widely used in Taiwan and worldwide. To improve access to acute care, we suggest developing a real-time telehealth transfer system tailored to the medical culture and policies of each country. This system should facilitate communication among nursing home staff, family members and hospital staff. Our findings on nurses' experiences during transfer of nursing home residents to the emergency department can be used to design more effective transfer policies such as telemedicine systems in Taiwan and other Asian countries or in those with large populations of Chinese immigrants. © 2016 John

  6. White Paper on the Status and Future of Ground-based Gamma-Ray Astronomy - Extragalactic Science Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczynski, H.; Coppi, P.; Dermer, C.; Dwek, E.; Georganopoulos, M.; Horan, D.; Jones, T.; Krennrich, F.; Mukherjee, R.; Perlman, E.; Vassiliev, V.

    2007-04-01

    In fall 2006, the Division of Astrophysics of the American Physical Society requested a white paper about the status and future of ground based gamma-ray astronomy. The white paper will largely be written in the year 2007. Interested scientists are invited to join the science working groups. In this contribution, we will report on some preliminary results of the extragalactic science working group. We will discuss the potential of future ground based gamma-ray experiments to elucidate how supermassive black holes accrete matter, form jets, and accelerate particles, and to study in detail the acceleration and propagation of cosmic rays in extragalactic systems like infrared galaxies and galaxy clusters. Furthermore, we discuss avenues to constrain the spectrum of the extragalactic infrared to optical background radiation, and to measure the extragalactic magnetic fields based on gamma-ray observations. Eventually, we discuss the potential of ground based experiments for conducting gamma-ray source surveys. More information about the white paper can be found at: http://cherenkov.physics.iastate.edu/wp/

  7. Radon Remediation and Protective Measures in UK Buildings: The Work of the Building Research Establishment Ltd. (invited paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scivyer, C.; Woolliscroft, M.

    1998-01-01

    The scope is described of work carried out by the Building Research Establishment Ltd (BRE) in the UK. BRE, funded by the UK Department of the Environment and the Regions (DETR), have been carrying out research into radon in UK buildings for over 10 years. Research has resulted in the successful development of a range of reliable, practical and cost effective radon remedial measures. The measures, which are described in a series of practical guides, are applicable to almost all building types found in the UK, and would be appropriate for use in many buildings found in other countries. The principal aims of this work have been to develop practical, cost effective and appropriate methods for reducing radon levels in existing buildings and to develop protective measures for new buildings. It is considered particularly important to ensure that measures recommended not only reduce radon levels, but that they do not cause adverse effects to the structure or indoor environment, whilst also being cost effective. A comprehensive series of field trials has been undertaken to test a variety of different solutions in more than 300 existing buildings and protective measures in more than 500 new buildings. To support the field trials BRE have a test house located in the South West of England which allows researchers access to a real house without causing considerable disruption to householders in conducting experiments. BRE have also carried out computer modelling work to try to understand the processes which cause radon entry, and how measures taken might affect these processes. A comprehensive database of work carried out in some 300 UK houses is also maintained. (author)

  8. The role of leader behaviors in hospital-based emergency departments' unit performance and employee work satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Blossom Yen-Ju; Hsu, Chung-Ping C; Juan, Chi-Wen; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Lin, Hung-Jung; Chen, Jih-Chang

    2011-01-01

    The role of the leader of a medical unit has evolved over time to expand from simply a medical role to a more managerial one. This study aimed to explore how the behavior of a hospital-based emergency department's (ED's) leader might be related to ED unit performance and ED employees' work satisfaction. One hundred and twelve hospital-based EDs in Taiwan were studied: 10 in medical centers, 32 in regional hospitals, and 70 in district hospitals. Three instruments were designed to assess leader behaviors, unit performance and employee satisfaction in these hospital-based EDs. A mail survey revealed that task-oriented leader behavior was positively related to ED unit performance. Both task- and employee-oriented leader behaviors were found to be positively related to ED nurses' work satisfaction. However, leader behaviors were not shown to be related to ED physicians' work satisfaction at a statistically significant level. Some ED organizational characteristics, however, namely departmentalization and hospital accreditation level, were found to be related to ED physicians' work satisfaction. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The Impact of Error-Management Climate, Error Type and Error Originator on Auditors’ Reporting Errors Discovered on Audit Work Papers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.H. Gold-Nöteberg (Anna); U. Gronewold (Ulfert); S. Salterio (Steve)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractWe examine factors affecting the auditor’s willingness to report their own or their peers’ self-discovered errors in working papers subsequent to detailed working paper review. Prior research has shown that errors in working papers are detected in the review process; however, such

  10. The effects of open access on un-published documents: A case study of economics working papers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber Frandsen, Tove

    2009-01-01

    The use of scholarly publications that have not been formally published in e.g. journals is widespread in some fields. In the past they have been disseminated through various channels of informal communication. However, the Internet has enabled dissemination of these un-published and often...... unrefereed publications to a much wider audience. This is particularly interesting seen in relation to the highly disputed open access advantage as the potential advantage for lowvisibility publications has not been given much attention in the literature. The present study examines the role ofworking papers....... There is no tendency to an increase in impact during the 10 years which is the case for the high impact journals. Consequently, the result of this study does not provide evidence of an open access advantage for working papers in economics....

  11. Human Capital Formation and Foreign Direct Investment in Developing Countries. OECD Development Centre Working Paper No. 211 (Formerly Technical Paper No. 211)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Koji

    2003-01-01

    This paper synthesises the existing literature on human capital formation and foreign direct investment (FDI) in developing countries. The aim is to take a bird's eye view of the complex linkages between the activities of multinational enterprises (MNEs) and policies of host developing countries. In doing so, general trends, best practices and…

  12. 5S program to reduce change-over time on forming department (case study on CV Piranti Works temanggung)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosiana Dewi, Septika; Setiawan, Budi; P, Susatyo Nugroho W.

    2013-06-01

    Productivity is one aspect that determines the success of a company in the competitive world of business. There are seven main types of activities that do not have value-added in manufacturing processes such as overproduction, waiting time, transportation, excess inventory, unnecessary motion and defects. The whole activity is a waste (waste) that can cause harm to the Company. Therefore, in production activities is important to pay attention so that the objectives of production productivity can be achieved. Problems experienced by CV Piranti Works is a production target is not achieved resulting in a lost sale raises the cost of which can cause harm to the Company. From the analysis conducted major known cause of the problem is the length of time required for changeover. This is supported by the high non-value added activity in the changeover activities. Lean Manufacturing is an approach to make system more efficient by reducing waste. This study refers to the book compiled by Takashi Osada (2004) and several other references. In this research used method 5S (Seiri, Seiton, Seiso, Seiketsu, and Shitsuke) for the of forming departement. The purpose of this research is to design a work environment using the 5S method (Seiri, Seiton, Seiso, Seiketsu, and Shitsuke) and make arrangement of equipment and working tool cabinet design with TRIZ methods. From these results, is expected to eliminate or reduce of non-value added activity and improved the changeover time so as to meet production targets completion of the company.

  13. 5S program to reduce change-over time on forming department (case study on CV Piranti Works temanggung)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewi, Septika Rosiana; Setiawan, Budi; Susatyo Nugroho W P

    2013-01-01

    Productivity is one aspect that determines the success of a company in the competitive world of business. There are seven main types of activities that do not have value-added in manufacturing processes such as overproduction, waiting time, transportation, excess inventory, unnecessary motion and defects. The whole activity is a waste (waste) that can cause harm to the Company. Therefore, in production activities is important to pay attention so that the objectives of production productivity can be achieved. Problems experienced by CV Piranti Works is a production target is not achieved resulting in a lost sale raises the cost of which can cause harm to the Company. From the analysis conducted major known cause of the problem is the length of time required for changeover. This is supported by the high non-value added activity in the changeover activities. Lean Manufacturing is an approach to make system more efficient by reducing waste. This study refers to the book compiled by Takashi Osada (2004) and several other references. In this research used method 5S (Seiri, Seiton, Seiso, Seiketsu, and Shitsuke) for the of forming departement. The purpose of this research is to design a work environment using the 5S method (Seiri, Seiton, Seiso, Seiketsu, and Shitsuke) and make arrangement of equipment and working tool cabinet design with TRIZ methods. From these results, is expected to eliminate or reduce of non-value added activity and improved the changeover time so as to meet production targets completion of the company.

  14. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the department's plutonium storage. Volume II, part 12: Working group assessment team report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Secretary of Energy's memorandum of March 15, 1994, established an initiative for a Department-wide assessment of the ES ampersand H vulnerabilities of the inventory of plutonium (Pu) in storage. Pu in intact nuclear weapons, spent fuel and transuranic (TRU) waste not colocated with other Pu was excluded from this assessment. The DOE Plutonium Vulnerability Working Group, which was formed for this purpose and produced the Project and Assessment Plans, will also manage the overall DOE complex assessments and produce a final report for the Secretary of Energy by September 30, 1994. The Project Plan and Assessment Plan for this assessment, and which established responsibilities for personnel essential to the study, were issued on April 25, 1994. This report contains the assessment of the Pantex Plant

  15. Cartography and risk management in radiotherapy: a collaborative work of the department of radiotherapy and the department of quality and risk management Institute Jean-Godinot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, T.D.; Loiseau, M.; Devie, I.; Heusghem, M.; Gaillot-Petit, N.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To deploy an inductive process for radiotherapy risk management in a regional cancer centre and to infer the actions required to solve the situations of criticality. Methods Close collaboration between the department of radiation oncology-biophysics and the department of quality and risk management in the same institution allowed to create a multi professional and multidisciplinary task force and to make the experience feedback easier. A preliminary risk analysis method was used to identify the generic dangers, the mapping of risks and the specification of the scales of criticality. This method helped to evaluate and to rate each apprehended event. Four scales have been defined: seriousness scale in five levels, likelihood scale in five classes, endeavour scale in four levels and criticality scale in three categories: acceptable (criticality 1) tolerable under control (criticality 2) and unacceptable (criticality 3). Results Fifty-seven level 1 dangerous situations linked to 78 scenarios of criticality acceptable, tolerable and unacceptable in 24, 44 and 10 cases respectively have been identified in the department of radiotherapy leading to carry out 28 risk reduction actions. Conclusions The performed risk analysis offered an original frame for a collective thinking among the care providers and contributed to modify their mode of conceiving both security and radioprotection. The study allowed us to give a relevant answer to the High Authority of Health and the Authority of Nuclear Security demands either in terms of efficient management of the risks in radiotherapy or regarding the daily concerns of the care-givers. (authors)

  16. Communication dated 26 May 2009 received from the Permanent Mission of Austria to the Agency enclosing a working paper regarding Multilateralisation of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The Secretariat has received a communication dated 26 May 2009 from the Permanent Mission of Austria, transmitting a working paper entitled 'Multilateralisation of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle: Increasing Transparency and Sustainable Security'. The working paper is based on a food-for-thought paper previously submitted by Austria on 10 May 2007, and issued as INFCIRC/706. As requested in that communication, the working paper is herewith circulated for the information of all Member States

  17. Associations between psychosocial work factors and provider mental well-being in emergency departments: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Anna; Weigl, Matthias

    2018-01-01

    Emergency departments (ED) are complex and dynamic work environments with various psychosocial work stressors that increase risks for providers' well-being. Yet, no systematic review is available which synthesizes the current research base as well as quantitatively aggregates data on associations between ED work factors and provider well-being outcomes. We aimed at synthesizing the current research base on quantitative associations between psychosocial work factors (classified into patient-/ task-related, organizational, and social factors) and mental well-being of ED providers (classified into positive well-being outcomes, affective symptoms and negative psychological functioning, cognitive-behavioural outcomes, and psychosomatic health complaints). A systematic literature search in eight databases was conducted in December 2017. Original studies were extracted following a stepwise procedure and predefined inclusion criteria. A standardized assessment of methodological quality and risk of bias was conducted for each study with the Quality Assessment Tool for Quantitative Studies from the Effective Public Health Practice Project. In addition to a systematic compilation of included studies, frequency and strength of quantitative associations were synthesized by means of harvest plots. Subgroup analyses for ED physicians and nurses were conducted. N = 1956 records were retrieved. After removal of duplicates, 1473 records were screened for titles and abstracts. 199 studies were eligible for full-text review. Finally, 39 original studies were included whereof 37 reported cross-sectional surveys. Concerning the methodological quality of included studies, the majority was evaluated as weak to moderate with considerable risk of bias. Most frequently surveyed provider outcomes were affective symptoms (e.g., burnout) and positive well-being outcomes (e.g., job satisfaction). 367 univariate associations and 370 multivariate associations were extracted with the majority being

  18. Associations between psychosocial work factors and provider mental well-being in emergency departments: A systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Schneider

    Full Text Available Emergency departments (ED are complex and dynamic work environments with various psychosocial work stressors that increase risks for providers' well-being. Yet, no systematic review is available which synthesizes the current research base as well as quantitatively aggregates data on associations between ED work factors and provider well-being outcomes.We aimed at synthesizing the current research base on quantitative associations between psychosocial work factors (classified into patient-/ task-related, organizational, and social factors and mental well-being of ED providers (classified into positive well-being outcomes, affective symptoms and negative psychological functioning, cognitive-behavioural outcomes, and psychosomatic health complaints.A systematic literature search in eight databases was conducted in December 2017. Original studies were extracted following a stepwise procedure and predefined inclusion criteria. A standardized assessment of methodological quality and risk of bias was conducted for each study with the Quality Assessment Tool for Quantitative Studies from the Effective Public Health Practice Project. In addition to a systematic compilation of included studies, frequency and strength of quantitative associations were synthesized by means of harvest plots. Subgroup analyses for ED physicians and nurses were conducted.N = 1956 records were retrieved. After removal of duplicates, 1473 records were screened for titles and abstracts. 199 studies were eligible for full-text review. Finally, 39 original studies were included whereof 37 reported cross-sectional surveys. Concerning the methodological quality of included studies, the majority was evaluated as weak to moderate with considerable risk of bias. Most frequently surveyed provider outcomes were affective symptoms (e.g., burnout and positive well-being outcomes (e.g., job satisfaction. 367 univariate associations and 370 multivariate associations were extracted with the

  19. Assessment of the relation of violence and burnout among physicians working in the emergency departments in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdur, Bülent; Ergin, Ahmet; Yüksel, Aykut; Türkçüer, İbrahim; Ayrık, Cüneyt; Boz, Bora

    2015-05-01

    Violence and burnout are frequently seen among medical doctors; however, the relation is not clear. This study aimed to assess the violence and its possible effects on burnout in physicians working in emergency units. This cross-sectional study targeted all physicians working in the emergency units of Pamukkale University Hospital, County and City Hospitals, 112 Emergency Services, and Private Hospitals in Denizli. Data were obtained by means of a self-administered questionnaire that consisted of questions on the demographics of the participants, Turkish version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory, and of the perpetrators of violence. What was also documented on the questionnaire was whether participants had been subjected to or had witnessed any verbal or physical violence during the previous one month of emergency physicians' certification program. A total of one hundred and seventy-four physicians were included into the study (85% of the targeted group). Many of the participants were between 24 and 59 years of age, with a mean age of 36.8±5.8 years. Married male doctors working in the City Hospital made up the majority. There were significant associations between emotional exhaustion and total violence (p=0.012) and verbal violence (p=0.016); depersonalization and total violence (p=0.021) and verbal violence (p=0.012). The results presented here indicated that there was a strong relation between burnout and violence experienced by physicians working in emergency units. Violence in the emergency department has a substantial effect on the physicians' well-being.

  20. The proportion of work-related emergency department visits not expected to be paid by workers' compensation: implications for occupational health surveillance, research, policy, and health equity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenewold, Matthew R; Baron, Sherry L

    2013-12-01

    To examine trends in the proportion of work-related emergency department visits not expected to be paid by workers' compensation during 2003-2006, and to identify demographic and clinical correlates of such visits. A total of 3,881 work-related emergency department visit records drawn from the 2003-2006 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Surveys. Secondary, cross-sectional analyses of work-related emergency department visit data were performed. Odds ratios and 95 percent confidence intervals were modeled using logistic regression. A substantial and increasing proportion of work-related emergency department visits in the United States were not expected to be paid by workers' compensation. Private insurance, Medicaid, Medicare, and workers themselves were expected to pay for 40 percent of the work-related emergency department visits with this percentage increasing annually. Work-related visits by blacks, in the South, to for-profit hospitals and for work-related illnesses were all more likely not to be paid by workers' compensation. Emergency department-based surveillance and research that determine work-relatedness on the basis of expected payment by workers' compensation systematically underestimate the occurrence of occupational illness and injury. This has important methodological and policy implications. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  1. Impact of an ABCDE team triage process combined with public guidance on the division of work in an emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantonen, Jarmo; Lloyd, Robert; Mattila, Juho; Kauppila, Timo; Menezes, Ricardo

    2015-06-01

    To study the effects of applying an emergency department (ED) triage system, combined with extensive publicity in local media about the "right" use of emergency services, on the division of work between ED nurses and general practitioners (GPs). An observational and quasi-experimental study based on before-after comparisons. Implementation of the ABCDE triage system in a Finnish combined ED where secondary care is adjacent, and in a traditional primary care ED where secondary care is located elsewhere. GPs and nurses from two different primary care EDs. Numbers of monthly visits to different professional groups before and after intervention in the studied primary care EDs and numbers of monthly visits to doctors in the local secondary care ED. The beginning of the triage process increased temporarily the number of independent consultations and patient record entries by ED nurses in both types of studied primary care EDs and reduced the number of patient visits to a doctor compared with previous years but had no effect on doctor visits in the adjacent secondary care ED. No further decrease in the number of nurse or GP visits was observed by inhibiting the entrance of non-urgent patients. The ABCDE triage system combined with public guidance may reduce non-urgent patient visits to doctors in different kinds of primary care EDs without increasing visits in the secondary care ED. However, the additional work to implement the ABCDE system is mainly directed to nurses, which may pose a challenge for staffing.

  2. European Society of Cardiology - Acute Cardiovascular Care Association position paper on safe discharge of acute heart failure patients from the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miró, Òscar; Peacock, Frank W; McMurray, John J; Bueno, Héctor; Christ, Michael; Maisel, Alan S; Cullen, Louise; Cowie, Martin R; Di Somma, Salvatore; Martín Sánchez, Francisco J; Platz, Elke; Masip, Josep; Zeymer, Uwe; Vrints, Christiaan; Price, Susanna; Mebazaa, Alexander; Mueller, Christian

    2017-06-01

    Heart failure is a global public health challenge frequently presenting to the emergency department. After initial stabilization and management, one of the most important decisions is to determine which patients can be safely discharged and which require hospitalization. This is a complex decision that depends on numerous subjective factors, including both the severity of the patient's underlying condition and an estimate of the acuity of the presentation. An emergency department observation period may help select the correct option. Ideally, during an observation period, risk stratification should be carried out using parameters specifically designed for use in the emergency department. Unfortunately, there is little objective literature to guide this disposition decision. An objective and reliable definition of low-risk characteristics to identify early discharge candidates is needed. Benchmarking outcomes in patients discharged from the emergency department without hospitalization could aid this process. Biomarker determinations, although undoubtedly useful in establishing diagnosis and predicting longer-term prognosis, require prospective validation for emergency department disposition guidance. The challenge of identifying emergency department acute heart failure discharge candidates will only be overcome by future multidisciplinary research defining the current knowledge gaps and identifying potential solutions.

  3. Business potentials related to smart grid. Issue paper - working group 5; Denmark. Smart Grid Network; Erhvervspotentialer i Smart Grid. Issue paper, arbejdsgruppe 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauge, B. (Villawatt, Taastrup (Denmark)); Mortensen, E. (DI Energibranchen, Copenhagen (Denmark)); Lyck, L.L. (DONG Energy A/S, Fredericia (Denmark)); Hillingsoee Stubberup, M. (Udenrigsministeriet. Invest in Denmark, Copenhagen (Denmark)); Baadsgaard Trolle, M. (Dansk Energi, Frederiksberg (Denmark)); Lomholt Svensson, N. (Klima- og Energiministeriet, Copenhagen (Denmark)); Roemer Kofod, P. (ABB A/S, Skovlunde); Hauch, R. (IBM A/S, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)); Cajus, S. (DI ITEK, Copenhagen (Denmark)); Stroem, S. (Vindmoelleindustrien, Frederiksberg (Denmark))

    2011-07-01

    The Smart Grid Network was established in 2010 by the Danish climate and energy minister tasked with developing recommendations for future actions and initiatives that make it possible to handle up to 50% electricity from wind energy in the power system in 2020. The task of working group 5 provides an immediate assessment of business potential at the sector level based on the recommendations contained in the reports of the working groups 1-4. The working group has only drawn preliminary conclusions regarding business opportunities that may arise as a result of the other network groups' recommendations. In particular three areas, Denmark has at present the potential to strengthen the Danish business potential: 1) System Solutions. The intelligent energy system is more about interaction between different system components than the components themselves. Here Denmark belongs to the world elite, including the extensive use of cogeneration and wind power; 2) Market Solutions. The Nordic electricity trading system ''Nord Pool'' is the most efficient market-based electricity system in the world, and Denmark has thus a good basis for creating market-based solutions for future power systems; 3) Large-scale demonstration environments creates opportunities for companies to test and refine their products, solutions and services. In Denmark, Energinet.dk and utility companies have opened up for companies to use the Danish network for testing solutions to real customers. More foreign players thus regard Denmark as an attractive market to test new technologies, partly because the Danish market is homogeneous and clear, and partly because Denmark in relation to the power system has a robust and well-managed network. Finally, the high share of fluctuating energy production helps to clarify the need for a flexible and intelligent power system. It is this combination of strengths that make Denmark a unique market for international companies to locate their

  4. Research, development and demonstration. Issue paper - working group 3; Denmark. Smart Grid Network; Forskning, udvikling og demonstration. Issue paper, arbejdsgruppe 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balasiu, A [Siemens A/S, Ballerup (Denmark); Troi, A [Danmarks Tekniske Univ. Risoe Nationallaboratoriet for Baeredygtig Energi, Roskilde (Denmark); Andersen, Casper [DI Energibranchen, Copenhagen (Denmark); and others

    2011-07-01

    The Smart Grid Network was established in 2010 by the Danish climate and energy minister tasked with developing recommendations for future actions and initiatives that make it possible to handle up to 50% electricity from wind energy in the power system in 2020. The task of working group 3 was defined as: - An overview of the Danish research and development of smart grids and related areas; - Conducting an analysis of the research and development needs required for the introduction of a smart grid in Denmark. Based on this analysis, provide suggestions for new large research and development projects; - Provide recommendations on how the activities are best carried out taking into account innovation, economic growth and jobs. In the analysis it is explained that Denmark so far has a strong position in several elements of RD and D activities. This position will soon be threatened as several European countries have launched ambitious initiatives to strengthen the national position. The working group recommends that Denmark gives priority to Smart Grids as a national action in order to solve the challenge of technically and economically efficient integration of renewable energy. Smart Grid is a catalyst that strengthens a new green growth industry (cleantech) in Denmark. Research and development has an important role to play in this development. A common vision and roadmap must be established for research institutions, energy companies and industries related to research, development and demonstration of Smart Grid, which can maintain and expand Denmark's global leadership position. As part of this, there is a need to strengthen and market research infrastructures, which can turn Denmark into a global hub for smart grid development. There is a current need to strengthen the advanced technical and scientific research in the complexities of the power system, research on market design, user behavior and smart grid interoperability. (LN)

  5. Research, development and demonstration. Issue paper - working group 3; Denmark. Smart Grid Network; Forskning, udvikling og demonstration. Issue paper, arbejdsgruppe 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balasiu, A. (Siemens A/S, Ballerup (Denmark)); Troi, A. (Danmarks Tekniske Univ.. Risoe Nationallaboratoriet for Baeredygtig Energi, Roskilde (Denmark)); Andersen, Casper (DI Energibranchen, Copenhagen (Denmark)) (and others)

    2011-07-01

    The Smart Grid Network was established in 2010 by the Danish climate and energy minister tasked with developing recommendations for future actions and initiatives that make it possible to handle up to 50% electricity from wind energy in the power system in 2020. The task of working group 3 was defined as: - An overview of the Danish research and development of smart grids and related areas; - Conducting an analysis of the research and development needs required for the introduction of a smart grid in Denmark. Based on this analysis, provide suggestions for new large research and development projects; - Provide recommendations on how the activities are best carried out taking into account innovation, economic growth and jobs. In the analysis it is explained that Denmark so far has a strong position in several elements of RD and D activities. This position will soon be threatened as several European countries have launched ambitious initiatives to strengthen the national position. The working group recommends that Denmark gives priority to Smart Grids as a national action in order to solve the challenge of technically and economically efficient integration of renewable energy. Smart Grid is a catalyst that strengthens a new green growth industry (cleantech) in Denmark. Research and development has an important role to play in this development. A common vision and roadmap must be established for research institutions, energy companies and industries related to research, development and demonstration of Smart Grid, which can maintain and expand Denmark's global leadership position. As part of this, there is a need to strengthen and market research infrastructures, which can turn Denmark into a global hub for smart grid development. There is a current need to strengthen the advanced technical and scientific research in the complexities of the power system, research on market design, user behavior and smart grid interoperability. (LN)

  6. Metallurgy Department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risø National Laboratory, Roskilde

    The activities of the Metallurgy Department at Risø during 1981 are described. The work is presented in three chapters: General Materials Research, Technology and Materials Development, Fuel Elements. Furthermore, a survey is given of the department's participation in international collaboration...

  7. When high pressure, system constraints, and a social justice mission collide: A socio-structural analysis of emergency department social work services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Megan; Cristofalo, Margaret; Dotolo, Danae; Torres, Nicole; Lahdya, Alexandra; Ho, Leyna; Vogel, Mia; Forrester, Mollie; Conley, Bonnie; Fouts, Susan

    2017-04-01

    The emergency department (ED) can be a critical intervention point for many patients with multifaceted needs. Social workers have long been part of interdisciplinary ED teams. This study aimed to contribute to the limited understanding of social worker-patient interactions and factors influencing social work services in this setting. This paper reports a qualitative content analysis of social work medical record notes (N = 1509) of services provided to trauma patients in an urban, public, level 1 trauma center and an in-depth analysis of semi-structured interviews with ED social workers (N = 10). Eight major social work roles were identified: investigator, gatekeeper, resource broker, care coordinator, problem solver, crisis manager, advocate, discharge planner. Analyses revealed a complex interplay between ED social work services and multi-layered contexts. Using a social-ecological framework, we identified the interactions between micro or individual level factors, mezzo or local system level factors and macro environmental and systemic factors that play a role in ED interactions and patient services. Macro-level contextual influences were socio-structural forces including socioeconomic barriers to health, social hierarchies that reflected power differentials between providers and patients, and distrust or bias. Mezzo-level forces were limited resources, lack of healthcare system coordination, a challenging hierarchy within the medical model and the pressure to discharge patients quickly. Micro-level factors included characteristics of patients and social workers, complexity of patient stressors, empathic strain, lack of closure and compassion. All of these forces were at play in patient-social worker interactions and impacted service provision. Social workers were at times able to successfully navigate these forces, yet at other times these challenges were insurmountable. A conceptual model of ED social work and the influences on the patient-social worker

  8. Identify function methyl cellulose glue of rehabilitation and activation in preparation Tissues used in restoration paper works

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    kobra dadmohammadi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to facilitate the use of methyl cellulose adhesive to repair paper works that its ink is sensitive to water. This research is conducted by analytical comparisons method and samples is collected by experiments related to research topics such as pH measurement, Calorimetric, infrared spectroscopy with total attenuated reflection (FTIR- ATR, the measurement of tensile strength as well measurement of The adhesive strength of the samples. The stages of this study is conducted so that the adhesive methyl cellulose at a concentration of 7% in methanol was prepared. The prepared specimens is treated under Temperature-humidity accelerated aging in accordance with standard ASTM D4714-96 no for 384 hours and under light in accordance with ASTM D6789-02 for 360 hours and Changes of color, pH, tensile strength and adhesion is investigated for them. Results showed that the samples pH is changed from 6.91 to 6.39 after light aging and to 6.06 after temperature-humidity aging. Also, Tensile strength of Samples is reduced from 0.31 to 0.23 kN per meter after light aging and to 0.24 kN per meter after the temperature-humidity aging. Also, the adhesive strength of the samples is decreased from 1.43 to 0.97 Newton after light aging and to 1.51 Newton after temperature-humidity aging.

  9. Work-Life Balance in the New Millennium: Where Are We? Where Do We Need To Go? CPRN Discussion Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duxbury, Linda; Higgins, Chris

    The effects of three types of work-life conflict in Canada were examined by using data from a set of work and family studies that were conducted in 1991 and 2001. The studies focused on the effects of the following types of conflict: (1) work overload; (2) work-to-family interference (where work gets in the way of family); and (3) family-to-work…

  10. How does innovation work within the developmental network state? New data on public-private agreements in a U.S. Department of Energy laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R. Keller

    Full Text Available Abstract The value of the Department of Energy (DOE-owned national laboratories to the U.S. national innovation system has long been a subject of debate. Advocates have drawn attention to the central role of the labs in the development of technologies including advanced batteries, solar energy breakthroughs, imaging technologies, and various IT endeavors, among others. Critics have recurrently suggested that the labs’ innovative capacities have been undermined by a lack of engagement with commercial firms and managerial tactics. Perhaps surprisingly, what has often been missing from the debate is a thorough review of data on the public-private partnerships in which the labs engage with private firms. This paper draws on heretofore non-public data on one type of contractual arrangement - Work-For-Others (WFO agreements - in which the labs perform contract work for private firms. We review 10 years of WFO data for a single DOE laboratory. Our analysis provides an initial picture of the surprisingly diverse geography and array of firms that employed the labs as contract R&D providers, as well as of key characteristics of these agreements. Although our data capture only a single laboratory’s agreements, the findings reinforce the importance of looking at the complex, overlapping network of programs within the U.S. federal system that support private sector innovation.

  11. Plutonium-related work and cause-specific mortality at the United States Department of Energy Hanford Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, Steve; Richardson, David; Wolf, Susanne; Mihlan, Gary

    2004-02-01

    Health effects of working with plutonium remain unclear. Plutonium workers at the United States Department of Energy (US-DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State, USA were evaluated for increased risks of cancer and non-cancer mortality. Periods of employment in jobs with routine or non-routine potential for plutonium exposure were identified for 26,389 workers hired between 1944 and 1978. Life table regression was used to examine associations of length of employment in plutonium jobs with confirmed plutonium deposition and with cause specific mortality through 1994. Incidence of confirmed internal plutonium deposition in all plutonium workers was 15.4 times greater than in other Hanford jobs. Plutonium workers had low death rates compared to other workers, particularly for cancer causes. Mortality for several causes was positively associated with length of employment in routine plutonium jobs, especially for employment at older ages. At ages 50 and above, death rates for non-external causes of death, all cancers, cancers of tissues where plutonium deposits, and lung cancer, increased 2.0 +/- 1.1%, 2.6 +/- 2.0%, 4.9 +/- 3.3%, and 7.1 +/- 3.4% (+/-SE) per year of employment in routine plutonium jobs, respectively. Workers employed in jobs with routine potential for plutonium exposure have low mortality rates compared to other Hanford workers even with adjustment for demographic, socioeconomic, and employment factors. This may be due, in part, to medical screening. Associations between duration of employment in jobs with routine potential for plutonium exposure and mortality may indicate occupational exposure effects. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. ESC Working Group on Valvular Heart Disease position paper--heart valve clinics: organization, structure, and experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancellotti, Patrizio; Rosenhek, Raphael; Pibarot, Philippe; Iung, Bernard; Otto, Catherine M; Tornos, Pilar; Donal, Erwan; Prendergast, Bernard; Magne, Julien; La Canna, Giovanni; Piérard, Luc A; Maurer, Gerald

    2013-06-01

    With an increasing prevalence of patients with valvular heart disease (VHD), a dedicated management approach is needed. The challenges encountered are manifold and include appropriate diagnosis and quantification of valve lesion, organization of adequate follow-up, and making the right management decisions, in particular with regard to the timing and choice of interventions. Data from the Euro Heart Survey have shown a substantial discrepancy between guidelines and clinical practice in the field of VHD and many patients are denied surgery despite having clear indications. The concept of heart valve clinics (HVCs) is increasingly recognized as the way to proceed. At the same time, very few centres have developed such expertise, indicating that specific recommendations for the initial development and subsequent operating requirements of an HVC are needed. The aim of this position paper is to provide insights into the rationale, organization, structure, and expertise needed to establish and operate an HVC. Although the main goal is to improve the clinical management of patients with VHD, the impact of HVCs on education is of particular importance: larger patient volumes foster the required expertise among more senior physicians but are also fundamental for training new cardiologists, medical students, and nurses. Additional benefits arise from research opportunities resulting from such an organized structure and the delivery of standardized care protocols. The growing volume of patients with VHD, their changing characteristics, and the growing technological opportunities of refined diagnosis and treatment in addition to the potential dismal prognosis if overlooked mandate specialized evaluation and care by dedicated physicians working in a specialized environment that is called the HVC.

  13. Identification and management of cardiometabolic risk in Canada: a position paper by the cardiometabolic risk working group (executive summary).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiter, Lawrence A; Fitchett, David H; Gilbert, Richard E; Gupta, Milan; Mancini, G B John; McFarlane, Philip A; Ross, Robert; Teoh, Hwee; Verma, Subodh; Anand, Sonia; Camelon, Kathryn; Chow, Chi-Ming; Cox, Jafna L; Després, Jean-Pierre; Genest, Jacques; Harris, Stewart B; Lau, David C W; Lewanczuk, Richard; Liu, Peter P; Lonn, Eva M; McPherson, Ruth; Poirier, Paul; Qaadri, Shafiq; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi; Rabkin, Simon W; Sharma, Arya M; Steele, Andrew W; Stone, James A; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Tobe, Sheldon; Ur, Ehud

    2011-01-01

    With the objectives of clarifying the concepts related to "cardiometabolic risk," "metabolic syndrome" and "risk stratification" and presenting practical strategies to identify and reduce cardiovascular risk in multiethnic patient populations, the Cardiometabolic Working Group presents an executive summary of a detailed analysis and position paper that offers a comprehensive and consolidated approach to the identification and management of cardiometabolic risk. The above concepts overlap and relate to the atherogenic process and development of type 2 diabetes. However, there is confusion about what these terms mean and how they can best be used to improve our understanding of cardiovascular disease treatment and prevention. The concepts related to cardiometabolic risk, pathophysiology, and strategies for identification and management (including health behaviours, pharmacotherapy, and surgery) in the multiethnic Canadian population are presented. "Global cardiometabolic risk" is proposed as an umbrella term for a comprehensive list of existing and emerging factors that predict cardiovascular disease and/or type 2 diabetes. Health behaviour interventions (weight loss, physical activity, diet, smoking cessation) in people identified at high cardiometabolic risk are of critical importance given the emerging crisis of obesity and the consequent epidemic of type 2 diabetes. Vascular protective measures (health behaviours for all patients and pharmacotherapy in appropriate patients) are essential to reduce cardiometabolic risk, and there is growing consensus that a multidisciplinary approach is needed to adequately address cardiometabolic risk factors. Health care professionals must also consider ethnicity-related risk factors in order to appropriately evaluate all individuals in their diverse patient populations. Copyright © 2011 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Philosophical Papers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Philosophical Papers is a generalist journal of philosophy edited in the Department of Philosophy at Rhodes University. The journal appears three times a year; the November issue of every year is topic-based and guest-edited. The journal is published by Routledge (Taylor & Francis). Information regarding submissions ...

  15. A Global Education Challenge: Harnessing Corporate Philanthropy to Educate the World's Poor. Center for Universal Education Working Paper 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Fleet, Justin W.

    2011-01-01

    Major actors in the global education community are emerging with new education strategies, including the World Bank, U.S. Agency for International Development and U.K. Department for International Development. These strategies attempt to identify game-changing policies to make strides in global education in anticipation of the Millennium…

  16. Presentation and analysis of work at the emergency department – of the University children’s Hospital Ljubljana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Bregant

    2013-05-01

    Conclusions: Since 2010, the paediatric emergency department of the University Children’s Hospital Ljubljana has functioned in compliance wtih the guidelines used in similar international tertiary centres. However, there is still room for improvement in organization and staffing.

  17. Special Technology Area Review on Spintronics. Report of Department of Defense Advisory Group on Electron Devices Working Group B (Microelectronics)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dunbridge, Barry; Palkuti, Les; Wolf, Stuart

    2004-01-01

    ...) as it applies to nonvolatile memories and quantum-based logic and computing. In addition, the information provided at the STAR is expected to be of use to the Services and Department of Defense (DoD...

  18. Use of Respiratory Mask and Influencing Factors among Workers Who Worked in Welding Department at Automotive Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melek Nihal Esin,A. Dilek Yilmaz

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: This study was designed in a cross sectional pattern in order to determine workers’ behaviors about respiratory mask use and the factors involved. METHOD: The study was conducted with 100 workers in the welding department of a factory operating in automotive sector and employing approximately 1000 people. The data in the study was collected by means of ‘Form for the Assessment of Descriptive Features of Employees’ and ‘Respiratory Mask Use Behaviors Form”, developed by the researchers; the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale, developed by Wallston and De Wellis; Self-Actualization Scale and Health Responsibility Scale, developed by Walker, Sechrist and Pender. RESULTS: It was found out that a majority of the workers are aged between 26 and 33 (32%, 76% of them are married, 37% are primary school graduates and 58% of them have been working for more than 11 years. It was also determined that 60% of the workers regularly wear respiratory mask. 14% of those using masks irregularly stated that they “used a respiratory mask for a short time” and 26% of them stated that they “never wore a respiratory mask”. The findings from the study showed that factors like the physical formation of the respiratory mask, the level of information about the mask, and the cognitive perceptual factors related to the employee’s health influenced respiratory mask use. Two variables with significant odds ratios were identified thorough logistic regression analysis. Worker who reported that they had inability to breathe when wearing a mask were over 9 times (OR= 9,48, %95 CI= 1,86- 16,52 and “the time spent putting on and removing a mask” were over 4 times (OR= 4,85, %95 CI= 0,03-8,81 more likely to have never wear a respiratory mask than those who used regularly wear mask . CONCLUSION: It is considered that the results from this study could form a set of basic data for “respiratory mask use improvement programs” to be designed by

  19. Spent Fuel Working Group report on inventory and storage of the Department`s spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials and their environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities. Volume 2, Working Group Assessment Team reports; Vulnerability development forms; Working group documents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-01

    The Secretary of Energy`s memorandum of August 19, 1993, established an initiative for a Department-wide assessment of the vulnerabilities of stored spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials. A Project Plan to accomplish this study was issued on September 20, 1993 by US Department of Energy, Office of Environment, Health and Safety (EH) which established responsibilities for personnel essential to the study. The DOE Spent Fuel Working Group, which was formed for this purpose and produced the Project Plan, will manage the assessment and produce a report for the Secretary by November 20, 1993. This report was prepared by the Working Group Assessment Team assigned to the Hanford Site facilities. Results contained in this report will be reviewed, along with similar reports from all other selected DOE storage sites, by a working group review panel which will assemble the final summary report to the Secretary on spent nuclear fuel storage inventory and vulnerability.

  20. Physical Health and Well-Being in Children and Youth: Review of the Literature. OECD Education Working Papers, No. 170

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aston, Ruth

    2018-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of trends in physical health outcomes of young people over the last several decades. It makes the argument for the importance of physical health and well-being for the individual and society, including its role in education outcomes. The paper then examines interventions, identifying common factors of effective…

  1. Too Scared to Learn? The Academic Consequences of Feeling Unsafe at School. Working Paper #02-13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacoe, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    A safe environment is a prerequisite for productive learning. This paper represents the first large-scale analysis of how feelings of safety at school affect educational outcomes. Using a unique longitudinal dataset of survey responses from New York City middle school students, the paper provides insight into the causal relationship between…

  2. Trends in International Trade in Higher Education: Implications and Options for Developing Countries. Education Working Paper Series, Number 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Sajitha

    2007-01-01

    This paper analyzes the trends, underlying factors and implications of the trade in higher education services. The term "trade in higher education" refers to the purchase of higher education services from a foreign country using domestic resources. The objectives of this paper are to provide policy makers in developing countries, World Bank staff,…

  3. The Demand For, and Impact Of, Youth Internships: Evidence from a Randomized Experiment in Yemen. Policy Research Working Paper 7463

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, David; Assaf, Nabila; Cusolito, Ana Paula

    2015-01-01

    This paper evaluates a youth internship program in the Republic of Yemen that provided firms with a 50 percent subsidy to hire recent graduates of universities and vocational schools. The first round of the program took place in 2014 and required both firms and youth to apply for the program. The paper examines the demand for such a program, and…

  4. Employment and Training Policy in the United States during the Economic Crisis. Upjohn Institute Working Paper No. 10-161

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Christopher J.; Eberts, Randall W.

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines labor market conditions and public employment policies in the United States during what some are calling the Great Recession. We document the dramatic labor market changes that rapidly unfolded when the rate of gross domestic product growth turned negative, from the end of 2007 through early 2009. The paper reviews the…

  5. Encuentros esteticos deweyanos con la cultura popular anglofona en la ensenanza de ingles como lengua extranjera (EILE). Working Paper (Deweyan Aesthetic Encounters with Anglophone Popular Culture in the Teaching of English as a Foreign Language. Working Paper).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoreda, Margaret Lee

    This paper discusses how the introduction of Anglophone popular culture in the English-as-a-foreign-language class can serve to foster critical aesthetic experiences. It is argued that the popular culture of the hegemonic Anglophone countries is already part of students' lives and for that reason should be included in any critical Anglophone…

  6. Compilation of Technical Papers Published Under Work Unit 72312501 (71844501) "Acceleration Performance in Advanced Operational Systems," 1985-2000

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Albery, William

    2001-01-01

    ... at the Dynamic Environment Simulator centrifuge, in the Biodynamics and Acceleration Branch (AFRL/HEPA), from 1985-2000. The papers are listed by first author and chronologically under ten different categories...

  7. Territories at the center of energy transition. For a French model of energy decentralisation. Working paper no. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Eeckhout, Laetitia; Dell'Oro, Jean-Louis; Fabregat, Sophie; Reju, Emmanuelle

    2013-12-01

    Energy transition constitutes a major challenge in terms of economic competitiveness and employment. The necessary struggle against climate change as well as economic and social challenges related to the lack of resources lead to a logical reversal, made possible by technological developments. What is at stake, for a profound change of production and consumption patterns, is favouring action for energy demand and sustainable development of renewable energies. Such advancement supposes great coordination between European, national and local energy priorities. Beyond aspects that need to remain centralized, more specifically security and networks management, it is in the population's interest, for equal costs, to have local authorities provide for themselves at their best with their energy issues and to develop local solutions for energy production, facing the price increase of global markets. In order for our country? where the choices of centralised productions were so far strongly favoured? to catch up on these topics, energy governance must progress towards an increased decentralisation. On this matter, the recent national debate on energy transition wasn't useless, but proposals that emerged, limited to those that meet consensus, were not up to the issues at stake. This working paper evaluates precisely and exhaustively the states of rules currently relevant to local authorities in such areas, limits and difficulties for their intervention and the challenges of energy decentralisation. Beyond the necessary regulatory simplification, these proposals aim at defining a new French model of national and local governance for energy control and decentralized energies. Regions which wish to do so, could become organizing authorities of decentralized energies. They could hand down this expertise to some local authorities that are skilled on a rather large territory, urban and rural. Their main tool would be composed of regional (and local) companies specialized

  8. Staggered work shifts : a way to downsize and restructure an emergency department workforce yet maintain current operational performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jabali, O.; Sinreich, D.

    2007-01-01

    Starting from the last decade of the twentieth century, most hospital Emergency Department (ED) budgets did not keep up with the demand for ED services made by growing populations and aging societies. Since labor consumes over 50% of the total monies invested in EDs and other healthcare systems, any

  9. Report on international round table conference 'Accidental radiation contamination of food of animal origin'. Vol.II (Working papers)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The World Association of Veterinary Food Hygienists (WAVFH) held an international round table conference in Stockholm, Sweden, January 26-29, 1987. The topic of the conference was 'Accidental Radiation Contamination of Food of Animal Origin'. The agenda was divided into three major topic areas: 1. Ecological Science; 2. Veterinary Science - Live Animals; and 3. Veterinary Science - Food of Animal Origin. Experts and delegates from member countries presented papers, participated in discussions and workshops and produced a multidisciplinary report covering the topic areas. Two volumes were produced; one a collection of all papers presented, and the other a compilation of the proceedings from each of the topic workshops. In order to rapidly distribute the Association's information to members, papers and other information were collated and disseminated as presented to the conference participants

  10. Report on international round table conference 'Accidental radiation contamination of food of animal origin'. Vol.II (Working papers)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1986-07-01

    The World Association of Veterinary Food Hygienists (WAVFH) held an international round table conference in Stockholm, Sweden, January 26-29, 1987. The topic of the conference was 'Accidental Radiation Contamination of Food of Animal Origin'. The agenda was divided into three major topic areas: 1. Ecological Science; 2. Veterinary Science - Live Animals; and 3. Veterinary Science - Food of Animal Origin. Experts and delegates from member countries presented papers, participated in discussions and workshops and produced a multidisciplinary report covering the topic areas. Two volumes were produced; one a collection of all papers presented, and the other a compilation of the proceedings from each of the topic workshops. In order to rapidly distribute the Association's information to members, papers and other information were collated and disseminated as presented to the conference participants.

  11. Intelligent transportation system (ITS) study for the Buffalo and Niagara Falls metropolitan area, Erie and Niagara Counties, New York : objectives, performance criteria & user service plan, working paper #3

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-06-18

    This paper is the third in a series that together will comprise an Intelligent Transportation System Study (ITS) for the Buffalo/Niagara Falls region. In this document, the problems identified in Working Paper #1 are critically reviewed to develop go...

  12. Career-Technical Education and Labor Market Outcomes: Evidence from California Community Colleges. A CAPSEE Working Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Ann; Kurlaender, Michal; Grosz, Michel

    2015-01-01

    This paper estimates the earnings returns to vocational, or career-technical, education programs in the nation's largest community college system. While career-technical education (CTE) programs have often been mentioned as an attractive alternative to four-year colleges for some students, very little systematic evidence exists on the returns to…

  13. Doing Poorly: The Real Income of American Children in a Comparative Perspective. Luxembourg Income Study. Working Paper No. 127.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainwater, Lee; Smeeding, Timothy M.

    This paper investigates the real living standards and poverty status of U.S. children in the 1990s compared to the children in 17 other nations, including Europe, Scandinavia, Canada, and Australia. The analysis is based on the Luxembourg Income Study database. It was found that American children have lower real spendable income than do comparable…

  14. The Black-White-Other Test Score Gap: Academic Achievement among Mixed Race Adolescents. Institute for Policy Research Working Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Melissa R.

    This paper describes the achievement patterns of a sample of 1,492 multiracial high school students and examines how their achievement fits into existing theoretical models that explain monoracial differences in achievement. These theoretical models include status attainment, parenting style, oppositional culture, and educational attitudes. The…

  15. Risk Aversion and Support for Merit Pay: Theory and Evidence from Minnesota's Q Comp Program. Working Paper #09-05

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadler, Carl; Wiswall, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Recent research attributes the lack of merit pay in teaching to the resistance of teachers. This paper examines whether the structure of merit pay affects the types of teachers who support it. We develop a model of the relative utility teachers receive from merit pay versus the current fixed schedule of raises. We show that if teachers are risk…

  16. Museums, Zoos, and Gardens: How Formal-Informal Partnerships Can Impact Urban Students' Performance. Working Paper #04-13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Meryle; Whitesell, Emilyn Ruble; Schwartz, Amy Ellen

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we provide the first rigorous evidence of the impact of a partnership between public middle schools and informal science institutions (ISIs), such as museums and zoos, on student outcomes. This study focuses on Urban Advantage (UA), a program in New York City (NYC) that explicitly draws upon the expertise and resources of the city's…

  17. The Trouble with Boys: Social Influences and the Gender Gap in Disruptive Behavior. NBER Working Paper No. 17541

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Marianne; Pan, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the importance of the home and school environments in explaining the gender gap in disruptive behavior. We document large differences in the gender gap across key features of the home environment--boys do especially poorly in broken families. In contrast, we find little impact of the early school environment on non-cognitive…

  18. Academic Resilience: What Schools and Countries Do to Help Disadvantaged Students Succeed in PISA. OECD Education Working Papers, No. 167

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agasisti, Tommaso; Avvisati, Francesco; Borgonovi, Francesca; Longobardi, Sergio

    2018-01-01

    Resilience refers to the capacity of individuals to prosper despite encountering adverse circumstances. This paper defines academic resilience as the ability of 15-year-old students from disadvantaged backgrounds to perform at a certain level in the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) in reading, mathematics and science that…

  19. Weathering the Great Recession with Human Capital? Evidence on Labor Market Returns to Education from Arkansas. A CAPSEE Working Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfield, Clive

    2015-01-01

    The Great Recession was one of the sharpest economic downturns of the past century, with significant impacts across the U.S. labor market. Over past decades, one key feature of the U.S. labor market has been the high and stable returns to education. In this paper I estimate the returns to education for large samples of young workers in Arkansas…

  20. Educational "Goodwill": Measuring the Intangible Assets at Highly Selective Private Colleges and Universities. NBER Working Paper No. 17412

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurnberg, Peter; Schapiro, Morton; Zimmerman, David

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we utilize data on the head-to-head loss rate for students accepted at Williams College, but who opt to enroll elsewhere. For example, we employ data that measure the fraction of students admitted to Williams and to Amherst (or Harvard or Yale, etc.) but who opt to attend Amherst (or Harvard or Yale, etc.) instead of Williams. We…

  1. Obesity and Developmental Functioning among Children Aged 2-4 Years. National Poverty Center Working Paper Series #08-07

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawley, John; Spiess, C. Katharina

    2008-01-01

    In developed countries, obesity tends to be associated with worse labor market outcomes. One possible reason is that obesity leads to less human capital formation early in life. This paper investigates the association between obesity and the developmental functioning of children at younger ages (2-4 years) than ever previously examined. Data from…

  2. Home Computers and Child Outcomes: Short-Term Impacts from a Randomized Experiment in Peru. NBER Working Paper No. 18818

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuermann, Diether W.; Cristia, Julian P.; Cruz-Aguayo, Yyannu; Cueto, Santiago; Malamud, Ofer

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents results from a randomized control trial in which approximately 1,000 OLPC XO laptops were provided for home use to children attending primary schools in Lima, Peru. The intervention increased access and use of home computers, with some substitution away from computer use outside the home. Beneficiaries were more likely to…

  3. Too Young to Leave the Nest: The Effects of School Starting Age. NBER Working Paper No. 13969

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Sandra E.; Devereux, Paul J.; Salvanes, Kjell G.

    2008-01-01

    Does it matter when a child starts school? While the popular press seems to suggest it does, there is limited evidence of a long-run effect of school starting age on student outcomes. This paper uses data on the population of Norway to examine the role of school starting age on longer-run outcomes such as IQ scores at age 18, educational…

  4. Facing the Knowledge Society: Reforming Secondary Education in Hong Kong and Shanghai. Education Working Paper Series. Number 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kai Ming; Yip, Hak Kwong

    2006-01-01

    This paper attempts to describe and analyze the development and reforms of secondary education in Hong Kong and Shanghai over the past 25 years. Comparing the two cities is useful in constructing a spectrum of possibilities on the one hand, and identifying some common themes in the development of secondary education on the other. The…

  5. A Benefit-Cost Analysis of the Tulsa Universal Pre-K Program. Upjohn Institute Working Paper 16-261

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartik, Timothy J.; Belford, Jonathan A.; Gormley, William T.; Anderson, Sara

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, benefits and costs are estimated for a universal pre-K program, provided by Tulsa Public Schools. Benefits are derived from estimated effects of Tulsa pre-K on retention by grade 9. Retention effects are projected to dollar benefits from future earnings increases and crime reductions. Based on these estimates, Tulsa pre-K has…

  6. Cognitive Processes in Folk Ornithology: The Identification of Gulls. Working Papers of the Language Behavior Research Laboratory, No. 42.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunn, Eugene

    Recent studies of folk biology clearly reveal the detailed empirical knowledge of living things which is an important and characteristic element of pre-scientific cultures. This paper attempts a contribution to the study of such systems of knowledge by analyzing the comparable skills of a few American birdwatchers. The process of identification of…

  7. The dynamics of the Russian lifestyle during transition: Changes in food, alcohol and cigarette consumption. ISU Economics Working Papers 09019

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herzfeld, T.; Huffman, S.K.; Rizov, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents evidence on the impact of individual as well as regional characteristics on changes in fat, protein, alcohol and cigarette consumption, and on diet’s diversity between 1994 and 2004. The results from a dynamic econometric model suggest that among individual determinants such as

  8. LDPI Working Paper 11: The mining-conservation nexus: Rio Tinto, development ‘gifts’ and contested compensation in Madagascar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seagle, C.W.

    2013-01-01

    This paper traces a genealogy of land access and legitimisation strategies culminating in the recent convergence of multinational mining and conservation in southeast Madagascar. Drawing on empirical research carried out on the Rio Tinto/QMM ilmenite mine in Fort Dauphin, it focuses on how local

  9. Small Family, Smart Family? Family Size and the IQ Scores of Young Men. NBER Working Paper No. 13336

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Sandra E.; Devereux, Paul J.; Salvanes, Kjell G.

    2007-01-01

    How do families influence the ability of children? Cognitive skills have been shown to be a strong predictor of educational attainment and future labor market success; as a result, understanding the determinants of cognitive skills can lead to a better understanding of children's long run outcomes. This paper uses a large dataset on the male…

  10. Homeworking: Home Office or Home Sweatshop? Report on Current Conditions of Homeworkers in Toronto's Garment Industry. NALL Working Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Roxana; Wong, Renita Yuk-Lin; Choi, Angela

    The current conditions of home workers in the garment industry in Toronto, Canada, were examined through in-depth telephone interviews with 30 Chinese-speaking immigrant women who were employed as home workers in 1999. The paper dicusses the formal training and informal learning experiences of immigrant woman who are garment workers. A comparison…

  11. Should Aid Reward Performance? Evidence from a Field Experiment on Health and Education in Indonesia. NBER Working Paper No. 17892

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olken, Benjamin A.; Onishi, Junko; Wong, Susan

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports an experiment in over 3,000 Indonesian villages designed to test the role of performance incentives in improving the efficacy of aid programs. Villages in a randomly-chosen one-third of subdistricts received a block grant to improve 12 maternal and child health and education indicators, with the size of the subsequent year's…

  12. Parental Choice in the Netherlands: Growing Concerns about Segregation. Sanford Working Paper Series. SAN10-02

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladd, Helen F.; Fiske, Edward B.; Ruijs, Nienke

    2010-01-01

    The Netherlands has a long history of parental choice and school anatomy. This paper examines why segregation by educational disadvantage has only recently emerged as a policy issue in the Netherlands. In addition, we document the levels and trends of school segregation in Dutch cities. We find segregation levels that are high both absolutely and…

  13. Black-White Achievement Gap and Family Wealth. National Poverty Center Working Paper Series #07-02

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, W. Jean; Conley, Dalton

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the extent to which family wealth affects the race-child achievement association for young children based on data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics. We found little evidence that wealth mediates the black-white test scores gap. However, liquid assets, particularly holding in stocks and mutual funds, are positively…

  14. India: Financing of Elementary Education in India in the 1990s. South Asia Education Sector Technical Working Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipahimalani, Vandana

    This paper studies the trends in the financing of elementary education in India over the past decade. In 1994 the Indian Supreme Court issued a directive to universalize free and compulsory elementary education, but that in a changing economic milieu where social service expenditures have often been reduced in other countries, it is important to…

  15. House Price Growth When Children Are Teenagers: A Path to Higher Earnings? Working Paper No. 14-13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Daniel; Luengo-Prado, María José

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines whether a rise in house prices that occurs immediately prior to children entering college has an impact on their earnings as adults. Higher house prices provide homeowners with additional funds to invest in their children's human capital. The results show that a 1 percentage point increase in house prices, when children are 17…

  16. Chernobyl's Subclinical Legacy: Prenatal Exposure to Radioactive Fallout and School Outcomes in Sweden. NBER Working Paper No. 13347

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almond, Douglas; Edlund, Lena; Palme, Marten

    2007-01-01

    Japanese atomic bomb survivors irradiated 8-25 weeks after ovulation subsequently suffered reduced IQ [Otake and Schull, 1998]. Whether these findings generalize to low doses (less than 10 mGy) has not been established. This paper exploits the natural experiment generated by the Chernobyl nuclear accident in April 1986, which caused a spike in…

  17. Making College Worth It: A Review of Research on the Returns to Higher Education. NBER Working Paper 19053

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreopoulos, Philip; Petronijevic, Uros

    2013-01-01

    Recent stories of soaring student debt levels and under-placed college graduates have caused some to question whether a college education is still a sound investment. In this paper, we review the literature on the returns to higher education in an attempt to determine who benefits from college. Despite the tremendous heterogeneity across potential…

  18. Creole Languages and Educational Development. Linguistic Communications: Working Papers of the Linguistic Society of Australia, No. 13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, R.W.

    An international conference on creole languages and educational development was held at the University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad, from July 24-28, 1972. It was attended by scholars from Africa, Australia, Hawaii, the Caribbean region, the United Kingdom, the United States, and France. The papers presented were descriptions of a…

  19. Heterogeneity in High Math Achievement across Schools: Evidence from the American Mathematics Competitions. NBER Working Paper No. 18277

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Glenn; Swanson, Ashley

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores differences in the frequency with which students from different schools reach high levels of math achievement. Data from the American Mathematics Competitions is used to produce counts of high-scoring students from more than two thousand public, coeducational, non-magnet, non-charter U.S. high schools. High-achieving students…

  20. Scientific Productivity and Academic Promotion: A Study on French and Italian Physicists. NBER Working Paper No. 16341

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissoni, Francesco; Mairesse, Jacques; Montobbio, Fabio; Pezzoni, Michele

    2010-01-01

    The paper examines the determinants of scientific productivity (number of articles and journals' impact factor) for a panel of about 3600 French and Italian academic physicists active in 2004-05. Endogeneity problems concerning promotion and productivity are addressed by specifying a generalized Tobit model, in which a selection probit equation…

  1. Building America's Job Skills with Effective Workforce Programs: A Training Strategy to Raise Wages and Increase Work Opportunities. Strategy Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenstone, Michael; Looney, Adam

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the importance of effective training and workforce development programs as part of a broader strategy to increase the competitiveness of American workers. Although rapid technological change and increasing global competition have delivered great economic benefits to the U.S. economy overall, the development of new and more…

  2. New Schools for the Cities: Designs for Equality and Excellence. A Working Paper prepared for the Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressman, Harvey

    This paper outlines several schemes for developing quality private schools for inner city students. The basic assumption justifying the proposal that such schools be independently managed is that the urban public school systems have patently failed to educate poor children. Therefore, a new national network of independent schools should be…

  3. Opportunities for Efficiency and Innovation: A Primer on How to Cut College Costs. Working Paper 2011-02

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, Vance H.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper the author explores how colleges whose primary mission is undergraduate education can strategically allocate resources in a way that reduces costs and prioritizes teaching and learning. He starts from a provocative thought-experiment--what would it cost to educate undergraduates at a hypothetical college built from scratch?--and uses…

  4. Opting For Families: Recent Trends in the Fertility of Highly Educated Women. NBER Working Paper No. 15074

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Qingyan; Weinberg, Bruce A.

    2009-01-01

    Observers have argued about whether highly-educated women are opting out of their careers and for families. If so, it is natural to expect fertility to increase and, insofar as children are associated with lower employment, further declines in employment. This paper provides a comprehensive study of recent trends in the fertility of…

  5. Language and Language Education: Working Papers of The National Languages Institute of Australia, Volume 1, Number 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Language and Language Education: Working Papers of the National Languages Institute of Australia, 1991

    1991-01-01

    This volume on language issues within Australia contains five research papers: "Patterns of Inter-Cultural Communication in Melbourne Factories: Some Research in Progress" (Michael Clyne); "Developing Proficiency Scales for Communicative Assessment" (D. E. Ingram, Elaine Wylie); "Rapid Profile: A Second Language Screening…

  6. Language and Language Education: Working Papers of the National Languages and Literacy Institute of Australia. Volume 2, Number 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Language and Language Education: Working Papers of the National Languages and Literacy Institute of Australia, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Papers included in this compilation are "Late Hebrew Immersion at Mt. Scopus College Melbourne: Towards Complete Hebrew Fluency for Jewish Day School Students" (S. C. Lorch, T. F. McNamara, E. Eisikovits); "Languages in Schools: Policy and Practice" (Roger A. Peddie); "Models and Sociolinguistic Factors in Some Victorian…

  7. Enhancing the Efficacy of Teacher Incentives through Loss Aversion: A Field Experiment. NBER Working Paper No. 18237

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, Roland G., Jr.; Levitt, Steven D.; List, John; Sadoff, Sally

    2012-01-01

    Domestic attempts to use financial incentives for teachers to increase student achievement have been ineffective. In this paper, we demonstrate that exploiting the power of loss aversion--teachers are paid in advance and asked to give back the money if their students do not improve sufficiently--increases math test scores between 0.201 (0.076) and…

  8. The Effect of Foreclosure on Boston Public School Student Academic Performance. Working Paper No. 13-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Katharine; Burke, Mary A.; Triest, Robert K.

    2013-01-01

    Although the recent wave of mortgage foreclosures has clearly been accompanied by economic hardship, relatively little research has examined how foreclosures affect the academic performance of students. This paper investigates the relationship between mortgage foreclosures and the academic performance of students using a unique dataset that…

  9. How well does journal 'impact' work in the assessment of papers on clinical physiology and nuclear medicine?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, HB; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1997-01-01

    .02.-0.0001), but an initial phase of no citation was identified, and the number of citations per year reached a maximum or plateau 3-7 years after publication, which was later than the general maximum of 2-3 years for all medical specialities. In a sample of 200 known autocitations, 75% of the papers had full recovery, 3...

  10. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the Department's plutonium storage. Volume II, part 2: Hanford working group assessment team report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    In a memorandum dated January 24, 1994, the Secretary of Energy initiated a department-wide assessment of current plutonium-related safety and environmental vulnerabilities at Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities. In a March 15, 1994 memorandum, the Secretary directed the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (ES ampersand H) to take the lead in coordinating this assessment, which will help to establish the plutonium portion of the foundation for decision making related to the ES ampersand H aspects of national surplus fissile material disposition efforts. This DOE-wide plutonium vulnerability assessment is intended to provide the information base needed to identify and prioritize interim corrective actions for the safe management of these materials

  11. Black Women in the New Services Economy: Help or Hinderance in Economic Self-Sufficiency? Working Paper No. 196.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woody, Bette

    This report of a study based on research and analysis of U.S. Census data examines how the services economy and its component industrial sectors have spurred employment growth and with its gains and losses for black women. The report is divided into three parts. The first part looks at current theories related to work and workforce participation…

  12. Successful Schools: How School-Level Factors Influence Success with Urban Advantage. Working Paper #01-14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Meryle; Whitesell, Emilyn Ruble; Leardo, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Informal science education institutions have been identified as critical participants in helping students succeed in science by working in collaboration with school systems across the country. The results of one such collaboration, the Urban Advantage (UA) program found that participation in UA improved student achievement, on average, by 0.6…

  13. Tuning-AHELO Conceptual Framework of Expected and Desired Learning Outcomes in Economics. OECD Education Working Papers No. 59

    Science.gov (United States)

    OECD Publishing (NJ1), 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Secretariat, at the invitation of the AHELO Group of National Experts, contracted the Tuning Association to undertake initial development work on learning outcomes to be used for valid and reliable assessments of students from diverse institutions and countries. The two disciplines…

  14. The Implications of Flexible Staffing Arrangements for Job Stability. Upjohn Institute Staff Working Paper No. 99-056. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houseman, Susan N.; Polivka, Anne E.

    A study examined the job stability of workers in the following flexible staffing arrangements: agency temporary, direct-hire temporary, on-call, contract company, independent contractor, and regular part-time work. Two data sources were used in the analysis. The first was a nationwide survey of employers on their use of flexible staffing…

  15. Building the Brain's "Air Traffic Control" System: How Early Experiences Shape the Development of Executive Function. Working Paper 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Scientific Council on the Developing Child, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Being able to focus, hold, and work with information in mind, filter distractions, and switch gears is like having an air traffic control system at a busy airport to manage the arrivals and departures of dozens of planes on multiple runways. In the brain, this air traffic control mechanism is called executive functioning, a group of skills that…

  16. General Education, Vocational Education, and Labor-Market Outcomes over the Life-Cycle. NBER Working Paper No. 17504

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanushek, Eric A.; Woessmann, Ludger; Zhang, Lei

    2011-01-01

    Policy debates about the balance of vocational and general education programs focus on the school-to-work transition. But with rapid technological change, gains in youth employment from vocational education may be offset by less adaptability and thus diminished employment later in life. To test our main hypothesis that any relative labor-market…

  17. The Effect of Child Health Insurance Access on Schooling: Evidence from Public Insurance Expansions. NBER Working Paper No. 20178

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohodes, Sarah; Kleiner, Samuel; Lovenheim, Michael F.; Grossman, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Public health insurance programs comprise a large share of federal and state government expenditure, and these programs are due to be expanded as part of the 2010 Affordable Care Act. Despite a large literature on the effects of these programs on health care utilization and health outcomes, little prior work has examined the long-term effects of…

  18. Contrasting Portraits: Integrating Materials about the Afro-Hispanic Woman Into the Traditional Curriculum. Working Paper No. 120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Marilyn

    Images of Black women in Hispanic literature tend to be the work of White authors or Black male authors who, however well-intentioned, cannot articulate the direct, lived experience of the black, Hispanic woman. Moreover, the image of the Black woman in Spain and Latin America is the result of a slavocratic, patriarchal system and, therefore,…

  19. Department of Defense perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devine, R.

    1985-01-01

    This paper examines radiation instrumentation from the Department of Defense perspective. Radiation survey instruments and calibration, or RADIAC, as it is called in the services, while administratively falling under the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Atomic Energy, has generally been managed at a lower level. The Naval Electronics Systems Command and Army Signal Corp are the two principles in the Department of Defense for RADIAC. The actions of the services are coordinated through the tri-service RADIAC working group, which meets about every year and a half. Several points from this organization are highlighted

  20. Working conditions in the engine department - A qualitative study among engine room personnel on board Swedish merchant ships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundh, Monica; Lützhöft, Margareta; Rydstedt, Leif; Dahlman, Joakim

    2011-01-01

    The specific problems associated with the work on board within the merchant fleet are well known and have over the years been a topic of discussion. The work conditions in the engine room (ER) are demanding due to, e.g. the thermal climate, noise and awkward working postures. The work in the engine control room (ECR) has over recent years undergone major changes, mainly due to the introduction of computers on board. In order to capture the impact these changes had implied, and also to investigate how the work situation has developed, a total of 20 engine officers and engine ratings were interviewed. The interviews were semi-structured and Grounded Theory was used for the data analysis. The aim of the present study was to describe how the engine crew perceive their work situation and working environment on board. Further, the aim was to identify areas for improvements which the engine crew consider especially important for a safe and effective work environment. The result of the study shows that the design of the ECR and ER is crucial for how different tasks are performed. Design which does not support operational procedures and how tasks are performed risk inducing inappropriate behaviour as the crew members' are compelled to find alternative ways to perform their tasks in order to get the job done. These types of behaviour can induce an increased risk of exposure to hazardous substances and the engine crew members becoming injured. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  1. Electronics department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities in 1978 of some of the groups within the Electronics Department. The work covered includes plant protection and operator studies, reliability techniques, application of nuclear techniques to mineral exploration, applied laser physics, computing and, lastly, research instrumentation. (author)

  2. Working conditions and psychosocial risk factors of employees in French electricity and gas company customer support departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Anne; Dessery, Michel; Boursier, Marie-Françoise; Grizon, Marie Catherine; Jayet, Christian; Reymond, Catherine; Thiebot, Michelle; Zeme-Ramirez, Monique; Calvez, Thierry

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the real impact of working conditions on the health of call center employees. The aim of this article is to describe the working conditions of French electricity and gas company customer service teams, especially those spending more than 75% of their working time handling calls in order to determine their subjective experience of their work and identify situations at risk of psychosocial constraints. A cross-sectional study using a self-completion questionnaire was conducted on a representative sample of 2,000 employees working in customer service centers. The questions focused on the variety of tasks performed, the organization of working time, the physical environment of the workstation, violent situations and psychosocial factors (Job Content Questionnaire). Multivariate statistical analyses were performed to identify factors associated with the wish to leave the sector and with a high level of psychosocial constraints. Women made up 66% of the sample. Despite a high educational level, the average socio-professional level of the employees was relatively low. Although the vast majority of employees had chosen this career (74%), just over half would like to leave. The main factors associated with iso-strain were inadequate breaks (odds ratio (OR) = 2.0), low perceived quality of work (OR = 2.4), high proportion of working time spent handling calls (≥75% of working time: OR = 5.9, between 50 and Employees who spend more than 75% of their working time on the phone cumulate every factor linked with a high level of constraints, but all employees of the EDF and Gaz de France customer service centers are concerned. These workers share many characteristics with other call centers: predominantly female workforce; high educational level; wish to leave this sector despite the initial choice; high level of psychosocial risk factors.

  3. Working Paper - WP/12/08- Exchange Rate Pass-through to Import Prices, and Monetary Policy in South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Janine Aron; Greg Farrell; John Muellbauer; Peter Sinclair

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how import prices adjust to exchange rates helps anticipate inflation effects and monetary policy responses. This paper examines exchange rate pass-through to the monthly import price index in South Africa during 1980–2009. Various short-run pass-through estimates are calculated simply without recourse to a full structural model, yet without neglecting the long-run relationships between prices or the effects of previous import price changes, and controlling for domestic and fore...

  4. From the accidental to articulated smart city: The creation and work of ‘Smart Dublin’: The Programmable City Working Paper 29

    OpenAIRE

    Coletta, Claudio; Heaphy, Liam; Kitchin, Rob

    2017-01-01

    While there is a relatively extensive literature concerning the nature of smart cities in general, the roles of corporate actors in their production, and the development and deployment of specific smart city technologies, to date there have been relatively few studies that have examined the situated practices as to how the smart city as a whole unfolds in specific places. In this paper, we chart the smart city ecosystem in Dublin, Ireland, and examine how the four city authorities have active...

  5. Spent Fuel Working Group report on inventory and storage of the Department's spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials and their environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    The Secretary of Energy's memorandum of August 19, 1993, established an initiative for a Department-wide assessment of the vulnerabilities of stored spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials. A Project Plan to accomplish this study was issued on September 20, 1993 by US Department of Energy, Office of Environment, Health and Safety (EH) which established responsibilities for personnel essential to the study. The DOE Spent Fuel Working Group, which was formed for this purpose and produced the Project Plan, will manage the assessment and produce a report for the Secretary by November 20, 1993. This report was prepared by the Working Group Assessment Team assigned to the Hanford Site facilities. Results contained in this report will be reviewed, along with similar reports from all other selected DOE storage sites, by a working group review panel which will assemble the final summary report to the Secretary on spent nuclear fuel storage inventory and vulnerability

  6. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the Department's plutonium storage. Volume II, part 1: Rocky Flats working group assessment team report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The objective of the Plutonium Environment, Safety, and Health (ES ampersand H) Vulnerability Assessment Project was to conduct a comprehensive assessment of the ES ampersand H vulnerabilities arising from the Department of Energy (DOE) storage and handling of its current plutonium holdings. The purpose of this assessment was to identify and prioritize ES ampersand H vulnerabilities that could lead to unnecessary or increased radiation exposure of workers, release of radioactive materials to the environment, or radiation exposure of the public. The results will serve as an information base for identifying interim corrective actions and options for the safe management of fissile materials

  7. Medical Reserve Corps Volunteers' Ability and Willingness to Report to Work for the Department of Health During Catastrophic Disasters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schechter, Shelly

    2007-01-01

    .... According to recent studies of paid healthcare professionals, approximately forty percent may be unable or unwilling to report to work during catastrophic disasters, but these questions have not yet...

  8. Should the Department of Defense Transfer the Defense Logistics Agency's Map Functions to the Defense Working Capital Fund

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zimmerman, Donald

    2000-01-01

    .... The functions cost about $25 million annually and are funded by operations and maintenance (O&M) dollars. This study analyzed if the functions should be transferred to the Defense Working Capital Fund...

  9. Working paper Green Gas. Overview of policy issues on Green Gas; Werkdocument Groen Gas. Overzicht Beleidsvraagstukken Groen Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumont, M.

    2012-07-15

    Early 2010, the interdepartmental Accelerator Team Green Gas was established which deals with policy issues in the field of Green Gas. This working document reflects the current state of affairs. Via the website www.groengas.nl new versions will be made available on a regular basis [Dutch] Begin 2010 is het interdepartementale Versnellerteam Groen Gas opgericht dat zich bezighoudt met vraagstukken op het gebied van Groen Gas die op het terrein van de rijksoverheid liggen. Dit werkdocument geeft de huidige stand van zaken weer. Via www.groengas.nl komen geregeld nieuwe versies beschikbaar.

  10. The legislative work in an authoritarian regime: the case of the São Paulo administrative department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Codato

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the legislative process of the Administrative Department of the state of São Paulo (DAESP during the Estado Novo dictatorship and seeks to answer three questions: i what were its real attributions? ii what was its place among the state-level government agencies? iii what was its role in the dictatorial regime's public decision-making structure? Ordering and interpreting information on the DAESP's deliberative process will allow us to establish whether or not it exercised power (understood as the capacity by those who controlled it to impose their preferences, what was the magnitude of this power, what type of power was exercised, over what and whom. The frequency of its meetings, the coordination of the agendas of the dictatorial State's apparatuses involved in the decision chain, the activism of each councillor of DAESP and a sample of the legal opinions produced by it between 1939-1947 were all analysed. The findings can be summarised into three propositions: i DAESP was not a decision-making arena per se as it did not make important decisions, but instead produced a huge amount of decisions regarding the formal aspects of the decree-laws issued by the Interventoria Federal (appointed governors; ii therefore, the president of the DAESP did not have greater political or bureaucratic power than the interventor, and iii although the Department mimicked some legislative routines, it cannot be considered a substitute of the state legislature.

  11. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the Department's plutonium storage. Volume I: Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    At the conclusion of the Cold War, the Department of Energy (DOE) stopped plutonium processing for nuclear weapons production. Facilities used for that purpose now hold significant quantities of plutonium in various forms. Unless properly stored and handled, plutonium can present environment, safety and health (ES ampersand H) hazards. Improperly stored plutonium poses a variety of hazards. When containers or packaging fail to fully protect plutonium metal from exposure to air, oxidation can occur and cause packaging failures and personnel contamination. Contamination can also result when plutonium solutions leak from bottles, tanks or piping. Plutonium in the form of scrap or residues generated by weapons production are often very corrosive, chemically reactive and difficult to contain. Buildings and equipment that are aging, poorly maintained or of obsolete design contribute to the overall problem. Inadvertent accumulations of plutonium of any form in sufficient quantities within facilities can result in nuclear criticality events that could emit large amounts of radiation locally. Contamination events and precursors of criticality events are causing safety and health concerns for workers at the Department's plutonium facilities. Contamination events also potentially threaten the public and the surrounding environment

  12. Pricing policies for a two-part exhaustible resource cartel: the case of OPEC (world oil project). Working paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hnyilicza, E.; Pindyck, R.S.

    1976-04-01

    This paper examines pricing policies for OPEC under the assumption that the cartel is composed of a block of spender countries with large cash needs and a block of saver countries with little immediate need for cash and a lower rate of discount. The decision problem for the two-part cartel is embodied in a game-theoretic framework and the optimal bargaining solution is computed using results from the theory of cooperative games developed by Nash. The set of feasible bargaining points--and the corresponding Nash solution--is computed under two assumptions on the behavior of output shares: that they are subject to choice and that they are fixed at historical values. The results suggest that for fixed output shares, there is little room for bargaining and the price path approximates the optimal monopoly price path. If the shares are subject to control, optimal paths depend significantly on the relative bargaining power of each block.

  13. Safety at work in handling and processing radioactive residues industrial safety at the Central Decontamination Plants Department (HDB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarzkopf, W.

    2003-01-01

    There is an old German saying which implies that he who courts risk eventually comes to grief. Nobody likes to come to grief, and we all know that our health and that of our families and our colleagues is most important. On the other hand, we must master a variety of dangerous situations every day, at home, on the road and, especially, at work. Unfortunately, it is wrong working techniques and incorrect working habits which again and again entail considerable accident risks. Although we have learned from experience over many years, and also from training and instruction on the job, how to recognize dangers early enough to counteract them effectively, negligence may develop over time and lead to wrong assessments. Accidents don't happen by chance. And it is better to be safe than sorry. This short video is to upgrade your knowledge, bring your experience up to date, and alert you to hazardous situations. (orig.)

  14. Progress report on research and development work 1991 of the Department of Hot Chemistry, Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-03-01

    In the year under review, the Institute of Hot Chemistry (IHCH) was in the midst of a thematic reorientation process. The priority of future chemical-technical work will be in the field of the development of supercriticality processes. The objective of such work consists in seeking new ways for getting rid of resistant chemical pollutants (halogenated organic compounds). The following projects are presented in detail: 1) Waste control in the environment (communal waste management; water and soil; emission-reducing processes; highly polluted soils); 2) Solid state and materials research (chemistry of materials research); basic physical research (neutrino and particle physics); 3) Nuclear waste management (concluding work on reprocessing technology), and 4) Other research projects (Institute-related research). The Annex lists the publications made by the IHCH staff. (BBR) [de

  15. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the Department's plutonium storage. Volume II, part 7: Mound working group assessment team report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This is the report of a visit to the Mound site by the Working Group Assessment Team (WGAT) to assess plutonium vulnerabilities. Purposes of the visit were: to review results of the site's self assessment of current practices for handling and storing plutonium; to conduct an independent assessment of these practices; to reconcile differences and assemble a final list of vulnerabilities; to calculate consequences and probability for each vulnerability; and to issue a report to the Working Group. This report, representing completion of the Mound visit, will be compiled along with those from all other sites with plutonium inventories as part of a final report to the Secretary of Energy

  16. Delivering Cost-Efficient Public Services in Health Care, Education and Housing in Chile. OECD Economics Department Working Papers, No. 606

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moccero, D.

    2008-01-01

    The Chilean authorities plan to raise budgetary allocations over the medium term for a variety of social programmes, including education, health care and housing. This incremental spending will need to be carried out in a cost-efficient manner to make sure that it yields commensurate improvements in social outcomes. Chile's health indicators show…

  17. MEN WANT WORK. REPORT TO THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR, OFFICE OF MANPOWER AUTOMATION AND TRAINING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LOLLIS, DAVID L.

    THE COUNCIL OF THE SOUTHERN MOUNTAINS MADE A ONE-YEAR STUDY OF THE MANPOWER DEVELOPMENT AND TRAINING ACT IN APPALACHIA AND HELPED ESTABLISH THE YOUTH, EDUCATION, JOB DEVELOPMENT, WORK EXPERIENCE, VISTA, AND ON THE JOB TRAINING PROGRAMS WHICH ARE REVIEWED AND EVALUATED IN THIS REPORT. IT WAS CONCLUDED THAT--(1) MEN WANT JOBS, (2) WHILE UNFILLED…

  18. New dawn for electricity? EU policy and the changing decision space for electricity production in Sweden; a CANES Working Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, Maans

    2009-11-15

    The European Union has taken an increasing interest in governing the energy sector in its Member States. However, EU still competes with national-level policies as well as sectoral organizational fields with sticky institutions, norms and knowledge. Therefore, despite its high ambitions in the energy field, for instance in the promotion of renewables and market reform, it is not clear whether the EU really exerts a strong influence, and if there is such an influence, the processes of influence and 'filtering' through to national political and industrial structures are not well understood. This paper examines a recent strategic change amongst national actors in Sweden in the energy sector; the decision space for investment in electricity. It examines the influence of European policy change, national political and policy change and organizational field-level developments on this decision space. It finds that European policy has rarely been very coercive, partly because Sweden has been a forerunner both on electricity market reform and renewable energy promotion, but that its influence is notable both directly through its emissions trading directive and more indirectly through signalling its intentions and long-term goals. Still, it appears that domestic developments, both cognitive and normative structures in the organizational field, and national policy change remain more instrumental determinants of the changed decision space. (Author)

  19. ESC Working Group on Valvular Heart Disease Position Paper: assessing the risk of interventions in patients with valvular heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenhek, Raphael; Iung, Bernard; Tornos, Pilar; Antunes, Manuel J.; Prendergast, Bernard D.; Otto, Catherine M.; Kappetein, Arie Pieter; Stepinska, Janina; Kaden, Jens J.; Naber, Christoph K.; Acartürk, Esmeray; Gohlke-Bärwolf, Christa

    2012-01-01

    Aims Risk scores provide an important contribution to clinical decision-making, but their validity has been questioned in patients with valvular heart disease (VHD), since current scores have been mainly derived and validated in adults undergoing coronary bypass surgery. The Working Group on Valvular Heart Disease of the European Society of Cardiology reviewed the performance of currently available scores when applied to VHD, in order to guide clinical practice and future development of new scores. Methods and results The most widely used risk scores (EuroSCORE, STS, and Ambler score) were reviewed, analysing variables included and their predictive ability when applied to patients with VHD. These scores provide relatively good discrimination, i.e. a gross estimation of risk category, but cannot be used to estimate the exact operative mortality in an individual patient because of unsatisfactory calibration. Conclusion Current risk scores do not provide a reliable estimate of exact operative mortality in an individual patient with VHD. They should therefore be interpreted with caution and only used as part of an integrated approach, which incorporates other patient characteristics, the clinical context, and local outcome data. Future risk scores should include additional variables, such as cognitive and functional capacity and be prospectively validated in high-risk patients. Specific risk models should also be developed for newer interventions, such as transcatheter aortic valve implantation. PMID:21406443

  20. WASP (Write a Scientific Paper): Open access unsolicited emails for scholarly work - Young and senior researchers perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuschieri, Sarah; Grech, Victor

    2018-04-20

    The increasing demand on academics and researchers to publish has led to the development of fake journals (also known as predatory journals). Such journals lack peer review and precipitate unfair criticism toward legitimate open access journals. Predatory journals tend to bombard a researcher's mailbox on a daily basis, inviting authors to submit a review/manuscript/opinion/short case to their journal while promising expedited publication - against a fee. This study assessed the unsolicited emails received over the period of November 2017 by a young and by a senior researcher. The young researcher received a substantially higher amount of emails (n = 101) compared to the senior researcher (n = 23). The article processing costs for solicited journals received, ranged between $49 and $3019. These journals are almost all only indexed in Google Scholar and do not display any meaningful journal metrics. Furthermore, the majority of the unsolicited emails were not relevant to the researcher's field of study. Therefore authors and readers alike should evaluate emails received with regard to journal legitimacy prior to submission of work to possibly predatory journals. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. On the Commons and Climate Change: Collective Action and GHG Mitigation - Working Paper No. 2012-13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochran, Ian

    2012-07-01

    Reducing greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions from anthropogenic activity may be one of the greatest collective-action problems faced by humanity. This poses challenges not only in terms of the institutional configurations to support coordinated governance processes, but equally the information tools and expertise necessary to link GHG mitigation with other policy priorities. This paper theoretically explores how the adoption of a modified theory of collective action based upon a behavioral theory of the individual allows for a re-framing of the climate-change policy challenge. As such, it appears important to develop a context within which collective action becomes possible where success is no longer solely tied to incentives, but equally to the provision of information, learning, and interaction between stakeholders while simultaneously fostering trust and reciprocity among actors. At all levels of government, information plays a key role to both inform and to facilitate communication, as well as to identify and develop the necessary actions and investments and to track changes in conditions. In the case of climate change, greenhouse-gas inventories and other informational tools are necessary components to track an a priori intangible emission. As such, it is key to analyze the legitimacy, credibility and saliency of information and expertise integrated into the decision-making process. Further, it is important to recognize that the construction of indicators and other information tools is not apolitical, but rather the product of a number of assumptions, interests and decisions concerning what is included and what is excluded shaped by the involved actors. (author)

  2. Long-term risks of kidney living donation: review and position paper by the ERA-EDTA DESCARTES working group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggiore, Umberto; Budde, Klemens; Heemann, Uwe; Hilbrands, Luuk; Oberbauer, Rainer; Oniscu, Gabriel C; Pascual, Julio; Schwartz Sorensen, Soren; Viklicky, Ondrej; Abramowicz, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Two recent matched cohort studies from the USA and Norway published in 2014 have raised some concerns related to the long-term safety of kidney living donation. Further studies on the long-term risks of living donation have since been published. In this position paper, Developing Education Science and Care for Renal Transplantation in European States (DESCARTES) board members critically review the literature in an effort to summarize the current knowledge concerning long-term risks of kidney living donation to help physicians for decision-making purposes and for providing information to the prospective live donors. Long-term risk of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) can be partially foreseen by trying to identify donors at risk of developing ‘de novo’ kidney diseases during life post-donation and by predicting lifetime ESRD risk. However, lifetime risk may be difficult to assess in young donors, especially in those having first-degree relatives with ESRD. The study from Norway also found an increased risk of death after living donor nephrectomy, which became visible only after >15 years of post-donation follow-up. However, these findings are likely to be largely the result of an overestimation due to the confounding effect related to a family history of renal disease. DESCARTES board members emphasize the importance of optimal risk–benefit assessment and proper information to the prospective donor, which should also include recommendations on health-promoting behaviour post-donation. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  3. Conceptual design of a rapid-cycling synchrotron for the KFA-Juelich spallation neutron source: working papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    An accelerator group was established at ANL by the request of KFA-Juelich to carry out a conceptual design study and cost estimate for a rapid-cycling synchrotron as a possible first stage program on spallation neutron sources at KFA-Juelich. This set of notes is the individual notes which form the basis of the final report under this proposal prepared in January 1983. The topics covered include: SNQ Synchrotron Lattice-I; injection and extraction orbit; extraction from SNQ-SRA; SRA injection; capture and acceleration considerations in the SNQ-SRA; longitudinal coupling impedance; power supplies for SNQ synchrotron proposals; space charge limits in the SNQ-SRA; error analysis; SNQ-SRA ring magnets preliminary designs and cost; summary of CERN booster 4-ring arrangement; V-lattices for SNQ-SRA and extraction from the V-lattices; rf parameters for capture, acceleration and extraction; some parameters of the SNQ-SRA injector system; Keil-Schnell criterion; risetime of longitudinal resistive wall instability; beam scrapers; a design of the vacuum system; some aspects of vacuum consideration for SNQ-SRA; choice working points; ring magnet power supplies for shaped extaction of 1.1 GeV SNQ; ring magnet design and costs; tune shift due to the fringing field of the quadrupoles; coherent instability due to ions in the residual gas; transverse stabilization of bunched beams; rf acceleration system; injection into the SRA; Landau damping to get transverse stability; chromaticity and amplitude dependent tune controls in the SNQ-SRA; conversion of the SNQ-SRA to a compressor ring; comments on beam loss; summary of longitudinal stability study and transverse stability study for the SNQ-SRA; and the beam stay clear regions of the SNQ-SRA

  4. Savings serving energy transition Green finance: a powerful and citizen-oriented tool. Working paper no. 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergne, Frederique; Kerhoas, Mailys; Lety, Benoit; Lutzky, Ana

    2015-06-01

    The lack of funding is often considered, especially by public decision-makers, as one of the major reasons for the slow-down of implementation of energy transition. However, savings and cash flow have never been so abundant. With exclusive money creation, facilitated by very accommodating monetary policies implemented by central banks, financial markets are over-flown with cash flow. This paradox underlines that the issue is not caused by the lack of financial means but rather on the lack of tools favouring the allocation of such means to energy transition. Investments needs are considerable, ranging from 60 to 70 billion Euros each year, which represents approximately 3% of the European GDP. On the European level, expenses supposed to be dedicated to energy transition are valued around 350 to 400 billion Euros each year during 10 years, or, once again, around 3% of the European GDP. The issue is mainly to allocate investments differently rather than increasing their global volume. Public authorities are not able to manage such investments directly and on their own. However, while private players from the financial sector haven taken initiatives and commitments, these have so far proven insufficient in comparison with the scope of the challenge. It is true that public authorities have often avoided acting directly on financial players. However, finance is not a neutral tool and its players, being part of the economy, have a specific role to play. Beyond the necessary development of local and public funding mechanisms favouring sustainable development projects? Which were not dealt with by the working group? This memo focuses on essential tools to create an efficient mechanism which supports huge allocation of savings on energy transition. Thus, it stresses out a global and innovative proposal with strong potential consequences, involving the implementation and the generalization of an 'energy transition' label for financial products, in order to enable

  5. France's 2015 energy transition law: Ambitious objectives, disappointing implementation to date. Working paper no. 16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legendre, Emilie; Avignon, Claire; Poirier, Anne-Claire; Blosseville, Thomas; Garric, Audrey; Landrin, Sophie; Van Eeckhout, Laetitia

    2016-04-01

    Eight months after the passing of the Act on energy transition for green growth on 17 August 2015 and leading up to the Environmental Congress at the end of April 2016, the working group of La Fabrique Ecologique, set up to follow the drafting and introduction of this law, published a new note which seeks to take stock, on the one hand and with hindsight, of the usefulness of this text and its key provisions and, on the other hand, of the difficulties involved in its application. Although this law falls very short of covering the entire field of climate action, it still provides a major tool. Its implementation is all the more important in that it takes place several weeks after COP21, which was a global success, and in that France, which presided the event, should be setting an example by applying the measures which it itself proposed. This text is also implemented in a context marked - in particular in economic terms - by a very sharp drop in the price of hydrocarbons. Although it may benefit economic agents in industrialised countries, this change reduces incentives to minimise the use of this energy source, thus further complicating the energy transition. In order to deal with this, a renewed determination is essential in order to take action as soon as possible. The balance drawn up in this note shows the following key points: 1) The scope of the text of law requires numerous implementing decrees. Some have been published and others will be announced in coming weeks. However, 77 % of them still have not been published, in particular those relating to the most organisational matters. In the current context, it is imperative to make up for lost time, in particular in order to avoid the risk of these important provisions actually being abandoned; 2) The absence of a decree relating to multi-annual energy programming - the cornerstone of energy transition - is a major problem. Following several reports, it was announced for 1 July 2016, but under conditions

  6. Ethical issues in the response to Ebola virus disease in US emergency departments: a position paper of the American College of Emergency Physicians, the Emergency Nurses Association and the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkat, Arvind; Wolf, Lisa; Geiderman, Joel M; Asher, Shellie L; Marco, Catherine A; McGreevy, Jolion; Derse, Arthur R; Otten, Edward J; Jesus, John E; Kreitzer, Natalie P; Escalante, Monica; Levine, Adam C

    2015-03-01

    The 2014 outbreak of Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) in West Africa has presented a significant public health crisis to the international health community and challenged US emergency departments to prepare for patients with a disease of exceeding rarity in developed nations. With the presentation of patients with Ebola to US acute care facilities, ethical questions have been raised in both the press and medical literature as to how US emergency departments, emergency physicians, emergency nurses and other stakeholders in the healthcare system should approach the current epidemic and its potential for spread in the domestic environment. To address these concerns, the American College of Emergency Physicians, the Emergency Nurses Association and the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine developed this joint position paper to provide guidance to US emergency physicians, emergency nurses and other stakeholders in the healthcare system on how to approach the ethical dilemmas posed by the outbreak of EVD. This paper will address areas of immediate and potential ethical concern to US emergency departments in how they approach preparation for and management of potential patients with EVD. Copyright © 2015 Emergency Nurses Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. An Emerging Knowledge-Based Economy in China? Indicators from OECD Databases. OECD Science, Technology and Industry Working Papers, 2004/4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criscuolo, Chiara; Martin, Ralf

    2004-01-01

    The main objective of this Working Paper is to show a set of indicators on the knowledge-based economy for China, mainly compiled from databases within EAS, although data from databases maintained by other parts of the OECD are included as well. These indicators are put in context by comparison with data for the United States, Japan and the EU (or…

  8. Immigrant Status and Secondary School Performance as Determinants of Post-Secondary Participation: A Comparison of Canada and Switzerland. OECD Education Working Papers, No. 77

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picot, Garnett

    2012-01-01

    This working paper seeks to explore the reasons why educational attainment in the immigrant population varies between North America and Europe. Specifically, the examples of Canada and Switzerland are used as Canada has an immigrant population with a typically higher rate of post-secondary education than that of the domestic population, while in…

  9. Increasing Choice or Inequality? Pathways through Early Education in Andhra Pradesh, India. Working Papers in Early Childhood Development, No. 58. Studies in Early Childhood Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streuli, Natalia; Vennam, Uma; Woodhead, Martin

    2011-01-01

    This working paper is part of the Studies in Early Transitions series emerging from "Young Lives", a 15-year longitudinal study of childhood poverty in Ethiopia, India, Peru and Vietnam. It explores recent trends for children growing up in Andhra Pradesh, one of India's most populous states, based on Young Lives survey data collected for…

  10. Continuity and Respect for Diversity: Strengthening Early Transitions in Peru. Working Papers in Early Childhood Development, No. 56. Studies in Early Childhood Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Patricia; Rojas, Vanessa; Portugal, Tamia

    2010-01-01

    This working paper is part of a series on early transitions from "Young Lives," a 15-year longitudinal study of childhood poverty in Ethiopia, India, Peru and Vietnam. It explores the diverse experiences of 28 children from four contrasting communities in Peru as they start school. These detailed case studies highlight common problems:…

  11. Improving Evaluation to Address the Unintended Consequences of Health Information Technology:. a Position Paper from the Working Group on Technology Assessment & Quality Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magrabi, F.; Ammenwerth, E.; Hyppönen, H.; de Keizer, N.; Nykänen, P.; Rigby, M.; Scott, P.; Talmon, J.; Georgiou, A.

    2016-01-01

    With growing use of IT by healthcare professionals and patients, the opportunity for any unintended effects of technology to disrupt care health processes and outcomes is intensified. The objectives of this position paper by the IMIA Working Group (WG) on Technology Assessment and Quality

  12. Cranioplasty as the return-to-work factor - 112 patients with cranial defects treated in the Department of Neurosurgery at the Medical University of Lodz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasprzak, Piotr; Ormezowska, Elżbieta; Jaskólski, Dariusz

    2017-07-14

    The number of craniectomies and the consequent reconstructive procedures has grown during the past decades. Cranial defects and methods of their repair could have some influence on work capability of the patients and their employability. The authors analyzed a group of 112 patients with cranial defects treated in the Department of Neurosurgery at the Medical University of Lodz, Poland, in the course of the katamnestic period longer than 6 months after reconstructive operation, and observed them between February 2008 and February 2015. Their work capability and employment were compared, all the patients were interviewed concerning the reasons for not working according to the Social Insurance Institution predication procedure. Before the cranioplasty, all the patients were capable of working without limitations according to biological criteria and 89 of them were employed. Twenty-three not working people consisted of 6 pupils, 7 retired and 10 not working for other reasons. During the period between the craniectomy and the cranioplasty, 88 patients were capable of working and only 2 were employed. After the reconstruction, 93 were capable of working without limitations and 16 - with limitations. Forty-seven were employed during the period of the follow-up, the rest of patients consisted of 2 pupils, 13 retired and 50 not working for various reasons. Cranioplasty is a very important factor contributing to return to work. This outcome may be seen as having a great social value and be added to the functions of cranial repair as protective, esthetic and normalizing the intracranial pressure previously described in the literature. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2017;30(5):803-809. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  13. Characterizing novice-expert differences in macrocognition: an exploratory study of cognitive work in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Christiane C; Denmark, T Kent; Crandall, Beth; Grome, Anna; Pappas, James

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study are to elicit and document descriptions of emergency physician expertise, to characterize cognitive differences between novice and expert physicians, and to identify areas in which novices' skill and knowledge gaps are most pronounced. The nature of the differences between novices and experts needs to be explored to develop effective instructional modalities that accelerate the learning curve of inexperienced physicians who work in high-complexity environments. We interviewed novice emergency physicians (first-year residents) and attending physicians with significant expertise, working in an academic Level I trauma center in Southern California. With cognitive task analysis, we used task diagrams to capture nonroutine critical incidents that required the use of complex cognitive skills. Timelines were constructed to develop a detailed understanding of challenging incidents and the decisions involved as the incident unfolded, followed by progressive deepening to tease out situation-specific cues, knowledge, and information that experts and novices used. A thematic analysis of the interview transcripts was conducted to identify key categories. Using classification techniques for data reduction, we identified a smaller set of key themes, which composed the core findings of the study. Five interns and 6 attending physicians participated in the interviews. Novice physicians reported having difficulties representing the patient's story to attending physicians and other health care providers. Overrelying on objective data, novice physicians use linear thinking to move to diagnosis quickly and are likely to discount and explain away data that do not "fit" the frame. Experienced physicians draw on expertise to recognize cues and patterns while leaving room for altering or even changing their initial diagnosis. Whereas experts maintain high levels of spatial, temporal, and organizational systems awareness when overseeing treatment modalities of

  14. Working Paper 2003-01

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Unknown

    Gender: Females are somewhat hesitant to share the data on some indicators like violence against ... go abroad discourages the people to complete higher education. .... cooperation from the local level, data updating will be difficult to pursue.

  15. The Decision Module Working Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-12-01

    and goal change has received very little attention In the litera- ture on the analysis of choice situations. It has generally been the case that the...Decision Making: Approach and Prototype" (197:0, done In context of the Mesarovlc - Pestel World Model Projet’ The Issues dealing with «-he cho ce...Nelson, Winder, and Schuette (1973) on evolutionary economic growth models. The discussion of the two components of the decision module that follows

  16. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the department's plutonium storage. Volume II, part 9, Oak Ridge Site working group assessment team report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The objective of the Plutonium Environmental Safety and Health (ES ampersand H) Vulnerability Assessment at the Oak Ridge (OR) Site was to conduct a comprehensive assessment of the ES ampersand H vulnerabilities arising from the storage and handling of its current plutonium holdings. The term open-quotes ES ampersand H Vulnerabilityclose quotes is defined for the purpose of this project to mean conditions or weaknesses that could lead to unnecessary or increased radiation exposure of workers, release of radioactive materials to the environment, or radiation exposure to the public. This assessment was intended to take a open-quotes snap-shotclose quotes of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Y-12 Plant's plutonium holdings and associated ES ampersand H vulnerabilities in the time frame of June 1 994. This vulnerability assessment process began with the OR Site Assessment Team (SAT) generating a self-assessment report including proposed vulnerabilities. The SAT identified 55 facilities which contain plutonium and other transuranics they considered might be in-scope for purposes of this study. The Working Group Assessment Team (WGAT), however, determined that 37 of the facilities actually contained only out-of-scope material (e.g., transuranic material not colocated with plutonium or transuranic (TRU) waste). The WGAT performed an independent assessment of the SATs report, conducted facility walkdowns, and reviewed reference documents such as Safety Analysis Reports (SARs), Operational Safety Requirements (OSRs), emergency preparedness plans, and procedures. The results of the WGAT review and open-quotes walkdownsclose quotes (a term as used here incorporating tours, document reviews, and detailed discussions with cognizant personnel) are discussed in Section 3.0. The ES ampersand H vulnerabilities that were identified are documented in Appendix A

  17. [Management policy-making for work and education in health: the case of the Bahia State Health Department, Brazil, 2007-2008].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Isabela Cardoso de Matos; Teixeira, Carmen Fontes

    2011-09-01

    The construction of Brazil's Unified National Health System (SUS) has raised a set of challenges for the health sector's administrators and personnel, including issues of work management and continuing education for health workers, in view of the financial, political, and organizational constraints in the process of changing the healthcare model. The current study aimed to analyze the process of formulating the Health Work and Education Management Policy by the Bahia State Health Department. Public policy cycle was used as the theoretical framework. The study analyzed data from institutional documents and records of participant observation by one of the authors. The results include mapping the governmental and nongovernmental stakeholders that participated in the process. The analysis highlights a series of problems in the SUS in Bahia related to work management and health workers' profile, taken as the point of departure for priority-setting in the State Strategic Agenda and Health Plan for 2008-2011.

  18. The roles played by the Canadian General Electric Company's Atomic Power Department in Canada's nuclear power program: work, organization and success in APD, 1955-1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantello, G.W.

    2003-01-01

    This thesis explores the roles played by the Canadian General Electric Company's Atomic Power Department (APD) in Canada's distinctive nuclear power program. From the establishment of APD in 1955 until the completion of the KANUPP project in Pakistan in 1972, the company's strategy encompassed the design, manufacture, and commissioning of entire nuclear power projects in Canada and abroad. APD then developed a specialized role in the design and supply of complete nuclear fuel handling systems, nuclear fuel bundles, and service work, that sustained a thriving workplace. Five key factors are identified as the reasons behind the long and successful history of the department: (1) Strong, capable and efficient management from the start, (2) Flexible organizational structure, (3) Extremely competent design group, (4) Excellent manufacturing, test, commissioning and service capabilities, (5) Correctly identifying, at the right time, the best fields in which to specialize. (author)

  19. Retrofitting Of RCC Piles By Using Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymer BFRP Composite Part 1 Review Papers On RCC Structures And Piles Retrofitting Works.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ananda Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Retrofitting works are immensely essential for deteriorated and damaged structures in Engineering and Medical fields in order to keep or return to the originality for safe guarding the structures and consumers. In this paper different types of methods of retrofitting review notes are given based on the experimental numerical and analytical methods results on strengthening the Reinforced cement concrete RCC structures including RCC piles. Soil-pile interaction on axial load lateral load reviews are also presented. This review paper is prepared to find out the performance of basalt fibre reinforced polymer BFRP composite retrofitted reinforced cement concrete single end bearing piles.

  20. Young Geophysicists: `Know How' Tips to Nourish Them from Lectures and Seminars to Field Work and Conferences (Geology and Geophysics Department, Novosibirsk State University, GGD, NSU).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhmenkulova, I. F.

    2016-12-01

    How to nourish young brilliant geophysicists? Here are the tips: We teach them as physicists (at the Department of Physics, together with students majoring in physics). Students have special facilities in field work, using most modern geophysical equipment. They can participate in real projects on applied geophysics during their studies. They attend special seminars and conferences for both young professionals and full-fledged scientists. Their English Language Program is focused on geophysical terminology. There are four specialties at Geology and Geophysics Department of Novosibirsk State University: Geophysics, Geochemistry, Geology, and Geochemistry of Oil and Gas. However, the curriculum for geophysicists is absolutely different from other specialties. Mathematics, physics and laboratory work are given at the Department of Physics (together with students majoring in physics). All the necessary geological subjects are also studied (including field work). During all period of their study the students work part time at many geophysical institutions. The equipment is both traditional and most modern, created at the Institute of Oil and Gas Geophysics. The students present the result of their field work and laboratory experiments in many seminars and conferences. For example, there is a traditional annual conference in Shira, Khakassia, for young professionals. Every year the Seminar in Geodynamics, Geophysics and Geomechanics is held in the Altay Mountains (Denisova Cave Camp). This Seminar was organized by the late Sergey Goldin, the Director of the Institute of Geophysics, the Head of the Chair of Geophysics, a Member of the Russian Academy of Sciences. In July 2016 this Seminar was devoted to 80's birth anniversary of Sergey Goldin. Several students of geophysics presented the results of their work there. Next year the seminar is supposed to be international. A special attention is given to the English course lasting for 5 years. The students learn general

  1. Selected papers

    CERN Document Server

    Elgot, Calvin C

    1982-01-01

    Cal Elgot was a very serious and thoughtful researcher, who with great determi­ nation attempted to find basic explanations for certain mathematical phenomena­ as the selection of papers in this volume well illustrate. His approach was, for the most part, rather finitist and constructivist, and he was inevitably drawn to studies of the process of computation. It seems to me that his early work on decision problems relating automata and logic, starting with his thesis under Roger Lyndon and continuing with joint work with Biichi, Wright, Copi, Rutledge, Mezei, and then later with Rabin, set the stage for his attack on the theory of computation through the abstract treatment of the notion of a machine. This is also apparent in his joint work with A. Robinson reproduced here and in his joint papers with John Shepherdson. Of course in the light of subsequent work on decision problems by Biichi, Rabin, Shelah, and many, many others, the subject has been placed on a completely different plane from what it was whe...

  2. Retrofitting Of RCC Piles By Using Basalt Fiber Reinforced Polymer BFRP Composite Part 1 Review Papers On RCC Structures And Piles Retrofitting Works.

    OpenAIRE

    R. Ananda Kumar; Dr. C. Selvamony; A. Seeni; Dr. T. R. Sethuraman

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Retrofitting works are immensely essential for deteriorated and damaged structures in Engineering and Medical fields in order to keep or return to the originality for safe guarding the structures and consumers. In this paper different types of methods of retrofitting review notes are given based on the experimental numerical and analytical methods results on strengthening the Reinforced cement concrete RCC structures including RCC piles. Soil-pile interaction on axial load lateral lo...

  3. Energy infrastructure of the United States and projected siting needs: Scoping ideas, identifying issues and options. Draft report of the Department of Energy Working Group on Energy Facility Siting to the Secretary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    A Department of Energy (DOE) Working Group on Energy Facility Siting, chaired by the Policy Office with membership from the major program and staff offices of the Department, reviewed data regarding energy service needs, infrastructure requirements, and constraints to siting. The Working Group found that the expeditious siting of energy facilities has important economic, energy, and environmental implications for key Administration priorities.

  4. The 2014 Academic College of Emergency Experts in India's Education Development Committee (EDC) White Paper on establishing an academic department of Emergency Medicine in India - Guidelines for Staffing, Infrastructure, Resources, Curriculum and Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Praveen; Galwankar, Sagar; Kalra, Om Prakash; Bhalla, Ashish; Bhoi, Sanjeev; Sundarakumar, Sundarajan

    2014-07-01

    Emergency medicine services and training in Emergency Medicine (EM) has developed to a large extent in developed countries but its establishment is far from optimal in developing countries. In India, Medical Council of India (MCI) has taken great steps by notifying EM as a separate specialty and so far 20 medical colleges have already initiated 3-year training program in EM. However, there has been shortage of trained faculty, and ambiguity regarding curriculum, rotation policy, infrastructure, teachers' eligibility qualifications and scheme of examination. Academic College of Emergency Experts in India (ACEE-India) has been a powerful advocate for developing Academic EM in India. The ACEE's Education Development Committee (EDC) was created to chalk out guidelines for staffing, infrastructure, resources, curriculum, and training which may be of help to the MCI and the National Board of Examinations (NBE) to set standards for starting 3-year training program in EM and develop the departments of EM as centers of quality education, research, and treatment across India. This paper has made an attempt to give recommendations so as to provide a uniform framework to the institutions, thus guiding them towards establishing an academic Department of EM for starting the 3-year training program in the specialty of EM.

  5. The 2014 Academic College of Emergency Experts in India′s Education Development Committee (EDC White Paper on establishing an academic department of Emergency Medicine in India - Guidelines for Staffing, Infrastructure, Resources, Curriculum and Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Aggarwal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Emergency medicine services and training in Emergency Medicine (EM has developed to a large extent in developed countries but its establishment is far from optimal in developing countries. In India, Medical Council of India (MCI has taken great steps by notifying EM as a separate specialty and so far 20 medical colleges have already initiated 3-year training program in EM. However, there has been shortage of trained faculty, and ambiguity regarding curriculum, rotation policy, infrastructure, teachers′ eligibility qualifications and scheme of examination. Academic College of Emergency Experts in India (ACEE-India has been a powerful advocate for developing Academic EM in India. The ACEE′s Education Development Committee (EDC was created to chalk out guidelines for staffing, infrastructure, resources, curriculum, and training which may be of help to the MCI and the National Board of Examinations (NBE to set standards for starting 3-year training program in EM and develop the departments of EM as centers of quality education, research, and treatment across India. This paper has made an attempt to give recommendations so as to provide a uniform framework to the institutions, thus guiding them towards establishing an academic Department of EM for starting the 3-year training program in the specialty of EM.

  6. Features of Teaching Third-Year Students the Subject «Assessment of the General State of a Child. Anthropometry. Measuring and Recording Body Temperature. Work with Newborn Children» by the Module «Nursing in Pediatrics» at the Department of Propedeut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Koniushevska

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the methodology of teaching at the department of propedeutics of pediatrics the subject «Assessment of the general state of a child. Anthropometry. Measuring and recording body temperature. Work with newborn children». Objectives of the lesson, the skills needed to achieve the goal are provided. Stages of lessons are presented.

  7. Moving toward a United States strategic plan in primary care informatics: a White Paper of the Primary Care Informatics Working Group, American Medical Informatics Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Little

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The Primary Care Informatics Working Group (PCIWG of the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA has identified the absence of a national strategy for primary care informatics. Under PCIWG leadership, major national and international societies have come together to create the National Alliance for Primary Care Informatics (NAPCI, to promote a connection between the informatics community and the organisations that support primary care. The PCIWG clinical practice subcommittee has recognised the necessity of a global needs assessment, and proposed work in point-of-care technology, clinical vocabularies, and ambulatory electronic medical record development. Educational needs include a consensus statement on informatics competencies, recommendations for curriculum and teaching methods, and methodologies to evaluate their effectiveness. The research subcommittee seeks to define a primary care informatics research agenda, and to support and disseminate informatics research throughout the primary care community. The AMIA board of directors has enthusiastically endorsed the conceptual basis for this White Paper.

  8. National platform electromobility. Working group 4 - Key issue paper standardization and certification; Nationale Plattform Elektromobilitaet. AG 4 - Eckpunktepapier Normung, Standardisierung und Zertifizierung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoelk, Stephanie [Audi AG, Ingolstadt (Germany). I/EM-1

    2010-07-01

    On behalf of the working group 4 ''Standardization and certification ''of the national platform electromobility arranged by the Federal Government, the ''German standardization roadmap electromobility'' was compiled. This gives a survey of the existing structures and definitions of the standardization and designates substantial demands and recommendations for action in order to contribute to the break-through of the electromobility in Europe and in the world. The position paper summarizes the central asking of the standardization roadmap. It identifies necessary basic conditions, appoints concrete recommendations for action and shows the further demand for action for the standardization.

  9. National platform electromobility. Working group 4 - Key issue paper standardization and certification; Nationale Plattform Elektromobilitaet. AG 4 - Eckpunktepapier Normung, Standardisierung und Zertifizierung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoelk, Stephanie (comp.) [Audi AG, Ingolstadt (Germany). I/EM-1

    2010-07-01

    On behalf of the working group 4 ''Standardization and certification ''of the national platform electromobility arranged by the Federal Government, the ''German standardization roadmap electromobility'' was compiled. This gives a survey of the existing structures and definitions of the standardization and designates substantial demands and recommendations for action in order to contribute to the break-through of the electromobility in Europe and in the world. The position paper summarizes the central asking of the standardization roadmap. It identifies necessary basic conditions, appoints concrete recommendations for action and shows the further demand for action for the standardization.

  10. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the department's plutonium storage. Volume II, part 10: Sandia National Laboratories - New Mexico working group assessment team report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Secretary of Energy's memorandum of March 15, 1994, established an initiative for a Department-wide assessment of the vulnerabilities of the inventory of plutonium in storage. Plutonium in intact nuclear weapons and spent fuel were excluded from this study. The DOE Plutonium Vulnerability Working Group, which was formed for this purpose and produced the Project and Assessment Plans, will also manage the open-quote snap-shot close-quote assessments and produce a final report for the Secretary by September 30, 1994. The Project Plan and Assessment Plan to accomplish this study, and which established responsibilities for personnel essential to the study, were issued on April 25, 1994

  11. Ethical issues in the response to Ebola virus disease in United States emergency departments: a position paper of the American College of Emergency Physicians, the Emergency Nurses Association, and the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkat, Arvind; Asher, Shellie L; Wolf, Lisa; Geiderman, Joel M; Marco, Catherine A; McGreevy, Jolion; Derse, Arthur R; Otten, Edward J; Jesus, John E; Kreitzer, Natalie P; Escalante, Monica; Levine, Adam C

    2015-05-01

    The 2014 outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa has presented a significant public health crisis to the international health community and challenged U.S. emergency departments (EDs) to prepare for patients with a disease of exceeding rarity in developed nations. With the presentation of patients with Ebola to U.S. acute care facilities, ethical questions have been raised in both the press and medical literature as to how U.S. EDs, emergency physicians (EPs), emergency nurses, and other stakeholders in the health care system should approach the current epidemic and its potential for spread in the domestic environment. To address these concerns, the American College of Emergency Physicians, the Emergency Nurses Association, and the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine developed this joint position paper to provide guidance to U.S. EPs, emergency nurses, and other stakeholders in the health care system on how to approach the ethical dilemmas posed by the outbreak of EVD. This paper will address areas of immediate and potential ethical concern to U.S. EDs in how they approach preparation for and management of potential patients with EVD. © 2015 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  12. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the Department's plutonium storage. Volume II, Part 5: Argonne National Laboratory - west working group assessment team report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    Based on the site visit and walkdowns, the Working Group Assessment Team (WGAT) considers the Site Assessment Team (SAT) report and question sets to be a factual assessment of the facilities. As a result of the Site and WGAT's reviews, six vulnerabilities were identified for further consideration by the Department of Energy (DOE) Plutonium Vulnerability Working Group preparing the final report. All six vulnerabilities were discussed among the respective site teams members and facility experts and agreement was reached. The vulnerabilities by facility identified by the SAT and WGAT are described below. No ranking or priority is implied by the order in which they are listed. In addition the WGAT identified and included issues for the Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) and DOE line management organizations that are not explicit Environment Safety ampersand Health (ES ampersand H) vulnerabilities

  13. Greenhouse-Gas Emissions and Abatement Costs of Nuclear, Fossil and Alternative Energy Options from a Life-Circle Perspective. Working paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritsche, U.R.

    2007-03-01

    As the issue of nuclear risks in its various forms - from radiation released during uranium mining to severe reactor accidents, and leakage from fuel reprocessing and repositories for spent fuel - is beyond the scope of this paper, we concentrate the following analysis on the more recent issues for which a scientifically reasonable range of data is available. In that respect, two arguments favouring nuclear electricity can be identified: It is allegedly free of CO2, and it is allegedly low cost. In this paper, we address both, presenting results of life-cycle cost and emission analyses of energy systems with respect to current technologies. We discuss the results with respect to other findings in the literature, and also indicate the cost-effectiveness of CO2 abatement in the electricity sector. The scientific work from which this paper draws was sponsored by a variety of sources, including the German Federal Ministry for Environment, Nature Protection, and Nuclear Safety (BMU), German Federal Ministry for Research and Education (BMBF), The Federal Environment Agency of Germany (UBA). (orig./GL)

  14. Debating the use of work-based learning and interprofessional education in promoting collaborative practice in primary care: a discussion paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Shona; Rutherford, Ishbel; Mountain, Kristina

    2012-01-01

    The context of primary care in the UK is changing rapidly, underpinned by continuing policy drivers to ensure person-centred safe and effective practice. Undergraduate and postgraduate programmes for healthcare practitioners are increasingly using interprofessional education (IPE) as one route to engender greater understanding of others' roles and contributions to health care, with the suggestion that IPE leads to better integration and teamwork, and thus stronger collaborative practice. Access to education and professional development for those working in primary care is difficult, and individuals need the focus of learning to be clearly relevant to their practice. To review and debate the evidence on the role of work-based learning and IPE in enhancing collaborative practice in primary care. Literature search and critique of key papers relevant to primary care practice. The three themes emerged of IPE, workbased learning (WBL) and collaborative practice. There is a growing body of literature to support the positive outcomes of IPE and the utilisation of WBL in developing practice. A range of practitioners in a variety of work settings have used WBL approaches in the implementation of innovations and the development of communities of practice. However, little evidence exists to support these approaches in primary care. The application of WBL across primary care teams can support a positive and collaborative learning culture, resulting in changes to professional practice.

  15. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the department's plutonium storage. Volume II, part 6: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory working group assessment team report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    President Clinton directed an Interagency Working Group to initiate a comprehensive review of long-term options for the disposition of surplus plutonium. As part of this initiative, Secretary of Energy Hazel O'Leary directed the Department of Energy to develop options and plans for the interim safe storage of these materials. One step in this direction is a plutonium vulnerability assessment of DOE facilities by a open-quotes Plutonium Vulnerability Working Group.close quotes In this effort, the working group developed a Project Plan and an Assessment Plan which basically laid out the approach and methodology for the assessments. The plans were issued on April 25, 1994. The Project Plan specifies a WGAT for each site with significant holdings of plutonium. Also, the plan requires that each site form a Site Assessment Team (SAT) to provide the self assessment for the project. Additionally, the working group was tasked with managing the assessments at each site, and providing the results in a final report for the Secretary by September 30, 1994

  16. Prevalence of Asthma, Asthma Attacks, and Emergency Department Visits for Asthma Among Working Adults - National Health Interview Survey, 2011-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurek, Jacek M; Syamlal, Girija

    2018-04-06

    In 2010, an estimated 8.2% of U.S. adults had current asthma, and among these persons, 49.1% had had an asthma attack during the past year (1). Workplace exposures can cause asthma in a previously healthy worker or can trigger asthma exacerbations in workers with current asthma* (2). To assess the industry- and occupation-specific prevalence of current asthma, asthma attacks, and asthma-related emergency department (ED) visits among working adults, CDC analyzed 2011-2016 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data for participants aged ≥18 years who, at the time of the survey, were employed at some time during the 12 months preceding the interview. During 2011-2016, 6.8% of adults (11 million) employed at any time in the past 12 months had current asthma; among those, 44.7% experienced an asthma attack, and 9.9% had an asthma-related ED visit in the previous year. Current asthma prevalence was highest among workers in the health care and social assistance industry (8.8%) and in health care support occupations (8.8%). The increased prevalence of current asthma, asthma attacks, and asthma-related ED visits in certain industries and occupations might indicate increased risks for these health outcomes associated with workplace exposures. These findings might assist health care and public health professionals in identifying workers in industries and occupations with a high prevalence of current asthma, asthma attacks, and asthma-related ED visits who should be evaluated for possible work-related asthma. Guidelines intended to promote effective management of work-related asthma are available (2,3).

  17. Ill-lighting syndrome: prevalence in shift-work personnel in the anaesthesiology and intensive care department of three Italian hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zanatta Paolo

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Light is one of the most important factors in our interaction with the environment; it is indispensable to visual function and neuroendocrine regulation, and is essential to our emotional perception and evaluation of the environment. Previous studies have focussed on the effects of prolonged anomalous exposure to artificial light and, in the field of work-related illness. Studies have been carried out on shift-work personnel, who are obliged to experience alterations in the physiological alternation of day and night, with anomalous exposure to light stimuli in hours normally reserved for sleep. In order to identify any signs and symptoms of the so-called ill-lighting syndrome, we carried out a study on a sample of anaesthesiologists and nurses employed in the operating theatres and Intensive Care Departments of three Italian hospitals. We measured the subjective emotional discomfort (stress experienced by these subjects, and its correlation with environmental discomfort factors, in particular the level of lighting, in their workplace. Methods We used a questionnaire developed by the Scandinavian teams who investigated Sick-Building Syndrome, that was self-administered on one day in the environments where the degree of illumination was measured according to UNIEN12464-1 regulations. Results Upon comparison of the types of exposure with the horizontal luminance values (lux measured ( 1500 lux and the degree of stress reported, (Intensive Care: mean stress = 55.8%, high stress = 34.6%; Operating Theatres: mean stress = 51.5%, high stress = 33.8%, it can be observed that the percentage of high stress was reduced as the exposure to luminance was increased, although this finding was not statistically significant. Conclusion We cannot share other authors' enthusiasm regarding the effects on workers well-being correlated to the use of fluorescent lighting. The stress level of our workers was found to be more heavily influenced by

  18. [Alfredo Tramoyeres Cases (1910-2002): first chairman of the Department of Urology at the Ciudad Sanitaria La Fe. Documentary-historical analysis of his works].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cánovas Ivorra, José Antonio; Tramoyeres Galvañ, Alfredo; Sánchez Ballester, Francisco; De la Torre Abril, Luis; Ordoño Domínguez, Felipe; Navalón Verdejo, Pedro; Pérez Albacete, Mariano; López Alcina, Emilio; Zaragoza Orts, Julio

    2004-12-01

    Urology, having been part of general surgery for centuries, was completely consolidated as a medical speciality in the middle of the XX Century as the result of years of evolution and development, and all the studies and works of certain authors that represent today the mainstays of our speciality. Valencia in the middle of the 20th century saw the birth of new hospitals including the "Ciudad Sanitaria La Fe". Alfredo Tramoyeres Cases was the first chairman of the Department of Urology. This article reviews his long and fertile professional life. We have reviewed all his scientific works. The articles have been obtained from Medicina Española, Revista Española de Cirugía Traumatológica y Ortopedia, and Archivos Españoles de Urología. His most important urological work is his doctoral thesis with the title "Sigmoid-procto-ureterostomy: personal modification" published in Valencia in 1976. For his biography we used the" Biographic and bibliographic history of the Spanish Urology over the XX century" and interviews with family members. We emphasize his thorough description of the various types of urinary diversion. He covers the topics of bladder diverticula and bladder neck disorders, in which he supports surgical treatment. Finally, he sets out the rupture of the posterior urethra and various treatments for prostate cancer at that time. Alfredo Tramoyeres Cases contributed to the definitive consolidation of our speciality in the area of Valencia during the second half of the XX century, through his long professional life, with his interesting scientific contributions.

  19. Interdisciplinary Program For In-Service Teachers; Working with Industry And University to Enhance Learning Experiences in the State of Ohio (Invited Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Lunsford

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Science Teaching for Ohio's New Economy (STONE is an interdisciplinary professional development program that inservice teachers grades K-12 that experience the integration of earth and physical science in an inquiry-based field. There are various field trips to various industrial settings that teach how geoscientist works in the aggregate industry. During the academic year there is a support system where the industry and the in-service teachers engage their students into real world industrial applications in the aggregate industry. This paper will discuss the utilization of high – tech instrumentation such as X-Ray Fluorescence and Scanning Electron Microscopy to teach real-world science applications of concern. Pre- and Post-test assessments as addressed by R.R. Hake have shown that these inquirybased professional development workshops that integrated academia with industry as a positive outcome for our students in Ohio.

  20. ANCCLI White Paper VI. Which conditions for an influential participation of CLIs and ANCCLI to the territorial and national follow-up of dismantling works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delalonde, Jean-Claude; Eimer, Michel; Boutin, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    After a brief presentation of the different phases of nuclear installation dismantling, and a statement about the interest of CLIs (Local information commissions) and ANCCLI (National association of local information commissions and committees), the first part of this white paper addresses the regulatory framework of dismantling, its process, and outlines roles of CLIs and ANCCLI in this process, and remaining issues. It describes the role CLIs already had in issues related to dismantling for different sites (Tricastin, Gard, Monts d'Arree, Saint-Laurent-des-Eaux). A set of proposals is formulated for an influential participation of CLIs and ANCCLI to the national and territorial follow-up of dismantling works. A road-map is proposed for CLIs who want to tackle the dismantling issue. An amendment is proposed for a decree related to the definitive stoppage and dismantling of basic nuclear installations and to subcontracting

  1. Cartography and risk management in radiotherapy: a collaborative work of the department of radiotherapy and the department of quality and risk management Institute Jean-Godinot; Cartographie et gestion des risques en radiotherapie: un travail commun du departement de radiotherapie et du departement de la qualite et de la gestion des risques de l'institut Jean-Godinot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, T.D.; Loiseau, M. [Institut Jean-Godinot, Dept. de radiotherapie, 51 - Reims (France); Devie, I.; Heusghem, M. [Institut Jean-Godinot, Dept. de la qualite et de la gestion des risques, 51 - Reims (France); Gaillot-Petit, N. [Institut Jean-Godinot, Unite de radiophysique medicale, 51 - Reims (France)

    2010-01-15

    Purpose To deploy an inductive process for radiotherapy risk management in a regional cancer centre and to infer the actions required to solve the situations of criticality. Methods Close collaboration between the department of radiation oncology-biophysics and the department of quality and risk management in the same institution allowed to create a multi professional and multidisciplinary task force and to make the experience feedback easier. A preliminary risk analysis method was used to identify the generic dangers, the mapping of risks and the specification of the scales of criticality. This method helped to evaluate and to rate each apprehended event. Four scales have been defined: seriousness scale in five levels, likelihood scale in five classes, endeavour scale in four levels and criticality scale in three categories: acceptable (criticality 1) tolerable under control (criticality 2) and unacceptable (criticality 3). Results Fifty-seven level 1 dangerous situations linked to 78 scenarios of criticality acceptable, tolerable and unacceptable in 24, 44 and 10 cases respectively have been identified in the department of radiotherapy leading to carry out 28 risk reduction actions. Conclusions The performed risk analysis offered an original frame for a collective thinking among the care providers and contributed to modify their mode of conceiving both security and radioprotection. The study allowed us to give a relevant answer to the High Authority of Health and the Authority of Nuclear Security demands either in terms of efficient management of the risks in radiotherapy or regarding the daily concerns of the care-givers. (authors)

  2. The Library Work Order Processing System: A New Approach to Motivate Employees and to Increase Production in the Technical Service Department of Mercer County Community College Library. Applied Educational Research and Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Yong Sup

    After reviewing the current movement toward job enrichment, a system was designed for the technical services department of the Mercer County Community College Library. The Library Work Order Processing System, as tried between January and March, 1974, was designed to permit each worker more variety of jobs. The technical services department was…

  3. Exploring Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    Exploratorium Magazine communicates ideas that exhibits cannot easily demonstrate, extending the museum beyond its physical walls. This issue takes an in-depth look at the science and history of paper. Topics include: (1) Fascinating Facts about Paper; (2) A Closer Look at the Paper in This Magazine; (3) Handmade Paper; (4) Paper Airplanes; (5)…

  4. The Influence of Organizational Commitment, Job Commitment and Job Satisfaction on Professionalism Perceived by Radiotechnologists Working in the Department of Radiation Oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gim, Yang Soo; Lee, Sun Young; Lee, Joon Seong; Gwak, Geun Tak; Park, Ju Gyeong; Lee, Seung Hoon; Hwang, Ho In; Cha, Seok Yong

    2012-01-01

    The study is to check the specialty of radiotherapists working in the department of radiation oncology and find job satisfaction, organizational commitment and job commitment having an effect on professional parts. After making analysis of the mutual relation, it is to provide radiotechnologists with making progress in the future. From March 2 to March 30, we had carried out a survey with email. It is possible to have 272 questionnaires answered in the survey. We make use of SPSS 13.0 for Windows to analyze the data collected for study. Frequency and a percentage are meant to show general characteristics, and t-test and ANOVA to do the difference between general properties and professionalism. Pearson's correlation coefficient also is meant to do the correlation of professionalism, organizational job commitment and job satisfaction, and multiple regression analysis to do the factor for a relevant variable to affect professionalism. There are subdivisions in the professionalism informing us of the self-regulation 17.74±2.32/3.55±46, a sense of calling 17.58±2.63/3.52±53, reference of the professional 17.14±2.39/3.43±48, service to the public 15.97±2.48/3.19±50, and autonomy 15.68±2.28/3.14±46. Grand mean turns out to be 83.89±7.63(Summation of items)/ 3.37±0.49(Numbers of items). When it comes to a statistical relation between general characteristics and professionalism, the statistics have it that these come within age (P 2 is 0.504. The results of the factors that influence professionalism working as radiotherapists in the department of radiation oncology have it that the more affective commitment, normative commitment, and job satisfaction we feel, the more professionalism we recognize. We think that the focus of professionalism is increased if getting the chances for radiotherapists to have little to do with developing opportunities given.

  5. Annual report 1982 chemistry department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, E.; Nielsen, O.J.

    1983-04-01

    The work going on in the Risoe National Laboratory, Chemistry Department is briefly surveyed by a presentation of all articles and reports published in 1982. The facilities and equipment are barely mentioned. The papers are divided into eight activities: 1. neutron activation analysis 2. analytical- and organic chemistry 3. environmental chemistry 4. polymer chemistry 5. geochemistry 6. radical chemistry 7. poitron annihilation 8. uranium process chemistry. (author)

  6. On a Work Expected to the Department of Emergency and Critical Care Medicine and the Emergency Unit of the Niigata University Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    小山, 真; Koyama, Shin

    2001-01-01

    The author would like to celebrate the start of the Department of emergency and critical care medicine and the Emergency unit of the Niigata University Hospital. The author also wishes to express his opinion, which is mentioned below, on preparing the Department and the Emergency unit for their future activity. 1 . The stuff members of the Department are expected to instruct undergraduate students in the knowledge and technique of Triage and the first aid in emergency exactly. 2 . The Emergen...

  7. Gut microbiota in early life and its influence on health and disease: A position paper by the Malaysian Working Group on Gastrointestinal Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeong Yeh; Hassan, Siti Asma; Ismail, Intan Hakimah; Chong, Sze Yee; Raja Ali, Raja Affendi; Amin Nordin, Syafinaz; Lee, Way Seah; Majid, Noorizan Abdul

    2017-12-01

    The role of gut microbiota in early life and its impact on gut health and subsequent diseases remain unclear. There is a lack of research and awareness in this area, especially in the Asia-Pacific region, including Malaysia. This paper reports the position of a Malaysian Working Group on some key issues surrounding gut microbiota in early life and its role in gut health and diseases, as well as experts' stand on probiotics and prebiotics. The group reached a consensus that certain factors, including elective caesarean; premature deliveries; complementary feeding; use of antibiotics, prebiotics and/or probiotics; and exposure to the external environmental, have an impact on gut microbiota in early life. However, as evidence is lacking, especially from the Asia-Pacific region, further studies are needed to understand how gut microbiota in early life affects subsequent diseases, including allergy, inflammatory bowel disease, obesity and infantile colic. Lastly, although beneficial in acute diarrhoeal disease and probably allergic eczema, probiotics (and/or prebiotics) should be used cautiously in other gut dysbiotic conditions until more data are available. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  8. The Influence of Organizational Commitment, Job Commitment and Job Satisfaction on Professionalism Perceived by Radiotechnologists Working in the Department of Radiation Oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gim, Yang Soo; Lee, Sun Young; Lee, Joon Seong; Gwak, Geun Tak; Park, Ju Gyeong; Lee, Seung Hoon; Hwang, Ho In; Cha, Seok Yong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Chunbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    The study is to check the specialty of radiotherapists working in the department of radiation oncology and find job satisfaction, organizational commitment and job commitment having an effect on professional parts. After making analysis of the mutual relation, it is to provide radiotechnologists with making progress in the future. From March 2 to March 30, we had carried out a survey with email. It is possible to have 272 questionnaires answered in the survey. We make use of SPSS 13.0 for Windows to analyze the data collected for study. Frequency and a percentage are meant to show general characteristics, and t-test and ANOVA to do the difference between general properties and professionalism. Pearson's correlation coefficient also is meant to do the correlation of professionalism, organizational job commitment and job satisfaction, and multiple regression analysis to do the factor for a relevant variable to affect professionalism. There are subdivisions in the professionalism informing us of the self-regulation 17.74{+-}2.32/3.55{+-}46, a sense of calling 17.58{+-}2.63/3.52{+-}53, reference of the professional 17.14{+-}2.39/3.43{+-}48, service to the public 15.97{+-}2.48/3.19{+-}50, and autonomy 15.68{+-}2.28/3.14{+-}46. Grand mean turns out to be 83.89{+-}7.63(Summation of items)/ 3.37{+-}0.49(Numbers of items). When it comes to a statistical relation between general characteristics and professionalism, the statistics have it that these come within age (P<.001), period of employment (P<.001), education status (P<.05), a monthly income (P<.001), radiotherapists who get a special license (P<.001), the position (P<.001), and an opportunity for developing (P<.001). As a result of organizational commitment, job commitment, and job satisfaction, grand mean in organizational commitment proves to be 81.10{+-}8.15/3.34{+-}34. There are subvisions showing affective commitment 28.64{+-}4.61/3.58, continuance commitment 27.54{+-}4.22/3.44{+-}53, and normative commitment

  9. An Analytical Comparison of the Opinions of Physicians Working in Emergency and Trauma Surgery Departments at Tabriz and Vienna Medical Universities Regarding Family Presence during Resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimanpour, Hassan; Behringer, Wilhelm; Tabrizi, Jafar Sadegh; Sarahrudi, Kambiz; Golzari, Samad E J; Hajdu, Stefan; Rasouli, Maryam; Nikakhtar, Mehdi; Mehdizadeh Esfanjani, Robab

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated the opinions of physicians working in the emergency and trauma surgery departments of Vienna Medical University, in Austria, and Tabriz Medical University, in Iran, regarding the presence of patients' relatives during resuscitation. In a descriptive-analytical study, the data obtained from questionnaires that had been distributed randomly to 40 specialists and residents at each of the participating universities were analyzed. The questionnaire consisted of two sections aimed at capturing the participants' demographic data, the participants' opinions regarding their support for the family's presence during resuscitation, and the multiple potential factors affecting the participants' attitudes, including health beliefs, triggers that could facilitate the procedure, self-efficacy, intellectual norms, and perceived behavioral control. The questionnaire also included a direct question (Question 16) on whether the participants approved of family presence. Each question could be answered using a Likert-type scale. The results showed that the mean scores for Question 16 were 4.31 ± 0.64 and 3.57 ± 1.31 for participants at Vienna and Tabriz universities, respectively. Moreover, physicians at Vienna University disapproved of the presence of patients' families during resuscitation to a higher extent than did those at Tabriz University (P = 0.018). Of the studied prognostic factors affecting the perspectives of Vienna Medical University's physicians, health beliefs (P = 0.000; B = 1.146), triggers (P = 0.000; B = 1.050), and norms (P = 0.000; B = 0.714) were found to be significant. Moreover, of the studied prognostic factors affecting the perspectives of Tabriz Medical University's physicians, health beliefs (P = 0.000; B = 0.875), triggers (P = 0.000; B = 1.11), self-efficacy (P = 0.001; B = 0.5), and perceived behavioral control (P = 0.03; B = 0.713) were significant. Most physicians at Vienna and Tabriz Medical universities were not open

  10. Audio Papers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Sanne Krogh; Samson, Kristine

    2016-01-01

    With this special issue of Seismograf we are happy to present a new format of articles: Audio Papers. Audio papers resemble the regular essay or the academic text in that they deal with a certain topic of interest, but presented in the form of an audio production. The audio paper is an extension...

  11. Paper electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobjörk, Daniel; Österbacka, Ronald

    2011-05-03

    Paper is ubiquitous in everyday life and a truly low-cost substrate. The use of paper substrates could be extended even further, if electronic applications would be applied next to or below the printed graphics. However, applying electronics on paper is challenging. The paper surface is not only very rough compared to plastics, but is also porous. While this is detrimental for most electronic devices manufactured directly onto paper substrates, there are also approaches that are compatible with the rough and absorptive paper surface. In this review, recent advances and possibilities of these approaches are evaluated and the limitations of paper electronics are discussed. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Cooperation mechanisms of the EU renewable energy directive and flexible mechanisms of the Kyoto Protocol: comparison and lessons learnt. Working paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frieden, Dorian; Tuerk, Andreas; Steiner, Daniel

    2013-07-15

    This working paper discusses similarities and differences between the cooperation mechanisms of the EU renewable energy directive (RES directive) and the flexible mechanisms of the Kyoto Protocol. The cooperation mechanisms allow the (virtual) trade of renewable energy and were introduced with the RES directive to provide Member States (MS) with greater flexibility to achieve their national targets for renewable energy sources (RES). A similar kind of flexibility is known from the flexible mechanisms of the Kyoto Protocol which aim at the cost efficient achievement of emission reduction targets. Lessons learned from the Kyoto mechanisms may allow conclusions to be drawn on the design and implementation of the renewable energy cooperation mechanisms. This paper first gives an overview of the cooperation mechanisms regarding their potential, advantages and disadvantages, barriers and preconditions. This is followed by a brief explanation of and a systematic comparison with the flexible mechanisms of the Kyoto Protocol – Joint Implementation (JI); Clean Development Mechanism (CDM); and International Emissions Trading (IET). A gamut of factors influenced the success of the Kyoto mechanisms in general and in specific national contexts. Therefore, it is not possible to directly transfer past experiences with the Kyoto mechanisms to the capability of specific nations to make use of the renewable energy cooperation mechanisms. A comparison of specific features, such as the mechanism type (transfer, project-based, support scheme), price building and specific barriers can, however, help anticipate the possible dynamics and challenges of the cooperation mechanisms. Experiences with the Kyoto mechanisms show that predictions based on supply-demand analysis were valid only to a limited extent and that specific factors such as institutional capacity constraints or legal uncertainties delayed or prevented the use of the mechanisms in some cases. Similarly, for the cooperation

  13. The "CHARM" Policy Analysis Framework: Evaluation of Policies to Promote Immigrant Students' Resilience. OECD Education Working Papers, No. 158

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgili, Özge

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on children with a migration background and conceptualises their migration experience as adversity. The paper adapts the resilience framework to understand how immigrant children can overcome adversity. The paper discusses policy models that can be derived from adopting a resilience approach to the measurement of immigrant…

  14. Stellenbosch Papers in Linguistics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stellenbosch Papers in Linguistics (SPiL) is an annual/biannual open access, peer-reviewed international journal, published by the Department of General Linguistics, Stellenbosch University. The papers published in SPiL are ... Poetry in South African Sign Language: What is different? EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL ...

  15. Intelligence in the power grid and services to the consumers. Issue paper - working group 4; Denmark. Smart Grid Network; Intelligens i el-nettet og serviceydelser til forbrugerne. Issue paper, arbejdsgruppe 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsen, B.O. (Solar Danmark A/S, Vejen (Denmark)); Hauge, B. (IT-Branchen, Copenhagen (Denmark)); Strunge, C. (Energinet.dk, Fredericia (Denmark)) (and others)

    2011-07-01

    The Smart Grid Network was established in 2010 by the Danish climate and energy minister tasked with developing recommendations for future actions and initiatives that make it possible to handle up to 50% electricity from wind energy in the power system in 2020. The task of working group 4 was to investigate what it takes to involve consumers in smart grid and how to create good conditions for new services related to smart grid. Against this background, the working group agreed the following recommendations: 1) Enhance consumer engagement. A prerequisite for electricity customers becoming involved in smart grid is that they have awareness and knowledge about the smart grid and their own possibilities for action in relation thereto. Therefore it is important that concepts such as smart grid and flexible electricity consumption gradually become popular among electric customers; 2) Minimize the risk. In order to promote electric customers' and other stakeholders' participation in the smart grid, the risk of this participation must be minimized. It is therefore recommended to enhance the skills of the professionals and to establish a common framework for security; 3) Make it easier to create new services. Part of the potential of smart grid can be realized through new services such as delivery of flexible electricity consumption for electric cars and heat pumps and the resale of local power generation at the customer. To facilitate the conditions for these services, the working group recommends that better access to relevant data is created, that the interoperability of smart grid solutions is strengthened, that requirements for buildings are made, that it is made easier to be an aggregator, and that test and inspiration laboratories for small and medium enterprises in the smart grid area are established. (LN)

  16. Evaluation of Early Childhood Coaching Implementation in Nebraska. Technical Report Vol. 1: Key Findings from Participant Follow Up Survey. CYFS Working Paper 2014-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Gayatri; Knoche, Lisa; Marvin, Christine; Bainter, Sue

    2014-01-01

    The Nebraska Early Childhood Coach (ECC) training was a 3 day (8 hours) professional development event sponsored by the Nebraska Department of Education, Office of Child Development in 2009-2010. Sixty-five early childhood teachers and related service providers participated for the purpose of learning the basic principles and behaviors associated…

  17. The University and Purposive Social Change: Selected Issues and Analysis of an Anti-Poverty Effort. Paths Out of Poverty -- Working Paper Series No. 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockdale, Jerry D.

    Experience with the 1970 Chenango Development Project (CDP), a rural anti-poverty project initiated by the New York State College of Agriculture at Cornell, led to concern with development and testing of purposive social change models, the role of action oriented social scientists, and the involvement of social science departments, colleges, and…

  18. Delivery of State-Provided Predictive Analytics to Schools: Wisconsin's DEWS and the Proposed EWIMS Dashboard. WCER Working Paper No. 2016-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clune, Bill; Knowles, Jared

    2016-01-01

    Since 2012, the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction (DPI) has maintained a statewide predictive analytics system providing schools with an early warning in middle grades of students at risk for not completing high school. DPI is considering extending and enhancing this system, known as the Dropout Early Warning System (DEWS). The proposed…

  19. 2004/06 Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study (BPS:04/06) Field Test Methodology Report. Working Paper Series. NCES 2006-01

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wine, Jennifer; Cominole, Melissa; Wheeless, Sarah; Bryant, Alyssa; Gilligan, Theresa; Dudley, Kristin; Franklin, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    The 2004/06 Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study (BPS:04/06), conducted for the U.S. Department of Education's National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), collected information about the education and employment experiences of students in the two years following their first enrollment in postsecondary education. The primary…

  20. Evaluation of Early Childhood Coaching Implementation in Nebraska. Technical Report Vol. 2: Key Findings from Participant Observational and Self-Reported Data. CYFS Working Paper 2014-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Gayatri; Knoche, Lisa; Marvin, Christine; Bainter, Sue

    2014-01-01

    The Nebraska Early Childhood Coach (ECC) training was a 3 day (8 hours) professional development event sponsored by the Nebraska Department of Education, Office of Child Development in 2009-2010. Sixty-five early childhood teachers and related service providers participated for the purpose of learning the basic principles and behaviors associated…