WorldWideScience

Sample records for department operations oversight

  1. The Department of Homeland Security Intelligence Enterprise: Operational Overview and Oversight Challenges for Congress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-19

    trends. This report was designed to support the BEST’s and other operational components in planning and conducting outbound firearms smuggling...operations throughout the homeland and overseas through executing procurement, budget, logistics , and training functions. The Executive Information and...shooting and bombing rampage at two hotels , a railway station, hospital, Jewish Center, cafe, and cinema. 164 were killed. All of these attacks

  2. Oversight of Department of Defense Reconstruction Projects in Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-16

    had to reschedule some of our site visits multiple times due to security conditions. As an alternative means for conducting oversight, due to a limited...employed less than 20 percent of the staff it was expected to employ. According to the doctors and nurses on site during our inspection, the limited

  3. More DoD Oversight Needed for Purchases Made Through the Department of Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-03

    obligations or to liquidate prior valid obligations. However, expired funds are not available for new obligations nor can they be used for new requirements...Oversight Would Enable The Department of Homeland Security To Address Risks,” September 2006 GAO Report No. GAO-05-456, “Interagency Contracting Franchise

  4. Independent oversight review of the Department of Energy Quality Assurance Program for suspect/counterfeit parts. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    To address the potential threat that suspect/counterfeit parts could pose to DOE workers and the public, the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Oversight initiated a number of activities beginning in mid-1995. Oversight placed increased emphasis on the field`s quality assurance-suspect/counterfeit parts programs during safety management evaluations, in keeping with the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) oversight responsibilities, which include oversight of the Department`s quality assurance (QA) programs. In addition, Oversight reviewed relevant policy documents and occurrence reports to determine the nature and magnitude of the problem within the Department. The results of that review, contained in an Office of Oversight report, Independent Oversight Analysis of Suspect/Counterfeit Parts Within the Department of Energy (November 1995), indicate a lack of consistency and comprehensiveness in the Department`s QA-suspect/counterfeit parts program. A detailed analysis of the causes and impacts of the problem was recommended. In response, this review was initiated to determine the effectiveness of the Department`s QA program for suspect/counterfeit parts. This study goes beyond merely assessing and reporting the status of the program, however. It is the authors intention to highlight the complex issues associated with suspect/counterfeit parts in the Department today and to present approaches that DOE managers might consider to address these issues.

  5. Independent oversight review of the Department of Energy Quality Assurance Program for suspect/counterfeit parts. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    To address the potential threat that suspect/counterfeit parts could pose to DOE workers and the public, the Office of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Oversight initiated a number of activities beginning in mid-1995. Oversight placed increased emphasis on the field's quality assurance-suspect/counterfeit parts programs during safety management evaluations, in keeping with the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) oversight responsibilities, which include oversight of the Department's quality assurance (QA) programs. In addition, Oversight reviewed relevant policy documents and occurrence reports to determine the nature and magnitude of the problem within the Department. The results of that review, contained in an Office of Oversight report, Independent Oversight Analysis of Suspect/Counterfeit Parts Within the Department of Energy (November 1995), indicate a lack of consistency and comprehensiveness in the Department's QA-suspect/counterfeit parts program. A detailed analysis of the causes and impacts of the problem was recommended. In response, this review was initiated to determine the effectiveness of the Department's QA program for suspect/counterfeit parts. This study goes beyond merely assessing and reporting the status of the program, however. It is the authors intention to highlight the complex issues associated with suspect/counterfeit parts in the Department today and to present approaches that DOE managers might consider to address these issues

  6. A Study on the Construct Validity of Safety Culture Oversight Model for Nuclear Power Operating Organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Su Jin; Choi, Young Sung; Oh, Jang Jin

    2015-01-01

    In Korea, the safety policy statement declared in 1994 by government stressed the importance of safety culture and licensees were encouraged to manage and conduct their self-assessments. A change in regulatory position about safety culture oversight was made after the event of SBO cover-up in Kori unit 1 and several subsequent falsification events. Since then KINS has been developing licensee's safety culture oversight system including conceptual framework of oversight, prime focus area for oversight, and specific details on regulatory expectations, all of which are based on defence-in-depth (DiD) safety enhancement approach. Development and gathering of performance data which is related to actual 'safety' of nuclear power plant are needed to identify the relationship between safety culture and safety performance. Authors consider this study as pilot which has a contribution on verifying the construct validity of the model and the effectiveness of survey based research. This is the first attempt that the validity of safety culture oversight model has been investigated with empirical data obtained from Korean nuclear power operating organization

  7. A Study on the Construct Validity of Safety Culture Oversight Model for Nuclear Power Operating Organization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Su Jin; Choi, Young Sung; Oh, Jang Jin [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    In Korea, the safety policy statement declared in 1994 by government stressed the importance of safety culture and licensees were encouraged to manage and conduct their self-assessments. A change in regulatory position about safety culture oversight was made after the event of SBO cover-up in Kori unit 1 and several subsequent falsification events. Since then KINS has been developing licensee's safety culture oversight system including conceptual framework of oversight, prime focus area for oversight, and specific details on regulatory expectations, all of which are based on defence-in-depth (DiD) safety enhancement approach. Development and gathering of performance data which is related to actual 'safety' of nuclear power plant are needed to identify the relationship between safety culture and safety performance. Authors consider this study as pilot which has a contribution on verifying the construct validity of the model and the effectiveness of survey based research. This is the first attempt that the validity of safety culture oversight model has been investigated with empirical data obtained from Korean nuclear power operating organization.

  8. Approaches to the mathematical description of NPP operational safety management and oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilej, D.V.; Berzhanskij, S.V.

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents analysis of features related to NPP operational safety management and oversight. According to analysis results, approaches are proposed to perform mathematical description of specific processes and to develop a scale for management to the current safety level as regards NPP power generation. Proposed approaches are making experimental equations and process approach of ISO-9001 quality system

  9. 1993 Annual performance report for Environmental Oversight and Monitoring at Department of Energy facilities in New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    In October of 1990, the New Mexico Environment Department entered into an agreement with the US Department of Energy (DOE) to create the Department of Energy Oversight and Monitoring Program. This program is designed to create an avenue for the State to ensure DOE facilities are in compliance with applicable environmental regulations, to allow the State oversight and monitoring independent of the DOE, to allow the State valuable input into remediation decision making, and to protect the environment and the public health and safety of New Mexicans concerning DOE facility activities. This agreement, called the Agreement in Principle (AIP), includes all four of New Mexico's DOE facilities: Los Alamos National Laboratory in Los Alamos; Sandia National Laboratories and the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute on Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque; and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad

  10. 1992 Annual performance report for Environmental Monitoring and Oversight at Department of Energy facilities in New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    In October 1990 an Agreement-in-Principle (AIP) was entered into between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of New Mexico for the purpose of supporting State oversight activities at DOE facilities in New Mexico. The State`s lead agency for the Agreement is the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). DOE has agreed to provide the State with resources over a five year period to support State activities in environmental oversight, monitoring, access and emergency response to ensure compliance with applicable federal, state, and local laws at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), and the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI). The Agreement is designed to assure the citizens of New Mexico that public health, safety and the environment are being protected through existing programs; DOE is in compliance with applicable laws and regulations; DOE has made substantial new commitments; cleanup and compliance activities have been prioritized; and a vigorous program of independent monitoring and oversight by the State is underway. This report relates the quality and effectiveness of the facilities` environmental monitoring and surveillance programs. This report satisfies that requirement for the January--December 1992 time frame.

  11. 1992 Annual performance report for Environmental Monitoring and Oversight at Department of Energy facilities in New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    In October 1990 an Agreement-in-Principle (AIP) was entered into between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of New Mexico for the purpose of supporting State oversight activities at DOE facilities in New Mexico. The State's lead agency for the Agreement is the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). DOE has agreed to provide the State with resources over a five year period to support State activities in environmental oversight, monitoring, access and emergency response to ensure compliance with applicable federal, state, and local laws at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), and the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI). The Agreement is designed to assure the citizens of New Mexico that public health, safety and the environment are being protected through existing programs; DOE is in compliance with applicable laws and regulations; DOE has made substantial new commitments; cleanup and compliance activities have been prioritized; and a vigorous program of independent monitoring and oversight by the State is underway. This report relates the quality and effectiveness of the facilities' environmental monitoring and surveillance programs. This report satisfies that requirement for the January--December 1992 time frame

  12. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY: Views on Proposed Civil Penalties, Security Oversight, and External Safety Regulation Legislation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jones, Gary

    2000-01-01

    This report provides the General Accounting Office's views on three bills designed to improve worker and nuclear facility safety and health as well as to enhance security for the Department of Energy (DOE...

  13. Audit Oversight: Followup Review of the Military Department Audit Agencies Peer Review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2004-01-01

    .... The external quality control review should determine whether the reviewed audit organization's internal quality control system was adequate and operating effectively to provide reasonable assurance...

  14. Support for Afghanistan’s Justice Sector: State Department Programs Need Better Management and Stronger Oversight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    note that the uraJt report down played the D value or fNL ’s deployment (in Novemher 2012) of the MctaSt’orm business process managemen t .sysl.em...effectiveness of the project operations under t he terms of this agreement . At the termination of the project a completion report shall be issued as an...including suggestions for reducing this burden, to Washington Headquarters Services, Directorate for Information Operations and Reports, 1215

  15. Oversight and enforcement at DOE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fergus, I.E., Christopher, R.K.

    1996-01-01

    This paper addresses recent changes to the independent oversight and enforcement programs within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and applications to criticality safety. DOE's Office of Oversight (Oversight hereafter), in the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH), independently evaluates whether management systems ensure adequate protection of the worker, public, and environment. Oversight has adopted a new approach to performing evaluations based on the guiding principles for safety management identified by the Secretary of Energy. The principles Oversight evaluates are line management responsibility for safety and health, comprehensive requirements, and competence commensurate with responsibilities. Recently, the DOE codified the implementation of integrated safety management, further expounding on these basic guiding principles and Oversight's role. The Office of Enforcement and Investigations in EH (Enforcement hereafter) is responsible for enforcement, and relevant documents describe its role. This paper briefly discusses criticality safety aspects of the twin initiatives of Oversight and Enforcement

  16. 1991 Annual performance report for environmental oversight and monitoring at Department of Energy Facilities in New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    On October 22, 1990 an agreement was entered into between the US DOE and the State of New Mexico. The agreement was designed to assure the citizens of New Mexico that the environment is protected and that public health, as related to the environment is also protected. The Agreement reflects the understanding and commitments between the parties regarding environmental oversight, monitoring, remediation and emergency response at the following DOE facilities: the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI); Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Sandia National Laboratory (SNL); and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). These provision are ongoing through a vigorous program of independent monitoring and oversight; prioritization of clean-up and compliance activities; and new commitments by DOE. While the initial assessment of the quality and effectiveness of the facilities' environmental monitoring and surveillance programs is not yet complete, preliminary findings are presented regarding air quality monitoring, environmental monitoring, and groundwater monitoring

  17. Anticipating urgent surgery in operating room departments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Lans, M.; Hans, Elias W.; Hurink, Johann L.; Wullink, Gerhard; van Houdenhoven, M.; Kazemier, G.

    2005-01-01

    Operating Room (OR) departments need to create robust surgical schedules that anticipate urgent surgery, while minimizing urgent surgery waiting time and overtime, and maximizing utilization. We consider two levels of planning and control to anticipate urgent surgery. At the tactical level, we study

  18. National Security Cutter: Enhanced Oversight Needed to Ensure Problems Discovered during Testing and Operations Are Addressed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    May Lead to NSCs and Future DHS Assets Deploying without Having Demonstrated Full Capabilities 22 Performance Issues Discovered Outside of IOT &E...Examples of National Security Cutter Critical Operational Issues and Key Performance Parameters 10 Table 3: National Security Cutter Major...Cutter IOT &E Initial Operational Test and Evaluation KPP Key Performance Parameter LRI-II Long-Range Interceptor II NSC National Security Cutter

  19. Defense Infrastructure: Actions Needed to Enhance Oversight of Construction Projects Supporting Military Contingency Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    supporting documentation for reviews that the U.S. Forces-Afghanistan conducted beginning in November 2011 of planned or ongoing contingency ...12 Contingency basing includes the planning , designing, constructing, operating, managing, and transitioning or closing of a non-enduring location...2016). Background Definition of “ Contingency Construction” Project Page 7 GAO-16-406 Defense Infrastructure statutory authority

  20. Romania - NPP PLiM Between Regulatory Requirement / Oversight and Operator Safety / Financial Interest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goicea, Lucian

    2012-01-01

    Cernavoda Unit 1 PLiM started in the first third of its design life, to develop as regulatory requirements of the components of standards and programmes and to benefit by earlier implementation of the measures for achieving maximum operating life. CNCAN regulatory present approach on the utility PLiM combines the regulatory requirements on management system, ageing management provisions of periodic safety review, detailed technical requirements of ageing programmes and different techniques focusing only on safety issues. (author)

  1. US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office Integrated Safety Management System Program Description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SHOOP, D.S.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) Program Description (PD) is to describe the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) ISMS as implemented through the RL Integrated Management System (RIMS). This PD does not impose additional requirements but rather provides an overview describing how various parts of the ISMS fit together. Specific requirements for each of the core functions and guiding principles are established in other implementing processes, procedures, and program descriptions that comprise RIMS. RL is organized to conduct work through operating contracts; therefore, it is extremely difficult to provide an adequate ISMS description that only addresses RL functions. Of necessity, this PD contains some information on contractor processes and procedures which then require RL approval or oversight

  2. A Comparison of the Audit and Accreditation Tools Used By The Health Care Financing Administration, The Texas Department of Insurance, and The National Committee on Quality Assurance: The Cost of Multi-Agency Oversight on Medicare+Choice Plans in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-04-12

    Comparison of Oversight Models in Managed Care 1 Running Head: Comparison of Oversight Models in Managed Care A Comparison of the Audit and...TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Comparison of the Audit and Accreditation Tools Used By The Health Care Financing Administration, The Texas Department of...Comparison of Oversight Models in Managed Care 5 A Comparison of the Audit and Accreditation Tools Used By The Health Care Financing

  3. Military Operations: DOD Needs to Address Contract Oversight and Quality Assurance Issues for Contracts Used to Support Contingency Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Solis, William M; Coffey, Carole; Baker, Sarah; Brown, Renee; Junek, Larry; La Due Lake, Ronald; Lenane, Katherine; Mason, Susan; Sawyer, Jr., Connie W; Thornton, Karen

    2008-01-01

    .... In its fiscal year 2007 report, the House Appropriations Committee directed GAO to examine the link between the growth in DOD's operation and maintenance costs and DOD's increased reliance on service contracts. GAO determined (1...

  4. Information exchange - DOE oversight programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubbs, D.C.; Field, H.C.

    1988-01-01

    Oversight programs are conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy to review activities carried out by field and contractor organizations. Two of these oversight programs focus on safeguards and security and on safety and health activities. These two programs are independent, but share many common objectives and review techniques. The mutual potential benefit was recognized from an exchange of information on review techniques. The first step in this exchange was the participation by an Office of Security Evaluations (OSE) staff member with the Office of Nuclear Safety (ONS) during their planning, conduct and reporting of a Technical Safety Appraisal (TSA). This paper briefly describes the OSE and ONS programs. It also identifies and analyzes the similarities and differences of the two programs. The purpose of this paper is to provide perspectives on the approach taken, the techniques used and the differences between two oversight programs conducted by the Department of Energy

  5. Tennessee Oversight Agreement combined annual reports, May 13, 1991--May 12, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Tennessee Oversight Agreement provides independent oversight and monitoring of the Department of Energy's activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation by the State. The agreement obligates the state to provide an annual report to DOE and for public distribution of the results of the DOE Oversight Division's monitoring and analysis activities and its findings of the quality and effectiveness of the Department of Energy's environmental monitoring and surveillance programs. The DOE Oversight Division's first report will discuss the status of the entire oversight agreement for the first two years of its existence. The 1991--1993 combined annual reports include a short history of the Division, a list of the Tennessee Oversight Agreement commitments and a status report on each of DOE Oversight Division's programs. Each Division program includes a descriptive status of its findings and recommendations. These findings and recommendations were also consolidated into a separate segment of the report (Chapter 7). Findings indicate there have been genuine successes in the areas of site access and data availability. More effort, however, is required in both of these areas before the state can verify that DOE and its contractors are meeting its obligations. Ambient surveillance monitoring by DOE is extensive. The DOE Oversight Division reviews this data to assure the state and its citizens that all areas of the environment are adequately protected by DOE operations. There is a noticeable lack of research and development in the technology for environmental remediation and radiological and mixed waste treatment, storage and disposal. The DOE Oversight Division's recommendations for improvement are provided with each of the findings listed in this report

  6. Army Medical Department Leaders in Military Operations Other Than War

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sadlon, Gary

    2000-01-01

    .... Likewise, the Army Medical Department (AMEDD) must insure its leaders, specifically those selected to deploy world-wide, have a more diverse skill set that enables them to fully operate within the full spectrum of scenarios...

  7. Operation and Support Costs for the Department of Defense

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pierrot, Lane; Kornfeld, Robert; Mechanic, Robert E; Miller, Michael; Bryton, Eugene; Berger, Michael; Dombey, Bonita; Kostak, William; Lussier, Frances; Moore, David

    1988-01-01

    Operation and support (O&S) funds -- the portion of the Department of Defense (DoD) budget that pays to operate DoD's forces -- have grown an average of about 2 percent per year from 1980 to 1988 in real...

  8. Strategic planning of an integrated program for state oversight agreements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walzer, A.E.; Cothron, T.K.

    1991-01-01

    Among the barrage of agreements faced by federal facilities are the State Oversight Agreements (known as Agreements in Principle in many states). These agreements between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the states fund the states to conduct independent environmental monitoring and oversight which requires plans, studies, inventories, models, and reports from DOE and its management and operating contractors. Many states have signed such agreements, including Tennessee, Kentucky, Washington, Idaho, Colorado, California, and Florida. This type of oversight agreement originated in Colorado as a result of environmental concerns at the Rocky Flats Plant. The 5-year State Oversight Agreements for Tennessee and Kentucky became effective on May 13, 1991, and fund these states nearly $21 million and $7 million, respectively. Implementation of these open-quotes comprehensive and integratedclose quotes agreements is particularly complex in Tennessee where the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation houses three installations with distinctly different missions. The program development and strategic planning required for coordinating and integrating a program of this magnitude is discussed. Included are the organizational structure and interfaces required to define and coordinate program elements across plants and to also effectively negotiate scope and schedules with the state. The planned Program Management Plan, which will contain implementation and procedural guidelines, and the management control system for detailed tracking of activities and costs are outlined. Additionally, issues inherent in the nature of the agreements and implementation of a program of this magnitude are discussed. Finally, a comparison of the agreements for Tennessee, Kentucky, Colorado, and Idaho is made to gain a better understanding of the similarities and differences in State Oversight Agreements to aid in implementation of these agreements

  9. Summary of Research 1997, Department of Operations Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    for addressing warfighting problems. This capabil- ity is especially important at the present time when technology in general, and information...Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, 1993 Master of Science in Operations Research-September 1997 Advisor: W. Max Woods, Department of

  10. Conducting operations at the Solid Waste Management Department at WRSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloedau, R.K.; Scogin, J.T.

    1994-01-01

    Conduct of Operations, which is one of the entities within the Westinghouse Savannah River Company's Performance Improvement Plan, is based on commercial nuclear power industry standards that were developed to improve operations in that industry. Implementation and compliance to the Conduct of Operations requirements are enhancing the Site's Mission: To serve the national interest of the United States by safely producing nuclear materials while protecting the employee and public health, as well as the environment. It also contributes to our Site's Vision: To be the recognized model of excellence for the United States Department of Energy Nuclear Weapons Complex, valuing and involving the individual to continually improve operations, safety, health environmental protection, quality, and customer satisfaction

  11. Department of Defense support to spill response operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ducey, D.L. Jr.; Walker, A.H.

    1993-01-01

    The Department of Defense (DOD), operating through the Directorate of Military Support in the Department of the Army, supports state, local and other federal agency response operations in a wide range of natural and man-caused emergencies. Examples within the past six years include the Ashland Oil tank collapse in Floreffe, Pennsylvania, Exxon Valdez cleanup, Loma Prieta earthquake, hurricanes Hugo and Andrew, Mexico City earthquake, Armero (Columbia) volcanic eruption, and Puerto Rico floods and mud slides. From March 24 to September 27, 1989, the period of the Exxon Valdez initial cleanup operations, DOD provided military and civilian personnel, US Navy ships for housing response workers, cargo and medical evacuation aircraft (fixed wing and helicopters), skimmers, modified dredges, landing craft, Dracones, Zodiak boats, radios, computers, and other miscellaneous equipment. This was in addition to assets of the Alaska Army and Air National Guard, which were committed by the governor. Support was provided to the US Coast Guard on scene coordinator and supervised by the Alaska Oil Spill Joint Task Force. The General Accounting Office, in its January 1990 report, Federal Costs Resulting from the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill, estimated that DOD spent $62.8 million through September 30, 1989, the largest expenditure by any federal agency. Use of military resources is a realistic scenario in certain situations. Primary responders at the federal and state level should understand how to request and employ these assets. This paper provides a background on DOD support to disaster relief operations, and discusses the types of support available to agencies responding to natural or man-caused emergencies, request and approval mechanisms, the Department of Defence organization to provide support, and reimbursement of the department

  12. Designing oversight for nanomedicine research in human subjects: systematic analysis of exceptional oversight for emerging technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, Susan M.; Jones, Cortney M.

    2011-01-01

    The basic procedures and rules for oversight of U.S. human subjects research have been in place since 1981. Certain types of human subjects research, however, have provoked creation of additional mechanisms and rules beyond the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) Common Rule and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) equivalent. Now another emerging domain of human subjects research—nanomedicine—is prompting calls for extra oversight. However, in 30 years of overseeing research on human beings, we have yet to specify what makes a domain of scientific research warrant extra oversight. This failure to systematically evaluate the need for extra measures, the type of extra measures appropriate for different challenges, and the usefulness of those measures hampers efforts to respond appropriately to emerging science such as nanomedicine. This article evaluates the history of extra oversight, extracting lessons for oversight of nanomedicine research in human beings. We argue that a confluence of factors supports the need for extra oversight, including heightened uncertainty regarding risks, fast-evolving science yielding complex and increasingly active materials, likelihood of research on vulnerable participants including cancer patients, and potential risks to others beyond the research participant. We suggest the essential elements of the extra oversight needed.

  13. Designing oversight for nanomedicine research in human subjects: systematic analysis of exceptional oversight for emerging technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Susan M.; Jones, Cortney M.

    2011-04-01

    The basic procedures and rules for oversight of U.S. human subjects research have been in place since 1981. Certain types of human subjects research, however, have provoked creation of additional mechanisms and rules beyond the Department of Health & Human Services (DHHS) Common Rule and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) equivalent. Now another emerging domain of human subjects research—nanomedicine—is prompting calls for extra oversight. However, in 30 years of overseeing research on human beings, we have yet to specify what makes a domain of scientific research warrant extra oversight. This failure to systematically evaluate the need for extra measures, the type of extra measures appropriate for different challenges, and the usefulness of those measures hampers efforts to respond appropriately to emerging science such as nanomedicine. This article evaluates the history of extra oversight, extracting lessons for oversight of nanomedicine research in human beings. We argue that a confluence of factors supports the need for extra oversight, including heightened uncertainty regarding risks, fast-evolving science yielding complex and increasingly active materials, likelihood of research on vulnerable participants including cancer patients, and potential risks to others beyond the research participant. We suggest the essential elements of the extra oversight needed.

  14. 12 CFR 4.66 - Oversight and monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Oversight and monitoring. 4.66 Section 4.66 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS...; Contracting for Goods and Services § 4.66 Oversight and monitoring. The Deputy Comptroller for Resource...

  15. Emergency department operations and management education in emergency medicine training

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bret A Nicks; Darrell Nelson

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND:This study was undertaken to examine the current level of operations and management education within US-based Emergency Medicine Residency programs.METHODS:Residency program directors at all US-based Emergency Medicine Residency programs were anonymously surveyed via a web-based instrument.Participants indicated their levels of residency education dedicated to documentation,billing/coding,core measure/quality indicator compliance,and operations management.Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics for the ordinal data/Likert scales.RESULTS:One hundred and six(106)program directors completed the study instrument of one hundred and fifty-six(156)programs(70%).Of these,82.6%indicated emergency department(ED)operations and management education within the training curriculum.Dedicated documentation training was noted in all but 1 program(99%).Program educational offerings also included billing/coding(83%),core measure/quality indicators(78%)and operations management training(71%).In all areas,the most common means of educating came through didactic sessions and direct attending feedback or 69%-94%and 72%-98%respectively.Residency leadership was most confident with resident understanding of quality documentation(80%)and less so with core measures(72%),billing/coding/RVUs(58%),and operations management tools(23%).CONCLUSIONS:While most EM residency programs integrate basic operational education related to documentation and billing/coding,a smaller number provide focused education on the dayto-day management and operations of the ED.Residency leadership perceives graduating resident understanding of operational management tools to be limited.All respondents value further resident curriculum development of ED operations and management.

  16. The Police Executive and Governance: Adapting Police Leadership to an Increase in Oversight and Accountability in Police Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Ellis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In a democracy, it is generally understood that the police serve at the will of the people and are accountable through police governance. This usually consists of elected and/or appointed officials whose primary legal authority is to set policy and appoint the police leaders whom they hold accountable for ensuring that effective policing operations are carried out. It is widely held in common law jurisdictions that the governing body is limited in their role and cannot get involved in “operational policing issues.” In June 2010, the G20 world leaders’ conference was held in Toronto, Canada. The events surrounding the police actions during this conference caused a great deal of concern and led the Toronto Police Services Board, who are the governing authority for the Toronto Police Service, to commission a review to look at their own role. The findings in relation to “board” involvement in the operational side of policing challenged a long held belief regarding the limited role of governance in police operations. These findings will be examined in relation to the lack of board expertise and the challenges faced by police leaders to adapt and develop their attitudes, skills and abilities to respond to any expansion of governance authority.

  17. Experiment in democracy: The citizen oversight council as a means of mitigating environmental impacts of terminal and tanker operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginsburg, P.; Sterling, S.; Gottehrer, S.

    1993-01-01

    In 1987, a handful of people from the small fishing community of Cordova, Alaska, coalesced around concern over the risks of oil-related pollution and oil spills in Prince William Sound posed by the trans-Alaska pipeline terminal and tanker operations in neighboring Valdez. The Cordova group sent an emissary to Alyeska Pipeline Service Company, which operates the Valdez Marine Terminal on behalf of its seven oil company owners. The emissary asked Alyeska to consider forming a citizen group to advise Alyeska on environmental issues of local or regional concern. Alyeska listened but rejected the idea. In March 1989, the Exxon Valdez ran aground on Bligh Reef. Alyeska's owners, acting principally at the behest of majority owner, British Petroleum, soon effected sweeping change in Alyeska's management. The change in management, with Jim Hermiller as president, produced a change in Alyeska's attitude toward the citizen advisory group proposal, and not long afterward Alyeska formed the Alyeska Citizen Advisory Committee. Over the next year that group evolved into what is now called the Prince William Sound Regional Citizens' Advisory Council, or RCAC. The Prince William Sound Regional Citizens' Advisory Council is a national experiment in providing citizens a voice in corporate decisions that affect them and their communities. This paper recounts the story of RCAC's formation and evolution, the group's mission under both federal law and its contract with Alyeska, and the hallmarks of its achievements and challenges to date

  18. Cost analysis of operating an all-digital radiology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arenson, R.L.; Soshadri, S.B.; DeSimone, D.; Hiss, S.S.

    1988-01-01

    Using the current film system as a baseline, this study analyzes the cost of digital acquisition, transmission, archiving, and display of all images generated in our department. Two approaches are considered: (1) conventional x-ray films are digitized with a laser scanning film digitizer; (2) images are captured with a direct digital receptor and no film is created. In both approaches, images from digital modalities are acquired directly from the scanners. The cost of equipment and its maintenance, film, supplies, storage space, operations, personnel, and so forth are analyzed for all approaches. The annual cost of operating the film system is $2.5 million. The estimated annual cost is $2.3 million for the first digital approach, $1.8 million for the second. This analysis demonstrates that these digital approaches can be cost-effective, viable alternatives to film-bases systems

  19. 12 CFR 1700.1 - Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight. 1700.1 Section 1700.1 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF FEDERAL HOUSING ENTERPRISE OVERSIGHT, DEPARTMENT OF... of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight. (a) Scope and authority. The Office of Federal Housing...

  20. Nuclear Oversight Function at Krsko NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozin, B.; Kavsek, D.

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear oversight function is used at the Krsko NPP constructively to strengthen safety and improve performance. Nuclear safety is kept under constant examination through a variety of monitoring techniques and activities, some of which provide an independent review. The nuclear oversight function at the Krsko NPP is accomplished by Quality and Nuclear Oversight Division (SKV). SKV has completed its mission through a combination of compliance, performance and effectiveness-based assessments. The performance-based assessment is an assessment using various techniques (observations, interviews, walk-downs, document reviews) to assure compliance with standards and regulations, obtain insight into performance, performance trends and also to identify opportunities to improve effectiveness of implementation. Generally, the performance-based approach to oversight function is based on some essential elements. The most important one which is developed and implemented is an oversight program (procedure). The program focuses on techniques, activities and objectives commensurate with their significance to plant operational safety. These techniques and activities are: self-assessments, assessments, audits, performance indicators, monitoring of corrective action program (CAP), industry independent reviews (such as IAEA's OSART and WANO Peer Review), industry benchmarking etc. Graded approach is an inherent product of a performance based program and ranking process. It is important not only to focus on the highest ranked performance based attributes but to lead to effective utilization of an oversight program. The attributes selected for oversight need to be based on plant specific experience, current industry operating experience, supplier's performance and quality issues. Collaboration within the industry and effective utility oversight of processes and design activities are essential for achieving good plant performance. So the oversight program must integrate relevant

  1. Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department Annual Operating Report, CY 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

    1994-02-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the waste management operations section of the liquid and gaseous waste operations department at ORNL for 1993. The process waste, liquid low-level waste, gaseous waste systems activities are reported, as well as the low-level waste solidification project. Upgrade activities is the various waste processing and treatment systems are summarized. A maintenance activity overview is provided, and program management, training, and other miscellaneous activities are covered

  2. Using online analytical processing to manage emergency department operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Bradley D; Asplin, Brent R

    2004-11-01

    The emergency department (ED) is a unique setting in which to explore and evaluate the utility of information technology to improve health care operations. A potentially useful software tool in managing this complex environment is online analytical processing (OLAP). An OLAP system has the ability to provide managers, providers, and researchers with the necessary information to make decisions quickly and effectively by allowing them to examine patterns and trends in operations and patient flow. OLAP software quickly summarizes and processes data acquired from a variety of data sources, including computerized ED tracking systems. It allows the user to form a comprehensive picture of the ED from both system-wide and patient-specific perspectives and to interactively view the data using an approach that meets his or her needs. This article describes OLAP software tools and provides examples of potential OLAP applications for care improvement projects, primarily from the perspective of the ED. While OLAP is clearly a helpful tool in the ED, it is far more useful when integrated into the larger continuum of health information systems across a hospital or health care delivery system.

  3. Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department annual operating report CY 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

    1995-03-01

    This report presents details about the operation of the liquid and gaseous waste department of Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the calendar year 1994. Topics discussed include; process waste system, upgrade activities, low-level liquid radioactive waste solidification project, maintenance activities, and other activities such as training, audits, and tours

  4. Regulatory Oversight Program, July 1, 1993 - March 3, 1997. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    On July 1, 1993, a Regulatory Oversight (RO) organization was established within the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) to provide regulatory oversight of the DOE uranium enrichment facilities leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). The purpose of the RO program was to ensure continued plant safety, safeguards and security while the Paducah and Portsmouth gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) transitioned to regulatory oversight by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). These activities were performed under the authority of the lease agreement between DOE and USEC until NRC issued a Certificate of Compliance or approved a Compliance Plan pursuant to Section 1701 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, and assumed regulatory responsibility. This report chronicles the formal development, operation and key activities of the RO organization from its beginning in July 1993, until the turnover of the regulatory oversight responsibility to the NRC on March 3, 1997. Through its evolution to closure, the RO program was a formal, proceduralized effort designed to provide consistent regulation and to facilitate transition to NRC. The RO Program was also a first-of-a-kind program for DOE. The process, experience, and lessons learned summarized herein should be useful as a model for transition of other DOE facilities to privatization or external regulation

  5. Regulatory Oversight Program, July 1, 1993--March 3, 1997. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    On July 1, 1993, a Regulatory Oversight (RO) organization was established within the United States Department of Energy (DOE), Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) to provide regulatory oversight of the DOE uranium enrichment facilities leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). The purpose of the RO program was to ensure continued plant safety, safeguards and security while the Paducah and Portsmouth gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs) transitioned to regulatory oversight by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). These activities were performed under the authority of the lease agreement between DOE and USEC until NRC issued a Certificate of Compliance or approved a Compliance Plan pursuant to Section 1701 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, and assumed regulatory responsibility. This report chronicles the formal development, operation and key activities of the RO organization from its beginning in July 1993, until the turnover of the regulatory oversight responsibility to the NRC on March 3, 1997. Through its evolution to closure, the RO program was a formal, proceduralized effort designed to provide consistent regulation and to facilitate transition to NRC. The RO Program was also a first-of-a-kind program for DOE. The process, experience, and lessons learned summarized herein should be useful as a model for transition of other DOE facilities to privatization or external regulation.

  6. Summary of Research 2000, Department of Operations Research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eagle, James

    2001-01-01

    .... Thesis abstracts of students advised by faculty in the Department are also included. The research program at the Naval Postgraduate School exists to support the graduate education of our students...

  7. Regulatory Oversight of Safety Culture — Korea’s Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, S.J.; Choi, Y.S.; Kim, J.T.

    2016-01-01

    In Korea, a regulatory oversight program of safety culture was launched in 2012 to establish regulatory measures against several events caused by weak safety culture in the nuclear industry. This paper is intended to introduce the preliminary regulatory oversight framework, development and validation of safety culture components, pilot safety culture inspection results and lessons learned. The safety culture model should be based on a sound understanding of the national culture and industry characteristics where the model will be applied. The nuclear safety culture oversight model is being developed and built on the Korean regulatory system to independently assess the nuclear power operating organizations’ safety culture.

  8. Safety Oversight of Decommissioning Activities at DOE Nuclear Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zull, Lawrence M.; Yeniscavich, William

    2008-01-01

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board) is an independent federal agency established by Congress in 1988 to provide nuclear safety oversight of activities at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) defense nuclear facilities. The activities under the Board's jurisdiction include the design, construction, startup, operation, and decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities at DOE sites. This paper reviews the Board's safety oversight of decommissioning activities at DOE sites, identifies the safety problems observed, and discusses Board initiatives to improve the safety of decommissioning activities at DOE sites. The decommissioning of former defense nuclear facilities has reduced the risk of radioactive material contamination and exposure to the public and site workers. In general, efforts to perform decommissioning work at DOE defense nuclear sites have been successful, and contractors performing decommissioning work have a good safety record. Decommissioning activities have recently been completed at sites identified for closure, including the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, the Fernald Closure Project, and the Miamisburg Closure Project (the Mound site). The Rocky Flats and Fernald sites, which produced plutonium parts and uranium materials for defense needs (respectively), have been turned into wildlife refuges. The Mound site, which performed R and D activities on nuclear materials, has been converted into an industrial and technology park called the Mound Advanced Technology Center. The DOE Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long term stewardship of these former EM sites. The Board has reviewed many decommissioning activities, and noted that there are valuable lessons learned that can benefit both DOE and the contractor. As part of its ongoing safety oversight responsibilities, the Board and its staff will continue to review the safety of DOE and contractor decommissioning activities at DOE defense nuclear sites

  9. 32 CFR Appendix A to Part 77 - DD Form 2580, Operation Transition Department of Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false DD Form 2580, Operation Transition Department of Defense A Appendix A to Part 77 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE... to Part 77—DD Form 2580, Operation Transition Department of Defense Outplacement and Referral System...

  10. United States Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, completion report Operation KLAXON, Fiscal Year 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), Completion Report provides a summary of activities conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) between October 1, 1992, and September 30, 1993, associated with Operation KLAXON. (In the past, each annual Completion Report dealt with a series of underground nuclear detonations; however, because no nuclear tests were conducted during FY 1993, this Report summarizes continuing nonnuclear and nuclear test readiness activities at the NTS sponsored by DOE/NV.) The report serves as a reference for those involved with the planning and execution of Operation KLAXON and also serves as a planning guide for future operations. Information in the report covers the logistics and management of activities. Scientific information and data associated with NTS activities are presented in technical documents published by participating agencies. In September 1992, Congress legislated a nine-month moratorium on the testing of nuclear weapons. The bill also provided for a resumption of testing (with no more than five tests per year, or a total of 15 during the next three years) in July 1993, and mandated an end to nuclear testing, entirely, by 1996. President Bush signed the bill into law in October 1992.

  11. United States Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, completion report Operation KLAXON, Fiscal Year 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), Completion Report provides a summary of activities conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) between October 1, 1992, and September 30, 1993, associated with Operation KLAXON. (In the past, each annual Completion Report dealt with a series of underground nuclear detonations; however, because no nuclear tests were conducted during FY 1993, this Report summarizes continuing nonnuclear and nuclear test readiness activities at the NTS sponsored by DOE/NV.) The report serves as a reference for those involved with the planning and execution of Operation KLAXON and also serves as a planning guide for future operations. Information in the report covers the logistics and management of activities. Scientific information and data associated with NTS activities are presented in technical documents published by participating agencies. In September 1992, Congress legislated a nine-month moratorium on the testing of nuclear weapons. The bill also provided for a resumption of testing (with no more than five tests per year, or a total of 15 during the next three years) in July 1993, and mandated an end to nuclear testing, entirely, by 1996. President Bush signed the bill into law in October 1992

  12. Population exposures from US Department of Energy operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welty, C.G. Jr.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Hawley, K.A.

    1987-09-01

    The DOE annually collects information concerning emissions and calculates radiation doses to the population within an 80-kilometer radius of its operating nuclear installations. For most of these installations, the resulting concentrations in environmental media are too low to be adequately measured; at those sites, computer modeling is used to predict values for estimating public radiation doses. The estimated public doses are evaluated by the DOE to ensure that its operations are in compliance with its public radiation dose standards. This paper describes the calculated population dose from all operating DOE installations for recent years, including radionuclide-specific contributions to public dose and comparisons with the expected population dose resulting from all background sources of radiation. The year-to-year trends since 1979 are shown, together with a description of the major reasons for the trends. Of significance to the dose estimation for this period was the change to using the effective-dose-equivalent factors. We conclude that the estimated radiation doses of combined DOE operations are small compared to the radiation dose received each year by the same population from natural sources of radioactivity. 5 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Critical Drivers for Safety Culture: Examining Department of Energy and U.S. Army Operational Experiences - 12382

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowes, Elizabeth A. [The S.M. Stoller Corporation, Broomfield, Colorado (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Evaluating operational incidents can provide a window into the drivers most critical to establishing and maintaining a strong safety culture, thereby minimizing the potential project risk associated with safety incidents. By examining U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) versus U.S. Army drivers in terms of regulatory and contract requirements, programs implemented to address the requirements, and example case studies of operational events, a view of the elements most critical to making a positive influence on safety culture is presented. Four case studies are used in this evaluation; two from DOE and two from U.S. Army experiences. Although the standards guiding operations at these facilities are different, there are many similarities in the level of hazards, as well as the causes and the potential consequences of the events presented. Two of the incidents examined, one from a DOE operation and the other from a U.S. Army facility, resulted in workers receiving chemical burns. The remaining two incidents are similar in that significant conduct of operations failures occurred resulting in high-level radioactive waste (in the case of the DOE facility) or chemical agent (in the case of the Army facility) being transferred outside of engineering controls. A review of the investigation reports for all four events indicates the primary causes to be failures in work planning leading to ineffective hazard evaluation and control, lack of procedure adherence, and most importantly, lack of management oversight to effectively reinforce expectations for safe work planning and execution. DOE and Army safety programs are similar, and although there are some differences in contractual requirements, the expectations for safe performance are essentially the same. This analysis concludes that instilling a positive safety culture comes down to management leadership and engagement to (1) cultivate an environment that values a questioning attitude and (2) continually reinforce expectations

  14. Operational Rations Current and Future of the Department of Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    with Spiced Sauce Beefsteak Chicken and Noodles Chicken or Turkey, Boned Apricots Peaches Chocolate Nut Roll Cookies Grape MEATS Ham and...Sauce Tuna Fish Turkey Loaf Fruit Cocktail Peacan Cake Roll Pound Cake Orange Tomato 16 ACCESSORY ITEMS Instant Coffee Instant Tea or Tea... INSTANT ACCESSORY PACKET FOOD PACKET, IN-FLIGHT INDIVIDUAL SPOON EARLY VERSION VI FOOD PACKET, LONG-RANGE Designed for troops in operations

  15. Parliamentary Oversight of European Security and Defence Policy: A Matter of Formal Competences or the Will of Parliamentarians?

    OpenAIRE

    Maatsch, A.; Galella, P.

    2016-01-01

    Are parliaments with strong formal powers for the deployment of troops likely to conduct more intensive oversight than their counterparts with weak or no powers? The literature suggests that strong formal powers delineate boundaries of parliamentary oversight. However, this article demonstrates that strong formal powers are not necessary for parliaments in order to conduct oversight. If parliaments with weak formal powers had strong incentives to carry out oversight of the EU NAVFOR Operation...

  16. Operating experience review - Ventilation systems at Department of Energy Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    The Office of Special Projects (DP-35), formerly Office of Self-Assessment (DP-9), analyzed occurrences caused by problems with equipment and material and recommended the following systems for an in-depth study: (1) Selective Alpha Air Monitor (SAAM), (2) Emergency Diesel Generator, (3) Ventilation System, (4) Fire Alarm System. Further, DP-35 conducted an in-depth review of the problems associated with SAAM and with diesel generators, and made several recommendations. This study focusses on ventilation system. The intent was to determine the causes for the events related to these system that were reported in the Occurrence Reporting and Processing System (ORPS), to identify components that failed, and to provide technical information from the commercial and nuclear industries on the design, operation, maintenance, and surveillance related to the system and its components. From these data, sites can develop a comprehensive program of maintenance management, including surveillance, to avoid similar occurrences, and to be in compliance with the following DOE orders.

  17. Assessment of the Plutonium Finishing Plant Criticality Alarm System U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NIRIDER, L.T.

    2002-01-01

    At the request of the Assistant Manager for Safety and Engineering, the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (RL) Engineering Support Division, performed an oversight review of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) nuclear Criticality Alarm System (CAS). The review was conducted to satisfy requirements and agreements associated with Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 2000-2, ''Vital Safety Systems.'' The PFP is managed by Fluor Hanford, Inc. for RL. The field assessment and staff interviews were conducted August 12 through August 19,2002. This was a limited scope assessment that consisted of a review of the nuclear CAS operations, maintenance, and compliance with National Consensus Standards Requirements. The main purpose of the assessment was to determine the adequacy of the existing alarm system and its associated infrastructure to support the PFP facility mission through the remaining facility lifetime. The Review Plan was modeled upon Criteria and Review Approach Documents (CRAD) developed for DNFSB Recommendation 2000-2 reviews conducted across the Hanford Site. Concerns regarding component degradation and failure, increasing numbers of occurrence reports associated with the alarm system, and reliability issues were addressed. Additionally, RL performed a review of the engineering aspects of the CAS including the functions of design authorities and aspects of systems engineering. However, the focus of the assessment was on operations, maintenance, and reliability of the CAS, associated procurement practices, adequacy of safety and engineering policies and procedures, safety documentation, and fundamental engineering practices including training, qualification, and systems engineering. This assessment revealed that the PFP CAS and its associated infrastructure, administrative procedures, and conduct of operations are generally effective. There are no imminent criticality safety issues associated with the operation of the

  18. Department

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2016-09-20

    Sep 20, 2016 ... Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, Kibabii University. Abstract. This study ... Key Words: Climate Change, Regional Circulation Model, PRECIS, Bungoma County ... by different computer models is much.

  19. 76 FR 31416 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Oversight of Contractor Ethics Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-31

    ...-AL92 Federal Acquisition Regulation; Oversight of Contractor Ethics Programs AGENCY: Department of... that contractors have implemented the mandatory contractor business ethics program requirements. DATES... to Improve DoD's Oversight of Contractor Ethics Programs. The ethics program requirement flows from...

  20. Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department annual operating report, CY 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillespie, M.A.; Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

    1993-03-01

    A total of 6.05 x 10{sup 7} gal of liquid waste was decontaminated by the Process Waste Treatment Plant (PWTP) ion exchange system during CY 1992. This averaged to 115 gpm throughout the year. When necessary, a wastewater sidestream of 50--80 gpm was treated through the use of a natural zeolite treatment system. An additional 8.00 x 10{sup 6} gal (average of 15 gpm throughout the year) were treated by the zeolite system. Therefore, the average total flow treated at the PWTP for CY 1992 was 130 gpm. In mid-June, the zeolite system was repiped to allow it the capability to treat the ion exchange system`s discharge due to rising Cs problems in the wastewater. While being used to treat the ion exchange system`s discharge, it cannot treat a sidestream of wastewater. During the year, the regeneration of the cation exchange resins resulted in the generation of 7.83 x 10{sup 3} gal of liquid low-level waste (LLLW) concentrate and 1.15 x 10{sup 4} gal of LLLW evaporator feed. The head-end softening process (precipitation/clarification) generated 604 drums (4.40 x 10{sup 3} ft{sup 3}) of solid low-level waste sludge. The zeolite treatment system generated approximately 8.40 x 10{sup 2} ft{sup 3} of spent zeolite resin, which was turned over to the Solid Waste Operations Department for disposal. See Table 1 for a monthly summary of activities at the PWTP. Figures 1, 2, 3, and 4 show a comparison of operations at the PWTP in 1992 with previous years. Figure 5 shows a comparison of annual rainfall at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1987. A total of 1.55 x 10{sup 8} gal of liquid waste (average of 294 gpm throughout the year) was treated at the Nonradiological Wastewater Treatment Plant (NRWTP). Of this amount, 1.40 x 10{sup 7} gal were treated by the precipitation/clarification process for removal of heavy metals. Twenty-five boxes (1.60 x 10{sup 3} ft{sup 3}) of solid sludge generated by the precipitation/clarification process were removed from the filter press room.

  1. Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department annual operating report, CY 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillespie, M.A.; Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

    1993-03-01

    A total of 6.05 x 10[sup 7] gal of liquid waste was decontaminated by the Process Waste Treatment Plant (PWTP) ion exchange system during CY 1992. This averaged to 115 gpm throughout the year. When necessary, a wastewater sidestream of 50--80 gpm was treated through the use of a natural zeolite treatment system. An additional 8.00 x 10[sup 6] gal (average of 15 gpm throughout the year) were treated by the zeolite system. Therefore, the average total flow treated at the PWTP for CY 1992 was 130 gpm. In mid-June, the zeolite system was repiped to allow it the capability to treat the ion exchange system's discharge due to rising Cs problems in the wastewater. While being used to treat the ion exchange system's discharge, it cannot treat a sidestream of wastewater. During the year, the regeneration of the cation exchange resins resulted in the generation of 7.83 x 10[sup 3] gal of liquid low-level waste (LLLW) concentrate and 1.15 x 10[sup 4] gal of LLLW evaporator feed. The head-end softening process (precipitation/clarification) generated 604 drums (4.40 x 10[sup 3] ft[sup 3]) of solid low-level waste sludge. The zeolite treatment system generated approximately 8.40 x 10[sup 2] ft[sup 3] of spent zeolite resin, which was turned over to the Solid Waste Operations Department for disposal. See Table 1 for a monthly summary of activities at the PWTP. Figures 1, 2, 3, and 4 show a comparison of operations at the PWTP in 1992 with previous years. Figure 5 shows a comparison of annual rainfall at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1987. A total of 1.55 x 10[sup 8] gal of liquid waste (average of 294 gpm throughout the year) was treated at the Nonradiological Wastewater Treatment Plant (NRWTP). Of this amount, 1.40 x 10[sup 7] gal were treated by the precipitation/clarification process for removal of heavy metals. Twenty-five boxes (1.60 x 10[sup 3] ft[sup 3]) of solid sludge generated by the precipitation/clarification process were removed from the filter

  2. Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department annual operating report, CY 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillespie, M.A.; Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

    1993-03-01

    A total of 6.05 x 10 7 gal of liquid waste was decontaminated by the Process Waste Treatment Plant (PWTP) ion exchange system during CY 1992. This averaged to 115 gpm throughout the year. When necessary, a wastewater sidestream of 50--80 gpm was treated through the use of a natural zeolite treatment system. An additional 8.00 x 10 6 gal (average of 15 gpm throughout the year) were treated by the zeolite system. Therefore, the average total flow treated at the PWTP for CY 1992 was 130 gpm. In mid-June, the zeolite system was repiped to allow it the capability to treat the ion exchange system's discharge due to rising Cs problems in the wastewater. While being used to treat the ion exchange system's discharge, it cannot treat a sidestream of wastewater. During the year, the regeneration of the cation exchange resins resulted in the generation of 7.83 x 10 3 gal of liquid low-level waste (LLLW) concentrate and 1.15 x 10 4 gal of LLLW evaporator feed. The head-end softening process (precipitation/clarification) generated 604 drums (4.40 x 10 3 ft 3 ) of solid low-level waste sludge. The zeolite treatment system generated approximately 8.40 x 10 2 ft 3 of spent zeolite resin, which was turned over to the Solid Waste Operations Department for disposal. See Table 1 for a monthly summary of activities at the PWTP. Figures 1, 2, 3, and 4 show a comparison of operations at the PWTP in 1992 with previous years. Figure 5 shows a comparison of annual rainfall at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1987. A total of 1.55 x 10 8 gal of liquid waste (average of 294 gpm throughout the year) was treated at the Nonradiological Wastewater Treatment Plant (NRWTP). Of this amount, 1.40 x 10 7 gal were treated by the precipitation/clarification process for removal of heavy metals. Twenty-five boxes (1.60 x 10 3 ft 3 ) of solid sludge generated by the precipitation/clarification process were removed from the filter press room

  3. Regulatory Oversight Program, July 1, 1993 - March 3, 1997. Volume 2: Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    On July, 1993, a Regulatory Oversight (RO) organization was established within the US DOE, Oak Ridge Operations to provide regulatory oversight of the DOE uranium enrichment facilities leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). The purpose of the OR program was to ensure continued plant safety, safeguards and security while the plants were transitioned to regulatory oversight by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Volume 2 contains copies of the documents which established the relationship between NRC, DOE, USEC, and DOL (Dept of Labor) required to facilitate regulatory oversight transition

  4. Regulatory Oversight Program, July 1, 1993--March 3, 1997. Volume 2: Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    On July, 1993, a Regulatory Oversight (RO) organization was established within the US DOE, Oak Ridge Operations to provide regulatory oversight of the DOE uranium enrichment facilities leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). The purpose of the OR program was to ensure continued plant safety, safeguards and security while the plants were transitioned to regulatory oversight by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Volume 2 contains copies of the documents which established the relationship between NRC, DOE, USEC, and DOL (Dept of Labor) required to facilitate regulatory oversight transition.

  5. Restart oversight assessment of Hanford 242-A evaporator: Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    This report summarizes a January 17--28, 1994, oversight assessment of restart activities for the 242-A Evaporator at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site about 25 miles northeast of Hanford, Washington. The assessment was conducted by qualified staff and consultants from the DOE Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH). Its focus was the readiness of the facility for the resumption of safe operations, in particular those operations involved in the treatment and disposal of condensate from the evaporation of liquid radioactive waste, a key element of the tank waste remediation project administered by the DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL). Overall, the assessment yielded eight programmatic concerns, supported by 38 individual findings. Of the concerns, four have already been closed, and the other four have been resolved. Results pointed up strengths in management and engineering design, as well as effective support of facility training programs by the management and operating contractor, Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). Weaknesses were evident, however, in conduct of operations, maintenance, and radiological practices. Furthermore, problems in the submittal and approval of Compliance Schedule Approvals--that is, WHC documentation of the status of compliance with DOE orders--were indicative of a programmatic breakdown in the DOE Order compliance process. According to the results of this assessment, there are no safety and health issues that would preclude or delay restart of the evaporator

  6. Administrative and operational strategies of the coffee processing industry department of Caldas (Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Octavio Diaz Arango

    2016-07-01

    domestic and international markets. Furthermore, it was concluded that quality management depends on operating performance and productivity when it comes to increasing the competitiveness of the coffee processing industries in the Department of Caldas (Colombia.

  7. 75 FR 47631 - Swets Information Services, Operations Department, Information Technology Group, Marketing Group...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-73,668] Swets Information Services, Operations Department, Information Technology Group, Marketing Group, Finance Group, Runnemede..., Information Technology (IT) Group, Marketing Group and the Finance Group into one entity instead of...

  8. Department

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2014-09-08

    Sep 8, 2014 ... Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies & Management 7(5): 572 – 580, 2014. ISSN:1998-0507 ... during the slack period of rain-fed agriculture. In spite of the ... be as a result of fact that operation of the irrigation farming ...

  9. Improving regulatory oversight of maintenance programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, S.

    2008-01-01

    Safe nuclear power plant operation requires that risks due to failure or unavailability of Structures, Systems and Components (SSCs) be minimized. Implementation of an effective maintenance program is a key means for achieving this goal. In its regulatory framework, the important relationship between maintenance and safety is acknowledged by the CNSC. A high level maintenance program requirement is included in the Class I Facilities Regulations. In addition, the operating licence contains a condition based on the principle that the design function and performance of SSCs needs to remain consistent with the plant's design and analysis documents. Nuclear power plant licensees have the primary responsibility for safe operation of their facilities and consequently for implementation of a successful maintenance program. The oversight role of the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) is to ensure that the licensee carries out that responsibility. The challenge for the CNSC is how to do this consistently and efficiently. Three opportunities for improvement to regulatory maintenance oversight are being pursued. These are related to the regulatory framework, compliance verification inspection activities and monitoring of self-reporting. The regulatory framework has been improved by clarifying expectations through the issuance of S-210 'Maintenance Programs for Nuclear Power Plants'. Inspection activities have been improved by introducing new maintenance inspections into the baseline program. Monitoring is being improved by making better use of self-reported and industry produced maintenance related performance indicators. As with any type of program change, the challenge is to ensure the consistent and optimal application of regulatory activities and resources. This paper is a summary of the CNSC's approach to improving its maintenance oversight strategy. (author)

  10. Missouri Department of Natural Resources Hazardous Waste Program Weldon Spring site remedial action project. Status of project to date January 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This document describes the progress made by the Missouri Department of Natural Resources during the third year (1995) of the Agreement in Support (AIS) in its oversight role at the Weldon Springs Site. The accomplishments this year include participation in several workgroup meetings, oversight of the two operable units (Groundwater and Quarry Residuals), coordination between the US DOE and the various regulatory programs, and continued independent analysis of the treated water discharges

  11. 76 FR 10135 - Public Housing Evaluation and Oversight: Changes to the Public Housing Assessment System (PHAS...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-23

    ... Vol. 76 Wednesday, No. 36 February 23, 2011 Part III Department of Housing and Urban Development 24 CFR Parts 901, 902, and 907 Public Housing Evaluation and Oversight: Changes to the Public Housing...

  12. United States Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office Environmental Compliance Handbook. Third edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-03-01

    The Environment, Safety and Health Division (ESHD) of the Nevada Operations Office has prepared this Environmental Compliance Handbook for all users of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and other US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) facilities. The Handbook gives an overview of the important environmental laws and regulations that apply to the activities conducted by the Nevada Operations Office and other users of DOE/NV facilities in Nevada

  13. United States Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office Environmental Compliance Handbook. Third edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    The Environment, Safety & Health Division (ESHD) of the Nevada Operations Office has prepared this Environmental Compliance Handbook for all users of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and other US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) facilities. The Handbook gives an overview of the important environmental laws and regulations that apply to the activities conducted by the Nevada Operations Office and other users of DOE/NV facilities in Nevada.

  14. Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department annual operating report, CY 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

    1996-03-01

    This report describes the operating activities, upgrade activities, maintenance, and other activities regarding liquid and gaseous low level radioactive waste management at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Miscellaneous activities include training, audits, tours, and environmental restoration support

  15. United States Department of Energy -- Richland Operations Office Environmental Protection Implementation Plan, November 9, 1989 to November 9, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paasch, R.A.

    1989-11-01

    Protection of the environment at the Hanford Site is being ensured through several dedicated activities. These dedicated activities include: Routine effluent monitoring to ensure operations control emissions to the environment and environmental surveillance to characterize and assess impacts of operations on the environment; Corrective activities including permitting of facilities and upgrading of systems to come into full compliance with environmental regulations; Activities for maintaining compliance with federal and state statutes regulating both active and inactive waste sites; Environmental restoration activities for cleanup of inactive sites; Oversight activities to ensure conduct of responsive and integrated programs for environmental protection; and Recognition of additional requirements of new or revised regulations and DOE orders and implementation of means for meeting these requirements

  16. Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department annual operating report CY 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maddox, J.J.; Scott, C.B.

    1997-03-01

    This annual report summarizes operating activities dealing with the process waste system, the liquid low-level waste system, and the gaseous waste system. It also describes upgrade activities dealing with the process and liquid low-level waste systems, the cathodic protection system, a stack ventilation system, and configuration control. Maintenance activities are described dealing with nonradiological wastewater treatment plant, process waste treatment plant and collection system, liquid low-level waste system, and gaseous waste system. Miscellaneous activities include training, audits/reviews/tours, and environmental restoration support

  17. 76 FR 12745 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security Office of Operations Coordination and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-08

    ... 20528. For privacy issues please contact: Mary Ellen Callahan (703-235-0780), Chief Privacy Officer... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Office of the Secretary [Docket No. DHS-2010-0055] Privacy Act of... Operations Center Tracker and Senior Watch Officer Logs System of Records AGENCY: Privacy Office, DHS. ACTION...

  18. The role of Quality Oversight in nuclear and hazardous waste management and environmental restoration at Westinghouse Hanford Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fouad, H.Y.

    1994-05-01

    The historical factors that led to the waste at Hanford are outlined. Westinghouse Hanford Company mission and organization are described. The role of the Quality Oversight organization in nuclear hazardous waste management and environmental restoration at Westinghouse Hanford Company is delineated. Tank Waste Remediation Systems activities and the role of the Quality Oversight organization are described as they apply to typical projects. Quality Oversight's role as the foundation for implementation of systems engineering and operation research principles is pointed out

  19. Operating experience review -- Conduct of operations at Department of Energy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    This research examined human error related occurrences, reported in the ORPS database, for the purpose of identifying weaknesses in the implementation of the guidance regarding the Conduct of Operations contained in DOE 5480.19. Specifically, this research examined three separate samples of occurrence reports from Defense Program facilities, which cited human error as a direct or contributing cause. These reports were evaluated using a coding scheme which incorporated the guidelines present in 5480.19, as well as a number of generic human factors concerns. The second chapter of this report summarizes the coding scheme which was used to evaluate the occurrence reports. Since the coding scheme is quite lengthy, only the parts of the scheme needed to make the remainder of the report clear are included in this chapter. Details on the development and content of the coding scheme are reported in Appendices A, B, and C. Chapter 3 presents the analysis of three different data sets. This chapter demonstrates that similar results were obtained across different data sets, collected at different points in time, and coded by different raters. The implications of the results obtained in Chapter 3 are discussed in Chapter 4. This chapter makes a number of suggestions for reducing the problems found in the occurrence reports. Chapter 5 applies the methodology that has been developed in this report to two facilities at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Finally, Chapter 6 reiterates the major findings of this report. Several additional analyses appear in appendices at the end of this report

  20. Design, Operation, and Controlled-Island Operation of the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2013 Microgrid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurnik, C. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Butt, R. S. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Metzger, I. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lavrova, O. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Patibandla, S. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wagner, V. [Schneider Electric, Knoxville, TN (United States); Frankosky, M. [Schneider Electric, Knoxville, TN (United States); Wiegand, G. [MicroPlanet, Inc., Woodinville, WA (United States)

    2015-04-22

    This document reports on the design and operation of a high-capacity and high-penetration-ratio microgrid, which consists of 19 photovoltaic-powered residential houses designed by collegiate teams as part of their participation in the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2013. The microgrid was interconnected with the local utility, and resulting net-power and power-quality events were recorded in high detail (1-minute data sampling or better). Also, a controlled-island operation test was conducted to evaluate the microgrid response to additional events such as increased loads (e.g., from electric vehicles) and bypassing of voltage regulators. This temporary ground-laid microgrid was stable under nominal and island-operation conditions; adverse weather and loads did not lead to power-quality degradation.

  1. Accreditation and quality approach in operating theatre departments: the French approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soudée, M

    2005-01-01

    Since 1996, French health establishments are subjected to a process of evaluating the quality of care, called "accreditation". This process was controlled by ANAES, which, after January 1st, 2005 became the Haute Autorité de Santé (HAS). The accreditation is characterized by a dual process of self-assessment and external audit, leading to four levels of accreditation. In spite of requiring a time-consuming methodology, this approach provides an important means of consolidating the development of the quality approach and re-stimulating the compliance of establishments with standards of safety and vigilance. The professional teams of many French operating theatre departments have been able to use the regulatory and restricting framework of accreditation to organize quality approaches specific to the operative system, supported by the organizational structures of the department such as the operating suite committee, departmental boards and the steering group. Based on quality guidelines including a commitment from the manager and operating suite committee, as well as a quality flow chart and a quality system, these teams describe the main procedures for running the operating theatre. They also organize the follow-up of incidents and undesirable events, along with the risks and points to watch. Audits of the operative system are planned on a regular basis. The second version of the accreditation process considerably reinforces the assessment of professional practices by evaluating the relevance, the risks and the methods of managing care for pathologies. It will make it possible to implement assessments of the health care provided by operating theatre departments and will reinforce the importance of search for quality.

  2. A qualitative phenomenological study: Enhanced, risk-based FAA oversight on part 145 maintenance practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Bryan G.

    The purpose of this qualitative phenomenological study was to examine the phenomenon of enhanced, risk-based Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) oversight of Part 145 repair stations that performed aircraft maintenance for Part 121 air carriers between 2007 and 2014 in Oklahoma. Specifically, this research was utilized to explore what operational changes have occurred in the domestic Part 145 repair station industry such as variations in management or hiring practices, training, recordkeeping and technical data, inventory and aircraft parts supply-chain logistics, equipment, and facilities. After interviewing 12 managers from Part 145 repair stations in Oklahoma, six major theme codes emerged from the data: quality of oversight before 2007, quality of oversight after 2007, advantages of oversight, disadvantages of oversight, status quo of oversight, and process improvement . Of those six major theme codes, 17 subthemes appeared from the data that were used to explain the phenomenon of enhanced oversight in the Part 145 repair station industry. Forty-two percent of the participants indicated a weak FAA oversight system that has hindered the continuous process improvement program in their repair stations. Some of them were financially burdened after hiring additional full-time quality assurance inspectors to specifically manage enhanced FAA oversight. Notwithstanding, the participants of the study indicated that the FAA must apply its surveillance on a more standardized and consistent basis. They want to see this standardization in how FAA inspectors interpret regulations and practice the same quality of oversight for all repair stations, particularly those that are repeat violators and fail to comply with federal aviation regulations. They believed that when the FAA enforces standardization on a consistent basis, repair stations can become more efficient and safer in the performance of their scope of work for the U.S. commercial air transportation industry.

  3. An independent safety assessment of Department of Energy nuclear reactor facilities: Procedures, operations and maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toto, G.; Lindgren, A.J.

    1981-02-01

    The 1979 accident at the Three Mile Island commercial nuclear power plant has led to a number of studies of nuclear reactors, in both the public and private sectors. One of these is that of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Facilities Personnel Qualification and Training (NFPQT) Committee, which has outlined tasks for assessment of 13 reactors owned by DOE and operated by contractors. This report covers one of the tasks, the assessment of procedures, operations, and maintenance at the DOE reactor facilities, based on a review of actual documents used at the reactor sites

  4. Characterization of the medical department of pharmaceutical companies operating in Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acílio Gala

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In a context of strong regulatory demands and high economic pressures and constraints, medical departments within pharmaceutical companies, have demonstrated its strategic relevance even though the functions to embrace are not globally consensual. In this context, a study that intended to analyse the management of medical activities, in pharmaceutical companies operating in Portugal, including allocated human resources and investment trends, was implemented. Quantitative information was collected through an electronic survey, in pharmaceutical companies with activity in Portugal. The analysis of the results supported the conclusion that the majority of the companies are affiliates of international companies and that 79% of them have formalized medical departments. The human resources of the medical departments of the participant companies include several professional classes, with predominance of pharmacists. Globally, the number of employees of the medical area has registered a systematic growth in the last years. It was also possible to conclude that the majority of the companies are increasing the investment in medical affairs activities. This study enables the understanding of these activities in pharmaceutical companies operating in Portugal, within the international panorama of pharmaceutical industry. It contributes to improve the knowledge about the relevance of medical departments while enabling the definition of novel pathways to increase the competiveness and sustainability of the companies.

  5. Analysis of Department of Defense social media policy and its impact on operational security

    OpenAIRE

    Leonhardi, Eric V.; Murphy, Mark; Kim, Hannah

    2015-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The emergence and rapid adoption of social media by society has forced the Department of Defense (DOD) to adapt, and ultimately develop and incorporate, social media policy into its cybersecurity strategy. While social media has influenced DOD strategy, it has also had a direct impact on the organization’s operational security (OPSEC). DOD personnel using social media represent a potential OPSEC risk through the various ways and means ...

  6. Resolving issues at the Department of Energy/Oak Ridge operations facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Row, T.H.; Adams, W.D.

    1988-01-01

    The development of the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office's model for waste management and its application in the Oak Ridge Reservation are discussed. The concept simply stated is to assure that all stakeholders in waste management decisions have the opportunity to be participants from the first step. The paper discusses the advisory committees involved in the process, subcontracting support, college and university relation, technology demonstrations and planning, other federal agency interaction, and the model meeting

  7. Oversight of the Air Force - What is the Audit Component and How Can Air Force Managers Deal with It Effectively?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-01

    This report discusses authority, mission, and responsibilities of the audit organizations that perform oversight of Air Force operations. A...the discussion of the major audit organizations. The audit oversight function is here to stay. Auditors and audit organizations can be beneficial to Air

  8. Potential pollution prevention and waste minimization for Department of Energy operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, J.; Ischay, C.; Kennicott, M.; Pemberton, S.; Tull, D.

    1995-10-01

    With the tightening of budgets and limited resources, it is important to ensure operations are carried out in a cost-effective and productive manner. Implementing an effective Pollution Prevention strategy can help to reduce the costs of waste management and prevent harmful releases to the environment. This document provides an estimate of the Department of Energy's waste reduction potential from the implementation of Pollution Prevention opportunities. A team of Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention professionals was formed to collect the data and make the estimates. The report includes a list of specific reduction opportunities for various waste generating operations and waste types. A generic set of recommendations to achieve these reduction opportunities is also provided as well as a general discussion of the approach and assumptions made for each waste generating operation

  9. Oversight Institutions Within the United Nations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Caroline Aggestam

    2015-01-01

    This article will give a description of the role of internal audit and governance functions within the United Nations system. The United Nations has, during the last 10 years, worked to establish effective oversight services. Oversight, governance and hereunder the internal audit function has been...

  10. 5 CFR 330.611 - Oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Oversight. 330.611 Section 330.611 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS RECRUITMENT, SELECTION, AND... Employees § 330.611 Oversight. OPM provides advice and assistance to agencies in implementing their Career...

  11. 12 CFR 370.10 - Oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... LIQUIDITY GUARANTEE PROGRAM § 370.10 Oversight. (a) Participating entities are subject to the FDIC's oversight regarding compliance with the terms of the temporary liquidity guarantee program. (b) A..., for the duration of the temporary liquidity guarantee program, to be subject to the FDIC's authority...

  12. Statistical process control: separating signal from noise in emergency department operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, Laura; Barrueto, Fermin

    2015-05-01

    Statistical process control (SPC) is a visually appealing and statistically rigorous methodology very suitable to the analysis of emergency department (ED) operations. We demonstrate that the control chart is the primary tool of SPC; it is constructed by plotting data measuring the key quality indicators of operational processes in rationally ordered subgroups such as units of time. Control limits are calculated using formulas reflecting the variation in the data points from one another and from the mean. SPC allows managers to determine whether operational processes are controlled and predictable. We review why the moving range chart is most appropriate for use in the complex ED milieu, how to apply SPC to ED operations, and how to determine when performance improvement is needed. SPC is an excellent tool for operational analysis and quality improvement for these reasons: 1) control charts make large data sets intuitively coherent by integrating statistical and visual descriptions; 2) SPC provides analysis of process stability and capability rather than simple comparison with a benchmark; 3) SPC allows distinction between special cause variation (signal), indicating an unstable process requiring action, and common cause variation (noise), reflecting a stable process; and 4) SPC keeps the focus of quality improvement on process rather than individual performance. Because data have no meaning apart from their context, and every process generates information that can be used to improve it, we contend that SPC should be seriously considered for driving quality improvement in emergency medicine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Status of existing federal environmental risk-based standards applicable to Department of Energy operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilyard, G.R.

    1991-09-01

    When conducting its environmental restoration, waste management, and decontamination and decommissioning activities, the US Department of Energy (DOE) must comply with a myriad of regulatory procedures and environmental standards. This paper assesses the status of existing federal risk-based standards that may be applied to chemical and radioactive substances on DOE sites. Gaps and inconsistencies among the existing standards and the technical issues associated with the application of those standards are identified. Finally, the implications of the gaps, inconsistencies, and technical issues on DOE operations are discussed, and approaches to resolving the gaps, inconsistencies, and technical issues are identified. 6 refs

  14. Upgrade of the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site's reactor operations and maintenance procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, T.E.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the program in progress at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to upgrade the existing reactor operating and maintenance procedures to current commercial nuclear industry standards. In order to meet this goal, the following elements were established: administrative procedures to govern the upgrade process, tracking system to provide status and accountability; and procedure writing guides. The goal is to establish a benchmark of excellence by which other Department of Energy (DOE) sites will measure themselves. The above three elements are addressed in detail in this paper

  15. [Proposing a physiological model for Emergency Department. Operating principles, classification of overcrowding and guidelines for redesign].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera Carranza, M; Aguado Correa, F; Padilla Garrido, N; López Camacho, F

    2017-04-30

    The operation of Emergency Departments (ED) is determined by demand, their own organizational structures and the connection to other medical care levels. When these elements are not simultaneous, it hinders patient flow and decreases capacity, making it necessary to employ a systemic approach to the chain of emergency care as a single operational entity. With this theoretical orientation, we suggest a conceptual model similar to the physiological cardiac output, in which the preload is the demand, the contractile or flow pump is the organizational structure, the afterload is the hospital, the pre-ED valve is primary care and outpatient emergencies, and the post-ED valve is the diagnostic support services and the specialist consultants. Based on this theoretical approach we classify the different types of ED overcrowding and systematise its causes and the different waiting lists that it generates, which can help to redesign the service and avoid its saturation.

  16. Environmental Monitoring Plan United States Department of Energy Richland Operations Office. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This Environmental Monitoring Plan was prepared for the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Richland Operations Office (RL) to implement the requirements of DOE Order 5400.1. According to the Order, each DOE site, facility, or activity that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant pollutants or hazardous materials shall prepare a written environmental monitoring plan covering two major activities: (1) effluent monitoring and (2) environmental surveillance. The plan is to contain information discussing the rationale and design criteria for the monitoring programs, sampling locations and schedules, quality assurance requirements, program implementation procedures, analytical procedures, and reporting requirements. The plan's purpose is to assist DOE in the management of environmental activities at the Hanford Site and to help ensure that operations on the site are conducted in an environmentally safe and sound manner

  17. Environmental Monitoring Plan United States Department of Energy Richland Operations Office. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-10

    This Environmental Monitoring Plan was prepared for the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Richland Operations Office (RL) to implement the requirements of DOE Order 5400.1. According to the Order, each DOE site, facility, or activity that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant pollutants or hazardous materials shall prepare a written environmental monitoring plan covering two major activities: (1) effluent monitoring and (2) environmental surveillance. The plan is to contain information discussing the rationale and design criteria for the monitoring programs, sampling locations and schedules, quality assurance requirements, program implementation procedures, analytical procedures, and reporting requirements. The plan`s purpose is to assist DOE in the management of environmental activities at the Hanford Site and to help ensure that operations on the site are conducted in an environmentally safe and sound manner.

  18. Human factors in nuclear safety oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, K.

    1989-01-01

    The mission of the nuclear safety oversight function at the Savannah River Plant is to enhance the process and nuclear safety of site facilities. One of the major goals surrounding this mission is the reduction of human error. It is for this reason that several human factors engineers are assigned to the Operations assessment Group of the Facility Safety Evaluation Section (FSES). The initial task of the human factors contingent was the design and implementation of a site wide root cause analysis program. The intent of this system is to determine the most prevalent sources of human error in facility operations and to assist in determining where the limited human factors resources should be focused. In this paper the strategy used to educate the organization about the field of human factors is described. Creating an awareness of the importance of human factors engineering in all facets of design, operation, and maintenance is considered to be an important step in reducing the rate of human error

  19. Department of Energy Operational Readiness Review for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has completed an Operational Readiness Review (ORR) for the restart of Contact Handled (CH) waste emplacement at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) located near Carlsbad, New Mexico. The ORR team assessed the readiness of Nuclear Waste Partnership, LLC (NWP) to manage and perform receipt through CH waste emplacement, and associated waste handling and management activities, including the ability of the National TRU Program (NTP) to evaluate the waste currently stored at the WIPP site against the revised and enhanced Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Field work for this review began on November 14, 2015 and was completed on November 30, 2016. The DOE ORR was conducted in accordance with the Department of Energy Operational Readiness Review Implementation Plan for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, dated November 8, 2016, and DOE Order 425.1D, Verification of Readiness to Start Up or Restart Nuclear Facilities. The review activities included personnel interviews, record reviews, direct observation of operations and maintenance demonstrations, and observation of multiple operational and emergency drills/exercises. The DOE ORR also evaluated the adequacy of the contractor’s ORR (CORR) and the readiness of the DOE Carlsbad field Office (CBFO) to oversee the startup and execution of CH waste emplacement activities at the WIPP facility. The WIPP facility is categorized as a Hazard Category 2 DOE Nonreactor Nuclear Facility for all surface and Underground (UG) operations per DOE-STD-1027-92, Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports. In addition, the WIPP experienced two events in February, 2014 that resulted in Accident Investigations being performed in accordance with the requirements of DOE Order 225.1B, Accident Investigations. Based upon the results of the accident investigations and hazard categorization of the facility, the team placed

  20. The nature and necessity of operational flexibility in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Michael J; Ferrand, Yann B; Laker, Lauren F; Froehle, Craig M; Vogus, Timothy J; Dittus, Robert S; Kripalani, Sunil; Pines, Jesse M

    2015-02-01

    Hospital-based emergency departments (EDs), given their high cost and major role in allocating care resources, are at the center of the debate about how to maximize value in delivering health care in the United States. To operate effectively and create value, EDs must be flexible, having the ability to rapidly adapt to the highly variable needs of patients. The concept of flexibility has not been well described in the ED literature. We introduce the concept, outline its potential benefits, and provide some illustrative examples to facilitate incorporating flexibility into ED management. We draw on operations research and organizational theory to identify and describe 5 forms of flexibility: physical, human resource, volume, behavioral, and conceptual. Each form of flexibility may be useful individually or in combination with other forms in improving ED performance and enhancing value. We also offer suggestions for measuring operational flexibility in the ED. A better understanding of operational flexibility and its application to the ED may help us move away from reactive approaches of managing variable demand to a more systematic approach. We also address the tension between cost and flexibility and outline how "partial flexibility" may help resolve some challenges. Applying concepts of flexibility from other disciplines may help clinicians and administrators think differently about their workflow and provide new insights into managing issues of cost, flow, and quality in the ED. Copyright © 2014 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Pre-operative fasting: a nationwide survey of German anaesthesia departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuer, J-P; Bosse, G; Seifert, S; Prochnow, L; Martin, J; Schleppers, A; Geldner, G; Soreide, E; Spies, C

    2010-03-01

    Shorter pre-operative fasting improves clinical outcome without an increased risk. Since October 2004, German Anaesthesiology Societies have officially recommended a fast of 2 h for clear fluids and 6 h for solid food before elective surgery. We conducted a nationwide survey to evaluate the current clinical practice in Germany. Between July 2006 and January 2007, standardized questionnaires were mailed to 3751 Anaesthesiology Society members in leading positions requesting anonymous response. The overall response rate was 66% (n=2418). Of those, 2148 (92%) claimed familiarity with the new guidelines. About a third (n=806, 34%) reported full adherence to the new recommendations, whereas 1043 (45%) reported an eased fasting practice. Traditional Nil per os after midnight was still recommended by 157 (7%). Commonest reasons reported for adopting the new guidelines were: 'improved pre-operative comfort' (84%), and 'increased patient satisfaction' (83%); reasons against were: 'low flexibility in operation room management' (19%), and 'increased risk of aspiration' (13%). Despite the apparent understanding of the benefits from reduced pre-operative fasting, full implementation of the guidelines remains poor in German anaesthesiology departments.

  2. Reports and operational engineering: An independent safety assessment of Department of Energy nuclear reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rochman, A.; Washburn, B.W.

    1981-02-01

    The Nuclear Facilities Personnel Qualification and Training (NFPQT) Committee, established via an October 24, 1979 memorandum from the Department of Energy (DOE) Under Secretary, was instructed to review the ''Kemeny Commission'' recommendations and to identify possible implications for DOE's nuclear facilities. As a result of this review, the Committee recommended that DOE carry out assessments in seven categories. The assessments would address specific topics identified for each category as delineated in the NFPQT ''Guidelines for Assessing the Safe Operation of DOE-Owned Reactors,'' dated May 7, 1980. The Committee recognized that similar assessments had been ongoing in the DOE program and safety overview organizations since the Three Mile Island nuclear accident and it was the Committee's intent to use the results of those ongoing assessments as an input to their evaluations. This information would be supplemented by additional studies consisting of the subject-related documents used at each reactor facility studied, and an on-site review of these reactor facilities by professional personnel within the Department of Energy, its operating contractors and independent consultants. 1 tab

  3. Regulatory Oversight Program, July 1, 1993--March 3, 1997. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    On July, 1993, a Regulatory Oversight (RO) organization was established within the US DOE, Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) to provide regulatory oversight of the DOE uranium enrichment facilities leased to the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC). The purpose of the OR program was to ensure continued plant safety, safeguards and security while the plants were transitioned to regulatory oversight by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Volume 3 contains copies of two reports that document the DOE/ORO regulatory oversight inspection and enforcement history for each gaseous diffusion plant site. Each report provides a formal mechanism by which DOE/ORO could communicate the inspection and enforcement history to NRC. The reports encompass the inspection activities that occurred during July 1, 1993 through March 2, 1997.

  4. Oil and gas site contamination risks : improved oversight needed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-02-01

    British Columbia has seen record levels of activities in the oil and gas sector. Upstream petroleum processes include exploration, well completion and production. Site contamination can occur during all of these activities, resulting in potential environmental and human health impacts. Although well operators are responsible by law for site restoration, there is a potential risk that some operators will not fulfill their responsibilities, thereby leaving the province liable for the site restoration costs. In British Columbia, the BC Oil and Gas Commission (OGC) is responsible for managing these risks through oversight activities designed to ensure that industry meets its obligations. The OGC also manages the orphan sites reclamation fund. This report presented an audit of the OGC in order to determine if it is providing adequate oversight of upstream oil and gas site contamination risks. The audit examined whether the agency responsibilities are clear and whether the OGC is fully aware of the environmental and financial risks associated with upstream oil and gas site contamination. The audit also examined if the OGC has established appropriate procedures to oversee the risks and to inform the public of how effectively site contamination risks are being managed. The report presented the audit background, audit expectations, findings, conclusions and recommendations. It was concluded that the OGC's oversight of the environmental and financial risks associated with oil and gas site contamination needs improving. tabs., figs.

  5. 13 CFR 120.1005 - Bureau of PCLP Oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bureau of PCLP Oversight. 120.1005 Section 120.1005 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Risk-Based Lender Oversight Supervision § 120.1005 Bureau of PCLP Oversight. SBA's Bureau of PCLP Oversight within...

  6. 12 CFR 985.4 - Finance Board oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Finance Board oversight. 985.4 Section 985.4 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD OFFICE OF FINANCE THE OFFICE OF FINANCE § 985.4 Finance Board oversight. (a) Oversight and enforcement actions. The Finance Board shall have the same regulatory oversight authority and enforcement powers...

  7. Contextual factors associated with hospitals' decision to operate freestanding emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patidar, Nitish; Weech-Maldonado, Robert; O'Connor, Stephen J; Sen, Bisakha; Trimm, J M Mickey; Camargo, Carlos A

    Freestanding emergency departments (FSEDs) are fast growing entities in health care, delivering emergency care outside of hospitals. Hospitals may benefit in several ways by opening FSEDs. The study used the resource dependence theory as a means to analyze the relationship between market and organizational factors and the likelihood of hospitals to operate FSEDs. All acute care hospitals in 14 states with FSEDs present during the study period from 2002 to 2011. Data on FSEDs were merged with American Hospital Association Annual Survey, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' Cost Reports, and Area Resource File data. The outcome variable consists of whether or not the hospital operates an FSED. Independent variables include per capita income, percent population over age of 65 years, primary care and specialist physicians per capita, urban location, change in the unemployment rate, change in the population, change in poverty level, market competition, total satellite and autonomous FSEDs in the market, Medicare-managed care penetration rate, hospital beds, total margin, and system membership. We used logistic regression analysis with state and year fixed effects. Standard errors in the regression were clustered by hospital. The number of hospitals operating satellite FSEDs increased from 32 (2.33%) in 2002 to 91 (5.76%) hospitals in 2011 among the 14 states included in the study sample. The results support the hypothesis that hospitals located in munificent environments and more competitive environments (presence of other FSEDs) are more likely to operate an FSED. Organizational level factors such as bed size and system membership are associated with a hospital operating an FSED. The findings may be used by policy makers in developing regulations for hospitals opening FSEDs. Also, study findings of this study may be used by hospitals to make informed decisions when formulating strategies regarding FSEDs.

  8. Implementing Data Definition Consistency for Emergency Department Operations Benchmarking and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiadom, Maame Yaa A B; Scheulen, James; McWade, Conor M; Augustine, James J

    2016-07-01

    The objective was to obtain a commitment to adopt a common set of definitions for emergency department (ED) demographic, clinical process, and performance metrics among the ED Benchmarking Alliance (EDBA), ED Operations Study Group (EDOSG), and Academy of Academic Administrators of Emergency Medicine (AAAEM) by 2017. A retrospective cross-sectional analysis of available data from three ED operations benchmarking organizations supported a negotiation to use a set of common metrics with identical definitions. During a 1.5-day meeting-structured according to social change theories of information exchange, self-interest, and interdependence-common definitions were identified and negotiated using the EDBA's published definitions as a start for discussion. Methods of process analysis theory were used in the 8 weeks following the meeting to achieve official consensus on definitions. These two lists were submitted to the organizations' leadership for implementation approval. A total of 374 unique measures were identified, of which 57 (15%) were shared by at least two organizations. Fourteen (4%) were common to all three organizations. In addition to agreement on definitions for the 14 measures used by all three organizations, agreement was reached on universal definitions for 17 of the 57 measures shared by at least two organizations. The negotiation outcome was a list of 31 measures with universal definitions to be adopted by each organization by 2017. The use of negotiation, social change, and process analysis theories achieved the adoption of universal definitions among the EDBA, EDOSG, and AAAEM. This will impact performance benchmarking for nearly half of US EDs. It initiates a formal commitment to utilize standardized metrics, and it transitions consistency in reporting ED operations metrics from consensus to implementation. This work advances our ability to more accurately characterize variation in ED care delivery models, resource utilization, and performance. In

  9. Conducting and publishing design science research : Inaugural essay of the design science department of the Journal of Operations Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Aken, Joan; Chandrasekaran, Aravind; Halman, Joop

    2016-01-01

    The new Design Science department at the Journal of Operations Management invites submissions using a design science research strategy for operations management (OM) issues. The objective of this strategy is to develop knowledge that can be used in a direct and specific way to design and implement

  10. Demographic, Operational, and Healthcare Utilization Factors Associated with Emergency Department Patient Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Matthew W.; Salzman, Joshua G.; LeFevere, Robert C.; Thomas, Avis J.; Isenberger, Kurt M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The primary aim of this study was to determine which objectively-measured patient demographics, emergency department (ED) operational characteristics, and healthcare utilization frequencies (care factors) were associated with patient satisfaction ratings obtained from phone surveys conducted by a third-party vendor for patients discharged from our ED. Methods This is a retrospective, observational analysis of data obtained between September 2011 and August 2012 from all English- and Spanish-speaking patients discharged from our ED who were contacted by a third-party patient satisfaction vendor to complete a standardized nine-item telephone survey by a trained phone surveyor. We linked data from completed surveys to the patient’s electronic medical record to abstract additional demographic, ED operational, and healthcare utilization data. We used univariate ordinal logistic regression, followed by two multivariate models, to identify significant predictors of patient satisfaction. Results We included 20,940 patients for analysis. The overall patient satisfaction ratings were as follows: 1=471 (2%); 2=558 (3%); 3=2,014 (10%), 4=5,347 (26%); 5=12,550 (60%). Factors associated with higher satisfaction included race/ethnicity (Non-Hispanic Black; Hispanic patients), age (patients ≥65), insurance (Medicare), mode of arrival (arrived by bus or on foot), and having a medication ordered in the ED. Patients who felt their medical condition did not improve, those treated in our ED behavioral health area, and those experiencing longer wait times had reduced satisfaction. Conclusion These findings provide a basis for development and evaluation of targeted interventions that could be used to improve patient satisfaction in our ED. PMID:26265963

  11. Technical assistance to Department of Energy/Office of Operational Safety Assurance Program for remedial action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denham, D.H.; Cross, F.T.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Marks, S.; Soldat, J.K.; Stenner, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    This project was initiated in FY 1984 to provide technical assistance to the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Operational Safety (OOS) in developing and implementing its Assurance Program for Remedial Action (APRA), i.e., overview of the DOE remedial action programs. During this second year of the project,* the technical assistance included report and procedure reviews, and assistance with conducting the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Program (UMTRAP) Office (DOE/AL) appraisal. This included participation in preappraisal visits to UMTRAP sites in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania; Grand Junction, Colorado; and Salt Lake City, Utah. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) also transferred the PNL-developed document review software to the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) staff in Grand Junction, Colorado, in anticipation of future document reviews by the ORAU staff. Other accomplishments have included publication of two formal documents and three project reports, preparation and presentation of five topical reports at national and international meetings, two foreign trip reports, and comments on proposed draft standards of the Environmental Protection Agency (40 CFR 193). The project manager has also participated on National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) and American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) subcommittees developing decommissioning standards, as well as International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) advisory groups developing environmental monitoring guidelines

  12. Prominent attractive qualities of nurses' work in operating room departments: A questionnaire study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björn, Catrine; Josephson, Malin; Wadensten, Barbro; Rissén, Dag

    2015-01-01

    The shortage of nurses in operating room departments (ORs) in Sweden and other countries can lead to reduced capacity and quality in healthcare, as well as more intense work for those on the job. Little is known about what nurses in ORs perceive as crucial for their workplace to be attractive. To capture attractive qualities of nurses' work in Swedish ORs and take a first step in the process of adapting the Attractive Work Questionnaire for use in a health care context. The Attractive Work Questionnaire was completed by 147 (67% ) nurses in four Swedish ORs. Principal Component Analyses (PCA) were performed to determine the underlying structure of the data. Factors contributing to job attractiveness identified in the area "work conditions" were: relations, leadership, equipment, salary, organisation, physical work environment, location, and working hours; in the area "work content": mental work, autonomy and work rate; and in the area "job satisfaction": status and acknowledgement. The PCA showed consistency with the original Attractive Work Questionnaire, Cronbach's alpha varied between 0.57-0.90. Prominent attractive qualities for nurses' work in Swedish ORs were possible to identify through the Attractive Work Questionnaire and the results suggest that the questionnaire can be useful in a health care context.

  13. 48 CFR 936.609-3 - Work oversight in architect-engineer contracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... architect-engineer contracts. 936.609-3 Section 936.609-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Architect-Engineer Services 936.609-3 Work oversight in architect-engineer contracts. In addition to the clause at 48...

  14. 77 FR 6411 - Training, Qualification, and Oversight for Safety-Related Railroad Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-07

    ... Oversight for Safety-Related Railroad Employees AGENCY: Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), Department of... establishing minimum training standards for each category and subcategory of safety-related railroad employee... or contractor that employs one or more safety-related railroad employee to develop and submit a...

  15. Shared leadership and the evolution of "one great department".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casady, Wanda M; Dowd, Terry A

    2005-01-01

    In 2001, Banner Baywood Medical Center's (BBMC) medical imaging department employed concepts to engage staff in a participative decision-making practice regarding those things that most impacted their jobs. A 5-member Oversight Committee was charged with defining a vision for the department to be achieved by 2005, determining obstacles or challenges that needed to be overcome in order to achieve the vision, and facilitating 12-week teams to find solutions to these obstacles. Several initiatives were implemented to ensure competitive salaries, more effective leadership, and overall greater participation by staff in the decision-making process. Within the project's first 18 months, the department's turnover rate was reduced from 40% to 14.5%. However, as the department continued to grow, it became evident that the structure of the Oversight Committee was no longer sufficient to achieve its goals. The members of the Oversight Committee decided to expand its membership to include a representative from every work group within the department. The new group was called the Strategic Thinking Group (STG). Shared leadership--defined by Conger and Pearce as "a dynamic", interactive process among individuals working in groups in which the objective is to lead one another to the achievement of the group goals--is a vital component of the department's operation. During the past 2 years, BBMC has been actively engaged in creating a workplace environment that promotes shared leadership. BBMC utilizes the Gallup Q12 Workplace Survey and the Press Ganey Patient Satisfaction Survey. These surveys use identical numerical ratings, with "5" (strongly agree/very good) the department's goal for employees and patients. Consequently, the department created a new slogan: "We Strive for 5." The outcomes of shared leadership have proven to have a positive impact on staff retention, the reduction of casual Iabor staff, employee satisfaction, and patient satisfaction.

  16. Improving MC and A Oversight in Russia by Implementing Measurement and Training Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokov, Dmitry; Byers, Kenneth R.

    2004-01-01

    As the Russian State regulatory agency responsible for oversight of nuclear material control and accounting (MC and A), Gosatomnadzor of Russia (GAN) determines the status of the MC and A programs at Russian facilities. Last year, GAN developed and implemented their Nuclear Material Measurement Program Plan which documents current non-destructive assay (NDA) measurement capability in all regions of GAN; provides justification for upgrades to equipment, procedures and training; and defines the inspector-facility operator interface as it relates to NDA measurement equipment use. This Program Plan has helped to give the GAN inspection measurements more legal and official status as an oversight tool, and has also helped to improve other GAN MC and A oversight activities. These improvements include developing a tamper-indicating device program, conducting NDA workshops at specific Russian nuclear facilities to better train MC and A inspectors, and developing training evaluation programs. The Program is an important tool to address the GAN role in oversight of the Russian Federal Information System nuclear material database. This paper describes the feedback received from the GAN regional offices on the implementation of the Program Plan during its first year in operation and how the Program Plan has affected other GAN inspection activities to improve MC and A oversight.

  17. 75 FR 81612 - The Consumer Operated and Oriented Plan (CO-OP) Advisory Board; Office of Consumer Information...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-28

    ... and Insurance Oversight (OCIIO) on the Department's strategy to foster the creation of qualified... and Insurance Oversight (OCIIO) on the Department's strategy to foster the creation of qualified... of this notice. Individuals requiring sign language interpretation or other special accommodations...

  18. Resolving issues at the Department of Energy/Oak Ridge Operations Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Row, T.H.; Adams, W.D.

    1988-01-01

    Waste management, like many other issues, has experienced major milestones. In 1971, the Calvert Cliff's decision resulted in an entirely different approach to the consideration of environmental impact analysis in reactor siting. The accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl have had profound effects on nuclear power plant design. The high-level waste repository program has had many similar experiences that have modified the course of events. The management of radioactive, hazardous chemical and mixed waste in all of the facilities of the Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) Office of the Department of Energy (DOE) took on an entirely different meaning in 1984. On April 13, 1984, Federal Judge Robert Taylor said that DOE should proceed 'with all deliberate speed' to bring the Y-12 plant into compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and the Clean Water Act. This decision resulted from a suit brought by the Legal Environmental Assistance Foundation (LEAF) and grew out of a continuing revelation of mercury spills and other problems related to the Oak Ridge plants of DOE. In this same time frame, other events occurred in Oak Ridge that would set the stage for major changes, to provide the supporting environment that allowed a very different and successful approach to resolving waste management issues at the DOE/ORO Facilities. This is the origin of the Oak Ridge Model which was recently adopted as the DOE Model. The concept is to assure that all stakeholders in waste management decisions have the opportunity to be participants from the first step. A discussion of many of the elements that have contributed to the success of the Model follows

  19. OC30 - Fracture reduction with nitrous oxide at the children's emergency department shortens the length of stay and reduces the use of full anaesthesia in the operating department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Sigrid; Wentzel, Anna-Pia; Ekstrom, Malin

    2016-05-09

    Theme: Accreditation and quality improvement. Dislocated fractures are common in the children's emergency department (ER). All forms of fracture reduction are very painful requiring nitrous oxide. The purpose is to shorten the length of stay in the hospital as well as sustain a high quality of care. All nurses received theoretical and practical training in the use of nitrous oxide. Evaluations with the families were made by telephone. A total of 40 enclosed fracture reductions were made at the ER, leading to a reduction of 33 patients in the operating department and the length of stay was shortened - this compared to the same time in 2014. No adverse event was reported and no patient felt any increase in pain during the treatment. All patients would repeat the procedure if necessary. The treatment has reduced the length of stay in the hospital without affecting the other patients in the ER or the quality of care.

  20. Integrating GIS and GPS in environmental remediation oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaletsky, K.; Earle, J.R.; Schneider, T.A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents findings on Ohio EPA Office of Federal Facilities Oversight's (OFFO) use of GIS and GPS for environmental remediation oversight at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Fernald Site. The Fernald site is a former uranium metal production facility within DOE's nuclear weapons complex. Significant uranium contamination of soil and groundwater is being remediated under state and federal regulations. OFFO uses GIS/GPS to enhance environmental monitoring and remediation oversight. These technologies are utilized within OFFO's environmental monitoring program for sample location and parameter selection, data interpretation and presentation. GPS is used to integrate sample data into OFFO's GIS and for permanently linking precise and accurate geographic data to samples and waste units. It is important to identify contamination geographically as all visual references (e.g., buildings, infrastructure) will be removed during remediation. Availability of the GIS allows OFFO to perform independent analysis and review of DOE contractor generated data, models, maps, and designs. This ability helps alleviate concerns associated with open-quotes black boxclose quotes models and data interpretation. OFFO's independent analysis has increased regulatory confidence and the efficiency of design reviews. GIS/GPS technology allows OFFO to record and present complex data in a visual format aiding in stakeholder education and awareness. Presented are OFFO's achievements within the aforementioned activities and some reasons learned in implementing the GIS/GPS program. OFFO's two years of GIS/GPS development have resulted in numerous lessons learned and ideas for increasing effectiveness through the use of GIS/GPS

  1. 32 CFR 2103.51 - Information Security Oversight Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Information Security Oversight Committee. 2103... BE DECLASSIFIED Implementation and Review § 2103.51 Information Security Oversight Committee. The NCS Information Security Oversight Committee shall be chaired by the Staff Counsel of the National Security...

  2. 32 CFR 2700.51 - Information Security Oversight Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Information Security Oversight Committee. 2700... MICRONESIAN STATUS NEGOTIATIONS SECURITY INFORMATION REGULATIONS Implementation and Review § 2700.51 Information Security Oversight Committee. The OMSN Information Security Oversight Committee shall be chaired...

  3. 13 CFR 120.1000 - Risk-Based Lender Oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Risk-Based Lender Oversight. 120.1000 Section 120.1000 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Risk-Based Lender Oversight Supervision § 120.1000 Risk-Based Lender Oversight. (a) Risk-Based Lender...

  4. 76 FR 71081 - Public Aircraft Oversight Safety Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-16

    ... NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD Public Aircraft Oversight Safety Forum The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) will convene a Public Aircraft Oversight Safety Forum which will begin at 9 a... ``Public Aircraft Oversight Forum: Ensuring Safety for Critical Missions'', are to (1) raise awareness of...

  5. For the Common Defense of Cyberspace: Implications of a US Cyber Militia on Department of Defense Cyber Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-12

    the Common Defense of Cyberspace: Implications of a US Cyber Militia on Department of Defense Cyber Operations 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT ...20130423/ NEWS/304230016/Navy-wants-1-000-more-cyber-warriors. 33 Edward Cardon , “Army Cyber Capabilities” (Lecture, Advanced Operations Course...Finally, once a cyber security professional is trained, many argue, to include the head of Army’s Cyber Command, Lieutenant General Edward Cardon

  6. Department of Energy’s ARM Climate Research Facility External Data Center Operations Plan Located At Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cialella, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gregory, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Lazar, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Liang, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ma, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tilp, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wagener, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The External Data Center (XDC) Operations Plan describes the activities performed to manage the XDC, located at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), for the Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility. It includes all ARM infrastructure activities performed by the Data Management and Software Engineering Group (DMSE) at BNL. This plan establishes a baseline of expectation within the ARM Operations Management for the group managing the XDC.

  7. Transparency and Oversight in Local Wellness Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chriqui, Jamie F.; Chaloupka, Frank J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Advocates have called for increased wellness policy transparency and oversight through the use of health advisory councils. This study examines (1) wellness policy transparency, (2) advisory council requirements, (3) factors associated with each, and (4) whether transparency or advisory council requirements are indicative of a stronger…

  8. Mainstreaming climate change adaptation strategies into New York State Department of Transportation's operations : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-31

    This study identifies climate change adaptation strategies and recommends ways of mainstreaming them into planned actions, including legislation, policies, programs and projects in all areas and at all levels within the New York State Department of T...

  9. INFORMATION SECURITYy: Serious Weaknesses Put State Department and FAA Operations at Risk

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dodaro, Gene

    1998-01-01

    We are pleased to be asked to discuss our work in computer security. As requested, our testimony will focus on the results of our recent reviews of the Department of State and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA...

  10. Mainstreaming climate change adaptation strategies into New York State Department of Transportation's operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-31

    This study identifies climate change adaptation strategies and recommends ways of mainstreaming them into planned actions, including legislation, policies, programs and projects in all areas and at all levels within the New York State Department of T...

  11. 75 FR 69689 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security Office of Operations Coordination and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-15

    ...'s as an identifier and may be shared with the Department); Citizenship; Contact information... facilities in a locked drawer behind a locked door. The records are stored on magnetic disc, tape, digital...

  12. Department of Energy Operation Quality Assurance Program for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project (Carlsbad, New Mexico)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    The purpose of this plan is to describe the Quality Assurance (QA)reverse arrow Program to be established and implemented by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Project Office (WPO) and by the Project Participants: the Scientific Advisor (Sandia National Laboratory) and the Management and Operating Contractor (Westinghouse Electric Corporation). This plan addresses the Pre-Operational and Operational phases of the WIPP Project not addressed under the construction phase. This plan also requires the QA Programs for DOE and Project Participants to be structured so as to comply with this plan and ANSI-ASME NQA-1. The prime responsibility for Operational Quality Assurance rests with the DOE WIPP Project Office and is implemented through the combined efforts of the Scientific Advisor and the Management and Operating Contractor. Overviews of selected operational and testing activities will be are conducted in accordance with prescribed requirements and that adequate documentation of these activities is maintained. 4 figs

  13. Brief introduction of USA new reactor oversight process and suggestions for our country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Xiaofeng; Chen Rui; Zhou Limin; Wang Xiuqing

    2002-01-01

    The NRC New Reactor Oversight Process focuses the nuclear safety supervision on the 3 areas: Reactor Safety, Radiation safety and Plant Security. Within the 3 areas, 7 cornerstones are detailed for the purpose. They are Initiating Events, Mitigating Systems, Barrier Integrity, Emergency Preparedness, Occupational Radiation Protection, Public Radiation Safety and Physical Protection. On cooperating with the inspections, the new process ensures a more effective, objective and timely evaluation of the safety level of the operating nuclear power plants. On considering the practices and the status in China nuclear safety supervision, the authors have to learn something from the NRC New Reactor Oversight Process. The authors must make an optimization on Chinese limited resources and put the emphasis on the issues with high risk in order to prevent the occurrence of the accidents. Properly inducing some ideas and methodology from the NRC New Reactor Oversight Process will benefit the development and perfection of the supervision mode of the NNSA

  14. An independent safety assessment of Department of Energy nuclear reactor facilities: Training of operating personnel and personnel selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drain, J.F.

    1981-02-01

    This study has been prepared for the Department of Energy's Nuclear Facilities Personnel Qualification and Training (NFPQT) Committee. Its purpose is to provide the Committee with background information on, and assessment of, the selection, training, and qualification of nuclear reactor operating personnel at DOE-owned facilities

  15. Recommendations for oversight of nanobiotechnology: dynamic oversight for complex and convergent technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramachandran, Gurumurthy; Wolf, Susan M.; Paradise, Jordan; Kuzma, Jennifer; Hall, Ralph; Kokkoli, Efrosini; Fatehi, Leili

    2011-01-01

    Federal oversight of nanobiotechnology in the U.S. has been fragmented and incremental. The prevailing approach has been to use existing laws and other administrative mechanisms for oversight. However, this “stay-the-course” approach will be inadequate for such a complex and convergent technology and may indeed undermine its promise. The technology demands a new, more dynamic approach to oversight. The authors are proposing a new oversight framework with three essential features: (a) the oversight trajectory needs to be able to move dynamically between “soft” and “hard” approaches as information and nano-products evolve; (b) it needs to integrate inputs from all stakeholders, with strong public engagement in decision-making to assure adequate analysis and transparency; and (c) it should include an overarching coordinating entity to assure strong inter-agency coordination and communication that can meet the challenge posed by the convergent nature of nanobiotechnology. The proposed framework arises from a detailed case analysis of several key oversight regimes relevant to nanobiotechnology and is informed by inputs from experts in academia, industry, NGOs, and government.

  16. A master surgical scheduling approach for cyclic scheduling in operating room departments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oostrum, Jeroen M.; van Houdenhoven, M.; Hurink, Johann L.; Hans, Elias W.; Wullink, Gerhard; Kazemier, G.

    This paper addresses the problem of operating room (OR) scheduling at the tactical level of hospital planning and control. Hospitals repetitively construct operating room schedules, which is a time-consuming, tedious, and complex task. The stochasticity of the durations of surgical procedures

  17. A model for generating master surgical schedules to allow cyclic scheduling in operating room departments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Oostrum, J.M.; van Houdenhoven, M.; Hurink, Johann L.; Hans, Elias W.; Wullink, Gerhard; Kazemier, G.

    2005-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of operating room scheduling at the tactical level of hospital planning and control. Hospitals repetitively construct operating room schedules, which is a time consuming tedious and complex task. The stochasticity of the durations of surgical procedures complicates

  18. Athletic Departments' Operating Expenses as a Predictor of Their Directors' Cup Standing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magner, Amber

    2014-01-01

    The NACDA Directors' Cup is a competition utilizing an unbiased scoring system that encourages a broad based athletic department as the standard for defining intercollegiate athletic success. Therefore, for NCAA DI athletic administrators the Directors' Cup should be the standard for defining intercollegiate athletic success. The purpose of this…

  19. 76 FR 37100 - Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement; Continued Operation of the Department of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-24

    ..., hazardous and radioactive material transportation, energy efficiency and renewable energy, nuclear energy, fossil energy, magnetic fusion, basic energy sciences, supercomputing, and biological and environmental.... Further, an updated evaluation of SNL/NM operational and transportation accident analyses and a new...

  20. Open Feedlots Listed in the Iowa Department of Natural Resources Animal Feeding Operations Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Currently, the Animal Feeding Operations (AFO) database does not allow facilities to be queried by watershed, therefore, this coverage was developed to assist with...

  1. Department of Defense Environmental Policy in Afghanistan During Operation Enduring Freedom

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Loertscher, Steven G

    2008-01-01

    Since the September 11, 2001 terror attacks on the Pentagon and the World Trade Center, the United States has conducted military operations in Afghanistan, a nation whose environment has been ravaged...

  2. Noncombatant Evacuation Operations: Department of State’s Lessons Learned Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    means for utilizing the lessons learned, in some form of rehearsal or exercise, will 4 make the lessons learned meaningful. A lesson should only...required by DOS policy. The Department agreed with the recommendations to establish certain procedures to address the need to constantly 44 update...doctrine.31 Futch also explained that CALL is constantly seeking to expand training and educational efforts about the lessons learned process and

  3. Optimizing Fire Department Operations Through Work Schedule Analysis, Alternative Staffing, and Nonproductive Time Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    and disadvantages ; for example, although the majority of fire departments in the United States abide by the 24/48- schedule, this schedule also leads...costs. The local bargaining group also falls into these criteria. The local bargaining unit must be agreeable to the policy changes. They cannot... agreeable to the local bargaining group particularly when it is addressed in an article of the current bargaining agreement. Additionally, the local

  4. Corporate social responsibility for nanotechnology oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzma, Jennifer; Kuzhabekova, Aliya

    2011-11-01

    Growing public concern and uncertainties surrounding emerging technologies suggest the need for socially-responsible behavior of companies in the development and implementation of oversight systems for them. In this paper, we argue that corporate social responsibility (CSR) is an important aspect of nanotechnology oversight given the role of trust in shaping public attitudes about nanotechnology and the lack of data about the health and environmental risks of nanoproducts. We argue that CSR is strengthened by the adoption of stakeholder-driven models and attention to moral principles in policies and programs. In this context, we examine drivers of CSR, contextual and leadership factors that influence CSR, and strategies for CSR. To illustrate these concepts, we discuss existing cases of CSR-like behavior in nanotechnology companies, and then provide examples of how companies producing nanomedicines can exhibit morally-driven CSR behavior.

  5. Regulatory oversight of nuclear safety in Finland. Annual report 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kainulainen, E. (ed.)

    2012-07-01

    The report constitutes the report on regulatory control in the field of nuclear energy which the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) is required to submit once a year to the Ministry of Employment and the Economy pursuant to Section 121 of the Nuclear Energy Decree. The report is also delivered to the Ministry of Environment, the Finnish Environment Institute, and the regional environmental authorities of the localities in which a nuclear facility is located. The regulatory control of nuclear safety in 2011 included the design, construction and operation of nuclear facilities, as well as nuclear waste management and nuclear materials. The first parts of the report explain the basics of nuclear safety regulation included as part of STUK's responsibilities, as well as the objectives of the operations, and briefly introduce the objects of regulation. The chapter concerning the development and implementation of legislation and regulations describes changes in nuclear legislation, as well as the progress of STUK's YVL Guide revision work. The section concerning the regulation of nuclear facilities contains an overall safety assessment of the nuclear facilities currently in operation or under construction. The chapter concerning the regulation of the final disposal project for spent nuclear fuel de-scribes the preparations for the final disposal project and the related regulatory activities. The section concerning nuclear non-proliferation describes the nuclear non-proliferation control for Finnish nuclear facilities and final disposal of spent nuclear fuel, as well as measures required by the Additional Protocol of the Safeguards Agreement. The chapter describing the oversight of security arrangements in the use of nuclear energy discusses oversight of the security arrangements in nuclear power plants and other plants, institutions and functions included within the scope of STUK's regulatory oversight. The chapter also discusses the national and

  6. ENSI Approach to Oversight of Safety Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humbel Haag, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Claudia Humbel Haag presented developments in ENSI approach to safety culture oversight. ENSI has developed a definition/understanding of Safety Culture and a concept of how to perform oversight of Safety Culture. ENSI defines safety culture in the following way: Safety Culture comprises the behaviour, world views (in the sense of conceptualisations of reality and explanation models), values (in the sense of aims and evaluation scales), and features of the physical environment (specifically, the nuclear power plant and the documents used) which are shared by many members of an organization, in as much as these are of significance to nuclear safety. A model of the accessibility of safety culture was presented ranging from the observable (external aspects of safety culture), to aspects that are accessible by asking questions, through to aspects that are not accessible (internal part of safety culture). ENSI considers observable aspects through the existing systematic safety assessment compliance program. Aspects that are observable by asking questions will be addressed by additional oversight activities outside the systematic assessment program. Aspects that are not accessible are addressed by helping the licensee to re-think its safety culture through proactive discussions on safety culture. Reports are issued to the licensee on assumptions and observations identified through the discussions. The conclusions of the presentation emphasised the importance of basing any interventions in this area on a solid understanding of the concept of safety culture. ENSI safety culture oversight principles were also described. These include licensee responsibility for safety, and the need for the regulator to critically review their own activities to ensure a positive influence on the licensee

  7. US Department of Energy DOE Nevada Operations Office, Nevada Test Site: Underground safety and health standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-05-01

    The Nevada Test Site Underground Safety and Health Standards Working Group was formed at the direction of John D. Stewart, Director, Nevada Test Site Office in April, 1990. The objective of the Working Group was to compile a safety and health standard from the California Tunnel Safety Orders and OSHA for the underground operations at the NTS, (excluding Yucca Mountain). These standards are called the NTS U/G Safety and Health Standards. The Working Group submits these standards as a RECOMMENDATION to the Director, NTSO. Although the Working Group considers these standards to be the most integrated and comprehensive standards that could be developed for NTS Underground Operations, the intent is not to supersede or replace any relevant DOE orders. Rather the intent is to collate the multiple safety and health references contained in DOE Order 5480.4 that have applicability to NTS Underground Operations into a single safety and heath standard to be used in the underground operations at the NTS. Each portion of the standard was included only after careful consideration by the Working Group and is judged to be both effective and appropriate. The specific methods and rationale used by the Working Group are outlined as follows: The letter from DOE/HQ, dated September 28, 1990 cited OSHA and the CTSO as the safety and health codes applicable to underground operations at the NTS. These mandated codes were each originally developed to be comprehensive, i.e., all underground operations of a particular type (e.g., tunnels in the case of the CTSO) were intended to be adequately regulated by the appropriate code. However, this is not true; the Working Group found extensive and confusing overlap in the codes in numerous areas. Other subjects and activities were addressed by the various codes in cursory fashion or not at all

  8. US Department of Energy DOE Nevada Operations Office, Nevada Test Site: Underground safety and health standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    The Nevada Test Site Underground Safety and Health Standards Working Group was formed at the direction of John D. Stewart, Director, Nevada Test Site Office in April, 1990. The objective of the Working Group was to compile a safety and health standard from the California Tunnel Safety Orders and OSHA for the underground operations at the NTS, (excluding Yucca Mountain). These standards are called the NTS U/G Safety and Health Standards. The Working Group submits these standards as a RECOMMENDATION to the Director, NTSO. Although the Working Group considers these standards to be the most integrated and comprehensive standards that could be developed for NTS Underground Operations, the intent is not to supersede or replace any relevant DOE orders. Rather the intent is to collate the multiple safety and health references contained in DOE Order 5480.4 that have applicability to NTS Underground Operations into a single safety and heath standard to be used in the underground operations at the NTS. Each portion of the standard was included only after careful consideration by the Working Group and is judged to be both effective and appropriate. The specific methods and rationale used by the Working Group are outlined as follows: The letter from DOE/HQ, dated September 28, 1990 cited OSHA and the CTSO as the safety and health codes applicable to underground operations at the NTS. These mandated codes were each originally developed to be comprehensive, i.e., all underground operations of a particular type (e.g., tunnels in the case of the CTSO) were intended to be adequately regulated by the appropriate code. However, this is not true; the Working Group found extensive and confusing overlap in the codes in numerous areas. Other subjects and activities were addressed by the various codes in cursory fashion or not at all.

  9. Operations report 1985 of the Department of Safety and Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hille, R.; Frenkler, K.L.

    1986-04-01

    Under the heading 'Licensing' the report deals with licensing procedures and the handling of nuclear-fuels and radioactive materials. Operational radiation protection is concerned with operational and personnel monitoring, mathematical methods and safety analyses. Environmental protection deals with emission control, immission monitoring and meteorological measurements, and safety technology with α/β-analysis, dosimetry, equipment servicing and mechanics, nuclear material safeguards. Other subdepartments take care of industrial safety, physical protection, emergency protection and training. Subjects dealt with, too, are dispersion pollutants in atmosphere and environment, further development of radiation protection methods, and the bibliography of radiation protection in KFA. (HK) [de

  10. 75 FR 54222 - Piedmont & Northern Railway, Inc.-Operation Exemption-North Carolina Department of Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-03

    ... to provide common carrier rail service over the Line, the common carrier obligation continues... to operate over approximately 13.04 miles of rail line (the Line) owned by the North Carolina... FD 35403, Patriot Rail, LLC--Continuance in Control Exemption--Piedmont & Northern Railway, in which...

  11. Department of Energy Site Operator Program. Final report, October 1, 1991--September 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    York Technical College is a two-year public institution accredited by the Commission of Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. York Technical College has been involved with electric vehicles since the late 1980`s. The four major objectives of the Site Operator Program were (1) field test and evaluate electric and hybrid vehicles and related components; (2) define and develop a national infrastructure system including electric charging systems, service/training education programs, utility system impacts and safety standards; (3) increase public awareness regarding environmental benefits, reduced dependency on foreign oil, technology development, and economic impacts; (4) assist local, state and federal agencies and fleet operators in developing electric and hybrid vehicle programs. The primary thrusts of the electric vehicle program at York Technical College, supporting the objectives of the Site Operator program were: (1) public awareness, (2) public education, (3) EV maintenance curriculum development and maintenance training, (4) field data collection, (5) vehicle modification and upgrade, (6) establish electric vehicle partnerships.

  12. US Department of Energy Portsmouth annual environmental report for 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    The Portsmouth plant is one of two U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-owned, contractor-managed uranium enrichment facilities in operation. As of July 1, 1993, responsibility for implementing environmental compliance at the facility was split between DOE, as site owner, and the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC), a government-owned corporation formed by the National Energy Policy Act of 1992, to operate the nation's uranium enrichment business. The management contractor for DOE is Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (formerly Martin Marietta Energy Systems), which is responsible for waste management, environmental restoration, removal of highly enriched uranium (HEU), and operation of nonleased facilities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (DOE/PORTS). Lockheed Martin Utility Services (formerly Martin Marietta Utility Services) provides management services for USEC. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission will assume direct oversight of USEC operations in 1997. Until then, DOE will provide oversight of nuclear safety and safeguards and security. DOE/PORTS is located on about six square miles in Pike County, Ohio. The County has approximately 24,250 residents. The total population within 50 miles of the plant is about 900,000. The main process at PORTS has been the separation of uranium isotopes through gaseous diffusion. Uranium is no longer enriched by DOE at PORTS. The uranium enrichment production operation facilities at the site are leased to USEC and are managed and operated by Lockheed Martin Utility Services

  13. US Department of Energy Portsmouth annual environmental report for 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    The Portsmouth plant is one of two U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-owned, contractor-managed uranium enrichment facilities in operation. As of July 1, 1993, responsibility for implementing environmental compliance at the facility was split between DOE, as site owner, and the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC), a government-owned corporation formed by the National Energy Policy Act of 1992, to operate the nation`s uranium enrichment business. The management contractor for DOE is Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (formerly Martin Marietta Energy Systems), which is responsible for waste management, environmental restoration, removal of highly enriched uranium (HEU), and operation of nonleased facilities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (DOE/PORTS). Lockheed Martin Utility Services (formerly Martin Marietta Utility Services) provides management services for USEC. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission will assume direct oversight of USEC operations in 1997. Until then, DOE will provide oversight of nuclear safety and safeguards and security. DOE/PORTS is located on about six square miles in Pike County, Ohio. The County has approximately 24,250 residents. The total population within 50 miles of the plant is about 900,000. The main process at PORTS has been the separation of uranium isotopes through gaseous diffusion. Uranium is no longer enriched by DOE at PORTS. The uranium enrichment production operation facilities at the site are leased to USEC and are managed and operated by Lockheed Martin Utility Services.

  14. US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office: Annual site environmental report, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDowell, E.M.; Black, S.C.

    1991-09-01

    Monitoring and surveillance on and around the Nevada Test Site (NTA) by DOE contractors and Site user organizations during 1990 indicated that underground nuclear testing operations were conducted in compliance with regulations, i.e., the dose the maximally exposed offsite individual could have received was less than 0.05 percent of the guideline for air exposure. All discharges of radioactive liquids remained onsite in containment ponds, and there was no indication of potential migration of radioactivity to the offsite area through groundwater. Surveillance around the NTS indicated that airborne radioactivity from test operations was not detectable offsite, and no measurable net exposure to members of the offsite population was detected through the offsite dosimetry program. Using the AIRDOS-PC model and NTS radionuclide emissions data, the calculated maximum effective dose equivalent offsite would have been 4.7 x 10 -3 mrem. Any person receiving this dose was also exposed to 123 mrem from natural background radiation. There were no nonradiological releases to the offsite area. Hazardous wastes were shipped to EPA-approved disposal facilities. Compliance with the various regulations stemming from the National Environmental Policy Act is being achieved and, where mandated, permits for air and water discharges and waste management have been obtained from the appropriate agencies. Non-NTS support facilities complied with the requirements of air quality permits and state or local wastewater discharge and hazardous waste permits. 63 figs., 88 tabs

  15. Contract Audits: Role in Helping Ensure Effective Oversight and Reducing Improper Payments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    the risk of improper paymen Department of Energy (DOE). DOE’s internal controls over payments to its Waste Treatment Plant ( WTP ) contractor did not...provide reasonab assurance against the risk of improper payments, particularly given the WTP project’s substantial inherent risks. 18 Several factors...DCAA and the contractor, with little oversight of its own, exposed the hundreds of millions of dolla spent annually on the WTP project to an

  16. Tennessee Oversight Agreement annual report, May 31, 1994--June 30, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation's DOE Oversight Division (TDEC/DOE-O) is responsible for assuring the citizens of Tennessee that their health, safety and environment on the Oak Ridge Reservation are protected and that appropriate remedial action is taken to provide this protection. TDEC/DOE-O has five program sections that reflect the organizational structure of the TDEC Bureau of Environment Divisions, as well as DOE's Environmental Safety and Health, Waste Management, and Environmental Restoration Programs

  17. Financial Management: DOD Needs to Clarify Its General Gift Fund Policies to Provide for Effective Oversight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-27

    Representatives Subject: Financial Management: DOD Needs to Clarify Its General Gift Fund Policies to Provide for Effective Oversight From fiscal...year 2005 through fiscal year 2008, the military services received about $295 million in monetary and nonmonetary gifts from individuals and...organizations wishing to donate gifts to the Department of Defense (DOD).1 Section 2601(a) of Title 10, U.S. Code is a long-standing authority under which

  18. Status of existing federal environmental risk-based standards applicable to Department of Energy operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilyard, G.R.; Jonas, R.J.; Wallo, A. III

    1991-01-01

    When conducting its environmental restoration, waste management, and decontamination and decommissioning activities, the US Department of Energy (DOE) must comply with a myriad of regulatory procedures and environmental standards. An assessment of the status of existing federal standards that may be applied to chemical and radioactive substances on DOE sites found substantial gaps and inconsistencies among the existing standards, and technical issues associated with the application of those standards. Of 271 chemical and radioactive substances found to be important across environmental media at the Hanford, Savannah River, and Oak Ridge Sites, 96 (35%) are unregulated by federal regulations and are not covered by DOE guidelines, 48 (18%) are covered by single federal standards or DOE guidelines, and 127 (47%) are covered by multiple regulations or DOE guidelines. Inconsistencies and technical issues among standards include the promulgation of different standards under different regulations for a given substance in an environmental medium, the application of standards for purposes other than originally intended, and the inability to meet standards because of technical limitations. Given the lack of a complete, consistent set of standards or generic procedures for determining applicable standards, and given the existence of inconsistencies and technical issues among the existing set of standards, DOE may be faced with lengthy negotiations of standards on a case-by-case basis. Such negotiations could result in inconsistent cleanup levels, high costs, potential delays, and missed regulatory milestones

  19. Department of Defense Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan FY 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    interoperability of equipment; and the management and oversight of contingency basing. Improved contingency base sustainability will also enhance mission...with communicating classified information from alternate work locations. In FY 2011, NGA developed and began implementing a telecommuting policy...operating procedures. DLA Disposition Services strengthened its oversight of the electronics demanufacturing process in FY 2011 by tightening

  20. External Police Oversight in Mexico: Experiences, Challenges, and Lessons Learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Guzmán Sánchez

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available After nearly 20 years of ‘reformist’ measures, the police in Mexico continues to be an ineffective, unreliable, and ‘far from citizen’ institution. The efforts made so far have faded amongst political interests and agendas; multidimensional frameworks out-dated at both conceptual and interagency levels; short-sighted competition for resources; evaluation and performance monitors that are handicapped by bureaucratic inaction; and weak transparency and accountability that perpetuate the opacity in which the police operate. In this context, the agenda of external police oversight is still at a rudimentary stage. However, there are several initiatives that have managed to push the issue to the frontier of new knowledge and promising practices. This paper outlines the experiences and challenges of—as well as the lessons learned by—the Institute for Security and Democracy (Insyde A.C., one of the most recognised think tanks in Mexico.

  1. US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office annual site environmental report, 1992. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, S.C.; Latham, A.R.; Townsend, Y.E. [eds.

    1993-09-01

    This report contains the environmental monitoring and assessment results for the Nevada Test Site for 1992. Monitoring and surveillance on and around the NTS by DOE contractors and Site user organizations during 1992 indicated that underground nuclear testing operations were conducted in compliance with regulations, i.e., the dose the maximally exposed offsite individual could have received was less than 0.15 percent of the guideline for air exposure. All 1992 nuclear events took place during the first three quarters of the calendar year prior to the Congressional testing moratorium. All discharges of radioactive liquids remained onsite in containment ponds, and there was no indication of potential migration of radioactivity to the offsite area through groundwater. Surveillance around the NTS indicated that airborne radioactivity from test operations was not detectable offsite, and no measurable net exposure to members of the offsite population was detected through the offsite dosimetry program. Using the CAP88-PC model and NTS radionuclide emissions data, the calculated maximum effective dose equivalent offsite would have been 0.012 mrem. Any person receiving this dose was also exposed to 78 mrem from natural background radiation. There were no nonradiological releases to the offsite area. Hazardous wastes were shipped to EPA-approved disposal facilities. Compliance with the various regulations stemming from the National Environmental Policy Act is being achieved and, where mandated, permits for air and water discharges and waste management have been obtained from the appropriate agencies. Non-NTS support facilities complied with the requirements of air quality permits and state or local wastewater discharge and hazardous waste permits.

  2. Acquisition and analysis of throughput rates for an operational department-wide PACS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Brent K.; Taira, Ricky K.; Dwyer, Samuel J., III; Huang, H. K.

    1992-07-01

    provides estimates on what a radiological department can expect from a PACS in terms of throughput and delay.

  3. Project Execution Plan, Waste Management Division, Nevada Operations Office, U.S. Department of Energy, April 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This plan addresses project activities encompassed by the U.S. Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office Waste Management Division and conforms to the requirements contained in the ''Life Cycle Asset Management,'' U.S. Department of Energy Order O430.1A; the Joint Program Office Policy on Project Management in Support of DOE Order O430.1, and the Project Execution and Engineering Management Planning Guide. The plan also reflects the milestone philosophies of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, as agreed to by the state of Nevada; and traditional project management philosophies such as the development of life cycle costs, schedules, and work scope; identification of roles and responsibilities; and baseline management and controls

  4. Statement of John H. Anttonen, Project Manager, Basalt Waste Isolation Project, Richland Operations Office, Department of Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    My name is John Anttonen and I am the Project Manager for the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) at the Department of Energy Richland Operation Office. The responsibilities of may office are to manage the day-to-day activities of the site suitability investigations of the basalt formations at the Hanford Site, a Department complex that is involved in a variety of national missions, including defense materials production, nuclear energy research, and radioactive waste management. In may prepared comments today I would like to touch upon four specific subject areas relating to the BWIP program and then I would be happy to answer any questions you might have. The topics I will cover are: (1) historical aspects; (2) site specific technical issues and how they will be addressed during site characterization of the basalt site at Hanford; (3) current project status and; (4) institutional interaction. For clarity, I have attached several charts to my statement

  5. The Department of Safeguards Quality Management System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konecni, S.

    2015-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Department of Safeguards quality management system (QMS) provides the framework for all activities that support the Agency's commitment to providing soundly-based safeguards conclusions regarding the peaceful use of nuclear material. The focus of the QMS is to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of safeguards implementation through defined, documented processes, routine oversight and continual improvement initiatives. In accordance with QMS principles, the high-level business processes representing the Department's activities are defined in procedures, guidelines and policies that are maintained in the Safeguards Document Manager. These processes form the basis for Department operations for drawing safeguards conclusions regarding State's compliance with their safeguards obligations. Oversight is provided through internal quality audits. These audits are targeted at processes selected by Senior Management with a focus on procedure compliance as well as customer expectations. Best practices and areas for improvement are assessed through continual improvement. Noncompliance and conditions that are adverse to quality are identified and analyzed in the Condition Report System. Root cause analysis and the implementation actions to eliminate the cause reduce the chance of condition recurrence. Through continual process improvement, processes are measured and analyzed to reduce process and administration waste. The improved processes improve efficiency while providing the desired results. Within the scope of the QMS, these tools support the performance of Departmental processes so that Safeguards products achieve the intended purpose. This paper describes how the various elements of the Department's QMS support safeguards implementation. (author)

  6. Applying advanced analytics to guide emergency department operational decisions: A proof-of-concept study examining the effects of boarding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew Taylor, R; Venkatesh, Arjun; Parwani, Vivek; Chekijian, Sharon; Shapiro, Marc; Oh, Andrew; Harriman, David; Tarabar, Asim; Ulrich, Andrew

    2018-01-04

    Emergency Department (ED) leaders are increasingly confronted with large amounts of data with the potential to inform and guide operational decisions. Routine use of advanced analytic methods may provide additional insights. To examine the practical application of available advanced analytic methods to guide operational decision making around patient boarding. Retrospective analysis of the effect of boarding on ED operational metrics from a single site between 1/2015 and 1/2017. Times series were visualized through decompositional techniques accounting for seasonal trends, to determine the effect of boarding on ED performance metrics and to determine the impact of boarding "shocks" to the system on operational metrics over several days. There were 226,461 visits with the mean (IQR) number of visits per day was 273 (258-291). Decomposition of the boarding count time series illustrated an upward trend in the last 2-3 quarters as well as clear seasonal components. All performance metrics were significantly impacted (pstudy regarding the use of advanced analytics in daily ED operations, time series analysis provided multiple useful insights into boarding and its impact on performance metrics. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Air sampling methods to evaluate microbial contamination in operating theatres: results of a comparative study in an orthopaedics department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, C; Tafuri, S; Montenegro, L; Cassano, M; Notarnicola, A; Lattarulo, S; Montagna, M T; Moretti, B

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the level of microbial contamination of air in operating theatres using active [i.e. surface air system (SAS)] and passive [i.e. index of microbial air contamination (IMA) and nitrocellulose membranes positioned near the wound] sampling systems. Sampling was performed between January 2010 and January 2011 in the operating theatre of the orthopaedics department in a university hospital in Southern Italy. During surgery, the mean bacterial loads recorded were 2232.9 colony-forming units (cfu)/m(2)/h with the IMA method, 123.2 cfu/m(3) with the SAS method and 2768.2 cfu/m(2)/h with the nitrocellulose membranes. Correlation was found between the results of the three methods. Staphylococcus aureus was detected in 12 of 60 operations (20%) with the membranes, five (8.3%) operations with the SAS method, and three operations (5%) with the IMA method. Use of nitrocellulose membranes placed near a wound is a valid method for measuring the microbial contamination of air. This method was more sensitive than the IMA method and was not subject to any calibration bias, unlike active air monitoring systems. Copyright © 2011 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Significant factors for work attractiveness and how these differ from the current work situation among operating department nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björn, Catrine; Lindberg, Magnus; Rissén, Dag

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to examine significant factors for work attractiveness and how these differ from the current work situation among operating department nurses. A second objective was to examine the associations between age, gender, length of employment, work engagement, work ability, self-rated health indicators and attractiveness of the current work situation. The attractiveness of work is rarely taken into account in research on nurse retention. To expand this knowledge, it is relevant to examine factors that make work attractive and their associations with related concepts. Correlational, cross-sectional survey using a convenience sample. Questionnaires were answered by 147 nurses in four operating departments in Sweden. Correlation and regression analyses were conducted. The nurses rated the significance of all factors of work attractiveness higher than they rated those factors in their current work situation; salary, organisation and physical work environment had the largest differences. The most significant attractive factors were relationships, leadership and status. A statistically significant positive correlation between work engagement and attractive work was found. In the multiple regression model, the independent variables work engagement and older age significantly predicted work attractiveness. Several factors should be considered in the effort to increase work attractiveness in operating departments and thereby to encourage nurse retention. Positive aspects of work seem to unite work engagement and attractive work, while work ability and self-rated health indicators are other important dimensions in nurse retention. The great discrepancies between the significance of attractive factors and the current work situation in salary, organisation and physical work environment suggest ways in which work attractiveness may be increased. To discover exactly what needs to be improved may require a deeper look into the construct of the examined factors. © 2015 John

  9. U.S. Department of Energy operational experience with shipments of foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messick, Charles E.; Massey, Charles D.; Mustin, Tracy P.

    1998-01-01

    On May 13, 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy issued a Record of Decision on a Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel. The goal of the long-term policy is to recover enriched uranium exported from the United States, while giving foreign research reactor operators sufficient time to develop their own long-term solutions for storage and disposal of spent fuel. The spent fuel accepted by the U.S. DOE under the policy must be out of the research reactors by May 12, 2006 and returned to the United States by May 12, 2009. (author)

  10. The US Department of Energy Nuclear Data and Low Energy Physics Programs: Aspects of current operational status and future direction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whetstone, S.L.; Meyer, R.A.

    1991-01-01

    The Nuclear Data and Low-Energy Programs are operated within the Division of Nuclear Physics of the US Department of Energy. The data program supports a range of activities including large scale data measurements, nuclear cross section modelling, and nuclear data compilation and dissemination. The US nuclear data needs and prospects for the future of this effort are currently being addressed and its present status is reviewed. Possibilities for the next generation nuclear data accessibility will be discussed and examples presented. The Low-Energy Nuclear Physics Program supports investigations into low-energy nuclear structure and neutrino physics. Among examples of the latter that are covered is the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

  11. DIII-D RESEARCH OPERATIONS ANNUAL REPORT TO THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EVANS,TE

    2003-12-01

    OAK-B135 The mission of the DIII-D research program is: ''To establish the scientific basis for the optimization of the tokamak approach to fusion energy production. The program is focused on developing the ultimate potential of the tokamak by building a better fundamental understanding of the physics of plasma confinement, stability, current drive and heating in high performance discharges while utilizing new scientific discoveries and improvements in their knowledge of these basic areas to create more efficient control systems, improved plasma diagnostics and to identify new types of enhanced operating regimes with improved stability properties. In recent years, this development path has culminated in the advanced tokamak (AT) approach. An approach that has shown substantial promise for improving both the fusion yield and the energy density of a burning plasma device. While the challenges of increasing AT plasma performance levels with greater stability for longer durations are significant, the DIII-D program has an established plan that brings together both the critical resources and the expertise needed to meet these challenges. The DIII-D research staff is comprised of about 300 individuals representing 60 institutions with many years of integrated research experience in tokamak physics, engineering and technology. The DIII-D tokamak is one of the most productive, flexible and best diagnosed magnetic fusion research devices in the world. It has significantly more flexibility than most tokamaks and continues to pioneer the development of sophisticated new plasma feedback control tools that enable the explorations of new frontiers in fusion science and engineering.

  12. US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office annual site environmental report: 1993. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, S.C.; Glines, W.M.; Townsend, Y.E. [eds.

    1994-09-01

    Monitoring and surveillance on and around the Nevada Test Site (NTS) by DOE contractors and NTS user organizations during 1993 indicated that operations on the NTS were conducted in compliance with applicable federal and DOE guidelines, i.e., the dose the maximally exposed offsite individual could have received was less than 0.04 percent of the 10 mrem per year guide for air exposure. No nuclear tests were conducted due to the moratorium. All discharges of radioactive liquids remained onsite in containment ponds, and there was no indication of potential migration of radioactivity to the offsite area through groundwater. Surveillance around the NTS indicated that airborne radioactivity from diffusion, evaporation of effluents, or resuspension was not detectable offsite, and no measurable net exposure to members of the offsite population was detected through the offsite dosimetry program. Using the CAP88-PC model and NTS radionuclide emissions data, the calculated effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual offsite would have been 0.004 mrem. Any person receiving this dose would also have received 97 mrem from natural background radiation. There were no nonradiological releases to the offsite area. Hazardous wastes were shipped offsite to approved disposal facilities. Compliance with the various regulations stemming from the National Environmental Policy Act is being achieved and, where mandated, permits for air and water discharges and waste management have been obtained from the appropriate agencies. Support facilities at off-NTS locations compiled with the requirements of air quality permits and state or local wastewater discharge and hazardous waste permits.

  13. US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office annual site environmental report: 1993. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, S.C.; Glines, W.M.; Townsend, Y.E.

    1994-09-01

    Monitoring and surveillance on and around the Nevada Test Site (NTS) by DOE contractors and NTS user organizations during 1993 indicated that operations on the NTS were conducted in compliance with applicable federal and DOE guidelines, i.e., the dose the maximally exposed offsite individual could have received was less than 0.04 percent of the 10 mrem per year guide for air exposure. No nuclear tests were conducted due to the moratorium. All discharges of radioactive liquids remained onsite in containment ponds, and there was no indication of potential migration of radioactivity to the offsite area through groundwater. Surveillance around the NTS indicated that airborne radioactivity from diffusion, evaporation of effluents, or resuspension was not detectable offsite, and no measurable net exposure to members of the offsite population was detected through the offsite dosimetry program. Using the CAP88-PC model and NTS radionuclide emissions data, the calculated effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual offsite would have been 0.004 mrem. Any person receiving this dose would also have received 97 mrem from natural background radiation. There were no nonradiological releases to the offsite area. Hazardous wastes were shipped offsite to approved disposal facilities. Compliance with the various regulations stemming from the National Environmental Policy Act is being achieved and, where mandated, permits for air and water discharges and waste management have been obtained from the appropriate agencies. Support facilities at off-NTS locations compiled with the requirements of air quality permits and state or local wastewater discharge and hazardous waste permits

  14. U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, environmental data report for the Nevada Test Site -- 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, S.C.; Townsend, Y.E. [eds.; Kinnison, R.R.

    1997-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, ``General Environmental Protection Program,`` establishes environmental protection program requirements, authorities, and responsibilities for DOE operations. These mandates require compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental protection regulations. During calendar year (CY) 1995 environmental protection and monitoring programs were conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and other DOE Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) managed sites in Nevada and across the United States. A detailed discussion of these environmental protection and monitoring programs, and summary data and assessments for environmental monitoring results at these sites in CY 1995 are provided in the DOE/NV, Annual Site Environmental Report--1995, (ASER) DOE/NV/11718-037. A brief description of the scope of this environmental monitoring is provided below, categorized by ``on-NTS`` and ``off-NTS`` monitoring.

  15. Advanced energy design and operation technologies research: Recommendations for a US Department of Energy multiyear program plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brambley, M.R.; Crawley, D.B.; Hostetler, D.D.; Stratton, R.C.; Addision, M.S.; Deringer, J.J.; Hall, J.D.; Selkowitz, S.E.

    1988-12-01

    This document describes recommendations for a multiyear plan developed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the Advanced Energy Design and Operation Technologies (AEDOT) project. The plan is an outgrowth of earlier planning activities conducted for DOE as part of design process research under the Building System Integration Program (BSIP). The proposed research will produce intelligent computer-based design and operation technologies for commercial buildings. In this document, the concept is explained, the need for these new computer-based environments is discussed, the benefits are described, and a plan for developing the AEDOT technologies is presented for the 9-year period beginning FY 1989. 45 refs., 37 figs., 9 tabs.

  16. [Importance of material logistics in the interface management of operation departments: is the supply of sterile equipment a new business area of operation room organization?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeck, J; Schmeck, S B; Kohnen, W; Werner, C; Schäfer, M; Gervais, H

    2008-08-01

    The implementation of diagnosis-related groups (DRGs) sharply increased economic pressure on hospitals. Hence, process optimization was focussed on cost-intensive areas, namely the operation room (OR) departments. Work-flow in the OR is characterized by a mandatory interlocking of the job functions of many different occupational groups and the availability of a variety of different materials. Alternatives for staff assignment optimization have been published in numerous publications dealing with the importance of OR management. In this connection the issue of material logistics in the context of OR management has not been frequently addressed. In order to perform a surgical procedure according to plan, one depends on personnel and on timely availability of the materials needed. Supply of sterilized materials is of utmost importance, because in most hospitals sterilized surgical devices constitute a critical resource. In order to coordinate the OR process with the production flow of sterilized materials, an organizational connection to the OR management makes sense. Hence, in a German university hospital the Department of Hospital Sterile Supplies was integrated into the OR management of the Department of Anesthesiology. This led to a close coordination of work-flow processes, and concomitantly a significant reduction of production costs of sterile supplies could be achieved by direct interaction with the OR. Thus, hospital sterile supplies can reasonably be integrated into an OR management representing a new interesting business area for OR organization.

  17. 41 CFR 105-53.133 - Information Security Oversight Office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Information Security... FUNCTIONS Central Offices § 105-53.133 Information Security Oversight Office. (a) Creation and authority. The Information Security Oversight Office (ISOO), headed by the Director of ISOO, who is appointed by...

  18. 10 CFR 440.23 - Oversight, training, and technical assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Oversight, training, and technical assistance. 440.23... PERSONS § 440.23 Oversight, training, and technical assistance. (a) The Secretary and the appropriate..., directly or indirectly, training and technical assistance to any grantee or subgrantee. Such training and...

  19. 10 Standards for Oversight and Transparency of National Intelligence Services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eskens, S.; van Daalen, O.; van Eijk, N.

    2016-01-01

    This report aims to enhance the policy debate on surveillance by intelligence services by focusing on two key components: oversight and transparency. Both oversight and transparency are essential to devising checks and balances in a way that respects human rights. By offering this concise list of

  20. 27 | Page OVERSIGHT FUNCTIONS OF THE LEGISLATURE: AN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fr. Ikenga

    2004-09-06

    Sep 6, 2004 ... its oversight functions remains weak because legislative role and ... ministers of his government and other officers in the public service of the Federation9, while .... 22 “Parliamentary Oversight of Finance and the Budgetary Process” - The ... Association of First Nations National, Chief Matthew Coon29 ...

  1. Navy Acquisition Executive's Management Oversight and Procurement Authority Category I and II Programs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2007-01-01

    .... This report discusses the management oversight and procurement authority within the Navy. Two other reports discussed the management oversight and procurement authority within the Army and Air Force...

  2. Environment, safety, and health. Status of DOE's reorganization of its safety oversight function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannerman, Carl J.; Cannon, Doris E.; Jones, Gary L.; Ulrich, Timothy W.

    1990-01-01

    Several major events that preceded the Secretary's decision to restructure DOE's management of its nuclear facilities were identified. The proposed restructuring plan, in concept, is designed to set in place an oversight framework, which will provide confidence in DOE's ability to operate its nuclear facilities in a safe manner. Further, on the basis of the previous work in this area as well as other independent studies, several issues were identified that may affect the success of the proposed restructuring plan

  3. Preliminary remediation goals for use at the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    This technical memorandum presents Preliminary Remediation Goals (PRGs) for use in human health risk assessment efforts under the United States Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Office Environmental Restoration (ER) Division. This document provides the ER Division with standardized PRGs which are integral to the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study process. They are used during project scooping (Data Quality Objectives development), in screening level risk assessments to support early action or No Further Investigation decisions, and in the baselines risk assessment where they are employed in the selection of chemicals of potential concern. The primary objective of this document is to standardize these values and eliminate any duplication of effort by providing PRGs to all contractors involved in risk activities. In addition, by managing the assumptions and systems used in PRG derivation, the ER Risk Assessment Program will be able to control the level of quality assurance associated with these risk-based guideline values

  4. Preliminary remediation goals for use at the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    This report presents Preliminary Remediation Goals (PRGs) for use in human health risk assessment efforts under the United States Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Office Environmental Restoration (ER) Division. Chemical-specific PRGs are concentration goals for individual chemicals for specific medium and land use combinations. The PRGs are referred to as risk-based because they have been calculated using risk assessment procedures. Risk-based calculations set concentration limits using both carcinogenic or noncarcinogenic toxicity values under specific exposure pathways. The PRG is a concentration that is derived from a specified excess cancer risk level or hazard quotient. This report provides the ER Division with standardized PRGs which are integral to the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study process. By managing the assumptions and systems used in PRG derivation, the Environmental Restoration Risk Assessment Program will be able to control the level of quality assurance associated with these risk-based guideline values

  5. Environmental assessment of facility operations at the U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office, Grand Junction, Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared a sitewide environmental assessment (EA) of the proposed action to continue and expand present-day activities on the DOE Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) facility in Grand Junction, Colorado. Because DOE-GJPO regularly proposes and conducts many different on-site activities, DOE decided to evaluate these activities in one sitewide EA rather than in multiple, activity-specific documents. On the basis of the information and analyses presented in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, as defined by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required for facility operations, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  6. Environmental assessment of facility operations at the U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office, Grand Junction, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared a sitewide environmental assessment (EA) of the proposed action to continue and expand present-day activities on the DOE Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) facility in Grand Junction, Colorado. Because DOE-GJPO regularly proposes and conducts many different on-site activities, DOE decided to evaluate these activities in one sitewide EA rather than in multiple, activity-specific documents. On the basis of the information and analyses presented in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, as defined by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required for facility operations, and DOE is issuing this Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI)

  7. Preliminary remediation goals for use at the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    This report presents Preliminary Remediation Goals (PRGs) for use in human health risk assessment efforts under the United States Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Office Environmental Restoration (ER) Division. Chemical-specific PRGs are concentration goals for individual chemicals for specific medium and land use combinations. The PRGs are referred to as risk-based because they have been calculated using risk assessment procedures. Risk-based calculations set concentration limits using both carcinogenic or noncarcinogenic toxicity values under specific exposure pathways. The PRG is a concentration that is derived from a specified excess cancer risk level or hazard quotient. This report provides the ER Division with standardized PRGs which are integral to the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study process. By managing the assumptions and systems used in PRG derivation, the Environmental Restoration Risk Assessment Program will be able to control the level of quality assurance associated with these risk-based guideline values.

  8. Preliminary remediation goals for use at the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    This technical memorandum presents Preliminary Remediation Goals (PRGs) for use in human health risk assessment efforts under the United States Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Office Environmental Restoration (ER) Division. This document provides the ER Division with standardized PRGs which are integral to the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study process. They are used during project scooping (Data Quality Objectives development), in screening level risk assessments to support early action or No Further Investigation decisions, and in the baselines risk assessment where they are employed in the selection of chemicals of potential concern. The primary objective of this document is to standardize these values and eliminate any duplication of effort by providing PRGs to all contractors involved in risk activities. In addition, by managing the assumptions and systems used in PRG derivation, the ER Risk Assessment Program will be able to control the level of quality assurance associated with these risk-based guideline values.

  9. Operations of the LR56 radioactive liquid cask transport system at U.S. Department of Energy sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, J.S.; Hornstra, D.J.; Sazawal, V.K.; Clement, G.

    1996-01-01

    The LR56 cask system is licensed for use in France under Certificate of Compliance F/309/B(U)F for transport of 4,000-liter volumes of radioactive liquids. Three LR56 cask systems (with modifications for use at Department of Energy (DOE) sites) have been purchased for delivery at the Hanford Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and Savannah River Site (SRS). The LR56 cask systems will be used for on-site transfers of Type B quantities of radioactive liquid waste. The ORNL unit will also be used as a Type A packaging for transfers of radioactive liquids between DOE sites. This paper discusses LR56 operating features and the use of the cask system at the three DOE sites

  10. The Nuclear Regulator's Role in Assessing Licensee. Oversight of Vendor and Other Contracted Services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Contracted services are an integral part of the design, construction and operation of a nuclear facility. Changes in the nuclear industry sector, including varied availability of nuclear expertise, the expansion of the international supply market and the introduction of new technologies, have tended to increase licensees' use of contracted services. These changes have created challenges for licensees and regulators related to the retention of nuclear expertise, the effective management of the interfaces between the licensees and contractors, and the oversight of contractor manufacturing quality in the context of greater multinational diversity. The regulatory body must address these challenges to provide assurance that the licensees maintain their responsibility for the safety of the facilities, regardless of who provides goods and services or where the activities involved in the supply chain take place. This report is intended to assist regulatory bodies in assessing their current practices for the regulatory oversight of licensees' use of contractors, and adapting them where necessary to meet the evolving situation

  11. Aviation Safety: FAA Oversight of Repair Stations Needs Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-10-24

    This report by the General Accounting Office examines the Federal Aviation : Administration's (FAA) oversight of the aviation repair station industry. : Specifically, this report addresses the following questions: (1) What is the : nature and scope o...

  12. 22 CFR 96.32 - Internal structure and oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Accreditation and Approval Licensing and Corporate Governance § 96.32 Internal structure and oversight. (a) The... number of such other provider; and (3) The name, address, and phone number of any entity it uses or...

  13. DIII-D research operations. Annual report to the Department of Energy, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.

    1993-05-01

    The DIII-D tokamak research program is carried out by, General Atomics (GA) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The DIII-D is the most flexible tokamak in the world. The primary goal of the DIII-D tokamak research program is to provide data needed by International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and to develop a conceptual physics blueprint for a commercially attractive electrical demonstration plant (DEMO) that would open a path to fusion power commercialization. Specific DIII-D objectives include the steady-state sustainment of plasma current as well as demonstrating techniques for microwave heating, divertor heat removal, fuel exhaust and tokamak plasma control. The DIII-D program is addressing these objectives in an integrated fashion with high beta and with good confinement. The DIII-D long-range plan is organized into two major thrusts; the development of an advanced divertor and the development of advanced tokamak concepts. These two thrusts have a common goal: an improved DEMO reactor with lower cost and smaller size than the present DEMO which can be extrapolated from the conventional ITER operational scenario. In order to prepare for the long-range program, in FY92 the DIII-D research program concentrated on three major areas: Divertor and Boundary Physics, Advanced Tokamak Studies, and Tokamak Physics

  14. Federal environmental standards of potential importance to operations and activities at US Department of Energy sites. Draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, K.M.; Bilyard, G.R.; Davidson, S.A.; Jonas, R.J.; Joseph, J.

    1993-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is now engaged in a program of environmental restoration nationwide across its 45 sites. It is also bringing its facilities into compliance with environmental regulations, decontaminating and decommissioning unwanted facilities, and constructing new waste management facilities. One of the most difficult questions that DOE must face in successfully remediating its inactive waste sites, decontaminating and decommissioning its inactive facilities, and operating its waste management facilities is: ``What criteria and standards should be met?`` Acceptable standards or procedures for determining standards will assist DOE in its conduct of ongoing waste management and pending cleanup activities by helping to ensure that those activities are conducted in compliance with applicable laws and regulations and are accepted by the regulatory community and the public. This document reports on the second of three baseline activities that are being conducted as prerequisites to either the development of quantitative standards that could be used by DOE, or consistent procedures for developing such standards. The first and third baseline activities are also briefly discussed in conjunction with the second of the three activities.

  15. DIII-D research operations. Annual report to the Department of Energy, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonen, T.C.; Baker, D.

    1993-01-01

    The DIII-D tokamak research program is carried out by General Atomics for the U.S. Department of Energy. The DIII-D is the most flexible and best diagnosed tokamak in the world and the second largest tokamak in the U.S. The primary goal of the DIII-D tokamak research program is to provide data needed by ITER and to develop a conceptual physics blueprint for a commercially attractive electrical demonstration plant (DEMO) that would open a path to fusion power commercialization. Specific DIII-D objectives include the steady-state sustainment of plasma current as well as demonstrating techniques for microwave heating, divertor heat removal, fuel exhaust and tokamak plasma control. The DIII-D program is addressing these objectives in an integrated fashion with high beta and with good confinement. The DIII-D long-range plan is organized into two major thrusts; the development of advanced divertor and the development of advanced tokamak concepts. These two thrusts have a common goal: an improved DEMO reactor with lower cost and smaller size than the present DEMO which can be extrapolated from the conventional ITER operational scenario. In order to prepare for the long-range program, in FY92 the DIII-D research program concentrated in three major areas: Tokamak Physics, Divertor and Boundary Physics, and Advanced Tokamak Studies

  16. DIII-D research operations. Annual report to the Department of Energy, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, D. [ed.

    1993-05-01

    The DIII-D tokamak research program is carried out by, General Atomics (GA) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The DIII-D is the most flexible tokamak in the world. The primary goal of the DIII-D tokamak research program is to provide data needed by International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and to develop a conceptual physics blueprint for a commercially attractive electrical demonstration plant (DEMO) that would open a path to fusion power commercialization. Specific DIII-D objectives include the steady-state sustainment of plasma current as well as demonstrating techniques for microwave heating, divertor heat removal, fuel exhaust and tokamak plasma control. The DIII-D program is addressing these objectives in an integrated fashion with high beta and with good confinement. The DIII-D long-range plan is organized into two major thrusts; the development of an advanced divertor and the development of advanced tokamak concepts. These two thrusts have a common goal: an improved DEMO reactor with lower cost and smaller size than the present DEMO which can be extrapolated from the conventional ITER operational scenario. In order to prepare for the long-range program, in FY92 the DIII-D research program concentrated on three major areas: Divertor and Boundary Physics, Advanced Tokamak Studies, and Tokamak Physics.

  17. DIII-D research operations. Annual report to the US Department of Energy, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-09-01

    The DIII-D research program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is aimed at developing the knowledge base for an economically and environmentally attractive energy source for the nation and the world. The DIII-D program mission is to advance fusion energy science understanding and predictive capability and improve the tokamak concept. The DIII-D scientific objectives are: (1) Advance understanding of fusion plasma physics and contribute to the physics base of ITER through extensive experiment and theory iteration in the following areas of fusion science - Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability - Plasma turbulence and transport - Wave-particle interactions - Boundary physics plasma neutral interaction (2) Utilize scientific understanding in an integrated manner to show the tokamak potential to be - More compact by increasing plasma stability and confinement to increase the fusion power density (Βτ) - Steady-state through disruption control, handling of divertor heat and particle loads and current drive (3) Acquire understanding and experience with environmentally attractive low activation material in an operating tokamak. This report contains the research conducted over the past year in search of these scientific objectives

  18. Review of the OSHA framework for oversight of occupational environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae-Young; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy

    2009-01-01

    The OSHA system for oversight of chemicals in the workplace was evaluated to derive lessons for oversight of nanotechnology. Criteria relating to the development, attributes, evolution, and outcomes of the system were used for evaluation that was based upon quantitative expert elicitation and historical literature analysis. The oversight system had inadequate resources in terms of finances, expertise, and personnel, and insufficient incentive for compliance. The system showed a lack of flexibility in novel situations. There were minimal requirements on companies for data on health and safety of their products. These factors have a strong influence on public confidence and health and safety. The oversight system also scored low on attributes such as public input, transparency, empirical basis, conflict of interest, and informed consent. The experts in our sample tend to believe that the current oversight system for chemicals in the workplace is neither adequate nor effective. It is very likely that the performance of the OSHA oversight system for nanomaterials will be equally inadequate.

  19. Dynamic oversight: implementation gaps and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, John

    2011-04-01

    Nanotechnology is touted as a transformative technology in that it is predicted to improve many aspects of human life. There are hundreds of products in the market that utilize nanostructures in their design, such as composite materials made out of carbon or metal oxides. Potential risks to consumers, to the environment, and to workers from the most common passive nanomaterial—carbon nanotubes—are emerging through scientific research. Newer more active nanostructures—such as cancer therapies and targeted drug systems—are also increasing in use and are raising similar risk concerns. Governing the risks to workers is the subject of this commentary. The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 grants the Occupational Safety and Health Administration the legal authority to set occupational health standards to insure that no worker suffers material impairment of health from work. However, setting a standard to protect workers from nanotechnology risks may occur some time in the future because the risks to workers have not been well characterized scientifically. Alternative risk governances—such as dynamic oversight through stakeholder partnerships, "soft law" approaches, and national adoption of international consensus standards—are evaluated in this article.

  20. Dynamic oversight: implementation gaps and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, John

    2011-01-01

    Nanotechnology is touted as a transformative technology in that it is predicted to improve many aspects of human life. There are hundreds of products in the market that utilize nanostructures in their design, such as composite materials made out of carbon or metal oxides. Potential risks to consumers, to the environment, and to workers from the most common passive nanomaterial—carbon nanotubes—are emerging through scientific research. Newer more active nanostructures—such as cancer therapies and targeted drug systems—are also increasing in use and are raising similar risk concerns. Governing the risks to workers is the subject of this commentary. The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 grants the Occupational Safety and Health Administration the legal authority to set occupational health standards to insure that no worker suffers material impairment of health from work. However, setting a standard to protect workers from nanotechnology risks may occur some time in the future because the risks to workers have not been well characterized scientifically. Alternative risk governances—such as dynamic oversight through stakeholder partnerships, “soft law” approaches, and national adoption of international consensus standards—are evaluated in this article.

  1. A Study of Construction Reactor Oversight Process in US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, I.; Kim, S. Y.; Jeong, G. Y.; Kim, S. P.

    2015-01-01

    This process provides a risk-informed approach such as construction significance determination process (SDP) and construction program performance index analogous to those used in the Reactor Oversight Process (ROP). The cROP has been applied to Vogtle units 3, 4 and V.C. Summer units 2, 3 under construction for the regulatory inspection. In this paper, the cROP is dissected to present its major contents and characteristics. The main features of the cROP can be summarized as followings: 1) The cROP which adopts the concept of the ROP used for operating NPPs assesses NPP under construction periodically to determine the appropriate level of regulatory response. 2) The cROP consists of three parts: the CIP, the CAP and the CEP. 3) The inspections for NPPs under construction can be categorized into three parts: vendor inspection, baseline inspection and supplemental and plant specific inspections. USNRC's regulatory resources can be used effectively based on baseline inspection, which is using ITAAC inspections. The construction SDP is used to assign the color scheme to categorize the significance of inspection findings. Regulatory actions are taken from CAM to which the significance of inspection findings input. In this paper, major contents and characteristics of USNRC's cROP have been presented

  2. Regulatory Oversight for New Projects - Challenges and Improvement in Regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lall, F.

    2016-01-01

    From inception, there has been rise in number of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) even though very few accidents / events led to intermittent setbacks. However these accidents / events have posed challenges towards enhancement of safety and scope of regulation in all phases of NPP such as siting, design, construction, commissioning and decommissioning. It is essential to ensure compliance to these enhanced safety requirements during all phases of NPP. New and evolutionary reactors are under threshold for regulatory consideration world over. The variety of technologies and genres by themselves pose challenges to regulatory bodies. These challenges are to be addressed through systematic enhancement of the regulation including updating of regulatory documents. The paper touches upon some key elements to be considered towards such enhancement of regulation during all stages of NPP. These being; ensuring quality assurance, regulatory oversight especially over supply chain and contractors, counterfeit material specifically in case of international dealings, emergency handling in case of multi-unit site, feedback and associated enhancements from international events, construction experience database and feedback for safety enhancement, qualification and acceptance of first of a kind systems, regulatory enforcement specifically in case of imported reactors and maintaining interface between safety and security. Regulation in present context has become dynamic and Regulatory bodies need to continue enhancement of its current regulation taking into account the technological developments, feedback from construction, operation and accidents in the current fleet of plants. The paper touches upon some of these elements and highlights the challenges and improvements in regulation. (author)

  3. United States Department of Energy Field Office, Richland, Environmental Protection Implementation Plan, November 9, 1990--November 9, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paasch, R.A.

    1991-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 (DOE 1988a), General Environmental Protection Program, establishes environmental protection program requirements, authorities, and responsibilities to ensure that DOE operations are in compliance with applicable federal, state and local environmental protection laws and regulations, executive orders, and internal department policies. Chapter 3 of DOE Order 5400.1 requires that each field organization prepare a plan for implementing the requirements of this order and update this plan annually. Therefore, this update to the US Department of Energy -- Richland Operations Office Environmental Protection Implementation Plan for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington, initially prepared November 9, 1989, is being issued. Responsibility for coordinating preparation of the annual update of this plan is assigned to the US Department of Energy Field Office, Richland, Safety and Environment Division's Environmental Oversight Branch

  4. Office of Safeguards and Security - Operational Interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammond, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    The mission of the Office of Safeguards and Security (OSS), Department of Energy (DOE) is to: Develop policy and programs to protect DOE facilities, nuclear materials, and classified information; Provide oversight for safeguards and security operations; Direct research and development (RandD) to support the protection program; and Strengthen international safeguards in support of nonproliferation policy. Objectives are to maintain an integrated safeguards and security system that is effective against a wide range of threats, and do so in a manner to minimize impacts on facility operation. Implementation is the responsibility of field offices and contractors operating DOE facilities. The OSS-operational interface is the focus of this discussion with emphasis on RandD to meet user needs. The scope and project selection process will be discussed along with information required for evaluation, and field operational planning and budgeting commitments to permit implementation of successful RandD results

  5. Current practice and perspectives in CRO oversight based on a survey performed among members of the German Association of Research-Based Pharmaceutical Companies (vfa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Michael; Hundt, Ferdinand; Busta, Susanne; Mikus, Stefan; Sanden, Per-Holger; Sörgel, Andrea; Ruppert, Thorsten

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the number and scope of outsourced activities in the pharmaceutical industry have increased heavily. In addition, also the type of outsourcing has changed significantly in that time. This raises the question of whether and how sponsors retain the capability to select and to control the contract research organizations (CROs) involved and what expertise still has to be present in the development department as well as other relevant departments to ensure adequate oversight, also in line with the expectations of regulators and health authorities. In order to answer these questions, a survey was conducted among the German vfa member companies. The survey describes the latest developments and experiences in outsourcing by 18 German vfa member companies. It concentrates on measures how to implement Quality Assurance (QA) when performing outsourced clinical studies. This study shows that the majority of companies apply a full-outsourcing, preferred-provider model of clinical trial services, with the clinical research department playing the major role in this process. A large amount of guiding documents, processes and tools are used to ensure an adequate oversight of the services performed by the CRO(s). Finally the guiding principles for all oversight processes should be transparent communication, a clearly established expectation for quality, a precise definition of accountability and responsibility while avoiding silo mentality, and a comprehensive documentation of the oversight's evidence. For globally acting and outsourcing sponsors, oversight processes need to be aligned with regards to local and global perspectives. This survey shows that the current implementation of oversight processes in the participating companies covers all relevant areas to ensure highest quality and integrity of the data produced by the outsourced clinical trial.

  6. Electronics department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities in 1978 of some of the groups within the Electronics Department. The work covered includes plant protection and operator studies, reliability techniques, application of nuclear techniques to mineral exploration, applied laser physics, computing and, lastly, research instrumentation. (author)

  7. Design and operating experience on the US Department of Energy experimental Mod-0 100-kW wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasgow, J. C.; Birchenough, A. G.

    1978-01-01

    The experimental wind turbine was designed and fabricated to assess technology requirements and engineering problems of large wind turbines. The machine has demonstrated successful operation in all of its design modes and served as a prototype developmental test bed for the Mod-0A operational wind turbines which are currently used on utility networks. The mechanical and control system are described as they evolved in operational tests and some of the experience with various systems in the downwind rotor configurations are elaborated.

  8. 75 FR 10507 - Information Security Oversight Office; National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Information Security Oversight Office; National Industrial Security Program Policy Advisory Committee (NISPPAC) AGENCY: National Archives and Records... individuals planning to attend must be submitted to the Information Security Oversight Office (ISOO) no later...

  9. DIII-D Research Operations annual report to the US Department of Energy, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonen, T.C.; Evans, T.E. (eds.)

    1992-03-01

    This report discusses the following topics on Doublet-3 research operations: DIII-D Program Overview; Boundary Plasma Research Program/Scientific Progress; Radio Frequency Heating and Current Drive; Core Physics; DIII-D Operations; Program Development; Support Services; ITER Contributions; Burning Plasma Experiment Contributions; and Collaborative Efforts.

  10. DIII-D Research Operations annual report to the US Department of Energy, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonen, T.C.; Evans, T.E.

    1992-03-01

    This report discusses the following topics on Doublet-3 research operations: DIII-D Program Overview; Boundary Plasma Research Program/Scientific Progress; Radio Frequency Heating and Current Drive; Core Physics; DIII-D Operations; Program Development; Support Services; ITER Contributions; Burning Plasma Experiment Contributions; and Collaborative Efforts

  11. Department of Education Information on Consolidation Opportunities and Student Aid. Testimony before the Subcommittee on Human Resources and the Intergovernmental Relations Committee on Government Reform and Oversight, House of Representatives. Statement of Cornelia M. Blanchette, Associate Director, Education and Employment Issues, Health, Education, and Human Services Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchette, Cornelia M.

    This report evaluates Department of Education opportunities to consolidate overlapping education programs, to find cost savings, and to strengthen its "gatekeeping" over schools' participation in student financial aid programs. It notes that, besides already proposed program consolidation, other programs that could be streamlined include…

  12. Staggered work shifts : a way to downsize and restructure an emergency department workforce yet maintain current operational performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jabali, O.; Sinreich, D.

    2007-01-01

    Starting from the last decade of the twentieth century, most hospital Emergency Department (ED) budgets did not keep up with the demand for ED services made by growing populations and aging societies. Since labor consumes over 50% of the total monies invested in EDs and other healthcare systems, any

  13. 49 CFR 659.29 - Oversight agency safety and security reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Oversight agency safety and security reviews. 659... Role of the State Oversight Agency § 659.29 Oversight agency safety and security reviews. At least... safety program plan and system security plan. Alternatively, the on-site review may be conducted in an on...

  14. 13 CFR 120.1070 - Lender oversight fees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lender oversight fees. 120.1070 Section 120.1070 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Risk-Based... Lender” means a Small Business Lending Company or a Non-Federally Regulated Lender. (2) On-site reviews...

  15. 15 CFR 2008.18 - Information Security Oversight Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Information Security Oversight Committee. 2008.18 Section 2008.18 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Foreign Trade Agreements OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE REGULATIONS TO IMPLEMENT E.O. 12065; OFFICE OF...

  16. Notification: Oversight of Clean Water State Revolving Loan Funds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project #OA-FY15-0153, April 6, 2015. The Office of Inspector General (OIG) for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is beginning preliminary research on the EPA oversight of the Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF).

  17. 40 CFR 51.362 - Motorist compliance enforcement program oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... deviate from established requirements, or in the case of non-government entities that process... registrations; and (10) The prevention of fraudulent procurement or use of inspection documents by controlling... measurements. (c) SIP requirements. The SIP shall include a description of enforcement program oversight and...

  18. Regulatory oversight strategy for chemistry program at Canadian nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kameswaran; Ram

    2012-09-01

    Chemistry program is one of the essential programs for the safe operation of a nuclear power plant. It helps to ensure the necessary integrity, reliability and availability of plant structures, systems and components important to safety. Additionally, the program plays an important role in asset preservation, limiting radiation exposure and environmental protection. A good chemistry program will minimize corrosion of materials, reduce activation products, minimize of the buildup of radioactive material leading to occupational radiation exposure and it helps limit the release of chemicals and radioactive materials to the environment. The legal basis for the chemistry oversight at Canadian NPPs is established by the Nuclear Safety and Control Act and its associated regulations. It draws on the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission's regulatory framework and NPP operating license conditions that include applicable standards such as CAN/CSA N286-05 Management System Requirements for Nuclear Power Plants. This paper focuses on the regulatory oversight strategy used in Canada to assess the performance of chemistry program at the nuclear power plants (NPPs) licensed by CNSC. The strategy consists of a combination of inspection and performance monitoring activities. The activities are further supported from information gathered through staff inspections of cross-cutting areas such as maintenance, corrective-action follow-ups, event reviews and safety related performance indicators. (authors)

  19. Inspection, testing, and operating requiremens for the packaging and shipping of uranium trioxide in 55-gallon Department of Transportation (DOT) Specification 6M shipping packagings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toomer, D.V.

    1991-06-01

    This document identifies the inspection, testing and operating requirements for the packaging, loading, and shipping of uranium trioxide (UO 3 ) in 55-gallon DOT Specification 6M shipping packagings from the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). Compliance with this document assures established controls for the purchasing, packaging, loading, and shipping of DOT Specification 6M shipping packagings are maintained in strict accordance with applicable Code of Federal Regulations (CFRs) and Department of Energy (DOE) Orders. 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  20. Department of Energy Support for Operations of the WMO/GAW Quality Control/Science Activity Center for the Americas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hicks, B. B.

    2003-11-13

    As a formal activity of the World Meteorological Organization's Global Atmosphere Watch, to provide, through agency collaboration, a center of excellence in the United States that would impose quality assurance techniques on data collected by national air and precipitation quality networks operating in the Americas (north, south, and central).

  1. Current practice and perspectives in CRO oversight based on a survey performed among members of the German Association of Research-Based Pharmaceutical Companies (vfa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hennig, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the number and scope of outsourced activities in the pharmaceutical industry have increased heavily. In addition, also the type of outsourcing has changed significantly in that time. This raises the question of whether and how sponsors retain the capability to select and to control the contract research organizations (CROs involved and what expertise still has to be present in the development department as well as other relevant departments to ensure adequate oversight, also in line with the expectations of regulators and health authorities. In order to answer these questions, a survey was conducted among the German vfa member companies. The survey describes the latest developments and experiences in outsourcing by 18 German vfa member companies. It concentrates on measures how to implement Quality Assurance (QA when performing outsourced clinical studies.This study shows that the majority of companies apply a full-outsourcing, preferred-provider model of clinical trial services, with the clinical research department playing the major role in this process. A large amount of guiding documents, processes and tools are used to ensure an adequate oversight of the services performed by the CRO(s.Finally the guiding principles for all oversight processes should be transparent communication, a clearly established expectation for quality, a precise definition of accountability and responsibility while avoiding silo mentality, and a comprehensive documentation of the oversight’s evidence. For globally acting and outsourcing sponsors, oversight processes need to be aligned with regards to local and global perspectives. This survey shows that the current implementation of oversight processes in the participating companies covers all relevant areas to ensure highest quality and integrity of the data produced by the outsourced clinical trial.

  2. Los Alamos National Laboratory Facilities, Security and Safeguards Division, Safeguards and Security Program Office, Protective Force Oversight Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to identify and describe the duties and responsibilities of Facility Security and Safeguards (FSS) Safeguards and Security (SS) organizations (groups/offices) with oversight functions over the Protection Force (PF) subcontractor. Responsible organizations will continue their present PF oversight functions under the Cost Plus Award Fee (CPAF) assessment, but now will be required to also coordinate, integrate, and interface with other FSS S and S organizations and with the PF subcontractor to measure performance, assess Department of Energy (DOE) compliance, reduce costs, and minimize duplication of effort. The role of the PF subcontractor is to provide the Laboratory with effective and efficient protective force services. PF services include providing protection for the special nuclear material, government property and classified or sensitive information developed and/or consigned to the Laboratory, as well as protection for personnel who work or participate in laboratory activities. FSS S and S oversight of both performance and compliance standards/metrics is essential for these PF objectives to be met

  3. US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Environmental Management Public Involvement Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-03-01

    This document was prepared in accordance with CERCLA requirements for writing community relations plans. It includes information on how the DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office prepares and executes Environmental Management Community relations activities. It is divided into three sections: the public involvement plan, public involvement in Oak Ridge, and public involvement in 1995. Four appendices are also included: environmental management in Oak Ridge; community and regional overview; key laws, agreements, and policy; and principal contacts

  4. Services Acquisition in the Department of Defense: Analysis of Operational and Performance Data to Identify Drivers of Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-24

    improving the disclosure of CPARS program office Audit results (Black et al., 2014, pp. 48–49). Acquisition Research Program Graduate School of...improving the disclosure of CPARS program office audit results (Black et al., 2014, pp. 44–49). Recommendations Based on our conclusions, we identified...Fitzsimmons, J. A., & Fitzsimmons, M. J. (2006). Service management: Operations, strategy, and information technology (5th ed.). New York, NY: McGraw -Hill

  5. Summary report of the Department of Energy, Division of Operational and Environmental Safety: Quality Assurance Programs 1 through 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welford, G.A.; Fisenne, I.M.; Sanderson, C.

    1978-01-01

    Analytical Laboratories which provide environmental monitoring data for assessment of radioactive contamination, under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contract, were requested to participate in a Quality Assurance Program. The Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) was asked to prepare intercomparison samples for radionuclide analysis of soil, water, air filters, tissue ash, and vegetation ash for distribution to the Analytical Laboratories. Samples were collected in the environment of DOE facilities, since only water and air samples could be conveniently spiked. A set of 6 to 8 samples is distributed quarterly to about 28 laboratories. EML performed multiple analyses on the samples, however, the results are considered intercomparisons not standards. This report summarizes the program and evaluates the data for Quality Assurance Programs (QAP) from 1 through 4

  6. Regulatory oversight on nuclear safety in Taiwan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, T-T. [Atomic Energy Council, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China)

    2014-07-01

    Taiwan is a densely populated island and over 98% of its energy is imported, 16.5% of which is nuclear, in the form of materials and services. Ensuring that the most stringent nuclear safety standards are met therefore remains a priority for the government and the operator, Taiwan power Company (Taipower). There are eight nuclear power reactors in Taiwan, six of which are in operation and two are under construction. The first began operating nearly 40 years ago. For the time being the issue of whether to decommission or extend life of the operating units is also being discussed and has no conclusion yet. Nuclear energy has been a hot issue in debate over the past decades in Taiwan. Construction of Lungmen nuclear power plant, site selection of a final low-level waste disposal facility, installation of spent fuel dry storage facilities and safety of the currently operating nuclear power reactors are the issues that all Taiwanese are concerned most. In order to ensure the safety of nuclear power plant, the Atomic Energy Council (AEC) has implemented rigorous regulatory work over the past decades. After the Fukushima accident, AEC has conducted a reassessment program to re-evaluate all nuclear power plants in Taiwan, and asked Taipower to follow the technical guidelines, which ENSREG has utilized to implement stress test over nuclear power plants in Europe. In addition, AEC has invited two expert teams from OECD/NEA and ENSREG to conduct peer reviews of Taiwan's stress test national report in 2013. My presentation will focus on activities regulating safety of nuclear power programs. These will cover (A) policy of nuclear power regulation in Taiwan, (B)challenges of the Lungmen Plant, (C) post-Fukushima safety re-assessment, and (D)radioactive waste management. (author)

  7. Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office evaluation of feasibility studies for private sector treatment of alpha and TRU mixed wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is currently storing a large quantity of alpha contaminated mixed low level waste which will require treatment prior to disposal. The DOE Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) recognized that current knowledge and funding were insufficient to directly pursue services for the requisite treatment. Therefore, it was decided that private sector studies would be funded to clarify cost, regulatory, technology, and contractual issues associated with procuring treatment services. This report analyzes the three private sector studies procured and recommends a path forward for DOE in procuring retrieval, assay, characterization, and treatment services for INEL transuranic and alpha contaminated mixed low level waste. This report was prepared by a team of subject matter experts from the INEL referred to as the DOE-ID Evaluation Team

  8. United States Department of Energy`s electric and hybrid vehicle site operator program. Final report, April 1991--September 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-06

    Drivers in San Juan County, which, is comprised of islands making for short distances on rural (low speed limits) roads, found that present day electric vehicle technology can work in certain applications. An honest, accurate appraisal of the expectations of the vehicle is essential. When needs and capabilities are able to match up, then successful ownership and operation can occur. Today`s EV technology can accomplish certain driving tasks. Careful, honest analysis what is expected of the car can lead to a rewarding EV driving experience. Providing recharge locations in the community proved essential of the peace of mind of the EV driver. Since heating and air conditioning represent electric loads whose reduces range, a moderate to warm year round climate is best for today`s EV. Also, even limited solar recharging has been determined to improve battery pack life.

  9. PARTICULARITIES OF PARLIAMENTARY OVERSIGHT IN DIFFERENT POLITICAL REGIMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia-Claudia CĂLIN-MIHALCEA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The quality and intensity of the parliamentary oversight performed over the Government are shaped by several major criteria: political regime, electoral system, structure of the Parliament (unicameral/bicameral, parliamentary culture and tradition. This paper emphasizes some distinctive elements and particular mechanisms of the control exercised over the activities of the executive power, from the point of view of the political regime established in states with modern democracies.

  10. Technical oversight for installation of TNX piezometers, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pidcoe, W.W. Jr. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1997-06-05

    Science Applications International Corporation was tasked under subcontract C002025P to provide technical oversight for the drilling of one pilot borehole, and the drilling and installation of five piezometers in the TNX Area Swamp. The work was performed in accordance with the Statement of Work in Task Order Proposal No. ER39-129 dated August 6, 1996. This report describes the activities associated with the performance of the task.

  11. DIII-D Research Operations annual report to the US Department of Energy, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohr, J.

    1995-07-01

    The DIII-D tokamak research program is managed by General Atomics (GA) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). Major program participants include GA, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and the University of California together with several other national laboratories and universities. The DIII-D is a moderate sized tokamak with great flexibility and extremely capable subsystems. The primary goal of the DIII-D tokamak research program is to provide data for development of a conceptual physics blueprint for a commercially attractive fusion power plant. In so doing, the DIII-D program provides physics and technology R ampersand D output to aid the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the Princeton Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) projects. Specific DIII-D objectives include the achievement of steady-state plasma current as well as the demonstration of techniques for radio frequency heating, divertor heat removal, particle exhaust and tokamak plasma control. The DIII-D program is addressing these objectives in an integrated fashion in plasmas with high beta and with high confinement. The long-range plan is organized with two principal elements, the development of an advanced divertor and the development of advanced tokamak concepts. These two elements have a common goal: an improved demonstration reactor (DEMO) with lower cost and smaller size than present DEMO concepts. In order to prepare for this long-range development, in FY94 the DIII-D research program concentrated on three major areas: Divertor and Boundary Physics, Advanced Tokamak studies, and Tokamak Physics

  12. US Department of Energy automated transportation management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, T.M.; Frost, D.M.; Lopez, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has approximately 80 facilities throughout the United States that specialize in either scientific research, engineering, technology, production, and/or waste management activities. These facilities can best be described as Government Owned, Contractor Operated (GOCO) sites, and vary in size from very small laboratories to large industrial plant type facilities. Each of these GOCO's have varying needs for transportation of materials into and/or out of their facility. Therefore, Traffic Management operations will differ from site to site due to size and the internal or site specific mission. The DOE Transportation Management Division (TMD) has the corporate responsibility to provide a well managed transportation management program for the safe, efficient, and economical transportation of all DOE-owned materials. To achieve this mission, TMD provides oversight, and when necessary, resources to assist in ensuring regulatory compliance in the packaging and shipment of DOE-owned materials. A large part of TMD's responsibility is to develop, administer, and provide policies and guidance concerning department-wide transportation and packaging operations. This responsibility includes overall Transportation Management policies and programs for the packaging and movement of all DOE materials, including radioactive materials, other hazardous materials/substances, and hazardous wastes. TMD formulates policies and guidance that assist the DOE Field Elements and GOCO's in meeting TMD's goal for safe, efficient and economical transportation. Considering there are at least 80 shipping and receiving sites, the challenge encountered by TMD has been the difficulty in managing such a diverse transportation community

  13. Maximizing Production Capacity from an Ultrafiltration Process at the Hanford Department of Waste Treatment Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foust, Henry C.; Holton, Langdon K.; Demick, Laurence E.

    2005-01-01

    The Department of Energy has contracted Bechtel National, Inc. to design, construct and commission a Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) to treat radioactive slurry currently stored in underground waste storage tanks. A critical element of the waste treatment capacity for the WTP is the proper operation of an ultrafiltration process (UFP). The UFP separates supernate solution from radioactive solids. The solution and solid phases are separately immobilized. An oversight review of the UFP design and operation has identified several methods to improve the capacity of the ultrafiltration process, which will also improve the capacity of the WTP. Areas explored were the basis of design, an analysis of the WTP capacity, process chemistry within the UFP, and UFP process control. This article discusses some of the findings of this oversight review in terms of sodium and solid production, which supports the treatment of low activity waste (LAW) associated with the facility, and solid production, which supports the treatment of high level waste (HLW) associated with the facility

  14. Sampling and analysis plan for ORNL filter press cake waste from the Liquid and Gaseous Waste Operations Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartling, M.H.; Bayne, C.K.; Cunningham, G.R.

    1994-09-01

    This document defines the sampling and analytical procedures needed for the initial characterization of the filter press cake waste from the Process Waste Treatment Plant (PWTP) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). It is anticipated that revisions to this document will occur as operating experience and sample results suggest appropriate changes be made. Application of this document will be controlled through the ORNL Waste Management and Remedial Action Division. The sampling strategy is designed to ensure that the samples collected present an accurate representation of the waste process stream. Using process knowledge and preliminary radiological activity screens, the filter press cake waste is known to contain radionuclides. Chemical characterization under the premise of this sampling and analysis plan will provide information regarding possible treatments and ultimately, disposal of filter press cake waste at an offsite location. The sampling strategy and analyses requested are based on the K-25 waste acceptance criteria and the Nevada Test Site Defense Waste Acceptance Criteria, Certification, and Transfer Requirements [2, NVO-325, Rev. 1]. The sampling strategy will demonstrate that for the filter press cake waste there is (1) an absence of RCRA and PCBs wastes, (2) an absence of transuranic (TRU) wastes, and (3) a quantifiable amount of radionuclide activity

  15. Missouri Department of Natural Resources Hazardous Waste Program Weldon Spring site remedial action project. Status of project to date January 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This document describes the progress made by the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MDNR) during the fourth year (1996) of the Agreement in Support (AIS) in its oversight role of the Weldon Springs Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP). The fourth year at the Weldon Springs Site shows sustained progress as the project moves through the final design and into the remedial action phases of the Chemical Plant Operable Unit. The remedial action phase includes the Foundations Removal work package, Chemical Solidification and Stabilization, and disposal cell

  16. Annual report of Department of Research Reactor and Tandem Accelerator, JFY2007. Operation, utilization and technical development of JRR-3, JRR-4, NSRR and tandem accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, Osamu; Awa, Yasuaki; Isaka, Koji; Kutsukake, Kenichi; Komeda, Masao; Shibata, Ko; Hiyama, Kazuhisa; Suzuki, Mayu; Sone, Takuya; Ohuchi, Tomoaki; Terakado, Yuichi; Sataka, Masao

    2009-06-01

    The Department of Research Reactors and Tandem Accelerator is in charge of the operation, utilization and technical development of JRR-3(Japan Research Reactor-3), JRR-4(Japan Research Reactor-4), NSRR(Nuclear Safety Research Reactor) and Tandem Accelerator. This annual report describes a summary of activities of services and technical developments carried out in the period between April 1, 2007 and March 31, 2008. The activities were categorized into five service/development fields: (1) Operation and maintenance of research reactors and tandem accelerator. (2) Utilization of research reactors and tandem accelerator. (3) Upgrading of utilization techniques of research reactors and tandem accelerator. (4) Safety administration for research reactors and tandem accelerator. (5) International cooperation. Also contained are lists of publications, meetings, granted permissions on lows and regulations concerning atomic energy, commendation, plans and outcomes in service and technical developments and so on. (author)

  17. Annual report of Department of Research Reactor and Tandem Accelerator, JFY2010. Operation, utilization and technical development of JRR-3, JRR-4, NSRR and Tandem Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Tetsuro; Nakamura, Kiyoshi; Kawamata, Satoshi; Yamada, Yusuke; Kawashima, Kazuhiro; Asozu, Takuhiro; Nakamura, Takemi; Arai, Masaji; Yoshinari, Shuji; Sataka, Masao

    2012-03-01

    The Department of Research Reactors and Tandem Accelerator is in charge of the operation, utilization and technical development of JRR-3(Japan Research Reactor No.3), JRR-4(Japan Research Reactor No.4), NSRR(Nuclear Safety Research Reactor) and Tandem Accelerator. This annual report describes a summary of activities of services and technical developments carried out in the period between April 1, 2010 and March 31, 2011. The activities were categorized into five service/development fields: (1) Operation and maintenance of research reactors and tandem accelerator, (2) Utilization of research reactors and tandem accelerator, (3) Upgrading of utilization techniques of research reactors and tandem accelerator, (4) Safety administration for research reactors and tandem accelerator, (5) International cooperation. Also contained are lists of publications, meetings, granted permissions on lows and regulations concerning atomic energy, commendation, outcomes in service and technical developments and so on. (author)

  18. Overview of the US Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, K.A.; Williams, D.L.; Reister, R.

    2012-01-01

    The US Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is focused on enabling the long-term operation of US commercial power plants. Decisions on life extension will be made by commercial power plant owners - the information provided by the research and development activities in the LWRS Program will reduce the uncertainty (and therefore the risk) associated with making those decisions. The LWRS Program encompasses two facets of long-term operation: (1) manage the aging of plant systems, structures, and components so that nuclear power plant lifetimes can be extended and the plants can continue to operate safely, efficiently, and economically; and (2) provide science-based solutions to the nuclear industry that support implementation of performance improvement technologies. An important aspect of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program is partnering with industry and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to support and conduct the long-term research needed to inform major component refurbishment and replacement strategies, performance enhancements, plant license extensions, and age-related regulatory oversight decisions. The Department of Energy research, development, and demonstration role focuses on aging phenomena and issues that require long-term research and/or unique Department of Energy laboratory expertise and facilities and are applicable to all operating reactors. This paper provides an overview of the Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program, including vision, goals, and major deliverables. (author)

  19. Evaluating oversight systems for emerging technologies: a case study of genetically engineered organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzma, Jennifer; Najmaie, Pouya; Larson, Joel

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. oversight system for genetically engineered organisms (GEOs) was evaluated to develop hypotheses and derive lessons for oversight of other emerging technologies, such as nanotechnology. Evaluation was based upon quantitative expert elicitation, semi-standardized interviews, and historical literature analysis. Through an interdisciplinary policy analysis approach, blending legal, ethical, risk analysis, and policy sciences viewpoints, criteria were used to identify strengths and weaknesses of GEOs oversight and explore correlations among its attributes and outcomes. From the three sources of data, hypotheses and broader conclusions for oversight were developed. Our analysis suggests several lessons for oversight of emerging technologies: the importance of reducing complexity and uncertainty in oversight for minimizing financial burdens on small product developers; consolidating multi-agency jurisdictions to avoid gaps and redundancies in safety reviews; consumer benefits for advancing acceptance of GEO products; rigorous and independent pre- and post-market assessment for environmental safety; early public input and transparency for ensuring public confidence; and the positive role of public input in system development, informed consent, capacity, compliance, incentives, and data requirements and stringency in promoting health and environmental safety outcomes, as well as the equitable distribution of health impacts. Our integrated approach is instructive for more comprehensive analyses of oversight systems, developing hypotheses for how features of oversight systems affect outcomes, and formulating policy options for oversight of future technological products, especially nanotechnology products.

  20. MEDICAID FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT: Better Oversight of State Claims for Federal Reimbursement Needed

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Calbom, Linda

    2002-01-01

    .... Developing baseline information on Medicaid issues at greatest risk for improper payments and measuring improvements in program management against that baseline is key to achieving effective financial oversight...

  1. Political and Budgetary Oversight of the Ukrainian Intelligence Community: Processes, Problems and Prospects for Reform

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Petrov, Oleksii

    2007-01-01

    This thesis addresses the problem of providing policy and budget oversight of Ukrainian intelligence organizations in accordance with norms and practices developed in contemporary Western democracies...

  2. Use of the Management Oversight and Risk Tree (MORT) methodology in health-physics program appraisals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essig, T.H.; Gilchrist, R.L.

    1981-06-01

    In January 1980, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) assumed a major role in helping the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) conduct comprehensive health physics appraisals at 47 operating nuclear power plants. These appraisals required the development of an analytical technique that permitted a deductive analysis of a health-physics program on an element-by-element basis. The technique employed was a modification of the Management Oversight and risk Tree (MORT) analytical logic methodology used in probabilistic assessments. This paper includes the method used in establishing the appraisal guidelines and assigning the proper level of importance within the analytical tree structure. The system for ensuring the proper subdivision necessary for an adequate assessment of each area (e.g., exposure controls and radioactive waste management) will also be discussed. In addition to these major subjects, the generation of specific review questions that correspond to the analytical trees is addressed

  3. Improving Oversight and Coordination of Department of Defense Programs That Address Problematic Behaviors Among Military Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Consider ways to leverage existing DoD data to continue to explore connections among problematic behaviors. Prevention strategies Review the effects that...Hepner, Targeting Alcohol Misuse: A Promising Strategy for Reducing Military Sexual Assaults? Santa Monica, Calif.: RAND Corporation , RR-538-OSD, 2014...and linking permissions, please visit www.rand.org/pubs/permissions. The RAND Corporation is a research organization that develops solutions to public

  4. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY: Views on Proposed Civil Penalties, Security Oversight, and External Safety Regulation Legislation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jones, Gary

    2000-01-01

    .... 3383 would amend the Atomic Energy Act by eliminating the exemption that currently allows certain nonprofit contractors to avoid paying civil penalties if they violate DOE's nuclear safety rules...

  5. (Department of Defense Office of Inspector General (DoD OIG)) Fiscal Year 2017 Oversight Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Transparency Act of 2014. Specifically, for a statistically valid sample of spending data submitted by the DoD, assess the completeness, timeliness...facilities did not appropriately transfer funds to the U.S. Treasury for 114 delinquent accounts, valued at $13.4 million, of the 125 accounts the...the DoD Office of Inspector General Delinquent Medical Service Account Audits This is a summary report to identify systemic problems regarding

  6. Audit Oversight: Followup Review of the Military Department Audit Agencies Peer Review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2004-01-01

    Government Auditing Standards (GAS) issued in June 2003 by the Comptroller General of the United States require that organizations conducting Government audits and attestation engagements have an appropriate internal quality control...

  7. 76 FR 4907 - The Consumer Operated and Oriented Plan (CO-OP) Advisory Board, February 7, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-27

    ... Department's strategy to foster the creation of qualified nonprofit health insurance issuers. Specifically... Oversight (OCIIO) on the Department's strategy to foster the creation of qualified nonprofit health... section of this notice. Individuals requiring sign language interpretation or other special accommodations...

  8. Quantification of the impact of multifaceted initiatives intended to improve operational efficiency and the safety culture: a case study from an academic medical center radiation oncology department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chera, Bhishamjit S; Mazur, Lukasz; Jackson, Marianne; Taylor, Kinely; Mosaly, Prithima; Chang, Sha; Deschesne, Kathy; LaChapelle, Dana; Hoyle, Lesley; Saponaro, Patricia; Rockwell, John; Adams, Robert; Marks, Lawrence B

    2014-01-01

    We have systematically been incorporating several operational efficiency and safety initiatives into our academic radiation oncology clinic. We herein quantify the impact of these initiatives on prospectively collected, clinically meaningful, metrics. The data from 5 quality improvement initiatives, each focused on a specific safety/process concern in our clinic, are presented. Data was collected prospectively: operational metrics recorded before and after implementation of the initiative were compared using statistical analysis. Results from the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality (AHRQ) patient safety culture surveys administered during and after many of these initiatives were similarly compared. (1) Workload levels for nurses assisting with brachytherapy were high (National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index (NASA-TLX) scores >55-60, suggesting, "overwork"). Changes in work flow and procedure room layout reduced workload to more acceptable levels (NASA-TLX 50% to <10%; P < .01). To assess the overall changes in "patient safety culture," we conducted a pre- and postanalysis using the AHRQ survey. Improvements in all measured dimensions were noted. Quality improvement initiatives can be successfully implemented in an academic radiation oncology department to yield measurable improvements in operations resulting in improvement in patient safety culture. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. State safety oversight program : audit of the tri-state oversight committee and the Washington metropolitan area transit authority, final audit report, March 4, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    The Federal Transit Administration (FTA) conducted an on-site audit of the safety program implemented by the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) and overseen by the Tri-State Oversight Committee (TOC) between December 14 and 17, 20...

  10. Real-time Responsiveness for Ethics Oversight During Disaster Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckenwiler, Lisa; Pringle, John; Boulanger, Renaud; Hunt, Matthew

    2015-11-01

    Disaster research has grown in scope and frequency. Research in the wake of disasters and during humanitarian crises--particularly in resource-poor settings--is likely to raise profound and unique ethical challenges for local communities, crisis responders, researchers, and research ethics committees (RECs). Given the ethical challenges, many have questioned how best to provide research ethics review and oversight. We contribute to the conversation concerning how best to ensure appropriate ethical oversight in disaster research and argue that ethical disaster research requires of researchers and RECs a particular sort of ongoing, critical engagement which may not be warranted in less exceptional research. We present two cases that typify the concerns disaster researchers and RECs may confront, and elaborate upon what this ongoing engagement might look like--how it might be conceptualized and utilized--using the concept of real-time responsiveness (RTR). The central aim of RTR, understood here as both an ethical ideal and practice, is to lessen the potential for research conducted in the wake of disasters to create, perpetuate, or exacerbate vulnerabilities and contribute to injustices suffered by disaster-affected populations. Well cultivated and deployed, we believe that RTR may enhance the moral capacities of researchers and REC members, and RECs as institutions where moral agency is nurtured and sustained. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Safety Culture Oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sieracki, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    The NRC recognises that it is important for all organizations performing or overseeing regulated activities to establish and maintain a positive safety culture commensurate with the safety and security significance of their activities and the nature and complexity of their organizations and functions. The NRC’s approach to safety culture is based on the premise that licencees bear the primary responsibility for safety. The NRC provides oversight of safety culture through expectations detailed in policy statements, safety culture assessor training for NRC inspectors, the oversight process, and the Allegations and Enforcement Programs. The NRC’s Safety Culture Policy Statement (SCPS) sets forth the Commission’s expectation that individuals and organizations establish and maintain a positive safety culture commensurate with the safety and security significance of their activities and the nature and complexity of their organizations and functions. The SCPS is not a regulation. It applies to all licencees, certificate holders, permit holders, authorisation holders, holders of quality assurance program approvals, vendors and suppliers of safety-related components, and applicants for a licence, certificate, permit, authorisation, or quality assurance program approval, subject to NRC authority.

  12. 17 CFR 201.440 - Appeal of determinations by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and Commission Review § 201.440 Appeal of determinations by the Public Company Accounting Oversight... for registration of a public accounting firm, may file an application for review. (b) Procedure. An... the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board. 201.440 Section 201.440 Commodity and Securities...

  13. 32 CFR 2400.19 - Declassification by the Director of the Information Security Oversight Office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Information Security Oversight Office. 2400.19 Section 2400.19 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to... SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY INFORMATION SECURITY PROGRAM Declassification and Downgrading § 2400.19 Declassification by the Director of the Information Security Oversight Office. If the Director of the Information...

  14. 75 FR 39954 - Oversight of Laboratory Developed Tests; Public Meeting; Change of Meeting Location

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-13

    ...] Oversight of Laboratory Developed Tests; Public Meeting; Change of Meeting Location AGENCY: Food and Drug... location for the upcoming public meeting entitled ``Oversight of Laboratory Developed Tests.'' A new... the public meeting, FDA is announcing in this notice a new location for the public meeting. II. New...

  15. Creating a Learning Organization in Law Enforcement: Maturity Levels for Police Oversight Agencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filstad, Cathrine; Gottschalk, Petter

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize a stage model for maturity levels for police oversight agencies. Design/methodology/approach: The paper is based on a literature review covering police oversight organizations and stages of growth models. Findings: As a conceptual paper, the main findings are related to the appropriateness of…

  16. 48 CFR 52.236-24 - Work Oversight in Architect-Engineer Contracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Architect-Engineer Contracts. 52.236-24 Section 52.236-24 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL... Provisions and Clauses 52.236-24 Work Oversight in Architect-Engineer Contracts. As prescribed in 36.609-3, insert the following clause: Work Oversight in Architect-Engineer Contracts (APR 1984) The extent and...

  17. Whistleblower Protection: DOD Needs to Enhance Oversight of Military Whistleblower Reprisal Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    WHISTLEBLOWER PROTECTION DOD Needs to Enhance Oversight of Military Whistleblower Reprisal Investigations Report...00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Whistleblower Protection: DOD Needs to Enhance Oversight of Military Whistleblower Reprisal...Government Accountability Office Highlights of GAO-15-477, a report to congressional requesters May 2015 WHISTLEBLOWER PROTECTION DOD

  18. Defense Forensics: Additional Planning and Oversight Needed to Establish an Enduring Expeditionary Forensic Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    forensic pathology, forensic anthropology, and forensic toxicology . 13DOD’s forensic directive defines DOD components as the Office of the...DEFENSE FORENSICS Additional Planning and Oversight Needed to Establish an Enduring Expeditionary Forensic ...COVERED 00-00-2013 to 00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Defense Forensics : Additional Planning and Oversight Needed to Establish an Enduring

  19. 76 FR 52997 - Public Company Accounting Oversight Board; Order Approving Proposed Board Funding Final Rules for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-24

    ... Accounting Oversight Board; Order Approving Proposed Board Funding Final Rules for Allocation of the Board's... August 18, 2011. I. Introduction On June 21, 2011, the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (the... public accounting firm, in amounts that are sufficient to cover the costs of processing and reviewing...

  20. 17 CFR 202.11 - Public Company Accounting Oversight Board budget approval process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Public Company Accounting Oversight Board budget approval process. 202.11 Section 202.11 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION INFORMAL AND OTHER PROCEDURES § 202.11 Public Company Accounting Oversight...

  1. Developing computer systems to support emergency operations: Standardization efforts by the Department of Energy and implementation at the DOE Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeBusk, R.E.; Fulton, G.J.; O'Dell, J.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the development of standards for emergency operations computer systems for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The proposed DOE computer standards prescribe the necessary power and simplicity to meet the expanding needs of emergency managers. Standards include networked UNIX workstations based on the client server model and software that presents information graphically using icons and windowing technology. DOE standards are based on those of the computer industry although Proposed DOE is implementing the latest technology to ensure a solid base for future growth. A case of how these proposed standards are being implemented is also presented. The Savannah River Site (SRS), a DOE facility near Aiken, South Carolina is automating a manual information system, proven over years of development. This system is generalized as a model that can apply to most, if not all, Emergency Operations Centers. This model can provide timely and validated information to emergency managers. By automating this proven system, the system is made easier to use. As experience in the case study demonstrates, computers are only an effective information tool when used as part of a proven process

  2. Annual report of Department of Research Reactor and Tandem Accelerator, JFY2011. Operation, utilization and technical development of JRR-3, JRR-4, NSRR and tandem accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Tetsuro; Nakamura, Kiyoshi; Kawamata, Satoshi; Ishikuro, Yasuhiro; Kawashima, Kazuhito; Kabumoto, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Takemi; Tamura, Itaru; Kawasaki, Sayuri; Sataka, Masao

    2013-03-01

    The Department of Research Reactors and Tandem Accelerator is in charge of the operation, utilization and technical development of JRR-3(Japan Research Reactor No.3), JRR-4(Japan Research Reactor No.4), NSRR(Nuclear Safety Research Reactor) and Tandem Accelerator. This annual report describes a summary of activities of services and technical developments carried out in the period between April 1, 2011 and March 31, 2012. The activities were categorized into six service/development fields: (1) Recovery from the Great East Japan Earthquake, (2) Operation and maintenance of research reactors and tandem accelerator, (3) Utilization of research reactors and tandem accelerator, (4) Upgrading of utilization techniques of research reactors and tandem accelerator, (5) Safety administration for research reactors and tandem accelerator, (6) International cooperation. Also contained are lists of publications, meetings, granted permissions on lows and regulations concerning atomic energy, number of staff members dispatched to Fukushima for the technical assistance, commendation, outcomes in service and technical developments and so on. (author)

  3. Annual report of Department of Research Reactors and Tandem Accelerator, JFY2006. Operation, utilization and technical development of JRR-3, JRR-4, NSRR and Tandem Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-12-01

    The Department of Research Reactors and Tandem Accelerator is in charge of the operation, utilization and technical development of JRR-3 (Japan Research Reactor-3), JRR-4 (Japan Research Reactor-4) and NSRR (Nuclear Safety Research Reactor) and Tandem Accelerator. The following services and technical developments were achieved in Japanese Fiscal Year 2006: 1) JRR-3 was operated for 181 days in 7 cycles and JRR-4 for 149 days in 37 cycles to provide neutrons for research and development of in-house and outside users. 2) JRR-3 and JRR-4 were utilized through deliberate coordination as follows, a) Neutron irradiations of 628 materials, for neutron transmutation doping of silicon etc. b) Capsule irradiations of 3,067 samples, for neutron activation analyses etc. c) Neutron beam experiments of 6,338 cases x days. 3) Concerning to the 10 times increasing plan of cold neutron beams from JRR-3, a pressure resistant test model of the high-performance neutron moderator vessel which had been designed to increase cold neutrons twice as much as the present one was fabricated. Various developments for upgrading cold neutron guide tubes with super mirrors were in progress. 4) Boron neutron capture therapy was carried out 34 times using JRR-4. Improved neutron collimators were built to fit well to any irregular outline for cancer around the neck. 5) NSRR carried out 4 times of pulse irradiations of high burn-up MOX fuels and 9 times of un-irradiated fuels to contribute to fuel safety researches. 6) The Tandem Accelerator was operated for 201 days to contribute to the researches of nuclear physics and solid state physics with high energy heavy ions. The new utilization program of sharing beam times with outside users was performed by carrying out 45 days. The beam intensity increasing program with a high performance ion source, in place of the compact one which has been working in the high voltage terminal, has made great progress. (author)

  4. Restart oversight assessment of Hanford 242-A evaporator: Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagdon, R.; Lasky, R.

    1994-08-01

    An assessment team from the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH), US Department of Energy (DOE), conducted an independent assessment of the 242-A Evaporator at the Hanford Site during January 17--28, 1994. An EH team member remained on-site following the assessment to track corrective actions and resolve prestart findings. The primary objective of this assessment was independent assurance that the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM), the DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL), and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) can safely restart the evaporator. Another objective of the EH team was to assess EM's Operational Readiness Evaluation (ORE) to determine if the programs, procedures, and management systems implemented for operation of the 241-A Evaporator ensure the protection of worker safety and health. The following section of this report provides background information on the 242-A Evaporator and Operational Readiness Review (ORR) activities conducted to date. The next chapter is divided into sections that address the results of discrete assessment activities. Each section includes a brief statement of conclusions for the functional area in question, descriptions of the review bases and methods, and a detailed discussion of the results. Concerns identified during the assessment are listed for the section to which they apply, and the specific findings upon which the concern is based can be found immediately thereafter

  5. Experience gained in enhancing operational safety at ComEd`s nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, D [Commonwealth Edison Co. (United States)

    1997-09-01

    The following aspects of experience gained in enhancing operational safety at Comed`s nuclear power plants are discussed: nuclear safety policy; centralization/decentralization; typical nuclear operating organization; safety review boards; human performance enhancement; elements of effective nuclear oversight.

  6. Experience gained in enhancing operational safety at ComEd's nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, D.

    1997-01-01

    The following aspects of experience gained in enhancing operational safety at Comed's nuclear power plants are discussed: nuclear safety policy; centralization/decentralization; typical nuclear operating organization; safety review boards; human performance enhancement; elements of effective nuclear oversight

  7. Clinical oversight and the avoidance of repeat induced abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacovetty, Erica L; Clare, Camille A; Squire, Mary-Beatrice; Kubal, Keshar P; Liou, Sherry; Inchiosa, Mario A

    2018-06-03

    To evaluate the impact of patient counseling, demographics, and contraceptive methods on repeat induced abortion in women attending family planning clinics. A retrospective chart review of repeat induced abortions was performed. The analysis included patients with an initial induced abortion obtained between January 1, 2001, and March 31, 2014, at New York City Health + Hospitals/Metropolitan. The duration of involvement in the family planning program, the use of contraceptive interventions, and 18 patient factors were analyzed for their correlation with the incidence of repeat induced abortions per year of follow-up. A decreased rate of repeat induced abortions was associated with a longer duration of clinical oversight (r 2 =0.449, Pabortions. By determining the patient characteristics that most influence repeat induced abortion rates, providers can best choose the most efficacious method of contraception available. © 2018 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  8. Planning for the Transition to Long-Term Stewardship at Three U.S. Department of Energy-Chicago Operations Office Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moos, L. P.; Ditmars, J. D.; Heston, S. L.; Granzen, G. A.; Holzemer, M. J.; Bennett, D. B.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a pilot study that resulted in the generation of draft planning documents for the upcoming transition from remediation construction to long-term stewardship at three national laboratories managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-Chicago Operations Office (CH). The remediation construction work at these facilities is being completed under the DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM) Program. Once the remediation is complete, the responsibility for long-term stewardship (LTS) of the closed waste sites is expected to be transferred to the DOE organization responsible for managing each of the three facilities (i.e., the site landlord). To prepare for this transfer, an extensive planning effort is required. This pilot study utilized the DOE guidance in effect at the time to (1) develop a series of documents identifying applicable requirements that the LTS Programs will need to satisfy, issues that need to be resolved before the transfer can proceed, and criteria to be used to determine when active remediation is complete and a given site is ready for transfer to the LTS Program; (2) examine alternate structures for possible LTS Programs; and (3) develop draft LTS Implementation Plans. This advanced planning effort yielded a number of observations and lessons learned that are applicable to any facility approaching the end of its remediation construction phase

  9. Exploring emergency department 4-hour target performance and cancelled elective operations: a regression analysis of routinely collected and openly reported NHS trust data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, Brad; Culliford, David; Guerrero-Ludueña, Richard; Monks, Thomas

    2018-05-24

    To quantify the effect of intrahospital patient flow on emergency department (ED) performance targets and indicate if the expectations set by the National Health Service (NHS) England 5-year forward review are realistic in returning emergency services to previous performance levels. Linear regression analysis of routinely reported trust activity and performance data using a series of cross-sectional studies. NHS trusts in England submitting routine nationally reported measures to NHS England. 142 acute non-specialist trusts operating in England between 2012 and 2016. The primary outcome measures were proportion of 4-hour waiting time breaches and cancelled elective operations. Univariate and multivariate linear regression models were used to show relationships between the outcome measures and various measures of trust activity including empty day beds, empty night beds, day bed to night bed ratio, ED conversion ratio and delayed transfers of care. Univariate regression results using the outcome of 4-hour breaches showed clear relationships with empty night beds and ED conversion ratio between 2012 and 2016. The day bed to night bed ratio showed an increasing ability to explain variation in performance between 2015 and 2016. Delayed transfers of care showed little evidence of an association. Multivariate model results indicated that the ability of patient flow variables to explain 4-hour target performance had reduced between 2012 and 2016 (19% to 12%), and had increased in explaining cancelled elective operations (7% to 17%). The flow of patients through trusts is shown to influence ED performance; however, performance has become less explainable by intratrust patient flow between 2012 and 2016. Some commonly stated explanatory factors such as delayed transfers of care showed limited evidence of being related. The results indicate some of the measures proposed by NHS England to reduce pressure on EDs may not have the desired impact on returning services to previous

  10. Fire Department Emergency Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, A.; Bell, K.; Kelly, J.; Hudson, J.

    1997-09-01

    In 1995 the SRS Fire Department published the initial Operations Basis Document (OBD). This document was one of the first of its kind in the DOE complex and was widely distributed and reviewed. This plan described a multi-mission Fire Department which provided fire, emergency medical, hazardous material spill, and technical rescue services

  11. Nuclear units operating improvement by using operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotaru, I.; Bilegan, I.C.

    1997-01-01

    The paper presents how the information experience can be used to improve the operation of nuclear units. This areas include the following items: conservative decision making; supervisory oversight; teamwork; control room distraction; communications; expectations and standards; operator training and fundamental knowledge, procedure quality and adherence; plant status awareness. For each of these topics, the information illustrate which are the principles, the lessons learned from operating experience and the most appropriate exemplifying documents. (authors)

  12. Political and Budgetary Oversight of the Ukrainian Intelligence Community: Processes, Problems and Prospects for Reform

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Petrov, Oleksii

    2007-01-01

    .... Official government documents, news reports and other literature on the intelligence system in Ukraine, as well as studies of intelligence oversight within democracies are the primary sources of data...

  13. Regulatory Oversight of Safety Culture in Nuclear Installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-03-01

    Experience across the international nuclear industry and in other technical fields over the past few decades has demonstrated the importance of a healthy safety culture in maintaining the safety of workers, the public and the environment. Both regulators and the nuclear industry recognize the need for licensees to develop a strong safety culture in order to support successful and sustainable nuclear safety performance. Progress over recent years can be observed in the rapid development of approaches to overseeing licensees' safety culture. This publication follows on and complements earlier publications on safety culture, from the publication Safety Culture (Safety Series No. 75-INSAG-4 (1991)), published after the Chernobyl accident, to the more recently published Safety Requirements on The Management System for Facilities and Activities (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-3 (2006)), which states that the management system is to be used to promote and support a strong safety culture. A number of attempts have been made at both the international and national levels to establish practical approaches to regulatory oversight of safety culture. During 2010 and 2011, two projects were conducted by the IAEA under the scope of the Safe Nuclear Energy - Regional Excellence Programme within the Norwegian Cooperation Programme with Bulgaria and Romania. These projects were implemented at the Bulgarian and Romanian regulatory bodies. They encompassed the development of a specific process to oversee licensees' safety culture, and involved 30 experts from 17 countries and 22 organizations. The IAEA continues to support Member States in the area of safety culture through its projects on safety management and capacity building. This publication addresses the basics of regulatory oversight of safety culture, describes the approaches currently implemented at several regulatory bodies around the world and, based on these examples, proposes a path to developing such a process

  14. Does nanobiotechnology oversight present a uniquely complex challenge to interagency cooperation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karkkainen, Bradley C.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous regulatory and oversight challenges exist in the field of nanobiotechnology. Although these challenges may appear novel and complex, similar issues have plagued environmental regulation since the 1970 s. This article argues that complexity, uncertainty, and regulatory gaps are common problems in environmental regulation, and that the lessons learned and progress made during more than 40 years of environmental regulation can serve as a guidepost for addressing nanobiotechnology regulation and oversight issues.

  15. Poor Government Oversight of Anham and Its Subcontracting Procedures Allowed Questionable Costs To Go Undetected

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-30

    contractor purchasing system review of Anham. Management Comments and Audit Response The Defense Contract Mangement Agency and the U.S. Central... Introduction 1  Background 1  Government Agency Roles and Oversight Responsibilities 4  Objectives 7  Weak Government Oversight Resulted in Significant...Subcontracting Procedures Allowed Questionable Costs To Go Undetected SIGIR 11-022 July 30, 2011 Introduction Since 2003, the United States Government

  16. Ideal Police Oversight and Review: The Next Piece of the Community Policing Puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    oversight. Included in that malpractice are instances of perceived physical and verbal abuse , perceived harassment, failure to take appropriate action...a kid from south Stockton. 1 I. INTRODUCTION A. PROBLEM STATEMENT—BACKGROUND Independent oversight boards are asked to make the complaint...communities with inclusion and investigative transparency when filing complaints of police misconduct and abuse of police powers. In his article “Race

  17. Reinventing oversight in the twenty-first century: the question of capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosso, Christopher; DeLeo, Rob A.; Kay, W. D.

    2011-01-01

    This article addresses a key question emerging from this project based at the University of Minnesota: the fundamental capacity of government to engage in “dynamic oversight” of emergent technologies. This conception of oversight requires additional or new types of capacity for government agencies that must arbitrate conflicts and endow any outcomes with necessary democratic legitimacy. Rethinking oversight thus also requires consideration of the fundamental design and organizational capacity of the regulatory regime in the democratic state.

  18. Annual report of Department of Research Reactor and Tandem Accelerator, JFY2014. Operation, Utilization and Technical Development of JRR-3, JRR-4, NSRR, Tandem Accelerator and RI Production Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osa, Akihiko; Imahashi, Masaki; Hirane, Nobuhiko; Motome, Yuiko; Tayama, Hidekazu; Tamura, Itaru; Harada, Yuko; Sakata, Mami; Kadokura, Masakazu; Takita, Chiharu

    2017-02-01

    The Department of Research Reactor and Tandem Accelerator is in charge of the operation, utilization and technical development of JRR-3 (Japan Research Reactor No.3), JRR-4 (Japan Research Reactor No.4), NSRR (Nuclear Safety Research Reactor), Tandem Accelerator and RI Production Facility. This annual report describes the activities of our department in fiscal year of 2014. We carried out the operation and maintenance, utilization, upgrading of utilization techniques, safety administration, and international cooperation. Also contained are lists of publications, meetings, granted permissions on laws and regulations concerning atomic energy, outcomes in service and technical developments and so on. (author)

  19. Annual report of Department of Research Reactor and Tandem Accelerator, JFY2013. Operation, Utilization and Technical Development of JRR-3, JRR-4, NSRR, Tandem Accelerator and RI Production Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashima, Yoichi; Murayama, Yoji; Nakamura, Kiyoshi; Uno, Yuki; Hirane, Nobuhiko; Ohuchi, Hitoshi; Ishizaki, Nobuhiro; Matsumura, Taichi; Nagahori, Kazuhisa; Harada, Yuko; Kadokura, Masakazu; Machi, Sumire; Takita, Chiharu

    2015-02-01

    The Department of Research Reactor and Tandem Accelerator is in charge of the operation, utilization and technical development of JRR-3(Japan Research Reactor No.3), JRR-4(Japan Research Reactor No.4), NSRR(Nuclear Safety Research Reactor), Tandem Accelerator and RI Production Facility. This annual report describes the activities of our department in fiscal year of 2013. We carried out the operation and maintenance, utilization, upgrading of utilization techniques, safety administration and international cooperation. Also contained are lists of publications, meetings, granted permissions on laws and regulations concerning atomic energy, outcomes in service and technical developments and so on. (author)

  20. Metallurgy Department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risø National Laboratory, Roskilde

    The activities of the Metallurgy Department at Risø during 1981 are described. The work is presented in three chapters: General Materials Research, Technology and Materials Development, Fuel Elements. Furthermore, a survey is given of the department's participation in international collaboration...

  1. Moving forward responsibly: Oversight for the nanotechnology-biology interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzma, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    Challenges and opportunities for appropriate oversight of nanotechnology applied to or derived from biological systems (nano-bio interface) were discussed in a public workshop and dialog hosted by the Center for Science, Technology, and Public Policy of the University of Minnesota on September 15, 2005. This paper discusses the themes that emerged from the workshop, including the importance of analyzing potential gaps in current regulatory systems; deciding upon the general approach taken toward regulation; employing non-regulatory mechanisms for governance; making risk and other studies transparent and available to the public; bolstering mechanisms for public participation in risk analysis; creating more opportunities for meaningful discussion of the social and ethical dimensions of the nano-bio interface; increasing funds for implications and problem-solving research in this area; and having independent and reliable sources for communication. The workshop was successful in identifying ways of moving forward responsibly so that ultimately nanotechnology and its products can succeed in developers', researchers', regulators', and the public's eyes

  2. Quality initiatives: lean approach to improving performance and efficiency in a radiology department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruskal, Jonathan B; Reedy, Allen; Pascal, Laurie; Rosen, Max P; Boiselle, Phillip M

    2012-01-01

    Many hospital radiology departments are adopting "lean" methods developed in automobile manufacturing to improve operational efficiency, eliminate waste, and optimize the value of their services. The lean approach, which emphasizes process analysis, has particular relevance to radiology departments, which depend on a smooth flow of patients and uninterrupted equipment function for efficient operation. However, the application of lean methods to isolated problems is not likely to improve overall efficiency or to produce a sustained improvement. Instead, the authors recommend a gradual but continuous and comprehensive "lean transformation" of work philosophy and workplace culture. Fundamental principles that must consistently be put into action to achieve such a transformation include equal involvement of and equal respect for all staff members, elimination of waste, standardization of work processes, improvement of flow in all processes, use of visual cues to communicate and inform, and use of specific tools to perform targeted data collection and analysis and to implement and guide change. Many categories of lean tools are available to facilitate these tasks: value stream mapping for visualizing the current state of a process and identifying activities that add no value; root cause analysis for determining the fundamental cause of a problem; team charters for planning, guiding, and communicating about change in a specific process; management dashboards for monitoring real-time developments; and a balanced scorecard for strategic oversight and planning in the areas of finance, customer service, internal operations, and staff development. © RSNA, 2012.

  3. 7 CFR 1291.10 - Reporting and oversight requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 1291.10 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SPECIALTY... contact person for each project with telephone number and email address. (7) Additional Information...

  4. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project independent direction and oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blazek, M.L.; Power, M.

    1991-01-01

    Hanford was selected in 1942 as one of the sites for the Manhattan Project. It produced plutonium for one of the world's first nuclear weapons. The US Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors continued to make plutonium for nuclear weapons at Hanford for more than four decades. In the early days of Hanford operations, radioactive materials routinely were released to the environment by many processes. The DOE disclosed documents about these releases in 1986. In 1987, Washington, Oregon, and regional Indian tribes gathered an independent panel of experts. This group recommended dose reconstruction and health effects feasibility studies. Later that year, DOE hired Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to reconstruct potential public radiation doses from Hanford's past releases of radioactive material. The DOE agreed with the states and tribes that project direction would come from an independent technical steering panel (TSP). This approach was critical to gain public credibility for the project and the science. The TSP directs the project and makes policy. That is now clear - but, it was hard-earned. Conducting science in an open public process is new, challenging, and clearly worthwhile. The panel's product is good science that is believed and accepted by the public - our client

  5. Department of Energy contract/business management initiatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, S.B.

    1992-01-01

    More than 40 years ago the Department of Energy (DOE) developed a unique contractual instrument called a management and operating contract, to be used for the operation of our weapons production plants and the national laboratories. The contracts are very broad in scope. There is no output objective set forth in the contract. There are no cost targets, nor any contractually motivated cost objectives. Performance is measured against criteria which is often subjective. The time has come to make changes in the structure of these contracts to reflect changes in the work being performed and to make the contractors more accountable. DOE's work now, at these sites, and for years to come, consists largely of major project-type work such as environmental restoration which lends itself to a more definitized structure. DOE is in the process of implementing a work order authorization control system (task order contracting) under its management and operating contracts. Target date for implementation for our for-profit contractors is FY 1992, and for the non-profit contractors is FY 1993. Under this system, requirements will be contracted for as entities of work and contractors will be held accountable for performance, schedules and costs. Billings, payments and award fee will be tied to the specific planning objectives set forth in the tasks, including costs and schedules. Incentives will be provided for outstanding performance, fee may be withheld if performance is unacceptable. These changes will necessitate more DOE oversight of contractor operations and sound business support systems, as well as effective management disciplines. US DOE will perform business management reviews to assure contractors' systems are adequate and to support this form of contracting. The Contractor Procurement Systems Review Program will be enhanced to assure good subcontractor procurement practices

  6. U.S. Department of Education Indirect Cost Determination Guidance for State and Local Government Agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Education, Washington, DC. Office of the Chief Financial and Chief Information Officer.

    This guide provides new direction in financial management and oversight practices for accounting and charging administrative costs as they relate to programs administered by the U.S. Department of Education. The document is divided into six sections. Section 1, which presents general information, offers details on definitions; indirect-cost rates;…

  7. Experience with Regulatory Strategies in Nuclear Power Oversight. Part 1: An International Exploratory Study. Part 2: Workshop Discussions and Conclusions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melber, Barbara [Melber Consulting, Seattle, WA (United States); Durbin, Nancy E. [Nancy E. Durbin Consulting, Kirkland, WA (United States); Tael, Irene (ed.) [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-03-01

    This report presents the results of a study which explored the use of six different regulatory strategies for oversight of commercial nuclear power facilities: prescriptive, case-based, outcome-based, risk-based, process-based, and self-assessment strategies. Information was collected on experiences with the use of these different regulatory strategies from experts from nuclear regulatory agencies in Canada, Finland, Spain, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the United States. Systematic, structured open-ended interviews with expert regulators with extensive experience were used in order to understand how regulatory strategies are applied in practice. Common patterns were identified regarding: Experts' perspectives on the major benefits and difficulties of using specific regulatory strategies; Experts' experiences with using regulatory strategies for three areas of oversight-design and modifications, quality systems, and training and qualifications; Expert views of the consequences of different regulatory strategies; Issues that emerged in the interviews regarding regulatory strategies. The major benefit of a prescriptive strategy was that it is clear about requirements and expectations. The major difficulties were that it takes responsibility away from the licensee, it requires a high use of regulator resources and is rigid and difficult to change. A case-based strategy had the key benefit of flexibility for adapting regulatory responses to unique situations, but the difficulties of being considered arbitrary, inconsistent, and unfair and requiring heavy resource use. An outcome-based strategy had the main benefit of allowing licensees to decide the best way to operate m order to meet safety goals, but the major difficulty of identifying appropriate ways to measure safety performance. The major benefit of a risk strategy was its use co prioritize safety issues and allocate resources. However, it was considered inappropriate to use as a stand alone strategy

  8. Experience with Regulatory Strategies in Nuclear Power Oversight. Part 1: An International Exploratory Study. Part 2: Workshop Discussions and Conclusions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melber, Barbara; Durbin, Nancy E.; Tael, Irene

    2005-03-01

    This report presents the results of a study which explored the use of six different regulatory strategies for oversight of commercial nuclear power facilities: prescriptive, case-based, outcome-based, risk-based, process-based, and self-assessment strategies. Information was collected on experiences with the use of these different regulatory strategies from experts from nuclear regulatory agencies in Canada, Finland, Spain, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the United States. Systematic, structured open-ended interviews with expert regulators with extensive experience were used in order to understand how regulatory strategies are applied in practice. Common patterns were identified regarding: Experts' perspectives on the major benefits and difficulties of using specific regulatory strategies; Experts' experiences with using regulatory strategies for three areas of oversight-design and modifications, quality systems, and training and qualifications; Expert views of the consequences of different regulatory strategies; Issues that emerged in the interviews regarding regulatory strategies. The major benefit of a prescriptive strategy was that it is clear about requirements and expectations. The major difficulties were that it takes responsibility away from the licensee, it requires a high use of regulator resources and is rigid and difficult to change. A case-based strategy had the key benefit of flexibility for adapting regulatory responses to unique situations, but the difficulties of being considered arbitrary, inconsistent, and unfair and requiring heavy resource use. An outcome-based strategy had the main benefit of allowing licensees to decide the best way to operate m order to meet safety goals, but the major difficulty of identifying appropriate ways to measure safety performance. The major benefit of a risk strategy was its use co prioritize safety issues and allocate resources. However, it was considered inappropriate to use as a stand alone strategy and a

  9. Chemical Processing Department monthly report for February 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1957-03-21

    This report from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO, discusses the following: Production operation, purex operation, redox operation, finished products operation, power and general maintenance operation, financial operation, facilities engineering operation, research and engineering operation, and employee relations operation.

  10. Recommendations for Nanomedicine Human Subjects Research Oversight: An Evolutionary Approach for an Emerging Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatehi, Leili; Wolf, Susan M.; McCullough, Jeffrey; Hall, Ralph; Lawrenz, Frances; Kahn, Jeffrey P.; Jones, Cortney; Campbell, Stephen A.; Dresser, Rebecca S.; Erdman, Arthur G.; Haynes, Christy L.; Hoerr, Robert A.; Hogle, Linda F.; Keane, Moira A.; Khushf, George; King, Nancy M.P.; Kokkoli, Efrosini; Marchant, Gary; Maynard, Andrew D.; Philbert, Martin; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy; Siegel, Ronald A.; Wickline, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    The nanomedicine field is fast evolving toward complex, “active,” and interactive formulations. Like many emerging technologies, nanomedicine raises questions of how human subjects research (HSR) should be conducted and the adequacy of current oversight, as well as how to integrate concerns over occupational, bystander, and environmental exposures. The history of oversight for HSR investigating emerging technologies is a patchwork quilt without systematic justification of when ordinary oversight for HSR is enough versus when added oversight is warranted. Nanomedicine HSR provides an occasion to think systematically about appropriate oversight, especially early in the evolution of a technology, when hazard and risk information may remain incomplete. This paper presents the consensus recommendations of a multidisciplinary, NIH-funded project group, to ensure a science-based and ethically informed approach to HSR issues in nanomedicine, and integrate HSR analysis with analysis of occupational, bystander, and environmental concerns. We recommend creating two bodies, an interagency Human Subjects Research in Nanomedicine (HSR/N) Working Group and a Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Nanomedicine (SAC/N). HSR/N and SAC/N should perform 3 primary functions: (1) analysis of the attributes and subsets of nanomedicine interventions that raise HSR challenges and current gaps in oversight; (2) providing advice to relevant agencies and institutional bodies on the HSR issues, as well as federal and federal-institutional coordination; and (3) gathering and analyzing information on HSR issues as they emerge in nanomedicine. HSR/N and SAC/N will create a home for HSR analysis and coordination in DHHS (the key agency for relevant HSR oversight), optimize federal and institutional approaches, and allow HSR review to evolve with greater knowledge about nanomedicine interventions and greater clarity about attributes of concern. PMID:23289677

  11. Twenty years of operation of the Radioisotope Department of the 3rd Medical Clinic, Faculty of General Medicine, Charles University in Prague

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapitola, J.

    1983-01-01

    Twenty years ago a radioisotope department was established in the old building of the 3rd Medical Clinic in Prague 2. The department is suitably placed and meets present requirements. It was set up as part of the 3rd Medical Clinic and of the Laboratory for endocrinology and Metabolism which gave it its main orientation and scope. Its present scope is much broader. In the twenty years since it was established 115,800 examinations were carried out, some 40 examination methods were introduced, 103 publications published, members of the department were co-authors of another 113 publications, they completed 11 research projects. The production of the department represents a substantial part of laboratory material especially in the diagnosis of endocrinopathy and metabolic disorders at the Clinic and is a significant part of the material of a number of research projects. The department has significantly contributed to the development of nuclear medicine in the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic in thyroid diagnosis, by the first introduction of radioimmunoassay methods, by the introduction of certain other special examination and laboratory methods and is currently taking part in the fulfilment of tasks given by the zoning of nuclear medicine in health care in Czechoslovakia in general and in Prague in particular. (author)

  12. Chemical Processing Department monthly report, October 1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, J. F.; Johnson, W. E.; Reinker, P. H.; Warren, J. H.; McCullugh, R. W.; Harmon, M. K.; Gartin, W. J.; LaFollette, T. G.; Shaw, H. P.; Frank, W. S.; Grim, K. G.; Warren, J. H.

    1963-11-21

    This report, for October 1963 from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO, discusses the following: Production operation; Purex and Redox operation; Finished products operation; maintenance; Financial operations; facilities engineering; research; employee relations; weapons manufacturing operation; and safety and security.

  13. 1 November 2012 - Signature of the Co-operation Agreement between the Administrative Department of Science, Technology and Innovation (COLCIENCIAS) of Colombia and the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High-Energy Physics and related technologies by CERN Director-General R. Heuer, witnessed by Ambassador of Colombia to Switzerland C. Turbay Quintero.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    1 November 2012 - Signature of the Co-operation Agreement between the Administrative Department of Science, Technology and Innovation (COLCIENCIAS) of Colombia and the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High-Energy Physics and related technologies by CERN Director-General R. Heuer, witnessed by Ambassador of Colombia to Switzerland C. Turbay Quintero.

  14. DIII-D Research Operations annual report to the US Department of Energy, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991. Magnetic Fusion Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonen, T.C.; Evans, T.E. [eds.

    1992-03-01

    This report discusses the following topics on Doublet-3 research operations: DIII-D Program Overview; Boundary Plasma Research Program/Scientific Progress; Radio Frequency Heating and Current Drive; Core Physics; DIII-D Operations; Program Development; Support Services; ITER Contributions; Burning Plasma Experiment Contributions; and Collaborative Efforts.

  15. Design and operating experience on the U.S. Department of Energy Experimental Mod-O 100 kW Wind Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasgow, J. C.; Birchenough, A. G.

    1978-01-01

    The Mod-O 100 kW Experimental Wind Turbine was designed and fabricated by NASA, as part of the Federal Wind Energy Program, to assess technology requirements and engineering problems of large wind turbines. The machine became operational in October 1975 and has demonstrated successful operation in all of its design modes. During the course of its operations the machine has generated a wealth of experimental data and has served as a prototype developmental test bed for the Mod-OA operational wind turbines which are currently used on utility networks. This paper describes the mechanical and control systems as they evolved in operational tests and describes some of the experience with various systems in the downwind rotor configuration.

  16. Planning/Budgeting/Evaluation Manual. An Operation Manual for Staff Members Concerning the Implementation of the Planning/Budgeting/Evaluation Cycle Within the Missouri State Department of Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri State Dept. of Education, Jefferson City.

    This manual identifies and systematizes the sequence of events necessary for the State Department of Education to effectively plan, implement, and evaluate its varied programs. The report (1) describes the cycle, (2) outlines the flow of events, (3) delineates offices responsible for each event, and (4) discusses overlapping phases of event cycles…

  17. Regulatory Oversight of Safety Culture in Finland: A Systemic Approach to Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oedewald, P.; Väisäsvaara, J.

    2016-01-01

    In Finland the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority STUK specifies detailed regulatory requirements for good safety culture. Both the requirements and the practical safety culture oversight activities reflect a systemic approach to safety: the interconnections between the technical, human and organizational factors receive special attention. The conference paper aims to show how the oversight of safety culture can be integrated into everyday oversight activities. The paper also emphasises that the scope of the safety culture oversight is not specific safety culture activities of the licencees, but rather the overall functioning of the licence holder or the new build project organization from safety point of view. The regulatory approach towards human and organizational factors and safety culture has evolved throughout the years of nuclear energy production in Finland. Especially the recent new build projects have highlighted the need to systematically pay attention to the non-technical aspects of safety as it has become obvious how the HOF issues can affect the design processes and quality of construction work. Current regulatory guides include a set of safety culture related requirements. The requirements are binding to the licence holders and they set both generic and specific demands on the licencee to understand, monitor and to develop safety culture of their own organization but also that of their supplier network. The requirements set for the licence holders has facilitated the need to develop the regulator’s safety culture oversight practices towards a proactive and systemic approach.

  18. Department o

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2016-10-31

    Oct 31, 2016 ... Department of Urban and Regional Planning, University of Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria. 2 ... Geospatial techniques were used for this study; data from primary and secondary source ... development, for instance, Nigeria cities .... (road network, road medians and water ..... Countries: A Case Study of Nigeria.

  19. Kansas Department of Transportation's enterprise energy and carbon accounting and utility research phase 1B : embodied and operational energy and carbon in buildings and vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Many organizations have become concerned about the environmental impact of their facilities and : operations. In order to lessen environmental impact, quantitative assessment of practice based on : improvements from a baseline condition is needed. Th...

  20. Kansas Department of Transportation's enterprise energy and carbon accounting and utility research phase 1B : embodied and operational energy and carbon in buildings and vehicles : technical summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Many organizations have become concerned about the environmental impact of their facilities and operations. In order to lessen environmental impact, quantitative assessment of practice based on improvements from a baseline condition is needed. The Ka...

  1. Kansas Department of Transportation enterprise energy and carbon accounting and utility usage research phase 2B : improving energy and fuel efficiencies in KDOT operations, [technical summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Reducing the environmental impact of facilities and operations has become an important function for many organizations. In many cases, such as utility and fuel use, reducing these impacts can also be coupled to financial savings. The Kansas Departmen...

  2. Kansas Department of Transportation enterprise energy and carbon accounting and utility usage research phase 2B : improving energy and fuel efficiencies in KDOT operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Reducing the environmental impact of facilities and operations has become an important function for many organizations. In many : cases, such as utility and fuel use, reducing these impacts can also be coupled to financial savings. The Kansas Departm...

  3. Transforming the Department of State: Adapting Operational Capacities and Capabilities to the Post-9/11 Reality, Evolving Interagency Responsibilities, and the Challenges of the 21st Century

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vancio, Willian J

    2006-01-01

    .... Seams and gaps in policy and operations are magnified during times of conflict. Most experts agree that future conflicts will be asymmetrical in nature, with such factors becoming more visible and noticeable than during peacetime...

  4. Continued oversight of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peake, R. Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed environmental standards applicable to the disposal of defence-related transuranic wastes at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). By statute, EPA also serves as the regulator and implements these standards at WIPP, which has been in operation since 1999. The general environmental standards are set forth in the Agency's 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 191 Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for the Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes (US NARA, 1985). These standards are implemented by site-specific compliance criteria at 40 CFR 194 (US NARA, 1996). The repository waste area is ∼650 meters below ground surface in a thick bedded salt formation that dips from west to east at ∼1 deg.. WIPP is located in the Chihuahuan Desert of south-eastern New Mexico, where the annual precipitation averages between 25 and 40 centimetres and there is high evapotranspiration. Much of the area around WIPP is federal land, managed by the Bureau of Land Management, and the area is sparsely populated. The transuranic waste disposed of at WIPP consists of materials such as radioactive sludges, soils and laboratory materials (e.g. chemical mixtures, contaminated glove boxes, paper and glass). Wastes are typically not treated unless necessary for shipping purposes (e.g. to limit hydrogen build-up). The waste is contaminated with plutonium, americium and other radionuclides, including some caesium and strontium. Transuranic waste is defined as waste with radionuclides heavier than uranium containing more than 3 700 Bq (100 nanocuries) of alpha-emitting transuranic isotopes per gram of waste; isotopes must have half-lives greater than 20 years. The WIPP Land Withdrawal Act limits the total disposal volume to ∼177 000 cubic meters (6.2 million cubic feet) and creates two categories of waste based on operational

  5. 7 CFR 1290.9 - Reporting and oversight requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... project with telephone number and e-mail address. (c) A final SF-269A “Financial Status Report (Short Form... 1290.9 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SPECIALTY...

  6. Biological Select Agents and Toxins: Risk-Based Assessment Management and Oversight.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnett, LouAnn Crawford; Brodsky, Benjamin H.

    2016-12-01

    Sandia National Laboratories' International Biological and Chemical Threat Reduction (SNL/IBCTR) conducted, on behalf of the Federal Select Agent Program (FSAP), a review of risk assessment in modern select agent laboratories. This review and analysis consisted of literature review, interviews of FSAP staff, entities regulated by FSAP, and deliberations of an expert panel. Additionally, SNL/IBCTR reviewed oversight mechanisms used by industries, US agencies, and other countries for high-consequence risks (e.g, nuclear, chemical, or biological materials, aviation, off-shore drilling, etc.) to determine if alternate oversight mechanisms existed that might be applicable to FSAP oversight of biological select agents and toxins. This report contains five findings, based on these reviews and analyses, with recommendations and suggested actions for FSAP to consider.

  7. Homeland security and public health: role of the Department of Veterans Affairs, the US Department of Homeland Security, and implications for the public health community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Kristi L

    2003-01-01

    The terrorist attacks of 11 September 2001 led to the largest US Government transformation since the formation of the Department of Defense following World War II. More than 22 different agencies, in whole or in part, and >170,000 employees were reorganized to form a new Cabinet-level Department of Homeland Security (DHS), with the primary mission to protect the American homeland. Legislation enacted in November 2002 transferred the entire Federal Emergency Management Agency and several Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) assets to DHS, including the Office of Emergency Response, and oversight for the National Disaster Medical System, Strategic National Stockpile, and Metropolitan Medical Response System. This created a potential separation of "health" and "medical" assets between the DHS and HHS. A subsequent presidential directive mandated the development of a National Incident Management System and an all-hazard National Response Plan. While no Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) assets were targeted for transfer, the VA remains the largest integrated healthcare system in the nation with important support roles in homeland security that complement its primary mission to provide care to veterans. The Emergency Management Strategic Healthcare Group (EMSHG) within the VA's medical component, the Veteran Health Administration (VHA), is the executive agent for the VA's Fourth Mission, emergency management. In addition to providing comprehensive emergency management services to the VA, the EMSHG coordinates medical back-up to the Department of Defense, and assists the public via the National Disaster Medical System and the National Response Plan. This article describes the VA's role in homeland security and disasters, and provides an overview of the ongoing organizational and operational changes introduced by the formation of the new DHS. Challenges and opportunities for public health are highlighted.

  8. Annual Site Environmental Report, Department of Energy Operations at the Energy Technology Engineering Center – Area IV, Santa Susana Field Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazee, Brad [North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hay, Scott [North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wondolleck, John [North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sorrels, Earl [North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rutherford, Phil [North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Dassler, David [North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jones, John [North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2014 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the DOE at Area IV of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The ETEC, a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, operation and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder reactor components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward environmental restoration and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Liquid metal research and development ended in 2002. Since May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV have been suspended by the DOE, but the environmental monitoring and characterization programs have continued. Results of the radiological monitoring program continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  9. Annual report of Department of Research Reactor and Tandem Accelerator, JFY2012. Operation, utilization and technical development of JRR-3, JRR-4, NSRR, Tandem Accelerator and RI Production Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murayama, Yoji; Ishii, Tetsuro; Nakamura, Kiyoshi; Uno, Yuki; Ishikuro, Yasuhiro; Kawashima, Kazuhito; Ishizaki, Nobuhiro; Matsumura, Taichi; Nagahori, Kazuhisa; Odauchi, Shouji; Maruo, Takeshi

    2014-03-01

    The Department of Research Reactor and Tandem Accelerator is in charge of the operation, utilization and technical development of JRR-3(Japan Research Reactor No.3), JRR-4(Japan Research Reactor No.4), NSRR(Nuclear Safety Research Reactor), Tandem Accelerator and RI Production Facility. This annual report describes a summary of activities of services and technical developments carried out in the period between April 1, 2012 and March 31, 2013. The activities were categorized into five service/development fields: (1) Operation and maintenance of research reactors and tandem accelerator, (2) Utilization of research reactors and tandem accelerator, (3) Upgrading of utilization techniques of research reactors and tandem accelerator, (4) Safety administration for department of research reactor and tandem accelerator, (5) International cooperation. Also contained are lists of publications, meetings, granted permissions on laws and regulations concerning atomic energy, number of staff members dispatched to Fukushima for the technical assistance, outcomes in service and technical developments and so on. (author)

  10. Defense Transformation: Background and Oversight Issues for Congress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O'Rourke, Ronald

    2004-01-01

    .... The Administration's vision for defense transformation calls for shifting the U.S. military toward a greater reliance on joint operations, network-centric warfare, effects-based operations, speed and agility, and precision application of firepower...

  11. Practical operation of technical department plants for the determination of the efficiency of bio gas according to the regulation VDI 4630; Praxisbetrieb von Technikumsanlagen zur Biogaspotenzialbestimmung gemaess VDI-Richtlinie 4630

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelles, M.; Banemann, D.; Engler, N. [Univ. Rostock (Germany). Inst. fuer Umweltingenieurwesen; Fritz, T. [HAWK, FH Hildesheim Holzminden Goettingen (Germany). Fachgebiet Technischer Umweltschutz; Ramhold, D. [IS Forschungsgesellschaft mbH (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    For the operation of biological gas facilities, the practice-orientated determination of gas yields is of great importance regarding to the input. The University of Rostock (Rostock, Federal Republic of Germany) and the University of Applied Sciences and Arts (Hildesheim, Federal Republic of Germany) developed the GRW procedure (GRW = Goettingen, Rostock, Wahlstedt) for the determination of yields of bio gas. The pilot plant successfully is operated for two years in Goettingen. Since the midth of 2006, a further plant runs at the research association of the Schaumann group in Wahlstedt (Federal Republic of Germany) in the course of a research co-operation. At present, a further developed plant is built in the new refuse economy technical school and bio energy technical department at the University of Rostock. The operation is taken up in the fourth quarter of the year 2007. The authors of the contribution under consideration report on the methodology, the practice-oriented conversion and results from the operation of the plants in the bio gas technical department.

  12. Adverse weather impact on aviation safety, investigation and oversight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    A brief review of the weather factors that effect aviation safety with respect to U.S. Coast Guard operations is presented. Precise meteorological information is an absolute necessity to the Coast Guard which must conduct life saving and rescue operations under the worst of weather conditions. Many times the weather conditions in which they operate are the cause of or a contributing factor to the predicament from which they must execute a rescue operation.

  13. Institutional Oversight of Occupational Health and Safety for Research Programs Involving Biohazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyson, Melissa C; Carpenter, Calvin B; Colby, Lesley A

    2017-06-01

    Research with hazardous biologic materials (biohazards) is essential to the progress of medicine and science. The field of microbiology has rapidly advanced over the years, partially due to the development of new scientific methods such as recombinant DNA technology, synthetic biology, viral vectors, and the use of genetically modified animals. This research poses a potential risk to personnel as well as the public and the environment. Institutions must have appropriate oversight and take appropriate steps to mitigate the risks of working with these biologic hazards. This article will review responsibilities for institutional oversight of occupational health and safety for research involving biologic hazards.

  14. A Grey Area: Congressional Oversight of the Middle Ground Between Title 10 and Title 50

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    1950’s, just a few short years after the Agency’s creation.1 With Watergate fresh on the country’s mind having just witnessed President Nixon’s...3 Congressional Oversight Legislative Overview Congressional oversight is not a result of modern scandals as one might think; it is as old as the...President Reagan’s tenure, however, members of Congress believed that he had overstepped his authority in the so-called “Iran-Contra affair.” The scandal

  15. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) MANAGEMENT OF THE HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT and IMMOBILIZATION PLANT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SHRADER, T.A.

    2005-01-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of River Protection is currently overseeing the construction of the new Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (more commonly referred to as the Waste Treatment Plant). In December 2000, a contract was awarded to Bechtel National, Inc. for the design, construction, and commissioning of the $5.8 billion facility to treat and vitrify a significant portion of the waste currently stored in large underground tanks on the Hanford Site. As the owner, the Office of River Protection has developed an organization to oversee the design, construction, and commissioning of the facility. A Federal Project Director is responsible for all aspects of the project, including safety, design, construction, commissioning; and the baseline (scope, cost, and schedule). The Project Director reports to the Manager of the Office of River Protection and recommends changes to the contract requirements, safety basis documents, or the baseline. Approximately 30 engineers, scientists, and other support personnel have been assigned to a unique organization that supports the Federal Project Director in providing oversight of each phase of the project (i.e., design, construction, and commissioning). The organization includes an Engineering Division, a Programs and Projects Division, a Safety Authorization Basis Team, and an Operations and Commissioning Team. This organization is unique within the Department of Energy and provides a focused team to resolve issues of safety, cost, schedule, technical design changes, and construction. This paper will describe this team and show how the Office of River Protection utilizes this oversight team to manage this complex, accelerated project. The size and technical complexity of the facility poses unique challenges for safety, permitting, commissioning, engineering, and baseline control. A robust training and qualification program has been developed that will insure the Departmental personnel working closely

  16. 78 FR 12369 - United States Government Policy for Institutional Oversight of Life Sciences Dual Use Research of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-22

    ... Oversight of Life Sciences Dual Use Research of Concern AGENCY: Office of Science and Technology Policy... comments on the proposed United States Government Policy for Institutional Oversight of Life Sciences Dual... requirements for certain categories of life sciences research at institutions that accept Federal funding for...

  17. Method or Madness: Federal Oversight Structures for Critical Infrastructure Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    daughters, Amber and Lauren, who always say just the right things to keep this all in perspective. Bike rides and soccer games helped to provide just...security perspective, is shared by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Department of Health and Human Services. The USDA monitors the meat ... poultry , and egg sectors, while HHS oversees production of all other food products.90 HHS implements a two-prong strategy to achieve a safe and

  18. Contemporary Approaches to Safety Culture: Lessons from Developing a Regulatory Oversight Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goebel, V.; Heppell-Masys, K.

    2016-01-01

    The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) regulates the use of nuclear energy and materials to protect health, safety, security and the environment, and to implement Canada’s international commitments on the peaceful use of nuclear energy; and to disseminate objective scientific, technical and regulatory information to the public. In the late 1990s, the CNSC conducted research into an Organization and Management (O&M) assessment method. Based on this research the CNSC conducted O&M assessments at all Canadian nuclear power plants and conducted additional assessments of nuclear research and uranium mine and mill operations. The results of these assessments were presented to licencees and used to inform their ongoing actions related to safety culture. Additional safety culture outreach and oversight activities provided licencees with opportunities to develop effective safety culture assessment methods, to share best practices across industry, and to strive for continual improvement of their organizations. Recent changes to the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) management system standard have resulted in the inclusion of requirements associated to safety culture and human performance. Representatives from several sectors of Canada’s nuclear industry, as well as participation from regulators such as the CNSC took part to the development of this consensus standard. Specifically, these requirements focus on monitoring and understanding safety culture, integrating safety into all of the requirements of the management system, committing workers to adhere to the management system and supporting excellence in workers’ performance. The CNSC is currently developing a regulatory document on safety culture which includes key concepts applicable to all licencees and specific requirements related to self-assessment, and additional guidance for nuclear power plants. Developing a regulatory document on safety culture requires consultation and fact finding initiatives at

  19. Final environmental assessment for the U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations receipt and storage of uranium materials from the Fernald Environmental Management Project site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-06-01

    Through a series of material transfers and sales agreements over the past 6 to 8 years, the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) has reduced its nuclear material inventory from 14,500 to approximately 6,800 metric tons of uranium (MTU). This effort is part of the US Department of energy`s (DOE`s) decision to change the mission of the FEMP site; it is currently shut down and the site is being remediated. This EA focuses on the receipt and storage of uranium materials at various DOE-ORO sites. The packaging and transportation of FEMP uranium material has been evaluated in previous NEPA and other environmental evaluations. A summary of these evaluation efforts is included as Appendix A. The material would be packaged in US Department of Transportation-approved shipping containers and removed from the FEMP site and transported to another site for storage. The Ohio Field Office will assume responsibility for environmental analyses and documentation for packaging and transport of the material as part of the remediation of the site, and ORO is preparing this EA for receipt and storage at one or more sites.

  20. Final environmental assessment for the U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations receipt and storage of uranium materials from the Fernald Environmental Management Project site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Through a series of material transfers and sales agreements over the past 6 to 8 years, the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) has reduced its nuclear material inventory from 14,500 to approximately 6,800 metric tons of uranium (MTU). This effort is part of the US Department of energy's (DOE's) decision to change the mission of the FEMP site; it is currently shut down and the site is being remediated. This EA focuses on the receipt and storage of uranium materials at various DOE-ORO sites. The packaging and transportation of FEMP uranium material has been evaluated in previous NEPA and other environmental evaluations. A summary of these evaluation efforts is included as Appendix A. The material would be packaged in US Department of Transportation-approved shipping containers and removed from the FEMP site and transported to another site for storage. The Ohio Field Office will assume responsibility for environmental analyses and documentation for packaging and transport of the material as part of the remediation of the site, and ORO is preparing this EA for receipt and storage at one or more sites

  1. DOC/WSNSO [Department of Commerce/Weather Service Nuclear Support Office] operational support to Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, P.

    1989-01-01

    The National Weather Service (NWS) is an agency of the Department of Commerce. The NWS has hundreds of weather offices throughout the United States. The Weather Service Nuclear Support Office (WSNSO) is a highly specialized unit of NWS that provides direct support to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) underground nuclear testing program. The WSNSO has been associated with the DOE for >33 yr. As a result of the unique relationship with the DOE, all WSNSO emergency response meteorologists and meteorological technicians are allowed access to classified material. Meteorological phenomena play a significant role during a Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) event, and WSNSO meteorologists provide direct support to ARAC. The marriage of state-of-the-art computer systems together with proven technology provides the on-scene WSNSO meteorologist with essentially a portable fully equipped, fully functional, advanced NWS weather station. The WSNSO's emergency response personnel and hardware are at the ready and can be mobilized within 2 h. WSNSO can provide on-scene weather forecasts and critical weather data collection whenever and wherever necessary

  2. Role of the Regulatory Body in Implementing Defence in Depth in Nuclear Installations - Regulatory Oversight in Egypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sheikh, B. M., E-mail: badawymel@yahoo.com [Egyptian Nuclear and Radiological Regulatory Authority Cairo (Egypt)

    2014-10-15

    The fundamental objective of all nuclear safety regulatory bodies is to ensure that nuclear facilities are operated at all times in an acceptably safe manner including the safe conduct of decommissioning activities. Defence in depth is recognized as one of the fundamental safety principles that underlie the safety of nuclear power plants. Defence in depth is implemented to provide a graded protection against a wide variety of transients, incidents and accidents, including equipment failures and human errors within nuclear power plants and events initiated outside plants. The Regulator Body plays an important role in implementing defence in depth in nuclear installations in the context of a clear allocation of responsibilities with an operating organization. This role starting with setting safety objectives and by its own independent review and technical assessment of the safety justifications provided by the operating organization in addition to safety culture investigating within relevant organizations. This paper briefly reviews this role in normal operation and post accidents, and its effects on overall nuclear safety in nuclear installations with reference to Egyptian regulatory oversight. (author)

  3. Chemical Processing Department monthly report, June 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1958-07-22

    This report for June 1958, from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO, discusses the following: Production operation; Purex and Redox operation; Finished products operation; maintenance; Financial operations; facilities engineering; research; and employee relations.

  4. Chemical Processing Department monthly report, March 1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1961-04-21

    This report for March 1961, from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO, discusses the following: Production operation; Purex and Redox operation; Finished products operation; maintenance: Financial operations; facilities engineering; research; and employee relations.

  5. [Implementation of the program of "Collaborative Development of Advanced Practical Education to Train Pharmacists in Leadership" under the joint operation of the pharmaceutical departments in fourteen national universities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Kazumasa; Tamura, Satoru; Kobayashi, Motomasa

    2012-01-01

    "Collaborative Development of Advanced Practical Education Program to Train Pharmacists with Leadership" applied jointly by the pharmaceutical departments of fourteen national universities was selected to receive the special expenditure support of Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology for fiscal year 2010 under "the Training of Highly Skillful Professionals and Improvement of the Quality of the Function of Professional Education". This project is to promote the collaborative development of the educational program which will make it possible to further advance and substantiate the education of pharmacists in the six year course of the pharmaceutical department for the ultimate purpose to introduce pharmacists with leadership who can play an active role and fill in a leadership position in a wide range of responsibilities into the society which, more and more, has come to expect pharmacy to take the initiative in acting against health hazards caused by infections, foods and environmental pollution as well as to meet the diversification of healthcare. To be more specific, this project is to try and evaluate the following programs repeatedly based on the plan-do-check-act (PDCA) cycle: 1) Practical medical and pharmaceutical education program; 2) Program concerning research on long term themes and advanced education; 3) Program concerning training and education of SPs (standardized patients or simulated patients) and PBL (problem-based learning) tutorial education; and 4) Program concerning the method of evaluation of education. Through this repeated trial and evaluation, this project ultimately seeks to construct a highly effective practical educational program which integrates each university's achievements and educational attempts rich in originality.

  6. Verifying Operational and Developmental Air Force Weather Cloud Analysis and Forecast Products Using Lidar Data from Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, E. P.

    2017-12-01

    Air Force Weather has developed various cloud analysis and forecast products designed to support global Department of Defense (DoD) missions. A World-Wide Merged Cloud Analysis (WWMCA) and short term Advected Cloud (ADVCLD) forecast is generated hourly using data from 16 geostationary and polar-orbiting satellites. Additionally, WWMCA and Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) data are used in a statistical long-term (out to five days) cloud forecast model known as the Diagnostic Cloud Forecast (DCF). The WWMCA and ADVCLD are generated on the same polar stereographic 24 km grid for each hemisphere, whereas the DCF is generated on the same grid as its parent NWP model. When verifying the cloud forecast models, the goal is to understand not only the ability to detect cloud, but also the ability to assign it to the correct vertical layer. ADVCLD and DCF forecasts traditionally have been verified using WWMCA data as truth, but this might over-inflate the performance of those models because WWMCA also is a primary input dataset for those models. Because of this, in recent years, a WWMCA Reanalysis product has been developed, but this too is not a fully independent dataset. This year, work has been done to incorporate data from external, independent sources to verify not only the cloud forecast products, but the WWMCA data itself. One such dataset that has been useful for examining the 3-D performance of the cloud analysis and forecast models is Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) data from various sites around the globe. This presentation will focus on the use of the Department of Energy (DoE) ARM data to verify Air Force Weather cloud analysis and forecast products. Results will be presented to show relative strengths and weaknesses of the analyses and forecasts.

  7. Fuels Preparation Department monthly report, May 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1958-06-17

    This report describes the operation of the fuels preparation department for the month of May, 1958. Manufacturing employee relations, process development, plant improvements, and financial operations are discussed.

  8. Environmental Assessment for the Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment Unit at the US Department of Energy's Mound Plant, Miamisburg, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    The glass melter would thermally treat mixed waste (hazardous waste contaminated with radioactive constituents largely tritium, Pu-238, and/or Th-230) that was generated at the Mound Plant and is now in storage, by stabilizing the waste in glass blocks. Depending on the radiation level of the waste, the glass melter may operate for 1 to 6 years. Two onsite alternatives and seven offsite alternatives were considered. This environmental assessment indicates that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the human environment according to NEPA, and therefore the finding of no significant impact is made, obviating the need for an environmental impact statement

  9. Program desk manual for occupational safety and health -- U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations, Office of Environment Safety and Health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musen, L.G.

    1998-01-01

    The format of this manual is designed to make this valuable information easily accessible to the user as well as enjoyable to read. Each chapter contains common information such as Purpose, Scope, Policy and References, as well as information unique to the topic at hand. This manual can also be provided on a CD or Hanford Internet. Major topics include: Organization and program for operational safety; Occupational medicine; Construction and demolition; Material handling and storage; Hoisting and rigging; Explosives; Chemical hazards; Gas cylinders; Electrical; Boiler and pressure vessels; Industrial fire protection; Industrial hygiene; and Safety inspection checklist

  10. Environmental Assessment for the Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment Unit at the US Department of Energy`s Mound Plant, Miamisburg, Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The glass melter would thermally treat mixed waste (hazardous waste contaminated with radioactive constituents largely tritium, Pu-238, and/or Th-230) that was generated at the Mound Plant and is now in storage, by stabilizing the waste in glass blocks. Depending on the radiation level of the waste, the glass melter may operate for 1 to 6 years. Two onsite alternatives and seven offsite alternatives were considered. This environmental assessment indicates that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the human environment according to NEPA, and therefore the finding of no significant impact is made, obviating the need for an environmental impact statement.

  11. Program desk manual for occupational safety and health -- U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations, Office of Environment Safety and Health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musen, L.G.

    1998-08-27

    The format of this manual is designed to make this valuable information easily accessible to the user as well as enjoyable to read. Each chapter contains common information such as Purpose, Scope, Policy and References, as well as information unique to the topic at hand. This manual can also be provided on a CD or Hanford Internet. Major topics include: Organization and program for operational safety; Occupational medicine; Construction and demolition; Material handling and storage; Hoisting and rigging; Explosives; Chemical hazards; Gas cylinders; Electrical; Boiler and pressure vessels; Industrial fire protection; Industrial hygiene; and Safety inspection checklist.

  12. 75 FR 81684 - Order Approving Public Company Accounting Oversight Board Budget and Annual Accounting Support...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-28

    ... Accounting Oversight Board Budget and Annual Accounting Support Fee for Calendar Year 2011 The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, as amended (the ``Sarbanes-Oxley Act''), established the Public Company Accounting... through registration of public accounting firms and standard setting, inspection, and disciplinary...

  13. 78 FR 11915 - Order Approving Public Company Accounting Oversight Board Budget and Annual Accounting Support...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-20

    ... Accounting Oversight Board Budget and Annual Accounting Support Fee for Calendar Year 2013 The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, as amended (the ``Sarbanes-Oxley Act''),\\1\\ established the Public Company Accounting... through registration of public accounting firms and standard setting, inspection, and disciplinary...

  14. 77 FR 2576 - Order Approving Public Company Accounting Oversight Board Budget and Annual Accounting Support...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-18

    ... Accounting Oversight Board Budget and Annual Accounting Support Fee for Calendar Year 2012 The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, as amended (the ``Sarbanes-Oxley Act''),\\1\\ established the Public Company Accounting... through registration of public accounting firms and standard setting, inspection, and disciplinary...

  15. 75 FR 3509 - Public Company Accounting Oversight Board; Order Approving Proposed Rules on Auditing Standard No...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-21

    ... Accounting Oversight Board; Order Approving Proposed Rules on Auditing Standard No. 7, Engagement Quality... (the ``Commission'') a notice (the ``Notice'') of proposed rules (File No. PCAOB-2009-02) on Auditing... identify any significant engagement deficiencies before it issues its audit report. Auditing Standard No. 7...

  16. Beyond Measure: New Approaches to Analyzing Congressional Oversight of Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    published books and peer reviewed journal articles. The Congressional Research Service being the key source on congressional procedure and theory ...Transportation Committee 1 Senate Homeland Security & Governmental Affairs Committee 15 Senate Small Business & Entrepreneurship 1 Senate Special...military contracting procedures in a war zone are not necessarily oversight of national security functions, reviews of FEMA contracting practices

  17. 75 FR 82417 - Public Company Accounting Oversight Board; Order Approving Proposed Rules on Auditing Standards...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-30

    ... Standards Board (``ASB'') of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants); and observations from... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [Release No. 34-63606; File No. PCAOB 2010-01] Public Company.... Introduction On September 15, 2010, the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (the ``Board'' or the ``PCAOB...

  18. 48 CFR 36.609-3 - Work oversight in architect-engineer contracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... architect-engineer contracts. 36.609-3 Section 36.609-3 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION SPECIAL CATEGORIES OF CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Architect-Engineer Services 36.609-3 Work oversight in architect-engineer contracts. The contracting officer...

  19. 77 FR 71803 - Guidance on Food and Drug Administration Oversight of Positron Emission Tomography Drug Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-04

    ... PET Drug Products--Questions and Answers.'' This guidance provides questions and answers that address.... 2201, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002. Send one self-addressed adhesive label to assist that office in... availability of a guidance entitled ``FDA Oversight of PET Drug Products--Questions and Answers.'' In 1997...

  20. 77 FR 11553 - Draft Guidance on Food and Drug Administration Oversight of Positron Emission Tomography Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... Oversight of PET Drug Products--Questions and Answers.'' The draft guidance provides questions and answers... assist that office in processing your requests. See the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section for electronic... PET Drug Products--Questions and Answers.'' In 1997, Congress passed the Food and Drug Administration...

  1. 75 FR 78779 - Order Approving Public Company Accounting Oversight Board Supplemental Budget Request To...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-16

    ...; Securities Exchange Act of 1934 Release No. 63526/December 10, 2010] Order Approving Public Company... Company Accounting Oversight Board (the ``PCAOB'') to oversee the audits of companies and related matters..., subject to approval by the Commission, auditing and related attestation, quality control, ethics, and...

  2. A Voice Crying in the Wilderness: Legislative Oversight Agencies' Efforts to Achieve Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanLandingham, Gary R.

    2006-01-01

    While legislative oversight offices, like many evaluation and policy analysis units, face substantial challenges in promoting use of their work by policymakers, they often have not taken steps to overcome these challenges by adopting the strategies suggested by the evaluation literature. Although the offices seek utilization, they have not fully…

  3. Counterfeit Parts: DOD Needs to Improve Reporting and Oversight to Reduce Supply Chain Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    agencies and contractors we met with stated that they have encountered counterfeit parts less frequently in the DOD supply chain , in part, because...the DOD supply chain as a method to prevent further counterfeiting.22 DOD and industry officials noted that timely reporting of...COUNTERFEIT PARTS DOD Needs to Improve Reporting and Oversight to Reduce Supply Chain Risk Report to Congressional Committees

  4. Management process invaded Ames as the Center shifted from NACA to NASA oversight. Ames constructed

    Science.gov (United States)

    1968-01-01

    Management process invaded Ames as the Center shifted from NACA to NASA oversight. Ames constructed a review room in its headquarters building where, in the graphical style that prevailed in the 1960's, Ames leadership could review progress against schedule, budget and performance measures. Shown, in October 1965 is Merrill Mead chief of Ames' program and resources office. (for H Julian Allen Retirement album)

  5. Inspector General, DOD, Oversight of the Audit of the FY 2000 Military Retirement Fund Financial Statements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-02-28

    statements and to report on the adequacy of internal controls and compliance with laws and regulations. We contracted the audit of the FY 2000 Military...performed on the oversight of the audit of the FY 2000 Military Retirement Fund Financial Statements.

  6. 20 CFR 411.595 - What oversight procedures are planned for the EN payment systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... EN payment systems? 411.595 Section 411.595 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION THE TICKET TO WORK AND SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROGRAM Employment Network Payment Systems § 411.595 What oversight procedures are planned for the EN payment systems? We use audits, reviews, studies and observation of daily...

  7. 78 FR 49257 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Management and Oversight of the National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    ... award. Each reserve compiles an ecological characterization or site profile to describe the biological... Collection; Comment Request; Management and Oversight of the National Estuarine Research Reserve System... estuarine research reserves representative of various regions and estuarine types in the United States to...

  8. AGB Statement on Board Responsibility for the Oversight of Educational Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This "Statement on Board Responsibility for the Oversight of Educational Quality," approved by the Board of Directors of the Association of Governing Boards (AGB) in March 2011, urges institutional administrators and governing boards to engage fully in this area of board responsibility. The seven principles in this statement offer suggestions to…

  9. 76 FR 52996 - Public Company Accounting Oversight Board; Order Approving Proposed Temporary Rule for an Interim...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-24

    ... Accounting Oversight Board; Order Approving Proposed Temporary Rule for an Interim Program of Inspection Related to Audits of Brokers and Dealers August 18, 2011. I. Introduction On June 21, 2011, the Public... that would be imposed on different categories of registered public accounting firms and classes of...

  10. Improvements Needed in U.S. Special Operations Command Global Battlestaff and Program Support Contract Oversight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-26

    the OSINT [ open source intelligence ] program.” Task Order Terms Not Well Defined and the Problem Was Previously Reported Task order terms...provide contractor manpower augmentation to the staff of the J2 JIC OS [ Open Source Intelligence ] Branch in the form of intelligence related support for...information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources , gathering and

  11. Policy, Practice, and Research Agenda for Emergency Medical Services Oversight: A Systematic Review and Environmental Scan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taymour, Rekar K; Abir, Mahshid; Chamberlin, Margaret; Dunne, Robert B; Lowell, Mark; Wahl, Kathy; Scott, Jacqueline

    2018-02-01

    Introduction In a 2015 report, the Institute of Medicine (IOM; Washington, DC USA), now the National Academy of Medicine (NAM; Washington, DC USA), stated that the field of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) exhibits signs of fragmentation; an absence of system-wide coordination and planning; and a lack of federal, state, and local accountability. The NAM recommended clarifying what roles the federal government, state governments, and local communities play in the oversight and evaluation of EMS system performance, and how they may better work together to improve care. This systematic literature review and environmental scan addresses NAM's recommendations by answering two research questions: (1) what aspects of EMS systems are most measured in the peer-reviewed and grey literatures, and (2) what do these measures and studies suggest for high-quality EMS oversight? To answer these questions, a systematic literature review was conducted in the PubMed (National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Institutes of Health; Bethesda, Maryland USA), Web of Science (Thomson Reuters; New York, New York USA), SCOPUS (Elsevier; Amsterdam, Netherlands), and EMBASE (Elsevier; Amsterdam, Netherlands) databases for peer-reviewed literature and for grey literature; targeted web searches of 10 EMS-related government agencies and professional organizations were performed. Inclusion criteria required peer-reviewed literature to be published between 1966-2016 and grey literature to be published between 1996-2016. A total of 1,476 peer-reviewed titles were reviewed, 76 were retrieved for full-text review, and 58 were retained and coded in the qualitative software Dedoose (Manhattan Beach, California USA) using a codebook of themes. Categorizations of measure type and level of application were assigned to the extracted data. Targeted websites were systematically reviewed and 115 relevant grey literature documents were retrieved. A total of 58 peer-reviewed articles met inclusion

  12. Protocol to the 1991 Co-operation Agreement between CERN and the Department of Atomic Energy of the Government of India (DAE)

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    CERN has signed a Cooperation Agreement with the Department of Atomic Energy of India (DAE) in 1991, followed in 1996 by a Protocol for collaboration within the framework of the LHC project. The work by way of Indian in-kind contributions to the LHC was coordinated by the DAE, and was compensated by CERN through payments into the 'LHC India Fund'. These payments were calculated at the level of half of the estimated European value of the in-kind contributions received. The collaboration was highly successful and was extended in 2003. In the previous year India had been granted Observer Status by the CERN Council. As the LHC Project approaches completion, the collaborations under the 1996 Protocol and the 2003 Extension are now coming to an end. With India rapidly developing into one of the world's most active and advanced accelerator centres, it seems fitting that CERN and India should continue their collaborative efforts in other accelerator areas of mutual interest. The Protocol proposed in this document has...

  13. Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by US Department of Energy waste management operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Folga, S.; Policastro, A.; Freeman, W.; Jackson, R.; Mishima, J.; Turner, S.

    1996-12-01

    This report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms evaluated. A personal-computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for the calculation of human health risk impacts. The WM PEIS addresses management of five waste streams in the DOE complex: low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste (HW), high-level waste (HLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and transuranic waste (TRUW). Currently projected waste generation rates, storage inventories, and treatment process throughputs have been calculated for each of the waste streams. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated, and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. Key assumptions in the development of the source terms are identified. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also discuss specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

  14. Regulatory oversight of safety culture in nuclear installations - New IAEA developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerhoas, Anne; )

    2012-01-01

    Ms. Anne Kerhoas described the IAEA work on guidance for regulatory oversight of safety culture. She summarised the various IAEA, OECD/NEA and ANS meetings that have been held on the topic between 1995 and 2011. The IAEA has carried out two recent projects with the Bulgarian and Romanian regulatory bodies to develop a safety culture oversight program. The work was funded by the Norwegian government and has involved 30 experts from 17 different countries. Draft guidance for regulators on how to monitor licensee safety culture has also been produced (IAEA-TECDOC-DD1070). The document is intended to provide practical guidance on oversight strategies and is applicable to a wide range of nuclear installations, including nuclear power plants, fuel cycle facilities, research reactors and waste management facilities. A number of principles for regulatory oversight of safety culture were summarised. For example, the primary responsibility for safety remains with the licensee, safety culture oversight should be performed at all stages of the life cycle of the nuclear installation, and multiple data collection methods should be used. The overall approach to safety culture described in the draft IAEA Tech doc includes a range of approaches to build up a meaningful picture of the licensee's safety culture. These include interviews, observations, review of documents, review of events, discussions and surveys. The importance of ongoing discussion with the licensee throughout the process to develop a deeper shared understanding of issues was emphasised. The results of the Chester 2 workshop will be used as an input to finalization of the draft Tech Doc

  15. DIII-D research operations annual report to the U.S. Department of Energy, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-07-01

    The mission of the DIII-D research program is to advance fusion energy science understanding and predictive capability and to improve and optimize the tokamak concept. A long term goal remains to integrate these products into a demonstration of high confinement, high plasma pressure (plasma β), sustained long pulse operation with fusion power plant relevant heat and particle handling capability. The DIII-D program is a world recognized leader in tokamak concept improvement and a major contributor to the physics R and D needs of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The scientific objectives of the DIII-D program are given in Table 1-2. The FY96 DIII-D research program was highly successful, as described in this report. A moderate sized tokamak, DIII-D is a world leader in tokamak innovation with exceptional performance, measured in normalized parameters

  16. DIII-D research operations annual report to the U.S. Department of Energy, October 1, 1996 through September 30, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    The main goals of the DIII-D experiments in 1997 were, by extending and integrating the understanding of fusion science, to make progress in the tokamak concept improvements as delineated in the DIII-D Long Range Plan and to make substantial contributions to urgently needed R and D for the ITER Engineering Design Activity. For these purposes, the authors modified the top divertor to include pumping with baffling of high triangularity shaped plasmas and brought into operation two megawatt-level-gyrotrons for electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and off-axis current drive. The elements of the DIII-D experimental program and its objectives are organized into five topical areas: Stability and Disruption Physics, Transport and Turbulence Physics, Divertor and Boundary Physics, Wave-Particle Physics, and Integrated Fusion Science and Innovative Concept Improvement. The resulting DIII-D fusion science accomplishments are described in detail in this report. This year was characterized by a number of important activities, most notably, two 110 GHz ECH gyrotrons were installed and commissioned, the upper RDP cryopump and baffle was installed, and the ohmic heating coil lead was successfully reinforced to allow return to the design coil configuration and an increase to 7.5 V-s next year. Real-time ``Isoflux`` plasma control was implemented to control the shape and position of the plasma. This system solves the MHD equilibrium equation in real time to accurately determine the location of the plasma boundary. At the same time, the authors were able to improve their safety record with three minor accidents and no lost time accidents. The staff available for operations tasks was substantially reduced owing to recent budget reductions and this impacted a number of activities.

  17. DIII-D research operations annual report to the U.S. Department of Energy, October 1, 1996 through September 30, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-10-01

    The main goals of the DIII-D experiments in 1997 were, by extending and integrating the understanding of fusion science, to make progress in the tokamak concept improvements as delineated in the DIII-D Long Range Plan and to make substantial contributions to urgently needed R and D for the ITER Engineering Design Activity. For these purposes, the authors modified the top divertor to include pumping with baffling of high triangularity shaped plasmas and brought into operation two megawatt-level-gyrotrons for electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and off-axis current drive. The elements of the DIII-D experimental program and its objectives are organized into five topical areas: Stability and Disruption Physics, Transport and Turbulence Physics, Divertor and Boundary Physics, Wave-Particle Physics, and Integrated Fusion Science and Innovative Concept Improvement. The resulting DIII-D fusion science accomplishments are described in detail in this report. This year was characterized by a number of important activities, most notably, two 110 GHz ECH gyrotrons were installed and commissioned, the upper RDP cryopump and baffle was installed, and the ohmic heating coil lead was successfully reinforced to allow return to the design coil configuration and an increase to 7.5 V-s next year. Real-time ''Isoflux'' plasma control was implemented to control the shape and position of the plasma. This system solves the MHD equilibrium equation in real time to accurately determine the location of the plasma boundary. At the same time, the authors were able to improve their safety record with three minor accidents and no lost time accidents. The staff available for operations tasks was substantially reduced owing to recent budget reductions and this impacted a number of activities

  18. Supplemental analysis of accident sequences and source terms for waste treatment and storage operations and related facilities for the US Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Folga, S.; Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Kohout, E.; Mishima, J.

    1996-12-01

    This report presents supplemental information for the document Analysis of Accident Sequences and Source Terms at Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities for Waste Generated by US Department of Energy Waste Management Operations. Additional technical support information is supplied concerning treatment of transuranic waste by incineration and considering the Alternative Organic Treatment option for low-level mixed waste. The latest respirable airborne release fraction values published by the US Department of Energy for use in accident analysis have been used and are included as Appendix D, where respirable airborne release fraction is defined as the fraction of material exposed to accident stresses that could become airborne as a result of the accident. A set of dominant waste treatment processes and accident scenarios was selected for a screening-process analysis. A subset of results (release source terms) from this analysis is presented

  19. Final environmental assessment for off-site transportation of low-level waste from four California sites under the management of the U.S. Department of Energy Oakland Operations Office

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-10-01

    The Department of Energy Oakland Operations Office (DOE/OAK) manages sites within California that generate Low Level Waste (LLW) in the course or routine site operations. It is the preference of the DOE to dispose of LLW at federally owned and DOE-operated disposal facilities; however, in some circumstances DOE Headquarters has determined that disposal at commercial facilities is appropriate, as long as the facility meets all regulatory requirements for the acceptance and disposal of LLW, including the passage of a DOE audit to determine the adequacy of the disposal site. The DOE would like to ship LLW from four DOE/OAK sites in California which generate LLW, to NRC-licensed commercial nuclear waste disposal facilities such as Envirocare in Clive, Utah and Chem Nuclear in Barnwell, South Carolina. Transportation impacts for shipment of LLW and MLLW from DOE Oakland sites to other DOE sites was included in the impacts identified in the Department's Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM-PEIS), published in May, 1997, and determined to be low. The low impacts for shipment to commercial sites identified herein is consistent with the WM-PEIS results

  20. Irradiation Processing Department monthly report, April 1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1961-05-15

    This document details activities of the irradiation processing department during the month of April, 1961. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: Research and Engineering Operations; Production and Reactor Operations; Facilities Engineering Operations; Production and Reactor Operations; Facilities Engineering Operation; Employee Relations Operation; Financial Operation; and NPR project.

  1. An Empirical Study of the Management and Oversight of Medical Services Acquisition within the Department of Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    Services Q517 Pharmacology Services Q518 Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Services Q519 Psychiatry Services Q520 Podiatry Services Q521...755,026 3,571,700 4,744,901 11,550,581 20,770,527 Q520 Podiatry Services 0 0 86,520 130,495 156,928 373,943 Q521 Pulmonary Services 0 0 131,666...1,289,888 1,220,701 2,254,564 3,001,237 8,599,189 Q519 Psychiatry Services 575,836 671,572 1,469,172 6,449,197 6,437,165 15,602,942 Q520 Podiatry

  2. 22 CFR 96.70 - Operation of the Complaint Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... AND APPROVAL OF PERSONS UNDER THE INTERCOUNTRY ADOPTION ACT OF 2000 (IAA) Oversight Through Review of... resolution of complaints; (4) Generate reports designed to show possible patterns of complaints; and (5... will be accessible through the Department's website to persons who wish to file complaints. Such forms...

  3. Draft and final Supplemental Environmental Impact Report for the proposed renewal of the contract between the United States Department of Energy and the Regents of the University of California for operation and management of the Lawrence berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    This Supplemental Environmental Impact Report (SEIR) has been prepared in conformance with the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and the University of California Procedures for the Implementation of CEQA (UC Procedures) to evaluate the potential environmental impacts associated with the University of California`s operation of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the next five years. The specific project under consideration in this SEIR is the renewal of a five-year contract between the University and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) to manage and operate the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. As the California agency responsible for carrying out the proposed project, the University is the lead agency responsible for CEQA compliance. Environmental impacts, mitigation, and a site overview are presented.

  4. Draft and final Supplemental Environmental Impact Report for the proposed renewal of the contract between the United States Department of Energy and the Regents of the University of California for operation and management of the Lawrence berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    This Supplemental Environmental Impact Report (SEIR) has been prepared in conformance with the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and the University of California Procedures for the Implementation of CEQA (UC Procedures) to evaluate the potential environmental impacts associated with the University of California's operation of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the next five years. The specific project under consideration in this SEIR is the renewal of a five-year contract between the University and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) to manage and operate the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. As the California agency responsible for carrying out the proposed project, the University is the lead agency responsible for CEQA compliance. Environmental impacts, mitigation, and a site overview are presented.

  5. Implementation of Good Clinical Laboratory Practice (GCLP) guidelines within the External Quality Assurance Program Oversight Laboratory (EQAPOL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Christopher A; Sanchez, Ana M; Garcia, Ambrosia; Denny, Thomas N; Sarzotti-Kelsoe, Marcella

    2014-07-01

    The EQAPOL contract was awarded to Duke University to develop and manage global proficiency testing programs for flow cytometry-, ELISpot-, and Luminex bead-based assays (cytokine analytes), as well as create a genetically diverse panel of HIV-1 viral cultures to be made available to National Institutes of Health (NIH) researchers. As a part of this contract, EQAPOL was required to operate under Good Clinical Laboratory Practices (GCLP) that are traditionally used for laboratories conducting endpoint assays for human clinical trials. EQAPOL adapted these guidelines to the management of proficiency testing programs while simultaneously incorporating aspects of ISO/IEC 17043 which are specifically designed for external proficiency management. Over the first two years of the contract, the EQAPOL Oversight Laboratories received training, developed standard operating procedures and quality management practices, implemented strict quality control procedures for equipment, reagents, and documentation, and received audits from the EQAPOL Central Quality Assurance Unit. GCLP programs, such as EQAPOL, strengthen a laboratory's ability to perform critical assays and provide quality assessments of future potential vaccines. © 2013.

  6. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Startup Plan to Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GREGORY, J.R.

    2000-01-01

    This plan defines the approach that will be used to ensure the transition from initial startup to normal operations of the SNF operations--are performed in a safe, controlled, and deliberate manner. It provides a phased approach that bridges the operations between the completion of the ORR and the return to normal operations. This plan includes management oversight and administrative controls to be implemented and then reduced in a controlled manner until normal operations are authorized by SNF Management

  7. 49 CFR 240.309 - Railroad oversight responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ascribed which the controlling railroad certified for joint operations purposes. (c) Based on that review and analysis each railroad shall determine what action(s) it will take to improve the safety of train... safety device in the controlling locomotive; (9) Incidents involving noncompliance with the railroad's...

  8. Safety-Related Contractor Activities at Nuclear Power Plants. New Challenges for Regulatory Oversight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chockie, Alan [Chockie Group International, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States)

    2005-09-15

    The use of contractors has been an integral and important part of the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of nuclear power plants. To ensure the safe and efficient completion of contracted tasks, each nuclear plant licensee has developed and refined formal contract management processes to meet their specific needs and plant requirements. Although these contract management processes have proven to be effective tools for the procurement of support and components tailored to the needs of nuclear power plants, contractor-related incidents and accidents have revealed some serious weaknesses with the implementation of these processes. Identifying and addressing implementation problems are becoming more complicated due to organizational and personnel changes affecting the nuclear power industry. The ability of regulators and licensees to effectively monitor and manage the safety-related performance of contractors will likely be affected by forthcoming organization and personnel changes due to: the aging of the workforce; the decline of the nuclear industry; and the deregulation of nuclear power. The objective of this report is to provide a review of current and potential future challenges facing safety-related contractor activities at nuclear power plants. The purpose is to assist SKI in establishing a strategy for the proactive oversight of contractor safety-related activities at Swedish nuclear power plants and facilities. The nature and role of contractors at nuclear plants is briefly reviewed in the first section of the report. The second section describes the essential elements of the contract management process. Although organizations have had decades of experience with the a contract management process, there remain a number of common implantation weaknesses that have lead to serious contractor-related incidents and accidents. These implementation weaknesses are summarized in the third section. The fourth section of the report highlights the

  9. Safety-Related Contractor Activities at Nuclear Power Plants. New Challenges for Regulatory Oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chockie, Alan

    2005-09-01

    The use of contractors has been an integral and important part of the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of nuclear power plants. To ensure the safe and efficient completion of contracted tasks, each nuclear plant licensee has developed and refined formal contract management processes to meet their specific needs and plant requirements. Although these contract management processes have proven to be effective tools for the procurement of support and components tailored to the needs of nuclear power plants, contractor-related incidents and accidents have revealed some serious weaknesses with the implementation of these processes. Identifying and addressing implementation problems are becoming more complicated due to organizational and personnel changes affecting the nuclear power industry. The ability of regulators and licensees to effectively monitor and manage the safety-related performance of contractors will likely be affected by forthcoming organization and personnel changes due to: the aging of the workforce; the decline of the nuclear industry; and the deregulation of nuclear power. The objective of this report is to provide a review of current and potential future challenges facing safety-related contractor activities at nuclear power plants. The purpose is to assist SKI in establishing a strategy for the proactive oversight of contractor safety-related activities at Swedish nuclear power plants and facilities. The nature and role of contractors at nuclear plants is briefly reviewed in the first section of the report. The second section describes the essential elements of the contract management process. Although organizations have had decades of experience with the a contract management process, there remain a number of common implantation weaknesses that have lead to serious contractor-related incidents and accidents. These implementation weaknesses are summarized in the third section. The fourth section of the report highlights the

  10. Notification: Audit of EPA's Adherence to Policies, Procedures and Oversight Controls Pertaining to the Administrator’s Travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project #OA-FY17-0382, August 28, 2017. The EPA OIG plans to begin preliminary research on the EPA’s adherence to policies, procedures and oversight controls pertaining to the Administrator’s travel to Oklahoma.

  11. Chemical Processing Department monthly report for September 1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1963-10-21

    This report, from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO for September 1963, discusses the following: Production operation; Purex and Redox operation; Finished products operation; maintenance; Financial operations, facilities engineering; research; employee relations; weapons manufacturing operation; and power and crafts operation.

  12. Oversight and management of a cell therapy clinical trial network: experience and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyé, Lemuel A; Sayre, Shelly L; Westbrook, Lynette; Jorgenson, Beth C; Handberg, Eileen; Anwaruddin, Saif; Wagner, Kristi A; Skarlatos, Sonia I

    2011-09-01

    The Cardiovascular Cell Therapy Research Network (CCTRN), sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), was established to develop, coordinate, and conduct multiple collaborative protocols testing the effects of cell therapy on cardiovascular diseases. The Network was born into a difficult political and ethical climate created by the recent removal of a dozen drugs from the US formulary and the temporary halting of 27 gene therapy trials due to safety concerns. This article describes the Network's challenges as it initiated three protocols in a polarized cultural atmosphere at a time when oversight bodies were positioning themselves for the tightest vigilance of promising new therapies. Effective strategies involving ongoing education, open communication, and relationship building with the oversight community are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Nuclear safety and security culture - an integrated approach to regulatory oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tronea, M.; Ciurea Ercau, C.

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the development and implementation of regulatory guidelines for the oversight of safety and security culture within licensees organizations. CNCAN (the National Commission for Nuclear Activities of Romania) has used the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) attributes for a strong safety culture as the basis for its regulatory guidelines providing support to the reviewers and inspectors for recognizing and gathering information relevant to safety culture. These guidelines are in process of being extended to address also security culture, based on the IAEA Nuclear Security Series No. 7 document Nuclear Security Culture: Implementing Guide. Recognizing that safety and security cultures coexist and need to reinforce each other because they share the common objective of limiting risk and that similar regulatory review and inspection processes are in place for nuclear security oversight, an integrated approach is considered justified, moreover since the common elements of these cultures outweigh the differences. (authors)

  14. Historic low-level radioactive waste federal policies, programs and oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchette, M.; Kenney, J.; Zelmer, B.

    2011-01-01

    'Full text:' The management of radioactive waste is one of the most serious environmental problems facing Canadians. From the early industrial uses of radioactive material in the 1930s to the development of nuclear power reactors and the medical and experimental use of radio-isotopes today, there has been a steady accumulation of waste products. Historic waste is low-level radioactive waste for which the federal government has accepted responsibility for long-term management. This paper will outline the policy framework used to govern institutional and financial arrangements for the disposal of radioactive waste by waste producers and owners and the major radioactive projects in which the Government of Canada is currently involved. It will provide an overview of the organizations established for the management of historic radioactive waste and NRCan's oversight role. Finally, an overview of the historic waste program activities managed on behalf of the federal government through these organizations in the Port Hope area, the Greater Toronto Area, in Fort McMurray, Alberta and along the Northern Transportation Route is provided. Canada's Policy Framework for Radioactive Waste, sets out principles that govern the institutional and financial arrangements for disposal of radioactive waste by waste producers and owners. According to the Policy Framework: The federal government will ensure that radioactive waste disposal is carried out in a safe, environmentally sound, comprehensive, cost-effective and integrated manner; The federal government has the responsibility to develop policy, to regulate, and to oversee producers and owners; and, The waste producers and owners are responsible, in accordance with the principle of 'polluter pays', for the funding, organization, management and operation of disposal and other facilities required for their wastes. Arrangements may be different for nuclear fuel waste, low-level radioactive waste and

  15. Chemical Processing Department monthly report, May 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1957-06-21

    The May, 1957 monthly report for the Chemical Processing Department of the Hanford Atomic Products Operation includes information regarding research and engineering efforts with respect to the Purex and Redox process technology. Also discussed is the production operation, finished product operation, power and general maintenance, financial operation, engineering and research operations, and employee operation.(MB)

  16. Chemical Processing Department monthly report, September 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1957-10-22

    The September, 1957 monthly report for the Chemical Processing Department of the Hanford Atomic Products Operation includes information regarding research and engineering efforts with respect to the Purex and Redox process technology. Also discussed is the production operation, finished product operation, power and general maintenance, financial operation, engineering and research operations, and employee operation.

  17. Improvements Needed in Managing Scope Changes and Oversight of Construction Projects at Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-30

    efficiency; advises the Secretary of Defense and Congress; and informs the public. Vision Our vision is to be a model oversight organization in the...Bachelor Enlisted Quarters and P220, Ammunition Supply Point, with combined estimated costs of $65.2 million, for audit . This is one in a series of...The Director stated that maintaining contract files was secondary to construction completion. As a result, there is an increased risk that

  18. Maintaining Oversight of Licensee Safety Culture. CSNI/WGHOF Survey Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    In preparation for this workshop, a survey was sent to members of the WGHOF in Autumn 2006. Purpose of the Survey was to explore and share the methods and approaches used to maintain oversight of licensee safety culture. 13 countries responded to the survey. The responses were used in the development of discussion topics and themes for this workshop. This presentation (slides) summarizes the results of the survey

  19. Institutional Oversight of Occupational Health and Safety for Research Programs Involving Biohazards

    OpenAIRE

    Dyson, Melissa C; Carpenter, Calvin B; Colby, Lesley A

    2017-01-01

    Research with hazardous biologic materials (biohazards) is essential to the progress of medicine and science. The field of microbiology has rapidly advanced over the years, partially due to the development of new scientific methods such as recombinant DNA technology, synthetic biology, viral vectors, and the use of genetically modified animals. This research poses a potential risk to personnel as well as the public and the environment. Institutions must have appropriate oversight and take app...

  20. Auditing the Auditors: Has the Establishment of the Audit Oversight Board Affected Audit Quality?

    OpenAIRE

    Ismail, Hashanah; Theng, Ung Chui

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of a research into the relationship between audit quality during the years before and after the incorporation of the Audit Oversight Board (AOB) in Malaysia in 2010. As the AOB only audits auditors of listed companies this study is based on 50 companies’ audited financial statements 2 years before and after AOB was established. A total of 200 firm years were observed. Using reported companies’ earnings to proxy for earnings and audit quality the data collecte...

  1. Torture, Impunity, and the Need for Independent Prosecutorial Oversight of the Executive Branch

    OpenAIRE

    Quigley, Fran

    2017-01-01

    Fran Quigley, Torture, Impunity, and the Need for Independent Prosecutorial Oversight of the Executive Branch, 20 Cornell J. L. & Pub. Pol'y 271 (2010) Allegations of Executive Branch misconduct present an inherent conflict of interest because prosecutorial discretion is invested in a U.S. Attorney General appointed by – and serving at the pleasure of – the President. Various commentators, including Justice Antonin Scalia, Professor Stephen Carter, and the many critics of the former indep...

  2. Hospital board oversight of quality and safety: a stakeholder analysis exploring the role of trust and intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, Ross; Freeman, Tim; Mannion, Russell

    2015-06-16

    Hospital boards, those executive members charged with developing appropriate organisational strategies and cultures, have an important role to play in safeguarding the care provided by their organisation. However, recent concerns have been raised over boards' ability to enact their duty to ensure the quality and safety of care. This paper offers critical reflection on the relationship between hospital board oversight and patient safety. In doing so it highlights new perspectives and suggestions for developing this area of study. The article draws on 10 interviews with key informants and policy actors who form part of the 'issue network' interested in the promotion of patient safety in the English National Health Service. The interviews surfaced a series of narratives regarding hospital board oversight of patient safety. These elaborated on the role of trust and intelligence in highlighting the potential dangers and limitations of approaches to hospital board oversight which have been narrowly focused on a risk-based view of organisational performance. In response, a need to engage with the development of trust based organisational relationships is identified, in which effective board oversight is built on 'trust' characterised by styles of leadership and behaviours that are attentive to the needs and concerns of both staff and patients. Effective board oversight also requires the gathering and triangulating of 'intelligence' generated from both national and local information sources. We call for a re-imagination of hospital board oversight in the light of these different perspectives and articulate an emerging research agenda in this area.

  3. A survey of front-line paramedics examining the professional relationship between paramedics and physician medical oversight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foerster, Christopher R; Tavares, Walter; Virkkunen, Ilkka; Kämäräinen, Antti

    2018-03-01

    Paramedicine is often dependent on physician medical directors and their associated programs for direction and oversight. A positive relationship between paramedics and their oversight physicians promotes safety and quality care while a strained or ineffective one may threaten these goals. The objective of this study was to explore and understand the professional relationship between paramedics and physician medical oversight as viewed by front-line paramedics. All active front-line paramedics from four municipal paramedic services involving three medical oversight groups in Ontario were invited to complete an online survey. Five hundred and four paramedics were invited to participate in the study, with 242 completing the survey (48% response rate); 66% male, 76% primary care paramedics with an average of 13 (SD=9) years of experience. Paramedics had neutral or positive perceptions regarding their autonomy, opportunities to interact with their medical director, and medical director understanding of the prehospital setting. Paramedics perceived medical directives as rigid and ambiguous. A significant amount of respondents reported a perception of having provided suboptimal patient care due to fear of legal or disciplinary consequences. Issues of a lack of support for critical thinking and a lack of trust between paramedics and medical oversight groups were often raised. Paramedic perceptions of physician medical oversight were mixed. Concerning areas identified were perceptions of ambiguous written directives and concerns related to the level of trust and support for critical thinking. These perceptions may have implications for the system of care and should be explored further.

  4. Institutional Oversight of Faculty-Industry Consulting Relationships in U.S. Medical Schools: A Delphi Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morain, Stephanie R; Joffe, Steven; Campbell, Eric G; Mello, Michelle M

    2015-01-01

    The conflicts of interest that may arise in relationships between academic researchers and industry continue to prompt controversy. The bulk of attention has focused on financial aspects of these relationships, but conflicts may also arise in the legal obligations that faculty acquire through consulting contracts. However, oversight of faculty members' consulting agreements is far less vigorous than for financial conflicts, creating the potential for faculty to knowingly or unwittingly contract away important rights and freedoms. Increased regulation could prevent this, but it is unclear what forms of oversight universities view as feasible and effective. In this article, we report on a Delphi study to evaluate several approaches for oversight of consulting agreements by medical schools. The panel was comprised of 11 senior administrators with responsibility for oversight of faculty consulting relationships. We found broad agreement among panelists regarding the importance of institutional oversight to protect universities' interests. There was strong support for two specific approaches: providing educational resources to faculty and submitting consulting agreements for institutional review. Notwithstanding the complexities of asserting authority to regulate private consulting agreements between faculty members and companies, medical school administrators reached consensus that several approaches to improving institutional oversight are feasible and useful. © 2015 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  5. 6th July 2010 - United Kingdom Science and Technology Facilities Council W. Whitehorn signing the guest book with Head of International relations F. Pauss, visiting the Computing Centre with Information Technology Department Head Deputy D. Foster, the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department P. Strubin,the Centre Control Centre with Operation Group Leader M. Lamont and the CLIC/CTF3 facility with Project Leader J.-P. Delahaye.

    CERN Multimedia

    Teams : M. Brice, JC Gadmer

    2010-01-01

    6th July 2010 - United Kingdom Science and Technology Facilities Council W. Whitehorn signing the guest book with Head of International relations F. Pauss, visiting the Computing Centre with Information Technology Department Head Deputy D. Foster, the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department P. Strubin,the Centre Control Centre with Operation Group Leader M. Lamont and the CLIC/CTF3 facility with Project Leader J.-P. Delahaye.

  6. Medical Oversight, Educational Core Content, and Proposed Scopes of Practice of Wilderness EMS Providers: A Joint Project Developed by Wilderness EMS Educators, Medical Directors, and Regulators Using a Delphi Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millin, Michael G; Johnson, David E; Schimelpfenig, Tod; Conover, Keith; Sholl, Matthew; Busko, Jonnathan; Alter, Rachael; Smith, Will; Symonds, Jennifer; Taillac, Peter; Hawkins, Seth C

    2017-01-01

    A disparity exists between the skills needed to manage patients in wilderness EMS environments and the scopes of practice that are traditionally approved by state EMS regulators. In response, the National Association of EMS Physicians Wilderness EMS Committee led a project to define the educational core content supporting scopes of practice of wilderness EMS providers and the conditions when wilderness EMS providers should be required to have medical oversight. Using a Delphi process, a group of experts in wilderness EMS, representing educators, medical directors, and regulators, developed model educational core content. This core content is a foundation for wilderness EMS provider scopes of practice and builds on both the National EMS Education Standards and the National EMS Scope of Practice Model. These experts also identified the conditions when oversight is needed for wilderness EMS providers. By consensus, this group of experts identified the educational core content for four unique levels of wilderness EMS providers: Wilderness Emergency Medical Responder (WEMR), Wilderness Emergency Medical Technician (WEMT), Wilderness Advanced Emergency Medical Technician (WAEMT), and Wilderness Paramedic (WParamedic). These levels include specialized skills and techniques pertinent to the operational environment. The skills and techniques increase in complexity with more advanced certification levels, and address the unique circumstances of providing care to patients in the wilderness environment. Furthermore, this group identified that providers having a defined duty to act should be functioning with medical oversight. This group of experts defined the educational core content supporting the specific scopes of practice that each certification level of wilderness EMS provider should have when providing patient care in the wilderness setting. Wilderness EMS providers are, indeed, providing health care and should thus function within defined scopes of practice and with

  7. 76 FR 49497 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security/United States Secret Service-001 Criminal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-10

    ...; forensic examination information; search warrants and search warrant returns; indictments; certified.... To an agency, organization, or individual for the purpose of performing audit or oversight operations as authorized by law, but only such information as is necessary and relevant to such audit or...

  8. Joint Professional Military Education: Opportunities Exist for Greater Oversight and Coordination of Associated Research Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    research requests across the department exposes DOD to the risk of potential overlap of studies and analysis research. View GAO-14-216. For more...National Defense University GPRA Government Performance and Results Act CCO Center for Complex Operations CSR Center for Strategic...their future leadership positions. To provide broad educational experiences, students can conduct research at the JPME research institutions as part

  9. Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at waste treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Operations, Volume 3: Appendixes C-H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J.

    1995-04-01

    This report contains the Appendices for the Analysis of Accident Sequences and Source Terms at Waste Treatment and Storage Facilities for Waste Generated by the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Operations. The main report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed as a part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies are assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms are evaluated. A personal computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for calculation of human health risk impacts. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also provide discussion of specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report

  10. Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at waste treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Operations, Volume 3: Appendixes C-H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J. [and others

    1995-04-01

    This report contains the Appendices for the Analysis of Accident Sequences and Source Terms at Waste Treatment and Storage Facilities for Waste Generated by the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Operations. The main report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed as a part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies are assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms are evaluated. A personal computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for calculation of human health risk impacts. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also provide discussion of specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

  11. Public Health Departments

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — State and Local Public Health Departments in the United States Governmental public health departments are responsible for creating and maintaining conditions that...

  12. Missouri Department of Natural Resources Hazardous Waste Program Weldon Spring site remedial action project. Status to date January 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This document describes the progress made by the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MDNR) during the fifth year (1997) of the Agreement in Support (AIS) in its oversight role of the Weldon Springs Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP). Staffing issues this year have been a challenge with the resignation of an Environmental Specialist (ES) in June 1997, and the death of Robert Stovall, an Environmental Engineer (EE) II in August 1997. Progress made during this period includes securing a contract laboratory, participation in several workgroup meetings for activities at the site, oversight of the Feasibility Study/Proposed Plan (FS/PP), coordination between the US Department of Energy and the various State regulatory programs and interactions with the local public drinking water supply agency and health departments

  13. Irradiation Processing Department monthly report, January 1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1961-02-15

    This document details activities of the irradiation processing department during the month of January, 1961. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: Research and Engineering Operations; Production and Reactor Operations; Facilities Engineering Operation; Employee Relations Operation; Financial Operation; and NPR Project.

  14. Irradiation Processing Department monthly report, June 1960

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1960-07-15

    This document details activities of the irradiation processing department during the month of June 1960. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: research and engineering operations; production and reactor operations; facilities engineering operation; employee relations operation; and financial operation.

  15. Irradiation Processing Department monthly report, December 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1959-01-21

    This document details activities of the irradiation processing department during the month of December 1958. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: Research and Engineering Operations; Production and Reactor Operations; Facilities Engineering operation; Employee Relations Operation; and Financial Operation.

  16. Irradiation Processing Department monthly report, April 1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1963-05-13

    This document details activities of the Irradiation Processing Department during the month of August, 1958. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: Research and Engineering Operations; Production and Reactor Operations; Facilities Engineering Operation; Employee Relations Operation; and Financial Operation.

  17. Irradiation Processing Department monthly report, August 1960

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1960-09-12

    This document details activities of the irradiation processing department during the month of August, 1960. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: Research and Engineering Operations; Production and Reactor operations; Facilities Engineering operation; Employee Relations Operation; and Financial Operation.

  18. Irradiation Processing Department monthly report, May 1960

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greninger, A.B.

    1960-06-20

    This document details activities of the irradiation processing department during the month of May, 1960. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: Research and Engineering Operations; Production and Reactor Operations; Facilities Engineering Operation; Employee Relations Operation; and Financial Operation.

  19. Irradiation Processing Department monthly report, March 1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1963-04-12

    This document details activities of the Irradiation Processing Department during the month of August, 1958. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: Research and Engineering Operations; Production and Reactor Operations; Facilities Engineering Operation; Employee Relations Operation; and Financial Operation.

  20. Irradiation Processing Department monthly report, July 1960

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1960-08-12

    This document details activities of the irradiation processing department during the month of July, 1960. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: Research and Engineering Operations; Production and Reactor Operations; Facilities Engineering Operation; Employee Relations Operation; and Financial Operation.

  1. WTO oversight over bilateral agreements: from a notification to an examination process?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Jens Ladefoged

    2014-01-01

    The TTIP will – like other free trade agreements (FTAs) – violate one of the cornerstones of the WTO, i.e. the Most-Favoured-Nation (MFN) principle. However, the multilateral trading system has since 1947 permitted the formation of trading blocks and preferential bilateral trading partnerships....... This contribution asks how the WTO can fulfill its task of ensuring that FTAs do not systematically undermine the multilateral trading order. It focuses on the issue of transparency in the current oversight process and discusses whether the WTO secretariat should be granted a stronger mandate to proactively...... investigate the economic effects of the notified FTAs....

  2. [Outsourcing of clinical laboratory department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murai, T

    2000-03-01

    Recently, to improve financial difficulties at various hospitals, outsourcing of the laboratory department is be coming more wide spread. At the department of clinical pathology of St. Luke's International Hospital, the system, so called, "Branch labo" which is one of the outsourcing laboratory conditions, was adopted in March 1999. In this reports. We described the decision procedure for accepting the situation and the circumstances of operation.

  3. Operational Readiness Review: Savannah River Replacement Tritium Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    The Operational Readiness Review (ORR) is one of several activities to be completed prior to introducing tritium into the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The Secretary of Energy will rely in part on the results of this ORR in deciding whether the startup criteria for RTF have been met. The RTF is a new underground facility built to safely service the remaining nuclear weapons stockpile. At RTF, tritium will be unloaded from old components, purified and enriched, and loaded into new or reclaimed reservoirs. The RTF will replace an aging facility at SRS that has processed tritium for more than 35 years. RTF has completed construction and is undergoing facility startup testing. The final stages of this testing will require the introduction of limited amounts of tritium. The US Department of Energy (DOE) ORR was conducted January 19 to February 4, 1993, in accordance with an ORR review plan which was developed considering previous readiness reviews. The plan also considered the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendations 90-4 and 92-6, and the judgements of experienced senior experts. The review covered three major areas: (1) Plant and Equipment Readiness, (2) Personnel Readiness, and (3) Management Systems. The ORR Team was comprised of approximately 30 members consisting of a Team Leader, Senior Safety Experts, and Technical Experts. The ORR objectives and criteria were based on DOE Orders, industry standards, Institute of Nuclear Power Operations guidelines, recommendations of external oversight groups, and experience of the team members

  4. Lessons Learned from a Five-year Evaluation of the Belgian Safety Culture Oversight Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernard, B.

    2016-01-01

    The Belgian Regulatory Body has implemented a Safety Culture oversight process since 2010. In a nutshell, this process is based on field observations provided by inspectors or safety analysts during any contact with a licencee (inspections, meetings, phone calls, etc). These observations are recorded within an observation (excel) sheet—aiming at describing factual and contextual issues — and are linked to IAEA Safety Culture attributes. It should be stressed that the purpose of the process is not to give a comprehensive view of a licencee safety culture but to address findings that require attention or action on the part of a licencee. In other words, gathering safety culture observations aims at identifying cultural, organizational or behavioural issues in order to feed a regulatory response to potential problems. Safety Culture Observations (SCO) are then fully integrated in routine inspection activities and must be seen as an input of the overall oversight process. As a result, the assessment of the SCO is inserted within the yearly safety evaluation report performed by Bel V and transmitted to the licencee. However, observing safety culture is not a natural approach for engineers. Guidance, training and coaching must be provided in order to open up safety dimensions to be captured. In other words, a SCO process requires a continuous support in order to promote a holistic and systemic view of safety.

  5. Nanotechnology, voluntary oversight, and corporate social performance: does company size matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzma, Jennifer; Kuzhabekova, Aliya

    2011-04-01

    In this article, we examine voluntary oversight programs for nanotechnology in the context of corporate social performance (CSP) in order to better understand the drivers, barriers, and forms of company participation in such programs. At the theoretical level, we use the management framework of CSP to understand the voluntary behavior of companies. At the empirical level, we investigate nanotech industry participation in the Environmental Protection Agency's Nanoscale Materials Stewardship Program (NMSP) as an example of CSP, in order to examine the effects of company characteristics on CSP outcomes. The analysis demonstrates that, on the average, older and larger companies for which nanotech is one of the many business activities demonstrate greater CSP as judged by company actions, declarations, and self-evaluations. Such companies tended to submit more of the requested information to the NMSP, including specific information about health and safety, and to claim fewer of the submitted items as confidential business information. They were also more likely to have on-line statements of generic and nano-specific corporate social responsibility principles, policies, and achievements. The article suggests a need to encourage smaller and younger companies to participate in voluntary oversight programs for nanotechnology and presents options for better design of these programs.

  6. Nanotechnology, voluntary oversight, and corporate social performance: does company size matter?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzma, Jennifer; Kuzhabekova, Aliya

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we examine voluntary oversight programs for nanotechnology in the context of corporate social performance (CSP) in order to better understand the drivers, barriers, and forms of company participation in such programs. At the theoretical level, we use the management framework of CSP to understand the voluntary behavior of companies. At the empirical level, we investigate nanotech industry participation in the Environmental Protection Agency’s Nanoscale Materials Stewardship Program (NMSP) as an example of CSP, in order to examine the effects of company characteristics on CSP outcomes. The analysis demonstrates that, on the average, older and larger companies for which nanotech is one of the many business activities demonstrate greater CSP as judged by company actions, declarations, and self-evaluations. Such companies tended to submit more of the requested information to the NMSP, including specific information about health and safety, and to claim fewer of the submitted items as confidential business information. They were also more likely to have on-line statements of generic and nano-specific corporate social responsibility principles, policies, and achievements. The article suggests a need to encourage smaller and younger companies to participate in voluntary oversight programs for nanotechnology and presents options for better design of these programs.

  7. Regulatory Oversight of the Legacy Gunner Uranium Mine and Mill Site in Northern Saskatchewan, Canada - 13434

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenson, Ron; Howard, Don [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, P.O. Box 1046, Station B, 280 Slater Street, Ottawa ON K1P 5S9 (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    As Canada's nuclear regulator, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) is responsible for licensing all aspects of uranium mining, including remediation activities at legacy sites. Since these sites already existed when the current legislation came into force in 2000, and the previous legislation did not apply, they present a special case. The Nuclear Safety and Control Act (NSCA), was written with cradle-to- grave oversight in mind. Applying the NSCA at the end of a 'facilities' life-cycle poses some challenges to both the regulator and the proponent. When the proponent is the public sector, even more challenges can present themselves. Although the licensing process for legacy sites is no different than for any other CNSC license, assuring regulatory compliance can be more complicated. To demonstrate how the CNSC has approached the oversight of legacy sites the history of the Commission's involvement with the Gunnar uranium mine and mill site provides a good case study. The lessons learned from the CNSC's experience regulating the Gunnar site will benefit those in the future who will need to regulate legacy sites under existing or new legislation. (authors)

  8. Health physics self-assessment and the nuclear regulatory oversight process at a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schofield, R.S.

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has developed improvements in their Nuclear Power Plant inspection, assessment and enforcement practices. The objective of these changes was to link regulatory action with power plant performance through a risk- informed process which is intended to enhance objectivity. One of the Strategic Performance Areas of focus by the U.S. NRC is radiation safety. Two cornerstones, Occupational Radiation Safety and Public Radiation Safety, make up this area. These cornerstones are being evaluated through U.S. NRC Performance Indicators (PI) and baseline site inspections. Key to the U.S. NRC's oversight program is the ability of the licensee to implement a self-assessment program which pro-actively identifies potential problems and develops improvements to enhance management's effectiveness. The Health Physics Self-Assessment Program at San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station (SONGS) identifies radiation protection-related weakness or negative trends. The intended end result is improved performance through rapid problem identification, timely evaluation, corrective action and follow-up effectiveness reviews. A review of the radiation protection oversight process and the SONGS Health Physics Self-Assessment Program will be presented. Lessons learned and management tools, which evaluate workforce and Health Physics (HP) staff performance to improve radiological practices, are discussed. (author)

  9. INEL oversight program. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1993--December 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Idaho's successful lawsuit over shipments of spent nuclear fuel is a major milestone for 1993. The challenge forced the U.S. Department of Energy to cease all shipments of spent nuclear fuel to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory until a site-wide environmental impact statement is completed. This agreement is a significant victory in Idaho's battle to hold the federal government responsible for its actions and force compliance with applicable laws. Much of the State's INEL-related activity in 1993 focused on ensuring that INEL operations are conducted in a manner that protects public health and the environment

  10. The impact of masculinity on safety oversights, safety priority and safety violations in two male-dominated occupations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kent; Hansen, Claus D.; Bloksgaard, Lotte

    2015-01-01

    Background Although men have a higher risk of occupational injuries than women the role of masculinity for organizational safety outcomes has only rarely been the object of research. Aim The current study investigated the association between masculinity and safety oversights, safety priority......-related context factors (safety leadership, commitment of the safety representative, and safety involvement) and three safety-related outcome factors (safety violations, safety oversights and safety priority) were administered twice 12 months apart to Danish ambulance workers (n = 1157) and slaughterhouse workers...

  11. Control, oversight and related terms in the international guidance on geological disposal of radioactive waste - Review of definitions and use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This document presents the most complete analysis of the use of the words control, oversight, etc. as used in NEA, IAEA and ICRP literature connected to radioactive waste disposal. It reveals the many different ways the same word, 'control', has been used in international guidance and ambiguities than can arise, especially so for the post-closure phase of the repository. The newly introduced ICRP terminology, namely the use of the words 'oversight' and 'built-in controls', represents a step forward in terminology and resolves the ambiguity

  12. The concept of oversight, its connection to memory keeping and its relevance for the medium term: The findings of the RK and M initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotzel, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    The medium term was introduced as the period of indirect oversight after repository closure, with timescales in the order of a few hundred years. While the importance of intrinsic control or 'passive' safety features in the post-closure phase of a geological repository has been recognised and stressed before, the role of oversight, by providing the capability to reduce or avoid some exposures, has come to the fore only recently. Oversight for the time being generally refers to 'watchful care' and society 'keeping an eye' on the technical system and the actual implementation of plans and decisions. In some regulatory frameworks oversight is indirectly required, for instance when mandating the creation of a land exclusion zone. In other frameworks, oversight is directly required, as illustrated, for instance, by the long-term stewardship concept of the US Environmental Protection Agency. Although sheer memory of the presence of the facility cannot be enough to constitute oversight, oversight and RK and M preservation do go hand in hand. For example, monitoring after repository closure fosters RK and M preservation, and vice versa. The presenter focused on terminology, potential oversight measures, and on roles and responsibilities of different stakeholders

  13. 17 CFR 240.19d-4 - Notice by the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board of disapproval of registration or of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Accounting Oversight Board of disapproval of registration or of disciplinary action. (a) Definitions—(1... Accounting Oversight Board of disapproval of registration or of disciplinary action. 240.19d-4 Section 240.19d-4 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES...

  14. 32 CFR 2004.20 - National Industrial Security Program Operating Manual (NISPOM) [201(a)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false National Industrial Security Program Operating... Defense INFORMATION SECURITY OVERSIGHT OFFICE, NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION NATIONAL INDUSTRIAL SECURITY PROGRAM DIRECTIVE NO. 1 Operations § 2004.20 National Industrial Security Program...

  15. Irradiation Processing Department monthly report, May 1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1961-06-15

    This document details activities of the irradiation processing department during the month of May, 1961. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: Research and Engineering Operations; production and Reactor Operations; Facilities Engineering Operation; Employee Relations Operation; and NPR Reactor.

  16. The EN Department has a new leader

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Roberto Saban takes over as new Engineering Department leader on 1 July 2010, at a time when the LHC is entering a stable operation phase. Roberto Saban presents his plans and vision.   Roberto Saban, new leader of the EN Department. The CERN Engineering (EN) Department's main areas of activity are technical coordination, the design and operation with beam of accelerator components and experimental facilities, the associated infrastructure systems, such as electrical distribution, cooling, ventilation and transport, and finally the design and construction of mechanical elements for the facilities. “I do not plan to change the internal structure of the Department because it works well but, with the LHC entering a phase of stable functioning, the Department will shift its focus to operation and maintenance. In this new situation, our role is not limited to supporting LHC operation but, on the contrary, we fully take part in it thanks to the synergy with the BE and TE Departments inside th...

  17. Scientific Services Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SSD in the South Western Region employs more than 200 people, of which 90% are scientists or engineers. Their purpose is to understand and clarify the extensive technical issues which arise during the operation of many different types of plant spread over a wide area of Southern England and South Wales. Priority is given to work in terms of its potential value to the Board. This brochure illustrates some aspects of the work of SSD. Based at Regional Headquarters in Bristol, the Department undertakes 'on site' inspection followed by more thorough laboratory examinations for the diagnosis of faults, and carries out selected research activities. Most of this effort is directed towards the three nuclear sites and four large conventional power stations in the Region. (author)

  18. Influence of Social Media on Crowd Behavior and the Operational Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    hierarchy of command, social protocol , or etiquette . Furthermore, the credibility of 7Headquarters, Department of the Army, Field Manual (FM) 3-24...subject to oversight and protocol requirements for accessing and exploiting these capabilities, external agencies and private initiatives are not

  19. Comparison of the Canadian and US Laws, Regulations, Policies, and Systems of Oversight for Animals in Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Gilly; Locke, Paul

    2016-05-01

    The Canadian and United States' approaches to oversight of animals in research are both based on the "3Rs" principles outlined in Russell and Burch's classic text, The Principles of Humane Experimental Technique. Each country seeks to protect the welfare of animals, while permitting the legitimate goals of scientific research to be attained according to the legal principles, cultures, and strengths and constraints of their jurisprudential and societal traditions. Canada is one of the most decentralized federations in the world, and regulation of activities is based to a great extent on custom and practice. The United States is more hierarchical and, at least with respect to laws governing animal research, more centralized. Accordingly, the Canadian approach is rooted in the concepts of social contracts, with a greater emphasis on guidance and policy and less reliance on legislation. No federal (national) direct legislation of laboratory animal welfare exists, although the federal government uses its criminal and spending authorities to shape behavior. The central feature of the Canadian system is the Canadian Council on Animal Care, which was formed to support universities and government departments involved in animal-based science. Animal care committees play a central role in implementing the guidelines and policies in facilities that carry out animal research. The United States has enacted two federal (national) laws applicable to animals in research. The Animal Welfare Act is a more traditional, command-and-control law that gives authority to the US Department of Agriculture to promulgate regulations, inspect facilities, and enforce violations. The Health Research Extension Act, which amended the US Public Health Services (PHS) Act, applies to any activity conducted or supported by the PHS, including research efforts supported by the US National Institutes of Health. It is largely nonregulatory and establishes a system of assurances and policies that covered

  20. Electronics Department progress report 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-05-01

    this report summarizes the Electronics Department's activities in 1983. These include work under the headings of man-machine system and operator studies, reliability techniques, application of nuclear techniques to mineral exploration, applied laser physics, computing and, lastly, research instrumentation. (author)

  1. Chemical Processing Department monthly report for July 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCune, F. K.; Johnson, W. E.; MacCready, W. K.; Warren, J. H.; Schroeder, O. C.; Groswith, C. T.; Mobley, W. N.; LaFollette, T. G.; Grim, K. G.; Shaw, H. P.; Richards, R. B.; Roberts, D. S.

    1957-08-22

    This report, for July 1957 from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO, discusses the following; Production operation; Purex and Redox operation; Finished products operation; maintenance; Financial operations; facilities engineering; research; and employee relations.

  2. Chemical Processing Department monthly report for December 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1959-01-21

    This report for December 1958, from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO, discusses the following: Production operation; Purex and Redox operation; Finished products operation; maintenance: Financial operations; facilities engineering; research; and employee relations.

  3. Chemical Processing Department monthly report for February 1959

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1959-03-20

    This report for February 1959, from the Chemical Processing Department at HAPO, discusses the following: Production operation; Purex and Redox operation; Finished products operation; maintenance: Financial operations; facilities engineering; research; and employee relations.

  4. The Global Fund's paradigm of oversight, monitoring, and results in Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Ashley; Cordon, Roberto; Told, Michaela; de Savigny, Don; Kickbusch, Ilona; Tanner, Marcel

    2017-12-12

    The Global Fund is one of the largest actors in global health. In 2015 the Global Fund was credited with disbursing close to 10 % of all development assistance for health. In 2011 it began a reform process in response to internal reviews following allegations of recipients' misuse of funds. Reforms have focused on grant application processes thus far while the core structures and paradigm have remained intact. We report results of discussions with key stakeholders on the Global Fund, its paradigm of oversight, monitoring, and results in Mozambique. We conducted 38 semi-structured in-depth interviews in Maputo, Mozambique and members of the Global Fund Board and Secretariat in Switzerland. In-country stakeholders were representatives from Global Fund country structures (eg. Principle Recipient), the Ministry of Health, health or development attachés bilateral and multilateral agencies, consultants, and the NGO coordinating body. Thematic coding revealed concerns about the combination of weak country oversight with stringent and cumbersome requirements for monitoring and evaluation linked to performance-based financing. Analysis revealed that despite the changes associated with the New Funding Model, respondents in both Maputo and Geneva firmly believe challenges remain in Global Fund's structure and paradigm. The lack of a country office has many negative downstream effects including reliance on in-country partners and ineffective coordination. Due to weak managerial and absorptive capacity, more oversight is required than is afforded by country team visits. In-country partners provide much needed support for Global Fund recipients, but roles, responsibilities, and accountability must be clearly defined for a successful long-term partnership. Furthermore, decision-makers in Geneva recognize in-country coordination as vital to successful implementation, and partners welcome increased Global Fund engagement. To date, there are no institutional requirements for

  5. Operational safety enhancement of Soviet-designed nuclear reactors via development of nuclear power plant simulators and transfer of related technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohut, P.; Epel, L.G.; Tutu, N.K.

    1998-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), under the US government's International Nuclear Safety Program (INSP), is implementing a program of developing and providing simulators for many of the Russian and Ukrainian Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) manage and provide technical oversight of the various INSP simulator projects for DOE. The program also includes a simulator technology transfer process to simulator design organizations in Russia and Ukraine. Training programs, installation of new simulators, and enhancements in existing simulators are viewed as providing a relatively fast and cost-effective technology transfer that will result in measurable improvement in the safety culture and operation of NPPs. A review of this program, its present status, and its accomplishments are provided in this paper

  6. The World Bank Inspection Panel and Quasi-Judicial Oversight: In Search of the 'Judicial Spirit' in Public International Law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Naudé Fourie (Andria)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThis PhD dissertation conceptualizes the World Bank Inspection Panel as a mechanism of quasi-judicial review or oversight, aimed at enhancing the accountability and legitimacy of the World Bank – which is conceived as an international institution exercising public power. The author

  7. 12 CFR 361.5 - What are the FDIC's oversight and monitoring responsibilities in administering this program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What are the FDIC's oversight and monitoring responsibilities in administering this program? 361.5 Section 361.5 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY MINORITY AND WOMEN OUTREACH PROGRAM CONTRACTING § 361...

  8. Supplemental investigations in support of environmental assessments by the Idaho INEL Oversight Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This document reports on the status of supplemental investigations in support of environmental assessments by the Idaho INEL Oversight Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Included is information on hydrology studies in wells open through large intervals, unsaturated zone contamination and transport processes, surface water-groundwater interactions, regional groundwater flow, and independent testing of air quality data

  9. 76 FR 40950 - Public Company Accounting Oversight Board; Notice of Filing of Proposed Board Funding Final Rules...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-12

    ... available, the issuer's net asset value. (i)(v) Issuer Accounting Support Fee The term ``issuer accounting... Accounting Oversight Board; Notice of Filing of Proposed Board Funding Final Rules for Allocation of the Board's Accounting Support Fee Among Issuers, Brokers, and Dealers, and Other Amendments to the Board's...

  10. 42 CFR 137.368 - Is the Secretary responsible for oversight and compliance of health and safety codes during...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... compliance of health and safety codes during construction projects being performed by a Self-Governance Tribe... SERVICES TRIBAL SELF-GOVERNANCE Construction Roles of the Secretary in Establishing and Implementing Construction Project Agreements § 137.368 Is the Secretary responsible for oversight and compliance of health...

  11. 76 FR 53683 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Oversight of Clinical Investigations: A Risk-Based Approach to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-29

    ... 200N, Rockville, MD 20852-1448; or the Office of Communication, Education and Radiation Programs... describes a modern, risk-based approach to monitoring that focuses on critical study parameters and relies... appropriate, and other forms of information technology. Title: Draft Guidance for Industry: Oversight of...

  12. 76 FR 40961 - Public Company Accounting Oversight Board; Notice of Filing of Proposed Temporary Rule for an...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-12

    ... of the Board Section 1. General Provisions * * * Rule 1001. Definitions of Terms Employed in Rules... Accounting Oversight Board; Notice of Filing of Proposed Temporary Rule for an Interim Program of Inspection... Act of 2002 (the ``Act''), notice is hereby given that on June 21, 2011, the Public Company Accounting...

  13. Report: Enhanced EPA Oversight and Action Can Further Protect Water Resources From the Potential Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #15-P-0204, July 16, 2015. Enhanced EPA oversight of the permitting process for diesel fuel use during hydraulic fracturing can further EPA efforts to protect water resources, and establishment of a plan for determining whether to propose a chemical

  14. Information Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-13

    restricted frequency list (JRFL). This list specifies protected, guarded, and taboo frequencies that should not normally be disrupted without prior... frequency list JROC Joint Requirement Oversight Council JSC Joint Spectrum Center JTCB joint targeting coordination board JTF joint task force JWAC joint

  15. Research on Integration of NPP Operational Safety Management Performance Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Miao; Shi, Liping

    2014-01-01

    The operational safety management of Nuclear Power Plants demands systematic planning and integrated control. NPPs are following the well-developed safety indicator systems proposed by IAEA Operational Safety Performance Indicator Programme, NRC Reactor Oversight Process or the other institutions. Integration of the systems is proposed to benefiting from the advantages of both systems and avoiding improper application into the real world. The authors analyzed the possibility and necessity for system integration, and propose an indicator system integrating method

  16. Governmental oversight of prescribing medications: history of the US Food and Drug Administration and prescriptive authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plank, Linda S

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of drug regulation and awarding of prescriptive authority is a complex and sometimes convoluted process that can be confusing for health care providers. A review of the history of how drugs have been manufactured and dispensed helps explain why this process has been so laborious and complicated. Because the federal and state governments have the responsibility for protecting the public, most regulations have been passed with the intentions of ensuring consumer safety. The current system of laws and regulations is the result of many years of using the legal system to correct drug marketing that had adverse health consequences. Government oversight will continue as prescribing medications transitions to an electronic form and as health care professionals in addition to physicians seek to gain prescriptive authority. © 2011 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  17. Regulatory Oversight of Radioactive Sources through the Integrated Management of Safety and Security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, K.

    2016-01-01

    The Hungarian Atomic Energy Authority (HAEA) has full regulatory competence; its mission is to oversee the safety and security of all the peaceful applications of atomic energy. All the radioactive sources having activity above the exemption level is registered and licensed both from safety and security points of view. The Hungarian central register of radioactive sources contains about 7,000 radioactive sources and 450 license holders. In order to use its limited resources the HAEA has decided to introduce an integrated regulatory oversight programme. Accordingly, during the licensing process and inspection activities the HAEA intends to assess both safety and security aspects at the same time. The article describes the Hungarian the various applications of radioactive materials, and summarizes the preparation activities of the HAEA. (author)

  18. Nonverbal contention and contempt in U.K. parliamentary oversight hearings on fiscal and monetary policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonhardt-Bailey, Cheryl

    2017-01-01

    In parliamentary committee oversight hearings on fiscal policy, monetary policy, and financial stability, where verbal deliberation is the focus, nonverbal communication may be crucial in the acceptance or rejection of arguments proffered by policymakers. Systematic qualitative coding of these hearings in the 2010-15 U.K. Parliament finds the following: (1) facial expressions, particularly in the form of anger and contempt, are more prevalent in fiscal policy hearings, where backbench parliamentarians hold frontbench parliamentarians to account, than in monetary policy or financial stability hearings, where the witnesses being held to account are unelected policy experts; (2) comparing committees across chambers, hearings in the House of Lords committee yield more reassuring facial expressions relative to hearings in the House of Commons committee, suggesting a more relaxed and less adversarial context in the former; and (3) central bank witnesses appearing before both the Lords and Commons committees tend toward expressions of appeasement, suggesting a willingness to defer to Parliament.

  19. Tennessee Oversight Agreement annual report, May 13, 1993 - May 12, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report discusses the activities of the Division of DOE Oversight in the areas of coordination with other State Agencies with regard to environmental restoration, corrective action, and waste management activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation; and the Division's efforts to keep the public informed of those DOE activities that may impact their health and the environment. This report includes the status of the Division's efforts in implementing the Tennessee Oversight Agreement (TOA). Each Program Section provides information concerning the status of its activities. The Administrative Section has been instrumental in achieving access to the ORR without prior notification to DOE and in obtaining documents and environmental, waste management, safety, and health information in a timely manner. The Environmental Restoration Program has provided in-depth document reviews and on-site coordination and monitoring of field activities required under the Federal Facility Agreement. Most notable of the activities are the investigations and planned remediation of the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek and the Watts Bar Reservoir. The Waste Management Program has audited DOE's compliance with air, water, solid, hazardous, and mixed waste storage, treatment, and disposal regulations. Effort was focused on all three DOE Facilities on the ORR. The final portion of this report discusses the Division's findings and recommendations. Most significant of these issues is the Division's request to be an active participant in DOE's prioritization of its TOA commitments. Other issues discussed include long term storage of radioactive waste and the use of environmental restoration funds. A discussion of those findings and recommendations provided in last year's annual report and addressed by DOE are included in this report as well. All documents, logs, files, etc. supporting this report are available for review during routine business hours at the Division's office

  20. Enhancing board oversight on quality of hospital care: an agency theory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H Joanna; Lockee, Carlin; Fraser, Irene

    2012-01-01

    Community hospitals in the United States are almost all governed by a governing board that is legally accountable for the quality of care provided. Increasing pressures for better quality and safety are prompting boards to strengthen their oversight function on quality. In this study, we aimed to provide an update to prior research by exploring the role and practices of governing boards in quality oversight through the lens of agency theory and comparing hospital quality performance in relation to the adoption of those practices. Data on board practices from a survey conducted by The Governance Institute in 2007 were merged with data on hospital quality drawn from two federal sources that measured processes of care and mortality. The study sample includes 445 public and private not-for-profit hospitals. We used factor analysis to explore the underlying dimensions of board practices. We further compared hospital quality performance by the adoption of each individual board practice. Consistent with the agency theory, the 13 board practices included in the survey appear to center around enhancing accountability of the board, management, and the medical staff. Reviewing the hospital's quality performance on a regular basis was the most common practice. A number of board practices, not examined in prior research, showed significant association with better performance on process of care and/or risk-adjusted mortality: requiring major new clinical programs to meet quality-related criteria, setting some quality goals at the "theoretical ideal" level, requiring both the board and the medical staff to be as involved as management in setting the agenda for discussion on quality, and requiring the hospital to report its quality/safety performance to the general public. Hospital governing boards should examine their current practices and consider adopting those that would enhance the accountability of the board itself, management, and the medical staff.

  1. Review of Nutrition Research and Education Activities. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Department Operations and Nutrition of the Committee on Agriculture. House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Agriculture.

    This document records the oral and written testimony given at a Congressional hearing on nutrition research and education as carried out by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Witnesses included officials from the Department, professors and administrators from various university nutrition programs, and medical doctors. Testimony stressed the…

  2. United States Department of State Strategic Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    employment sources such as temporary hires, family member appointments, telecommuting , part- time and jobsharing arrangements, and contracts...primary responsibility for coordination and oversight with respect to science and technology agreements with foreign governments. GOAL: Stabilize

  3. Department of Defense Intelligence Information System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gimble, Thomas

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of the audit were to determine whether the systems that comprise the DoDIIS are interoperable and whether oversight of acquisition management is adequate to assure that the development...

  4. Federal Health Care Center: VA and DOD Need to Develop Better Information to Monitor Operations and Improve Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Defense (DOD) responsibility for contracting support Quality assurance Accreditation and oversight from external entities and credentialing and...MTF designation would introduce additional operational requirements and challenges to the FHCC, including financial management and quality assurance...departments—including DOD’s operational readiness mission—by integrating services previously provided by the former North Chicago VA Medical Center

  5. Peace Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lewis, William

    1995-01-01

    .... Indeed, despite the energetic leadership of Under Secretary-General Kofi R. Annan who directs the Department of Peacekeeping Operations, the organization has increasing difficulty in acquiring properly trained and equipped forces in time to intervene in conflict situations and humanitarian crises.

  6. Investigation and consideration on the framework of oversight-based safety regulation. U.S. NRC 'Risk-Informed, Performance-Based' Regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saji, Gen

    2001-01-01

    Regulation on safety, environment and health in Japan has before today been intended to correspond with an accident at forms of reinforcement of national standards and monitoring, if any. However, as it was thought that such regulation reinforcement was afraid to bring some social rigidity, and to weaken independent responsibility, as a result, because of anxiety of losing peoples' merits inversely, some fundamental directivity such as respect of self-responsibility principle' and 'necessary and least limit of regulation' were selected as a part of political innovation. On the other hand, at a background of wide improvements on various indexing values showing operation results of nuclear power stations in U.S.A., private independent effort on upgrading of safety is told to largely affect at beginning of INPO (Institute of Nuclear Power Operations), without regulation reinforcement of NRC side. This is a proof of concrete effect of transfer to oversight-based safety regulation. Here were introduced on nuclear safety in U.S.A. at a base of some references obtained on entering the 'MIT summer specialist program. Nuclear system safety', on focussing at new safety regulation of NRC and its effect and so on, and adding some considerations based on some knowledge thereafter. (G.K.)

  7. Summary of operations and performance of the Murdock site restoration project in June 2005-December 2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-05-31

    This document summarizes the performance of the groundwater and surface water restoration systems installed by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Murdock, Nebraska, during the initial period of systems operation, from June 2005 through December 2006. In the Murdock project, several innovative technologies are being used to remove carbon tetrachloride contamination from a shallow aquifer underlying the town, as well as from water naturally discharged to the surface at the headwaters of a small creek (a tributary to Pawnee Creek) north of the town (Figure 1.1). The restoration activities at Murdock are being conducted by the CCC/USDA as a non-time-critical removal action under the regulatory authority and supervision of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region VII. Argonne National Laboratory assisted the CCC/USDA by providing technical oversight for the restoration effort and facilities during this review period. Included in this report are the results of all sampling and monitoring activities performed in accord with the EPA-approved Monitoring Plan for this site (Argonne 2006), as well as additional investigative activities conducted during the review period. This document presents overviews of the treatment facilities (Section 2) and site operations and activities (Section 3), then describes the groundwater, surface water, vegetation, and atmospheric monitoring results (Section 4) and modifications and costs during the review period (Section 5). Section 6 summarizes the initial period of operation.

  8. 6 June 2012 - British Member of Parliament for Bromsgrove Parliamentary Private Secretary to George Osborne, Chancellor of the Exchequer S. Javid MP signing the guest book with Adviser E. Tsesmelis and visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Beams Department Head P. Collier, Head of Operations M. Lamont and Adviser E. Tsesmelis.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    6 June 2012 - British Member of Parliament for Bromsgrove Parliamentary Private Secretary to George Osborne, Chancellor of the Exchequer S. Javid MP signing the guest book with Adviser E. Tsesmelis and visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Beams Department Head P. Collier, Head of Operations M. Lamont and Adviser E. Tsesmelis.

  9. Facility operations transparency and remote monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beddingfield, David

    2006-01-01

    Remote monitoring technologies offer many opportunities, not only to strengthen IAEA safeguards, but also to improve national, industrial and local oversight of various nuclear operations. Remote monitoring benefits in greater timeliness, reduced inspector presence and improved state-of-health awareness are well-known attributes. However, there is also the capability to organize data into a comprehensive knowledge of the 'normal operating envelope' of a facility. In considering future applications of remote monitoring there is also a need to develop a better understanding of the potential cost-savings versus higher up-front costs and potential long-term maintenance or upgrade costs. (author)

  10. Miscellaneous Industrial Mineral Operations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This map layer includes miscellaneous industrial minerals operations in the United States. The data represent commodities covered by the Minerals Information Team...

  11. Retailing: Careers in the Department Store Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gail M.

    1982-01-01

    The retailing industry is overviewed and executive training programs are detailed. Jobs in retailing are described: merchandising, department manager, assistant buyer, buyer, merchandise manager, and store manager. Also discussed are operations, financial control, and personnel management. (CT)

  12. Notification: Audit of EPA’s Adherence to Policies, Procedures and Oversight Controls Pertaining to the Administrator’s Travel (2nd notification)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project #OA-FY17-0382, October 6, 2017 - The EPA OIG plans to expand the scope of preliminary research on the EPA’s adherence to policies, procedures and oversight controls pertaining to the Administrator’s travel.

  13. Procedure for hazards analysis of plutonium gloveboxes used in analytical chemistry operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delvin, W.L.

    1977-06-01

    A procedure is presented to identify and assess hazards associated with gloveboxes used for analytical chemistry operations involving plutonium. This procedure is based upon analytic tree methodology and it has been adapted from the US Energy Research and Development Administration's safety program, the Management Oversight and Risk Tree

  14. 78 FR 52933 - Strengthening the Operating Framework and Furthering the Objectives of Coalition for Accelerating...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-27

    ... late-emerging issues. Standardized data will allow reviewers to increase review consistency and perform... functions and ongoing business operations, including premarket review, post-market safety, oversight of drug... trials, such as age and gender, have been established through Clinical Data Interchange Standards...

  15. The Department of Energy Tiger Teams; analysis of findings and plans for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziemer, P.L.

    1992-01-01

    Since mid-1989, the Department of Energy (DOE) has used 'Tiger Teams' to provide independent oversight and assessments of the compliance and management of environment, safety, and health programs in DOE facilities. These assessments have provided the Secretary of Energy with not only the current compliance status of each facility together with the associated vulnerabilities, but also have identified root causes for noncompliance. By mid-1992, Tiger Team assessments will be completed for all major DOE facilities (production, research, and testing facilities) as well as a number of smaller or less complex sites. (author)

  16. US system of oversight for genetic testing: a report from the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Genetics, Health and Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira-Gonzalez, Andrea; Teutsch, Steven; Williams, Marc S; Au, Sylvia M; Fitzgerald, Kevin T; Miller, Paul Steven; Fomous, Cathy

    2008-09-01

    As genetic testing technology is integrated into healthcare, increasingly detailed information about individual and population genetic variation is available to patients and providers. Health professionals use genetic testing to diagnose or assess the risk of disease in individuals, families and populations and to guide healthcare decisions. Consumers are beginning to explore personalized genomic services in an effort to learn more about their risk for common diseases. Scientific and technological advances in genetic testing, as with any newly introduced medical technology, present certain challenges to existing frameworks of oversight. In addition, the growing use of genetic testing will require a significant investment in evidence-based assessments to understand the validity and utility of these tests in clinical and personal decisionmaking. To optimize the use of genetic testing in healthcare, all sectors of the oversight system need to be strengthened and yet remain flexible in order to adapt to advances that will inevitably increase the range of genetic tests and methodologies.

  17. Academic Departments: Problems, Variations, and Alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHenry, Dean E.; And Others

    Do academic departments promote scholarship, protect higher learning from stagnation and interference, and provide a sound basis for hiring and advancing faculty? Or do they stifle teaching and research, foster parochialism, and limit the development of professors and students? There exist operating alternatives to conventional departments. Those…

  18. Historical events of the Chemical Processing Department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, W.A.

    1965-11-12

    The purpose of this report is to summarize and document the significant historical events pertinent to the operation of the Chemical Processing facilities at Hanford. The report covers, in chronological order, the major construction activities and historical events from 1944 to September, 1965. Also included are the production records achieved and a history of the department`s unit cost performance.

  19. Further Improvements Needed in Navy’s Oversight and Management of Contracting for Facilities Construction on Diego Garcia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-05-23

    1981, the Navy awarded a cost reimbursable contract to a joint venture to construct facility projects for fiscal years 1981 and 1982 with an estimated...through fiscal year 1986. In July 1981, the Navy awarded a cost reimburs - able contract (cost plus award fee) to Raymond, Brown & Root, Molem, a joint...Navy’s oversight and management of the acquisition of these facilities. A COST REIMBURSABLE CONTRACT MAKES STRONG CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION VITAL Under

  20. Vessel Operator System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Operator cards are required for any operator of a charter/party boat and or a commercial vessel (including carrier and processor vessels) issued a vessel permit from...

  1. DOD Task Force for Business and Stability Operations in Afghanistan: Review of Selected Expenditures Highlights Serious Management and Oversight Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-15

    execute projects and programs, but rather to advise DOD entities on ways to improve contracting processes and procedures. The memorandum establishing the...Task Force stated, “The Task Force will not be responsible for contracting, but will advise existing DoD contracting offices on improved...including the fact that the AGS did not appear to screen the trainees it nominated , resulting in the majority of the trainees being functionally

  2. Observations from Oversight Organizations Impacting Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom Beginning FY 2003 Through FY 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-30

    the base budget.41 41 USAAA Report No. A-2009-0188- FFM . 22 Chapter 2. Actions Taken by...Report No. A-2009-0212-FFS, “Requirements for Mobilized Soldiers,” September 17, 2009 Army Audit Agency Report No. A-2009-0188- FFM , “Assessing... FFM , “Assessing Future Base Budget Requirements, Manning Program Evaluation Group (FOUO),” March 3, 2009 32 Army Audit Agency Report No. A-2009

  3. The evolving regulation of uranium recovery operations in the United States: Inovative approaches are necessary for cost effective regulatory oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, A.J.; Lehrenbaum, W.U.; Lashway, D.C.

    2000-01-01

    The US domestic uranium industry is at a crossroads. Historic low prices for uranium, combined with stringent and often irrational regulatory requirements, pose a very real threat to the industry's continued viability. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has taken a number of innovative steps to reform and rationalize its regulatory program. However, if the domestic uranium recovery industry is to remain viable, additional steps toward innovation and reform are needed, and effective implementation of reforms adopted by the Commission is essential. (author)

  4. Operating Experience at NPP Krsko

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavsek, D.; Bach, B.

    1998-01-01

    Systematic analysis of operational experience by assessment of internal and industry events and the feedback of lessons learned is one of the essential activities in the improvement of the operational safety and reliability of the nuclear power plant. At NPP Krsko we have developed a document called ''Operating Experience Assessment Program''. Its purpose is to establish administrative guidance for the processing of operating events including on-site and industry events. Assessment of internal events is based on the following methods: Event and Causal Factor Charting, Change Analysis, Barrier Analysis, MORT (Management Oversight and Risk Tree Analysis) and Human Performance Evaluation. The operating experience group has developed a sophisticated program entitled ''Operating experience tracking system'' (OETS) in response to the need for a more efficient way of processing internal and industry operating experience information. The Operating Experience Tracking System is used to initiate and track operational events including recommended actions follow up. Six screens of the system contain diverse essential information which allows tracking of operational events and enables different kinds of browsing. OETS is a part of the NPP Krsko nuclear network system and can be easily accessed by all plant personnel. (author)

  5. Irradiation Processing Department, monthly record report, February, 1960

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1960-03-22

    This document details activities of the irradiation processing department at the Hanford Reservation during the month of February, 1960. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: Research and Engineering Operation; Manufacturing Operation; Facilities Engineering Operation; Relations Practices Operation; Financial Operation; and NPR operation.

  6. Addressing conflicts of interest in nanotechnology oversight: lessons learned from drug and pesticide safety testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Kevin C., E-mail: ke@sc.edu [University of South Carolina, Department of Philosophy, USC NanoCenter (United States); Volz, David C. [University of South Carolina, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Arnold School of Public Health (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Financial conflicts of interest raise significant challenges for those working to develop an effective, transparent, and trustworthy oversight system for assessing and managing the potential human health and ecological hazards of nanotechnology. A recent paper in this journal by Ramachandran et al., J Nanopart Res, 13:1345-1371 (2011) proposed a two-pronged approach for addressing conflicts of interest: (1) developing standardized protocols and procedures to guide safety testing; and (2) vetting safety data under a coordinating agency. Based on past experiences with standardized test guidelines developed by the international Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and implemented by national regulatory agencies such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA), we argue that this approach still runs the risk of allowing conflicts of interest to influence toxicity tests, and it has the potential to commit regulatory agencies to outdated procedures. We suggest an alternative approach that further distances the design and interpretation of safety studies from those funding the research. In case the two-pronged approach is regarded as a more politically feasible solution, we also suggest three lessons for implementing this strategy in a more dynamic and effective manner.

  7. Addressing conflicts of interest in nanotechnology oversight: lessons learned from drug and pesticide safety testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, Kevin C.; Volz, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Financial conflicts of interest raise significant challenges for those working to develop an effective, transparent, and trustworthy oversight system for assessing and managing the potential human health and ecological hazards of nanotechnology. A recent paper in this journal by Ramachandran et al., J Nanopart Res, 13:1345–1371 (2011) proposed a two-pronged approach for addressing conflicts of interest: (1) developing standardized protocols and procedures to guide safety testing; and (2) vetting safety data under a coordinating agency. Based on past experiences with standardized test guidelines developed by the international Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and implemented by national regulatory agencies such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA), we argue that this approach still runs the risk of allowing conflicts of interest to influence toxicity tests, and it has the potential to commit regulatory agencies to outdated procedures. We suggest an alternative approach that further distances the design and interpretation of safety studies from those funding the research. In case the two-pronged approach is regarded as a more politically feasible solution, we also suggest three lessons for implementing this strategy in a more dynamic and effective manner.

  8. Comparison of Management Oversight and Risk Tree and Tripod-Beta in Excavation Accident Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamadfam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Accident investigation programs are a necessary part in identification of risks and management of the business process. Objectives One of the most important features of such programs is the analysis technique for identifying the root causes of accidents in order to prevent their recurrences. Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP was used to compare management oversight and risk tree (MORT with Tripod-Beta in order to determine the superior technique for analysis of fatal excavation accidents in construction industries. Materials and Methods MORT and Tripod-Beta techniques were used for analyzing two major accidents with three main steps. First, these techniques were applied to find out the causal factors of the accidents. Second, a number of criteria were developed for the comparison of the techniques and third, using AHP, the techniques were prioritized in terms of the criteria for choosing the superior one. Results The Tripod-Beta investigation showed 41 preconditions and 81 latent causes involved in the accidents. Additionally, 27 root causes of accidents were identified by the MORT analysis. Analytical hierarchy process (AHP investigation revealed that MORT had higher priorities only in two criteria than Tripod-Beta. Conclusions Our findings indicate that Tripod-Beta with a total priority of 0.664 is superior to MORT with the total priority of 0.33. It is recommended for future research to compare the available accident analysis techniques based on proper criteria to select the best for accident analysis.

  9. The roles of antitrust law and regulatory oversight in the restructured electricity industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glazer, C.A.; Little, M.B.

    1999-05-01

    The introduction of retail wheeling is changing the roles of regulators and the courts. When states unbundle the vertically integrated investor-owned utility (IOU) into generation companies, transmission companies, and distribution companies, antitrust enforcement and policy setting by the state public utility/service commissions (PUCs) will be paramount. As was seen in the deregulation of the airline industry, vigorous enforcement of antitrust laws by the courts and proper policy setting by the regulators are the keys to a successful competitive market. Many of the problems raised in the airline deregulation movement came about due to laxity in correcting clear antitrust violations and anti-competitive conditions before they caused damage to the market. As retail wheeling rolls out, it is critical for state PUCs to become attuned to these issues and, most of all, to have staff trained in these disciplines. The advent of retail wheeling changes the application of the State Action Doctrine and, in turn, may dramatically alter the role of the state PUC--meaning antitrust law and regulatory oversight must step in to protect competitors and consumers from monopolistic abuse.

  10. Addressing conflicts of interest in nanotechnology oversight: lessons learned from drug and pesticide safety testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Kevin C.; Volz, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Financial conflicts of interest raise significant challenges for those working to develop an effective, transparent, and trustworthy oversight system for assessing and managing the potential human health and ecological hazards of nanotechnology. A recent paper in this journal by Ramachandran et al., J Nanopart Res, 13:1345-1371 (2011) proposed a two-pronged approach for addressing conflicts of interest: (1) developing standardized protocols and procedures to guide safety testing; and (2) vetting safety data under a coordinating agency. Based on past experiences with standardized test guidelines developed by the international Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and implemented by national regulatory agencies such as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA), we argue that this approach still runs the risk of allowing conflicts of interest to influence toxicity tests, and it has the potential to commit regulatory agencies to outdated procedures. We suggest an alternative approach that further distances the design and interpretation of safety studies from those funding the research. In case the two-pronged approach is regarded as a more politically feasible solution, we also suggest three lessons for implementing this strategy in a more dynamic and effective manner.

  11. Department of Defense: Observations on the National Industrial Security Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barr, Ann C; Denomme, Thomas J; Booth, Brandon; Krump, John; Sloan, Karen; Slodkowski, Lillian; Sterling, Suzanne

    2008-01-01

    .... In terms of facility oversight, DSS maintained files on contractor facilities security programs and their security violations, but it did not analyze this information to determine, for example...

  12. Operational Readiness Review Final Report for K Basin Fuel Transfer System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DAVIES, T.H.

    2002-01-01

    An Operational Readiness Review (ORR) was conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) to verify that an adequate state of readiness had been achieved for startup of the K Basin Fuel Transfer System (FTS). The DOE ORR was conducted during the period November 6-18, 2002. The DOE ORR team concluded that the K Basin Fuel Transfer System is ready to start operations, subject to completion and verification of identified pre-start findings. The ORR was conducted in accordance with the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) K Basin Fuel Transfer System (FTS) Operational Readiness Review (ORR) Plan of Action and the Operational Readiness Review Implementation Plan for K Basin Fuel Transfer System. Review activities consisted of staff interviews, procedure and document reviews, and observations of normal facility operations, operational upset conditions, and an emergency drill. The DOE ORR Team also reviewed and assessed the adequacy of the contractor ORR3 and the RL line management review. The team concurred with the findings and observations identified in these two reports. The DOE ORR for the FTS evaluated the contractor under single-shift operations. Of concern to the ORR Team was that SNF Project management intended to change from a single-shift FTS operation to a two-shift operation shortly after the completion of the DOE ORR. The ORR team did not assess two-shift FTS operations and the ability of the contractor to conduct a smooth transition from shift to shift. However, the DOE ORR team did observe an operational upset drill that was conducted during day shift and carried over into swing shift; during this drill, swing shift was staffed with fewer personnel as would be expected for two-shift operations. The facility was able to adequately respond to the event with the reduced level of staff. The ORR Team was also able to observe a Shift Manager turnover meeting when one shift manager had to be relieved during the middle of the day. The ORR

  13. Operational power reactor health physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, B.A.

    1987-01-01

    Operational Health Physics can be comprised of a multitude of organizations, both corporate and at the plant sites. The following discussion centers around Baltimore Gas and Electric's (BG and E) Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, located in Lusby, Maryland. Calvert Cliffs is a twin Combustion Engineering 825 MWe pressurized water reactor site with Unit I having a General electric turbine-generator and Unit II having a Westinghouse turbine-generator. Having just completed each Unit's ten-year Inservice Inspection and Refueling Outge, a total of 20 reactor years operating health physics experience have been accumulated at Calvert Cliffs. Because BG and E has only one nuclear site most health physics functions are performed at the plant site. This is also true for the other BG and E nuclear related organizations, such as Engineering and Quality Assurance. Utilities with multiple plant sites have corporate health physics entity usually providing oversight to the various plant programs

  14. Conduct of operations: The foundation of safety -- An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willett, D.J.; Hertel, N.E.

    1992-05-01

    This paper discusses issues and approaches dealing with conceptualizing, implementing, and maintaining configuration control commensurate with the conduct of operations approach defined by DOE ORDER 5480.19. Specific topics reviewed will include key elements of assessments to determine the status quo such as assessment criteria, assessment personnel, and assessment scope; administrative programs to maintain the status quo such as organizational definition, responsibilities, interfaces, and priorities; oversight to determine control effectiveness via compliance and performance assessment

  15. Present status of the interlaboratorial co-operative study for standards rocks of granite (GB-1) and basalt (BB-1) from the Geochemistry Department of I.G.U.F. Ba./Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linhares, P.S.

    1987-01-01

    Results for major, minor and trace elements obtained by twelve laboratories for the standards rocks, Granite (GB-1) and Basalte (BB-1), of the Geochemistry Department of Geociences Institute-U-F.Ba are presented. At present status of the study it is possible to approach the most probably correct value (usable value) for the concentration of each of the major and minor elements. (author) [pt

  16. Alternative considerations for environmental oversight training: Results from a needs assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, C.; Hensley, J.

    1995-11-01

    For staff to perform their jobs effectively and efficiently, they must be adequately trained. Well-trained staff are also more likely to be satisfied with their jobs and to remain with a given organization. In addition to hiring staff with relevant backgrounds and skills, critical steps in maintaining adequately trained staff are to analyze skill levels needed for the various tasks that personnel are required to perform and to provide training to improve staff s skill base. This first analysis is commonly referred to as a training needs assessment. Training needs are usually determined by defining the tasks required for a particular job and the associated knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to adequately accomplish these tasks. The Office of Northwestern Area Programs of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Environmental Management (EM) oversees environmental remediation activities in the Chicago, Idaho, Oakland, and Richland Operations Offices. For this organization to effectively carry out its mission, its staff need to be as proficient as possible in the appropriate knowledge and skills. Therefore, a training needs assessment was conducted to determine staff`s level of knowledge and proficiency in various skills. The purpose of the assessment was to: (1) Examine the types of activities or tasks in which staff are involved, (2) Determine the skills needed to perform relevant tasks, and (3) Assess gaps in knowledge and skills for the tasks performed in order to suggest opportunities for skill development.

  17. Operating room manager game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hans, Elias W.; Nieberg, T.

    2007-01-01

    The operating room (OR) department of a hospital forms the heart of the organization, where the single largest cost is incurred. This document presents and reports on the “Operating Room Manager Game,” developed to give insight into managing a large hospital's OR department at various levels of

  18. A Qualitative Assessment and Analysis of Stakeholder Expectations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bullard, Steven

    2003-01-01

    A Department of Defense acquisition program is influenced by a large number of external stakeholders, including operational users, oversight authorities, contractors and suppliers, and interfacing program managers...

  19. Department of Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Drone Integration Pilot Program MEET THE SECRETARY TRANSPORTATION TUESDAY FEATURED NEWS The Briefing Room Connect With ... Carriers - Get a DOT Number Find Your State Transportation Department 5 Star Automobile Crash Test Ratings Office ...

  20. Department of Business Administrati

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2015-08-20

    Aug 20, 2015 ... Department of Business Administration, Olabisi Onabanjo University, Ago-Iwoye, ... strategy and product performance with a special focus on the food and beverage industry in ... for the actions that the leaders will create in.

  1. Department of Education (DOE)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The purpose of this agreement is to assist the U.S. Department of Education in its obligation to ensure that applicants for student financial assistance under Title...

  2. Department of reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-04-01

    The general development of the Department of Reacctor Technology at Risoe during 1981 is presented, ant the activities within the major subject fields are described in some detail. Lists of staff, publications, and computer programs are included. (author)

  3. Administering an Academic Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Donald W.; Sperry, John B.

    1986-01-01

    Clarifies the possible forms of leadership taken by the administrator of an academic department. Discusses such elements as authoritarian leadership, faculty consensus, power and responsibility, input factors, types of decision making, faculty recruiting, and authoritarian versus democratic approach. (CT)

  4. Department of energy technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-04-01

    The general development of the Department of Energy Technology at Risoe during 1982 is presented, and the activities within the major subject fields are described in some detail. List of staff, publications and computer programs are included. (author)

  5. A Citation Tracking System to Facilitate Sponsoring Institution Oversight of ACGME-Accredited Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Timothy R; Poe, John D; Zimmerman, Richard S; Rose, Steven H

    2012-12-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requires the graduate medical education committee and the designated institutional official to ensure that citations for noncompliance with the accreditation standards and institutional trends in citations are reviewed and corrected. To describe a citation tracking system (CTS) that uses Microsoft Office Access to efficiently catalogue, monitor, and document resolution of citations. The CTS was implemented in a sponsoring institution with oversight of 133 ACGME-accredited programs. The designated institutional official and the graduate medical education committee review all program letters of notification and enter citations into the CTS. A program-correction plan is required for each citation and is entered into the database. Open citations and action plans are reviewed by the graduate medical education committee and the designated institutional official on a quarterly basis, with decisions ranging from "closing" the citation to approving the action plan in process to requiring a new or modified action plan. Citation categories and subcategories are accessed on the ACGME website and entered into the CTS to identify trends. All 236 citations received since the 2006 Mayo School of Graduate Medical Education institutional site visit were entered into the CTS. On November 22, 2011, 26 of 236 citations (11%) were in active status with ongoing action plans, and 210 (89%) citations had been resolved and were closed. The CTS uses commercially available software to ensure citations are monitored and addressed and to simplify analysis of citation trends. The approach requires minimal staff time for data input and updates and can be performed without institutional information technology assistance.

  6. Surrogate receptivity to participation in critical illness genetic research: aligning research oversight and stakeholder concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Bradley D; Butler, Kevin; Bolcic-Jankovic, Dragana; Clarridge, Brian R; Kennedy, Carie R; LeBlanc, Jessica; Chandros Hull, Sara

    2015-04-01

    Collection of genetic biospecimens as part of critical illness investigations is increasingly commonplace. Oversight bodies vary in restrictions imposed on genetic research, introducing inconsistencies in study design, potential for sampling bias, and the possibility of being overly prohibitive of this type of research altogether. We undertook this study to better understand whether restrictions on genetic data collection beyond those governing research on cognitively intact subjects reflect the concerns of surrogates for critically ill patients. We analyzed survey data collected from 1,176 patients in nonurgent settings and 437 surrogates representing critically ill adults. Attitudes pertaining to genetic data (familiarity, perceptions, interest in participation, concerns) and demographic information were examined using univariate and multivariate techniques. We explored differences among respondents who were receptive (1,333) and nonreceptive (280) to genetic sample collection. Whereas factors positively associated with receptivity to research participation were "complete trust" in health-care providers (OR, 2.091; 95% CI, 1.544-2.833), upper income strata (OR, 2.319; 95% CI, 1.308-4.114), viewing genetic research "very positively" (OR, 3.524; 95% CI, 2.122-5.852), and expressing "no worry at all" regarding disclosure of results (OR, 2.505; 95% CI, 1.436-4.369), black race was negatively associated with research participation (OR, 0.410; 95% CI, 0.288-0.585). We could detect no difference in receptivity to genetic sample collection comparing ambulatory patients and surrogates (OR, 0.738; 95% CI, 0.511-1.066). Expressing trust in health-care providers and viewing genetic research favorably were associated with increased willingness for study enrollment, while concern regarding breach of confidentiality and black race had the opposite effect. Study setting had no bearing on willingness to participate.

  7. Department of Reactor Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risø National Laboratory, Roskilde

    The general development of the Department of Reactor Technology at Risø during 1981 is presented, and the activities within the major subject fields are described in some detail. Lists of staff, publications, and computer programs are included.......The general development of the Department of Reactor Technology at Risø during 1981 is presented, and the activities within the major subject fields are described in some detail. Lists of staff, publications, and computer programs are included....

  8. Department of Material Studies - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The technology of modifying surfaces of technological materials by means of continuous and pulsed energy and particle beams has been intensely studied for more than 20 years. In some fields, it is currently utilized on a wide scale in industry. Continuous or pulsed ion and plasma beams play a significant role among various approaches used in this area. The research carried by Department P-IX is centered on applications of our two ion implantation facilities (ion implanters) of different kinds and unique sources of high-intensity intense plasma pulses, operated by the Department of Plasma Physics. The Department cooperates closely with Forschungszentrum Rossendorf (FZR, Dresden, Germany) in the field of analytical ion beam techniques and the use of unique ion implantation facilities. The main objectives of the Department are: · the search for new ways of modifying the surface properties of solid materials by means of continuous or pulsed ion and plasma beams and · the implementation of ion implantation techniques in national industries as a method of improving the lifetime of machine parts and tools utilized in industry. In 2008, research was focused on: · ion implantation/plasma treatment of ceramics aimed at improving their wettability in ceramic-metal joints, · ion beam synthesis and plasma pulse activation of superconducting MgB 2 phases, · cobalt and zirconium inclusions in conducting layers produced in oxide insulators (Al 2 O 3 ) by ion implantation and thermal annealing. Research was conducted in cooperation with Department P-V of IPJ, Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (Warsaw), Warsaw University of Technology, Institute of Technology of Materials for Electronics (Warsaw), Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences (Poznan), Institute of Chemical Physics PAS and Forschungszentrum Rossendorf FZR (Dresden, Germany), as well as with some industrial companies. (author)

  9. Regulation and construction of nuclear powerplants: South Texas Nuclear Project. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations of the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce, House of Representatives, Ninety-sixth Congress, Second Session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    On September 23, 1980, the Subcommittee of Oversight and Investigation held a congressional hearing to discuss the regulation and construction of the South Texas Nuclear Power Plant project. Discussion included recommendations to prevent problems, like the problem encountered at Three Mile Island, from occurring during construction and operation. The chairman of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission discussed the procedure for inspection and regulation process. One power plant at the South Texas project experienced significant problems because of an inadequate quality assurance and quality control program. These difficulties caused delay in construction, increased cost, and raised questions of safety. The problems encountered at Three Mile Island and at the first plant of the South Texas project provided the reasons for this congressional hearing

  10. Irradiation Processing Department monthly record report, September 1959

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greninger, A.B.

    1959-10-22

    This document details activities of the irradiation processing department during the month of September, 1959. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: Research and Engineering Operations; Production and Reactor Operations; Facilities Engineering Operation; Employee Relations Operation; and Financial Operation.

  11. Irradiation Processing Department monthly record report, August 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1958-09-19

    This document details activities of the irradiation processing department during the month of August, 1958. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: Research and Engineering Operations; Production and Reactor Operations; Facilities Engineering Operation; Employee Relations Operation; and Financial Operation.

  12. Irradiation Processing Department monthly record report, May 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1958-06-20

    This document details activities of the irradiation processing department during the month of May 1958. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: Research and Engineering Operations; Production and Reactor Operations; Facilities Engineering Operation; Employee Relations Operation; and Financial Operation.

  13. Irradiation Processing Department monthly record report, December 1956

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1957-01-19

    This document details activities of the Irradiation Processing Department during the month of December 1956. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: Research and Engineering Operations; Production and Reactor Operations; Facilities Engineering Operation; Employee Relations Operation; and Financial Operation.

  14. Irradiation Processing Department monthly record report, November 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1958-12-19

    This document details activities of the irradiation processing department during the month of November 1958. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: research and engineering operation; production and reactor operations; facilities engineering operation; employee relations operations; and financial operation.

  15. Irradiation Processing Department monthly record report, July 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1958-08-21

    This document details activities of the irradiation processing department during the month of July, 1958. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: Research and Engineering Operations; Production and Reactor Operations; Facilities Engineering Operation; Employee Relations Operation; and Financial Operation.

  16. Irradiation Processing Department monthly record report, October 1956

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1956-11-21

    This document details activities of the irradiation processing department during the month of October, 1956. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: Research and Engineering Operations; Production and Reactor Operations; Facilities Engineering Operation; Employee Relations Operation; and Financial Operation.

  17. Irradiation Processing Department monthly record report, March 1959

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greninger, A.B.

    1959-04-21

    This document details activities of the irradiation processing department during the month of March, 1959. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: Research and Engineering Operations; Production and Reactor Operations; Facilities Engineering Operation; Employee Relations Operation; and Financial Operation.

  18. Irradiation Processing Department monthly record report, November 1956

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1956-12-20

    This document details activities of the irradiation processing department during the month of November 1956. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: research and engineering operations; production and reactor operations; facilities engineering operation; employee relations operation; and financial operation.

  19. Irradiation Processing Department monthly record report, March 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1957-04-19

    This document details activities of the irradiation processing department during the month of March, 1957. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: Research and Engineering Operations; Production and Reactor Operations; Facilities Engineering Operation; Employee Relations Operation; and Financial Operation.

  20. Irradiation Processing Department monthly record report, January 1959

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greninger, A.B.

    1959-02-20

    This document details activities of the irradiation processing department during the month of January 1959. A general summary is included at the start of the report, after which the report is divided into the following sections: Research and Engineering Operations; Production and Reactor Operations; Facilities Engineering operation; Employee Relations Operation; and Financial Operation.