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Sample records for department national rural

  1. REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF RURAL EDUCATION, NATIONAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATION, OCTOBER, 1967.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ISENBERG, ROBERT M.

    THE GOALS FOR RURAL EDUCATION, THE ACTIVITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT, AND STATISTICAL DATA ABOUT MEMBERSHIP AND FINANCIAL STATUS ARE PRESENTED IN THE MAIN BODY OF THE REPORT. THE APPENDICES INCLUDE--(1) A FINANCIAL STATEMENT, (2) REPORTS FROM THE ADVISORY COMMITTEE TO THE STATE DIRECTORS, FROM THE COMMITTEE ON RURAL LIFE AND EDUCATION, FROM THE…

  2. Department of Rural and Urban Planning, University

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2016-12-14

    Accepted: December 14, 2016. Department of Rural and Urban Planning, University of Zimbabwe .... planning, The maps on URL: ... system that provide answers to many questions concerning any .... required and make a layout or export the.

  3. National Rural Health Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... History of Rural Health Globalization Urban Bias Dependency Theory Political Economy History of Rural Health IV: '60s ... Data Grassroots Action Center Policy Documents Legislative and Regulatory Agenda Medicaid News Response to 2013 OIG CAH ...

  4. Rural development--national improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, R C

    1984-05-01

    Rural development should be viewed as the core of any viable strategy for national development in developing countries where an average 2/3 of the population live in rural areas. Rural development is multisectoral, including economic, sociopolitical, environmental, and cultural aspects of rural life. Initially, the focus is on the provision of basic minimum needs in food, shelter, clothing, health, and education, through optimum use and employment of all available resources, including human labor. The development goal is the total development of the human potential. The hierarchy of goals of development may be shown in the form of an inverted pyramid. At the base are basic minimum needs for subsistence whose fulfillment leads to a higher set of sociopolitical needs and ultimately to the goal of total developmentand the release of creative energies of every individual. If development, as outlined, were to benefit the majority of the people then they would have to participate in decision making which affects their lives. This would require that the people mobilize themselves in the people'ssector. The majority can equitably benefit from development only if they are mobilized effectively. Such mobilization requires raising the consciousness of the people concerning their rights and obligations. All development with the twin objectives of growth with equity could be reduced to restructuring the socioeconomic, and hence political relationships. Desinging and implementing an intergrated approach to rural development is the 1st and fundamental issue of rural development management. The commonly accepted goals and objectives of a target group oriented antipoverty development strategy include: higher productivity and growth in gross national product (GNP); equitable distribution of the benefits of development; provision of basic minimum needs for all; gainful employment; participation in development; self reliance or self sustaining growth and development; maintenance of

  5. New Directions in Rural Education: A National Conference on Rural Education (Perth, Australia, 1979). Conference Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, M.; And Others

    The National Conference on Rural Education, a major event in the 1979 calendar of the Education Department of Western Australia, was held under the auspices of the Centre for Educational Research and Innovation (CERI) of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Educationalists, government, and community representatives…

  6. National Honor For Rural Women

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    NEWLY literate women are taking the lead in eliminating rural poverty through literacy. Ten of the nation’s best newly literate women were selected by’the All-China Women’s Federation to attend a grand prize awards ceremony held in Beijing on September 7, 1996, just before the World Anti-illiteracy Day. The All-China Women’s Federation has set a goal of wiping out illiteracy

  7. Department of National Security Affairs [presentation

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    A slide presentation. The Department of National Security Affairs (NSA) offers fully accredited programs leading to the Master of Arts in Security Studies, as well as a Ph.D. program in Security Studies. In addition to specializing in traditional security domains such as nuclear proliferation, arms control, maritime strategy, interstate wars, insurgency, terrorism and homeland security, the NSA department conducts cutting edge research and education in the areas of cyber warfare, space politi...

  8. Emergency Department of a Rural Hospital in Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Johnson, MD, MPH

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is a paucity of data studying patients and complaints presenting to emergency departments (EDs in low- and middle-income countries. The town of Pedro Vicente Maldonado (PVM is located in the northwestern highlands of Ecuador. Hospital PVM (HPVM is a rural teaching hospital providing family medicine residency training. These physicians provide around-the-clock acute medical care in HPVM’s ED. This study provides a first look at a functioning ED in rural Latin America by reviewing one year of ED visits to HPVM. Methods: All ED visits between April 14, 2013, and April 13, 2014, were included and analyzed, totaling 1,239 patient visits. Data were collected from their electronic medical record and exported into a de-identified Excel® database where it was sorted and categorized. Variables included age, gender, mode of arrival, insurance type, month and day of the week of the service, chief complaint, laboratory and imaging requests, and disposition. We performed descriptive statistics, and where possible, comparisons using Student’s T or chi-square, as appropriate. Results: Of the 1239 total ED visits, 48% were males and 52% females; 93% of the visits were ambulatory, and 7% came by ambulance. Sixty-three percent of the patients had social security insurance. The top three chief complaints were abdominal pain (25.5%, fever (15.1% and trauma (10.8%. Healthcare providers requested labs on 71.3% of patients and imaging on 43.2%. The most frequently requested imaging studies were chest radiograph (14.9%, upper extremity radiograph (9.4%, and electrocardiogram (9.0%. There was no seasonal or day-of-week variability to number of ED patients. The chief complaint of human or animal bite made it more likely the patient would be admitted, and the chief complaint of traumatic injury made it more likely the patient would be transferred. Conclusion: Analysis of patients presenting to a rural ED in Ecuador contributes to the global study

  9. On Promoting the Construction of Model Province of National Rural Informationization in Hubei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengfei Zhang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The construction of model province of national rural informationization, which needs more departments jointly and participants, is a systematic, socialized major project. Hubei provincial government, standing in the angle of planning the province's economic and social development as a whole, proposes the “one Yuan multi-level” development strategy and it has laid a solid foundation to make Hubei province become the construction pilot provinces of “model province of national rural informationization”. In the construction of model province of rural informationization, the open and inclusive concept is of great significance to realize national long-term goals and make the rural information service sustained and long efficient. At the same time, each department and each participation main body coordinate with each other, which realize the integration of rural information service resources and prevent rural information service from redundant and inefficient investment. Therefore, in the construction of model province of national rural informationization, Hubei province need to uphold the open and inclusive concept, further emancipate the mind, and complement each other. It should strengthen organizational leadership, complete the top planning and design, strengthen the department coordination, innovate information services operating mechanism, strengthen integration of information resources and integrated application of service platform, strengthen the system construction and examination management, strengthen the propaganda guidance, and further promote each work of model province carried out smoothly and orderly.

  10. A random spatial sampling method in a rural developing nation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelle C. Kondo; Kent D.W. Bream; Frances K. Barg; Charles C. Branas

    2014-01-01

    Nonrandom sampling of populations in developing nations has limitations and can inaccurately estimate health phenomena, especially among hard-to-reach populations such as rural residents. However, random sampling of rural populations in developing nations can be challenged by incomplete enumeration of the base population. We describe a stratified random sampling method...

  11. National study of emergency department observation services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiler, Jennifer L; Ross, Michael A; Ginde, Adit A

    2011-09-01

    The objective was to describe patient and facility characteristics of emergency department (ED) observation services in the United States. The authors analyzed the 2007 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS). Characteristics of EDs with observation units (OUs) were compared to those without, and patients with a disposition of ED observation were compared to those with a "short-stay" (observational analysis. An estimated 1,746 U.S. EDs (36%) reported having OUs, of which 56% are administratively managed by ED staff. Fifty-two percent of hospitals with ED-managed OUs are in an urban location, and 89% report ED boarding, compared to 29 and 65% of those that do not have an OU. The admission rate is 38% at those with ED-managed OUs and 15% at those without OUs. Of the 15.1% of all ED patients who are kept in the hospital following an ED visit, one-quarter are kept for either a short-stay admission (1.8%) or an ED observation admission (2.1%). Most (82%) ED observation patients were discharged from the ED. ED observation patients were similar to short-stay admission patients in terms of age (median = 52 years for both, interquartile range = 36 to 70 years), self-pay (12% vs. 10%), ambulance arrival (37% vs. 36%), urgent/emergent triage acuity (77% vs. 74%), use of ≥1 ED medication (64% vs.76%), and the most common primary chief complaints and primary diagnoses. Over one-third of U.S. EDs have an OU. Short-stay admission patients have similar characteristics as ED observation patients and may represent an opportunity for the growth of OUs. © 2011 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  12. Rural-Urban Disparities in Child Abuse Management Resources in the Emergency Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Esther K.; Spiro, David M.; Lowe, Robert A.; Newgard, Craig D.; Hall, Michael Kennedy; McConnell, Kenneth John

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize differences in child abuse management resources between urban and rural emergency departments (EDs). Methods: We surveyed ED directors and nurse managers at hospitals in Oregon to gain information about available abuse-related resources. Chi-square analysis was used to test differences between urban and rural EDs.…

  13. Rural-Urban Disparities in Child Abuse Management Resources in the Emergency Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Esther K.; Spiro, David M.; Lowe, Robert A.; Newgard, Craig D.; Hall, Michael Kennedy; McConnell, Kenneth John

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize differences in child abuse management resources between urban and rural emergency departments (EDs). Methods: We surveyed ED directors and nurse managers at hospitals in Oregon to gain information about available abuse-related resources. Chi-square analysis was used to test differences between urban and rural EDs.…

  14. Research on Human Resources Development of Rural Public Service Departments in New Countryside Construction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of defining related concepts concerning human resources in rural public service departments,this paper analyses the overall status quo of human resources in China’s rural public service departments and points out the problems existing in human resources in China’s rural public service departments during new countryside construction as follows:first,the constitution structure is not rational;second,the cultural quality of staff is universally low,and the business capacity remains to be promoted;third,the improvement of human resources development environment lags behind,and the supporting reform is short.In the context of new countryside construction,the opportunities faced by the human resources in China’s rural public service departments are as follows:China has elevated strengthening new countryside construction and rural talents construction as important state development strategy;the ideas of service-oriented government and learning-oriented government are put forward;civil servant system is overhauled.Therefore,I advance the development strategy of human resources in China’s rural public service departments as follows:implement elastic personnel system reform in public service departments(including civil servant positions in department),to form the public service personnel system of "able one comes in,mediocre one moves over and shiftless one steps down";audaciously promote young and middle-aged grass-roots cadres with strong business ability,high political quality,acute judgement and decision-making ability;build learning-oriented grass-roots public service organization,to make the staff in rural pubic service departments study assiduously and progress;broaden horizon,and build the human resources development system geared to international standards;in developed regions,the human resources in grass-roots public service departments should introduce enterprise competition model.

  15. A Rural-Urban Comparison in Emergency Department Visits for U.S. Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wanqing; Mason, Ashley E.; Boyd, Brian; Sikich, Linmarie; Baranek, Grace

    2017-01-01

    We examined rural-urban differences in emergency department visits, and child and clinical characteristics associated with visits for U.S. children aged 3-17 years with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Rural children with ASD were twice more likely to have emergency department visits in urban hospitals than rural children without ASD. The children…

  16. Factors influencing adherence to an emergency department national protocol.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ebben, R.H.A.; Vloet, L.C.M.; Groot, J.M. de; Achterberg, T. van

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify factors that influence emergency nurses' adherence to an emergency department national protocol (EDNP). A survey of emergency nurses (n=200) and physicians with medical end responsibility on an emergency department (n=103) was carried out. Emergency nurses

  17. A cluster randomised trial to assess the impact of clinical pathways on AMI management in rural Australian emergency departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snow Pamela C

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People living in rural Australia are more likely to die in hospital following an acute myocardial infarction than those living in major cities. While several factors, including time taken to access hospital care, contribute to this risk, it is also partially attributable to the lower uptake of evidence-based guidelines for the administration of thrombolytic drugs in rural emergency departments where up to one-third of eligible patients do not receive this life-saving intervention. Clinical pathways have the potential to link evidence to practice by integrating guidelines into local systems, but their impact has been hampered by variable implementation strategies and sub-optimal research designs. The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of a five-step clinical pathways implementation process on the timely and efficient administration of thrombolytic drugs for acute myocardial infarctions managed in rural Australian emergency departments. Methods/Design The design is a two-arm, cluster-randomised trial with rural hospital emergency departments that treat and do not routinely transfer acute myocardial infarction patients. Six rural hospitals in the state of Victoria will participate, with three in the intervention group and three in the control group. Intervention hospitals will participate in a five-step clinical pathway implementation process: engagement of clinicians, pathway development according to local resources and systems, reminders, education, and audit and feedback. Hospitals in the control group will each receive a hard copy of Australian national guidelines for chest pain and acute myocardial infarction management. Each group will include 90 cases to give a power of 80% at 5% significance level for the two primary outcome measures: proportion of those eligible for thrombolysis receiving the drug and time to delivery of thrombolytic drug. Discussion Improved compliance with thrombolytic guidelines via

  18. A Rural-Urban Comparison in Emergency Department Visits for U.S. Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wanqing; Mason, Ashley E; Boyd, Brian; Sikich, Linmarie; Baranek, Grace

    2017-03-01

    We examined rural-urban differences in emergency department visits, and child and clinical characteristics associated with visits for U.S. children aged 3-17 years with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Rural children with ASD were twice more likely to have emergency department visits in urban hospitals than rural children without ASD. The children with ASD in rural areas were economically disadvantaged and concentrated in the South and Midwest regions. Rural children diagnosed with ASD and multiple comorbidities during emergency department visits were 1.6 times as that of urban children. Rural children with ASD, particularly those with multiple comorbidities, require more emergency department services when compared with urban children with ASD.

  19. A random spatial sampling method in a rural developing nation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Michelle C; Bream, Kent D W; Barg, Frances K; Branas, Charles C

    2014-04-10

    Nonrandom sampling of populations in developing nations has limitations and can inaccurately estimate health phenomena, especially among hard-to-reach populations such as rural residents. However, random sampling of rural populations in developing nations can be challenged by incomplete enumeration of the base population. We describe a stratified random sampling method using geographical information system (GIS) software and global positioning system (GPS) technology for application in a health survey in a rural region of Guatemala, as well as a qualitative study of the enumeration process. This method offers an alternative sampling technique that could reduce opportunities for bias in household selection compared to cluster methods. However, its use is subject to issues surrounding survey preparation, technological limitations and in-the-field household selection. Application of this method in remote areas will raise challenges surrounding the boundary delineation process, use and translation of satellite imagery between GIS and GPS, and household selection at each survey point in varying field conditions. This method favors household selection in denser urban areas and in new residential developments. Random spatial sampling methodology can be used to survey a random sample of population in a remote region of a developing nation. Although this method should be further validated and compared with more established methods to determine its utility in social survey applications, it shows promise for use in developing nations with resource-challenged environments where detailed geographic and human census data are less available.

  20. Differences in access to services in rural emergency departments of Quebec and Ontario.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Fleet

    Full Text Available Rural emergency departments (EDs are important safety nets for the 20% of Canadians who live there. A serious problem in access to health care services in these regions has emerged. However, there are considerable geographic disparities in access to trauma center in Canada. The main objective of this project was to compare access to local 24/7 support services in rural EDs in Quebec and Ontario as well as distances to Levels 1 and 2 trauma centers.Rural EDs were identified through the Canadian Healthcare Association's Guide to Canadian Healthcare Facilities. We selected hospitals with 24/7 ED physician coverage and hospitalization beds that were located in rural communities. There were 26 rural EDs in Quebec and 62 in Ontario meeting these criteria. Data were collected from ministries of health, local health authorities, and ED statistics. Fisher's exact test, the t-test or Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test, were performed to compare rural EDs of Quebec and Ontario.All selected EDs of Quebec and Ontario agreed to participate in the study. The number of EDs visits was higher in Quebec than in Ontario (19 322 ± 6 275 vs 13 446 ± 8 056, p = 0.0013. There were no significant differences between Quebec and Ontario's local population and small town population density. Quebec's EDs have better access to advance imaging services such as CT scanner (77% vs 15%, p < .0001 and most the consultant support and ICU (92% vs 31%, p < .0001. Finally, more than 40% of rural EDs in Quebec and Ontario are more than 300 km away from Levels 1 and 2 trauma centers.Considering that Canada has a Universal health care system, the discrepancies between Quebec and Ontario in access to support services are intriguing. A nationwide study is justified to address this issue.

  1. A National Survey of Emergency Department Triage in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göransson, Katarina; Ehrenberg, Anna; Ehnfors, Margareta

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the organisation of and knowledge about triage work in Swedish emergency departments (ED) as a first step to understanding what is necessary for decision support in ED triage systems in Sweden. A national survey using telephone interviews for data collection was used. Results showed great variety in how work regarding ED triage is organised and performed. The variety occurs in several areas including education, personnel performing triage, facilities available and scales used. PMID:14728356

  2. Alternative futures for the Department of Energy National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-02-01

    This Task Force was asked to propose alternate futures for the Department of Energy laboratories noted in the report. The authors` intensive ten months` study revealed multiple missions and sub-missions--traditional missions and new missions--programs and projects--each with factors of merit. They respectively suggest that the essence of what the Department, and particularly the laboratories, should and do stand for: the energy agenda. Under the overarching energy agenda--the labs serving the energy opportunities--they comment on their national security role, the all important energy role, all related environmental roles, the science and engineering underpinning for all the above, a focused economic role, and conclude with governance/organization change recommendations.

  3. Assessment of factors influencing retention in the Philippine National Rural Physician Deployment Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardia Juan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ‘Doctors to the Barrios’ (DTTB Program was launched in 1993 in response to the shortage of doctors in remote communities in the Philippines. While the Program has attracted physicians to work in such areas for the prescribed 2-year period, ongoing monitoring shows that very few chose to remain there for longer and be absorbed by their Local Government Unit (LGU. This assessment was carried out to explore the reasons for the low retention rates and to propose possible strategies to reverse the trend. Methods A mixed methods approach was used comprising a self-administered questionnaire for members of the current cohort of DTTBs, and oral interviews with former DTTBs. Results Among former DTTBs, the wish to serve rural populations was the most widely cited motivation. By comparison, among the current cohort of DTTBs, more than half joined the Program due to return of service obligations; a quarter to help rural populations, and some out of an interest in public health. Those who joined the Program to return service experienced significantly less satisfaction, whilst those who joined out of an interest in public health were significantly more satisfied with their rural work. Those who graduated from medical schools in the National Capital Region were significantly more critical about their compensation and perceived there to be fewer options for leisure in rural areas. With regard to the factors impeding retention, lack of support from the LGU was most frequently mentioned, followed by concerns about changes in compensation upon absorption by the LGU, family issues and career advancement. Conclusions Through improved collaboration with the Department of Health, LGUs need to strengthen the support provided to DTTBs. Priority could be given to those acting out of a desire to help rural populations or having an interest in public health, and those who have trained outside of the National Capital Region. Whether physicians

  4. Assessment of factors influencing retention in the Philippine National Rural Physician Deployment Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardia, Juan Alfonso; Prytherch, Helen; Ronquillo, Kenneth; Nodora, Rodel G; Ruppel, Andreas

    2012-11-20

    The 'Doctors to the Barrios' (DTTB) Program was launched in 1993 in response to the shortage of doctors in remote communities in the Philippines. While the Program has attracted physicians to work in such areas for the prescribed 2-year period, ongoing monitoring shows that very few chose to remain there for longer and be absorbed by their Local Government Unit (LGU). This assessment was carried out to explore the reasons for the low retention rates and to propose possible strategies to reverse the trend. A mixed methods approach was used comprising a self-administered questionnaire for members of the current cohort of DTTBs, and oral interviews with former DTTBs. Among former DTTBs, the wish to serve rural populations was the most widely cited motivation. By comparison, among the current cohort of DTTBs, more than half joined the Program due to return of service obligations; a quarter to help rural populations, and some out of an interest in public health. Those who joined the Program to return service experienced significantly less satisfaction, whilst those who joined out of an interest in public health were significantly more satisfied with their rural work. Those who graduated from medical schools in the National Capital Region were significantly more critical about their compensation and perceived there to be fewer options for leisure in rural areas. With regard to the factors impeding retention, lack of support from the LGU was most frequently mentioned, followed by concerns about changes in compensation upon absorption by the LGU, family issues and career advancement. Through improved collaboration with the Department of Health, LGUs need to strengthen the support provided to DTTBs. Priority could be given to those acting out of a desire to help rural populations or having an interest in public health, and those who have trained outside of the National Capital Region. Whether physicians should be able to use the Program to fulfil return service obligations

  5. Technology integration project: Environmental Restoration Technologies Department Sandia National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, C.V.; Burford, T.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Restoration Technologies; Allen, C.A. [Tech Reps, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Restoration Technologies Department is developing environmental restoration technologies through funding form the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Science and Technology. Initially, this technology development has been through the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID). It is currently being developed through the Contaminant Plume containment and Remediation Focus Area, the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area, and the Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Cross-Cutting Program. This Technology Integration Project (TIP) was responsible for transferring MWLID-developed technologies for routine use by environmental restoration groups throughout the DOE complex and commercializing these technologies to the private sector. The MWLID`s technology transfer/commercialization successes were achieved by involving private industry in development, demonstration, and technology transfer/commercialization activities; gathering and disseminating information about MWLID activities and technologies; and promoting stakeholder and regulatory involvement. From FY91 through FY95, 30 Technical Task Plans (TTPs) were funded. From these TTPs, the MWLID can claim 15 technology transfer/commercialization successes. Another seven technology transfer/commercialization successes are expected. With the changeover to the focus areas, the TIP continued the technology transfer/commercialization efforts begun under the MWLID.

  6. Heat Stress Illness Emergency Department Visits in National Environmental Public Health Tracking States, 2005-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fechter-Leggett, Ethan D; Vaidyanathan, Ambarish; Choudhary, Ekta

    2016-02-01

    Variability of heat stress illness (HSI) by urbanicity and climate region has rarely been considered in previous HSI studies. We investigated temporal and geographic trends in HSI emergency department (ED) visits in CDC Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (Tracking) states for 2005-2010. We obtained county-level HSI ED visit data for 14 Tracking states. We used the National Center for Health Statistics Urban-Rural Classification Scheme to categorize counties by urbanicity as (1) large central metropolitan (LCM), (2) large fringe metropolitan, (3) small-medium metropolitan, or (4) nonmetropolitan (NM). We also assigned counties to one of six US climate regions. Negative binomial regression was used to examine trends in HSI ED visits over time across all counties and by urbanicity for each climate region, adjusting for pertinent variables. During 2005-2010, there were 98,462 HSI ED visits in the 14 states. ED visits for HSI decreased 3.0% (p < 0.01) per year. Age-adjusted incidence rates of HSI ED visits increased from most urban to most rural. Overall, ED visits were significantly higher for NM areas (IRR = 1.41, p < 0.01) than for LCM areas. The same pattern was observed in all six climate regions; compared with LCM, NM areas had from 14 to 90% more ED visits for HSI. These findings of significantly increased HSI ED visit rates in more rural settings suggest a need to consider HSI ED visit variability by county urbanicity and climate region when designing and implementing local HSI preventive measures and interventions.

  7. Heat Stress Illness Emergency Department Visits in National Environmental Public Health Tracking States, 2005–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fechter-Leggett, Ethan D.; Vaidyanathan, Ambarish; Choudhary, Ekta

    2015-01-01

    Variability of heat stress illness (HSI) by urbanicity and climate region has rarely been considered in previous HSI studies. We investigated temporal and geographic trends in HSI emergency department (ED) visits in CDC Environmental Public Health Tracking Network (Tracking) states for 2005–2010. We obtained county-level HSI ED visit data for 14 Tracking states. We used the National Center for Health Statistics Urban-Rural Classification Scheme to categorize counties by urbanicity as 1) large central metropolitan (LCM), 2) large fringe metropolitan (LFM), 3) small–medium metropolitan (SMM), or 4) nonmetropolitan (NM). We also assigned counties to one of six US climate regions. Negative binomial regression was used to examine trends in HSI ED visits over time across all counties and by urbanicity for each climate region, adjusting for pertinent variables. During 2005–2010, there were 98,462 HSI ED visits in the 14 states. ED visits for HSI decreased 3.0 % (p < 0.01) per year. Age-adjusted incidence rates of HSI ED visits increased from most urban to most rural. Overall, ED visits were significantly higher for NM areas (IRR = 1.41, p < 0.01) than for LCM areas. The same pattern was observed in all six climate regions; compared with LCM, NM areas had from 14 % to 90 % more ED visits for HSI. These findings of significantly increased HSI ED visit rates in more rural settings suggest a need to consider HSI ED visit variability by county urbanicity and climate region when designing and implementing local HSI preventive measures and interventions. PMID:26205070

  8. 77 FR 51543 - National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration National Advisory Committee on Rural Health...-second meeting. Name: National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services. Dates and Times...:15 a.m. Place: Radisson Hotel & Suites Austin Downtown, 111 East Cesar Chavez Street, Austin,...

  9. Rural telemedicine infrastructure and services in the Department of Cauca, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendón, Alvaro; Martínez, Andrés; Dulcey, María F; Seoane, Joaquín; Shoemaker, Richard G; Villarroel, Valentín; López, Diego M; Simó, Javier

    2005-08-01

    The development of telemedicine programs for the public health network of the Department of Cauca, Colombia, (Department is the major political and territorial division of the country. The Department of Cauca is located on the Pacific coast in the southwest of the country.) would make it possible to satisfy many identified needs such as medical coordination, continuing education, epidemiologic surveillance, patient referral and counterreferral, and an end to the feeling of isolation among professionals who work in rural health centers. Nevertheless, geographic, economic, and social difficulties, and the lack of a telecommunication infrastructure in areas with these characteristics present a challenge of such magnitude that the majority of existing telemedicine projects in Colombia have been centered in urban or other areas which present fewer difficulties. In the municipality of Silvia, the University of Cauca has established a prototype network using the "Hispano-American Health Link" (EHAS in Spanish) program technologies, which uses very high frequency (VHF) and wireless fidelity, (WiFi, a set of standards for wireless local area networks) radio systems for the deployment of low-cost voice and data networks. Over this network information access and exchange services have been developed, in order to meet the needs identified above. The objectives were to obtain information about the development of the project's activities and their possible impact. Project telecommunication network and information services are described, and the results and conclusions of the first evaluation are presented.

  10. Patient satisfaction with triage nursing in a rural hospital emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Regina; Neal, Carolyn; Davis, Barbara A; Almes, Elizabeth; Whitledge, Lynn; Littlepage, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    This study examined what relationships or differences exist between patient and nurse characteristics, satisfaction with triage nurse caring behaviors, general satisfaction with the triage nurse, and intent to return to a rural hospital emergency department (ED). The ED, located at a 401-bed teaching hospital in a small southern city, averages 28,000 visits annually. Samples of ED nurses (N = 11) and ED patients (N = 65) were asked to respond to demographic forms and the Consumer Emergency Care Satisfaction Scale (CECSS) Adapted. Findings indicated that the nurse's acuity rating and the patient's perception of condition had a positive relationship. The patient's perception of condition, patient satisfaction, and caring satisfaction were predictors of intent to return. When patients perceived themselves as seriously ill or injured, they expressed less intent to return to that ED.

  11. The prevalence and correlates of lifetime psychiatric disorders and trauma exposures in urban and rural settings: results from the national comorbidity survey replication (NCS-R.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer S McCall-Hosenfeld

    Full Text Available Distinctions between rural and urban environments produce different frequencies of traumatic exposures and psychiatric disorders. We examine the prevalence of psychiatric disorders and frequency of trauma exposures by position on the rural-urban continuum.The National Comorbidity Survey Replication (NCS-R was used to evaluate psychiatric disorders among a nationally-representative sample of the U.S. population. Rurality was designated using the Department of Agriculture's 2003 rural-urban continuum codes (RUCC, which differentiate counties into levels of rurality by population density and adjacency to metropolitan areas. Lifetime psychiatric disorders included post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD, anxiety disorders, major depressive disorder, mood disorders, impulse-control disorders, and substance abuse. Trauma exposures were classified as war-related, accident-related, disaster-related, interpersonal or other. Weighted logistic regression models examined the odds of psychiatric disorders and trauma exposures by position on the rural-urban continuum, adjusted for relevant covariates.75% of participants were metropolitan, 12.2% were suburban, and 12.8% were from rural counties. The most common disorder reported was any anxiety disorder (38.5%. Drug abuse was more common among metropolitan (8.7%, p = 0.018, compared to nonmetropolitan (5.1% suburban, 6.1% rural participants. A one-category increase in rurality was associated with decreased odds for war-related trauma (aOR = 0.86, 95%CI 0.78-0.95. Rurality was not associated with risk for any other lifetime psychiatric disorders or trauma exposure.Contrary to the expectation of some rural primary care providers, the frequencies of most psychiatric disorders and trauma exposures are similar across the rural-urban continuum, reinforcing calls to improve mental healthcare access in resource-poor rural communities.

  12. Administering the Hybrid Department: A National Survey of Combined Communications/Theatre Arts Departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halperin-Royer, Ellen

    1998-01-01

    Studies characteristics of hybrid speech/theater departments that describe themselves as highly cooperative and collegial. Presents perceived advantages and disadvantages of having a combined speech/theater department and results of questions pertaining to administrative difficulties in combined departments. Discusses alternative theories about…

  13. Department

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2016-09-20

    Sep 20, 2016 ... Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, Kibabii University. 2. Department .... be seen that average rainfall exhibited a cyclic pattern with a reducing trend under both scenarios .... Department of Meteorology, University.

  14. Prevalence of Unrecognised Depression Among Outpatient Department Attendees of A Rural Hospital in Delhi, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Charu; Kishore, Jugal; Agarwal, Paras; Singh, Satya Vir

    2013-01-01

    Background: Depression is one of the most common mental disorders affecting 121 million people in the world and it frequently goes unrecognised among patients. This study was carried out to find out the prevalence of unrecognised depression among out patient attendees of a rural hospital in Delhi, India and its socio demographic correlates. Material and Methods: This is a rural hospital based cross sectional study among 395 patients attending different non-psychiatric outpatient departments. Data was collected by using predesigned & pretested questionnaire and prevalence of depression was determined by PRIME MD (PHQ-9) and analysed by using SPSS version 16. Data was analysed using chi-square test with “p” value < 0.05 considered as significant. Independent association of socio demographic variables were determined by multi–variate logistic regression analysis using WHO EPI INFO software. Results: The study included 67% females and 33% males with mean age 31.73 + 12 years. Most were Hindu (80%), married (75%), illiterate (47%) and were unemployed (65%). Out of 395 patients, 119 (30.1%) were diagnosed to be having depression. Out of 119 patients who were found depressed, 25 (21%) were already diagnosed case of depression and 94 (79%) were detected by using PRIME-MD, giving prevalence of unrecognised depression 23.8%. Among socio demographic factors, gender, religion, education status and being widow/separated were found to be statistically significantly associated with hidden depression among the patients. Conclusion: Unrecognized depression is a common in non-psychiatric OPDs. There is a need to screen patients presenting in such OPDs for depression. PMID:24179898

  15. Infrastructure Development and the National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme: Evidence from Bankura, West Bengal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Roy (Jitendra); A.S. Bedi (Arjun Singh)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction. The immediate goal of the National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme (NREGS) is to ensure a social safety net for vulnerable groups by providing a fall-back source of employment when other alternatives are scarce. However, its long-term goals are to create durable rural

  16. Infrastructure Development and the National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme: Evidence from Bankura, West Bengal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Roy (Jitendra); A.S. Bedi (Arjun Singh)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction. The immediate goal of the National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme (NREGS) is to ensure a social safety net for vulnerable groups by providing a fall-back source of employment when other alternatives are scarce. However, its long-term goals are to create durable rural ass

  17. 2011 Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control (DNREC) Lidar: Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Terrapoint collected LiDAR for over 177 square kilometers of the Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge in Kent County, Delaware. The nominal pulse spacing for this...

  18. The National Rural Information Clearinghouse of the National Rural Center. [Interim Report], March 1976 through November 1977. Final Report, December 1977 through September 1978.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinson, Elizabeth A.; Chewning, David L.

    Summarizing the organizational structure of operations and giving examples of the kinds of services provided, this report describes the establishment, work methods, and achievements of the National Rural Information Clearinghouse. The clearinghouse program maintains a specialized library, a reference service, and a technical assistance service…

  19. Depart

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2017-01-26

    Jan 26, 2017 ... Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, ... informal automobile workshops in virtually every open space in Nigerian cities that ..... plantation to encourage a green society and.

  20. Infrastructure Development and the National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme: Evidence from Bankura, West Bengal

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction. The immediate goal of the National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme (NREGS) is to ensure a social safety net for vulnerable groups by providing a fall-back source of employment when other alternatives are scarce. However, its long-term goals are to create durable rural assets and infrastructure which meet local needs and help address chronic poverty and to foster a model of governance based on the principles of grass-root democracy and transparency (Ministry of Rura...

  1. Mid-term evaluation of the NRECA (National Rural Electric Cooperative Association) Central America Rural Electrification Support Program (CARES)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlack, R.D. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Jones, H.G. (Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Inc., TN (USA)); Garcia, A. III (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (USA). Dept. of Agricultural Engineering); Flores, E. (Flores (Edgar), Guatemala City (Guatemala))

    1990-09-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory was requested by the Regional Office for Central America and Panama to conduct a mid-term evaluation of the Cares Project, which is being implemented by the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association. This evaluation was conducted over a three week period by a four person team. Overall, the project has had numerous successes and is highly valued by local counterpart utilities and USAID Missions. Notwithstanding the significant results of the project, changes can be made in certain operating procedures and in the direction of some programmatic activities that can lead to an even more effective project.

  2. Department

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2017-05-25

    May 25, 2017 ... Department of Animal production Federal University of Technology Minna – Niger state,. Nigeria ... principles by poultry farmers in Kwara State, Nigeria. The ma .... usually incur by broiler and layer farmers ... A multi-stage sampling technique .... their birds under intensive care, which is ... husbandry system.

  3. Educational Facility Evaluations of Primary Schools in Rural Honduras: Departments of Cortes and Meambar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council of Educational Facility Planners, International, Scottsdale, AZ.

    A team of 11 educational facility planners and architects from the United States and Canada conducted a facility evaluation of schools in the rural areas of Meambar and Cortes, Honduras. Team members were all part of the Council of Educational Facility Planners, International and traveled to Honduras under the auspices of a Christian mission…

  4. Urban-rural mental health differences in Great Britain: findings from the National Morbidity Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paykel, E; Abbott, R; Jenkins, R; Brugha, T; Meltzer, H

    2003-01-01

    Studies of urban-rural differences in prevalence of non-psychotic mental disorder have not given consistent findings. Such differences have received relatively little study in Great Britain. Data from 9777 subjects in the Household Survey of the National Morbidity Survey of Great Britain were analysed for differences between urban, semi-rural, and rural areas. Psychiatric morbidity was assessed by scores on the Revised Clinical Interview Schedule (CIS-R), together with alcohol dependence, drug dependence, and receipt of treatment from general practitioners. Associations with other characteristics were examined by logistic regression. Urban subjects had higher rates than rural of CIS-R morbidity, alcohol dependence, and drug dependence, with semi-rural subjects intermediate. Urban subjects also tended to be members of more deprived social groups, with more adverse living circumstances and greater life stress--factors themselves associated with disorder. Urban-rural differences in alcohol and drug dependence were no longer significant after adjustment for these factors by logistic regression, and differences on CIS-R morbidity were considerably reduced. There were no differences in treatment. There are considerable British urban-rural differences in mental health, which may largely be attributable to more adverse urban social environments.

  5. Revised National Estimates of Emergency Department Visits for Sepsis in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Henry E; Jones, Allison R; Donnelly, John P

    2017-09-01

    The emergency department is an important venue for initial sepsis recognition and care. We sought to determine contemporary estimates of the epidemiology of U.S. emergency department visits for sepsis. Analysis of data from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey. U.S. emergency department visits, 2009-2011. Adult (age, ≥ 18 yr) emergency department sepsis patients. We defined serious infection as an emergency department diagnosis of a serious infection or a triage temperature greater than 38°C or less than 36°C. We defined three emergency department sepsis classifications: 1) original emergency department sepsis-serious infection plus emergency department diagnosis of organ dysfunction, endotracheal intubation, or systolic blood pressure less than or equal to 90 mm Hg or explicit sepsis emergency department diagnoses; 2) quick Sequential Organ Failure Assessment emergency department sepsis-serious infection plus presence of at least two "quick" Sequential Organ Failure Assessment criteria (Glasgow Coma Scale ≤ 14, respiratory rate ≥ 22 breaths/min, or systolic blood pressure ≤ 100 mm Hg); and 3) revised emergency department sepsis-original or quick Sequential Organ Failure Assessment emergency department sepsis. None. We used survey design and weighting variables to produce national estimates of annual adult emergency department visits using updated sepsis classifications. Over 2009-2011, there were 103,257,516 annual adult emergency department visits. The estimated number of emergency department sepsis visits were as follows: 1) original emergency department sepsis 665,319 (0.64%; 95% CI, 0.57-0.73); 2) quick Sequential Organ Failure Assessment emergency department sepsis 318,832 (0.31%; 95% CI, 0.26-0.37); and 3) revised emergency department sepsis 847,868 (0.82%; 95% CI, 0.74-0.91). Sepsis continues to present a major burden to U.S. emergency departments, affecting up to nearly 850,000 emergency department visits annually. Updated

  6. What Every Department Chair Should Know about the Dean: Findings from Four National Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowker, Lee H.; Lynch, David M.

    Information about deans that may be helpful to department chairs is presented, based on the findings of four national surveys of deans. The surveys of social science, graduate, continuing education, and arts and sciences deans covered the deans' role in resource allocation to departments, teaching and research support for faculty, tenure and…

  7. Keystone National Policy Dialogue on Department of the Navy Hazardous Waste Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-18

    AD-A236 322 i| Keystone National Policy Dialogue on m| Department of the Navy ilHazardous Waste Mngmn _ Final Report I! U-I MarchU18, 199 i D...status and strengthen the institutional ability to "look" across programs. I I I I I I I I I I vii I I I I I KEYSTONE NATIONAL POLICY DIALOGUE ON THE...Twenty-three individuals were invited to participate Ln the Keystone National Policy Dialogue on the Department or the ::av Hazardous Waste Management

  8. Tourist preferences for ecotourism in rural communities adjacent to Kruger National Park: A choice experiment approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaminuka, P.; Groeneveld, R.A.; Selomane, A.O.; Ierland, van E.C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyses the potential for development of ecotourism in rural communities adjacent to Kruger National Park (KNP) in South Africa. We determine preferences of tourists, according to origin and income levels, for ecotourism and their marginal willingness to pay (MWTP) for three ecotourism a

  9. Rural Electrification of Coban Municipality, Alta Verapaz Department (Guatemala) using Intigis Model; Electrificacion Rural en el Municipio de Coban, Departamento de Alta Verapaz (Guatemala) segun el Modelo Intigis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominguez Bravo, J.; Pinedo Pascua, I.; Auger Campos, C.; Cedillo Heine, A.; Gil Garcia, M.

    2009-05-15

    The present project started as an educational exercise for the Renewable Energies and Environment Masters given by the Polytechnic University of Madrid (UPM). It has been developed in collaboration with the research centre CIEMAT, the NGO Energy without Borders (ESF) and the University UPM, with the purpose of analyzing in a real context the application of Geographic Information Systems in renewable energies regional integration. The final aim of our study is to provide the isolated communities, specifically 13 communities in Alta Verapaz (Department of Coban, Guatemala), with the necessary conditions of electrification. This improvement will make possible the sustainable development of the area. Through the analysis of the geographic, technical and economic information gathered, using the IntiGIS methodology we will identify which is the most suitable autonomous generating system to cover the basic needs of the rural population in these Guatemalan communities. (Author) 9 refs.

  10. Research programs at the Department of Energy National Laboratories. Volume 2: Laboratory matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    For nearly fifty years, the US national laboratories, under the direction of the Department of Energy, have maintained a tradition of outstanding scientific research and innovative technological development. With the end of the Cold War, their roles have undergone profound changes. Although many of their original priorities remain--stewardship of the nation`s nuclear stockpile, for example--pressing budget constraints and new federal mandates have altered their focus. Promotion of energy efficiency, environmental restoration, human health, and technology partnerships with the goal of enhancing US economic and technological competitiveness are key new priorities. The multiprogram national laboratories offer unparalleled expertise in meeting the challenge of changing priorities. This volume aims to demonstrate each laboratory`s uniqueness in applying this expertise. It describes the laboratories` activities in eleven broad areas of research that most or all share in common. Each section of this volume is devoted to a single laboratory. Those included are: Argonne National Laboratory; Brookhaven National Laboratory; Idaho National Engineering Laboratory; Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Los Alamos National Laboratory; National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Pacific Northwest Laboratory; and Sandia National Laboratories. The information in this volume was provided by the multiprogram national laboratories and compiled at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory.

  11. 78 FR 19307 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-29

    .... Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Natchez Trace Parkway, Tupelo, MS that meet the definition... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Natchez Trace Parkway, Tupelo, MS AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior....

  12. 78 FR 50093 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... the Interior, National Park Service, Grand Teton National Park, Moose, WY, that meet the definition of... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Grand Teton National Park, Moose, WY AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior....

  13. The majority of surgical departments adhere to national Danish guidelines for surveillance after colorectal cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Jakob; Roikjær, Ole; Jess, Per

    2013-01-01

    In 2003 the use of post-operative surveillance (POS) after surgery for colorectal cancer (CRC) in Denmark was studied. Diversity in the choice and frequency of surveillance modalities was found. Subsequently, the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group (DCCG) has published guidelines for POS. In the same...... period, the number of departments performing CRC surgery has been reduced by 50% nationally. The aim of the present study was to describe the POS after CRC in Denmark following a reduction in the number of departments performing operations for CRC and the DCCG's publication of national recommendations...

  14. Department of Defense Enhanced Particulate Matter Surveillance Program (EPMSP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    relation to five rural IMPROVE sites (Dome Land NWA, Joshua Tree NP, Bosque del Apache NWR, Salt Creek, and San Andres NWR) and five urban STN sites...The five rural sites are at Dome Land National Wildlife Area (NWA), Joshua Tree National Park, Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Salt...Department of Defense (DoD) lands in the southwestern U.S. in relation to five rural IMPROVE sites (Dome Land NWA, Joshua Tree NP, Bosque del Apache NWR

  15. Mental health professionals' perspectives of telemental health with remote and rural First Nations communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Kerri; O'Donnell, Susan; Coulson, Heather; Kakepetum-Schultz, Tina

    2011-01-01

    We conducted an online survey and interviews amongst mental health workers in Canada who reported experience in working with rural and remote First Nations (although not necessarily telemental health). Sixty-three respondents (of the 164) to the online survey reported experience in working with clients in remote and rural First Nations. Only 16 of the online survey respondents with remote and rural First Nations experience reported having received training in videoconferencing use. When asked how frequently they used videoconferencing with clients, 51% reported never using it, 19% used it once every few months and 10% reported using it a few times a month. Approximately 50% of participants reported finding it useful. Approximately 38% found the technology easy or very easy to use, and 15% found it very difficult. Individual in-depth interviews were also conducted with professionals who had First Nations telemental health experience specifically (n = 5). A quantitative data analysis was used to explore their perceptions of usefulness and ease of use of telemental health, as well as the relationships among these constructs. Advantages, disadvantages and challenges in using the technology were identified from the qualitative data. Promising ways forward include incorporating traditional practices and the Seven Teachings into telemental health services.

  16. Local Governments in Rural West Bengal, India and their Coordination with Line Departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaskar Chakrabarti

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In India, the 73rd constitutional amendment of 1992 decentralises agriculture, irrigation, health, education along with 23 other items to the Panchayats, the village level self-government body. It is envisaged that the three-tier Panchayat system at the District, Block and the Village level would coordinate with different ‘line departments’ of the government for planning various schemes and their implementation. In West Bengal, a state in eastern India, where the Panchayats were revitalised before the constitutional amendment, the initial years were marked by strong coordination between the Panchayats and other departments, especially land and agriculture, making West Bengal a ‘model’ case for the Panchayats. However, where service delivery through the Panchayats has been criticised in recent years, the disjuncture between Panchayats and the line departments is a cause for alarm. In this paper, we search for the causes behind the low level of coordination between government departments and the Panchayat at each tier. We analyse the complex process of organisational coordination that characterises decentralisation, and show how decision making in local governments is nested within various levels of hierarchy. The study focuses on the formal structures of coordination and control with regard to decision-making between the Panchayats and the line departments. We show how these processes work out in practice. These involve lack of role definition, problems of accountability, and politics over access to resources and relations of power within, as well as outside, the Panchayat.

  17. Local Governments in Rural West Bengal, India and their Coordination with Line Departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaskar Chakrabarti

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In India, the 73rd constitutional amendment of 1992 decentralises agriculture, irrigation, health, education along with 23 other items to the Panchayats, the village level self-government body. It is envisaged that the three-tier Panchayat system at the District, Block and the Village level would coordinate with different ‘line departments’ of the government for planning various schemes and their implementation. In West Bengal, a state in eastern India, where the Panchayats were revitalised before the constitutional amendment, the initial years were marked by strong coordination between the Panchayats and other departments, especially land and agriculture, making West Bengal a ‘model’ case for the Panchayats. However, where service delivery through the Panchayats has been criticised in recent years, the disjuncture between Panchayats and the line departments is a cause for alarm. In this paper, we search for the causes behind the low level of coordination between government departments and the Panchayat at each tier. We analyse the complex process of organisational coordination that characterises decentralisation, and show how decision making in local governments is nested within various levels of hierarchy. The study focuses on the formal structures of coordination and control with regard to decision-making between the Panchayats and the line departments. We show how these processes work out in practice. These involve lack of role definition, problems of accountability, and politics over access to resources and relations of power within, as well as outside, the Panchayat.

  18. Acute admissions to medical departments. A comparison between an urban and a rural district

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J C; Evald, T; Elbrønd, R;

    1995-01-01

    To compare hospitalization into medical departments, acute admissions into a city hospital and into a district hospital were compared prospectively over a two-week period. Patients referred to the city hospital were on average older, were more frequently living alone and they had a greater amount...

  19. The Local Beneath the National and Global - Institutional Education, Credentialed Natural Resource Management (NRM) and Rural Community (Un) Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Janice

    2011-01-01

    The implementation of strategies for national and global outcomes has in some instances left rural community resources and practices devalued and disturbed and rural people demoralised with the result that local community sustainability has been compromised. Formal education in Australia is about many things, but is rarely sympathetic towards…

  20. Post-Secondary Distance Education in a Contemporary Colonial Context: Experiences of Students in a Rural First Nation in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Jesse; Burton, Kevin; Lockhart, Emily; O'Donnell, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Post-secondary distance education gives students and their families living in remote and rural regions the option to stay in their communities while they study instead of moving closer to the universities in cities. Post-secondary distance education is an option in many rural and remote First Nation (Indigenous) communities in Canada; however…

  1. U.S. Department of Energy Commercial Reference Building Models of the National Building Stock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deru, M.; Field, K.; Studer, D.; Benne, K.; Griffith, B.; Torcellini, P.; Liu, B.; Halverson, M.; Winiarski, D.; Rosenberg, M.; Yazdanian, M.; Huang, J.; Crawley, D.

    2011-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Technologies Program has set the aggressive goal of producing marketable net-zero energy buildings by 2025. This goal will require collaboration between the DOE laboratories and the building industry. We developed standard or reference energy models for the most common commercial buildings to serve as starting points for energy efficiency research. These models represent fairly realistic buildings and typical construction practices. Fifteen commercial building types and one multifamily residential building were determined by consensus between DOE, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and represent approximately two-thirds of the commercial building stock.

  2. Department of the Interior Environmental Assessment: Public Deer Hunting on Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes to initiate an annual public hunt for white-tailed deer on Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge. It is the purpose of the...

  3. 75 FR 15695 - Renewal of Department of Defense Federal Advisory Committee; Board of Visitors National Defense...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-30

    ... Defense gives notice that it is renewing the charter for the Board of Visitors National Defense University (hereafter referred to as the Board). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jim Freeman, Deputy Committee... of the Secretary Renewal of Department of Defense Federal Advisory Committee; Board of...

  4. 77 FR 44673 - Meeting of the Department of Justice National Motor Vehicle Title Information System Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-30

    ... Vehicle Title Information System (NMVTIS) Federal Advisory Committee to discuss various issues relating to... of Justice Programs Meeting of the Department of Justice National Motor Vehicle Title Information System Federal Advisory Committee AGENCY: Office of Justice Programs (OJP), Justice. ACTION: Notice...

  5. Rural Ambulatory Access for Semi-Urgent Care and the Relationship of Distance to an Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Ashley; Hoegh, Andy; Kuehl, Damon

    2015-07-01

    Availability of timely access to ambulatory care for semi-urgent medical concerns in rural and suburban locales is unknown. Further distance to an emergency department (ED) may require rural clinics to serve as surrogate EDs in their region, and make it more likely for these clinics to offer timely appointments. We determined the availability of urgent (within 48 hours) access to ambulatory care for non-established visiting patients, and assessed the effect of insurance and ability to pay cash on a patient's success in scheduling an appointment in rural and suburban Eastern United States. We also assessed how proximity to EDs and urgent care (UC) facilities influenced access to semi-urgent ambulatory appointments at primary care facilities. The Appalachian Trail, which runs from Georgia to Maine, was used as a transect to select 190 rural and suburban primary care clinics located along its entire length. We calculated their location and distance to the nearest hospital-based ED or UC via Google Earth. A sham patient representing a non-established visiting patient called each clinic over a four-month period (2013), requesting an appointment in the next 48 hours for one of three scripted clinical vignettes representing common semi-urgent ambulatory concerns. We randomized the scenarios and insurance statuses (insured vs. uninsured). Each clinic was contacted twice, once with the caller representing an insured patient, once with the caller representing an uninsured patient. When the caller was representing an uninsured patient, any required upfront payment was requested from each clinic. One hundred dollars was used as a cutoff between the uninsured as a distinction between those able to afford substantial upfront sums and those who could not. To determine if proximity to other sources of care impacted a clinic's ability to grant an appointment, distance to the nearest ED or UC was modeled as a dichotomous variable using 30 miles as the divider. Of 380 requests, 96

  6. 78 FR 78380 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Fort...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... Service, Fort Bowie National Historic Site, Bowie, AZ AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Fort Bowie National Historic... control of these human remains should submit a written request to Fort Bowie National Historic Site. If...

  7. 76 FR 7232 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Dinosaur...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-09

    ... Service, Dinosaur National Monument, Dinosaur, CO AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Dinosaur National Monument, Dinosaur... culturally affiliated with the human remains may contact Dinosaur National Monument. Disposition of the...

  8. The influences of Taiwan's National Health Insurance on women's choice of prenatal care facility: Investigation of differences between rural and non-rural areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chi-Liang

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taiwan's National Health Insurance (NHI, implemented in 1995, substantially increased the number of health care facilities that can deliver free prenatal care. Because of the increase in such facilities, it is usually assumed that women would have more choices regarding prenatal care facilities and thus experience reduction in travel cost. Nevertheless, there has been no research exploring these issues in the literature. This study compares how Taiwan's NHI program may have influenced choice of prenatal care facility and perception regarding convenience in transportation for obtaining such care for women in rural and non-rural areas in Taiwan. Methods Based on data collected by a national survey conducted by Taiwan's National Health Research Institutes (NHRI in 2000, we tried to compare how women chose prenatal care facility before and after Taiwan's National Health Insurance program was implemented. Basing our analysis on how women answered questionnaire items regarding "the type of major health care facility used and convenience of transportation to and from prenatal care facility," we investigated whether there were disparities in how women in rural and non-rural areas chose prenatal care facilities and felt about the transportation, and whether the NHI had different influences for the two groups of women. Results After NHI, women in rural areas were more likely than before to choose large hospitals for prenatal care services. For women in rural areas, the relative probability of choosing large hospitals to choosing non-hospital settings in 1998–1999 was about 6.54 times of that in 1990–1992. In contrast, no such change was found in women in non-rural areas. For a woman in a non-rural area, she was significantly more likely to perceive the transportation to and from prenatal care facilities to be very convenient between 1998 and 1999 than in the period between 1990 and 1992. No such improvement was found for women in

  9. The Tallinn Department of the Estonian National Museum: History and Developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piret Õunapuu

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The Estonian National Museum (ENM, established in 1909 in Tartu,developed quickly and comprised a large membership in the country – the members living in Tallinn were active in heritage collection and awareness-raising activities, and formed a separate department which gradually gained independence. As an inevitable outcome, the Tallinn Department finally separated from the parent museum. Despite organisational difficulties and political circumstances, the department managed to supplement collections and arrange spectacular events. In 1919, the Tallinn Department of the ENM became an independent Estonian Museum Society in Tallinn, i.e. the Estonian Museum in Tallinn, which, in the course of time, became more inclined toward art and developed into the Art Museum of Estonia.

  10. Achievement of national cholesterol education program goals by patients with dyslipidemia in rural ambulatory care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qayyum, Rehan; Chattha, Ashraf A; Bhullar, Navneet; Katsetos, Manny; Schulman, Peter

    2006-01-01

    The Third Adult Treatment Panel (ATP III) of the National Cholesterol Education Program provides guidelines for managing dyslipidemia; however, studies from large centers find that most dyslipidemic patients fail to achieve management goals. Few data exist on lipid management in rural settings. To determine the proportion of rural dyslipidemic patients achieving ATP III goals, records of 461 patients were reviewed from 4 practices. Only 54% of the patients with dyslipidemia achieved ATP III goals. Patients with diabetes or with a family history of premature coronary heart disease were less likely to achieve ATP III goals (odds ratio 0.56; 95% confidence interval, 0.38-0.84 and odds ratio 0.42; 95% confidence interval, 0.25-0.71, respectively). Patients taking statins were more likely to achieve goals (odds ratio 3.23; 95% confidence interval, 2.13-4.89). These results indicate that a significant proportion of patients with dyslipidemia in rural practices do not achieve management goals. Strategies to improve lipid management in rural practices are needed.

  11. Expectations of health care quality among rural Maya villagers in Sololá Department, Guatemala: a qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippolito, Matthew; Chary, Anita; Daniel, Michael; Barnoya, Joaquin; Monroe, Anne; Eakin, Michelle

    2017-03-14

    Indigenous populations in Latin America have worse health outcomes than their nonindigenous counterparts. Differences in access to and use of biomedical resources may explain some of the observed disparities. Efforts to address these differences could be aided in part by better understanding the socio-medical contexts in which they occur. We performed a qualitative analysis of field notes collected during a 2008 program evaluation of a health post in a rural Maya village in Sololá Department, Guatemala. Forty-one interviews were conducted among a community-based convenience sample of adult men and women. Interviews focused on experiences, perceptions, and behaviors related to the local biomedical and ethnomedical health care resources. Penetrance of the local health post was high, with most (90%) of respondents having accessed it within the prior five years. The prevailing attitude toward the health post was positive. We identified facilitators and barriers to health post use that corresponded with three thematic areas: clinic operations, visits and consultations, and medical resources. Proximity to the home, free consultations and medications, and social support services were among the most commonly cited facilitators. Barriers included limited clinic hours, medication stock-outs, provision of care that did not meet patient expectations, and unavailability of diagnostic tests. In a rural Maya community in Guatemala, operational and quality-based factors, independent of sociocultural considerations, informed the perception of and decision to access biomedical resources. Interventions that address these factors may increase health care utilization and alleviate some of the health disparities that accompany indigeneity in Guatemala and similar contexts.

  12. Role of AYUSH Doctors in Filling the Gap of Health Workforce Inequality in Rural India with Special Reference to National Rural Health Mission: A Situational Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janmejaya Samal

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Paucity of health workforce in rural India has always been a problem. Lack of interest of modern allopathic graduates in serving the rural poor has worsened the situation little more. The National Rural Health Mission brought an innovative concept of mainstreaming of AYUSH and revitalization of local health tradition by collocating AYUSH doctors at various rural health facilities such as community health centers and primary health centers. In this context a study was aimed, based on secondary data, to make a situational analysis of health workforce in rural India and thereby analyzing the status and role of AYUSH Doctors in filling this gap of health workforce inequality. As on 01/01/2010 there were 61% of Ayurveda, 31.40% of Homoeopathy, 6.50% of Unani, 0.90% of Siddha and 0.20% of Naturopathy doctors serving in India. AYUSH facilities had been collocated in 240 district hospitals, 1716 community health centers and 8938 primary health centers in 2010. About 39.8% District Hospitals (DH, 38% Community Health Centers (CHC and 38.2% Primary Health Centers (PHC had been collocated with AYUSH facilities by 2010. About 30.9 lakhs rural population were being served by district hospitals, 4.3 lakhs of rural population were being served by CHCs and 0.8 lakhs of rural population were being served by PHCs in various states/UTs wherever the corresponding facilities exist. Equitable distribution of health workforce is of paramount importance in achieving both the horizontal and vertical health equity in rural India which is doable with proper implementation of AYUSH workforce.

  13. National Institutes of Health Funding to Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery at U.S. Medical Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestre, Jason; Ahn, Jaimo; Levin, L Scott

    2017-01-18

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is the largest supporter of biomedical research in the U.S., yet its contribution to orthopaedic research is poorly understood. In this study, we analyzed the portfolio of NIH funding to departments of orthopaedic surgery at U.S. medical schools. The NIH RePORT (Research Portfolio Online Reporting Tools) database was queried for NIH grants awarded to departments of orthopaedic surgery in 2014. Funding totals were determined for award mechanisms and NIH institutes. Trends in NIH funding were determined for 2005 to 2014 and compared with total NIH extramural research funding. Funding awarded to orthopaedic surgery departments was compared with that awarded to departments of other surgical specialties in 2014. Characteristics of NIH-funded principal investigators were obtained from department web sites. In 2014, 183 grants were awarded to 132 investigators at 44 departments of orthopaedic surgery. From 2005 to 2014, NIH funding increased 24.3%, to $54,608,264 (p = 0.030), but the rates of increase seen did not differ significantly from those of NIH extramural research funding as a whole (p = 0.141). Most (72.6%) of the NIH funding was awarded through the R01 mechanism, with a median annual award of $343,980 (interquartile range [IQR], $38,372). The majority (51.1%) of the total funds supported basic science research, followed by translational (33.0%), clinical (10.0%), and educational (5.9%) research. NIH-funded orthopaedic principal investigators were predominately scientists whose degree was a PhD (71.1%) and who were male (79.5%). Eleven NIH institutes were represented, with the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) providing the preponderance (74.2%) of the funding. In 2014, orthopaedic surgery ranked below the surgical departments of general surgery, ophthalmology, obstetrics and gynecology, otolaryngology, and urology in terms of NIH funding received. The percentage increase of NIH

  14. Developing of National Accreditation Model for Rural Health Centers in Iran Health System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Sadegh Tabrizi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The primary health care has notable effects on community health and accreditation is one of the appropriate evaluation methods that led to health system performance improvement, therefore, this study aims to developing of national accreditation model for rural health centers in Iran Health System.Firstly the suitable accreditation models selected to benchmarking worldwide via systematic review, the related books and medical university's web site surveyed and some interviews hold with experts. Then the obtain standards surveyed from the experts' perspectives via Delphi technique. Finally, the obtainedmodel assessedvia the experts' perspective and pilot study.The researchers identified JCAHO and CCHSA as the most excellent models. The obtained standards and their quality accepted from experts' perspective and pilot study, and finally the number of 55 standards acquired.The designed model has standards with acceptable quality and quantity, and researchers' hopeful that its application in rural health centers led to continues quality improvement.

  15. 78 FR 50097 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Casa...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-16

    ... Service, Casa Grande Ruins National Monument, Coolidge, AZ AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Casa Grande Ruins National... these human remains and associated funerary objects should submit a written request to Casa Grande Ruins...

  16. 75 FR 45656 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Siuslaw National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-03

    ... National Forest is responsible for notifying the Confederated Tribes of the Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Siuslaw National Forest, Waldport, OR AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. Notice...

  17. Double reading rates and quality assurance practices in Norwegian hospital radiology departments: two parallel national surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauritzen, Peter M; Hurlen, Petter; Sandbæk, Gunnar; Gulbrandsen, Pål

    2015-01-01

    Double reading as a quality assurance (QA) tool is employed extensively in Norwegian hospital radiology departments. The practice is resource consuming and regularly debated. To investigate the rates of double reading in Norwegian hospital radiology departments, to identify department characteristics associated with double reading rates, and to investigate associations between double reading and other quality improvement. We issued two parallel national surveys to management and to consultant radiologists, respectively. Management was defined as the chief medical officer and/or the head of the radiology department. The management survey covered staffing, perceived resource situation, double reading, guidelines, and quality improvement. The radiologist survey served to validate management responses concerning double reading. Management survey items concerning practices of quality improvement were organized into three indices reflecting different quality approaches, namely: appropriateness of investigations; personal performance feedback; and system performance feedback. The response rates of the surveys were 100% (45/45) for management and 55% (266/483) for radiologists. Of all exams read by consultants, 33% were double read. The double reading rate was highest in university hospital departments (59%), intermediate in other teaching departments (30%), and lowest in non-teaching departments (11%) (P = 0.01). Among the quality indices, mean scores were highest on appropriateness index (68%), intermediate on the person index (56%), and lowest on system index (37%). There were no correlations between double reading rates and scores on any of the quality indices. The rate of double reading in Norwegian hospital radiology is significantly correlated to department teaching status, but not to other practices of quality work. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  18. Rural Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Rural Health Topics & States Topics View more Rural Aging The nation's population is aging, and with that change comes increased healthcare needs. ... Disease Control and Prevention report, The State of Aging and Health in America 2013 , the population 65 ...

  19. Managing bioterrorism mass casualties in an emergency department: lessons learned from a rural community hospital disaster drill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinson, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Bioterrorism represents a threat for which most emergency departments (EDs) are ill prepared. In order to develop an evidence-based plan for ED and hospital management of contaminated patients, a review was conducted of the most effective strategies developed during the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic, as well as Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and military guidelines on biowarfare. Six basic steps were identified: 1) lock down the hospital and control access to the ED; 2) protect emergency care personnel with appropriate personal protective equipment; 3) decontaminate and triage patients; 4) isolate patients; 5) treat patients with appropriate medications or measures, including decontamination of wounds; and 6) use restrictive admission and transfer guidelines. By emphasizing these six basic concepts, a rural ED passed an annual state-run bioterrorism mass-casualty drill. The drill provided health care personnel with the knowledge and skills necessary to prepare for future bioterrorism casualties. These same concepts could also be used to manage highly virulent viral or bacterial outbreaks.

  20. 77 FR 59021 - License Amendment Request for the U.S. Department of the Army, National Ground Intelligence...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION License Amendment Request for the U.S. Department of the Army, National Ground Intelligence Center.... This license is held by the U.S. Department of the Army, National Ground Intelligence Center...

  1. 20 CFR 656.2 - Description of the Immigration and Nationality Act and of the Department of Labor's role thereunder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Description of the Immigration and Nationality Act and of the Department of Labor's role thereunder. 656.2 Section 656.2 Employees' Benefits... Immigration and Nationality Act and of the Department of Labor's role thereunder. (a) Description of the...

  2. National targets, process transformation and local consequences in an NHS emergency department (ED): a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezyridis, Paraskevas; Timmons, Stephen

    2014-06-13

    In the attempt to reduce waiting times in emergency departments, various national health services have used benchmarking and the optimisation of patient flows. The aim of this study was to examine staff attitudes and experience of providing emergency care following the introduction of a 4 hour wait target, focusing on clinical, organisational and spatial issues. A qualitative research design was used and semi-structured interviews were conducted with 28 clinical, managerial and administrative staff members working in an inner-city emergency department. A thematic analysis method was employed and NVivo 8 qualitative data analysis software was used to code and manage the emerging themes. The wait target came to regulate the individual and collective timescales of healthcare work. It has compartmentalised the previous unitary network of emergency department clinicians and their workspace. It has also speeded up clinical performance and patient throughput. It has disturbed professional hierarchies and facilitated the development of new professional roles. A new clinical information system complemented these reconfigurations by supporting advanced patient tracking, better awareness of time, and continuous, real-time management of emergency department staff. The interviewees had concerns that this target-oriented way of working forces them to have a less personal relationship with their patients. The imposition of a wait-target in response to a perceived "crisis" of patients' dissatisfaction led to the development of a new and sophisticated way of working in the emergency department, but with deep and unintended consequences. We show that there is a dynamic interrelation of the social and the technical in the complex environment of the ED. While the 4 hour wait target raised the profile of the emergency department in the hospital, the added pressure on clinicians has caused some concerns over the future of their relationships with their patients and colleagues. To

  3. Research Notes ~ Development of a Defense Learning Network for the Canadian Department of National Defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Margueratt

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The idea of an online learning network for members of the Canadian Department of National Defence (DND has surfaced several times over the past decade and a half, but has never reached the level of development seen in the current Defence Learning Network (DLN initiative. Past attempts at creating a learning network failed primarily because of the lack of a champion within DND’s senior leadership, and the ability of traditional residential learning to meet the training and education needs of the Department. Recently, however, the rising cost of residential learning, coupled with recognition of the benefits afforded by distance learning, particularly learning flexibility and the ability of learners to engaged in requisite learning at their home base rather than at dispersed locations across Canada, have greatly enhanced the attractiveness of distance learning as a viable learning delivery option.

  4. headspace: National Youth Mental Health Foundation: making headway with rural young people and their mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Craig A; O'Brien, Matthew S; McGorry, Patrick D

    2007-04-01

    Mental health is the number one health issue affecting young people in Australia today, yet only one in four of these young people receive professional help. Approximately 14% of 12- to 17-year-olds and 27% of 18- to 25-year-olds experience mental health problems each year. However, many do not have ready access to treatment or are reluctant to seek that help. These issues might be exacerbated in the rural and remote regions of Australia where sociocultural barriers such as stigma, lack of anonymity and logistic difficulties including cost and availability of transport can hinder young people accessing mental health services. headspace: the National Youth Mental Health Foundation has been funded to address these issues. headspace will provide funding for the establishment of communities of youth services across Australia, provide national and local community awareness campaigns and plans, establish a centre of excellence that will identify and disseminate evidence-based practice in addressing youth mental health issues, and translate findings into education and training programs that are targeted at service providers to work with youth mental health. The communities of youth services will build the capacity of local communities to identify early, and provide effective responses to, young people aged 12-25 years with mental health and related substance use disorders. Specific approaches in rural, regional and remote areas will be developed as well as specific programs to involve young Indigenous people.

  5. Managing the advanced cancer patient in the Australian emergency department environment : Findings from a national survey of emergency department clinicians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.J. Weiland (Tracey); Lane, H. (Heather); G.A. Jelinek; C.H.L. Marck (Claudia); Weil, J. (Jennifer); M. Boughey (Mark); Philip, J. (Jennifer)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Delivery of care to people with advanced cancer in the emergency department (ED) is complicated by competing service demands, workloads and physical design constraints. We explored emergency clinicians’ attitudes to the ED environment when caring for patients who present with

  6. Early death after discharge from emergency departments: analysis of national US insurance claims data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermeyer, Ziad; Cohn, Brent; Wilson, Michael; Jena, Anupam B; Cutler, David M

    2017-02-01

     To measure incidence of early death after discharge from emergency departments, and explore potential sources of variation in risk by measurable aspects of hospitals and patients.  Retrospective cohort study.  Claims data from the US Medicare program, covering visits to an emergency department, 2007-12.  Nationally representative 20% sample of Medicare fee for service beneficiaries. As the focus was on generally healthy people living in the community, patients in nursing facilities, aged ≥90, receiving palliative or hospice care, or with a diagnosis of a life limiting illnesses, either during emergency department visits (for example, myocardial infarction) or in the year before (for example, malignancy) were excluded.  Death within seven days after discharge from the emergency department, excluding patients transferred or admitted as inpatients.  Among discharged patients, 0.12% (12 375/10 093 678, in the 20% sample over 2007-12) died within seven days, or 10 093 per year nationally. Mean age at death was 69. Leading causes of death on death certificates were atherosclerotic heart disease (13.6%), myocardial infarction (10.3%), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (9.6%). Some 2.3% died of narcotic overdose, largely after visits for musculoskeletal problems. Hospitals in the lowest fifth of rates of inpatient admission from the emergency department had the highest rates of early death (0.27%)-3.4 times higher than hospitals in the highest fifth (0.08%)-despite the fact that hospitals with low admission rates served healthier populations, as measured by overall seven day mortality among all comers to the emergency department. Small increases in admission rate were linked to large decreases in risk. In multivariate analysis, emergency departments that saw higher volumes of patients (odds ratio 0.84, 95% confidence interval 0.81 to 0.86) and those with higher charges for visits (0.75, 0.74 to 0.77) had significantly fewer deaths. Certain

  7. A study evaluating knowledge, attitude and practices of practitioners in the medicine department of tertiary care teaching rural hospital with respect to antihypertensives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jatin Patel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate knowledge, attitude and practices of practitioners in the medicine department of tertiary care teaching rural hospital with respect to antihypertensives and find out the disparity between the recommended and actual practices for pharmacological management. Methods: It was survey type of study, carried out using feedback questionnaire related to use of antihypertensives. Total 25 consultants were included in the study. Results: It was found that in mild hypertension single drug and two drugs in combination were preferred by 15 and 10 practitioners respectively. In moderate hypertension single drug, two drugs in combination, and greater than two drugs were preferred by 3, 13, and 7 practitioners respectively. In severe hypertension two drugs in combination and greater than two drugs were preferred by 16 and 9 practitioners respectively; none preferred single drug. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors /angiotensin receptor blockers, beta blockers, Calcium channel blockers, diuretics were preferred as first line drug by 7, 4, 8, and 16 practitioners respectively. Most commonly preferred combination was Losartan and amlodipine by 16 practitioners. In pregnancy nifedipine was preferred as the first line drug while in elderly diuretics were preferred. In hypertensive patients with age less than 40 years all practitioners preferred ACEIs/ARBs. In diabetics ACEIs/ARBs was preferred by all practitioners. Each practitioner claimed to follow Joint National Committee (JNC 7 criteria. Cost of drug was an important consideration in all their prescribing patterns. Conclusion: The knowledge, attitudes and practices followed by the practitioners of Dhiraj hospital were satisfactory and guidelines oriented. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(3.000: 715-717

  8. Department of the Interior : Draft Environmental Statement : DES 74-54 : Proposed Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Range Wilderness Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a draft of an analysis of the environmental impact wilderness designation would pose for the Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Range Wilderness...

  9. Challenges of maternal mortality reduction and opportunities under National Rural Health Mission--a critical appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Satish

    2005-01-01

    Maternal Mortality Ratio (MMR) continues to remain high in our country without showing any declining trend over a period of two decades. The proportions of maternal deaths contributed by direct obstetric causes have also remained more or less the same in rural areas. There is a strong need to improve coverage of antenatal care, promote institutional deliveries and provide emergency obstetric care. Delays occur in seeking care for obstetric complications and levels of 'met obstetric need' continue to be low in many parts of the country. Most of the First Referral Units (FRUs) and CHCs function at sub-optimal level in the country. National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) offers institutional mechanism and strategic options to reduce high MMR. 'Janani Suraksha Yojna', strengthening of CHCs (as per Indian Public Health standards) to offer 24 hours quality services including that of anesthetists and Accredited Social Health Activist (ASHA) are important proposals in this regard. District Health Mission can play an important role in monitoring maternal deaths occurring in hospitals or in community and thus create a social momentum to prevent and reduce maternal deaths. NRHM, however, depends largely on Panchayati Raj Institutions for effective implementation of proposed interventions and utilization of resources. In most parts of our country, State Governments have not empowered PRIs with real devolution of power. Therefore, much needs to be done locally to build the capacity of PRIs and develop state-specific guidelines in operational terms to implement interventions under NRHM for reducing maternal mortality ratio.

  10. Post-Secondary Distance Education in a Contemporary Colonial Context: Experiences of Students in a Rural First Nation in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Burton

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Post-secondary distance education gives students and their families living in remote and rural regions the option to stay in their communities while they study instead of moving closer to the universities in cities. Post-secondary distance education is an option in many rural and remote First Nation (Indigenous communities in Canada; however there are many challenges to successful adoption in these communities. There are also many opportunities for post-secondary institutions to expand their abilities and capacity in developing and delivering appropriate content supporting these unique, self-governing environments in Canada. We explore the experiences of students from a rural First Nation in Canada with post-secondary distance education, focusing on how different delivery methods offer both opportunities and challenges for community-based students. The study is situated in the context of contemporary colonialism in Canada.

  11. State and use of monitoring and evaluation systems in national and provincial departments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Futhi Umlaw

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Since 2009, South Africa has seen a major shift in emphasis concerning monitoring and evaluation (M&E systems. This shift was partially stimulated by the South African government being faced with a number of pressures, key amongst which were persistent poverty and inequality and widespread service delivery protests. These pressures resulted ina greater willingness by government to address the poor quality of public services, and other governance problems that needed a greater focus on M&E to address these challenges. This led to the establishment of the Department of Performance Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME in early 2010. A comprehensive survey on the state and use of M&E systems in national and provincial government was conducted by the DPME as an attempt to understand the M&E landscape since 1994. The results were used to make informed policy and programme decisions. This paper outlines the findings of the survey.

  12. Departments of corrections as purchasers of community-based treatment: a national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiak, Sheryl Pimlott; Arfken, Cynthia L; Gibson, Erica Shifflet

    2009-06-01

    Community-based substance abuse treatment for offenders has been shown to reduce both substance use and recidivism. One strategy to ensure treatment availability for offenders is to have each state's Department of Corrections (DOC) fund treatment directly. Purchasing treatment implies regulation, but DOC as both a purchaser and regulator of community-based services has been underexamined. This national survey of administrators from the Single State Authority (SSA) and DOC in each state found DOCs purchase treatment in 35 states, with most states purchasing it directly from community-based providers utilizing a variety of funding sources. Fewer states reported DOCs purchased ancillary services than SSAs (68% vs. 81%). Although both DOCs and SSAs had workforce and program requirements, there were differences within and between states. Most (41/42) SSA administrators reported a strong relationship with DOC. This report represents the first step in describing the availability, mechanisms, and regulations of these two publicly funded community-based treatment systems.

  13. The Health and Well-Being of Children in Rural Areas: A Portrait of the Nation 2007. The National Survey of Children's Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of Health and Human Services, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The National Survey of Children's Health (NSCH) provides a unique resource with which to analyze the health status, health care use, activities, and family and community environments experienced by children in rural and urban areas. The NSCH was designed to measure the health and well-being of children from birth through age 17 in the United…

  14. National rural health mission--opportunity for Indian Public Health Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Sandip Kumar

    2005-01-01

    Indian Public Health Association (IPHA) welcomes the release of National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) documents. It suggests that manpower requirements of the Community Health Centre (CHC) should be rationally determined on the basis of work and patient load of the CHC. Importance should be given on availability of simple & life saving equipment, female staff when male staff is not available. Safe drinking water, an adequate sanitation and excreta disposal facility through Panchayet Raj Institution (PRI) or privatization was proposed. Accredited Social Health Activist (ASHA) has been accepted more streamlining based on the community was suggested. Capacity building or training should be CHC based for grass-root level functionaries with incentive to Medical officer (MO). IPHA proposes to extend support in capacity building, development of manual for ASHA & other categories of health professional as well as Program Implementation Plan (PIP).

  15. Patients Prefer Boarding in Inpatient Hallways: Correlation with the National Emergency Department Overcrowding Score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Richards

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The boarding of patients in Emergency Department (ED hallways when no inpatient beds are available is a major cause of ED crowding. One solution is to board admitted patients in an inpatient rather than ED hallway. We surveyed patients to determine their preference and correlated their responses to real-time National Emergency Department Overcrowding Score (NEDOCS. Methods. This was a survey of admitted patients in the ED of an urban university level I trauma center serving a community of 5 million about their personal preferences regarding boarding. Real-time NEDOCS was calculated at the time each survey was conducted. Results. 99 total surveys were completed during October 2010, 42 (42% patients preferred to be boarded in an inpatient hallway, 33 (33% preferred the ED hallway, and 24 (24% had no preference. Mean (±SD NEDOCS (range 0–200 was 136±46 for patients preferring inpatient boarding, 112±39 for ED boarding, and 119±43 without preference. Male patients preferred inpatient hallway boarding significantly more than females. Preference for inpatient boarding was associated with a significantly higher NEDOCS. Conclusions. In this survey study, patients prefer inpatient hallway boarding when the hospital is at or above capacity. Males prefer inpatient hallway boarding more than females. The preference for inpatient hallway boarding increases as the ED becomes more crowded.

  16. 76 FR 38719 - Interim Notice of Funding Availability for the Department of Transportation's National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    ... under the Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act for... geographic distribution of grant funds, an appropriate balance in addressing the needs of urban and rural... United States. (iv) Environmental Sustainability: Improving energy efficiency, reducing dependence on...

  17. Distance Learning for Food Security and Rural Development: A Perspective from the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Scott; Gasperini, Lavinia; Rudgard, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    The distance learning experiences of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization led to the following suggestions for applying distance learning strategies to the challenges of food security and rural development: use distance learning for the right reasons, be sensitive to context, use existing infrastructure, engage stakeholders, and…

  18. Violence and Drug Use in Rural Teens: National Prevalence Estimates from the 2003 Youth Risk Behavior Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Andrew O.; Mink, Michael D.; Harun, Nusrat; Moore, Charity G.; Martin, Amy B.; Bennett, Kevin J.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare national estimates of drug use and exposure to violence between rural and urban teens. Methods: Twenty-eight dependent variables from the 2003 Youth Risk Behavior Survey were used to compare violent activities, victimization, suicidal behavior, tobacco use, alcohol use, and illegal drug use…

  19. Strategy for Upgrading Preparedness in Small and Rural Communities to Meet National Preparedness Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    Advisors: Lauren Fernandez Sam Clovis THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK i REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting...Thesis Co-Advisor Sam Clovis Thesis Co-Advisor Harold A. Trinkunas, PhD Chairman, Department of National Security Affairs iv THIS...Russ Jack; my advisors, Lauren Fernandez and Sam Clovis , for their patience and guidance in this thesis work; and my classmates for their never-ending

  20. U.S. Department of Energy Consequence Management Under the National Response Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Don Van Etten and Paul Guss

    2009-02-03

    Under the Nuclear/Radiological Incident Annex of the National Response Framework, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has specific responsibilities as a coordinating agency and for leading interagency response elements in the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC). Emergency response planning focuses on rapidly providing response elements in stages after being notified of a nuclear/radiological incident. The use of Home Teams during the field team deployment period and recent advances in collecting and transmitting data from the field directly to assessment assets has greatly improved incident assessment times for public protection decisions. The DOE’s Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) based in Las Vegas, Nevada, has successfully deployed technical and logistical support for this mission at national exercises such as Top Officials Exercise IV (TOPOFF IV). In a unique response situation, DOE will provide advance contingency support to NASA during the scheduled launch in the fall of 2009 of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). The MSL rover will carry a radioisotope power system that generates electricity from the heat of plutonium’s radioactive decay. DOE assets and contingency planning will provide a pre-incident response posture for rapid early plume phase assessment in the highly unlikely launch anomaly.

  1. Child Nutritional Status by Rural/Urban Residence: A Cross-National Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Kiira; Heaton, Tim B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Rural children in developing countries have poor health outcomes in comparison with urban children. This paper considers 4 questions regarding the rural/urban difference, namely: (1) do individual-level characteristics account for rural/urban differences in child nutritional status; (2) do community-level characteristics account for…

  2. Past and projected rural land conversion in the US at state, regional, and national levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eric M. White; Anita T. Morzillo; Ralph J. Alig

    2009-01-01

    The developed land area of the United States increased by 14,2 million hectares between 1982 and 2003. Along with a projected U.S. population increase to more than 360 million individuals by 2030, is an expected continuation of expanding rural land development. Related to population growth, rural land development and the associated loss of rural open space are expected...

  3. United States Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Sandia Field Office NESHAP Annual Report CY2014 for Sandia National Laboratories New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    evelo, stacie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Miller, Mark L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This report provides a summary of the radionuclide releases from the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration facilities at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) during Calendar Year (CY) 2014, including the data, calculations, and supporting documentation for demonstrating compliance with 40 Code of Federal Regulation (CFR) 61, Subpart H--NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR EMISSIONS OF RADIONUCLIDES OTHER THAN RADON FROM DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FACILITIES. A description is given of the sources and their contributions to the overall dose assessment. In addition, the maximally exposed individual (MEI) radiological dose calculation and the population dose to local and regional residents are discussed.

  4. Portrait of trauma care in Quebec's rural emergency departments and identification of priority intervention needs to improve the quality of care: a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleet, Richard; Tounkara, Fatoumata Korika; Ouimet, Mathieu; Dupuis, Gilles; Poitras, Julien; Tanguay, Alain; Fortin, Jean Paul; Trottier, Jean-Guy; Ouellet, Jean; Lortie, Gilles; Plant, Jeff; Morris, Judy; Chauny, Jean Marc; Lauzier, François; Légaré, France

    2016-04-20

    Trauma remains the primary cause of death in individuals under 40 years of age in Canada. In Quebec, the Trauma Care Continuum (TCC) has been demonstrated to be effective in decreasing the mortality rate among trauma victims. Although rural citizens are at greater risk for trauma and trauma death, no empirical data concerning the effectiveness of the TCC for the rural population in Quebec are available. The emergency departments (EDs) are important safety nets for rural citizens. However, our data indicate that access to diagnostic support services, such as intensive care units and CT is limited in rural areas. The objectives are to (1) draw a portrait of trauma services in rural EDs; (2) explore geographical variations in trauma care in Quebec; (3) identify adaptable factors that could reduce variation; and (4) establish consensus solutions for improving the quality of care. The study will take place from November 2015 to November 2018. A mixed methodology (qualitative and quantitative) will be used. We will include data (2009-2013) from all trauma victims treated in the 26 rural EDs and tertiary/secondary care centres in Quebec. To meet objectives 1 and 2, data will be gathered from the Ministry's Database of the Quebec Trauma Registry Information System. For objectives 3 and 4, the project will use the Delphi method to develop consensus solutions for improving the quality of trauma care in rural areas. Data will be analysed using a Poisson regression to compare mortality rate during hospital stay or death on ED arrival (objectives 1 and 2). Average scores and 95% CI will be calculated for the Delphi questionnaire (objectives 3 and 4). This protocol has been approved by CSSS Alphonse-Desjardins research ethics committee (Project MP-HDL-2016-003). The results will be published in peer-reviewed journals. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  5. Ear Infection and Its Associated Risk Factors in First Nations and Rural School-Aged Canadian Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandima P. Karunanayake

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Ear infections in children are a major health problem and may be associated with hearing impairment and delayed language development. Objective. To determine the prevalence and the associated risk factors of ear infections in children 6–17 years old residing on two reserves and rural areas in the province of Saskatchewan. Methodology. Data were provided from two rural cross-sectional children studies. Outcome variable of interest was presence/absence of an ear infection. Logistic regression analysis was conducted to examine the relationship between ear infection and the other covariates. Results. The prevalence of ear infection was 57.8% for rural Caucasian children and 43.6% for First Nations children living on-reserve. First Nations children had a lower risk of ear infection. Ear infection prevalence was positively associated with younger age; first born in the family; self-reported physician-diagnosed tonsillitis; self-reported physician-diagnosed asthma; and any respiratory related allergy. Protective effect of breastfeeding longer than three months was observed on the prevalence of ear infection. Conclusions. While ear infection is a prevalent condition of childhood, First Nations children were less likely to have a history of ear infections when compared to their rural Caucasian counterparts.

  6. Changes in Emergency Department Imaging: Perspectives From National Patient Surveys Over Two Decades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Hanna, Tarek N; Babb, James S; Duszak, Richard

    2017-05-05

    To use patient-generated data to assess the changing role of emergency department (ED) imaging for a spectrum of clinical indications. The Household Component Emergency Room Visits File was obtained from 1996 through 2014 for the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, a nationally representative survey of US households. Percentage of visits associated with various imaging modalities was computed annually, stratified by respondents' self-reported primary condition during the visit. Modality characteristics were assessed for conditions most frequently imaged in 1996 or 2014. For most conditions, use of advanced imaging (defined by Medical Expenditure Panel Survey as CT or MRI) in the ED increased significantly (P calculus (from 0% to 48.5%) and headache (from 17.5% to 33.3%), which were the most commonly imaged conditions by CT or MRI in 2014. For ultrasound, the most commonly imaged condition was pregnancy in 1996 (32.9%) and 2014 (44.5%). No other condition was associated with ultrasound in >20% of visits. For radiography, the most commonly imaged conditions were extremity wounds and fractures in 1996 (range 84.5%-90.2%) and 2014 (range 93.4%-93.9%). Use of radiography decreased for urinary calculus from 67.4% to 24.2% (P advanced imaging increased significantly, though growth was variable across conditions. In certain scenarios, advanced ED imaging is adding to, rather than replacing, other modalities. Ultrasound and radiography utilization was overall unchanged. That national patient survey data mirror traditional claims-based studies suggests an expanded role for patient-generated data in identifying areas of imaging utilization that may benefit from targeted optimization efforts. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Awareness Regarding Anemia, Gestational Diabetes and Pregnancy Induced Hypertension among Antenatal Women Attending Outpatient Department in a Rural Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    George M; George N; Ramesh N

    2016-01-01

    "Introduction: Antenatal mothers should not only be aware of normal antenatal care but also be aware about common morbidities like anemia, gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH), etc., which can have adverse pregnancy outcomes. This study was conducted to assess the awareness regarding anemia, GDM and PIH among antenatal women attending outpatient clinic in a rural hospital. Methods: This was a cross sectional study done during the period of October-Novem...

  8. Pediatric Concussion Management in the Emergency Department: A National Survey of Parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamarripa, Angela; Clark, Sarah J; Rogers, Alexander J; Wang-Flores, Helena; Stanley, Rachel M

    2017-02-01

    To examine parental expectations and beliefs about diagnosis and management of pediatric concussion. We conducted a cross-sectional web-based survey of a nationally representative panel of US parents in March 2014. Parents of 10- to 17-year-old children responded to questions about their expectations and beliefs about diagnosis and management of pediatric concussion in the emergency department (ED). Weighted percentages for descriptive statistics were calculated, and χ2 statistics were used for bivariate analysis. Survey participation was 53%, and of 912 parent respondents with a child 10-17 years of age who were presented with a scenario of their child having mild symptoms of concussion, 42% would seek immediate ED care. Parents who would seek immediate ED care for this scenario were more likely than parents who would consult their child's usual provider or wait at home to "definitely expect" imaging (65% vs 21%), definitive diagnosis of concussion (77% vs 61%), a timeline for return to activity (80% vs 60%), and a signed return to play form (55% vs 41%). Many parents who bring children to the ED following a possible concussion are likely to expect comprehensive and definitive care, including imaging, a definitive diagnosis, a timeline for return to activity, and a signed return to play form. To manage these expectations, healthcare providers should continue to educate parents about the evaluation and management of concussion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Farmers or rural workers? A current social characterization of rural families of Atamisqui Department, Santiago del Estero ¿Campesinos o asalariados rurales? Una caracterización social actual de las familias rurales del Departamento de Atamisqui, Santiago del Estero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustina Desalvo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It is often said that Santiago del Estero concentrates a large number of farmers. In this paper, we present a first approach to the subject in order to begin to demystify the idea. To do this, we use data obtained from the Familiar Characterization Form prepared by PROINDER in 2009 - implemented by the Secretariat for Family Agriculture and Rural Development, Delegation Santiago del Estero- and interviews conducted in villages of Atamisqui department in April 2010. The form used allows us, among other things, measure the weight that have different sources of income in total household income. This, together with the evidence gathered in interviews, allows us to know how live analyzed families. It notes that the most important support comes from the seasonal employee working developed in different rural activities (though especially in the deflowering of corn and harvesting blueberries and various transfers (pensions, social benefits, remittances. These data would indicate, in this particular case, that the subject usually characterized as farmer hides, in reality, the atamisqueña rural working class.Suele afirmarse que Santiago del Estero concentra un elevado número de campesinos. En este artículo presentamos una primera aproximación al tema con el propósito de comenzar a desmitificar dicha idea. Para ello, recurrimos a datos arrojados por el Formulario de Caracterización Familiar del PROINDER, año 2009 -ejecutado desde la Subsecretaría de Desarrollo Rural y Agricultura Familiar de Santiago del Estero- y entrevistas realizadas en parajes rurales del departamento de Atamisqui en abril del 2010. El Formulario utilizado nos permite, entre otras cosas, mensurar el peso que las distintas fuentes de ingreso tienen en el total del ingreso familiar. Esto, junto a los testimonios recogidos en las entrevistas, nos permite conocer de qué viven las familias analizadas. Se observa que el sustento más importante proviene del trabajo estacional

  10. A National Survey of Medical School Obstetrics and Gynecology Departments, 1965 to 1975

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spellacy, William N.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Representatives of 108 departments of obstetrics and gynecology completed a written questionnaire in 1976 designed to assess the changes that had occurred in the teaching resources of the departments for the years 1965, 1970, and 1975.

  11. A National Research Council Evaluation of the Department of Energy's Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickson, D.; Holmes, K. J.; Cooke, D.

    2012-12-01

    Marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) resources are increasingly becoming part of energy regulatory, planning, and marketing activities in the U.S. and elsewhere. In particular, state-based renewable portfolio standards and federal production and investment tax credits have led to an increased interest in the possible deployment of MHK technologies. The Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Public Law 109-58) directed the Department of Energy (DOE) to estimate the size of the MHK resource base. In order to help DOE prioritize its overall portfolio of future research, increase the understanding of the potential for MHK resource development, and direct MHK device and/or project developers to locations of greatest promise, the DOE Wind and Water Power Program requested that the National Research Council (NRC) provide an evaluation of the detailed assessments being conducted by five individual resource assessment groups. These resource assessment groups were contracted to estimate the amount of extractable energy from wave, tidal, ocean current, ocean thermal energy conversion, and riverine resources. Performing these assessments requires that each resource assessment group estimate the average power density of the resource base, as well as the basic technology characteristics and spatial and temporal constituents that convert power into electricity for that resource. The NRC committee evaluated the methodologies, technologies, and assumptions associated with each of these resource assessments. The committee developed a conceptual framework for delineating the processes used to develop the assessment results requested by the DOE, with definitions of the theoretical, technical, and practical resource to clarify elements of the overall resource assessment process. This allowed the NRC committee to make a comparison of different methods, terminology, and processes among the five resource assessment groups. The committee concluded that the overall approach taken by the wave resource and

  12. Emergency department physician training in Jamaica: a national public hospital survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Eric W

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emergency Department (ED medical officers are often the first medical responders to emergencies in Jamaica because pre-hospital emergency response services are not universally available. Over the past decade, several new ED training opportunities have been introduced locally. Their precise impact on the health care system in Jamaica has not yet been evaluated. We sought to determine the level of training, qualifications and experience of medical officers employed in public hospital EDs across the nation. Methods A database of all medical officers employed in public hospital EDs was created from records maintained by the Ministry of Health in Jamaica. A specially designed questionnaire was administered to all medical officers in this database. Data was analyzed using SPSS Version 10.0. Results There were 160 ED medical officers across Jamaica, of which 47.5% were males and the mean age was 32.3 years (SD +/- 7.1; Range 23–57. These physicians were employed in the EDs for a mean of 2.2 years (SD +/- 2.5; Range 0–15; Median 2.5 and were recent graduates of medical schools (Mean 5.1; SD +/- 5.9; Median 3 years. Only 5.5% of the medical officers had specialist qualifications (grade III/IV, 12.8% were grade II medical officers and 80.5% were grade I house officers or interns. The majority of medical officers had no additional training qualifications: 20.9% were exposed to post-graduate training, 27.9% had current ACLS certification and 10.3% had current ATLS certification. Conclusion The majority of medical officers in public hospital EDs across Jamaica are relatively inexperienced and inadequately trained. Consultant supervision is not available in most public hospital EDs. With the injury epidemic that exists in Jamaica, it is logical that increased training opportunities and resources are required to meet the needs of the population.

  13. What is going to change in EU rural development policies after 2013? Main implications in different national contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Mantino

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper will address the changes the CAP post‐2013 may bring to its second pillar in EU countries. After the presentation of the legislative package put forward by the European Commission, a debate emerged in some countries on how to define rural development strategies for the period 2014‐2020. The paper will discuss positive innovations and main challenges of the new rural development policies with respect to what happened in the 2007‐2013 period. In particular, the paper intends to focus on the following issues: 1 which relevant changes have been introduced in the rural development framework; 2 how these changes can influence the preparation of the next programming period 2014-2020, looking more in depth at three countries (Italy, Spain and France; 3 what lessons can be drawn from this reform and the initial implementation in three countries in terms of institutional changes and their likely success and failure. This analysis concludes that the success or failure of the 2014-2020 reform of rural development will significantly depend on what types of transaction costs and incentive systems will be brought about within the programming system. These two factors in turn will strongly depend on the way the different actors will perceive the different costs and incentives, their expectations on the role of rural development programmes in a context where budget for agriculture is shrinking everywhere, and finally their capability to build new strategic alliances and cooperation at every level (national, regional and local with other economic and social actors. Future policy scenarios might bring new and heavy constraints to rural development policies and consequently might also reduce the opportunities of institutional innovations.

  14. Securing America’s Future. Realizing the Potential of the Department of Energy’s National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glauthier, T. J. [TJG Energy Associates, LLC, Bloomberg, VA (United States); Cohon, Jared L. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Augustine, Norman R. [U.S. Dept. of Homeland Security, Washington, DC (United States); Austin, Wanda M. [Aerospace Corporation, El Segundo, CA (United States); Elachi, Charles [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Fleury, Paul A. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Hockfield, Susan J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Meserve, Richard A. [Covington and Burling LLP, Washington, DC (United States); Murray, Cherry A. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2015-10-23

    The Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories are national assets that have contributed profoundly to the Nation’s security, scientific leadership, and economic competitiveness. In recognition of the continuing and evolving threats to our security and the dramatic increase in global economic and scientific competition, the laboratories are and will continue to be vitally important. Yet, the contributions of the National Laboratories are not inevitable, nor have they realized their full potential. This final report of the Commission to Review the Effectiveness of the National Energy Laboratories recommends ways the laboratories could overcome challenges to more efficiently and effectively accomplish the work for which they are uniquely suited.

  15. Outreach and Education in the Life Sciences A Case Study of the U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, Richard E.; Burbank, Roberta L.; Mahy, Heidi A.

    2010-03-15

    This project was intended to assess the impact of the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Agency (DOE/NNSA) -sponsored education and outreach activities on the Biological Weapons Convention (BWC) in DOE national laboratories. Key activities focused on a series of pilot education and outreach workshops conducted at ten national laboratories. These workshops were designed to increase awareness of the BWC, familiarize scientists with dual-use concerns related to biological research, and promote the concept of individual responsibility and accountability

  16. National landscape Laag-Holland: rural web dynamics in a metropolitan landscape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekhuizen, van R.E.; Oostindië, H.A.

    2010-01-01

    This book argues that networking is key to the success of rural development. The notion of rural web is, in this respect, strategic. The contributions in this book help understand how creative net- works are actively being shaped and developed. The contributions to this book stem from the ETUDE

  17. Rural Communities Matter: How PTAs Can Increase Parent Involvement in Our Nation's Small Towns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markell, Ginny

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the role of Parent Teacher Associations in increasing parent participation in rural and small town schools, noting facts about rural schools and describing how to reach out to parents and overcome such barriers as not feeling valued, not speaking English well, and not having transportation. (SM)

  18. 78 FR 34125 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, San Juan National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    ...The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Forest Service, San Juan National Forest has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or Native Hawaiian organizations, and has determined that there is a cultural affiliation between the human remains and associated funerary objects and present-day Indian tribes or......

  19. Mean consumption, poverty and inequality in rural India in the 60th round of the National Sample Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Raghbendra; Gaiha, Raghav; Sharma, Anurag

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on mean consumption, poverty (all three FGT measures) and inequality during 2004 for rural India using National Sample Survey (NSS) data for the 60th Round. Mean consumption at the national level is much higher than the poverty line. However, the Gini coefficient is higher than in recent earlier rounds. The headcount ratio is 22.9 per cent. Mean consumption, all three measures of poverty and the Gini coefficient are computed at the level of 20 states and 63 agro-climatic zones in these 20 states. It is surmised that despite impressive growth rates deprivation is pervasive, pockets of severe poverty persist, and inequality is rampant.

  20. A National Survey of Core Course Requirements, Department Names, and Undergraduate Program Titles in Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Corwin P.

    1998-01-01

    Assesses the typical number of core courses departments have, the most commonly used ones, and, in a general way, their contents. Provides data on department names and undergraduate program areas for a picture of the communication disciplines in the 1990s. (RS)

  1. Horizontal and vertical integration-diversification in rural hospitals: a national study of strategic activity, 1983-1988.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mick, S S; Morlock, L L; Salkever, D; de Lissovoy, G; Malitz, F E; Wise, C G; Jones, A S

    1993-01-01

    This study examines both the magnitude of and factors influencing the adoption of 13 horizontal and vertical integration and diversification strategies in a national sample of 797 U.S. rural hospitals during the period 1983-1988. Using organization theory, hypotheses were posed relating environmental and market factors, geographic location, and hospital characteristics to the adoption of horizontal and vertical integration and diversification. Results indicate that only one of 13 strategies was adopted by more than 50 percent of all rural hospitals during the study period, and that most of the directional hypotheses were not confirmed using Cox's proportional hazards models. In particular, environmental and market factors were unrelated to the strategies studied. Issues of methodology and theory are discussed; however, during an historically turbulent period, both relatively low levels of rural hospital strategic activities and lack of predictive power of the theory suggest caution in relying heavily on a policy for rural hospital survival that is dependent on individual market-oriented strategic behavior.

  2. Needs assessment for fire department services and resources for the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-15

    This report has been developed in response to a request from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to evaluate the need for fire department services so as to enable the Laboratory to plan effective fire protection and thereby: meet LANL`s regulatory and contractual obligations; interface with the Department of Energy (DOE) and other agencies on matters relating to fire and emergency services; and ensure appropriate protection of the community and environment. This study is an outgrowth of the 1993 Fire Department Needs Assessment (prepared for DOE) but is developed from the LANL perspective. Input has been received from cognizant and responsible representatives at LANL, DOE, Los Alamos County (LAC) and the Los Alamos Fire Department (LAFD).

  3. Diagnostic criteria and reporting procedures for pre-eclampsia: a national survey among obstetrical departments in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemmensen, Åse Kathrine; Olsen, SF; Wengel, CM;

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A precondition for the rational use of obstetric databases in biomedical research is detailed knowledge on how data are being generated. We identified the diagnostic procedures and criteria for pre-eclampsia (PE) and assessed the level of obstetric training of the personnel responsible...... of pregnancy diagnoses to the National Patient Registry differed widely in training. For complicated pregnancies, departments ranged from having only specialists reporting all cases to secretaries reporting up to 50%. Cut off limits of blood pressure (BP) and protein loss used to diagnose pre-eclampsia showed...... large differences across departments. The diagnoses given to three case stories showed little correlation to the criteria the departments reported using. CONCLUSION: Even in a small country like Denmark with 34 obstetrical departments, there was little consensus on the diagnostic criteria for pre-eclampsia...

  4. The Quebec rural emergency department project: a cross-sectional study of a potential two-pronged strategy in the knowledge transfer process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mélodie-Anne Drouin

    Full Text Available Health services research generates useful knowledge. Promotion of implementation of this knowledge in medical practice is essential. Prior to initiation of a major study on rural emergency departments (EDs, we deployed two knowledge transfer strategies designed to generate interest and engagement from potential knowledge users. The objective of this paper was to review: 1 a combined project launch and media press release strategy, and 2 a pre-study survey designed to survey potential knowledge users' opinions on the proposed study variables.We evaluated the impact of the project launch (presentation at two conferences hosted by key stakeholders and media press release via a survey of participants/stakeholders and by calculating the number of media interview requests and reports generated. We used a pre-study survey to collect potential key stakeholder' opinions on the study variables.Twenty-one of Quebec's 26 rural EDs participated in the pre-study survey (81% participation rate. The press release about the study generated 51 press articles and 20 media request for interviews, and contributed to public awareness of a major rural research initiative. In the pre-study survey, thirteen participants (46% mentioned prior knowledge of the research project. Results from the pre-study survey revealed that all of the potential study variables were considered to be relevant for inclusion in the research project. Respondents also proposed additional variables of interest, including factors promoting retention of human resources.The present study demonstrated the potential utility of a two-pronged knowledge transfer strategy, including a combined formal launch and press release, and a pre-study survey designed to ensure that the included variables were of interest to participants and stakeholders.

  5. Search & Rescue Plan: Necedah National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Necedah National Wildlife Refuge is located in a rural environment approximately 150 miles northwest of Milwaukee, 100 miles northwest of Madison, and 150 miles...

  6. Agriculturization within a new rurality context: New pluriactive actors in the department of Río Primero in the province of Córdoba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Orlando Coppi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available During the past decades, Argentina has shown evidence of a steady agriculturization process. The department of Río Primero, in the province of Córdoba, is part of a clear dynamics within a large part of the Pampas region. The area studied displays profound productive, economic and social transformations. In this context, the most vulnerable within the structure are left out of the production system. However, small urban producers have recently appearedin the scene, and in apparent contradiction, have begun complementing their urban incomes with those from agricultural activities. In this paper, we deal with the start of agricultural activities of the new urban pluriactive actors, their reasons to begin these activities, their productionmodes and adaptation strategies, their paths in life and the rural links they may have in their family histories, taking into account what role inheritance and/or the assignment of lands play a role within that income.

  7. Nations first federal combined solar power purchase launched by EPA, Forest Service, Energy Department and GSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    SAN FRANCISCO - The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Forest Service, Department of Energy and General Services Administration announced the first ever federal partnership to purchase solar power. This action follows President Obama's order

  8. Prescribing practices of topical corticosteroids in the outpatient dermatology department of a rural tertiary care teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathod, Suvarna S; Motghare, Vijay M; Deshmukh, Vinod S; Deshpande, Rushikesh P; Bhamare, Chetanraj G; Patil, Jyoti R

    2013-09-01

    Inappropriate or excessive use of topical corticosteroids can lead to cutaneous and systemic adverse effects which occur more commonly with the use of very potent steroids. Monitoring and analysis of the prescription practices of topical steroids can help to achieve rational prescription of these drugs. The present study was carried out to study and analyze the pattern of prescribing topical corticosteroids among outpatients attending the dermatology clinic in a rural tertiary care and teaching hospital, Ambajogai, Maharashtra. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted for a duration of two months from August 2011 to September 2011, and 500 prescriptions were randomly collected from the dermatology pharmacy and analyzed. About 66% of the prescriptions contained four to five drugs per prescription. Topical steroids were given in 28.4% of all the prescriptions. In almost all the prescriptions, strength, quantity of the steroid to be used, frequency, site, and duration of application was not mentioned. The chief complaints and diagnoses were not mentioned in about 85% of the prescriptions for topical corticosteroids. About 94.36% of the prescriptions contained very potent steroids. Inadequate prescribing information is a clear characteristic of the dermatological prescriptions containing topical corticosteroids. Doctors should be educated about the importance of giving patients sufficient information regarding the use of steroids. There is a need to revise hospital formulary where low-potency steroids can also be included along with potent ones so that the latter can be avoided in conditions where they are unnecessary.

  9. Distance Learning for Food Security and Rural Development: A Perspective from the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott McLean

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces the work of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO, and describes its interest in the application of distance learning strategies pertinent to the challenges of food security and rural development around the world. The article briefly reviews pertinent examples of distance learning, both from the experience of FAO and elsewhere, and summarises a complex debate about the potential of distance learning in developing countries. The paper elaborates five practical suggestions for applying distance learning strategies to the challenges of food security and rural development. The purpose of publishing this article is both to disseminate our ideas about distance learning to interested professional and scholarly audiences around the world, and to seek feedback from those audiences.

  10. Difficult airway equipment in departments of emergency medicine in Ireland: results of a national survey.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, K

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Adverse effects associated with difficult airway management can be catastrophic and include death, brain injury and myocardial injury. Closed-malpractice claims have shown prolonged and persistent attempts at endotracheal intubation to be the most common situation leading to disastrous respiratory events. To date, there has been no evaluation of the types of difficult airway equipment currently available in Irish departments of emergency medicine. The objective of this survey was to identify the difficult airway equipment available in Irish departments of emergency medicine. METHODS: Departments of emergency medicine in the Republic of Ireland with at least one dedicated Emergency Medicine consultant were surveyed via telephone. RESULTS: All of the departments contacted held at least one alternative device on site for both ventilation and intubation. The most common alternative ventilation device was the laryngeal mask airway (89%). The most common alternative intubating device was the surgical airway device (100%). CONCLUSIONS: Irish departments of emergency medicine compare well with those in the UK and USA, when surveyed concerning difficult airway equipment. However, we believe that this situation could be further improved by training inexperienced healthcare providers in the use of the laryngeal mask airway and intubating laryngeal mask airway, by placing greater emphasis on the ready availability of capnography and by the increased use of portable difficult airway storage units.

  11. Prescribing practices of topical corticosteroids in the outpatient dermatology department of a rural tertiary care teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvarna S Rathod

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Inappropriate or excessive use of topical corticosteroids can lead to cutaneous and systemic adverse effects which occur more commonly with the use of very potent steroids. Monitoring and analysis of the prescription practices of topical steroids can help to achieve rational prescription of these drugs. Aim: The present study was carried out to study and analyze the pattern of prescribing topical corticosteroids among outpatients attending the dermatology clinic in a rural tertiary care and teaching hospital, Ambajogai, Maharashtra. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted for a duration of two months from August 2011 to September 2011, and 500 prescriptions were randomly collected from the dermatology pharmacy and analyzed. Results: About 66% of the prescriptions contained four to five drugs per prescription. Topical steroids were given in 28.4% of all the prescriptions. In almost all the prescriptions, strength, quantity of the steroid to be used, frequency, site, and duration of application was not mentioned. The chief complaints and diagnoses were not mentioned in about 85% of the prescriptions for topical corticosteroids. About 94.36% of the prescriptions contained very potent steroids. Conclusion: Inadequate prescribing information is a clear characteristic of the dermatological prescriptions containing topical corticosteroids. Doctors should be educated about the importance of giving patients sufficient information regarding the use of steroids. There is a need to revise hospital formulary where low-potency steroids can also be included along with potent ones so that the latter can be avoided in conditions where they are unnecessary.

  12. Winter Bird Assemblages in Rural and Urban Environments: A National Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Tryjanowski

    Full Text Available Urban development has a marked effect on the ecological and behavioural traits of many living organisms, including birds. In this paper, we analysed differences in the numbers of wintering birds between rural and urban areas in Poland. We also analysed species richness and abundance in relation to longitude, latitude, human population size, and landscape structure. All these parameters were analysed using modern statistical techniques incorporating species detectability. We counted birds in 156 squares (0.25 km2 each in December 2012 and again in January 2013 in locations in and around 26 urban areas across Poland (in each urban area we surveyed 3 squares and 3 squares in nearby rural areas. The influence of twelve potential environmental variables on species abundance and richness was assessed with Generalized Linear Mixed Models, Principal Components and Detrended Correspondence Analyses. Totals of 72 bird species and 89,710 individual birds were recorded in this study. On average (± SE 13.3 ± 0.3 species and 288 ± 14 individuals were recorded in each square in each survey. A formal comparison of rural and urban areas revealed that 27 species had a significant preference; 17 to rural areas and 10 to urban areas. Moreover, overall abundance in urban areas was more than double that of rural areas. There was almost a complete separation of rural and urban bird communities. Significantly more birds and more bird species were recorded in January compared to December. We conclude that differences between rural and urban areas in terms of winter conditions and the availability of resources are reflected in different bird communities in the two environments.

  13. Winter Bird Assemblages in Rural and Urban Environments: A National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tryjanowski, Piotr; Sparks, Tim H; Biaduń, Waldemar; Brauze, Tomasz; Hetmański, Tomasz; Martyka, Rafał; Skórka, Piotr; Indykiewicz, Piotr; Myczko, Łukasz; Kunysz, Przemysław; Kawa, Piotr; Czyż, Stanisław; Czechowski, Paweł; Polakowski, Michał; Zduniak, Piotr; Jerzak, Leszek; Janiszewski, Tomasz; Goławski, Artur; Duduś, Leszek; Nowakowski, Jacek J; Wuczyński, Andrzej; Wysocki, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    Urban development has a marked effect on the ecological and behavioural traits of many living organisms, including birds. In this paper, we analysed differences in the numbers of wintering birds between rural and urban areas in Poland. We also analysed species richness and abundance in relation to longitude, latitude, human population size, and landscape structure. All these parameters were analysed using modern statistical techniques incorporating species detectability. We counted birds in 156 squares (0.25 km2 each) in December 2012 and again in January 2013 in locations in and around 26 urban areas across Poland (in each urban area we surveyed 3 squares and 3 squares in nearby rural areas). The influence of twelve potential environmental variables on species abundance and richness was assessed with Generalized Linear Mixed Models, Principal Components and Detrended Correspondence Analyses. Totals of 72 bird species and 89,710 individual birds were recorded in this study. On average (± SE) 13.3 ± 0.3 species and 288 ± 14 individuals were recorded in each square in each survey. A formal comparison of rural and urban areas revealed that 27 species had a significant preference; 17 to rural areas and 10 to urban areas. Moreover, overall abundance in urban areas was more than double that of rural areas. There was almost a complete separation of rural and urban bird communities. Significantly more birds and more bird species were recorded in January compared to December. We conclude that differences between rural and urban areas in terms of winter conditions and the availability of resources are reflected in different bird communities in the two environments.

  14. Virtual Special Issue on Catalysis at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruski, Marek; Sadow, Aaron D.; Slowing, Igor I.; Marshall, Christopher L.; Stair, Peter; Rodriguez, Jose; Harris, Alex; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Biener, Juergen; Matranga, Christopher; Wang, Congjun; Schaidle, Joshua A.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Ruddy, Daniel A.; Deutsch, Todd; Alia, Shaun M.; Narula, Chaitanya; Overbury, Steve; Toops, Todd; Bullock, R. Morris; Peden, Charles H. F.; Wang, Yong; Allendorf, Mark D.; Nørskov, Jens; Bligaard, Thomas

    2016-05-06

    Catalysis research at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) National Laboratories covers a wide range of research topics in heterogeneous catalysis, homogeneous/molecular catalysis, biocatalysis, electrocatalysis, and surface science. Since much of the work at National Laboratories is funded by DOE, the research is largely focused on addressing DOE’s mission to ensure America’s security and prosperity by addressing its energy, environmental, and nuclear challenges through transformative science and technology solutions. The catalysis research carried out at the DOE National Laboratories ranges from very fundamental catalysis science, funded by DOE’s Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), to applied research and development (R&D) in areas such as biomass conversion to fuels and chemicals, fuel cells, and vehicle emission control with primary funding from DOE’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. National Laboratories are home to many DOE Office of Science national scientific user facilities that provide researchers with the most advanced tools of modern science, including accelerators, colliders, supercomputers, light sources, and neutron sources, as well as facilities for studying the nanoworld and the terrestrial environment. National Laboratory research programs typically feature teams of researchers working closely together, often joining scientists from different disciplines to tackle scientific and technical problems using a variety of tools and techniques available at the DOE national scientific user facilities. Along with collaboration between National Laboratory scientists, interactions with university colleagues are common in National Laboratory catalysis R&D. In some cases, scientists have joint appointments at a university and a National Laboratory.

  15. Virtual Special Issue on Catalysis at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruski, Marek; Sadow, Aaron; Slowing, Igor; Marshall, Christopher L.; Stair, Peter C.; Rodriguez, Jose A.; Harris, Alex; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Biener, Juergen; Matranga, Christopher; Wang, Congjian; Schaidle, Josh; Beckham, Gregg T.; Ruddy, Daniel A.; Deutsch, Todd; Alia, Shaun; Narula, Chaitanya; Overbury, Steven H.; Toops, Todd J.; Bullock, R. Morris; Peden, Charles HF; Wang, Yong; Allendorf, Mark D.; Norskov, Jens K.; Bligaard, Thomas

    2016-04-21

    Catalysis research at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Laboratories covers a wide range of research topics in heterogeneous catalysis, homogeneous/ molecular catalysis, electrocatalysis, and surface science. Since much of the work at National Laboratories is funded by DOE, the research is largely focused on addressing DOE’s mission to ensure America’s security and prosperity by addressing its energy, environmental, and nuclear challenges through trans-formative science and technology solutions. The catalysis research carried out at the DOE National Laboratories ranges from very fundamental catalysis science, funded by DOE’s Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), to applied research and development (R&D) in areas such as biomass conversion to fuels and chemicals, fuel cells, and vehicle emission control with primary funding from DOE’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. National Laboratories are home to many DOE Office of Science national scientific user facilities that provide researchers with the most advanced tools of modern science, including accelerators, colliders, supercomputers, light sources, and neutron sources, as well as facilities for studying the nanoworld and the terrestrial environment. National Laboratory research programs typically feature teams of researchers working closely together, often joining scientists from different disciplines to attack scientific and technical problems using a variety of tools and techniques available at the DOE national scientific user facilities. Along with collaboration between National Laboratory scientists, interactions with university colleagues are common in National Laboratory catalysis R&D. In some cases, scientists have joint appoint-ments at a university and a National Laboratory.

  16. The Development and Validation of a Human Systems Integration (HSI) Program for the Canadian Department of National Defence (DND)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    The Development and Validation of a Human Systems Integration (HSI) Program for the Canadian Department of National Defence (DND) Mike Greenley ... Greenley , Andrea Scipione, Jeremy Brooks and Alice Salway CAE Professional Services (Canada) Limited (Formerly Greenley & Associates Incorporated...IHS et à appuyer la mise en œuvre d’un programme officiel et amélioré d’IHS au MDN du Canada. Greenley & Associates Incorporated ix Table of

  17. Temporomandibular Joint Disorders Among Patients Treated in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at Muhimbili National Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJD) are the most common debilitating conditions of the stomatognathic system. Although they exist in the community they are not mentioned in the literature as an endemic health problem. Their prevalence does not seem to be clear enough for the health system in Tanzania to give them priority as other health problems. Study setting: The study was done in the department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH). To determine the o...

  18. Department of Energy’s ARM Climate Research Facility External Data Center Operations Plan Located At Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cialella, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gregory, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Lazar, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Liang, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ma, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tilp, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wagener, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The External Data Center (XDC) Operations Plan describes the activities performed to manage the XDC, located at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), for the Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility. It includes all ARM infrastructure activities performed by the Data Management and Software Engineering Group (DMSE) at BNL. This plan establishes a baseline of expectation within the ARM Operations Management for the group managing the XDC.

  19. The Rhetoric of Culture as an Act of Closure in a Cross-National Software Development Department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Eskild; Nardi, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    of the word “culture” as an exclusionary act of closure. As theorized by Metiu, who builds on Weber, closure occurs when one group seeks to preserve the advantages of their situation relative to another group. We conducted an ethnographic study of a cross-national software department with members in Denmark...... used a “rhetoric of culture” as an act of closure, and we focus on technology choices and behavior as they were impacted by closure....

  20. Trauma team activation varies across Dutch emergency departments: a national survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egberink, Rolf; Otten, Harm-Jan; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; van Vugt, Arie B.; Doggen, Catharina Jacoba Maria

    2015-01-01

    Background Tiered trauma team response may contribute to efficient in-hospital trauma triage by reducing the amount of resources required and by improving health outcomes. This study evaluates current practice of trauma team activation (TTA) in Dutch emergency departments (EDs). Methods A survey was

  1. Trauma team activation varies across Dutch emergency departments: a national survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egberink, Rolf; Otten, Harm-Jan; IJzerman, Maarten J.; Vugt, van Arie B.; Doggen, Carine J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Tiered trauma team response may contribute to efficient in-hospital trauma triage by reducing the amount of resources required and by improving health outcomes. This study evaluates current practice of trauma team activation (TTA) in Dutch emergency departments (EDs). Methods A survey w

  2. Influencing Factors and Path Choice of Rebuilding Rural Financial Supervision System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The necessity of rebuilding Chinese rural financial supervision system is expounded. Rebuilding rural financial supervision system is conducive to normalizing rural financial order and forming the benign competitive situation; to clarifying the role played by rural financial organization and providing better financial services for "three agriculture";to forming safe rural financial environment to promote the development of rural economy and national economy. The restricting factors of rebuilding Chinese rural financial supervision system are analyzed. The major reasons are that rural financial legislation is relatively backward and the supervision department lacks the necessary legal basis. The administrative supervision is insufficient, which lead to the mal-position, administrative offside and vacancy of rural financial supervision;rural financial organization mechanism is unreasonable and the internal supervision mechanism is relatively bad;supervision organization of rural financial industry is imperfect and the function is imperfect; public’s supervision awareness is weak and social supervision mechanism develops slowly. The paths for rebuilding Chinese rural financial supervision system are put forward including accelerating rural financial legislation to provide perfect legal evidence for rural financial supervision system; clarifying the position on governmental functions and fully displaying the leading role of rural financial supervision; establishing specialized rural financial supervision organization to perfect its supervision functions; vigorously cultivating people’s supervision awareness to promote the development of social supervision mechanism.

  3. Virtual Special Issue on Catalysis at the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruski, Marek [Ames Laboratory; Sadow, Aaron D. [Ames Laboratory; Slowing, Igor I. [Ames Laboratory; Marshall, Christopher L. [Argonne National Laboratory; Stair, Peter [Argonne National Laboratory; Rodriguez, Jose [Brookhaven National Laboratory; Harris, Alex [Brookhaven National Laboratory; Somorjai, Gabor A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Biener, Juergen [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Matranga, Christopher [National Energy Technology Laboratory; Wang, Congjun [National Energy Technology Laboratory; Schaidle, Joshua A. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Beckham, Gregg T. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Ruddy, Daniel A. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Deutsch, Todd [National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Alia, Shaun M. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Narula, Chaitanya [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Overbury, Steve [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Toops, Todd [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Bullock, R. Morris [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Peden, Charles H. F. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Wang, Yong [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Allendorf, Mark D. [Sandia National Laboratory; Nørskov, Jens [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory; Bligaard, Thomas [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    2016-04-18

    Catalysis research at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Laboratories covers a wide range of research topics in heterogeneous catalysis, homogeneous/molecular catalysis, biocatalysis, electrocatalysis, and surface science. Since much of the work at National Laboratories is funded by DOE, the research is largely focused on addressing DOE's mission to ensure America's security and prosperity by addressing its energy, environmental, and nuclear challenges through transformative science and technology solutions. The catalysis research carried out at the DOE National Laboratories ranges from very fundamental catalysis science, funded by DOE's Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), to applied research and development (R&D) in areas such as biomass conversion to fuels and chemicals, fuel cells, and vehicle emission control with primary funding from DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  4. [Quality of postoperative pain therapy in Austria: national survey of all departments of anesthesiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinstner, C; Likar, R; Sandner-Kiesling, A; Hutschala, D; Pipam, W; Gustorff, B

    2011-09-01

    Despite increasingly sophisticated concepts of perioperative pain therapy, such as increased use of combined regional anesthesia techniques, the renaissance of ketamine and dipyrone or the use of oral opioids, no significant improvement has been achieved in postoperative pain therapy since 1995. About 300,000 of the approximately 700,000 patients undergoing major surgery each year in Austria experience moderate to severe postoperative pain. The aim of this study was therefore to assess the nationwide status of perioperative acute pain management in postoperative recovery rooms and surgical wards in order to identify potential areas for improvement. In 2006 the directors of all Austrian anesthesiology departments (n=125, 100%) were contacted and asked to give detailed information on the status of acute pain management of each individual hospital in Austria using a standardized questionnaire. Data of each individual department were derived from quality control and self-assessment of each department. No patients were questioned. The return rate was 96% (n=120) due to intensive personal contact in cases of missing data. In this nationwide survey 120 anesthesiology departments participated together accounting for a total of 757,895 operations per year. Of the patients 63.6% were informed preoperatively on the available regimens of acute pain management. In 81% of patients perioperative pain therapy consisted of a multimodal therapeutic approach, 58.6% of the departments used international guidelines and 39.7% worked with international guidelines adapted to local requirements. In 88% of patients a detailed prescription for postoperative pain therapy was available when transferred to the surgical ward. Surgical wards were equipped with routine pain therapy protocols in 28% another 20% of wards had special pain therapy protocols for individual operations. In 22% of cases pain assessment was repeated 3-4 times per day and in 33.9% postoperative pain was assessed only once

  5. A Marriage That Worked: The Department of Defense Dependents Schools and the National Writing Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mary Ann

    2000-01-01

    Long-term, successful marriages, like that between dependent schools and the National Writing Project, do not always go smoothly. In 1997, DoDDS students performed well on a worldwide assessment of eight different writing modes. Good partnerships avoid shortcuts, use proven models, and reject uniform approaches. (MLH)

  6. [Implementation of the national food program as an important factor in changes in socio-demographic processes and structures in rural areas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitenko, V V

    1985-01-01

    The author investigates changes in socio-demographic processes and structures in rural areas of the USSR that have occurred as a result of the national food program. Special attention is given to potential changes in migration, both permanent and seasonal, among villages and towns. Future changes in the age and sex distribution and in marital and family structures are estimated. Trends in rural employment and occupational patterns are also considered. (summary in ENG, RUS)

  7. Demography, maternal health and the epidemiology of malaria and other major infectious diseases in the rural department Tsamba-Magotsi, Ngounie Province, in central African Gabon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manego, R Zoleko; Mombo-Ngoma, G; Witte, M; Held, J; Gmeiner, M; Gebru, T; Tazemda, B; Mischlinger, J; Groger, M; Lell, B; Adegnika, A A; Agnandji, S T; Kremsner, P G; Mordmüller, B; Ramharter, M; Matsiegui, P B

    2017-01-28

    Sub-Saharan Africa is undergoing an epidemiological transition from a predominance of infectious diseases to non-communicable and lifestyle related conditions. However, the pace of this transition and the pattern of disease epidemiology are uneven between affluent urban and rural poor populations. To address this question for a remote rural region located in the central African rainforest region of Gabon, this study was conducted to assess reasons for health care attendance and to characterize the epidemiology of malaria and other major infectious diseases for the department of Tsamba Magotsi. Major causes for health care attendance were collected from local hospital records. Cross sectional population based surveys were performed for the assessment of local malaria epidemiology. Pregnant women attending antenatal care services were surveyed as a sentinel population for the characterization of chronic viral and parasitic infections in the community. Infectious diseases were responsible for 71% (7469) of a total of 10,580 consultations at the formal health care sector in 2010. Overall, malaria - defined by clinical syndrome - remained the most frequent cause for health care attendance. A cross sectional malaria survey in 840 asymptomatic individuals residing in Tsamba Magotsi resulted in a Plasmodium spp. infection prevalence of 37%. The infection rate in 2-10 year old asymptomatic children - a standard measure for malaria endemicity - was 46% (100 of 217) with P. falciparum as predominant species (79%). Infection with other plasmodial species (P. ovale and P. malariae) presented most commonly as coinfections (23.2%). Prevalence of HIV, HBV, and syphilis were 6.2, 7.3, and 2.5%, respectively, in cross-sectional assessments of antenatal care visits of pregnant women. Urogenital schistosomiasis and the filarial pathogens Loa loa and Mansonella perstans are highly prevalent chronic parasitic infections affecting the local population. Despite major improvements in the

  8. 76 FR 25696 - National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-05

    ...-Snell at the Office of Rural Health Policy (ORHP) via Telephone at (301) 443-0835 or by e-mail at ddemasse-snell@hrsa.gov . The committee meeting agenda will be posted on ORHP's Web site http://www...

  9. Past and projected rural land conversion in the US at state, regional, and national levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    The developed land area of the US increased by 14.2 million hectares between 1982 and 2003. Along with a projected US population increase to more than 360 million individuals by 2030 is an expected continuation of expanding rural land development. Related to population growth, ru...

  10. Organizational Challenges for Schools in Rural Municipalities: Cross-National Comparisons in a Nordic Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Tommy; Stjernström, Olof

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the spatial structure of primary schools and alternative organizational frameworks are studied in a number of rural municipalities in the northern parts of Norway, Sweden, and Finland. The aim of the study is to investigate how the spatial structure of schools has changed between the years 2008 and 2013 in these municipalities, what…

  11. RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF RELAPAROTOMY IN DEPARTMENT OF OBSTRETRICS, GYNAECOLOGY AND FAMILY PLANNING IN, RURAL TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL, ANDHRA PRADESH, INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Thombarapu, Prabha Devi Kodey, GangadharaRao Koneru

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Relaparotomy is biggest dilemma to the surgeon and critical to the patient to undergo second surgery within short span of time .It is challenging both physically and mentally to the patient. Aim: Aim of the study was to determine incidence of relaparotomy and its indication, management and outcome in the department of Obstetrics, Gynaecology and Family Planning (OBGYN & FP in NRI Medical College & General Hospital at Guntur District. Materials and Methods: It is a retrospective observational study for the duration of 3 and ½ years. Total number of surgeries -7, 718. Total number of relaparotomy- 27 which include referral cases. Results: Incidence for relaparotomy was 0.34%. Most important cause for relaparotomy was haemorrhagic causes (44.4%, followed by burst abdomen (33.3%. Relaparotomy can increase morbidity, mortality (14.8% of patients with increased hospital stay on an average of 27 days including Intensive Care Unit, further increasing the financial burden to the patient. Conclusion: Emergency relaparotomy is a life saving procedure. Good expertise in selection of primary surgery and right surgical technique, intra operative hemostasis, control of post operative infection can avoid relaparatomy

  12. Department of Energy award DE-SC0004164 Climate and National Security: Securing Better Forecasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reno Harnish

    2011-08-16

    The Climate and National Security: Securing Better Forecasts symposium was attended by senior policy makers and distinguished scientists. The juxtaposition of these communities was creative and fruitful. They acknowledged they were speaking past each other. Scientists were urged to tell policy makers about even improbable outcomes while articulating clearly the uncertainties around the outcomes. As one policy maker put it, we are accustomed to making these types of decisions. These points were captured clearly in an article that appeared on the New York Times website and can be found with other conference materials most easily on our website, www.scripps.ucsd.edu/cens/. The symposium, generously supported by the NOAA/JIMO, benefitted the public by promoting scientifically informed decision making and by the transmission of objective information regarding climate change and national security.

  13. Investigating the Benefits and Drawbacks of Realigning the National Guard Under the Department of Homeland Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    officers from both the Army and Air National Guard; the Maryland and Delaware state emergency manage- ment agencies; active and retired U.S. Coast...Maryland and Delaware state emergency management agencies; current and retired USCG officers (ranks ranging from commander to [four-star] admiral...constitutions and other laws—to support operations within their state as necessary (or in other states through emergency man- agement assistance compact

  14. Swedish emergency department triage and interventions for improved patient flows: a national update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farrokhnia Nasim

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Scandinavia, emergency department triage and patient flow processes, are under development. In Sweden, the triage development has resulted in two new triage scales, the Adaptive Process Triage and the Medical Emergency Triage and Treatment System. Both these scales have logistic components, aiming to improve patient flows. The aim of this study was to report the development and current status of emergency department triage and patient flow processes in Sweden. Methods In 2009 and 2010 the Swedish Council on Health Technology Assessment sent out a questionnaire to the ED managers in all (74 Swedish hospital emergency departments. The questionnaire comprised questions about triage and interventions to improve patient flows. Results Nearly all (97% EDs in Sweden employed a triage scale in 2010, which was an increase from 2009 (73%. Further, the Medical Emergency Triage and Treatment System was the triage scale most commonly implemented across the country. The implementation of flow-related interventions was not as common, but more than half (59% of the EDs have implemented or plan to implement nurse requested X-ray. Conclusions There has been an increase in the use of triage scales in Swedish EDs during the last few years, with acceleration for the past two years. Most EDs have come to use the Medical Emergency Triage and Treatment System, which also indicates regional co-operation. The implementation of different interventions for improved patient flows in EDs most likely is explained by the problem of crowding. Generally, more studies are needed to investigate the economical aspects of these interventions.

  15. Children diagnosed with congenital cardiac malformations at the national university departments of pediatric cardiology: positive predictive values of data in the Danish National Patient Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Agergaard

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Peter Agergaard1, Anders Hebert2, Jesper Bjerre3, Karina Meden Sørensen4, Charlotte Olesen3, John Rosendal Østergaard31Department of Pediatrics, Viborg Hospital, Viborg, Denmark; 2Department of Pediatrics, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Denmark; 3Department of Pediatrics, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby, Denmark; 4Department of Clinical Biochemistry and Immunology, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, DenmarkIntroduction: The present study was conducted to establish the positive predictive value of congenital cardiac malformation diagnoses registered in the Danish National Patient Registry (NPR, thereby exploring whether the NPR can serve as a valid tool for epidemiologic studies of congenital cardiac malformations.Materials and methods: The study population comprised every individual born from 2000 to 2008 who was registered in the NPR with a congenital cardiac malformation diagnosis and treated at one of the two national departments of pediatric cardiology. Positive predictive values were established comparing NPR information with the clinical record of each individual.Results: A total of 2952 patients with a total of 3536 diagnoses were eligible for validation. Review of their clinical records unveiled no patient without cardiac malformation. In 98% (98%–99% of the cases, the NPR diagnosis could be found as the discharge diagnosis in the patient's clinical record, and in 90% (89%–91% of the cases the NPR diagnosis was considered a true reflection of the patient's actual malformation.Conclusions: Our study verifies that the present study population retrieved from the NPR is a valid tool for epidemiological research within the topic of congenital cardiac malformations, given that the research question is not dependent on a fully established sensitivity of the NPR. Precautions should be made regarding cardiac malformations characterized by low prevalence or poor predictive values, and the reported validity should not be

  16. 76 FR 19758 - Small, Rural School Achievement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-08

    ... Small, Rural School Achievement Program AGENCY: Office of Elementary and Secondary Education, Department... designated with a school locale code of 7 or 8 by the Department's National Center for Education Statistics... code methodology in place on the date of enactment of section 6211(b) of the Elementary and...

  17. Role of AYUSH workforce, therapeutics, and principles in health care delivery with special reference to National Rural Health Mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samal, Janmejaya

    2015-01-01

    Decades back AYUSH systems of medicine were limited to their own field with few exceptions in some states as health in India is a state issue. This took a reverse turn after the initiation of National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) in 2005 which brought the concept of "Mainstreaming of AYUSH and Revitalization of Local Health Traditions" utilizing the untapped AYUSH workforces, therapeutics and principles for the management of community health problems. As on 31/03/2012 AYUSH facilities were co-located in 468 District Hospitals, 2483 Community Health Centers and 8520 Primary Health Centers in the country. Several therapeutics are currently in use and few drugs have been included in the ASHA drug kit to treat common ailments in the community. At the same time Government of India has recognized few principles and therapeutics of Ayurveda as modalities of intervention to some of the community health problems. These include Ksharasutra (medicine coated thread) therapy for ano-rectal surgeries and Rasayana Chikitsa (rejuvenative therapy) for senile degenerative disorders etc. Similarly respective principles and therapeutics can also be utilized from other systems of AYUSH such as Yoga and Naturopathy, Unani, Siddha and Homoeopathy. Akin to Ayurveda these principles and therapeutics can also help in managing community health problems if appropriately implemented. This paper is a review on the role of AYUSH, as a system, in the delivery of health care in India with special reference to National Rural Health Mission.

  18. US Department of Energy National Solid Waste Information Management System (NSWIMS): Annual report for calendar year 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, W.L.

    1988-07-01

    The Solid Waste Information Management System (SWIMS) is the database used to gather information for the US Department of Energy (DOE) on DOE and Department of Defense solid low-level radioactive waste (LLW). The National SWIMS Annual Report (NSWIMS) provides officials of the DOE with management information on the entire DOE/defense solid LLW cycle. The acronym for the annual report, NSWIMS, signifies that an improved format has been developed to make this document a more useful tool for assessing solid LLW management performance. Part I provides a composite summary of the DOE/defense solid LLW management. It includes data related to waste generation, forecasting, treatment, and disposal. Part II contains SWIMS computer-supplied information with discussions of the data presented, standardized and simplified data tables, and revised figures. All data are presented without interpretation and are potentially useful to users for evaluating trends, identifying possible problem areas, and defining future implications. 33 figs., 29 tabs.

  19. US Department of Energy National Solid Waste Information Management System (NSWIMS) annual report for calendar year 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, T.

    1989-09-01

    This report is generated annually from the National Solid Waste Information Management System (SWIMS) database. The SWIMS database operates under NOMAD2, fourth generation database management system. The database resides on an IBM 3083 mainframe with a virtual machine operating system. This system was implemented to meet the requirements of Energy Research and Development Administration Manual. The SWIMS database has kept pace with requirements of subsequent directives and complies with current Department of Energy (DOE) orders for retention of data on the management of solid low-level radioactive waste (LLW). SWIMS provides a comprehensive method for collecting and maintaining data related to management of US DOE and Department of Defense (DOE/Defense) related LLW. 33 figs., 29 tabs.

  20. Social determinants of rest deprivation amongst Ghanaian women: national and urban-rural comparisons with data from a cross-sectional nationally representative survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelmark, Maurice B; Bull, Torill

    2010-09-28

    Rest deprivation (rest/napping/sleep 6 or less hours daily) is a clinically recognised risk factor for poor health, but its epidemiology is little studied. This study reports prevalence's and social correlates of rest deprivation in Ghana. Data are from the 2008 Ghana Demographic and Health Survey. Women ages 15-49 were recruited in a national sampling design. Respondents were 4,916 women in the national sample, a sub-sample of 530 women in the three northernmost rural regions and a sub-sample of 853 women in urban Greater Accra. Prevalence's of rest deprivation were 0.13% nationally, 14.5% in Greater Accra and 16.8% in the North. The significant correlates nationally were age, education, wealth index, Christian religion and literacy. In Accra, they were age, wealth index, having household electricity, and possession of a refrigerator, a stove and a mobile phone. In the North, they were education, occupation, drinking water source, possession of motorcycle/scooter, Christian religion, literacy, and possession of a clock and a cupboard. In logistic regression analyses controlling for age in the national sample, the significant odds ratios were 1.40 for no education compared to secondary and higher education, 0.78-0.43 for the four poorer wealth quintiles compared to the richest wealth index quintile, and 0.55 for Christian religion compared to all others.Also controlling for age, the significant odds ratios in Accra were 2.15 for the second richest wealth quintile compared to the richest quintile and 0.16 for possession of a mobile phone. In the North they were 0.49 for Christian religion compared to all others, 1.87 for having a protected compared to an unprotected water source, and 0.41 for having a cupboard in the home. Education, wealth and religion were related to rest deprivation nationally but not in the urban and rural regions (except for religion in the North). This suggests caution in generalising about the social correlates of rest deprivation at a

  1. An Approach for a National eHealth Implementation – the Case of Modular Interactive Tiles for Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Henrik Hautop; Jensen, Line Steiness Dejnbjerg; Ssessanga, Yusuf

    2015-01-01

    and energy efficient technology which can be set up and used anywhere and anytime. We have formed a national partnership for sustainable implementation, comprising a governmental representative, national hospital, national health university department, regional hospitals, Living Labs and NGOs performing......, the partners contextualise the eHealth solution to fit the needs in urban, rural and deep rural areas....

  2. U.S. Department of Energy NESHAP Annual Report for CY 2014 Sandia National Laboratories Tonopah Test Range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evelo, Stacie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Miller, Mark L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) Annual Report has been prepared in a format to comply with the reporting requirements of 40 CFR 61.94 and the April 5, 1995 Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). According to the EPA approved NESHAP Monitoring Plan for the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), 40 CFR 61, subpart H, and the MOA, no additional monitoring or measurements are required at TTR in order to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP regulation.

  3. [Antidotes availability in Emergency Departments of the Italian National Health System and development of a national data-bank on antidotes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, Carlo; Petrolini, Valeria; Lonati, Davide; Butera, Raffaella; Bove, Angelo; Mela, Lidia; Manzo, Luigi

    2006-01-01

    The availability of antidotes in Italian hospitals has been evaluated through the answers to a specific questionnaire sent to all Italian Emergency Departments, Intensive Care Units, 118 emergency response system, and Poison Centres. Five Poison Centres and, approximately, the 30% of the Emergency Departments and Intensive Care Units of all Italian emergency hospitals answered to the questionnaire. The results point out an insufficient availability of antidotes in the Italian emergency hospitals, with an almost total absence of those necessary for the treatment of less frequent and less known poisonings (e.g. digoxin, industrial agents), also when the antidote is a lifesaving drug. To improve the antidotes availability for the toxicological emergencies and to facilitate its supplying, a "national antidotes data-base" (BaNdA) has been realized, freely available to the hospital services which register themselves and make their antidotes stockpile available.

  4. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico's fleet services department.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, Anastasia Dawn

    2003-06-01

    This Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (PPOA) was conducted for the Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico's (SNL/NM) Fleet Services Department between December 2001 and August 2002. This is the third PPOA conducted at Fleet in the last decade. The primary purpose of this PPOA was to review progress of past initiatives and to provide recommendations for future waste reduction measures of hazardous and solid waste streams and increasing the purchase of environmentally friendly products. This report contains a summary of the information collected and analyses performed with recommended options for implementation. The Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Pollution Prevention Group will work with SNL/NM's Fleet Services to implement these options.

  5. Information Access in Rural America: January 1979 - September 1991. Quick Bibliography Series: QB 92-18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Patricia La Caille

    This bibliography contains 159 entries related to information dissemination in rural areas and the role of rural libraries in accessing information. The entries were derived from the AGRICOLA database produced by the National Agriculture Library (United States Department of Agriculture) and cover such topics as information needs in rural…

  6. Urban and rural variation in clustering of metabolic syndrome components in the Thai population: results from the fourth National Health Examination Survey 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aekplakorn Wichai

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information on the distribution of Metabolic syndrome (MetS and its combinations by urban/rural areas in lower-middle income countries has been limited. It is not clear how the various combinations of MetS components varied by urban/rural population and if particular combinations of MetS are more common. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of MetS and combinations of MetS components according to sex and urban/rural areas from a nationally representative sample of Thai adults. Methods Data from the fourth National Health Examination Survey of 19,256 Thai adults aged 20 years and over were analyzed. MetS was defined using the harmonized criteria of six international expert groups with Asian-specific cut-point for waist circumference. Results The prevalence of MetS was 23.2% among adults aged ≥ 20 years (19.5% in men and 26.8% in women. Among men, the prevalence of MetS in urban was higher than those in rural areas (23.1% vs 17.9%, P P Conclusion Metabolic syndrome affects both urban and rural population with different pattern of MetS combinations. Dyslipidemia and obesity were the most common components among women in rural areas, hence, interventions to prevent and control these factors should be strengthened.

  7. Nonmethane hydrocarbons and ozone in three rural southeast United States national parks: A model sensitivity analysis and comparison to measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Daiwen; Aneja, Viney P.; Mathur, Rohit; Ray, John D.

    2003-10-01

    A detailed modeling analysis is conducted focusing on nonmethane hydrocarbons and ozone in three southeast United States national parks for a 15-day time period (14-29 July 1995) characterized by high O3 surface concentrations. The three national parks are Smoky Mountains National Park (GRSM), Mammoth Cave National Park (MACA), and Shenandoah National Park (SHEN), Big Meadows. A base emission scenario and eight variant predictions are analyzed, and predictions are compared with data observed at the three locations for the same time period. Model-predicted concentrations are higher than observed values for O3 (with a cutoff of 40 ppbv) by 3.0% at GRSM, 19.1% at MACA, and 9.0% at SHEN (mean normalized bias error). They are very similar to observations for overall mean ozone concentrations at GRSM and SHEN. They generally agree (the same order of magnitude) with observed values for lumped paraffin compounds but are an order of magnitude lower for other species (isoprene, ethene, surrogate olefin, surrogate toluene, and surrogate xylene). Model sensitivity analyses here indicate that each location differs in terms of volatile organic compound (VOC) capacity to produce O3, but a maximum VOC capacity point (MVCP) exists at all locations that changes the influence of VOCs on O3 from net production to production suppression. Analysis of individual model processes shows that more than 50% of daytime O3 concentrations at the high-elevation rural locations (GRSM and SHEN) are transported from other areas; local chemistry is the second largest O3 contributor. At the low-elevation location (MACA), about 80% of daytime O3 is produced by local chemistry and 20% is transported from other areas. Local emissions (67-95%) are predominantly responsible for VOCs at all locations, the rest coming from transport. Chemistry processes are responsible for about 50% removal of VOCs for all locations; less than 10% are lost to surface deposition and the rest are exported to other areas

  8. State health department perceived utility of and satisfaction with ArboNET, the U.S. National Arboviral Surveillance System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Nicole P; Brown, Jennifer A; Kightlinger, Lon; Rosenberg, Lauren; Fischer, Marc

    2012-01-01

    We assessed the perceived utility of data collected through ArboNET, the national arboviral surveillance system, and evaluated state health department user satisfaction with system function. We used an online assessment tool to collect information about types of arboviral surveillance conducted, user satisfaction with ArboNET's performance, and use of data collected by the system. Representatives of all 53 reporting jurisdictions were asked to complete the assessment during spring 2009. Representatives of 48 (91%) jurisdictions completed the assessment. Two-thirds of respondents were satisfied with ArboNET's overall performance. Most concerns were related to data transmission, particularly the lack of compatibility with the National Electronic Disease Surveillance System (NEDSS). Users found mosquito (85%), human disease (80%), viremic blood donor (79%), and veterinary disease (75%) surveillance data to be useful. While there was disagreement about the usefulness of avian mortality and sentinel animal surveillance, only 15% of users supported eliminating these categories. Respondents found weekly maps and tables posted on the U.S. Geological Survey (92%) and CDC (88%) websites to be the most useful reports generated from ArboNET data. Although many jurisdictions were willing to report additional clinical or laboratory data, time and resource constraints were considerations. Most respondents (71%) supported review and possible revision of the national case definition for human arboviral disease. As a result of this assessment, CDC and partner organizations have made ArboNET NEDSS-compatible and revised national case definitions for arboviral disease. Alternative data-sharing and reporting options are also being considered. Continued evaluation of ArboNET will help ensure that it continues to be a useful tool for national arboviral disease surveillance.

  9. The Vanguard of Community-based Integrated Care in Japan: The Effect of a Rural Town on National Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Hatano

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Japan has the largest percentage of elderly people in the world. In 2012 the government implemented a community-based integrated care system which provides seamless community healthcare resources for elderly people with chronic diseases and disabilities.  Methods: This paper describes the challenges of establishing a community-based integrated care system in 1974 in Mitsugi, a rural town of Japan. This system has influenced the government and become the model for the nationwide system.  Results: In the 1970s, Mitsugi’s aging population was growing faster than Japan’s, but elder care was fragmented among a variety of service sections. A community-based integrated care system evolved because of the small but aging population size and the initiative of some local leaders of medical care and politics. After the system took effect, the proportion of bedridden people and medical care costs for the elderly dropped in Mitsugi while it continued to rise everywhere else in Japan. Mitsugi’s community-based integrated care system is now shaping national policy.  Conclusion: Mitsugi is in the vanguard of Japan’s community-based integrated care system. The case showed the community-based integrated care system can diffuse from rural to urban areas.

  10. National park visitor segments and their interest in rural tourism services and intention to revisit

    OpenAIRE

    SIEVÄNEN TUIJA; NEUVONEN MARJO; POUTA EIJA

    2015-01-01

    The study aims to understand national park visitors’ interests to use tourism services provided in the vicinity of Linnansaari, Seitseminen and Repovesi national parks in Southern Finland. Separate visitor groups were identified based on their use of tourism services and their intention to revisit the area. Data were generated from a questionnaire survey of 736 visitors to the national parks. The analyses revealed five dimensions of interest in tourism services from which five visitor groups ...

  11. Perceived Differences in the Management of Mental Health Patients in Remote and Rural Australia and Strategies for Improvement: Findings from a National Qualitative Study of Emergency Clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Jelinek

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. We aimed to describe perceptions of Australian emergency clinicians of differences in management of mental health patients in rural and remote Australia compared with metropolitan hospitals, and what could be improved. Methods. Descriptive exploratory study using semi-structured telephone interviews of doctors and nurses in Australian emergency departments (EDs, stratified to represent states and territories and rural or metropolitan location. Content analysis of responses developed themes and sub-themes. Results. Of 39 doctors and 32 nurses responding to email invitation, 20 doctors and 16 nurses were interviewed. Major themes were resources/environment, staff and patient issues. Clinicians noted lack of access in rural areas to psychiatric support services, especially alcohol and drug services, limited referral options, and a lack of knowledge, understanding and acceptance of mental health issues. The clinicians suggested resource, education and guideline improvements, wanting better access to mental health experts in rural areas, better support networks and visiting specialist coverage, and educational courses tailored to the needs of rural clinicians. Conclusion. Clinicians managing mental health patients in rural and remote Australian EDs lack resources, support services and referral capacity, and access to appropriate education and training. Improvements would better enable access to support and referral services, and educational opportunities.

  12. Complex association between rural/urban residence, household wealth and women's overweight: evidence from 30 cross-sectional national household surveys in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madise, Nyovani Janet; Letamo, Gobopamang

    2017-01-01

    We sought to demonstrate that the relationship between urban or rural residence and overweight status among women in Sub-Saharan Africa is complex and confounded by wealth status. We applied multilevel logistic regression to data from 30 sub-Saharan African countries which were collected between 2006 and 2012 to examine the association between women's overweight status (body mass index ≥ 25) and household wealth, rural or urban place of residence, and their interaction. Macro-level statistics from United Nations agencies were used as contextual variables to assess the link between progress in globalization and patterns of overweight. Household wealth was associated with increased odds of being overweight in nearly all of the countries. Urban/rural living and household wealth had a complex association with women's overweight status, shown by 3 patterns. In one group of countries, characterised by low national wealth (median per capita gross national income (GNI) = $660 in 2012) and lower overall prevalence of female overweight (median = 24 per cent in 2010), high household wealth and urban living had independent associations with increased risks of being overweight. In the second group of less poor countries (median per capita GNI = $870) and higher national levels of female overweight (median = 29), there was a cross-over association where rural women had lower risks of overweight than urban women at lower levels of household wealth, but in wealthier households, rural women had higher risks of overweight than urban women. In the final group of countries, household wealth was an important predictor of overweight status, but the association between urban or rural place of residence and overweight status was not statistically significant. The median per capita GNI for this third group was $800 and national prevalence of female overweight was high (median = 32% in 2010). As nations develop and household wealth increases, rural African women

  13. Department of Homeland Security Fellowship Internship Experience at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, J

    2006-08-30

    As a DHS intern at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), I was a member of the Agricultural Domestic Demonstration and Application Program (AgDDAP) under the mentorship of Benjamin Hindson. This group is focused on developing assays for the rapid detection of animal diseases that threaten agriculture in the United States. The introduction of a foreign animal disease to the US could potentially result in devastating economic losses. The 2001 Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD) outbreak in the UK cost over 20 billion dollars and resulted in the death of over 6 million animals. FMD virus is considered to be one of greatest threats to agriculture due to its high infectivity, robustness, and broad species range. Thus, export of meat and animal products from FMD endemic countries is strictly regulated. Although the disease is rarely fatal in adult animals, morbidity is close to 100%. FMD also causes overall production (i.e. milk, mass) to decrease dramatically and can reduce it permanently. The rapid and accurate diagnosis of FMD and other foreign animal diseases is essential to prevent these diseases from spreading and becoming endemic to the country. Every hour delay in the detection of FMD is estimated to cost up to 3 million dollars. Diagnosis of FMD is often complicated by other diseases manifesting similar symptoms in the animal, such as vesicular stomatitis, bluetongue, etc. Typically, diagnosis cannot be made by clinical signs alone and samples must be sent away for testing. Depending on the test, such as in virus isolation, this can take several days. AgDDAP had previously developed a high-throughput multiplexed polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the rule-out of Foot-and-Mouth Disease and six other look-alike diseases. This assay is intended for use in FMD surveillance, differential diagnosis in an outbreak scenario, and to establish an FMD-clean state after an outbreak. PCR based assays are favorable for multiple reasons. Viral nucleic acids can be

  14. National Centers for Environmental Prediction-Department of Energy (NCEP-DOE) Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP)-II Reanalysis (Reanalysis-2)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NCEP-DOE Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP-II) reanalysis is a follow-on project to the "50-year" (1948-present) NCEP-NCAR Reanalysis Project....

  15. U.S. Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service : Environmental Assessment : Final (1/2011) for Proposed Hunting Plan for Crane Meadows National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The United States Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing to provide hunting opportunities on Crane Meadows National Wildlife Refuge in Little Falls, Minnesota that...

  16. The use of National Youth Service Corp members to build AIDS competent communities in rural Edo State Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omorodion, Francisca; Akpede, Ese; Maticka-Tyndale, Eleanor; Agbontean-Eghafona, Kokunre; Onokerhoraye, Andrew

    2012-06-01

    This paper focuses on the community component of a larger action research project on HIV Prevention for Rural Youth (HP4RY), funded by the Global Health Research Initiative (Canada). It began with ethnographic research in 10 communities selected using geographic representative sampling and random assignment to one of three research arms. Using the AIDS Competent Community (ACC) model developed by Catherine Campbell, the ethnographic research identified factors in six domains that contributed to youth vulnerability to HIV infection. This was followed by recruitment, training and deployment of three overlapping cohorts of young adults (n = 40) serving in Nigeria's National Youth Service Corp (NYSC), to mobilize youth and adults in the communities to increase communities' AIDS competence over a nearly 2 year period. Monthly reports of these Corpers, observations of a Field Coordinator, and community feedback supported the conclusion that communities moved towards greater AIDS competence and reduction in youth vulnerability to HIV infection.

  17. Strategic Plan for Coordinating Rural Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) Transit Development in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truett, L.F.

    2002-12-19

    The Great Smoky Mountains National Park, located along the border between North Carolina and Tennessee, is the most visited national park in the United States. This rugged, mountainous area presents many transportation challenges. The immense popularity of the Smokies and the fact that the primary mode of transportation within the park is the personal vehicle have resulted in congestion, damage to the environment, impacts on safety, and a degraded visitor experience. Access to some of the Smokies historical, cultural, and recreational attractions via a mass transit system could alleviate many of the transportation issues. Although quite a few organizations are proponents of a mass transit system for the Smokies, there is a lack of coordination among all parties. In addition, many local residents are not completely comfortable with the idea of transit in the Smokies. This document provides a brief overview of the current transportation needs and limitations in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, identifies agencies and groups with particular interests in the Smokies, and offers insights into the benefits of using Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) technologies in the Smokies. Recommendations for the use of rural ITS transit to solve two major transportation issues are presented.

  18. Quality of Life in Rural and Urban Adults 65 Years and Older: Findings from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baernholdt, Marianne; Yan, Guofen; Hinton, Ivora; Rose, Karen; Mattos, Meghan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The proportion of people over 65 years of age is higher in rural areas than in urban areas, and their numbers are expected to increase in the next decade. This study used Andersen's behavioral model to examine quality of life (QOL) in a nationally representative sample of community-dwelling adults 65 years and older according to…

  19. Nutritional status of breastfed infants in rural Zambia : comparison of the National Center for Health Statistics growth reference versus the WHO 12-month breastfed pooled data set

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hautvast, J.L.A.; Pandor, A.; Burema, J.; Tolboom, J.J.M.; Chishimba, N.; Monnens, L.A.H.; Staveren, van W.A.

    2000-01-01

    Cross-sectional data for breastfed infants in rural Zambia were used to evaluate the effect of applying two different data sets as a reference, i.e. the WHO 12-month breastfed pooled data set and the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) growth reference in terms of prevalence of malnutrition

  20. Diagnostic criteria and reporting procedures for pre-eclampsia: a national survey among obstetrical departments in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemmensen, Åse Kathrine; Olsen, SF; Wengel, CM;

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A precondition for the rational use of obstetric databases in biomedical research is detailed knowledge on how data are being generated. We identified the diagnostic procedures and criteria for pre-eclampsia (PE) and assessed the level of obstetric training of the personnel responsible...... of pregnancy diagnoses to the National Patient Registry differed widely in training. For complicated pregnancies, departments ranged from having only specialists reporting all cases to secretaries reporting up to 50%. Cut off limits of blood pressure (BP) and protein loss used to diagnose pre-eclampsia showed......-eclampsia. The findings emphasize the need for standardizing diagnostic criteria and reporting practice and may have implications on how to interpret data regarding pre-eclampsia....

  1. National Dissemination of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Depression in the Department of Veterans Affairs Health Care System: Therapist and Patient-Level Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlin, Bradley E.; Brown, Gregory K.; Trockel, Mickey; Cunning, Darby; Zeiss, Antonette M.; Taylor, C. Barr

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system is nationally disseminating and implementing cognitive behavioral therapy for depression (CBT-D). The current article evaluates therapist and patient-level outcomes associated with national training in and implementation of CBT-D in the VA health care system. Method: Therapist…

  2. Staff Report to the Senior Department Official on Recognition Compliance Issues. Recommendation Page: National Accrediting Commission Of Cosmetology Arts and Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The National Accrediting Commission of Cosmetology Arts and Sciences (NACCAS) is a national accreditor whose scope of recognition is for the accreditation throughout the United States of postsecondary schools and departments of cosmetology arts and sciences and massage therapy. The agency accredits approximately 1,300 institutions offering…

  3. National Dissemination of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Depression in the Department of Veterans Affairs Health Care System: Therapist and Patient-Level Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlin, Bradley E.; Brown, Gregory K.; Trockel, Mickey; Cunning, Darby; Zeiss, Antonette M.; Taylor, C. Barr

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system is nationally disseminating and implementing cognitive behavioral therapy for depression (CBT-D). The current article evaluates therapist and patient-level outcomes associated with national training in and implementation of CBT-D in the VA health care system. Method: Therapist…

  4. Nighttime assaults: using a national emergency department monitoring system to predict occurrence, target prevention and plan services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bellis Mark A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emergency department (ED data have the potential to provide critical intelligence on when violence is most likely to occur and the characteristics of those who suffer the greatest health impacts. We use a national experimental ED monitoring system to examine how it could target violence prevention interventions towards at risk communities and optimise acute responses to calendar, holiday and other celebration-related changes in nighttime assaults. Methods A cross-sectional examination of nighttime assault presentations (6.01 pm to 6.00 am; n = 330,172 over a three-year period (31st March 2008 to 30th March 2011 to English EDs analysing changes by weekday, month, holidays, major sporting events, and demographics of those presenting. Results Males are at greater risk of assault presentation (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 3.14, 95% confidence intervals [CIs] 3.11-3.16; P 2 = 0.918; P  Conclusions To date, the role of ED data has focused on helping target nightlife police activity. Its utility is much greater; capable of targeting and evaluating multi-agency life course approaches to violence prevention and optimising frontline resources. National ED data are critical for fully engaging health services in the prevention of violence.

  5. “Es preciso, pues, regimentar”. The organization of the National Guard in the rural space. Buenos Aires, 1852-1862

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Canciani

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we will analize the organization of the National Guard in the bonaerense rural space and frontier, during the ten years post of your creation (1852-1862. The process encompass two cycles. The first, 1852-1857, was characterized by the predominance of peace justices in the institutional control. And the second, 1857-1862, was defined by stronger presence of the regiments chiefs. We will study the role of the civil and military authorities and your relations with the National Guard of the rural space. Finally, we will debate the perception that exists about the power relations between civilian - military and your inside.Key words: National Guard; Military commanders; Buenos Aires province; 1850s.

  6. EVALUATION OF ASHA PROGRAMME IN SELECTED BLOCK OF RAISEN DISTRICT OF MADHYA PRADESH UNDER THE NATIONAL RURAL HEALTH MISSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagwan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently Government of India is providing comprehensive integrated health care to the rural people under the umbrella of National Rural Health Mission (NRHM. A village level community health worker “Accredited Social Health Activist” (ASHA’ acts as an interface between the community and the public health system. OBJECTIVE : To assess the socio - demographic profile of ASHA workers and to evaluate their knowledge and practice of their responsibilities. SETTINGS & DESIGN : Cross - sectional study , Obedullaganj and Sa n chi blocks of Bhopal district of Madhya Pradesh . METHODS & MATERIAL: A cross - sectional study was conducted at obedullaganj and Sanchi in the Bhopal district of Madhya Pradesh for a period of 1 year from October 2007 to October 2008 The study participa nts were trained ASHA workers working in the Sanchi & Obedullaganj block. Statistical Analysis : Chi Square test using MS excel & SPSS ver 17. RESULT : Majority of ASHA workers were aware about helping in immunization , accompanying clients for delivery , providing ANC and family planning services as a part of responsibility. About 99% of ASHAs knew registration of births and deaths , assisting Auxiliary Nurse Midwife (ANM in village health planning , creating awareness on basic sanitation and per sonal hygiene. CONCLUSION : Despite the training given to ASHAs , lacunae still exists in their knowledge regarding various aspects of child health morbidity. Monthly meetings can be used as a platform for the reinforcement of various aspects of child health . Periodical refresher training should be conducted for all of the recruited ASHA workers. In the future training sessions , more emphasis should be given to high risk cases requiring prompt referral.

  7. Journal Article: the National Dioxin Air Monitoring Network (Ndamn): Measurements of CDDs, CDFs, and Coplanar PCBs at 18 Rural, 8 National Parks, and 2 Suburban Areas of the U.S.: Results for the Year 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    In June, 1998, the U.S. EPA established the National Dioxin Air Monitoring Network (NDAMN). The primary goal of NDAMN is determine the temporal and geographical variability of atmospheric CDDs, CDFs, and coplanar PCBs at rural and nonimpacted locations throughout the United Stat...

  8. Journal Article: the National Dioxin Air Monitoring Network (Ndamn): Measurements of CDDs, CDFs and Coplanar PCBs at 15 Rural and 6 National Park Areas of the U.S.: June 1998-December 1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA has established a National Dioxin Air Monitoring Network (NDAMN) to determine the temporal and geographical variability of atmospheric CDDs, CDFs and coplanar PCBs at rural and nonimpacted locations throughout the United States. Currently operating at 32 sampling st...

  9. [The department of occupational medicine of the State School of Occupational Medicine at the National Institute of Occupational Medicine in Warsaw in 1926-1939].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braczkowska, B; Jabłoński, L

    1999-01-01

    The Department of Occupational Hygiene, State School of Hygiene at the National Institute of Hygiene was established in 1926/27. Prof. Brunon Nowakowski was its founder and the first Director. Teaching and providing of highly qualified personnel for occupational medicine institutions was the main area of the Department's activity. The Department also carried out scientific research focusing on organisation of labour hygiene in Poland, and occupational diseases, lead poisoning in particular. The results of studies carried out by the Department provided the basis for the elaboration of numerous legal regulations in the area of occupational medicine.

  10. Rural community tourism in western Sichuan's Qiang nationality:a case study of Wulong Stockade

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The importance of the local economy of the development of tourism resources in China's relatively underdeveloped minority areas is already common knowledge in academic and business circles. However, it's necessary to research more on specific patterns of tourism development in these ethnic' minority areas. This paper studies Wulong Stockade in Beichuan County in Sichuan Province and examines the distinctive experience of the local Qiang community about developing local tourism resources and the local funding of the development, It notes how the introduction of new re-afforestation laves of 1999 affected the traditional, agriculture-based economy and how a member of the community was a key motivator in initiating tourism as a new economic resource. It has also explored changes in the economic conditions of Qiang peasants since tourism began in Wulong Stockade, where local incomes have increased considerably. This paper focuses on a characteristic Qiang area in the mountains of western Sichuan, demonstrates the necessity and feasibility of community tourism development, and suggests that other ethnic minority mountain villages in rural areas draw lessons from Wulong Stockade's experience.

  11. 78 FR 78493 - National Rural Transportation Assistance Program: Solicitation for Proposals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... questions, please contact Lorna Wilson at lorna.wilson@dot.gov or (202) 366-0893. A TDD is available at 1... newsletter or bulletin). The recipient will report on national and State program accomplishments and... delivered to Lorna Wilson, Federal Transit Administration, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE, Room E43-...

  12. Rural-urban disparities in school nursing: implications for continuing education and rural school health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Mary M; Fullerton, Lynne; Sapien, Robert; Greenberg, Cynthia; Bauer-Creegan, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the professional and educational challenges experienced by rural school nurses. We conducted this study to describe disparities between the urban and rural professional school nurse workforce in New Mexico and to identify how best to meet the continuing education needs of New Mexico's rural school nurse workforce. We analyzed state data from a 2009 New Mexico Department of Health school nurse workforce survey (71.7% response rate). We included all survey respondents who indicated working as a school nurse in a public school setting in any grade K-12 and who identified their county of employment (N = 311). Rural school nurses were twice as likely as metropolitan nurses to provide clinical services to multiple school campuses (67.3% compared to 30.1%, P LGBT) health (P = .0004), and suicide risk identification and prevention (P = .015). Online courses and telehealth were identified by rural school nurses as among the preferred means for receiving continuing education. Our findings support the provision of online courses and telehealth content to address urban-rural disparities in school nursing education and support rural school health. © 2014 National Rural Health Association.

  13. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory safeguards and security quarterly progress report to the US Department of Energy. Quarterly report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, G.; Mansur, D.L.; Ruhter, W.D.; Steele, E.; Strait, R.S.

    1994-04-01

    The Safeguards Technology Program (STP) is a program in LLNL`s Nuclear Chemistry Division that develops advanced, nondestructive-analysis (NDA) technology for measurement of special nuclear materials. Our work focuses on R&D relating to x- and gamma-ray spectrometry techniques and to the development of computer codes for interpreting the spectral data obtained by these techniques. A review of the Safeguards Technology Program at LLNL by representatives of the Department of Energy Office of Safeguards and Security and Office of Research was conducted via teleconference on March 4, 1994. Objectives, milestones, and recent accomplishments were presented for each of the four LLNL tasks in NDA, and plans to address user needs in these NDA areas were discussed. An informal presentation on the LLNL Safeguards Technology Program was presented to the JOWOG-30 meeting at the Los Alamos National Laboratory on March 10, 1994. The JOWOG meetings bring together representatives from Laboratories in the DOE complex, as well as their counterparts from the United Kingdom. Within JOWOG-30 a variety of topics are discussed, including NDA and its various applications within the U.S. and U.K. complexes.

  14. Calendar Year 2001 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-03-31

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2001 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The monitoring data were obtained from groundwater and surface water sampling locations within three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12. The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2001 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities in the Bear Creek, East Fork, and Chestnut Ridge Regimes. Section 2 identifies the sampling locations in each hydrogeologic regime and the corresponding sampling frequency during CY 2001, along with the associated quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) sampling. Section 3 describes groundwater and surface water sample collection and Section 4 identifies the field measurements and laboratory analytes for each sampling location. Section 5 outlines the data management protocols and data quality objectives (DQOs). Section 6 describes the groundwater elevation monitoring in each regime during CY 2001 and Section 7 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational, regulatory, and technical information.

  15. Tinnitus and hyperacusis therapy in a UK National Health Service audiology department: Patients’ evaluations of the effectiveness of treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aazh, Hashir; Moore, Brian C. J.; Lammaing, Karen; Cropley, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To assess patients’ judgements of the effectiveness of the tinnitus and hyperacusis therapies offered in a specialist UK National Health Service audiology department. Design: Cross-sectional service evaluation questionnaire survey. Patients were asked to rank the effectiveness of the treatment they received on a scale from 1 to 5 (1 = no effect, 5 = very effective). Study sample: The questionnaire was sent to all patients who received treatment between January and March 2014 (n = 200) and 92 questionnaires were returned. Results : The mean score was greatest for counselling (Mean = 4.7, SD = 0.6), followed by education (Mean = 4.5, SD = 0.8), cognitive behavioural therapy - CBT (Mean = 4.4, SD = 0.7), and hearing tests (Mean = 4.4, SD = 0.9). Only 6% of responders rated counselling as 3 or below. In contrast, bedside sound generators, hearing aids, and wideband noise generators were rated as 3 or below by 25%, 36%, and 47% of participants, respectively. Conclusion: The most effective components of the tinnitus and hyperacusis therapy interventions were judged by the patients to be counselling, education, and CBT. PMID:27195947

  16. Ambulance diversion and emergency department offload delay: resource document for the National Association of EMS Physicians position statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooney, Derek R; Millin, Michael G; Carter, Alix; Lawner, Benjamin J; Nable, Jose Victor; Wallus, Harry J

    2011-01-01

    The emergency medical services (EMS) system is a component of a larger health care safety net and a key component of an integrated emergency health care system. EMS systems, and their patients, are significantly impacted by emergency department (ED) crowding. While protocols designed to limit ambulance diversion may be effective at limiting time on divert status, without correcting overall hospital throughput these protocols may have a negative effect on ED crowding and the EMS system. Ambulance offload delay, the time it takes to transfer a patient to an ED stretcher and for the ED staff to assume the responsibility of the care of the patient, may have more impact on ambulance turnaround time than ambulance diversion. EMS administrators and medical directors should work with hospital administrators, ED staff, and ED administrators to improve the overall efficiency of the system, focusing on the time it takes to get ambulances back into service, and therefore must monitor and address both ambulance diversions and ambulance offload delay. This paper is the resource document for the National Association of EMS Physicians position statement on ambulance diversion and ED offload time. Key words: ambulance; EMS; diversion; bypass; offload; delay.

  17. Factors Influencing Receipt of Iron Supplementation by Young Children and their Mothers in Rural India: Local and National Cross-Sectional Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moodie Rob

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In India, 55% of women and 69.5% of preschool children are anaemic despite national policies recommending routine iron supplementation. Understanding factors associated with receipt of iron in the field could help optimise implementation of anaemia control policies. Thus, we undertook 1 a cross-sectional study to evaluate iron supplementation to children (and mothers in rural Karnataka, India, and 2 an analysis of all-India rural data from the National Family Health Study 2005-6 (NFHS-3. Methods All children aged 12-23 months and their mothers served by 6 of 8 randomly selected sub-centres managed by 2 rural Primary Health Centres of rural Karnataka were eligible for the Karnataka Study, conducted between August and October 2008. Socioeconomic and demographic data, access to health services and iron receipt were recorded. Secondly, NFHS-3 rural data were analysed. For both studies, logistic regression was used to evaluate factors associated with receipt of iron. Results The Karnataka Study recruited 405 children and 377 of their mothers. 41.5% of children had received iron, and 11.5% received iron through the public system. By multiple logistic regression, factors associated with children's receipt of iron included: wealth (Odds Ratio (OR 2.63 [95% CI 1.11, 6.24] for top vs bottom wealth quintile, male sex (OR 2.45 [1.47, 4.10], mother receiving postnatal iron (OR 2.31 [1.25, 4.28], mother having undergone antenatal blood test (OR 2.10 [1.09, 4.03]; Muslim religion (OR 0.02 [0.00, 0.27], attendance at Anganwadi centre (OR 0.23 [0.11, 0.49], fully vaccinated (OR 0.33 [0.15, 0.75], or children of mothers with more antenatal health visits (8-9 visits OR 0.25 [0.11, 0.55] were less likely to receive iron. Nationally, 3.7% of rural children were receiving iron; this was associated with wealth (OR 1.12 [1.02, 1.23] per quintile, maternal education (compared with no education: completed secondary education OR 2.15 [1.17, 3

  18. Department of

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2014-08-27

    Aug 27, 2014 ... Ethiopian Journal of Environmental Studies & Management 7(5): 468 – 477, 2014 ... Department of Planning, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology .... Anglican and Presbyterian schools have all been mined; exposing school children to dust and .... the district office of the National Disaster.

  19. 78 FR 22282 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    ..., National Park Service, Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument, Crow Agency, MT AGENCY: National Park..., Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or... definition of sacred objects. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian...

  20. 78 FR 45964 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ..., National Park Service, Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument, Crow Agency, MT AGENCY: National Park..., Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes or... definition of sacred object. Lineal descendants or representatives of any Indian tribe or Native Hawaiian...

  1. 77 FR 48533 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-14

    ..., National Park Service, Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument, Crow Agency, MT AGENCY: National Park... consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes, has determined that the cultural items meet the definition of... Superintendent, Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument, P.O. Box 39, Crow Agency, MT 59022-0039, telephone...

  2. 78 FR 72701 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Natural...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-03

    ... Service, Natural Bridges National Monument, Moab, UT AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION... associated funerary object should submit a written request to Natural Bridges National Monument. If no... request with information in support of the request to Natural Bridges National Monument at the address...

  3. Calendar Year 2002 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2003-03-31

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2002 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2002 monitoring data were obtained from groundwater and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12. The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge south of Y-12. The sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2002 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities in the Bear Creek, East Fork, and Chestnut Ridge Regimes. Section 2 describes the monitoring programs implemented by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC during CY 2002. Section 3 identifies the sampling locations in each hydrogeologic regime and the corresponding sampling frequency during CY 2002, along with the associated quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) sampling. Section 4 describes groundwater and surface water sample collection and Section 5 identifies the field measurements and laboratory analytes for each sampling location. Section 6 outlines the data management protocols and data quality objectives (DQOs). Section 7 describes the groundwater elevation monitoring in each regime during CY 2002 and Section 8 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational, regulatory, and technical information.

  4. Los Alamos National Laboratory: A guide to records series supporting epidemiologic studies conducted for the Department of Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this guide is to describe each series of records that pertains to the epidemiologic studies conducted by the Epidemiology Section of the Occupational Medicine Group (ESH-2) at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in Los Alamos, New Mexico. The records described in this guide relate to occupational studies performed by the Epidemiology Section, including those pertaining to workers at LANL, Mound Plant, Oak Ridge Reservation, Pantex Plant, Rocky Flats Plant, and Savannah River Site. Also included are descriptions of other health-related records generated or collected by the Epidemiology Section and a small set of records collected by the Industrial Hygiene and Safety Group. This guide is not designed to describe the universe of records generated by LANL which may be used for epidemiologic studies of the LANL work force. History Associates Incorporated (HAI) prepared this guide as part of its work as the support services contractor for DOE`s Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project. This introduction briefly describes the Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project, HAI`s role in the project, the history of LANL the history and functions of LANL`s Health Division and Epidemiology Section, and the various epidemiologic studies performed by the Epidemiology Section. It provides information on the methodology that HAI used to inventory and describe records housed in the offices of the LANL Epidemiology Section in Technical Area 59 and at the LANL Records Center. Other topics include the methodology used to produce the guide, the arrangement of the detailed record series descriptions, and information concerning access to records repositories.

  5. Workforce issues in rural surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynge, Dana Christian; Larson, Eric H

    2009-12-01

    Almost one quarter of America's population and one third of its landmass are defined as rural and served by approximately 20% of the nation's general surgeons. General surgeons are the backbone of the rural health workforce. There is significant maldistribution of general surgeons across regions and different types of rural areas. Rural areas have markedly fewer surgeons per population than the national average. The demography of the rural general surgery workforce differs substantially from the urban general surgery workforce, raising concerns about the extent to which general surgical services can be maintained in rural areas of the United States.

  6. 2003 U.S. Department of Energy Strategic Plan: Protecting National, Energy, and Economic Security with Advanced Science and Technology and Ensuring Environmental Cleanup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None,

    2003-09-30

    The Department of Energy contributes to the future of the Nation by ensuring energy security, maintaining the safety, security and reliability of the nuclear weapons stockpile, cleaning up the environment from the legacy of the Cold War, and developing innovations in science and technology. After 25 years in existence, the Department now operates 24 preeminent research laboratories and facilities and four power marketing administrations, and manages the environmental cleanup from 50 years of nuclear defense activities that impacted two million acres in communities across the country. The Department has an annual budget of about $23 billion and employs about 14,500 Federal and 100,000 contractor employees. The Department of Energy is principally a national security agency and all of its missions flow from this core mission to support national security. That is true not just today, but throughout the history of the agency. The origins of the Department can be traced to the Manhattan Project and the race to develop the atomic bomb during World War II. Following the war, Congress engaged in a vigorous and contentious debate over civilian versus military control of the atom. The Atomic Energy Act of 1946 settled the debate by creating the Atomic Energy Commission, which took over the Manhattan Project’s sprawling scientific and industrial complex.

  7. [Kingella kingae ostemyelitis and septic arthritis in paediatric patients. Six cases from the Department of Pediatrics, National University Hospital of Iceland.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birgisson, H; Steingrímsson, O; Guðnason, T

    2000-01-01

    Kingella kingae (K. kingae) is a gram negative rod most often associated with septic arthritis and osteomyelitis in children. Infections caused by K. kingae had not been reported in Iceland when six cases were diagnosed at the Pediatric Department at the National University Hospital of Iceland. In this report we describe those cases and review the literature.

  8. The new map department in the National Library of Poland and the first steps to the automation of cataloguing its collections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucyna Szaniawska

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available In 1961, when the Krasinski Palace (the Palace of the Republic was rebuilt, it was given to the National Library's use. All the departments of the Division of Special Collections were placed in the Palace, including the map department. In 1963 the government made a decision to construct a new building for the National Library of Poland. In the beginning it was planned to move all the collections from the buildings, which they had occupied before, placed in three different districts of Warsaw (including the Division of Special Collections to the new National Library's building. Its construction started in 1977. But during the works on the site and the move of the collections of books and periodicals dating from the 19th and 20th centuries, it became obvious that those departments, and in particular, their collections, took up too much space, and there was no room for them all. So new plans of enlarging the new building of the National Library were made, but the economic crisis which we are now going through in our country has postponed its development until the distant future. Until now, there is still a remaining part of the Division of Special Collections in the Krasinski Palace, the departments which preserve collections of manuscripts, early printed books, graphics and drawings. Special grand exhibitions are also held in the beautiful baroque rooms there.

  9. 76 FR 80389 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate a Cultural Item: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-23

    ... Battlefield National Monument, Crow Agency, MT AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes....O. Box 39, Crow Agency, MT, 59022-0039, telephone (406) 638-3201. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice...

  10. 76 FR 80391 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-23

    ... Battlefield National Monument, Crow Agency, MT AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes... Monument, P.O. Box 39, Crow Agency, MT 59022-0039, telephone (406) 638-3201. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION...

  11. 76 FR 80390 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-23

    ... Battlefield National Monument, Crow Agency, MT AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument, in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes... Monument, P.O. Box 39, Crow Agency, MT 59022-0039, telephone (406) 638-3201. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION...

  12. Calendar Year 2008 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elvado Environmental LLC

    2009-12-01

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2008 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2008 monitoring data were obtained from wells, springs, and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12 (Figure A.1). The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12. Section 2 of this report provides background information pertinent to groundwater and surface water quality monitoring in each hydrogeologic regime, including the topography and bedrock geology, surface water drainage, groundwater system, and extent of groundwater contamination. The CY 2008 groundwater and surface water monitoring data in this report were obtained from sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC (B&W Y-12) and from sampling and analysis activities implemented under several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). Cooperative implementation of the monitoring programs directed by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC (i.e., coordinating sample collection and sharing data) ensures that the CY 2008 monitoring results fulfill requirements of all the applicable monitoring drivers with no duplication of sampling and analysis efforts. Section 3 of this report contains a summary of information regarding the

  13. 7 CFR 1940.560 - Guarantee Rural Rental Housing Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE, RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, AND FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) GENERAL Methodology and Formulas for...

  14. Rural Veterans by State

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This speadsheet contains data from the 2014 American Community Survey and shows the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of Veterans who live in rural and...

  15. Review article: Diagnostic accuracy of risk stratification tools for patients with chest pain in the rural emergency department: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Tina; Jennings, Natasha; Clifford, Stuart; O'connell, Jane; Lutze, Matthew; Gosden, Edward; Hadden, N Fionna; Gardner, Glenn

    2016-10-01

    Risk stratification tools for patients presenting to rural EDs with undifferentiated chest pain enable early definitive treatment in high-risk patients. This systematic review compares the most commonly used risk stratification tools used to predict the risk of major adverse cardiac event (MACE) for patients presenting to rural EDs with chest pain. A comprehensive search of MEDLINE and Embase for studies published between January 2011 and January 2015 was undertaken. Study quality was assessed using QUADAS-2 criteria and the PRISMA guidelines.Eleven studies using eight risk stratification tools met the inclusion criteria. The percentage of MACE in the patients stratified as suitable for discharge, and the percentage of patients whose scores would have recommended admission that did not experience a MACE event were used as comparisons. Using the findings of a survey of emergency physicians that found a 1% MACE rate acceptable in discharged patients, the EDACS-ADP was considered the best performer. EDACS-ADP had one of the lowest rates of MACE in those discharged (3/1148, 0.3%) and discharged one of the highest percentage of patients (44.5%). Only the GRACE tool discharged more patients (69% - all patients with scores <100) but had a MACE rate of 0.3% in discharged patients. The HFA/CSANZ guidelines achieved zero cases of MACE but discharged only 1.3% of patients.EDACS-ADP can potentially increase diagnostic efficiency of patients presenting at ED with chest pain. Further assessment of tool in a rural context is recommended.

  16. 新农村建设中农村公共服务部门人力资源开发研究%Research on Human Resources Development of Rural Public Service Departments in New Countryside Construction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李忠东

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of defining related concepts concerning human resources in rural public service departments, this paper analyses the overall status quo of human resources in China's rural public service departments and points out the problems existing in human resources in China's rural public service departments during new countryside construction as follows: first, the constitution structure is not rational; second , the cultural quality of staff is universally low, and the business capacity remains to be promoted; third, the improvement of human resources development environment lags behind, and the supporting reform is short. In the context of new countryside construction, the opportunities faced by the human resources in China's rural public service departments are as follows: China has elevated strengthening new countryside construction and rural talents construction as important state development strategy; the ideas of service-oriented government and learning-oriented government are put forward; civil servant system is overhauled. Therefore, I advance the development strategy of human resources in China's rural public service departments as follows: implement elastic personnel system reform in public service departments (including civil servant positions in department) , to form the public service personnel system of "able one comes in, mediocre one moves over and shiftless one steps down"; audaciously promote young and middle-aged grass-roots cadres with strong business ability, high political quality, acute judgement and decision-making ability; build leaming-oriented grass-roots public service organization, to make the staff in rural pubic service departments study assiduously and progress; broaden horizon, and build the human resources development system geared to international standards; in developed regions, the human resources in grass-roots public service departments should introduce enterprise competition model.%在界定农村公共服务部门人

  17. Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality General Report on Well Groundwater for Hillside National Wildlife Refuge in 1998

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Two of the rice irrigation wells were sampled in August, 1998, as part of the Agrichemical Groundwater Monitoring Program. This program is not regulatory in any way,...

  18. 76 FR 77012 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Organ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-09

    ... Service, Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Ajo, AZ and Arizona State Museum, Tucson, AZ AGENCY... Drive, Ajo, AZ 85321, telephone (520) 387-6849 ext. 7500. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here... of Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Ajo, AZ and in the physical custody of the Arizona...

  19. 78 FR 22283 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    .... ADDRESSES: Dan Kimball, Superintendent, Everglades National Park, 4001 State Road 9336, Homestead, FL 33034, telephone (305) 242-7707, email Dan_Kimball@nps.gov . ] SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Notice is here given in... request with information in support of the claim to Dan Kimball, Superintendent, Everglades National Park...

  20. Rural Logistics System Based on Rural Informatization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Current status of rural informatization construction in China,including the relatively weak rural informatization,asymmetric market information,low level of information sharing,dispersedly allocated resources and no cross point among each other are analyzed.The importance of informatization in rural logistic system is introduced:firstly,decision making of logistics system plan is based on information.Secondly,improvement of the overall efficiency of logistics system is based on information.Thirdly,logistics transmission takes the Internet as the carrier.Necessity of rural logistics system is discussed from five aspects of increasing the employment of farmers,enhancing the income of farmers,reducing the blindness of agricultural production and circulation,sharing the risks of agricultural management,and promoting the rural economic restructuring.According to the above five steps,five countermeasures are posed in order to improve the rural logistics system.The countermeasures cover the aspects of deepening the information awareness of government,establishing a rural informatization system suited to the national condition of China,strengthening the information infrastructure in rural areas,promoting the integration of rural information resources and establishing the training system for agricultural information talents.

  1. Nonmethane Hydrocarbons and Ozone in the Rural Southeast United States National Parks: A Model Sensitivity Analysis and Its Comparison with Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, D.; Aneja, V. P.; Mathur, R.; Ray, J. D.

    2001-12-01

    A comprehensive modeling analysis is conducted using the Multiscale Air Quality SImulation Platform (MAQSIP) focusing on nonmethane hydrocarbons and ozone in three southeast United States national parks for a 15-day time period (July 14th to July 29th, 1995) characterized by high O3 surface concentrations. Nine emission scenarios including the base scenario are analyzed. Model predictions are compared with and contrasted against observed data at the three locations for the same time period. Model predictions (base scenario) tend to give lower daily maximum O3 concentrations than observation by 10.8% at Cove Mountain, Great Smoke Mountains National Park (GRSM), 26.8% at Mammoth Cave National Park (MACA), and 17.6% at Big Meadows, Shenandoah National Park (SHEN). Overall mean ozone concentrations are very similar at GRSM and SHEN (observed data at MACA are not available). Model predicted concentrations of lumped paraffin compounds match the observed values on the same order, while the observed concentrations for other species (isoprene, ethene, surrogate olefin, surrogate toluene, and surrogate xylene) are usually an order of magnitude higher than the predictions. Sensitivity analyses indicate each location has its own characteristics in terms of the capacity of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) to produce O3, but a maximum VOC capacity point (MVCP) exists at all locations that changes the influence of VOCs on O3 from production to destruction. Analysis of individual model process budgets shows that more than 50% of daytime O3 concentrations at these rural locations are transported from other areas, local chemistry is the second largest contributor (13% to 42%), all other processes combined contribute less than 10% of the daytime O3 concentrations. Local emissions (>99%) are predominantly responsible for VOCs at all locations, while vertical diffusion (>70%) is the predominant process to move VOCs away from the modeling grid. Dry deposition ( ~ 10%) and chemistry (2

  2. 南京国民政府对乡村教育思潮的回应%The Responding of Nanking National Government to the Thoughts of Rural Education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘克辉

    2011-01-01

    Nanking National Government responded to the thoughts of Rural Education actively.From the following two aspects,we could arrive at this conclusion.On the one hand,some laws or bills of rural education passed in this period.For instance,Nanking National Government convened the first National Education conference which approved several proposals in rural education.Another example was the bill of implementing rural education of Three Principles the People passed in the Third Plenary Session of KMT Central Committee.On the other hand,the practical activities of Nanjing National Government revealed its great concern about rural education.First,Nanjing National Government paid attention to and accepted those popular rural educators and their experiments.Second,the Rural Revival Committee was set up.It aimed to revive the economy in the countryside and carried out rural fact-findings.It also valued the development of rural education.Third,Nanjing National Government attached importance to the publication of rural educational journals,textbooks,and other relevant books.All mentioned above marked that rural education fully came into view of the government and became a part of national construction.%从南京国民政府召开第一次全国教育会议,通过多项有关乡村教育的提案,到国民党三中全会通过《实施三民主义的乡村教育案》;从南京国民政府对民间乡村教育家及其实验的关注和认同,到成立农村复兴委员会、调查农村实况、复兴农村经济、注重乡村教育的发展,再到重视乡村教育期刊、教科书和其他乡村教育书籍的出版,南京国民政府对乡村教育思潮进行的种种积极回应,标志着乡村教育全面进入政府的视野,并成为国家建设的一部分。

  3. Undergraduate Rural Medical Education Program Development: Focus Group Consultation with the NRHA Rural Medical Educators Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Laura H.; Wheat, John R.; Leeper, James D.; Florence, Joseph A.; Boulger, James G.; Hunsaker, Matt L.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Over a decade ago, leaders in rural medical education established the Rural Medical Educators (RME) Group, an interest group within the National Rural Health Association, to support faculty in rural medical education programs. This group has convened an annual RME conclave since 2006. In 2008, this conclave convened 15 national leaders in…

  4. Calendar Year 2004 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    2005-09-01

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2004 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2004 monitoring data were obtained from groundwater and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12 (Figure A.1). The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge south of Y-12. The CY 2004 monitoring data were obtained under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. (BWXT) and several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). Data contained in this report meet applicable requirements of DOE Order 450.1 (Environmental Protection Program) regarding evaluation of groundwater and surface water quality in areas: (1) which are, or could be, affected by operations at Y-12 (surveillance monitoring); and (2) where contaminants from Y-12 are most likely to migrate beyond the boundaries of the ORR (exit pathway/perimeter monitoring). However, detailed analysis, evaluation, and interpretation of the CY 2004 monitoring data is deferred to the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater Monitoring Data Compendium (BWXT 2005). For each monitoring well, spring, and surface water sampling station included in this report, the GWPP Compendium provides: (1) pertinent well installation and construction information; (2) a complete sampling history, including sampling methods and

  5. Calendar Year 2010 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department Of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elvado Environmental LLC

    2011-12-01

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2010 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2010 monitoring data were obtained from wells, springs, and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12 (Figure A.1). The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12. Section 2 of this report provides background information pertinent to groundwater and surface water quality monitoring in each hydrogeologic regime, including the topography and bedrock geology, surface water drainage, groundwater system, and extent of groundwater contamination. The CY 2010 groundwater and surface water monitoring data in this report were obtained from sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC (B&W Y-12) and from sampling and analysis activities implemented under several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). Cooperative implementation of the monitoring programs directed by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC (i.e., coordinating sample collection and sharing data) ensures that the CY 2010 monitoring results fulfill requirements of all the applicable monitoring drivers with no duplication of sampling and analysis efforts. Section 3 of this report contains a summary of information regarding the

  6. Calendar Year 2005 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2006-09-01

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2005 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2005 monitoring data were obtained from groundwater and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12 (Figure A.1). The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge south of Y-12. The CY 2005 monitoring data were obtained under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. (BWXT) and several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). Data contained in this report meet applicable requirements of DOE Order 450.1 (Environmental Protection Program) regarding evaluation of groundwater and surface water quality in areas: (1) which are, or could be, affected by operations at Y-12 (surveillance monitoring); and (2) where contaminants from Y-12 are most likely to migrate beyond the boundaries of the ORR (exit pathway/perimeter monitoring). However, detailed analysis, evaluation, and interpretation of the CY 2005 monitoring data is deferred to the ''Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater Monitoring Data Compendium'' (BWXT 2006). For each monitoring well, spring, and surface water sampling station included in this report, the GWPP Compendium provides: (1) pertinent well installation and construction information; (2) a complete sampling history, including

  7. Calendar Year 2007 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elvado Environmental LLC

    2008-12-01

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2007 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2007 monitoring data were obtained from wells, springs, and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12 (Figure A.1). The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12. Section 2 of this report provides background information pertinent to groundwater and surface water quality monitoring in each hydrogeologic regime, including the topography and bedrock geology, surface water drainage, groundwater system, and extent of groundwater contamination. The CY 2007 groundwater and surface water monitoring data in this report were obtained from sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. (BWXT), and from sampling and analysis activities implemented under several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). In December 2007, the BWXT corporate name was changed to Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC (B&W Y-12), which is applied to personnel and organizations throughout CY 2007 for this report. Cooperative implementation of the monitoring programs directed by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC (i.e., coordinating sample collection and sharing data) ensures that the CY 2007 monitoring results fulfill requirements of

  8. Calendar Year 2005 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2006-09-01

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2005 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2005 monitoring data were obtained from groundwater and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12 (Figure A.1). The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge south of Y-12. The CY 2005 monitoring data were obtained under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. (BWXT) and several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). Data contained in this report meet applicable requirements of DOE Order 450.1 (Environmental Protection Program) regarding evaluation of groundwater and surface water quality in areas: (1) which are, or could be, affected by operations at Y-12 (surveillance monitoring); and (2) where contaminants from Y-12 are most likely to migrate beyond the boundaries of the ORR (exit pathway/perimeter monitoring). However, detailed analysis, evaluation, and interpretation of the CY 2005 monitoring data is deferred to the ''Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater Monitoring Data Compendium'' (BWXT 2006). For each monitoring well, spring, and surface water sampling station included in this report, the GWPP Compendium provides: (1) pertinent well installation and construction information; (2) a complete sampling history, including

  9. Calendar Year 2004 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    2005-09-01

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2004 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2004 monitoring data were obtained from groundwater and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12 (Figure A.1). The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge south of Y-12. The CY 2004 monitoring data were obtained under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. (BWXT) and several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). Data contained in this report meet applicable requirements of DOE Order 450.1 (Environmental Protection Program) regarding evaluation of groundwater and surface water quality in areas: (1) which are, or could be, affected by operations at Y-12 (surveillance monitoring); and (2) where contaminants from Y-12 are most likely to migrate beyond the boundaries of the ORR (exit pathway/perimeter monitoring). However, detailed analysis, evaluation, and interpretation of the CY 2004 monitoring data is deferred to the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater Monitoring Data Compendium (BWXT 2005). For each monitoring well, spring, and surface water sampling station included in this report, the GWPP Compendium provides: (1) pertinent well installation and construction information; (2) a complete sampling history, including sampling methods and

  10. Calendar Year 2009 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy, Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elvado Environmental LLC

    2010-12-01

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2009 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2009 monitoring data were obtained from wells, springs, and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12. The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12. Section 2 of this report provides background information pertinent to groundwater and surface water quality monitoring in each hydrogeologic regime, including the topography and bedrock geology, surface water drainage, groundwater system, and extent of groundwater contamination. The CY 2009 groundwater and surface water monitoring data in this report were obtained from sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC (B&W Y-12) and from sampling and analysis activities implemented under several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). Cooperative implementation of the monitoring programs directed by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC (i.e., coordinating sample collection and sharing data) ensures that the CY 2009 monitoring results fulfill requirements of all the applicable monitoring drivers with no duplication of sampling and analysis efforts. Section 3 of this report contains a summary of information regarding the groundwater and

  11. Calendar Year 2011 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elvado Environmental LLC,

    2012-12-01

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2011 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2011 monitoring data were obtained from wells, springs, and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12. The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12. This report provides background information pertinent to groundwater and surface water quality monitoring in each hydrogeologic regime, including the topography and bedrock geology, surface water drainage, groundwater system, and known extent of groundwater contamination. The CY 2011 groundwater and surface water monitoring data in this report were obtained from sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC (B&W Y-12) and from sampling and analysis activities implemented under several monitoring programs managed by the DOE Environmental Management (EM) contractor responsible for environmental cleanup on the ORR. In August 2011, URS | CH2M Oak Ridge LLC (UCOR) replaced Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) as the DOE EM contractor. For this report, BJC/UCOR will be referenced as the managing contractor for CY 2011. Cooperative implementation of the monitoring programs directed by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC/UCOR (i.e., coordinating sample collection and sharing data) ensures

  12. Juvenile Justice in Rural America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovic, Joanne, Ed.; And Others

    Producing a much-needed organized body of literature about rural juvenile justice, 14 papers (largely from the 1979 National Symposium on Rural Justice) are organized to identify current issues, identify forces causing changes in current systems, review programs responding to rural juvenile justice problems, and provide planning models to aid…

  13. Spatial analysis of factors associated with household subscription to the National Health Insurance Scheme in rural Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Manortey

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of health insurance schemes in financing healthcare delivery and to minimize the poverty gap is gaining considerable recognition among the least developed and resource challenged countries around the world. With the implementation of the socialized health insurance scheme, Ghana has taken the lead in Sub-Saharan Africa and now working out further strategies to gain universal coverage among her citizenry. The primary goal of this study is to explore the spatial relationship between the residential homes and demographic features of the people in the Barekese subdistrict in Ghana on the probability to enroll the entire household unit in the National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS. Household level data were gathered from 20 communities on the enrollment status into the NHIS alongside demographic and socioeconomic indicators and the spatial location of every household that participated in the study. Kulldorff’s purely spatial scan statistic was used to detect geographic clusters of areas with participatory households that have either higher or lower enrollment patterns in the insurance program. Logistic regression models on selected demographic and socioeconomic indicators were built to predict the effect on the odds of enrolling an entire household membership in the NHIS. Three clusters significantly stood out to have either high or low enrollment patterns in the health insurance program taking into accounts the number of households in those sub-zones of the study region. Households in the Cluster 1 insurance group have very high travel expenses compared to their counterparts in the other idenfied clusters. Travel cost and time to the NHIS registration center to enroll in the program were both significant predictors to participation in the program when controlling for cluster effect. Residents in the High socioeconomic group have about 1.66 [95% CI: 1.27-2.17] times the odds to enroll complete households in the insurance program compared to

  14. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs draft environmental impact statement. Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    This document analyzes at a programmatic level the potential environmental consequences over the next 40 years of alternatives related to the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy. It also analyzes the site-specific consequences of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sitewide actions anticipated over the next 10 years for waste and spent nuclear fuel management and environmental restoration. For programmatic spent nuclear fuel management, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, decentralization, regionalization, centralization and the use of the plans that existed in 1992/1993 for the management of these materials. For the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, ten-year plan, minimum and maximum treatment, storage, and disposal of US Department of Energy wastes.

  15. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2, Part A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    This document analyzes at a programmatic level the potential environmental consequences over the next 40 years of alternatives related to the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy. It also analyzes the site-specific consequences of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sitewide actions anticipated over the next 10 years for waste and spent nuclear fuel management and environmental restoration. For programmatic spent nuclear fuel management this document analyzes alternatives of no action, decentralization, regionalization, centralization and the use of the plans that existed in 1992/1993 for the management of these materials. For the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, ten-year plan, minimum and maximum and maximum treatment, storage, and disposal of US Department of Energy wastes.

  16. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    This document analyzes at a pregrammatic level the potential environmental consequences over the next 40 years of alternatives related to the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy. It also analyzes the site-specific consequences of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sitewide actions anticipated over the next 10 years for waste and spent nuclear fuel management and environmental restoration. For pregrammatic spent nuclear fuel management, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, decentralization, regionalization, centralization and the use of the plans that existed in 1992/1993 for the management of these materials. For the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, ten-year plan, minimum and maximum treatment, storage, and disposal of US Department of Energy wastes.

  17. 75 FR 14460 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-25

    ... traditional Drum Religion. Officials of Grand Teton National Park have determined that, pursuant to 25 U.S.C... traditional Native American religious leaders for the practice of traditional Native American religions...

  18. 76 FR 80388 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-23

    ... Battlefield National Monument. History and description of the cultural items The two cultural items are a rattle made of rawhide with attached horse hair tail, eagle feather, and buffalo wool; and a grass seed...

  19. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Belize; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-03-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Belize, a Central American country bordering Mexico to the north, Guatemala to the west and south, and the Caribbean Sea to the east. Although not an island nation, Belize is included in this energy snapshot series because it is a member of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM), an alliance of 15 Caribbean nations in the region.

  20. How we do it: coblation tonsillectomy complication rates from a single ENT department compared with the National Prospective Tonsillectomy Audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, M P A; Smithard, A; Jervis, P

    2006-04-01

    Coblation tonsillectomy is a relatively new technique, the results of which need auditing within practising units, to justify its continued usage. * The National Prospective Tonsillectomy Audit provides an excellent source of data for individual units to compare their results to. * This retrospective audit of 391 coblation tonsillectomies shows that our units haemorrhage and return to theatre rates are similar to the National rates for cold steel & ties data. * Resolution of training issues and patient selection may lead to increased use of this technique.

  1. Professionalising counter fraud specialists (fraud investigators) in the UK public sector: a focus upon Department for Work and Pensions, National Health Service and the Local Authority

    OpenAIRE

    Frimpong, KO

    2013-01-01

    This thesis seeks to examine and explore the professionalisation initiatives of the UK public sector counter fraud specialists (fraud investigators), with a focus upon the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP), National Health Service (NHS) and Local Authority (LA). The conceptual framework used to underpin the study was functionalist / “traits” theory of a profession and professionalisation. The main research question for the thesis concerns the issue of whether counter fraud specialism is ...

  2. Drawing a Link—Women’s Empowerment and Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act: A Study Conducted in the Goalpara District, Assam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr Manisha Bhattacharyya

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on an empirical research that examined the extent of economic empowerment gained by women engaged in Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act (MGNREGA in the district of Goalpara, Assam. The key objective of the MGNREGA is to provide social security to rural households by guaranteeing 100 days of paid employment in public works within a year. Based on nine variables (education, land ownership, ownership of other assets, control over income contributed by a woman to her family, control over the income of the family, savings, access to credit, social participation, cash income earned from income generating activities and calculated using empowerment index, the research compared the magnitude of women’s empowerment before and after getting involved in MGNREGA. The findings suggest that while MGNREGA is an important leap to ensuring economic empowerment to rural women, but the scheme has not been implemented properly in the district—women and men not getting 100 days of employment, irregular mode of payment, very slow progress and poor quality in public works.

  3. Syndromic diagnosis of malaria in rural Sierra Leone and proposed additions to the national integrated management of childhood illness guidelines for fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nnedu, Obinna N; Rimel, Bryan; Terry, Carey; Jalloh-Vos, Heidi; Baryon, Brima; Bausch, Daniel G

    2010-04-01

    Many countries in Africa, including Sierra Leone, have adopted artemisinin-based combination therapy as first-line therapy for treatment of patients with malaria. Because laboratory testing is often unavailable in rural areas, the cost-benefit and viability of this approach may depend on accurately diagnosing malaria by using clinical criteria. We assessed the accuracy of syndromic diagnosis for malaria in three peripheral health units in rural Sierra Leone and determined factors that were associated with an accurate malaria diagnosis. Of 175 children diagnosed with malaria on syndromic grounds, 143 (82%) were confirmed by the Paracheck-Pf test. In a multivariate analysis, splenomegaly (P = 0.04) was the only clinical sign significantly associated with laboratory-confirmed malaria, and sleeping under a bed net was protective (P = 0.05). Our findings show that clinical malaria is diagnosed relatively accurately in rural Sierra Leone. Incorporating bed net use and splenomegaly into the national Integrated Management of Childhood Illness guidelines for evaluation of fever may further enhance diagnostic accuracy for malaria.

  4. Somatotype of rural Han nationality in Xing'an league of Inner Mongolia%内蒙古兴安盟农村汉族体型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李玉玲; 陆舜华; 粟淑媛; 曹瑜; 陈琛; 国海

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the somatotype character of rural Han nationality in Inner Mongolia. Methods: Rural Han in Xing'an league of Inner Mongolia were measured by Heath-Carter somatotyping method. Results: The mean somatotype values of the male and female were 3. 9-5. 1-2. 0 and 5. 9-5. 4-1. 3 in rural districts respectively, which represented the endomor-phic mesomorph category in the male and mesomorphic endomorph category in the female. With their age increasing, the values of endomorphy and mesomorphy increased, while the values of ectomorphy decreased in rural males and females of Xing'an. Conclusion: There are significant differences in the somatotypes between genders in rural adults of Xing'an league of Inner Mongolia. The somatotype of rural adults is close to those of Han in Shandong, Ewenki, Mongol and Han in Bay-annur league of Inner Mongolia.%目的:了解内蒙古兴安盟农村汉族成人的体型特点.方法:采用Heath-Carter法对内蒙古兴安盟农村汉族进行体型分析.结果:内蒙古兴安盟汉族农村男性平均体型值为3.9-5.1-2.0,属于偏内胚层的中胚层体型;农村女性平均体型值为5.9-5.4-1.3,属于偏中胚层的内胚层体型;随年龄增长,农村男、女总体上均呈现出内因子和中因子值上升后变化不大,外因子下降后变化不大的趋势.结论:内蒙古兴安盟汉族农村成人体型性别间存在差异;与国内其他族群相比,内蒙古兴安盟地区农村汉族的体型与山东汉族、鄂温克族最接近,其次是内蒙通辽蒙古族及巴盟汉族.

  5. Rural Health Clinics (RHCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rural healthcare organizations attract healthcare providers by posting job opportunities online by state. Candidates who are interested in ... areas may register with 3RNet to search for job opportunities. The National Health Service Corps (NHSC) provides scholarships ...

  6. A cross-national investigation into the marketing department's influence within the firm : Towards initial empirical generalizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, P.C.; Leeflang, P.S.H.; Reiner, J.; Natter, M.; Grinstein, A.; Baker, B.; Gustafson, A.; Saunders, J.

    2011-01-01

    This study of the influence of the marketing department (MD), as well as its relationship with firm performance, includes seven industrialized countries and aims to generalize the conceptual model presented by Verhoef and Leeflang (2009). This investigation considers the antecedents of perceived MD

  7. A cross-national investigation into the marketing department's influence within the firm : Towards initial empirical generalizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, P.C.; Leeflang, P.S.H.; Reiner, J.; Natter, M.; Grinstein, A.; Baker, B.; Gustafson, A.; Saunders, J.

    2011-01-01

    This study of the influence of the marketing department (MD), as well as its relationship with firm performance, includes seven industrialized countries and aims to generalize the conceptual model presented by Verhoef and Leeflang (2009). This investigation considers the antecedents of perceived MD

  8. Calendar Year 2009 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy, Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elvado Environmental LLC

    2010-12-01

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2009 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2009 monitoring data were obtained from wells, springs, and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12. The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12. Section 2 of this report provides background information pertinent to groundwater and surface water quality monitoring in each hydrogeologic regime, including the topography and bedrock geology, surface water drainage, groundwater system, and extent of groundwater contamination. The CY 2009 groundwater and surface water monitoring data in this report were obtained from sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC (B&W Y-12) and from sampling and analysis activities implemented under several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). Cooperative implementation of the monitoring programs directed by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC (i.e., coordinating sample collection and sharing data) ensures that the CY 2009 monitoring results fulfill requirements of all the applicable monitoring drivers with no duplication of sampling and analysis efforts. Section 3 of this report contains a summary of information regarding the groundwater and

  9. Calendar Year 2006 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    2007-09-01

    This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2006 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2006 monitoring data were obtained from wells, springs, and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12 (Figure A.1). The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12. Section 2 of this report provides background information pertinent to groundwater and surface water quality monitoring in each hydrogeologic regime, including the topography and bedrock geology, surface water drainage, groundwater system, and extent of groundwater contamination. The CY 2006 groundwater and surface water monitoring data in this report were obtained from sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. (BWXT), and from sampling and analysis activities implemented under several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). Cooperative implementation of the monitoring programs directed by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC (i.e., preparing SAPs, coordinating sample collection, and sharing data) ensures that the CY 2006 monitoring results fulfill requirements of all the applicable monitoring drivers with no duplication of sampling and analysis efforts. Section 3 of this report contains a summary of information regarding the groundwater and

  10. U.S. Department of the Interior Climate Science Centers and U.S. Geological Survey National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center—Annual report for 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiskopf, Sarah R.; Varela Minder, Elda; Padgett, Holly A.

    2017-05-19

    Introduction2016 was an exciting year for the Department of the Interior (DOI) Climate Science Centers (CSCs) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center (NCCWSC). In recognition of our ongoing efforts to raise awareness and provide the scientific data and tools needed to address the impacts of climate change on fish, wildlife, ecosystems, and people, NCCWSC and the CSCs received an honorable mention in the first ever Climate Adaptation Leadership Award for Natural Resources sponsored by the National Fish, Wildlife, and Plant Climate Adaptation Strategy’s Joint Implementation Working Group. The recognition is a reflection of our contribution to numerous scientific workshops and publications, provision of training for students and early career professionals, and work with Tribes and indigenous communities to improve climate change resilience across the Nation. In this report, we highlight some of the activities that took place throughout the NCCWSC and CSC network in 2016.

  11. The Accommodation of Rural and Urban Workers to Industrial Discipline and Urban Living: A Four-Nation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Form, William H.

    1971-01-01

    Hypotheses related to migrants' adaptation to occupational and social systems of industrial society were tested using data on automobile workers from rural and urban backgrounds in countries at different levels of industrialization: India, Argentina, Italy, and United States. Hypotheses were the industrial man hypothesis and the developmental…

  12. National procurement of private-sector treatment for U.S. Department of Energy mixed low-level wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, J.B.; Jones, D.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Seeker, W.R. [Energy and Environmental Research Corp., Irvine, CA (United States); Alex, L.J. [Committee for Environmental Management, Washington (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The cost of bringing DOE into compliance with the Federal Facilities Compliance Act may be dramatically reduced if the private sector treats DOE mixed low level waste. If the DOE clearly defines this market by using national procurement contracts, the private sector will be able to decide if investing in DOE waste treatment contracts is good business. DOE can structure the mixed waste treatment market to influence the profitability of the contracts and to influence the quality of private sector responses. National procurement contracts will incorporate advice from the private sector so that issues of concern to industry are adequately incorporated.

  13. Rural Areas Feel Effects of Macroeconomic Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malley, James R.; Hady, Thomas F.

    1987-01-01

    Diversification of rural economies and changes in financial markets and world trade have broken down many barriers that insulated rural areas in the past. United States rural areas--the rural South and Northeast in particular--now appear to be affected slightly more than urban areas by national monetary and fiscal policies. (JHZ)

  14. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Barbados; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-06-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Barbados, an independent nation in the Lesser Antilles island chain in the eastern Caribbean. Barbados’ electricity rates are approximately $0.28 per kilowatt-hour (kWh), below the Caribbean regional average of $0.33/kWh.

  15. 78 FR 72703 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-03

    ..., Colorado; Tohono O'odham Nation of Arizona; Ute Indian Tribe of the Uintah & Ouray Reservation, Utah; Ute Mountain Tribe of the Ute Mountain Reservation, Colorado, New Mexico & Utah; and Utu Utu Gwaitu Paiute... 3 faunal bones, 23 pumpkin fragments, 1 grass stalk, 1 shell bead, and 2 chert flakes. In...

  16. 77 FR 39506 - Notice of Inventory Completion: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Tongass National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-03

    ... the National Park Service's administrative responsibilities under NAGPRA, 25 U.S.C. 3003(d)(3). The determinations in this notice are the sole responsibility of the museum, institution, or Federal agency that has... Goldschmidt and Theodore H. Haas, first issued in 1948, reprinted in 1988 by the Sealaska Heritage Association...

  17. The Rhetoric of Culture as an Act of Closure in a Cross-National Software Development Department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Eskild; Nardi, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    Global software teams work on interdependent tasks across geographies, time zones, and cultures. Studies of cross-national software teams report that the main challenges are sharing knowledge, creating trust, and establishing common ground. In this study we examine another challenge—the use...

  18. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Haiti; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-06-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Haiti, an independent nation that occupies the western portion of the island of Hispaniola in the northern Caribbean Sea. Haiti’s utility rates are roughly $0.35 U.S. dollars (USD) per kilowatt-hour (kWh), above the Caribbean regional average of $0.33 USD/kWh.

  19. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Palau; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-06-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of Palau, an independent island nation geographically located in the Micronesia region. Palau’s residential electricity rates are approximately $0.28 U.S. dollars (USD) per kilowatt-hour (kWh), more than twice the average U.S. residential rate of $0.13 USD/kWh.

  20. University Adult Education in Independent Zambia: The Role of a Department of Extra-Mural Studies in National Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okafor, Clement Abiazem

    1971-01-01

    Like other African countries, Zambia's most pragmatic approach to national development must lie in adult education. The University of Zambia is one agency involved toward this goal and its emphasis is on rapid expansion of university-type education and the training of adult educators. (Author/JB)

  1. A comparison of enoxaparin with unfractionated heparins in patients with coronary heart disease in an emergency department in rural South Indian tertiary care teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Akram; Patel, Isha; Asani, Himani; Jagadeesan, M; Parimalakrishnan, S; Selvamuthukumaran, S

    2015-01-01

    Antithrombotic therapy with heparin plus antiplatelets reduces the rate of ischemic events in patients with coronary heart disease. Low molecular weight heparin has a more predictable anticoagulant effect than standard unfractionated heparin, is easier to administer, does not require monitoring and is associated with less ADRs. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate and compare the clinical and cost outcomes of Enoxaparin with a standard unfractionated heparin in patients with coronary heart disease. This was a noninvasive prospective observational descriptive study carried out at a multi-specialty tertiary care teaching hospital situated in rural Tamil Nadu, India. Male and female coronary heart disease (CHD) patients aged 35-75 years newly diagnosed or those having a history of CHD were included. The intervention group received enoxaparin for 5 days. A series of resting the electrocardiogram, prothrombin time and ADRs were measured in all patients during days 1 and 21 respectively. Compared to unfractionated heparin group of patients, the average prothrombin time was significantly higher (P < 0.0001) whereas hypokalemia was significantly lower (P < 0.02) in enoxaparin group of patients. Even though recurrence of angina and ADRs such as bleeding, nausea, headache and sudden cough occurred less frequently in the enoxaparin group of patients compared to unfractionated heparin group of patients, the differences were not significant. Antithrombotic therapy with enoxaparin plus aspirin was safer and more effective than unfractionated heparin plus aspirin, in reducing the incidence of ischemic events in patients with unstable angina or myocardial infarction in the early phase.

  2. Solutions to Integration Model of Rural Information Resources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xirong; GAO; Bo; TAO

    2014-01-01

    The integration of rural information resources is a key factor restricting rural informationization and effective operation of rural information services. To solve problems of separate rural information resources and departments acting willfully regardless of overall interest,this paper analyzed characteristics and distribution of rural information resources,built a basic framework for integration of rural information resources and a mathematic model of integration,and finally came up with specific solutions to integration of rural information resources.

  3. The influence of distance and level of care on delivery place in rural Zambia: a study of linked national data in a geographic information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrysch, Sabine; Cousens, Simon; Cox, Jonathan; Campbell, Oona M R

    2011-01-25

    Maternal and perinatal mortality could be reduced if all women delivered in settings where skilled attendants could provide emergency obstetric care (EmOC) if complications arise. Research on determinants of skilled attendance at delivery has focussed on household and individual factors, neglecting the influence of the health service environment, in part due to a lack of suitable data. The aim of this study was to quantify the effects of distance to care and level of care on women's use of health facilities for delivery in rural Zambia, and to compare their population impact to that of other important determinants. Using a geographic information system (GIS), we linked national household data from the Zambian Demographic and Health Survey 2007 with national facility data from the Zambian Health Facility Census 2005 and calculated straight-line distances. Health facilities were classified by whether they provided comprehensive EmOC (CEmOC), basic EmOC (BEmOC), or limited or substandard services. Multivariable multilevel logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate the influence of distance to care and level of care on place of delivery (facility or home) for 3,682 rural births, controlling for a wide range of confounders. Only a third of rural Zambian births occurred at a health facility, and half of all births were to mothers living more than 25 km from a facility of BEmOC standard or better. As distance to the closest health facility doubled, the odds of facility delivery decreased by 29% (95% CI, 14%-40%). Independently, each step increase in level of care led to 26% higher odds of facility delivery (95% CI, 7%-48%). The population impact of poor geographic access to EmOC was at least of similar magnitude as that of low maternal education, household poverty, or lack of female autonomy. Lack of geographic access to emergency obstetric care is a key factor explaining why most rural deliveries in Zambia still occur at home without skilled care

  4. The influence of distance and level of care on delivery place in rural Zambia: a study of linked national data in a geographic information system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Gabrysch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Maternal and perinatal mortality could be reduced if all women delivered in settings where skilled attendants could provide emergency obstetric care (EmOC if complications arise. Research on determinants of skilled attendance at delivery has focussed on household and individual factors, neglecting the influence of the health service environment, in part due to a lack of suitable data. The aim of this study was to quantify the effects of distance to care and level of care on women's use of health facilities for delivery in rural Zambia, and to compare their population impact to that of other important determinants. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Using a geographic information system (GIS, we linked national household data from the Zambian Demographic and Health Survey 2007 with national facility data from the Zambian Health Facility Census 2005 and calculated straight-line distances. Health facilities were classified by whether they provided comprehensive EmOC (CEmOC, basic EmOC (BEmOC, or limited or substandard services. Multivariable multilevel logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate the influence of distance to care and level of care on place of delivery (facility or home for 3,682 rural births, controlling for a wide range of confounders. Only a third of rural Zambian births occurred at a health facility, and half of all births were to mothers living more than 25 km from a facility of BEmOC standard or better. As distance to the closest health facility doubled, the odds of facility delivery decreased by 29% (95% CI, 14%-40%. Independently, each step increase in level of care led to 26% higher odds of facility delivery (95% CI, 7%-48%. The population impact of poor geographic access to EmOC was at least of similar magnitude as that of low maternal education, household poverty, or lack of female autonomy. CONCLUSIONS: Lack of geographic access to emergency obstetric care is a key factor explaining why most rural deliveries

  5. Fiscal years 1993 and 1994 decontamination and decommissioning activities photobriefing book for the Argonne National Laboratory-East Site, Technology Development Division, Decontamination and Decommissioning Projects Department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This photobriefing book describes the ongoing decontamination and decommissioning projects at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)-East Site near Lemont, Illinois. The book is broken down into three sections: introduction, project descriptions, and summary. The introduction elates the history and mission of the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Projects Department at ANL-East. The second section describes the active ANL-East D and D projects, giving a project history and detailing fiscal year (FY) 1993 and FY 1994 accomplishments and FY 1995 goals. The final section summarizes the goals of the D and D Projects Department and the current program status. The D/D projects include the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor, Chicago Pile-5 Reactor, that cells, and plutonium gloveboxes. 73 figs.

  6. Wind Vision: A New Era for Wind Power in the United States (Highlights); U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-03-01

    This is a four-part Wind Vision project, consisting of Wind Vision Highlights, Executive Summary, a Full Report, and Appendix. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Program, in close cooperation with the wind industry, led a comprehensive analysis to evaluate future pathways for the wind industry. The Wind Vision report updates and expands upon the DOE's 2008 report, 20% Wind Energy by 2030, and defines the societal, environmental, and economic benefits of wind power in a scenario with wind energy supplying 10% of national end-use electricity demand by 2020, 20% by 2030, and 35% by 2050.

  7. National project seeking to improve pain management in the emergency department setting: findings from the NHMRC-NICS National Pain Management Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Steven; Knott, Jonathan; Bennetts, Scott; Jazayeri, Mitra; Huckson, Sue

    2013-04-01

    The National Pain Management Initiative was established by the National Institute of Clinical Studies to improve analgesic practice across Australian EDs. A barrier analysis provided information to better implement changes in analgesic practice. A working party was established and developed a multifaceted intervention strategy and clinical indicators. An online data collection system was developed and sites collected data at three monthly intervals for 18 months. A stepped-wedge design was chosen to manage the number of hospitals involved. Clinical indicators included documentation of pain score, time to analgesia, appropriate use of parenteral narcotics and effectiveness of analgesia for severe pain. A total of 16,627 patient datasets were entered from 45 metropolitan and regional hospitals. There was an increase from 41% to 64% in documented pain score (difference in proportions 23%, 95% confidence interval: 20-26) and median time to analgesia fell from 61 min (interquartile range: 23-122) to 41 min (interquartile range: 15-95). Appropriate parenteral narcotic use was over 90% for all time points combined. For all patients with severe pain there was no significant change in the proportion with a documented reduction of pain within 1 h of presentation. Significant improvements in documentation of pain score and time to analgesia were demonstrated through a national project of targeted improvement. Parenteral narcotic use has a high level of adherence to recommended practice. An improvement in the effectiveness of analgesia in severe pain has not been clearly demonstrated in this study. © 2012 NHMRC. EMA © 2012 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  8. U.S. Department of the Interior Climate Science Centers and U.S. Geological Survey National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center—Annual report for 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela Minder, Elda; Padgett, Holly A.

    2016-04-07

    2015 was another great year for the Department of the Interior (DOI) Climate Science Centers (CSCs) and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center (NCCWSC) network. The DOI CSCs and USGS NCCWSC continued their mission of providing the science, data, and tools that are needed for on-the-ground decision making by natural and cultural resource managers to address the effects of climate change on fish, wildlife, ecosystems, and communities. Our many accomplishments in 2015 included initiating a national effort to understand the influence of drought on wildlife and ecosystems; providing numerous opportunities for students and early career researchers to expand their networks and learn more about climate change effects; and working with tribes and indigenous communities to expand their knowledge of and preparation for the impacts of climate change on important resources and traditional ways of living. Here we illustrate some of these 2015 activities from across the CSCs and NCCWSC.

  9. Effectiveness of diabetes and hypertension management by rural primary health-care workers (Behvarz workers) in Iran: a nationally representative observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzadfar, Farshad; Murray, Christopher J L; Gakidou, Emmanuela; Bossert, Thomas; Namdaritabar, Hengameh; Alikhani, Siamak; Moradi, Ghobad; Delavari, Alireza; Jamshidi, Hamidreza; Ezzati, Majid

    2012-01-07

    Non-communicable diseases and their risk factors are leading causes of disease burden in Iran and other middle-income countries. Little evidence exists for whether the primary health-care system can effectively manage non-communicable diseases and risk factors at the population level. Our aim was to examine the effectiveness of the Iranian rural primary health-care system (the Behvarz system) in the management of diabetes and hypertension, and to assess whether the effects depend on the number of health-care workers in the community. We used individual-level data from the 2005 Non-Communicable Disease Surveillance Survey (NCDSS) for fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and systolic blood pressure (SBP), body-mass index, medication use, and sociodemographic variables. Data for Behvarz-worker and physician densities were from the 2006 Population and Housing Census and the 2005 Outpatient Care Centre Mapping Survey. We assessed the effectiveness of treatment on FPG and SBP, and associations between FPG or SBP and Behvarz-worker density with two statistical approaches: a mixed-effects regression analysis of the full NCDSS sample adjusting for individual-level and community-level covariates and an analysis that estimated average treatment effect on data balanced with propensity score matching. NCDSS had data for 65,619 individuals aged 25 years or older (11,686 of whom in rural areas); of these, 64,694 (11,521 in rural areas) had data for SBP and 50,202 (9337 in rural areas) had data for FPG. Nationally, 39·2% (95% CI 37·7 to 40·7) of individuals with diabetes and 35·7% (34·9 to 36·5) of those with hypertension received treatment, with higher treatment coverage in women than in men and in urban areas than in rural areas. Treatment lowered mean FPG by an estimated 1·34 mmol/L (0·58 to 2·10) in rural areas and 0·21 mmol/L (-0·15 to 0·56) in urban areas. Individuals in urban areas with hypertension who received treatment had 3·8 mm Hg (3·1 to 4·5) lower SBP than

  10. Examining the Tendency of Students‧ Shying Away from Departments of Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taki, Noriko

    Although Japan professes to be a scientific and technological country, more and more students have refused to apply to departments of engineering. From fiscal year 1992 through fiscal year 2008 the number of university applicants dropped to 71.6%. The number of applicants for engineering departments dropped to 61.1%, which is sharper than the decline in the number of total applicants. Among all faculties of national and public universities, engineering departments (first stage of individual exam) have the lowest difficulty level. Almost half of the engineering departments in national and public universities allow more than 50% of their applicants to pass the exam. The gap in difficulty level of entrance examinations between topnotch national universities and rural public universities has been expanding. The difficulty of entrance examination of medical technology departments is much higher than that of engineering ones. However, high-performing students have been enrolling in medical technology departments. For private universities, the gap in the number of engineering applicants between major metropolitan universities and rural ones has become considerable. Almost half of the high school teachers have realized the tendency of students' shying away from engineering departments. The contents of learning of engineering departments are too segmentalzed to understand, which makes it difficult for students to get an image of what they can do in their future after graduation. It is crucial for engineering departments to offer easy-to-understand information on future occupations to junior high students and high school students.

  11. Application of the Scenario Planning Process - a Case Study: The Technical Information Department at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuster, J A

    2001-11-26

    When the field of modern publishing was on a collision course with telecommunications, publishing organizations had to come up to speed in fields that were, heretofore, completely foreign and technologically forbidding to them. For generations, the technology of publishing centered on offset lithography, typesetting, and photography--fields that saw evolutionary and incremental change from the time of Guttenberg. But publishing now includes making information available over the World Wide Web--Internet publishing--with its ever-accelerating rate of technological change and dependence on computers and networks. Clearly, we need a methodology to help anyone in the field of Internet publishing plan for the future, and there is a well-known, well-tested technique for just this purpose--Scenario Planning. Scenario Planning is an excellent tool to help organizations make better decisions in the present based on what they identify as possible and plausible scenarios of the future. Never was decision making more difficult or more crucial than during the years of this study, 1996-1999. This thesis takes the position that, by applying Scenario Planning, the Technical Information Department at LLNL, a large government laboratory (and organizations similar to it), could be confident that moving into the telecommunications business of Internet publishing stood a very good chance of success.

  12. Pollution Sources and Mortality Rates across Rural-Urban Areas in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendryx, Michael; Fedorko, Evan; Halverson, Joel

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To conduct an assessment of rural environmental pollution sources and associated population mortality rates. Methods: The design is a secondary analysis of county-level data from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Department of Agriculture, National Land Cover Dataset, Energy Information Administration, Centers for Disease Control…

  13. Pollution Sources and Mortality Rates across Rural-Urban Areas in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendryx, Michael; Fedorko, Evan; Halverson, Joel

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To conduct an assessment of rural environmental pollution sources and associated population mortality rates. Methods: The design is a secondary analysis of county-level data from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Department of Agriculture, National Land Cover Dataset, Energy Information Administration, Centers for Disease Control…

  14. Agriculture and Rural Development on Fort Hood Lands, 1849-1942: National Register Assessments of 710 Historic Archeological Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-04-01

    1890s, despite setbacks to the cattle industry brought to Burnet, Lampasas, Hamilton, that occurred as a result of the 1884-1887 Bosque , Coryell, and...ran a sawmill on the Genealogical Society 1986:375-376). Bosque River in 1855. He served in Speight’s Near Sugar Loaf and Palo Alto, J. G. B. Infantry...years, rural that sought to claim Spain’s northern frontier communities formed, evolved, and declined, were remote, as was the Camino Real, the main

  15. Where Do Freestanding Emergency Departments Choose to Locate? A National Inventory and Geographic Analysis in Three States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuur, Jeremiah D; Baker, Olesya; Freshman, Jaclyn; Wilson, Michael; Cutler, David M

    2017-04-01

    We determine the number and location of freestanding emergency departments (EDs) across the United States and determine the population characteristics of areas where freestanding EDs are located. We conducted a systematic inventory of US freestanding EDs. For the 3 states with the highest number of freestanding EDs, we linked demographic, insurance, and health services data, using the 5-digit ZIP code corresponding to the freestanding ED's location. To create a comparison nonfreestanding ED group, we matched 187 freestanding EDs to 1,048 nonfreestanding ED ZIP codes on land and population within state. We compared differences in demographic, insurance, and health services factors between matched ZIP codes with and without freestanding EDs, using univariate regressions with weights. We identified 360 freestanding EDs located in 30 states; 54.2% of freestanding EDs were hospital satellites, 36.6% were independent, and 9.2% were not classifiable. The 3 states with the highest number of freestanding EDs accounted for 66% of all freestanding EDs: Texas (181), Ohio (34), and Colorado (24). Across all 3 states, freestanding EDs were located in ZIP codes that had higher incomes and a lower proportion of the population with Medicaid. In Texas and Ohio, freestanding EDs were located in ZIP codes with a higher proportion of the population with private insurance. In Texas, freestanding EDs were located in ZIP codes that had fewer Hispanics, had a greater number of hospital-based EDs and physician offices, and had more physician visits and medical spending per year than ZIP codes without a freestanding ED. In Ohio, freestanding EDs were located in ZIP codes with fewer hospital-based EDs. In Texas, Ohio, and Colorado, freestanding EDs were located in areas with a better payer mix. The location of freestanding EDs in relation to other health care facilities and use and spending on health care varied between states. Copyright © 2016 American College of Emergency Physicians

  16. Environmental dose in the Nuclear Medicine Department of the National Institute of Cancer;Dosis ambiental en el Departamento de Medicina Nuclear del Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres U, C. L.; Avila A, O. L. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Medina V, L. A.; Buenfil B, A. E.; Brandan S, M. E. [UNAM, Instituto de Fisica, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Trujillo Z, F. E. [Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Av. San Fernando No. 22, Col. Seccion XVI, 14080 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Gamboa de Buen, I. [UNAM, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2009-07-01

    The dosimeters TLD-100 and TLD-900 were used to know the levels of environmental dose in areas of the Nuclear Medicine Department of the National Institute of Cancer. The dosimeters calibration was carried out in the Metrology Department of the National Institute of Nuclear Research. The radioisotopes used in the studied areas are {sup 131}I, {sup 18}F, {sup 67}Ga, {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 111}In, {sup 201}Tl and {sup 137}Cs with gamma energies between 93 and 662 KeV. Dosimeters were placed during five months in the diagnostic, injection, waiting and PET rooms as well as hot room, waste room, enclosed corridors to patient rooms treated with {sup 131}I and {sup 137}Cs and witness dosimeters to know the bottom. The values found vary between 0.3 and 70 major times that those of bottom. The maximum doses were measured in the waste room and in the enclosed corridor to the patient rooms with cervical uterine cancer treated with {sup 137}Cs. (Author)

  17. Treatment and Survival of Medicare Beneficiaries with Colorectal Cancer: A Comparative Analysis Between a Rural State Cancer Registry and National Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rane, Pallavi B; Madhavan, S Suresh; Sambamoorthi, Usha; Sita, Kalidindi; Kurian, Sobha; Pan, Xiaoyun

    2017-02-01

    The aim was to examine and compare with "national" estimates, receipt of colorectal cancer (CRC) treatment in the initial phase of care and survival following a CRC diagnosis in rural Medicare beneficiaries. A retrospective study was conducted on fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries diagnosed with CRC in 2003-2006, identified from West Virginia Cancer Registry (WVCR)-Medicare linked database (N = 2119). A comparative cohort was identified from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare (N = 38,168). CRC treatment received was ascertained from beneficiaries' Medicare claims in the 12 months post CRC diagnosis or until death, whichever happened first. Receipt of minimally appropriate CRC treatment (MACT) was defined using recommended CRC treatment guidelines. All-cause and CRC-specific mortality in the 36-month period post CRC diagnosis were examined. Differences in usage of CRC surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation were observed between the 2 populations, with those from WVCR-Medicare being less likely to receive any type of CRC surgery (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.82; 95% confidence interval [CI] = [0.73-0.93]). Overall, those from WVCR-Medicare had a lower likelihood of receiving MACT, (AOR = 0.85; 95% CI = [0.76-0.96]) compared to their national counterparts. Higher hazard of CRC mortality was observed in the WVCR-Medicare cohort (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.26; 95% CI = [1.20-1.32]) compared to the SEER-Medicare cohort. Although more beneficiaries from WVCR-Medicare were diagnosed in early-stage CRC compared to their SEER-Medicare counterparts, they had a lower likelihood of receiving MACT and a higher hazard of CRC mortality. This study highlights the need for an increased focus on improving access to care at every phase of the CRC care continuum, especially for those from rural settings.

  18. Working Together, Staying Vital. Proceedings of the Joint Conference of the Western Australian District High Schools Administrators' Association and the National Society for the Provision of Education in Rural Australia (20th, Fremantle, Western Australia, June 2004)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boylan, Colin, Ed.; Hemmings, Brian, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    The 20th National Society for the Provision of Education in Rural Australia (SPERA) and Western Australia District High School Administrators' Association (WADHSAA) joint conference proceedings, based on the theme "Working Together, Staying Vital," was held in Fremantle, Perth, Western Australia, in June 2004. The proceedings contain 13…

  19. "URM candidates are encouraged to apply": a national study to identify effective strategies to enhance racial and ethnic faculty diversity in academic departments of medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek, Monica E; Kim, Karen E; Johnson, Julie K; Vela, Monica B

    2013-03-01

    There is little evidence regarding which factors and strategies are associated with high proportions of underrepresented minority (URM) faculty in academic medicine. The authors conducted a national study of U.S. academic medicine departments to better understand the challenges, successful strategies, and predictive factors for enhancing racial and ethnic diversity among faculty (i.e., physicians with an academic position or rank). This was a mixed-methods study using quantitative and qualitative methods. The authors conducted a cross-sectional study of eligible departments of medicine in 125 accredited U.S. medical schools, dichotomized into low-URM (bottom 50%) versus high-URM rank (top 50%). They used t tests and chi-squared tests to compare departments by geographic region, academic school rank, city type, and composite measures of "diversity best practices." The authors also conducted semistructured in-depth interviews with a subsample from the highest- and lowest-quartile medical schools in terms of URM rank. Eighty-two medical schools responded (66%). Geographic region and academic rank were statistically associated with URM rank, but not city type or composite measures of diversity best practices. Key themes emerged from interviews regarding successful strategies for URM faculty recruitment and retention, including institutional leadership, the use of human capital and social relationships, and strategic deployment of institutional resources. Departments of medicine with high proportions of URM faculty employ a number of successful strategies and programs for recruitment and retention. More research is warranted to identify new successful strategies and to determine the impact of specific strategies on establishing and maintaining workforce diversity.

  20. “URM Candidates Are Encouraged to Apply”: A National Study to Identify Effective Strategies to Enhance Racial and Ethnic Faculty Diversity in Academic Departments of Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek, Monica E.; Kim, Karen E.; Johnson, Julie K.; Vela, Monica B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There is little evidence regarding which factors and strategies are associated with high proportions of underrepresented minority (URM) faculty in academic medicine. The authors conducted a national study of U.S. academic medicine departments to better understand the challenges, successful strategies, and predictive factors for enhancing racial and ethnic diversity among faculty (i.e., physicians with an academic position or rank). Method This was a mixed-methods study using quantitative and qualitative methods. The authors conducted a cross-sectional study of eligible departments of medicine in 125 accredited U.S. medical schools, dichotomized into low-URM (bottom 50%) versus high-URM rank (top 50%). They used t tests and chi-squared tests to compare departments by geographic region, academic school rank, city type, and composite measures of “diversity best practices.” The authors also conducted semistructured in-depth interviews with a subsample from the highest-and lowest-quartile medical schools in terms of URM rank. Results Eighty-two medical schools responded (66%). Geographic region and academic rank were statistically associated with URM rank, but not city type or composite measures of diversity best practices. Key themes emerged from interviews regarding successful strategies for URM faculty recruitment and retention including institutional leadership, the use of human capital and social relationships and strategic deployment of institutional resources. Conclusions Departments of medicine with high proportions of URM faculty employ a number of successful strategies and programs for recruitment and retention. More research is warranted to identify new successful strategies and to determine the impact of specific strategies on establishing and maintaining workforce diversity. PMID:23348090

  1. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2, Part B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    Two types of projects in the spent nuclear fuel and environmental restoration and waste management activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are described. These are: foreseeable proposed projects where some funding for preliminary planning and/or conceptual design may already be authorized, but detailed design or planning will not begin until the Department of Energy (DOE) has determined that the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act process for the project have been completed; planned or ongoing projects not yet completed but whose National Environmental Policy Act documentation is already completed or is expected to be completed before the Record of Decision for this Envirorunental Impact Statement (EIS) is issued. The section on project summaries describe the projects (both foreseeable proposed and ongoing).They provide specific information necessary to analyze the environmental impacts of these projects. Chapter 3 describes which alternative(s) each project supports. Summaries are included for (a) spent nuclear fuel projects, (b) environmental remediation projects, (c) the decontamination and decommissioning of surplus INEL facilities, (d) the construction, upgrade, or replacement of existing waste management facilities, (e) infrastructure projects supporting waste management activities, and (f) research and development projects supporting waste management activities.

  2. Atmospheric measurements of CDDs, CDFs and coplanar PCBs in rural and remote locations of the United States in the year 2001 from the National Dioxin Air Monitoring Network (NDAMN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleverly, D. [National Center for Environmental Assessment, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (United States); Winters, D. [Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, WA, DC (United States); Ferrario, J.; Dupuy, A.; Byrne, C. [Environmental Chemistry Lab., U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Stennis Space Center, MS (United States); Riggs, K.; Hartford, P.; Joseph, D.; Wisbith, T. [Battelle Memorial Inst., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2004-09-15

    The U.S. EPA has established a National Dioxin Air Monitoring Network (NDAMN) to address three primary objectives: (1) to determine the atmospheric levels and occurrences of dioxin-like compounds in rural and agricultural areas where livestock, poultry and animal feed crops are grown; (2) to provide measurements of atmospheric levels of dioxin-like compounds in remote areas of the U.S.; and (3) to provide information regarding the long-range and transboundary transport of dioxin-like compounds in air over the United States. Figure 1 shows the locations of NDAMN sites. Previously EPA has reported on the preliminary results of monitoring at 9 rural locations from June1998 through December 19991, and calendar year 2000. The year 1999 measurement at the 9 rural stations indicated an annual mean TEQ{sub DF}-WHO{sub 98} air concentration of about 11.3 fg m{sup -3}. In the year 2000, the mean of 18 rural stations and 8 remote areas were 14.6 fg m{sup -3} and 2.0 fg m{sup -3}, respectively. Since this reporting, NDAMN has been extended to include additional stations. We are reporting the air monitoring results of NDAMN for calendar year 2001 at both rural and remote sites in the U.S. The rural sites are indicated as circles and remote sites are indicted as squares on Figure 1.

  3. U.S. Department of the Interior Fish and Wildlife Service : Environmental Assessment for Opening Portions of Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge for Hunting as Proposed in the 1992 Hunting Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes to open portions of the Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge for hunting of Canada geese, white-tailed deer, and other...

  4. Trends in nutritional status and nutrient intakes and correlates of overweight/obesity among rural adult women (≥18-60 years) in India: National Nutrition Monitoring Bureau (NNMB) national surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshram, I I; Balakrishna, N; Sreeramakrishna, K; Rao, K Mallikharjun; Kumar, R Hari; Arlappa, N; Manohar, G; Reddy, Ch Gal; Ravindranath, M; Kumar, S Sharad; Brahmam, G N V; Laxmaiah, A

    2016-04-01

    To assess trends in nutrient intakes and nutritional status of rural adult women (≥18-60 years) and the association of sociodemographic characteristics with overweight/obesity. Community-based cross-sectional studies carried out during 1975-79 to 2011-12 by the National Nutrition Monitoring Bureau (NNMB) were used. Anthropometric measurements such as height, weight and waist circumference, carried out during the surveys, were used. Association and logistic regression analyses between sociodemographic characteristics and overweight/obesity and abdominal obesity were conducted using a complex samples procedure. Ten NNMB states of India. Non-pregnant and non-lactating rural women aged ≥18-60 years covered during the above periods from ten states in India. The prevalence of chronic energy deficiency has declined from 52 % during 1975-79 to 34 % during 2011-12, while that of overweight/obesity has increased from 7 % to 24 % during the same period. Median intakes of most of the nutrients have increased over the same period, although they were below recommended levels. The chance of overweight/obesity and abdominal obesity was significantly (Pobesity has increased during the same period. This increase in overweight/obesity may be attributed to increased consumption of fatty foods, sedentary lifestyle and improved socio-economic status. There is a need to educate the community about regular physical exercise, low intakes of fats and oils, and a balanced diet.

  5. 7 CFR 1940.564 - Section 502 subsidized guaranteed Rural Housing loans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE, RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, AND FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) GENERAL Methodology and Formulas for...

  6. 7 CFR 1940.575 - Section 515 Rural Rental Housing (RRH) loans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE, RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, AND FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) GENERAL Methodology and Formulas for...

  7. 7 CFR 1940.565 - Section 502 subsidized Rural Housing loans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE, RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, AND FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) GENERAL Methodology and Formulas for...

  8. Overview of Rural Tourism Development in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tianhui; XIE

    2015-01-01

    Rural tourism is a form of tourism relying on rural environment,with rural unique natural scene and cultural characteristics( production pattern,life style,folk customs,and rural culture) as object,and integrating sightseeing,vacation,recreation and shopping. Rural tourism provides recreation products for urban residents,promotes national and local economy,promotes rural employment,keeps traditional culture,improves rural ecological environment,and promotes urban and rural exchange. From concept and characteristics of rural tourism,this paper made a brief overview of development background,realistic significance,influence factors,development mode,and existing problems,in the hope of providing favorable references for grasping development situation of rural tourism in China.

  9. The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Agency's Use of Geographic Information Systems for Nuclear Emergency Response Support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. L. Guber

    2001-06-01

    The U.S, Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Agency's (NNSA) Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) provides Geographic Information System (GIS) support during nuclear emergency response activities. As directed by the NNSA, the RSL GIS staff maintains databases and equipment for rapid field deployment during an emergency response. When on location, GIS operators provide information products to on-site emergency managers as well as to emergency managers at the DOE Headquarters (HQ) Emergency Operations Center (EOC) in Washington, D.C. Data products are derived from multiple information sources in the field including radiological prediction models, field measurements taken on the ground and from the air, and pertinent information researched on the Internet. The GIS functions as a central data hub where it supplies the information to response elements in the field, as well as to headquarters officials at HQ during emergency response activities.

  10. Rural Veterans by State (2015)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This spreadsheet contains data from the 2015 American Community Survey and shows the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of Veterans who live in rural and...

  11. Rural Veterans by State (2014)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This speadsheet contains data from the 2014 American Community Survey and shows the demographic and socioeconomic characteristics of Veterans who live in rural and...

  12. Somatotype of Han nationality in rural of Mindong dialect group%汉族闽东语族群乡村成人体型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宇克莉; 郑连斌; 胡莹; 王杨; 薛虹; 程智; 邓维; 时蕊

    2015-01-01

    目的::研究汉族闽东语族群乡村成人的体型特征。方法:采用 Heath-Carter 人体测量法对汉族闽东语族群乡村成人382例(男188例,女194例)进行了体型研究。结果:闽东语族群乡村男性平均体型值为5.4-4.5-1.9,乡村女性平均体型值为6.2-4.0-1.7,均属于偏中胚层的内胚层体型。在13种体型中,男女出现率最高的体型均为偏内胚层的中胚层体型。随年龄增长,乡村男性与女性内因子值、中因子值逐渐增大;外因子值逐渐减小,体脂(%)逐渐增加,女性50~岁组体脂最为发达,40岁以后的3个年龄组平均体型接近,20~岁组身体充实度最差,40岁以后身体逐渐充实。结论:闽东语族群体型相对接近于四川汉族,而距离广西汉族差距较大。%Obj ective :To analyze the somatotype of Han nationality in the rural areas of Mindong dialet group.Methods :The somatotype of 382 rural adults (188 males and 1 94 females)of Han in the rural areas of Mindong dialet group was studied using the Heath-Carter somatotyping method.Results :The mean somatotype values of the males and females were 5.4-4.5-1.9 and 6.2-4.0-1.7 in rural districts (both were mesomorphic endomorph category).The top frequency of somatotype was endomorphic mesomorph category.With their age increasing,the values of endomorphy and mesomorphy were increased, while the values of ectomorphy were decreased in both rural males and females.Body fat (%)was gradually increased (female 50-year-old group had the most developed body fat).The average somatotype of the three age groups after the 40-year-old group was in similarity,and the 20-year-old group had the worst body plumpness,and then after the age of 40 years,the body gradually enriched.Conclusion:The Mindong dialect group is close to Sichuan Han,but differ greatly from Guangxi Han.

  13. Frequent Users of Hospital Emergency Departments in Korea Characterized by Claims Data from the National Health Insurance: A Cross Sectional Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Hoon Woo

    Full Text Available The Korean National Health Insurance, which provides universal coverage for the entire Korean population, is now facing financial instability. Frequent emergency department (ED users may represent a medically vulnerable population who could benefit from interventions that both improve care and lower costs. To understand the nature of frequent ED users in Korea, we analyzed claims data from a population-based national representative sample. We performed both bivariate and multivariable analyses to investigate the association between patient characteristics and frequent ED use (4+ ED visits in a year using claims data of a 1% random sample of the Korean population, collected in 2009. Among 156,246 total ED users, 4,835 (3.1% were frequent ED users. These patients accounted for 14% of 209,326 total ED visits and 17.2% of $76,253,784 total medical expenses generated from all ED visits in the 1% data sample. Frequent ED users tended to be older, male, and of lower socio-economic status compared with occasional ED users (p < 0.001 for each. Moreover, frequent ED users had longer stays in the hospital when admitted, higher probability of undergoing an operative procedure, and increased mortality. Among 8,425 primary diagnoses, alcohol-related complaints and schizophrenia showed the strongest positive correlation with the number of ED visits. Among the frequent ED users, mortality and annual outpatient department visits were significantly lower in the alcohol-related patient subgroup compared with other frequent ED users; furthermore, the rate was even lower than that for non-frequent ED users. Our findings suggest that expanding mental health and alcohol treatment programs may be a reasonable strategy to decrease the dependence of these patients on the ED.

  14. S.2058: This act may be cited as the Department of Energy National Security Act for Fiscal Year 1999, introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundred Fifth Congress, Second Session, May 11, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    This bill is to authorize appropriations for fiscal year 1999 for defense activities of the Department of Energy, and for other purposes. Topics addressed in the bill include DOE national security programs including recurring general provisions and program authorizations, restrictions,and limitations; defense nuclear facilities safety board; national defense stockpile; naval petroleum reserves; and Panama Canal commission.

  15. Statement of Ronald E. Lambertson, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior, before the House Subcommittee on Public Lands and National Parks concerning National Wildlife Refuge additions to the National Wilderness Preservation System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a statement on the Mattamuskeet, Cedar Island, and Pea Island Wildlife Refuges. Given by Ronald E. Lambertson, it says that there are almost no...

  16. Relation between Rural Financial Development and Rural Economic Growth: A Case Study of Yunnan Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei; XU; Lijia; HU

    2015-01-01

    Rural economy is an essential part of China’s national economy. It is necessary to study mutual relation between rural financial development and rural economic growth. In this study,panel VAR model was built. Based on time series data in 1995- 2010,it tested the relation between rural financial development and rural economic growth through ADF test,co-integration test and Granger causality test. Finally,it came up with policy recommendations,in the hope of promoting coordinated development of rural finance and rural economy.

  17. Effect of national schistosomiasis control programme on Taenia solium taeniosis and porcine cysticercosis in rural communities of Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braae, Uffe Christian; Magnussen, Pascal; Harrison, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Taenia solium is found throughout sub-Saharan Africa and co-endemic with schistosomiasis in many regions. Taenia solium leads to taeniosis and neurocysticercosis - the leading cause of preventable epilepsy globally. This study aimed to assess the effects of the National Schistosomiasis Control...

  18. The Struggle of Rural Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteva, Gustavo; And Others

    Diverse aspects of rural problems and the social organization of Mexican labor are explored in this summary of Mexican rural history. Achnowledging Mexico's rich, unexhausted, and unexplored natural resources, Mexico is described as a poverty-stricken, hungry nation, with high degrees of malnutrition, deprivation, and illiteracy heavily…

  19. Rural Students Falling Behind

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Access to leading universities more difficult than ever for students from rural areas As a sophomore majoring in English at the Department of Foreign Languages and Literature at Tsinghua University, Zhao Jun has learned the true meaning of "spiritual solitude" over the past year.

  20. The national employment guarantee scheme and inequities in household spending on food and non-food determinants of health in rural India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilip, T R; Dandona, Rakhi; Dandona, Lalit

    2013-10-15

    Inequities in a population in spending on food and non-food items can contribute to disparities in health status. The Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme (MGNREGS) was launched in rural India in 2006, aimed at providing at least 100 days of manual work to a member in needy households. We used nationally representative data from the consumer expenditure surveys of 2004-05 and 2009-10 and the employment survey of 2009-10 conducted by National Sample Survey Organisation to assess the effect of MGNREGS in reducing inequities in consumption of food and non-food items between poor and non-poor households in the states of India. Variations among the states in implementation of MGNREGS were examined using the employment and unemployment survey data, and compared with official programme data up to 2012-13. Inequity in spending on food and non-food items was assessed using the ratio of monthly per capita consumer expenditure (MPCE) between the most vulnerable (labourer) and least vulnerable categories of households. The survey data suggested 1.42 billion person-days of MGNRGES employment in the 2009-10 financial year, whereas the official programme data reported 2.84 billion person-days. According to the official data, the person-days of MGNRGES employment decreased by 43.3% from 2009-10 to 2012-13 for the 9 large less developed states of India. Survey data revealed that the average number of MGNREGS work days in a year per household varied from 42 days in Rajasthan to less than 10 days in 14 of the 20 major states in India in 2009-10. Rajasthan with the highest implementation of MGNRGES among the 9 less developed states of India had the highest relative decline of 10.4% in the food spending inequity from 2004-05 to 2009-10 between the most vulnerable and less vulnerable households. The changes in inequity for non-food spending did not have any particular pattern across the less developed states. In the most vulnerable category, the households in

  1. Department of Agricultural Extension and Rural Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2017-03-20

    Mar 20, 2017 ... ISSN:1998-0507 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ejesm.v10i2.12. Submitted: January 27, 2017 ... technologies are evolved (Bolan et al.,. 2010). Adewumi ... attracts houseflies, constitutes health hazard to man, animals and thus becomes a menace to ... Perceptions have been shown to be good determinants ...

  2. National scale-up of integrated community case management in rural Ethiopia: implementation and early lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Although under-five mortality in Ethiopia has decreased 67% in the past two decades, many, children still die from preventable or treatable conditions, mainly pneumonia, newborn problems, diarrhea, malaria and malnutrition. Most of these deaths can be avoided with timely and appropriate care, but access to and use of treatment remains inadequate. Community health workers, appropriately trained, supervised, and supplied with essen- tial equipment and medicines, can deliver case management or referral to most sick children. In 2010, Ethiopia added pneumonia to diarrhea, malaria and severe acute malnutrition, targeted for treatment in the integrated community case management (iCCM) strategy. This article describes the national scale-up of iCCM implementation and early lessons learned. We reviewed data related to iCCM program inputs and processes from reports, minutes, and related documents from January 2010 through July 2013. We describe introduction and scale-up through eight health system components. The government and partners trained and supplied 27,116 of the total 32,000 Health Extension Workers and mentored 80% of them to deliver iCCM services to over one million children. The government led a strong-iCCM partnership that attracted development partners in implementation, monitoring, evaluation, and research. Service utilization and weak supply chain remain-major challenges. Strong MOH leadership, policy support, and national partnerships helped successful national iCCM scale-up and should help settle remaining challenges.

  3. Greenways for rural sustainable development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottomano Palmisano, Giovanni; Govindan, Kannan; Loisi, Rosa V.

    2016-01-01

    within the CAP because they help to protect and manage environmental heritage, promote economic activities and enhance the social assets of rural areas; furthermore, given their natural ability to simultaneously connect these resources, greenways promote Rural Sustainable Development (RSD......Policy makers have recently begun to agree on environmental, economic and social aspects of rural areas that are enhanced according to the European Union (EU) Common Agricultural Policy (CAP), and in particular in the national Rural Development Programmes (RDPs).Greenways are an acknowledged tool...

  4. 75 FR 17121 - Inviting Applications for Rural Business Opportunity Grants; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Rural Business--Cooperative Service Inviting Applications for Rural Business Opportunity Grants; Correction AGENCY: Rural Business--Cooperative Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice; correction. SUMMARY: The...

  5. Differences Among States in Rural Veterans' Use of VHA and Non-VHA Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Alan N; Weeks, William B; Charlton, Mary E

    2017-01-01

    To understand how vouchers for non-VHA care of VHA-enrolled veterans might affect rural enrollees, we determined how much enrollees use VHA and non-VHA inpatient care, and whether this use varies substantially between rural and urban residents depending on state of residence. For veterans listed in the 2007 VHA enrollment file as living in Arizona, Iowa, Louisiana, Tennessee, Florida, South Carolina, Pennsylvania, or New York, we merged 2004-2007 administrative discharge data for all VHA hospitalizations with all non-VHA hospitalizations listed in state health department or hospital association databases. Within states, rural and urban residents (RUCA-defined) were compared on VHA and non-VHA hospitalization rates, overall and for major diagnostic categories. Non-VHA hospital use was much greater than VHA use, though it also was more variable across states. In states with higher proportions of urban enrollees, use of non-VHA hospitals was lower for small or isolated rural town residents than urban residents; in the more rural states, it was greater. Rural enrollees also used VHA hospitals more than urban enrollees if they lived in the South, but they used VHA hospitals less in other states. Findings were consistent across principal diagnoses, except that in every state, rural veterans were hospitalized less often for mental disorders but more for respiratory diseases. Logistic regressions controlling several covariates consistently showed that very rural enrollees relied on VHA hospitals more than urban enrollees. Vouchers would likely increase non-VHA use more in states with greater rural populations. Vouchers for non-VHA inpatient care might have greater impact in rural states. © 2015 National Rural Health Association.

  6. Rural buyers' perception about mosquito repellants

    OpenAIRE

    Mehta, D.; Anand GARG; Naveen K MEHTA

    2010-01-01

    Mosquito repellants prevent mosquito bites and prevention of "man-mosquito contact" is a critical factor in transmission and spread of any disease through mosquitoes particularly in rural area. There has been a long standing 'bias' towards rural buyers. The rural markets are considered rigid in the nature but it is not the case in real sense. Marketing to rural buyers is not only a challenge to the marketers but to the manufacturers, communicators, national planners and economists as well. Th...

  7. Use of the emergency department for dermatologic care in the United States by ethnic group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abokwidir, Manal; Davis, Scott A; Fleischer, Alan B; Pichardo-Geisinger, Rita O

    2015-01-01

    The emergency department (ED) is not the ideal setting for dermatologic care, but may be widely used, especially among disadvantaged ethnic minorities. This study was performed to characterize the role of the ED in providing dermatologic care for each racial and ethnic group in the United States. We analyzed visits from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey from 1993 to 2010. Settings (office-based, outpatient department or ED), diagnoses and race/ethnicity were assessed to compare usage of the ED across groups. Usage of the ED for dermatologic conditions increased over time (p dermatologic care of black (18.3%) and Hispanic (10.5%) patients than for white patients (5.9%) and were used most in rural or small metropolitan areas. Providing better insurance, more dermatologists in rural areas and better dermatologic training for family physicians may help improve care for underserved populations and reduce inappropriate use of the ED.

  8. Twelve Months of Air Quality Monitoring at Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Southwestern Rural Nevada, U.S.A (EMSI April 2007)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelbrecht, Johann P; Shafer, David S; Campbell, Dave; Campbell, Scott; McCurdy, Greg; Kohl, Steven D; Nikolich, George; Sheetz, Larry

    2011-08-01

    The one year of air quality monitoring data collected at the Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) was the final part of the air quality "Scoping Studies" for the Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI) in southern and central Nevada. The objective of monitoring at Ash Meadows was to examine aerosol and meteorological data, seasonal trends in aerosol and meteorological parameters as well as to examine evidence for long distance transport of some constituents. The 9,307 hectare refuge supports more than 50 springs and 24 endemic species, including the only population of the federally listed endangered Devil’s Hole pupfish (Cyprinodon diabolis) (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1990). Ash Meadows NWR is located in a Class II air quality area, and the aerosol measurements collected with this study are compared to those of Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) sites. Measurements taken at Ash Meadows NWR over a period of 12 months provide new baseline air quality and meteorological information for rural southwestern Nevada, specifically Nye County and the Amargosa Valley.

  9. Moving beyond sex: Assessing the impact of gender identity on human papillomavirus vaccine recommendations and uptake among a national sample of rural-residing LGBT young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarczyk, Robert A; Whitehead, Jennifer L; Stephenson, Rob

    2017-06-01

    While national human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination estimates exist by sex, little is known about HPV vaccination rates by gender identity. We conducted a self-administered, anonymous online cross-sectional survey, with recruitment through Facebook ads, of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender individuals in rural areas of the US. We compared HPV vaccine recommendation and uptake by self-reported sex assigned at birth and current gender identity. Six hundred sixty respondents were age eligible for HPV vaccination: 84% reported gender identity aligned with their sex assigned at birth, while 10% reported gender identity the differed from their sex assigned at birth; an additional 6% reported non-binary gender identity. Only 14% of male sex assigned at birth and 44% of female sex assigned at birth received HPV vaccine, similar to estimates by current gender identity. Transgender respondents' HPV vaccination experience mirrored that of cisgender respondents with regard to sex assigned at birth. Providers may base HPV vaccine recommendations on individuals' sex assigned at birth, which may impact transgender individuals' vaccine coverage. Future HPV vaccine uptake studies should account for gender identity. With sex-specific catch-up HPV vaccination recommendations, the role of gender identity on provider recommendation and reimbursement needs to be addressed. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. TV'S DEPARTMENT STORES: Shopping from the couch

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pat Gao

    2005-01-01

    For hordes of Taiwan's rural residents and office workers, a hard day in the fields or at the stock exchange leaves little time for a trip to the city or a stroll around the warrens of a department store...

  11. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Monitoring Optimization Plan for Groundwater Monitoring Wells at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-04-01

    This document is the monitoring optimization plan for groundwater monitoring wells associated with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The plan describes the technical approach that is implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) to focus available resources on the monitoring wells at Y-12 that provide the most useful hydrologic and groundwater quality monitoring data. The technical approach is based on the GWPP status designation for each well. Under this approach, wells granted “active” status are used by the GWPP for hydrologic monitoring and/or groundwater quality sampling, whereas wells granted “inactive” status are not used for either purpose. The status designation also defines the frequency at which the GWPP will inspect applicable wells, the scope of these well inspections, and extent of any maintenance actions initiated by the GWPP. Details regarding the ancillary activities associated with implementation of this plan (e.g., well inspection) are deferred to the referenced GWPP plans.

  12. Environmental Compliance Guide. Guidance manual for Department of Energy compliance with the Clean Water Act: National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-07-01

    This manual provides general guidance for Department of Energy (DOE) officials for complying with Sect. 402 of the Clean Water Act (CWA) of 1977 and amendments. Section 402 authorizes the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) or states with EPA approved programs to issue National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits for the direct discharge of waste from a point source into waters of the United States. Although the nature of a project dictates the exact information requirements, every project has similar information requirements on the environmental setting, type of discharge(s), characterization of effluent, and description of operations and wastewater treatment. Additional information requirements for projects with ocean discharges, thermal discharges, and cooling water intakes are discussed. Guidance is provided in this manual on general methods for collecting, analyzing, and presenting information for an NPDES permit application. The NPDES program interacts with many sections of the CWA; therefore, background material on pertinent areas such as effluent limitations, water quality standards, toxic substances, and nonpoint source pollutants is included in this manual. Modifications, variances, and extensions applicable to NPDES permits are also discussed.

  13. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory safeguards and security quarterly progress report to the U.S. Department of Energy. Quarter ending December 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, G.; Mansur, D.L.; Ruhter, W.D.; Strauch, M.S.

    1997-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) carries out safeguards and security activities for the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Safeguards and Security (OSS), as well as other organizations, both within and outside the DOE. This document summarizes the activities conducted for the OSS during the First Quarter of Fiscal Year 1997 (October through December, 1996). The nature and scope of the activities carried out for OSS at LLNL require a broad base of technical expertise. To assure projects are staffed and executed effectively, projects are conducted by the organization at LLNL best able to supply the needed technical expertise. These projects are developed and managed by senior program managers. Institutional oversight and coordination is provided through the LLNL Deputy Director`s office. At present, the Laboratory is supporting OSS in four areas: (1) safeguards technology; (2) safeguards and material accountability; (3) computer security--distributed systems; and (4) physical and personnel security support. The remainder of this report describes the activities in each of these four areas. The information provided includes an introduction which briefly describes the activity, summary of major accomplishments, task descriptions with quarterly progress, summaries of milestones and deliverables and publications published this quarter.

  14. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Safeguards and Security quarterly progress report to the US Department of Energy: Quarter ending December 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, G.; Mansur, D.L.; Ruhter, W.D.; Steele, E.; Strait, R.S.

    1994-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) carries out safeguards and security activities for the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Safeguards and Security (OSS), as well as other organizations, both within and outside the DOE. This document summarizes the activities conducted for the OSS during the first quarter of fiscal year 1994 (October through December, 1993). The nature and scope of the activities carried out for OSS at LLNL require a broad base of technical expertise. To assure projects are staffed and executed effectively, projects are conducted by the organization at LLNL best able to supply the needed technical expertise. These projects are developed and managed by senior program managers. Institutional oversight and coordination is provided through the LLNL Deputy Director`s office. At present, the Laboratory is supporting OSS in five areas: (1) Safeguards Technology, (2) Safeguards and Decision Support, (3) Computer Security, (4) DOE Automated Physical Security, and (5) DOE Automated Visitor Access Control System. This report describes the activities in each of these five areas. The information provided includes an introduction which briefly describes the activity, summary of major accomplishments, task descriptions with quarterly progress, summaries of milestones and deliverables and publications published this quarter.

  15. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Monitoring Optimization Plan For Groundwater Monitoring Wells At The U.S. Department Of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-09-01

    This document is the monitoring optimization plan for groundwater monitoring wells associated with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The plan describes the technical approach that is implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) to focus available resources on the monitoring wells at Y-12 that provide the most useful hydrologic and groundwater quality monitoring data. The technical approach is based on the GWPP status designation for each well. Under this approach, wells granted "active" status are used by the GWPP for hydrologic monitoring and/or groundwater quality sampling, whereas wells granted "inactive" status are not used for either purpose. The status designation also defines the frequency at which the GWPP will inspect applicable wells, the scope of these well inspections, and extent of any maintenance actions initiated by the GWPP. Details regarding the ancillary activities associated with implementation of this plan (e.g., well inspection) are deferred to the referenced GWPP plans. This plan applies to groundwater wells associated with Y-12 and related waste management areas and facilities located within three hydrogeologic regimes.

  16. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory safeguards and security quarterly progress report to the US Department of Energy: Quarter ending September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruhter, W.D.; Strait, R.S.; Mansur, D.L.; Davis, G.

    1993-10-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) carries out safeguards and security activities for the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Safeguards and Security (OSS), as well as other organizations, both within and outside the DOE. This document summarizes the activities conducted for the OSS during the fourth quarter of Fiscal Year 1993 (July through September, 1993). The nature and scope of the activities carried out for OSS at LLNL require a broad base of technical expertise. To assure projects are staffed and executed effectively, projects are conducted by the organization at LLNL best able to supply the needed technical expertise. These projects are developed and managed by senior program managers. Institutional oversight and coordination is provided through the LLNL Deputy Director`s office. At present, the Laboratory is supporting OSS in five areas: Safeguards Technology, Safeguard System Studies, Computer Security, DOE Automated Physical Security and DOE Automated Visitor Access Control System. The remainder of this report describes the activities in each of these five areas. The information provided includes an introduction which briefly describes the activity, summary of major accomplishments, task descriptions with quarterly progress, summaries of milestones and deliverables and publications published this quarter.

  17. Investigating Rural Teachers' Professional Development, Instructional Knowledge, and Classroom Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Todd A.; Nugent, Gwen C.; Chumney, Frances L.; Ihlo, Tanya; Shapiro, Edward S.; Guard, Kirra; Koziol, Natalie; Bovaird, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Teachers Speak was a national survey study designed to investigate the characteristics of rural elementary school teachers' existing professional development; differences in professional development practices between rural and non-rural settings; and the potential influence of professional development characteristics on rural teachers' knowledge,…

  18. Nurse Practitioner Autonomy and Satisfaction in Rural Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spetz, Joanne; Skillman, Susan M; Andrilla, C Holly A

    2016-01-29

    Rural primary care shortages may be alleviated if more nurse practitioners (NPs) practiced there. This study compares urban and rural primary care NPs (classified by practice location in urban, large rural, small rural, or isolated small rural areas) using descriptive analysis of the 2012 National Sample Survey of NPs. A higher share of rural NPs worked in states without physician oversight requirements, had a DEA (drug enforcement administration) number, hospital admitting privileges, and billed using their own provider identifier. Rural NPs more often reported they were fully using their NP skills, practicing to the fullest extent of the legal scope of practice, satisfied with their work, and planning to stay in their jobs. We found lower per capita NP supply in rural areas, but the proportion in primary care increased with rurality. To meet rural primary care needs, states should support rural NP practice, in concert with support for rural physician practice.

  19. Rural Youth in Asia. Report of the CCA Rural Youth Study Group (Sibu, Malaysia, March 14-19, 1976).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977

    Historical causes of rural poverty and general recommendations for work among rural youth in India, Malaysia, Philippines, Sri Lanka, and Thailand are presented in this summary of national reports given before the Rural Youth Study Group in 1976. In addition to study papers on each country, the volume contains an introduction on rural youth and…

  20. 7 CFR 1940.563 - Section 502 non-subsidized guaranteed Rural Housing (RH) loans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Section 502 non-subsidized guaranteed Rural Housing (RH) loans. 1940.563 Section 1940.563 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE, RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, AND FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...

  1. China’s Urban-Rural Integration Policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingqing Ye

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis presented here is based on the keynote speech discussing the most recent developments in rural policy on urban-rural integration in China delivered in Chinese by Professor Ye Xingqing at the Ninth European Conference on Agriculture and Rural Development in China (ECARDC9 held at the University of Leeds in the UK on 3-5 April 2009. Professor Ye’s paper provides a comprehensive overview of the main initiatives, their rationale and their context, including some of the debates surrounding them. Professor Ye, who is an invited keynote speaker of ECARDC9 and the director-general of the Department for Rural Economy, Research Office of the State Council, People’s Republic of China, has been personally involved in the process of formulating these policy initiatives.Translated from Chinese by Prof. Flemming Christiansen, professor in Chinese Studies, Department of East Asian Studies, University of Leeds and also Director of National Institute of Chinese Studies, White Rose East Asia Centre, United Kingdom.

  2. Spatiotemporal discordance in five common measures of rurality for US counties and applications for health disparities research in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven A. Cohen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Rural populations face numerous barriers to health, including poorer health care infrastructure, access to care, and other sociodemographic factors largely associated with rurality. Multiple measures of rurality used in the biomedical and public health literature can help assess rural-urban health disparities and may impact the observed associations between rurality and health. Furthermore, understanding what makes a place truly rural versus urban may vary from region to region in the United States.Purpose: The objectives of this study are to compare and contrast five common measures of rurality and determine how well-correlated these measures are at the national, regional, and divisional level, as well as to assess patterns in the correlations between the prevalence of obesity in the population aged 60+ and each of the five measures of rurality at the regional and divisional level.Methods: Five measures of rurality were abstracted from the US Census and US Department of Agriculture (USDA to characterize US counties. Obesity data in the population aged 60+ were abstracted from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS. Spearman’s rank correlations were used to quantify the associations among the five rurality measurements at the national, regional, and divisional level, as defined by the US Census Bureau. Geographic information systems were used to visually illustrate temporal, spatial, and regional variability. Results: Overall, Spearman’s rank correlations among the five measures ranged from 0.521 (percent urban-Urban Influence Code to 0.917 (Rural-Urban Continuum Code-Urban Influence Code. Notable discrepancies existed in these associations by Census region and by division. The associations between measures of rurality and obesity in the 60+ population varied by rurality measure used and by region. Conclusion: This study is among the first to systematically assess the spatial, temporal, and regional differences

  3. Rural Supremacy

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Meera

    2011-01-01

    The success of any brand depends on it acceptance by the consumers. This project highlights the rural buying behaviour. The rural consumers tend to show a closed mind towards branded goods and services. Though the current scenario is improved than the past but still large amount of rural market is untapped. The marketers now understand the potential at the bottom of the pyramid but there are doubts regarding the way this market can be reached and converted into customers. Many factors like in...

  4. Rural Supremacy

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Meera

    2011-01-01

    The success of any brand depends on it acceptance by the consumers. This project highlights the rural buying behaviour. The rural consumers tend to show a closed mind towards branded goods and services. Though the current scenario is improved than the past but still large amount of rural market is untapped. The marketers now understand the potential at the bottom of the pyramid but there are doubts regarding the way this market can be reached and converted into customers. Many factors like in...

  5. Prescription of opioid and nonopioid analgesics for dental care in emergency departments: Findings from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okunseri, Christopher; Okunseri, Elaye; Xiang, Qun; Thorpe, Joshua M; Szabo, Aniko

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine trends and associated factors in the prescription of opioid analgesics, nonopioid analgesics, opioid and nonopioid analgesic combinations, and no analgesics by emergency physicians for nontraumatic dental condition (NTDC)-related visits. Our secondary aim was to investigate whether race/ethnicity is a possible predictor of receiving a prescription for either type of medication for NTDC visits in emergency departments (EDs) after adjustment for potential covariates. We analyzed data from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey for 1997-2000 and 2003-2007, and used multinomial multivariate logistic regression to estimate the probability of receiving a prescription for opioid analgesics, nonopioid analgesics, or a combination of both, compared with receiving no analgesics for NTDC-related visits. During 1997-2000 and 2003-2007, prescription of opioid analgesics and combinations of opioid and nonopioid analgesics increased, and that of no analgesics decreased over time. The prescription rates for opioid analgesics, nonopioid analgesics, opioid and nonopioid analgesic combinations, and no analgesics for NTDC-related visits in EDs were 43 percent, 20 percent, 12 percent, and 25 percent, respectively. Majority of patients categorized as having severe pain received prescriptions for opioids for NTDC-related visits in EDs. After adjusting for covariates, patients with self-reported dental reasons for visit and severe pain had a significantly higher probability of receiving prescriptions for opioid analgesics and opioid and nonopioid analgesic combinations. Prescription of opioid analgesics increased over time. ED physicians were more likely to prescribe opioid analgesics and opioid and nonopioid analgesic combinations for NTDC-related visits with reported severe pain. © 2014 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  6. Prescription of Opioid and Non-opioid Analgesics for Dental Care in Emergency Departments: Findings from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okunseri, Christopher; Okunseri, Elaye; Xiang, Qun; Thorpe, Joshua M.; Szabo, Aniko

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to examine trends and associated factors in the prescription of opioid analgesics, non-opioid analgesics, opioid and non-opioid analgesic combinations and no analgesics by emergency physicians for nontraumatic dental condition (NTDC)-related visits. Our secondary aim was to investigate whether race/ethnicity is a possible predictor of receiving a prescription for either type of medication for NTDC visits in emergency departments (EDs) after adjustment for potential covariates. Methods We analyzed data from the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey for 1997–2000 and 2003–2007, and used multinomial multivariate logistic regression to estimate the probability of receiving a prescription for opioid analgesics, non-opioid analgesics, or a combination of both compared to receiving no analgesics for NTDC-related visits. Results During 1997–2000 and 2003–2007, prescription of opioid analgesics and combinations of opioid and non-opioid analgesics increased and that of no analgesics decreased over time. The prescription rates for opioid analgesics, non-opioid analgesics, opioid and non-opioid analgesic combinations and no analgesics for NTDC-related visits in EDs were 43%, 20%, 12% and 25% respectively. Majority of patients categorized as having severe pain received prescriptions for opioids for NTDC-related visits in EDs. After adjusting for covariates, patients with self-reported dental reasons for visit and severe pain had a significantly higher probability of receiving prescriptions for opioid analgesics and opioid and non-opioid analgesic combinations. Conclusion Prescription of opioid analgesics increased over time. ED physicians were more likely to prescribe opioid analgesics and opioid and non-opioid analgesic combinations for NTDC-related visits with reported severe pain. PMID:24863407

  7. Relationships among moral distress, level of practice independence, and intent to leave of nurse practitioners in emergency departments: results from a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautmann, Jennifer; Epstein, Elizabeth; Rovnyak, Virginia; Snyder, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this research study were to investigate moral distress among emergency department (ED) nurse practitioners (NPs) and examine relationships between moral distress and level of practice independence as well as intent to leave a position. Moral distress has been studied regarding registered nurses and physicians (MDs) but less so in NPs. It is important to explore moral distress in NPs because they tread a unique path between nursing and physician roles. Moral distress may play a significant role in staff nurses' intention to leave practice, and level of practice independence is found to have a relationship with NPs' intention to leave. A convenience sample of ED NPs was obtained from a mailing list of a national nursing specialty organization, the Emergency Nurses Association. Using a correlational design, survey methods assessed moral distress with the Moral Distress Scale-Revised (MDS-R), level of practice independence with the Dempster Practice Behavior Scale, and intent to leave with self-report. Correlational and regression analyses of data were conducted to characterize moral distress among ED NPs and associations between moral distress, level of practice independence, and intent to leave. Results found ED NPs do experience moral distress with poor patient care results from inadequate staff communication and working with incompetent coworkers in their practice. The MDS-R was a significant predictor of intention to leave among respondents. This study is the first of its kind to explore moral distress in ED NPs. Results suggest moral distress influences ED NPs' intent to leave their position. Further studies are needed to explore the findings from this research and to formulate interventions to alleviate moral distress in ED NPs and improve retention in the clinical setting.

  8. Groundwater Protection Program Management Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elvado Environmental LLC; Environmental Compliance Department Environment, Safety, and Health Division Y-12 National Security Complex

    2004-03-31

    This document presents the Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) management plan for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12). The Y-12 GWPP functions as the primary point-of-contact for groundwater-related issues at Y-12, provides stewardship of the extensive network of groundwater monitoring wells at Y-12, and serves as a resource for technical expertise, support, and historical data for groundwater-related activities at Y-12. These organizational functions each serve the primary programmatic purpose of the GWPP, which is to ensure that groundwater monitoring activities within areas under Y-12 administrative control provide representative data in compliance with the multiple purposes of applicable state and federal regulations, DOE orders, and the corporate policies of BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. (hereafter referenced as BWXT), the Y-12 management and operations (M&O) contractor for DOE. This GWPP management plan addresses the requirements of DOE Order 450.1 (BWXT Y12 S/RID) regarding the implementation of a site-wide approach for groundwater protection at each DOE facility. Additionally, this plan is a ''living'' document that is reviewed annually, revised and reissued every three years, and is formatted to provide for updating individual sections independent of the rest of the document. Section 2 includes a short description of the groundwater system at Y-12, the history of groundwater monitoring at Y-12 and the corresponding evolution of the GWPP, and an overview of ongoing Y-12 groundwater monitoring activities. Section 3 describes the key elements of the GWPP management strategy. Organizational roles and responsibilities of GWPP personnel are outlined in Section 4. Section 5 presents an overview of the GWPP project plans for applicable programmatic elements. Section 6 lists the reports, plans, and documents that are referenced for technical and administrative details.

  9. Soil Sampling to Demonstrate Compliance with Department of Energy Radiological Clearance Requirements for the ALE Unit of the Hanford Reach National Monument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritz, Brad G.; Dirkes, Roger L.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2007-04-01

    The Hanford Reach National Monument consists of several units, one of which is the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE) Unit. This unit is approximately 311 km2 of shrub-steppe habitat located to the south and west of Highway 240. To fulfill internal U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements prior to any radiological clearance of land, DOE must evaluate the potential for residual radioactive contamination on this land and determine compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5400.5. Historical soil monitoring conducted on ALE indicated soil concentrations of radionuclides were well below the Authorized Limits. However, the historical sampling was done at a limited number of sampling locations. Therefore, additional soil sampling was conducted to determine if the concentrations of radionuclides in soil on the ALE Unit were below the Authorized Limits. This report contains the results of 50 additional soil samples. The 50 soil samples collected from the ALE Unit all had concentrations of radionuclides far below the Authorized Limits. The average concentrations for all detectable radionuclides were less than the estimated Hanford Site background. Furthermore, the maximum observed soil concentrations for the radionuclides included in the Authorized Limits would result in a potential annual dose of 0.14 mrem assuming the most probable use scenario, a recreational visitor. This potential dose is well below the DOE 100-mrem per year dose limit for a member of the public. Spatial analysis of the results indicated no observable statistically significant differences between radionuclide concentrations across the ALE Unit. Furthermore, the results of the biota dose assessment screen, which used the ResRad Biota code, indicated that the concentrations of radionuclides in ALE Unit soil pose no significant health risk to biota.

  10. Metallurgy Department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risø National Laboratory, Roskilde

    The activities of the Metallurgy Department at Risø during 1981 are described. The work is presented in three chapters: General Materials Research, Technology and Materials Development, Fuel Elements. Furthermore, a survey is given of the department's participation in international collaboration...

  11. Effect of National Schistosomiasis Control Programme on Taenia solium taeniosis and porcine cysticercosis in rural communities of Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braae, Uffe Christian; Magnussen, Pascal; Harrison, Wendy; Ndawi, Benedict; Lekule, Faustin; Johansen, Maria Vang

    2016-09-01

    Taenia solium is found throughout sub-Saharan Africa and co-endemic with schistosomiasis in many regions. Taenia solium leads to taeniosis and neurocysticercosis - the leading cause of preventable epilepsy globally. This study aimed to assess the effects of the National Schistosomiasis Control Programme on prevalence of taeniosis and porcine cysticercosis over a four year period in Tanzania. School-based mass drug administration (MDA) of praziquantel was carried out based on schistosomiasis endemicity. Four human and five porcine cross-sectional surveys were carried out from 2012 to 2015 in Mbozi and Mbeya district in Tanzania. Three rounds of school-based MDA of praziquantel were delivered in Mbozi and two in Mbeya. The prevalence of taeniosis and porcine cysticercosis was estimated annually. Stool samples were collected from humans and prevalence of taeniosis estimated by copro-Ag-ELISA. Blood samples from pigs were collected to estimate cysticercosis prevalence by Ag-ELISA. "Track-and-treat" of taeniosis cases was carried out after each survey. In total 12082 stool samples and 4579 porcine serum samples were collected. Significantly fewer children (≤ 15) from Mbozi were infected throughout the study than children from Mbeya who showed a significant decrease in copro-Ag prevalence after the first treatment only. During the final survey in Mbozi the prevalence of taeniosis in adults (1.8%) was significantly lower (p = 0.031, OR 0.40, CI: 0.17-0.89), compared to baseline (4.1%). The prevalence of porcine cysticercosis (8%) had also dropped significantly (p = 0.002, OR 0.49, CI: 0.32-0.76) in this district compared to baseline (13%), whereas no significant difference was seen in Mbeya compared to baseline. The study suggests that three rounds of MDA targeting schistosomiasis in school-aged children combined with 'track-and-treat' contributed to a reduction in prevalence of T. solium in this population, and also had a spillover effect on adults in treated

  12. Nation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Uffe

    2014-01-01

    Nation er et gammelt begreb, som kommer af det latinske ord for fødsel, natio. Nationalisme bygger på forestillingen om, at mennesker har én og kun én national identitet og har ret til deres egen nationalstat. Ordet og forestillingen er kun godt 200 år gammel, og i 1900-tallet har ideologien bredt...... sig over hele verden. Nationalisme er blevet global....

  13. La educación de las mujeres rurales en el Territorio Nacional de La Pampa durante los primeros gobiernos peronistas (1946-1955 The education of the rural women in the National Territory of The Pampas during the first Peronista governments (1946-1955

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy M. Peirano

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo tiene como objetivo analizar la relación que el Estado peronista (1946-1955 estableció con las mujeres rurales del Territorio Nacional de La Pampa. La comprensión del rol de las mujeres rurales en un ámbito que estaba en pleno proceso de definición de su identidad política remite, por un lado a las políticas agrarias del peronismo y por otro, y de manera necesaria, al desarrollo del proceso histórico regional. En este contexto la educación de la mujer rural consistió en uno de los objetivos de relevancia para el Estado. Si bien es cierto que la enseñanza agrícola de la mujer campesina no fue sólo una preocupación del peronismo, en estos años esta actividad cobró interés en el ámbito regional; se instalaron las Misiones del Hogar Agrícola cuya finalidad era, precisamente, la formación de la mujer campesina.This work has as objective to analyze the relationship that the Peronista State (1946-1955 settled down with the rural women of the National Territory from La Pampa. In this sense, the understanding of the list of the rural women in an environment that in the middle of process of definition of its political identity was remits, on one hand to the agrarian politicians of the peronismo and for other, and in a necessary way, to the development of the regional historical process. In this context the rural woman's education consisted on one of the objectives of relevance for the State. Although it is certain that the rural woman's agricultural teaching was not only a concern of the peronismo, in these years this activity charged interest in the regional environment. They settled the Missions of the Agricultural Home whose purpose was, in fact, the rural woman's formation.

  14. Rural buyers' perception about mosquito repellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. MEHTA

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Mosquito repellants prevent mosquito bites and prevention of "man-mosquito contact" is a critical factor in transmission and spread of any disease through mosquitoes particularly in rural area. There has been a long standing 'bias' towards rural buyers. The rural markets are considered rigid in the nature but it is not the case in real sense. Marketing to rural buyers is not only a challenge to the marketers but to the manufacturers, communicators, national planners and economists as well. That is why it has been necessary to understand the various aspects of selected rural areas and consumption pattern for such a fast growing market i.e. mosquito repellants and rural buyers’ perception towards such urban products. The present paper aims to find out the factors influencing the purchase decisions of rural buyers for mosquito repellants and to study the perceptions of present and potential rural buyers' of selected mosquito repellant brands.

  15. Impact of mothers' employment on infant feeding and care: a qualitative study of the experiences of mothers employed through the Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Manisha; Ariana, Proochista; Webster, Premila

    2014-04-02

    To explore the experiences of mothers employed through the Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act (MGNREGA) using focus group discussions (FGDs) to understand the impact of mothers' employment on infant feeding and care. The effects of mothers' employment on nutritional status of children could be variable. It could lead to increased household income, but could also compromise child care and feeding. The study was undertaken in the Dungarpur district of Rajasthan, India. Mothers of infants <12 months of age. Ten FGDs, two in each of the five administrative blocks of the study district were conducted. The groups were composed of a minimum of 5 and maximum of 8 participants, giving a total of 62 mothers. Thematic analysis was conducted to assess patterns and generate emergent themes. Four major themes were identified-'mothers' employment compromises infant feeding and care', 'caregivers' inability to substitute mothers' care', 'compromises related to childcare and feeding outweigh benefits from MGNREGA' and 'employment as disempowering'. Mothers felt that the comprises to infant care and feeding due to long hours of work, lack of alternative adequate care arrangements, low wages and delayed payments outweighed the benefits from the scheme. This study provides an account of the trade-off between mothers' employment and child care. It provides an understanding of the household power relationships, societal and cultural factors that modulate the effects of mothers' employment. From the perspective of mothers, it helps to understand the benefits and problems related to providing employment to women with infants in the MGNREGA scheme and make a case to pursue policy changes to improve their working conditions.

  16. Prevalence and outcomes of cataract surgery in adult rural Chinese populations of the Bai nationality in Dali: the Yunnan minority eye study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Shen

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the prevalence and visual acuity (VA outcomes of cataract surgery in adults of the Bai Nationality populations in rural China. METHODS: We conducted a population-based cross-sectional survey (from randomly selected block groups of Chinese Bai Nationality aged ≥50 years in southwestern China. Presenting visual acuity (PVA, best corrected visual acuity (BCVA were recorded and a detailed eye examination was carried out. For all aphakic and pseudophakic subjects identified, information on the date, setting, type, and complications of cataract surgery were recorded. In eyes with VA <20/63, the principal cause of visual impairment was identified. RESULTS: Of 2133 (77.8% of 2742 subjects, 99 people (129 eyes had undergone cataract surgery. The prevalence of cataract surgery was 4.6%. Surgical coverage among those with PVA <20/200 in both eyes because of cataract was 52.8%. Unoperated cataract was associated with older age. The main barrier to cataract surgery was lack of awareness and knowledge, cost, and fear. Among the 129 cataract-operated eyes, 22.5% had PVA of ≥20/32, 25.6% had PVA of 20/40 to 20/63, 23.3% had PVA <20/63 to 20/200, and 28.7% had PVA<20/200. With BCVA, the percentages were 42.6%, 23.3%, 10.9%, and 23.3%, respectively. Aphakia (odds ratio [OR], 8.49; P<0.001 and no education (OR, 10.18; P = 0.001 or less education (OR, 6.49; P = 0.014 were significantly associated with postoperative visual impairment defined by PVA, while aphakia (OR, 8.49; P<0.001 and female gender (OR, 4.19; P = 0.004 were significantly associated with postoperative visual impairment by BCVA. The main causes of postoperative visual impairment were refractive error, retinal disorders and glaucoma. CONCLUSIONS: Half of those with bilateral visual impairment or blindness because of cataract remain in need of cataract surgery in Bai population. Surgical uptake and visual outcomes should be further improved in the future.

  17. Rural Households

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    dependency on state institutions under the Vietnamese transition to a market society. It discusses present poverty definitions and measures by comparing survey data with the formal economic categorization of rural households. Both the overall characteristics of rural society and qualitative data indicate...

  18. Going Rural

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Foreign banks are beginning to invest in China's rural financial system, helping to meet a strong need for capital As Chinese commercial banks retreat from the rural market, foreign banks appear ready to jump into a sector with a strong thirst for capital. In July, Rabobank Group, the International Finance Corp. and the United

  19. Rural Agrobusiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treillon, Roland; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This publication describes the formation and evolution of rural agribusiness (RA) in the southern hemisphere as a precondition for improving the lives of families in rural communities, and focuses on RA endeavors created by development projects in Latin America, the Caribbean, and Africa. After a short introduction, the first section of this study…

  20. ASSESSMENT OF THE RURAL POPULATION TO THE RESULTS OF NATIONAL CENSUS 2002, 2010. IN THE REPUBLICS OF THE NORTH CAUCASUS: GIS APPROACHES AND METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. P. Turun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the dynamics of the rural population of the North Caucasus republics in 1989–2010 analyzes the differences of census data with the results of the current account of the population over two intercensal period. For obtaining the most accurate data in the rural population applies a correction factor the results of the census are considered critical, given the problems of its implementation.

  1. Marketing mix for rural development in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    POLGÁR (DESZKE Klára-Dalma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The sustainable development supposes a uniformly increasing of living level for the entire population of a nation. The reducing of disparities between the urban and rural regions is a purpose of the rural development policy, as a part of Community Agriculture Policy and also subject of European financing programs. A marketing approach of rural development could ensure an integrated implementation of LEADER program in Romania. This paper defines the components of marketing mix for rural development and their content for Romanian rural development marketing.

  2. Strategic Environmental Research and Development Project FY 1994: Assessing national remote sensing technologies for use in US Department of Energy Environmental Restoration Activities, Oak Ridge Solid Waste Storage Area 4 case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, A.L.; Smyre, J.L.; Evers, T.K.

    1995-02-01

    During FY 1994, the Oak Ridge Environmental Restoration (ER) Remote Sensing Program teamed with members of the Oak Ridge National Security Program Office (NSPO), the Environmental Research Institute of Michigan (ERIM) under contract to the National Exploitation Laboratory (NEL), the Oak Ridge Waste Area Group 4 (WAG 4) ER Program, and the US Department of Energy (DOE), Offices of Technology Development, Nonproliferation and National Security, and Environmental Restoration, to conduct a test and demonstration of the uses of national remote sensing technologies at DOE hazardous waste sites located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Objectives of the Oak Ridge study were to determine if national remote sensing technologies are useful in conducting prescreening, characterization, and/or monitoring activities to expedite the clean-up process at hazardous waste sites and to cut clean-up costs wherever possible. This project was sponsored by the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Project (SERDP).

  3. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs draft environmental impact statement. Volume 1, Appendix B: Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this report to assist its management in making two decisions. The first decision, which is programmatic, is to determine the management program for DOE spent nuclear fuel. The second decision is on the future direction of environmental restoration, waste management, and spent nuclear fuel management activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 1 of the EIS, which supports the programmatic decision, considers the effects of spent nuclear fuel management on the quality of the human and natural environment for planning years 1995 through 2035. DOE has derived the information and analysis results in Volume 1 from several site-specific appendixes. Volume 2 of the EIS, which supports the INEL-specific decision, describes environmental impacts for various environmental restoration, waste management, and spent nuclear fuel management alternatives for planning years 1995 through 2005. This Appendix B to Volume 1 considers the impacts on the INEL environment of the implementation of various DOE-wide spent nuclear fuel management alternatives. The Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program, which is a joint Navy/DOE program, is responsible for spent naval nuclear fuel examination at the INEL. For this appendix, naval fuel that has been examined at the Naval Reactors Facility and turned over to DOE for storage is termed naval-type fuel. This appendix evaluates the management of DOE spent nuclear fuel including naval-type fuel.

  4. The effects of the Malaysian Department of Wildlife and National Parks' environmental education program on the environmental knowledge and attitudes of 13--17 year old students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Ebil

    The study focused on the effects of the Malaysian Department of Wildlife and National Park's (DWNP) environmental education program on the environmental knowledge and attitudes of the secondary school students. Conducted between May 11, 1998 and August 11, 1998, this study was designed to reflect three objectives: (1) to determine the effect of participation in the DWNP's environmental education program on environmental knowledge and attitudes of 13--17 year old Malaysian students, (2) to identify demographic factors that contribute to the change of environmental knowledge and attitudes, and (3) to establish base line data for future evaluation of the effectiveness of DWNP's environmental education program. The sample was comprised of 806 randomly selected students from 10 different schools, with 402 randomly assigned to the experimental grouped and 404 to the control group. Pretest and post-tests were administered at the schools. The experimental group was exposed to the Environmental Education Program (EEP) at the Environmental Education Center (EEC) at Bukit Rengit, Lanchang, Pahang, Malaysia sometime between May 14, 1998 and August 8, 1998. At the EEC, the experimental group was again divided, with half receiving the pretest and post-test, while the other half were given only the post-test. The instrument used in this study was a modification of the Children's Environmental Attitudes and Knowledge Scale (CHEAKS) developed by Leeming, et al. (1995). This instrument had sound psychometric properties suitable for this research setting, and allowed comparisons of results with previous studies. T-tests, ANOVA, and ANCOVA were used to determine group differences. Overall, secondary school students in the experimental group showed a significantly greater change in environmental knowledge than did students in the control group. Significant differences were also found on the Attitude sub-scale, with the control group exhibiting negative change in attitude, and slightly

  5. Predicting return visits to the emergency department for pediatric patients: Applying supervised learning techniques to the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ya-Han; Tai, Chun-Tien; Chen, Solomon Chih-Cheng; Lee, Hai-Wei; Sung, Sheng-Feng

    2017-06-01

    Return visits (RVs) to the emergency department (ED) consume medical resources and may represent a patient safety issue. The occurrence of unexpected RVs is considered a performance indicator for ED care quality. Because children are susceptible to medical errors and utilize considerable ED resources, knowing the factors that affect RVs in pediatric patients helps improve the quality of pediatric emergency care. We collected data on visits made by patients aged ≤18years to EDs from the National Health Insurance Research Database. The outcome of interest was a RV within 3days of the initial visit. Potential factors were categorized into demographics, medical history, features of ED visits, physician characteristics, hospital characteristics, and treatment-seeking behavior. A multivariate logistic regression was used to identify independent predictors of RVs. We compared the performance of various data mining techniques, including Naïve Bayes, classification and regression tree (CART), random forest, and logistic regression, in predicting RVs. Finally, we developed a decision tree to stratify the risk of RVs. Of 125,940 visits, 6,282 (5.0%) were followed by a RV within 3 days. Predictors of RVs included younger age, higher acuity, intravenous fluid, more examination types, complete blood count, consultation, lower hospital level, hospitalization within one week before the initial visit, frequent ED visits in the past one year, and visits made in Spring or on Saturdays. Patients with allergic diseases and those underwent ultrasound examination were less likely to return. Decision tree models performed better in predicting RVs in terms of area under curve. The decision tree constructed using the CART technique showed that the number of ED visits in the past one year, diagnosis category, testing of complete blood count, and age were important discriminators of risk of RVs. We identified several factors which are associated with RVs to the ED in pediatric patients

  6. The National Early Warning Score (NEWS) for outcome prediction in emergency department patients with community-acquired pneumonia: results from a 6-year prospective cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbiti-Rohr, Diana; Kutz, Alexander; Christ-Crain, Mirjam; Thomann, Robert; Zimmerli, Werner; Hoess, Claus; Henzen, Christoph; Mueller, Beat; Schuetz, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the accuracy of the National Early Warning Score (NEWS) to predict mortality and adverse clinical outcomes for patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) compared to standard risk scores such as the pneumonia severity index (PSI) and CURB-65. Design Secondary analysis of patients included in a previous randomised-controlled trial with a median follow-up of 6.1 years. Settings Patients with CAP included on admission to the emergency departments (ED) of 6 tertiary care hospitals in Switzerland. Participants A total of 925 patients with confirmed CAP were included. NEWS, PSI and CURB-65 scores were calculated on admission to the ED based on admission data. Main outcome measure Our primary outcome was all-cause mortality within 6 years of follow-up. Secondary outcomes were adverse clinical outcome defined as intensive care unit (ICU) admission, empyema and unplanned hospital readmission all occurring within 30 days after admission. We used regression models to study associations of baseline risk scores and outcomes with the area under the receiver operating curve (AUC) as a measure of discrimination. Results 6-year overall mortality was 45.1% (n=417) with a stepwise increase with higher NEWS categories. For 30 day and 6-year mortality prediction, NEWS showed only low discrimination (AUC 0.65 and 0.60) inferior compared to PSI and CURB-65. For prediction of ICU admission, NEWS showed moderate discrimination (AUC 0.73) and improved the prognostic accuracy of a regression model, including PSI (AUC from 0.66 to 0.74, p=0.001) and CURB-65 (AUC from 0.64 to 0.73, p=0.015). NEWS was also superior to PSI and CURB-65 for prediction of empyema, but did not well predict rehospitalisation. Conclusions NEWS provides additional prognostic information with regard to risk of ICU admission and complications and thereby improves traditional clinical-risk scores in the management of patients with CAP in the ED setting. Trial registration number

  7. Groundwater Protection Program Management Plan For The U.S. Department Of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elvado Environmental, LLC

    2009-09-01

    This document presents the Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) management plan for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12). The Y-12 GWPP functions as the primary point-of-contact for groundwater-related issues at Y-12, provides stewardship of the extensive network of groundwater monitoring wells at Y-12, and serves as a resource for technical expertise, support, and historical data for groundwater-related activities at Y-12. These organizational functions each serve the primary programmatic purpose of the GWPP, which is to ensure that groundwater monitoring activities within areas under Y-12 administrative control provide representative data in compliance with the multiple purposes of applicable state and federal regulations, DOE orders, and the corporate policies of Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12 LLC (hereafter referenced as B&W Y-12), the Y-12 management and operations (M&O) contractor for DOE. B&W Y-12 is a new corporate name, assumed in January 2007, for the company formerly known as BWXT Y-12, L.L.C., hereafter referenced as BWXT. This GWPP management plan addresses the requirements of DOE Order 450.1A Environmental Protection Program (hereafter referenced as DOE O 450.1A), which emphasize a site-wide approach for groundwater protection at each DOE facility through implementation of groundwater surveillance monitoring. Additionally, this plan addresses the relevant and applicable GWPP elements and goals described in the DOE O 450.1A technical guidance documents issued in June 2004 (DOE 2004) and May 2005 (DOE 2005). This GWPP management plan is a 'living' document that is reviewed annually, revised and reissued every three years, and is formatted to provide for updating individual sections independent of the rest of the document. Section 2 includes a short description of the groundwater system at Y-12, the history of groundwater monitoring at Y-12 and the corresponding evolution of the GWPP

  8. Rural-urban differentials in the rates and factors associated with post-neonatal mortality in Nigeria: Evidence from the 2013 national household survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adewuyi, Emmanuel Olorunleke; Adama, Samuel John; Adefemi, Kazeem; Akintunde, Olufemi Abayomi; Bulndi, Lydia Babatunde

    2017-07-26

    The burden of post-neonatal mortality remains considerably high in Nigeria. This study examines the rural-urban differences in post-neonatal mortality rates (PNMR) and associated factors in Nigeria. Dataset from the 2013 Nigeria demographic and health survey, disaggregated by rural-urban residence, was analyzed. PNMR was reported using frequency tabulation, whereas, factors associated were first evaluated using Chi-Square test and further examined using multivariable logistic regression analysis. A total of 30384 singleton livebirths (20449 in rural and 9935 in urban residences) in the five years preceding the survey was included in this study. PNMR in rural and urban residences were 34 (95%CI: 31 - 38) and 22 (95%CI: 18 - 26) deaths per 1000 live births (Purban residence, poor wealth index (AOR: 1.660, 95%CI: 1.024 - 2.689), living in the South-East region (AOR: 2.902, 95%CI: 1.470 - 5.726), and home delivery (AOR: 1.539, 95%CI: 1.016 - 2.330) increased the odds of post-neonatal mortality. Regardless of residence, the use of solid cooking-fuels (Rural: AOR: 2.394, 95%CI: 1.211 - 4.734; Urban: AOR: 1.912, 95%CI: 1.206 - 3.030), birth interval Urban: AOR: 1.630, 95%CI: 1.042 - 2.550) and lack of breastfeeding (Rural: AOR: 2.547, 95%CI: 2.089 - 3.105; Urban: AOR: 2.152, 95%CI: 1.496 - 3.096) increased the odds of post-neonatal mortality. PNMR and associated factors differ in rural and urban Nigeria. Post-neonates in urban areas had better survival chances. Intervention efforts would need to prioritize findings in this study. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Hazards Control Department 1995 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, G.W.

    1996-09-19

    This annual report of the Hazards Control Department activities in 1995 is part of the department`s efforts to foster a working environment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) where every person desire to work safely.

  10. 7 CFR 1945.18 - United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food and Agriculture Council (FAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food and Agriculture Council (FAC). 1945.18 Section 1945.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE, RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE...

  11. The Changing Landscape of HIV Prevention in the United States: Health Department Experiences and Local Adaptations in Response to the National HIV/AIDS Strategy and High-Impact Prevention Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Holly H; Essuon, Aba; Hoyte, Tamika; Shapatava, Ekaterine; Shelley, Gene; Rios, Aisha; Beane, Stephanie; Bourgeois, Stacey; Dunbar, Erica; Sapiano, Tobey

    2017-05-10

    HIV prevention has changed substantially in recent years due to changes in national priorities, biomedical advances, and health care reform. Starting in 2010, motivated by the National HIV/AIDS Strategy (NHAS) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) High-Impact Prevention (HIP), health departments realigned resources so that cost-effective, evidence-based interventions were targeted to groups at risk in areas most affected by HIV. This analysis describes how health departments in diverse settings were affected by NHAS and HIP. We conducted interviews and a consultation with health departments from 16 jurisdictions and interviewed CDC project officers who monitored programs in 5 of the jurisdictions. Participants were asked to describe changes since NHAS and HIP and how they adapted. We used inductive qualitative analysis to identify themes of change. Health departments improved their HIV prevention practices in different ways. They aligned jurisdictional plans with NHAS and HIP goals, increased local data use to monitor program performance, streamlined services, and strengthened partnerships to increase service delivery to persons at highest risk for infection/transmission. They shifted efforts to focus more on the needs of people with diagnosed HIV infection, increased HIV testing and routine HIV screening in clinical settings, raised provider and community awareness about preexposure prophylaxis, and used nontraditional strategies to successfully engage out-of-care people with diagnosed HIV infection. However, staff-, provider-, and data-related barriers that could slow scale-up of priority programs were consistently reported by participants, potentially impeding the ability to meet national goals. Findings suggest progress toward NHAS and HIP goals has been made in some jurisdictions but highlight the need to monitor prevention programs in different contexts to identify areas for improvement and increase the likelihood of national success

  12. Strengthening Science Departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Todd; Melville, Wayne; Bartley, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Teachers do not work in a vacuum. They are, in most cases, part of a science department in which teachers and the chairperson have important roles in science education reform. Current reform is shaped by national standards documents that emphasize the pedagogical and conceptual importance of best practices framed by constructivism and focused on…

  13. Department of the Interior U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service : Final Environmental Assessment for Recreational Fishing Plan : Cypress Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The primary purpose of the proposed action is to consider recreational fishing opportunities on Cypress Creek NWR. This EA analyzes four different fishing...

  14. Department of the Interior Final Environmental Assessment: Continuation of Big and Upland Game Hunting and the Initiation of Sambar Deer Hunting on St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) proposes to continue upland and big game hunting and to initiate public hunting of the sambar deer on St. Vincent...

  15. Effect of the Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act (MGNREGA) on malnutrition of infants in Rajasthan, India: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Manisha; Ariana, Proochista; Ohuma, Eric O; Gray, Ron; De Stavola, Bianca; Webster, Premila

    2013-01-01

    Analyse the effect of the Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act (MGNREGA), a wage-for-employment policy of the Indian Government, on infant malnutrition and delineate the pathways through which MGNREGA affects infant malnutrition. MGNREGA could reduce infant malnutrition through positive effects on household food security and infant feeding. Mixed methods using cross-sectional study and focus group discussions conducted in Dungarpur district, Rajasthan, India. Infants aged 1 to <12 months and their mothers/caregivers. Final sample 528 households with 1056 participants, response rate 89.6%. Selected households were divided into MGNREGA-households and non-MGNREGA-households based on participation in MGNREGA between August-2010 and September-2011. Infant malnutrition measured using anthropometric indicators - underweight, stunting, and wasting (WHO criteria). We included 528 households with 1,056 participants. Out of 528, 281 households took part in MGNREGA between August'10, and September'11. Prevalence of wasting was 39%, stunting 24%, and underweight 50%. Households participating in MGNREGA were less likely to have wasted infants (OR 0·57, 95% CI 0·37-0·89, p = 0·014) and less likely to have underweight infants (OR 0·48, 95% CI 0·30-0·76, p = 0·002) than non-participating households. Stunting did not differ significantly between groups. We did 11 focus group discussions with 62 mothers. Although MGNREGA reduced starvation, it did not provide the desired benefits because of lower than standard wages and delayed payments. Results from path analysis did not support existence of an effect through household food security and infant feeding, but suggested a pathway of effect through low birth-weight. Participation in MGNREGA was associated with reduced infant malnutrition possibly mediated indirectly via improved birth-weight rather than by improved infant feeding. Addressing factors such as lack of mothers' knowledge and inappropriate

  16. National Defense: Department of Defense’s Waiver of Competitive Prototyping Requirement for the Navy’s Fleet Replenishment Oiler Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-08

    Defense: Department of Defense’s Waiver of Competitive Prototyping Requirement for the Navy’s Fleet Replenishment Oiler Program The Weapon Systems...Department of Defense’s Waiver of Competitive Prototyping Requirement for the Navy’s Fleet Replenishment Oiler Program 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...15, 2014, we received notice from DOD that it had waived the competitive prototyping requirement for the Fleet Replenishment Oiler (T-AO(X)) program

  17. Study on the Sustainable Development of Rural Sports Associations in the Perspective of National Fitness%全民健身视角下乡镇体育社团可持续性发展研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王石峰

    2016-01-01

    体育社团是体育社会组织的主要表现形式,它是实施全民健身战略的有效载体,在基层群众体育中的地位和作用日益凸显.本文从全民健身的视角下,阐述了乡镇体育社团与全民健身之间的关系,剖析出当前乡镇体育社团的发展困境,即"三无问题"、管理职能缺失、法制化滞后、文化素养偏低等,在此基础上,提出若干优化乡镇体育社团可持续发展的路径.%Sports associations are the main form of sports social organizations, it is the effective carrier of the implementation of the national fitness strategy and become increasingly prominent of the status and role of mass sports in the grassroots.this paper from the perspective of the National Fitness,to expound the relationship rural sports associations and the national fitness,analysed of the plight of the development of the rural sports associations which have "three noes" of problems,lack of management functions,lag of legal system and low cultural quality, based on that,it proposedsome optimization rural sports associations of sustainable development path.

  18. 43 CFR 404.58 - Do rural water projects authorized before the enactment of the Rural Water Supply Act of 2006...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the enactment of the Rural Water Supply Act of 2006 have to comply with the requirements in this rule... RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECLAMATION RURAL WATER SUPPLY PROGRAM Miscellaneous § 404.58 Do rural water projects authorized before the enactment of the Rural Water Supply Act of 2006 have to comply...

  19. Rural Priority

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    As the Chinese economy soars ahead in the wake of the international financial crisis, more attention is being given to the country’s indus-trial, financial, investment and trade figures. But the Central Rural Work

  20. Rural nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, Rhonda L.; Usher, Kim

    2015-01-01

    with descriptive techniques. In-depth interviews were conducted and the transcribed data were analysed using thematic techniques. Results: The results of this study demonstrate that in general rural people are willing to seek mental health care, and that rural nurses are well suited to provide initial care...... to young people. Conclusions: Non-traditional venues such as community, school and justice settings are ideal places where more convenient first conversations about mental health with young people and their families, and rural nurses should be deployed to these settings. Relevance to Clinical Practice......: Rural nurses are able to contribute important initial engagement interventions that enhance the early mental health care for young people when it is needed....

  1. From an Agricultural Economy to a Rural Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Arturo Meza Carvajalino

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of the dynamics of Colombian economy over the past 43 years. Sectorial and regional analyses show the relevance of the primary sector as a source of growth and wealth. Following comparison to the industry, the primary sector’s importance is emphasized, being dominant in 75% of the country’s departments. Policymakers are encouraged to understand Colombia from the territory and praising rural economy as opposed to agricultural economy. This new approach moves away from the institutional arrangements of systems of national accounts, to delve into those activities taking place in rural territories. This allows us to understand the issues from a systemic approach and not from their opportunity and competitiveness costs.

  2. 7 CFR 1940.589 - Rural Business Enterprise Grants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Rural Business Enterprise Grants. 1940.589 Section..., RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE, RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, AND FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) GENERAL Methodology and Formulas for Allocation of...

  3. 7 CFR 1940.593 - Rural Business Opportunity Grants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Rural Business Opportunity Grants. 1940.593 Section..., RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE, RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, AND FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) GENERAL Methodology and Formulas for Allocation of...

  4. Coordinating rural-urban education and institution innovation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xiaodong

    2007-01-01

    In order to implement the spirit of the Sixteenth National People's Congress to accelerate development of rural education,deepen reform of rural education, guarantee a well-off society, and harmonize rural and urban development, coordinating ruralurban education is the key to China's development. At present, the rural-urban coordinating education is influenced by many factors,including rural-urban income difference, rural-urban educational resources difference, rural-urban background difference, and ruralurban institutional difference. In order to realize the coordinating development of rural-urban education, we need innovation in "Hukou" institution, land institution, financial institution and rural education institution. Institution innovation would be the guarantee to the coordinating rural-urban education.

  5. Rural Infrastructure Construction in New Socialist Countryside Construction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    In the background of new socialist countryside construction,rural infrastructure construction is favorable to consolidating fundamental position of agriculture,expanding rural job opportunities,increasing farmers’ income,and favorable to development of rural economy and the national economy. Rural infrastructure construction mainly includes construction of agricultural basic production conditions,construction of rural ecological environment,construction of agricultural service system,and construction of rural living facilities. Finally,we put forward approaches and methods for strengthening rural infrastructure construction: firstly,increase fund input to provide financial support for rural infrastructure construction; second ly,make scientific village planning to ensure sustainability of rural infrastructure construction; thirdly,arouse farmers’ enthusiasm and initiative to promote stable development of rural infrastructure construction.

  6. Hot Land Created by Rural Women

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Tens of thousands of visitors attended the China national exhibition on "Rural Women's Achievements in Ten Years of the Dual Campaign" that was held recently in Beijing. Through pictures, models, material objects and video shows displayed throughout the 5, 700 square meters of floor space, they got to know of many rural women and their excellent performances. Their economic and social benefits helped the audience to re-appraise them, appreciating them as contributors to the state not just poor rural wom...

  7. Rural Electric Network Alteration Spurs Cable Production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>Most aluminum cable enterprises in Yunnan and Zhejiang focus their production capacity on overhead cables needed in rural electric network alteration. During the 12th Five-Year Plan period, China launched the rural electric network alteration & upgrade project. As of the middle of 2011, the budget of the central government for the rural electric network alteration & upgrade project planned by the National Development and Reform Commission has reached up to RMB 64.96 billion.

  8. Implementation of Main Statements of Educational Plan in the Elective Course “Endodontic Techniques in Pediatric Dentistry” for the Sub-Interns at the Department of Pediatric Dentistry of Ivano-Frankivsk National Medical University

    OpenAIRE

    Kostyuk, I. R.

    2014-01-01

    The article demonstrates the method of implementation of the main statements of educational plan in the elective course “Endodontic techniques in Pediatric Dentistry” for the dental sub-interns at the Department of Pediatric Dentistry of Ivano-Frankivsk National Medical University. We have developed and adapted for use in higher medical institutions an educational-and-methodological complex based on the typical program that will provide training future European professionals. The practical le...

  9. 15 February 2012 - Geneva United Nations Office Director-General K.-J. Tokayev in the LHC tunnel with Adviser for Relations with international organisations M. Bona and Technology Department Head F. Bordry.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-claude Gadmer

    2012-01-01

    Kassym-Jomart Tokayev, director-general of the United Nations Office at Geneva, (centre picture 02), visited CERN on 15 February. He toured the LHC tunnel with Maurizio Bona, CERN’s adviser to the director-general, relations with international organizations, left, and Frédérick Bordry, CERN’s technology department head. He also visited the ATLAS underground experimental area, as well as the exhibition at the Globe of Science and Innovation.

  10. What Is Rural?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of mind. For others, rural is an objective quantitative measure. The USDA , Economic Research Service, provides insight to rural definitions with an article, Defining the "Rural" in Rural America: The use ...

  11. National report for CSD-16 The Netherlands: A review of sustainable development in agriculture, land and rural development, drought and desertification, and Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Andriesse; K. Boone; C. de Bont; J. Brouwers; M. Hack-Ten Broeke; G. Migchels; O. Oenema; G. van de Peet; I. Pinxterhuis; A. Smit; M. Stuiver; W. Sukkel; W. Verkerke; S. Verzandvoort; A. Visser; K. Zwart; M. Damen

    2008-01-01

    This report forms the Netherlands’ contribution to CSD-16 (2008) of the UN Commission on Sustainable Development. It comprises an overview of the Netherlands’ policies, priorities and activities with regard to sustainable development in the fields of agriculture, land and rural development, drought

  12. National Parks

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — National Park Service unit boundaries (NTAD). These park boundaries signify legislative boundary definitions and local park names have been consolidated according to...

  13. Rural Primary School Closures in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, Richard C.

    A three-phase interdisciplinary effort between educators and environmental planners is focusing on the social effects of rural primary school reorganization now occuring in England as a result of a declining birth rate and the resulting need for school closure. A questionnaire mailed nationally to rural Local Education Authorities, cross-community…

  14. Implementing Patient Safety Initiatives in Rural Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingner, Jill; Moscovice, Ira; Tupper, Judith; Coburn, Andrew; Wakefield, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Implementation of patient safety initiatives can be costly in time and energy. Because of small volumes and limited resources, rural hospitals often are not included in nationally driven patient safety initiatives. This article describes the Tennessee Rural Hospital Patient Safety Demonstration project, whose goal was to strengthen capacity for…

  15. Distance Education Use in Rural Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannum, Wallace H.; Irvin, Matthew J.; Banks, Jonathan B.; Farmer, Thomas W.

    2009-01-01

    A national survey of rural school systems in the United States was conducted to determine the extent to which distance education is being utilized by rural schools, the technologies used, the curriculum areas impacted, the perceived needs for distance education, their satisfaction with distance education, and the barriers to distance education…

  16. 3 CFR - Biofuels and Rural Economic Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Biofuels and Rural Economic Development Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of May 5, 2009 Biofuels and Rural Economic Development... Protection Agency In the Nation's ongoing efforts to achieve energy independence, biomass and biofuels...

  17. National rural elderly survey self-health management%民族地区农村老年人自我健康管理状况调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈正英

    2011-01-01

    Objective To detect national rural elderly self-perceived health status and self-health management related behavior, and analyze the relevant factors, the development of the community and elderly health management basis. Methods Stratified random sampling method was used in the research. 320 rural elderly people ^60 years old in western region was selected. Self-designed questionnaire of mental health status and health-related behaviors was used and Epidata 3. 02 was used to establish a database and data entry, SPSS 13. 0 software was used for analysis. Results The percentage of having community health records was 8. 65% in 312 people, the percentage of suffering from 1, ^2 kinds of chronic disease was 18. 91% and 44. 87% respectively. The percent of comprehensive mastering and understanding was 3.42% and 19. 77%. The percent of sleeping time less than 6,6 ~8, 9 ~ 10 and S 11 h/d was 25. 32% , 58. 97% , 12. 82% and 2. 89%. The percentage of communities organizing body-building, with body-building square, with special indoor space and without body-building space was 9. 29% , 17. 95% , 10. 58% and 71.47%. There were 30. 45% persons having 5*3 times/w body-building activities. The percentage of paying attention trophic structure very much and normal was 2. 88% and 14.42%. The percentage of smoking was 39. 74% , the percentage of drinking was 30. 45%. There were difference among different age old persons in sight, hearing, the sense of taste and touch. More worse in feeling ability, more elder. Conclusions Health behavior situation of the elderly in western Hunan ethnic areas is not reasonable enough, there is a more serious problem in the health of the elderly community management and health promotion. The health behavior of elderly residents in health promotion should be strengthened to improve health, enhance quality of life.%目的 了解民族地区农村老年人的自我健康感知状况及自我健康管理相关行为,并分析其相关因素,为社区的发

  18. Complications - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Complications - national data. This data set includes national-level data the hip/knee complication measure, and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality...

  19. HCAHPS - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The national average for the HCAHPS survey categories. HCAHPS is a national, standardized survey of hospital patients about their experiences during a recent...

  20. Payment - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Payment measures – national data. This data set includes national-level data for the payment measures associated with an episode of care for heart attack, heart...

  1. National Energy Policy Plan; A Report to the Congress Required by Title VIII of the Department of Energy Organization Act (Public Law 95-91)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-10-01

    Since the third National Energy Plan in 1981 total energy efficiency has increased, domestic energy resources are being developed more effectively, oil prices have declined, US dependence on foreign energy sources has diminished, and the nation's vulnerability to energy supply disruptions has been reduced markedly. The policy goal is an adequate supply of energy at reasonable costs. Strategies include minimizing federal control and involvement in energy markets while maintaining public health and safety and environmental quality and promoting a balanced and mixed energy resource system. Federal programs and actions in energy are reviewed.

  2. The Digital Divide and Rural Community Colleges: Problems and Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsinas, Stephen G.; Moeck, Pat

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the seriousness of the digital divide-the discrepancy between technology-literate and -illiterate people-in rural areas in the United States. Reports that rural young, minority, and single-parent households lag behind the national average in both personal computer ownership and Internet access. Offers suggestions for ways rural community…

  3. Rural regions in the EU : exploring differences in economic development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terluin, Ida Joke

    2001-01-01

    Search for driving forces behind economic development in rural regions of the EU From a recent OECD analysis, it appeared that there were dynamic rural regions which showed an employment performance above the national average during the 1980s, and that there were also rural regions whose employment

  4. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Safeguards and Security quarterly progress report to the U.S. Department of Energy. Quarter ending December 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, B.; Davis, G.; Johnson, D. [and others

    1996-01-01

    The Safeguards Technology Program (STP) is a program in LLNL`s Isotope Sciences Division of the Chemistry and Materials Science Department that develops advanced, nondestructive analysis (NDA) technology for measurement of special nuclear materials. Our work focuses on R&D relating to x- and gamma-ray spectrometry techniques and to the development of computer codes for interpreting the spectral data obtained by these techniques.

  5. National Energy Policy Plan; A Report to Congress Required by Title VIII of the Department of Energy Organization Act (Public Law 95-91)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    This plan report is divided into the following chapters: the course ahead, currently predominant fuels (oil, gas), America's energy triad, sources of diversity and long-term supply, sources of uncertainty, summary of current projections, and public comments on the nation's policy toward energy. (DLC)

  6. A Vanishing Rural School Advantage? Changing Urban/Rural Student Achievement Differences in Latin America and the Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luschei, Thomas F.; Fagioli, Loris P.

    2016-01-01

    In 1997, a cross-national assessment of educational achievement in Latin America and the Caribbean found that rural schools in Colombia outperformed urban schools in tests of reading and mathematics, except in very large cities. Given a long history of urban/rural inequality in the region, Colombia's rural school advantage attracted substantial…

  7. Determining the efficacy of national strategies aimed at addressing the challenges facing health personnel working in rural areas in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Mburu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Shortages of Human Resources for Health (HRH in rural areas are often driven by poor working and living conditions, inadequate salaries and benefits, lack of training and career development opportunities amongst others. The South African government has adopted a human resource strategy for the health sector in 2011 aimed at addressing these challenges.Aim: This study reviews the challenges faced by health personnel against government strategies aimed at attracting and retaining health personnel in these underserved areas.Setting: The study was conducted in six primary health care service sites in the Hlabisa sub-district of Umkhanyakude, located in northern KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.Methods: The study population comprised 25 health workers including 11 professional nurses, 4 staff nurses and 10 doctors (4 medical doctors, 3 foreign medical doctors and 3 doctors undertaking community service. Qualitative data were collected from semi-structured interviews and analysed using thematic analysis.Results: Government initiatives including the rural allowance, deployment of foreign medical doctors and the presence of health personnel undertaking their community service in rural areas are positively viewed by health personnel working in rural health facilities. However, poor living and working conditions, together with inadequate personal development opportunities, remain unresolved challenges. It is these challenges that will continue to dissuade experienced health personnel from remaining in these underserved areas.Conclusion: South Africa’s HRH strategy for the Health Sector 2012/13–2015/16 had highlighted the key challenges raised by respondents and identified strategies aimed at addressing these challenges. Implementation of these strategies is key to improving both living and working conditions, and providing health personnel with opportunities for further development will require inter-ministerial collaboration if the HRH 2030

  8. Rural Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... deaths, and rural areas have higher rates of passenger vehicle and large truck occupant deaths. In 2014, ... uses data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System, and includes information about what types of nonfatal injuries are treated ...

  9. Ditching the single-payer system in the national health service: how the English Department of Health is learning the wrong lessons from the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Lucy; Gerada, Clare; McKee, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Reforms to the British National Health Service introduce major changes to how health care will be delivered. The core elements include the creation of new purchaser organizations, Clinical Commissioning Groups, which unlike their predecessors will be able to recruit and reject general practices and their patients without geographical restriction. The Clinical Commissioning Groups are to transition from statutory bodies to freestanding organizations, with most of their functions privatized and an increasingly privatized system of provision, In this paper, we explore the likely consequences of these proposals, drawing in particular on the experience of managed care organizations in the United States, whose approach has influenced the English proposals extensively. We argue that the wrong lessons are being learned and the English reforms are likely to fundamentally undermine the principles on which the British National Health Service was founded.

  10. Medical evaluation abnormalities in acute psychotic patients seen at the emergency department of Muhimbili national hospital in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    OpenAIRE

    S.G. Yusuf*; M.S. Runyon; V. Mwafongo; T.A. Reynolds

    2013-01-01

    Prior studies have shown varied rates of medical pathology in patients presenting to acute care settings with psychotic symptoms, and there is almost no literature from the sub-Saharan Africa region. We investigated the yield of physical examination and laboratory testing among patients presenting with acute psychosis to an urban ED in Dar es Salaam. Methods: This was a prospective observational study of patients presenting to the ED at Muhimbili National Hospital with acute psychosis. A s...

  11. Department of the Navy Fiscal Year 2014 Annual Financial Report. The Nation’s Total Force: At the Right Place, At the Right Time, All the Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    operate forward across the globe, providing the nation offshore options to deter and defeat aggression today and in the future The Navy and Marine...for larger uses of solar power, and is considering geothermal, hydrothermal, wave, and wind power This A view of solar panels installed on top of a...and regulatory requirements; ● Funds, property, and other assets are safeguarded against waste, loss, unauthorized use, or misappropriation; and

  12. Energy Transition Initiative: Island Energy Snapshot - Federated States of Micronesia; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-06-01

    This profile provides a snapshot of the energy landscape of the Federated States of Micronesia, a sovereign nation and U.S.-associated state in the western Pacific Ocean. The Federated States of Micronesia’s electricity rates for residential customers exceed $0.48 U.S. dollars (USD)/per kilowatt-hour (kWh), nearly four times the average U.S. residential rate of $0.13 USD/kWh.

  13. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory safeguards and security quarterly progress report to the US Department of Energy quarter ending September 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, G.; Mansur, D.L.; Ruhter, W.D.; Steele, E.; Strait, R.S.

    1994-10-01

    This report presents the details of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory safeguards and securities program. This program is focused on developing new technology, such as x- and gamma-ray spectrometry, for measurement of special nuclear materials. This program supports the Office of Safeguards and Securities in the following five areas; safeguards technology, safeguards and decision support, computer security, automated physical security, and automated visitor access control systems.

  14. Vision of the Training Department of the National Institute of Nuclear Research; Vision del Departamento de Capacitacion del Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominguez A, C. E. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2008-12-15

    The availability of skilled personnel is an essential element of the national infrastructure, to ensure the safety and security through the strong principles of management and good technology, quality assurance, training and qualification of new personnel, thorough safety evaluations and building on lessons of experience and research. In the national case the General Regulation of Radiation Safety requires that the Radiation Safety Responsible (RSR) must be experienced in issues of radiation safety of the facility in which employed. As experience has been found by chance that some people who have attended courses offered by the National Institute of Nuclear Research and have not achieved a result approval, obtain approval at the respective courses offered by other entities, which may have a potential dilemma (not at all cases since then), in the sense that the aspiration to become experts in the safety basic standards, can be addressed only after ensuring that there is an acceptance at the level of the course and evaluation ways of the present courses to RSR. Viewed another way, one can consider the formation of RSR experience in planning for better training of experts in the safety basic standards. It happens that the courses offered to RSR some of them do not cover the requirements of time, content and practices established in the regulations. The Mexican Society of Radiological Safety can affect as a partner to improve the courses quality. (Author)

  15. Resources Available to Department Chairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, David M.; Bowker, Lee H.

    Resources available to department chairs from the following sources are described: the department's discipline; the national higher education community; the local institution; and the chair's own skills, background, roles, and structural placement within the organization. The use of these resources to deal with common problems faced by chairs is…

  16. Low carbon rural housing provision in China: Participation and decision making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Wenling; Spaargaren, G.; Mol, A.P.J.; Heerink, N.B.M.; Wang, C.

    2014-01-01

    Under the national strategy of ‘building a new socialist countryside’, concentrated rural housing is increasing in some rural regions in China. In this research we use three case studies to analyze decision making on concentrated rural housing and the potential for future low carbon rural housing. T

  17. Low carbon rural housing provision in China: Participation and decision making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Wenling; Spaargaren, G.; Mol, A.P.J.; Heerink, N.B.M.; Wang, C.

    2014-01-01

    Under the national strategy of ‘building a new socialist countryside’, concentrated rural housing is increasing in some rural regions in China. In this research we use three case studies to analyze decision making on concentrated rural housing and the potential for future low carbon rural housing. T

  18. National Transport Code Collaboration (NTCC) PTRANSP, Final Report to the US Department of Energy for the Period August 1, 2007 Through July 31, 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lao, Lang L. [General Atomics; St John, Holger [General Atomics; Staebler, Gary M. [General Atomics; Snyder, Phil B. [General Atomics

    2010-08-20

    This report describes the work done under U.S. Department of Energy grant number DE-FG02-07ER54935 for the period ending July 31, 2010. The goal of this project was to provide predictive transport analysis to the PTRANSP code. Our contribution to this effort consisted of three parts: (a) a predictive solver suitable for use with highly non-linear transport models and installation of the turbulent confinement models GLF23 and TGLF, (b) an interface of this solver with the PTRANSP code, and (c) initial development of an EPED1 edge pedestal model interface with PTRANSP. PTRANSP has been installed locally on this cluster by importing a complete PTRANSP build environment that always contains the proper version of the libraries and other object files that PTRANSP requires. The GCNMP package and its interface code have been added to the SVN repository at PPPL.

  19. The Department of Veterans Health Administration Office of Nursing Service, "transforming nursing in a national healthcare system: an example of transformation in action".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertenberger, Sydney; Chapman, Kathleen M; Wright-Brown, Salena

    2011-01-01

    The Department of Veterans Health Administration Office of Nursing Service has embarked on a multiyear transformational process, an example of which is the development of an organization-wide nursing handbook. The development of this handbook offered the opportunity to improve collaboration, redefine expectations and behavior, as well as prepare for the future of Nursing within the Veterans Health Administration. The lessons learned from this process have revolved around the themes of leadership skills for managing high-level change often in a virtual environment; constant collaboration; that the practice of nursing will continue to evolve on the basis of new evidence, technology, customer expectations, and resources; and that the process to accomplish this goal is powerful.

  20. 湘语族群乡村汉族成人的体型特点%Somatotype of Han nationality adults in rural areas of Xiang dialect group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李传刚; 李咏兰; 陆舜华; 郑连斌; 李永霞; 孔祥薇; 傅媛

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To study the somatotype of Han in rural areas of Xiang dialect group. Methods: The Heath-Carter method was used to study the adult somatotype of 410 adults (196 males and 214 females) of Han in Shuangfeng county of Hunan province. Results: The mean somatotype values of the rural males and females were respectively 3. 8-5. 0-2. 7 and 5. 1-4. 5-1. 9 in Xiang dialect group, which respresented the endomorphic-mesomorphy category in males and mesomorphic-endomorphy category in females. Endomorphy and mesomorphy of rural males and females reached the highest value in 40-year-old group, and ectomorphy reached the highest values in 20-year-old group. The top somatotypes frequency of males were endomorphic mesomorph category, endomorph-mesomorph category, balanced mesomorph category and mesomorph endomorphic category, and the top somatotypes frequency of females were mesomorphic endomorph category, mesomorph-endomorph category and endomorphic mesomorph category. The somatotype of rural males was close to that of Han of Guangxi, Han of Yunnan, Daur, Oroqen, Mongol and far away from Zhuang, Gelao. The somatotype of rural females was close to that of Han of Yunnan, Han of Inner Mongnlia, Ewenki, Oroqen, Daur and far away from Zhuang, Gelao. Conclusion- Rural adult of Xiang dialect group has the common characters of somatotype with north China type.%目的:研究湘语族群乡村汉族成人的体型特点.方法:采用Heath-Carter人体测量方法对湖南省双峰县乡村汉族成人410例(男196例,女214例)进行了体型研究.结果:湘语族群乡村汉族男性平均体型值为3.8-5.0-2.7,属偏内胚层的中胚层型;女性平均体型值为5.1-4.5-1.9,属偏中胚层的内胚层体型.乡村汉族男性、女性内、中因子值均在40~岁组达到最大,外因子值在20~岁组最大.在13种体型中,男性出现率较高的体型为偏内胚层的中胚层体型、内胚层-中胚层均衡体型、均衡的中胚层体型、偏中胚层的

  1. Rural Health Information Hub

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... issues that impact rural health in RHIhub’s Topic Guides. Recently updated: Social Determinants of Health for Rural People Browse all 50+ topics Community Health Gateway Find rural project examples in Rural Health Models and Innovations and proven strategies for strong rural programs with ...

  2. Chinese Rural labors Transfer under the Coordination of Urban-Rural Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The strategic significance of Chinese rural labor transfer is expounded.It is conducive to solving the three agricultural problems concerning agriculture,rural areas,and farmers and coordinating the urban and rural development;promoting the rational distribution of human resources and realizing the growth of national economy;restructuring industrial structure and improving Chinese market competitiveness.The problems in the transfer of Chinese rural labors are analyzed,which include the low overall cultural level of rural labors;imperfect organization developmental;weak management mechanism and imperfect supporting measures.The rational paths for Chinese rural labor transfer are pointed out,including break the urban and rural dual structure and realize the free move of rural labors;strengthen the organization construction to provide high-quality socialized service for rural labor transfer;perfect security system to foster favorable social environment for rural labor transfer;establish scientific management mechanism to realize the sustainable rural labor transfer.

  3. Aeromagnetic and Aeroradiometric Data for the Conterminous United States and Alaska from the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Patricia L.; Kucks, Robert P.; Ravat, Dhananjay

    2009-01-01

    The National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program was initiated in 1973 with a primary goal of identifying uranium resources in the United States. The airborne program's main purpose was to collect radiometric data of the conterminous United States and Alaska. Magnetic data were also collected. After the program ended, most of the data were given to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). All areas were flown at about 400 feet above ground, the optimum height for collecting radiometric data, and the line spacing varied from 3 to 6 mile intervals. A few selected quadrangles or parts of quadrangles were flown at 1- or 2-mile line spacing. About forty smaller areas were targeted and flown at 0.25-mile to 1 mile line spacing.

  4. Peru : Impact of the Rural Roads Program on Democracy and Citizenship in Rural Areas

    OpenAIRE

    Remy Simatovia, María Isabel

    2008-01-01

    The rural roads program, overseen by Provias Descentralizado (subdivision of Peru's Ministry of Transportation and Communications), began in 1995, and has received funds from the Peruvian Government, the World Bank and the Inter-American Development Bank. It is a national program for the rehabilitation and maintenance of roads that link rural communities and villages with secondary and pri...

  5. Integrated rural development: commitment and policy-frame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, A R

    1979-07-01

    India's 6th plan accords top priority to rural development with emphasis on development of agriculture and allied activities and rural industries. Rural growth has been slow and rural proverty has been increasing, because most of the low income groups in the rural areas depend heavily on agriculture for their livelihood. Primary constraints in the development of rural residents arise from their dependence on agriculture for livelihood, the importance of nonagricultural sources of income, and the compounding effects of natural calamities. Rural development is a strategy designed to improve the economic and social life of a specific group of people. It involves extending the benefits of development to the poorest residents of rural areas -- small farmers, tenants, landless, rural artisans, scheduled castes and scheduled tribes. Rural development must be designed to increase production and raise productivity. India's 6th plan has recognized that the distribution of unemployment and poverty as well as the potential for development of agriculture and related activities varies both among and within regions. Efforts have now been made to make the programs area specific. The new approach aims at integrating field programs reflecting the economic activity of the rural family whose employment and development is the primary objective. Policy directed at ensuring a flow of new field-tested technical knowledge relevant to small holder production is essential for rural development success. A strong commitment to rural development policies at the national level is necessary if the impact on the problems of rural poverty is to be effective and broad-based.

  6. [Social conditions in which medical students from the faculty of medicine of the National University of Mexico (UNAM) perform their Social Service in rural areas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamui-Sutton, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work is to describe the conditions in which medical students perform their Social Service, highlighting their experiences in areas such as: information before they move and the motivation to leave home; the perception of personal and environmental lack of safety; the institutional support that they receive during their work in the community and the financial support provided. The methodological design of the study included an exploratory phase, in which collective interviews were performed, using the focal group technique, with students who had been in rural areas. Three hundred sixty cases were considered, 72.8% corresponded to rural areas, and 27.7% to Mexico City. According to the findings, the following actions are proposed: give better information and improve the process of vacancy selection; increase the scholarship received by students in Social Service; establish legal, police, and community support mechanisms to guarantee the student's personal safety; pay attention to aspects such as the student's emotional and social situation, and design programs with gender perspective to enhance certainty and safety.

  7. [Environment and rural development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufumier, M

    1992-01-01

    Management of natural resources and preservation of ecological balance are perceived today as essential elements of rural development. The recently multiplying environmental ministries in developing countries are intended not only to correct the damages resulting from uncontrolled urbanization and industrialization, but to address ecosystemic degradation in the countryside. The aptitude demonstrated by numerous peasant societies for exploiting their environments over the long term while preserving their potential should be recognized and their specific, detailed knowledge incorporated into environmental protection projects. It is a mistake to conclude that peasants do not care about environmental problems; they often lack the resources to take needed action. Active participation of impoverished rural dwellers requires that measures taken do not reduce their incomes or resources in the short term. Rural development projects must assure protection of the environment while taking into account the interests of diverse categories of rural dwellers, such as farmers, herders, or wood cutters. There has been considerable progress in the past 2 decades in understanding the functioning of cultivated and pasture ecosystems and in developing techniques to limit damage to them. A vast effort is now needed to understand the economic, social, and cultural functions of customs and practices of different social groups involved in agricultural development and territorial management in order to prioritize problems and arrive at a consensus of all those affected concerning environmental protection. Social science research is needed into marketing of agricultural products, circulation of cooking fuels, village-town relations, and migration in order to determine the effects of these phenomena on management and conservation of natural resources in rural areas. Experimental research should be directed toward finding practical solutions to problems encountered by rural cultivators

  8. Report on Department of Homeland Security Sponsored Research Project at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on Preparation for an Improvised Nuclear Device Event

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A., B

    2008-07-31

    Following the events of September 11th, a litany of imaginable horribles was trotted out before an anxious and concerned public. To date, government agencies and academics are still grappling with how to best respond to such catastrophes, and as Senator Lieberman's quote says above, now is the time to plan and prepare for such events. One of the nation's worst fears is that terrorists might detonate an improvised nuclear device (IND) in an American city. With 9/11 serving as the catalyst, the government and many NGOs have invested money into research and development of response capabilities throughout the country. Yet, there is still much to learn about how to best respond to an IND event. My summer 2008 internship at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory afforded me the opportunity to look in depth at the preparedness process and the research that has been conducted on this issue. While at the laboratory I was tasked to collect, combine, and process research on how cities and the federal government can best prepare for the horrific prospect of an IND event. Specific projects that I was involved with were meeting reports, research reviews, and a full project report. Working directly with Brooke Buddemeier and his support team at the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center, I was able to witness first hand, preparation for meetings with response planners to inform them of the challenges that an IND event would pose to the affected communities. In addition, I supported the Homeland Security Institute team (HSI), which was looking at IND preparation and preparing a Congressional report. I participated in meetings at which local responders expressed their concerns and contributed valuable information to the response plan. I specialized in the psycho-social aspects of an IND event and served as a technical advisor to some of the research groups. Alongside attending and supporting these meetings, I worked on an independent research project which collected

  9. Traffic safety information in South Africa : how to improve the National Accident Register. Submitted to the National Department of Transport, Republic of South Africa and the Ministry of Transport, Public Works and Water Management, The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluis, J. van der (ed.)

    2001-01-01

    This report describes a project that was carried out to investigate ways and means to improve the problems experienced with the South African National Accident Register (NAR) system, and to determine a long term strategy on road safety information in South Africa. Within the framework of the Road Sa

  10. Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act 2009 United States Department of Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Mohit [Seeo, Incorporated, Hayward, CA (United States); Grape, Ulrik [Seeo, Incorporated, Hayward, CA (United States)

    2014-07-29

    The purpose of this project was for Seeo to deliver the first ever large-scale or grid-scale prototype of a new class of advanced lithium-ion rechargeable batteries. The technology combines unprecedented energy density, lifetime, safety, and cost. The goal was to demonstrate Seeo’s entirely new class of lithium-based batteries based on Seeo’s proprietary nanostructured polymer electrolyte. This technology can enable the widespread deployment in Smart Grid applications and was demonstrated through the development and testing of a 10 kilowatt-hour (kWh) prototype battery system. This development effort, supported by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) enabled Seeo to pursue and validate the transformational performance advantages of its technology for use in grid-tied energy storage applications. The focus of this project and Seeo’s goal as demonstrated through the efforts made under this project is to address the utility market needs for energy storage systems applications, especially for residential and commercial customers tied to solar photovoltaic installations. In addition to grid energy storage opportunities Seeo’s technology has been tested with automotive drive cycles and is seen as equally applicable for battery packs for electric vehicles. The goals of the project were outlined and achieved through a series of specific tasks, which encompassed materials development, scaling up of cells, demonstrating the performance of the cells, designing, building and demonstrating a pack prototype, and providing an economic and environmental assessment. Nearly all of the tasks were achieved over the duration of the program, with only the full demonstration of the battery system and a complete economic and environmental analysis not able to be fully completed. A timeline over the duration of the program is shown in figure 1.

  11. Chilhood leprosy: Clinical and epidemiological study in the Department of Dermatology, Clinicas Hospital, Faculty of Medical Sciences, National University of Asuncion-Paraguay, 2005-2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Di Martino Ortiz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Leprosy in childhood is not a common finding. The risk of a child to develop the disease is 4 times greater in contact with close people and 9 times higher among household contacts. The maximum risk observed is when the contact is Multibacillary (MB and intradomicilliary. Leprosy in childhood reflects the clinical characteristics of adult, with some peculiar aspects. Non-contagious forms (IL and TT are common during childhood. The contagious forms (BB, LB and LL are less frequent due to higher required incubation period. Aim: To describe the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of childhood leprosy in the Department of Dermatology, Clinicas Hospital from January 2005 to July 2014. Methods: Retrospective, observational cross-sectional study with an analytical component. Results: The total number of leprosy patients was 369, and of these 11 were pediatric patients (2.98% with a predominance of males (8/11 from 3 to 16 years. The BI ranged from negative to 3+. 6/11 were MB. The evolution was good in all cases and two patients developed leprorreactions. The lesions were predominant in facial location. 6/11 patients had family contacts. Conclusions: Leprosy in children is more common than is reported, especially in endemic areas. In <5 years, the disease is very rare. More than half of the cases of children with leprosy have a positive contact. It is considered that in <5 years the spread is always intradomiciliary; this shows the importance of monitoring contacts, which will be possible with the determination of all stakeholders in order to banish the undetected cases and prevent damage.

  12. Computer Security Awareness Guide for Department of Energy Laboratories, Government Agencies, and others for use with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL): Computer security short subjects videos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    Lonnie Moore, the Computer Security Manager, CSSM/CPPM at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Gale Warshawsky, the Coordinator for Computer Security Education & Awareness at LLNL, wanted to share topics such as computer ethics, software piracy, privacy issues, and protecting information in a format that would capture and hold an audience`s attention. Four Computer Security Short Subject videos were produced which ranged from 1-3 minutes each. These videos are very effective education and awareness tools that can be used to generate discussions about computer security concerns and good computing practices. Leaders may incorporate the Short Subjects into presentations. After talking about a subject area, one of the Short Subjects may be shown to highlight that subject matter. Another method for sharing them could be to show a Short Subject first and then lead a discussion about its topic. The cast of characters and a bit of information about their personalities in the LLNL Computer Security Short Subjects is included in this report.

  13. Expanding Cooperation between the Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges (NASULGC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maw, Ian L.

    2006-08-01

    The DOE and the NASULGC have agreed to have closer cooperation with the purpose of expanding the access of the DOE to the research and Extension capacities of the state universities and land-grant colleges. The objective of this expanded cooperation will be to provide access to Extension and Outreach Systems for delivering products and services of the DOE research and development programs and to develop partnerships in research that will increase the productivity of DOE and NASULGC-affiliated institution research programs. NASULGC is uniquely qualified to partner with the DOE because they represent each of the institutions involved in the national extension system. Five projects have been developed to initiate the expanded cooperation between DOE/EERE and BAA/NASULGC. In some cases, these are pilot projects designed to develop information that can support broadened cooperation. They are offered for action by the BAA to the EERE Board. Agreement on the initiation of these projects will result in their implementation during the 2004 calendar year. At midyear and at the end of 2004, those responsible for each of the projects will provide an accounting of activities and assessment of results for expanding energy education, research and technical assistance. The five suggested projects are; Expanding the Opportunities for Cooperation and Communication o Advisory Boards o Meetings o EERE new hires; Use of Extension and Outreach Systems for the Dissemination and Delivery of DOE/EERE Products and Services; Youth Education in Science and Technology; Engaging the Research Capacity of NASULGC Institutions; and Workshops at the DOE Labs for Scientists from the NASULGC-Affiliated Institutions.

  14. Integrated rural development programs: a skeptical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttan, V W

    1975-11-01

    -industrial development, or by the expansion of national and international markets, depends on the capacity for adaptive responses on the part of cultural, political, and economic institutions as well as on technical innovations which can generate substantial new income flows in response to the new economic opportunities. Improvements in the welfare of the rural population in poor regions will call for institutional innovations which effectively link urban and rural areas through a series of nonmarket and market relationships. A major implication of the models is that given the "markets" in which they operate, bureaucracies will be successful in capturing a relatively large share of the economic gains generated by their activities.

  15. National Wetlands Inventory Lines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Linear wetland features (including selected streams, ditches, and narrow wetland bodies) mapped as part of the National Wetlands Inventory (NWI). The National...

  16. National Airspace System Resources

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — National Airspace System Resources (NASR) maintains the national aeronautical information database, containing static data related to NAS facilities and operations....

  17. National Health Expenditure Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — National Health Expenditure Accounts are comprised of the following, National Health Expenditures - Historical and Projected, Age Estimates, State Health...

  18. Study on Responsibilities and Evaluation of Different Departments in Cervical Cancer Screening Program for Rural Women%农村妇女宫颈癌筛查项目部门职责界定和评价研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    盖莉莉; 赵新辉; 窦岚; 井明霞

    2015-01-01

    目的:通过界定新疆宫颈癌筛查项目涉及的相关部门及其职责,评价各部门职责的履行情况,为提高新疆乃至全国宫颈癌筛查项目县(市)的工作绩效提供参考依据。方法采用文献归纳、头脑风暴、专题小组讨论等方法界定宫颈癌筛查项目的参与部门及其职责分工。采用分层抽样法抽取26个县、14个市,利用问卷调查方法,对40个县(市)参与宫颈癌筛查项目的各部门职责履行情况进行调查。结果共发放问卷40份,回收39份,其中有效问卷37份,有效回收率为92.5%。界定了新疆宫颈癌筛查项目的11个相关部门和25项部门职责。新疆宫颈癌筛查项目各部门对其职责落实情况由高到低排序依次为县(市)妇幼保健院>县(市)人民政府>县(市)卫生局>县(市)妇联>县(市)广播电视局>乡镇卫生院>县(市)计生部门>县(市)财务局>县(市)医院>县(市)民政局>县(市)公安局。结论县(市)政府和卫生行政部门应加大对乡镇卫生院的财力、人力投入;采取激励措施,增加公立医院对公共卫生项目的重视程度,使其较好地发挥医疗优势;建立社会大卫生观,协调卫生系统外部部门参与筛查。%Objective To define the responsibilities of different departments in cervical cancer screening project in Xinjiang,and to evaluate the performance of different departments′duties,so as to provide references for improving performance of cervical cancer screening program in Xinjiang and all over the country. Methods By using multiple methods, such as literature review,brainstorm and focus group discussions the responsibilities of different departments in cervical cancer screening project were defined. Through stratified sampling method,40 project counties( cities)of cervical cancer screening program ( including 26 counties and 14 cities)were randomly

  19. On Anti-poverty Strategy for Poor Rural Areas in Minority Nationality Regions:Taking Minority Nationality Regions in Inner Mongolia for an Example%浅论民族地区的贫困农村的反贫困策略——以内蒙古民族地区为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜佳家

    2012-01-01

    Poverty is always a major problem that hinders the progress of human society,so eliminating poverty is the dream of mankind for thousands of years.Poverty not only shows in low income and living standard in the impoverished area,but also the fully backward state of social culture in poor areas.This paper discusses the causes of poor rural areas in minority nationality regions and anti-poverty strategies,aiming to improve the backwardness of poverty rural areas in minority nationality regions,and promote social harmony and progress.%贫困问题始终是困扰人类社会进步的重大问题,消除贫困是人类几千年来的梦想。贫困不仅表现在贫困地区低收入和低生活水平,还表现在贫困地区社会文化的全面落后状态。本论文探讨民族地区贫困农村的成因以及反贫困策略,通过开发式扶贫、参与式扶贫以及农村社会工作的介入,旨在改善民族地区贫困农村的落后状态,促进社会和谐进步发展。

  20. Prioritization: A Means of Achieving Positive Rural Development In Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amadi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Rural development occupies a priority place in agenda of Nigeria’s national development. However, the gap between scarce and stingy allocation of resources by Governments and rural people’s needs calls for prioritization in the areas of investment with regards to rural development. This paper examined the priority areas for rural development in Nigeria. Data on the needs of rural dwellers were randomly collected in 2006, 2008 and 2010 respectively. The rural dwellers were interviewed in each of the years using questionnaire and oral discussions. The questionnaire centered on rural dwellers needs among many alternatives such as Irrigation Facility, Roads, Markets, Portable Water Supply, Clinics/Hospitals, Electricity, Loan, Schools/Education and farm inputs. Analysis of variance, (ANOVA using the general linear models procedure was used in data analysis. Results show that majority of rural farmers’ needs are in order of preference Potable Water Supply, Roads, Farm Inputs, Loan and Schools/Education. The implication is that future rural development projects and Programs if directed towards these areas will help to accelerate the improvement of rural dwellers welfare and help to reduce the number of rural to urban migrating, resulting in rural stability and integrated rural development.

  1. The Differences in Urban and Rural Public Goods Supply under New Rural Construction Background%新农村背景下城乡公共产品供给差异研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常玲

    2011-01-01

    Urban and rural public goods supply was the basis and fundament of urban and rural economic and social development. The current situation of the differences in urban and rural public goods supply was analyzed from the aspects of social insurance, infrastructure construction and educational facility. The differences of urban and rural public products supply were due to the influence from unsound urban and rural e-conomy structure, national development strategy and decision-making department. It was proposed that to solve the difference of urban and rural public product supply, it was necessary to strengthen rural infrastructural construction, quickening urban-rural integration, optimization of organizational structure and enlargement of policy support and financial investment etc.%统筹城乡公共产品供给是统筹城乡经济社会协调发展的基础和根本.从社会保障、基础设施建设及教育设施方面分析了我国城乡公共产品供给存在的差异,指出我国城乡公共产品供给差异的存在是受城乡二元经济结构、国家发展战略及决策部门不健全的影响,提出要解决城乡公共产品的供给差异,有必要加强农村基础设施建设、加快城乡一体化、优化组织结构以及加大政策支持和资金投入等.

  2. Evaluation and Optimization Approaches of Rural Financial Ecological Environment in Hubei Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaofang; ZOU

    2015-01-01

    Agriculture is the foundation of national economy,and the quality of rural financial ecological environment determines the level of rural economic development. At the same time of making outstanding achievements in rural financial reform,there are still many problems in rural financial ecological environment. Taking Hubei Province as an example,this paper summarized existing problems from current situations of rural financial ecological environment,and finally came up with pertinent recommendations.

  3. Materials Research Department annual report 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerensen, B.F.; Hansen, N. [eds.

    1998-04-01

    Selected activities of the Materials Research Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 1997 are described. The scientific work is presented in four chapters: Materials Science, Materials Chemistry, Materials Engineering and Materials Technology. A survey is given of the Department`s participation in international collaboration and of its activities within education and training. Furthermore, the main figures outlining the funding and expenditure of the Department are given. Lists of staff members, visiting scientists, publications and other Department activities are included. (au) 278 refs.

  4. Leadership development for rural health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Size, Tim

    2006-01-01

    Leadership is the capacity to help transform a vision of the future into reality. Individuals who can and will exercise leadership are like a river's current--a part past where we now stand, a part yet to come. We have an ongoing need to remember and to look toward the next "generation." A key responsibility of those here now, is to mentor and to create structures for mentoring, in order to maximize the flow and effectiveness of tomorrow's leaders. When recruiting organizational leaders, the recruitment and interview process must seek individuals who in addition to technical competence, also have demonstrated leadership in their prior work and activities. To exercise effective leadership, we must work to know who we are, how we relate to others, and the environment around us. "Servant leadership" is a perspective held by many throughout the rural health community and offers a key set attributes of leadership useful to rural health. To implement the Institute of Medicine's recommendations in Through Collaboration: the Future of Rural Health, we must develop leaders skilled in collaboration, both internal to their organization and across organizations. The National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services had it right when they said to the Secretary and to the rest of us, "the best way to honor Jim is to consciously work to help develop the next generation of rural health leaders." There are, of course, a multitude of leadership institutes, programs, and courses throughout America; this is not a call for yet another separate entity. But it is a call to each of us in rural health to assure that we are deliberate in how we identify "emerging leaders from and for rural communities and provide them with the training and resources to play a lead role in ensuring access to quality healthcare in their states and communities." Let's get started.

  5. Legal aspects of rural tourism in Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Ferreira Arizaga

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Rural tourism is now a growing modality in Uruguay and in the world.In the national legal norm that regulates this activity is Decree 371/2002, which established the characterization of rural tourism and the conditions of their providers.According to this rural tourism it is developed outside urban centers, with personalized service and spacious; uses natural, cultural, heritage, housing and services of the rural areas, it contributes to local development resources, diversification and tourism competitiveness.We intend to analyze the regulatory framework of the activity, with special emphasis on the categorization of the establishments and the set obligations for providers of rural tourism services, the liability regime established in the Law on Tourism and the application

  6. The potentials for creating sustainable rural tourism in Bačka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stankov Uglješa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Average rural household in Bačka mostly depend on agricultural activities. Modern society changes, especially changes in agriculture production imply need for diversification of business activities. Rural tourism can be important part of rural economy for some villages in Bačka. Fertile plain, Danube, Tisa and other smaller rivers, animals and games represent base of natural tourist attractions of rural tourism. However, main competitive advantages of Bačka are anthropogenic values. Traditional pannonian houses, baroques churches, numerous rural festivities, and "melting point" of different nationalities make good base for rural tourism development. Different combinations of rural attractions create several tourist experiences of this region: authentic tourist experience at "szalashes", particular tourist experience in villages, intensive tourist experience of rural events and manifestations, not authentic tourist experiences of pseudo rural attractions and complex tourist experience in rural areas. Regarding to emitive centers of rural tourist demand can be specified tree regions for development of rural tourism - region of Novi Sad, Subotica, and Sombor. Rural tourism can make a valuable contribution to rural economies, job creation, landscape conservation, retention of rural population, support to rural culture and tradition, nature conservation and other. At the same time, rural tourism is facing various limitations. With in this context, rural tourism planning has to include principles of sustainable development.

  7. Establishing a faith-based organisation nursing school within a national primary health care programme in rural Tanzania: an auto-ethnographic case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Bischoff

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 2007, the Tanzanian government called for improvements in its primary health care services. Part of this initiative was to accelerate the training rate for nurses qualified to work in rural areas. The aim of this study was to reflect on the issues experienced whilst establishing and implementing a faith-based organisation (FBO nursing school and make recommendations for other similar initiatives. Design: This paper describes an auto-ethnographic case study design to identify the key difficulties involved with establishing and implementing a new nursing school, and which factors helped the project achieve its goals. Results: Six themes emerged from the experiences that shaped the course of the project: 1 Motivation can be sustained if the rationale of the project is in line with its aims. Indeed, the project's primary health care focus was to strengthen the nursing workforce and build a public–private partnership with an FBO. All these were strengths, which helped in the midst of all the uncertainties. 2 Communication was an important and often underrated factor for all types of development projects. 3 Managing the unknown and 4 managing expectations characterised the project inception. Almost all themes had to do with 5 handling conflicts. With so many participants having their own agendas, tensions were unavoidable. A final theme was 6 the need to adjust to ever-changing targets. Conclusions: This retrospective auto-ethnographic manuscript serves as a small-scale case study, to illustrate how issues that can be generalised to other settings can be deconstructed to demonstrate how they influence health development projects in developing countries. From this narrative of experiences, key recommendations include the following: 1 Find the right ratio of stakeholders, participants, and agendas, and do not overload the project; 2 Be alert and communicate as much as possible with staff and do not ignore issues hoping they will solve

  8. 收入和价格对农户消费需求的影响——基于全国农村住户调查的实证分析%THE EFFECTS OF INCOME AND PRICE TO RURAL HOUSEHOLD CONSUMPTION——THE EMPIRICAL ANALYSIS OF NATIONAL RURAL HOUSEHOLD SURVEY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张玉梅; 王东杰; 吴建寨; 喻闻; 李志强

    2013-01-01

    China rural households' life consumption and food demand are analyzed by using national household survey data of 2009 with the sample of 6199, which is about 10% of the total survey. The two stages method of ELES-AIDS is adopted. The demand elasticity of income and price are estimated to quantify the effects of income and price, and the rising of food price is simulated to analyze its impacts to food consumption. The results show that the consumption of rural households is rising to a new stage. Rural households will improve their life quality and increase more expenditure on residence, culture and education, entertainment, transportation and medical care, and pursue diversity food consumption, such as meat, vegetable, and fruits. Price is still a very important factor to rural household consumption. The rapid rising food price will have an impact on the structure of food consumption, i.e, grain and vegetable will be increased, while, meat, egg, milk, and aquatic product will be decreased. Shopping basket and price stabilization are still substantial to ensure rural households consumption.%利用2009年6199户全国农村住户调查数据(占总样本量的10%),运用ELES-AIDS模型,估算农户的生活消费和食物消费的需求收入弹性和需求价格弹性,分析农户的消费需求特征,收入和价格对农户消费需求的影响,并模拟分析食品价格上涨对食物消费需求的影响.研究表明:农村居民生活消费水平进入到一个新阶段,收入提高后,农民注重提高生活质量,重点增加居住、文化教育娱乐、交通通讯和医疗保健的支出;在食物消费方面更加追求多样化,食物消费结构进一步优化,特别是对肉类、蔬菜和水果的消费需求将增长较快.价格仍然是影响农户消费的重要因素,食物价格的过快上涨,会对农户的食物消费结构调整产生一定的负面影响,即增加粮食、蔬菜等基本食物消费,而相应减少肉、蛋、奶和

  9. 7 CFR Exhibit C to Subpart G of... - Subordination by the Government for Use With Rural Housing Site Loans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Housing Site Loans C Exhibit C to Subpart G of Part 1822 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE, RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, AND FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS AND GRANTS PRIMARILY FOR REAL ESTATE...

  10. The Rural Development Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Louis E.

    1991-01-01

    Progress toward rural development has been hampered by flawed views of rural America; serious limitations to existing social and economic data on sparsely populated areas; treatment of rural America as a geographical entity unconnected to the larger U.S. economy and society; perceived lack of feasible political solution to rural problems; and…

  11. Rural-Urban Connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Daniel F.; LaGreca, Anthony J.; Mullis, Ronald L.

    This publication combines three papers on rural and urban youth issues. "Key Issues Facing Rural Youth" (Daniel F. Perkins) notes that rural adolescents share the same concerns and exhibit the same problem behaviors as their urban counterparts. But in addition, geographic isolation presents problems unique to rural areas. A framework is proposed…

  12. Quantitative and theoretical analysis of the joint Department of Energy-National Institute of Standards and Technology Energy-Related Inventions Program from 1975 to 1995: Implications for development of public policy toward innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pevenstein, Jack Edward

    This dissertation presents 18 alternative models for computing the social rate of return (SRR) of the joint Department of Energy (DOE)-National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Energy-Related Inventions Program (ERIP) from 1975 to 1995. The models differ on the on the choice of societal benefit, adjustments made to the benefits, accounting for initial investments in ERIP and annual program appropriations. Alternative quantitative measures of societal benefit include annual gross market sales of successfully commercialized ERIP-supported inventions, annual energy savings resulting from the use of such inventions, pollution-remediation cost reductions due to decreased carbon emissions from greenhouse gases associated with more efficient energy generation. SRR computation employs the net present value (NPV) model with the SRR being the discount rate that reduces the NPV of a stream of societal benefits to zero over a period of n years given an initial investment and annual program appropriations. The SRR is the total rate of return to the nation from public investment in ERIP. The data used for computation were assembled by Dr. Marilyn A. Brown and her staff at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under contract to DOE since 1985. Other data on energy use and carbon emission from greenhouse gas production come from official publications of DOE's Energy Information Administration. Mean ERIP SRR = 412.7% with standard deviation = +/-426.5%. The population of the SRR sample is accepted as normally distributed at an alpha = 0.05, using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. These SRR's, which appear reasonable in comparison with those computed by Professor Edwin Mansfield, (Wharton School) for inventions and by Dr. Gregory Tassey (NIST Chief Economist) for NIST programs supporting innovations in measurement technology, show a significant underinvestment in public service technology innovation evaluation programs for independent inventors and small technology

  13. Pelvic inflammatory disease: identifying research gaps--proceedings of a workshop sponsored by Department of Health and Human Services/National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, November 3-4, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darville, Toni

    2013-10-01

    In November 2011, the National Institutes of Health convened a workshop of basic researchers, epidemiologists, and clinical experts in pelvic inflammatory disease to identify research gaps hindering advances in diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. This article summarizes the presentations, discussions, and conclusions of this group and highlights significant controversies that reveal aspects of pelvic inflammatory disease research that would most greatly benefit from the application of newer molecular, immunologic, and radiologic techniques. Multiple limitations to performing new clinical trials exist; however, emerging data from ongoing clinical trials will add to the current body of knowledge regarding prevention and treatment strategies. In addition, use of established health care databases could serve as a valuable tool for performance of unbiased epidemiologic outcome studies.

  14. Low Impact Development Intensive Rural Construction Planning in Xu Fu Village Ningbo, China: Planning Review through Rural Resilience Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roosmayri Lovina Hermaputi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Xu Fu Village Ningbo LID Intensive Rural Construction Planning is a cooperation project between Zhejiang University and Ningbo Institute of Technology which named "12th Five-Year National Science and Technology support program-the comprehensive demonstration of the key technology of the beautiful rural construction in the rapid urbanization area of the Yangtze River Delta". This plan focuses on intensive rural construction as part of rural development and construction project that applies the principles of low impact development. Xu Fu Village located in the Yangtze River Delta Region. Currently, the rural growth brings the high impact of development, as a result of rapid urbanization growth arising several issues, such as low land use efficiency, dispersed rural residence, homestead occupies more, rural roads covering over, etc. Meanwhile, Xu Fu village wishes to develop its tourism potential. Thus, the intensive rural construction should be done to avoid the severe effect. The project result hopefully can improve the quality and level of rural residential planning, design, and construction; improve their living environment; save construction land and water use; and improve energy efficiency. The aim of this study is to review the Low Impact Development (LID Intensive Rural Construction in Xu Fu Village, Ningbo City through the rural resilience perspective. This paper will describe the project plan first, then review it through rural resilience perspective. This paper will elaborate the rural resilience theory and then review the rural resiliency through two parts; the first part is identifying rural resilience in rural infrastructure development based on the criteria created by Ayyob S. and Yoshiki Y. (2014, about urban resiliency criteria, and then the second part is reviewing Xu Fu Village resilience through Arup Resilience Qualities (2012, considering three rural resilience domain (economy, ecology, and cultural.

  15. The assessment on impact of essential drugs policy on primary health care system in rural areas of Shandong Province policy and regulation division of the Health Department of Shandong Province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhuge; Shu, Defeng; Xia, Mei; Gao, Dehai; Lu, Dan; Huang, Ning; Tian, Xiaoqing; An, Limei; Li, Shixue; Li, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    At present, China has achieved an initial establishment and gradual implementation of a framework for national essential drugs policy. With the further implementation of the national essential drugs policy, it is not clear how the policy works, whether it achieves the original intention of essential drugs policy, and what impact essential drugs policy exerts on the primary health care system. In view of it, we conducted a field research on sample areas of Shandong Province to understand the conditions of the implementation of the essential drugs policy in Shandong Province. From three perspectives of medical institutions, patients and medical staff, this thesis analyzes the impact of essential drugs policy on village-level and township-level health service system, summarizes the effectiveness of implementing essential drugs policy, discovers the problems of various aspects and conducts an in-depth analysis of the causes, and puts forward feasible suggestions to provide reference for improving the essential drugs policy. The assessment results show that the implementation of essential drugs policy in Shandong Province has played a positive role in promoting the sound development of the primary health care system, changed the situation of covering hospital expenses with medicine revenue in the past, contributed to the return of medical institutions to public welfare, and reduced the patient's economic burden of disease. But there emerge many problems as follows: impact on the doctor's diagnosis and treatment due to incompleteness of drug types, and distribution not in place, patient loss and operational difficulty of village clinic. Thus, this thesis makes recommendations of drugs catalog formulation, drug procurement, sales and use, and meanwhile points out that the supporting financial compensation policy and performance appraisal policy and other measures in place are a prerequisite for a positive role of essential drugs policy.

  16. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs, Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1, Appendix D: Part A, Naval Spent Nuclear Fuel Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    Volume 1 to the Department of Energy`s Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Management Programs Environmental Impact Statement evaluates a range of alternatives for managing naval spent nuclear fuel expected to be removed from US Navy nuclear-powered vessels and prototype reactors through the year 2035. The Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) considers a range of alternatives for examining and storing naval spent nuclear fuel, including alternatives that terminate examination and involve storage close to the refueling or defueling site. The EIS covers the potential environmental impacts of each alternative, as well as cost impacts and impacts to the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program mission. This Appendix covers aspects of the alternatives that involve managing naval spent nuclear fuel at four naval shipyards and the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Kesselring Site in West Milton, New York. This Appendix also covers the impacts of alternatives that involve examining naval spent nuclear fuel at the Expended Core Facility in Idaho and the potential impacts of constructing and operating an inspection facility at any of the Department of Energy (DOE) facilities considered in the EIS. This Appendix also considers the impacts of the alternative involving limited spent nuclear fuel examinations at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. This Appendix does not address the impacts associated with storing naval spent nuclear fuel after it has been inspected and transferred to DOE facilities. These impacts are addressed in separate appendices for each DOE site.

  17. Rural health care in Mexico?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañedo, L

    1974-09-27

    A very large percentage of Mexico's population living in rural areas lacks resources for health care. Any new effort to provide such care must emphasize the health of the infant population because of the high percentage of infants in the country. Plans made at the national level have not been correlated with the conditions that exist in rural areas. For example, the majority of university programs are oriented toward urban medical practice, and the construction of more schools of medicine to solve the problem of doctors in rural areas is based on a mistaken premise. This problem has not been solved even in developed countries such as the United States where, as in Mexico, graduates in medicine migrate to the cities where optimal conditions are met for practicing the type of medicine for which they have been trained. Furthermore, it is both expensive and illogical to maintain urban doctors in rural areas where they cannot practice their profession for lack of resources; to do so is to deny the purpose of their education (27). Conventional schools of medicine, for reasons of investment and of structure, should teach only very selected groups of students who, on finishing their training, are fully capacitated to practice specialized medicine. A different system is required if we are to provide adequate health care in the rural communities. A system such as that described herein, adapted to the real need of rural communities, would avoid the necessity to create dysfunctional bureaucracies and would not destroy those institutions which have proved useful in the past. This study should be considered as one of the many pilot programs that should be initiated in order to determine the type of program that would best solve the problem of health care in rural Mexico. Other programs already being considered at the National Autonomous University of Mexico include the A36 plan of the Faculty of Medicine, now in operation; the work of C. Biro carried out in Netzahualcoyotl City

  18. Provincialism, Rurality and Canadian Masculinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Dunk

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Images of provincial rural life are often key symbols in the construction of national identities, even in highly urbanized wealthy nations. Some 60 percent of the Canadian population lives in just four urban concentrations around Toronto, Montreal, Vancouver, and the Calgary-Edmonton corridor and a very significant proportion consists of immigrants, many of them from Asia, Africa, the Caribbean and South America. Canada is still a dominion within the British Commonwealth but everyday metropolitan life in Canada is far more diverse and international than the historic connections to Britain, or France, might suggest. Nonetheless, it is the provincial hinterlands and rural regions that are most often used to imagine Canada and Canadians.

  19. Materials Research Department Annual report 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winther, Grethe; Hansen, N. [eds.

    1999-04-01

    Selected activities of the Materials Research Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 1998 are described. The scientific work is presented in five chapters: Materials Science, Materials Engineering, Materials Technology, Materials Chemistry and Fusion Materials. A survey is given of the Departments collaboration with national and international industries and research institutions. Furthermore, the main figures outlining the funding and expenditure of the Department are given. Lists of staff members, visiting scientists and educational activities are included. (au) 165 refs.

  20. Department of History, National University of Singapore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kongpasa Sengsourivong

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on original household survey on the six villages in Vientiane vicinity in 2005, the paper investigates the impact of Savings Groups (SGs programs on household income, expenditure, and asset, applying the methodology of Coleman’s (1999 study on Thailand to address placement bias and endogeneity problem. The results revealed that SGs programs brought certain changes; SGs boosted educational expenditures implying activation of human capital formation, increased the house asset suggesting villagers’ investment reflected by possible business activation, and brought a possible shift in income sources from traditional agriculture to livestock raising. The paper interprets these different results from Coleman ( ibid. in two possible ways; First the Laotian case is to an extent, free from a bias associated with seed capital allocation, therefore is more suitable to capture the effect than Thailand, and second it is since the stage of financial accessibility in Laos is far less developed than in Thailand.

  1. People's participation in rural electrification - a successful case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamalapur, G.D. [National Institute of Technology Karnataka, Surathkal (India); Udaykumar, R.Y. [National Institute of Technology Karnataka, Department of Electrical Engineering, Surathkal (India)

    2012-06-15

    Rural electrification is an integral component of poverty alleviation and rural growth of a nation. A developing nation, like India has 72.2 percent people living in rural areas. Still, electricity has not played an effective role in the socio-economic growth of villages. The Government of India has an ambitious target of providing electricity to all villages by 2008 and all rural households by 2012. Steps are already initiated with Rural Electric Corporation, Rural Electricity Supply Technology Mission, State Electricity Boards led reforms, Reforms in Power Sector, Electricity Act 2003, Rajiv Gandhi Grameen Vidyutikaran Yojana etc. An attempt has been made in this paper to assess the present status of rural electrification in India and the major factors contributing to rural electrical distribution. Steps initiated by the Government of India through Rural Electric Corporation (REC) and a successful case study of the people's participation model is presented. (orig.)

  2. Rural Education in Mexico: A Gateway to a Better Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    for All, The Quality Imperative. EFA Global Monitoring Report 2005, Paris: UNESCO Publishing, 2004. United Nations . Official List of MDG...vehicle for the promotion of cultural and national identity….Literacy is, along with education in general, a basic human right.... Literacy is, finally...population and within this rural population, since 60.8% live below the national poverty line as compared to 39.8% within urban areas.6 The rural

  3. The Department of Physics of National Northwest Union University in the period of Resistance war against Japan%抗战时期的国立西北联大物理学系概况

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白秀英; 姚远

    2012-01-01

    Research the Department of Physics of National Northwest Union University in the period of Resistance war against Japan, in order to provides clues and historical evidence of Chinese wartime Science and history of education. Methods The literature research method. Results During the Resistance War Against Japan, National Xi'an Temporary University's Department of Physics was renamed as the Department of Physics, National Northwest Union University after moving to Hanzhong, nine professors and 10 teachers opened more than 30 specialized compulsory and elective courses as well as cutting-edge physics courses such as Modern (generation) physics, Geophysics, Atomic physics. Quantum mechanics. Professors wrote more than 10 kinds of handouts such as Theoretical mechanics, Thermal, Optical, Atomic physics, held two the Eleventh and the Twelfth, held the study of the atomic bomb, commemorated the great scientists Newton and other scientific presentations, trained 85 graduates of physics in nine years. Conclusion The primary, preparatory, undergraduate physics education system has been set up in Department of Physics, Northwest Union University, which has also formed systematic construction of teachers, professional faculties of Physics, Associations,etc. Cutting-edge physics in Europe and America was introduced in Northwest of China, laid solid foundation for the post-war higher and elementary physics education in Northwest China.%目的 研究抗战时期的西北联大物理系,为科学教育史研究提供线索和历史佐证.方法 文献考证研究法.结果 抗战时期的西安临大物理系,南迁汉中后更名为国立西北联合大学物理系,9位教授10多名教师先后开设了30多门专业必修和选修课程以及近世(代)物理、地球物理、物性学、量子力学等物理学前沿课程,编写了理论力学、热学、光学、物性学等10多种讲义,召开了中国物理学会第十一、十二届年会西北区分会,开展了原子

  4. Rural Revitalization in New Mexico: A Grass Roots Initiative Involving School and Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitzel, Gerald R.; Benavidez, Alicia C.; Bianchi, Barbara C.; Croom, Linda L.; de la Riva, Brandy R.; Grein, Donna L.; Holloway, James E.; Rendon, Andrew T.

    2007-01-01

    The Rural Education Bureau of the New Mexico Public Education Department has established a program to address the special needs of schools and communities in the extensive rural areas of the state. High poverty rates, depopulation and a general lack of viable economic opportunity have marked rural New Mexico for decades. The program underway aims…

  5. 43 CFR 404.3 - What is the Reclamation Rural Water Supply Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What is the Reclamation Rural Water Supply... RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECLAMATION RURAL WATER SUPPLY PROGRAM Overview § 404.3 What is the Reclamation Rural Water Supply Program? This program addresses domestic, municipal, and industrial...

  6. Maestría en Educación Rural: una propuesta innovadora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Carvajal Jiménez

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Recibido 3 de noviembre de 2006 • Aprobado 30 de noviembre de 2007      Resumen. El siguiente artículo hace referencia a la Maestría en Educación Rural (MER, que inició en el año 2006. Esta maestría se presenta como una experiencia innovadora en el ámbito de los estudios de posgrado, por sus diversos componentes: una modalidad presencial y a distancia, con componente virtual, su itinerancia, pues cada uno de sus cinco módulos se desarrollan en un país centroamericano y participan en ellos, estudiantes de diversas nacionalidades. Se convierte así en una oferta novedosa que presenta la División de Educación Rural (DER, del Centro de Investigación y Docencia en Educación (CIDE a la comunidad nacional e internacional interesada y vinculada con el desarrollo de las zonas rurales de la región.  Abstract. This article is about the Graduate Program in Rural Education that started in 2006. This program is an innovative experience because it is developed in two different modalities: face to face and distance with virtual components.It includes five different modules; each one developed in a different Central American country. The participants are from all over Central America. The author explains, how this is an original alternative from the Rural Education Department (DER of the Center of Investigation and Teaching in Education (CIDE to the national and international community, that supports people who is interested and linked with the development of rural areas in the region.

  7. An Approach to Developing Local Climate Change Environmental Public Health Indicators in a Rural District

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Climate change represents a significant and growing threat to population health. Rural areas face unique challenges, such as high rates of vulnerable populations; economic uncertainty due to their reliance on industries that are vulnerable to climate change; less resilient infrastructure; and lower levels of access to community and emergency services than urban areas. This article fills a gap in public health practice by developing climate and health environmental public health indicators for a local public health department in a rural area. We adapted the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network's framework for climate and health indicators to a seven-county health department in Western Kentucky. Using a three-step review process, we identified primary climate-related environmental public health hazards for the region (extreme heat, drought, and flooding) and a suite of related exposure, health outcome, population vulnerability, and environmental vulnerability indicators. Indicators that performed more poorly at the county level than at the state and national level were defined as “high vulnerability.” Six to eight high vulnerability indicators were identified for each county. The local health department plans to use the results to enhance three key areas of existing services: epidemiology, public health preparedness, and community health assessment. PMID:28352286

  8. STUDY OF RURAL TOURISM IN TURPAN, CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KEYIM Parhad; YANG De-gang; ZHANG Xiao-lei

    2005-01-01

    Rural tourism has long been considered the means of accelerating economic and social development,and has become a development tool for many rural areas. In response to agricultural structure adjustment, rural tourism in China took into shape as a new economic growth point to meet the market demand at the late 1980s.Now, a structural frame of rural tourism has shaped, with the core of Zhujiang (Pearl) River Delta, Beijing, Shanghai and Chengdu of China. But in Xinjiang, the westem part of China, there are hardly any studies in this field in spite of its richness of tourism resources. In this paper, development of rural tourism is studied in Turpan of Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region. With its rich natural and cultural tourism resources, Turpan has become one of the pioneer tourism destinations in China. But same to the rural tourism development of the other areas' of China, rural tourism programs in Turpan mainly aimed at sightseeing activities, and little attention had been paid to the protection and exploitation of national minority culture-an important factor to satisfy both tourists demand and local economic development. However, this kind of rural tourism development policy is harmful on the long run. Because, many tourists seek tourist destinations that offer pleasant experiences related to not only the natural environment but also historic heritage and cultural patterns. The study suggests that on the base of government support in the long term, to enhance tourism training, to protect and exploit national minority culture are essential elements of rural tourism development in Turpan.

  9. Accessibility, availability and affordability of anti-malarials in a rural district in Kenya after implementation of a national subsidy scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simiyu Chrispinus

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poor access to prompt and effective treatment for malaria contributes to high mortality and severe morbidity. In Kenya, it is estimated that only 12% of children receive anti-malarials for their fever within 24 hours. The first point of care for many fevers is a local medicine retailer, such as a pharmacy or chemist. The role of the medicine retailer as an important distribution point for malaria medicines has been recognized and several different strategies have been used to improve the services that these retailers provide. Despite these efforts, many mothers still purchase ineffective drugs because they are less expensive than effective artemisinin combination therapy (ACT. One strategy that is being piloted in several countries is an international subsidy targeted at anti-malarials supplied through the retail sector. The goal of this strategy is to make ACT as affordable as ineffective alternatives. The programme, called the Affordable Medicines Facility - malaria was rolled out in Kenya in August 2010. Methods In December 2010, the affordability and accessibility of malaria medicines in a rural district in Kenya were evaluated using a complete census of all public and private facilities, chemists, pharmacists, and other malaria medicine retailers within the Webuye Demographic Surveillance Area. Availability, types, and prices of anti-malarials were assessed. There are 13 public or mission facilities and 97 medicine retailers (registered and unregistered. Results The average distance from a home to the nearest public health facility is 2 km, but the average distance to the nearest medicine retailer is half that. Quinine is the most frequently stocked anti-malarial (61% of retailers. More medicine retailers stocked sulphadoxine-pyramethamine (SP; 57% than ACT (44%. Eleven percent of retailers stocked AMFm subsidized artemether-lumefantrine (AL. No retailers had chloroquine in stock and only five were selling artemisinin

  10. National Environmental Policy Act

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) was the first major environmental law in the United States and established national environmental policies for the...

  11. National Wetlands Inventory Polygons

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Wetland area features mapped as part of the National Wetlands Inventory (NWI). The National Wetlands Inventory is a national program sponsored by the US Fish and...

  12. National Convective Weather Diagnostic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current convective hazards identified by the National Convective Weather Detection algorithm. The National Convective Weather Diagnostic (NCWD) is an automatically...

  13. Rural Entrepreneurship or Entrepreneurship in the Rural

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsgaard, Steffen; Müller, Sabine; Tanvig, Hanne Wittorff

    2015-01-01

    ” and “space” from human geography are applied to develop a nuanced understanding of rural entrepreneurship as a spatial phenomenon. Space consists of processes of movement and mobility, while places consist of localized material, social and economic relations. Findings: Two ideal types are developed, namely......Purpose: This article investigates how rural entrepreneurship engages with place and space. It explores the concept of “rural” in rural enterprise, and illustrates the importance of distinguishing between types of rural entrepreneurship. Design/methodology/approach: The constructs of “place...... (i) entrepreneurship in the rural and (ii) rural entrepreneurship. The former represents entrepreneurial activities that have limited embeddedness and enact a profit-oriented and mobile logic of space. The latter represents entrepreneurial activities that leverage local resources to re-connect place...

  14. Office of Rural Health Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Hub Rural Health Research Gateway Rural Community Health Gateway White House Rural Council  Eligibility Analyzer Contact Us Subscribe to FORHP weekly announcement for rural health grantees and stakeholders by e-mail Subscribe to ...

  15. Department of Agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health and Safety Organic Plants Recreation Research and Science Rural Trade Our Agency Our Agency About USDA Agencies Initiatives Careers Employee Services Reforming USDA Staff Offices Media Media Agency News Releases Agency Reports Blog Digital Press Releases Testimony ...

  16. Trends in nutrient intakes, nutritional status, and correlates of undernutrition among rural children below 5 years of age: The National Nutrition Monitoring Bureau Survey 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I I Meshram

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In spite of several national nutrition intervention programs that have been in operation since the past four decades, undernutrition continues to be an important public health problem in India. Aim: The aim of the present study was to assess the trends in food and nutrient intakes and nutritional status of children in India below 5 years of age. Setting and Design: A community-based, cross-sectional study was carried out in ten National Nutrition Monitoring Bureau states by adopting a multistage random sampling procedure. Methods: Data were collected on the household (HH socioeconomic and demographic particulars, and anthropometric measurements of the children, such as their length/height and weight, were noted. A 24-h dietary recall method was used for assessing dietary intake. Results: Intake of all the foodstuffs except pulses, vegetables, and fats and oils declined over a period of time (1975–1979 to 2011–2012 while the intake of all the micronutrients except Vitamins A and C declined during the same period. The prevalence of undernutrition, i.e. underweight, stunting, and wasting has declined from 76%, 82%, and 27%, respectively in 1975–1979 to 42%, 44%, and 19%,respectively, in 2011–2012 among 1-5 year children. The severe form of undernutrition has also declined during the same period. The prevalence of undernutrition was significantly (P < 0.01 higher among children of illiterate mothers, those belonging to lower socioeconomic status, and those living in nuclear families. Conclusions: The prevalence of undernutrition declined over the period despite the decrease in food and nutrient intake. However, the pace of decline was slower and it was attributed to improved health-care services coupled with control of communicable diseases and increase in the HHs income. Further efforts are needed to improve the literacy of parents, environmental and personal hygiene, along with the food security of HHs through a public

  17. Knowledge and Adherence to the National Guidelines for Malaria Case Management in Pregnancy among Healthcare Providers and Drug Outlet Dispensers in Rural, Western Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Riley

    Full Text Available Although prompt, effective treatment is a cornerstone of malaria control, information on provider adherence to malaria in pregnancy (MIP treatment guidelines is limited. Incorrect or sub-optimal treatment can adversely affect the mother and fetus. This study assessed provider knowledge of and adherence to national case management guidelines for uncomplicated MIP.We conducted a cross-sectional study from September to November 2013, in 51 health facilities (HF and a randomly-selected sample of 39 drug outlets (DO in the KEMRI/CDC Health and Demographic Surveillance System area in western Kenya. Provider knowledge of national treatment guidelines was assessed with standardized questionnaires. Correct practice required adequate diagnosis, pregnancy assessment, and treatment with correct drug and dosage. In HF, we conducted exit interviews in all women of childbearing age assessed for fever. In DO, simulated clients posing as first trimester pregnant women or as relatives of third trimester pregnant women collected standardized information.Correct MIP case management knowledge and practice were observed in 45% and 31% of HF and 0% and 3% of DO encounters, respectively. The correct drug and dosage for pregnancy trimester was prescribed in 62% of HF and 42% of DO encounters; correct prescription occurred less often in first than in second/ third trimesters (HF: 24% vs. 65%, p<0.01; DO: 0% vs. 40%, p<0.01. Sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, which is not recommended for malaria treatment, was prescribed in 3% of HF and 18% of DO encounters. Exposure to artemether-lumefantrine in first trimester, which is contraindicated, occurred in 29% and 49% of HF and DO encounters, respectively.This study highlights knowledge inadequacies and incorrect prescribing practices in the treatment of MIP. Particularly concerning is the prescription of contraindicated medications in the first trimester. These issues should be addressed through comprehensive trainings and increased

  18. Knowledge and Adherence to the National Guidelines for Malaria Case Management in Pregnancy among Healthcare Providers and Drug Outlet Dispensers in Rural, Western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Christina; Dellicour, Stephanie; Ouma, Peter; Kioko, Urbanus; ter Kuile, Feiko O; Omar, Ahmeddin; Kariuki, Simon; Buff, Ann M; Desai, Meghna; Gutman, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Although prompt, effective treatment is a cornerstone of malaria control, information on provider adherence to malaria in pregnancy (MIP) treatment guidelines is limited. Incorrect or sub-optimal treatment can adversely affect the mother and fetus. This study assessed provider knowledge of and adherence to national case management guidelines for uncomplicated MIP. We conducted a cross-sectional study from September to November 2013, in 51 health facilities (HF) and a randomly-selected sample of 39 drug outlets (DO) in the KEMRI/CDC Health and Demographic Surveillance System area in western Kenya. Provider knowledge of national treatment guidelines was assessed with standardized questionnaires. Correct practice required adequate diagnosis, pregnancy assessment, and treatment with correct drug and dosage. In HF, we conducted exit interviews in all women of childbearing age assessed for fever. In DO, simulated clients posing as first trimester pregnant women or as relatives of third trimester pregnant women collected standardized information. Correct MIP case management knowledge and practice were observed in 45% and 31% of HF and 0% and 3% of DO encounters, respectively. The correct drug and dosage for pregnancy trimester was prescribed in 62% of HF and 42% of DO encounters; correct prescription occurred less often in first than in second/ third trimesters (HF: 24% vs. 65%, pmalaria treatment, was prescribed in 3% of HF and 18% of DO encounters. Exposure to artemether-lumefantrine in first trimester, which is contraindicated, occurred in 29% and 49% of HF and DO encounters, respectively. This study highlights knowledge inadequacies and incorrect prescribing practices in the treatment of MIP. Particularly concerning is the prescription of contraindicated medications in the first trimester. These issues should be addressed through comprehensive trainings and increased supportive supervision. Additional innovative means to improve care should be explored.

  19. Energy efficiency and renewable energy options for riskmanagement and insurance loss reduction: An inventory oftechnologies, research capabilities, and research facilities at theU. S. Department of Energy's National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Allan; Mills, Evan; Vine, Edward.

    1998-08-31

    The promotion of technologies and services for insurance loss reduction and loss prevention is as old as the fields of insurance and risk management. This report addresses a new category of risk management opportunity involving technologies and procedures that use energy more efficiently or supply renewable energy. While the economic benefits of these measures are of interest to energy consumers seeking to reduce their energy expenditures, we have found that they also offer a novel and largely untapped pathway for achieving traditional risk management objectives. Most of the technologies described in this report were supported by government- sponsored RD D programs over many years of effort. These technologies have many benefits, including insurance loss reduction and prevention. The insurance and risk management communities could take advantage of these technologies, either independently or in cost-sharing partnerships with existing R D programs. In this report, we present a compilation of energy-efficiency and renewable energy projects (e.g., energy-efficient halogen torchiere replacements) and techniques (e.g., infrared cameras to detect fire hazards) that are currently being investigated at the U.S. Department of Energy's national laboratories and which the insurance and risk management communities could encourage their customers to use to address their short-term and long-term needs. Once the loss-prevention benefits of these technologies and techniques (many of which are not yet available in the marketplace) are sufficiently demonstrated, insurers can promote their use through informational programs and perhaps financial incentives (e.g., risk-adjusted insurance premium schemes) through the insurance regulatory and rate-making processes. We identified 78 technologies and techniques being investigated by nine national laboratories which can help to reduce insurance losses and manage risks, especially those associated with power failures, fire and wind

  20. Rural Electrification in China: History and Institution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wuyuan Peng; Jiahua Pan

    2006-01-01

    China has been highly successful in electrifying rural areas in the past half century.Institutional structure and its reform are important for investment and, therefore,development of rural electrification. Over time, there have been three major institutional changes initiated by the central government; When the People's Republic was founded in 1949, it was short of capital, technology and management professionals to promote rural electrification, so rural electricity had a separate administrative system from the urban areas. From 1949 to 1977, China established a comprehensive vertical system of rural electricity administration under strict central planning. At the end of the 1970s, with the adoption of economic reform policy, the central government handed over the management of the local electricity system to local government. County levelhas proved the most effective implementation unit for both planning and project implementation of the rural electricity system. From 1998 to 2002, the central government has been separating local electricity supply from local governments to facilitate the commercial operation of the utility market.After 2002, the rural electricity system was merged with the urban system, forming an integrated national electricity administrative system in China.

  1. The Determinants of Agricultural Productivity and Rural Household ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rahel

    potent for factor of production and rural household income enhancement. The policy ... production intended to meet national food security needs. But, output per ... from difference sources to averse the risk associated in agricultural farm sector. ... Agricultural productivity and rural household income in Ethiopia and more.

  2. Rural Principal Leadership Skill Proficiency and Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winn, Pam; Erwin, Sue; Gentry, Jim; Cauble, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Because of the importance of developing highly skilled rural school leaders, statewide assessments of 259 rural Texas public school administrators were analyzed to determine principal confidence levels in leadership skill domains identified by the National Policy Board of Educational Administration (NPBEA). Important findings indicate differences…

  3. Final Report. [Training of Physicians for Rural Areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLaughlin, Max, MD

    2004-07-23

    The purpose of the Southwest Alabama Medical Education Consortium (SAMEC) is to create an organization to operate a medical residency program focused on rural physician training. If successful, this program would also serve as a national model to address physician placement in other rural and underserved areas.

  4. Rural Health Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and International Patterns , the authors found that rural American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth have a higher mortality rate than their urban counterparts. Additionally, the rate of substance abuse admissions was higher for rural AI/AN ...

  5. The Management Education of the Rural Entrepreneur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugen Bruno Ştefan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The Bureau of Social Research, within a strategic EU project– Rural Entrepreneur (2011 – coordinated by the National Foundation of Young Managers, analyzed in 2001 the needs of developing management and consultancy programs in order to improve the knowledge, skills, and managerial behaviour of the small and prospective entrepreneurs from the rural area of Romania. This study has revealed that three quarters of the rural entrepreneurs and over 85% of the prospective entrepreneurs have never been trained in management development. Their managerial education is often poor and usually acquired after starting the business up. The majority does not even consider that a prior training is necessary because business opportunities in the rural area are rare and the access of European funding is difficult. Over 90% of the new businesses fail in the first year. The managerial training programs and entrepreneurial consultancy can significantly reduce this percentage.

  6. Materials Research Department annual report 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerensen, B.F.; Hansen, N. [eds.

    2000-04-01

    Selected activities of the Materials Research Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 1999 are described. The scientific work is presented in three chapters: Materials Science, Materials Engineering and Materials Technology. A survey is given of the Department's participation in collaboration with national and international industries and research institutions and of its actitivities within education and training. Furthermore, the main figures outlining the funding and expenditures of the Department are given. Lists of staff members, visiting scientists, publications and other Department activities are included. (au)

  7. Assessing the Value of Rural California High School Career Technical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morehead, Coleen Louise

    2015-01-01

    While empirical studies on rural education have defined many of the socioeconomic factors associated with rural students nationally, there is a lack of definitive and comprehensive research defining the benefit or value of career technical education for rural California high school students. Consequently, this lack of research may in turn…

  8. Broadband Communications for Rural Development? Yes -- But We Will Need a Marketing Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    Widespread provision of non-entertainment services by way of telecommunications can have a significant impact on rural growth and public services and on rural-urban migration patterns if the mix of these services and the places where they are to be introduced are chosen within the context of a national rural policy, and if local residents perceive…

  9. Assessing the Value of Rural California High School Career Technical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morehead, Coleen Louise

    2015-01-01

    While empirical studies on rural education have defined many of the socioeconomic factors associated with rural students nationally, there is a lack of definitive and comprehensive research defining the benefit or value of career technical education for rural California high school students. Consequently, this lack of research may in turn…

  10. The 2000 Census and Growth Patterns in Rural America. The Main Street Economist: Commentary on the Rural Economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheaff, Katharine

    The 2000 Census reveals four patterns of change in rural America. Rural areas in states such as Florida and Arizona are gaining population due to high retiree growth. These areas will experience growth in service sector jobs that have low pay and low educational requirements. Florida and Arizona trail the nation in high school and college…

  11. Working Together to Make a Difference in Rural America: North Central Regional Center for Rural Development, 2010 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    North Central Regional Center for Rural Development, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The North Central Regional Center for Rural Development (NCRCRD) is one of four regional centers in the United States that have worked to improve the quality of life in rural communities for nearly 40 years. With funding from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture and the land-grant universities in our 12-state region, the NCRCRD…

  12. Rural Education Issues: Rural Administrators Speak Out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Julia; Nierengarten, Gerry

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the issues that most affect Minnesota's rural public school administrators as they attempt to fulfill the mandates required from state legislation and communities. A second purpose was to identify exemplary practices valued by individual Minnesota rural schools and districts. Electronic surveys were sent…

  13. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Calendar Year 2000 Groundwater Monitoring Data Evaluation Report for the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2001-09-01

    This report presents an evaluation of the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained during calendar year (CY) 2000 from sampling locations in the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Chestnut Ridge Regime encompasses several hazardous and nonhazardous waste management facilities associated with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) southeast of Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Figure A.1). Prepared by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP), this monitoring data evaluation report addresses applicable provisions of DOE Order 5400.1 -- General Environmental Protection Program -- that require: (1) an evaluation of the quantity and quality of groundwater in areas that are, or could be, impacted by Y-12 operations, (2) an evaluation of the quality of surface water and groundwater where contaminants from Y-12 facilities are most likely to migrate beyond the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) property line, and (3) an evaluation of long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12. The following sections of this report contain relevant background information (Section 2.0); describe the results of the respective data evaluations required under DOE Order 5400.1 (Section 3.0); summarize significant findings of each evaluation (Section 4.0); and list the technical reports and regulatory documents cited for more detailed information (Section 5.0). Illustrations (maps and trend graphs) and data summary tables referenced in each section are presented in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively.

  14. A brief history of Sandia National Laboratories and the Department of Energy%3CU%2B2019%3Es Office of Science : interplay between science, technology, and mission.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsao, Jeffrey Yeenien; Myers, Samuel Maxwell, Jr.; Simmons, Jerry Alvon; McIlroy, Andrew; Vook, Frederick L.; Collis, Samuel Scott; Picraux, Samuel Thomas

    2011-08-01

    In 1957, Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) initiated its first programs in fundamental science, in support of its primary nuclear weapons mission. In 1974, Sandia initiated programs in fundamental science supported by the Department of Energy's Office of Science (DOE-SC). These latter programs have grown to the point where, today in 2011, support of Sandia's programs in fundamental science is dominated by that Office. In comparison with Sandia's programs in technology and mission applications, however, Sandia's programs in fundamental science are small. Hence, Sandia's fundamental science has been strongly influenced by close interactions with technology and mission applications. In many instances, these interactions have been of great mutual benefit, with synergies akin to a positive 'Casimir's spiral' of progress. In this report, we review the history of Sandia's fundamental science programs supported by the Office of Science. We present: (a) a technical and budgetary snapshot of Sandia's current programs supported by the various suboffices within DOE-SC; (b) statistics of highly-cited articles supported by DOE-SC; (c) four case studies (ion-solid interactions, combustion science, compound semiconductors, advanced computing) with an emphasis on mutually beneficial interactions between science, technology, and mission; and (d) appendices with key memos and reminiscences related to fundamental science at Sandia.

  15. A comparison of dose and dose-rate conversion factors from the Soviet Union, United Kingdom, US Department of Energy, and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Fusion Safety Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rood, A.S.; Abbott, M.L.

    1991-12-01

    Several independent data sets of radiological dose and dose-rate conversion factors (DCF/DRCF) have been tabulated or developed by the international community both for fission and fusion safety purposes. This report compares sets from the US Department of Energy, the Soviet Union, and the United Kingdom with those calculated by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Fusion Safety Program. The objectives were to identify trends and potential outlying values for specific radionuclides and contribute to a future benchmark evaluation of the CARR computer code. Fifty-year committed effective dose equivalent factors were compared for the inhalation and ingestion pathways. External effective dose equivalent rates were compared for the air immersion and ground surface exposure pathways. Comparisons were made by dividing dose factors in the different data bases by the values in the FSP data base. Differences in DCF/DRCF values less than a factor of 2 were considered to be in good agreement and are likely due to the use of slightly different decay data, variations in the number of organs considered for calculating CEDE, and rounding errors. DCF/DRCF values that differed by greater than a factor of 10 were considered to be significant. These differences are attributed primarily to the use of different radionuclide decay data, selection and nomenclature for different isomeric states, treatment of progeny radionuclides, differences in calculational methodology, and assumptions on a radionuclide`s chemical form.

  16. A comparison of dose and dose-rate conversion factors from the Soviet Union, United Kingdom, US Department of Energy, and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Fusion Safety Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rood, A.S.; Abbott, M.L.

    1991-12-01

    Several independent data sets of radiological dose and dose-rate conversion factors (DCF/DRCF) have been tabulated or developed by the international community both for fission and fusion safety purposes. This report compares sets from the US Department of Energy, the Soviet Union, and the United Kingdom with those calculated by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Fusion Safety Program. The objectives were to identify trends and potential outlying values for specific radionuclides and contribute to a future benchmark evaluation of the CARR computer code. Fifty-year committed effective dose equivalent factors were compared for the inhalation and ingestion pathways. External effective dose equivalent rates were compared for the air immersion and ground surface exposure pathways. Comparisons were made by dividing dose factors in the different data bases by the values in the FSP data base. Differences in DCF/DRCF values less than a factor of 2 were considered to be in good agreement and are likely due to the use of slightly different decay data, variations in the number of organs considered for calculating CEDE, and rounding errors. DCF/DRCF values that differed by greater than a factor of 10 were considered to be significant. These differences are attributed primarily to the use of different radionuclide decay data, selection and nomenclature for different isomeric states, treatment of progeny radionuclides, differences in calculational methodology, and assumptions on a radionuclide's chemical form.

  17. Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1, Appendix C, Savannah River Site Spent Nuclear Fuel Mangement Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is engaged in two related decision making processes concerning: (1) the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the DOE Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) which will focus on the next 10 years; and (2) programmatic decisions on future spent nuclear fuel management which will emphasize the next 40 years. DOE is analyzing the environmental consequences of these spent nuclear fuel management actions in this two-volume Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Volume 1 supports broad programmatic decisions that will have applicability across the DOE complex and describes in detail the purpose and need for this DOE action. Volume 2 is specific to actions at the INEL. This document, which limits its discussion to the Savannah River Site (SRS) spent nuclear fuel management program, supports Volume 1 of the EIS. Following the introduction, Chapter 2 contains background information related to the SRS and the framework of environmental regulations pertinent to spent nuclear fuel management. Chapter 3 identifies spent nuclear fuel management alternatives that DOE could implement at the SRS, and summarizes their potential environmental consequences. Chapter 4 describes the existing environmental resources of the SRS that spent nuclear fuel activities could affect. Chapter 5 analyzes in detail the environmental consequences of each spent nuclear fuel management alternative and describes cumulative impacts. The chapter also contains information on unavoidable adverse impacts, commitment of resources, short-term use of the environment and mitigation measures.

  18. Medicare and Rural Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1.9 million rural beneficiaries participated in Medicare Advantage (MA) and other prepaid plans, accounting for 13.4% of MA enrollees. While rural participation is not proportionate to urban participation, strong rural enrollment in ... Medicare Advantage – The ACA reduces the payments to companies providing ...

  19. Historic Sites and National Register of Historic Places, National Register of Historic Places - NRHP is a list of properties identified by the Federal Government as significant in American history and culture. These properties include districts, buildings, sites and objects of significance to the nation, etc., Published in 2007, 1:24000 (1in=2000ft) scale, Maryland Department of Planning.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC State | GIS Inventory — Historic Sites and National Register of Historic Places dataset current as of 2007. National Register of Historic Places - NRHP is a list of properties identified by...

  20. Rural placements in Tasmania: do experiential placements and background influence undergraduate health science student's attitudes toward rural practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Lisa M; Routley, Georgina K; Peek, Karla J

    2008-01-01

    Each year growing numbers of undergraduate health science students, from a variety of disciplines, participate in a University of Tasmania Department of Rural Health supported rural placement program in Tasmania. This study aimed to investigate the influence rural placement and rural background had on students' intentions to live and work in a rural or remote location after graduation. Between January 2005 and December 2006, 336 students participated in the placement program. Students were requested to complete a survey at the completion of their placement. A response rate of 239 was achieved (71%). The survey measured students' stated rural career intentions and rural background status according to location of primary and secondary school attendance. A demographic analysis of respondents was undertaken and results cross tabulated according to the rural, remote and metropolitan area (RRMA) classification system. Statistical analyses, including paired t-tests and a Wilcoxon signed rank test, were conducted to compare reported mean intention to practise rurally both prior to and after placement. The results from this survey show that rural placements in the undergraduate health science programs have a predominantly positive influence on students' intention to work in a rural community post-graduation. While these findings were significant for the disciplines of nursing, medicine and allied health, the results were not significant for pharmacy students. Students' average intention to practise rurally significantly increased after the placement for students from RRMA classifications 1 and 3-5. The value of rural placements as a method for increasing health science students' intentionality to take up rural practice as a positive and viable career option is considerable.

  1. Problems and Recommendations for Rural Statistics and Survey Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengjun; ZHANG

    2014-01-01

    With constant deepening of the reform and opening-up,national economic system has changed from planned economy to market economy,and rural survey and statistics remain in a difficult transition period. In this period,China needs transforming original statistical mode according to market economic system. All levels of government should report and submit a lot and increasing statistical information. Besides,in this period,townships,villages and counties are faced with old and new conflicts. These conflicts perplex implementation of rural statistics and survey and development of rural statistical undertaking,and also cause researches and thinking of reform of rural statistical and survey methods.

  2. Developing district health systems in the rural Transvaal Issues ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Developing district health systems in the rural Transvaal Issues arising from the ... as a foundation for national health services based on primary health care. ... Close attention needs to be given to districtlevel health management, the ...

  3. RURAL TOURISM IN ROMANIA - A MARKETING PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrică ŞTEFAN

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of national tourist brand is one of the priorities of the Ministry of Regional Development and Tourism. The project on branding Romania is EU-funded, within the Regional Operational Program (ROP 2007-2013. Out of the different evaluation point of views - qualitative research in source markets and domestic market, project's team opinions, branding project research on the attractiveness / competitiveness, 6 tourism key product of Romanian tourism have been identified, one of them beeing Countryside &Rural Tourism. The paper aimed to present an analysis of the Countryside and rural tourism from a marketing perspective bearing in mind that, in order to reach the target set by the Romanian National Tourism Development Masterplan 2007-2026, of increasing the number of visitors at 9,7 milion in 2016, a marketing plan will be implemented. The average yearly growth of the arrivals number for the countryside and rural sector for 2011-2015 will be 25%.

  4. An Investigation into the Mental Health of the Rural Primary School Students of the Mulao Nationality%仫佬族农村小学生心理健康状况调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘雪珍

    2011-01-01

    The research aims to find out the mental health status of the rural primary school students of the Mulao nationality.By using the "Mental Health Test(MHT)",a questionnaire investigation was launched into 431 rural primary school students of the Mulao Nationality in Luocheng Mulao Autonomous County.The result shows that the positive ratio of mental health problems of these students is 0.5%,and 59.2% of the students have problems in at least one dimension of the eight sub-scales.The mental health problems of girl students are more than those of boy students;the problems of the children in single-parent families are more than those in normal families;and the problems of home-left children are more than those of the children staying with their parents; these differences have statistical significance(p0.05);the problem prevalence of Grade Four is the lowest,Grade Five comes next,and Grade Six is the highest.All these indicate that in view of the current mental health status of these children,schools,families and society should pay special attention to the mental health problems of girl students,children in single-parent families and home-left children.%调查的主要目的是了解罗城仫佬族农村小学生心理健康状况;采用的方法是用《心理健康诊断测验》对罗城仫佬族自治县431名仫佬族农村小学生进行问卷调查。分析其结果如下:仫佬族农村小学生心理健康问题的阳性检出率为0.5%,八个分量表中至少有一项呈阳性的检出率为59.2%;心理健康问题女生高于男生,单亲儿童高于非单亲儿童,留守儿童高于非留守儿童,差异具有统计学意义(P﹤0.05);4年级问题检出率最低,5年级其次,6年级最高。这些结论表明,仫佬族农村小学生心理健康状况不容乐观,学校、家庭、社会应特别关注女生、单亲家庭儿童与留守儿童的心理健康教育。

  5. National Emergency Communications Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Integration Center’s ( NIC ) Incident Management Systems Integration Division (IMSID) promotes plain- language standards and associated guidance. o Within...and Command and Control Centers Coordination Centers Lead Agency Supporting/Participating Departments and Agencies National Operations Center ( NOC ...National Guard Bureau NGO Nongovernmental Organization NIC National Integration Center NIEM National Information Exchange Model National Emergency

  6. Chinese rural reform:experience,problems and the future

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩俊

    2009-01-01

    Chinese rural reform has made great achievements and accumulated a wealth of experience since the beginning of reform and opening up 30 years ago.At the core is the rapid and sustained development of the national economy.Currently,there are obstacles in rural reform;for example,the supply and demand of primary products are frequently out of balance,shortages of rural labor occur thanks to structural problems on the supply side,and the equality system between rural and urban citizens has yet to be established.Therefore,to make important breakthroughs,we must change our ideas of controlling the food market;we must improve rural land policy, loosen rural financial supervision,adjust the fiscal expense structure,protect farmers’ legal rights and interests,accelerate the building-up of democracy at the grassroots level,and intensify overall planning and coordination.

  7. Priorities in Investment Decisions for Rural Development in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Popa

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Romania joined the European Union- EU -in 2007, as an emerging economy and rural by excellence and this feature is keeping even in 2012. Difficulty in establishing investment priorities for rural development in Romania is caused by the large size and fragility of the rural area and the fact that all inputs have an inadequate level. The objectives of rural development are strongly influenced by national policy and European policy of the European Union, but also by the politics of international organizations (World Bank Group-WBG, Food and Agriculture Organization-FAO. Investment for climate changes and for infrastructure is strongly correlated and is vital in all states, including Romania. The six EU Priorities for rural development in the period 2014-2020 are also considering priorities for increasing education level and social inclusion in the rural areas, which are other pressing needs in Romania in order to move to a modern agriculture.

  8. Calendar Year 2007 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Annual Monitoring Report for the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee - RCRA Post-Closure Permit Nos. TNHW-113, TNHW-116, and TNHW-128

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elvado Environmental

    2008-02-01

    This report contains groundwater quality monitoring data obtained during calendar year (CY) 2007 at the following hazardous waste treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) units located at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; this S-3 Site, Oil Landfarm, Bear Creek Burial Grounds/Walk-In Pits (BCBG/WIP), Eastern S-3 Site Plume, Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (CRSP), Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Baste (CRSDB), few Hollow Quarry (KHQ), and East Chestnut Ridge Waste Pile (ECRWP). Hit monitoring data were obtained in accordance with the applicable Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) hazardous waste post-closure permit (PCP). The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) - Division of Solid Waste Management issued the PCPs to define the requirements for RCRA post-closure inspection, maintenance, and groundwater monitoring at the specified TSD units located within the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (PCP no. TNHW-116), Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (PCP no. TNHW-113), and Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (PCP no. TNHW-128). Each PCP requires the Submittal of an annual RCRA groundwater monitoring report containing the groundwater sampling information and analytical results obtained at each applicable TSD unit during the preceding CY, along with an evaluation of groundwater low rates and directions and the analytical results for specified RCRA groundwater target compounds; this report is the RCRA annual groundwater monitoring report for CY 2007. The RCRA post-closure groundwater monitoring requirements specified in the above-referenced PCP for the Chestnut Ridge Regime replace those defined in the previous PCP (permit no. TNHW-088), which expired on September 18, 2005, but remained effective until the TDEC issued the new PCP in September 2006. The new PCP defines site-specific groundwater sampling and analysis requirements for the

  9. Enabling department-scale supercomputing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberg, D.S.; Hart, W.E.; Phillips, C.A.

    1997-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories have one of the longest and most consistent histories of supercomputer use. The authors summarize the architecture of DOE`s new supercomputers that are being built for the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI). The authors then argue that in the near future scaled-down versions of these supercomputers with petaflop-per-weekend capabilities could become widely available to hundreds of research and engineering departments. The availability of such computational resources will allow simulation of physical phenomena to become a full-fledged third branch of scientific exploration, along with theory and experimentation. They describe the ASCI and other supercomputer applications at Sandia National Laboratories, and discuss which lessons learned from Sandia`s long history of supercomputing can be applied in this new setting.

  10. Rural Entrepreneurship or Entrepreneurship in the Rural

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsgaard, Steffen; Müller, Sabine; Tanvig, Hanne Wittorff

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This article investigates how rural entrepreneurship engages with place and space. It explores the concept of “rural” in rural enterprise, and illustrates the importance of distinguishing between types of rural entrepreneurship. Design/methodology/approach: The constructs of “place” and ...... these processes are enabled and constrained by the immediate context or “place”. The paper weaves space and place in order to show the importance of context for entrepreneurship, which responds to the recent calls for contextualizing entrepreneurship research and theories....

  11. Rural-urban migration in the USSR: problems and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaslavskaya, T I; Korel, L V

    1984-01-01

    Rural-urban migration in the USSR is a cause of social and economic underdevelopment of rural areas, partially a result of the accelerated growth in industry during the 1930s and 1940s that created labor opportunities for the rural populations. From 1927 to 1979 almost 71% of the present population of the USSR moved from farms to cities. The 3 main time spans that characterize these population movements are: 1) the pre-war period, when national industrialization called for labor; 2) the post-war period, which experienced the highest rates of cityward movement due to the hard economic agricultural situation; and 3) the 1960s and 1970s, characterized by a steady, moderately average rate of rural population decline due to a 14% migration rate. Since the early 1970s, policies aimed at preventing this excessive rural exodus, by reducing rural-urban discrepancies and creating compatible rural living conditions with urban ones, have been initiated. To study the inadequacies of rural life that cause rural-urban migration, rural communities were surveyed to determine what types of services are considered disirable and lacking in rural areas. Rural advantages reported are: nearness to nature, peaceful life, opportunity to keep privately formed plots, and the love of farm work, in that descending order. Socioeconomic improvement is needed, and priorities for rural social development should be: 1) close the farm industrial gap in job interest and working conditions; 2) improve educational opportunities for rural youth; 3) provide assistance to private farming; and 4) give more attention to morale in productions teams. The impact of urbanization on rural-urban migration create anticipation of certain changes: 1) spatial mobility of rural populations will grow; 2) the rural-urban exchange will become more equivalent; and 3) social homogeneity of rural and urban societies will increase. however, in order to maintain these favourable shifts in migration trends, it is necessary to

  12. Urban-Rural Flows of Physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricketts, Thomas C.; Randolph, Randy

    2007-01-01

    Context: Physician supply is anticipated to fall short of national requirements over the next 20 years. Rural areas are likely to lose relatively more physicians. Policy makers must know how to anticipate what changes in distribution are likely to happen to better target policies. Purpose: To determine whether there was a significant flow of…

  13. Light for rural regions; Licht aufs Land

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlin, John [California Univ., Santa Barbara (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2010-07-01

    The history of solar power: Kenia is the first state in which more of the inhabitants use solar power than the national electricity grid. The 13th instalment of the series based on John Perlin's book ''From Space to Earth'' shows how solar power reached the rural regions of developing countries. (orig.)

  14. Evaluation of Training Programs for Rural Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indira, A.

    2008-01-01

    An Evaluation of the "Impact Assessment of the Training Programs" of a National Level Training Institution in India was conducted using the Kirkpatrick Method (KP Method). The studied Institution takes up research, provides training, offers consultancy and initiates action in the rural sector of India. The evaluation study used a…

  15. Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Calendar Year 2000 Groundwater Monitoring Data Evaluation Report for the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2001-09-01

    This report presents an evaluation of the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained during calendar year (CY) 2000 in the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime). The Bear Creek Regime encompasses many confirmed and potential sources of groundwater and surface water contamination associated with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Figure A.1). Prepared by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP), this report addresses applicable provisions of DOE Order 5400.1 (General Environmental Protection Program) that require: (1) an evaluation of the quantity and quality of groundwater and surface water in areas that are, or could be, affected by Y-12 operations, (2) an evaluation of groundwater and surface water quality in areas where contaminants from Y-12 operations are most likely to migrate beyond the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) property line, and (3) an evaluation of long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12. The following sections of this report contain relevant background information (Section 2.0); describe the results of the respective data evaluations required under DOE Order 5400.1 (Section 3.0); summarize significant findings of each evaluation (Section 4.0); and list the technical reports and regulatory documents cited for more detailed information (Section 5.0). Illustrations (maps and trend graphs) are presented in Appendix A. Brief data summary tables referenced in each section are contained within the sections. Supplemental information and extensive data tables are provided in Appendix B.

  16. System Analysis Department. Annual Report 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duijm, N.J.; Jensen, E.; Larsen, H.; Skipper, S. (eds.)

    2002-04-01

    This report describes the work of the Systems Analysis Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 2001. The department is undertaking research within Energy Systems Analysis, Energy, Environment and Development Planning - UNEP Centre, Safety, Reliability and Human Factors, and Technology Scenarios. The report includes summary statistics and lists of publications, committees and staff members. (au)

  17. Systems Analysis Department. Annual Report 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duijm, N.J.; Jensen, E.; Larsen, H.; Olsson, C.

    2001-05-01

    This report describes the work of the Systems Analysis Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 2000. The department is undertaking research within Energy Systems Analysis, Energy, Environment and Development Planning - UNEP Centre, Safety, Reliability and Human Factors, and Technology Scenarios. The report includes summary statistics and lists of publications, committees and staff members. (au)

  18. Systems Analysis department. Annual progress report 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Hans; Olsson, Charlotte; Petersen, Kurt E.

    1998-03-01

    The report describes the work of the Systems Analysis Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 1997. The department is undertaking research within Energy systems Analysis, Integrated Energy, Environment and Development Planning - UNEP Centre, Industrial Safety and Reliability and Man/Machine Interaction. The report includes lists of publications lectures, committees and staff members. (au) 110 refs.

  19. Systems Analysis Department. Annual Report 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, H.; Olsson, C. (eds.)

    2004-04-01

    This report describes the work of the Systems Analysis Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 2003. The department is undertaking research within Energy Systems Analysis, Energy, Environment and Development Planning UNEP Centre, Safety, Reliability and Human Factors, and Technology Scenarios. The report includes summary statistics and list of staff members. (au)

  20. Systems Analysis Department. Annual progress report 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, H.; Olsson, C.; Petersen, K.E. [eds.

    1997-03-01

    The report describes the work of the Systems Analysis Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 1996. The department is undertaking research within Simulation and Optimisation of Energy Systems, Energy and Environment in Developing Countries - UNEP Centre, Integrated Environmental and Risk Management and Man/Machine Interaction. The report includes lists of publications, lectures, committees and staff members. (au) 131 refs.