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Sample records for dentures prosthetic devices

  1. Prosthetic stomatitis with removable dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozalieva Yu.Yu.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The Research Objective: To study patients with prosthetic stomatitis, who use the removable laminar dentures. Materials: The consultations and treatment of 79 patients aged 47-65 years have been conducted. The patients have been divided into two clinical groups. The first clinical group (39 persons with the performance of immediate prosthet-ics; the second control clinical group (40 persons — the permanent dentures were produced without the preliminary instruction. Results: All the patients, having the laminar dentures without the preliminary use of immediate constructions of dentures, in spite of repeated correction of them, have had changes of dentures and transitory fold. Patients have been exposed to prosthetic stomatitis of different etiology (without trauma; the single-shot or multiple correction of dentures by the method of rebasing with using of cold cure plastics has been made. Conclusion: Structural and functional changes of dentition during the prosthetic stomatitis lead to disorders, associated by the mucositis. Use of the term of «prosthetic stomatitis» reflects etiological and pathogenetic component of changes in the denture-supporting tissues

  2. Carbon based prosthetic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devlin, D.J.; Carroll, D.W.; Barbero, R.S.; Archuleta, T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US); Klawitter, J.J.; Ogilvie, W.; Strzepa, P. [Ascension Orthopedics (US); Cook, S.D. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (US). School of Medicine

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objective was to evaluate the use of carbon/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites for use in endoprosthetic devices. The application of these materials for the metacarpophalangeal (MP) joints of the hand was investigated. Issues concerning mechanical properties, bone fixation, biocompatibility, and wear are discussed. A system consisting of fiber reinforced materials with a pyrolytic carbon matrix and diamond-like, carbon-coated wear surfaces was developed. Processes were developed for the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) of pyrolytic carbon into porous fiber preforms with the ability to tailor the outer porosity of the device to provide a surface for bone in-growth. A method for coating diamond-like carbon (DLC) on the articulating surface by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was developed. Preliminary results on mechanical properties of the composite system are discussed and initial biocompatibility studies were performed.

  3. 21 CFR 872.3600 - Partially fabricated denture kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3600 Partially fabricated denture kit. (a... mold, by partially polymerizing the resin denture base materials while the materials are in...

  4. Toxicology of antimicrobial nanoparticles for prosthetic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuñez-Anita, Rosa Elvira; Acosta-Torres, Laura Susana; Vilar-Pineda, Jorge; Martínez-Espinosa, Juan Carlos; de la Fuente-Hernández, Javier; Castaño, Víctor Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Advances in nanotechnology are producing an accelerated proliferation of new nanomaterial composites that are likely to become an important source of engineered health-related products. Nanoparticles with antifungal effects are of great interest in the formulation of microbicidal materials. Fungi are found as innocuous commensals and colonize various habitats in and on humans, especially the skin and mucosa. As growth on surfaces is a natural part of the Candida spp. lifestyle, one can expect that Candida organisms colonize prosthetic devices, such as dentures. Macromolecular systems, due to their properties, allow efficient use of these materials in various fields, including the creation of reinforced nanoparticle polymers with antimicrobial activity. This review briefly summarizes the results of studies conducted during the past decade and especially in the last few years focused on the toxicity of different antimicrobial polymers and factors influencing their activities, as well as the main applications of antimicrobial polymers in dentistry. The present study addresses aspects that are often overlooked in nanotoxicology studies, such as careful time-dependent characterization of agglomeration and ion release. PMID:25187703

  5. 21 CFR 872.3760 - Denture relining, repairing, or rebasing resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3760 Denture relining... device composed of materials such as methylmethacrylate, intended to reline a denture surface that contacts tissue, to repair a fractured denture, or to form a new denture base. This device is not...

  6. Toxicology of antimicrobial nanoparticlesfor prosthetic devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuñez-Anita RE

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Rosa Elvira Nuñez-Anita,1 Laura Susana Acosta-Torres,2 Jorge Vilar-Pineda,2 Juan Carlos Martínez-Espinosa,3 Javier de la Fuente-Hernández, 2 Víctor Manuel Castaño4 1Facultad de Medicina Veterinariay Zootecnia, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Tarìmbaro Municipio de Morelia, Michoacán, México; 2Escuela Nacionalde Estudios Superiores, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Unidad León, Leòn Guanajuato, México; 3Unidad Profesional Interdisciplinaria de Ingenieria Campus Guanajuato, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Leòn Guanajuato, México; 4Departamento de Materiales Moleculares, Centro de Física Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Campus Juriquilla, Querètaro, México Abstract: Advances in nanotechnology are producing an accelerated proliferation of new nanomaterial composites that are likely to become an important source of engineered health-related products. Nanoparticles with antifungal effects are of great interest in the formulation of microbicidal materials. Fungi are found as innocuous commensals and colonize various habitats in and on humans, especially the skin and mucosa. As growth on surfaces is a natural part of the Candida spp. lifestyle, one can expect that Candida organisms colonize prosthetic devices, such as dentures. Macromolecular systems, due to their properties, allow efficient use of these materials in various fields, including the creation of reinforced nanoparticle polymers with antimicrobial activity. This review briefly summarizes the results of studies conducted during the past decade and especially in the last few years focused on the toxicity of different antimicrobial polymers and factors influencing their activities, as well as the main applications of antimicrobial polymers in dentistry. The present study addresses aspects that are often overlooked in nanotoxicology studies, such as careful time-dependent characterization of agglomeration

  7. 21 CFR 872.3520 - OTC denture cleanser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3520 OTC denture cleanser. (a) Identification. An OTC denture cleanser is a device that consists of material in the form of a powder, tablet, or paste that is intended to remove debris from removable prosthetic dental appliances, such as bridges...

  8. 21 CFR 872.3570 - OTC denture repair kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false OTC denture repair kit. 872.3570 Section 872.3570...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3570 OTC denture repair kit. (a) Identification. An OTC denture repair kit is a device consisting of a material, such as a resin monomer system...

  9. 21 CFR 872.3300 - Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures. 872.3300... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3300 Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures. (a) Identification. A hydrophilic resin coating for dentures is a device that consists of a...

  10. The effectiveness of chemical denture cleansers and ultrasonic device in biofilm removal from complete dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Patrícia Costa; Andrade, Ingrid Machado de; Peracini, Amanda; Souza-Gugelmin, Maria Cristina Monteiro de; Silva-Lovato, Cláudia Helena; de Souza, Raphael Freitas; Paranhos, Helena de Freitas Oliveira

    2011-01-01

    Adequate denture hygiene can prevent and treat infection in edentulous patients. They are usually elderly and have difficulty for brushing their teeth. This study evaluated the efficacy of complete denture biofilm removal using chemical (alkaline peroxide-effervescent tablets), mechanical (ultrasonic) and combined (association of the effervescent and ultrasonic) methods. Eighty complete denture wearers participated in the experiment for 21 days. They were distributed into 4 groups (n=20): (1) Brushing with water (Control); (2) Effervescent tablets (Corega Tabs); (3) Ultrasonic device (Ultrasonic Cleaner, model 2840 D); (4) Association of effervescent tablets and ultrasonic device. All groups brushed their dentures with a specific brush (Bitufo) and water, 3 times a day, before applying their treatments. Denture biofilm was collected at baseline and after 21 days. To quantify the biofilm, the internal surfaces of the maxillary complete dentures were stained and photographed at 45º. The photographs were processed and the areas (total internal surface stained with biofilm) quantified (Image Tool 2.02). The percentage of the biofilm was calculated by the ratio between the biofilm area multiplied by 100 and the total area of the internal surface of the maxillary complete denture. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used for comparison among groups followed by the Dunn multiple-comparison test. All tests were performed respecting a significance level of 0.05. Significant difference was found among the treatments (KW=21.18; Pcomplete dentures.

  11. Cortical control for prosthetic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Andrew B.; Kipke, D. W.; Perepelkin, P. D.

    1996-05-01

    The work presented in this session is part of a project to develop an arm-control system based on neuronal activity recorded from the cerebral cortex. This will make it possible for amputees or paralyzed individuals to move a prosthetic arm or, using functional neural stimulation, their own limbs as effortlessly and with as much skill as intact individuals. We are developing and testing this system in monkeys and hope to have a prototype working in the next couple of years. This project has been made more feasible because we have been able, in the last 15 years to extract, from the brain, a signal that represents arm trajectory accurately. In this paper, we describe how this technique was developed and how we use this as the basis for our control signal. An alternative approach using a self-organizing feature map, an algorithm to deduce arm configuration given an endpoint trajectory and the development of a telemetry system to transmit the neuronal data is described in subsequent papers.

  12. The effectiveness of chemical denture cleansers and ultrasonic device in biofilm removal from complete dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Costa Cruz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Adequate denture hygiene can prevent and treat infection in edentulous patients. They are usually elderly and have difficulty for brushing their teeth. OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the efficacy of complete denture biofilm removal using chemical (alkaline peroxide-effervescent tablets, mechanical (ultrasonic and combined (association of the effervescent and ultrasonic methods. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eighty complete denture wearers participated in the experiment for 21 days. They were distributed into 4 groups (n=20: (1 Brushing with water (Control; (2 Effervescent tablets (Corega Tabs; (3 Ultrasonic device (Ultrasonic Cleaner, model 2840 D; (4 Association of effervescent tablets and ultrasonic device. All groups brushed their dentures with a specific brush (Bitufo and water, 3 times a day, before applying their treatments. Denture biofilm was collected at baseline and after 21 days. To quantify the biofilm, the internal surfaces of the maxillary complete dentures were stained and photographed at 45º. The photographs were processed and the areas (total internal surface stained with biofilm quantified (Image Tool 2.02. The percentage of the biofilm was calculated by the ratio between the biofilm area multiplied by 100 and the total area of the internal surface of the maxillary complete denture. RESULTS: The Kruskal-Wallis test was used for comparison among groups followed by the Dunn multiple-comparison test. All tests were performed respecting a significance level of 0.05. Significant difference was found among the treatments (KW=21.18; P<0.001, the mean ranks for the treatments and results for Dunn multiple comparison test were: Control (60.9; Chemical (37.2; Mechanical (35.2 and Combined (29.1. CONCLUSION: The experimental methods were equally effective regarding the ability to remove biofilm and were superior to the control method (brushing with water. Immersion in alkaline peroxide and ultrasonic vibration can be used as auxiliary agents

  13. 21 CFR 872.3540 - OTC denture cushion or pad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3540 OTC denture cushion or pad. (a...-counter. (b) Classification. (1) Class I if the device is made of wax-impregnated cotton cloth that the... denture cushion or pad is made of a material other than wax-impregnated cotton cloth or if the...

  14. An extremely lightweight fingernail worn prosthetic interface device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetkin, Oguz; Ahluwalia, Simranjit; Silva, Dinithi; Kasi-Okonye, Isioma; Volker, Rachael; Baptist, Joshua R.; Popa, Dan O.

    2016-05-01

    Upper limb prosthetics are currently operated using several electromyography sensors mounted on an amputee's residual limb. In order for any prosthetic driving interface to be widely adopted, it needs to be responsive, lightweight, and out of the way when not being used. In this paper we discuss the possibility of replacing such electrodes with fingernail optical sensor systems mounted on the sound limb. We present a prototype device that can detect pinch gestures and communicate with the prosthetic system. The device detects the relative position of fingers to each other by measuring light transmitted via tissue. Applications are not limited to prosthetic control, but can be extended to other human-machine interfaces.

  15. Which mesh or graft? Prosthetic devices for abdominal wall reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid, Shazia; El-Hayek, Kevin

    2016-03-01

    This article reviews the ever-increasing number of prosthetic devices--both synthetic mesh and biologic grafts--now in use for abdominal wall reconstruction. It also introduces a novel hybrid synthetic/biologic graft (Zenapro) and suture passer device (Novapass).

  16. Real-time decision fusion for multimodal neural prosthetic devices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Robert White

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The field of neural prosthetics aims to develop prosthetic limbs with a brain-computer interface (BCI through which neural activity is decoded into movements. A natural extension of current research is the incorporation of neural activity from multiple modalities to more accurately estimate the user's intent. The challenge remains how to appropriately combine this information in real-time for a neural prosthetic device. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we propose a framework based on decision fusion, i.e., fusing predictions from several single-modality decoders to produce a more accurate device state estimate. We examine two algorithms for continuous variable decision fusion: the Kalman filter and artificial neural networks (ANNs. Using simulated cortical neural spike signals, we implemented several successful individual neural decoding algorithms, and tested the capabilities of each fusion method in the context of decoding 2-dimensional endpoint trajectories of a neural prosthetic arm. Extensively testing these methods on random trajectories, we find that on average both the Kalman filter and ANNs successfully fuse the individual decoder estimates to produce more accurate predictions. CONCLUSIONS: Our results reveal that a fusion-based approach has the potential to improve prediction accuracy over individual decoders of varying quality, and we hope that this work will encourage multimodal neural prosthetics experiments in the future.

  17. PATIENT SATISFACTION WITH ORTHOPEDIC AND PROSTHETIC MEDICAL DEVICES

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    Ivona Malovecká

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Collecting information about patient satisfaction with orthopedic and prosthetic medical devices in terms of utility, tolerance, and compliance is essential for verifying and improving the quality of these devices. In addition, such information is useful for improving the patients’ quality of life, and the quality management systems of health care providers. This study assessed patient satisfaction with these devices from a sample of patients with orthopedic, neurologic, and rheumatic diseases at the Specialized Hospital for Orthopedic Prosthetics and at the premises of the Dispenser of Orthopedic and Prosthetic Medical Devices, both in Bratislava in the Slovak Republic. The assessment involved a translated and validated questionnaire about patient satisfaction with orthopedic and prosthetic medical devices to evaluate key factors of weight, fit, appearance, comfort, pain free, free of abrasiveness, ease of application, and durability of each device. The study samples consisted of patients with lower limb problems (42.5%, spine problems (26.9%, and a combination of leg and spine issues (25.9%. Orthopedic disease occurred in 73.6% of these patients, a combination of orthopedic and neurologic disease in 13.5%, and neurologic disease in 7.3%. Orthopedic insoles (36.3%, hip belts (17.6%, and the corset on the spine (5.2% were the most used devices. Overall, the medical devices rated highly, with a high proportion of patients voting “strongly satisfied” in five of the eight key factors (range 51.8 to 63.2%, followed by a moderately lower proportion for durability (43.5%, comfort (37.3%, and appearance (31.1%. The comfort in wearing the device received the greatest patient dissatisfaction (22.8% of patients, followed by appearance (12.4%, and then fit (7.3%.

  18. Prosthetic rehabilitation with collapsible hybrid acrylic resin and permanent silicone soft liner complete denture of a patient with scleroderma-induced microstomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kunwarjeet; Gupta, Nidhi; Gupta, Ridhimaa; Abrahm, Dex

    2014-07-01

    Scleroderma is an autoimmune multisystem rheumatic condition characterized by fibrosis of connective tissues of the body, resulting in hardening and impairment of the function of different organs. Deposition of collagen fibers in peri-oral tissues causes loss of elasticity and increased tissue stiffness, resulting in restricted mouth opening. A maximal oral opening smaller than the size of a complete denture can make prosthetic treatment challenging. Patients with microstomia who must wear removable dental prostheses (RDPs) often face the difficulty of being unable to insert or remove a conventional RDP. A sectional-collapsible denture is indicated for the prosthetic management of these patients, but reduced manual dexterity often makes intraoral manipulation of the prosthesis difficult. A single collapsible complete denture is a better choice for functional rehabilitation of these patients. This clinical report describes in detail the prosthodontic management of a maxillary edentulous patient with restricted mouth opening induced by scleroderma with a single collapsible removable complete denture fabricated with heat-polymerized silicone soft liner and heat-cured acrylic resin. The preliminary and secondary impressions were made with moldable aluminum trays by using putty and light-body poly(vinyl siloxane) elastomeric impression material. The collapsed denture can be easily inserted and removed by the patient and also provides adequate function in the mouth.

  19. Deep pain sensitivity is correlated with oral-health-related quality of life but not with prosthetic factors in complete denture wearers

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    Yuri Martins COSTA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Low pressure Pain Threshold (PPT is considered a risk factor for Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD and is influenced by psychological variables. Objectives To correlate deep pain sensitivity of masticatory muscles with prosthetic factors and Oral-Health-Related Quality of Life (OHRQoL in completely edentulous subjects. Material and Methods A total of 29 complete denture wearers were recruited. The variables were: a Pressure Pain Threshold (PPT of the masseter and temporalis; b retention, stability, and tooth wear of dentures; c Vertical Dimension of Occlusion (VDO; d Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP adapted to orofacial pain. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, the Pearson Product-Moment correlation coefficient, the Spearman Rank correlation coefficient, the Point-Biserial correlation coefficient, and the Bonferroni correction (α=1% were applied to the data. Results The mean age (standard deviation of the participants was of 70.1 years (9.5 and 82% of them were females. There were no significant correlations with prosthetic factors, but significant negative correlations were found between the OHIP and the PPT of the anterior temporalis (r=-0.50, 95% CI-0.73 to 0.17, p=0.005. Discussion The deep pain sensitivity of masticatory muscles in complete dentures wearers is associated with OHRQoL, but not with prosthetic factors.

  20. Deep pain sensitivity is correlated with oral-health-related quality of life but not with prosthetic factors in complete denture wearers

    Science.gov (United States)

    COSTA, Yuri Martins; PORPORATTI, André Luís; HILGENBERG-SYDNEY, Priscila Brenner; BONJARDIM, Leonardo Rigoldi; CONTI, Paulo César Rodrigues

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Low pressure Pain Threshold (PPT) is considered a risk factor for Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) and is influenced by psychological variables. Objectives To correlate deep pain sensitivity of masticatory muscles with prosthetic factors and Oral-Health-Related Quality of Life (OHRQoL) in completely edentulous subjects. Material and Methods A total of 29 complete denture wearers were recruited. The variables were: a) Pressure Pain Threshold (PPT) of the masseter and temporalis; b) retention, stability, and tooth wear of dentures; c) Vertical Dimension of Occlusion (VDO); d) Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP) adapted to orofacial pain. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, the Pearson Product-Moment correlation coefficient, the Spearman Rank correlation coefficient, the Point-Biserial correlation coefficient, and the Bonferroni correction (α=1%) were applied to the data. Results The mean age (standard deviation) of the participants was of 70.1 years (9.5) and 82% of them were females. There were no significant correlations with prosthetic factors, but significant negative correlations were found between the OHIP and the PPT of the anterior temporalis (r=-0.50, 95% CI-0.73 to 0.17, p=0.005). Discussion The deep pain sensitivity of masticatory muscles in complete dentures wearers is associated with OHRQoL, but not with prosthetic factors. PMID:26814457

  1. NIRS monitoring of muscle contraction to control a prosthetic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Thomas; Zambarbieri, Daniela; Beltrami, Giorgio; Verni, Gennaro

    1999-01-01

    The fitting of upper-extremity amputees requires special efforts, and its significance has been increased by the development of the myoelectrically controlled prosthetic arm. This solution is not free of problems due to the nature of the amputation, to the electromagnetic noise affecting the myelectrical signal and to the perspiration due to the contact between socket and the residual limb. Starting from the fact that NIRS and electromyographic signals are similar during a muscle contraction, we have first studied the NIRS signal during forearm muscle contractions in normal and amputee subjects. Then a new system to interface the NIRS unit and the myoelectrical prosthetic hand has been developed. The NIRS unit has been used as optical sensor and all the operations (I/O and signal processing) are performed via software. This system has been tested on normal and amputee subjects performing hand grasping using a visual biofeedback control scheme. All the subjects have been able to perform these operations demonstrating the NIRS technique. This could represent an alternative solution for controlling a prosthetic device.

  2. Effects of Salivary Oxidative Markers on Edentulous Patients' Satisfaction with Prosthetic Denture Treatments: A Pilot Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Huang Chang

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess relationships among periodontal conditions, salivary antioxidant levels, and patients' satisfaction with their prostheses.This study was conducted at the Division of Prosthodontics, Department of Dentistry, Taipei Medical University Hospital. The periodontal condition of patients was based on an assessment of the plaque index (PI and gingival index (GI. The pH value, flow rate, and buffer capacity of the saliva were estimated. The salivary total antioxidant status (TAS and superoxide dismutase (SOD level were also determined. Patients' satisfaction with prosthetic treatments was evaluated using the Chinese version of the short-form Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14C. A multivariate regression model was used to determine whether patients' satisfaction with prosthetic treatment was affected by their oral health status.In total, 35 edentulous patients were recruited. In the Spearman correlation analysis, salivary pH (r = -0.36, p = 0.03 and the buffer ability (r = -0.48, p<0.01 were associated with OHIP-14C scores. In the multivariate analysis, patients who had a higher GI also had a higher score of physical disabilities (β = 1.38, p = 0.04. Levels of SOD increased with the scores of psychological discomfort (β = 0.33 U/g protein, p = 0.04.This study suggested that both the GI and SOD levels were associated with patients' satisfaction with prosthetic treatments. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to elucidate the relationship between OHIP scores and salivary oxidative markers in edentulous patients.

  3. A new device for blockout procedures in rotational path removable partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, K C; Chen, P S

    1993-05-01

    The rationale of a rotation axis is discussed and on this basis a blockout device is designed for rotational path removable partial dentures. This device has three basic components, which are (1) the acrylic resin block, (2) the rotation axis, and (3) the functional part. In the blockout procedures for removable partial dentures with tilted mandibular molars, the rotation axis of the prosthesis is first localized by the blockout device. A knife edge, made of Duralay resin that corresponds to the survey lines of teeth to be used as supports, is constructed and is joined to the functional part of the blockout device. Blockout regions are determined by the rotational movement of the Duralay resin knife edge along the rotation axis of the blockout device. In addition to the function of blockout, the device can also be used to analyze diagnostic casts for critical undercuts. Internal and external types of blockout devices are also discussed.

  4. Fabricating complete dentures with CAD/CAM technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante, Luis; Yilmaz, Burak; McGlumphy, Edwin; Finger, Israel

    2014-05-01

    Conventional complete denture prosthetics require several appointments to register the maxillomandibular relationship and evaluate the esthetics. The fabrication of milled complete dental prostheses with digital scanning technology may decrease the number of appointments. The step-by-step method necessary to obtain impressions, maxillomandibular relation records, and anterior tooth position with an anatomic measuring device is described. The technique allows the generation of a virtual denture, which is milled to exact specifications without the use of conventional stone casts, flasking, or processing techniques.

  5. Effects of hygiene guidance associated or not to provision of hygiene devices on habits of denture wearers

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    Fernanda Ferruzzi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Appropriate hygiene of dentures contributes to the maintenance of oral and systemic health. However, most of denture wearers had never been instructed on how to perform daily oral/denture care. The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of a guidance material associated or not to the provision of hygiene devices and its effect on the habits of denture wearers. Forty- eight complete denture wearers were randomly divided into three groups. Group N received no guidance on how to clean and wear their dentures, group G received an illustrated leaflet and verbal complementary instructions and group GK received the same guidance as group G and a hygiene kit for denture cleaning. After a six to ten week period they responded to a ‘hygiene and wearing habits’ questionnaire. Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis considering p < 0.05. Brushing was the most frequent cleaning method, the majority of groups N and G used toothpaste. Participants of group G and GK presented low percentages of individuals with hygiene and wearing routine considered improper. The differences between groups in hygiene and wearing routine were statistically significant (p < 0.001. The proposed guidance material yielded better results when associated to provision of hygiene devices for denture cleaning.

  6. Shape Optimization for Additive Manufacturing of Removable Partial Dentures--A New Paradigm for Prosthetic CAD/CAM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junning Chen

    Full Text Available With ever-growing aging population and demand for denture treatments, pressure-induced mucosa lesion and residual ridge resorption remain main sources of clinical complications. Conventional denture design and fabrication are challenged for its labor and experience intensity, urgently necessitating an automatic procedure. This study aims to develop a fully automatic procedure enabling shape optimization and additive manufacturing of removable partial dentures (RPD, to maximize the uniformity of contact pressure distribution on the mucosa, thereby reducing associated clinical complications. A 3D heterogeneous finite element (FE model was constructed from CT scan, and the critical tissue of mucosa was modeled as a hyperelastic material from in vivo clinical data. A contact shape optimization algorithm was developed based on the bi-directional evolutionary structural optimization (BESO technique. Both initial and optimized dentures were prototyped by 3D printing technology and evaluated with in vitro tests. Through the optimization, the peak contact pressure was reduced by 70%, and the uniformity was improved by 63%. In vitro tests verified the effectiveness of this procedure, and the hydrostatic pressure induced in the mucosa is well below clinical pressure-pain thresholds (PPT, potentially lessening risk of residual ridge resorption. This proposed computational optimization and additive fabrication procedure provides a novel method for fast denture design and adjustment at low cost, with quantitative guidelines and computer aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM for a specific patient. The integration of digitalized modeling, computational optimization, and free-form fabrication enables more efficient clinical adaptation. The customized optimal denture design is expected to minimize pain/discomfort and potentially reduce long-term residual ridge resorption.

  7. Shape Optimization for Additive Manufacturing of Removable Partial Dentures--A New Paradigm for Prosthetic CAD/CAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junning; Ahmad, Rohana; Suenaga, Hanako; Li, Wei; Sasaki, Keiichi; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing

    2015-01-01

    With ever-growing aging population and demand for denture treatments, pressure-induced mucosa lesion and residual ridge resorption remain main sources of clinical complications. Conventional denture design and fabrication are challenged for its labor and experience intensity, urgently necessitating an automatic procedure. This study aims to develop a fully automatic procedure enabling shape optimization and additive manufacturing of removable partial dentures (RPD), to maximize the uniformity of contact pressure distribution on the mucosa, thereby reducing associated clinical complications. A 3D heterogeneous finite element (FE) model was constructed from CT scan, and the critical tissue of mucosa was modeled as a hyperelastic material from in vivo clinical data. A contact shape optimization algorithm was developed based on the bi-directional evolutionary structural optimization (BESO) technique. Both initial and optimized dentures were prototyped by 3D printing technology and evaluated with in vitro tests. Through the optimization, the peak contact pressure was reduced by 70%, and the uniformity was improved by 63%. In vitro tests verified the effectiveness of this procedure, and the hydrostatic pressure induced in the mucosa is well below clinical pressure-pain thresholds (PPT), potentially lessening risk of residual ridge resorption. This proposed computational optimization and additive fabrication procedure provides a novel method for fast denture design and adjustment at low cost, with quantitative guidelines and computer aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) for a specific patient. The integration of digitalized modeling, computational optimization, and free-form fabrication enables more efficient clinical adaptation. The customized optimal denture design is expected to minimize pain/discomfort and potentially reduce long-term residual ridge resorption.

  8. Shape Optimization for Additive Manufacturing of Removable Partial Dentures - A New Paradigm for Prosthetic CAD/CAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    With ever-growing aging population and demand for denture treatments, pressure-induced mucosa lesion and residual ridge resorption remain main sources of clinical complications. Conventional denture design and fabrication are challenged for its labor and experience intensity, urgently necessitating an automatic procedure. This study aims to develop a fully automatic procedure enabling shape optimization and additive manufacturing of removable partial dentures (RPD), to maximize the uniformity of contact pressure distribution on the mucosa, thereby reducing associated clinical complications. A 3D heterogeneous finite element (FE) model was constructed from CT scan, and the critical tissue of mucosa was modeled as a hyperelastic material from in vivo clinical data. A contact shape optimization algorithm was developed based on the bi-directional evolutionary structural optimization (BESO) technique. Both initial and optimized dentures were prototyped by 3D printing technology and evaluated with in vitro tests. Through the optimization, the peak contact pressure was reduced by 70%, and the uniformity was improved by 63%. In vitro tests verified the effectiveness of this procedure, and the hydrostatic pressure induced in the mucosa is well below clinical pressure-pain thresholds (PPT), potentially lessening risk of residual ridge resorption. This proposed computational optimization and additive fabrication procedure provides a novel method for fast denture design and adjustment at low cost, with quantitative guidelines and computer aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) for a specific patient. The integration of digitalized modeling, computational optimization, and free-form fabrication enables more efficient clinical adaptation. The customized optimal denture design is expected to minimize pain/discomfort and potentially reduce long-term residual ridge resorption. PMID:26161878

  9. Loosening torque of prosthetic screws in metal-ceramic or metal-acrylic resin implant-supported dentures with different misfit levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchi, Ataís; Paludo, Litiane; Ferraz Mesquita, Marcelo; Schuh, Christian; Federizzi, Leonardo; Oro Spazzin, Aloísio

    2013-04-26

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the prosthesis material (metal-acrylic resin or metal-ceramic) on loosening torque of the prosthetic screws in an implant-supported mandibular denture under two levels of vertical misfit. Ten frameworks were fabricated with commercially pure titanium, and five of them received acrylic resin and acrylic artificial teeth as veneering material and the other five were veneered with porcelain. Two levels of vertical fit were also created by fabricating 20 cast models to obtain four experimental groups according to the prosthesis material and misfit: Group 1 (metal-acrylic resin prosthesis with a passive fit); Group 2 (metal-acrylic resin prosthesis with a non-passive fit); Group 3 (metal-ceramic prosthesis with a passive fit); and Group 4 (metal-ceramic prosthesis with a non-passive fit). Two hundred prosthetic titanium-alloy screws were divided in 40 sets (five screws per set, n=10). After 24h, the loosening torque of the screws was evaluated using a digital torque meter. The results were submitted to two-way ANOVA analysis of variance followed by a Tukey's test (α=0.05). The mean values and standard deviations for each group were G1=7.05 (1.64), G2=5.52 (0.90), G3=6.46 (1.34), and G4=4.35 (0.99). Overall, the prosthesis material and misfit factors showed a statistically significant influence on the loosening torque (p<0.05). Metal-ceramic prosthesis and misfits decreased the loosening of the torque of the prosthetic screws.

  10. The effect of different prosthetic restorations on the dietary selection in edentulous patients. A longitudinal study of patients initially treated with optimal complete dentures and finally with tissue-integrated prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandström, B; Lindquist, L W

    1987-12-01

    The effect of prosthetic restoration of masticatory ability on dietary selection was evaluated in 23 edentulous patients with denture adaptation problems. The patients were first given optimal complete dentures and then a fixed prosthesis on tissue-integrated implants in the lower jaw. Changes in dietary selection were evaluated from 4-day records obtained before prosthetic treatment and on six occasions up to 78 months after treatment. With the method used, no significant changes in food selection were recorded during the rehabilitation period, except for a slight increase in intake of crisp bread and fresh fruit after treatment with fixed tissue-integrated prostheses in the mandibular jaw. It is concluded that an improved oral function will not in itself lead to a change in dietary selection and that dietary changes probably require professional and individually given dietary advice by a trained dietitian.

  11. Efficiency of voluntary opening hand and hook prosthetic devices : 24 years of development?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Gerwin; Bongers, Raoul M.; Van der Sluis, Corry K.; Plettenburg, Dick H.

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative data on the mechanical performance of upper-limb prostheses are very important in prostheses development and selection. The primary goal of this study was to objectively evaluate the mechanical performance of adultsize voluntary opening (VU) prosthetic terminal devices and select the

  12. Efficiency of voluntary opening hand and hook prosthetic devices, 24 years of development?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, G.; Bongers, R.M.; Van der Sluis, C.K.; Plettenburg, D.H.

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative data on the mechanical performance of upper-limb prostheses are very important in prostheses development and selection. The primary goal of this study was to objectively evaluate the mechanical performance of adult-size voluntary opening (VO) prosthetic terminal devices and select the

  13. Efficiency of voluntary opening hand and hook prosthetic devices : 24 years of development?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Gerwin; Bongers, Raoul M.; Van der Sluis, Corry K.; Plettenburg, Dick H.

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative data on the mechanical performance of upper-limb prostheses are very important in prostheses development and selection. The primary goal of this study was to objectively evaluate the mechanical performance of adultsize voluntary opening (VU) prosthetic terminal devices and select the be

  14. Efficiency of voluntary opening hand and hook prosthetic devices, 24 years of development?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, G.; Bongers, R.M.; Van der Sluis, C.K.; Plettenburg, D.H.

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative data on the mechanical performance of upper-limb prostheses are very important in prostheses development and selection. The primary goal of this study was to objectively evaluate the mechanical performance of adult-size voluntary opening (VO) prosthetic terminal devices and select the b

  15. Device to monitor sock use in people using prosthetic limbs: Technical report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan E. Sanders, PhD

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A device using radio frequency identification (RFID technology was developed to continuously monitor sock use in people who use prosthetic limbs. RFID tags were placed on prosthetic socks worn by subjects with transtibial limb loss, and a high-frequency RFID reader and antenna were placed in a portable unit mounted to the outside of the prosthetic socket. Bench testing showed the device to have a maximum read range between 5.6 cm and 12.7 cm, depending on the RFID tag used. Testing in a laboratory setting on three participants with transtibial amputation showed that the device correctly monitored sock presence during sitting, standing, and walking activity when one or two socks were worn but was less reliable when more socks were used. Accurate detection was sensitive to orientation of the tag relative to the reader, presence of carbon fiber in the prosthetic socket, pistoning of the limb in the socket, and overlap among the tags. Use of ultra-high-­frequency RFID may overcome these limitations. With improvements, the technology may prove useful to practitioners prescribing volume accommodation strategies for patients by providing information about sock use between clinical visits, including timing and consistency of daily sock-ply changes.

  16. Surface EMG and intra-socket force measurement to control a prosthetic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Joe; Patterson, Rita; Popa, Dan

    2015-06-01

    Surface electromyography (SEMG) has been shown to be a robust and reliable interaction method allowing for basic control of powered prosthetic devices. Research has shown a marked decrease in EMG-classification efficiency throughout activities of daily life due to socket shift and movement and fatigue as well as changes in degree of fit of the socket throughout the subject's lifetime. Users with the most severe levels of amputation require the most complex devices with the greatest number of degrees of freedom. Controlling complex dexterous devices with limited available inputs requires the addition of sensing and interaction modalities. However, the larger the amputation severity, the fewer viable SEMG sites are available as control inputs. Previous work reported the use of intra-socket pressure, as measured during wrist flexion and extension, and has shown that it is possible to control a powered prosthetic device with pressure sensors. In this paper, we present data correlations of SEMG data with intra-socket pressure data. Surface EMG sensors and force sensors were housed within a simulated prosthetic cuff fit to a healthy-limbed subject. EMG and intra-socket force data was collected from inside the cuff as a subject performed pre-defined grip motions with their dominant hand. Data fusion algorithms were explored and allowed a subject to use both intra-socket pressure and SEMG data as control inputs for a powered prosthetic device. This additional input modality allows for an improvement in input classification as well as information regarding socket fit through out activities of daily life.

  17. Hybrid nanostructured coating for increased resistance of prosthetic devices to staphylococcal colonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghel, Ion; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai

    2013-01-01

    Prosthetic medical device-associated infections are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality rates. Novel improved materials and surfaces exhibiting inappropriate conditions for microbial development are urgently required in the medical environment. This study reveals the benefit of using natural Mentha piperita essential oil, combined with a 5 nm core/shell nanosystem-improved surface exhibiting anti-adherence and antibiofilm properties. This strategy reveals a dual role of the nano-oil system; on one hand, inhibiting bacterial adherence and, on the other hand, exhibiting bactericidal effect, the core/shell nanosystem is acting as a controlled releasing machine for the essential oil. Our results demonstrate that this dual nanobiosystem is very efficient also for inhibiting biofilm formation, being a good candidate for the design of novel material surfaces used for prosthetic devices.

  18. Hybrid nanostructured coating for increased resistance of prosthetic devices to staphylococcal colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghel, Ion; Grumezescu, Alexandru Mihai

    2013-01-02

    Prosthetic medical device-associated infections are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality rates. Novel improved materials and surfaces exhibiting inappropriate conditions for microbial development are urgently required in the medical environment. This study reveals the benefit of using natural Mentha piperita essential oil, combined with a 5 nm core/shell nanosystem-improved surface exhibiting anti-adherence and antibiofilm properties. This strategy reveals a dual role of the nano-oil system; on one hand, inhibiting bacterial adherence and, on the other hand, exhibiting bactericidal effect, the core/shell nanosystem is acting as a controlled releasing machine for the essential oil. Our results demonstrate that this dual nanobiosystem is very efficient also for inhibiting biofilm formation, being a good candidate for the design of novel material surfaces used for prosthetic devices.

  19. A new in-built device for one-point stepless prosthetic alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, P; Lind, L; Lind, K; Rennerfeldt, G; Kreicbergs, A

    1988-08-01

    The authors have developed a new in-built device for alignment of below-knee prostheses. The device allows one-point, stepless adjustment of angle and slide, independently of each other and also after completed prosthetic manufacture. Principally, the device consists of a half-sphere for angle adjustment and a plate for both slide adjustment and socket application. If the socket has to be exchanged, the whole device can be re-used, apart from the plate, which forms part of the socket bottom. The device is light, compact, cosmetically easy to cover and cheap. The design incorporates a combination of the most important facilities for alignment as well as for exchange of socket, and by its simplicity seems to offer major advantages over other designs.

  20. On the applicability of fluidic flexible matrix composite variable impedance materials for prosthetic and orthotic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philen, M.

    2009-10-01

    The applicability of variable impedance fluidic flexible matrix composites (F2MC) is investigated for development of prosthetic and orthotic devices. The F2MC material is an innovative combination of high performance composite tubes containing high bulk modulus fluids. The new material system can potentially achieve a change in stiffness of several orders of magnitude through valve control. The F2MC material system is investigated in this research through analytical studies for active impedance control for load transfer reduction in transtibial prosthetic sockets and impedance joint control for ankle-foot orthoses (AFO). Preliminary analysis results indicate that the variable modulus system can reduce the load transfer between the limb and transtibial socket and can provide impedance tailoring for improving foot-slap in an AFO.

  1. A training platform for many-dimensional prosthetic devices using a virtual reality environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putrino, David; Wong, Yan T; Weiss, Adam; Pesaran, Bijan

    2015-04-15

    Brain machine interfaces (BMIs) have the potential to assist in the rehabilitation of millions of patients worldwide. Despite recent advancements in BMI technology for the restoration of lost motor function, a training environment to restore full control of the anatomical segments of an upper limb extremity has not yet been presented. Here, we develop a virtual upper limb prosthesis with 27 independent dimensions, the anatomical dimensions of the human arm and hand, and deploy the virtual prosthesis as an avatar in a virtual reality environment (VRE) that can be controlled in real-time. The prosthesis avatar accepts kinematic control inputs that can be captured from movements of the arm and hand as well as neural control inputs derived from processed neural signals. We characterize the system performance under kinematic control using a commercially available motion capture system. We also present the performance under kinematic control achieved by two non-human primates (Macaca Mulatta) trained to use the prosthetic avatar to perform reaching and grasping tasks. This is the first virtual prosthetic device that is capable of emulating all the anatomical movements of a healthy upper limb in real-time. Since the system accepts both neural and kinematic inputs for a variety of many-dimensional skeletons, we propose it provides a customizable training platform for the acquisition of many-dimensional neural prosthetic control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Sectional dentures revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karir, Naveen; Hindocha, Vishali; Walmsley, A Damien

    2012-04-01

    Sectional dentures are constructed in separate parts which join together intra-orally to create a single prosthesis. They are used to exploit undercuts around teeth, hard and soft tissues which require more than one path of insertion, and are usually of split pin or locking bolts design. By using two case studies, we aim to illustrate the provision of sectional dentures and to which situations their uses are best suited. A 30-year-old male was referred to the Department of Prosthetics at the Birmingham Dental Hospital for a replacement upper partial cobalt chrome denture of a Kennedy Class IV bounded saddle. The patient had a history of failed upper cobalt chrome removable partial dentures owing to loss of retention and poor stability over the previous 12 months. A 40-year-old female patient was referred by her GDP for restoration of a bounded saddle in the lower right quadrant with a history of intolerance to previous dentures. These two cases demonstrate the successful use of sectional dentures in the aesthetic zone. Although more technically demanding, they lie well within the scope of general practice and offer patients alternative solutions from dental implants and bridgework. These cases highlight the importance of the use of alternative prosthetic techniques which can be simple and achievable for all practitioners. Sectional dentures are a treatment modality for the edentulous space where the presence of one or more undercuts prevents restoration by more conventional techniques. This paper highlights some of the situations in which sectional dentures can be employed and emphasizes their use in general practice.

  3. Reorientation simplified: A device for recording and reproducing the path of insertion for removable partial dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaibhav D Kamble

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The record of path of insertion on the dental cast is part of the dentist′s work authorization to the dental laboratory technician. The path of insertion record enables the dental technician to replace the cast on a surveyor in the same position that the dentist selected. Analysis of factors that influence the path of insertion should determine a path of insertion that will reduce the potential for dislodgement and promote stability of removable partial denture (RPD. Materials and Methods: The recording of the relation of a cast to a dental surveyor and the transfer of this relationship to the dental laboratory may be done by tripodization, by scoring the base of the cast, or by cementing a reference pin on the cast. Conclusion: Recording the established path of insertion can be difficult when the procedure uses a cemented pin and the casts are mounted in an articulator. This article describes a procedure for innovative dowel pin and sleeve device to record the path of insertion of RPDs, which serves the same purpose as the cemented pin but can be easily removed and replaced.

  4. Efficiency of voluntary opening hand and hook prosthetic devices: 24 years of development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Gerwin; Bongers, Raoul M; Van der Sluis, Corry K; Plettenburg, Dick H

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative data on the mechanical performance of upper-limb prostheses are very important in prostheses development and selection. The primary goal of this study was to objectively evaluate the mechanical performance of adult-size voluntary opening (VO) prosthetic terminal devices and select the best tested device. A second goal was to see whether VO devices have improved in the last two decades. Nine devices (four hooks and five hands) were quantitatively tested (Hosmer model 5XA hook, Hosmer Sierra 2 Load VO hook, RSL Steeper Carbon Gripper, Otto Bock model 10A60 hook, Becker Imperial hand, Hosmer Sierra VO hand, Hosmer Soft VO hand, RSL Steeper VO hand, Otto Bock VO hand). We measured the pinch forces, activation forces, cable displacements, mass, and opening span and calculated the work and hysteresis. We compared the results with data from 1987. Hooks required lower activation forces and delivered higher pinch forces than hands. The activation forces of several devices were very high. The pinch forces of all tested hands were too low. The Hosmer model 5XA hook with three bands was the best tested hook. The Hosmer Sierra VO hand was the best tested hand. We found no improvements in VO devices compared with the data from 1987.

  5. Pilot Study for OCT Guided Design and Fit of a Prosthetic Device for Treatment of Corneal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Gam T. Le

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess optical coherence tomography (OCT for guiding design and fit of a prosthetic device for corneal disease. Methods. A prototype time domain OCT scanner was used to image the anterior segment of patients fitted with large diameter (18.5–20 mm prosthetic devices for corneal disease. OCT images were processed and analyzed to characterize corneal diameter, corneal sagittal height, scleral sagittal height, scleral toricity, and alignment of device. Within-subject variance of OCT-measured parameters was evaluated. OCT-measured parameters were compared with device parameters for each eye fitted. OCT image correspondence with ocular alignment and clinical fit was assessed. Results. Six eyes in 5 patients were studied. OCT measurement of corneal diameter (coefficient of variation, %, cornea sagittal height (%, and scleral sagittal height (% is highly repeatable within each subject. OCT image-derived measurements reveal strong correlation between corneal sagittal height and device corneal height ( and modest correlation between scleral and on-eye device toricity (. Qualitative assessment of a fitted device on OCT montages reveals correspondence with slit lamp images and clinical assessment of fit. Conclusions. OCT imaging of the anterior segment is suitable for custom design and fit of large diameter (18.5–20 mm prosthetic devices used in the treatment of corneal disease.

  6. Breaking the fixed-arrival-time restriction in reaching movements of neural prosthetic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Lakshminarayan; da Silva, Marco

    2011-06-01

    We routinely generate reaching arm movements to function independently. For paralyzed users of upper extremity neural prosthetic devices, flexible, high-performance reaching algorithms will be critical to restoring quality-of-life. Previously, algorithms called real-time reach state equations (RSE) were developed to integrate the user's plan and execution-related neural activity to drive reaching movements to arbitrary targets. Preliminary validation under restricted conditions suggested that RSE might yield dramatic performance improvements. Unfortunately, real-world applications of RSE have been impeded because the RSE assumes a fixed, known arrival time. Recent animal-based prototypes attempted to break the fixed-arrival-time assumption by proposing a standard model (SM) that instead restricted the user's movements to a fixed, known set of targets. Here, we leverage general purpose filter design (GPFD) to break both of these critical restrictions, freeing the paralyzed user to make reaching movements to arbitrary target sets with various arrival times and definitive stopping. In silico validation predicts that the new approach, GPFD-RSE, outperforms the SM while offering greater flexibility. We demonstrate the GPFD-RSE against SM in the simulated control of an overactuated 3-D virtual robotic arm with a real-time inverse kinematics engine.

  7. Welding of Prosthetic Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciechowska M.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the techniques of joining metal denture elements, used in prosthetic dentistry: the traditional soldering technique with a gas burner and a new technique of welding with a laser beam; the aim of the study was to make a comparative assessment of the quality of the joints in view of the possibility of applying them in prosthetic structures. Fractographic examinations were conducted along with tensile strength and impact strength tests, and the quality of the joints was assessed compared to the solid metal. The experiments have shown that the metal elements used to make dentures, joined by the technique which employs a laser beam, have better strength properties than those achieved with a gas burner.

  8. Development and testing of new upper-limb prosthetic devices: Research designs for usability testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Resnik, PT, PhD, OCS

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this article are to describe usability testing and introduce designs and methods of usability testing research as it relates to upper-limb prosthetics. This article defines usability, describes usability research, discusses research approaches to and designs for usability testing, and highlights a variety of methodological considerations, including sampling, sample size requirements, and usability metrics. Usability testing is compared with other types of study designs used in prosthetic research.

  9. Prosthetic advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Zach T; Potter, Benjamin K; Vandersea, James; Wolf, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Much of the current prosthetic technology is based on developments that have taken place during or directly following times of war. These developments have evolved and improved over the years, and now there are many more available options to provide a comfortable, cosmetic, and highly functional prosthesis. Even so, problems with fit and function persist. Recent developments have addressed some of the limitations faced by some military amputees. On-board microprocessor-controlled joints are making prosthetic arms and legs more responsive to environmental barriers and easier to control by the user. Advances in surgical techniques will allow more intuitive control and secure attachment to the prosthesis. As surgical techniques progress and permeate into standard practice, more sophisticated powered prosthetic devices will become commonplace, helping to restore neuromuscular loss of function. Prognoses following amputation will certainly rise, factoring into the surgeon's decision to attempt to save a limb versus perform an amputation.

  10. Does Hollowing of Complete Denture Enhance Retention? - A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Ashish; Dhull, Kanika Singh; Iyer, Satish R; Mittal, Manish; Kalra, Shilpa; Yadav, Shweta

    2015-05-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation is an extremely challenging task in extreme resorption cases of the maxillary denture-bearing area. Reducing the weight of a maxillary obturator has been seen as beneficial. But whether reducing the weight of conventional complete denture also increases retention or not, is still very dubious. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the effect of maxillary denture weight on denture retention and stability. For this study, a total of 10 patients were considered for the pilot study (06 female and 04 male) with an average age of 70 y. Each patient was provided with two sets of maxillary complete dentures, one hollow labeled as A and one conventional maxillary denture labeled as B. It was shown that mean values for retention using MKIS for retention for hollow dentures (A) was 7.8 and for conventional dentures (B) it was 8.2 and the stability for maxillary dentures was more with conventional dentures (B) than hollow maxillary dentures (A) and it was significant as p-value was 0.015 (pdenture retention and stability, chewing and comfort values of conventional dentures and hollow dentures were slightly better for conventional dentures.

  11. Surface modification of neural prosthetic devices by conducting polymers and biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xinyan

    Micromachined neural prosthetic devices facilitate the functional stimulation of and recording from the peripheral and central nervous systems. The microelectrode sites on the neural probes are the actual interface to communicate with neurons. The surfaces of the devices should provide intimate interfacial contact between electrodes and neurons, facilitate the charge transport from ionically conductive tissue to electronically conductive electrode and induce selected neurons or neuron processes to attach onto the microelectrode. Traditional metal electrode materials do not fulfill these functions. Biocompatible conducting polymers were therefore used to modify the surface of the microelectrodes. An electrochemical polymerization approach was developed to directly deposit conductive polymers, such as polypyrrole and poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT), together with biopolymers, such as protein polymers and bioactive peptides, onto the microelectrode sites. It was found that the deposition of conducting polymer significantly lowered the electrode impedance which is beneficial to neural signal transport. The electronic properties of the conductive polymers were found to be influenced by the film morphology, which could be tailored by controlling the polymerization conditions. The incorporation of biopolymers was confirmed by microfocused Fourier-Transformed infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Rat glia and human neuroblastoma cells were shown to preferentially attach and grow on the coated electrode site area of the neural probes. The chemical stability of conducting polymer/biomolecule coatings was studied using FTIR, impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The biomolecules were stable in the film after seven weeks of soaking in deionized water, while polypyrrole underwent some subtle changes in chemical structure. PEDOT was proven to be a more stable material under potential cycling and provided even lower impedance. The adhesion between the coating and

  12. Denture stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Amy Yuntzu-Yen; Zirwas, Matthew J

    2007-01-01

    A 70-year-old woman presented for evaluation of an eruption localized to the area covered by her partial upper denture. Her medical history and physical examination were otherwise unremarkable. She originally had a metal upper partial denture, which she used for many years without difficulty. Four years before presentation, she developed a painful eruption affecting only the tissue covered by the upper partial denture. Contact dermatitis to metal was suspected, and a new upper partial denture constructed primarily of acrylates was fashioned. When she transitioned to the new denture, the inflammation in her oral mucosa persisted and perhaps worsened, despite an excellent fit. Examination revealed striking erythema and mild edema sharply localized to the areas where the partial upper denture contacted the gum ridge. Patch testing was performed and revealed allergies to multiple acrylates, including methyl methacrylate. A swab from the gums was sent for yeast culture. No Candida was detected. Based on suspected candidal overgrowth on the denture, the patient was advised to begin applying nystatin ointment between the gums and the denture, and to start soaking the dentures nightly in chlorhexidine 0.12% solution. In addition, because the relevance of the acrylate allergy was unclear, her dentist was contacted and it was recommended that the dentures be boiled to induce polymerization of any residual un-reacted methacrylate monomers. The patient had a 90% improvement in the clinical appearance and in symptoms at an 8-week follow-up appointment. Due to logistic issues, the dentures had not yet been boiled. The improvement, despite the dentures not having been boiled, was felt to demonstrate that the acrylate allergy was not relevant. The patient has continued to slowly show further improvement over 6 months of follow-up.

  13. Denture adhesives: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadiochou, Sofia; Emmanouil, Ioannis; Papadiochos, Ioannis

    2015-05-01

    Denture adhesives have been the objective of scientific research for over half a century. Although they are used by denture wearers worldwide, investigations of their effectiveness and biocompatibility have led to controversial conclusions. The purpose of this study was to review the literature data with regard to the effectiveness and biocompatibility of denture adhesives as well as the attitudes of both patients and dental professionals toward these materials. An electronic search of English peer-reviewed dental literature in the Medline database was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness and biocompatibility of denture adhesives. There was no limitation in publication year, so the search included all the available scientific evidence included in that particular database until March 2014. Specific inclusion criteria were used for the selection of the appropriate articles. A manual search of the citations of the obtained articles followed to extend the electronic search. A full text review was carried out for only 32 articles. Of the 32 articles, 21 examined the efficacy of denture adhesives in terms of retention and stability and masticatory performance, 6 evaluated the issue of the biocompatibility of denture adhesives, and 5 presented the attitudes of either professionals or patients toward these materials. The majority of clinical studies supported the fact that denture adhesives enhance the retention, stability, and masticatory performance of a removable prosthesis. In terms of biocompatibility, long-term in vivo studies to investigate potential harmful effects were lacking. Patients are satisfied with denture adhesives that meet their needs. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Treatment of persistent corneal epithelial defect with overnight wear of a prosthetic device for the ocular surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Pauline; Ridges, Ryan; Jacobs, Deborah S; Rosenthal, Perry

    2013-12-01

    To report experience in the treatment of persistent corneal epithelial defect using overnight wear of a prosthetic device for the ocular surface. Retrospective interventional case series. A clinical database of patients who underwent prosthetic replacement of the ocular surface ecosystem (PROSE) treatment from March 2003 to August 2008 was searched to identify patients treated for persistent corneal epithelial defect. In early 2003, overnight wear of a PROSE device and addition of commercially available, nonpreserved, topical ophthalmic moxifloxacin to the saline in the device reservoir became standard practice at this center when treating persistent corneal epithelial defect. Medical records were abstracted to obtain underlying diagnoses, previous treatments, days to re-epithelialization, and complications for subsequent analysis. PROSE treatment incorporating overnight wear, with adjunctive use of moxifloxacin, was employed in 20 eyes of 19 patients for a total of 372 days. Re-epithelialization occurred in 17 of 20 eyes. Median duration of treatment incorporating overnight wear was 8.5 days (range = 2-76 days). Healing occurred in ≤7 days in 12 eyes, 8-14 days in 3 eyes, and >14 days in 2 eyes (range = 1-35 days). There were no cases of microbial keratitis. Overnight wear of a PROSE device is effective in promoting healing of persistent corneal epithelial defect. In comparison to an earlier series from this center, the rate of microbial keratitis as a complication of treatment has been reduced with the use of a nonpreserved topical fourth-generation fluoroquinolone in the device reservoir. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Development and testing of new upper-limb prosthetic devices: Research designs for usability testing

    OpenAIRE

    Linda Resnik, PT, PhD, OCS

    2011-01-01

    The purposes of this article are to describe usability testing and introduce designs and methods of usability testing research as it relates to upper-limb prosthetics. This article defines usability, describes usability research, discusses research approaches to and designs for usability testing, and highlights a variety of methodological considerations, including sampling, sample size requirements, and usability metrics. Usability testing is compared with other types of study designs used in...

  16. Prosthetic Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Overview CoE for Limb Loss Prevention and Prosthetic Engineering Menu Menu VA Center of Excellence for Limb ... ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Prosthetic Engineering - Overview Our aim is to improve prosthetic prescription ...

  17. Elderly complete denture wearers: a social approach to tooth loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadaki, Eftychia; Anastassiadou, Vassiliki

    2012-06-01

    To correlate emotional reactions to tooth loss with denture satisfaction attributes in elderly complete denture wearers. Total tooth loss is a serious life event, and poor oral health has an impact on daily life. Edentulism treated by rehabilitation with dentures can have a positive effect on patients' self-image and social behaviour. A group of 80 edentulous subjects undergoing routine prosthetic care in a Greek Department of Prosthetic Dentistry were interviewed using two structured questionnaires. The first questionnaire explored reactions to tooth loss, whereas the second measured their subjective experience of complete dentures. The responses to both questionnaires were compared using the statistical package SPSS v.17. The results showed significant correlation between aspects of tooth loss experience and complete denture satisfaction. Despite the fact that a substantial proportion of patients were satisfied with their complete dentures, some patients experienced increased social and psychological problems related to their edentulousness and the wearing of complete dentures. The aesthetic and functional aspects of complete dentures affected both patients' social behaviour and self-confidence. Total tooth loss was not only reflected in patient's social behaviour and self-image, but it had a complex and multifaceted impact on satisfaction from complete dentures. © 2011 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. Case Study on Human Walking during Wearing a Powered Prosthetic Device: Effectiveness of the System “Human-Robot”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Grosu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is known that force exchanges between a robotic assistive device and the end-user have a direct impact on the quality and performance of a particular movement task. This knowledge finds a special reflective importance in prosthetic industry due to the close human-robot collaboration. Although lower-extremity prostheses are currently better able to provide assistance as their upper-extremity counterparts, specific locomotion problems still remain. In a framework of this contribution the authors introduce the multibody dynamic modelling approach of the transtibial prosthesis wearing on a human body model. The obtained results are based on multibody dynamic simulations against the real experimental data using AMP-Foot 2.0, an energy efficient powered transtibial prosthesis for actively assisted walking of amputees.

  19. 76 FR 18472 - Medicare Program; Revisions to the Durable Medical Equipment, Prosthetics, Orthotics, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-04

    ... the Act. Prosthetic devices are defined in this section of the Act as ``devices (other than dental... lens.'' Other examples of prosthetic devices include cardiac pacemakers, cochlear implants,...

  20. Inhibition of denture plaque deposition on complete dentures by 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine polymer coating: A clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeya, Kenji; Iwasa, Fuminori; Inoue, Yuuki; Fukunishi, Miya; Takahashi, Nana; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Baba, Kazuyoshi

    2017-05-12

    Denture plaque-associated infections are regarded as a source of serious dental and medical complications in the elderly population. Methods of managing this problem are needed. The purpose of this clinical study was to evaluate the effects of treatment with a 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine polymer, PMBPAz, on plaque deposition in complete dentures. The study protocol was approved by the Ethics Committee of Showa University (#2013-013). Eleven individuals with maxillary complete dentures participated in this study. Their dentures were treated with PMBPAz, and the amount of denture plaque accumulation was evaluated by staining the denture surfaces with methylene blue after 2 weeks of denture usage. The same procedures were repeated to evaluate the original denture surfaces as a control. The image of the stained denture surface was captured using a digital camera, and the percentage of stained area, quantified as a pixel-based density, of the whole denture area (percentage of plaque index) was calculated for the mucosal and polished surfaces. To quantify the biofilm on the dentures, denture plaque biofilm was detached by ultrasonic vibration, resuspended in diluent, and measured with a microplate reader at an optical density of 620 nm. The effects of PMBPAz treatment on these variables were statistically analyzed with ANOVA (α=.05). The mean ±SD percentage of plaque index was 40.7% ±19.9% on the mucosal surfaces and 28.0% ±16.8% on the polished surfaces of the control denture. The mean percentage of plaque index of PMBPAz-treated dentures significantly decreased to 17.4%% ±12.0% on the mucosal surfaces (Pcomplete dentures. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Prosthetic Rehabilitation in Children: An Alternative Clinical Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nádia Carolina Teixeira Marques

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Complete and partial removable dentures have been used successfully in numerous patients with oligodontia and/or anodontia. However, there is little information in the literature regarding the principles and guidelines to prosthetic rehabilitation for growing children. This case report describes the management of a young child with oligodontia as well as the treatment planning and the prosthetic rehabilitation technique.

  2. Radio frequency identification (RFID) of dentures in long-term care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrid, Carlos; Korsvold, Tové; Rochat, Aline; Abarca, Marcelo

    2012-03-01

    The difficulty of identifying the ownership of lost dentures when found is a common and expensive problem in long term care facilities (LTCFs) and hospitals. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability of using radiofrequency identification (RFID) in the identification of dentures for LTCF residents after 3 and 6 months. Thirty-eight residents of 2 LTCFs in Switzerland agreed to participate after providing informed consent. The tag was programmed with the family and first names of the participants and then inserted in the dentures. After placement of the tag, the information was read. A second and third assessment to review the functioning of the tag occurred at 3 and 6 months, and defective tags (if present) were reported and replaced. The data were analyzed with descriptive statistics. At the 3-month assessment of 34 residents (63 tags) 1 tag was unreadable and 62 tags (98.2%) were operational. At 6 months, the tags of 27 of the enrolled residents (50 tags) were available for review. No examined tag was defective at this time period. Within the limits of this study (number of patients, 6-month time span) RFID appears to be a reliable method of tracking and identifying dentures, with only 1 of 65 devices being unreadable at 3 months and 100% of 50 initially placed tags being readable at the end of the trial. Copyright © 2012 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Post-operative orbital imaging: a focus on implants and prosthetic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Ashok [Royal London Hospital, Diagnostic Neuroradiology, Barts Health NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Mankad, Kshitij [Great Ormond Street Hospital, Diagnostic Neuroradiology, London (United Kingdom); Poitelea, Cornelia; Verity, David H. [Moorfields Eye Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Davagnanam, Indran [National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15

    Accurate interpretation of orbital imaging in the presence of either orbital implants requires a sound knowledge of both the surgical approach used and the imaging characteristics of the implanted devices themselves. In this article, the radiological appearance of the various devices used in ophthalmology, and their relationship to other orbital structures, is reviewed. In addition, the intended anatomical location, function of these devices, and clinical indications for their use are provided. (orig.)

  4. Rehabilitation with immediate denture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayelin de la Caridad Suárez González

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This is the case of a 42-year-old male patient, with past history of good health, active worker, who referred refusal to the period of tooth loss both for his own personality and work responsibility. On intra-buccal examination, his central superior and inferior incisors showed plenty of tooth decay that got most of his teeth structures; besides, on X-ray examination, horizontal bone loss is observed at third apical level of the present teeth and mobility grade III and IV, for what their extraction is indicated. From the prosthetic point of view, he was diagnosed as a superior and inferior partial edentulous patient, Kennedy class I. It was decided to rehabilitate by immediate superior and inferior total denture, performing previous multiple extractions with corrective alveoloplasty and alveolectomy. With the surgical and appliances treatment, excellent results were achieved, showing the effectiveness of this treatment.

  5. Dental prosthetic status and prosthetic need of the institutionalized elderly living in geriatric homes in mangalore: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Rekha P; Hegde, Vijaya

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. To promote oral health among the elderly, we need to know their prosthetic status and prosthetic need. Hence, a survey of prosthetic status and need of elderly inmates of old age homes in Mangalore was done. Materials and Methods. A cross-sectional study was undertaken, and 133 subjects aged 60 years and above were examined (54.9% males and 45.1% females). Results. Eighty-eight percent of those examined were fully edentulous, and only 12% had complete dentures; none of the study subjects had partial dentures. Prosthetic status was significantly associated with gender (P = .024), while prosthetic need and gender were not significantly associated (P = .395). Conclusions. A high unmet need for prosthetic care existed among the institutionalized elderly surveyed.

  6. Does Hollowing of Complete Denture Enhance Retention? – A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Ashish; Iyer, Satish R; Mittal, Manish; Kalra, Shilpa; Yadav, Shweta

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Prosthetic rehabilitation is an extremely challenging task in extreme resorption cases of the maxillary denture-bearing area. Reducing the weight of a maxillary obturator has been seen as beneficial. But whether reducing the weight of conventional complete denture also increases retention or not, is still very dubious. The aim of this pilot study was to determine the effect of maxillary denture weight on denture retention and stability. Materials and Methods For this study, a total of 10 patients were considered for the pilot study (06 female and 04 male) with an average age of 70 y. Each patient was provided with two sets of maxillary complete dentures, one hollow labeled as A and one conventional maxillary denture labeled as B. Results It was shown that mean values for retention using MKIS for retention for hollow dentures (A) was 7.8 and for conventional dentures (B) it was 8.2 and the stability for maxillary dentures was more with conventional dentures (B) than hollow maxillary dentures (A) and it was significant as p-value was 0.015 (pdenture retention and stability, chewing and comfort values of conventional dentures and hollow dentures were slightly better for conventional dentures. PMID:26155561

  7. Fixed prosthetic treatment in patients with cleft lip and palate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bajevska Jagoda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The prosthetic treatment of patients with cleft palate includes various treatment options such as fixed partial dentures, removable partial prosthesis, etc. The type of prosthetic appliance is determined by the oral health of each individual and the circumstances. We presented three adult patients with the cleft lip and palate subjected to prosthetic treatment. Case report. From the possible prosthetic solutions according to the conditions in the oral cavity and the circumstances, fixed partial dentures veneered with composite or ceramic were chosen. A proper relationship between the teeth was reached with the fixed partial dentures, and function established, the phonetics improved and satisfying aesthetics effect accomplished improving the profile appearance of the patient’s face. Plastic surgery of the nose was performed after that. Conclusion. Multidisclipinary treatment is necessary for favourable long-term outcome in cleft lip and palate patients.

  8. A case study of technology transfer: Rehabilitative engineering at Rancho Los Amigos Hospital. [prosthetic devices engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildred, W.

    1973-01-01

    The transfer of NASA technolgy to rehabilitative applications of artificial limbs is studied. Human factors engineering activities range from orthotic manipulators to tiny dc motors and transducers to detect and transmit voluntary control signals. It is found that bicarbon implant devices are suitable for medical equipment and artificial limbs because of their biological compatibility with human body fluids and tissues.

  9. Polyvinyl siloxane template aids in recontouring natural teeth opposing single dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javid, N; Esquivel, J F

    1996-09-01

    This article describes a procedure that provides proper reduction of natural teeth opposing complete dentures. By use of a polyvinyl siloxane prosthetic template, natural dentition can be reduced to a more favorable plane, which will facilitate denture construction. This procedure will eliminate the risk of arbitrary grinding and will minimize guesswork through guided intraoral reduction.

  10. Diagnosis of prosthetic joint infection with alpha-defensin using a lateral flow device: a multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, P; Van Cauter, M; Driesen, R; Neyt, J; Cornu, O; Bellemans, J

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this current multicentre study is to analyse the presence of alpha-defensin proteins in synovial fluid using the Synovasure lateral flow device and to determine its diagnostic reliability and accuracy compared with the prosthetic joint infection (PJI) criteria produced by the Musculoskeletal Infection Society (MSIS). A cohort of 121 patients comprising 85 total knee arthroplasties and 36 total hip arthroplasties was prospectively evaluated between May 2015 and June 2016 in three different orthopaedic centres. The tests were performed on patients with a chronically painful prosthesis undergoing a joint aspiration in a diagnostic pathway or during revision surgery. Based on the MSIS criteria, 34 patients (28%) would have had a PJI, and 87 patients had no PJI. Testing with the lateral flow device had a sensitivity of 97.1% (95% confidence intervals (CI) 84.5 to 99.9) and a specificity of 96.6% (95% CI 90.3 to 99.2). The positive predictive value was 91.7% (95% CI 77.7% to 98.3), and the negative predictive value was 98.8% (95% CI 93.6 to 99.9). Receiver operator characteristics analysis demonstrated an area under the curve for the Synovasure test of 0.97 (95% CI 0.93 to 1.00). Our findings suggest that the Synovasure test has an excellent diagnostic performance to confirm or reject the diagnosis of a PJI. The results are promising for the care of the painful or problematic knee and hip joint arthroplasty and the test should be considered as part of the diagnostic toolbox for PJIs. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2017;99-B:1176-82. ©2017 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  11. A novel prosthetic device and method for guided tissue preservation of immediate postextraction socket implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Stephen J; Hochman, Mark N; Tan-Chu, Jocelyn Hui-Ping; Mieleszko, Adam J; Tarnow, Dennis P

    2014-01-01

    Preservation of the surrounding hard and soft tissues associated with an immediate postextraction socket implant to replace a nonrestorable tooth in the esthetic zone is one of the greatest challenges facing the dental team. Several studies have documented the biologic and esthetic benefits of bone graft containment with either a custom healing abutment or provisional restoration. Use of a prefabricated shell that replicates the extracted tooth at the cervical region can help achieve guided tissue preservation and sustainable esthetic outcomes in an easy, simple, consistent, and less time consuming way. The following case report of a hopeless maxillary right central incisor in a female patient possessing adjacent teeth with a thin periodontal phenotype illustrates this new treatment device, method, and concept.

  12. Level of Denture Cleanliness Influences the Presence of Denture Stomatitis on Maxillary Denture Bearing-Mucosa

    OpenAIRE

    Winatty Krisma; Martha Mozartha; Rani Purba

    2014-01-01

    Plaque accumulation on internal surface of denture is a common problem among removable denture wearers. Poor denture cleanliness can increase colonization of Candida albicans and cause inflammatory reaction of denture-bearing mucosa, i.e. denture stomatitis. Objective: To find out the effect of denture cleanliness level on denture stomatitis on maxillary denture-bearing mucosa in a group of removable denture wearers who received prosthodontic treatment at Poliklinik Gigi RSMH Palembang and to...

  13. Psychophysical testing of visual prosthetic devices: a call to establish a multi-national joint task force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Joseph F., III; Ayton, Lauren N.

    2014-04-01

    Recent advances in the field of visual prostheses, as showcased in this special feature of Journal of Neural Engineering , have led to promising results from clinical trials of a number of devices. However, as noted by these groups there are many challenges involved in assessing vision of people with profound vision loss. As such, it is important that there is consistency in the methodology and reporting standards for clinical trials of visual prostheses and, indeed, the broader vision restoration research field. Two visual prosthesis research groups, the Boston Retinal Implant Project (BRIP) and Bionic Vision Australia (BVA), have agreed to work cooperatively to establish a multi-national Joint Task Force. The aim of this Task Force will be to develop a consensus statement to guide the methods used to conduct and report psychophysical and clinical results of humans who receive visual prosthetic devices. The overarching goal is to ensure maximum benefit to the implant recipients, not only in the outcomes of the visual prosthesis itself, but also in enabling them to obtain accurate information about this research with ease. The aspiration to develop a Joint Task Force was first promulgated at the inaugural 'The Eye and the Chip' meeting in September 2000. This meeting was established to promote the development of the visual prosthetic field by applying the principles of inclusiveness, openness, and collegiality among the growing body of researchers in this field. These same principles underlie the intent of this Joint Task Force to enhance the quality of psychophysical research within our community. Despite prior efforts, a critical mass of interested parties could not congeal. Renewed interest for developing joint guidelines has developed recently because of a growing awareness of the challenges of obtaining reliable measurements of visual function in patients who are severely visually impaired (in whom testing is inherently noisy), and of the importance of

  14. Digitally planned and fabricated mandibular fixed complete dentures. Part 2. Prosthodontic phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattadiyil, Mathew T; Goodacre, Charles J; Lozada, Jaime L; Garbacea, Antoanela

    2015-01-01

    Part 1 of this patient report described a prosthetically driven protocol that used computer-aided engineering for the fabrication of a mandibular conversion denture and maxillary provisional complete denture using the AvaDent Digital Denture system. The report demonstrated that this system combined with NobelClinician implant-planning software can be used to efficiently convert a digital denture into an immediately loaded provisional implant-supported fixed complete denture (hybrid prosthesis). Part 2 of the patient report describes the technique and steps involved in the fabrication of a digitally planned and fabricated mandibular fixed complete denture with incorporated titanium milled bar opposed by a definitive computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacture-milled maxillary complete denture.

  15. Level of Denture Cleanliness Influences the Presence of Denture Stomatitis on Maxillary Denture Bearing-Mucosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winatty Krisma

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Plaque accumulation on internal surface of denture is a common problem among removable denture wearers. Poor denture cleanliness can increase colonization of Candida albicans and cause inflammatory reaction of denture-bearing mucosa, i.e. denture stomatitis. Objective: To find out the effect of denture cleanliness level on denture stomatitis on maxillary denture-bearing mucosa in a group of removable denture wearers who received prosthodontic treatment at Poliklinik Gigi RSMH Palembang and to investigate the denture hygiene habits of removable denture wearers. Methods: Thirty subjects participated in this study. Denture cleanliness level was assessed with disclosing solution to disclose denture plaque on internal surface of maxillary denture. Cleanliness level was graded according to Budtz-Jorgensen. Intraoral examination was done to determine any visible signs of denture stomatitis. Data referring to denture hygiene habits of removable denture wearers was collected from interview using questionnaire. Data were analyzed using the Komolgorov-Smirnov test. Results: Result of the study showed that 40% subjects had poor upper denture cleanliness. Denture stomatitis was observed on maxillary denture-bearing mucosa in 43.3% subjects. Kolmogorov-Smirnov test showed that there was a significant effect of denture cleanliness level on denture stomatitis on maxillary denture-bearing mucosa (p<0.05. Conclusion: Denture cleanliness level influence the occurence of denture stomatitis on maxillary denture bearing-mucosa in a group of removable denture wearers who received prosthodontic treatment.

  16. [Experience with prosthetic disc nucleus device in Mexico. Final report of a 4-year follow-up].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Olivares, Luis Miguel; Pérez-Víquez, Ariel; Miramontes-Martínez, Víctor; Alpízar-Aguirre, Armando; Reyes-Sánchez, Alejandro Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Discal hernia is generally treated by discectomies that are mutilating and cause instability and low back pain in 50% of the patients. Partial arthroplasty is used in an attempt to avoid degeneration after a discectomy. Nineteen patients from the INR (National Institute of Rehabilitation) were selected with extruded discal hernia. All inclusion criteria were met, with a minimal follow-up of 4 years. Evolution was evaluated with the Oswestry scale (OS) and x-ray studies. Statistical analysis was done with Student's t-test. Sixteen men and three women were included in the study, with an average age of 35.4 years. OS before surgery was 57.37% and improved to 22% (p < 0.001). The results obtained in the Prolo scale 4 years later were for the economy scale, p < 0.001 (Wilcoxon Z = 3.87) and for the functional scale, p < 0.001 (Wilcoxon Z = -3.94). The intervertebral space height (IS) before surgery was 6 and 8 mm, and 4 years later, in 12 patients it remained between 8 and 10 mm. The prosthesis had variations according to its initial placement in seven patients, and in all there was subsidence. In two cases migration surpassed the limits of the vertebral body without clinical repercussion. None of the patients required re-operation. Prosthetic disc nucleus device improved clinical conditions and x-rays of the patients using Oswestry, Prolo and intersomatic space height enhancement after 4 years of follow-up in 12/19 patients.

  17. Five years of aftercare of implant-retained mandibular overdentures and conventional dentures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, A.; Geertman, M.E.; Meijer, H.J.; Raghoebar, G.M.; Kwakman, J.M.; Creugers, N.H.J.; Oort, R.P. van

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this multicentre randomized clinical trial was to analyse surgical and prosthetic aftercare and clinical implant performance of edentulous patients with implant-retained mandibular overdentures and of patients with conventional dentures, either or not after pre-prosthetic

  18. Five years of aftercare of implant-retained mandibular overdentures and conventional dentures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, A.; Geertman, M.E.; Meijer, H.J.A.; Raghoebar, G.M.; Creugers, N.H.J.; Oort, R.P. van

    The purpose of this multicentre randomized clinical trial was to analyse surgical and prosthetic aftercare and clinical implant performance of edentulous patients with implant-retained mandibular overdentures and of patients with conventional dentures, either or not after pre-prosthetic

  19. New clinical technique for fabrication immediate partial denture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulsalam Ali Zwiad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Immediate partial denture is a choice of treatment due to various cases of teeth extraction such as badly carious teeth, periodontal disease, eruption problems, trauma, and other reasons. Many choices are used to replace the lost teeth; one of these choices is a removable plastic denture in which hot cured acrylic resin should be used to fabricate such denture. Aim of Study: To provide an applicable technique to fabricate an immediate partial denture by reducing and declining the prosthetic steps and some materials in proportional to the conventional method. Clinical Procedures: Maxillary and mandibular stone casts are mounted to a simple articulator and the procedures are explained as step by step to fabricate an immediate partial denture without using the conventional methods and material, just using a small quantity of white cold cure acrylic resin to fabricate the artificial teeth, hot cure acrylic resin for the denture base and mold made of a silicon impression material are used to fabricate an immediate partial denture. Conclusion: The finished immediate partial denture showed a good retention and produced the exact shapes and sizes of the extracted teeth with low cost and less time for a dentist and patient.

  20. The Prevalence of Oral Inflammation Among Denture Wearing Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybyłowska, D; Rubinsztajn, R; Chazan, R; Swoboda-Kopeć, E; Kostrzewa-Janicka, J; Mierzwińska-Nastalska, E

    2015-01-01

    Oral inflammation is an important contributor to the etiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, which can impact patient's health status. Previous studies indicate that people with poor oral health are at higher risk for nosocomial pneumonia. Denture wearing is one promoting factor in the development of mucosal infections. Colonization of the denture plaque by Gram-negative bacteria, Candida spp., or other respiratory pathogens, occurring locally, may be aspirated to the lungs. The studies showed that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients treated with combinations of medicines with corticosteroids more frequently suffer from Candida-associated denture stomatitis. Treatment of oral candidiasis in patients with COPD constitutes a therapeutic problem. Therefore, it is essential to pay attention to the condition of oral mucosal membrane and denture hygiene habits. The guidelines for care and maintenance of dentures for COPD patients are presented in this paper. The majority of patients required improvement of their prosthetic and oral hygiene. Standard oral hygiene procedures in relation to dentures, conducted for prophylaxis of stomatitis complicated by mucosal infection among immunocompromised patients, are essential to maintain healthy oral tissues. The elimination of traumatic denture action in dental office, compliance with oral and denture hygiene, proper use and storage of prosthetic appliances in a dry environment outside the oral cavity can reduce susceptibility to infection. Proper attention to hygiene, including brushing and rinsing the mouth, may also help prevent denture stomatitis in these patients.

  1. An alternative approach in fabrication of fixed complete dentures using a duplicate denture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshari, Fatemeh S; Hallas, Matthew B; Knoernschild, Kent L

    2012-10-01

    The traditional prosthetic steps in the fabrication of a fixed complete denture after implant osseointegration include final impression, verification of implant positioning in the working cast, mounting of the working cast, and mock denture wax trial insertion prior to the laboratory fabrication of the metal substructure; however, in patient scenarios of immediate loading of implants, the interim conversion prosthesis can be used to advance from the final impression to the milling of the underlying framework in one appointment. Consistency in the initial wax trial insertion, radiographic guide, and intraoral positioning of the conversion prosthesis can result in a well-designed definitive prosthesis in less time with the use of the existing duplicate complete denture. © 2012 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  2. [Complete removable dentures and prognathism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postaire, M; Raux, D

    1991-06-01

    Further to some reminders concerning terminology and resorption, this article presents the full denture prosthetic treatment for two patients with total edentation and a prognathic malocclusion. The first case presents a tridimensional symptomatology, described by: a progeny; a voluminous mandibular terrain; a concave profile; a rather closed mandibular angle; a mandible ridge which circumscribes the upper jaw; The particularities of the prosthetic treatment in this case are: a lowering of the posterior occlusal plane; a mounting of the teeth in a limited external position, that is to say, the maxillary lingual cuspids and the mandibular mesio-distal groove on the inter-crest line; the mandibular incisors and cuspids placed with a lingual inclination to obtain an edge-to-edge occlusal contact. The second case is of vertical symptomatology type, described by: a macrogeny; a moderate concavity of the profile; a very marked increase of the vertical dimension; an open mandibular angle; a short ramus; a long mandibule; a very marked overjet between the anterior crests. The particularities of the prosthetic treatment for this case are: a posterior teeth placement, avoiding cross-bite position, taken into account the strong convergence of the intercrest lines; a strong lingual inclination of the mandibular incisors and cuspids, in order to obtain an edge-to-edge occlusal contact. In the light of these two specific cases, emphasis is placed on the particularities of the treatment and on the teeth placement proposed in order to avoid any cross-bite teeth mounting.

  3. Unilateral removable partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodall, W A; Greer, A C; Martin, N

    2017-01-27

    Removable partial dentures (RPDs) are widely used to replace missing teeth in order to restore both function and aesthetics for the partially dentate patient. Conventional RPD design is frequently bilateral and consists of a major connector that bridges both sides of the arch. Some patients cannot and will not tolerate such an extensive appliance. For these patients, bridgework may not be a predictable option and it is not always possible to provide implant-retained restorations. This article presents unilateral RPDs as a potential treatment modality for such patients and explores indications and contraindications for their use, including factors relating to patient history, clinical presentation and patient wishes. Through case examples, design, material and fabrication considerations will be discussed. While their use is not widespread, there are a number of patients who benefit from the provision of unilateral RPDs. They are a useful treatment to have in the clinician's armamentarium, but a highly-skilled dental team and a specific patient presentation is required in order for them to be a reasonable and predictable prosthetic option.

  4. Design and properties of maxillofacial prosthetic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreopoulos, A G; Theophanides, T

    1993-11-01

    Maxillofacial reconstruction by prosthetic means is a valuable contribution that medicine offers to the public. Materials design and properties are the main problems faced by scientists in this field. Materials used for intraoral prostheses are not ideal, but they have been perfected to the point of practical use. Denture resins, gold, chromium-cobalt alloys, and porcelain are widely used and produce acceptable results in the oral cavity. In this review, the properties and performance of some polymeric materials used in maxillofacial prosthetics are discussed, and new trends in research and development are also reported.

  5. [Prosthetic rehabilitation: needs in Senegalese dental offices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbodj, E B; Diouf, M; Faye, D; Ndiaye, A; Seck, M T; Ndiaye, C; Diallo, P D

    2011-12-01

    Knowledge of dental prosthetic needs will develop strategies for prevention and treatment through a package of individual, community and professional policies. The aim of this study was to evaluate prosthetic needs in Senegalese dental offices. The survey was conducted among people aged 15 years and more attending Senegalese dental clinics. The mean number of missing teeth was 4.4. Only 55.3% of the sample expressed the need for dentures and 81.8% had a diagnosed need for prosthesis. A statistically significant difference was noticed between the needs diagnosed and the expressed needs (p dental offices.

  6. Characterization of complete denture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Srivastava, Rajeev; Choukse, Vivek

    2011-01-01

    Characterization is a procedure in which the character or collective qualities of a person are introduced in the complete denture, either by modification of teeth or denture bases, to make it appear...

  7. Fabrication of sectional complete denture using metal framework design for a patient with microstomia:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohanian A

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available "nMicrostomia is defined as an abnormally small oral orifice. Microstomia can occur as a result of trauma from electrical and thermal lesions, chemical burns and trauma from surgeries. Prosthetic rehabilitation of microstomia patients presents difficulties at all stages, from the preliminary impressions to fabrication of prosthesis. For impression procedures different treatment methods have been suggested. Swing hinge and collapsible dentures are used to provide prosthodontic treatment to patients with microstomia. Not only is such a prosthesis difficult to fabricate, but may be expensive. The literature contains reports on the fabrication of sectional denture with the denture pieces connected by different designs. This article describes a simple method of fabricating a 2-pieces denture using removeable partial denture metal framework to connect the sections, for a patient with limited oral opening. Combination of metal framework and sectional complete denture for a patient with limited oral opening is an acceptable, effective and available method.

  8. Prosthetic Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Costs Copays Means Test Health Insurance Make a Payment Annual Income Thresholds Non-VA Care Purchased Care ... center of pressure under the prosthetic foot; enhancing balance and stability of lower limb amputees. Foot-Ankle ...

  9. 21 CFR 872.3400 - Karaya and sodium borate with or without acacia denture adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... denture adhesive. 872.3400 Section 872.3400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... and sodium borate with or without acacia denture adhesive. (a) Identification. A karaya and sodium borate with or without acacia denture adhesive is a device composed of karaya and sodium borate with...

  10. Complication rates and patient satisfaction with removable dentures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilhan, Hakan; Erdogan, Ozge; Ergin, Selen; Celik, Melahat; Ates, Gokcen

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this clinical study was to evaluate the frequency and type of prosthetic complications in relation to type and properties of removable dentures and to investigate the influence of these complications and several data about the existing dentures on patient satisfaction. MATERIALS AND METHODS Ninety nine patients (44 males and 55 females) wearing removable dentures have been included in the study. The complications of the patients were recorded; patient satisfaction was determined with a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and the relationship of complications and patient satisfaction with several data about the dentures such as denture age, type of denture, centric relation and vertical dimension was investigated. Kruskal Wallis, Mann Whitney U and Chi square tests were used for statistical analyses. The results were evaluated statistically at a significance level of Pdentures with correct centric relations was found to be significantly lower than dentures with wrong centric relations (Pdentures with wrong centric relations caused need for addition of artificial teeth. PMID:22737317

  11. COMPARISON OF BOND STRENGTH OF THREE DENTURE TEETH MADE IN IRAN WITH RESIN BASES AND IVOCLAR DENTURE TEETH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R MOSHARRAF

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. One of the most common repairs in removable prostheses is, substitution debonded teeth in their places. In the other hand, with the incrased use of implants & the commensurate increase in force applied to prosthetic components, it is probable that tooth debonding will become an even greater clinical problem. Therefore in this study we are trying to select the strongest bond strength of Iranian denture teeth with respect to lvoclar denture teeth (Approved and recommended by ADA. Methods. In this study the upper anterior set of three Iranian denture teeth (called Berelian, Marjan and Supernevoclar and lvoclar denture teeth were used. of each type of denture teeth, 21 specimens was selected and the denture teeth glaze was removed in each specimen. Then the laboratory procedures (removal of wax & resin packing according to British Standard 3990 (BS 3990 or ISO 3336 was done. Each specimen was tested by an Instron machine. The tensile test used with the cross-head speed of 5mm/min until fracture occured. Results. The mean bond strength in Berelian teeth uppermost, afterward Marjan, Ivoclar and Super nevoclared in second, third and fourh rank respectively. But statistical analysis showed no significanrt difference among the mean bond strength in four groups of denture teeth. The percentage of cohesive fracture (sum of acrylic farcture and dental fracture in Berelian specimens was uppermost, afterward Supernevoclar and Marjan were placed in second, third & fourth rank respectively. But statistical analysis showed no significant difference among the percentage of cohesive fracture in different groups of denture teeth. Discussion. The bond strength and the percentage of cohesive fracture of Iranian denture teeth is the same & competitive to lvoclar denture teeth (approved and recommended by ADA.

  12. (18)F-FDG-PET/CT angiography in the diagnosis of infective endocarditis and cardiac device infection in adult patients with congenital heart disease and prosthetic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzi, María N; Dos-Subirà, L; Roque, Albert; Fernández-Hidalgo, Nuria; Cuéllar-Calabria, Hug; Pijuan Domènech, Antonia; Gonzàlez-Alujas, María T; Subirana-Domènech, M T; Miranda-Barrio, B; Ferreira-González, Ignacio; González-López, Juan J; Igual, Albert; Maisterra-Santos, Olga; García-Dorado, David; Castell-Conesa, Joan; Almirante, Benito; Escobar Amores, Manuel; Tornos, Pilar; Aguadé-Bruix, Santiago

    2017-12-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) and cardiac device infection (CDI) are a major complication in the growing number of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) reaching adulthood. We aimed to evaluate the added value of (18)F-FDG-PET/CT angiography (PET/CTA) in the diagnosis of IE-CDI in adults with CHD and intravascular or intracardiac prosthetic material, in whom echocardiography (ECHO) and modified Duke Criteria (DC) have limitations because of the patients' complex anatomy. A prospective study was conducted in a referral center with multidisciplinary IE and CHD Units. PET/CTA and ECHO findings were compared in consecutive adult (≥18years) patients with CHD who have prosthetic material and suspected IE-CDI. The initial diagnosis using the DC and the diagnosis with the additional PET/CTA data (DC+PET/CTA) were compared with the final diagnostic consensus established by an expert team at three months. Between November-2012 and April-2017, 25 patients (15 men; median age 40years) were included. Cases were initially classified as definite in 8 (32%), possible in 14 (56%) and rejected in 3 (12%). DC+PET/CTA allowed reclassification of 12/14 (86%) cases initially identified as possible IE. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy of DC at IE suspicion were 39.1%/83.3%/90.4%/25.5%/61.2%, respectively. The diagnostic performance increased significantly with addition of PET/CTA data: 87%/83.3%/95.4%/61.5%/85.1%, respectively. PET/CTA also provided an alternative diagnosis in 3 patients with rejected IE, and detected pulmonary embolisms in 3 patients. PET/CTA was a useful diagnostic tool in the complex group of adult patients with CHD who have cardiac or intravascular prosthetic material and suspected IE or CDI, providing added diagnostic value to the modified DC (increased sensitivity) and improving case classification. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Rehabilitation and Prosthetic Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Service » Prosthetic & Sensory Aids Service (PSAS) Rehabilitation and Prosthetic Services Menu Menu Rehabilitation and Prosthetics Rehabilitation and ... Enter ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Prosthetic & Sensory Aids Service (PSAS) Our Mission The mission ...

  14. Swallowed dentures: Two cases and a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahir Gachabayov

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Fixed dentures can be accidentally ingested as well as removable dentures. Denture loosening leads to accidental denture ingestion. Patients with denture loosening should be recommended to visit dentist as soon as possible.

  15. OVERLAY DENTURES: A REVIEW AND REPORT OF FOUR CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deeksha SHARMA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Patients with ectodermal dysplasia or having under‑ gone cleft surgery with anodontia or hypodontia, hypo‑ plastic conical teeth and patients with severely worn dentition are difficult to treat because of the poor remaining tooth structure. These patients often exhibit loss of vertical dimension of occlusion and aesthetic problems and usually need complex prosthetic treatments. Financial constraints or other priorities often restrict one from choosing the most desirable treatment. The overlay removable denture is a covering prosthesis partially supported by natural teeth, tooth roots, or dental implants, providing an efficient alter‑ native of treatment. Clinical reports describe the various applications of overlay dentures.

  16. Controlling fungal biofilms with functional drug delivery denture biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jianchuan; Jiang, Fuguang; Yeh, Chih-Ko; Sun, Yuyu

    2016-04-01

    Candida-associated denture stomatitis (CADS), caused by colonization and biofilm-formation of Candida species on denture surfaces, is a significant clinical concern. We show here that modification of conventional denture materials with functional groups can significantly increase drug binding capacity and control drug release rate of the resulting denture materials for potentially managing CADS. In our approach, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-based denture resins were surface grafted with three kinds of polymers, poly(1-vinyl-2-pyrrolidinone) (PNVP), poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA), and poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA), through plasma-initiated grafting polymerization. With a grafting yield as low as 2 wt%, the three classes of new functionalized denture materials showed significantly higher drug binding capacities toward miconazole, a widely used antifungal drug, than the original PMMA denture resin control, leading to sustained drug release and potent biofilm-controlling effects against Candida. Among the three classes of functionalized denture materials, PNVP-grafted resin provided the highest miconazole binding capability and the most powerful antifungal and biofilm-controlling activities. Drug binding mechanisms were studied. These results demonstrated the importance of specific interactions between drug molecules and functional groups on biomaterials, shedding lights on future design of CADS-managing denture materials and other related devices for controlled drug delivery.

  17. On denture marking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrman, H I; DiZinno, J A; Wasén, J; René, N

    1999-06-01

    During the last decades in Sweden dentures have been permanently marked with a stainless steel metal band incorporated into the acrylic and containing the patient's birth date, a special number, and "S" for Sweden. The last recommendation issued by the National Board of Health and Welfare states that "the patients shall always be offered denture marking and be informed about the benefit thereof. Denture marking is not permitted if the patient refuses it". Requirements for denture markers have been that they should be biologically inert (when incorporated into the denture), not be expensive, be easy to inscribe, be possible to retrieve after an accident, and survive elevated temperatures for a reasonable time under normal circumstances. Although the frequency of edentulousness has decreased in recent years due to the improvement in oral health there remains a need to address the issue of marking of complete dentures, because there is a large variation in the oral status of populations in different countries. Given that only one marked denture can reveal the identity of a deceased person when all other methods fail to do so, makes it worthwhile. Furthermore, denture marking is important in long-term care facilities. We have investigated the issue of denture marking in Europe and in the United States. The results from the European survey show that denture marking is, to our knowledge regulated by law only in Sweden and Iceland. In the US denture marking is so far mandatory in 21 states while New York State requires dentures to be marked if the patient requests it and several other states impose the obligation to mark dentures on long-term care facilities. Since there is no international consensus regarding the issue of denture marking it is important to address it. A survey from the Nordic countries has shown that if denture marking was in general use, the contribution to the establishment of identity by forensic odontology in cases of fire would increase by about 10

  18. Changes in Oral Health Related Quality of Life (OHRQoL) 
and Satisfaction with Conventional Complete Dentures Among Elderly People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erić, Jelena; Tihaček Šojić, Ljiljana; Bjelović, Ljiljana; Tsakos, Georgios

    To assess the changes in oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) and satisfaction among older adults after receiving new complete dentures, and the association of age, gender, education, medical history, past prosthetic history (number of previous complete dentures and time since current complete dentures) and quality of existing complete dentures with patients' ratings of satisfaction with their complete dentures. The study comprised 114 community-dwelling adults ≥ 65 year of age, all wearing complete dentures in both jaws. The sample was selected from four senior day centres. Data were collected using clinical oral examinations and a self-administered questionnaire. Dentures were clinically evaluated for retention, stability, occlusion, articulation and vertical dimension. The questionnaire recorded data on sociodemographic information, previous denture history, oral satisfaction scale (OSS), and OHRQoL through the Oral Impacts on Daily Performance (OIDP) scale. There was a significant improvement in OHRQoL after treatment (mean OIDP score: 2.7) compared to before treatment (mean OIDP score: 6.6). The largest changes were in relation to impacts on eating (33.3% to 15.9%) and smiling (17.5% to 4.5%). Six months after placement of the dentures, patient satisfaction improved compared to before treatment (p complete dentures. The provision of new dentures among older adults resulted in significantly better satisfaction and OHRQoL than wearing existing dentures. There was no significant correlation between the clinical assessment of the dentures and patients' satisfaction with them.

  19. EFFICIENCY OF PROSTHETIC TREATMENT WITH POST RESECTION PROSTHESES WITH SOLID SUBSTITUTE PART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Gerdzhikov

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to track the effectiveness of prosthetic treatment with post resection dentures with solid substitute part and their role in the restoration of damaged functions. Materials and methods: The study included 14 patients (9 men and 5 women with different size and location of defects in the upper jaw treated in the period 2010-2016 with post resection prostheses with a solid substitute part. The impressions were taken with irreversible hydrocolloid impression material. The prostheses were completed by heat-curing acrylic with low quantity residual monomer. The effectiveness of prosthetics was evaluated by the method of Mihaylov for both oral-nasal examination of the pressure with the device "Oronasopneumotest." For objectifying and assess the occlusal-articulation ratios was held computerized occlusal analysis with the system T-SCAN 8. Results: The results showed successful obturation and sealing of defects in all patients. It was found satisfactory recovery of the speaking function and normalization of occlusal-articulation ratios. Conclusion: The prosthetic treatment with post resection prostheses with a solid substitute part allows successful recovery of the lost speech and chewing functions, helping to restore self esteem and social rehabilitation of patients.

  20. Evaluation of satisfaction and complications in patients with existing complete dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilhan, Hakan; Geckili, Onur; Ergin, Selen; Erdogan, Ozge; Ates, Gokcen

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this clinical trial was to assess satisfaction, as well as the frequency and type of prosthetic complications in terms of several variables, in patients with complete dentures that had been supplied at private clinics. The study subjects were 64 patients with a mean age of 63.48 years wearing complete dentures provided at private clinics, and requesting new ones. The degree of patient satisfaction with their dentures was assessed, as well as complications and parameters related to the dentures such as the accuracy of vertical dimensions and centric relation, arrangement and possible malposition of the artificial teeth, and the border length of the denture bases. The most common complication was loss of retention (85.9%), followed by ulceration (44.2%). Mandibular dentures with long vestibular borders showed a significantly higher incidence of epulis fissuratum (P = 0.017), and denture-related sore spots influenced patients' speech ability (P = 0.023). Routine recalls seem to be important for wearers of complete dentures, as several insidious complications may develop and cause damage to the dentures as well as the patients' oral tissues.

  1. Cytological response of palatal epithelium to TiN-coated CoCr alloy denture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Sokołowski

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the impact of titanium nitride coatings on CoCr alloy metal parts in framework dentures on human palatal epithelium cytology compared to framework dentures made with the same alloy but without titanium nitride coating, and to acrylic dentures. Every prosthetic restoration introduced into the oral cavity and remaining in direct contact with the palate exhibits a varied and harmful effect on the state of the palatal epithelium by disturbing its keratinization. CoCr alloy dentures produce a significantly greater perturbation of keratinization compared to acrylic dentures. There is no evidence showing that a titanium nitride coating of the CoCr alloy plays a protective role in the environment of the oral cavity.

  2. Cytological response of palatal epithelium to TiN-coated CoCr alloy denture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukomska-Szymańska, Monika; Brzeziński, Piotr M; Zieliński, Andrzej; Sokołowski, Jerzy

    2012-04-24

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of titanium nitride coatings on CoCr alloy metal parts in framework dentures on human palatal epithelium cytology compared to framework dentures made with the same alloy but without titanium nitride coating, and to acrylic dentures. Every prosthetic restoration introduced into the oral cavity and remaining in direct contact with the palate exhibits a varied and harmful effect on the state of the palatal epithelium by disturbing its keratinization. CoCr alloy dentures produce a significantly greater perturbation of keratinization compared to acrylic dentures. There is no evidence showing that a titanium nitride coating of the CoCr alloy plays a protective role in the environment of the oral cavity.

  3. Influence of denture plaque biofilm on oral mucosal membrane in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybyłowska, D; Mierzwińska-Nastalska, E; Rubinsztajn, R; Chazan, R; Rolski, D; Swoboda-Kopeć, E

    2015-01-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have the lower airways colonized with pathogenic bacteria in a stable period of the disease and during exacerbations. The etiology of bacterial exacerbations of COPD depends on the underlying disease, the frequency of exacerbations and antibiotic therapy. Microorganisms can be aspirated off the denture plaque biofilm into the lower respiratory tract and could reduce the patient's immunity and cause pneumonia. COPD patients, who are using acrylic dentures in oral cavity, are exposed to denture stomatitis and oral candidiasis. The aim of this study was to establish the composition of denture plaque biofilm and its impact on the oral mucosa in COPD patients. The study included patients in a stable phase of COPD using removable denture and the control group included healthy wearer's appliances. Examinations concerned the oral mucosal membrane and the hygienic condition of prosthetic restorations. Microbiological examinations were performed by taking a direct swab from the surface of acrylic dentures. Seventeen bacterial and fungal strains were isolated from denture plaque of COPD patients, which could be a reservoir of pathogens in the upper and lower airways. The results showed a greater frequency of prosthetic stomatitis complicated by mucosal infections among COPD patients compared to healthy subjects.

  4. Prognoses of new complete dentures from the patient's denture assessment of existing dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komagamine, Yuriko; Kanazawa, Manabu; Sasaki, Yoshiyuki; Sato, Yusuke; Minakuchi, Shunsuke

    2017-06-01

    The aim was to determine prognostic factors affecting frequent post-delivery adjustments of new complete dentures using patients' assessments of existing complete dentures. A total of 125 edentulous participants (56 men, 69 women; mean age, 76.4 years) who required new complete dentures evaluated existing dentures using the patient's denture assessment (PDA), a questionnaire regarding the self-assessment of dentures composed of 22 question items and containing six subscales: "function," "lower denture," "upper denture," "expectation," "esthetics and speech," and "importance." Moreover, the numbers of post-delivery adjustments of new dentures were recorded. A multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to identify significant factors for frequent adjustments of new dentures with five subscales of the PDA (excluding "importance"), level of mandibular ridge resorption, and age as independent variables. The analysis showed that "function," "esthetics and speech," and level of mandibular ridge resorption were significant variables for a frequent number of post-delivery adjustments of new complete dentures. The results suggested that patients' assessments of existing dentures using the PDA might allow a prediction of prognosis for complete denture treatments. Additionally, low "function" scores and high "esthetics and speech" scores for existing dentures and high levels of mandibular ridge resorption were significant prognostic factors affecting frequent post-delivery adjustments of new complete dentures. It may be difficult for edentulous persons to adapt to new complete dentures, especially those who have complaints about mastication and swallowing with existing dentures and poor mandibular ridges, but are satisfied with esthetics and speech.

  5. Antimicrobial activity of complete denture cleanser solutions based on sodium hypochlorite and Ricinus communis - a randomized clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salles, Marcela Moreira; Badaró, Maurício Malheiros; Arruda, Carolina Noronha Ferraz de; Leite, Vanessa Maria Fagundes; Silva, Cláudia Helena Lovato da; Watanabe, Evandro; Oliveira, Viviane de Cássia; Paranhos, Helena de Freitas Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    To preserve oral health and to maintain the prosthetic devices, it is important not only to improve the properties of commonly known hygiene products, but also to investigate new materials with antimicrobial action. Objectives This study evaluated the antimicrobial activity of sodium hypochlorite (0.25% and 0.50%) and 10% Ricinus communis' solutions against specific microorganisms. Sixty four maxillary complete denture wearers were instructed to brush their dentures three times a day and to soak them (20 min/day) in the solutions: SH1: 0.25% sodium hypochlorite; SH2: 0.5% sodium hypochlorite; RC: 10% R. communis oil; and C: 0.85% saline (control). The solutions were used for 7 days in a randomized sequence. Following each period of use, there was a 1-week washout period. Antimicrobial activity was determined by Colony Forming Units (CFU) counts of Streptococcus mutans, Candida spp., and gram-negative microorganisms. For collecting biofilm, the internal surface of maxillary dentures was brushed with saline solution, and biofilm suspension obtained. After dilutions (100 - 10-3), aliquots were seeded in Mitis salivarius, CHROMagar Candida, and MacConkey agar for detecting S. mutans, Candida spp., or gram-negative microorganisms, respectively. After incubation, colonies were counted, and CFU/mL values were calculated. Then, transformation - log10 (CFU+1) - data were analyzed using the Friedman test (α=0.05). Results showed significant differences between the solutions (p<0.001). All three solutions showed antimicrobial activity against S. mutans. Against Candida spp., RC and SH1 solutions showed similar effect while SH2 showed superior activity. SH1 and SH2 solutions showed antimicrobial action against gram-negative microorganisms. The Candida species most frequently isolated was C. albicans, followed by C. tropicalis and C. glabrata. The 0.5% sodium hypochlorite solution was the most effective and might be used to control denture biofilm. C. albicans was the most

  6. Circuit For Control Of Electromechanical Prosthetic Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed circuit for control of electromechanical prosthetic hand derives electrical control signals from shoulder movements. Updated, electronic version of prosthesis, that includes two hooklike fingers actuated via cables from shoulder harness. Circuit built around favored shoulder harness, provides more dexterous movement, without incurring complexity of computer-controlled "bionic" or hydraulically actuated devices. Additional harness and potentiometer connected to similar control circuit mounted on other shoulder. Used to control stepping motor rotating hand about prosthetic wrist to one of number of angles consistent with number of digital outputs. Finger-control signals developed by circuit connected to first shoulder harness transmitted to prosthetic hand via sliprings at prosthetic wrist joint.

  7. Prosthetic rehabilitation of edentulous patient with limited oral access: A clinical report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Microstomia may result from surgical treatment of orofacial neoplasms, cleft lips, maxillofacial trauma, burns, radiotherapy or scleroderma. A maximal oral opening that is smaller than the size of a complete denture can make prosthetic treatment challenging. This clinical report presents the prosthodontic management of a total edentulous patient with microstomia. Sectional mandibular and maxillary trays and foldable mandibular and maxillary denture were fabricated for the total edentulous patient.

  8. Prosthetic rehabilitation of a preschooler with induced anodontia - A clinical report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivayogi M Hugar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of prosthetic rehabilitation with complete dentures for a three year nine months old child is presented. Dental prosthesis are frequently used to avoid psychologic, speech, or swallowing problems in preschooler children. The case was followed up for a period of three years. These prosthesis were modified as the child grew and as the permanent teeth erupted into the oral cavity the dentures were trimmed from the areas of erupting teeth to facilitate their eruption.

  9. Comparison of denture tooth movement between CAD-CAM and conventional fabrication techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodacre, Brian J; Goodacre, Charles J; Baba, Nadim Z; Kattadiyil, Mathew T

    2017-05-12

    -CAM-bonded, injection, and fluid resin. Techniques involving compression during processing showed increased positive occlusal tooth movement compared with techniques not involving compression. CAD-CAM monolithic dentures produced the best combination of accuracy and reproducibility of the tested techniques. The results from this study demonstrate that varying amounts of tooth movement can be expected depending on the processing technique. However, the clinical significance of these differences is unknown. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of toothbrushes and denture brushes on heat-polymerized acrylic resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas Pontes, Karina Matthes; de Holanda, Janaína Câncio; Fonteles, Cristiane Sa Roriz; Pontes, Cassio de Barros; Lovato da Silva, Cláudia Helena; Paranhos, Helena de Freitas Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    It is important to choose an appropriate brush for denture cleaning to prevent damage to the surface properties of prosthetic devices. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the abrasiveness of toothbrushes and denture brushes on boiled and microwave-processed acrylic resins. Specimens of 4 resin brands were prepared (n = 30). Five brands of brushes (n = 6) were used in a toothbrushing machine, first for 17,800 strokes and then for an additional 35,600 strokes (total of 53,400), at a load of 200 g. An analytical balance and a profilometer were used to assess the weight and surface roughness, respectively, before and after 17,800 and 53,400 strokes. Analysis of variance and Tukey tests were used for data analysis (α = 0.05). Weight loss increased with time, while surface roughness remained the same. There were no statistically significant differences among toothbrushes and denture brushes in the resulting weight loss (17,800 strokes, 1.83 mg; 53,400 strokes, 3.78 mg) or surface roughness (17,800 or 53,400 strokes, 0.14 µm). The weight loss values after 53,400 brush strokes indicated that Clássico (2.28 mg) and VIPI Wave (2.75 mg) presented significantly greater abrasion resistance than Lucitone 550 (3.36 mg) and Onda-Cryl (2.85 mg) (P < 0.05). The type of brush and the polymerization method did not influence resin wear after brushing.

  11. Does wearing dentures change sensory nerve responses under the denture base?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Nana; Kimoto, Suguru; Kawai, Yasuhiko

    2014-03-01

    The standard textbook on complete dentures suggests the necessity of relief for the incisive and posterior palatine foramina of denture wearers to prevent the impingement of the nerves and vessels passing through these foramina. However, concrete evidence of the effect of dentures on the sensory function of the nerves underlying dentures is lacking. The study aim was to investigate the influence of denture-induced compression on sensory nerve responses to stimulations. Only partially edentulous patients of maxillary Kennedy class II who wear dentures (WD) or who never wear dentures (ND) were recruited as participants. The WD and ND groups had 15 participants with a mean age of 66.9 years and 22 participants with a mean age of 60.2 years, respectively. Current perception thresholds (CPTs) at 2000, 250 and 5 Hz, corresponding to A-beta, A-delta and C fibres, respectively, were measured by the Neurometer(®) NS3000 device and compared between groups. The data were analysed by the t-test, the paired t-test and analysis of covariance adjusted for age, sex and thickness of the mucosa. The CPTs showed large differences at 2000 Hz but no differences at the other frequencies when the WD and ND groups were compared. Only the CPT of the edentulous side at 2000 Hz was significantly different between groups. Wearing removable partial dentures contributes to changes of responses to stimulations in the large fibre of the sensory nerve underlying the maxillary alveolar ridge. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. 77 FR 14989 - Medicare Program; Revisions to the Durable Medical Equipment, Prosthetics, Orthotics, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-14

    ... Act. Prosthetic devices are defined as devices (other than dental) which replace all or part of an... devices include cardiac pacemakers, cochlear implants, electrical continence aids, electrical...

  13. Implant-retained mandibular overdentures versus conventional dentures: 10 years of care and aftercare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Anita; Meijer, Henny J A; Raghoebar, Gerry M; Vissink, Arjan

    2006-01-01

    This 10-year prospective, randomized, clinical trial investigated the treatment outcome of edentulous patients treated with mandibular overdentures retained by 2 endosseous implants compared with conventional dentures in patients with or without vestibuloplasty. One hundred fifty-one edentulous patients (5 groups) with a symphyseal mandibular bone height between 8 and 25 mm participated. Sixty-two patients were treated with an overdenture retained by 2 implants (groups 1 and 3), 59 patients were treated with a conventional denture (groups 2 and 5), and 30 patients were treated with a conventional denture after preprosthetic vestibuloplasty (group 4). Patients who received conventional dentures but preferred implants later on could undergo implant surgery after 1 year of their initial treatment, but were analyzed in their original group. The prosthetic and surgical care and aftercare were scored during a 10-year evaluation period. One hundred thirty-three patients completed the 10-year follow-up evaluations. Forty-four percent of patients treated with conventional dentures switched within 10 years to implant-retained overdentures, versus 16% of the patients who were treated with conventional dentures after vestibuloplasty. On average, a greater time investment and more treatment sessions were needed in patients treated with implant-retained overdentures compared to patients treated with conventional dentures. Patients treated with an implant-retained overdenture need more treatment interventions and treatment time than patients treated with conventional dentures.

  14. "Denture marking" as an aid to forensic identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Jayashree; Kumar, C Dhinesh; Simon, Paul

    2012-09-01

    "Identification through forensic science is an art of giving the corpse a name A real life detective work that would put even Sherlock Homes to shame." Forensic dentistry deals with proper handling and examination of dental evidence and proper evaluation and presentation of dental findings in interest of justice. Denture marking or labeling is not a new concept in either Prosthetic or Forensic dentistry and its routine practice has been urged by Forensic dentists internationally for many years. Denture marking is accepted as a means of identifying dentures and persons in geriatric institutions or post mortem during war, crimes, and civil unrest, natural and mass disasters. Prosthodontists are playing very important role in forensic dentistry as they are concerned with fabrication of various prostheses which can serve as an important tool for identification. Identification is essential requirement of any medico-legal investigation because a wrong identity may pose a problem in delivering justice. The main objective of this article is to discuss the various methods of denture marking and to emphasize the importance of denture marking for person identification in medico legal investigations.

  15. Masticatory performance of complete denture wearers after using two adhesives: a crossover randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Junior, Norberto Martins; Rodriguez, Larissa Santana; Mendoza Marin, Danny Omar; Paleari, André Gustavo; Pero, Ana Carolina; Compagnoni, Marco Antonio

    2014-11-01

    Masticatory performance analysis of conventional complete denture wearers who use denture adhesives is scarce in the dental literature. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of the use of 2 denture adhesives on the masticatory performance of conventional complete denture wearers by means of a crossover study. Forty individuals who were edentulous received new maxillary and mandibular complete dentures, and, after an adaptation period, were submitted to masticatory performance analysis without denture adhesive (control). The participants were randomly divided and assigned to 2 protocols: protocol 1, denture adhesive 1 (Ultra Corega cream tasteless) use during the first 15 days, followed by no use of denture adhesive over the next 15 days (washout), and then use of denture adhesive 2 (Ultra Corega powder tasteless) for 15 days; protocol 2, denture adhesive 2 (Ultra Corega powder tasteless) use during the first 15 days, followed by no use of denture adhesive during the next 15 days (washout), and then use of denture adhesive 1 (Ultra Corega cream tasteless) for 15 days. The masticatory performance was assessed immediately after the use of denture adhesive by means of the sieve method, in which participants were instructed to deliberately chew 5 almonds for 20 chewing strokes. Masticatory performance was calculated by the weight of comminuted material that passed through the sieves. Data were analyzed by a 1-way ANOVA for paired samples and the multiple comparison of means by using the Bonferroni test (α=.05). A significant increase in masticatory performance was noted after using the Ultra Corega cream (mean, 32.6%) and Ultra Corega powder (mean, 31.2%) when compared with the control group (mean, 19.8%) (Padhesives evaluated. The use of denture adhesive improved the masticatory performance of conventional complete denture wearers. No difference was found in masticatory performance with the use of cream or powder denture adhesive. Copyright © 2014

  16. Posterior open occlusion management by registration of overlay removable partial denture: A clinical report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Nosouhian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This clinical report describes prosthetic rehabilitation of posterior open bite relationship in a patient with several missing teeth and skeletal Class III malocclusion. Primary diagnostic esthetic evaluations were performed by mounting casts in centric relation and estimating lost vertical dimension of occlusion. Exclusive treatments were designated by applying overlay removable partial denture with external attachment systems for higher retentions.

  17. Posterior open occlusion management by registration of overlay removable partial denture: A clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosouhian, Saeid; Davoudi, Amin; Derhami, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    This clinical report describes prosthetic rehabilitation of posterior open bite relationship in a patient with several missing teeth and skeletal Class III malocclusion. Primary diagnostic esthetic evaluations were performed by mounting casts in centric relation and estimating lost vertical dimension of occlusion. Exclusive treatments were designated by applying overlay removable partial denture with external attachment systems for higher retentions.

  18. Creative mechanism design for a prosthetic hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wen-Tung; Tseng, Ching-Huan; Wu, Long-Long

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, an auxiliary methodology called the creative mechanism design is introduced into the innovation of gripping devices for prosthetic hands. This methodology is a systematic approach based on modification of existing devices for the generation of all possible topological structures of mechanisms and mechanical devices. An existing gripping device (Teh Lin ATG-5F prosthetic hand) constructed by a planar six-bar linkage with one degree of freedom is dealt with by using this methodology. Through the processes of generalization, number synthesis, specialization and particularization for the existing design, five new mechanisms are created in this study to apply to anthropomorphic prosthetic hands. The results show that the methodology for creative mechanism design is a powerful tool for creating new categories of mechanisms to avoid existing designs that have patent protection and can help designers in the conceptual phase. Also, this methodology is validated as a useful way to improve prosthetic hands for amputees.

  19. In vitro comparison of the tensile bond strength of denture adhesives on denture bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kore, Doris R; Kattadiyil, Mathew T; Hall, Dan B; Bahjri, Khaled

    2013-12-01

    With several denture adhesives available, it is important for dentists to make appropriate patient recommendations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the tensile bond strength of denture adhesives on denture base materials at time intervals of up to 24 hours. Fixodent, Super Poligrip, Effergrip, and SeaBond denture adhesives were tested with 3 denture base materials: 2 heat-polymerized (Lucitone 199 and SR Ivocap) and 1 visible-light-polymerized (shade-stable Eclipse). Artificial saliva with mucin was used as a control. Tensile bond strength was tested in accordance with American Dental Association specifications at 5 minutes, 3 hours, 6 hours, 12 hours, and 24 hours after applying the adhesive. Maximum forces before failure were recorded in megapascals (MPa), and the data were subjected to a 2-way analysis of variance (α=.05). All 4 adhesives had greater tensile bond strength than the control. Fixodent, Super Poligrip, and SeaBond had higher tensile bond strength values than Effergrip. All adhesives had the greatest tensile bond strength at 5 minutes and the least at 24 hours. The 3 denture bases produced significantly different results with each adhesive (Padhesives had the greatest tensile bond strength, followed by Ivocap and Eclipse. All 4 adhesives had greater tensile bond strength than the control, and all 4 adhesives were strongest at the 5-minute interval. On all 3 types of denture bases, Effergrip produced significantly lower tensile bond strength, and Fixodent, Super Poligrip, and SeaBond produced significantly higher tensile bond strength. At 24 hours, the adhesive-base combinations with the highest tensile bond strength were Fixodent on Lucitone 199, Fixodent on Eclipse, Fixodent on Ivocap, and Super Poligrip on Ivocap. Copyright © 2013 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Hollow Maxillary Complete Denture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Radke, Usha; Mundhe, Darshana

    2011-01-01

    .... The resorption occurs at a faster rate in mandibular arch as compared to the maxillary arch; but severely atrophic maxillae with large interridge distance often pose a clinical challenge during fabrication of a successful maxillary complete denture...

  1. DENTURE WEARER: ALCALIGENES SPECIES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    associated with Alcaligenes species infection in a patient using an upper single ... patient was HIV negative and VDRL screening for syphilis was also negative. ... status of denture and the underlying oral mucosal, to prevent opportunistic.

  2. FABRICATION OF A RETINAL PROSTHETIC TEST DEVICE USING ELECTRODEPOSITED SILICON OVER POLYPYRROLE PATTERNED WITH SU-8 PHOTORESIST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Eric; Ellis, Daniel; Charles, Duran; McKenzie, Jason

    2015-01-01

    A materials fabrication study of a photodiode array for possible application of retina prosthesis was undertaken. A test device was fabricated using a glassy carbon electrode patterned with SU-8 photoresist. In the openings, p-type polypyrrole was first electrodeposited using 1-butyl-1-methylpyridinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid. The polypyrrole was self-doped with imide ion at ~1.5 mole %, was verified as p-type, and had a resistivity of ~20 Ωcm. N-type Silicon was then electrodeposited over this layer using silicon tetrachloride / phosphorus trichloride in acetonitrile and passivated in a second electrodeposition using trimethylchlorosilane. Electron microscopy revealed the successful electrodeposition of silicon over patterned polypyrrole. Rudimentary photodiode behavior was observed. The passivation improved but did not completely protect the electrodeposited silicon from oxidation by air.

  3. A Study on Effect of Surface Treatments on the Shear Bond Strength between Composite Resin and Acrylic Resin Denture Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Nirmalya; Gupta, Tapas K; Banerjee, Ardhendu

    2011-03-01

    Visible light-cured composite resins have become popular in prosthetic dentistry for the replacement of fractured/debonded denture teeth, making composite denture teeth on partial denture metal frameworks, esthetic modification of denture teeth to harmonize with the characteristics of adjacent natural teeth, remodelling of worn occlusal surfaces of posterior denture teeth etc. However, the researches published on the bond strength between VLC composite resins and acrylic resin denture teeth is very limited. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of five different methods of surface treatments on acrylic resin teeth on the shear bond strength between light activated composite resin and acrylic resin denture teeth. Ninety cylindrical sticks of acrylic resin with denture teeth mounted atop were prepared. Various treatments were done upon the acrylic resin teeth surfaces. The samples were divided into six groups, containing 15 samples each. Over all the treated and untreated surfaces of all groups, light-cured composite resin was applied. The shear strengths were measured in a Universal Testing Machine using a knife-edge shear test. Data were analyzed using one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and mean values were compared by the F test. Application of bonding agent with prior treatment of methyl methacrylate on the acrylic resin denture teeth resulted in maximum bond strength with composite resin.

  4. Prosthetic devices shaped as tubular chambers for the treatment of large diaphyseal defects by guided bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoli Aldini, N; Fini, M; Giavaresi, G; Guzzardella, G A; Giardino, R

    2005-01-01

    Guided tissue regeneration is based on the hypothesis that the different tissues have unequal abilities to penetrate a wounded area during the healing process. The use of a device acting as a chamber allows the growth of a particular tissue and prevents the ingrowth of other tissues which impair the healing process. At the same time the chamber protects and maintains in situ the intrinsic growth factors so that they may perform their specific activity. Guided tissue regeneration currently plays a well-recognized role mostly in dentistry and peripheral nerve surgery but interesting perspectives have also opened up in orthopedics. Considering the possibility of using guided bone regeneration in the repair of diaphyseal bone defects, this updated survey highlights some critical points and pathways related to the state-of-the-art of this promising procedure, focusing particularly on the properties of the material to make the tubular chamber, the use of osteopromotive factors and the most appropriate animal model to be used for the experimental evaluation.

  5. Evidence Regarding the Treatment of Denture Stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarborough, Alexandra; Cooper, Lyndon; Duqum, Ibrahim; Mendonça, Gustavo; McGraw, Kathleen; Stoner, Lisa

    2016-06-01

    Denture stomatitis is a common inflammatory condition affecting the mucosa underlying complete dentures. It is associated with denture microbial biofilm, poor denture hygiene, poor denture quality, and nocturnal denture use. Numerous treatment methodologies have been used to treat stomatitis; however, a gold standard treatment has not been identified. The aim of this systematic review is to report on the current knowledge available in studies representing a range of evidence on the treatment of denture stomatitis.

  6. Pursuing prosthetic electronic skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chortos, Alex; Liu, Jia; Bao, Zhenan

    2016-09-01

    Skin plays an important role in mediating our interactions with the world. Recreating the properties of skin using electronic devices could have profound implications for prosthetics and medicine. The pursuit of artificial skin has inspired innovations in materials to imitate skin's unique characteristics, including mechanical durability and stretchability, biodegradability, and the ability to measure a diversity of complex sensations over large areas. New materials and fabrication strategies are being developed to make mechanically compliant and multifunctional skin-like electronics, and improve brain/machine interfaces that enable transmission of the skin's signals into the body. This Review will cover materials and devices designed for mimicking the skin's ability to sense and generate biomimetic signals.

  7. Simplified versus traditional techniques for complete denture fabrication: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulino, Marcília R; Alves, Luana R; Gurgel, Bruno C V; Calderon, Patrícia S

    2015-01-01

    A number of methods have been described for the fabrication of complete dentures. There are 2 common ways to make conventional complete dentures: a traditional method and a simplified method. The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review to compare the efficiency of simplified and traditional methods for the fabrication of complete dentures. The review was conducted by 3 independent reviewers and included articles published up to December 2013. Three electronic databases were searched: MEDLINE-PubMed, The Cochrane Library, and ISI Web of Science. A manual search also was performed to identify clinical trials of simplified versus traditional fabrication of complete dentures. Six articles were classified as randomized controlled clinical trials and were included in this review. The majority of the selected articles analyzed general satisfaction, denture stability, chewing ability and function, comfort, hygiene, esthetics, speech function, quality of life, cost, and fabrication time. Although the studies reviewed demonstrate some advantages of simplified over traditional prostheses, such as lower cost and clinical time, good chewing efficiency, and a positive effect on the quality of life, the reports related the use of different simplified methods for the fabrication of complete dentures. Additional randomized controlled trials that used similar simplified techniques for the fabrication of complete dentures should be performed with larger sample sizes and longer follow-up periods. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Denture labeling: A new approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pardeep K Bansal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for denture labeling is important for forensic and social reasons in case patients need to be identified individually. The importance of denture marking has long been acknowledged by the dental profession. Over the years, various denture marking systems have been reported in the literature, but none till date fulfills all the prescribed ADA specifications. A simple, easy, inexpensive procedure for marking accurate identification marks on dentures with a lead foil is described here. The label caring the patient information is incorporated in the acrylic resin during the denture processing.

  9. Microprocessor prosthetic knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Dale

    2006-02-01

    This article traces the development of microprocessor prosthetic knees from early research in the 1970s to the present. Read about how microprocessor knees work, functional options, patient selection, and the future of this prosthetic.

  10. Prosthetic Knee Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Google Bookmarks Technorati Yahoo MyWeb Prosthetic Knee Systems Translated into plain language by Helen Osborne of ... Consulting Original article by Bill Dupes Prosthetic knee systems are among the most complex of all components. ...

  11. 21 CFR 872.3480 - Polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... adhesive. 872.3480 Section 872.3480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive. (a) Identification. A polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive is a device composed of polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) intended...

  12. 21 CFR 872.3450 - Ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or karaya denture adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3450 Ethylene oxide... retention and comfort. (b) Classification. (1) Class I if the device is made of wax-impregnated cotton...

  13. Computerized cephalometric evaluation of changes following treatment with complete dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strajnić Ljiljana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to provide longitudinal evaluation of the changes after complete dentures therapy and the rate of residual ridge resorption through a six-year period of denture wearing. The authors presented the case of a 76-year-old patient, edentulous for twelve years, wearing complete dentures for six years, with the eugnat jaw relationship. Cephalometric radiograph was carried out in the process of new complete denture production, while the evaluation was carried out after six years. Cephalometric analysis was performed by using ”Dr. Ceph” computer software (FYI Technologies, GA, USA. After six years, the reduction of anterior total facial height was 5.5 mm and the anterior lower facial height was 5.5 mm, the vertical residual ridge reduction of the maxilla was 1.4 mm and the reduction of the mandible was 3mm. The study confirms the reliability and advantages of cephalometric analyses and reveals their application possibilities in prosthetic diagnostics and therapy, as well as in evaluation of rehabilitative results in edentulous patients and longitudinal analysis of changes on the orofacial complex tissues and intemaxillary relationships.

  14. Denture hygiene habits among elderly patients wearing complete dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apratim, Abhishek; Shah, Sanket S; Sinha, Manish; Agrawal, Manisha; Chhaparia, Nidhi; Abubakkar, Abu

    2013-11-01

    To determine the denture hygiene habits in complete denture patients according to their age and time of dentures. In this study a self administered structured was developed to know the attitude of the patients regarding denture hygiene in the department of Prosthodontics. The total study sample consisted of 230 subjects including 124 (53.9%) males and 106 (46.1%) females. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 15.0 with chi-square test at p-value dentures daily once. Participants from the younger age group and who had been wearing dentures since 2 years maintain better frequency of cleaning. The majority of these subjects used water and brush for denture cleansing. After seeing the condition, half of the dentures were rated as good 50.3%, followed by fair and poor as 29.5 and 20.2% respectively. Poor condition of complete dentures seen in the population is mainly due to irregularly cleansing habits and also less usage of cleansing solutions. Dentists should give proper instructions regarding maintenance of denture hygiene.

  15. Coated with nanomaterials intraocular lenses, ophthalmic and human body implantable devices with high catalytic antioxidant activities: a new nanotechnology strategy of peroxidase cellular enzyme mimics increasing the biocompatibility and therapeutic deployment of the medical prosthetic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babizhayev, Mark A

    2013-04-01

    attack. Coated IOLs according to the patented nanotechnology can address the vast majority of cataract surgery-induced complications, such as secondary cataract, intraocular inflammation (endophthalmitis) and foreign body reactions, cystoid macular oedema, corneal edema. The nanotechnology offers physicians and surgeons to develop and commercialize costeffective therapeutic medical implantable devices, products and support systems with metabolic activities for the treatment of ophthalmic diseases and of a wide range of pathological states and disorders which are treated by insertion of the implantable and prosthetic (polymeric) devices.

  16. Denture Care Practices and Perceived Denture Status among Complete Denture Wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosuru, Krishnam Raju V; Devi, Ganji; Grandhi, Vikram; Prasan, Kumar K; Yasangi, Manoj K; Dhanalakshmi, Mannem

    2017-01-01

    Considerable importance to oral health care was lacking in India, and oral health neglect continues to exist, which is evident in the low utilization rates and poor oral health status. Conventional dentures are the most common alternative in restoration of lost teeth. Without proper denture care practices, there is an increased risk of developing a multitude of problems. The aim of this study is to assess the denture care practices among complete denture wearers in East Godavari district, Andhra Pradesh. A cross-sectional study was conducted in the department of Prosthodontics at the Konaseema Institute of Dental Sciences, Amalapuram, Andhra Pradesh. Patients with self-care ability and adequate overall health who were using either single or full complete dentures for more than 6 months from the time of the study were requested to participate in the study. A total of 375 study participants were given a self-administered questionnaire on denture care practices followed by clinical examination of the denture status. Statistical analysis was done using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software for windows, version 20.0 (Armonk, NY: IBM Corp). The majority of participants reported cleansing their dentures once a day, with brush and water, and had the habit of removing the dentures at night. Almost 80% of the participants reported their denture status to be good/fair. Clinical examination revealed that slightly more than half of the participants had poor denture status. This study highlights the need for improvement in patient education and counseling with respect to the maintenance of dentures and upkeep of denture hygiene. It also emphasizes the need for educating patients on how to evaluate the status of their dentures.

  17. An investigation of complete denture teaching in the UK: part 1. A survey of undergraduate teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieder, M; Faigenblum, M; Eder, A; Louca, C

    2013-08-01

    This paper is the first in a series of two that investigate the undergraduate teaching of complete dentures in the UK. A questionnaire was sent by email to 13 UK dental schools enquiring about the number of hours spent in the lecture theatre, laboratory and clinic. The schools were also asked to give their views about the preparedness of the new graduates for dealing with complete dentures in general practice. There was great disparity between schools in the overall number of lectures delivered. Two schools claimed 28 hours and the remainder varied between 6-15 hours. Four schools devoted more time to laboratory work whereas three schools spent more time in the clinic. One school reported no dedicated clinical time for complete dentures. There appears to be a regional variation with northern UK dental schools spending more time on the teaching of complete dentures. The quota for complete dentures varied from three in most schools to eight in one school and none in another. Comments from the dental schools varied from a reported lack of suitable complete denture cases, to concerns with insufficient curricular time devoted to the subject and a subsequent lack of clinical competence on graduation. Some schools have integrated complete denture teaching into the general prosthodontic course as it is considered inappropriate to teach different aspects of prosthetics in isolation. Competence in complete dentures falls short of what is expected. With a single exception all the schools seem to have low expectations for their undergraduate students to be practically trained and experienced in the production of complete dentures. Despite the advent of implants and the introduction of clinical dental technicians, there is and will continue to be a need for the competent treatment of the edentulous population by general practitioners.

  18. Maxillary Complete Denture Outcomes: A Systematic Review of Patient-Based Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalji, Ghadeer; McGraw, Kate; Cooper, Lyndon F

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to report on the current knowledge regarding patient satisfaction as a primary outcome for maxillary complete denture therapy. We asked, "For the maxillary edentulous patient treated using maxillary dentures, what are the patient-based outcomes regarding quality of life and treatment satisfaction." An electronic search of publications up to March 2014 was established using four databases: PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, and Embase. To meet the ultimate goal of establishing clinical guidelines based on available information, prospective comparative studies, cohort prospective studies, and retrospective studies on more than 10 subjects were included. The electronic search identified 4,530 articles that were evaluated at the title, abstract, and article level to include 31 articles of interest. The patient-based outcomes and satisfaction data included were examined and reported. The studies included 5,485 participants. Of these, 2,685 were identified as wearing maxillary complete dentures. Reported mean ages ranged from 59.7 to 73.6 years. A systematic review indicated that the provision of new maxillary complete dentures for edentulous patients results in improved self-reported satisfaction and oral health-related quality of life. The included reports, while providing evidence that complete denture satisfaction of participants and new dentures improve self-reported outcomes, did not include variables that influence these positive outcomes. A broad range of evidence supports the use of complete dentures for rehabilitation of the edentulous maxilla. When considering treatment of the edentulous maxilla, the expectations of patients for esthetic and phonetic (social) rehabilitation are high and can be met using maxillary complete dentures as the mode of prosthetic rehabilitation. Patients dissatisfied with new complete dentures may be referred for dental implant therapies involving fixed or removable prostheses.

  19. Kenny-Caffey Syndrome: oral findings and 4-year follow-up of overlay denture therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Tahsin; Kecik, Defne; Cehreli, Zafer C

    2007-01-01

    Kenny-Caffey Syndrome (KCS) is an extremely rare osteosclerotic bone dysplasia associated with hypocalcemia and ocular abnormalities. Although the condition is well reported in the medical literature, dental manifestations have not been discussed in great detail. The purpose of this report is to present specific oral features and prosthetic management in a KCS patient. Overlay dentures were utilized in the management of low vertical dimension of occlusion, congenital absence of several permanent teeth, and problems associated with function and esthetics. Results of the 4-year follow-up overlay denture therapy are presented.

  20. Cameo surface recording in complete denture fabrication using transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation: A clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koli, Dheeraj; Nanda, Aditi; Kaur, Harsimran; Verma, Mahesh; Jain, Chandan

    2017-08-01

    Severe bone loss in patients with complete edentulism poses a treatment challenge. In fabricating a denture, the stability of the prosthesis must be enhanced by recording the cameo surface within the confines of the physiological position of the cheek and tongue muscles (the neutral zone) and by shaping it accordingly. The treatment of a patient with a completely edentulous maxillary arch and severe maxillary anterior bone loss is described. The cameo surface was recorded within the physiological limits during the fabrication of a complete denture by using transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Computer-aided technology for fabricating complete dentures: systematic review of historical background, current status, and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidra, Avinash S; Taylor, Thomas D; Agar, John R

    2013-06-01

    . A body of scientific literature related to computer-aided technology for complete dentures is emerging. Significant advancements in this technology have now resulted in their commercial availability with shorter clinical protocols. However, prospective clinical trials with true clinical endpoints are necessary to validate this technology. This could affect dental education, patient care, research, and public health worldwide. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Comparative analysis of unilateral removable partial denture and classical removable partial denture by using finite element method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radović, Katarina; Čairović, Aleksandra; Todorović, Aleksandar; Stančić, Ivica; Grbović, Aleksandar

    2010-01-01

    Various mobile devices are used in the therapy of unilateral free-end saddle. Unilateral dentures with precise connectivity elements are not used frequently. In this paper the problem of applying and functionality of unilateral free- end saddle denture without major connector was taken into consideration. The aim was to analyze and compare a unilateral RPD (removable partial denture) and a classical RPD by calculating and analyzing stresses under different loads. 3D models of unilateral removable partial denture and classical removable partial denture with casted clasps were made by using computer program CATIA V5 (abutment teeth, canine and first premolar, with crowns and abutment tissues were also made). The models were built in full-scale. Stress analyses for both models were performed by applying a force of 300 N on the second premolar, a force of 500 N on the first molar and a force of 700 N on the second molar. The Fault Model Extractor (FME) analysis and calculation showed the complete behaviour of unilateral removable partial denture and abutments (canine and first premolar), as well as the behaviour of RPD under identical loading conditions. Applied forces with extreme values caused high stress levels on both models and their abutments within physiological limits. Having analyzed stresses under same conditions, we concluded that the unilateral RPD and classical RPD have similar physiological values

  3. Prosthetic rehabilitation using adhesive bridge and fixed-fixed bridge on the maxilla and telescopic crown overdenture on mandible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indah Sulistiawaty

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Prosthetic rehabilitation is the rehabilitation process of masticatory and esthetics function for patients missing teeth and alveolar bone by means of manufacture and installation of dentures. The prosthetic rehabilitation commonly used include denture adhesive bridge, fixed-fixed bridge, as well as telescopic overdenture. Adhesive bridge is bridge denture consisting of single pontic and two retainer wings attached to the abutment using cement or resin. Fixed-fixed bridge is a bridge denture with rigid connectors on both ends of the pontics, whereas the telescopic crown Overdenture is a removable denture that uses linked precision on the original tooth in the form of primary coping on abutment and secondary coping on the denture. To expose the procedures of prosthetic rehabilitation using adhesive bridge and fixed-fixed bridge on the maxilla and telescopic crown Overdenture on mandible. Male patients aged 32 years came with complaints of difficulty to chew food because he had lost some teeth behind. In the maxilla, teeth are lost in the region of 15 and 16 performed by making the fixed-fixed bridge with abutment teeth 14 and 17. Loss of teeth in the region of 26, performed the manufacture of adhesive bridge with a box preparation on the occlusal 25 and 27. In the mandible, tooth loss in the region of 36,37,46, and 47 performed manufacture of telescopic crown Overdenture with primer coping on the teeth 35.38, 45, and 48 and the secondary coping on a metal frame. Prosthetic rehabilitation especially in the case of loss of back teeth is very important because with the denture patients can chew properly and maintain the stomatognathic system.

  4. Removable partial dentures without rests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinig, D A

    1994-04-01

    Ever since Bonwill recommended the use of rests on removable partial dentures in 1899, rests have been universally considered inviolate and have gone unchallenged and untested. The author claims that removable partial dentures without rests may not cause the adverse conditions usually predicted, such as gingival stripping, gingival inflammation, mutilated residual ridges, or extensive and rapid resorption of the alveolar ridges. In removable partial dentures made by the author for several patients, the residual ridge remained stable and in physiologic equilibrium when rests were not used. A history of the long-term effect on patients wearing partial dentures with and without rests is presented.

  5. Rotationally actuated prosthetic helping hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, William E. (Inventor); Belcher, Jewell G., Jr. (Inventor); Carden, James R. (Inventor); West, Thomas W. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A prosthetic device has been developed for below-the-elbow amputees. The device consists of a cuff, a stem, a housing, two hook-like fingers, an elastic band for holding the fingers together, and a brace. The fingers are pivotally mounted on a housing that is secured to the amputee's upper arm with the brace. The stem, which also contains a cam, is rotationally mounted within the housing and is secured to the cuff, which fits over the amputee's stump. By rotating the cammed stem between the fingers with the lower arm, the amputee can open and close the fingers.

  6. Evaluation of Denture Stomatitis in Croatian Adult Population

    OpenAIRE

    Ćelić, R.; Knezović Zlatarić, D.; Baučić, I.

    2001-01-01

    Denture stomatitis (DS) is often found under the removable partial dentures (RPDs). There are many factors influencing it, such as patient’s age and gender, smoking habits, denture age, denture material, denture wearing habits, denture hygiene habits, oral hygiene instruction, denture cleanness and denture plaque accumulation. The aim of this study was to find out the influence these factors have on the prevalence of DS under RPDs and complete dentures (CDs). A total of 200 pat...

  7. The effect of a new denture adhesive on bite force until denture dislodgement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M.; Kulak, Y.; de Baat, C.; Arikan, A.; Ucankale, M.

    2005-01-01

    : PURPOSE: Denture adhesives are used to improve the denture retention and comfort of complete denture wearers. The purpose of this investigation was to establish the effect of a new denture adhesive on maximum bite force until denture dislodgement (BFDD) after adhesive application. MATERIALS AND

  8. The effect of a new denture adhesive on bite force until denture dislodgement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Özcan (Behiye); Y. Kulak (Yasemin); C. de Baat; A. Arikan (Ayla); M. Ucankale (Mert)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Denture adhesives are used to improve the denture retention and comfort of complete denture wearers. The purpose of this investigation was to establish the effect of a new denture adhesive on maximum bite force until denture dislodgement (BFDD) after adhesive application.

  9. The attitude of complete denture wearers towards denture adhesives in Istanbul

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M.; Kulak, Y.; Arikan, A.; Silahtar, E.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of using denture adhesives is to subjectively benefit denture-wearers with improved fit and comfort of their dentures and to improve their chewing ability and confidence. The purpose of this study was to investigate the approach and thought of complete denture wearers to denture adhesive

  10. Do CAD/CAM dentures really release less monomer than conventional dentures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmassl, Patricia-Anca; Wiedemair, Verena; Huck, Christian; Klaunzer, Florian; Steinmassl, Otto; Grunert, Ingrid; Dumfahrt, Herbert

    2017-06-01

    Computer-aided design (CAD)/computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) dentures are assumed to have more favourable material properties than conventionally fabricated dentures, among them a lower methacrylate monomer release. The aim of this study was to test this hypothesis. CAD/CAM dentures were generated from ten different master casts by using four different CAD/CAM systems. Conventional, heat-polymerised dentures served as control group. Denture weight and volume were measured; the density was calculated, and the denture surface area was assessed digitally. The monomer release after 7 days of water storage was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. Whole You Nexteeth and Wieland Digital Dentures had significantly lower mean volume and weight than conventional dentures. Baltic Denture System and Whole You Nexteeth had a significantly increased density. Baltic Denture System had a significantly smaller surface area. None of the CAD/CAM dentures released significantly less monomer than the control group. All tested dentures released very low amounts of methacrylate monomer, but not significantly less than conventional dentures. A statistically significant difference might nevertheless exist in comparison to other, less recommendable denture base materials, such as the frequently used autopolymerising resins. CAD/CAM denture fabrication has numerous advantages. It enables the fabrication of dentures with lower resin volume and lower denture weight. Both could increase the patient comfort. Dentures with higher density might exhibit more favourable mechanical properties. The hypothesis that CAD/CAM dentures release less monomer than conventional dentures could, however, not be verified.

  11. The attitude of complete denture wearers towards denture adhesives in Istanbul

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozcan, M.; Kulak, Y.; Arikan, A.; Silahtar, E.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of using denture adhesives is to subjectively benefit denture-wearers with improved fit and comfort of their dentures and to improve their chewing ability and confidence. The purpose of this study was to investigate the approach and thought of complete denture wearers to denture

  12. Bonding of acrylic denture teeth to resin denture bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerts, G A V M; Stuhlinger, M E

    2012-07-01

    Anterior teeth debonding from dentures is a common problem. This study tested the bond strength of denture teeth to two types of denture resin, with and without grooving the ridge-lap surface. Bond strength and fracture type of three different groups were compared: 1. Teeth bonded to heat-cured polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA); 2. Teeth bonded to pour-type PMMA; 3. Grooved teeth bonded to pour-type PMMA. Specimens were manufactured following ISO standard 22112. Force values at failure were analysed using one-way analysis of variance, using the mixed procedure with confidence interval of 95%. Types of failure were identified as adhesive, cohesive or combination. In descending order, mean failure forces were 418.55N (Group One), 367.55N (Group Two) and 290.05N (Group Three). There was no significant difference between the means of groups 1 and 2 (p = 0.0627). Group Three differed from both other groups (p denture teeth (83% and 72% respectively); group Three showed predominantly cohesive fractures within the denture PMMA (75%). Without ridge-lap modification, the bond strengths of denture teeth to pour-type and heat-cured denture resin were similar. Failures were predominantly of cohesive nature within the teeth themselves. Grooving the ridge-lap reduced fracture resistance and led to breakages predominantly in denture PMMA.

  13. Prevention of Prosthetic Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eremin O.V.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Prevention in prosthetic dentistry is not just a regular oral hygiene and the prevention of caries in the early stages of its development. The initial goal of orthopedic and dental should be the ability to convey to the patient's sense of pros-thetics that proteziruya one saved more. An example is included prosthetic dental arch defects with bridges or single artificial crowns on implants that will prevent movement of teeth and the continuity of the dentition

  14. 21 CFR 870.3935 - Prosthetic heart valve holder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prosthetic heart valve holder. 870.3935 Section 870.3935 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... heart valve holder. (a) Identification. A prosthetic heart valve holder is a device used to hold...

  15. Principles of obstacle avoidance with a transfemoral prosthetic limb

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Keeken, Helco G.; Vrieling, Aline H.; Hof, At L.; Postema, Klaas; Otten, Bert

    2012-01-01

    In this study, conditions that enable a prosthetic knee flexion strategy in transfemoral amputee subjects during obstacle avoidance were investigated. This study explored the hip torque principle and the static ground principle as object avoidance strategies. A prosthetic limb simulator device was u

  16. Antimicrobial activity of complete denture cleanser solutions based on sodium hypochlorite and Ricinus communis – a randomized clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    SALLES, Marcela Moreira; BADARÓ, Maurício Malheiros; de ARRUDA, Carolina Noronha Ferraz; LEITE, Vanessa Maria Fagundes; da SILVA, Cláudia Helena Lovato; WATANABE, Evandro; OLIVEIRA, Viviane de Cássia; PARANHOS, Helena de Freitas Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT To preserve oral health and to maintain the prosthetic devices, it is important not only to improve the properties of commonly known hygiene products, but also to investigate new materials with antimicrobial action. Objectives This study evaluated the antimicrobial activity of sodium hypochlorite (0.25% and 0.50%) and 10% Ricinus communis’ solutions against specific microorganisms. Material and Methods Sixty four maxillary complete denture wearers were instructed to brush their dentures three times a day and to soak them (20 min/day) in the solutions: SH1: 0.25% sodium hypochlorite; SH2: 0.5% sodium hypochlorite; RC: 10% R. communis oil; and C: 0.85% saline (control). The solutions were used for 7 days in a randomized sequence. Following each period of use, there was a 1-week washout period. Antimicrobial activity was determined by Colony Forming Units (CFU) counts of Streptococcus mutans, Candida spp., and gram-negative microorganisms. For collecting biofilm, the internal surface of maxillary dentures was brushed with saline solution, and biofilm suspension obtained. After dilutions (100 - 10-3), aliquots were seeded in Mitis salivarius, CHROMagar Candida®, and MacConkey agar for detecting S. mutans, Candida spp., or gram-negative microorganisms, respectively. After incubation, colonies were counted, and CFU/mL values were calculated. Then, transformation - log10 (CFU+1) - data were analyzed using the Friedman test (α=0.05). Results showed significant differences between the solutions (p<0.001). Results All three solutions showed antimicrobial activity against S. mutans. Against Candida spp., RC and SH1 solutions showed similar effect while SH2 showed superior activity. SH1 and SH2 solutions showed antimicrobial action against gram-negative microorganisms. The Candida species most frequently isolated was C. albicans, followed by C. tropicalis and C. glabrata. Conclusions The 0.5% sodium hypochlorite solution was the most effective and might be used to

  17. [Improving the speech with a prosthetic construction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalpers, M J; Engelen, M; van der Stappen, J A A M; Weijs, W L J; Takes, R P; van Heumen, C C M

    2016-03-01

    A 12-year-old boy had problems with his speech due to a defect in the soft palate. This defect was caused by the surgical removal of a synovial sarcoma. Testing with a nasometer revealed hypernasality above normal values. Given the size and severity of the defect in the soft palate, the possibility of improving the speech with speech therapy was limited. At a centre for special dentistry an attempt was made with a prosthetic construction to improve the performance of the palate and, in that way, the speech. This construction consisted of a denture with an obturator attached to it. With it, an effective closure of the palate could be achieved. New measurements with acoustic nasometry showed scores within the normal values. The nasality in the speech largely disappeared. The obturator is an effective and relatively easy solution for palatal insufficiency resulting from surgical resection. Intrusive reconstructive surgery can be avoided in this way.

  18. Hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia with anodontia: A rare case-rehabilitation by prosthetic management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Naveen Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectodermal dysplasia is a hereditary disorder characterized by developmental dystrophies of ectodermal derivatives- It is characterized by triad of signs comprising sparse hair, abnormal or missing teeth and inability to sweat. This case of 12-year-old boy with hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia and complete anodontia of both primary and permanent dentition is presented. Owing to the need for treatment at an early age for anodontia and due to the ill-formed maxillary and mandibular residual ridges, the prosthetic management can be difficult. Complete dentures with soft liners and hollow maxillary denture were provided to encourage normal psychological development and to improve the function of the stomatognathic system.

  19. [Acrylic resin removable partial dentures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baat, C. de; Witter, D.J.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2011-01-01

    An acrylic resin removable partial denture is distinguished from other types of removable partial dentures by an all-acrylic resin base which is, in principle, solely supported by the edentulous regions of the tooth arch and in the maxilla also by the hard palate. When compared to the other types of

  20. [Experimental basis of a new material for the manufacture of bases dentures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shturminskiĭ, V G

    2013-10-01

    The author studied the problem of improving the quality of prosthetic removable prostheses through the development of new basic material based on polypropylene copolymer. To this end, we examined the physical and chemical structure and hygienic properties of the produced material. The studies found that the developed material of polypropylene optimal solution for the partial plate denture bases, without flaws acrylic prosthesis and improves the properties of the previously used polypropylene plastics.

  1. Prosthetic rehabilitation of an edentulous patient with cleft palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento, Hugo Ramalho; Rodigues, Polyana Barbara; Marcello-Machado, Raissa Micaella; Pinto, Luciana Rezende; Faot, Fernanda

    2014-01-01

    It is difficult today to find older patients without their cleft palate prosthetically rehabilitated. This case report presents the rehabilitation by conventional dental prostheses of a cleft palate patient who had no prior treatment. A 52-year-old male presented himself to have his fissured palate obturated and occlusion restored. He reported difficulties in swallowing food and liquids, along with a severe speech disability. The patient's medical history revealed diabetes mellitus type II, hypertension, low vision due to macular atrophic lesions, and xerostomia. The upper and lower arches were completely and partially edentulous, respectively. The treatment plan involved a conventional denture to be placed in the upper arch, and a removable partial denture to be placed in the lower arch.

  2. Simplified Prosthetic Rehabilitation of a Patient after Oral Cancer Removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranjčić, Josip; Džakula, Nikola; Vojvodić, Denis

    2016-09-01

    The treatment of patients with oral cancer is complex: a multidisciplinary approach needs to be taken and maxillofacial and oral surgeons, an oncologist, a prosthodontist should be included, and a psychologist is often needed. This case report describes the prosthetic rehabilitation of a patient after surgical removal of oral cancer with obturator prosthesis. Resection cavity was located in central part of the hard palate and the condition belonged to Aramany class 3 maxillary defects. The two-step impression technique of denture bearing area was used and the resection of cavity was performed. A primary impression-the impression of denture bearing area was made using irreversible hydrocolloid material, while the second impression - the impression of resection cavity was made using condensation silicone material and obturator prosthesis framework. The obturator prosthesis replaced lost teeth, improved oral function and esthetics at minimal costs.

  3. Tongue pressure recordings during speech using complete denture

    CERN Document Server

    Jeannin, Christophe; Payan, Yohan; Dittmar, André; Grosgogeat, Brigitte

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes an original experimental procedure to measure mechanical interactions between tongue and teeth during speech production. Using edentulous people as subjects, pressure transducers are inserted in their complete denture duplicate. Physiology is respected during sound and pressure recording as with standard complete denture. Original calibration device is also described in order to know what kind of information can be extracted from the data. The measurements are realized in different experimental conditions in order to remove the auditory and the orosensory feedbacks. Then the first results of the pilot study are presented

  4. Epidemiology and etiology of denture stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendreau, Linda; Loewy, Zvi G

    2011-06-01

    Denture stomatitis, a common disorder affecting denture wearers, is characterized as inflammation and erythema of the oral mucosal areas covered by the denture. Despite its commonality, the etiology of denture stomatitis is not completely understood. A search of the literature was conducted in the PubMed electronic database (through November 2009) to identify relevant articles for inclusion in a review updating information on the epidemiology and etiology of denture stomatitis and the potential role of denture materials in this disorder. Epidemiological studies report prevalence of denture stomatitis among denture wearers to range from 15% to over 70%. Studies have been conducted among various population samples, and this appears to influence prevalence rates. In general, where reported, incidence of denture stomatitis is higher among elderly denture users and among women. Etiological factors include poor denture hygiene, continual and nighttime wearing of removable dentures, accumulation of denture plaque, and bacterial and yeast contamination of denture surface. In addition, poor-fitting dentures can increase mucosal trauma. All of these factors appear to increase the ability of Candida albicans to colonize both the denture and oral mucosal surfaces, where it acts as an opportunistic pathogen. Antifungal treatment can eradicate C. albicans contamination and relieve stomatitis symptoms, but unless dentures are decontaminated and their cleanliness maintained, stomatitis will recur when antifungal therapy is discontinued. New developments related to denture materials are focusing on means to reduce development of adherent biofilms. These may have value in reducing bacterial and yeast colonization, and could lead to reductions in denture stomatitis with appropriate denture hygiene.

  5. The attitude of complete denture wearers towards denture adhesives in Istanbul

    OpenAIRE

    Ozcan, M.; Kulak, Y.; ARIKAN, A.; Silahtar, E.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of using denture adhesives is to subjectively benefit denture-wearers with improved fit and comfort of their dentures and to improve their chewing ability and confidence. The purpose of this study was to investigate the approach and thought of complete denture wearers to denture adhesives and to see why they had tried denture adhesive, and their reasons for its current use or non-use through a questionnaire. One hundred and fifteen patients attending the Marmara University, Dental...

  6. Prosthetic cost projections for servicemembers with major limb loss from Vietnam and OIF/OEF

    OpenAIRE

    David K. Blough, PhD; Sharon Hubbard, MS; Lynne V. McFarland, PhD; Douglas G. Smith, MD; Jeffrey M. Gambel, MD, MPH, MSW; Gayle E. Reiber, PhD

    2010-01-01

    This study projects prosthetic- and assistive-device costs for veterans with limb loss from Vietnam and injured servicemembersreturning from Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) to inform the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) for these veterans’ future care. The 2005 Medicare prosthetic device component prices were applied to current prosthetic and assistive-device use obtained from a national survey of 581 veterans and servicemembers with major traumatic amput...

  7. Evaluation of the effect of denture adhesives on surface roughness of two chemically different denture base resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Mahmoud; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of four commercially available denture adhesives (DAs) on surface roughness of two chemically different denture base materials. Materials and Methods: Fifty specimens of heat-cured polymethyl methacrylate, and another fifty specimens of light-cured urethane dimethacrylate were divided into five groups (n = 10), each was immersed in four prepared DAs (Corega Super Cream, Corega Ultra Powder, Olivafix Cream, Protefix Cream) as well as distilled water (control group). The mean surface roughness (Ra) of the polished and unpolished surfaces of the specimens was recorded using profilometer device. T-test for paired observation was used to indicate any changes in surface roughness between the baseline and after 30 days of immersion in the DA. Results: Almost all the tested DAs had no significant effect on the roughness of polished and unpolished surfaces of both denture base materials. The Corega super cream DA produced significant increase in the roughness of the polished surfaces of both types of acrylic specimens (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The majority of the investigated DAs appears not to affect the surface roughness of denture base materials. Only Corega super cream DA produced detectable increase in the roughness of polished surfaces of denture base specimens. PMID:27403047

  8. The trial denture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, S H

    1977-04-01

    1. Many difficult situations can be avoided if the dentist keeps constantly aware of the physiologic, the psychologic, and the artistic factors involved in the construction of dentures, whether they be partial or complete. 2. No one would think of buying an automobile without getting adequate instruction in how to drive; neither should a patient expect to wear artifical restorations without training and practice. 3. The dentist at the try-in should check: a. The bases for fit and extension. b. Thin labial flange at frenum area. c. Posterior palatal seal and length of upper. d. Posterior tooth poisition for height of plane, relation of plane to alatragus line, tongue room, and ridge relation. e. Anterior tooth position for lip support, length, and relation to lower lip. f. Entire setup for vertical dimension of the face, test balance and simultaneous tooth contacts in all desired positions. If discrepancies exist between the articulator and the mouth, make new jaw relation records. g. Check palatal contour and incisor positions in speaking. "F" and "V" sounds to test the upper incisor, sibilant sounds for vertical dimension and lower-to-upper incisal relationships. h. Wax-up for support and proper external form. If tori exist on upper or lower, be sure there is sufficient thickness to allow relief later on. i. Be sure to repeat and continue instruction of the patient in his understanding and handling of the new dentures. Now, in addition to all these checks to dentist makes, he must constantly anticipate the thoughts and attitudes of the patient and interpret them for better rapport and ultimate patient understanding. No stage in complete dentures is anticipated with such mixed emotions as is the try-in. No stage is so significant to the future success or failure of the patient to take dentures in his stride. No stage has so much potential for making the person happy or sinking him into the depths of despair. The return of self-confidence, the pride in appearance

  9. Prosthetic helping hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vest, Thomas W. (Inventor); Carden, James R. (Inventor); Norton, William E. (Inventor); Belcher, Jewell G. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A prosthetic device for below-the-elbow amputees, having a C-shaped clamping mechanism for grasping cylindrical objects, is described. The clamping mechanism is pivotally mounted to a cuff that fits on the amputee's lower arm. The present invention is utilized by placing an arm that has been amputated below the elbow into the cuff. The clamping mechanism then serves as a hand whenever it becomes necessary for the amputee to grasp a cylindrical object such as a handle, a bar, a rod, etc. To grasp the cylindrical object, the object is jammed against the opening in the C-shaped spring, causing the spring to open, the object to pass to the center of the spring, and the spring to snap shut behind the object. Various sizes of clamping mechanisms can be provided and easily interchanged to accommodate a variety of diameters. With the extension that pivots and rotates, the clamping mechanism can be used in a variety of orientations. Thus, this invention provides the amputee with a clamping mechanism that can be used to perform a number of tasks.

  10. Cochlear Implant Using Neural Prosthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shweta; Singh, Shashi kumar; Dubey, Pratik Kumar

    2012-10-01

    This research is based on neural prosthetic device. The oldest and most widely used of these electrical, and often computerized, devices is the cochlear implant, which has provided hearing to thousands of congenitally deaf people in this country. Recently, the use of the cochlear implant is expanding to the elderly, who frequently suffer major hearing loss. More cutting edge are artificial retinas, which are helping dozens of blind people see, and ìsmartî artificial arms and legs that amputees can maneuver by thoughts alone, and that feel more like real limbs.Research, which curiosity led to explore frog legs dancing during thunderstorms, a snail shapedorgan in the inner ear, and how various eye cells react to light, have fostered an understanding of how to ìtalkî to the nervous system. That understanding combined with the miniaturization of electronics and enhanced computer processing has enabled prosthetic devices that often can bridge the gap in nerve signaling that is caused by disease or injury.

  11. A case with tumor of left parotid gland and denture stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MercuŢ, Veronica; Iorgulescu, Daniel; Popescu, Sanda Mihaela; Mărgăritescu, Claudiu; MercuŢ, Răzvan; CrăiŢoiu, Monica Mihaela; Scrieciu, Monica

    2015-01-01

    The article discuss the case of an edentulous patient presented to the dental clinic for pain and burning sensation of oral mucosa and diagnosed subsequently with oxyphilic adenoma. A 58-year-old patient, with maxillary edentulism, treated with complete denture, presented to the Clinic of Prosthetic Dentistry of the Faculty of Dental Medicine, University of Medicine and Pharmacy of Craiova, Romania, for pain of oral mucosa and bad stability of denture. The diagnosis of erythematous denture stomatitis as consequence of salivary flow reduction was establish after patient's clinical examination, and by unstimulated sialometry. Clinical exam suggested hyposalivation could be a consequence of a tumor situated at the level of the left parotid gland. The echography confirmed the diagnosis of left parotid gland tumor. The tumor was surgical removed and histopathological exam confirmed oxyphilic adenoma. Education of patient for wearing new denture while maintaining a strict oral hygiene and dealing with low salivary flow was the treatment for denture stomatitis. General dentist has an important role in finding and diagnosing patients with systemic diseases, especially salivary tumors.

  12. An illusionary prosthetic design for a unilateral cleft palate patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andaç Barkın Bavbek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The prosthetic rehabilitation is an important part of the cleft lip and palate therapy assisting orthodontic and orthognathic treatments. Prosthesis does not only help to improve function and aesthetics but also needs to facilitate a better oral health. The aim of this report is to introduce the prosthetic approach of a 21-year-old female unilateral cleft palate patient that considered reinforcing the mobile canine adjacent to the cleft, easing the elimination of dental plaque from the remaining fistula and reaching an accurate occlusion. Facial aesthetics was established by the illusionary effect of a removable crown complex which is joined onto a fixed partial denture with a precision attachment system.

  13. Genitourinary Prosthetics: A Primer for the Non-urologic Surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavien, Garjae; Zaid, Uwais; Peterson, Andrew C

    2016-06-01

    Genitourinary prosthetics are used for correction of functional deficits and to improve the quality of lives of affected patients. General surgeons must evaluate patients scheduled for nonurologic surgery with urologic devices that can impact their perioperative management. Lack of recognition of these prosthetics preoperatively can lead to unnecessary morbidity for the patient and have legal implications for the surgeon. Close consultation with a urologist may avoid common complications associated with these devices and allows for surgical assistance when operative misadventures do occur. This article reviews 3 common urologic prosthetics: testicular prosthesis, artificial urinary sphincter, and penile prosthesis.

  14. GIANT PROSTHETIC VALVE THROMBUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth Kumar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical prosthetic valves are predisposed to bleeding, thrombosis & thromboembolic complications. Overall incidence of thromboembolic complications is 1% per year who are on oral anticoagulants, whereas bleeding complications incidence is 0.5% to 6.6% per year. 1, 2 Minimization of Scylla of thromboembolic & Charybdis of bleeding complication needs a balancing act of optimal antithrombotic therapy. We are reporting a case of middle aged male patient with prosthetic mitral valve presenting in heart failure. Patient had discontinued anticoagulants, as he had subdural hematoma in the past. He presented to our institute with a giant prosthetic valve thrombus.

  15. Welding of Prosthetic Alloys / Spawanie Stopów Protetycznych Typu Co-Cr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciechowska M.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the techniques of joining metal denture elements, used in prosthetic dentistry: the traditional soldering technique with a gas burner and a new technique of welding with a laser beam; the aim of the study was to make a comparative assessment of the quality of the joints in view of the possibility of applying them in prosthetic structures. Fractographic examinations were conducted along with tensile strength and impact strength tests, and the quality of the joints was assessed compared to the solid metal. The experiments have shown that the metal elements used to make dentures, joined by the technique which employs a laser beam, have better strength properties than those achieved with a gas burner.

  16. Combined orthognathic surgery and prosthetic treatment for class III skeletal malocclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luka Dias Wellar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This clinical report discusses the case of a partially edentulous patient with class III skeletal malocclusion, suffering from poor masticatory function and esthetic appearance caused by severe anteroposterior discrepancy between the dental arches and loss of occlusal vertical dimension. The functional and esthetic rehabilitation was performed with orthognathic surgery followed by prosthetic treatment using an overlay removable partial denture. At the end of the treatment, the patient was successfully rehabilitated, both functionally and esthetically, through reestablishment of the occlusal vertical dimension and correction of the anteroposterior discrepancy between the dental arches. The overlay removable partial denture is a simple and time-efficient alternative in the treatment of partially edentulous patients with class III skeletal malocclusions and small anteroposterior discrepancies between dental arches. Additionally, an esthetic smile and functional rehabilitation of the stomatognathic system was satisfactorily obtained with orthognathic surgery followed by prosthetic treatment.

  17. Combined orthognathic surgery and prosthetic treatment for class III skeletal malocclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Luka Dias Wellar; Leandro Reinhardt; Marcos Antonio Torriani; Tatiana Pereira-Cenci; Noéli Boscato

    2013-01-01

    This clinical report discusses the case of a partially edentulous patient with class III skeletal malocclusion, suffering from poor masticatory function and esthetic appearance caused by severe anteroposterior discrepancy between the dental arches and loss of occlusal vertical dimension. The functional and esthetic rehabilitation was performed with orthognathic surgery followed by prosthetic treatment using an overlay removable partial denture. At the end of the treatment, the patient...

  18. Prosthetic Valve Thrombosis: Diagnosis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Jalaj; Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Pinnamaneni, Sowmya; Sarungbam, Judy; Jain, Diwakar

    2016-01-01

    St. Jude mechanical prosthesis is the most commonly used prosthetic device with least valvular complications with excellent hemodynamics. However, prosthetic valve thrombosis is one of the serious complications, with rates between 0.03% and 0.13% per patient-year depending on the type of anticoagulation used and compliance to the therapy. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is the initial screening tool (class I) that would provide clues for the assessment of valvular hemodynamics. Fluoroscopy is an alternate imaging modality for the assessment of mechanical leaflet motion, especially in patients when prosthetic valves are difficult to image on TTE or transesophageal echocardiography. A complete fluoroscopic evaluation of a prosthetic valve includes assessment of valvular motion and structural integrity. Opening and closing angles can be measured fluoroscopically to determine whether a specific valve is functioning properly. We discuss a case of a 91-year-old man with thrombosis of bileaflet mechanical mitral prosthesis that was demonstrated on real-time fluoroscopy (not evident on TTE). An algorithmic approach to diagnosis and management of prosthetic heart valve thrombosis is outlined.

  19. A clinical study to evaluate denture adhesive use in well-fitting dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Carlos A; Gendreau, Linda; Shanga, Gilbert; Magnuszewski, Tabetha; Fernandez, Patricia; Durocher, John

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this study was the assessment of retention and stability and functional benefits of denture adhesive applied to well-fitting and well-made dentures. This was a randomized, crossover study to compare two marketed denture adhesives (test cream, Super Poligrip® Free, and test strip, Super Poligrip® Comfort Seal Strips) and an unmarketed cream adhesive (GlaxoSmith Kline Consumer Healthcare) with no adhesive as the negative control. Thirty-six subjects completed the study. One hour after the application of denture adhesive, retention and stability were measured using the Kapur Index and maxillary incisal bite force. Two hours after application, functional tests were used to assess denture movement and peanut particle migration under the denture. Subjects also rated confidence, comfort, satisfaction with dentures, and denture wobble in conjunction with the functional tests. Denture adhesives significantly (p dentures. Subjects experienced significantly (p dentures. Significant (p denture wobble were associated with the use of adhesive. There was significant (p denture adhesive was well tolerated. The results of this study provide evidence that use of Super Poligrip® denture adhesives can enhance aspects of performance of complete well-fitting dentures as well as provide increased comfort, confidence, and satisfaction with dentures. © 2011 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  20. Evaluation of complete denture quality and masticatory efficiency in denture wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Jaiane Augusta Medeiros; de Resende, Camila Maria Bastos Machado; Lopes, Ana Lilian Correia; Mestriner, Wilson; Roncalli, Angelo Giuseppe; Farias-Neto, Arcelino; Carreiro, Adriana da Fonte Porto

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate (1) the influence of complete denture quality and years of denture use on masticatory efficiency and (2) the relationship between complete denture quality and years of use. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 93 edentulous patients (mean age: 65.6 years) wearing both mandibular and maxillary dentures. Patients were classified into two categories according to years of denture use: ≤ 2 years and ≥ 5 years. Masticatory efficiency was evaluated via the colorimetric method with beads as the artificial test food. A reproducible method for objective evaluation of the technical quality of complete dentures was employed. The association between denture quality and years of denture use was analyzed using chi-square and Fisher exact tests. The results of masticatory efficiency testing were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance (with the Tukey post hoc test) in terms of years of denture use (≤ 2 years, ≥ 5 years) and denture quality (poor, average, good). A significant relationship was found between denture quality and years of denture use (P denture use (0.101 ± 0.076 absorbance) and ≥ 5 years of use (0.068 ± 0.076 absorbance). Masticatory efficiency was not influenced by denture quality. Complete denture quality and masticatory efficiency significantly decreased over time. However, complete denture quality did not influence masticatory efficiency.

  1. Complete Denture in a Microstomia Patient

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Satpathy, Ashish; Gujjari, Anil K

    2015-01-01

    .... It's the duty of a dentist to provide every possible care to the patient with microstomia. This paper describes the treatment of a microstomia patient requiring complete dentures using sectional dentures...

  2. [Denture stomatitis - definition, etiology, classification and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubera, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    Denture stomatitis pertains to a number of pathological symptoms in the oral cavity caused by wearing acrylic dentures. Etiological factors include: mucosal trauma, fungal infection and accumulation of denture plaque. All of these factors appear to increase the ability of Candida albicans to colonize both the denture and oral mucosal surfaces. Antifungal treatment can eradicate C. albicans contamination and relieve stomatitis symptoms. Early diagnosis of the lesion is essential to assure rational therapy.

  3. Case report: a tale of two dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, H; Sequeira, P

    1998-12-01

    A case is presented where loss of an incisor tooth in a partial denture wearer created an aesthetic emergency. It was not possible to solve this simply by addition of a tooth to the existing denture. Reference to the previous dental history suggested that a further immediate solution might be unwise. The design of the existing denture lent itself to the novel solution of a second denture, retained by elements of the first.

  4. Effectiveness of a denture hygiene intervention programme among institutionalized elders

    OpenAIRE

    Au, Kar-yan; Cheung, Hiu-ching; Chung, Sze-man; Lai, Chi-fung; Leung, Ki-ki, Jessica; Leung, Yat-fung; Ng, Yuk-chun; Wah, Yat-shing, Jonathan; Wong, Chun-lung

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of a denture hygiene intervention programme in terms of improving denture cleanliness and denture stomatitis. Methods: Residents at seven elderly care homes were invited to participate in a denture hygiene programme. Clinical assessment of denture stomatitis was undertaken and denture cleanliness assessed: (i) qualitatively by the Denture Cleanliness Index ratings and (ii) quantitatively by planimetric assessments of plaque coverage from digital im...

  5. [Improvement of patient's quality of life by changing the treatment plan from cone-crown retained denture to implant prosthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Akira

    2005-02-01

    The patient was a 51-year-old male with a chief complaint of masticatory disturbance and anesthetic problem for the upper partially edentulous region. The cone-crown retained denture was selected as a first treatment plan. However, sufficient satisfaction was not achieved because of oral discomfort, such as bulkiness of the denture and gustatory sensation. Therefore, the treatment plan had to be changed to improve these problems. A second plan using hybrid prostheses was selected, i.e. implant prosthesis for the premolar and molar edentulous region and removable bridge for the incisor and canine region. This case suggests the difficulty of selecting a treatment plan matching the patient's demands. Remarkable improvement for the oral discomfort was observed and the patient's QOL was improved by careful planning of the prosthetic treatment. No problem has been observed for three years after the second prosthetic intervention.

  6. Novel denture-cleaning system based on hydroxyl radical disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Taro; Nakamura, Keisuke; Ikai, Hiroyo; Hayashi, Eisei; Shirato, Midori; Mokudai, Takayuki; Iwasawa, Atsuo; Niwano, Yoshimi; Kohno, Masahiro; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a new denture-cleaning device using hydroxyl radicals generated from photolysis of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Electron spin resonance analysis demonstrated that the yield of hydroxyl radicals increased with the concentration of H2O2 and light irradiation time. Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and methicillin-resistant S aureus were killed within 10 minutes with a > 5-log reduction when treated with photolysis of 500 mM H2O2; Candida albicans was killed within 30 minutes with a > 4-log reduction with photolysis of 1,000 mM H2O2. The clinical test demonstrated that the device could effectively reduce microorganisms in denture plaque by approximately 7-log order within 20 minutes.

  7. Effectiveness of denture cleanser associated with microwave disinfection and brushing of complete dentures: in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesma, Newton; Rocha, Alessandra Lima; Laganá, Dalva Cruz; Costa, Bruno; Morimoto, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Complete dentures acts as a reservoir for microbial colonization, which may lead to systemic infections. Microwave irradiation has been used as an efficient method of denture disinfection. Even though current methods eliminate denture-base microorganisms, a recurrence rate of denture stomatitis (DS) is still observed among denture-wearing patients. It was hypothesized that microwave disinfection kills microorganisms but do not remove dead bacteria from the denture surface. To test this hypothesis, the biofilm found in the dentures of 10 patients with DS was evaluated. In addition, the effects of microwave irradiation plus brushing (MW+B) on the denture biofilm and the combination of denture cleanser with microwave irradiation and brushing (MW+DC+B) for the removal of denture-accumulating microorganisms were investigated. Microbiological data were analyzed statistically by nonparametric analysis (Friedman/Wilcoxon, α=0.05). MW+B and MW+DC+B were effective in reducing the rate of microorganisms (99.2% and 99.5% respectively), but without significant difference between them (p=0.553). However, it was observed that the complete removal of microorganisms from denture surface was only possible when all regimens were combined (MW+DC+B). Microwave irradiation in combination with soaking in denture cleanser and brushing effectively disinfected the dentures and removed denture biofilm.

  8. Impact of Prosthetic Care on Oral Health Related Quality of Life - A Follow-Up Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Geetha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To measure the impact of the type of prosthetic treatment on oral health related quality of life (OHR QoL using 0ral Health impact Profile-14(0HIP-14. Materials & Method: A follow-up study was conducted amongst 105 patients attending the Department of Prosthodontics of M.R Ambedkar Dental College & Hospital, Bangalore for replacement of missing teeth. Initially, they were interviewed by a single calibrated interviewer to collect demographic details and subsequently, OHIP-14 questionnaire was used to assess their pre- prosthetic and one month post-prosthetic quality of life. Information regarding dentate status and type of prostheses was collected from their case records and based on this information the patients were divided into 3 groups i.e., Complete Denture (CD group, Removable Partial Denture (RPD group and Fixed Partial Denture (FPD group. Analysis of Variance (ANOVA test was used to compare between groups using SPSS version 20. Results: This study revealed that there was improved taste sensation (0.82±0.76, less irritability with others (1.61±0.49, more comfortable to eat (1.42±0.70, less self-conscious (1.48±0.61, had a satisfactory diet (1.58±0.61 and less embarrassment (1.36±0.5 among the CD group as compared RPD and FPD groups. Conclusions: The results indicated that the type of prostheses placed had a major influence on improving OHR QoL among denture users.

  9. Prosthetic Hand With Two Gripping Fingers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, William E.; Belcher, Jewell B.; Vest, Thomas W.; Carden, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Prosthetic hand developed for amputee who retains significant portion of forearm. Outer end of device is end effector including two fingers, one moved by rotating remaining part of forearm about its longitudinal axis. Main body of end effector is end member supporting fingers, roller bearing assembly, and rack-and-pinion mechanism. Advantage of rack-and-pinion mechanism enables user to open or close gap between fingers with precision and force.

  10. Matching prosthetics order records in VA National Prosthetics Patient Database to healthcare utilization databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mark W; Su, Pon; Phibbs, Ciaran S

    2010-01-01

    The National Prosthetics Patient Database (NPPD) is the national Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) dataset that records characteristics of individual prosthetic and assistive devices. It remains unknown how well NPPD records can be matched to encounter records for the same individuals in major VA utilization databases. We compared the count of prosthetics records in the NPPD with the count of prosthetics-related procedures for the same individuals recorded in major VA utilization databases. We then attempted to match the NPPD records to the utilization records by person and date. In general, 40% to 60% of the NPPD records could be matched to outpatient utilization records within a 14-day window around the NPPD dataset entry date. Match rates for inpatient data were lower: 10% to 16% within a 14-day window. The NPPD will be particularly important for studies of certain veteran groups, such as those with spinal cord injury or blast-related polytraumatic injury. Health services researchers should use both the NPPD and utilization databases to develop a full understanding of prosthetics use by individual patients.

  11. Rotationally Actuated Prosthetic Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, William E.; Belcher, Jewell G., Jr.; Carden, James R.; Vest, Thomas W.

    1991-01-01

    Prosthetic hand attached to end of remaining part of forearm and to upper arm just above elbow. Pincerlike fingers pushed apart to degree depending on rotation of forearm. Simpler in design, simpler to operate, weighs less, and takes up less space.

  12. Dentist-Patient Communication and Denture Quality Associated with Complete Denture Satisfaction Among Taiwanese Elderly Wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jen-Hao; Huang, Hsiao-Ling; Lin, Ying-Chun; Chou, Tsau-Mau; Ebinger, John; Lee, Huey-Er

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore individual (ie, sociodemographic characteristics, patient personality) and clinical factors (ie, dentist-patient communication, denture quality) associated with complete denture satisfaction among the Taiwanese elderly population. A multistage sampling and cross-sectional design was used to collect data. A total of 387 fully edentulous citizens, aged 65 years and older and who had received new sets of complete dentures, were selected. The participants completed clinical dental examinations and questionnaires by personal interview to collect information on denture satisfaction and associated variables. The relationship among three groups of these participants (satisfied, neutral, and dissatisfied) and potential factors were simultaneously examined using polytomous logistic regression analysis. Overall, 36.7% of the participants were dissatisfied with their dentures. Living status (crude odds ratio [COR] = 2.04), personality (COR = 4.86), dentist-patient communication (COR = 7.46), and denture quality (COR = 5.02) were associated with complete denture satisfaction. The multivariate regression model showed that dentist-patient communication (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 6.41) and denture quality (AOR = 4.40) were significant complete denture satisfaction factors that diluted the effect of living status and personality. Inadequate dentistpatient communication and low denture quality were associated with the dissatisfaction of patients with dentures. To increase complete denture satisfaction, the importance of training programs aimed at enhancing dentist-patient communication and denture quality cannot be overemphasized.

  13. Clinical effects of acrylic resilient denture liners applied to mandibular complete dentures on the alveolar ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto, S; Kimoto, K; Gunji, A; Kawai, Y; Murakami, H; Tanaka, K; Syu, K; Aoki, H; Toyoda, M; Kobayashi, K

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether resilient denture liners has the potential to decrease problems affecting the alveolar ridge mucosa during the first adjustment session following the initial fitting of the denture. Interventions were complete denture treatment with permanent acrylic resilient denture liner dentures (RLD) in mandibles and conventional heat-activated acrylic resin dentures (ARD) in mandibles. Maxillary dentures were fabricated with conventional heat-activated ARD. Seventy-four subjects were randomly allocated to the RLD and ARD groups by random permuted blocks within the strata method after obtaining written informed consent. A randomized controlled parallel clinical trial with two hospital centres was conducted from April 2004 to July 2006. The problems were comprehensively evaluated by three outcomes with subjective and objective factors as follows: (i) numbers of sore spots, (ii) duration of wearing dentures and (iii) pain perception with 100 mm Visual Analog Scale. The numbers of sore spots in the mandibular support and border areas for the RLD group were significantly less than those for the ARD groups (P dentures an additional day longer than the ARD wearers (P denture liners to mandibular complete dentures provided edentulous patients with fewer problems affecting the alveolar during the first adjustment session following the initial fitting of the denture when compared with conventional denture treatments.

  14. [Foreign dentures and dental tourism--willingness-to-pay and factors influencing the demand for foreign dental prosthesis in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köberlein, J; Klingenberger, D

    2011-07-01

    With the progressive realisation of the single European market, public interest has been directed towards cross-border healthcare services to an increasing extent. More and more dentures are being imported into Germany from foreign countries. Furthermore, patients are becoming ever more mobile, travelling to other countries to receive prosthetic treatment from dentists. The objective of this evaluation was to determine by means of a dedicated questionnaire the patients' individual preferences for foreign dentures and the potential savings. 1 368 individuals between the ages of 30 and 75 years were interviewed within a representative omnibus survey. The evaluation of the individual willingness-to-pay included 4 treatment scenarios, which were assessed by the participants in a "bidding game". Participants could choose between a "crown scenario" and an "implant scenario", both with the subcategories "foreign dentures" and "dental tourism". The direct comparison revealed a preference for the "foreign dentures" option over "dental tourism". Average willingness-to-pay for the dental tourism option in the crown scenario was calculated as 80 Euro, and in the implant scenario as 280 Euro less in comparison with the willingness-to-pay for the foreign dentures option. The willingness to switch to a less expensive dentist was one of the main determinants in the causal explanation for the variance in willingness-to-pay. Quality proved to be the decisive criterion and was indicated by 92.4% participants. A lower price for dentures played a subordinate role and was only stated as the decisive factor by 31.1% participants. In conclusion, the results clearly indicate that the decision for or against foreign dentures and the extent of willingness-to-pay depends on a range of criteria, of which "price" is only one and not the decisive factor. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Partial denture-- an ENT surgeon's nightmare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, M; Sagesh, M

    2012-11-01

    Foreign body oesophagus is one among the common otorhinolaryngology emergencies that we come across. Artificial partial denture impaction in the oesophagus is often an ENT surgeon's nightmare. This study was done in the department of otorhinolaryngology, Government Medical College Kozhikode for a period of 2 years. All patients presented with history of accidental swallowing of partial denture followed by dysphagia. Radiological evaluation was done and subsequently oesophagoscopy and removal of the denture was done. In failed cases exploration and removal of foreign body was required. Complications were found in partial denture with metal wire clasps. It is better to avoid using malfitting dentures with small base, those with metal wire clasps and be cautious of using dentures in alcoholics and unconscious patients.

  16. Prosthetics in Paediatric Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vulićević Zoran

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Premature loss of teeth in children may lead to both functional and esthetic problems. Missing teeth in both anterior and posterior regions may cause malfunctions in mastication and proper pronunciation. If the missing teeth are not replaced, further complications may occur, including adjacent tooth migration, loss of alveolar bone, and irregular occlusion. Considering the sensitive nature of children, loss of teeth may cause the development of insecurities and low self esteem problems. Due to dynamic nature of growth in children and adolescents, prosthetic appliances must not hinder development of orofacial system, and must meet adequate esthetic and functional standards. Dental prosthetic appliances in paediatrics must be planned with respect to the special conditions that led to tooth loss or damage. Multi-disciplinary approach is needed, under constant supervision of paediatric dentist and orthodontist, as well as regular checkups with clinical and radiographical examinations.

  17. DARPA Revolutionizing Prosthetics 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    therapeutic applications  System performance validation and design compliance  End-to-end interactive simulation  Acquires control signals ( myoelectric ...Cortical Control for Hand Movement CalTech • Higher Cortex Signal /Intent Extraction Otto Bock • Prosthetic Components • Control Bus Architecture...Clinical Support APL • Program Management • System Engineering & Integration • Signal & Image processing • Virtual Reality & Controls RIC • Virtual

  18. Magnets in prosthetic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, M A; Walmsley, A D; Harris, I R

    2001-08-01

    Magnetic retention is a popular method of attaching removable prostheses to either retained roots or osseointegrated implants. This review chronicles the development of magnets in dentistry and summarizes future research in their use. The literature was researched by using the Science Citation Index and Compendex Web from 1981 to 2000. Articles published before 1981 were hand researched from citations in other publications. Articles that discussed the use of magnets in relation to prosthetic dentistry were selected.

  19. A Comparative Study of Heat and Self-Cured Acrylic Resins on Color Stability of 5 Brands of Denture Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vafaee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Denture teeth play a critical role in overall aesthetic outcomes of removable complete dentures, and long-term maintenance of these outcomes depends on the color stability of the prosthetic teeth. The characteristics of denture base resins play a significant role in prosthetic clinical performance and aesthetics. Objectives The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of two flasking materials on the color stability of five brands of denture teeth that were immersed in commonly consumed beverages. Materials and Methods In the present study 560 denture teeth (20 series were invested with heat- and cold-cured acrylic resin. All the specimens were thermo cycled between 4°C and 60°C, with 60 Seconds dwell times for 1000 cycles. Subsequently, the specimens in each group were divided into four subgroups based on the immersion medium: coffee, tea, cola, or distilled water. Digital images of the teeth were taken before immersion and 30 days after immersion. The color samples were measured using the CIE L* a* b* system, and color differences (ΔE were calculated. The data were evaluated by 3-way ANOVA and the Tukey HSD test. Results There were significant differences in color change between the cold-cured acrylic resins and the heat-cured acrylic resins, with a reduced amount of discoloration in the heat-cured group (ΔE = 10.12 ± 3.93, P = 0.001. The solutions showed significantly different amounts of discoloration on the teeth; distilled water had the least effect (ΔE = 8.49 ± 2.62, P = 0.001 and coffee had the maximum discoloration (ΔE = 14.14 ± 7.77, P = 0.001. A Tukey test showed that there was no significant difference between each brand of denture teeth. Conclusions Coffee caused the most color changes in the examined resin denture teeth. Tea and cola left less staining on the teeth, and distilled water caused the least discoloration. Generally, investing by heat- and cold-cured acrylic resins can significantly affect the

  20. Development of prosthetic skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilaru, Rohit

    The objective of this research was to embed tactile sensors in polyimides. This novel method could be utilized to realize prosthetic skin for sensing different kinds of mechanical stimuli. Tactile sensors have an increasing demand in medical sectors: upper and lower-limb prosthetics and in the industrial sectors: robot end-effectors, grippers and manipulators. The sensors developed are targeted for prosthetic arm tactile sensing applications. Current work presents piezoresistive differential pressure sensors fabricated on flexible polyimide film or substrate. A unique technique to bond a flexible superstrate polyimide layer to a MEMS tactile sensor array is presented in this thesis. The sensor is made of aluminium oxide membrane layer with nichrome piezoresistors as the half-Wheatstone bridge elements. Four different types of sensor designs have been characterized to obtain gauge factor of thin film nichrome. The sensor arrays with and without the superstrate film were simulated for obtaining the maximum stress, average strain and deflection of the membrane. The maximum change in output voltage was 0.8 mV. The gauge factors calculated for tactile sensor with superstrate range between 2.2 to 7.8 and without superstrate range 1.5 to 5.7.

  1. Design of a Compact, Reconfigurable, Prosthetic Wrist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Zinck

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The design of a prosthetic wrist is the result of compromises between the function and the practicality of the device. Conventional prosthetic wrists use a single degree of freedom to produce pro/supination of the hand. It has not been demonstrated that this is the most functional alignment for a single axis. Previous work by the authors suggests that if the wrist must have only one rotatory axis then a more oblique orientation would be more functional. To test this idea, a compact wrist with a single axis and spherical design has been made that will allow any axis of rotation to be selected and the functional performance of the resulting arm be tested.

  2. Hyperzincemia from ingestion of denture adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu; Carvalho, Ricardo M; Pashley, David H

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the recent literature that documents the serious adverse systemic effects of prolonged, excessive zinc ingestion from the overuse of denture adhesives. This condition causes elevation of serum zinc levels that result in depression of serum copper. The low serum copper levels cause bone marrow depression and widespread sensory and motor neuropathies. Epidemiologic studies revealed the source of excessive zinc intake to be from overuse of denture adhesives. Denture patients must be advised of the risks of prolonged overuse of denture adhesives.

  3. Candidal Leukoplakia on Patient with Removable Denture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiril Paskalis

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Candida infection is a common problem in patients using removable dentures, with the most frequent type is denture stomatitis. But other type of candidal infection could also happen in these patients, such as candidal leukoplakia. We reported a 61 years old female patient who complained a painful lesion under her lower removable denture. Oral examination revealed white plaque that could not be rubbed over an ulcer on the lingual part of alveolar processes under the lower removable denture plate, and also an erythematous area on palatum durum above the upper full denture. The patient was suspected to have candidal leukoplakia on the lingual part of the mandible and denture stomatitis on the palate area. The treatment consisted of nystatin oral suspension, chlorhexidine solution, multivitamins, along with denture replacement and oral health education. The entire lesion resolved within 2 months therapy. Candidal infection treatment on denture patient needs not only medication or denture replacement, but also patient compliance to achieve maximal result.

  4. MASTICATION, PHONETICS AND ESTHETICS AS A FINAL RESULT OF PARTIAL OR COMPLETE DENTURE TREATMENT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalina Georgieva

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Three target groups- dentists/ dental students, dental technicians and patients were asked to fill in an anonymous questionnaire about their satisfaction of the final results after prosthetic treatment with removable dentures using a scale from 1 to 5 (1- completely dissatisfied, 2-dissatisfied, 3-indifferent, 4-satisfied, 5-completely satisfied. The mean results (including colour, shape and size of artificial teeth, arrangement of front teeth, colour of artificial gums, phonetics, mastication, natural smile, enough space for tongue for all three groups of respondents were compared. Dental technicians (4,34 are more satisfied than dentists/dental students (3,62 and patients (3,53. A successful outcome of prosthetic treatment depends on one hand on the professional approach of the dental team and on the other hand on the patient’s motivation and cooperation. The predictive final results and realistic expectations lead to satisfaction of all participants in the treatment process.

  5. Upper extremity amputations and prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovadia, Steven A; Askari, Morad

    2015-02-01

    Upper extremity amputations are most frequently indicated by severe traumatic injuries. The location of the injury will determine the level of amputation. Preservation of extremity length is often a goal. The amputation site will have important implications on the functional status of the patient and options for prosthetic reconstruction. Advances in amputation techniques and prosthetic reconstructions promote improved quality of life. In this article, the authors review the principles of upper extremity amputation, including techniques, amputation sites, and prosthetic reconstructions.

  6. Denture adhesive use in complete dentures: clinical recommendations and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duqum, Ibrahim; Powers, Kendall Ann; Cooper, Lyndon; Felton, David

    2012-01-01

    This literature review sought to determine the advantages and disadvantages of denture adhesive use among complete denture patients. Manuscripts were obtained by searching the National Library of Medicine's PubMed database, Cochrane Collaboration Library, ADA Center for Evidence-Based Dentistry website, and EMBASE database. A total of 85 abstracts were reviewed, and 38 articles that met the inclusion criteria for this review were selected. The inclusion criteria included clinical trials and case series in which 10 or more patients were treated, as well as Cochrane collaboration reviews and in vitro studies where clinical relevance could be determined. The selected manuscripts were reviewed using a standardized manuscript review matrix. Although denture adhesives improve the retention and function of complete dentures, standardized guidelines are needed for the proper use, application, and removal of denture adhesives. Additionally, long-term studies are warranted on the biologic effects of denture adhesives. There is a need to establish a regular recall program for complete denture patients.

  7. Denture Hygiene Knowledge and Practices among Complete Denture Wearers attending a Postgraduate Dental Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Thatapudi; Gowd, Snigdha; Suresan, Vinay; Mantri, Sneha; Saxena, Sudhanshu; Mishra, Prateek; Panday, Pragya

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the denture hygiene knowledge and practices among patients using complete dentures attending a postgraduate dental hospital in Jabalpur city. The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between hygiene knowledge and practices to the denture wearer's gender, education, and income. A descriptive, cross-sectional survey was conducted using a self-administered questionnaire involving the complete denture patients attending the Department of Prosthodontics. The study subjects were randomly selected by recruiting old dentures wearers visiting the Department of Prosthodontics for a recall visit or for new dentures on the odd dates of the month. All subjects signed an informed consent before filling the questionnaire. The institutional review committee approved the study. Descriptive statistics included computation of frequencies and percentages. Nonparametric test, namely, chi-square test, was used for further data analysis; p-value dentures for more than 5 years. In this study, 51 (10.2%) subjects reported never having been advised by their dentists as to how to clean their dentures. Among all the subjects interviewed, 264 (52.8%) reported to clean the oral tissues daily. This study disclosed that 66 (13.2%) of the subjects usually slept with their dentures. Maximum subjects in illiterate group had experienced bad breath sometimes when compared with subjects in postgraduate group (χ(2) = 47.452, p denture cleaning according to gender (χ(2) = 101.076, p denture wearers have limited knowledge of denture cleansing and oral hygiene practices. Hygiene habits and practices may not always present a positive correlation with the gender, educational level, and income of the subjects. Periodic recall for evaluation of denture and mucosal surfaces along with reinforcement of denture hygiene instructions will go a long way in helping the patients reap maximum benefits out of their prostheses.

  8. Nanoscale Properties of Neural Cell Prosthetic and Astrocyte Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, D. A.; Ayres, V. M.; Delgado-Rivera, R.; Ahmed, I.; Meiners, S. A.

    2009-03-01

    Preliminary data from in-vivo investigations (rat model) suggest that a nanofiber prosthetic device of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2)-modified nanofibers can correctly guide regenerating axons across an injury gap with aligned functional recovery. Scanning Probe Recognition Microscopy (SPRM) with auto-tracking of individual nanofibers is used for investigation of the key nanoscale properties of the nanofiber prosthetic device for central nervous system tissue engineering and repair. The key properties under SPRM investigation include nanofiber stiffness and surface roughness, nanofiber curvature, nanofiber mesh density and porosity, and growth factor presentation and distribution. Each of these factors has been demonstrated to have global effects on cell morphology, function, proliferation, morphogenesis, migration, and differentiation. The effect of FGF-2 modification on the key nanoscale properties is investigated. Results from the nanofiber prosthetic properties investigations are correlated with astrocyte response to unmodified and FGF-2 modified scaffolds, using 2D planar substrates as a control.

  9. Thermoplastics for prosthetic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, R B; Davies, R M

    1981-10-01

    The rapid and accurate thermoforming of plastics for prosthetic applications has been the subject of considerable research and development by the Bioengineering Centre. This paper outlines the progress in the general concepts that have been effected to date. The original below knee (B/K) socket vacuum forming technique has been extended to above knee (A/K) and supracondylar cases, and there have been developments in rotational casting technology. The work is necessarily based on a sound understanding of the properties of the materials concerned and of the associated manufacturing processes. The contribution of the Bioengineering Centre is outlined together with summaries of collaborative work carried out with other organizations.

  10. Pulsatile prosthetic valve flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, W M; Snyder, A; Alchas, P; Rosenberg, G; Pierce, W S

    1980-01-01

    The laser Doppler system has been established as a useful tool for eliciting the properties of simulated cardiovascular flows, and thus for comparative studies of flow properties of prosthetic valves. Significant differences among valve types and between models of one type have been documented. The complex variations of velocity profiles with time show that comparisons must be made for unsteady pulsatile rather than steady flow, despite the volume and complexity of the data required. Future studies will include methods of compacting the data presentation and improving the details of the experimental stimulation.

  11. Pseudomembranous candidiasis in patient wearing full denture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurdiana Nurdiana

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral candidiasis is a common opportunistic infection of the oral cavity caused by an overgrowth of Candida species, the commonest being Candida albicans. Candida albicans is a harmless commensal organism inhabiting the mouths but it can change into pathogen and invade tissue and cause acute and chronic disease. Dentures predispose to infection with Candida in as many as 65% of elderly people wearing full upper dentures. Purpose: The purpose of this case report is to discuss thrush in patient wearing full denture which rapidly developed. Case: This paper report a case of 57 year-old man who came to the Oral Medicine Clinic Faculty of Dentistry Airlangga University with clinical appearance of pseudomembranous candidiasis (thrush. Case Management: Diagnosis of this case is confirmed with microbiology examination. Patient was wearing full upper dentures, and from anamnesis known that patient wearing denture for 24 hours and he had poor oral hygiene. Patient was treated with topical (nystatin oral suspension and miconazole oral gel and systemic (ketoconazole antifungal. Patient also instructed not to wear his denture and cleaned white pseudomembrane on his mouth with soft toothbrush. Conclusion: Denture, habit of wearing denture for 24 hours, and poor oral hygiene are predisposing factors of thrush and it can healed completely after treated with topical and systemic antifungal.

  12. Digital immediate dentures treatment: A clinical report of two patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumeier, Toni Tien; Neumeier, Harold

    2016-09-01

    The use of computer-aided engineering (CAE) and computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) technology to fabricate complete dentures was introduced in 2011. Clinical procedures for digital immediate dentures can be identical to those for conventional immediate dentures and can be simplified by leaving all remaining dentition until the time of extraction and denture placement. Through the digital process, a single digital design and a definitive digital record are created which can be used to fabricate the immediate digital denture and surgical reduction guide for alveoloplasty. Digital immediate dentures can be relined using the same process as for conventional dentures. The definitive digital dentures can be fabricated with a reline impression and new centric relation record, using the existing digital immediate denture without additional clinical procedures. Providing patients with digital immediate dentures is a viable trend.

  13. An international multicenter study on the effectiveness of a denture adhesive in maxillary dentures using disposable gnathometers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Baat, Cees; van 't Hof, Martin; van Zeghbroeck, Lieve; Ozcan, Mutlu; Kalk, Warner

    No consensus has been achieved on whether denture adhesives are beneficial adjuncts in denture-wearers management. The purpose of this international multicenter study was to determine objectively the effect of a denture adhesive (Kukident) on the retention of complete maxillary dentures using

  14. An international multicenter study on the effectiveness of a denture adhesive in maxillary dentures using disposable gnathometers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baat, C. de; Hof, M.A. van 't; Zeghbroeck, L. van; Ozcan, M.; Kalk, W.

    2007-01-01

    No consensus has been achieved on whether denture adhesives are beneficial adjuncts in denture-wearers management. The purpose of this international multicenter study was to determine objectively the effect of a denture adhesive (Kukident) on the retention of complete maxillary dentures using

  15. New developments in prosthetic arm systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vujaklija I

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Ivan Vujaklija,1 Dario Farina,1 Oskar C Aszmann2 1Institute of Neurorehabilitation Systems, Bernstein Focus Neurotechnology Göttingen, University Medical Center Göttingen, Georg-August University, Göttingen, Germany; 2Christian Doppler Laboratory for Restoration of Extremity Function, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria Abstract: Absence of an upper limb leads to severe impairments in everyday life, which can further influence the social and mental state. For these reasons, early developments in cosmetic and body-driven prostheses date some centuries ago, and they have been evolving ever since. Following the end of the Second World War, rapid developments in technology resulted in powered myoelectric hand prosthetics. In the years to come, these devices were common on the market, though they still suffered high user abandonment rates. The reasons for rejection were trifold – insufficient functionality of the hardware, fragile design, and cumbersome control. In the last decade, both academia and industry have reached major improvements concerning technical features of upper limb prosthetics and methods for their interfacing and control. Advanced robotic hands are offered by several vendors and research groups, with a variety of active and passive wrist options that can be articulated across several degrees of freedom. Nowadays, elbow joint designs include active solutions with different weight and power options. Control features are getting progressively more sophisticated, offering options for multiple sensor integration and multi-joint articulation. Latest developments in socket designs are capable of facilitating implantable and multiple surface electromyography sensors in both traditional and osseointegration-based systems. Novel surgical techniques in combination with modern, sophisticated hardware are enabling restoration of dexterous upper limb

  16. Effect of Different Denture Base Materials and Changed Mouth Temperature on Dimensional Stability of Complete Dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafa, Khalid A O

    2016-01-01

    Background. Type of materials used in fabrication of denture base has an effect on dimension during denture base material processing and other factors related to clinical use. Objective. The study aims were to assess the dimensional stability including thermal changes of three different denture base materials. Methods. Ninety patients were selected to construct complete dentures with different denture base materials. They were randomly divided into three groups: group 1, patients with cobalt chrome metallic base; group 2, patients with heat curing acrylic resin fabricated by injection moulding technique; and group 3, patients with denture bases fabricated by conventional heat curing acrylic resin. The dimensional changes were assessed using digital caliper. Results. After the twelfth month, injection moulding acrylic resin had significantly the highest dimensional change followed by the conventional heat curing acrylic resin. There were no significant differences in the dimensions between the three types of denture base materials at normal mouth temperature, while, after hot tea drinking at 45°C, the dimensional change was significantly the highest in cobalt chrome metallic denture base group. Conclusion. Cobalt chrome metallic denture base has stable dimension compared to denture bases fabricated of acrylic resin but it was more affected by altered mouth temperature. The study was registered in the International Standard Randomized Controlled Trials Number (ISRCTN) registry with study ID (ISRCTN94238244).

  17. Soft denture liners' effect on the masticatory function in patients wearing complete dentures: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palla, Eleni Sotiria; Karaoglani, Eleni; Naka, Olga; Anastassiadou, Vassiliki

    2015-12-01

    To explore the effect of soft denture liners on the masticatory performance and muscle activity of edentulous patients wearing complete dentures, as determined by using objective measurement methods. Randomized controlled clinical trials and Cross-over studies that evaluated the masticatory capacity and muscle activity in denture wearers with and without soft denture liners were included in this systematic review. A comprehensive literature search was performed via electronic databases using the appropriate key words. The last search took place in September 2014. The potentially appropriate articles were identified and evaluated for eligibility through a predefined review process conducted by two examiners. Six out of the 176 identified records were included for quality and systematic assessment. The observed clinical and methodological diversity determined the narrative approach for the pooling of the findings. According to the studies brought together for the current systematic review, soft denture liners provided denture wearers with increased masticatory function compared to conventional denture base materials. Specifically, the use of long-term silicone liners significantly improved the mastication parameters. The observed intervention effects suggest further studies of higher quality to allow reliable conclusions to be drawn and to strengthen the clinical significance of these materials to patient's functionality. Soft denture lining materials have been suggested to address functional problems arising during complete denture function. This study was designed to systematically review the impact of soft liners' use on the masticatory efficiency in denture wearers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of Different Denture Base Materials and Changed Mouth Temperature on Dimensional Stability of Complete Dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid A. O. Arafa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Type of materials used in fabrication of denture base has an effect on dimension during denture base material processing and other factors related to clinical use. Objective. The study aims were to assess the dimensional stability including thermal changes of three different denture base materials. Methods. Ninety patients were selected to construct complete dentures with different denture base materials. They were randomly divided into three groups: group 1, patients with cobalt chrome metallic base; group 2, patients with heat curing acrylic resin fabricated by injection moulding technique; and group 3, patients with denture bases fabricated by conventional heat curing acrylic resin. The dimensional changes were assessed using digital caliper. Results. After the twelfth month, injection moulding acrylic resin had significantly the highest dimensional change followed by the conventional heat curing acrylic resin. There were no significant differences in the dimensions between the three types of denture base materials at normal mouth temperature, while, after hot tea drinking at 45°C, the dimensional change was significantly the highest in cobalt chrome metallic denture base group. Conclusion. Cobalt chrome metallic denture base has stable dimension compared to denture bases fabricated of acrylic resin but it was more affected by altered mouth temperature. The study was registered in the International Standard Randomized Controlled Trials Number (ISRCTN registry with study ID (ISRCTN94238244.

  19. Efficacy of three denture brushes on biofilm removal from complete dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roseana Aparecida Gomes Fermandes

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of three denture brushes (Bitufo-B; Medic Denture-MD; Colgate-C on biofilm removal from upper and lower dentures using a specific dentifrice (Corega Brite. The correlation between biofilm levels on the internal and external surfaces of the upper and lower dentures was also evaluated. A microbiological assay was performed to assess the growth of colony-formed units (cfu of Candida yeasts on denture surface. Thirty-three patients were enrolled in a 10-week trial divided in two stages: 1 (control - three daily water rinses within 1 week; 2 - three daily brushings within 3 weeks per tested brush. Internal (tissue and external (right buccal flange surfaces of the complete dentures were disclosed (neutral red 1% and photographed. Total denture areas and disclosed biofilm areas were measured using Image Tool 3.00 software for biofilm quantification. Dentures were boxed with #7 wax and culture medium (CHROMagarTM Candida was poured to reproduce the internal surface. Statistical analysis by Friedman's test showed significant difference (p0.01. Analysis by the Correlation test showed higher r values (B=0.78; MD=0.8341, C=0.7362 for the lower dentures comparing the surfaces (internal and external and higher r values (B=0.7861, MD=0.7955, C=0.8298 for the external surface comparing the dentures (upper and lower. The results of the microbiological showed no significant difference (p>0.01 between the brushes with respect to the frequency of the species of yeasts (chi-square test. In conclusion, all denture brushes evaluated in this study were effective in the removal of biofilm. There was better correlation of biofilm levels between the surfaces for the lower dentures, and between the dentures for the external surface. There was no significant difference among the brushes regarding the frequency of yeasts.

  20. Toxicology of antimicrobial nanoparticles for prosthetic devices

    OpenAIRE

    Nuñez-Anita RE; Acosta-Torres LS; Vilar-Pineda J; Martínez-Espinosa JC; de la Fuente-Hernández J; Castaño VM

    2014-01-01

    Rosa Elvira Nuñez-Anita,1 Laura Susana Acosta-Torres,2 Jorge Vilar-Pineda,2 Juan Carlos Martínez-Espinosa,3 Javier de la Fuente-Hernández, 2 Víctor Manuel Castaño4 1Facultad de Medicina Veterinariay Zootecnia, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Tarìmbaro Municipio de Morelia, Michoacán, México; 2Escuela Nacionalde Estudios Superiores, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de M...

  1. Assessment of the diagnostic accuracy of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in prosthetic infective endocarditis and cardiac implantable electronic device infection: comparison of different interpretation criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez-Ballve, Ana; Jesus Perez-Castejon, Maria; Carreras-Delgado, Jose L. [Clinico San Carlos University Hospital, San Carlos Health Research Institute (IdISSC), Complutense University of Madrid, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Madrid (Spain); Delgado-Bolton, Roberto C. [Clinico San Carlos University Hospital, San Carlos Health Research Institute (IdISSC), Complutense University of Madrid, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Madrid (Spain); San Pedro Hospital and Centre for Biomedical Research of La Rioja (CIBIR), University of La Rioja, Department of Diagnostic Imaging (Radiology) and Nuclear Medicine, La Rioja (Spain); Sanchez-Enrique, Cristina; Vilacosta, Isidre; Vivas, David; Olmos, Carmen [Clinico San Carlos University Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Madrid (Spain); Ferrer, Manuel E.F. [Clinico San Carlos University Hospital, Research Unit, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-12-15

    The diagnosis of prosthetic valve (PV) infective endocarditis (IE) and infection of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) remains challenging. The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in these patients and analyse the interpretation criteria. We included 41 patients suspected of having IE by the Duke criteria who underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT. The criteria applied for classifying the findings as positive/negative for IE were: (a) visual analysis of only PET images with attenuation-correction (AC PET images); (b) visual analysis of both AC PET images and PET images without AC (NAC PET images); (c) qualitative analysis of NAC PET images; and (d) semiquantitative analysis of AC PET images. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT was considered positive for IE independently of the intensity and distribution of FDG uptake. The gold standard was the Duke pathological criteria (if tissue was available) or the decision of an endocarditis expert team after a minimum 4 months follow-up. We studied 62 areas with suspicion of IE, 28 areas (45 %) showing definite IE and 34 (55 %) showing possible IE. Visual analysis of only AC PET images showed poor diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity 20 %, specificity 57 %). Visual analysis of both AC PET and NAC PET images showed excellent sensitivity (100 %) and intermediate specificity (73 %), focal uptake being more frequently associated with IE. The accuracy of qualitative analysis of NAC PET images depended on the threshold: the maximum sensitivity, specificity and accuracy achieved were 88 %, 80 %, 84 %, respectively. In the semiquantitative analysis of AC PET images, SUVmax was higher in areas of confirmed IE than in those without IE (∇SUVmax 2.2, p < 0.001). When FDG uptake was twice that in the liver, IE was always confirmed, and SUVmax 5.5 was the optimal threshold for IE diagnosis using ROC curve analysis (area under the curve 0.71). The value of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in the diagnosis of suspected IE of PVs

  2. Developing a software for removable partial denture design: Part II: Introduction of RPD graph software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nejatidanesh F

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Designing removable partial dentures is one of the most important phases of prosthetic treatments. Computer can be used to facilitate and increase accuracy of removable partial denture design. The aim of this study was to develop a software for removable partial denture design.Materials and Methods: A questionnaire (discussed in part I and major textbooks, were used to determine the design rules.  The software (RPD Graph was developed using Visual C++ and Maryam program. The RPD Graph can determine the classification of partial edentulous arch. With defining the missing teeth and providing data about prognosis and conditions of abutment teeth, the removable partial design will be developed by RPD Graph. This software is a knowledge-based system which has specific characteristics. It can be used as an educational tool for teaching RPD design and as a clinical tool for supporting clinician's decision. In addition it can be developed to more complete softwares.

  3. Frequency of Temporomandibular Disorders in Asymptomatic Removable Partial and Complete Denture Wearers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Dulčić

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A dogmatic view on occlusion as the main aetiological factor for temporomandibular disorder (TMD has been present in the literature for a long time, but a direct scientific correlation between occlusal disorders and TMD has never been proven. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of TMD signs and tissue-specific diagnoses in a population of 164 asymptomatic participants, 70 removable partial denture wearers and 94 complete denture wearers of an average age of 61.3 years, by means of clinical manual functional analysis. TMD was found in 42.1% of the participants. No statistically significant difference in the occurrence of TMD was found between removable partial and complete denture wearers and between genders (P > 0.05. The most frequent tissue-specific diagnoses were osteoarthrosis (11%, total anterior disc displacement (9.1% and partial anterolateral disc displacement (8.5%. The frequency of tissue-specific diagnoses was also not influenced by the type of prosthetic replacements.

  4. Influence of saliva medium on freeing heavy metal ion from fixed dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalicanin, Biljana; Ajduković, Zorica

    2008-07-01

    In dental-prosthetic practice, various kinds of fixed dentures, crowns and bridges, have very often been used in order to replace natural teeth and to respond to all health and esthetic needs. This study investigated the effect of saliva medium on migration of ions of heavy metals from fixed dentures that were fixed with various cements. Also, the influence of saliva medium on natural human teeth was observed. Potentiometric stripping analysis was used in order to determine the content of toxic heavy metals in the examined samples. The study confirmed that synthetic saliva had no significant influence on heavy metal ion migration from the natural teeth, whereas slight migration of some observed toxic heavy metal ions from the fixed dentures was present. This, however, indicates that these contents, although very low, must be taken seriously, because the above mentioned metals have cumulative effect which after some period of time may lead to functional disorders of some organs, and even to some very serious diseases.

  5. Devising the prosthetic prescription and typical examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passero, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    Limb deficiency has a significant impact on the involved person, with upper limb absence presenting a materially different set of issues than lower limb absence. The primary objectives in fitting a patient with a prosthesis are to enhance their independence in performing daily activities, and to improve their quality of life. For lower limb absence, the primary issues are safety, stability, and the ability to ambulate in a manner consistent with their overall health. The primary objectives in prescribing upper limb prosthetics are function, durability, appearance, comfort, and usability of the device. This article discusses the nuances associated with managing these patients.

  6. 21 CFR 890.3025 - Prosthetic and orthotic accessory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... intended for medical purposes to support, protect, or aid in the use of a cast, orthosis (brace), or prosthesis. Examples of prosthetic and orthotic accessories include the following: A pelvic support band and belt, a cast shoe, a cast bandage, a limb cover, a prosthesis alignment device, a postsurgical pylon,...

  7. Prosthetic arm monitoring system using a programmable interface controller.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denaro, B A; Schoenberg, J S; Self, B P; Bagley, A

    2001-01-01

    Children with upper extremity limb deficiency are often prescribed a prosthetic arm to assist with daily function. Three types of prostheses are available: passive, active body-powered, and active myoelectric; costs range from $3,000 to $15,000. Clinicians rely on parent and child feedback regarding the usefulness of the prosthesis, and may assess the child's skill in using the device in a controlled setting. However, these methods do not provide an objective quantification of the wear and use of the device during daily activities. The purpose of this project is to develop a sensor to record the amount of time per day the prosthetic arm is worn, and to count the number of times per day the child activates (closes) the prosthetic hand (or terminal device). The system that has been developed can be integrated unobtrusively into a child's prosthetic arm. A programmable interface controller (PIC) with interface circuitry and memory was developed to record the daily wear pattern and hand usage of the prosthesis at 15-minute intervals. Memory and battery capacities are sufficient to record data over a three-month period. A personal computer interface downloads the collected data and may be used to reprogram the device for different time periods of data collection. All components, including the battery, have a mass of 87 grams and fit inside the forearm cavity of a 9-year old's prosthesis. Controlled trials are underway at Shriners Hospital for Children, Northern California, to determine system reliability.

  8. Effects of glass fiber mesh with different fiber content and structures on the compressive properties of complete dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Sang-Hui; Cho, Hye-Won; Oh, Seunghan; Bae, Ji-Myung

    2015-06-01

    No study has yet evaluated the strength of complete dentures reinforced with glass fiber meshes with different content and structures. The purpose of this study was to compare the reinforcing effects of glass fiber mesh with different content and structures with that of metal mesh in complete dentures. Two types of glass fiber mesh were used: SES mesh (SES) and glass cloth (GC2, GC3, and GC4). A metal mesh was used for comparison. The complete dentures were made by placing the reinforcement 1 mm away from the tissue surface. A control group was prepared without any reinforcement (n=10). The compressive properties were measured by a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. The results were analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis test and the Duncan multiple range test (α=.05). The fracture resistance of the SES group was significantly higher than that of the control, GC4, and metal groups (asymptotic P=.004), but not significantly different from the GC2 and GC3 groups. The toughness of the SES and GC3 groups was significantly higher than that of the others (asymptotic Pcomplete dentures. The content of the glass fiber mesh seemed more important than the structures. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The behavior of implant-supported dentures and abutments using the cemented cylinder technique with different resinous cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivete Aparecida de Mathias Sartori

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluate the behavior of implant-supported dentures and their components, made by cemented cylinder technique, using threetypes of resin cements. Methods: Fifty three patients, of whom 26 were women and 27 men, aged between 25 and 82 years. Results: With partial (54.43% and total (45.57% implant-supported dentures, of the Cone Morse, external and internal hexagon types (Neodent®, Curitiba, Brazil, totaling 237 fixations, were analyzed. The resin cements used were Panavia® (21.94%, EnForce® (58.23% and Rely X® (19.83% and the components were used in accordance with the Laboratory Immediate Loading - Neodent® sequence. The period of time of denture use ranged between 1 and 5 years. The results reported that 5(2.1% cylinders were loosened from metal structure (both belonging to Rely X group, 2(0.48% implants were lost after the first year of use, 16(6.75% denture retention screws wereloosened and 31(13.08% abutment screws were unloosened.Conclusion: The reasons for these failures probably are: metal structure internal retention failure, occlusal pattern, cementation technique and loading conditions. The cemented cylinder technique was effective when used in partial and total implant-supported rehabilitations, keeping prosthetic components stable, despite the resin cement utilized. However, further clinical studies must be conducted.

  10. The influence of maxillary central incisor position in complete dentures on /s/ sound production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runte, C; Lawerino, M; Dirksen, D; Bollmann, F; Lamprecht-Dinnesen, A; Seifert, E

    2001-05-01

    The insertion of prosthodontic restorations often leads to speech defects, most of which are transient but nevertheless a source of concern to the patient. For the dental practitioner, there are few guidelines on designing a prosthetic restoration with maximum phonetic success. This study investigated the effect of different maxillary central incisor positions on phonetic patterns. The inclination angle of central incisor blocks in duplicate complete maxillary dentures was changed in a range of -30 degrees to +30 degrees from the original position (0 degrees). Test words and sentences were acoustically analyzed. Spectral parameters such as first peak, noise band (defined by upper and lower limits of the most intensively blackened frequency area), Fast Fourier Transformation power spectrum, energy spectrum, and time were investigated. Influences of oral stereognosis, hearing, and age as cofactors on /s/ articulation were also taken into account. The change of incisor block angle in both directions usually caused a poorer execution of the /s/ sound. The labial angulation seemed to have a greater effect than the palatal angulation. The most significant changes were those in the noise band and energy spectrum. Immediate phonetic adaptation of prosthetic restorations in the maxillary incisor region can be achieved only if the original position of the natural teeth is transferred to the denture. Although these misarticulations are, in most cases, likely to disappear within a few weeks, they may persist and even lead to psychosocial problems. A better understanding of the causes of misarticulation and the limits of adaptation according to certain morphologic parameters of dentures is important.

  11. Anticoagulation for Prosthetic Valves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Kaneko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Implantation of prosthetic valve requires consideration for anticoagulation. The current guideline recommends warfarin on all mechanical valves. Dabigatran is the new generation anticoagulation medication which is taken orally and does not require frequent monitoring. This drug is approved for treatment for atrial fibrillation and venous thromboembolism, but the latest large trial showed that this drug increases adverse events when used for mechanical valve anticoagulation. On-X valve is the new generation mechanical valve which is considered to require less anticoagulation due to its flow dynamics. The latest study showed that lower anticoagulation level lowers the incidence of bleeding, while the risk of thromboembolism and thrombosis remained the same. Anticoagulation poses dilemma in cases such as pregnancy and major bleeding event. During pregnancy, warfarin can be continued throughout pregnancy and switched to heparin derivative during 6–12 weeks and >36 weeks of gestation. Warfarin can be safely started after 1-2 weeks of discontinuation following major bleeding episode.

  12. Advances in upper extremity prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlotolow, Dan A; Kozin, Scott H

    2012-11-01

    Until recently, upper extremity prostheses had changed little since World War II. In 2006, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency responded to an increasing number of military amputees with the Revolutionizing Prosthetics program. The program has yielded several breakthroughs both in the engineering of new prosthetic arms and in the control of those arms. Direct brain-wave control of a limb with 22° of freedom may be within reach. In the meantime, advances such as individually powered digits have opened the door to multifunctional full and partial hand prostheses. Restoring sensation to the prosthetic limb remains a major challenge to full integration of the limb into a patient's self-image.

  13. Prosthodontic Rehabilitation of Hereditary Ectodermal Dysplasia in an 11-Year-Old Patient with Flexible Denture: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha Jain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary ectodermal dysplasia is a rare group of inherited disorders characterized by aplasia or dysplasia of two or more tissues of ectodermal origin such as hair, nails, teeth, and skin. The dental characteristics of this syndrome include anodontia or hypodontia of the primary and/or permanent teeth, hypoplastic conical teeth, and underdevelopment of the alveolar ridges. The options for a definitive treatment plan include fixed, removable or implant-supported prostheses, singly or in combination. This clinical report describes the prosthetic rehabilitation of an 11-year-old boy with hereditary ectodermal dysplasia. Maxillary flexible removable partial denture and mandibular conventional complete denture were fabricated to establish an acceptable masticatory function, speech, and esthetics for the patient.

  14. Estimation of the Patients' Adaptation to Noble Alloy Dentures Relying on the Parameters of Biological Fluids in Oral Cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEBEDENKO I. Yu.; PARUNOV V. A.; KITKINA T. B.

    2012-01-01

    For the study of the effect of Plagodent and Palladent noble alloy dentures (OJSC "SIC ‘Supermetal’",Russia),the elemental compositions of the fluids obtained from gingival sulcus of abutment teeth of metal-ceramic dentures with frames made of the above-stated dental alloys,have been investigated.Response of white blood cells and fibroblasts in the gingival fluid and the mixed saliva of the patients a long time after prosthetic repair,relying on the content of proinflammatory interleukins IL-1 β and IL-6,anti-inflammatory interleukins IL-4 and IL-10,the factor of tumor necrosis TNF-α and lactoferrin,has been investigated.The results obtained have convincingly proved the biosafety of the Plagodent and Palladent noble alloys.

  15. 2-Methacryloyloxyethyl Phosphorylcholine Polymer Treatment of Complete Dentures to Inhibit Denture Plaque Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeya, Kenji; Fukunishi, Miya; Iwasa, Fuminori; Inoue, Yuuki; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Baba, Kazuyoshi

    2016-12-26

    Removable dentures made of poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) are prone to bacterial adherence and dental plaque formation, which is called denture plaque. Denture plaque-associated infection is a source of serious dental and medical complications in the elderly. 2-Methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) is a well-known biomedical material that exhibits marked antithrombogenicity and tissue compatibility because of its high resistance to protein adsorption and cell adhesion. Therefore, MPC polymer coatings are suggested to have the potential to inhibit plaque deposition on the surface of PMMA dentures. However, coating MPC polymer on the surface of a PMMA denture is a complex procedure that requires specialized equipment, which is regarded as a major barrier to its clinical application. Here, we introduce a new MPC polymer treatment procedure that uses poly (MPC-co-BMA-co-MPAz) (PMBPAz) to prevent denture plaque deposition on removable dentures. This procedure enables the MPC coating of PMMA denture surfaces in a simple and stable manner that is resistant to various chemical and mechanical stresses due to the MPC layer of PMBPAz that is covalently bound to the PMMA surface by ultraviolet light irradiation. In addition, the procedure does not require any specialized equipment and can be completed by clinicians within 2 min. We applied this procedure in a clinical setting and demonstrated its clinical utility and efficacy in inhibiting plaque deposition on removable dentures.

  16. Cast Partial Denture versus Acrylic Partial Denture for Replacement of Missing Teeth in Partially Edentulous Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramita Suwal

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare the effects of cast partial denture with conventional all acrylic denture in respect to retention, stability, masticatory efficiency, comfort and periodontal health of abutments. Methods: 50 adult partially edentulous patient seeking for replacement of missing teeth having Kennedy class I and II arches with or without modification areas were selected for the study. Group-A was treated with cast partial denture and Group-B with acrylic partial denture. Data collected during follow-up visit of 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year by evaluating retention, stability, masticatory efficiency, comfort, periodontal health of abutment. Results: Chi-square test was applied to find out differences between the groups at 95% confidence interval where p = 0.05. One year comparison shows that cast partial denture maintained retention and stability better than acrylic partial denture (p< 0.05. The masticatory efficiency was significantly compromising from 3rd month to 1 year in all acrylic partial denture groups (p< 0.05. The comfort of patient with cast partial denture was maintained better during the observation period (p< 0.05. Periodontal health of abutment was gradually deteriorated in all acrylic denture group (p

  17. Minimally invasive preparation and design of a cantilevered, all-ceramic, resin-bonded, fixed partial denture in the esthetic zone: a case report and descriptive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barwacz, Christopher A; Hernandez, Marcela; Husemann, R Henry

    2014-01-01

    Resin-bonded, fixed partial dentures have the potential to offer a minimally invasive, fixed-prosthetic approach to tooth replacement in patients who may not be candidates for implant therapy. However, traditional preparation protocols often recommend extensive preparation designs on two abutment teeth, thereby potentially compromising the long-term health of the adjacent abutments and often resulting in unilateral debonding of one of the retainers in the long term. In light of advances in high-strength ceramic systems capable of being reliably bonded to tooth structure and offering improved esthetic outcomes, as well as clinical and case-series research demonstrating improved survivability of cantilevered resin-bonded fixed partial dentures, new preparation designs and methodologies can be advocated. The following case report demonstrates the clinical application of sonoabrasion, coupled with a dental operating microscope, to minimally prepare a single abutment for a cantilevered, all-ceramic resin-bonded fixed partial denture. Relevant historic and contemporary literature regarding double versus single-retainer resin-bonded fixed partial dentures are reviewed, as well as clinical conditions that are most favorable for such restorations to have an optimal long-term prognosis. If appropriate clinical conditions exist, a cantilevered, all-ceramic, resin-bonded, fixed partial denture may be the most conservative means of tooth replacement in a patient who is not a candidate for an endosseous implant. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Rehabilitation regimes based upon psychophysical studies of prosthetic vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S. C.; Suaning, G. J.; Morley, J. W.; Lovell, N. H.

    2009-06-01

    Human trials of prototype visual prostheses have successfully elicited visual percepts (phosphenes) in the visual field of implant recipients blinded through retinitis pigmentosa and age-related macular degeneration. Researchers are progressing rapidly towards a device that utilizes individual phosphenes as the elementary building blocks to compose a visual scene. This form of prosthetic vision is expected, in the near term, to have low resolution, large inter-phosphene gaps, distorted spatial distribution of phosphenes, restricted field of view, an eccentrically located phosphene field and limited number of expressible luminance levels. In order to fully realize the potential of these devices, there needs to be a training and rehabilitation program which aims to assist the prosthesis recipients to understand what they are seeing, and also to adapt their viewing habits to optimize the performance of the device. Based on the literature of psychophysical studies in simulated and real prosthetic vision, this paper proposes a comprehensive, theoretical training regime for a prosthesis recipient: visual search, visual acuity, reading, face/object recognition, hand-eye coordination and navigation. The aim of these tasks is to train the recipients to conduct visual scanning, eccentric viewing and reading, discerning low-contrast visual information, and coordinating bodily actions for visual-guided tasks under prosthetic vision. These skills have been identified as playing an important role in making prosthetic vision functional for the daily activities of their recipients.

  19. Parameter Estimation Technique of Nonlinear Prosthetic Hand System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H.Jali

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper illustrated the parameter estimation technique of motorized prosthetic hand system. Prosthetic hands have become importance device to help amputee to gain a normal functional hand. By integrating various types of actuators such as DC motor, hydraulic and pneumatic as well as mechanical part, a highly useful and functional prosthetic device can be produced. One of the first steps to develop a prosthetic device is to design a control system. Mathematical modeling is derived to ease the control design process later on. This paper explained the parameter estimation technique of a nonlinear dynamic modeling of the system using Lagrangian equation. The model of the system is derived by considering the energies of the finger when it is actuated by the DC motor. The parameter estimation technique is implemented using Simulink Design Optimization toolbox in MATLAB. All the parameters are optimized until it achieves a satisfactory output response. The results show that the output response of the system with parameter estimation value produces a better response compare to the default value

  20. Prosthetic management of an epileptic patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akeredolu, P A; Temisanren, O T; Danesi, M A

    2005-12-01

    This case report illustrates the problems of tooth loss in an epileptic patient. The patient presented with a broken denture following a seizure. She gave a history of breaking and swallowing her dentures during seizures. Before presentation she had worn five upper removable partial dentures. An upper removable partial denture with increased thickness of the acrylic palatal was fabricated and fitted satisfactorily. The patient was taught how to insert and remove the prosthesis as quickly as possible. Epileptic patients can use dentures but run the risk of frequently breaking and swallowing them during seizures. The risk can be reduced if patients and relatives are taught how to remove the dentures prior to or during seizures.

  1. Pre-prosthetic surgery: Mandible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaki, Veeramalai Nadu; Balu, Kandasamy; Ramesh, Sadashiva Balakrishnapillai; Arvind, Ramraj Jayabalan; Venkatesan

    2012-01-01

    Pre-prosthetic surgery is that part of oral and maxillofacial surgery which restores oral function and facial form. This is concerned with surgical modification of the alveolar process and its surrounding structures to enable the fabrication of a well-fitting, comfortable, and esthetic dental prosthesis. The ultimate goal of pre-prosthetic surgery is to prepare a mouth to receive a dental prosthesis by redesigning and smoothening bony edges. PMID:23066301

  2. Pre-prosthetic surgery: Mandible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veeramalai Naidu Devaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pre-prosthetic surgery is that part of oral and maxillofacial surgery which restores oral function and facial form. This is concerned with surgical modification of the alveolar process and its surrounding structures to enable the fabrication of a well-fitting, comfortable, and esthetic dental prosthesis. The ultimate goal of pre-prosthetic surgery is to prepare a mouth to receive a dental prosthesis by redesigning and smoothening bony edges.

  3. Prosthetics & Orthotics Manufacturing Initiative (POMI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-21

    technologies pursued in Task 1: Reconfigurable Sockets was determined to have promise in allowing sockets to be adjusted after manufacture . The most likely...overheating in the socket, and this concept may be suitable for commercialization efforts in the future. Prosthetics & Orthotics Manufacturing ...and manufacturing of prosthetic systems to increase durability and comfort, and on giving medical personnel tools to aid in the care of our most

  4. Methods for characterization of mechanical and electrical prosthetic vacuum pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komolafe, Oluseeni; Wood, Sean; Caldwell, Ryan; Hansen, Andrew; Fatone, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    Despite increasingly widespread adoption of vacuum-assisted suspension systems in prosthetic clinical practices, there remain gaps in the body of scientific knowledge guiding clinicians' choices of existing products. In this study, we identified important pump-performance metrics and developed techniques to objectively characterize the evacuation performance of prosthetic vacuum pumps. The sensitivity of the proposed techniques was assessed by characterizing the evacuation performance of two electrical (Harmony e-Pulse [Ottobock; Duderstadt, Germany] and LimbLogic VS [Ohio Willow Wood; Mt. Sterling, Ohio]) and three mechanical (Harmony P2, Harmony HD, and Harmony P3 [Ottobock]) prosthetic pumps in bench-top testing. Five fixed volume chambers ranging from 33 cm(3) (2 in.(3)) to 197 cm(3) (12 in.(3)) were used to represent different air volume spaces between a prosthetic socket and a liner-clad residual limb. All measurements were obtained at a vacuum gauge pressure of 57.6 kPa (17 inHg). The proposed techniques demonstrated sensitivity to the different electrical and mechanical pumps and, to a lesser degree, to the different setting adjustments of each pump. The sensitivity was less pronounced for the mechanical pumps, and future improvements for testing of mechanical vacuum pumps were proposed. Overall, this study successfully offers techniques feasible as standards for assessing the evacuation performance of prosthetic vacuum pump devices.

  5. Methods for characterization of mechanical and electrical prosthetic vacuum pumps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluseeni Komolafe, PhD

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite increasingly widespread adoption of vacuum-assisted suspension systems in prosthetic clinical practices, there remain gaps in the body of scientific knowledge guiding clinicians’ choices of existing products. In this study, we identified important pump-performance metrics and developed techniques to objectively characterize the evacuation performance of prosthetic vacuum pumps. The sensitivity of the proposed techniques was assessed by characterizing the evacuation performance of two electrical (Harmony e-Pulse [Ottobock; Duderstadt, Germany] and LimbLogic VS [Ohio Willow Wood; Mt. Sterling, Ohio] and three mechanical (Harmony P2, Harmony HD, and Harmony P3 [Ottobock] prosthetic pumps in bench-top testing. Five fixed volume chambers ranging from 33 cm3 (2 in.3 to 197 cm3 (12 in.3 were used to represent different air volume spaces between a prosthetic socket and a liner-clad residual limb. All measurements were obtained at a vacuum gauge pressure of 57.6 kPa (17 inHg. The proposed techniques demonstrated sensitivity to the different electrical and mechanical pumps and, to a lesser degree, to the different setting adjustments of each pump. The sensitivity was less pronounced for the mechanical pumps, and future improvements for testing of mechanical vacuum pumps were proposed. Overall, this study successfully offers techniques feasible as standards for assessing the evacuation performance of prosthetic vacuum pump devices.

  6. The use of underactuation in prosthetic grasping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Kyberd

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Underactuation as a method of driving prosthetic hands has a long history. The pragmatic requirements of such a device to be light enough to be worn and used regularly have meant that any multi degree of freedom prosthetic hand must have fewer actuators than the usable degrees of freedom. Aesthetics ensures that while the hand needs five fingers, five actuators have considerable mass, and only in recent years has it even been possible to construct a practical anthropomorphic hand with five motors. Thus there is an important trade off as to which fingers are driven, and which joints on which fingers are actuated, and how the forces are distributed to create a functional device. This paper outlines some of the historical solutions created for this problem and includes those designs of recent years that are now beginning to be used in the commercial environment.

    This paper was presented at the IFToMM/ASME International Workshop on Underactuated Grasping (UG2010, 19 August 2010, Montréal, Canada.

  7. Nitinol for Prosthetic and Orthotic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Emma; Buis, Arjan

    2011-07-01

    As global populations age, conditions such as stroke and diabetes require individuals to use rehabilitation technology for many years to come due to chronic musculoskeletal, sensory, and other physical impairments. One in four males currently aged 45 will experience a stroke within 40 years and will often require access to prolonged rehabilitation. In addition, worldwide, one individual loses a limb every 30 s due to the complications of diabetes. As a result, innovative ideas are required to devise more effective prosthetic and orthotic devices to enhance quality of life. While Nitinol has already found much favor within the biomedical industry, one area, which has not yet exploited its unique properties, is in the field of physical rehabilitation, ranging from prosthetic and orthotic devices to assistive technology such as wheelchairs. Improved intervention capabilities based on materials such as Nitinol have the potential to vastly improve patients' quality of life and in the case of orthoses, may even reduce the severity of the condition over time. It is hoped that this study will spark discussion and interest for the materials community in a field which has yet to be fully exploited.

  8. Implant-prosthetic rehabilitation after radiation treatment in head and neck cancer patients: a case-series report of outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotic, Jasna; Jamsek, Jure; Kuhar, Milan; Ihan Hren, Natasa; Kansky, Andrej; Özcan, Mutlu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Slovenia has a high burden of head and neck cancer. Patients are mostly treated with surgery followed by radiation therapy. Advanced surgical and prosthodontic techniques have expanded the rehabilitation options. The aim of the study was to review the outcome of implant-prosthetic treatment after radiation therapy. Patients and methods Twenty irradiated head and neck cancer patients who received a removable implant-supported denture at the University Medical Centre Ljubljana were included in the study. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, Cox proportional hazard models and logistic regression were used to assess the implant survival and success rate. Results Twenty patients had 100 implants inserted. The estimated implant survival rate was 96% after 1 year and 87% after 5 years. Failures were mostly observed before loading (91.2%). Implants inserted in the transplanted bone were significantly more likely to fail. Out of 89 implants supporting the dentures, 79 implants (88.7%) were successful, meaning that they were functionally loaded and exhibited no pain, radiolucency or progressive bone loss. Prosthetic treatment was significantly less successful in older patients. The attachment system and the number of implants did not have a statistically significant influence on the success rate. Conclusions Implant-supported dentures have been shown to be a reliable treatment modality after head and neck cancer surgery and radiation therapy. Possible early failures should be communicated with the patients.

  9. Effectiveness of microwave disinfection of complete dentures on the treatment of Candida-related denture stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neppelenbroek, K H; Pavarina, A C; Palomari Spolidorio, D M; Sgavioli Massucato, E M; Spolidorio, L C; Vergani, C E

    2008-11-01

    The effectiveness of microwave disinfection of maxillary complete dentures on the treatment of Candida-related denture stomatitis was evaluated. Patients (n = 60) were randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups of 15 subjects each; patients performed the routine denture care; Mw group: patients had their upper denture microwaved (650 W per 6 min) three times per week for 30 days; group MwMz: patients received the treatment of Mw group in conjunction with topical application of miconazole three times per day for 30 days; group Mz: patients received the antifungal therapy of group MwMz. Cytological smears and mycological cultures were taken from the dentures and the palates of all patients before treatment at day 15 and 30 of treatment and at follow-up (days 60 and 90). The effectiveness of the treatments was evaluated by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. Microbial and clinical analysis of the control group demonstrated no significant decrease in the candidal infection over the clinical trial. Smears and cultures of palates and dentures of the groups Mw and MwMz exhibited absence of Candida at day 15 and 30 of treatment. On day 60 and 90, few mycelial forms were observed on 11 denture smears (36.6%) from groups Mw and MwMz, but not on the palatal smears. Miconazole (group Mz) neither caused significant reduction of palatal inflammation nor eradicated Candida from the dentures and palates. Microwaving dentures was effective for the treatment of denture stomatitis. The recurrence of Candida on microwaved dentures at follow-up was dramatically reduced.

  10. Age, gender, dentures and oral mucosal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacEntee, M I; Glick, N; Stolar, E

    1998-03-01

    The numbers of participants over 75 years of age in previous studies of oral health have not been sufficient to permit a full investigation of the influence of age on the mouth. In this study a disproportionate stratified random sample of 255 independent elders was selected from a list of urban voters to provide similar numbers of men and women in three age groups. The subjects were interviewed and examined, and nearly half of them had mucosal disorders. There was a significant (P angular cheilitis in particular were associated significantly with men and with the use of defective dentures. Logistic regression revealed that neither age alone nor the quality of dentures predispose to mucosal lesions, but that the odds of finding stomatitis, denture-related hyperplasia and angular cheilitis in particular increased about three-fold in denture-users, and almost doubled in men.

  11. Improving the esthetic replacement of missing anterior teeth: interaction between periodontics and a rotational path removable partial denture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncalves, Leticia Machado; Bezerra-Junior, Jose Ribamar Sabino; Benatti, Bruno Braga; Santana, Ivone Lima

    2011-01-01

    The rotational path of insertion concept for removable partial dentures (RPDs) can be used in esthetically demanding situations. This clinical report describes the treatment of a patient with an anterior maxillary edentulous area using a rotational path RPD. To optimally improve gingival esthetics and to allow proximal retention on the surveyors, a crown-lengthening surgical procedure was performed prior to prosthetic treatment on all teeth involved in this rehabilitation. When correctly planned and fabricated, this prosthesis allows excellent functional and esthetic results, minimizes tooth preparation, and reduces the tendency toward plaque accumulation.

  12. The conversion partial denture: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waliszewski, Michael P; Brudvik, James S

    2004-04-01

    The treatment alternative described maximizes the benefit of remaining teeth while allowing simplified alteration of the prosthesis if abutments are lost during the life span of the removable partial denture (RPD). A conversion partial is an RPD whose tooth-frame assembly components are individually fabricated and then joined with an acrylic resin major connector. The conversion RPD optimizes retention and stabilization of a terminal dentition and can be easily converted to an immediate complete denture.

  13. A review of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacture techniques for removable denture fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Mehmet Selim; Baytaroğlu, Ebru Nur; Erdem, Ali; Dilber, Erhan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review was to investigate usage of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacture (CAD/CAM) such as milling and rapid prototyping (RP) technologies for removable denture fabrication. An electronic search was conducted in the PubMed/MEDLINE, ScienceDirect, Google Scholar, and Web of Science databases. Databases were searched from 1987 to 2014. The search was performed using a variety of keywords including CAD/CAM, complete/partial dentures, RP, rapid manufacturing, digitally designed, milled, computerized, and machined. The identified developments (in chronological order), techniques, advantages, and disadvantages of CAD/CAM and RP for removable denture fabrication are summarized. Using a variety of keywords and aiming to find the topic, 78 publications were initially searched. For the main topic, the abstract of these 78 articles were scanned, and 52 publications were selected for reading in detail. Full-text of these articles was gained and searched in detail. Totally, 40 articles that discussed the techniques, advantages, and disadvantages of CAD/CAM and RP for removable denture fabrication and the articles were incorporated in this review. Totally, 16 of the papers summarized in the table. Following review of all relevant publications, it can be concluded that current innovations and technological developments of CAD/CAM and RP allow the digitally planning and manufacturing of removable dentures from start to finish. As a result according to the literature review CAD/CAM techniques and supportive maxillomandibular relationship transfer devices are growing fast. In the close future, fabricating removable dentures will become medical informatics instead of needing a technical staff and procedures. However the methods have several limitations for now.

  14. [Prosthetic dental alloys. 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero Engelmbright, M A

    1990-11-01

    A wide variety of restoration materials for prosthetic odontology is now available to the dental surgeon, either of the covalent type (acrylic resins), metallic (alloys), ionic (porcelains), or a combination of them, as in the so-called composites, such as the composite resins, or as ceramics-metals mixtures. An example of the latter is a product called Miracle-Mix, a glass ionomere cement reinforced with an amalgam alloy. In those cases where the blend is done by a synterization process, the material is called Cermet. The above-listed alternatives clearly evidence day-to-day advances in odontology, with researchers and manufacturers engaged the world over in improving existing products or developing new ones to enrich the dentist's armamentarium. As a side effect of this constant renewal, those dentists who have failed to update their knowledge fall behind in their practice as they persist in using products they have known for years, and may be deceived by advertisements of too-often unreliable products. It is, therefore, important to be aware of available products and their latest improvements.

  15. [Prosthetic dental alloys (2)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero Englembright, M A

    1990-12-01

    A wide variety of restoration materials for prosthetic odontology is now available to the dental surgeon, either of the covalent type (acrylic resins), metallic (alloys), ionic (porcelains), or a combination of them, as in the so-called composites, such as the composite resins, or as ceramics-metals mixtures. An example of the latter is a product called Miracle-Mix, a glass ionomere cement reinforced with an amalgam alloy. In those cases where the blend is done by a synterization process, the material is called Cermet. The above-listed alternatives clearly evidence day-to-day advances in odontology, with researchers and manufacturers engaged the world over in improving existing products or developing new ones to enrich the dentist's armamentarium. As a side effect of this constant renewal, those dentists who have failed to update their knowledge fall behind in their practice as they persist in using products they have known for years, and may be deceived by advertisements of too-often unreliable products. It is, therefore, important to be aware of available products and their latest improvements.

  16. Amputations and prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzur, M S

    1999-01-01

    The author presents in a condensed way an overview of the principles of limb amputations and further treatment of patients who underwent such a procedure. The metabolic cost of walking, load transfer, and wound healing are reviewed in a concise manner. Particular attention is given to blood supply to the wound and methods to determine adequate perfusion with a clear analysis of the pro and cons of the Doppler method. Pediatric amputations, because of their specificity, are considered apart. Disarticulation of limbs is the method of choice in children, because of it retains growth potential of the bone and prevents bony overgrowth of the stump. The article discusses the main indications for limb amputations: trauma, peripheral vascular disease, musculoskeletal tumors and gas gangrene. In every case the specificity of the amputation is considered by the author. Postoperative care is also presented, with a short description of possible complications. Pain is the most common and treatment strategies should be similar to those used in treating patients with major reflex sympathetic causalgia. Edema, joint contracture, wound failure and dermatologic problems are all shortly reviewed. The last part of the article treats with the principles of prosthetics in both the upper and lower limb. These principles are presented basing on the level of amputation: for the upper limb hand, transradial, transhumeral amputations and shoulder disarticulation. For the lower limb foot and ankle, transtibial and transfemoral amputations are considered.

  17. Oral health: dentures and dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martonffy, Andrea Ildiko

    2015-01-01

    More than 35 million Americans have lost all of their teeth, and 178 million are missing at least one tooth. Left unmanaged, tooth loss, or edentulism, can lead to nutritional deficiencies, oral pain, and poor psychosocial functioning. The family physician may be the first clinician to discuss tooth loss as a health concern with the patient. A patient who is interested in replacing missing teeth may be a candidate for dentures, implants, or a combination of these. The patient's preferences, general health, degree of edentulism, ability to follow up regularly, smoking status, and overall oral health should be considered when the prosthodontist makes recommendations for treatment. Smoking can delay tissue healing; therefore, heavy smoking may be a contraindication to implant placement. If a patient chooses dentures, the family physician should perform regular oral examinations, because up to 70% of denture wearers are affected by denture stomatitis at some point. Poor fit, poor hygiene, nighttime wearing of removable dentures, and bacterial or candidal infections can all be identified and managed by the family physician. The physician also can reinforce proper wear and care instructions for dentures and proper care of implants.

  18. The effects of denture status on nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papas, A S; Palmer, C A; Rounds, M C; Russell, R M

    1998-01-01

    In Part I of this study, the Human Nutrition Research Center of the United States Department of Agriculture's Nutritional Status Study (NSS) of 691 independently living elderly people aged 60-98 found that poor dietary quality was associated with low educational attainment, low median family income, and self-report of partial or full dentures. In Part II, further analysis was conducted on a random subsample of 181 subjects who were examined and divided into four groups according to dentate status: two dentures, one denture, partial dentures, and teeth. In this subgroup, significant correlations were found between the quality of nutrient intake and the degree of edentulousness. Analysis of 53 nutrients plus calories from three-day food records showed a significantly higher nutritional quality of the diet in dentate volunteers than in the other groups. This difference was approximately 20% for 19 nutrients, bringing some nutrients (such as calcium) below the RDA for this age group. Although direct correlations cannot be made with actual nutritional status, the introduction of dentures could further compromise the precarious nutritional intake of the elderly population. With this in mind, dentists need to consider carefully the importance of their elderly patients maintaining at least some natural dentition and should provide adequate information on nutritional adaptations to dentures.

  19. Impact of advanced manufacturing technology on prosthetic and orthotic practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D

    1988-04-01

    Radical changes in the technology applied to prosthetics and orthotics are being proposed. This paper attempts to define the scope and character of advanced manufacturing technology and examines the rehabilitation problems which are or could be tackled. Lower-limb prosthetics has been the major area under investigation so far, but orthopaedic footwear, spinal orthotics and custom seating for the disabled have also been investigated using similar technological approaches. The whole process of patient measurement, device design, and component manufacture is conceived as an integrated system relying upon shape or tissue property sensing, computer based device design and computer-numerically-controlled or robot manufacturing processes. The aim is to retain flexibility for custom design which is necessary to provide for individual patients, and yet improve the rapidity and precision of overall device manufacture and service delivery.

  20. Cognitive status of edentate elders wearing complete denture: Does quality of denture matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerutti-Kopplin, Daiane; Emami, Elham; Hilgert, Juliana Balbinot; Hugo, Fernando Neves; Padilha, Dalva Maria Pereira

    2015-09-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that an individual's level of mastication may play a role in their cognitive status. This suggests that in edentate individuals wearing complete denture, non-optimal mastication via inadequate denture could be related to cognitive status. To examine the impact of quality of denture on cognitive status of a sample of elderly edentate Brazilian individuals wearing complete denture. This study is a cross-sectional analysis of data collected from 117 edentate elders (mean age 73.7 ± 5.6 years) wearing complete denture, in southern Brazil. Cognitive impairment was assessed using the Brazilian version of the mini-mental state examination (MMSE). Clinical examination was conducted to evaluate the quality of dentures by use of the FAD (functional assessment of dentures) instrument. Masticatory ability was assessed by self-reported questions. The mean MMSE score for the total sample was 23.1 (SD=4.4) and was associated with age (p=0.001), education (pdentures (pdentures in maintaining cognitive activity in elders. This association may be explained via mastication pathway. The potential beneficial effect of functional dentures on cognitive status via mastication could encourage preventive strategies to decrease substantial risk of morbidity in elders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Hardness, Cohesiveness, and Adhesiveness of Oral Moisturizers and Denture Adhesives: Selection Criteria for Denture Wearers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiko Fujimoto

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of seven denture adhesives and eight oral moisturizers, all of which are commercially available, were evaluated using a texture profile analysis. A new assessment chart is proposed for the selection criteria of denture adhesive and oral moisturizers using a radar chart with three axes: hardness, cohesiveness, and adhesiveness.

  2. Smartphones as image processing systems for prosthetic vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapf, Marc P; Matteucci, Paul B; Lovell, Nigel H; Suaning, Gregg J

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility of implants for prosthetic vision has been demonstrated by research and commercial organizations. In most devices, an essential forerunner to the internal stimulation circuit is an external electronics solution for capturing, processing and relaying image information as well as extracting useful features from the scene surrounding the patient. The capabilities and multitude of image processing algorithms that can be performed by the device in real-time plays a major part in the final quality of the prosthetic vision. It is therefore optimal to use powerful hardware yet to avoid bulky, straining solutions. Recent publications have reported of portable single-board computers fast enough for computationally intensive image processing. Following the rapid evolution of commercial, ultra-portable ARM (Advanced RISC machine) mobile devices, the authors investigated the feasibility of modern smartphones running complex face detection as external processing devices for vision implants. The role of dedicated graphics processors in speeding up computation was evaluated while performing a demanding noise reduction algorithm (image denoising). The time required for face detection was found to decrease by 95% from 2.5 year old to recent devices. In denoising, graphics acceleration played a major role, speeding up denoising by a factor of 18. These results demonstrate that the technology has matured sufficiently to be considered as a valid external electronics platform for visual prosthetic research.

  3. [Chemiluminescence of whole saliva in antioxidant treatment of prosthetic bed tissues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunian, M Iu; Lalaian, B K; Zakarian, A E; Grigorian, K L; Pogosian, G A; Egiazarian, A V

    2010-03-01

    Inflammatory reaction is always accompanied by increased intensity of free-radical oxidation, especially when the phenomena of hypoxia and microcirculatory disorders that occur during the development of side-effects of acrylic removable dentures. This study determined the effectiveness of adaptogens, antioxidants in the complex treatment of diseases of tissues prosthetic field and their influence on the processes of LPO in whole mixed unstimulated saliva. Formed in the reaction to initiate the process of oxygen radicals (OH, RO, O(2)), initiate the formation of lipid peroxide radicals RO(2) biological substrate, the recombination of which leads to the emergence of unsustainable tetroxids, which decays with the release of light quanta. This luminescence is recorded as an amplified current of the photomultiplier, the registration systems. The results suggest the intensive formation of free radicals and peroxides in diseased tissue prosthetic field. Probably the main reason for increasing free-radical oxidation is the release of peroxidase from the crumbling inflammation, phagocytes (mainly neutrophils). The process of peroxidation contributes to an increase in blood supply to inflamed tissues, leading to local enrichment of oxygen, as well as toxic effects of acrylic bases of partial and complete removable dentures in the prosthetic field of tissue. Effect of antioxidants in combination with traditional treatment in 70 patients with periodontal disease and prosthetic bed was assessed by chemiluminescence analysis of whole mixed unstimulated saliva. The level of lipid peroxidation and chemiluminescence activity exceeded the normal values in the 1,5-2 - twice before the treatment. After treatment with antioxidants, these parameters decreased and increased during remission. Thus, studies to determine the status of saliva chemiluminescence method to treat and monitor the dynamics after treatment of periodontitis tissues supporting teeth prosthetic field in the control

  4. Development of a prototype over-actuated biomimetic prosthetic hand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R Williams

    Full Text Available The loss of a hand can greatly affect quality of life. A prosthetic device that can mimic normal hand function is very important to physical and mental recuperation after hand amputation, but the currently available prosthetics do not fully meet the needs of the amputee community. Most prosthetic hands are not dexterous enough to grasp a variety of shaped objects, and those that are tend to be heavy, leading to discomfort while wearing the device. In order to attempt to better simulate human hand function, a dexterous hand was developed that uses an over-actuated mechanism to form grasp shape using intrinsic joint mounted motors in addition to a finger tendon to produce large flexion force for a tight grip. This novel actuation method allows the hand to use small actuators for grip shape formation, and the tendon to produce high grip strength. The hand was capable of producing fingertip flexion force suitable for most activities of daily living. In addition, it was able to produce a range of grasp shapes with natural, independent finger motion, and appearance similar to that of a human hand. The hand also had a mass distribution more similar to a natural forearm and hand compared to contemporary prosthetics due to the more proximal location of the heavier components of the system. This paper describes the design of the hand and controller, as well as the test results.

  5. Development of a prototype over-actuated biomimetic prosthetic hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Matthew R; Walter, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    The loss of a hand can greatly affect quality of life. A prosthetic device that can mimic normal hand function is very important to physical and mental recuperation after hand amputation, but the currently available prosthetics do not fully meet the needs of the amputee community. Most prosthetic hands are not dexterous enough to grasp a variety of shaped objects, and those that are tend to be heavy, leading to discomfort while wearing the device. In order to attempt to better simulate human hand function, a dexterous hand was developed that uses an over-actuated mechanism to form grasp shape using intrinsic joint mounted motors in addition to a finger tendon to produce large flexion force for a tight grip. This novel actuation method allows the hand to use small actuators for grip shape formation, and the tendon to produce high grip strength. The hand was capable of producing fingertip flexion force suitable for most activities of daily living. In addition, it was able to produce a range of grasp shapes with natural, independent finger motion, and appearance similar to that of a human hand. The hand also had a mass distribution more similar to a natural forearm and hand compared to contemporary prosthetics due to the more proximal location of the heavier components of the system. This paper describes the design of the hand and controller, as well as the test results.

  6. Transition of natural teeth to denture (Literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Anita Kristanti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aesthetic needs of patients with complete dentures is currently greatly increasing. To encounter of the stages and the process of complete dentures settlement that takes time, the operators must develop a variety of techniques to overcome them. One of it is by considering the transitional denture method to overcome the aesthetics problem during these stages. Various selection methods during this transitional stage are the making of overdenture, immediate dentures or denture after clearance all remaining natural teeth. Each one has its advantages and disadvantages. Principally, the aesthetic needs, adaptation process, masticatory function and the tissues health are the main reason of this transitional denture. As conclusion, dentures transition method is very helpfull to encounter the patients problems to finish the process of definitive dentures settlement.

  7. Prospective cohort pilot study of 2-visit CAD/CAM monolithic complete dentures and implant-retained overdentures: Clinical and patient-centered outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidra, Avinash S; Farrell, Kimberly; Burnham, David; Dhingra, Ajay; Taylor, Thomas D; Kuo, Chia-Ling

    2016-05-01

    average of 5 emails (0-11) per patient were sent to the laboratory technicians to communicate the improvisation the CAD design of the dentures. An average of 3.3 denture adjustments were needed after insertion (0-10) during the 1-year period. For patient-centered outcomes, median ratings of all 14 participants indicated each of the 12 studied outcomes was favorable at the 1-year recall. Statistically significant improvements in patient ratings from baseline to 1 year were observed for the absence of denture sore spots and treatment time to make the dentures (Pdentures were noted in the 14 evaluated participants, and all dentures were intact and in good condition at the 1-year follow-up. Clinical and patient-centered outcomes for CAD/CAM monolithic dentures fabricated using a 2-visit protocol were evaluated favorably at a 1-year follow-up. However, the proportion of excellent and good ratings for overall satisfaction and assessment was higher for patients than clinicians. A considerable amount of the clinician's time and effort was devoted to aiding in the digital process for the fabrication of CAD/CAM dentures. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Photodynamic inactivation of microorganisms present on complete dentures. A clinical investigation. Photodynamic disinfection of complete dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Daniela Garcia; Pavarina, Ana Cláudia; Dovigo, Lívia Nordi; Mima, Ewerton Garcia de Oliveira; Machado, Ana Lucia; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for the disinfection of complete dentures. Biofilm samples were collected from dentures of 60 denture users who were randomly divided into four experimental groups (n = 15 each): subjects whose maxillary dentures were sprayed with 50 and 100 mg/l of Photogem® suspension (groups P50S and P100S) and patients whose maxillary dentures were treated with 50 and 100 mg/l of Photogem® gel (groups P50G and P100G). Dentures with photosensitizers were left in the dark for 30 min (pre-irradiation time) and then irradiated with blue LED light at 37.5 J/cm(2) (26 min). Denture samples were taken with sterile cotton swab before (left side surfaces) and after (right side surfaces) PDT. All microbial material was diluted and plated on selective media for Candida spp., Staphylococcus mutans spp., streptococci and a non-selective media. After incubation (48 h/37°C), the number of colony-forming units (cfu/ml) was counted. Microorganisms grown on selective media were identified using biochemical methods before and after PDT. The data were submitted to McNemar and Kruskal-Wallis tests (α = 0.05). No growth after PDT was observed in 60, 53, 47, and 40% of dentures from P100G, P50G, P100S, and P50S groups, respectively. When evidence of microorganisms' growth was observed, PDT regimens eliminated over 90% of microorganisms on dentures. This clinical study showed that PDT was effective for disinfecting dentures.

  9. 75 FR 14510 - Implementation of Device Registration and Listing Requirements Enacted in the Public Health...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-26

    ... hospital, clinic, dental laboratory, orthoepic or prosthetic retail facility whose primary responsibility... as whether the device contains materials from animal sources, is an implanted device, and...

  10. Compact prosthetic hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, W. A.; Wiker, G. A.

    1977-01-01

    Device combines tilt, wrist-rotation, and grasping mechanisms in single housing. Main body is about 15 centimeters long and 7.5 centimeters wide. Reduced weight and increased flexibility result from redesign and rearrangement of components.

  11. Denture hyperplasia with areas simulating oral inverted ductal papilloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Pablo Agustin; Perez, Danyel Elias da Cruz; Jorge, Jacks; Rangel, Ana Lúcia Carrinho Ayrosa; León, Jorge Esquiche; Almeida, Oslei Paes de

    2005-07-01

    Denture hyperplasia is a reactive lesion of the oral mucosa, usually associated to an ill-fitting denture. This lesion is easily diagnosed and in some cases distinct microscopic variations such as osseous, oncocytic and squamous metaplasia may be found. These metaplastic alterations probably are associated with the lymphocytic infiltrate usually present in denture hyperplasia. We present a case of denture hyperplasia containing salivary gland tissue with ductal alterations mimicking an oral inverted ductal papilloma.

  12. Influence of Loading Positions of Mandibular Unilateral Distal Extension Removable Partial Dentures on Movements of Abutment Tooth and Denture Base

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xilin Jin; Sato, Masayuki; Nishiyama, Akira; Ohyama, Takashi

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of our study was to explore theeffects of different loading positions on the movementsof the abutment tooth and denture base ofremovable partial denture with unilaterallydesigned framework (RPD-U...

  13. Is the Prosthetic Homologue Necessary for Embodiment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornfeld, Chelsea; Swanston, Michelle; Cassella, Joseph; Beasley, Casey; Green, Jacob; Moshayev, Yonatan; Wininger, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Embodiment is the process by which patients with limb loss come to accept their peripheral device as a natural extension of self. However, there is little guidance as to how exacting the prosthesis must be in order for embodiment to take place: is it necessary for the prosthetic hand to look just like the absent hand? Here, we describe a protocol for testing whether an individual would select a hand that looks like their own from among a selection of five hands, and whether the hand selection (regardless of homology) is consistent across multiple exposures to the same (but reordered) set of candidate hands. Pilot results using healthy volunteers reveals that hand selection is only modestly consistent, and that selection of the prosthetic homologue is atypical (61 of 192 total exposures). Our protocol can be executed in minutes, and makes use of readily available equipment and softwares. We present both a face-to-face and a virtual protocol, for maximum flexibility of implementation. PMID:28066228

  14. Is the prosthetic homologue necessary for embodiment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea Dornfeld

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Embodiment is the process by which patients with limb loss come to accept their peripheral device as a natural extension of self. However, there is little guidance as to how exacting the prosthesis must be in order for embodiment to take place: is it necessary for the prosthetic hand to look just like the absent hand? Here, we describe a protocol for testing whether an individual would select a hand that looks like their own from among a selection of 5 hands, and whether the hand selection (regardless of homology is consistent across multiple exposures to the same (but reordered set of candidate hands. Pilot results using healthy volunteers reveals that hand selection is only modestly consistent, and that selection of the prosthetic homologue is atypical (61 of 192 total exposures. Our protocol can be executed in minutes, and makes use of readily available equipment and softwares. We present both a face-to-face and a virtual protocol, for maximum flexibility of implementation.

  15. Current techniques in CAD/CAM denture fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Nadim Z; AlRumaih, Hamad S; Goodacre, Brian J; Goodacre, Charles J

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the use of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) to produce complete dentures has seen exponential growth in the dental market, and the number of commercially available CAD/CAM denture systems grows every year. The purpose of this article is to describe the clinical and laboratory procedures of 5 CAD/CAM denture systems.

  16. RELATIVE IMPORTANCE OF PSYCHOLOGIC FACTORS IN DENTURE SATISFACTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VERVOORN, JM; DUINKERKE, ASH; LUTEIJN, F; VANDEPOEL, ACM

    The aim of this investigation was to explore the relative importance of psychologic variables in explaining the degree of denture satisfaction in full denture patients. A group of 125 patients who were on a waiting list to have new dentures constructed participated in this study. The patients

  17. Denture hygiene knowledge and practice amongst patients in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... Methods: This was a cross-sectional study involving 203 patients attending a teaching hospital. ... Other information obtained were the duration of denture use, frequency of denture cleaning and type of ... About 41.9% had been using dentures for more than 10 years.

  18. Development of Candida-associated denture stomatitis: new insights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Pereira-Cenci; A.A. Del Bel Cury; W. Crielaard; B. ten Cate

    2008-01-01

    Despite therapeutic progress, opportunistic oral fungal infectious diseases have increased in prevalence, especially in denture wearers. The combination of entrapment of yeast cells in irregularities in denture-base and denture-relining materials, poor oral hygiene and several systemic factors is th

  19. Gaitography applied to prosthetic walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roerdink, Melvyn; Cutti, Andrea G; Summa, Aurora; Monari, Davide; Veronesi, Davide; van Ooijen, Mariëlle W; Beek, Peter J

    2014-11-01

    During walking on an instrumented treadmill with an embedded force platform or grid of pressure sensors, center-of-pressure (COP) trajectories exhibit a characteristic butterfly-like shape, reflecting the medio-lateral and anterior-posterior weight shifts associated with alternating steps. We define "gaitography" as the analysis of such COP trajectories during walking (the "gaitograms"). It is currently unknown, however, if gaitography can be employed to characterize pathological gait, such as lateralized gait impairments. We therefore registered gaitograms for a heterogeneous sample of persons with a trans-femoral and trans-tibial amputation during treadmill walking at a self-selected comfortable speed. We found that gaitograms directly visualize between-person differences in prosthetic gait in terms of step width and the relative duration of prosthetic and non-prosthetic single-support stance phases. We further demonstrated that one should not only focus on the gaitogram's shape but also on the time evolution along that shape, given that the COP evolves much slower in the single-support phase than in the double-support phase. Finally, commonly used temporal and spatial prosthetic gait characteristics were derived, revealing both individual and systematic differences in prosthetic and non-prosthetic step lengths, step times, swing times, and double-support durations. Because gaitograms can be rapidly collected in an unobtrusive and markerless manner over multiple gait cycles without constraining foot placement, clinical application of gaitography seems both expedient and appealing. Studies examining the repeatability of gaitograms and evaluating gaitography-based gait characteristics against a gold standard with known validity and reliability are required before gaitography can be clinically applied.

  20. Myoelectric control of prosthetic hands: state-of-the-art review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geethanjali P

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Purushothaman Geethanjali School of Electrical Engineering Department of Control and Automation VIT University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India Abstract: Myoelectric signals (MES have been used in various applications, in particular, for identification of user intention to potentially control assistive devices for amputees, orthotic devices, and exoskeleton in order to augment capability of the user. MES are also used to estimate force and, hence, torque to actuate the assistive device. The application of MES is not limited to assistive devices, and they also find potential applications in teleoperation of robots, haptic devices, virtual reality, and so on. The myoelectric control-based prosthetic hand aids to restore activities of daily living of amputees in order to improve the self-esteem of the user. All myoelectric control-based prosthetic hands may not have similar operations and exhibit variation in sensing input, deciphering the signals, and actuating prosthetic hand. Researchers are focusing on improving the functionality of prosthetic hand in order to suit the user requirement with the different operating features. The myoelectric control differs in operation to accommodate various external factors. This article reviews the state of the art of myoelectric prosthetic hand, giving description of each control strategy. Keywords: EMG, assistive device, amputee, myoelectric control, electric powered, body ­powered, bioelectric signal control

  1. Resource-efficient proces chains to manufacture patient-specific prosthetic fingers

    OpenAIRE

    Hagedorn-Hansen, D.; Oosthuizen, G. A.; Gerhold, T.

    2016-01-01

    The high cost of quality prostheses, together with the lack of trained prosthetists, makes it challenging to obtain prosthetic devices in developing communities. Modern 3D digitising techniques and additive manufacturing (AM) technologies are gaining popularity in the bio-medical industry and, in the case of prosthesis production, reduce the need for a trained prosthetist. The objective of this research was to develop a new resource-efficient process chain for the manufacturing of prosthetic ...

  2. Attitudes and usage of denture adhesives by complete denture wearers: a survey in Greece and the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polyzois, G.L.; Baat, C. de

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore whether there are differences in usage of and attitudes towards denture adhesives among patients in two countries. BACKGROUND: There are no multi-country surveys concerning usage of and attitudes towards denture adhesives from complete denture wearers. MATERIALS AND METHODS:

  3. The use of existing denture-satisfaction ratings for a diagnostic test to indicate prognosis with newly delivered complete dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Yasuhiko; Matsumaru, Yuichi; Kanno, Kyoko; Kawase, Mitsuaki; Kawase, Mitsuo; Shu, Kazuyoshi; Izawa, Takeshi; Gunji, Atsuko; Kobayashi, Kihei

    2009-10-01

    The study investigated the relation between subjective satisfaction ratings of existing dentures and outcomes of newly delivered dentures, and the ability of the diagnostic test, using existing ratings, to indicate prognosis with newly delivered dentures. Consecutive 165 edentulous patients were recruited from November 2001 to August 2006 at a university-affiliated hospital. Dentures were fabricated with an acrylic base with full-balanced occlusion using hard resin artificial teeth by multiple prosthodontists. At the baseline and 3-month after delivery, patients rate their overall, maxillary, and mandibular satisfaction for existing and replaced dentures on a 100-mm visual analogue scale (VAS). The association between baseline ratings and newly delivered dentures was analyzed by regression analysis. The test's performance was measured by constructing a two-by-two table; patients with the following cutoff values on the VAS (overall: dentures. Relative validity of the diagnostic tests was assessed by means of sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios. Mandibular dentures showed a significant association between baseline and new dentures (coefficient=0.27, p=0.01). Results of test measures for overall, maxillary, and mandibular existing dentures were 71%, 38%, and 87% (sensitivity); 62%, 66%, and 49% (specificity); and 1.1, 1.9, and 1.7 (positive likelihood), and 0.5, 1.0, and 0.2 (negative likelihood). Test performance indicates that the negative (satisfied) result for mandibular existing dentures may be useful to rule out the unsatisfied patients with new mandibular dentures.

  4. The influence of patient characteristics on acrylic-based resilient denture liners embedded in maxillary complete dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Akina; Kimoto, Suguru; Saeki, Hiroyuki; Ono, Masanori; Furuse, Nobuhiko; Kawai, Yasuhiko

    2016-07-01

    A major complication associated with the use of resilient denture liners (RDLs) is a change in hardness over time. In vivo studies on the deterioration of RDLs over time are needed. We aimed to investigate the influence of patient characteristics on the hardness of acrylic-based RDLs (ARDLs) embedded in complete maxillary dentures. We hypothesized that 1 month after application of the ARDLs, the hardness would be influenced by age, saliva condition, occlusal force, smoking, drinking, denture wearing during sleeping, denture cleanser usage, and denture type. Thirty complete maxillary denture wearers were recruited after obtaining informed consent. One investigator measured the Shore D hardness of the commercially available ARDLs, Soften (SFT), FD Soft (FDS), and Bio Liner (BIO) using a Vesmeter(®). The salivary flow rates and pH values and the occlusal force were measured for all patients before initiation of the study. T-tests and Pearson's correlation coefficients were used for the statistical analyses. A p-value of dentures while sleeping, use of denture cleansers, and denture type were associated with an increase in the hardness of the RDLs. The resting saliva pH only influenced the hardness of the SFT ARDLs. Smoking, denture wearing while sleeping, denture cleanser usage, denture type, and resting saliva pH are important predictors of the deterioration of ARDLs over time. Copyright © 2015 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Attitudes and usage of denture adhesives by complete denture wearers: a survey in Greece and the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polyzois, G.L.; Baat, C. de

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore whether there are differences in usage of and attitudes towards denture adhesives among patients in two countries. BACKGROUND: There are no multi-country surveys concerning usage of and attitudes towards denture adhesives from complete denture wearers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Th

  6. The Relationship between Temporomandibular Disorders (TMDs and Overall Denture Conditions in Complete Denture Wearers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Rostamkhani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is any relationship between the condition of complete dentures and TMDs. Methods: The sample consisted of 61 consecutive patients (35 females and 26 males who were admitted to the Department of Prosthodontics of Mashhad Faculty of Dentistry for fabrication of new complete dentures.  The age range of the participants was between 32 and 80 years, with the mean age of 57.05±10.26 years. The patients were examined by two prosthodontists. Using a questionnaire, the first prosthodontist asked the patients about their habits and history of trauma to the temporomandibular joints (TMJs. She then examined the participants for signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs.  The second prosthodontist examined each participant's existing denture and checked its fit, stability, retention, occlusion, and centric relation, and recorded how long it had been in service. The examination was double blind. The data were recorded in examination sheets. Results: The relationship between TMDs and denture fit, stability, retention, centric relation and occlusion was analyzed using Fisher’s Exact Test. No significant relationship was found between denture characteristics and TMDs in complete denture wearers (P-value>0.05. Conclusion: Complete denture characteristics did not play a role in the development of TMDs in edentulous patients.

  7. On the clinical deformation of maxillary complete dentures. Influence of denture-base design and shape of denture-bearing tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el Ghazali, S; Glantz, P O; Strandman, E; Randow, K

    1989-04-01

    This paper aimed to study the influence of denture base design and the shape of the denture-supporting area on the functional deformation of maxillary complete dentures. Six strain-gauged duplicate maxillary dentures were made for the study of two test subjects with different shapes of the palatal vault. Each subject was supplied with two polymethyl methacrylate dentures, one with a 1-mm-thick palatal base and the other 2 mm thick. A third denture was constructed with a cobalt-chromium base. The functional loading tests included maximum biting and the chewing of the food test samples. An analysis based on chewing time and total number of chewing cycles per test piece was also made. The results showed that surface straining is highly complex at the anterior part of the maxillary dentures constructed from polymethyl methacrylate and that increasing the denture thickness per se might not be accompanied by a reduction of strain. The results also suggest that high thrust to the supporting tissue is produced with high palatal vault dentures made in polymethyl methacrylate. The study proposes that cobalt-chromium bases may be used in maxillary dentures to reduce functional deformation and thrust to the supporting tissues at the anterior part of the maxilla.

  8. Speech intelligibility enhancement through maxillary dental rehabilitation with telescopic prostheses and complete dentures: a prospective study using automatic, computer-based speech analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipfer, Christian; Bocklet, Tobias; Noeth, Elmar; Schuster, Maria; Sokol, Biljana; Eitner, Stephan; Nkenke, Emeka; Stelzle, Florian

    2012-01-01

    A completely edentulous or partially edentulous maxilla involving missing anterior teeth may impact speech production and lead to reduced speech intelligibility. The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the effect of a dental prosthetic rehabilitation on speech intelligibility in patients with a toothless or interrupted maxillary arch by means of an automatic, standardized speech recognition system. The speech intelligibility of 45 patients with complete tooth loss or a loss including missing anterior teeth in the maxilla was evaluated by means of a polyphone-based automatic speech recognition system that assessed the percentage of correctly recognized words (word accuracy). To replace inadequate maxillary removable dentures, 20 patients from the overall sample had been rehabilitated with complete dentures and 25 patients with telescopic prostheses. Speech recordings were made in four recording sessions (with and without existing prostheses and then at 1 week and 6 months after placement of newly fabricated prostheses). Significantly higher speech intelligibility was observed in both patient groups compared to the original results without the dentures inserted. After 6 months of adaptation, both groups had reached a level of speech quality that was comparable to the healthy control group. However, patients receiving new telescopic prostheses showed significantly higher levels of speech intelligibility compared to those receiving new complete dentures. Within 6 months, speech intelligibility did not significantly improve from the level found 1 week after insertion of new prostheses for both groups. Patients benefit from the fabrication of new dentures in terms of speech intelligibility, regardless of the type of prosthesis. However, telescopic crown prostheses yield significantly better speech quality compared to complete dentures.

  9. An alternative technique for hollowing maxillary complete denture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suryakant C Deogade

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Extreme resorption of edentulous maxilla may cause difficulty during fabrication of a maxillary complete denture. Increased inter-ridge distance often creates a clinical problem due to heavy-weighted maxillary prosthesis. This article elaborates an alternative approach for hollowing a maxillary complete denture. It utilizes a clear template of the trial denture facilitating the creation of a gelatin cavity form. This hollowing ensures the even thickness of both denture base resins for structural integrity and reduces the heaviness of the denture.

  10. The cast aluminum denture base. Part I: Rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halperin, A R

    1980-06-01

    Experiments with various casting techniques have been done, and aluminum base dentures have been made for many patients. The subjective clinical response from patients wearing aluminum dentures has not been different from patients wearing acrylic resin dentures. However, Brudvik and Holt have stated that they have had marked clinical success in using aluminum bases. A literature review on using aluminum as a denture base material has been presented, and the rationale for its use has been discussed. In part II, a technique will be described that can be used for casting aluminum denture bases.

  11. Transesophageal echocardiogram causing denture dislodgement with upper airway partial obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Najeeb; Shaikh, Azim

    2009-06-01

    A 30-year-old female was evaluated with transesophageal echocardiography to exclude an atrial septal defect. The patient denied having dentures or partial dentures during her pre-procedure history and immediately prior to the procedure. Following the transesophageal echocardiography it was discovered that the patient had a partial airway obstruction caused by dislodgement of her partial dentures. The case illustrates the importance of not only asking patients if they have dentures, partial dentures, or any dental appliances, but also manually checking and directly looking into patients' mouths prior to transesophageal echocardiography for any dental appliances.

  12. Manufacturing hollow obturator with resilient denture liner on post hemimaxillectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Josef Kridanto Kamadjaja

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available A resilient denture liner is placed in the part of the hollow obturator base that contacts to post hemimaxillectomy mucosa. Replacing the resilient denture liner can makes the hollow obturator has an intimate contact with the mucosa, so it can prevents the mouth liquid enter to the cavum nasi and sinus, also eliminates painful because of using the hollow obturator. Resilient denture liner is a soft and resilient material that applied to the fitting surface of a denture in order to allow a more distribution of load. A case was reported about using the hollow obturator with resilient denture liner on post hemimaxillectomy to overcome these problems.

  13. Do flexible acrylic resin lingual flanges improve retention of mandibular complete dentures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed Elmorsy, Ayman Elmorsy; Ahmed Ibraheem, Eman Mostafa; Ela, Alaa Aboul; Fahmy, Ahmed; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the retention of conventional mandibular complete dentures with that of mandibular complete dentures having lingual flanges constructed with flexible acrylic resin "Versacryl." The study sample comprised 10 completely edentulous patients. Each patient received one maxillary complete denture and two mandibular complete dentures. One mandibular denture was made of conventional heat-cured acrylic resin and the other had its lingual flanges made of flexible acrylic resin Versacryl. Digital force-meter was used to measure retention of mandibular dentures at delivery and at 2 weeks and 45 days following denture insertion. The statistical analysis showed that at baseline and follow-up appointments, retention of mandibular complete dentures with flexible lingual flanges was significantly greater than retention of conventional mandibular dentures (P dentures, retention of dentures increased significantly over the follow-up period (P complete dentures improved denture retention.

  14. Neural-Network Control Of Prosthetic And Robotic Hands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Theresa M.

    1991-01-01

    Electronic neural networks proposed for use in controlling robotic and prosthetic hands and exoskeletal or glovelike electromechanical devices aiding intact but nonfunctional hands. Specific to patient, who activates grasping motion by voice command, by mechanical switch, or by myoelectric impulse. Patient retains higher-level control, while lower-level control provided by neural network analogous to that of miniature brain. During training, patient teaches miniature brain to perform specialized, anthropomorphic movements unique to himself or herself.

  15. Comparative study of Candida by conventional and CHROMagar method in non-denture and denture wearers by oral rinse technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Nayak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Candidal species colonizes the oral cavities of healthy individuals without dentures and also of denture wearers. Soft liners and tissue conditioning materials have been found to support the growth of Candida albicans which may predispose to lesions. The most important and common candidal species are C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. glabrata. C albicans is usually isolated from both the fitting surface of the denture and the denture-bearing mucosa of the affected patients. The aim of this study was to isolate, quantify, and speciate candidal species in non-denture wearers (controls and denture wearers (study group by the oral rinse technique. Isolation was done using Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA. Speciation was done using conventional methods like the germ tube test, carbohydrate fermentation test, urease test, as well as the CHROMagar method. Aims and Objective: 1 To assess the prevalence of Candida in non-denture wearers and in denture wearers by oral rinse technique, with isolation on SDA; 2 to speciate and quantify Candida in non-denture wearers and denture wearers by using conventional methods (germ tube test, carbohydrate fermentation test, urease test and the CHROMagar method; 3 to assess the influence of smoking and diabetes on candidal species among the denture wearers; and 4 to assess the sensitivity and specificity of SDA and CHRO Magar Materials and Methods: Salivary samples for Candida evaluation were collected from the subjects in sterile sample containers, using the oral rinse technique. Results: C glabrata was the most commonly found species among denture wearers and non-denture wearers both by conventional and CHROMagar methods. In males, C. albicans was the predominant species, whereas C. glabrata was the predominant species in females. Candidal colonization was higher in denture wearers compared to non-denture wearers, especially among females. The CHROMagar method was more rapid compared to conventional

  16. Prosthetics & Orthotics Manufacturing Initiative (POMI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-21

    regions either smeared unacceptably or the joint between the disparate regions was unacceptably weak during thermoforming events. The solution was to...The thin sheets were able to survive the thermoforming process and function as sensors. Prosthetics & Orthotics Manufacturing Initiative (POMI

  17. Prosthetic Hand Lifts Heavy Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carden, James R.; Norton, William; Belcher, Jewell G.; Vest, Thomas W.

    1991-01-01

    Prosthetic hand designed to enable amputee to lift diverse heavy objects like rocks and logs. Has simple serrated end effector with no moving parts. Prosthesis held on forearm by system of flexible straps. Features include ruggedness, simplicity, and relatively low cost.

  18. Rotational path removable partial denture (RPD): conservative esthetic treatment option for the edentulous mandibular anterior region: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Jennifer S; Billy, Edward J

    2008-01-01

    It can be esthetically and financially daunting for patients to lose teeth in an anterior region of the mouth. For these patients, traditional treatment options presented in the past have included fixed partial denture, implants, and conventional removable partial denture (RPD). For patients faced with financial, anatomical, and/or esthetic limitations, the edentulous region can be restored successfully with a rotational path RPD. Rotational path RPD designs have often been overlooked by the dental profession due to its complex concepts involving the prosthetic design and sensitive laboratory techniques. With better understanding of the concepts and design, the dental clinician can deliver the highest esthetic outcome in compromised areas in which other treatment options may often face limitations. This paper reviews the method used to esthetically design and plan a posterior-anterior rotational path RPD in an edentulous mandibular anterior region for a patient missing the mandibular incisors. Due to inadequate understanding of the mechanics of rotational path RPDs, many clinicians have not adapted the application of this advantageous prosthesis. When correctly designed and fabricated, the rotational path RPD provides improved esthetics, cleanliness, and retention for patients who may not be suitable candidates for implants or fixed partial dentures in tooth-supported edentulous regions.

  19. [Occlusal vertical dimension in removable complete dentures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Haan, R; Witter, D J

    2011-12-01

    In removable complete dentures, the occlusal vertical dimension is an important factor for patients' satisfaction with aesthetics. An excessively reduced occlusal vertical dimension is especially likely to lead to complaints about aesthetics, whereas an increased occlusal vertical dimension may lead to discomfort and a decision not to wear the complete dentures. There are various methods for determining the occlusal vertical dimension in complete dentures, based on the vertical dimension in the rest position of the mandible or on phonetics. However, none of the methods have proven to be clearly superior, in terms of reliability, than the others. The assessment of the occlusal vertical dimension will become more reliable if several methods are used simultaneously. Moreover, knowledge of the characteristics of the ageing face is essential.

  20. Leaching from denture base materials in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lygre, H.; Solheim, E.; Gjerdet, N.R. [School of Medicine, Univ. of Bergen (Norway)

    1995-04-01

    Specimens made from denture base materials were leached in Ringer Solution and in ethanol. The specimens comprised a heat-cured product processed in two different ways and two cold-cured materials. The organic compounds leaching from the specimens to the solutions were separated, identified, and quantified by a combined gas-chromatography and gas-chromatography/mass-spectrometry technique. Additives and degradation products, possibly made by free radical reactions, were released from the denture base materials. In Ringer solution only phthalates could be quantified. In ethanol solvent, biphenyl, dibutyl phthalate, dicyclohexyl phthalate, phenyl benzoate, and phenyl salicylate were quantified. In addition, copper was found in the ethanol solvent from one of the denture base materials. The amount of leachable organic compounds varies among different materials. Processing temperature influences the initial amount of leachable compounds. 36 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Will wearing dentures affect edentulous patients' breathing during sleep?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiuwen; Zou, Dong; Feng, Hailan; Pan, Shaoxia

    2017-01-14

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of wearing dentures on obstructive sleep apnea and hypopnea among completely edentulous patients. A self-controlled study was conducted among 30 edentulous patients. Polysomnograms were recorded in the sleep laboratory on two consecutive nights. Participants slept with their dentures in one night and without dentures in the other. The apnea and hypopnea index (AHI), lowest oxygen saturation (L-SpO2), and morning blood pressure (MBP) were collected for statistical analysis. Among the edentulous participants, 24 showed a higher AHI when sleeping with dentures. The average AHI for all 30 participants was significantly higher when they slept with dentures than without dentures (16.3 ± 14.7 vs 13.4 ± 14.0/h, P dentures) had a significant increase in AHI when sleeping with dentures, and nearly half of them (5 out of 11) reached the diagnostic standard for OSAHS (AHI >5). A higher morning diastolic blood pressure was recorded when participants slept with dentures (P dentures can lead to significant increase of AHI and diastolic MBP among edentulous people. Hence, we suggest that Chinese edentulous people should remove their dentures before sleep. ChiCTR-IOR-16008404.

  2. Myoelectric control of prosthetic hands: state-of-the-art review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geethanjali, Purushothaman

    2016-01-01

    Myoelectric signals (MES) have been used in various applications, in particular, for identification of user intention to potentially control assistive devices for amputees, orthotic devices, and exoskeleton in order to augment capability of the user. MES are also used to estimate force and, hence, torque to actuate the assistive device. The application of MES is not limited to assistive devices, and they also find potential applications in teleoperation of robots, haptic devices, virtual reality, and so on. The myoelectric control-based prosthetic hand aids to restore activities of daily living of amputees in order to improve the self-esteem of the user. All myoelectric control-based prosthetic hands may not have similar operations and exhibit variation in sensing input, deciphering the signals, and actuating prosthetic hand. Researchers are focusing on improving the functionality of prosthetic hand in order to suit the user requirement with the different operating features. The myoelectric control differs in operation to accommodate various external factors. This article reviews the state of the art of myoelectric prosthetic hand, giving description of each control strategy.

  3. [Dimensional accuracy of microwave-cured denture base resin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, K; Okamoto, F; Ogata, K; Sato, T

    1989-02-01

    Recently, microwave-cured denture base resin was developed, and the resin solved the problem of internal porosity which had been generated by curing the conventional denture base resins with microwave irradiation. In this study, the dimensional accuracy of microwave-cured denture base resin was compared with that of other denture base resins, such as pour-type resin, heat-cured resin and heat-shock resin. From the experiment, the following results were obtained. 1. Dimensional accuracy of microwave-cured denture base resin was better than that of heat-cured resin and heat-shock resin, and was similar to that of pour-type resin. 2. Dimensional accuracy of microwave-cured denture base resin by slow cooling method and rapid cooling method was almost the same. Those findings suggest that microwave-cured denture base resin is valuable in clinic.

  4. Impact testing of the residual limb: System response to changes in prosthetic stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Boutwell, PhD

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Currently, it is unknown whether changing prosthetic limb stiffness affects total limb stiffness and/or influences the shock absorption of an individual with transtibial amputation. The hypotheses tested within this study are that a decrease in longitudinal prosthetic stiffness will produce (1 reduced total limb stiffness and (2 reduced magnitude of peak impact forces and increased time delay to peak force. Fourteen subjects with a transtibial amputation participated in this study. Prosthetic stiffness was modified by means of a shock-absorbing pylon that provides reduced longitudinal stiffness through compression of a helical spring within the pylon. A sudden loading evaluation device was built to examine changes in limb loading mechanics during a sudden impact event. No significant change was found in the peak force magnitude or timing of the peak force between prosthetic limb stiffness conditions. Total limb stiffness estimates ranged from 14.9 to 17.9 kN/m but were not significantly different between conditions. Thus, the prosthetic-side total limb stiffness was unaffected by changes in prosthetic limb stiffness. The insensitivity of the total limb stiffness to prosthetic stiffness may be explained by the mechanical characteristics (i.e., stiffness and damping of the anatomical tissue within the residual limb.

  5. [Gerontoprosthesis. Concept of rebuilding old complete dentures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marxkors, R; Mayer, K

    1990-04-01

    If aged patients who have been wearing their full dentures without complications so far, need further prothetic treatment, the dentist must not replace the old denture by a completely new one. It is better to rebuild it step by step. This demand is based on the following theses: --Nobody but the patient himself is able to perform functional movements. --Unless bite and occlusion are correct, patients are not able to perform accurate functional movements. --When bite and occlusion have been checked and, if necessary, improved, bases and alveolar ridges must be congruent.

  6. Rotational path removable partial denture design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, T E; Krol, A J

    1982-10-01

    A detailed description of a rotational path of insertion design for removable partial dentures has been presented. By minimizing the use of conventional clasps, this technique offers some advantages. Rotational path designs may minimize adverse periodontal response to a removable partial denture by reducing plaque accumulation and may be applied in esthetically demanding situations. The design concept involves the use of rigid retentive components that gain access to undercut areas through a rotational path of insertion. These rigid components satisfy the basic requirements of conventional direct retained design.

  7. Endodontic and prosthetic treatment of teeth with periapical lesions in a 16-year-old-girl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buket Ayna

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the nonsurgical endodontic therapy using calcium hydroxide intracanal dressing and prosthetic treatment of 9 teeth with periapical lesions in a 16-year-old female patient. The periodontal treatment plan included oral hygiene instructions, mechanical debridement and gingivectomy in the maxillary incisors to improve gingival contouring. Root canal treatment was indicated for teeth 11-13, 21, 22, 42-45. After successive changes of a calcium hydroxide intracanal dressing during 6 weeks, the size of the periapical radiolucencies decreased and lesion remission occurred after root canal obturation. The endodontically treated teeth received a bondable polyethylene reinforcement fiber (Ribbond in the prepared canal space and crown buildup was done with composite resin. Prosthetic rehabilitation was planned with single-unit metal-ceramic crowns and fixed partial dentures. Clinical and radiographic evaluation after 6 months showed successful results. The outcomes of this case showed that chronic periapical lesions can respond favorably to nonsurgical endodontic treatment in adolescent patients and that, with proper indication, polyethylene fibers can provide an effective conservative and esthetic option for reinforcing endodontically treated teeth undergoing prosthetic rehabilitation.

  8. Endodontic and prosthetic treatment of teeth with periapical lesions in a 16-year-old-girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayna, Buket; Ayna, Emrah; Celenk, Sema

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the nonsurgical endodontic therapy using calcium hydroxide intracanal dressing and prosthetic treatment of 9 teeth with periapical lesions in a 16-year-old female patient. The periodontal treatment plan included oral hygiene instructions, mechanical debridement and gingivectomy in the maxillary incisors to improve gingival contouring. Root canal treatment was indicated for teeth 11-13, 21, 22, 42-45. After successive changes of a calcium hydroxide intracanal dressing during 6 weeks, the size of the periapical radiolucencies decreased and lesion remission occurred after root canal obturation. The endodontically treated teeth received a bondable polyethylene reinforcement fiber (Ribbond) in the prepared canal space and crown buildup was done with composite resin. Prosthetic rehabilitation was planned with single-unit metal-ceramic crowns and fixed partial dentures. Clinical and radiographic evaluation after 6 months showed successful results. The outcomes of this case showed that chronic periapical lesions can respond favorably to nonsurgical endodontic treatment in adolescent patients and that, with proper indication, polyethylene fibers can provide an effective conservative and esthetic option for reinforcing endodontically treated teeth undergoing prosthetic rehabilitation.

  9. The Denture-Associated Oral Microbiome in Health and Stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Baochen; Wu, Tingxi; McLean, Jeffrey; Edlund, Anna; Young, Youngik; He, Xuesong; Lv, Hongyang; Zhou, Xuedong; Shi, Wenyuan; Li, Huiying; Lux, Renate

    2016-01-01

    While investigation of the microbiome on natural oral surfaces has generated a wealth of information, few studies have examined the microbial communities colonizing dentures and their relationship to oral health. To address this knowledge gap, we characterized the bacterial community associated with dentures and remaining teeth in healthy individuals and patients with denture stomatitis. The microbiome compositions of matched denture and tooth plaque samples of 10 healthy individuals and 9 stomatitis patients were determined by 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. The microbial communities colonizing dentures and remaining teeth in health and disease were very similar to each other. Matched denture and tooth samples from the same individuals shared a significantly higher percentage of identical phylotypes than random pairs of samples from different study participants. Despite these overall similarities, several bacterial phylotypes displayed discrete health- and stomatitis-associated denture colonization, while others were distinct in health and disease independently of the surface. Certain phylotypes exhibited differential colonization of dentures and teeth independently of denture health status. In conclusion, denture and natural tooth surfaces in health and stomatitis harbor similar bacterial communities. Individual-related rather than surface-specific factors play a significant role in the bacterial phylotype composition colonizing dentures and teeth. This individual-specific mutual influence on denture and tooth surface colonization could be an important factor in maintaining oral health in denture wearers. Discrete differences in colonization patterns for distinct genera and phylotypes warrant further studies regarding their potential involvement or utility as specific indicators of health and disease development in denture-wearing individuals. IMPORTANCE Denture stomatitis is a prevalent inflammatory condition of the mucosal tissue in denture wearers that is

  10. ServoSEA concept: Cheap, miniature series-elastic actuators for orthotic, prosthetic and robotic hands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ates, S.; Sluiter, V.I.; Lammertse, P.; Stienen, A.H.A.

    2014-01-01

    For interactive humanoids, rehabilitation robots, and orthotic and prosthetic devices, the human-robot interaction is an essential but challenging element. Compliant Series-Elastic Actuators (SEAs) are ideal to power such devices due to their low impedance and smoothness of generated forces. In this

  11. Oral rehabilitation of a patient with amelogenesis imperfecta using removable overlay denture: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodsi, S; Rasaeipour, S; Vojdani, M

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was oral rehabilitation of 17-year old patient with amelogenesis imperfecta using removable overlay denture in order to satisfy her esthetic and functional expectations and enhance her self-image. Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a group of genetic disorders that primarily affect the quality and quantity of amelogenesis in both primary and permanent dentitions. The main clinical characteristics are severe attrition, tooth sensitivity and unesthetic appearance. This clinical report illustrates the oral rehabilitation of a 17-year-old girl with hypoplastic-hypomature type of AI with cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) overlay removable partial denture (ORPD) that is one of the most economical and biocompatible replacements for noble metal and nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) alloy. The presented case report suggests that Co-Cr ORPD can be a good temporary or even permanent treatment option for AI patients with limited budget, low esthetic concerns or medical limitations. There are major advantages in cast metal ORPDs; they are simpler, less traumatic and less expensive than fixed prosthetic options. This case report supports their use in patients with amelogenesis imperfecta.

  12. [Developing a plan of treatment with a cast metal frame removable partial denture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witter, D J; Barèl, J C; Keltjens, H M A M; de Baat, C; Creugers, N H J

    2011-02-01

    When considering prosthetic replacement of absent teeth, a treatment plan is necessary. In evaluating whether replacement of teeth is sensible, the causes and consequences of tooth loss must be considered. This concerns information about problems having to do with the patient, potential complications, purely prosthodontic problems, and specific problems. The patient-related problems require collecting data through patient history as well as a clinical and radiologic examination. Complications are risk-factors which negatively influence the prognosis of general health or of a treatment. Potential complications should be eliminated as much as possible through a preliminary treatment. Purely prosthodontic problems are conditions in the area of absence of several teeth or parts of them, and in the area of occlusal and mandibular stability and articulation. Specific problems may be related to inadequate interocclusal space and the quality of the abutment teeth. A cast metal frame removable partial denture may be a relatively inexpensive and minimally treatment alternative for an expensive and complicated treatment with 1 or more fixed partial dentures.

  13. Geriatric slim implants for complete denture wearers: clinical aspects and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huard, Cedric; Bessadet, Marion; Nicolas, Emmanuel; Veyrune, Jean-Luc

    2013-01-01

    Background Advances made in prevention have helped postpone complete edentulism in older patients. However, in the elderly, the physiological state reduces patients’ ability to adapt to oral rehabilitation and degrades the patient’s oral condition. Consequently, elderly edentulous subjects avoid many types of foods, which can lead to substantial nutritional consequences. Complete dentures retained by implants are, currently, the treatment of reference in prosthodontic mandibular rehabilitation. Indeed, the mandibular symphysis generally tolerates implantation, even when the mandible is strongly resorbed. However, in the elderly, implant rehabilitation is compromised by the complexity of the surgical protocol and possible postoperative complications. In this context, the use of geriatric “slim implants” (GSI) offers an interesting alternative. Methods In the present study, the surgical and prosthetic procedures for the use of GSI in a French dental hospital are presented. The objective was the stabilization of a complete mandibular denture in an elderly person, with the immediate implantation of four GSI. Results The operating procedure was found to be less invasive, less expensive, simpler, and more efficient than the conventional procedure. Conclusion The result strongly suggests that this protocol could be used systematically to treat complete edentulism in very elderly patients. Long-term monitoring and the evaluation of the reliability of this type of rehabilitation should be undertaken. PMID:24009432

  14. Anticandidal efficacy of denture cleansing tablet, Triphala, Aloe vera, and Cashew leaf on complete dentures of institutionalized elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Pooja J; Hegde, Vijaya; Gomes, Leslie

    2014-01-01

    With an increase in the number of dependent elderly, there is a need to introduce few natural products for denture cleansing, which are easily and economically available. Hence the aim of this study was to compare the anticandidal efficacy of denture cleansing tablet (sodium bicarbonate and sodium perborate monohydrate), Triphala (Phyllanthus emblica, Terminalia chebula and Terminalia belerica fruits powders in equal proportion), cashew leaf, Aloe vera and water (control) on complete dentures of institutionalized elderly. Study population consisted of 50 institutionalized elderly of Mangalore, Karnataka, with 10 in each group. Swabs were collected from the dentures before and after the use of denture cleansing tablet, Triphala, cashew leaf, Aloe vera, and water (control). Thereafter, the swabs were cultured on Sabouraud dextrose agar and the total candida counts were determined. Denture cleansing tablet and Triphala Churna showed a statistically significant reduction in Candida counts (P Denture cleansing tablet and Triphala Churna were found to be more effective.

  15. IMPROVDENT: improving dentures for patient benefit. A crossover randomised clinical trial comparing impression materials for complete dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Janine C; Navarro-Coy, Nuria; Pavitt, Sue H; Hulme, Claire; Godfrey, Mary; Craddock, Helen L; Brunton, Paul A; Brown, Sarah; Dillon, Sean; Dukanovic, Gillian; Fernandez, Catherine; Wright, Jonathan; Collier, Howard; Swithenbank, Shirley; Lee, Carol; Hyde, T Paul

    2012-08-31

    According to the UK Adult Dental Health Survey (2009) 15% of adults aged 65-74, 30% aged 75-84 and 47% aged >85 years are edentulous and require complete dentures. Patients' quality of life and nutrition status are affected by poor dentures. The quality of the dental impression is the most important issue for improving the fit and comfort of new dentures. There is paucity of RCT evidence for which impression material is best for complete dentures construction. This study aims to compare two impression materials for effectiveness and cost effectiveness. IMPROVDENT is a double-blind crossover trial comparing the use of alginate and silicone, two commonly used denture impression materials, in terms of patient preference and cost-effectiveness. Eighty five edentulous patients will be recruited and provided with two sets of dentures, similar in all aspects except for the impression material used (alginate or silicone). Patients will try both sets of dentures for a two-week period, unadjusted, to become accustomed to the feel of the new dentures (habituation period). Patients will then wear each set of dentures for a period of 8 weeks (in random order) during which time the dentures will be adjusted for optimum comfort. Finally, patients will be given both sets of dentures for a further two weeks to wear whichever denture they prefer (confirmation period).Patients will be asked about quality of life and to rate dentures on function and comfort at the end of each trial period and asked which set they prefer at the end of the habituation period (unadjusted denture preference) and confirmation period (adjusted denture preference). A health economic evaluation will estimate incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of producing dentures from the two materials. A qualitative study will investigate the impact of dentures on behaviour and quality of life. IMPROVDENT is funded by NIHR RfPB (PB-PG-0408-16300). This trial aims to provide evidence on the costs and quality of dentures

  16. Improvdent: Improving dentures for patient benefit. A crossover randomised clinical trial comparing impression materials for complete dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gray Janine C

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background According to the UK Adult Dental Health Survey (2009 15% of adults aged 65–74, 30% aged 75–84 and 47% aged >85 years are edentulous and require complete dentures. Patients’ quality of life and nutrition status are affected by poor dentures. The quality of the dental impression is the most important issue for improving the fit and comfort of new dentures. There is paucity of RCT evidence for which impression material is best for complete dentures construction. This study aims to compare two impression materials for effectiveness and cost effectiveness. Methods/Design IMPROVDENT is a double-blind crossover trial comparing the use of alginate and silicone, two commonly used denture impression materials, in terms of patient preference and cost-effectiveness. Eighty five edentulous patients will be recruited and provided with two sets of dentures, similar in all aspects except for the impression material used (alginate or silicone. Patients will try both sets of dentures for a two-week period, unadjusted, to become accustomed to the feel of the new dentures (habituation period. Patients will then wear each set of dentures for a period of 8 weeks (in random order during which time the dentures will be adjusted for optimum comfort. Finally, patients will be given both sets of dentures for a further two weeks to wear whichever denture they prefer (confirmation period. Patients will be asked about quality of life and to rate dentures on function and comfort at the end of each trial period and asked which set they prefer at the end of the habituation period (unadjusted denture preference and confirmation period (adjusted denture preference. A health economic evaluation will estimate incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of producing dentures from the two materials. A qualitative study will investigate the impact of dentures on behaviour and quality of life. Funding: IMPROVDENT is funded by NIHR RfPB (PB-PG-0408-16300. Discussion

  17. Assessment of Candida species colonization and denture-related stomatitis in complete denture wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zomorodian, Kamiar; Haghighi, Neda Nejabat; Rajaee, Naeem; Pakshir, Keyvan; Tarazooie, Bita; Vojdani, Mahroo; Sedaghat, Farzaneh; Vosoghi, Mehrdad

    2011-02-01

    Candida species are considered the primary causative agents of denture stomatitis, but their role in colonization and disease in denture wearers remains undefined. In this study, we investigated risk factors associated with progression to Candida-related denture stomatitis in patients using complete dentures, and we genetically identified Candida isolates associated with disease and colonization. We recruited 114 retirement home residents for this study, from whom oral mucosa samples were collected and cultured following oral cavity exams. Morphologic analysis was used to identify potential yeast-positive cultures, which were then characterized further by RFLP analysis. C. albicans was the most frequently recovered species (61; 41.5%), followed by C. glabrata (27; 18.4%), and C. tropicalis (19; 12.9%). In addition, 16 isolates (10.9%) of C. dubliniensis were recovered, which was the first identification of this species in clinical samples from Iran. This study demonstrated a significant association between the duration of denture wear and oral candidiasis. Furthermore, we noted a high prevalence of C. dubliniensis in complete denture wearers.

  18. Reinforcement of Denture Base Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Nejatiant

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: PMMA has been the most popular denture base material because of its advantages including good aesthetics, accurate fit, stability in the oral environment, easy laboratory and clinical manipulation and inexpensive equipments since the 1930’s. However, its fracture resistance is not satisfactory. Aim: The aim of this study is to improve the fracture resistance of denture bases made of PMMA by assessing the effect of resin type, packing and processing variables on biaxial flexural strength (BFS. Materials & methods: 930 discs, 12 mm diameter and 2 mm thick were prepared with the following variables: a. Veined (V and Plain (P PMMA. b. 5 different powder/liquid ratios by volume (1.5:1, 2:1, 2.5:1, 3:1, 3.5:1. c. Conventional (C and Injection packing methods (I. d. Dry heat (D Water bath (W; and e. different curing times. The discs were trimmed and stored in 37°C tap water for 50 hours before carrying out BFS test, according to BS EN ISO 1567: 2001. BFS test was carried out using a tensile-testing machine (Lloyd LRX, Lloyd instruments Ltd (Figure.1 b, with a x-head speed of 1mm/min. ONE-WAY ANOVA analysis and TUKEY’S comparison were carried out (MINITAB. The temperature within the curing baths and inside of curing resin was evaluated by using a thermocouple. Results: BFS of Powder/liquid ratio of 1.5:1 is significantly lower than the other four ratios. Among the last four ratios, 2.5:1 was the strongest one although the difference was not significant. BFS of the plain type of PMMA is significantly higher than the veined type.• BFS of conventionally packed PMMA discs was greater than the injectional packed ones and the difference is significant. Water bath cured resin showed a significant higher BFS compared with dry heat curing. • Changing the curing time in the dry heat bath from 7h @ 75º C and 2hrs @ 95º C to 5hrs @ 75º C and 3hrs @ 95º C and then 2hrs @ 95º C improves BFS of PMMA. In the water bath the trend is identical

  19. Finite element analysis of the contact interface between trans-femoral stump and prosthetic socket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linlin; Zhu, Ming; Shen, Ling; Zheng, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Transfemoral amputees need prosthetic devices after amputation surgery, and the interface pressure between the residual limb and prosthetic socket has a significant effect on an amputee's satisfaction and comfort. The purpose of this study was to build a nonlinear finite element model to investigate the interface pressure between the above-knee residual limb and its prosthetic socket. The model was three-dimensional (3D) with consideration of nonlinear boundary conditions. Contact analysis was used to simulate the friction conditions between skin and the socket. The normal stresses up to 80.57 kPa at the distal end of the soft tissue. The longitudinal and circumferential shear stress distributions at the limb-socket interface were also simulated. This study explores the influences of load transfer between trans-femoral residual limb and its prosthetic socket.

  20. Prosthetic finger phalanges with lifelike skin compliance for low-force social touching interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Cabibihan, John-John; Ge, Shuzhi Sam; 10.1186/1743-0003-8-16

    2011-01-01

    Prosthetic arms and hands that can be controlled by the user's electromyography (EMG) signals are emerging. Eventually, these advanced prosthetic devices will be expected to touch and be touched by other people. As realistic as they may look, the currently available prosthetic hands have physical properties that are still far from the characteristics of human skins because they are much stiffer. In this paper, different configurations of synthetic finger phalanges have been investigated for their skin compliance behaviour and have been compared with the phalanges of the human fingers and a phalanx from a commercially available prosthetic hand. Handshake tests were performed to identify which areas on the human hand experience high contact forces. After these areas were determined, experiments were done on selected areas using an indenting probe to obtain the force-displacement curves. Finite element simulations were used to compare the force-displacement results of the synthetic finger phalanx designs with th...

  1. Prosthetic treatment in dentinogenesis imperfecta type II: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedat Güven

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI or hereditary opalescent dentin is an autosomal dominant disorder affecting both primary and permanent dentition. Early diagnosis and treatment of DI is important for normal facial growth and esthetic continuity by preserving occlusion and tooth structure. It also provides psychological motivation by increasing the patient’s quality of life. Providing functional dentition in DI patients prevents loss of the vertical dimension, while enabling normal growth of the facial bones and jaw joint. CASE REPORT: A 20-year-old male with DI was referred to our clinic with chewing difficulty and esthetic and speech problems. His brother also had this disease. Oral examination showed the loss of many teeth and the absence of enamel on most of the remaining teeth, causing discoloration and exposing soft dentinal tissue with calcification disorder. Despite widespread attrition of the teeth, pulp chambers were not exposed. The tip of the lower jaw was prominent in the patient’s profile. Placing metal-ceramic fixed dentures in the lower jaw and an overdenture prosthesis in the upper jaw improved the patient’s psychological state as well as his function, phonation, and esthetics. CONCLUSION: This case report presents the intraoral findings in a patient with DI, including the histopathological findings, and the prosthetic treatment approach and the treatment outcome.

  2. 21 CFR 872.3420 - Carboxymethylcellulose sodium and cationic polyacrylamide polymer denture adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... polyacrylamide polymer denture adhesive. 872.3420 Section 872.3420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION....3420 Carboxymethylcellulose sodium and cationic polyacrylamide polymer denture adhesive. (a) Identification. A carboxymethylcellulose sodium and cationic polyacrylamide polymer denture adhesive is a...

  3. Effects of complete dentures on respiratory performance: spirometric evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskin, Bulent; Sipahi, Cumhur; Karakoc, Omer; Atay, Arzu; Ciftci, Faruk; Tasci, Canturk; Akin, Hakan; Arisan, Volkan; Sevketbeyoglu, Haldun; Turker, Turker

    2014-03-01

    There is a lack of data regarding whether edentulous subjects should remove dentures during spirometric measurements or not. The purpose of this study is to determine influences of complete dentures on spirometric parameters in edentulous subjects. A total of 46 complete denture wearers were included in this study. Respiratory functions of the subjects were evaluated by spirometric tests that were performed in four different oral conditions: without dentures (WOD), with dentures, lower denture only and upper denture only. Forced vital capacity (FVC), peak expiratory flow, forced expiratory volume in 1 s and forced expiratory flow between 25% and 75% were evaluated. The data were analyzed with Friedman, Wilcoxon and paired-samples t tests (α = 0.05). Significant differences were found between spirometric parameters in different oral conditions (p dentures (FVC), and WOD (forced expiratory volume in 1 s) and with upper dentures (forced expiratory volume in 1 s) (p complete dentures may unfavourably affect spirometric values of edentulous subjects. However, current findings need to be confirmed with advanced respiratory function tests. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Patients' perceptions of benefits and risks of complete denture therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Bárbara Barbério; Dos Santos, Mateus Bertolini Fernandes; Marchini, Leonardo

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess patients' perceptions of benefits and risks concerning complete denture therapy. A secondary objective was to assess the influence of clinical and sociodemographic variables on patients' perceptions. The sample was composed of 104 volunteers who presented themselves for complete denture treatment at a dental school. The average age of the volunteers was 69.2 years (±) 9.3. Patient opinions concerning the benefits of complete denture therapy were recorded using a previously reported questionnaire. The answers were evaluated in three domains: (1) benefits (positive perceptions); (2) risks (negative perceptions); and (3) consequences of no treatment. The average time of use of the previous dentures was 20 years (SD ±12.9). Risk factors (negative perceptions) received lower scores by the patients, while the consequences of no treatment received higher scores. No association was found among evaluations of the previous dentures and educational level, marital status, and gender; however, patients' evaluation about their previous dentures was significantly different depending on age (p = 0.001) and previous dentures' time of use (p = 0.038). Patients presented a positive perception of complete denture therapy, and the risk factors (negative perceptions) received the lowest scores. Patient perception regarding complete denture therapy was not influenced by educational level, evaluation of the previous dentures, or marital status. © 2014 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  5. Proposed technique for fabricating complete denture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulsalam Ali Zwiad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Reduction of the visits for fabricating complete dentures are welcomed by both dentists and patients and this might be an aspect of the new changes in prosthodontic treatment according to the suggested new methods. Clinical Innovation: Complete dentures fabricated by the technique described in this report reduce processing time, cost and efforts since the technique does not require the use of gypsum materials, metal flasks or other related materials to obtain a mold for packing the heat cured acrylic resin as might be needed with the conventional method. This method requires only an appropriate volume of silicone impression material to provide the required mold and a heat pressure machine for processing and polymerization of the heat-cured acrylic resin. Although this technique might be difficult to be applicable by all dentist but it could be consider an advisable method. Discussion: Because the record base in this technique is made of heat cured resin, it provides a reliable denture base with better retention and stability and it overcomes the shortcomings that may be faced during registration of vertical dimension. This technique meets the basic requirements for a successful complete denture which is well tolerated by the patient′s mouth.

  6. Dual Component Removable Partial Denture shows improved ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-02-18

    Feb 18, 2009 ... Dual Component Removable Partial Denture (DuCo RPD) is composed of a double base; lower and upper. ... periodontitis, and tooth decay etc, is a disease that leads ..... SRPD did not lead to negative effects in body weight,.

  7. The lingualized occlusion of complete denture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BEN Wei-hong; Eleni Roumanas

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the literatures dealing with the lingualized occlusion of complete denture including the origin,development and research. Lingualized occlusion is a valuable concept because many advantages of anatomic and nonanatomic occlusions are retained,satisfactory occlusion is easily obtained,balanced occlusion can be accomplished.

  8. Electomyographic evaluation of the efficiency ot two prosthetic teeth arrangement techniques in double complete dentures

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Resumo: O objetivo desta pesquisa foi avaliar eletromiograficamente o padrão de atividade muscular resultante da utilização de duas técnicas de montagem de dentes artificiais para obtenção de equilíbrio em prótese total dupla. Vinte e quatro pacientes totalmente edêntulos, livres de sinais e sintomas de Desordem Temporomandibular (DTM) com no mínimo cinco anos de uso de próteses totais, foram separados em dois grupos de 12 pacientes: (G1 e G2). Para o G1, utilizou-se a técnica Convencional, o...

  9. Nuclear Medicine in Diagnosis of Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Musso

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decades cardiovascular disease management has been substantially improved by the increasing introduction of medical devices as prosthetic valves. The yearly rate of infective endocarditis (IE in patient with a prosthetic valve is approximately 3 cases per 1,000 patients. The fatality rate of prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE remains stable over the years, in part due to the aging of the population. The diagnostic value of echocardiography in diagnosis is operator-dependent and its sensitivity can decrease in presence of intracardiac devices and valvular prosthesis. The modified Duke criteria are considered the gold standard for diagnosing IE; their sensibility is 80%, but in clinical practice their diagnostic accuracy in PVE is lower, resulting inconclusively in nearly 30% of cases. In the last years, these new imaging modalities have gained an increasing attention because they make it possible to diagnose an IE earlier than the structural alterations occurring. Several studies have been conducted in order to assess the diagnostic accuracy of various nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis of PVE. We performed a review of the literature to assess the available evidence on the role of nuclear medicine techniques in the diagnosis of PVE.

  10. Nuclear Medicine in Diagnosis of Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musso, Maria; Petrosillo, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades cardiovascular disease management has been substantially improved by the increasing introduction of medical devices as prosthetic valves. The yearly rate of infective endocarditis (IE) in patient with a prosthetic valve is approximately 3 cases per 1,000 patients. The fatality rate of prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) remains stable over the years, in part due to the aging of the population. The diagnostic value of echocardiography in diagnosis is operator-dependent and its sensitivity can decrease in presence of intracardiac devices and valvular prosthesis. The modified Duke criteria are considered the gold standard for diagnosing IE; their sensibility is 80%, but in clinical practice their diagnostic accuracy in PVE is lower, resulting inconclusively in nearly 30% of cases. In the last years, these new imaging modalities have gained an increasing attention because they make it possible to diagnose an IE earlier than the structural alterations occurring. Several studies have been conducted in order to assess the diagnostic accuracy of various nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis of PVE. We performed a review of the literature to assess the available evidence on the role of nuclear medicine techniques in the diagnosis of PVE. PMID:25695043

  11. Selection patterns of dietary foods in edentulous participants rehabilitated with maxillary complete dentures opposed by mandibular implant-supported prostheses: a multicenter longitudinal assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajbakhsh, Sharareh; Rubenstein, Jeffrey E; Faine, Mary P; Mancl, Lloyd A; Raigrodski, Ariel J

    2013-10-01

    concluded that vegetable intake and ability to masticate raw, hard, and fibrous food for these participants improved when they received a mandibular implant-supported prosthesis opposed by a maxillary complete denture. According to the analysis and findings, the overall eating experience was more pleasurable, and eating in public was more comfortable after replacement of complete dentures with a mandibular implant-supported prosthesis. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Computer-printer denture microlabeling system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, B C

    1998-03-01

    This procedure is easy to use and is cost-effective because it uses equipment that exist in any office or institution. The material used, transparency film for use with plain paper copier, is less expensive than either photographic slide film or normal slide films. Moreover, the transparency sheet can be used again for photocopying until the sheet is fully used up. There is no added cost of development of film, or is it necessary to wait for the whole roll of film to be used before the label can be retrieved and used. The background of the label is clear and only the black images of the characters of the label can be clearly seen. The effect of the transparency film, photocopy ink, and adhesive glue is not known. But no adverse effects have been noted. Microlabels have advantages over conventional labels with characters in font size 8 to 12, because more information, such as the full name of the patient, sex, country of origin, and national identification number can be incorporated. With more detailed information, quick identification of a deceased person can be made. Microlabels with a clear background will have minimal esthetic impact on the patient. The disadvantages of the technique is that it may not withstand a fire. In situations where the deceased body is badly burned, the denture and its identification strip may be burned, too. However, this risk can be minimized by placing the strip in the most posterior part of the denture-palatal in the maxillary denture and distal lingual in the mandibular denture. For testing of durability, dentures with the labels were placed in water for up to 4 months. The labels showed no sign of fading or deterioration.

  13. Development of an underactuated prosthetic hand with the step motor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Dawei; Jin Minghe; Jiang Li; Shi Shicai; Liu Hong

    2006-01-01

    We present the development of a novel prosthetic hand based on the underactuated mechanism. The aim is focused on increasing its dexterity while keeping the same dimension and weight of a traditional prosthetic device. The hybrid step motor is used as the actuator, which enables the finger to keep enough high contact torque on the grasped object with less energy consumption provided by the holding torque. The grasping force of the finger is estimated from the base joint torque, and the adoption of impedance control has provided compliance in the grasping. Also a parallel observer is used to switch over between the impedance control and the torque holding mode. The experimental results show the effectiveness of the design and control strategy.

  14. Validation of the prosthetic esthetic index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özhayat, Esben B; Dannemand, Katrine

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In order to diagnose impaired esthetics and evaluate treatments for these, it is crucial to evaluate all aspects of oral and prosthetic esthetics. No professionally administered index currently exists that sufficiently encompasses comprehensive prosthetic esthetics. This study aimed...... to validate a new comprehensive index, the Prosthetic Esthetic Index (PEI), for professional evaluation of esthetics in prosthodontic patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The content, criterion, and construct validity; the test-retest, inter-rater, and internal consistency reliability; and the sensitivity...

  15. Modulation of grasping force in prosthetic hands using neural network-based predictive control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasluosta, Cristian F; Chiu, Alan W L

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the implementation of a neural network-based predictive control system for driving a prosthetic hand. Nonlinearities associated with the electromechanical aspects of prosthetic devices present great challenges for precise control of this type of device. Model-based controllers may overcome this issue. Moreover, given the complexity of these kinds of electromechanical systems, neural network-based modeling arises as a good fit for modeling the fingers' dynamics. The results of simulations mimicking potential situations encountered during activities of daily living demonstrate the feasibility of this technique.

  16. Computer Aided Facial Prosthetics Manufacturing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng H.K.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Facial deformities can impose burden to the patient. There are many solutions for facial deformities such as plastic surgery and facial prosthetics. However, current fabrication method of facial prosthetics is high-cost and time consuming. This study aimed to identify a new method to construct a customized facial prosthetic. A 3D scanner, computer software and 3D printer were used in this study. Results showed that the new developed method can be used to produce a customized facial prosthetics. The advantages of the developed method over the conventional process are low cost, reduce waste of material and pollution in order to meet the green concept.

  17. Oral prosthetics from a Nordic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokstad, Asbjørn

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe oral prosthetics in a context intended for other, primarily Nordic, health professionals and health authorities. An article describing oral prosthetics for the general public was formulated on the basis of recent data and publications in prosthodontics from Scandinavian authors. A draft was presented to the educational committee of the Scandinavian Society for Prosthetic Dentistry for verification and consensus. Following modifications and amendments by representatives from the 11 dental schools in the Nordic countries, the educational committee has approved the present article. The report consists of four sections describing oral prosthetics, prosthetic therapy, undergraduate teaching in oral prosthetics, and advanced oral prosthetics, from a Nordic perspective. The report appraises the various factors in context with demographic, cultural, and professional circumstances and suggests strategies for improvement of present conditions. The relationship between the undergraduate curriculum in oral prosthetics and the public need for advanced oral prosthetics must continuously be monitored so that patients can obtain optimal care from the profession.

  18. 21 CFR 870.3545 - Ventricular bypass (assist) device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ventricular bypass (assist) device. 870.3545... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3545 Ventricular bypass (assist) device. (a) Identification. A ventricular bypass (assist) device is a device that...

  19. Satisfying esthetic demands with rotational path partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, T E

    1982-09-01

    A description of the rotational path design concept for removable partial dentures has been presented. Through the combined efforts of the clinician and laboratory technician, a rotational path partial denture can be developed that meets the basic mechanical requirements and eliminates certain clasp arms. The primary advantages of this design include less display of metal, enhancing the patient's appearance, and decreased tooth and tissue coverage by partial denture framework components.

  20. Effect of surface treatments on shear bond strength of denture teeth to denture base resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Bahrani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Debonding of denture teeth from denture bases is the most common failure in removable dentures. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of surface treatments on shear bond strength of denture teeth to heat-polymerized and autopolymerized denture base resins. Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, 60 maxillary central incisor acrylic teeth were divided into two groups. Group M was polymerized with heat-polymerized acrylic resin (Meliodent by compression molding technique and group F was processed by autopolymerized acrylic resin (Futura Gen by injection molding technique. Within each group, specimens were divided into three subgroups according to the teeth surface treatments (n = 10: (1 ground surface as the control group (M 1 and F 1 , (2 ground surface combined with monomer application (M 2 and F 2 , and (3 airborne particle abrasion by 50 μm Al 2 O 3 (M 3 and F 3 . The shear bond strengths of the specimens were tested by universal testing machine with crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey′s honestly significant difference (HSD tests (P < 0.05. Results: The mean shear bond strengths of the studied groups were 96.40 ± 14.01, 124.70 ± 15.64, and 118 ± 16.38 N for M 1 , M 2 , and M 3 and 87.90 ± 13.48, 117 ± 13.88, and 109.70 ± 13.78 N for F 1 , F 2 , and F 3 , respectively. The surface treatment of the denture teeth significantly affected their shear bond strengths to the both the denture base resins (P < 0.001. However, there were no significant differences between the groups treated by monomer or airborne particle abrasion (P = 0.29. The highest percentage of failure mode was mixed in Meliodent and adhesive in Futura Gen. Conclusion: Monomer application and airborne particle abrasion of the ridge lap area of the denture teeth improved their shear bond strengths to the denture base resins regardless of the type of polymerization.

  1. Prosthetic rehabilitation of severe Siebert′s Class III defect with modified Andrews bridge system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu Rathee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prosthetic dentistry involves the replacement of missing and contiguous tissues with artificial substitutes to restore and maintain the oral functions, appearance, and health of the patient. The treatment of edentulous areas with ridge defects poses a challenging task for the dentist. Management of such cases involves a wide range of treatment options comprising mainly of surgical interventions and non surgical techniques such as use of removable, fixed or fixed- removable partial dentures. But each treatment plan undertaken should be customized according to patient needs. A variety of factors such as quality and quantity of existing contiguous hard and soft tissues, systemic condition and economic status of the patient play an important role in treatment planning, clinical outcome and prognosis. This case report presents the restoration of a Seibert′s Class III ridge defect by an economical modification of Andrews Bridge in a 32 Year old patient.

  2. Liquid supported denture-management of flabby ridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranav V Mody

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The ideal properties of a denture are adequate rigidity on polished surface to bear masticatory forces and at the same time, flexibility and softness on the tissue surface for proper and even distribution of masticatory forces. The problem with conventional denture is rigidity of tissue surface; leads to uneven distribution of load. This drawback even worsens in the case of flabby, atrophic and unemployed ridges with excessive bone resorption.The liquid supported denture allows continued adaptation and eliminates the disadvantages of denture designs based on the application of temporary tissue conditioners or soft liners.

  3. Denture bar-coding: An innovative technique in forensic dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dineshshankar, Janardhanam; Venkateshwaran, Rajendran; Vidhya, J.; Anuradha, R.; Mary, Gold Pealin; Pradeep, R.; Senthileagappan, A. R.

    2015-01-01

    Denture markers play an important role in forensic odontology and also in identifying a person. A number of methods are there for identifying dentures from a less expensive technique to a more expensive technique. Out of different denture markers, the bar-coding system is a way of collecting data from the mobile. Even a huge amount of data can be stored in that. It can be easily incorporated during acrylization of the denture and thus could be helpful in identification. This article reviews the strengths of bar-coding and how easily it can be used in the routine procedure. PMID:26538876

  4. Denture bar-coding: An innovative technique in forensic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dineshshankar, Janardhanam; Venkateshwaran, Rajendran; Vidhya, J; Anuradha, R; Mary, Gold Pealin; Pradeep, R; Senthileagappan, A R

    2015-08-01

    Denture markers play an important role in forensic odontology and also in identifying a person. A number of methods are there for identifying dentures from a less expensive technique to a more expensive technique. Out of different denture markers, the bar-coding system is a way of collecting data from the mobile. Even a huge amount of data can be stored in that. It can be easily incorporated during acrylization of the denture and thus could be helpful in identification. This article reviews the strengths of bar-coding and how easily it can be used in the routine procedure.

  5. The social solution-denture esthetics, phonetics, and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roumanas, Eleni D

    2009-02-01

    Tooth loss and rehabilitation with dentures can have tremendous patient impact and social implications. In an image-conscious society, dentures restore a sense of normalcy and allow the patient the ability to interact with others. The most frequent denture complaints include chewing discomfort and objectionable esthetics and phonetics. Determining patient expectations and their influence on patient satisfaction with treatment is critical. Current evidence on functional outcomes, patient satisfaction, and cost-effectiveness of treatment with conventional dentures versus implants are important factors to consider during treatment planning for the edentulous patient. The purpose of this article is to review some exemplar literature for the successful treatment of the edentulous patient.

  6. Improved denture retention in patients with retracted tongues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Hua; Chen, Jen-Hao; Lee, Huey-Er; Chang, Hong-Po; Chen, Hong-Sen; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Chou, Tsau-Mau

    2009-08-01

    Patients who wear mandibular dentures and hold their tongues in retracted positions alter the dimensions of the sublingual space and disrupt the peripheral seal that is needed for optimal denture retention. The authors studied whether retention could be improved if patients moved their tongues from a retracted resting position to an ideal resting position. The authors observed and classified the mandibular residual ridge morphologies of 85 participants who wore complete dentures. The authors recorded and compared the retention of the mandibular denture before and after repositioning the tongue to the ideal resting position. When the participants' tongues were in a retracted resting position, the average retention of the mandibular denture was 75.38 gram weight (+/- 81.83 standard deviation [SD]). After participants repositioned their tongues to the ideal resting position, the average retention of the mandibular denture was 118.89 gw (+/- 93.00 SD), an increase of 57.73 percent. In all morphological classes, when participants held their tongues in the ideal resting position, the average mandibular denture retention increased by 57.73 percent, a statistically significant improvement compared with when participants held their tongues in a retracted resting position. Clinicians are encouraged to evaluate carefully the tongue resting position in all patients who wear dentures, help create reasonable therapeutic expectations by informing patients about the significant effect that tongue position will have on future denture retention and provide helpful neuromuscular training for patients with retracted-tongue habits.

  7. Effects of home and office care denture reliners on maxillary complete dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udo-Yamakawa, Aiko; Kawai, Yasuhiko

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of office (OR) and home (HR) care temporary denture reliners on satisfaction and functional outcomes in maxillary complete denture wearers. Thirty-four maxillary edentulous patients received application of either OR or HR to their maxillary complete dentures. Patient's ratings on satisfaction and functional aspects were measured on a 100-mm visual analogue scale at 4 days post-application. Associations between baseline ratings and improvement were also assessed. There were no significant differences between the two groups in satisfaction ratings or in the functional outcomes. The OR group showed a significant improvement in mastication and retention, whereas the HR group exhibited a significant improvement in general satisfaction and mastication. Improvement was negatively associated with baseline ratings of speech, ease of cleaning, stability and retention in the OR groups and across all variables, except ease of cleaning, in the HR group. When used correctly, home care denture therapy can be as effective as office applied temporary liner in improving satisfaction with problematic maxillary dentures.

  8. Denture quality has a minimal effect on health-related quality of life in patients with removable dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, M; John, M T; Tsukasaki, H; Furuyama, C; Baba, K

    2011-11-01

    The present study examined the association of denture quality and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with removable dentures. In a study of 171 consecutive patients with removable partial dentures or complete dentures (mean age: 68·0 ± 9·3 years) at a university-based prosthodontic clinic, dentists rated two aspects of denture quality (stability and aesthetics) using a 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS). HRQoL was evaluated using the mental and physical component summary (MCS and PCS) scores of the Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form 36-Item Health Survey (SF-36). Oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) was evaluated using the Oral Health Impact Profile-Japanese version (OHIP-J). The associations among denture quality, OHRQoL, and HRQoL were examined by linear regression models. Bivariable linear regression analyses revealed that denture stability was significantly associated with the SF-36 MCS [regression coefficient = 0·52 for a 10-unit increase in denture stability on a 0-100 VAS, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0·03-1·00, P = 0·04], but not with the PCS (0·11, 95% CI: -0·49 to 0·70). Denture aesthetics was not related to the PCS or the MCS (0·22, 95% CI: -0·44 to 0·88 or 0·07, 95%CI: -0·47 to 0·62). When OHIP-J was added to the regression model, this variable was substantially and significantly associated with the MCS and PCS summary scores; in addition, the regression coefficient for denture quality decreased in magnitude and was statistically nonsignificant in all analyses. The quality of removable dentures had a minimal effect on HRQoL in patients with removable dentures, and this association was mediated by OHRQoL. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Comparative study of maxillary complete dentures constructed of metal base and metal structure framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkubo, C; Kurtz, K S; Suzuki, Y; Hanatani, S; Abe, M; Hosoi, T

    2001-02-01

    A removable denture designed using a three-dimensional cast metal framework (hereafter referred to as the 'structurally designed' denture) could extend denture longevity because it is unbreakable and easy to adjust. The aim of the present clinical study was to compare two types of maxillary removable dentures: conventional dentures and structurally designed denture. One edentulous and five partially dentate patients were fitted with two maxillary dentures made from the same impression and same occlusal relationship. About 20 days after delivery of the denture, masticatory analysis was conducted chewing phase (open, closed, and occluded); coefficients of variation and average variation were calculated. Denture vibration during tapping was then measured using an accelerometer. The patients were also interviewed about comfort, ease of chewing, speech, stability, aesthetics and preference for regular use. For both masticatory movements and denture vibration, there were no significant differences (P>0.1) between the conventional denture and the structural design denture. In evaluating the dentures according to each criteria, the significant superiority of one denture over the other could not be determined. However, all patients subjectively preferred the structurally designed dentures for regular use. According to these findings, structurally designed dentures do not appear to have any particular physiological problems as compared with the conventional dentures.

  10. Patients with oral tumors. Part 1: Prosthetic rehabilitation following tumor resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierz, Janine; Hallermann, Wok; Mericske-Stern, Regina

    2013-01-01

    The present study reports on the surgical and prosthodontic rehabilitation of 46 patients, 31 male and 15 female, after resection of oral tumors. The treatment was carried out from 2004 to 2007 at the Department of Prosthodontics, University of Bern, with a follow-up time of 3 to 6 years. The average age at diagnosis was 54 years. 76% of all tumors were squamous cell carcinoma, followed by adenocarcinoma. Resection of the tumors including soft and/or hard tissues was performed in all patients. 80% of them additionally underwent radiotherapy and 40% chemotherapy. A full block resection of the mandible was perfomed in 23 patients, and in 10 patients, the tumor resection resulted in an oronasal communication. 29 patients underwent grafting procedures, mostly consisting of a free fibula flap transplant. To enhance the prosthetic treatment outcome and improve the prosthesis stability, a total of 114 implants were placed. However, 14 implants were not loaded because they failed during the healing period or the patient could not complete the final treatment with the prostheses. The survival rate of the implants reached 84.2% after 4 to 5 years. Many patients were only partially dentate before the tumors were detected, and further teeth had to be extracted in the course of the tumor therapy. Altogether, 31 jaws became or remained edentulous. Implants provide stability and may facilitate the adaptation to the denture, but their survival rate was compromised. Mostly, patients were fitted with removable prostheses with obturators in the maxilla and implant-supported complete dentures with bars in the mandible. Although sequelae of tumor resection are similar in many patients, the individual intermaxillary relations, facial morphology and functional capacity vary significantly. Thus, individual management is required for prosthetic rehabilitation.

  11. Consumer satisfaction with the services of prosthetics and orthotics facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosmans, Joline; Geertzen, Jan; Dijkstra, Pieter U

    2009-03-01

    Consumer satisfaction with the services provided in a prosthetics and orthotics (P&O) facility has seldom been studied. The aim of this study was to analyze consumer satisfaction regarding the services provided by 15 P&O facilities in The Netherlands. Consumers (n = 1,364) of these P&O facilities who were fitted with a prosthesis, orthopaedic shoes, an orthosis, or another device, were asked to rate the overall services provided and whether they were satisfied with the device provided and its delivery time. Additionally, they filled in a modified SERVQUAL questionnaire (see Appendix). Consumers gave the service provided by P&O facilities a mean overall rating of 8.1. The highest ratings were given by consumers fitted with a prosthesis (mean overall rating of services: 8.4). In total, 78% of the consumers were satisfied with the device provided and 93% with the delivery time. The results of our study showed that, on the SERVQUAL, 50% of the statements fulfilled the criteria for a satisfactory quality of the services. The overall consumer rating of the service provided by P&O facilities is high and depends on the device provided. The outcomes on the SERVQUAL were moderate. In future, it is important to study consumer satisfaction more extensively in order to improve the quality of P&O services in daily practice. Additionally, specific questionnaires need to be developed to measure all aspects of prosthetic and orthotic care, with the aim to improve the services.

  12. Development of a contemporary animal model of Candida albicans-associated denture stomatitis using a novel intraoral denture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Clorinda C; Yu, Alika; Lee, Heeje; Fidel, Paul L; Noverr, Mairi C

    2012-05-01

    Denture stomatitis (DS) is a fungal infection characterized by inflammation of the oral mucosa in direct contact with the denture and affects up to 50% of denture wearers. Despite the prevalence, very little is known about the role of fungal or host factors that contribute to pathogenesis. Recently, we developed a novel intraoral denture system for rodent research. This denture system consists of custom-fitted fixed and removable parts to allow repeated sampling and longitudinal studies. The purpose of this study was to use this denture system to develop a clinically relevant animal model of DS. To establish DS, rats were inoculated with pelleted Candida albicans, which resulted in sustained colonization of the denture and palate for 8 weeks postinoculation. Biofilm formation on the denture was observed by week 4 and on the palate by week 6 postinoculation. Rats were monitored for clinical signs of disease by assigning a clinical score after macroscopic examination of the palate tissue according to Newton's method. By week 4 postinoculation, the majority of inoculated rats with dentures exhibited a clinical score of 1 (pinpoint erythema). By week 6 and week 8 postinoculation, increasing percentages of rats exhibited a clinical score of 2 (diffuse erythema/edema). Histological analysis of palate tissue demonstrated progressively increasing inflammatory cell recruitment throughout the time course of the infection. Palatal biofilm formation was commensurate with development of palatal erythema, which suggests a role for biofilm in the inflammatory response.

  13. Relationship among local and functional factors in the development of denture stomatitis in denture wearers in northern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lurdete Maria Rocha GAUCH

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship among functional and qualitative factors in the development of denture stomatitis (DS (according to Newton's classification in acrylic-based denture wearers residents from northern Brazil.MATERIAL AND METHOD: A total of 99 patients who wore partial or total acrylic resin-based upper dentures were included in this study. The subjects completed an epidemiological data form that includes the patient's gender, age, local factors (hygiene habits, remove denture to sleep, use of mouthwash, present condition of the denture, age of the denture and functional factors (vertical dimension at rest, vertical dimension of occlusion, occlusion, retention, and static and dynamic stability. To detect yeasts, samples were collected from the inner surface of the dentures and from the palatal mucosa in contact with it. Subsequently, the samples were cultured on Sabouraud dextrose agar, observing macro and microscopic characteristics.RESULT: In the present study, we did not find any significant relationship between the gender and disease onset. Based on the Newton classification, 36.3% of the patients presented with DS and 89.0% were colonized by yeasts; of these subjects, 50% had type I lesions, 33.3% had type II lesions, and 16.6% had type III lesions. All of the qualitative and local factors, except the use of mouthwash, were clinically relevant to the development of disease.CONCLUSION: Denture stomatitis in denture users in northern Brazil was multifactorial, involving local, functional and microbiological factors.

  14. Radio frequency identification--an innovative solution to guide dexterous prosthetic hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trachtenberg, Matthew S; Singhal, Girish; Kaliki, Rahul; Smith, Ryan J; Thakor, Nitish V

    2011-01-01

    Dexterous manipulation of a multi-fingered prosthetic hand requires far more cognitive effort compared to typical 1 degree of freedom hands, which hinders their acceptance clinically. This paper presents a Myoelectrically-Operated Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) Prosthetic Hand (MORPH); an implementation of RFID with a myoelectric prosthetic hand as a means to amplify the controllable degrees of freedom. Contextual information from an object equipped with an RFID tag allows automatic preshaping along with dexterous control in an attempt to reduce the cognitive effort required to operate the terminal device. The myoelectric-RFID hybrid has been demonstrated in a proof-of-concept case study where an amputee was fitted with the device and subjected to activities adapted from the Jebsen Hand Function Test and the Smith Hand Function Evaluation with RFID-tagged and untagged items. Evaluation tests revealed that the MORPH system performed significantly better in 4 of the 8 tasks, and comparable to the control in the remainder.

  15. PRESENTATION OF A MODIFIED METHOD OF VESTIBULOPLASTY WITH AN EARLY PROSTHETIC LOADING.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desislava Konstantinova

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Experience reveals that preliminary surgical correction is quite often expedient in mounting dentures for edentulous jaws. The purpose of the investigation is to introduce a method of vestibuloplasty for edentulous jaws by which the dentures are better held in place and retained. The use of xenoderm grafts with early insertion of the prostheses subsequent to surgical manipulation shows excellent results. Materials and methods: Patients were divided into two groups - with the first group the prosthesis was made prior to surgery and placed on the 7th day after removal of sutures. With the second group the prostheses were made following a complete healing of soft tissue, i.e. 1 month after surgery. With both groups xenoderm grafts were applied to cover the open wound surface area. Results: The post-operative period for both groups of patients proceeded normally and without complications. For the group with early prosthetic loading due to the method of vestibuloplasty it was possible to maintain the depth of the vestibule. Conclusions: The method proposed by the authors using xenoderm grafts and early loading on the newly-formed vestibule has proved a success and implies further in-depth application with larger group of patients.

  16. Avaliação da estomatite protética em portadores de próteses totais Evaluation of denture stomatitis in users of complete dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terezinha Rezende CARVALHO de OLIVEIRA

    2000-09-01

    functional factors considered were: occlusion, vertical dimension of occlusion (VDO, dynamic and static retention, as well as stability. The qualitative factors were: oral and prosthetic hygiene, continuous use, complete denture status, time of use and time of edentulism. The study group comprised 116 totally edentulous patients, with and without DS, of both genders using tissue-supported prostheses. The data were analyzed through the Chi-square test, at the 0.05 significance level, and through the Fisher test, when the frequency was low. The results indicated that the majority of our patients presented DS. None of these factors was by itself responsible for the presence of DS, indicating that DS was probably due to many factors.

  17. Süperpozisyon apareyleri (*) (Overlay Dentures)

    OpenAIRE

    Muğan, Nuri; Cansevergil, Esengün

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARYRemovable partial or complete prothèses which are used to alleviate maxillary constriction and discrepancies in vertical -dimension are called « overlay dentures». The patients maxillary teeth or ridge is overiayed by acriylic and the artificial teeth are positioned in accordance with the mandibular teeth to establish a better occlusion as well as to improve the estetios of the individual. The improved anterior tooth relationships also provide the anatomic basis for the correct produc...

  18. Not chewing food among the Thai elderly with complete denture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viwatwongkasem, Chukiat; Kudngaongarm, Romanee; Chaisupamongkollarp, Somchai; Thamsoonthorn, Chanida; Naovaratsophon, Anchalee; Nipattasat, Prapon; Vichathai, Weeranun; Pakdethanakul, Chaweewan; Jareinpituk, Suthi; Satitvipawee, Pratana

    2013-12-01

    The study aims to investigate the use of a complete denture in terms of not chewing food and determining the strength of association between not chewing food and several potential risk factors among the Thai elderly. Under the support of the "Khao Aroi" or "Delicious Rice" or "Dental Implant" Project of Institute of Dentistry, Department of Medical Services, Ministry of Public Health, and in co-operation with the Ministry of Science and Technology during 2007-2011, a cross-sectional survey by multi-stage cluster sampling was conducted in 2008, in 21 provinces, 87 hospitals, with 2,676 Thai elderly. The sample was drawn from a sampling frame of 58,043 target Thai people aged 60 years and over under the Dental Prosthesis Service Campaign (DPSC) project during 2005 and 2007. All Thai elderly, who received a complete denture from the DPSC project at least three months prior were surveyed from May to October 2008 through questionnaires. Data were analyzed by a set of descriptive analyses and binary logistic regression models. Not chewing food among the Thai elderly, after receiving a complete denture, was 12.5%, quite a bit more effective than ordinary work. Nontaluck found 38% for the proportion not wearing dentures in the 30-baht health care program. This finding is confirmed by the work of Dalodom et al that the use of dentures by Thai elderly was 93% in the DPSC project. The important risk factors that influenced not to chew food were satisfaction with dentures, patients satisfaction with the denture fitting and care, while controlling the amount of dentures, respectively. Satisfaction of patients with their dentures, good oral health care in fitting denture work, and good communication between dentists and patients are important keys affecting the use of dentures.

  19. Long-Term Soft Denture Lining Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chladek, Grzegorz; Żmudzki, Jarosław; Kasperski, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Long-term soft denture lining (LTSDL) materials are used to alleviate the trauma associated with wearing complete dentures. Despite their established clinical efficacy, the use of LTSDLs has been limited due to the unfavorable effects of the oral environment on some of their mechanical and performance characteristics. The unresolved issue of LTSDL colonization by Candida albicans is particularly problematic. Silicone-based LTSDL (SLTSDL) materials, which are characterized by more stable hardness, sorption and solubility than acrylic-based LTSDLs (ALTSDLs), are currently the most commonly used LTSDLs. However, SLTSDLs are more prone to debonding from the denture base. Moreover, due to their limitations, the available methods for determining bond strength do not fully reflect the actual stability of these materials under clinical conditions. SLTSDL materials exhibit favorable viscoelastic properties compared with ALTSDLs. Furthermore, all of the lining materials exhibit an aging solution-specific tendency toward discoloration, and the available cleansers are not fully effective and can alter the mechanical properties of LTSDLs. Future studies are needed to improve the microbiological resistance of LTSDLs, as well as some of their performance characteristics. PMID:28788163

  20. Long-Term Soft Denture Lining Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Chladek

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Long-term soft denture lining (LTSDL materials are used to alleviate the trauma associated with wearing complete dentures. Despite their established clinical efficacy, the use of LTSDLs has been limited due to the unfavorable effects of the oral environment on some of their mechanical and performance characteristics. The unresolved issue of LTSDL colonization by Candida albicans is particularly problematic. Silicone-based LTSDL (SLTSDL materials, which are characterized by more stable hardness, sorption and solubility than acrylic-based LTSDLs (ALTSDLs, are currently the most commonly used LTSDLs. However, SLTSDLs are more prone to debonding from the denture base. Moreover, due to their limitations, the available methods for determining bond strength do not fully reflect the actual stability of these materials under clinical conditions. SLTSDL materials exhibit favorable viscoelastic properties compared with ALTSDLs. Furthermore, all of the lining materials exhibit an aging solution-specific tendency toward discoloration, and the available cleansers are not fully effective and can alter the mechanical properties of LTSDLs. Future studies are needed to improve the microbiological resistance of LTSDLs, as well as some of their performance characteristics.

  1. The Relationship between Temporomandibular Disorders (TMDs) and Overall Denture Conditions in Complete Denture Wearers

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is any relationship between the condition of complete dentures and TMDs. Methods: The sample consisted of 61 consecutive patients (35 females and 26 males) who were admitted to the Department of Prosthodontics of Mashhad Faculty of Dentistry for fabrication of new complete dentures.  The age range of the participants was between 32 and 80 years, with the mean age of 57.05±10.26 years. The patients were examined by two prosth...

  2. 21 CFR 807.65 - Exemptions for device establishments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... dispenser, optician, clinical laboratory, assembler of diagnostic x-ray systems, and personnel from a hospital, clinic, dental laboratory, orthotic or prosthetic retail facility, whose primary responsibility... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ESTABLISHMENT REGISTRATION AND DEVICE LISTING FOR MANUFACTURERS AND INITIAL...

  3. A microbiological evaluation of the use of denture cleansers in combination with an oral rinse in complete denture patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasan Murali

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim : Patients with complete dentures more occasionally neglect their denture and oral health by improper maintenance of dentures, resulting in bad oral and denture hygiene. This may lead to a host of multiple local and systemic problems such as stomatitis, bacterial and fungal infections, reservoirs for distant infections, denture stains and bad breath. Most denture wearers maintain their dentures with simple manual cleansing methods, which are not adequate to effectively sanitize the reservoir of microorganisms inhabiting the denture surfaces. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of the use of a denture cleanser and compare it with an adjunct use of chlorhexidine mouth rinse along with the denture cleanser and possibly suggest it as a suitable protocol. Materials and Methods : Two groups of complete denture patients were selected for the study. The total number of patients in each group was 12 and the total period of the study was 21 days. Three sets of microbiological samples were collected from each patient: before the start of the study, on day 8 and on day 21 of the study. The first sample was collected after an initial washover period (7 days with plain water before the start of the study and the second set after 1 week of study initiation, where group-1 followed protocol-I (denture cleanser only and group-2 followed protocol-II (denture cleanser and mouth rinse. A second washout period of 7 days followed and a crossover of the protocol was performed for the groups and followed for 1 week. Then, a third set of samples were collected. The colony-forming units were calculated for each patient for each sample and statistically analyzed. Friedman test for non-parametric analysis was employed for the comparison within the groups and a Mann-Whitney test was used for the statistical comparison between the groups. Results : There was a definite reduction in the bacterial numbers and a significant statistical difference

  4. The "Amex" cast aluminum denture of World War I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyson, J M; Whitehorne, J W

    2001-07-01

    In 1917-18, the U.S. Army revived a denture technique first introduced in 1866 by Dr. James Baxter Bean, the Confederate dental surgeon who established the first military maxillofacial hospital trauma ward in Atlanta, Georgia, during the American Civil War--the cast aluminum wartime denture.

  5. Risk factors associated with denture stomatitis in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, J D; Rivera-Hidalgo, F; Beach, M M

    2005-07-01

    This study reports denture stomatitis (DS) prevalence from a large USA probability sample from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1988-1994 (NHANES III). Oral examinations were performed on 3450 individuals 18-90+ years of age (mean: 59.2; SD: 0.50 years), 57.7% male and 42.3% female. Multivariable logistic regression models were fitted for DS using sociodemographic, denture quality, blood analytes, alcohol and tobacco use, history of diabetes, and current antibiotic use as covariates. Odds ratios (OR), adjusted for other covariates in each model (AOR) are presented. Of 3450 removable denture wearers, 963 (27.9%) had DS. DS prevalence was associated with wearing maxillary (AOR: 6.20) and mandibular (AOR: 5.21) complete dentures continuously; smoking >/=15 cigarettes day (maxillary complete: AOR = 1.31; mandibular complete: AOR = 1.50; maxillary partial: AOR = 2.04); vitamin A deficiency (mandibular complete: AOR = 5.97; maxillary partial: AOR = 5.67; mandibular partial: AOR = 24.42). Maxillary dentures with inadequate relines had approximately half the OR of DS than those with adequate relines (maxillary complete: AOR = 0.42; mandibular complete: AOR = 0.50). Denture stomatitis prevalence is associated with the amount of tissue covered by dentures, low vitamin A levels, cigarette smoking, and constant denture wear.

  6. [Serious complications following removal of an ingested partial denture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter, M.H. de; Damme, P.A. van; Drenth, J.P.H.

    2007-01-01

    Complications occurred in a 41-year-old woman following an attempt to remove a partial denture by oesophagoscopy. These were: laceration of the oesophagus with subsequent mediastinitis, pneumothorax, and pneumopericardium. At a second oesophagoscopy the denture was removed from the oesophagus using

  7. [Serious complications following (removal after) ingestion of a partial denture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter, M.H. de; Damme, P.A. van; Drenth, J.P.H.

    2008-01-01

    Complications occurred in a 41-year-old woman (case 1) following a first attempt to remove a partial denture by oesophagoscopy. These were: laceration of the oesophagus with subsequent mediastinitis, pneumothorax, and pneumopericardium. With a second oesophagoscopy the denture was removed from the o

  8. Trial of an experimental castor oil solution for cleaning dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Ingrid Machado de; Andrade, Kelly Machado de; Pisani, Marina Xavier; Silva-Lovato, Cláudia Helena; de Souza, Raphael Freitas; Paranhos, Helena de Freitas Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Denture hygiene is essential because denture biofilm is involved in oral infections and systemic diseases. Although there are chemical agents available on the market, none of them have ideal properties and research on such products is still necessary. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a castor bean (Ricinus communis)-based solution for removing denture biofilm, compared to two traditional products (sodium hypochlorite and alkaline peroxide). Fifty maxillary complete denture wearers were instructed to brush their dentures after meals and to immerse their dentures once a day in the following solutions: Saline (20 min; control), Polident alkaline peroxide (3 min), NaOCl (20 min) and 2% castor oil solution (20 min). Participants used each solution for a period of 7 consecutive days, according to a random sequence. After each period, the internal surfaces of maxillary complete dentures were stained with a disclosing solution (1% neutral red), photographed and the disclosed biofilm was quantified with the aid of specific software. The influence of treatments on results was verified by the Friedman test (α=0.05). Tested solutions presented significant difference (Fr=51.67; poil presented intermediate results (median: 1.0% and 1.5%, respectively). It can be concluded that the castor oil solution tested in this study was comparable to alkaline peroxide in terms of efficiency in denture biofilm removal.

  9. 21 CFR 870.3300 - Vascular embolization device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vascular embolization device. 870.3300 Section 870...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Prosthetic Devices § 870.3300 Vascular embolization device. (a) Identification. A vascular embolization device is an intravascular implant intended to...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3080 - Intervertebral body fusion device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intervertebral body fusion device. 888.3080... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3080 Intervertebral body fusion device. (a) Identification. An intervertebral body fusion device is an implanted single or...

  11. Prosthetic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pokpong Amornvit

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ocular trauma can be caused by road traffic accidents, falls, assaults, or work-related accidents. Enucleation is often indicated after ocular injury or for the treatment of intraocular tumors, severe ocular infections, and painful blind eyes. Rehabilitation of an enucleated socket without an intraocular implant or with an inappropriately sized implant can result in superior sulcus deepening, enophthalmos, ptosis, ectropion, and lower lid laxity, which are collectively known as post-enucleation socket syndrome. This clinical report describes the rehabilitation of post-enucleation socket syndrome with a modified ocular prosthesis. Modifications to the ocular prosthesis were performed to correct the ptosis, superior sulcus deepening, and enophthalmos. The rehabilitation procedure produced satisfactory results.

  12. Prosthetic rehabilitation of the upper limb amputee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard O′Keeffe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The loss of all or part of the arm is a catastrophic event for a patient and a significant challenge to rehabilitation professionals and prosthetic engineers. The large, upper extremity amputee population in India has, historically, been poorly served, with most having no access to support or being provided with ineffective prostheses. In recent years, the arrival of organisations like Otto Bock has made high quality service standards and devices accessible to more amputees. This review attempts to provide surgeons and other medical professionals with an overview of the multidisciplinary, multistage rehabilitation process and the solution options available. With worldwide upper extremity prosthesis rejection rates at significant levels, the review also describes some of the factors which influence the outcome. This is particularly relevant in the Indian context where the service can involve high cost investments. It is the responsibility of all contributing professionals to guide vulnerable patients through the process and try to maximise the benefit that can be obtained within the resources available.

  13. Maxillofacial prosthetic rehabilitation of the oral cancer patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfaardt, J.F.; Monteith, B.D. (University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa). Dept. of Prosthetic Dentistry)

    1982-08-01

    The victim of orofacial cancer is frequently subjected to severe morphological and functional disturbance: a condition which the maxillofacial prosthetist can do much to alleviate through the use of various prosthetic devices. The successful rehabilitation of these patients, however, is often compromised by the presence of psychosocial and other problems, the solution of which extends beyond the limits of a single clinical discipline. The modern approach to orofacial cancer, therefore, is organised within the context of interdisciplinary co-operation: each phase of patient management being planed and executed according to the co-ordinated efforts of the various members of a head and neck cancer team.

  14. 75 FR 52629 - Medicare Program; Establishing Additional Medicare Durable Medical Equipment, Prosthetics...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-27

    ..., hospital beds, nebulizers, oxygen delivery systems, and wheelchairs. Prosthetic devices are included in the... using wheelchairs. In Sec. 424.57(c)(8), we proposed to clarify this provision by revising (c)(8) to... for inventory, storage, including patient records, a desk and chairs, and in most cases a restroom for...

  15. Comparative evaluation of nutritional status of elderly dentulous and completely edentulous patients wearing complete dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhumita R Makwana

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The scientific progress has reached a level where nutritional interventions may play a part in the prevention of degenerative conditions of age, improvement of quality of life and impact on health care burden and resources. Moreover a timely intervention can stop weight loss in elderly at risk of malnutrition or undernourished. Evaluation of nutritional status is important for any nutrition or dietary modification. We therefore did a comparative study of evaluation of nutritional status of elderly dentulous and completely edentulous patients wearing complete dentures. Rationale: To evaluate nutritional status in dentulous and edentulous denture wearing elderly patient. To evaluate any relationship between edentulous denture wearer patient and malnutrition. To determine if the recommended dietary allowance is met by elderly dentulous and completely edentulous patients wearing complete dentures. To find out the need of nutritional supplement for edentulous complete denture wearer patients. Objectives: The objectives were to evaluate nutritional status in dentulous and edentulous denture wearing elderly patients and to find out any relationship between edentulous denture wearer patients and malnutrition. We also tried to find out the need of nutritional supplement for edentulous denture wearer patients. Material & Method: A total of 100  healthy Male and Female  patients  between the age of 60  to 80 years attending the OPD of Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Dental Sciences, Dharmsinh Desai University, Nadiad, Gujarat were selected and divided into two sample groups dentulous and edentulous. Subjects with no natural teeth who reported wearing complete maxillary and   mandibular dentures for at least 6 months were taken as the edentulous sample and subjects with at least 24 teeth who did not wear dentures were taken as dentulous sample. Mini Nutrition Assesment Tool, 24 Hour Diet Recall & Food Frequency Form were used to

  16. Prolonged Impacted Denture in the Esophagus: A Case Report and

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulzar Ahmad Dar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Foreign body ingestion and aspiration is among the most common causes of emergency department visit associated with high morbidity and mortality. Ingested and aspirated denture is rare conditions being scarcely reported in the literature. We herein report a 57-year-old man who presented with 2-day history of liquid and solid dysphagia who was diagnosed to have impacted denture in esophagus since 3 years prior to presentation. He was diagnosed to have esophagus adenocarcinoma and had undergone esophageal radiotherapy. The denture was removed successfully using esophagoscopy and the patient was discharged after 48-hour care with good condition. To prevent accidental ingestion, dentures should be made to fit properly. Damaged or malfitting dentures should be discarded and replaced. Patients should be strongly advised against wearing them during sleep-time.

  17. Imaging findings of swallowed dentures: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Ashish; Bosco, Jerome; Subramanian, Manickam; Chokkapan, Kabilan; Shenoy, Jagadish; Lim, Tze Chwan

    2015-12-01

    Dental prosthesis is an uncommon ingested non-food foreign body in adults. Once swallowed, it can lead to serious complications and morbidity. Hence, early localization of the offending foreign body is crucial for timely management. As the dentures are usually made up of non-metallic material and often impacted at or below the level of C7 vertebra, conventional radiograph has limited role in their evaluation. We describe the clinical history and imaging findings of swallowed partial dentures in four patients who presented to the emergency department. The dentures were localized using unenhanced CT of the neck that showed the characteristic mildly hyperdense curvilinear or irregular appearance of the dentures within the upper esophagus. Multiplanar CT reconstructions provide an orientation of the ingested denture within the esophagus, thus guiding the endoscopist.

  18. Simplified versus comprehensive fabrication of complete dentures: patient ratings of denture satisfaction from a randomized crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydecke, Guido; Vogeler, Michael; Wolkewitz, Martin; Türp, Jens C; Strub, Joerg R

    2008-02-01

    To determine if patient ratings of their ability to chew are dependent on the method of complete denture fabrication. Twenty edentulous patients participated in a randomized within-subject crossover trial. Each participant received 2 sets of new complete dentures. One pair (Gerber prosthesis) was manufactured based on tracings (to determine centric relation) and facebow transfer; semianatomic teeth with a lingualized and balanced occlusal pattern were used. The other set of complete dentures was made using a simplified procedure without facebow transfer; jaw relations were recorded with wax occlusion rims, and anatomic teeth were set with a canine and premolar guidance (Gysi prosthesis). The 2 dentures were delivered in randomized order, and each was worn for 3 months. Three months after insertion, patients' ratings of each new prosthesis were obtained on visual analog scales for general satisfaction, comfort, ability to speak, stability, esthetics, ease of cleaning, and ability to chew. Patients rated their general satisfaction, stability, and esthetic appearance significantly better for the Gysi prostheses ( P denture treatment methods were detected for ability to speak, comfort, chewing ability, and the ease of cleaning the dentures. A comprehensive method for the fabrication of complete dentures using lingualized teeth does not appear to positively influence patient ratings of denture satisfaction when compared to a simple procedure with anatomic teeth.

  19. 21 CFR 872.3220 - Facebow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3220 Facebow. (a) Identification. A facebow is a device intended.... This determination is intended for use in placing denture casts accurately into an articulator (§...

  20. Contemporary methods and mobile denture cleansers and theirs significance for older population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strajnić Ljiljana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. A dramatic increase in the number of people living in their seventies, eighties and nineties is associated with a loss of teeth and the use of mobile dentures. The aim of this paper was to highlight the consequences of poor denture hygiene on oral and general health in vulnerable elderly people, in long-term hospitalized elderly patients and in long-term institutionalized elderly in nursing homes. Denture deposits and consequences of poor denture hygiene. The number of bacteria living in the mouth is getting larger after putting denture on. Namely, a small ”space” develops between jaw and denture, creating perfect conditions for bacterial growth. Denture becomes a ”reservoir” of micro-organisms. Denture deposits such as bacterial plaque, fungi, tartar and remnants could be responsible for: stomatitis prothetica, cheilitis angularis, inflammatory fibrous hyperplasia, halitosis (bad breath, dental caries in mobile denture carriers, mucositis and periimplantitis in mobile implant over-dentures carriers, accelerated destruction of denture materials for underlying, such as denture base soft liners, respiratory airways diseases, bacterial endocarditis and gastrointestinal infections. Removal of denture deposits. It is recommendable to combine mechanical and chemical denture cleaning. Denture submersion into a commercial cleansing solution for less than one hour is an effective cleaning method. Commercial cleansers specifically intended for dentures with metal parts should be used for those dentures. Commercial cleansers with a new component of silicon polymer, whose thin layer surrounds all denture surfaces and disables oral bacteria to agglomerate, are effective and useful. Preventive hygienic treatments are very important in hospitals and homes for the aged, bearing in mind that old and ill persons reside here. Those institutions are recommended to get equipped with ultrasound denture cleaners. Importance of written brochure on

  1. [Three dimensional changes of the denture base of the complete denture following polymerization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y

    1990-02-01

    The objective of this study was to clarify some of the dimensional change patterns of the denture base of the complete denture following polymerization. Dimensional changes of three polymerization method types were compared. The complete dentures were measured by using the three dimensional measurement system. The results obtained were summarized as follows. 1. Dimensional changes from the original model immediately after polymerization of complete upper and lower dentures were recorded and all three polymerization methods produced shrinkage on all three axes toward the center. Heat cured resin samples and microwave cured resin samples showed the same shrinkage with pour type resin samples only showing 1/2 that amount. 2. The gradual dimensional changes occurring after polymerization up until 4 weeks were also recorded. The heat cured resin samples showed no additional changes but remained in its shrunken state. The pour-type resin samples began to enlarge until almost all of them reached the original model size within 4 weeks. The microwave cured resin samples began to enlarge but only slightly and then soon stopped changing. 3. All polymerization method types showed more dimensional change in the lower plate than in the upper plate.

  2. Development of prosthetic arm with pneumatic prosthetic hand and tendon-driven wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Hiroyuki; Tsujiuchi, Nobutaka; Koizumi, Takayuki; Kan, Hiroto; Hirano, Masanori; Nakamura, Yoichiro

    2009-01-01

    Recently, various prosthetic arms have been developed, but few are both attractive and functional. Considering human coexistence, prosthetic arms must be both safe and flexible. In this research, we developed a novel prosthetic arm with a five-fingered prosthetic hand using our original pneumatic actuators and a slender tendon-driven wrist using a wire drive and two small motors. Because the prosthetic hand's driving source is comprised of small pneumatic actuators, the prosthetic hand is safe when it makes contact with people; it can also operate flexibly. In addition, the arm has a tendon-driven wrist to expand its motion space and to perform many operations. First, we explain the pneumatic hand's drive mechanism and its tendon-driven wrist. Next, we identify the characteristics of the hand and the wrist and construct a control system for this arm and verify its control performance.

  3. Effect of different denture cleansers on surface roughness and microhardness of artificial denture teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuzugullu, Bulem; Cetinsahin, Cem; Celik, Cigdem

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to compare the effects of different denture cleansers on the surface roughness and microhardness of various types of posterior denture teeth. MATERIALS AND METHODS 168 artificial tooth specimens were divided into the following four subgroups (n=42): SR Orthotyp PE (polymethylmethacrylate); SR Orthosit PE (Isosit); SR Postaris DCL (double cross-linked); and SR Phonares II (nanohybrid composite). The specimens were further divided according to the type of the denture cleanser (Corega Tabs (sodium perborate), sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), and distilled water (control) (n=14)) and immersed in the cleanser to simulate a 180-day immersion period, after which the surface roughness and microhardness were tested. The data were analyzed using the Kruskal–Wallis test, Conover's nonparametric multiple comparison test, and Spearman's rank correlation analysis (P<.05). RESULTS A comparison among the denture cleanser groups showed that NaOCl caused significantly higher roughness values on SR Orthotyp PE specimens when compared with the other artificial teeth (P<.001). Furthermore, Corega Tabs resulted in higher microhardness values in SR Orthotyp PE specimens than distilled water and NaOCl (P<.005). The microhardness values decreased significantly from distilled water, NaOCl, to Corega Tabs for SR Orthosit PE specimens (P<.001). SR Postaris DLC specimens showed increased microhardness when immersed in distilled water or NaOCl when compared with immersion in Corega Tabs (P<.003). No correlation was found between surface roughness and microhardness (r=0.104, P=.178). CONCLUSION NaOCl and Corega Tabs affected the surface roughness and microhardness of all artificial denture teeth except for the new generation nanohybrid composite teeth. PMID:27826382

  4. Geriatric slim implants for complete denture wearers: clinical aspects and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huard C

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cedric Huard,2 Marion Bessadet,1,2 Emmanuel Nicolas,1,2 Jean-Luc Veyrune,1,21Clermont Université, Université d'Auvergne, Centre de Recherche en Odontologie Clinique, Clermont-Ferrand, France; 2CHU Clermont-Ferrand, Service d'Odontologie, Clermont-Ferrand, FranceBackground: Advances made in prevention have helped postpone complete edentulism in older patients. However, in the elderly, the physiological state reduces patients' ability to adapt to oral rehabilitation and degrades the patient's oral condition. Consequently, elderly edentulous subjects avoid many types of foods, which can lead to substantial nutritional consequences. Complete dentures retained by implants are, currently, the treatment of reference in prosthodontic mandibular rehabilitation. Indeed, the mandibular symphysis generally tolerates implantation, even when the mandible is strongly resorbed. However, in the elderly, implant rehabilitation is compromised by the complexity of the surgical protocol and possible postoperative complications. In this context, the use of geriatric "slim implants" (GSI offers an interesting alternative.Methods: In the present study, the surgical and prosthetic procedures for the use of GSI in a French dental hospital are presented. The objective was the stabilization of a complete mandibular denture in an elderly person, with the immediate implantation of four GSI.Results: The operating procedure was found to be less invasive, less expensive, simpler, and more efficient than the conventional procedure.Conclusion: The result strongly suggests that this protocol could be used systematically to treat complete edentulism in very elderly patients. Long-term monitoring and the evaluation of the reliability of this type of rehabilitation should be undertaken.Keywords: gerodontology, oral health, prostheses, mini-implant

  5. Dynamic balance changes within three weeks of fitting a new prosthetic foot component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Jenny A; Stergiou, Nicholas; Wurdeman, Shane R

    2017-07-05

    Balance during walking is of high importance to prosthesis users and may affect walking during baseline observation and evaluation. The aim of this study was to determine whether changes in walking balance occurred during an adaptation period following the fitting of a new prosthetic component. Margin of stability in the medial-lateral direction (MOSML) and an anterior instability margin (AIM) were used to quantify the dynamic balance of 21 unilateral transtibial amputees during overground walking. Participants trialled two prosthetic feet presenting contrasting movement/balance constraints; a Higher Activity foot similar to that of their own prosthesis, and a Lower Activity foot. Participants were assessed before (Visit 1) and after (Visit 2) a 3-week adaptation period on each foot. With the Higher Activity component, MOSML decreased on the prosthetic side, and increased on the sound side from Visit 1 to Visit 2, eliminating a significant inter-limb difference apparent at Visit 1 (Visit 1-sound=0.062m, prosthetic=0.075m, p=0.018; Visit 2-sound=0.066m, prosthetic=0.074m, p=0.084). No such change was seen with the Lower Activity foot (Visit 1-sound=0.064m, prosthetic=0.077m, p=0.007; Visit 2-sound=0.063m, prosthetic=0.080m, pbalance during walking can occur following the initial receipt of a device regardless of whether the component is of the same functional category as the one an individual is accustomed to using. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Denture hygiene knowledge, attitudes, and practices toward patient education in denture care among dental practitioners of Jabalpur city, Madhya Pradesh, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Suresan

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: It may be concluded that the study subjects had limited knowledge of denture cleansing materials and denture hygiene importance. Attitudes varied among the subjects when it came to sharing information with their patients.

  7. Telescopic Partial Dentures-Concealed Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagat, Tushar Vitthalrao; Walke, Ashwini Nareshchandra

    2015-01-01

    The ideal goal of good dentist is to restore the missing part of oral structure, phonetics, his look and the most important is restored the normal health of the patient, which is hampered due to less or insufficient intake of food. Removable partial denture (RPD) treatment option is considered as a notion, which precludes the inevitability of “floating plastic” in edentulous mouth, that many times fail to fulfill the above essential of the patients. In modern dentistry, though the dental implants or fixed partial denture is the better options, but they have certain limitations. However, overdentures and particularly telescopic denture is the overlooked technology in dentistry that would be a boon for such needy patients. Telescopic denture is especially indicated in the distal edentulous area with minimum two teeth bilaterally present with a good amount of periodontal support. This treatment modality is sort of preventive prosthodontics remedy, which in a conservative manner preserve the remaining teeth and helps in conservation of alveolar bone ultimately. There are two tenets related to this option, one is constant conservation edentulous ridge around the retained tooth and the most important is the endless existence of periodontal sensory action that directs and monitor gnathodynamic task. In this option the primary coping or inner coping are cemented on the prepared tooth, and a similar removable outer or inner telescopic crown placed tightly by using a mechanism of tenso-friction, this is firmly attached to a removable RPD in place without moving or rocking of the prosthesis, which is the common compliant of almost all patients of RPD. Copings are also protecting the abutment from tooth decay and also offers stabilization and maintaining of the outer crown. The outer crown engages the inner coping and gives as an anchor for the remainder of the dentition. This work is the review of telescopic prosthesis which is well supported by the case discussion, and

  8. Esthetic designs of removable partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, C H; Chow, T W

    2003-01-01

    The increased emphasis on physical appearance in contemporary society has increased the demand for esthetic dental restorations. Although the success of implant dentistry has expanded the scope of esthetic fixed prostheses, many patients demand a removable partial denture (RPD) for health, anatomic, psychological, or financial reasons. Fabricating an esthetically pleasing RPD while avoiding the unsightly display associated with conventional clasp assemblies often presents a challenge to dentists. This article examines using lingual clasps, proximal undercuts (also known as rotational path insertion), and acetal resin clasps as simple and effective means of improving RPD esthetics.

  9. Turning points in removable partial denture philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waliszewski, Michael P

    2010-10-01

    This article discusses key turning points in removable partial denture (RPD) philosophy. Early advancements tended to focus upon improving the technical quality of the prosthesis itself. The beginning of the 20th century brought significant public pressure upon the dental profession due to consequences associated with poor quality fixed prostheses. The result was dramatic improvement and heavy demand for RPDs. Technical and efficiency issues conspired to temper this enthusiasm, eventually resulting in reduced respect for RPDs. By highlighting key writings and technical issues during these periods of change it is hoped the reader will gain a more precise understanding of the current status of RPD philosophy.

  10. Development of a Multi-DOF Electromyography Prosthetic System Using the Adaptive Joint Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hernandez Arieta

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an electrically powered prosthetic system controlled by electromyography (EMG signal detected from the skin surface of the human body. The research of electrically powered prosthetic systems is divided into two main subjects. One is the design of the joint mechanism. We propose the use of an adaptive joint mechanism based on the tendon-driven architecture. This mechanism includes mechanical torque–velocity converters and a mechanism to assist the proximal joint torque by distal actuators. The other subject is the recognition of the EMG signal. For the discrimination of many patterns and nonlinear properties of the EMG signal, we propose a controller based on a simple pattern recognition information process. The system also drives 12 servomotors to move the adaptive joint mechanism. In this paper, we show the proposed system and describe the mechanical design of the prosthetic hand. The experimental results show that the electrically powered devices can be controlled using the proposed method.

  11. Auditory display as a prosthetic hand sensory feedback for reaching and grasping tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Jose; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Natsumi, Nakayama; Sekine, Masashi; Yu, Wenwei

    2012-01-01

    Upper limb amputees have to rely extensively on visual feedback in order to monitor and manipulate successfully their prosthetic device. This situation leads to high consciousness burden, which generates fatigue and frustration. Therefore, in order to enhance motor-sensory performance and awareness, an auditory display was used as a sensory feedback system for the prosthetic hand's spatio-temporal and force information in a complete reaching and grasping setting. The main objective of this study was to explore the effects of using the auditory display to monitor the prosthetic hand during a complete reaching and grasping motion. The results presented in this paper point out that the usage of an auditory display to monitor and control a robot hand improves the temporal and grasping performance greatly, while reducing mental effort and improving their confidence.

  12. Advanced prosthetic techniques for below knee amputations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staats, T B

    1985-02-01

    Recent advances in the evaluation of the amputation stump, the materials that are available for prosthetic application, techniques of improving socket fit, and prosthetic finishings promise to dramatically improve amputee function. Precision casting techniques for providing optimal fit of the amputation stump using materials such as alginate are described. The advantages of transparent check sockets for fitting the complicated amputation stump are described. Advances in research that promise to provide more functional prosthetic feet and faster and more reliable socket molding are the use of CAD-CAM (computer aided design-computer aided manufacturing) and the use of gait analysis techniques to aid in the alignment of the prosthesis after socket fitting. Finishing techniques to provide a more natural appearing prosthesis are described. These advances will gradually spread to the entire prosthetic profession.

  13. Computed Tomography of Prosthetic Heart Valves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habets, J.

    2012-01-01

    Prosthetic heart valve (PHV) dysfunction is an infrequent but potentially life-threatening disease with a heterogeneous clinical presentation. Patients with PHV dysfunction clinically can present with symptoms of congestive heart failure (dyspnea, fatigue, edema), fever, angina pectoris, dizziness d

  14. Ultrasound imaging in lower limb prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Tania; Solomonidis, Stephan; Sandham, William; Spence, William

    2002-03-01

    The biomechanical interaction between the residual limb and the prosthetic socket determines the quality of fit of the socket in lower limb prosthetics. An understanding of this interaction and the development of quantitative measures to predict the quality of fit of the socket are important for optimal socket design. Finite-element modeling is used widely for biomechanical modeling of the limb/socket interaction and requires information on the internal and external geometry of the residual limb. Volumetric imaging methods such as X-ray computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasound have been used to obtain residual limb shape information. Of these modalities, ultrasound has been introduced most recently and its development for visualization in prosthetics is the least mature. This paper reviews ultrasound image acquisition and processing methods as they have been applied in lower limb prosthetics.

  15. DME Prosthetics Orthotics, and Supplies Fee Schedule

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Durable Medical Equipment, Prosthetics-Orthotics, and Supplies Fee Schedule. The list contains the fee schedule amounts, floors, and ceilings for all procedure codes...

  16. A conventional microwave oven for denture cleaning: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondani, Mario Augusto; Samim, Firoozeh; Feng, Hong

    2012-06-01

    Denture cleaning should be quick and easy to perform, especially in long-term care facilities. The lack of proper oral hygiene can put older adults at higher risk from opportunistic oral infections, particularly fungal. As an alternative to regular brushing, the use of a microwave oven has been suggested for cleaning and disinfecting dentures. To synthesise and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the use of a conventional microwave oven for cleaning and disinfecting complete dentures. A brief literature search focused on papers dealing with microwave therapy for denture cleaning through PubMed Central, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Google Scholar, Ovid MEDLINE(R) In-Process, and Scifinder Scholar. One hundred and sixty-seven manuscripts published in English with full text were found, and 28 were accepted and discussed in the light of the advantages and disadvantages of the use of conventional microwave oven for cleaning and disinfecting complete dentures. There was no standardisation for microwave use for denture cleaning. Manual cleaning still seemed to be the optimal method for controlling fungal infection and denture stomatitis. However, such a daily routine appeared to be underused, particularly in long-term care facilities. © 2010 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Polyamide as a Denture Base Material: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahroo Vojdani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article was to review the biocompatibility, physical, and mechanical properties of the polyamide denture base materials. An electronic search of scientific papers from 1990-2014 was carried out using PubMed, Scopus and Wiley Inter Science engines using the search terms “nylon denture base” and “polyamide denture base”. Searching the key words yielded a total of 82 articles. By application of inclusion criteria, the obtained results were further reduced to 24 citations recruited in this review. Several studies have evaluated various properties of polyamide (nylon denture base materials. According to the results of the studies, currently, thermo-injectable, high impact, flexible or semi-flexible polyamide is thought to be an alternative to the conventional acrylic resins due to its esthetic and functional characteristics and physicochemical qualities. It would be justifiable to use this material for denture fabrication in some cases such as severe soft/ hard tissue undercuts, unexplained repeated fracture of denture, in aesthetic-concerned patients, those who have allergy to other denture base materials, and in patients with microstomia. Although polyamide has some attractive advantages, they require modifications to produce consistently better properties than the current polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA materials. Moreover, since there is a very limited knowledge about their clinical performance, strict and careful follow-up evaluation of the patients rehabilitated with polyamide prosthesis is recommended.

  18. Polyamide as a Denture Base Material: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojdani, Mahroo; Giti, Rashin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the biocompatibility, physical, and mechanical properties of the polyamide denture base materials. An electronic search of scientific papers from 1990-2014 was carried out using PubMed, Scopus and Wiley Inter Science engines using the search terms “nylon denture base” and “polyamide denture base”. Searching the key words yielded a total of 82 articles. By application of inclusion criteria, the obtained results were further reduced to 24 citations recruited in this review. Several studies have evaluated various properties of polyamide (nylon) denture base materials. According to the results of the studies, currently, thermo-injectable, high impact, flexible or semi-flexible polyamide is thought to be an alternative to the conventional acrylic resins due to its esthetic and functional characteristics and physicochemical qualities. It would be justifiable to use this material for denture fabrication in some cases such as severe soft/ hard tissue undercuts, unexplained repeated fracture of denture, in aesthetic-concerned patients, those who have allergy to other denture base materials, and in patients with microstomia.  Although polyamide has some attractive advantages, they require modifications to produce consistently better properties than the current polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) materials. Moreover, since there is a very limited knowledge about their clinical performance, strict and careful follow-up evaluation of the patients rehabilitated with polyamide prosthesis is recommended. PMID:26106628

  19. Masticatory Function of Subjects Rehabilitated with Conventional Complete Denture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Martins da Silva PRADO

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluate masticatory function of subjects rehabilitated with conventional complete denture, considered adequate or good (index of Kapur, by means of objective and subjective tests and to verify influence of quality and denture time use. Method: Masticatory performance tests (MP, using test food Optocal, had been carried through with 20 and 40 chewing strokes in 21 subjects with complete denture (group CD and 15 with natural dentition (group ND. Masticatory performance index was taken by means of the calculation of the Average Geometric Diameter of chewed and sifted particles. Results: After analysis statistics (Tukey b, p<0.05, observed that group CD obtainable 12% and 31% of the performance reached for group ND subjects, after 20 and 40 strokes, respectively, being that literature quantifies masticatory performance from 20% to 30% of the natural dentition. Statistical significant differences (t-test student, p<0.05 between MP and masticatory ability had not been verified, as well as denture quality of group CD. In relation to denture use period, users with more than six months had obtainable better resulted, possibly for being more adapts to the denture. Conclusion: In the limit of this study, it could be possible conclude that complete dentures users considered adequate or good had improved its MP after use six months. Standing out that with 20 strokes, in test food related, the result (12% was worst to in literature described.

  20. Tenecteplase in prosthetic mitral valve thrombosis

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    In the few reported cases of prosthetic mitral valve thrombosis, where surgical intervention was considered as high risk, fibrinolytic therapy had proved life saving. The authors present clinical, laboratory, and imaging data from such a patient, with prosthetic mitral valve thrombosis and its successful management with tenecteplase. The use of tenecteplase as a viable fibrinolytic agent for the first time was justified, due to the lack of immunogenicity concerns compared to streptokinase.

  1. Tenecteplase in prosthetic mitral valve thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyub Ghori, Masood; Bakir, Sherif; Ellahham, Samer; Al Nassir, Adnan; Al Zubaidi, Abdulmajeed; Augustin, Norbert; Abdelaziz, Moataz Ayman; Turrin, Nicolas Patrick; Al Mahmeed, Wael Abdulrahman

    2011-04-01

    In the few reported cases of prosthetic mitral valve thrombosis, where surgical intervention was considered as high risk, fibrinolytic therapy had proved life saving. The authors present clinical, laboratory, and imaging data from such a patient, with prosthetic mitral valve thrombosis and its successful management with tenecteplase. The use of tenecteplase as a viable fibrinolytic agent for the first time was justified, due to the lack of immunogenicity concerns compared to streptokinase.

  2. Surgical and Prosthetic Rehabilitation of Combination Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Carlino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this report is to analyze the clinical symptoms, ethologic factors, and prosthetic rehabilitation in a case of Combination Syndrome (CS. The treatment of CS can be conventional or surgical, with or without the bone reconstruction of maxilla. The correct prosthetic treatment helps this kind of patients to restore the physiologic occlusion plane to allow a correct masticatory and aesthetic function. Management of this kind of patients can be a challenge for a dental practitioner.

  3. Advances in lower-limb prosthetic technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laferrier, Justin Z; Gailey, Robert

    2010-02-01

    The boundaries once faced by individuals with amputations are quickly being overcome through biotechnology. Although there are currently no prosthetics capable of replicating anatomic function, there have been radical advancements in prosthetic technology, medical science, and rehabilitation in the past 30 years, vastly improving functional mobility and quality of life for individuals with lower-limb amputations. What once seemed impossible is rapidly becoming reality. The future seems limitless, and the replication of anatomic function now seems possible.

  4. Denture hygiene knowledge, attitudes, and practices toward patient education in denture care among dental practitioners of Jabalpur city, Madhya Pradesh, India

    OpenAIRE

    Vinay Suresan; Sneha Mantri; Suryakant Deogade; Sumathi, K.; Pragya Panday; Ankit Galav; Kanika Mishra

    2016-01-01

    Context: Researchers have concentrated their focus on denture wearer's attitude and practice toward denture cleansing despite the fact that they should be more focused on the attitudes of the dentists’ themselves towards patient education at the time of denture delivery. It is an obligation of every dentist to motivate, instruct and provide the means and methods of plaque control for their patients. Aims: The aim was to assess the denture hygiene knowledge, attitudes and practice towards pati...

  5. Graduates’ perceptions of prosthetic and orthotic education and clinical practice in Tanzania and Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Magnusson

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Maintaining and improving the quality of prosthetics and orthotics education at the Tanzania Training Centre for Orthopaedic Technologists is essential for the provision of appropriate prosthetics and orthotics services in African countries.Objectives: To describe how Tanzanian and Malawian graduates’ of the Diploma in Orthopaedic Technology perceive their education and how it could be improved or supplemented to facilitate clinical practice of graduates.Methods: Nineteen graduates from the diploma course in orthopaedic technology were interviewed and phenomenographic analysis was applied to the data.Results: Seven descriptive categories emerged, namely varied awareness of the profession before starting education, well-equipped teaching facilities, aspects lacking in the learning context, need for changes in the curriculum, enabling people to walk is motivating, obstacles in working conditions and the need for continuous professional development. All participants perceived possible improvements to the content and learning environment.Conclusions: Prosthetic and orthotic education can be better provided by modifying the content of the diploma programme by dedicating more time to the clinical management of different patient groups and applied biomechanics as well as reducing the programme content focusing on technical aspects of prosthetic and orthotic practice. Graduates were not prepared for the rural working conditions and the graduates desired continued training.Keywords: orthotic; prosthetic; education; Malawi; Tanzania; assistive device; assistive technology; developing countries; low-income country

  6. FEM Analysis of Mandibular Prosthetic Overdenture Supported by Dental Implants: Evaluation of Different Retention Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicciù, M.; Cervino, G.; Bramanti, E.; Lauritano, F.; Lo Gudice, G.; Scappaticci, L.; Rapparini, A.; Guglielmino, E.; Risitano, G.

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic rehabilitation of total edentulous jaws patients is today a common technique that clinicians approach in their daily practice. The use of dental implants for replacing missing teeth is going to be a safe technique and the implant-prosthetic materials give the possibility of having long-term clinical success. Aim of this work is to evaluate the mechanical features of three different prosthetic retention systems. By applying engineering systems of investigations like FEM and von Mises analyses, how the dental implant material holds out against the masticatory strength during the chewing cycles has been investigated. Three common dental implant overdenture retention systems have been investigated. The ball attachment system, the locator system, and the common dental abutment have been processed by Ansys Workbench 15.0 and underwent FEM and von Mises investigations. The elastic features of the materials used in the study have been taken from recent literature data. Results revealed different response for both types of device, although locator system showed better results for all conditions of loading. The data of this virtual model show all the features of different prosthetic retention systems under the masticatory load. Clinicians should find the better prosthetic solution related to the patients clinical condition in order to obtain long-term results. PMID:26798405

  7. FEM Analysis of Mandibular Prosthetic Overdenture Supported by Dental Implants: Evaluation of Different Retention Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cicciù

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prosthetic rehabilitation of total edentulous jaws patients is today a common technique that clinicians approach in their daily practice. The use of dental implants for replacing missing teeth is going to be a safe technique and the implant-prosthetic materials give the possibility of having long-term clinical success. Aim of this work is to evaluate the mechanical features of three different prosthetic retention systems. By applying engineering systems of investigations like FEM and von Mises analyses, how the dental implant material holds out against the masticatory strength during the chewing cycles has been investigated. Three common dental implant overdenture retention systems have been investigated. The ball attachment system, the locator system, and the common dental abutment have been processed by Ansys Workbench 15.0 and underwent FEM and von Mises investigations. The elastic features of the materials used in the study have been taken from recent literature data. Results revealed different response for both types of device, although locator system showed better results for all conditions of loading. The data of this virtual model show all the features of different prosthetic retention systems under the masticatory load. Clinicians should find the better prosthetic solution related to the patients clinical condition in order to obtain long-term results.

  8. Development of a Tactile and Slip Sensor Controlled Prosthetic Hand System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, W.; Wang, R. C.; Zhang, J. C.; Jin, D. W.

    2008-10-01

    Supported by the latest sensor and microcontroller technologies, prosthetic hands have been widely used to reclaim the human functionaries. Among these, the most advanced prosthetic hand was controlled by the tactile and EMG singles. However, for a slippery object, attention has to be taken for the inexperienced users who need to control the shrinkage of the wrist flexor carefully. In this paper, the authors presented a prosthetic hand control system using PVDF film sensor to provide both tactile and slip force feedback signals to operate the hand. The PVDF film sensor used for this control system was specifically developed to detect both tactile and slip force between the prosthetic finger and object. The method of distinguishing two signals was described. A prototype system was constructed using a microcontroller to process the signal from the sensor and provide control signal to the motors operate the prosthetic hand. The test result of the prototype device shown that comparing with the one without slippery signal feedback, this system was easy to operate for an inexperienced user.

  9. Rechargeable wireless EMG sensor for prosthetic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichter, P A; Lange, E H; Riehle, T H; Anderson, S M; Hedin, D S

    2010-01-01

    Surface electrodes in modern myoelectric prosthetics are often embedded in the prosthesis socket and make contact with the skin. These electrodes detect and amplify muscle action potentials from voluntary contractions of the muscle in the residual limb and are used to control the prosthetic's movement and function. There are a number of performance-related deficiencies associated with external electrodes including the maintenance of sufficient electromyogram (EMG) signal amplitude, extraneous noise acquisition, and proper electrode interface maintenance that are expected to be improved or eliminated using the proposed implanted sensors. This research seeks to investigate the design components for replacing external electrodes with fully-implantable myoelectric sensors that include a wireless interface to the prosthetic limbs. This implanted technology will allow prosthetic limb manufacturers to provide products with increased performance, capability, and patient-comfort. The EMG signals from the intramuscular recording electrode are amplified and wirelessly transmitted to a receiver in the prosthetic limb. Power to the implant is maintained using a rechargeable battery and an inductive energy transfer link from the prosthetic. A full experimental system was developed to demonstrate that a wireless biopotential sensor can be designed that meets the requirements of size, power, and performance for implantation.

  10. Removable partial dentures with rotational paths of insertion: problem analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firtell, D N; Jacobson, T E

    1983-07-01

    Removable partial dentures designed to use a rotational path of insertion are technique sensitive. When indicated and when the principles discussed are followed, a denture that uses a rotational path can be highly successful. Tooth coverage can be decreased, which is an advantage in plaque control, caries reduction, and periodontal support. Esthetics can be improved without resorting to intracoronal retainers, and the number of components subject to distortion is reduced. When properly designed and constructed, use of a rotational path of insertion can result in a removable partial denture that is strong, hygienic, and esthetic.

  11. Deterioration of polymethyl methacrylate dentures in the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Hiroshi; Suenaga, Hanako; Takahashi, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Osamu; Sasaki, Keiichi; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)-made prostheses used in the oral cavity were evaluated by multimodal assessment in order to elucidate the biodeterioration of PMMA. In used dentures (UD), the micro-Vickers hardness of the polished denture surface and denture basal surface was lower than that of the torn surface (pPMMA deteriorated during long-term use in the oral cavity in terms of hardness and volatile content with component alteration, and suggests the involvement of biodeterioration, possibly due to saliva and oral microbiota.

  12. Glass fiber reinforcement in repaired acrylic resin removable dentures: preliminary results of a clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallittu, P K

    1997-01-01

    The clinical usefulness of continuous E-glass partial fiber reinforcement of acrylic resin removable dentures was evaluated an average 13 months after the insertion of the fibers. Twelve removable complete dentures and ten removable partial dentures with a history of recurrent fracture were selected for this study. The partial fiber reinforcement was incorporated into the denture at the time of repair. One complete denture and one removable partial denture fractured in the region of reinforcement during the examination period. These fractures were most likely caused by faulty placement of the fiber reinforcement in the denture in the dental laboratory. In six dentures, new fractures occurred in regions without partial fiber reinforcement. The results revealed the importance of both the correct positioning of the partial fiber reinforcement in the denture and the use of accurate laboratory techniques.

  13. Effect of Cast Modification on Denture Base Adaptation Following Maxillary Complete Denture Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed, Mohammed E; Porwal, Amit; Ehrenberg, David; Weiner, Saul

    2017-01-19

    To investigate the effect of cast modifications on denture base adaptation in coronal and sagittal projections following maxillary complete denture processing. A total of 60 edentulous maxillary casts (n = 10) were distributed among six groups. Group 1 was the control group with no modification, groups 2 through 6 included a butterfly postdam preparation, groups 3 and 4 also included a 10-mm wide/4-mm deep box with addition of four round holes in group 4, and groups 5 and 6 also included a 20-mm wide/4-mm deep box with addition of four round holes in group 6. The boxes were prepared at the mid-heel area of the casts. Two layers of baseplate wax (1 mm each) were used to standardize denture base thickness across the groups. A standard technique was used to replicate the denture tooth set-up, and standardized processing was done for all the groups. Following deflasking, casts with the dentures were sectioned in the coronal and sagittal directions. Microscopic pictures were taken at preselected points. Data were organized in tables, and statistical analyses were performed using repeated measure ANOVA, Tukey post hoc tests, and post hoc comparison tests set at 5% level of significance. Maximum gaps were measured at the mid-palatal area followed by nearby areas and the areas near ridge crests in both coronal and sagittal projections. The analyses revealed significant differences between the groups in coronal projection (1/2, 3/4, 5/6) and sagittal projection (1, 2, 3/4, 5/6) without significant differences within the pairs. The groups were ranked from the highest group 1 to the lowest group 6 relative to the gap means. Post hoc comparisons showed that points 1C and 2A had the highest gap means across the study groups. Within the limitations of this study, it can be extrapolated that the denture base adaptation can be effectively increased with the box preparation at the mid-heel aspect of the casts. Significant reduction of gaps was seen when the box size increased from

  14. Clinical effects of glazing denture acrylic resin bases using an ultraviolet curing method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budtz-Jörgensen, E; Kaaber, S

    1986-12-01

    Control of denture plaque accumulation is essential to obtain and maintain a healthy oral mucosa in denture wearers. The present study was designed to study the effect on denture plaque accumulation and denture stomatitis of coating the fitting denture surface by a glaze. Twenty-one subjects wearing complete dentures participated in the study. Glazing of the denture surface was performed using a Perma Cure System. Plaque accumulation was studied clinically and using a semiquantitative microbiologic technique. Plaque accumulation on the glazed and the non-glazed halves of the fitting denture surface was compared after 1 wk. There was significantly less plaque on the glazed half of the denture (P less than 0.001), and the calculated number of CFU of bacteria/cm2 was significantly lower from the test area of the glazed half than from the test area of the non-glazed half of the denture (P less than 0.001). When the patients were re-examined 1 month after the entire fitting denture surface had been glazed plaque scores, yeast scores and number of CFU of bacteria/cm2 were not significantly different from those observed before glazing. There was a reduction of the erythema of the palatal mucosa in 14/19 patients with denture-induced stomatitis. The study indicates that coating of the fitting denture surface by a glaze may be a means to improve denture cleanliness; however, the present glazing system should be further developed to produce a more uniform glazing.

  15. Evaluation of flexural strength and color stability of different denture base materials including flexible material after using different denture cleansers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Vrinda R.; Shah, Darshana Nilesh; Chauhan, Chirag J.; Doshi, Paras J.; Kumar, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Present study aimed at evaluating the colour stability and flexural strength of flexible denture base materials (Valplast) and Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) denture base material (Meliodent) processed by two different methods (Injection moulding and compression moulding) after immersing them in three different denture cleansers with acidic, basic and neutral PH. Methods and Materials: Total 120 specimens (65 × 10 × 3 mm3), 40 specimens of each material (Valplast, Meliodent compression moulding and injection moulding) were immersed in denture cleansers having different PH; Valclean (Acidic), Clinsodent (Basic) and Polident (Neutral) as well as Distilled Water. Color changes were measured with a spectrophotometer after 1 month, 3 months and 6 months of immersion cycle. A flexural 3-point bending test was carried out by using an Instron universal testing machine after 6 months of soaking. Data were analyzed using SPSS software Results: Maximum effect on colour stability was noted with Clinsodent followed by Valclean. Least color changes were observed after immersion in Polident. Colour difference was increased significantly as the immersion time increased. For both Meliodent and Nylon resins, statistically significant change in flexural strength occurred with immersion in all denture cleansers. Clinsodent has greater effect as compared to Valclean and Polident. Conclusions: Polident and Valclean can be safely used as denture cleanser for both nylon and acrylic resin denture base materials as far as colour stability and flexural strength both are concerned. PMID:26929541

  16. Laser welding of removable partial denture frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brudvik, James S; Lee, Seungbum; Croshaw, Steve N; Reimers, Donald L; Reimers, Dave L

    2008-01-01

    To identify and measure distortions inherent in the casting process of a Class III mandibular cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) framework to illustrate the problems faced by the laboratory technician and the clinician and to measure the changes that occur during the correction of the fit discrepancy using laser welding. Five identical castings of a Co-Cr alloy partial denture casting were made and measured between 3 widely separated points using the x, y, and z adjustments of a Nikon Measurescope. The same measurements were made after each of the following clinical and laboratory procedures: sprue removal, sectioning of the casting into 3 parts through the posterior meshwork, fitting the segments to the master cast, picking up the segments using resin, and laser welding of the 3 segments. Measurements of all 5 castings showed a cross-arch decrease after sprue removal, an increase after fitting the segments to the master cast, and a slight decrease after resin pickup and laser welding. Within the limitations of this study, the findings suggest that precise tooth-frame relations can be established by resin pickup and laser welding of segments of Co-Cr removable partial denture frameworks.

  17. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis of Candida albicans isolates colonizing acrylic dentures before and after denture replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Khai How; Lee, Hee Ji; Knight, Nicholas J; Holmes, Ann R; Cannon, Richard D

    2017-08-01

    Yeast, in particular Candida albicans, are the principal fungal cause of denture stomatitis, and can also be present as a commensal in many individuals. Few studies, however, have examined oral retention of yeast strains over time. We analyzed the yeast present in saliva samples and from the dentures of 10 individuals colonized with yeast but with no signs of stomatitis, before new complete maxillary dentures were fitted and also at 1, 3, and 6 months after denture replacement. Yeast species were presumptively identified on selective agar plates and were present in nine individuals before denture replacement and in six at the 6-month time point. C. albicans was detected in seven individuals pre-replacement, and in three by 6 months post-replacement. Sixty-two isolates (up to five from each C. albicans-positive sample) were analyzed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) (33 from saliva and 29 from dentures). Six MLST allele profiles were identified that were common to several individuals. These profiles included three previously reported diploid sequence types (DSTs) and three novel DSTs. Two of the novel DSTs were closely related variants of a previously reported DST, and both showed loss of heterozygosity polymorphisms within one of the seven MLST gene sequences. For three individuals, at least one DST that was present before denture replacement was still detected in either saliva or on dentures at subsequent sampling times. Our results indicate that denture replacement reduces but does not remove, colonising yeast and confirm previous observations of C. albicans strain microevolution. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Combined effect of new complete dentures and simple dietary advice on nutritional status in edentulous patients: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komagamine, Yuriko; Kanazawa, Manabu; Iwaki, Maiko; Jo, Ayami; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Amagai, Noriko; Minakuchi, Shunsuke

    2016-11-09

    Individuals who are edentulous have a lower intake of fruit, vegetables, fiber, and protein compared with their dentate counterparts because tooth loss is accompanied by a decrease in ability to chew. Whether or not a combination of prosthetic rehabilitation and simple dietary advice produces improvement in dietary intake among edentulous persons is unclear. We aim to investigate the effect of a simultaneous combination of simple dietary advice delivered by dentists and provision of new complete dentures on dietary intake in edentulous individuals who request new dentures. Through a double-blinded, parallel, randomized controlled trial in which 70 edentate persons who request new complete dentures will be enrolled, eligible study participants will be randomly allocated to either a dietary intervention group receiving dietary advice or to a control group receiving only advice on the care and maintenance of dentures. Outcome measures include daily intake of nutrients and food items, assessed using a brief self-administered diet history questionnaire; antioxidant capacity, determined using blood and urine samples; nutritional status, assessed with the Mini-Nutritional Assessment-Short Form; oral health-related quality of life, assessed with the Japanese version of the Oral Health Impact Profile-EDENT and the Geriatric Oral Health Assessment Index; subjective chewing ability; masticatory performance, assessed using a color-changeable chewing gum and a gummy jelly; patient self-assessment of dentures; mild cognitive impairment, assessed with the Japanese version of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment; and functional capacity, assessed with the Japan Science and Technology Agency Index of Competence. Outcome measures, except for antioxidant capacity, are to be implemented at three time points: at baseline and at 3 and 6 months following intervention. Antioxidant capacity data are to be collected twice: at baseline and at 3 months following intervention. Differences

  19. Comparative Analysis of the Water Sorption and Cytotoxicity of Two different Denture Base Systems: An in vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Prashanth; Chhapdia, Lokesh; Verma, Pranav; Sahu, Anshul; Kushwaha, Narendra S; Chaturvedi, Rahul; Manna, Suvashri

    2017-09-01

    Different biomaterials and techniques have been introduced in the field of prosthetic dentistry with the purpose of replacement and rehabilitation of the edentulous areas. Due to their shorter setting time, the light-activated restorative and prosthetic materials have the capability of releasing few amount of cytotoxic materials in the oral cavity. Polymer materials [urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA) and bis-acryl] are assumed to have high mechanical properties. Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) offers numerous advantages of being highly esthetic in nature and at the same time being cost-effective. Hence, this study aimed to assess and compare the water sorption and cytotoxicity of light-activated UDMA denture base resin and conventional heat-activated PMMA resin. This study included assessment and comparison of water sorption and cytotoxicity of heat-activated PMMA resin and light-activated UDMA denture base system. Fabrication of heat-activated PMMA resin and UDMA specimens was done by investing the wax patterns in stone molds using manufacturer's instructions. Contraction of the specimens was done for assessment of cytotoxicity and water resorption of the UDMA and PMMA resin samples. All the results were analyzed by Statistical Package for the Social Sciences software version 18.0. Chi-square test and one-way analysis of variance tests were used for the assessment of the level of significance; p < 0.05 was taken as significant. Mean lysis score observed in the PMMA and UDMA groups was 0.4 and 0.3 respectively. While observing at the 3 months time, the mean water resorption in the PMMA and UDMA groups was found to be 37.9 and 40.2 respectively. Significant difference in relation to water resorption was observed between the two study groups only at 3 months time. Both materials used in this study are nontoxic. Furthermore, UDMA resin materials exhibited lower water resorption after more than 1 month of time of storage. Water resorption is similar for different denture

  20. Evaluate the Effect of Commercially Available Denture Cleansers on Surface Hardness and Roughness of Denture Liners at Various Time Intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Hilal S.; Singh, Sumeet; Hari, Prasad A.; Amarnath, G. S.; Kundapur, Vinaya; Pasha, Naveed; Anand, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective: Chemical cleansing by denture cleansers is first choice for denture plaque control. The most common problems while using denture cleansers are hardening, porosity, odor sorption, water sorption, solubility, and colour change, bacterial and fungal growth. Chemical cleansing procedures have been found to have an effect on the physical and mechanical properties of denture liners. Thus, this study was conducted to evaluate the effect of commercially available denture cleansers on surface hardness and roughness of acrylic and silicon based denture liners at various time interval. Method: Two autopolymerising denture liners Kooliner (acrylic) and GC reline soft (silicon) were tested with two commercially available denture cleansers, polident and efferdent plus. Total of 120 specimens were prepared and all the specimens were divided into six groups based on the relining materials and denture cleansers used. Surface hardness and surface roughness was tested using Shore A durometer and profilometer respectively at the end of day 1, day 7, day 30 and day 90. All the specimens were stored in artificial saliva throughout the study. Cleanser solution was prepared daily by adding Polident and Efferdent plus denture cleanser tablet into 250ml of enough very warm (not hot) water. Acrylic and silicon liner groups were cleansed in a solution of denture cleanser and water for 15 minutes daily, rinsed with water and stored in artificial saliva at room temperature. The data was analyzed with one way ANOVA and independent t-test. Result: The acrylic soft lining showed gradual hardening and increase in surface roughness after immersion in denture cleanser and also with time. Acrylic liner material showed maximum hardness and roughness with Polident followed by Efferdent plus and water (control group). Silicone lining material showed a slight difference in hardness and roughness between the test group and control group. There was a slight increase in hardness in

  1. Recent advancements in prosthetic hand technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, Angana; Mazumdar, Sushmi; Sahai, Nitin; Paul, Sudip; Bhatia, Dinesh; Verma, Suresh; Rohilla, Punit Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Recently, significant advances over the past decade have been made in robotics, artificial intelligence and other cognitive related fields, allowing development of highly sophisticated bio-mimetic robotics systems. In addition, enormous number of robots have been designed and assembled by explicitly realising their biological oriented behaviours. To enhance skill behaviours and adequate grasping abilities in these devices, a new phase of dexterous hands has been developed recently with bio-mimetically oriented and bio-inspired functionalities. The aim in writing this review paper is to present a detailed insight towards the development of the bio-mimetic based dexterous robotic multi-fingered artificial hand. An "ideal" upper limb prosthesis should be perceived as a part of their natural body by the amputee and should replicate sensory-motor capabilities of the amputated limb. Upper-limb amputations are most often the result of sudden trauma to the body, although they also can be caused by malignancy, congenital deficiencies and vascular diseases. This paper discusses the different bio-mimetic approaches using a framework that permits for a common description of biological and technical based hand manipulation behaviour. In particular, the review focuses on a number of developments in the inspired robotic systems. In conclusion, the study found that a huge amount of research efforts in terms of kinematics, dynamics, modelling and control methodologies are being put in to improve the present hand technology, thereby providing more functionality to the prosthetic limb of the amputee. This would improve their quality-of-life and help in performing activities of daily living (ADL) tasks with comparative ease in the near future.

  2. Cetacean Swimming with Prosthetic Limbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode-Oke, Ayodeji; Ren, Yan; Dong, Haibo; Fish, Frank

    2016-11-01

    During entanglement in fishing gear, dolphins can suffer abrasions and amputations of flukes and fins. As a result, if the dolphin survives the ordeal, swimming performance is altered. Current rehabilitation technques is the use of prosthesis to regain swimming ability. In this work, analyses are focused on two dolphins with locomotive impairment; Winter (currently living in Clearwater Marine Aquarium in Florida) and Fuji (lived in Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium in Japan). Fuji lost about 75% of its fluke surface to necrosis (death of cells) and Winter lost its tail due to amputation. Both dolphins are aided by prosthetic tails that mimic the shape of a real dolphin tail. Using 3D surface reconstruction techniques and a high fidelity Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) flow solver, we were able to elucidate the kinematics and hydrodynamics and fluke deformation of these swimmers to clarify the effectiveness of prostheses in helping the dolphins regain their swimming ability. Associated with the performance, we identified distinct features in the wake structures that can explain this gap in the performance compared to a healthy dolphin. This work was supported by ONR MURI Grant Number N00014-14-1-0533.

  3. Simulation of a sensor array for multiparameter measurements at the prosthetic limb interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Gabriel I.; Mamishev, Alexander V.

    2004-07-01

    Sensitive skin is a highly desired device for biomechanical devices, wearable computing, human-computer interfaces, exoskeletons, and, most pertinent to this paper, for lower limb prosthetics. The measurement of shear stress is very important because shear effects are key factors in developing surface abrasions and pressure sores in paraplegics and users of prosthetic/orthotic devices. A single element of a sensitive skin is simulated and characterized in this paper. Conventional tactile sensors are designed for measurement of the normal stress only, which is inadequate for comprehensive assessment of surface contact conditions. The sensitive skin discussed here is a flexible array capable of sensing shear and normal forces, as well as humidity and temperature on each element.

  4. The effect of denture design and fixatives on the retention of mandibular complete dentures tested on a novel in-vitro edentulous model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A; Al-Kaisy, N; Miller, C A; Martin, N

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the design (extension and adaptation) of a mandibular complete acrylic denture and the use of denture adhesives using a novel in-vitro edentulous model. The model is a highly anatomically accurate replica based on a moderately resorbed human mandibular edentulous arch. The model has been designed and fabricated by means of an elaborate clinical and technical process that employs synthetic elastomeric materials with properties that attempts to reproduce in-vitro characteristics of the soft tissues overlying the ridges and immediate reflected tissues. This model was used to measure and compare the retention of mandibular dentures ofvarying designs (well-fitting, over- and under-extended) with and without the aid of denture fixatives. Retention tests were conducted with different volumes of artificial saliva at a cross head speed of 50 mm/min with 4 equidistant holding points on the denture occlusal surface, using a universal tensile testing machine in an axial pull direction. The effect of three denture adhesives on denture retention was also tested on the same denture types at different times over a period of 5 hours and beyond. The in-vitro model presented can be effectively used to test the retention of mandibular complete dentures. The speed of dislodgement force and amount of saliva are important variables in mandibular denture retention. The retention of well-fitting dentures was statistically higher than that of ill-fitting dentures. A significantly higher retention force was needed to dislodge mandibular dentures (well and ill-fitting dentures) when using a denture adhesive.

  5. A comparative mechanical and bone remodelling study of all-ceramic posterior inlay and onlay fixed partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Clarice; Li, Qing; Li, Wei; Thompson, Mark; Swain, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Comparative studies of bone remodelling and mechanical stresses between inlay and onlay fixed partial dentures (FPD) are rather limited. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the biological consequence in posterior mandibular bone and the mechanical responses in these two different prosthetic configurations. Three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis (FEA) models are created to explore the mechanical responses for the inlay and onlay preparations within the same oral environment. Strain induced bone remodelling was simulated under mastication. The remodelling adopted herein relates the strain in the bone to the change of Hounsfield Unit (HU) value in proportion to the surface area density (SAD) of bony morphology, which allows directly correlating to clinical computerised tomography (CT) data. The results show that both FPD designs exhibit a similar resultant change in bone mineral density (BMD) though the onlay configuration leads to a more uniform distribution of bone density. The inlay design results in higher mechanical stresses whilst allowing preservation of healthy tooth structure. This study provides an effective means to further clinical assessment and investigation into biomechanical responses and long-term restorative outcome with different FPD designs. Quantifying in vivo stress distributions associated with inlay/onlay FPDs can further supplement clinical investigations into prosthetic durability, FPD preparation techniques (i.e., taper angles, material development), consequent stress distributions and the ongoing biomechanical responses of mandibular bone. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Self-perceived changes in oral health-related quality of life after receiving different types of conventional prosthetic treatments: a cohort follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, Javier; Castillo-Oyagüe, Raquel; Lynch, Christopher D; Albaladejo, Alberto; Castaño, Antonio

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the changes in oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) reported by subjects treated with conventional prostheses. A consecutive sample of 153 patients seeking prosthodontic rehabilitation was recruited. Socio-demographic and prosthetic-related factors (Eichner Index; number of occlusal, aesthetic, and lost units) were registered. Baseline impacts on OHRQoL were collected using the OHIP-14 questionnaire. One month after treatment, the participants answered whether the prostheses had generated better, equal, or poorer effects within the 14 items of a retrospective scale (Post-OHIP). The study patients were compared with the reference population (P-population; n=123) in terms of OHRQoL. Such P-population consisted of Spanish adults wearing conventional dental prostheses who were not seeking any dental treatment. The reliability and validity of the tests applied and the factor structure of the Post-OHIP were investigated. A Poisson regression model was calculated to predict what items would change favourably after treatment. Four prosthetic cohorts were established according to the types of rehabilitations performed: 1-FDPs: metal-ceramic fixed dental prostheses; 2-M-RPDs: metal-based removable partial dentures; 3-ADs: acrylic partial dentures and 4-CDs: complete dentures. Both tests confirmed adequate psychometric properties. Most items of the Post-OHIP consistently loaded on a single factor. Patients requiring ADs or CDs reported significantly lower baseline OHRQoL than those needing M-RPDs or FDPs. Pain/discomfort was the only hampering issue subsequent to removable rehabilitation. M-RPDs are expected to provide the significantly highest therapeutic improvements. Patients perceived benefits in chewing ability, aesthetics and satisfaction with their mouth after receiving conventional dental prostheses. Conventional prosthetic therapy enhances patients' overall well-being although it can cause discomfort and chewing dysfunction in more than 20% of

  7. New electromagnetic methods for the evaluation of prosthetic heart valves (invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udpa, Satish

    2002-05-01

    Prosthetic devices are being implanted at record levels as the nation "ages" and advances in prosthetic science are made. Devices that are implanted range from artificial limbs and hips to devices such as heart valves. Periodic evaluation of the state of the devices is of significant interest particularly in the case of prosthetics whose failure can be fatal. An example of such a device is the artificial heart valve. Heart valves are usually replaced when stenosis or incompetence is indicated. This article presents a selection of some new techniques that are being developed for the detection of outlet strut failures in Bjork-Shiley heart valves. Methods that show particular promise include a noninvasive electromagnetic method that relies on the excitation and measurement of the resonant vibration modes of the strut. An alternate approach involves the induction of currents in the outlet strut using a pair of external excitation coils. The field generated by the current induced in the strut perturbs the field generated by the excitation coils. The field perturbations are measured using a catheter-mounted gradiometer. Test results obtained using an experimental rig designed to demonstrate the proof-of-concept are presented.

  8. Effects of different denture cleaning methods to remove Candida albicans from acrylic resin denture based material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huey-Er Lee

    2011-12-01

    Conclusion: Compared to other methods, brushing, soaking in a commercial cleansing tablet solution, or a combination of both methods can significantly reduce the adherence of C albicans to denture samples. Compared to soaking in distilled water, soaking in a commercial mouthwash solution or irradiation with UV-light had more significant cleaning effects, but these methods were not as effective as the aforementioned three methods.

  9. Peer Review and Quality Assessment in Complete Denture Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novetsky, Marvin; Razzoog, Michael E.

    1981-01-01

    A program in peer review and quality assessment at the University of Michigan denture department is described. The program exposes students to peer review in order to assess the quality of their treatment. (Author/MLW)

  10. Use of Amorolfine in Candida- associated Denture Stomatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Sunil

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Denture stomatitis (DS is an inflammatory lesion, in which there is redness of theoral mucosa underneath a removable denture. Although Candida albicans is a component ofnormal microbial flora, local and systemic factors can cause opportunistic infections. Poorlyfitting or unhygienic dentures leads to the presence of yeasts attached to it., and causeinflammation. Treatment procedures include correction of ill-fitting dentures, plaquecontrol, and topical and systemic antifungal therapy. Nystatin and Amphoteresin B are usedtopically as suspension. Since candidiasis is highly resistant to antifungal agents, systemicusage of ketoconazole, fluconazole or itraconazole are necessary. But the systemic use ofthese drugs can cause side effects like liver toxicity, drug interactions etc. Lucio; Lorengoetal had conducted a study of the efficacy of amorolfine antifungal varnish, by localapplication, and found that it suppresses the nystatin resistant Candida associated denturestomatitis.

  11. The various methods and benefits of denture labeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Datta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Labeled dentures can be important in identifying the owners in case of an accident, loss of memory, states of unconsciousness, being inadvertently misplaced on admission to a hospital or, in identifying the bodies of those who have died in a calamity. Positive identification through labeled dentures plays a key role in forensic scenario. Marking dentures has been considered as an important part of forensic dentistry, although no standardized method is followed. A number of labeling systems are available and can be broadly separated into either surface marking methods or inclusion systems. Each of the commonly described techniques is assessed with respect to their strengths and weaknesses. The more contemporary methods, though hi-tech, are expensive and may not be suitable for all dental practitioners to use. This article reviews the strengths and weaknesses of various methods involved in labeling dentures concluding by recommending that this valuable topic be included in the dental curriculum in India.

  12. Rotational path removable partial denture: an esthetic alternative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byron, Raymond; Frazer, Robert Q; Herren, Michael C

    2007-01-01

    Missing teeth can be replaced using any of a number of methods. Patients may choose to replace missing teeth with a prosthesis that is either removable, fixed, or retained with implants. When it is necessary to replace anterior or posterior teeth, a properly designed and fabricated rotational path removable partial denture can be both successful and esthetically pleasing to the patient. However, while a patient's functional and esthetic needs can be met successfully, rotational path removable partial dentures can be more demanding for the laboratory technician to fabricate and for the dentist to seat in the mouth. Rotational path removable partial dentures frequently are overlooked as a viable means of treating missing teeth. This article reviews the principles of rotational path removable partial dentures, as well as their categories, advantages, and disadvantages, in the hope that more dentists will consider them when the need arises.

  13. Development and measurement properties of the Orthotics and Prosthetics Users' Survey (OPUS): a comprehensive set of clinical outcome instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, A W; Bode, R K; O'Reilly, C

    2003-12-01

    The need to measure and evaluate orthotics and prosthetics (O&P) practice has received growing recognition in the past several years. Reliable and valid self-report instruments are needed that can help facilities evaluate patient outcomes. The objective of this project was to develop a set of self-report instruments that assess functional status, quality of life, and satisfaction with devices and services that can be used in an orthotics and prosthetics clinic. Selecting items from a variety of existing instruments, the authors developed and revised four instruments that differentiate patients with varying levels of lower limb function, quality of life, and satisfaction with devices and services. Evidence of construct validity is provided by hierarchies of item difficulty that are consistent with clinical experience. For example, with the lower limb function instrument, running one block was much more difficult than walking indoors. The instruments demonstrate adequate internal consistency (0.88 for lower limb function, 0.88 for quality of life, 0.74 for service satisfaction, 0.78 for device satisfaction). The next steps in their research programme are to evaluate sensitivity and construct validity. The Orthotics and Prosthetics Users' Survey (OPUS) is a promising self-report instrument which may, with further development, allow orthotic and prosthetic practitioners to evaluate the quality and effectiveness of their services as required by accreditation standards such as those of the American Board for Certification in Orthotics and Prosthetics that mandate quality assessment.

  14. Dynamic Facial Prosthetics for Sufferers of Facial Paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fergal Coulter

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThis paper discusses the various methods and the materialsfor the fabrication of active artificial facial muscles. Theprimary use for these will be the reanimation of paralysedor atrophied muscles in sufferers of non-recoverableunilateral facial paralysis.MethodThe prosthetic solution described in this paper is based onsensing muscle motion of the contralateral healthy musclesand replicating that motion across a patient’s paralysed sideof the face, via solid state and thin film actuators. Thedevelopment of this facial prosthetic device focused onrecreating a varying intensity smile, with emphasis ontiming, displacement and the appearance of the wrinklesand folds that commonly appear around the nose and eyesduring the expression.An animatronic face was constructed with actuations beingmade to a silicone representation musculature, usingmultiple shape-memory alloy cascades. Alongside theartificial muscle physical prototype, a facial expressionrecognition software system was constructed. This formsthe basis of an automated calibration and reconfigurationsystem for the artificial muscles following implantation, soas to suit the implantee’s unique physiognomy.ResultsAn animatronic model face with silicone musculature wasdesigned and built to evaluate the performance of ShapeMemory Alloy artificial muscles, their power controlcircuitry and software control systems. A dual facial motionsensing system was designed to allow real time control overmodel – a piezoresistive flex sensor to measure physicalmotion, and a computer vision system to evaluate real toartificial muscle performance.Analysis of various facial expressions in real subjects wasmade, which give useful data upon which to base thesystems parameter limits.ConclusionThe system performed well, and the various strengths andshortcomings of the materials and methods are reviewedand considered for the next research phase, when newpolymer based artificial muscles are constructed

  15. A Mobile Motion Analysis System Using Intertial Sensors for Analysis of Lower Limb Prosthetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, John Kyle P [ORNL; Ericson, Milton Nance [ORNL; Farquhar, Ethan [ORNL; Lind, Randall F [ORNL; Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Soldiers returning from the global war on terror requiring lower leg prosthetics generally have different concerns and requirements than the typical lower leg amputee. These subjects are usually young, wish to remain active and often desire to return to active military duty. As such, they demand higher performance from their prosthetics, but are at risk for chronic injury and joint conditions in their unaffected limb. Motion analysis is a valuable tool in assessing the performance of new and existing prosthetic technologies as well as the methods in fitting these devices to both maximize performance and minimize risk of injury for the individual soldier. We are developing a mobile, low-cost motion analysis system using inertial measurement units (IMUs) and two custom force sensors that detect ground reaction forces and moments on both the unaffected limb and prosthesis. IMUs were tested on a robot programmed to simulate human gait motion. An algorithm which uses a kinematic model of the robot and an extended Kalman filter (EKF) was used to convert the rates and accelerations from the gyro and accelerometer into joint angles. Compared to encoder data from the robot, which was considered the ground truth in this experiment, the inertial measurement system had a RMSE of <1.0 degree. Collecting kinematic and kinetic data without the restrictions and expense of a motion analysis lab could help researchers, designers and prosthetists advance prosthesis technology and customize devices for individuals. Ultimately, these improvements will result in better prosthetic performance for the military population.

  16. A geometrical optimization of a magneto-rheological rotary brake in a prosthetic knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsson, K. H.; Jonsdottir, F.; Thorsteinsson, F.

    2010-03-01

    Magneto-rheological (MR) fluids have been successfully introduced to prosthetic devices. One such device is a biomechanical prosthetic knee that uses MR fluids to actively control its rotary stiffness. The brake is rotational, utilizing the MR fluid in shear mode. In this study, the geometrical design of the MR brake is addressed. This includes the design of the magnetic circuit and the geometry of the fluid chamber. Mathematical models are presented that describe the rotary torque of the brake. A novel perfluorinated polyether (PFPE)-based MR fluid is introduced, whose properties are tailored for the prosthetic knee. On-state and off-state rheological measurements of the MR fluid are presented. The finite element method is used to evaluate the magnetic flux density in the MR fluid. The design is formulated as an optimization problem, aiming to maximize the braking torque. A parametric study is carried out for several design parameters. Subsequently, a multi-objective optimization problem is defined that considers three design objectives: the field-induced braking torque, the off-state rotary stiffness and the weight of the brake. Trade-offs between the three design objectives are investigated which provides a basis for informed design decisions on furthering the success of the MR prosthetic knee.

  17. Denture identification using unique identification authority of India barcode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhindra Mahoorkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the years, various denture marking systems have been reported in the literature for personal identification. They have been broadly divided into surface marking and inclusion methods. In this technique, patient′s unique identification number and barcode printed in the patient′s Aadhaar card issued by Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI are used as denture markers. This article describes a simple, quick, and economical method for identification of individual.

  18. Removable partial denture with a lateral rotational path of insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharav, H; Ben-Ur, Z; Laufer, B Z; Cardash, H S

    1995-08-01

    A removable partial denture with a lateral path of insertion is useful when unsightly facial clasps are objectional to the patient. Rounded rest seat preparations allow extensions of the minor connector to rotate laterally into embrasure undercuts, providing retention. Guiding planes on the contralateral side ensure a different path of withdrawal from the retentive elements. A Kennedy Class IV arch with a long edentulous span is used to illustrate the denture design.

  19. Adaptive prosthetics for the lower extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, K

    2001-06-01

    The potential for lifestyle recovery is tremendous for most lower extremity amputees. The amazing and ever-expanding array of adaptive prosthetics can help make the devastating loss of amputation more bearable for patients, their families, and their health care team. The new amputee, in a state of shock and grief, does not know what his or her prosthetic options are. It is crucial that the surgeon is knowledgeable about what the patient can have and what the patient needs to ask for. Dana Bowman stated: Ideally, the new amputee should say to their doctor, "I'd like my leg to be lightweight, flexible, durable, comfortable. I want to do sports or I want to ride bikes with my kids." Whatever it is they like to do. I was told I would never be able to wear two dynamic feet and that my sky diving days were over. I said, "Well how do you know? Can't I try?" It took years to find out what I could have and then to find people to help me get it. The prosthetic prescription the physician writes is the patient's gateway to the kind of prosthetics that will enable him or her to pursue the activities of their life. Often, new amputees end up with the bare minimum prosthesis, which can cause problems with comfort and mobility. A poorly designed or badly fitting prosthesis is as disabling as the actual amputation. When the surgeon can help the amputee and his or her family understand what kind of prosthetic choices are available, it establishes an optimistic outlook that is highly beneficial to the entire recovery process physically and mentally. "When I lost my leg, if someone would have told me that I could at least try to run again, that would have meant a lot," said Brian Frasure. "Getting that positive mental attitude is every bit as important as having good medical and prosthetic care." By asking probing questions about the patient's preamputation lifestyle and postamputation goals, the physician can write a prescription for truly adaptive prosthetics. The surgeon should

  20. Survival analysis of mandibular complete dentures with acrylic-based resilient liners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto, Suguru; Kimoto, Katsuhiko; Murakami, Hiroshi; Gunji, Atsuko; Ito, Nana; Kawai, Yasuhiko

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this long-term randomised controlled trial was to compare the longevity of dentures constructed using a conventional acrylic resin (CAR) to that of dentures constructed using an acrylic-based resilient liner (ARL). The follow-up study was essentially carried out by annual telephone calls to each of the 67 participants. The Kaplan-Meier method and life-table analysis were used for univariate analyses. The Cox proportional-hazards test was used as a final model for statistically adjusting predictor variables such as sex, clinician type, mandibular denture type and age at denture delivery. The denture type was likely to affect the survival time of the dentures, while the sex and clinician type were not. The group using acrylic-based resilient denture liners had twice the risk of having shorter denture-survival times than those using conventional acrylic resin dentures. Younger participants were likely to have a reduced risk of having shorter denture-survival times than older participants. We conclude that mandibular complete dentures constructed using ARL are twice as likely as dentures constructed using CAR to have shorter denture survival times, mainly because of material deterioration. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. A Study of Factors Contributing to Denture Stomatitis in a North Indian Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Vinayak Naik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Factors like oral and denture hygiene, presence of saliva, age of the denture, and degree of colonization with Candida albicans are to be evaluated as local contributing factors for causing denture stomatitis. 100 patients aged 30 to 70 years were selected for the study. Among these, 70 patients were labeled test group showing signs of stomatitis and 30 patients as control group as they showed no inflammatory signs. Clinical tests included oral and denture hygiene evaluation, salivary measurements, and age of the dentures, and microscopic investigations were done. Results showed no significant differences between the two groups in terms of saliva, oral and denture hygiene habits, and denture age. Test group showed stomatitis in patients who were wearing dentures for 5 to 10 years compared to control group who were wearing dentures for 10 years and above. Denture age was proportional to Candida colonization and not to degree of inflammation. Significant differences were found in Candida colonization of the fitting surface of the denture between stomatitis and control groups. Poor denture hygiene habits are the most prominent contributing factor for denture stomatitis and colonization.

  2. Fracture resistance of three-unit zirconia fixed partial denture with modified framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partiyan, Arthur; Osman, Essam; Rayyan, Mohammad M; Aboushelib, Moustafa; Ibrahim, Ahmed; Jimbo, Ryo

    2017-01-01

    Obtaining ideal prosthetic framework design is at times hindered by anatomical limitations in the posterior region that might increase the risk for zirconia restoration fracture. Modification such as increasing the bulk thickness especially in the connector region could result in strengthening the zirconia framework. Three-unit zirconia fixed partial dentures replacing mandibular molars were fabricated using the following two techniques: CAD/CAM technology and manual copy milling. Modified framework with unveneered full thickness connectors were designed and fabricated with the aforementioned methods. Conventional frameworks (0.5 mm thick with rounded 3 mm connectors) served as control (N = 20). After cementation on epoxy dies, the frameworks were loaded to fracture in a universal testing machine. Fractured surfaces were prepared for examination using scanning electron microscopy. Statistical analysis revealed significant differences in fracture resistance between conventional and modified framework design for both fabrication techniques tested. SEM examination indicated that critical crack originated at the tensile surface of the connectors for conventional frameworks. The critical crack for modified frameworks occurred on the axial wall of the abutments. The modification of the zirconia framework design presented significant improvement of the fracture resistance compared to the conventional design.

  3. Comparison of satisfaction with current prosthetic care in veterans and servicemembers from Vietnam and OIF/OEF conflicts with major traumatic limb loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berke, Gary M; Fergason, John; Milani, John R; Hattingh, John; McDowell, Martin; Nguyen, Viet; Reiber, Gayle E

    2010-01-01

    Prosthetic care is a vital aspect of healthcare and rehabilitation for veterans and servicemembers with major traumatic limb loss. Our survey queried 581 veterans and servicemembers with limb loss from the Vietnam and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF)/Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) conflicts. Among survey participants, 78.2% from the Vietnam conflict and 90.5% from the OIF/OEF conflict currently use prosthetic devices. In Vietnam respondents, 78% received prosthetic care from private sources, 16% from Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) prosthetic laboratories, 0.9% from Department of Defense (DOD), and 5% from multiple sources. In OIF/OEF respondents, 42% received prosthetic care from private sources, 9% percent from VA, 39% from DOD, and 10% from multiple sources. Participants identified their satisfaction with current prosthetic devices and prosthetic services. Reports of pain, sweating, skin irritation, and problems with socket fit continue to be significant issues for participants from both conflicts regardless of level of amputation or site of service. In those with upper-limb loss who used myoelectric prostheses, minimal effect on prosthesis use and satisfaction was noted. Among lower-limb loss participants from both conflicts, notable differences existed in prosthesis satisfaction by source of care.

  4. Comparison of satisfaction with current prosthetic care in veterans and servicemembers from Vietnam and OIF/OEF conflicts with major traumatic limb loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary M. Berke, MS, CP, FAAOP

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Prosthetic care is a vital aspect of healthcare and rehabilitation for veterans and servicemembers with major traumaticlimb loss. Our survey queried 581 veterans and servicememberswith limb loss from the Vietnam and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF/Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF conflicts. Among survey participants, 78.2% from the Vietnam conflict and 90.5% from the OIF/OEF conflict currently use prosthetic devices. In Vietnam respondents, 78% received prosthetic care from private sources, 16% from Department of Veterans Affairs (VA prosthetic laboratories, 0.9% from Department of Defense (DOD, and 5% from multiple sources. In OIF/OEF respondents,42% received prosthetic care from private sources, 9% percent from VA, 39% from DOD, and 10% from multiple sources. Participants identified their satisfaction with current prosthetic devices and prosthetic services. Reports of pain, sweating, skin irritation, and problems with socket fit continue to be significant issues for participants from both conflicts regardless of level of amputation or site of service. In those with upper-limb loss who used myoelectric prostheses, minimal effect on prosthesis use and satisfaction was noted. Among lower-limb loss participants from both conflicts, notable differencesexisted in prosthesis satisfaction by source of care.

  5. [Prosthetic rehabilitation in patient with forced class III malocclusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krunić, N; Kostić, M; Janośević, P; Petrović, D; Kostić, I; Petrović, M; Igić, M

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents clinical case of 63 years old edentulous patient with slight class III malocclusion. For 15 years he was using inadequately fabricated dentures causing forced severe class III malocclusion. Forced progeny was corrected by newly fabricated dentures which restored normal orofacial function and facial harmony.

  6. A 5-year follow-up study on the prosthetic rehabilitation of the elderly in Helsinki, Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevalainen, M J; Närhi, T O; Ainamo, A

    2004-07-01

    In 1990, 364 elderly (76-86 years) inhabitants of Helsinki, Finland, attended a dental and oral examination study that was conducted as part of the Helsinki Aging Study. In spring 1996, these subjects were recalled for a 5-year follow-up. Between the baseline and follow-up examinations, 114 (31%) subjects had deceased (86 women and 28 men), whereas 134 had either moved, were too ill, or refused to participate in the follow-up. Follow-up examination was conducted for 113 subjects (79 women and 34 men), with the participating rate being 46%. Five subjects became edentulous during the follow-up. Of the subjects, 61% had 1-32 teeth at follow-up. In these subjects, the mean number of teeth decreased from 14.9 (+/-8.3) to 13.5 (+/-8.6) (P Prosthetic status changed in 40% of the elderly dentate people: 25% received new prostheses whereas 15% lost prostheses that were not replaced. New fixed partial dentures were made in five maxillae and in nine mandibles during the follow-up. Acrylic removable partial dentures (ARPD) were most frequently used: 35% of dentate subjects had an ARPD. Subjects with removable prostheses had higher levels of salivary microbes and higher root caries incidence than those with natural teeth. Furthermore, the presence of removable prostheses at baseline, together with the male gender, was clearly associated with tooth loss during follow-up. This study indicates that fixed rather than removable prostheses should be used in elderly patients. The need for a removable denture ought to be carefully considered.

  7. Oral health-related quality of life and prosthetic status of nursing home residents with or without dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klotz AL

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Anna-Luisa Klotz,1 Alexander Jochen Hassel,1 Johannes Schröder,2,3 Peter Rammelsberg,1 Andreas Zenthöfer1 1Department of Prosthodontics, Dental School, 2Institute of Gerontology, 3Section of Geriatric Psychiatry, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany Purpose: The objective of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the effect of prosthetic status on the oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL of nursing home residents with or without dementia.Methods: The study was performed in 14 nursing homes across the federal state of Baden-Württemberg, Germany. All eligible participants were included, and general and medical information and information about their dental and prosthetic statuses were collected. The Geriatric Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI was administered to evaluate OHRQoL. The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE served to classify participants into living or not living with dementia according to the established cutoff value for dementia (MMSE <24. Parametric bivariate statistics and logistic regression models were used to analyze data at P<0.05.Results: A total of 169 participants were included in this study. The mean age of the participants was 82.9 years. A total of some 70% of the sample was living with dementia. The mean GOHAI score along the sample was 49.1 (8.3, and 41% of the sample reported substantially compromised OHRQoL (GOHAI <50. OHRQoL was statistically similar for people with or without dementia (P=0.234; objective oral health was also similar in both groups (P>0.05. The number of teeth (odds ratio [OR]: 2.0, the type of prosthetic status (OR: 6.5, and denture-related treatment needs (OR: 2.4 were the major factors significantly affecting OHRQoL (P<0.05.Conclusion: The OHRQoL of elderly nursing home residents is substantially compromised. Several prosthetic treatment needs for residents living with or without dementia were identified. Edentulism without tooth replacement and having <5 teeth resulted

  8. Raoultella ornithinolytica: An unusual pathogen for prosthetic joint infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, Piseth; Theron, Françoise; Honnorat, Estelle; Prost, Didier; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Stein, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    We herein report the first case of a prosthetic joint infection caused by Raoultella ornithinolytica in an immunocompetent patient. The clinical outcome was favorable after a two-stage prosthetic exchange and a six-month course of antimicrobial therapy.

  9. Adaptive sports technology and biomechanics: prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luigi, Arthur Jason; Cooper, Rory A

    2014-08-01

    With the technologic advances in medicine and an emphasis on maintaining physical fitness, the population of athletes with impairments is growing. It is incumbent upon health care practitioners to make every effort to inform these individuals of growing and diverse opportunities and to encourage safe exercise and athletic participation through counseling and education. Given the opportunities for participation in sports for persons with a limb deficiency, the demand for new, innovative prosthetic designs is challenging the clinical and technical expertise of the physician and prosthetist. When generating a prosthetic prescription, physicians and prosthetists should consider the needs and preferences of the athlete with limb deficiency, as well as the functional demands of the chosen sporting activity. The intent of this article is to provide information regarding the current advancements in the adaptive sports technology and biomechanics in the field of prosthetics, and to assist clinicians and their patients in facilitating participation in sporting activities.

  10. Changes in lower extremity prosthetic practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trower, Ted A

    2006-02-01

    In recent years, much attention has been given to the revolution in new materials for prosthetics and the components that they have made possible. The average weight of a delivered prosthesis has decreased, currently available components offer improved function and superior symmetry of gait, and limb interfaces provide superior skin protection and comfort. The focus on the features of these components sometimes has led to neglect of the basic elements of prosthetic design--the fit and the alignment. If the fit and alignment are on the mark, an amputee can function at remarkably high levels with rudimentary components. This article discusses the basics of lower extremity prosthetic practice and addresses challenges for the future.

  11. The effect of denture stability on bite force and muscular effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caloss, R; Al-Arab, M; Finn, R A; Throckmorton, G S

    2011-06-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that denture instability limits the amount of voluntary muscular effort generated by denture wearers. Seventeen edentulous subjects (seven men, 10 women; mean age 60·3 ± 13·0 years) with newly acquired implant-retained mandibular overdentures and a conventional maxillary denture participated. Maximum bite forces and corresponding electromyographic (EMG) activity from the temporalis and masseter muscles (bilaterally) were recorded under two experimental conditions: (i) Unilateral premolar and molar bites without additional support, and (ii) premolar and molar bites with bite block support on the opposite side. In addition, EMG values alone were recorded during maximum clenching without any transducer between the upper and lower dentures. The level of muscular effort was significantly higher with greater denture support. These results indicate that denture instability probably prevents denture wearers from using the full potential of their jaw muscles, especially during unilateral biting and chewing, even with two implants supporting the mandibular dentures.

  12. Reestablishment of Occlusal Vertical Dimension in Complete Denture Wearing in Two Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Omar Mendoza Marin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The assessment and reestablishment of the occlusal vertical dimension (OVD are considered important factors in the treatment of complete denture wearers. The long-time use of a complete denture can result in jaw displacement due to abrasion of the artificial teeth and residual ridge resorption, causing esthetic complications. Most patients with old dentures and incorrect OVD accept reestablishment of the OVD with new complete dentures, even if they were used to their old dentures. The present clinical report describes a method of gradual reestablishment of OVD using a diagnostic acrylic splint on artificial teeth in old complete dentures before the manufacture of new complete dentures. Clinical Significance. The use of a reversible treatment for reestablishment of the OVD in old complete dentures with a diagnostic occlusal acrylic splint allows for the reestablishment of the intermaxillary relationship, providing physiological conditions of masticatory performance associated with the recovery of facial esthetics in edentulous patients.

  13. Elastic modulus and flexural strength comparisons of high-impact and traditional denture base acrylic resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nour M. Ajaj-ALKordy

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that the high-impact acrylic resin is a suitable denture base material for patients with clinical fracture of the acrylic denture.

  14. Reestablishment of Occlusal Vertical Dimension in Complete Denture Wearing in Two Stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Danny Omar Mendoza; Leite, Andressa Rosa Perin; de Oliveira Junior, Norberto Martins; Compagnoni, Marco Antonio; Pero, Ana Carolina; Arioli Filho, João Neudenir

    2015-01-01

    The assessment and reestablishment of the occlusal vertical dimension (OVD) are considered important factors in the treatment of complete denture wearers. The long-time use of a complete denture can result in jaw displacement due to abrasion of the artificial teeth and residual ridge resorption, causing esthetic complications. Most patients with old dentures and incorrect OVD accept reestablishment of the OVD with new complete dentures, even if they were used to their old dentures. The present clinical report describes a method of gradual reestablishment of OVD using a diagnostic acrylic splint on artificial teeth in old complete dentures before the manufacture of new complete dentures. Clinical Significance. The use of a reversible treatment for reestablishment of the OVD in old complete dentures with a diagnostic occlusal acrylic splint allows for the reestablishment of the intermaxillary relationship, providing physiological conditions of masticatory performance associated with the recovery of facial esthetics in edentulous patients.

  15. Pediatric unilateral below-elbow amputees: retrospective analysis of 34 patients given multiple prosthetic options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, Robin C; Tomhave, Wendy

    2002-01-01

    Thirty-four unilateral below-elbow amputees from the Shriners Hospitals for Children/Twin Cities were retrospectively analyzed in long-term follow-up. All of these patients were provided with a variety of prosthetic options, including a "passive" cosmetic upper extremity device. Most of the patients were also fitted with conventional prostheses using a body-powered voluntary closing terminal device (97%) as well as myoelectric prostheses (82%). These patients were considered consistent prosthetic users by the clinic team. The average follow-up was 14 years, with many of the patients being followed up throughout their entire childhood. All patients were sent questionnaires, and the authors carried out patient interviews and chart review. Final analysis indicated that 15 patients (44%) selected a simple cosmetic "passive hand" as their prosthesis of choice. In long-term follow-up 14 patients (41%) continued as multiple users. Fourteen patients (41%) selected the conventional prosthesis using a voluntary closing terminal device as the prosthesis of choice. Only five patients (15%) selected the myoelectric device as their primary prosthesis. The authors conclude that successful unilateral pediatric amputees may choose multiple prostheses on the basis of function and that frequently the most functional prosthesis selected in the long term is the simplest in design. The authors believe strongly that unilateral pediatric amputees should be offered a variety of prosthetic options to help with normal activities of daily living.

  16. Efficacy of conventional and experimental techniques for denture repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rached, R N; Powers, J M; Del Bel Cury, A A

    2004-11-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of one experimental and three conventional techniques for denture repair. Forty maxillary dentures were constructed in dental stone casts duplicated from an edentulous copper-aluminium maxillary master cast. Two groups of 20 dentures each were prepared with Lucitone 199 (water-bath, 8 h/74 degrees C) or Acron MC (microwave, 3 min/500 W) denture base materials processed in gypsum moulds. The 40 dentures were all separated sagittally in the middle. After that, five dentures of each denture base material were repaired with one of the four following techniques: L (Lucitone 199, water-bath, 8 h/74 degrees C, gypsum mould), A (Acron MC, microwave, 3 min/500 W, gypsum mould), AR (Acron MC/R, autopolymerized, 60 psi/45 degrees C/15 min) and the experimental technique AS (Acron MC, 1 min/500 W + 1 min/0 W + 1 min/500 W, hard silicone mould). The parameters denture accuracy (DA), horizontal (HC) and vertical changes (VC) of the occlusal plane measured the efficacy of the repair techniques. The DA was determined by weighing a film of silicone impression material set in contact to the tissue surface of the denture seated on the metallic master die. For HC, cross-arch measurements were made among reference marks drilled on the teeth 11, 21, 16 and 26. The VC was obtained by calculating the relative differences in height between similar teeth of each semi-arch (pairs 13-23, 14-24, 15-25 e 16-26). For DA, HC and VC, the percentage differences between the percentage means obtained before and after repair were calculated and grouped for comparisons. Analysis of variance (SuperANOVA) and means compared by Tukey-Kramer intervals (0.05) revealed that AR repair had the best percentage difference value for DA [0.5% (P 0.05)]. For HC, there was a statistical difference (P 0.05). Denture accuracy was not affected by the interaction of base material-repair technique; repair with AR technique gave the best adaptation; the interaction of base material

  17. Optimising the prescription of prosthetic technologies (opptec): Outcome measures for evidence based prosthetic practice and use

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryall, Dr Nicola

    2010-01-01

    This study provided a forum for patients and service providers to voice their opinions in what they believe to be the important predictors and outcomes involved in successful rehabilitation following limb loss. To develop a consensus on the most important outcomes and factors to address for both the lower limb and upper limb prosthetic prescription process, the above data relating to lower limb and upper prosthetics were subsequently used in the next phase of the research involving two Delphi surveys of 23 and 53 experts within the lower limb and upper limb amputation and prosthetic field respectively, including users, service providers and researchers.\\r\

  18. The Prosthetic Experience Between Body and Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Morten

    2018-01-01

    for an experience-based analysis of experimental practices operating between body and technology. These practices, which, rather than falling into the category of science fiction or horror cinema as some recent critique from post-human studies would have it, are pointing towards a genealogy of prosthetic experience......In this paper, I argue that a prosthetic aesthetic instigated by experimental art practices operate with and within a ‘second nature’ – in-between science and art. Drawing on theories from Dewey and Edelman and examples from Da Vinci, Brancusi, Man Ray, Dali and Stelarc, I am calling...

  19. Mesofluidic controlled robotic or prosthetic finger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, Randall F; Jansen, John F; Love, Lonnie J

    2013-11-19

    A mesofluidic powered robotic and/or prosthetic finger joint includes a first finger section having at least one mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a first actuator, a second mesofluidic actuator in fluid communication with a second actuator and a second prosthetic finger section pivotally connected to the first finger section by a joint pivot, wherein the first actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger to provide a first mechanical advantage relative to the joint point and wherein the second actuator pivotally cooperates with the second finger section to provide a second mechanical advantage relative to the joint point.

  20. Capability Enhancement and Amputee Care in Operation Iraqi Freedom: The Role of a Rehabilitation and Prosthetics Assistance Team in Reconstruction Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    prosthetic devices were delivered (21% of patients seen) with the remainder of patients either BK (36% Multiple (1%) Bilateral Upper (1% Partial Foot (2% KD...femoral limb loss KO- knee disarticulation Seines- ankle disarticulation P;u1ial Foot - Carpal-in et a carpal amputation Bilateral lower extremity limb loss...prosthetic limb lypi- cally marked the transition in rehabilitation goals to functional outcomes such as using an upper extremity prosthesis to per

  1. IN VITRO WEAR RESISTANCE OF THREE TYPES OF POLYMETHYL METHACRYLATE DENTURE TEETH

    OpenAIRE

    Katia Rodrigues Reis; Gerson Bonfante; Luiz Fernando Pegoraro; Paulo Cesar Rodrigues Conti; Pedro Cesar Garcia de Oliveira; Osvaldo Bazzan Kaizer

    2008-01-01

    The wear resistance of denture teeth is important to the longevity of removable prostheses of edentulous patients. The ability of denture teeth to maintain a stable occlusal relationship over time may be influenced by this property. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the wear resistance of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) denture teeth based on their chemical composition when opposed by a ceramic antagonist. The maxillary canines (n=10) of 3 PMMA denture teeth (Trubyte Biotone, ...

  2. Rotational path of insertion for removable partial dentures with an anterior saddle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Kevin H-K; Fang, Daniel T-S; Smales, Roger J; Newsome, Philip R H; Chow, Tak W

    2003-01-01

    The provision of removable partial dentures remains a viable treatment modality for many partially dentate patients. Replacing missing anterior teeth with a removable partial denture using a rotational path of insertion provides improved retention and appearance. The use of a rotational path of insertion also provides additional retention for a removable partial denture restoring combined anterior and posterior bounded saddles. Two case reports demonstrate the use of the rotational path of insertion for partial denture design.

  3. Comparative roll-over analysis of prosthetic feet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curtze, Carolin; Hof, At L.; van Keeken, Helco G.; Halbertsma, Jan P. K.; Postema, Klaas; Otten, Bert

    2009-01-01

    A prosthetic foot is a key element of a prosthetic leg, literally forming the basis for a stable and efficient amputee gait. We determined the roll-over characteristics of a broad range of prosthetic feet and examined the effect of a variety of shoes on these characteristics. The body weight of a pe

  4. Simplified Complete Denture: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Ye; Sun, Jian

    2017-06-01

    Many procedures are used to construct traditional (T) complete dentures; however, a simplified (S) method requiring fewer steps and less time is available. This systematic review intends to summarize the modeling of simplified methods for complete dentures and evaluate the differences between the T method and S method. With this review, we hope to lay the foundation for proposing a standardized fabrication method for "simplified dentures." The MEDLINE (via PubMed) and EMBASE databases were searched for articles on simplified complete dentures published in English before April 2014. Eleven articles were included. One was about one-step complete dentures, two were about SET (simplified treatment of edentulous patients), and the others were about the normal simplified method, which includes impression, occlusal registration, and try-in. Seven were randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs). The time, cost, patient satisfaction, clinical effects, masticatory performance, masticatory ability, and professional evaluation reported in these studies were compared. We summarized the different techniques of fabricating complete dentures and discussed the RCTs of the normal complete technique. None of the RCTs identified significant differences between the S and T groups in terms of patient ratings for general satisfaction, OHIP-edentulous scale, denture quality, or masticatory ability. At the same time, the T method was significantly more expensive and required more time to complete than the S method. Current scientific evidence suggests that the S method can replace or partly replace the T method. Moreover, specific rules should be devised to restrict the simplified construction, and detailed research should be conducted. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  5. Photoelastic analysis of stresses transmitted by complete dentures lined with hard or soft liners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Izabella P; Consani, Rafael L X; Mesquita, Marcelo F; Nóbilo, Mauro A A

    2015-10-01

    Stresses transmitted on the alveolar bone ridge by lined conventional complete mandibular dentures can decrease the bone absorption level. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the stresses induced on the alveolar bone ridge of lined conventional complete mandibular dentures by using photoelastic analysis. One maxillary and three mandibular conventional dentures were developed for the following treatments: 1 - Unlined denture (control), 2 - Denture lined with resin-based material, and 3 - Denture lined with silicone-based material. The photoelastic analysis took place with the dentures in the position of maximum intercuspation, and the mandibular photoelastic models were axially loaded with 10 kgf (98 N). Unlined denture (control) presented stresses along the model, especially on the anterior and left lateral sides with less stresses on the right side. On the left lateral side, the denture base lined with resin-based material demonstrated similar stresses to that of the control; however, lower stresses occurred in the premolar and retromolar regions. Denture bases lined with silicone-based material showed decreased fringe orders and homogeneous distribution of induced stresses. Both lined dentures exhibited lower stresses when compared to unlined dentures. Silicone-based material provided a more homogeneous distribution of stresses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The relationship between various parameters of complete denture quality and patients' satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfadda, Sara A

    2014-09-01

    Patients' appreciation of their conventional complete dentures might be affected by the quality of the dentures. A random sample of 33 edentulous patients who were rehabilitated by means of conventional complete dentures participated in the study. Three independent investigators who underwent technique calibration evaluated the dentures on the basis of seven clinical criteria by using a validated examination form. The patients filled out a validated denture satisfaction scale. The author used Pearson product-moment correlation and analysis of covariance to identify possible correlations. The study results showed that most patients were between "reasonably satisfied" and "very satisfied" with their dentures. The author found nominally higher satisfaction among those receiving both mandibular and maxillary dentures and significant positive correlations between the overall denture satisfaction score and the stability of the mandibular denture (P = .039) and retention of the mandibular denture (P = .005). In contrast, esthetic lip support and lower lip line, occlusion, and maxillary stability and retention were not correlated with participants' overall satisfaction level (P > .064). The results of this study show that a clinically stable mandibular denture was the most important determinant of patients' satisfaction. The study findings highlight the most important denture quality parameters that can aid clinicians in meeting their patients' expectations.

  7. Electromyographic Evaluation of the Effect of Lined Dentures on Masticatory Muscle Activity in Edentulous Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Shitij; Gaur, Abhishek; Dupare, Arun; Rastogi, Shiksha; Kamatagi, Laxmikant

    2015-01-01

    Aim The purpose of this study was to examine changes in relative electromyographic (EMG) activities of temporal and masseter muscles after relining the dentures with silicone and acrylic-resin based denture liners. Materials and Methods Conventional complete dentures were fabricated for 20 edentulous patients. One month after completing adjustments of the dentures, electromyography of the masseter and temporalis muscle during maximum intercuspation was recorded. The dentures were then relined with a silicone denture liner and after an adaptation period of one month, were again subjected for electromyographic evaluation. Further, the dentures were relined with acrylic denture liner and subjected to electromyographic evaluation. Data was analysed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 15.0. Intergroup comparisons were done using ANOVA followed by post-hoc assessments using Tukey HSD test. Results Mean amplitude and duration with conventional dentures was found to be significantly lower as compared to silicone lined and acrylic lined dentures for all the comparisons. Statistically, no significant difference between silicone lined and acrylic lined dentures was observed for any of the comparisons. Conclusion Within the limitations of this experimental design, it was concluded that relining significantly increases electromyographic activity of the masseter and temporalis muscles. Thus, resulting in an improved biting force, chewing efficiency and masticatory performance. There were no significant differences between silicone and acrylic based denture liners for both electromyographic variables. PMID:26436054

  8. Complete denture wearing and fractures among edentulous patients treated in university clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamiya, Aline S; Monteiro, Douglas R; Marra, Juliê; Compagnoni, Marco A; Barbosa, Debora B

    2012-06-01

    The prevalence of wearing and fracture of complete dentures was evaluated among edentulous patients treated in two dental schools in Brazil. Acceptance and wearing of complete dentures are related to adaptive behaviour of edentulous patients. However, one reason that could interfere with the wearing dentures is their potential to fracture, which is still a common complication in denture rehabilitation practice. Two hundred and twenty-four edentulous patients rehabilitated with complete dentures from 2000 to 2005 in Araçatuba and Araraquara Dental School, University of State of São Paulo, were assessed in 2006 and 2007 to answer a questionnaire about wearing and fracture of their dentures. Statistical analysis were performed using Epi Info software and chi-squared test to compare maxillary and mandibular data (α = 0.05). Almost 26% of the patients did not wear their dentures, and among the remainder, the majority wore the maxillary denture. About 30% of the dentures were fractured, with higher prevalence in the maxillary arch (p = 0.003). Discontinuation of wearing dentures was quite high, especially considering the treatment which was carried out in university clinics. Prevalence of fractures was also high, greater for the maxillary denture, and was one of the main reasons for non-wearing of complete dentures. © 2011 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. Spectrogram Analysis of Complete Dentures with Different Thickness and Palatal Rugae Materials on Speech Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamada Zaki Mahross

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the influence of reproduction of different thickness and palatal rugae materials on complete dentures speech using Computerized Speech Lab (CSL (spectrogram. Materials and Methods. Three completely edentulous male patients (aged 50–60 years were selected for reading a paragraph. Twelve upper dentures were constructed, four for each patient. The patients’ speech groups were divided into five groups, Group I: patients without dentures; Group II: patients rehabilitated with conventional acrylic dentures; Group III: patients with conventional acrylic dentures with rugae reproduction; Group IV: patients with dentures with metallic framework of minimal thickness and direct ragged metallic palatal surface at rugae area; Group V: patients with dentures with palatal rugae constructed from resilient acrylic resin material with thickness less than conventional denture. Speech samples were recorded after insertion of each denture for groups using Computerized Speech Lab (CSL (spectrogram. The sounds selected were lingopalatal /s/z/sh/t/d/ and /l/. Results. Group III produced high mean significant difference with /sh/t/ sound. For Group IV, the difference was noticed with /s/z/sh/t/ and /d/ sounds, while for Group V the difference was shown with /z/l/ sound (P<0.05. Conclusion. It is recommended to reproduce the rugae area in complete denture because the phonetic quality of complete denture with rugae is superior to the conventional denture.

  10. The oral microbiome of denture wearers is influenced by levels of natural dentition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.E. O'Donnell; D. Robertson; C.J. Nile; L.J. Cross; M. Riggio; A. Sherriff; D. Bradshaw; M. Lambert; J. Malcolm; M.J. Buijs; E. Zaura; W. Crielaard; B.W. Brandt; G. Ramage

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The composition of dental plaque has been well defined, whereas currently there is limited understanding of the composition of denture plaque and how it directly influences denture related stomatitis (DS). The aims of this study were to compare the microbiomes of denture wearers, and to u

  11. Effect of denture adhesive on the micro-organisms in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozkan, Yasemin Kulak; Ucankale, Mert; Ozcan, Mutlu; Uner, Nurver

    2012-01-01

    Background: Denture adhesives increase the retention and stability of dentures in edentulous patients, especially in cases where salivary flow is impaired or in the management of traumatised oral mucosa. Objectives: The effect of a denture adhesive on the oral flora at different time intervals. Meth

  12. Removable partial denture use among a selected group of Nigerian undergraduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C C Azodo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the self-reported prevalence of removable partial denture use among a selected group of Nigerian undergraduates. Materials and Methods: Four hundred non-dental undergraduates of University of Benin recruited over four week′s period were studied. Results: The prevalence of removable partial denture use among the respondents was 1.8%. Denture use was more among those aged 17-25 years, females and right handed individuals. Removable partial denture users were less likely to have received professional instruction on tooth brushing and brush their teeth more than once-daily than non-denture users. Removable partial denture users were more likely to be cigarette smokers, regular soft drink consumer and report perceived efficacy in oral self-care and prevention of gingivodental diseases than non-denture users. Removable partial denture users were also more likely to have opened bottled drink with their teeth and experienced shocking sensation from their teeth than non-denture users. Conclusion: The prevalence of removable partial denture use was low among the respondents. The denture wearer were more likely to report higher perceived efficacy in oral self-care and prevention of gingivodental disease despite indulgence in unhealthy oral health practices and lower receipt of professional instruction on tooth brushing. The implication of this study is that dental practitioner should endeavor to give oral health instruction to removable partial denture users to improve their oral health practices and decrease the risk of preventable oral diseases.

  13. Evaluation of Prevalence of Oral Candidiasis in Patients Using Complete Denture Wears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Tavakkol

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Denture stomatotos os a common problem of the denture wears, and its etiology is not clear from the literatures. Some studies show that the aetiology is candida albicans, while other reports point out the other agents including candida albicans. The present study was designed to evaluate the prevalence of oral candidiasis in patients using complete denture with different datas. 50 subjects all wearing complete denture participated in this study. The palatal mucosa was swabbed and swabs were cultured in Sabourauds medium containing 0.005% chloramphenicol then cultures were tested with common mycological lab tests. In 80% of patients oral candidiasis have been diagnosed. In the investigation a direct relation between the oral candidiasis and removal of denture at night, denture cleanliness, presence of any suction and symptoms of denture stomatitis was shown. No relation between the oral candidiasis and sex, smoking habit, succeptible disease, angular cheilitis; the recent condition of denture and the retention of denture were found. The findings of our investigation indicates that candida albicans is the causative agent of denture stomatitis while other factors such as denture cleanliness, removal of denture at night and presence of any suction may be considered as well.

  14. 21 CFR 872.3410 - Ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or carboxymethylcellulose sodium denture adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... carboxymethylcellulose sodium denture adhesive. 872.3410 Section 872.3410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION....3410 Ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or carboxymethylcellulose sodium denture adhesive. (a) Identification. An ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or carboxymethylcellulose sodium denture adhesive is a...

  15. Method of making self-cleaning skin-like prosthetic polymer surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, John T.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Shibata, Jason

    2017-06-06

    An external covering and method of making an external covering for hiding the internal endoskeleton of a mechanical (e.g., prosthetic) device that exhibits skin-like qualities is provided. The external covering generally comprises an internal bulk layer in contact with the endoskeleton of the prosthetic device and an external skin layer disposed about the internal bulk layer. The external skin layer is comprised of a polymer composite with carbon nanotubes embedded therein. The outer surface of the skin layer has multiple cone-shaped projections that provide the external skin layer with superhydrophobicity. The carbon nanotubes are preferably vertically aligned between the inner surface and outer surface of the external skin layer in order to provide the skin layer with the ability to transmit heat. Superhydrophobic powders may optionally be used as part of the polymer composite or applied as a coating to the surface of the skin layer to enhance superhydrophobicity.

  16. 21 CFR 872.3500 - Polyvinylmethylether maleic anhydride (PVM-MA), acid copolymer, and carboxymethylcellulose sodium...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...), acid copolymer, and carboxymethylcellulose sodium (NACMC) denture adhesive. 872.3500 Section 872.3500...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3500 Polyvinylmethylether maleic anhydride (PVM-MA), acid copolymer, and carboxymethylcellulose sodium (NACMC) denture adhesive. (a) Identification...

  17. A structural equation model relating oral condition, denture quality, chewing ability, satisfaction, and oral health-related quality of life in complete denture wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaga, Eijiro; Sato, Yusuke; Minakuchi, Shunsuke

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the relationship between mandibular ridge form, stability and retention of mandibular complete denture, accuracy of jaw relation recording, patients' perception of chewing ability, satisfaction with dentures and oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) in complete denture wearers. A total of 183 edentulous patients, who visited the Dental Hospital of Tokyo Medical and Dental University for new complete dentures, were recruited. Oral examination was performed. Cawood and Howell's method was used to grade the mandibular ridge form. The stability and retention of the mandibular complete denture were assessed using Kapur method. Accuracy of jaw relation recording was evaluated using a newly developed jaw relation index. Patients' perception of chewing ability was rated using a food intake questionnaire. Patients' satisfaction with complete dentures was assessed on a 100-mm visual analogue scale. OHRQoL was measured using the Japanese version of the Oral Health Impact Profile for edentulous subjects. A structural equation model was constructed based on the hypothesis that oral condition and denture quality would be related to chewing ability, satisfaction and OHRQoL. Significant relationships were found between mandibular ridge form, stability of mandibular complete denture, accuracy of jaw relation recording, perceived chewing ability, satisfaction and OHRQoL. Various fit indices were within acceptable limits. Oral condition and denture quality were related to patients' perception of chewing ability, satisfaction with dentures and OHRQoL in complete denture wearers. A favourable oral condition and denture quality are important for successful complete denture therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The agenetic body: prosthetics or the new Promethean ideal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenmeyer, Cristina

    2016-07-04

    In our rapidly changing world, we are often encouraged to treat our bodies as objects of constant improvement by means of various facilities and innovations. As part of this "Promethean tendency," the present-day alliance between medicine and technology has opened up a new perspective on the ill and disabled body, by providing access to sophisticated prosthetics that are increasingly seen as ideal remedies. These devices allow patients to benefit from previously unimaginable treatments and inestimable scientific advances, yet they also create new forms of dependency that go beyond simply forming a habit. They are part of a complex process which results in the construction of a body full of paradoxes and whose effects go beyond the subject's image construction. Based on the case of Mathilde, a little girl with a partial arm agenesis, the author traces some elements of the psychic process of constructing a body: from a congenital malformation towards a body "supplemented" by a prosthesis.

  19. Custom design in lower limb prosthetics for athletic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergason, J R; Boone, D A

    2000-08-01

    In summary, the prosthetist is the best source of information with regard to the fast-changing lower extremity prosthetics technology for sports. The needs and desires of the amputee should be outlined and balanced with the cost of the desired components and design. In many cases, one carefully designed prosthesis can serve in dual roles for everyday ambulation and certain athletic activities. In other cases, the amputee is limited severely by a prosthesis that is not designed for a specific activity. Using a prosthesis for activities that it was not designed to accommodate can cause physical injury to the amputee as well as structural failure of the device. A properly designed and fitted prosthesis can open a whole new world of activity to the amputee and helps him or her to reach the desired a vocational goals.

  20. Minimizing incisional dehiscence following 2-stage prosthetic breast reconstruction in the setting of radiation therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Nahabedian, Maurice Y.

    2013-01-01

    Incisional dehiscence is a potential complication following prosthetic breast reconstruction. This is exacerbated in the setting of previous radiation therapy (RT) at the time of exchange of the tissue expander to a permanent implant. A technical modification is described that has successfully minimized this adverse event. Twenty-nine patients that had tissue expanders and RT underwent exchange of the device through a laterally based incision along the inframammary fold (IMF) rather than thro...

  1. The influence of a hydraulic prosthetic ankle on residual limb loading during sloped walking

    OpenAIRE

    Koehler-McNicholas, Sara R.; Nickel, Eric A.; Medvec, Joseph; Barrons, Kyle; Mion, Spencer; Hansen, Andrew H.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, numerous prosthetic ankle-foot devices have been developed to address the demands of sloped walking for individuals with lower-limb amputation. The goal of this study was to compare the performance of a passive, hydraulic ankle-foot prosthesis to two related, non-hydraulic ankles based on their ability to minimize the socket reaction moments of individuals with transtibial amputation during a range of sloped walking tasks. After a two-week accommodation period, kinematic data...

  2. The traumatic lower extremity amputee: surgical challenges and advances in prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannada, Lisa K; Vaidya, Rahul; Covey, Dana C; Hanna, Kathryn; Dougherty, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The mangled lower extremity is a challenging injury to treat. Orthopaedic surgeons treating patients with these severe injuries must have a clear understanding of contemporary advantages and disadvantages of limb salvage versus amputation. It is helpful to review the acute management of mangled extremity injuries in the civilian and military populations, to be familiar with current postoperative protocols, and to recognize recent advances in prosthetic devices.

  3. Consumer satisfaction in prosthetics and orthotics facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertzen, J.H.B.; Gankema, H.G.J.; Groothoff, J.W.; Dijkstra, P.U.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess consumer/patient satisfaction with the services of the prosthetics and orthotics (P&O) facilities in the north of the Netherlands, using a modified SERVQUAL questionnaire. In this questionnaire, consumer interests and experiences are assessed on a 5-point Likert s

  4. The Prosthetic Experience Between Body and Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Morten

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, I argue that a prosthetic aesthetic instigated by experimental art practices operate with and within a ‘second nature’ – in-between science and art. Drawing on theories from Dewey and Edelman and examples from Da Vinci, Brancusi, Man Ray, Dali and Stelarc, I am calling for an exper...

  5. Multimodality Imaging Assessment of Prosthetic Heart Valves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suchá, D.; Symersky, Petr; Tanis, W; Mali, Willem P Th M; Leiner, Tim; van Herwerden, LA; Budde, Ricardo P J

    2015-01-01

    Echocardiography and fluoroscopy are the main techniques for prosthetic heart valve (PHV) evaluation, but because of specific limitations they may not identify the morphological substrate or the extent of PHV pathology. Cardiac computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have emerg

  6. Proceedings, 1972 Carahan Conference on Electronic Prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, John S., Ed.; DeVore, R. William, Ed.

    Presented are 28 papers given at a 1972 conference on electronic prosthetics for the handicapped. Among the papers are the following titles: "Therapy for Cerebral Palsy Employing Artifician Sense Organs for Alternatives to Proprioceptive Feedback"; "Excessive Neuromuscular Time Delay as a Possible Cause of Poor Hand-Eye Coordination and…

  7. Design and characterization of a biologically inspired quasi-passive prosthetic ankle-foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Luke M; Lai, Cara H; Rouse, Elliott J

    2014-01-01

    By design, commonly worn energy storage and release (ESR) prosthetic feet cannot provide biologically realistic ankle joint torque and angle profiles during walking. Additionally, their anthropomorphic, cantilever architecture causes their mechanical stiffness to decrease throughout the stance phase of walking, opposing the known trend of the biological ankle. In this study, the design of a quasi-passive pneumatic ankle-foot prosthesis is detailed that is able to replicate the biological ankle's torque and angle profiles during walking. The prosthetic ankle is comprised of a pneumatic piston, bending spring and solenoid valve. The mechanical properties of the pneumatic ankle prosthesis are characterized using a materials testing machine and the properties are compared to those from a common, passive ESR prosthetic foot. The characterization spanned a range of ankle equilibrium pressures and testing locations beneath the foot, analogous to the location of center of pressure within the stance phase of walking. The pneumatic ankle prosthesis was shown to provide biologically appropriate trends and magnitudes of torque, angle and stiffness behavior, when compared to the passive ESR prosthetic foot. Future work will focus on the development of a control system for the quasi-passive device and clinical testing of the pneumatic ankle to demonstrate efficacy.

  8. Alveolar ridge rehabilitation to increase full denture retention and stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mefina Kuntjoro

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Atrophic mandibular alveolar ridge generally complicates prostetic restoration expecially full denture. Low residual alveolar ridge and basal seat can cause unstable denture, permanent ulcer, pain, neuralgia, and mastication difficulty. Pre-proshetic surgery is needed to improve denture retention and stability. Augmentation is a major surgery to increase vertical height of the atrophic mandible while vestibuloplasty is aimed to increase the denture bearing area. Purpose: The augmentation and vestibuloplasty was aimed to provide stability and retentive denture atrophic mandibular alveolar ridge. Case: A 65 years old woman patient complained about uncomfortable denture. Clinical evaluate showed flat ridge in the anterior mandible, flabby tissue and candidiasis, while residual ridge height was classified into class IV. Case management: Augmentation using autograph was conducted as the mandible vertical height is less than 15 mm. Autograph was used to achieve better bone quantity and quality. Separated alveolar ridge was conducted from left to right canine region and was elevated 0.5 mm from the previous position to get new ridge in the anterior region. The separated alveolar ridge was fixated by using T-plate and ligature wire. Three months after augmentation fixation appliances was removed vestibuloplasty was performed to increase denture bearing area that can make a stable and retentive denture. Conclusion: Augmentation and vestibuloplasty can improve flat ridge to become prominent.Latar belakang: Ridge mandibula yang atrofi pada umumnya mempersulit pembuatan restorasi prostetik terutama gigi tiruan lengkap (GTL. Residual alveolar ridge dan basal seat yang rendah menyebabkan gigi tiruan menjadi tidak stabil, menimbulkan ulser permanen, nyeri, neuralgia, dan kesulitan mengunyah. Tujuan: Augmentasi dan vestibuloplasti pada ridge mandibula yang atrofi dilakukan untuk menciptakan gigi tiruan yang stabil dan retentive. Kasus: Pasien wanita

  9. A randomised controlled trial of complete denture impression materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, T P; Craddock, H L; Gray, J C; Pavitt, S H; Hulme, C; Godfrey, M; Fernandez, C; Navarro-Coy, N; Dillon, S; Wright, J; Brown, S; Dukanovic, G; Brunton, P A

    2014-08-01

    There is continuing demand for non-implant prosthodontic treatment and yet there is a paucity of high quality Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT) evidence for best practice. The aim of this research was to provide evidence for best practice in prosthodontic impressions by comparing two impression materials in a double-blind, randomised, crossover, controlled, clinical trial. Eighty-five patients were recruited, using published eligibility criteria, to the trial at Leeds Dental Institute, UK. Each patient received two sets of dentures; made using either alginate or silicone impressions. Randomisations determined the order of assessment and order of impressions. The primary outcome was patient blinded preference for unadjusted dentures. Secondary outcomes were patient preference for the adjusted dentures, rating of comfort, stability and chewing efficiency, experience of each impression, and an OHIP-EDENT questionnaire. Seventy-eight (91.8%) patients completed the primary assessment. 53(67.9%) patients preferred dentures made from silicone impressions while 14(17.9%) preferred alginate impressions. 4(5.1%) patients found both dentures equally satisfactory and 7 (9.0%) found both equally unsatisfactory. There was a 50% difference in preference rates (in favour of silicone) (95%CI 32.7-67.3%, pUnilever Hatton Award of the International Assocation for Dental Research, Capetown, South Africa, June 2014. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. A Simplified Technique to Measure Plaque on the Intaglio Surfaces of Complete Dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almas, Khalid; Salameh, Ziad; Kutkut, Ahmad; Al Doubali, Ahmad

    2015-04-01

    The main aim of this study was to develop a simplified quantitative denture plaque index that could help dentists to motivate denture patients to maintain optimal oral hygiene. The secondary aim was to assess specific areas of dentures more prone to accumulate plaque and subjects' oral hygiene habits related to their dentures. One hundred subjects who wore maxillary and/or mandibular complete dentures for at least one year were included in the study as a powered sample. Fifteen females and 85 males, age range 45-75 years, were recruited. The study was carried out at King Saud University (KSU), College of Dentistry. A plaque disclosing solution was used to assess the plaque covered areas of denture. A quantitative percentage (10 x 10%) score index was developed by assessing plaque scores from digital images of intaglio surfaces of the dentures. The weighted kappa method was used to assess inter-examiner agreement in the main study. The new denture plaque index was identified as ASKD-DPI (Almas, Salameh, Kutkut, and Doubali-Denture Plaque Index). It ranged from 0 - 100%, and reflected the percentage of the intaglio surfaces of maxillary and mandibular complete dentures that contained plaque. It also classified quantitative percentages: 30 subjects ranged from 0 - 30% (low DPI), 50 subjects ranged from 31 - 70% (moderate DPI), and 20 subjects ranged from 71 - 100% (high DPI) denture plaque score. A simplified denture plaque index (ASKD-DPI) technique was developed and tested in this study. ASKD-DPI may be used for evaluating denture plaque scores, monitoring denture hygiene, and measuring compliance of patients regarding plaque control for complete dentures.

  11. Effect of ill-fitting dentures on the swallowing duration in patients using polygraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, Annalisa; Cattaneo, Ruggero; Masci, Chiara; Spadaro, Alessandro; Marzo, Giuseppe

    2012-06-01

    Surface electromyography (SEMG) has been widely used in the recent years to study swallowing physiology, offering a valid and reliable tool for identifying normal swallowing. The goal of our study was to assess the contribution of denture fitness in the age-related increase of swallowing duration. Twenty denture wearers and 20 dentate individuals were analysed using SEMG and a computerised kinesiography of mandibular movement. Three spontaneous saliva swallowings were recorded for each patient with both their old and new prostheses. Three spontaneous saliva swallowings were recorded for each dentate person in two different recording sessions. Old prosthesis mean swallowing time was 1.84 (SD ± 0.85) seconds while the new well-fitting prostheses needed a 1.28 (SD ± 0.55) (p = 0.0009) swallowing time. The difference in swallowing time was significant (p = 0.01) between dentate subjects and individuals wearing an old prosthesis. No significant difference was found between dentate subjects and the same prosthesis wearers when a new well-fitting prosthesis was worn. Data presented in this work suggest that part of the increased duration of swallowing showed by elderly and healthy people is because of incorrect an dental prosthesis. Prolongation of swallowing duration in the elderly population could be reconsidered in the light of the quality of dental device worn by the aged population. © 2011 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. The use of radio-frequency identification tags for labeling dentures--scanning properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Raymond; Pretty, Iain A

    2009-05-01

    The inclusion of radio-frequency identification (RFID)-tags within dental prostheses has been suggested as means of effectively labeling such devices and permitting rapid and reliable identification of the wearer. Previous studies have suggested that patients will accept denture labeling and recognize the need for such systems. However, they demand systems that are aesthetic, durable, and secure. One concern over the use of RFID-tags is that they could be scanned by third parties without the patient's knowledge. This study categorizes the scanning patterns of RFID-tags both in vitro and in vivo to provide data for patients for the consent process and for forensic dentists to ensure that they are scanning prostheses optimally. The results demonstrate that the RFID chips can only be read when the interrogator is in close proximity to the denture and thus should alleviate any concerns over privacy issues. However, evidence obtained from both the literature and experiments suggests that authorities must agree upon a unified standard for chip and reader specifications and protocols in order to avoid cases in which RFID-tags may fail to be read by an incompatible reader.

  13. [A new blockout instrument for the construction of rotational path removable partial dentures. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, K C; Chen, P S

    1991-03-01

    This article introduces a new blockout device for rotational path removable partial dentures. The concept of rotation axis is discussed, from which a more convenient tool for clinical use is derived. The blockout instrument can be divided into three parts: the acrylic block, the rotation axis and the functional part. In the case of tilted mandibular molars, distal and lingual surfaces of anterior abutments should be blocked out according to the rotational path of insertion. In the blockout procedures, the blockout instrument is mounted between the two rotation centers on the two distal abutments with dental stone, so as to coincide the rotation axis of the instrument and that of the denture to be constructed. After the areas below the survey line of the anterior abutments are aproned with wax, Duralay resin is applied onto the areas above the survey line, and extended to join the functional parts of the blockout instrument. After setting, Duralay resin is removed and the portion above the survey line is trimmed to form a knife edge which corresponds to the survey line. Thereafter, the blockout areas are determined by the rotation movement of the knife-edge shaped Duralay resin along the rotation axis of the blockout instrument. This blockout method is more easily performed compared to the method mentioned by Firtell and Jacobson. In addition to the function of blockout, it can also be assisted in analyzing undercut and diagnosis.

  14. Study protocol for a multi-center, randomized controlled trial to develop Japanese denture adhesive guidelines for patients with complete dentures: the Denture Adhesive Guideline trial: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto, Suguru; Kawai, Yasuhiko; Gunji, Atsuko; Kondo, Hisatomo; Nomura, Taro; Murakami, Tomohiko; Tsuboi, Akito; Hong, Guang; Minakuchi, Shunsuke; Sato, Yusuke; Ohwada, Gaku; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Kimoto, Katsuhiko; Hoshi, Noriyuki; Saita, Makiko; Yoneyama, Yoshikazu; Sato, Yohei; Morokuma, Masakazu; Okazaki, Joji; Maeda, Takeshi; Nakai, Kenichiro; Ichikawa, Tetsuo; Nagao, Kan; Fujimoto, Keiko; Murata, Hiroshi; Kurogi, Tadafumi; Yoshida, Kazuhiro; Nishimura, Masahiro; Nishi, Yasuhiro; Murakami, Mamoru; Hosoi, Toshio; Hamada, Taizo

    2016-10-18

    Denture adhesives, characterized as medical products in 1935 by the American Dental Association, have been considered useful adjuncts for improving denture retention and stability. However, many dentists in Japan are hesitant to acknowledge denture adhesives in daily practice because of the stereotype that dentures should be inherently stable, without the aid of adhesives. The aim of this study is to verify the efficacy of denture adhesives to establish guidelines for Japanese users. The null hypothesis is that the application of denture adhesives, including the cream and powder types, or a control (isotonic sodium chloride solution) would not produce different outcomes nor would they differentially improve the set outcomes between baseline and day 4 post-application. This ten-center, randomized controlled trial with parallel groups is ongoing. Three hundred edentulous patients with complete dentures will be allocated to three groups (cream-type adhesive, powder-type adhesive, and control groups). The participants will wear their dentures with the denture adhesive for 4 days, including during eight meals (three breakfasts, two lunches, and three dinners). The baseline measurements and final measurements for the denture adhesives will be performed on the first day and after breakfast on the fourth day. The primary outcome is a general satisfaction rating for the denture. The secondary outcomes are denture satisfaction ratings for various denture functions, occlusal bite force, resistance to dislodgement, masticatory performance, perceived chewing ability, and oral health-related quality of life. Between-subjects comparisons among the three groups and within-subjects comparisons of the pre- and post-intervention measurements will be performed. Furthermore, a multiple regression analysis will be performed. The main analyses will be based on the intention-to-treat principle. A sample size of 100 subjects per group, including an assumed dropout rate of 10 %, will be

  15. Comparative Study of Acceptance and Adaptation to New Complete Dentures, Using Two Construction Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalakidis, Savvas N; Anastassiadou, Vassiliki; Sofou, Afrodite; Pissiotis, Argirios L

    2016-10-01

    To validate patients' acceptance and adaptation to new complete dentures, fabricated using two construction protocols. Evaluation was achieved by means of two psychometric questionnaires and registration of total number of sore spots. Twenty complete denture wearers, who sought replacement dentures because of complaints (material degradation or unsatisfactory repaired fracture) associated with them, were selected according to specific inclusion criteria. The denture construction protocols were randomly assigned to the study participants. Ten participants received complete dentures using a duplication construction protocol with a bilateral balanced occlusal (BBO) scheme (duplicate complete denture group); ten participants received complete dentures using a traditional construction protocol with BBO (traditional complete denture group). All study participants completed the Complete Denture Satisfaction and the Oral Health Impact Profile-20 (OHIP-20) questionnaires before they received the new complete dentures (pretreatment) and at 3 and 6 months post-treatment. At the initial adaptation/adjustment visits, the location and number of sore spots were identified. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate differences between groups and within each group pre- and post-treatment. Denture satisfaction and oral health related quality of life scores were independent of the complete denture construction protocol. Within the traditional complete denture group there was a statistically significant increase in denture satisfaction and equivalent decrease (improvement) in OHIP-20 scores between pre- and post-treatment (both at 3-month and 6-month visits). This finding was consistent for OHIP-20 scores within the duplicate complete denture group, but not for denture satisfaction, which was not statistically significant. The total number of recorded sore spots was approximately double for the traditional complete denture group compared to the duplicate complete denture group

  16. Extensive fixed partial dentures on mandibular canine teeth: a 5-year recall study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, B R; Yontchev, E; Carlsson, G E

    1989-01-01

    Twelve patients were followed for 5 years after treatment with a 12-unit cantilever fixed partial denture on the mandibular canines opposed by a complete maxillary denture. Two fixed dentures had to be removed, one because of an abutment tooth root-fracture and one because of rapid marginal bone loss in a terminal stage of leukemia. Caries and periodontal lesions were rare, but other complications, principally related to endodontics, occurred. All complications were amenable to standard treatment procedures. Extensive mandibular cantilever fixed partial dentures may be used in the rehabilitation of patients with a very reduced dentition and a history of difficulties in adapting to removable dentures.

  17. Cyborg beast: a low-cost 3d-printed prosthetic hand for children with upper-limb differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuniga, Jorge; Katsavelis, Dimitrios; Peck, Jean; Stollberg, John; Petrykowski, Marc; Carson, Adam; Fernandez, Cristina

    2015-01-20

    There is an increasing number of children with traumatic and congenital hand amputations or reductions. Children's prosthetic needs are complex due to their small size, constant growth, and psychosocial development. Families' financial resources play a crucial role in the prescription of prostheses for their children, especially when private insurance and public funding are insufficient. Electric-powered (i.e., myoelectric) and body-powered (i.e., mechanical) devices have been developed to accommodate children's needs, but the cost of maintenance and replacement represents an obstacle for many families. Due to the complexity and high cost of these prosthetic hands, they are not accessible to children from low-income, uninsured families or to children from developing countries. Advancements in computer-aided design (CAD) programs, additive manufacturing, and image editing software offer the possibility of designing, printing, and fitting prosthetic hands devices at a distance and at very low cost. The purpose of this preliminary investigation was to describe a low-cost three-dimensional (3D)-printed prosthetic hand for children with upper-limb reductions and to propose a prosthesis fitting methodology that can be performed at a distance. No significant mean differences were found between the anthropometric and range of motion measurements taken directly from the upper limbs of subjects versus those extracted from photographs. The Bland and Altman plots show no major bias and narrow limits of agreements for lengths and widths and small bias and wider limits of agreements for the range of motion measurements. The main finding of the survey was that our prosthetic device may have a significant potential to positively impact quality of life and daily usage, and can be incorporated in several activities at home and in school. This investigation describes a low-cost 3D-printed prosthetic hand for children and proposes a distance fitting procedure. The Cyborg Beast

  18. Enhancing retention of partial dentures using elastomeric retention rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kakkirala Revathi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents an alternative method for the retention of partial dentures that relies on the engagement of tooth undercuts by a lining material. The lab procedures are also presented. A new maxillary and mandibular acrylic partial dentures were fabricated using elastomeric retention technique for a partially dentate patient. A partially dentate man reported difficulty in retaining his upper removable partial denture (RPD. The maxillary RPD was designed utilizing elastomeric retention technique. During follow-up, it was necessary to replace the retention rings due to wear. The replacement of the retention rings, in this case, was done through a chairside reline technique. Elastomeric retention technique provides exceptionally good retention can be indicated to stabilize, cushion, splint periodontally involved teeth, no enough undercut for clasps, eliminate extractions, single or isolated teeth.

  19. Prefabricated light-polymerizing plastic pattern for partial denture framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Takaichi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Our aim is to report an application of a prefabricated light-polymerizing plastic pattern to construction of removable partial denture framework without the use of a refractory cast. A plastic pattern for the lingual bar was adapted on the master cast of a mandibular Kennedy class I partially edentulous patient. The pattern was polymerized in a light chamber. Cobalt-chromium wires were employed to minimize the potential distortion of the plastic framework. The framework was carefully removed from the master cast and invested with phosphate-bonded investment for the subsequent casting procedures. A retentive clasp was constructed using 19-gauge wrought wire and was welded to the framework by means of laser welding machine. An excellent fit of the framework in the patient′s mouth was observed in the try-in and the insertion of the denture. The result suggests that this method minimizes laboratory cost and time for partial denture construction.

  20. POST INSERTION PROBLEMS AND THEIR MANAGEMENT IN COM PLETE DENTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT : Edentulism is considered a poor health outcome and may compromise the quality of life. Although the number of adult losing their natural teeth is diminishing, there are still large numbers of edentulous adults in the population. Man y patients experience difficulties in wearing or using dentures. In some cases they may n ot be prepared to accept the limited efficiency of dentures when compared to natural teet h they replace. Patient satisfaction is critical determinant in the success or failure of c omplete denture therapy. The prosthodontist needs a thorough knowledge of anatomy, physiology, pa thology and psychology to treat these problems. This article is intended to assist practiti oners in the management of those problems that in our experience occur most frequently