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Sample records for denture utilizing preimpregnated

  1. Fracture Resistance of Composite Fixed Partial Dentures Reinforced with Pre-impregnated and Non-impregnated Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Mosharraf

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. The mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced composite fixed partial dentures (FPDs are affected by fiber impregnation. The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the fracture resistance of composite fixed partial dentures reinforced with pre-impregnated and non-impregnated fibers. Materials and methods. Groups (n=5 of three-unit fiber-reinforced composite FPDs (23 mm in length from maxillary second premolar to maxillary second molar were fabricated on two abutments with pontic width of 12 mm. One group was fabricated as the control group with composite (Gradia and the other two groups were fabricated with composite (Gradia reinforced with pre-impregnated fiber (Fibrex ribbon and non-impregnated fiber (Fiber braid, respectively. The specimens were stored in distilled water for one week at 37°C and then tested in a universal testing machine by means of a three-point bending test. Statistical analysis consisted of one-way ANOVA and a post hoc Scheffé’s test for the test groups (α=0.05. Results. Fracture resistance (N differed significantly between the control group and the other two groups (P<0.001, but there were no statistically significant differences between the pre-impregnated and non-impregnated groups (P=0.565. The degree of deflection measured (mm did not differ significantly between the three groups (P=0.397, yet the mean deflection measured in pre-impregnated group was twice as that in the other two groups. Conclusion. Reinforcement of composite with fiber might considerably increase the fracture resistance of FPDs; however, the type of the fiber used resulted in no significant difference in fracture resistance of FPD specimens.

  2. [Study on interface compatibility and fracture resistance of polyglycidyl methacrylate pre-impregnated quartz fiber reinforced polymethyl methacrylate denture base resin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ming-ming; Yan, Xu; Deng, Xu-ling

    2015-02-18

    To explore the reinforcement of polyglycidyl methacrylate (PGMA) pre-impregnated quartz fiber mesh in denture base materials by investigation of interface compatibility and fracture resistance. 1-layer, 2-layer, 3-layer PGMA pre-impregnated quartz fiber meshes, electrolyzed cobalt-chromium alloy mesh and cobalt-chromium alloy mesh conditioned by metal primer were integrated in polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) resin by sandwich embedding method. Block samples of 5 groups were prepared (40 mm×15 mm×2 mm). Fracture resistance was determined in a 3-point bending test at 2 mm/min. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), micrographs were taken from the fractured surfaces to analyze the bonding interface compatibility. The group of 3-layer PGMA pre-impregnated quartz fiber mesh presented the highest elastic modulus of 6 406 MPa and flexural strength of 227 MPa among the five groups, while the 1-layer and 2-layer expressed the similar elastic modulus and flexural strength to the pure PMMA group. The metal groups demonstrated better mechanical properties, while the metal surface conditioner played much better. The metal surface conditioner pre-impregnated cobalt-chromium alloy and PGMA pre-impregnated quartz fiber mesh showed compatible interface with PMMA. The mechanical properties were improved by the increasing of the fiber by adding the more meshed. Although the benign interface did help the compatibility, the quantity of the fibers played an important role in the strength.

  3. Feasibility and Manufacturing Considerations of Hemp Textile Fabric Utilized in Pre-Impregnated Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osusky, Gregory

    This study investigates the fabrication and mechanical properties of semicontinuous, hemp fiber reinforced thermoset composites. This research determines if off-the-shelf refined woven hemp fabric is suitable as composite reinforcement using resin pre-impregnated method. Industrial hemp was chosen for its low cost, low resource input as a crop, supply chain from raw product to refined textile and biodegradability potential. Detail is placed on specimen fabrication considerations. Lab testing of tension and compression is conducted and optimization considerations are examined. The resulting composite is limited in mechanical properties as tested. This research shows it is possible to use woven hemp reinforcement in pre-impregnated processed composites, but optimization in mechanical properties is required to make the process commercially practical outside niche markets.

  4. Influence of educational materials on the hygiene and utilization habits of denture wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferruzzi, Fernanda; Martins, Julio Cesar Leonard Sabczak; Mori, Aline Akemi; Santin, Gabriela Cristina; Kurihara, Eduardo; Sabio, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of educational materials on the denture hygiene and utilization habits of 70 adult volunteers who had been using complete dentures for at least 5 years. On the day they received new dentures, 32 patients were provided with an illustrated leaflet and verbal instructions on oral hygiene and utilization habits, while the remaining 38 participants were advised to continue cleaning and wearing their new dentures as they had their previous dentures. After a 6- to 10-week period, 66 of 70 subjects were interviewed about socioeconomic factors, denture hygiene, and utilization habits. The percentage of patients with a proper denture care routine was low in both groups, suggesting that patients had a tendency not to change old habits. However, statistical analysis showed a positive correlation between receiving instruction and performing denture care in a way that is closer to the recommended method: brushing without toothpaste, using a specific brush; soaking in a sodium hypochlorite solution; and removing the prosthesis at night. Within the limitations of this study, it was concluded that this approach to patient education could be applied to improve the hygiene and utilization habits of denture wearers as well as encourage the correct use of complete dentures.

  5. Glass fibre reinforced acrylic resin complete dentures: a 5-year clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goguţă, Luciana Maria; Bratu, Dorin; Jivănescu, Anca; Erimescu, Raluca; Mărcăuţeanu, Corina

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the study was to establish the wear resistance of the glass fiber reinforced complete dentures comparative to the traditional acrylic complete dentures. Complete new dentures were made to replace old fractured 'un'-reinforced acrylic dentures. The total number of dentures was 30 and woven E-glass fibre reinforcements were used in maxillary complete dentures. Unidirectional E-glass fibre reinforcements were used as partial fibre reinforcements in mandibular complete dentures. Ten complete acrylic un-reinforced dentures were used as control. The follow-up period was 5 years and the recalls were made at 6 months. After 5 years of wearing the new dentures, the control dentures suffered seven fractures. After 5 years all the mandibular reinforced dentures were in good shape. The maxillary complete reinforced dentures suffered four partial fractures. Fracture lines were restricted by the glass fibre net and the patients could still use their dentures. Pre-impregnated E-glass fibre nets and polymer pre-impregnated E-glass unidirectional fibres are useful in reinforcing acrylic resin complete dentures especially were heavy occlusal forces are involved. Glass fibre reinforcement will be applied on the tension side in both cases (total fibre reinforcement and partial fibre reinforcement). The reinforcement cannot replace the necessary linings and occlusal adjustments. © 2011 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. The Evaluation of 3-Dimensional Polymerization Changes of a Denture Resin Utilizing Injection Molding with Water Bath Polymerization and Microwave Polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Dimensional change in complete dentures fabricated by injection molding and microwave processing . J Prosthet Dent, 2003. 89(1): p. 37-44. 21. Phoenix...The Evaluation of 3-Dimensional Polymerization Changes of a Denture Resin Utilizing Injection Molding with Water Bath Polymerization and Microwave...Specification 12 regarding working qualities of cured resins: “The polymer, when processed according to the instructions furnished by the manufacturer

  7. Denture Wearer: Alcaligenes Species

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mrs Musa

    for denture stomatitis include poor denture hygiene, continual and nighttime wearing of removable dentures; accumulation of denture plaque and poor-fitting dentures that can traumatize the oral mucosal. These factors appear to increase the ability of Candida albicans to colonize both the denture and oral mucosal surfaces, ...

  8. Effect of Reinforcement Using Stainless Steel Mesh, Glass Fibers, and Polyethylene on the Impact Strength of Heat Cure Denture Base Resin - An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, H B Mallikarjuna; Shaik, Sharaz; Sachdeva, Harleen; Khare, Sumit; Haralur, Satheesh B; Roopa, K T

    2015-06-01

    The impact strength of denture base resin is of great concern and many approaches have been made to strengthen acrylic resin dentures. The objective of this study was to compare the impact strength of the denture base resin with and without reinforcement and to evaluate the impact strength of denture base resin when reinforced with stainless steel mesh, glass fiber, and polyethylene fibers in the woven form. The specimens (maxillary denture bases) were fabricated using a standard polyvinylsiloxane mold with conventional heat cured polymethyl methacrylate resin. The specimens were divided into four groups (n = 10). Group I specimens or control group were not reinforced. Group II specimens were reinforced with stainless steel mesh and Group III and Group IV specimens were reinforced with three percent by weight of glass fibers and polyethylene fibers in weave form respectively. All the specimens were immersed in water for 1-week before testing. The impact strength was measured with falling weight impact testing machine. One-way analysis of variance and Tukey's post-hoc test were used for statistical analysis. Highest impact strength values were exhibited by the specimens reinforced with polyethylene fibers followed by glass fibers, stainless steel mesh, and control group. Reinforcement of maxillary complete dentures showed a significant increase in impact strength when compared to unreinforced dentures. Polyethylene fibers exhibit better impact strength followed by glass fibers and stainless steel mesh. By using pre-impregnated glass and polyethylene fibers in woven form (prepregs) the impact strength of the denture bases can be increased effectively.

  9. Swallowed dentures: Two cases and a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahir Gachabayov

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Fixed dentures can be accidentally ingested as well as removable dentures. Denture loosening leads to accidental denture ingestion. Patients with denture loosening should be recommended to visit dentist as soon as possible.

  10. Removable dentures with eclipse-repairing and relining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundevska, Jadranka; Panchevska, Sanja; Kovacevska, Gordana

    2014-01-01

    While utilizing removable dentures, regardless of whether the dentures are acrylic or fabricated of eclipse resin, the need for their filling-relining or their repair frequently arises. The purpose of this study is to display the technicalities of the procedure for rebasing and relining of removable light curing eclipse denture resin. This study presents cases of relining and repairing of removable dentures fabricated from light curing ECLIPSE resin on patients at the Department for Removable Prosthodontics at the University Dental Clinic Centre in Skopje. One of the most significant features of this method of fabrication of removable eclipse dentures and their relining and repairing is the shortened duration of work in the dental laboratory. The displayed mode of rebasing also allows us to maintain one of the advantages of this type of dentures--the absence of allergy stomatitis symptoms.

  11. On denture marking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrman, H I; DiZinno, J A; Wasén, J; René, N

    1999-06-01

    During the last decades in Sweden dentures have been permanently marked with a stainless steel metal band incorporated into the acrylic and containing the patient's birth date, a special number, and "S" for Sweden. The last recommendation issued by the National Board of Health and Welfare states that "the patients shall always be offered denture marking and be informed about the benefit thereof. Denture marking is not permitted if the patient refuses it". Requirements for denture markers have been that they should be biologically inert (when incorporated into the denture), not be expensive, be easy to inscribe, be possible to retrieve after an accident, and survive elevated temperatures for a reasonable time under normal circumstances. Although the frequency of edentulousness has decreased in recent years due to the improvement in oral health there remains a need to address the issue of marking of complete dentures, because there is a large variation in the oral status of populations in different countries. Given that only one marked denture can reveal the identity of a deceased person when all other methods fail to do so, makes it worthwhile. Furthermore, denture marking is important in long-term care facilities. We have investigated the issue of denture marking in Europe and in the United States. The results from the European survey show that denture marking is, to our knowledge regulated by law only in Sweden and Iceland. In the US denture marking is so far mandatory in 21 states while New York State requires dentures to be marked if the patient requests it and several other states impose the obligation to mark dentures on long-term care facilities. Since there is no international consensus regarding the issue of denture marking it is important to address it. A survey from the Nordic countries has shown that if denture marking was in general use, the contribution to the establishment of identity by forensic odontology in cases of fire would increase by about 10

  12. The effect of reinforcement with woven E-glass fibers on the impact strength of complete dentures fabricated with high-impact acrylic resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Hun; Watts, David C

    2004-03-01

    The fracture of acrylic maxillary complete dentures occurs frequently during service through heavy occlusal force or accidental damage. The purposes of this study were to measure the impact strength of maxillary complete dentures fabricated with high-impact acrylic resin and to evaluate the effect of woven E-glass fiber-reinforcement on the impact strength of the complete dentures. Preimpregnated woven E-glass fibers (Stick Net) were used to reinforce 10 complete denture bases fabricated with a heat-polymerized high-impact acrylic resin (Lucitone 199). Ten unreinforced complete dentures served as a control group. All specimens were stored in water at 37 degrees C for 2 months before testing. The impact strengths (J) of the dentures were measured with a falling-weight impact test. The impact strengths of both groups were compared by a repeated measures analysis of variance (alpha=.05). The Weibull distribution was also applied to calculate the cumulative fracture probability as a function of impact strength. The mean impact strength of the control dentures was 90.0+/-38.1 J at crack initiation, and 95.9+/-37.7 J at complete fracture, whereas the impact strength of reinforced dentures was 201.7+/-77.9 J and 277.9+/-102.5 J, respectively. Statistical analysis showed that impact strength of the high-impact acrylic complete denture was significantly increased by the addition of woven E-glass fiber (Pdentures fabricated with high-impact acrylic resin increased by a factor greater than 2 when reinforced with woven E-glass fiber.

  13. What Are Dentures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... every tooth in the mouth. Both types of dentures are removable and usually made of metal and acrylic resin (say: uh-KRIH-lik REH-zun), a plastic-like material that is molded to fit the exact shape of a person's mouth. Suction helps hold the dentures in place, so they stick to the surface ...

  14. Denture labeling: A new approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pardeep K Bansal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for denture labeling is important for forensic and social reasons in case patients need to be identified individually. The importance of denture marking has long been acknowledged by the dental profession. Over the years, various denture marking systems have been reported in the literature, but none till date fulfills all the prescribed ADA specifications. A simple, easy, inexpensive procedure for marking accurate identification marks on dentures with a lead foil is described here. The label caring the patient information is incorporated in the acrylic resin during the denture processing.

  15. Successful removable partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Christopher D

    2012-03-01

    Removable partial dentures (RPDs) remain a mainstay of prosthodontic care for partially dentate patients. Appropriately designed, they can restore masticatory efficiency, improve aesthetics and speech, and help secure overall oral health. However, challenges remain in providing such treatments, including maintaining adequate plaque control, achieving adequate retention, and facilitating patient tolerance. The aim of this paper is to review the successful provision of RPDs. Removable partial dentures are a successful form of treatment for replacing missing teeth, and can be successfully provided with appropriate design and fabrication concepts in mind.

  16. The denture hygiene, denture stomatitis and role of dental hygienist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadig, W

    2010-08-01

    Denture induced stomatitis (DIS) affects a large number of denture wearer patients, particularly elderly people. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of DIS among a sample of denture wearers attending a teaching hospital, in relation to denture hygiene level and method, age, gender, objective and subjective severity of the lesion. A total of 71 denture wearers were systemically interviewed and clinically examined by the same operator of their oral mucosal health and the denture hygiene practice. A questionnaire, including 20 questions was used in this study. The results showed an incidence of DIS in both arches of 62% with no difference between the maxillary and mandibular arches. Denture hygiene within patients was good by 21.1%, of the sample, fair by 43.6% and poor by 35.2%. Another finding proved the incidence of DIS to be higher (Rev-1 + Rev-2) in elderly patients and a significant association was found between the presence of DIS and denture hygiene habits and sleeping with dentures (P responsibility by routinely providing post-placement denture hygiene instructions to educate and motivate the patient.

  17. [Removable partial dentures. Oral functions and types].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creugers, N H J; de Baat, C

    2009-11-01

    A removable partial denture enables the restoration or improvement of 4 oral functions: aesthetics, mandibular stability, mastication, and speech. However, wearing a removable partial denture should not cause oral comfort to deteriorate. There are 3 types of removable partial dentures: acrylic tissue-supported dentures, dentures with cast metal frameworks en dentures with cast metal frameworks and (semi)precision attachments. Interrupted tooth arches,free-ending tooth arches, and a combination of interrupted as well as free-ending tooth arches can be restored using these dentures. Well-known disadvantages of removable partial dentures are problematic oral hygiene, negative influence on the remaining dentition and limited oral comfort. Due to the advanced possibilities of fixed tooth- or implant-supported partial dentures, whether or not free-ending, or tooth- as well as implant-supported partial dentures, the indication of removable partial dentures is restricted. Nevertheless, for the time being the demand for removable partial dentures is expected to continue.

  18. [Acrylic resin removable partial dentures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Baat, C; Witter, D J; Creugers, N H J

    2011-01-01

    An acrylic resin removable partial denture is distinguished from other types of removable partial dentures by an all-acrylic resin base which is, in principle, solely supported by the edentulous regions of the tooth arch and in the maxilla also by the hard palate. When compared to the other types of removable partial dentures, the acrylic resin removable partial denture has 3 favourable aspects: the economic aspect, its aesthetic quality and the ease with which it can be extended and adjusted. Disadvantages are an increased risk of caries developing, gingivitis, periodontal disease, denture stomatitis, alveolar bone reduction, tooth migration, triggering of the gag reflex and damage to the acrylic resin base. Present-day indications are ofa temporary or palliative nature or are motivated by economic factors. Special varieties of the acrylic resin removable partial denture are the spoon denture, the flexible denture fabricated of non-rigid acrylic resin, and the two-piece sectional denture. Furthermore, acrylic resin removable partial dentures can be supplied with clasps or reinforced by fibers or metal wires.

  19. [Removable partial dentures. Oral functions and types

    OpenAIRE

    Creugers, N.H.J.; Baat, C. de

    2009-01-01

    A removable partial denture enables the restoration or improvement of 4 oral functions: aesthetics, mandibular stability, mastication, and speech. However, wearing a removable partial denture should not cause oral comfort to deteriorate. There are 3 types of removable partial dentures: acrylic tissue-supported dentures, dentures with cast metal frameworks en dentures with cast metal frameworks and (semi)precision attachments. Interrupted tooth arches,free-ending tooth arches, and a combinatio...

  20. Stereotactic radiosurgery with an upper partial denture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tayama, Shusaku; Kunieda, Etsuo; Takeda, Atsushi; Takeda, Toshiaki; Oku, Yohei

    2009-01-01

    A 54-year-old male with partial denture underwent stereotactic radiosurgery with an infrared camera-guided system for a metastatic brain tumor arising from lung cancer. Although this method utilizes a biteplate mounted on the upper jaw to detect head movement, the patient only had four teeth in his upper jaw. In order to stabilize the biteplate, the maxillary denture was fixed to the biteplate with an autopolymerizing resin. In addition, the rest-occlusal position of the lower jaw was impressed on the inferior surface of the biteplate with an autopolymerizing resin. To assess reproducibility and stability, the distance between the left and right incus and left and right markers was measured during pre-planning, as well as before and after stereotactic irradiation. Wearing the biteplate ensures the accuracy of radiotherapy planning for the implementation of radiosurgery in patients who have many maxillary teeth missing. However, a large degree of error was observed when the biteplate was removed. (author)

  1. Do CAD/CAM dentures really release less monomer than conventional dentures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmassl, Patricia-Anca; Wiedemair, Verena; Huck, Christian; Klaunzer, Florian; Steinmassl, Otto; Grunert, Ingrid; Dumfahrt, Herbert

    2017-06-01

    Computer-aided design (CAD)/computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) dentures are assumed to have more favourable material properties than conventionally fabricated dentures, among them a lower methacrylate monomer release. The aim of this study was to test this hypothesis. CAD/CAM dentures were generated from ten different master casts by using four different CAD/CAM systems. Conventional, heat-polymerised dentures served as control group. Denture weight and volume were measured; the density was calculated, and the denture surface area was assessed digitally. The monomer release after 7 days of water storage was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. Whole You Nexteeth and Wieland Digital Dentures had significantly lower mean volume and weight than conventional dentures. Baltic Denture System and Whole You Nexteeth had a significantly increased density. Baltic Denture System had a significantly smaller surface area. None of the CAD/CAM dentures released significantly less monomer than the control group. All tested dentures released very low amounts of methacrylate monomer, but not significantly less than conventional dentures. A statistically significant difference might nevertheless exist in comparison to other, less recommendable denture base materials, such as the frequently used autopolymerising resins. CAD/CAM denture fabrication has numerous advantages. It enables the fabrication of dentures with lower resin volume and lower denture weight. Both could increase the patient comfort. Dentures with higher density might exhibit more favourable mechanical properties. The hypothesis that CAD/CAM dentures release less monomer than conventional dentures could, however, not be verified.

  2. Effect of denture soft liner on mandibular ridge resorption in complete denture wearers after 6 and 12 months of denture insertion: A prospective randomized clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Dinesh Babu

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: The use of soft denture liner significantly reduces the residual ridge resorption in complete denture wearers as compared to conventional denture wearers (without denture liner over a period of 1 year.

  3. [Acrylic resin removable partial dentures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baat, C. de; Witter, D.J.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2011-01-01

    An acrylic resin removable partial denture is distinguished from other types of removable partial dentures by an all-acrylic resin base which is, in principle, solely supported by the edentulous regions of the tooth arch and in the maxilla also by the hard palate. When compared to the other types of

  4. Flexible Thermoplastic Denture Base Materials for Aesthetical Removable Partial Denture Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Kunwarjeet; Aeran, Himanshu; Kumar, Narender; Gupta, Nidhi

    2013-01-01

    Conventional fixed partial dentures, implant supported Fixed Partial Dentures (FDPs) and removable partial dentures are the most common treatment modalities for the aesthetic and functional rehabilitation of partially edentulous patients. Although implants and FDP have certain advantages over removable partial dentures, in some cases, removable partial dentures may be the only choice which is available. Removable cast partial dentures are used as definitive removable prostheses when indicated...

  5. Enhancing retention of partial dentures using elastomeric retention rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kakkirala Revathi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents an alternative method for the retention of partial dentures that relies on the engagement of tooth undercuts by a lining material. The lab procedures are also presented. A new maxillary and mandibular acrylic partial dentures were fabricated using elastomeric retention technique for a partially dentate patient. A partially dentate man reported difficulty in retaining his upper removable partial denture (RPD. The maxillary RPD was designed utilizing elastomeric retention technique. During follow-up, it was necessary to replace the retention rings due to wear. The replacement of the retention rings, in this case, was done through a chairside reline technique. Elastomeric retention technique provides exceptionally good retention can be indicated to stabilize, cushion, splint periodontally involved teeth, no enough undercut for clasps, eliminate extractions, single or isolated teeth.

  6. Clinical application of removable partial dentures using thermoplastic resin. Part II: Material properties and clinical features of non-metal clasp dentures

    OpenAIRE

    Fueki, Kenji; Ohkubo, Chikahiro; Yatabe, Masaru; Arakawa, Ichiro; Arita, Masahiro; Ino, Satoshi; Kanamori, Toshikazu; Kawai, Yasuhiko; Kawara, Misao; Komiyama, Osamu; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Hosoki, Maki; Masumi, Shin-ichi; Yamauchi, Mutsuo

    2014-01-01

    This position paper reviews physical and mechanical properties of thermoplastic resin usedfor non-metal clasp dentures, and describes feature of each thermoplastic resin in clinicalapplication of non-metal clasp dentures and complications based on clinical experience ofexpert panels. Since products of thermoplastic resin have great variability in physical andmechanical properties, clinicians should utilize them with careful consideration of thespecific properties of each product. In general, ...

  7. Acoustic analysis and speech intelligibility in patients wearing conventional dentures and rugae incorporated dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adaki, Raghavendra; Meshram, Suresh; Adaki, Shridevi

    2013-12-01

    Phonetics is an important function of oral cavity. It has been overlooked quite frequently while fabricating the complete dentures. In this study modification of anterior palatal surface of denture is done and assessed for its impact on phonetics. Purpose is to assess acoustic and speech intelligibility analysis in edentulous patients and also to evaluate the influence of conventional dentures, arbitrary rugae and customized rugae dentures on speech in complete denture wearers. Ten healthy edentulous patients 55-70 years of age were selected for the study. Dentures were fabricated in conventional way for these patients. Recordings were done for intelligibility and acoustic analysis of the speech. Recordings were done without denture, with conventional denture, with arbitrary rugae denture, with customized rugae denture. Each recording was done at an interval of 10 days period. All four recordings were analyzed and comparison was done using paired 't' test. There was significant improvement in frequency peak noise energy for 's', antiformant frequency for 'n' in rugae incorporated dentures. There was relative improvement in frequency peak noise energy for 'sh', frequency proximity burst, voice onset time for 'd', with rugae incorporated dentures. Findings of intelligibility analysis have shown substitution errors with conventional dentures. There was relative improvement of speech with rugae incorporated dentures. Among these, customized rugae dentures showed better results than arbitrary rugae dentures.

  8. Effect of soft denture liner on stress distribution in supporting structures under a denture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, F; Koran, A; Asaoka, K; Matsumoto, N

    1993-01-01

    This study examined the effect of a soft denture liner on the distribution of stresses in the denture-supporting structures. Dentures without a linear and with three configurations of a soft liner were simulated by using a two-dimensional viscoelastic finite-element stress analysis. The stress intensity at functional force-bearing areas decreased when a soft denture liner was used. However, the stresses in the bone increased remarkably up to 3.0 seconds after loading. Because of the time-dependent effect of stresses applied to soft denture liners, denture patients who clench or brux may not benefit as greatly from soft denture liners. The study indicates that viscoelastic finite-element analysis is helpful for evaluating soft denture liners. Soft denture liners appear to be useful for improving the stress distribution in the supporting structures under dentures.

  9. Acoustic Analysis and Speech Intelligibility in Patients Wearing Conventional Dentures and Rugae Incorporated Dentures

    OpenAIRE

    Adaki, Raghavendra; Meshram, Suresh; Adaki, Shridevi

    2013-01-01

    Phonetics is an important function of oral cavity. It has been overlooked quite frequently while fabricating the complete dentures. In this study modification of anterior palatal surface of denture is done and assessed for its impact on phonetics. Purpose is to assess acoustic and speech intelligibility analysis in edentulous patients and also to evaluate the influence of conventional dentures, arbitrary rugae and customized rugae dentures on speech in complete denture wearers. Ten healthy ed...

  10. Assessment of clasp design and flexural properties of acrylic denture base materials for use in non-metal clasp dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Yoshihiro

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibilities of utilizing new acrylic denture base materials in resin clasps using three-point flexural tests and cantilever beam tests. Seven non-metal clasp denture (NMCD) materials and four acrylic denture base materials were used for three-point flexural tests and six NMCD materials and three acrylic denture base materials were used for cantilever beam tests. The flexural strength, elastic modulus, and 0.05% proof stress were measured by three-point flexural tests according to International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 20795-1. And load at 0.5mm deformation, elastic modulus were measured by Cantilever beam tests. For the three-point flexural tests, only materials that met the conditions for both flexural strength and elastic modulus were the polycarbonate Reigning N (REN) and the acrylics Acron (AC), Pro Impact (PI), Procast DSP (PC) and IvoBase High Impact (HI) which are required in ISO 20795-1, Type 3 denture base materials. And for cantilever beam tests there was no significant difference between PI and either EstheShot (ES), EstheShot Bright (ESB), REN or Acry Tone (ACT) in load at 0.5mm deformation, and no significant difference between PI and either Lucitone FRS (LTF), ES, ESB, REN or ACT in elastic modulus. The results thus suggested that some of the acrylic materials used as denture base materials may also be usable for NMCDs, and that the flexural properties of the acrylic material PI resemble those of ES, ESB and ACT, meaning that similar clasp designs may also be feasible. Copyright © 2015 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Removable partial dentures. Oral functions and types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creugers, N.H.J.; Baat, C. de

    2009-01-01

    A removable partial denture enables the restoration or improvement of 4 oral functions: aesthetics, mandibular stability, mastication, and speech. However, wearing a removable partial denture should not cause oral comfort to deteriorate. There are 3 types of removable partial dentures: acrylic

  12. [Conventional retaining of removable partial dentures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keltjens, H.M.A.M.; Witter, D.J.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2009-01-01

    Mechanical and biological criteria have to be met in retaining the metal frame of a removable partial denture. Additionally, a removable partial denture is part of the occlusal interface by the clasps and the denture teeth. With respect to mechanical aspects, all rigid parts of the removable partial

  13. The effect of denture stability, occlusion, oral hygiene and smoking on denture-induced stomatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nimri, Gadeer Mukatash

    2008-01-01

    This longitudinal clinical investigation was undertaken to find out the effect of denture wearing habit (day versus day and night), denture hygiene and cigarette smoking habit on the frequency of denture induced stomatitis. Comparisons were made between 240 complete denture wearers, half of whom were asked to wear their dentures at the daytime only and the other half to wear the denture day and night. All these participants were male patients with a mean age of 57.6 years who had received maxillary complete acrylic dentures for the first time. Fifty percent of the samples were smokers. A standard method for examination of the mouth and denture construction, insertion and follow up were employed. Putative risk factors (denture wearing habits, denture hygiene and smoking) were investigated. Subjects were recalled 12 months after insertion to examine the quality of the denture and the condition of the maxillary mucosa. No significant correlation was found between deterioration of stability or occlusion and type of habitual use of the dentures (P > 0.05). Fourteen percent of the cases reported with inflamed maxillary mucosa. Deterioration of retention or occlusion separately showed no correlation with the condition of the mucosa. However, associated deterioration of both stability and occlusion proved to be significantly correlated with the occurrence of denture stomatitis (P < 0.05). Denture stomatitis was significantly more frequently with subjects wearing their dentures overnight compared with those who removed them (P < 0.05). A significant correlation was also found between cigarette smoking, poor oral hygiene and the presence of denture induced stomatitis (P < 0.05). Nocturnal denture wearing habit, deficient oral and denture hygiene, and cigarette smoking are all important predisposing factors to denture-induced stomatitis, however, none of these factors was the sole cause of mucosal inflammation. (author)

  14. Flexible thermoplastic denture base materials for aesthetical removable partial denture framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kunwarjeet; Aeran, Himanshu; Kumar, Narender; Gupta, Nidhi

    2013-10-01

    Conventional fixed partial dentures, implant supported Fixed Partial Dentures (FDPs) and removable partial dentures are the most common treatment modalities for the aesthetic and functional rehabilitation of partially edentulous patients. Although implants and FDP have certain advantages over removable partial dentures, in some cases, removable partial dentures may be the only choice which is available. Removable cast partial dentures are used as definitive removable prostheses when indicated, but location of clasps may affect aesthetics. So, when patient is concerned about aesthetics, flexible partial dentures which is aesthetically superior to flipper and cast partial dentures, may be considered. But for the success of flexible removable partial denture, proper diagnosis, treatment planning and insertion technique of this prosthesis is very important, which have been thoroughly described in this article.

  15. Unilateral removable partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodall, W A; Greer, A C; Martin, N

    2017-01-27

    Removable partial dentures (RPDs) are widely used to replace missing teeth in order to restore both function and aesthetics for the partially dentate patient. Conventional RPD design is frequently bilateral and consists of a major connector that bridges both sides of the arch. Some patients cannot and will not tolerate such an extensive appliance. For these patients, bridgework may not be a predictable option and it is not always possible to provide implant-retained restorations. This article presents unilateral RPDs as a potential treatment modality for such patients and explores indications and contraindications for their use, including factors relating to patient history, clinical presentation and patient wishes. Through case examples, design, material and fabrication considerations will be discussed. While their use is not widespread, there are a number of patients who benefit from the provision of unilateral RPDs. They are a useful treatment to have in the clinician's armamentarium, but a highly-skilled dental team and a specific patient presentation is required in order for them to be a reasonable and predictable prosthetic option.

  16. Denture hygiene knowledge and practice amongst patients in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To assess patients' knowledge on denture hygiene and the hygiene methods used for cleaning removable partial dentures. Methods: This was a ... Other information obtained were the duration of denture use, frequency of denture cleaning and type of material used for denture cleaning. Results: The age of the ...

  17. Materials and methods for cleaning dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budtz-Jørgensen, E

    1979-12-01

    Proper hygienic care of removable dentures is an important means of maintaining a healthy oral mucosa in denture wearers. Denture cleanliness is often poor due to improper mechanical cleansing and the relative inefficiency of most commercial products for chemical cleansing of dentures. Dentists and patients should realize that microbial plaque on dentures may be harmful to both the oral mucosa and the patient's general health. It is the responsibility of the patient to maintain oral hygiene through a daily home care routine. It is the obligation of the dentist to motivate and instruct the patient and provide the means and methods for plaque control. Future research should be directed to developing solution cleansers which can maintain plaque-free dentures with a daily soaking period of 15 to 30 minutes and not affect the color and surface luster of the denture acrylic resin.

  18. Fabrication of an overdenture covering a torus palatinus using a combination of denture base materials: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Stephen; Hellen, Warren

    2006-04-01

    A maxillary torus provides a challenge when restoring an edentulous arch. Tori tend to have very thin mucosa and can be intolerant of normal pressures from a denture base. The tori tend to have large undercuts and at times extend to the junction with the soft palate, preventing the creation of a good palatal seal. Triple lamination involves combining 3 materials to fabricate a denture base that utilizes the retentive aspects of the torus. The thermoplastic flange provides a measure of flexibility, allowing the denture to seat over the torus. The resilient liner provides a cushion to diffuse the occlusal load, while the rigid acrylic base provides the support for the denture teeth. Using this approach, a very retentive denture was fabricated using the maxillary torus as a key element in anchoring the prosthesis.

  19. Comparison Predominant Oral micro-flora in Subjects with and without Complete Denture Referred to Yazd Dentistry Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Ali Jafari

    2014-11-01

    Results: The non-aureus staphylococcus and alpha-hemolytic streptococci showed the highest positive culture among the isolated microorganisms in both groups, whereas beta hemolytic streptococci showed the least percent of isolated microorganism in both groups. The higher density of non-aureus Staphylococci, α-hemolitic Streptococci, Gram negative cocobasillus, non-pathogenic Neisseria, Candida and Corynebacterium were recovered from oral samples of denture users in compare with dentate subjects (P= 0.0001. There was also seen a statistical significant correlation between the number of isolated microorganisms and the duration of denture utilization in denture users (P=0.013. Conclusion: Results of the present study showed that complete denture can be act as a predisposal factor in overgrowing of several oral micro-flora particularly Candida, non-aureus Staphylococci, α-hemolytic streptococci, gram negative cocobacillus, non-pathogenic Neisseria, and Corynebacterium, which emphasized the users denture hygine.

  20. Use of a permanent soft denture liner in the retromylohyoid eminence and knife-edge ridge areas of the mandible to aid in retention and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Maritza; Lee, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Many edentulous patients who wear complete dentures have alveolar ridge resorption. While retention is a concern in both arches, the mandibular arch presents more of a challenge due to less available bone. Mini-implants may not be an option in a case with knife-edge ridges. Lingual undercuts in the posterior mandibular region of the retromylohyoid eminence can be used to increase retention. A permanent soft denture liner is ideal for this application. It is softer than the acrylic denture material that is typically utilized, thus there is less discomfort when the patient inserts or removes the denture. A literature search indicates underutilization or lack of knowledge of this technique. This article presents a case involving a patient who could not tolerate traditional dentures. A silicone-based permanent soft denture liner was placed over the knife-edge ridge and retromylohyoid areas of the mandible.

  1. 21 CFR 872.3600 - Partially fabricated denture kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... mold, by partially polymerizing the resin denture base materials while the materials are in contact...: Evaluation and Testing,’ ” and (2) “OTC Denture Reliners, Repair Kits, and Partially Fabricated Denture Kits...

  2. Evaluation of radiopaque denture liner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goshima, T; Gettleman, L; Goshima, Y; Yamamoto, A

    1992-09-01

    Radiopacity is needed in polymeric biomaterials to facilitate noninvasive detection. Permanent denture liner material with barium sulfate filler is nearly as radiopaque as aluminum and would be useful in radiographic identification. If 1 mm to 3 mm thicknesses are used, it should be easily observable radiographically.

  3. Accuracy of Digitally Fabricated Wax Denture Bases and Conventional Completed Complete Dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawarczyk, Bogna; Lümkemann, Nina; Eichberger, Marlis; Wimmer, Timea

    2017-12-19

    The purpose of this investigation was to analyze the accuracy of digitally fabricated wax trial dentures and conventionally finalized complete dentures in comparison to a surface tessellation language (STL)-dataset. A generated data set for the denture bases and the tooth sockets was used, converted into STL-format, and saved as reference. Five mandibular and 5 maxillary denture bases were milled from wax blanks and denture teeth were waxed into their tooth sockets. Each complete denture was checked on fit, waxed onto the dental cast, and digitized using an optical laboratory scanning device. The complete dentures were completed conventionally using the injection method, finished, and scanned. The resulting STL-datasets were exported into the three-dimensional (3D) software GOM Inspect. Each of the 5 mandibular and 5 maxillary complete dentures was aligned with the STL- and the wax trial denture dataset. Alignment was performed based on a best-fit algorithm. A three-dimensional analysis of the spatial divergences in x -, y - and z -axes was performed by the 3D software and visualized in a color-coded illustration. The mean positive and negative deviations between the datasets were calculated automatically. In a direct comparison between maxillary wax trial dentures and complete dentures, complete dentures showed higher deviations from the STL-dataset than the wax trial dentures. The deviations occurred in the area of the teeth as well as in the distal area of the denture bases. In contrast, the highest deviations in both the mandibular wax trial dentures and the mandibular complete dentures were observed in the distal area. The complete dentures showed higher deviations on the occlusal surfaces of the teeth compared to the wax dentures. Computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM)-fabricated wax dentures exhibited fewer deviations from the STL-reference than the complete dentures. The deviations were significantly greater in the vicinity of the

  4. Accuracy of Digitally Fabricated Wax Denture Bases and Conventional Completed Complete Dentures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lümkemann, Nina; Eichberger, Marlis; Wimmer, Timea

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to analyze the accuracy of digitally fabricated wax trial dentures and conventionally finalized complete dentures in comparison to a surface tessellation language (STL)-dataset. A generated data set for the denture bases and the tooth sockets was used, converted into STL-format, and saved as reference. Five mandibular and 5 maxillary denture bases were milled from wax blanks and denture teeth were waxed into their tooth sockets. Each complete denture was checked on fit, waxed onto the dental cast, and digitized using an optical laboratory scanning device. The complete dentures were completed conventionally using the injection method, finished, and scanned. The resulting STL-datasets were exported into the three-dimensional (3D) software GOM Inspect. Each of the 5 mandibular and 5 maxillary complete dentures was aligned with the STL- and the wax trial denture dataset. Alignment was performed based on a best-fit algorithm. A three-dimensional analysis of the spatial divergences in x-, y- and z-axes was performed by the 3D software and visualized in a color-coded illustration. The mean positive and negative deviations between the datasets were calculated automatically. In a direct comparison between maxillary wax trial dentures and complete dentures, complete dentures showed higher deviations from the STL-dataset than the wax trial dentures. The deviations occurred in the area of the teeth as well as in the distal area of the denture bases. In contrast, the highest deviations in both the mandibular wax trial dentures and the mandibular complete dentures were observed in the distal area. The complete dentures showed higher deviations on the occlusal surfaces of the teeth compared to the wax dentures. Computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM)-fabricated wax dentures exhibited fewer deviations from the STL-reference than the complete dentures. The deviations were significantly greater in the vicinity of the denture

  5. Accuracy of Digitally Fabricated Wax Denture Bases and Conventional Completed Complete Dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogna Stawarczyk

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this investigation was to analyze the accuracy of digitally fabricated wax trial dentures and conventionally finalized complete dentures in comparison to a surface tessellation language (STL-dataset. A generated data set for the denture bases and the tooth sockets was used, converted into STL-format, and saved as reference. Five mandibular and 5 maxillary denture bases were milled from wax blanks and denture teeth were waxed into their tooth sockets. Each complete denture was checked on fit, waxed onto the dental cast, and digitized using an optical laboratory scanning device. The complete dentures were completed conventionally using the injection method, finished, and scanned. The resulting STL-datasets were exported into the three-dimensional (3D software GOM Inspect. Each of the 5 mandibular and 5 maxillary complete dentures was aligned with the STL- and the wax trial denture dataset. Alignment was performed based on a best-fit algorithm. A three-dimensional analysis of the spatial divergences in x-, y- and z-axes was performed by the 3D software and visualized in a color-coded illustration. The mean positive and negative deviations between the datasets were calculated automatically. In a direct comparison between maxillary wax trial dentures and complete dentures, complete dentures showed higher deviations from the STL-dataset than the wax trial dentures. The deviations occurred in the area of the teeth as well as in the distal area of the denture bases. In contrast, the highest deviations in both the mandibular wax trial dentures and the mandibular complete dentures were observed in the distal area. The complete dentures showed higher deviations on the occlusal surfaces of the teeth compared to the wax dentures. Computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM-fabricated wax dentures exhibited fewer deviations from the STL-reference than the complete dentures. The deviations were significantly greater in the

  6. [Clinical aspects of removable complete dentures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarov, A

    2010-02-01

    One of the main goals of modern orthopedic dentistry is the development of high quality removable complete dentures. Some materials used in removable complete denture construction consist of polymethyl methacrylate, which causes of serious pathological process in the tissue of denture's zone, as a result - weakness of adaptation ability of organism and dissatisfaction. Interest increases in production of different types of removable dentures made of thermoplastic materials, which is biocompatible with the organ and tissues of the oral cavity. Interest to manufacture of removable complete denture made of thermoplastic materials as a progressive technologic and aesthetic solution rises constantly in recent years. The aim of this study was to examine the properties of thermoplastic materials in orthopedic dentistry. The results of this investigation revealed good functional and adaptation properties of removable complete denture made of thermoplastic materials.

  7. Candidal Leukoplakia on Patient with Removable Denture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiril Paskalis

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Candida infection is a common problem in patients using removable dentures, with the most frequent type is denture stomatitis. But other type of candidal infection could also happen in these patients, such as candidal leukoplakia. We reported a 61 years old female patient who complained a painful lesion under her lower removable denture. Oral examination revealed white plaque that could not be rubbed over an ulcer on the lingual part of alveolar processes under the lower removable denture plate, and also an erythematous area on palatum durum above the upper full denture. The patient was suspected to have candidal leukoplakia on the lingual part of the mandible and denture stomatitis on the palate area. The treatment consisted of nystatin oral suspension, chlorhexidine solution, multivitamins, along with denture replacement and oral health education. The entire lesion resolved within 2 months therapy. Candidal infection treatment on denture patient needs not only medication or denture replacement, but also patient compliance to achieve maximal result.

  8. Comparing the efficiency of Denture brush and Ordinary brush in complete Denture cleaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Fayaz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Please cite this article as: Fayaz A, Shakerian M, Ansari GH. Comparing the Efficiency of Denture brush and Ordinary brush in complete Denture cleaning. Novel Biomed 2013;1(2:62-65.Background & objective: Denture cleansing is a key element in retaining mucosa free of any inflammation. However, many denture users usually ignore this important factor. This investigation was designed to compare the efficacy of a denture brush and an ordinary brush in cleansing process of complete dentures.Materials & Methods: A group of 31 individuals aged 44-76 years were included in this study. Each patient was then instructed to use the denture brush for a period of 4 weeks while an ordinary brush was to be used for the following 4 weeks. Dentures were photographed and evaluated at every two week intervals using a computer photographic software assessment method. Pictures were compared using the image tool for plaque remaining on the denture surfaces. Student t-test was used to analyse data collected.Results: Comparison of the brush type efficacy at 2 and 4 weeks did not show any significant difference ( P>0.05 , however , clinical evaluation indicated that denture brush leaves much less plaque bio-film compare to the ordinary one, with mean plaque traced at 6.88 to 9.24 in 4 weeks.Conclusion: There were no significant differences found between the two brushes’ efficacy, with clinical evaluation significantly in favor of denture brush.

  9. Shear Bond Strength of Acrylic Denture Teeth to PMMA and Polyamide Denture Base Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Nakhaei

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Detachment of denture teeth from denture base is one of the most common reasons for costly denture repairs .This study aimed at evaluating the bond strength of an acrylic denture tooth to polyamide injection-molded thermoplastic denture base material compared with three conventional polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA denture base resins. Materials and Method: A total of 40 acrylic denture molar teeth were randomly allocated into four groups (n=10 of heat-polymerized (HP, Auto-polymerized (AP, Injection molded (IM and Polyamide thermoplastic (PT. All denture base/acrylic teeth combinations underwent 5000 thermal cycles (5-55◦C.Samples were subjected to shear bond strength test by a universal testing machine with a 1 mm/min crosshead speed .Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey’s tests(α=0.05. Results: Mean ±SD of shear bond strength values were (MPa 4.82±1.21, 4.52±1.67, 3.7±0.84 and 4.13±2.21 for groups HP, AP, IM and PT respectively. No significant difference was found among the experimental groups (P=0.429. Conclusion: Polyamide thermoplastic denture base resin was similar to conventional PMMA denture base materials in terms of bond strength to artificial denture teeth.

  10. [Anterior guidance in complete dentures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubreuil, J; Trevelo, A

    1990-01-01

    Although the anterior guidance in complete dentures is not really a guide, the arrangement of the anterior maxillary and mandibular prosthetic teeth, defines a propulsive line called the virtual anterior guidance, a part from the cinematic criterias. The influence of this guide on cuspal movement is superior, in all mandibular points, to the influence of the condylar pathway. If this line is not respected, the practitioner may have to do excessive grindings during occlusal adjustments.

  11. Candida-associated denture stomatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Salerno, Carmen; Pascale, Michelangelo; Contaldo, María; Esposito, V.; Busciolano, Maurizio; Milillo, Lucio; Guida, Agostino; Petruzzi, Massimo; Serpico, Rosario

    2011-01-01

    Candida albicans is a dimorphic yeast strongly gram positive able to live as normal commensal organism in the oral cavity of healthy people. It is the yeast more frequently isolated in the oral cavity. Under local and systemic factors related to the host conditions, it becomes virulent and responsible of oral diseases known as oral candidiasis. It has been shown that the presence of denture is a predisposing factor to the onset of pathologies related to C. albicans. Clinical studies have ...

  12. PERSONALISED DENTURES WITH BRANCHING TECHNIQUE

    OpenAIRE

    Puneet; Priyanka

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: While the basic process of making dentures has chang ed little over the past several decades, new materials and techniques can help labor atories and clinicians provide functional, esthetic restorations that offer exceptional value t o patients. Unlike the conventional “linear” methods which foll ow specific steps in a cookbook fashion, the Branching Technique is a dynamic conce pt which can be adjusted to meet the clinical needs of each patient. Thi...

  13. Changes in the masticatory function of complete denture wearers after relining the mandibular denture with a soft denture liner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, I; Hirano, S; Takahashi, Y; Keh, E S

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine changes in the masticatory function of complete denture wearers after relining the mandibular denture with a soft liner. Conventional complete dentures were fabricated for 6 completely edentulous patients. One month after completing adjustments of the dentures, maximum biting force, masticatory performance, and electromyography of the masseter muscle during mastication were recorded. Chewing strokes, chewing time, muscular activity, and masticatory rhythm were calculated using the recorded electromyography. The mandibular dentures were then relined with a soft liner. One month after finishing adjustments of the relined dentures, the same tests were performed. These values were compared using a paired t test (alpha = 0.05). When using the soft liner, masticatory performance and maximum biting force were significantly greater (P = 0.019 and P = 0.023, respectively). In addition, the number of chewing strokes was significantly lower (P = 0.020), and chewing time was reduced (P = 0.010). A more stable masticatory rhythm was also found in the initial chewing stage. The muscular activity tended to decrease after the insertion of the lined denture, but no significant difference was found between before and after relining. It was shown that applying a soft lining material to the mandibular dentures of 6 edentulous patients improved masticatory function with no adverse effect on the muscular task.

  14. Stress analysis of a complete maxillary denture under various drop impact conditions: a 3D finite element study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunbuloglu, Emin

    2015-01-01

    Complete maxillary dentures are one of the most economic and easy ways of treatment for edentulous patients and are still widely used. However, their survival rate is slightly above three years. It is presumed that the failure reasons are not only due to normal fatigue but also emerge from damage based on unavoidable improper usage. Failure types other than long-term fatigue, such as over-deforming, also influence the effective life span of dentures. A hypothesis is presumed, stating that the premature/unexpected failures may be initiated by impact on dentures, which can be related to dropping them on the ground or other effects such as biting crispy food. Thus, the behavior of a complete maxillary denture under impact loading due to drop on a rigid surface was investigated using the finite element method utilizing explicit time integration and a rate-sensitive elastoplastic material model of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). Local permanent deformations have been observed along with an emphasis on frenulum region of the denture, regardless of the point of impact. Contact stresses at the tooth-denture base were also investigated. The spread of energy within the structure via wave propagation is seen to play a critical role in this fact. Stress-wave propagation is also seen to be an important factor that decreases the denture's fatigue life.

  15. Influence of denture treatment on brain function activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshio Hosoi

    2011-02-01

    In this study, it was revealed that brain function activity was enhanced by the improvement of complete dentures, and by wearing partial dentures. Not only denture function improvement but also brain functional activation was achieved in elderly denture wearers at risk of brain activity deterioration.

  16. Pseudomembranous candidiasis in patient wearing full denture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurdiana Nurdiana

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral candidiasis is a common opportunistic infection of the oral cavity caused by an overgrowth of Candida species, the commonest being Candida albicans. Candida albicans is a harmless commensal organism inhabiting the mouths but it can change into pathogen and invade tissue and cause acute and chronic disease. Dentures predispose to infection with Candida in as many as 65% of elderly people wearing full upper dentures. Purpose: The purpose of this case report is to discuss thrush in patient wearing full denture which rapidly developed. Case: This paper report a case of 57 year-old man who came to the Oral Medicine Clinic Faculty of Dentistry Airlangga University with clinical appearance of pseudomembranous candidiasis (thrush. Case Management: Diagnosis of this case is confirmed with microbiology examination. Patient was wearing full upper dentures, and from anamnesis known that patient wearing denture for 24 hours and he had poor oral hygiene. Patient was treated with topical (nystatin oral suspension and miconazole oral gel and systemic (ketoconazole antifungal. Patient also instructed not to wear his denture and cleaned white pseudomembrane on his mouth with soft toothbrush. Conclusion: Denture, habit of wearing denture for 24 hours, and poor oral hygiene are predisposing factors of thrush and it can healed completely after treated with topical and systemic antifungal.

  17. [Designing metal frame removable partial dentures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witter, D.J.; Barel, J.C.; Keltjens, H.M.A.M.; Creugers, N.H.J.

    2011-01-01

    Oral health care providers have the full responsibility for designing metal frame removable partial dentures and making all of the necessary preparations. Important principles of design are that the denture should hamper natural cleaning and daily oral hygiene as little as possible and that it

  18. [Study on retention and stability of linear occlusal complete dentures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping; Xu, Jun

    2003-01-01

    To learn retention and stability of linear occlusal complete dentures by investigating the subjective feelings of patient and the value of retention force. Static retention forces of maxillary and mandibular dentures were measured for 25 patients wearing linear occlusal dentures by using Hz-1 retention dynamometer. The subjective feelings of patients in functional state were gained simultaneously through questionnaire. Linear occlusal dentures demonstrate good retention in static and dynamic state. Among patients with severe resorption of residual ridge (RRR), mandibular linear occlusal dentures (shown good retentive subjective feelings) demonstrate significantly smaller retention force than those with slight or medium degree of RRR. There is no correlation between the subjective feelings and the values of retention forces of mandibular dentures. The subjective feelings of patients wearing new linear occlusal dentures are much better than that of old anatomic occlusal dentures. Linear occlusal dentures improve the performances of dentures by enhancing their stability during mastication movement.

  19. Effects of denture maintenance on satisfaction levels of Taiwanese elderly using removable partial dentures: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ju-Hui; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Wang, Chau-Hsiang; Lee, Huey-Er; Du, Je-Kang

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between patient satisfaction with removable partial dentures and denture maintenance by patients, including regular application of denture adhesives and cleansers. The success of removable partial dentures depends on patient satisfaction with dentures and their regular denture maintenance. Demographic information, the Oral Impacts on Daily Performance (OIDP) indicator and details of denture maintenance (including the use of denture cleansers and adhesives) were collected from 193 (41.5% men and 58.5% women) participants by using questionnaires. A dentist performed oral examinations to evaluate denture function according to the OIDP items photographically and recorded the number of remaining teeth and Kennedy's classification. Most participants were satisfied with their removable partial dentures and tended to have higher satisfaction levels than the dentist's estimation. Further, those using denture adhesives and cleansers had higher satisfaction levels than those not using such denture maintenance. Appropriate education regarding denture use is important because regular denture maintenance by patients affects their degree of satisfaction with dentures, as well as the dentist's skill and the patient's oral condition. Dentists could use this information to predict the potential success of dentures. © 2011 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Efficacy of commercial and household denture cleansers against Candida albicans adherent to acrylic denture base resin: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Nanditha Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Within the limitations of this in vitro study, denture cleansers were found to be effective in reducing C albicans cells adhering to dentures. The commercial denture cleansers (Fittydent® and Clinsodent® were more effective than household denture cleansers (vinegar and diluted vinegar.

  1. The bond between acrylic resin denture teeth and the denture base: recommendations for best practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radford, D R; Juszczyk, A S; Clark, R K F

    2014-02-01

    Failure of the bond between denture teeth and base acrylic resin has been shown to be a cause of denture failure leading to inconvenience and costly repair. The optimal combination of acrylic resin denture tooth, denture base material, laboratory protocol and processing method has not yet been established. Extensive research enables the following recommendations for best practice to be made. Adopt practices that maximise the strength of the bond: select appropriate denture teeth; select base acrylic resin from the same manufacturer as the denture teeth; remove the glaze from ridgelaps of the denture teeth; apply monomer to the ridgelaps of the denture teeth before packing the base acrylic resin dough; use the manufacturers' recommended liquid/powder ratio; follow the manufacturers' recommended curing cycle; allow the flask to cool slowly and rest before deflasking. Adopt practices that avoid factors detrimental to bond strength: remove all traces of wax from the ridge laps of the denture teeth; remove all traces of mould seal from the ridgelaps of the denture teeth. It is evident that a number of factors are involved which may assist or prevent formation of an adequate bond, suggesting that attention to detail by the dental technician may be the most critical factor.

  2. Effect of Different Denture Base Materials and Changed Mouth Temperature on Dimensional Stability of Complete Dentures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafa, Khalid A. O.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Type of materials used in fabrication of denture base has an effect on dimension during denture base material processing and other factors related to clinical use. Objective. The study aims were to assess the dimensional stability including thermal changes of three different denture base materials. Methods. Ninety patients were selected to construct complete dentures with different denture base materials. They were randomly divided into three groups: group 1, patients with cobalt chrome metallic base; group 2, patients with heat curing acrylic resin fabricated by injection moulding technique; and group 3, patients with denture bases fabricated by conventional heat curing acrylic resin. The dimensional changes were assessed using digital caliper. Results. After the twelfth month, injection moulding acrylic resin had significantly the highest dimensional change followed by the conventional heat curing acrylic resin. There were no significant differences in the dimensions between the three types of denture base materials at normal mouth temperature, while, after hot tea drinking at 45°C, the dimensional change was significantly the highest in cobalt chrome metallic denture base group. Conclusion. Cobalt chrome metallic denture base has stable dimension compared to denture bases fabricated of acrylic resin but it was more affected by altered mouth temperature. The study was registered in the International Standard Randomized Controlled Trials Number (ISRCTN) registry with study ID (ISRCTN94238244). PMID:27143970

  3. Effect of Different Denture Base Materials and Changed Mouth Temperature on Dimensional Stability of Complete Dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid A. O. Arafa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Type of materials used in fabrication of denture base has an effect on dimension during denture base material processing and other factors related to clinical use. Objective. The study aims were to assess the dimensional stability including thermal changes of three different denture base materials. Methods. Ninety patients were selected to construct complete dentures with different denture base materials. They were randomly divided into three groups: group 1, patients with cobalt chrome metallic base; group 2, patients with heat curing acrylic resin fabricated by injection moulding technique; and group 3, patients with denture bases fabricated by conventional heat curing acrylic resin. The dimensional changes were assessed using digital caliper. Results. After the twelfth month, injection moulding acrylic resin had significantly the highest dimensional change followed by the conventional heat curing acrylic resin. There were no significant differences in the dimensions between the three types of denture base materials at normal mouth temperature, while, after hot tea drinking at 45°C, the dimensional change was significantly the highest in cobalt chrome metallic denture base group. Conclusion. Cobalt chrome metallic denture base has stable dimension compared to denture bases fabricated of acrylic resin but it was more affected by altered mouth temperature. The study was registered in the International Standard Randomized Controlled Trials Number (ISRCTN registry with study ID (ISRCTN94238244.

  4. Clinical effects of acrylic resilient denture liners applied to mandibular complete dentures on the alveolar ridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto, S; Kimoto, K; Gunji, A; Kawai, Y; Murakami, H; Tanaka, K; Syu, K; Aoki, H; Toyoda, M; Kobayashi, K

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether resilient denture liners has the potential to decrease problems affecting the alveolar ridge mucosa during the first adjustment session following the initial fitting of the denture. Interventions were complete denture treatment with permanent acrylic resilient denture liner dentures (RLD) in mandibles and conventional heat-activated acrylic resin dentures (ARD) in mandibles. Maxillary dentures were fabricated with conventional heat-activated ARD. Seventy-four subjects were randomly allocated to the RLD and ARD groups by random permuted blocks within the strata method after obtaining written informed consent. A randomized controlled parallel clinical trial with two hospital centres was conducted from April 2004 to July 2006. The problems were comprehensively evaluated by three outcomes with subjective and objective factors as follows: (i) numbers of sore spots, (ii) duration of wearing dentures and (iii) pain perception with 100 mm Visual Analog Scale. The numbers of sore spots in the mandibular support and border areas for the RLD group were significantly less than those for the ARD groups (P < 0.05). The RLD wearers were able to wear their dentures an additional day longer than the ARD wearers (P < 0.05). The maxillary and mandibular pain ratings for the RLD group were significantly lower than those for the ARD group (P < 0.05). Application of resilient denture liners to mandibular complete dentures provided edentulous patients with fewer problems affecting the alveolar during the first adjustment session following the initial fitting of the denture when compared with conventional denture treatments.

  5. Controlling Fungal Biofilms with Functional Drug Delivery Denture Biomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Wen, Jianchuan; Jiang, Fuguang; Yeh, Chih-Ko; Sun, Yuyu

    2015-01-01

    Candida -associated denture stomatitis (CADS), caused by colonization and biofilm-formation of Candida species on denture surfaces, is a significant clinical concern. We show here that modification of conventional denture materials with functional groups can significantly increase drug binding capacity and control drug release rate of the resulting denture materials for potentially managing CADS. In our approach, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-based denture resins were surface grafted with ...

  6. Evaluate the Effect of Commercially Available Denture Cleansers on Surface Hardness and Roughness of Denture Liners at Various Time Intervals

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammed, Hilal S.; Singh, Sumeet; Hari, Prasad A.; Amarnath, G. S.; Kundapur, Vinaya; Pasha, Naveed; Anand, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective: Chemical cleansing by denture cleansers is first choice for denture plaque control. The most common problems while using denture cleansers are hardening, porosity, odor sorption, water sorption, solubility, and colour change, bacterial and fungal growth. Chemical cleansing procedures have been found to have an effect on the physical and mechanical properties of denture liners. Thus, this study was conducted to evaluate the effect of commercially available denture cle...

  7. Achieving an even thickness in heat-polymerized permanent acrylic resin denture bases for complete dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeson, M G; Jepson, N J

    1999-09-01

    Permanent denture bases form the fitting surface of a denture and are constructed on a master cast, in heat-polymerized acrylic resin. These bases are strong and rigid and demonstrate both the fit and retention of the final prosthesis. General recommendations suggests a thickness of between 1.5 to 3 mm for these bases. The normal procedure for producing such a denture base is to manually adapt materials to the cast, in their plastic state, before processing. Such procedures are liable to distortion and variation in the thickness of the resultant denture base and may be unreliable. This article describes a method for achieving a consistent thickness in a heat-polymerized, permanent, acrylic resin denture base through the use of a vacuum-formed, thermoplastic blank as a template. The method is simple, and results in a denture base with a consistent even thickness.

  8. CAD/CAM produces dentures with improved fit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmassl, Otto; Dumfahrt, Herbert; Grunert, Ingrid; Steinmassl, Patricia-Anca

    2018-02-22

    Resin polymerisation shrinkage reduces the congruence of the denture base with denture-bearing tissues and thereby decreases the retention of conventionally fabricated dentures. CAD/CAM denture manufacturing is a subtractive process, and polymerisation shrinkage is not an issue anymore. Therefore, CAD/CAM dentures are assumed to show a higher denture base congruence than conventionally fabricated dentures. It has been the aim of this study to test this hypothesis. CAD/CAM dentures provided by four different manufacturers (AvaDent, Merz Dental, Whole You, Wieland/Ivoclar) were generated from ten different master casts. Ten conventional dentures (pack and press, long-term heat polymerisation) made from the same master casts served as control group. The master casts and all denture bases were scanned and matched digitally. The absolute incongruences were measured using a 2-mm mesh. Conventionally fabricated dentures showed a mean deviation of 0.105 mm, SD = 0.019 from the master cast. All CAD/CAM dentures showed lower mean incongruences. From all CAD/CAM dentures, AvaDent Digital Dentures showed the highest congruence with the master cast surface with a mean deviation of 0.058 mm, SD = 0.005. Wieland Digital Dentures showed a mean deviation of 0.068 mm, SD = 0.005, Whole You Nexteeth prostheses showed a mean deviation of 0.074 mm, SD = 0.011 and Baltic Denture System prostheses showed a mean deviation of 0.086 mm, SD = 0.012. CAD/CAM produces dentures with better fit than conventional dentures. The present study explains the clinically observed enhanced retention and lower traumatic ulcer-frequency in CAD/CAM dentures.

  9. Flexible denture base material: A viable alternative to conventional acrylic denture base material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J P Singh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Although clinician′s skills and experience play a major role in designing and fabrication of the optimum prosthodontic restorations, the selection of denture resins is equally important, especially when the patient has been using the prostheses since long. Eighteen cases who were not satisfied with their conventional acrylic dentures were selected. They were provided flexible dentures along with a questionnaire to precisely evaluate the advantages of new material. Prosthodontic planning & observations regarding this material are discussed on various parameters.

  10. Evaluation of denture hygiene among removable denture wearers referred to clinics of Kerman, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molouk Torabi Parizi DDS, MS 1

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM:The number of patients who need prosthetictreatments has increased. Efficient and regularprocedures for cleaning removable dentures are important for maintaining good oral health. The aim of this study was toanalyze the oral and prostheses care habits of removabledenture users, who attendedthe clinics of Kerman, Iran.METHODS:This cross-sectional study was carried out on 350 patients, who attended the clinics of Kerman and werechosen by the multistage sampling method. Data were obtained from a checklist consisting of demographiccharacteristics (age, sex, educational level, kind of prosthesis, age of prosthesis, self-report of halitosis, and smokingstatus, denture hygiene habits, denture-wearing behavior, and cleanliness of denture by examiner. Data was analyzedusing chi-squared test (P < 0.05.RESULTS:The mean age of patients was 58.52 ± 10.78 years, 103 (29.4% were male and 247 (70.6% were female.The results showed that 78.6% had complete denture and 12.7% reported halitosis, 55.1% used their denture at night,and 36.4% had poor denture hygiene. Brushing was the most used cleaning method by the patients (36.5%. 60.4%reported never having been instructed by their dentists as to how to clean their dentures. 58.6% had been using the samedenture for more than 5 years. There was a significant correlation between the kind of denture, and denture hygiene andeducation level.CONCLUSIONS:According to the results of the present study denture hygiene was not favorable. Therefore, dentistsshould instruct the patients on cleaning their denture in order to prevent denture–induced lesions.

  11. Influence of denture cleansers on the color stability of three types of denture base acrylic resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Guang; Murata, Hiroshi; Li, YingAi; Sadamori, Sinshuke; Hamada, Taizo

    2009-03-01

    Color stability is an important property of denture base acrylic resin. Color changes indicate aging or damaged dental materials. However, little information is available on the influence of denture cleansers on the color stability of acrylic resins. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of denture cleansers on the color stability of 3 different types of acrylic resin. One heat-polymerized (HP) acrylic denture base resin (Acron), 1 autopolymerized (AP) hard direct reline acrylic resin (Denture Liner), and 1 visible-light-polymerized (VLP) hard direct reline acrylic resin (Tokuso Lite-Rebase) were evaluated. Five specimens of each material, 10 x 10 x 2 mm, were immersed in 1 of 9 commercial denture cleanser solutions or distilled water (control). Color changes were measured with a colorimeter and evaluated using the CIE L*a*b* colorimetric system. Data were analyzed using 1-way and 3-way ANOVA and the Student-Newman-Keuls test (alpha=.05). Significant differences (P<.05) were found among the acrylic resins and denture cleansers in terms of color change (DeltaE) produced after 365 days. The DeltaE values of all denture base acrylic resins increased with time. The DeltaE of the AP acrylic resin was larger than that of the other acrylic resins. The least discoloration was found with ZTC denture cleanser (acid type). The influence of alkaline peroxide-type denture cleanser (Steradent) on the color stability of HP acrylic resin and AP acrylic resin was significantly greater (P<.05) than that of the other cleansers. These results suggest that the color stability of denture base acrylic resins is influenced by polymerization type and the type of denture cleanser used.

  12. Cast Partial Denture versus Acrylic Partial Denture for Replacement of Missing Teeth in Partially Edentulous Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramita Suwal

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare the effects of cast partial denture with conventional all acrylic denture in respect to retention, stability, masticatory efficiency, comfort and periodontal health of abutments. Methods: 50 adult partially edentulous patient seeking for replacement of missing teeth having Kennedy class I and II arches with or without modification areas were selected for the study. Group-A was treated with cast partial denture and Group-B with acrylic partial denture. Data collected during follow-up visit of 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year by evaluating retention, stability, masticatory efficiency, comfort, periodontal health of abutment. Results: Chi-square test was applied to find out differences between the groups at 95% confidence interval where p = 0.05. One year comparison shows that cast partial denture maintained retention and stability better than acrylic partial denture (p< 0.05. The masticatory efficiency was significantly compromising from 3rd month to 1 year in all acrylic partial denture groups (p< 0.05. The comfort of patient with cast partial denture was maintained better during the observation period (p< 0.05. Periodontal health of abutment was gradually deteriorated in all acrylic denture group (p

  13. Flexible removable partial dentures: a basic overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Edward E; Rubel, Barry; Smith, John B

    2014-01-01

    For many years, flexible resin materials have been available for fabricating removable partial denture (RPD) prostheses. Using a nonrigid material for the major connector or other components of an RPD may be a consideration for certain patients. Except for the promotional literature that has been written for flexible resin dentures, there is very little information available in the dental literature concerning nonrigid RPDs. As a result, the decision to use this treatment option depends on the judgment and experience of the dentist and fabricating laboratory. This article summarizes clinically pertinent information about flexible, nonrigid partial dentures.

  14. Clinical application of a soft denture liner: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, R T

    1995-06-01

    Patients with thin, nonresilient mucosa, poor ridge morphology, chronic xerostomia, and acquired or congenital defects are candidates for soft denture liners. Soft denture liners may be placed during fabrication of the new denture or during relining of the existing dentures. Soft mandibular denture liners are ideal for senior patients with resorbed mandibular ridges who need replacement of existing dentures to correct excessively closed vertical dimension of occlusion and for patients who have maxillary complete dentures and mandibular natural teeth, severe loss of maxillary ridge, and clenching habits. Soft denture liners should be used only when needed because of their short service life. However, for those patients who cannot tolerate hard denture bases, soft liners are an appropriate alternative treatment.

  15. A study to evaluate the location and frequency of denture-related ulcerations and postinsertion adjustments in complete denture patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Jain

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Removable complete denture is one of the most common treatment modalities for completely edentulous patients. After denture insertion, patient very often faces problems with the denture even after complete care is taken during fabrication procedure. Most common complaint is traumatic ulcers. The present study aimed to locate the most common areas of ulcerations due to complete dentures, how frequently they occur and how many times patient visits for adjustment after insertion of complete denture. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and twenty-one patients were selected and were delivered complete dentures. Dentures were fabricated for all the patients. Each step of denture fabrication was controlled and guided by a prosthodontist. After placement of dentures, patients were evaluated at every recall visit and their dentures were adjusted. All the details of each visit (area of ulceration and number of visits were recorded in a self-designed format. Descriptive statistical analysis was done using SPSS version 13 software. Chi-squared test was used to evaluate the correlation between mucosal injuries and postinsertion day and the relationship between lesions, patient age, and patient gender. Results: All the 221 patients required denture adjustment due to mucosal injuries. No significant difference was found between denture-related injuries between males and females. Injuries related to mandibular dentures were significantly higher than those related to maxillary dentures. In mandible, the most common area of mucosal injury is posterior one-third of alveololingual sulcus; while in maxilla, the most common area of mucosal injury is labial frenum. Conclusion: Postinsertion adjustments are an important aspect of rehabilitating patient with complete dentures. Most of the denture-related injuries were in limiting areas. Proper border molding techniques, accurate secondary impressions, and use of pressure indicating paste during

  16. Maxillomandibular relationship record for implant complete mouth rehabilitation with elastomeric material and facial surface index of existing denture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravinkumar G Patil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The maxillomandibular relationship (MMR record is a critical step to establish the new occlusion in implant supported complete mouth rehabilitation. Using patients existing denture for recording the MMR requires implant definitive cast to be modified extensively to completely seat the denture (with unaltered flanges on it. This may influence the correct seating of the denture on the implant definitive cast causing faulty recording of the MMR. Materials and Method: Elastomeric record bases, reinforced with the resin framework, are fabricated and relined with the light body elastomeric material when all the healing abutments are in place. The MMR is recorded with these elastomeric record bases using vacuum formed facial surface index of the occluded existing dentures as a guideline. Results: The elastomeric record bases with facial surface index of the existing dentures can allow clinicians to record MMR records without removing the healing abutments from the mouth with acceptable accuracy. This can save chair-side time of the procedure. The record of facial surfaces of existing complete denture in the form of vacuum formed sheet helps to set the occlusal vertical dimension. Conclusion: Use of facial surface index together with the elastomeric record bases can be the useful alternative technique to record the MMR in patients with implant supported full mouth rehabilitation. Further study is required to prove its routine clinical utility.

  17. Removable partial dentures: use of rapid prototyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Julia Magalhaes Costa; Anami, Lilian Costa; Araujo, Rodrigo Maximo; Pavanelli, Carlos A

    2014-10-01

    The CAD/CAM technology associated with rapid prototyping (RP) is already widely used in the fabrication of all-ceramic fixed prostheses and in the biomedical area; however, the use of this technology for the manufacture of metal frames for removable dentures is new. This work reports the results of a literature review conducted on the use of CAD/CAM and RP in the manufacture of removable partial dentures. © 2014 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  18. Ecology of Candida-associated Denture Stomatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Budtz-Jørgensen, Ejvind

    2011-01-01

    Introduction of a prosthesis into the oral cavity results in profound alterations of the environmental conditions as the prosthesis and the underlying mucosa become colonized with oral microorganisms, including Candida spp. This may lead to denture stomatitis, a non-specific inflammatory reaction against microbial antigens, toxins and enzymes produced by the colonizing microorganisms. The role of Candida in the etiology of denture stomatitis is indicated by an increased number of yeasts on th...

  19. Removable partial dentures: clinical concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnenkamp, David M

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a review of the traditional clinical concepts for the design and fabrication of removable partial dentures (RPDs). Although classic theories and rules for RPD designs have been presented and should be followed, excellent clinical care for partially edentulous patients may also be achieved with computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing technology and unique blended designs. These nontraditional RPD designs and fabrication methods provide for improved fit, function, and esthetics by using computer-aided design software, composite resin for contours and morphology of abutment teeth, metal support structures for long edentulous spans and collapsed occlusal vertical dimensions, and flexible, nylon thermoplastic material for metal-supported clasp assemblies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of denture adhesive on the retention of milled and heat-activated maxillary denture bases: A clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlRumaih, Hamad S; AlHelal, Abdulaziz; Baba, Nadim Z; Goodacre, Charles J; Al-Qahtani, Ali

    2018-03-15

    Clinical studies have identified advantages of digital complete denture technology including patient satisfaction, improved mastication, increased retention, and technique efficiency. However, studies that focusing on the effect of denture adhesive on the retention of milled and heat-activated denture bases are lacking. The purpose of this clinical study was to evaluate the effectiveness of denture adhesive on the retention of milled and heat-activated denture bases. Twenty participants with complete maxillary edentulism were selected for this study (11 men and 9 women). Definitive impressions were obtained and scanned (iSeries impression scanner; Dental Wings). Digital data were sent to Global Dental Science for the fabrication of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) milled denture bases (MB condition). The physical impressions were poured in stone to produce casts for the fabrication of heat-activated acrylic resin denture bases (HB condition). A portable clinical motorized test stand and advance digital force gauge were modified to measure the amount of denture base retention in newtons. The denture bases were seated over the edentulous maxillary ridge and pulled 3 times vertically at 10-minute intervals without denture adhesive (MB and HB control conditions) and with denture adhesive (MBA and HBA test conditions). For statistical analysis, a repeated-measures ANOVA was performed (α=.05). The control MB condition had significantly higher retention values compared with all other conditions (Pbases. No significant differences were found with or without the use of denture adhesive among heat-activated denture bases (P>.05). Significantly higher retention values were recorded with milled denture bases than heat-activated resin bases without the use of denture adhesive. However, denture adhesive did negatively affect the retention of milled complete dentures. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry

  1. Effect of denture soft liner on mandibular ridge resorption in complete denture wearers after 6 and 12 months of denture insertion: A prospective randomized clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, B Dinesh; Jain, Veena; Pruthi, Gunjan; Mangtani, Nidhi; Pillai, Rajath S

    2017-01-01

    Soft liners act as a cushion between the denture base and the residual ridge. Hence, it is important to study their effect on resorption of mandibular denture bearing area. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of soft denture liner on mandibular ridge resorption after 1 year in completely denture wearers. Twenty-eight completely edentulous patients having age between 45 and 60 years with well-formed ridges in class I jaw relations were selected as per the inclusion and exclusion criterion. Randomization chart was used to enroll participants in experimental and control groups who were given mandibular dentures with and without soft denture liner, respectively. Vertical measurements were made on orthopantomograph and analyzed using Adobe Photoshop 7.0 software at five points, i.e., one at central incisor and two points at right and left first premolars and two in each first molar region. On application of repeated measures analysis of variance, both groups showed a significant change in bone height after denture delivery ( P denture liner significantly reduces the residual ridge resorption in complete denture wearers as compared to conventional denture wearers (without denture liner) over a period of 1 year.

  2. Transition of natural teeth to denture (Literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Anita Kristanti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aesthetic needs of patients with complete dentures is currently greatly increasing. To encounter of the stages and the process of complete dentures settlement that takes time, the operators must develop a variety of techniques to overcome them. One of it is by considering the transitional denture method to overcome the aesthetics problem during these stages. Various selection methods during this transitional stage are the making of overdenture, immediate dentures or denture after clearance all remaining natural teeth. Each one has its advantages and disadvantages. Principally, the aesthetic needs, adaptation process, masticatory function and the tissues health are the main reason of this transitional denture. As conclusion, dentures transition method is very helpfull to encounter the patients problems to finish the process of definitive dentures settlement.

  3. 21 CFR 872.3570 - OTC denture repair kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3570 OTC denture repair kit. (a) Identification... powder and liquid glues, that is intended to be applied permanently to a denture to mend cracks or breaks...

  4. Denture hyperplasia with areas simulating oral inverted ductal papilloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Pablo Agustin; Perez, Danyel Elias da Cruz; Jorge, Jacks; Rangel, Ana Lúcia Carrinho Ayrosa; León, Jorge Esquiche; Almeida, Oslei Paes de

    2005-07-01

    Denture hyperplasia is a reactive lesion of the oral mucosa, usually associated to an ill-fitting denture. This lesion is easily diagnosed and in some cases distinct microscopic variations such as osseous, oncocytic and squamous metaplasia may be found. These metaplastic alterations probably are associated with the lymphocytic infiltrate usually present in denture hyperplasia. We present a case of denture hyperplasia containing salivary gland tissue with ductal alterations mimicking an oral inverted ductal papilloma.

  5. The all-ceramic, inlay supported fixed partial denture. Part 2. Fixed partial denture design: a finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, M C; Field, C J; Swain, M V

    2011-09-01

    The clinical use of all-ceramic crowns and fixed partial dentures has seen widespread adoption over the past few years due to their increasing durability and longevity. However, the application of inlays as an abutment design has not been as readily embraced because of their relatively high failure rates. With the use of an idealized inlay preparation design and prosthesis form which better distributes the tensile stresses, it is possible to utilize the inlay as support for an all-ceramic fixed partial denture. Utilizing a three-dimensional finite element analysis, a direct comparison of the inlay supported all-ceramic bridge against the traditional full crown supported all-ceramic bridge is made. The results demonstrate that peak stresses in the inlay bridge are around 20% higher than in the full crown supported bridge with von Mises peaking at about 730 MPa when subjected to theoretical average maximum bite force in the molar region of 700 N, which is similar to the ultimate tensile strengths of current zirconia based ceramics. © 2011 Australian Dental Association.

  6. 21 CFR 872.3580 - Preformed gold denture tooth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... tooth in a fixed or removable partial denture. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Preformed gold denture tooth. 872.3580 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3580 Preformed gold denture tooth. (a...

  7. The antifungal activity and cytotoxicity of silver containing denture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antifungal activity and cytotoxicity of silver containing denture base material. A Kurt, G Erkose-Genc, M Uzun, Z Emrence, D Ustek, G Isik-Ozkol. Abstract. Objective: Denture base materials are susceptible to fungal adhesion, which is an important etiological issue in the pathogenesis of denture stomatitis. The purpose of ...

  8. 21 CFR 872.3300 - Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures. 872.3300... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3300 Hydrophilic resin coating for dentures. (a) Identification. A hydrophilic resin coating for dentures is a device that consists of a water...

  9. Efficacy of Denture Cleansers in Reducing Microbial Counts from Removable Partial Dentures: A Short-Term Clinical Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Lucena-Ferreira,Silvia Carneiro de; Cavalcanti,Indira Moraes Gomes; Cury,Altair Antoninha Del Bel

    2013-01-01

    This clinical study investigated if daily immersion in denture cleansers reduces microbial counts on removable partial denture's (RPD) biofilm. Twenty-five RPD wearer volunteers were selected and instructed to complement the hygiene of their dentures by immersing them in an enzymatic peroxide-based denture cleanser (Polident® 3 minute) once a day for 3 min for a period of 15 days. The biofilm was collected from RPD surfaces with a swab immediately before (baseline) and after the experimental ...

  10. The influence of patient characteristics on acrylic-based resilient denture liners embedded in maxillary complete dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Akina; Kimoto, Suguru; Saeki, Hiroyuki; Ono, Masanori; Furuse, Nobuhiko; Kawai, Yasuhiko

    2016-07-01

    A major complication associated with the use of resilient denture liners (RDLs) is a change in hardness over time. In vivo studies on the deterioration of RDLs over time are needed. We aimed to investigate the influence of patient characteristics on the hardness of acrylic-based RDLs (ARDLs) embedded in complete maxillary dentures. We hypothesized that 1 month after application of the ARDLs, the hardness would be influenced by age, saliva condition, occlusal force, smoking, drinking, denture wearing during sleeping, denture cleanser usage, and denture type. Thirty complete maxillary denture wearers were recruited after obtaining informed consent. One investigator measured the Shore D hardness of the commercially available ARDLs, Soften (SFT), FD Soft (FDS), and Bio Liner (BIO) using a Vesmeter(®). The salivary flow rates and pH values and the occlusal force were measured for all patients before initiation of the study. T-tests and Pearson's correlation coefficients were used for the statistical analyses. A p-value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Smoking, wearing dentures while sleeping, use of denture cleansers, and denture type were associated with an increase in the hardness of the RDLs. The resting saliva pH only influenced the hardness of the SFT ARDLs. Smoking, denture wearing while sleeping, denture cleanser usage, denture type, and resting saliva pH are important predictors of the deterioration of ARDLs over time. Copyright © 2015 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Maximizing mandibular prosthesis stability utilizing linear occlusion, occlusal plane selection, and centric recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Richard A; Williamson, Anne E; Bowley, John; Toothaker, Randy

    2004-03-01

    The stability of mandibular complete dentures may be improved by reducing the transverse forces on the denture base through linear (noninterceptive) occlusion, selecting an occlusal plane that reduces horizontal vectors of force at occlusal contact, and utilizing a central bearing intraoral gothic arch tracing to record jaw relations. This article is intended to acquaint the reader with one technique for providing stable complete denture prostheses using the aforementioned materials, devices, and procedures.

  12. Light weight dentures: An innovative technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sham Gundawar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Retention, stability and support are the basic principles on which the success of a complete denture relies. The severely resorbed maxillary and mandibular edentulous arches that are narrow and constricted with increased interarch space provide decreased support, retention and stability. To decrease the leverage, reduction in the weight of the prosthesis was recommended and also found beneficial. This article describes a simple procedure to reduce the weight of maxillary complete denture by use of an autopolymerizing acrylic resin shell which is incorporated during the packing stage.This method has the advantage of being easy and requires very little additional time.Hollow maxillary complete denture considerably reduces the weight of the prosthesis, which in turn prevents transmission of detrimental forces by reducing leverage action. This results in increased retention and stability and up to some extent it also preserves the existing residual alveolar ridge. The technique uses a clear matrix of trial denture to facilitate shaping of dough spacer to ensure an even thickness of acrylic to resist deformation and prevent seepage of saliva into the cavity making this technique more predictable. An autopolymerizing acrylic resin shell which creates hollow space and also has strength. Technique is simple to execute, easy economical and matching the shade of autopolymerizing acrylic resin with heat cures acrylic resin enhances esthetics. Light weight hollow dentures provide healthy and comfortable living for the geriatric edentulous patient.

  13. Dental health professional recommendation and consumer habits in denture cleansing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axe, Alyson S; Varghese, Roshan; Bosma, MaryLynn; Kitson, Nicola; Bradshaw, David J

    2016-02-01

    Regular cleaning of dentures is essential to the oral and general health of denture wearers. Only limited systematic data are available on the recommendations that dental health care professionals (DHCPs) make to patients for denture cleaning. Data on denture wearers' cleaning regimens are also lacking. The purpose of this study was to provide data on recommendations that DHCPs make to patients for denture cleaning and on the cleaning regimens of denture wearers. DHCPs (n=613), including dentists and hygienists, were surveyed in developed (Japan, USA, Italy) and developing (Brazil, India) countries. A questionnaire assessing a range of denture cleaning recommendations was used. The questions addressed products, frequency, how to use remedies, the suggested dilution and duration of cleansing treatment, the location of dentures while cleaning, and the reasoning behind the recommendation of particular products or modes of treatment. Denture cleansing methods and the routine of denture wearers in developed and developing countries were also surveyed with a questionnaire (n=2862) and a 1-week diary (n=1462). An average of more than 2 treatments was recommended by DHCPs. Specialist denture cleanser tablets, "regular" toothpaste, mouthwash, soap and water, denture paste, foam or liquid denture cleanser, and dishwashing detergents were most commonly recommended; other product recommendations included baking soda, vinegar, salt water, and bleach. More than 10% of DHCPs made no primary recommendation on cleaning. Denture tablets were more commonly recommended in developed countries, whereas toothpaste was the most common recommendation in developing countries. Denture wearers used products and methods similar to those recommended by DHCPs. Toothpaste, water, and mouthwash were used more frequently than denture tablets. More than 75% of denture wearers reported using denture cleanser tablets for more than 5 minutes, whereas soap and toothpaste were typically used for less

  14. Manufacturing hollow obturator with resilient denture liner on post hemimaxillectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Josef Kridanto Kamadjaja

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available A resilient denture liner is placed in the part of the hollow obturator base that contacts to post hemimaxillectomy mucosa. Replacing the resilient denture liner can makes the hollow obturator has an intimate contact with the mucosa, so it can prevents the mouth liquid enter to the cavum nasi and sinus, also eliminates painful because of using the hollow obturator. Resilient denture liner is a soft and resilient material that applied to the fitting surface of a denture in order to allow a more distribution of load. A case was reported about using the hollow obturator with resilient denture liner on post hemimaxillectomy to overcome these problems.

  15. Do flexible acrylic resin lingual flanges improve retention of mandibular complete dentures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed Elmorsy, Ayman Elmorsy; Ahmed Ibraheem, Eman Mostafa; Ela, Alaa Aboul; Fahmy, Ahmed; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the retention of conventional mandibular complete dentures with that of mandibular complete dentures having lingual flanges constructed with flexible acrylic resin "Versacryl." The study sample comprised 10 completely edentulous patients. Each patient received one maxillary complete denture and two mandibular complete dentures. One mandibular denture was made of conventional heat-cured acrylic resin and the other had its lingual flanges made of flexible acrylic resin Versacryl. Digital force-meter was used to measure retention of mandibular dentures at delivery and at 2 weeks and 45 days following denture insertion. The statistical analysis showed that at baseline and follow-up appointments, retention of mandibular complete dentures with flexible lingual flanges was significantly greater than retention of conventional mandibular dentures (P dentures, retention of dentures increased significantly over the follow-up period (P acrylic resin lingual flanges in the construction of mandibular complete dentures improved denture retention.

  16. Comparative study of Candida by conventional and CHROMagar method in non-denture and denture wearers by oral rinse technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Nayak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Candidal species colonizes the oral cavities of healthy individuals without dentures and also of denture wearers. Soft liners and tissue conditioning materials have been found to support the growth of Candida albicans which may predispose to lesions. The most important and common candidal species are C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. glabrata. C albicans is usually isolated from both the fitting surface of the denture and the denture-bearing mucosa of the affected patients. The aim of this study was to isolate, quantify, and speciate candidal species in non-denture wearers (controls and denture wearers (study group by the oral rinse technique. Isolation was done using Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA. Speciation was done using conventional methods like the germ tube test, carbohydrate fermentation test, urease test, as well as the CHROMagar method. Aims and Objective: 1 To assess the prevalence of Candida in non-denture wearers and in denture wearers by oral rinse technique, with isolation on SDA; 2 to speciate and quantify Candida in non-denture wearers and denture wearers by using conventional methods (germ tube test, carbohydrate fermentation test, urease test and the CHROMagar method; 3 to assess the influence of smoking and diabetes on candidal species among the denture wearers; and 4 to assess the sensitivity and specificity of SDA and CHRO Magar Materials and Methods: Salivary samples for Candida evaluation were collected from the subjects in sterile sample containers, using the oral rinse technique. Results: C glabrata was the most commonly found species among denture wearers and non-denture wearers both by conventional and CHROMagar methods. In males, C. albicans was the predominant species, whereas C. glabrata was the predominant species in females. Candidal colonization was higher in denture wearers compared to non-denture wearers, especially among females. The CHROMagar method was more rapid compared to conventional

  17. [Occlusal vertical dimension in removable complete dentures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Haan, R; Witter, D J

    2011-12-01

    In removable complete dentures, the occlusal vertical dimension is an important factor for patients' satisfaction with aesthetics. An excessively reduced occlusal vertical dimension is especially likely to lead to complaints about aesthetics, whereas an increased occlusal vertical dimension may lead to discomfort and a decision not to wear the complete dentures. There are various methods for determining the occlusal vertical dimension in complete dentures, based on the vertical dimension in the rest position of the mandible or on phonetics. However, none of the methods have proven to be clearly superior, in terms of reliability, than the others. The assessment of the occlusal vertical dimension will become more reliable if several methods are used simultaneously. Moreover, knowledge of the characteristics of the ageing face is essential.

  18. Wear resistance of injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamanaka, Ippei; Iwamoto, Misa; Lassila, Lippo V. J.; Vallittu, Pekka K.; Takahashi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective This study investigated the wear resistance of injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins using nanoindentation instrument. Materials and methods Six injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins (two polyamides, two polyesters, one polycarbonate, one polymethylmethacrylate [PMMA]) and a PMMA conventional heat-polymerized denture-based polymer control were tested. Elastic modulus, hardness, wear depth, and roughness were calculated using a nanoindentation instrument. Results Elastic modulus and hardness of the injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins were significantly lower than those of the PMMA conventional heat-polymerized denture-based polymer. Wear depth of polycarbonate and PMMA conventional heat-polymerized denture-based polymer were significantly higher than that of other injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins. The roughness of injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins was significantly more than that of PMMA conventional heat-polymerized denture-based polymer after testing. Conclusions Wear resistance of injection-molded thermoplastic denture base was low compared to PMMA conventional heat-polymerized denture-based polymers. PMID:28642909

  19. Midline Fractures in Single Maxillary Complete Acrylic vs Flexible Dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhiman, R K; Chowdhury, Sk Roy

    2009-04-01

    Patients using single maxillary denture against their natural mandibular teeth face the problem of midline fracture in their routine acrylic dentures. Various techniques have failed over the years to address the problem. In this study, flexible denture material (Lucitone) with injection moulding system has been used and evaluated for midline fracture in these patients. A total of 58 patients in the age group of 38 to 80 years, who had experienced midline fracture in their acrylic maxillary dentures were selected. They were provided with new dentures using flexible denture material. Various parameters, namely, mastication, phonetics, esthetics and comfort level were evaluated. Only two cases reported slight crack in the palatal region of the-maxillary dentures after 18 months of use. Mastication and phonetics were found to be improved with flexible dentures. The flexible denture is a promising material for preventing midline fractures in a single maxillary denture. It is well tolerated by the patients as compared to the methyl meth-acrylate dentures.

  20. Rehabilitation of failing dentition with interim immediate denture prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in therapy have helped patients with periodontal disease to retain part of their natural dentition for an extended period. These patients can be well served by properly designed removable partial dentures. For the patient facing the loss of all his/her remaining natural teeth, there are three treatment options. One is for the patient to have all remaining teeth extracted and wait for 6–8 weeks for the extraction sites to heal. The conventional complete denture is made following healing, leaving the patient without teeth not only during the healing phase but also during the time required for the fabrication of the conventional complete denture. A second option is to convert an existing removable partial denture into an interim immediate complete denture. A third option is to make a conventional immediate complete denture. The aim of this clinical report was to describe the fabrication of interim immediate denture in a patient with hopeless existing dentition.

  1. Finite element analysis of stress relaxation in soft denture liner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Y; Abe, Y; Okane, H; Tsuga, K

    2000-08-01

    To gather knowledge related to establishing criteria for selecting soft denture liners for individual patients, the effects of certain properties of soft denture liners on stress distribution were evaluated by two-dimensional finite element analysis. A partial mandibular edentulous ridge crest was modelled. Six combinations of thickness (mucosa: 1 or 2 mm; soft denture liner: 1, 2, or 3 mm) and 18 combinations of Young's modulus (mucosa: three kinds; soft denture liner: six kinds) were analysed. The ratio of maximum to minimum stress in the mucosa (stress ratio) was calculated to estimate stress concentration. In the case of thin mucosa (1 mm thickness), the lower the Young's modulus of the soft denture liner, the lower the stress ratio. However, if the soft denture liner had a lower Young's modulus than the mucosa, stress concentrated adversely. These results suggest that the elasticity of the soft denture liner should match the elasticity of the mucosa to obtain the optimum cushioning effect.

  2. [Gerontoprosthesis. Concept of rebuilding old complete dentures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marxkors, R; Mayer, K

    1990-04-01

    If aged patients who have been wearing their full dentures without complications so far, need further prothetic treatment, the dentist must not replace the old denture by a completely new one. It is better to rebuild it step by step. This demand is based on the following theses: --Nobody but the patient himself is able to perform functional movements. --Unless bite and occlusion are correct, patients are not able to perform accurate functional movements. --When bite and occlusion have been checked and, if necessary, improved, bases and alveolar ridges must be congruent.

  3. Removable denture-related oral mucosal lesions: descriptive clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökçen Akçiçek

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate whether there was a relationship between removable denture-related oral mucosal lesions and denture type, and demographic characteristics. Materials and Method: The age, sex, denture type, systemic condition and medication use, presence of denture-related oral mucosal lesions (DROML, their locations and patients’ awareness of above mentioned lesions were recorded for 199 patients. Pearson chi-square test was used to analyse the relationship between the DROML and denture type, and demographic characteristics of the patients. Results: Among the patients included to the study, 122 (61.3% were female and 77 (38.7% were male. Ninety-six patients (48.2% exhibited DROML, whereas 103 patients (51.8% had no DROML. No relationship was detected between DROML and age, and sex (p>0.05. The most commonly detected DROML was denture stomatitis (34.7%. Denture stomatitis was significantly more frequently seen in partial denture wearers (p<0.05, while epulis fissuratum and flabby ridge were statistically more frequent in complete denture wearers (p<0.001. Traumatic ulcer was more frequently found in mandibular complete denture wearers (p<0.05, while epulis fissuratum and flabby ridge were significantly more common in maxillary complete denture wearers (p<0.001. Among the patients with DROML, 57.3% stated that they were unaware of these lesions. Conclusion: In this study sample, the rate of DROML was high in patients wearing removable dentures (48.2%, and more than half of the patients with DROML were not aware of these lesions. Upon these findings, it is considered that removable denture wearers should follow the denture usage instructions and should be informed about the importance of periodic controls.

  4. Clinical application of removable partial dentures using thermoplastic resin. Part II: Material properties and clinical features of non-metal clasp dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fueki, Kenji; Ohkubo, Chikahiro; Yatabe, Masaru; Arakawa, Ichiro; Arita, Masahiro; Ino, Satoshi; Kanamori, Toshikazu; Kawai, Yasuhiko; Kawara, Misao; Komiyama, Osamu; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Hosoki, Maki; Masumi, Shin-ichi; Yamauchi, Mutsuo; Aita, Hideki; Ono, Takahiro; Kondo, Hisatomo; Tamaki, Katsushi; Matsuka, Yoshizo; Tsukasaki, Hiroaki; Fujisawa, Masanori; Baba, Kazuyoshi; Koyano, Kiyoshi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2014-04-01

    This position paper reviews physical and mechanical properties of thermoplastic resin used for non-metal clasp dentures, and describes feature of each thermoplastic resin in clinical application of non-metal clasp dentures and complications based on clinical experience of expert panels. Since products of thermoplastic resin have great variability in physical and mechanical properties, clinicians should utilize them with careful consideration of the specific properties of each product. In general, thermoplastic resin has lower color-stability and higher risk for fracture than polymethyl methacrylate. Additionally, the surface of thermoplastic resin becomes roughened more easily than polymethyl methacrylate. Studies related to material properties of thermoplastic resin, treatment efficacy and follow-up are insufficient to provide definitive conclusions at this time. Therefore, this position paper should be revised based on future studies and a clinical guideline should be provided. Copyright © 2014 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Contributions of edentulous mandibular alveolar ridge height and denture adhesive to complete denture retention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xingqi; Chen, Xinmin; Peng, Yan; Xu, Chao; Men, Qinglin

    2011-10-01

    The present paper is to investigate the relationship between height and stress-bearing area of mandibular alveolar ridge, their influence on retention of complete denture, and the effectiveness of denture adhesive (DA). Five mandibular edentulous models of different heights and a rabbit palate model were prepared in Die-Stone. Measurements were made on the heights and stress-bearing areas of mandibular alveolar ridge, the retention force of mandibular models 15 min after DA administration, and the retention force on the rabbit palate before and after adhering. All available data were analyzed statistically. Linear regression relationship was demonstrated between ridge height and bearing area, ridge height and retention force, and bearing area and retention force (Pridge directly correlate with the retention of complete denture, and DA significantly improves the retention ability of complete denture.

  6. The effectiveness of chemical denture cleansers and ultrasonic device in biofilm removal from complete dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Costa Cruz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Adequate denture hygiene can prevent and treat infection in edentulous patients. They are usually elderly and have difficulty for brushing their teeth. OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the efficacy of complete denture biofilm removal using chemical (alkaline peroxide-effervescent tablets, mechanical (ultrasonic and combined (association of the effervescent and ultrasonic methods. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Eighty complete denture wearers participated in the experiment for 21 days. They were distributed into 4 groups (n=20: (1 Brushing with water (Control; (2 Effervescent tablets (Corega Tabs; (3 Ultrasonic device (Ultrasonic Cleaner, model 2840 D; (4 Association of effervescent tablets and ultrasonic device. All groups brushed their dentures with a specific brush (Bitufo and water, 3 times a day, before applying their treatments. Denture biofilm was collected at baseline and after 21 days. To quantify the biofilm, the internal surfaces of the maxillary complete dentures were stained and photographed at 45º. The photographs were processed and the areas (total internal surface stained with biofilm quantified (Image Tool 2.02. The percentage of the biofilm was calculated by the ratio between the biofilm area multiplied by 100 and the total area of the internal surface of the maxillary complete denture. RESULTS: The Kruskal-Wallis test was used for comparison among groups followed by the Dunn multiple-comparison test. All tests were performed respecting a significance level of 0.05. Significant difference was found among the treatments (KW=21.18; P<0.001, the mean ranks for the treatments and results for Dunn multiple comparison test were: Control (60.9; Chemical (37.2; Mechanical (35.2 and Combined (29.1. CONCLUSION: The experimental methods were equally effective regarding the ability to remove biofilm and were superior to the control method (brushing with water. Immersion in alkaline peroxide and ultrasonic vibration can be used as auxiliary agents

  7. Improvdent: Improving dentures for patient benefit. A crossover randomised clinical trial comparing impression materials for complete dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gray Janine C

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background According to the UK Adult Dental Health Survey (2009 15% of adults aged 65–74, 30% aged 75–84 and 47% aged >85 years are edentulous and require complete dentures. Patients’ quality of life and nutrition status are affected by poor dentures. The quality of the dental impression is the most important issue for improving the fit and comfort of new dentures. There is paucity of RCT evidence for which impression material is best for complete dentures construction. This study aims to compare two impression materials for effectiveness and cost effectiveness. Methods/Design IMPROVDENT is a double-blind crossover trial comparing the use of alginate and silicone, two commonly used denture impression materials, in terms of patient preference and cost-effectiveness. Eighty five edentulous patients will be recruited and provided with two sets of dentures, similar in all aspects except for the impression material used (alginate or silicone. Patients will try both sets of dentures for a two-week period, unadjusted, to become accustomed to the feel of the new dentures (habituation period. Patients will then wear each set of dentures for a period of 8 weeks (in random order during which time the dentures will be adjusted for optimum comfort. Finally, patients will be given both sets of dentures for a further two weeks to wear whichever denture they prefer (confirmation period. Patients will be asked about quality of life and to rate dentures on function and comfort at the end of each trial period and asked which set they prefer at the end of the habituation period (unadjusted denture preference and confirmation period (adjusted denture preference. A health economic evaluation will estimate incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of producing dentures from the two materials. A qualitative study will investigate the impact of dentures on behaviour and quality of life. Funding: IMPROVDENT is funded by NIHR RfPB (PB-PG-0408-16300. Discussion

  8. [Elderly people and removable partial dentures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baat, C. de

    2009-01-01

    The most frequently reported disadvantages of removable partial dentures are the more demanding daily oral hygiene self-care, especially for people who already experience difficulties in self-care, and the possible harmful influence on the remaining dentition. These disadvantages can be expressed in

  9. Dual Component Removable Partial Denture shows improved ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dual Component Removable Partial Denture (DuCo RPD) is composed of a double base; lower and upper. The lower base, where the artificial teeth are attached, acts as a support and is in contact with the alveolar ridges and oral mucosa. Clasps are designed on the upper base, which acts towards the retention and ...

  10. Proposed technique for fabricating complete denture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulsalam Ali Zwiad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Reduction of the visits for fabricating complete dentures are welcomed by both dentists and patients and this might be an aspect of the new changes in prosthodontic treatment according to the suggested new methods. Clinical Innovation: Complete dentures fabricated by the technique described in this report reduce processing time, cost and efforts since the technique does not require the use of gypsum materials, metal flasks or other related materials to obtain a mold for packing the heat cured acrylic resin as might be needed with the conventional method. This method requires only an appropriate volume of silicone impression material to provide the required mold and a heat pressure machine for processing and polymerization of the heat-cured acrylic resin. Although this technique might be difficult to be applicable by all dentist but it could be consider an advisable method. Discussion: Because the record base in this technique is made of heat cured resin, it provides a reliable denture base with better retention and stability and it overcomes the shortcomings that may be faced during registration of vertical dimension. This technique meets the basic requirements for a successful complete denture which is well tolerated by the patient′s mouth.

  11. Dual Component Removable Partial Denture shows improved ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-02-18

    Feb 18, 2009 ... performed for three years to survey body weight, physical signs, facial symmetry, dental caries, alveolar bone density ... symmetry, dental caries, alveolar bone density and periodontal status were not statistically different between the ..... provisional to an existing removable partial denture. J. Prosthodont.

  12. Adherence of Candida to complete denture surfaces in vitro: A comparison of conventional and CAD/CAM complete dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Fouzan, Afnan F; Al-Mejrad, Lamya A; Albarrag, Ahmed M

    2017-10-01

    The goal of this study was to compare the adhesion of Candida albicans to the surfaces of CAD/CAM and conventionally fabricated complete denture bases. Twenty discs of acrylic resin poly (methyl methacrylate) were fabricated with CAD/CAM and conventional procedures (heat-polymerized acrylic resin). The specimens were divided into two groups: 10 discs were fabricated using the CAD/CAM procedure (Wieland Digital Denture Ivoclar Vivadent), and 10 discs were fabricated using a conventional flasking and pressure-pack technique. Candida colonization was performed on all the specimens using four Candida albicans isolates. The difference in Candida albicans adhesion on the discs was evaluated. The number of adherent yeast cells was calculated by the colony-forming units (CFU) and by Fluorescence microscopy. There was a significant difference in the adhesion of Candida albicans to the complete denture bases created with CAD/CAM and the adhesion to those created with the conventional procedure. The CAD/CAM denture bases exhibited less adhesion of Candida albicans than did the denture bases created with the conventional procedure ( P CAD/CAM procedure for fabricating complete dentures showed promising potential for reducing the adherence of Candida to the denture base surface. Clinical Implications. Complete dentures made with the CAD/CAM procedure might decrease the incidence of denture stomatitis compared with conventional dentures.

  13. Polyamide as a Denture Base Material: A Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Vojdani, Mahroo; Giti, Rashin

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the biocompatibility, physical, and mechanical properties of the polyamide denture base materials. An electronic search of scientific papers from 1990-2014 was carried out using PubMed, Scopus and Wiley Inter Science engines using the search terms “nylon denture base” and “polyamide denture base”. Searching the key words yielded a total of 82 articles. By application of inclusion criteria, the obtained results were further reduced to 24 citations recr...

  14. Factors influencing patients’ satisfaction with complete dentures: a qualitative study.

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Jessica de Cassia Motta; Departamento de Odontologia – Univ de Taubaté – Taubaté – SP – Brazil.; dos Santos, Jarbas Francisco Fernandes; Departamento de Odontologia – Univ de Taubaté – Taubaté – SP – Brazil.; Marchini, Leonardo; College of Dentistry – University of Iowa – Iowa City – IA – USA.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The treatment most used worldwide for edentulism is conventional complete dentures, and the most important factor for the success of denture treatment seems to be patient satisfaction. The present study aims to use a qualitative approach to investigate factors that were previously associated with patient satisfaction with dentures by quantitative techniques (correlational studies). Material and methods: Twenty patients (12 women and 8 men, age 59-87) participated in open and semi-s...

  15. ORAL HYGIENE OF PROSTHETIC DENTURE USER IN KODINGARENG ISLAND

    OpenAIRE

    NUR, NURUL KUSUMADEWI S.KG

    2008-01-01

    Objectives:to determine the level of oral hygiene for prosthetic denture user, especially for full-denture in Kodingareng Island. This researchincluded the distribution level of prosthetic denture user based on age and education.Methods: the method that used in this research is observational descriptive withcross sectional-studyas the research design. Variable result of the research determined in to 3, those are bad, middle, and good. Result:the highest percentage o...

  16. The Effect of Two Types of Denture Adhesive on the Satisfaction Parameters of Complete Denture Wearers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzin M

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Patient satisfaction is highly influenced by the retention of the denture. In some instances using denture adhesives may help the patient to achieve this goal. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the participants’ ’opinion concerning the effectiveness of two types of denture adhesives having the same composition (Fixative-powder, Protefix-cream. Materials and Methods: Forty healthy patients (25 Males and 15 Fe-males who visited the Department of Prosthodontics of Shiraz Dentistry School were selected. The oral cavity was examined and patients with oral ulcers, history of allergic reaction, severe xerostomia, red, white and/or red and white lesions were excluded. The subjects were instructed to receive a sequence of treatment protocols. All patients applied Fixative-powder on the dentures for seven days. The Participants were asked to fill a question-naire to include their opinion regarding the strength, biocompatibility, convenience and masticatory ability of the adhesive. On the next seven days, the patients were asked not to use the adhesives and they completed the same questionnaire again. Finally, all participants were asked to apply Protefix-cream on their dentures for a week followed by no cream applica-tion for another 7 days. These patients answered the same questionnaire and data were collected and analyzed using paired-samples t-test and Chi-square test. Result: Denture adhesives significantly improved the overall satisfaction level of the patients (p =0.01. When testing the fixative powder, the satis-faction score of the participants during the first week (powder application and the 2nd weak (no application was 19.95±3.76 and 26.2±2.82, respec-tively. The overall satisfaction rate of the patients using the Protefix adhe-sive was 19.35±5.48 in the third week (adhesive application and 25.85± 4.35 in the fourth week (no application. Conclusions: The study clarified that applying denture

  17. A study of dentists’ preferences for the restoration of shortened dental arches with partial dentures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria; Ibraheem, Shukran; Al-Hallak, Khaled Rateb; Ali El Khalifa, Mohammed Othman; Baroudi, Kusai

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to use a utility method in order to assess dentists’ preferences for the restoration of shortened dental arches (SDAs) with partial dentures. Also, the impact of patient age and length of the SDA on dentists’ preferences for the partial dentures was investigated. Materials and Methods: Totally, 104 subjects holding a basic degree in dentistry and working as staff members in a private dental college in Saudi Arabia were interviewed and presented with 12 scenarios for patients of different ages and mandibular SDAs of varying length. Participants were asked to indicate on a standardized visual analog scale how they would value the health of the patient's mouth if the mandibular SDAs were restored with cobalt-chromium removable partial dentures (RPDs). Results: With a utility value of 0.0 representing the worst possible health state for a mouth and 1.0 representing the best, dentists’ average utility value of the RPD for the SDAs was 0.49 (sd= 0.15). Mean utility scores of the RPDs across the 12 SDA scenarios ranged between 0.35 and 0.61. RPDs that restored the extremely SDAs attracted the highest utility values and dentists’ utility of the RPD significantly increased with the increase in the number of missing posterior teeth. No significant differences in dentists’ mean utility values for the RPD were identified among SDA scenarios for patients of different ages. Conclusion: Restoration of the mandibular SDAs by RPDs is not a highly preferred treatment option among the surveyed group of dentists. Length of the SDA affects dentists’ preferences for the RPD, but patient age does not. PMID:26038647

  18. Properties of injection-molded thermoplastic polyester denture base resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamanaka, Ippei; Takahashi, Yutaka; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated the properties of injection-molded thermoplastic polyester denture base resins. Two injection-molded thermoplastic polyester denture base resins (polyethylene terephthalate copolymer and polycycloalkylene terephthalate copolymer) were tested. Specimens of each denture base material were fabricated for flexural properties testing, Charpy impact testing and shear bond testing (n = 10). The flexural strength at the proportional limit, elastic modulus, Charpy impact strength and the shear bond strength of the two denture base materials were estimated. The polycycloalkylene terephthalate copolymer denture base resin had significantly lower flexural strength at the proportional limit, lower elastic modulus, higher impact strength and lower shear bond strength compared to the polyethylene terephthalate copolymer denture base resin. The properties of the injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins composed of polyethylene terephthalate copolymer and polycycloalkylene terephthalate copolymer were different from each other. The polycycloalkylene terephthalate copolymer denture base resin had significantly lower flexural strength at the proportional limit, lower elastic modulus, higher impact strength and lower shear bond strength compared to the polyethylene terephthalate copolymer denture base resin.

  19. The social solution-denture esthetics, phonetics, and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roumanas, Eleni D

    2009-02-01

    Tooth loss and rehabilitation with dentures can have tremendous patient impact and social implications. In an image-conscious society, dentures restore a sense of normalcy and allow the patient the ability to interact with others. The most frequent denture complaints include chewing discomfort and objectionable esthetics and phonetics. Determining patient expectations and their influence on patient satisfaction with treatment is critical. Current evidence on functional outcomes, patient satisfaction, and cost-effectiveness of treatment with conventional dentures versus implants are important factors to consider during treatment planning for the edentulous patient. The purpose of this article is to review some exemplar literature for the successful treatment of the edentulous patient.

  20. Improved denture retention in patients with retracted tongues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Hua; Chen, Jen-Hao; Lee, Huey-Er; Chang, Hong-Po; Chen, Hong-Sen; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Chou, Tsau-Mau

    2009-08-01

    Patients who wear mandibular dentures and hold their tongues in retracted positions alter the dimensions of the sublingual space and disrupt the peripheral seal that is needed for optimal denture retention. The authors studied whether retention could be improved if patients moved their tongues from a retracted resting position to an ideal resting position. The authors observed and classified the mandibular residual ridge morphologies of 85 participants who wore complete dentures. The authors recorded and compared the retention of the mandibular denture before and after repositioning the tongue to the ideal resting position. When the participants' tongues were in a retracted resting position, the average retention of the mandibular denture was 75.38 gram weight (+/- 81.83 standard deviation [SD]). After participants repositioned their tongues to the ideal resting position, the average retention of the mandibular denture was 118.89 gw (+/- 93.00 SD), an increase of 57.73 percent. In all morphological classes, when participants held their tongues in the ideal resting position, the average mandibular denture retention increased by 57.73 percent, a statistically significant improvement compared with when participants held their tongues in a retracted resting position. Clinicians are encouraged to evaluate carefully the tongue resting position in all patients who wear dentures, help create reasonable therapeutic expectations by informing patients about the significant effect that tongue position will have on future denture retention and provide helpful neuromuscular training for patients with retracted-tongue habits.

  1. Temporal changes of denture plaque microbiologic composition evaluated in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana; da Silva, Wander José; Cenci, Maximiliano Sérgio; Cury, Altair Antoninha Del Bel

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed how biofilm composition is affected by both time and denture material in complete denture wearers. Biofilm was formed during two phases of 14 days on acrylic resin and denture liner specimens mounted on the buccal surface of the mandibular dentures of 21 patients. Specimens were removed randomly on days 2, 7, and 14. Higher counts of Candida glabrata, total streptococci, Actinomyces, total microorganisms, and percentage of Actinomyces were observed after 7 and 14 days (P < .05). C glabrata was the only species to show progressively rising counts from day 2 to 14, while no difference was found in biofilm composition among the materials tested.

  2. Caracterização de um pré-impregnado aeronáutico por FT-IR e análise térmica Characterization of pre-impregnated of epoxy resin/carbon fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanesa C. G. M. Ferrari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho consiste na caracterização de um pré-impregnado ("prepreg" de resina epoxídica/fibra de carbono, usando-se espectroscopia no infravermelho com transformada de Fourier (FT-IR, análise termogravimétrica (TG, calorimetria exploratória diferencial (DSC e análise térmica dinâmico-mecânica (DMTA. A análise por FT-IR foi realizada nos modos de transmissão (pastilha de KBr, pirólise em bico de Bunsen e controlada e detecção fotoacústica (PAS. Os espectros de FT-IR de transmissão revelaram a presença de resina epoxídica, grupos ciano, amínicos e bisfenol A, que possibilitaram identificar o provável agente de cura:a cianoguanidina (ou dicianodiamida do sistema epoxídico. Os espectros de FT-IR/PAS permitiram acompanhar as alterações espectrométricas causadas pela cura. A análise térmica auxiliou na observação e compreensão dos eventos durante o processo de cura, etapas de gelificação e vitrificação, e da influência destas nas temperaturas de transição vítrea (Tg do material curado e na escolha do intervalo de temperatura de cura, que é um dos parâmetros mais importantes do processo produtivo.This work explores the characterization of pre-impregnated ("prepreg" materials made with an epoxy resin/carbon fiber, using FT-IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetry (TG, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA. FT-IR spectroscopy was used in the transmission mode (KBr pellets, pyrolysis without control and controlled pyrolysis and photoacoustic detection (FT-IR/PAS. The transmission FT-IR spectra revealed the presence of epoxy resin, cyano groups, amine and bisphenol A, which allowed us to identify the probable agent of cure: cyanoguanidine (or DCD. With FT-IR/PAS it was possible to monitor spectrometric changes caused by curing. The thermal analysis assisted in observing and understanding events during the curing process, including the gelation and vitrification steps. It

  3. Effect of microwave cured acrylic resin on candidal growth in complete denture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmy, A.H.M.

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of heat-cured acrylic resin denture base and microwave-cured acrylic resin denture base on candidal growth . Seven completely edentulous male patients with on history of denture wearing participated in this study. all the selected patients were re-habilitated by mucosa supported complete dentures .The dentures were constructed from conventional heat-cured acrylic resin denture base following monoplane concept of occlusion. Before dismissing the patients and one month after denture insertion, salivary samples were collected according to oral rinse technique. one month resting period was allowed so as candidal count can reach to normal, then dentures were re based using microwave-cured acrylic denture base, before denture insertion and one month after denture insertion, salivary sample were collected before and one month following the same oral rinse technique.

  4. Denture quality has a minimal effect on health-related quality of life in patients with removable dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, M; John, M T; Tsukasaki, H; Furuyama, C; Baba, K

    2011-11-01

    The present study examined the association of denture quality and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with removable dentures. In a study of 171 consecutive patients with removable partial dentures or complete dentures (mean age: 68·0 ± 9·3 years) at a university-based prosthodontic clinic, dentists rated two aspects of denture quality (stability and aesthetics) using a 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS). HRQoL was evaluated using the mental and physical component summary (MCS and PCS) scores of the Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form 36-Item Health Survey (SF-36). Oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) was evaluated using the Oral Health Impact Profile-Japanese version (OHIP-J). The associations among denture quality, OHRQoL, and HRQoL were examined by linear regression models. Bivariable linear regression analyses revealed that denture stability was significantly associated with the SF-36 MCS [regression coefficient = 0·52 for a 10-unit increase in denture stability on a 0-100 VAS, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0·03-1·00, P = 0·04], but not with the PCS (0·11, 95% CI: -0·49 to 0·70). Denture aesthetics was not related to the PCS or the MCS (0·22, 95% CI: -0·44 to 0·88 or 0·07, 95%CI: -0·47 to 0·62). When OHIP-J was added to the regression model, this variable was substantially and significantly associated with the MCS and PCS summary scores; in addition, the regression coefficient for denture quality decreased in magnitude and was statistically nonsignificant in all analyses. The quality of removable dentures had a minimal effect on HRQoL in patients with removable dentures, and this association was mediated by OHRQoL. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Effect of implant support on mandibular distal extension removable partial dentures: relationship between denture supporting area and stress distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Maki; Suzuki, Yasunori; Kurihara, Daisuke; Shimpo, Hidemasa; Ohkubo, Chikahiro

    2013-04-01

    This study explored the relationship between implant support and the denture-supporting area by comparing the stability of an implant-supported distal extension removable partial denture and a conventional distal extension removable partial denture. A model simulating a mandibular bilateral distal extension missing (#34-37 and #44-47) was fabricated using silicone impression material as soft tissue (2 mm thick) on an epoxy resin bone model. The denture base was reduced by 5 mm cutting part of both the retromolar pad and the lingual border. Loads of up to 5 kg were applied, and the pressure and displacement of the RPDs were simultaneously measured and analyzed using the Wilcoxon test (αremovable partial denture (ISRPD) was significantly less than on the conventional RPD (CRPD). As the supporting area of the denture base decreased, the pressure and the denture displacement of the CRPD were greater than for the ISRPD. This study indicated that implant placement at the distal edentulous ridge can prevent denture displacement of the distal extension bases, regardless of the supporting area of the denture base. Copyright © 2013 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Relationship among local and functional factors in the development of denture stomatitis in denture wearers in northern Brazil

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    Lurdete Maria Rocha GAUCH

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship among functional and qualitative factors in the development of denture stomatitis (DS (according to Newton's classification in acrylic-based denture wearers residents from northern Brazil.MATERIAL AND METHOD: A total of 99 patients who wore partial or total acrylic resin-based upper dentures were included in this study. The subjects completed an epidemiological data form that includes the patient's gender, age, local factors (hygiene habits, remove denture to sleep, use of mouthwash, present condition of the denture, age of the denture and functional factors (vertical dimension at rest, vertical dimension of occlusion, occlusion, retention, and static and dynamic stability. To detect yeasts, samples were collected from the inner surface of the dentures and from the palatal mucosa in contact with it. Subsequently, the samples were cultured on Sabouraud dextrose agar, observing macro and microscopic characteristics.RESULT: In the present study, we did not find any significant relationship between the gender and disease onset. Based on the Newton classification, 36.3% of the patients presented with DS and 89.0% were colonized by yeasts; of these subjects, 50% had type I lesions, 33.3% had type II lesions, and 16.6% had type III lesions. All of the qualitative and local factors, except the use of mouthwash, were clinically relevant to the development of disease.CONCLUSION: Denture stomatitis in denture users in northern Brazil was multifactorial, involving local, functional and microbiological factors.

  7. Esthetic double-structure fixed partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravasini, G; Ugolini, G; Ravasini, F

    1996-04-01

    A new technical procedure for fixed partial dentures and single inlays allows the use of a metal supporting structure with independent ceramic coverage. The advantages of the technique are the bonding of metal to beveled dentinal margins with conventional cement and the acid-etched resin composite cementation of the ceramic, which permits more conservative preparation of the teeth. The complexity of the structure, the laboratory costs, and the doubling of the cementation procedures are the main disadvantages of the technique.

  8. Comparison of the Effect of two Denture Cleansers on Tensile bond Strength of a Denture Liner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzin, M; Bahrani, F; Adelpour, E

    2013-09-01

    One of the most clinical challenging issues in prosthodontics is debonding of soft liners from the denture base. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare tensile bond strength between soft liner and heat-cured acrylic resin when immersed in two different types of denture cleanser and distilled water, at different period of times. In this experimental in vivo study, 238 heat-cured acrylic blocks were made. A soft liner was embedded between the acrylic blocks. Samples were divided into four groups: 17 samples were in the control group and were not soaked in any solution .The remaining samples were divided into 3 groups (Distilled water, Calgon and Fittydent). Each group was then subdivided into two subcategories, regarding the immersion time variable; 15 and 45 minutes. All samples were placed in tension force and tensile bond strength was recorded with the testing machine. One- way ANOVA and Tucky HSD post-hoc test were adopted to analyze the yielded data (α> 0.05). Specimens which were immersed in two denture cleansers (Fittydent and Calgon) and in distilled water showed significant difference (p= 0.001) in bonding strength when compared to the control group. The subjects immersed in denture cleanser solutions and distilled water did not reveal any significant difference (p= 0.90). For all groups; most of the bonding failures (72%) were cohesive type. The effect of the denture cleansers and distilled water on the bond strength was not statistically different; however, the difference was significant between the immersed groups with the non-immersed group. Moreover, type of the denture cleanser did not show any effect on the tensile strength. The tensile strength increases with time of immersion.

  9. Long-Term Soft Denture Lining Materials

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    Grzegorz Chladek

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Long-term soft denture lining (LTSDL materials are used to alleviate the trauma associated with wearing complete dentures. Despite their established clinical efficacy, the use of LTSDLs has been limited due to the unfavorable effects of the oral environment on some of their mechanical and performance characteristics. The unresolved issue of LTSDL colonization by Candida albicans is particularly problematic. Silicone-based LTSDL (SLTSDL materials, which are characterized by more stable hardness, sorption and solubility than acrylic-based LTSDLs (ALTSDLs, are currently the most commonly used LTSDLs. However, SLTSDLs are more prone to debonding from the denture base. Moreover, due to their limitations, the available methods for determining bond strength do not fully reflect the actual stability of these materials under clinical conditions. SLTSDL materials exhibit favorable viscoelastic properties compared with ALTSDLs. Furthermore, all of the lining materials exhibit an aging solution-specific tendency toward discoloration, and the available cleansers are not fully effective and can alter the mechanical properties of LTSDLs. Future studies are needed to improve the microbiological resistance of LTSDLs, as well as some of their performance characteristics.

  10. Advances in Soft Denture Liners: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashem, Mohammed Ibrahim

    2015-04-01

    Soft denture liners are used in complete and partial removable dentures to distribute functional loads homogeneously on the denture-bearing tissues. These materials are recommended in cases of irregular bone resorption, bony undercuts, thin atrophic mucosa, immediate prosthesis, healing after implant placement, and for patients with bruxism and xerostomia. The resilient lining materials can be categorized as plasticized acrylic resins or silicone elastomers. The plasticized acrylic resin comprises of acrylic polymers and copolymers, a liquid containing an acrylic monomer and plasticisers, such as ethyl alcohol and/or ethyl acetate responsible for preserving the material softness. The silicone elastomers, consisting of dimethylsiloxane polymers, with a chemical composition similar to that of the silicone impression materials devoid of leachable plasticisers, retain their elastic properties for prolonged periods. Most of the currently available materials have several disadvantages, including color stability, long-term resiliency, abrasion resistance, bond strength and porosity. Several modifications have been done recently to overcome of these disadvantages of the soft liners. The current review summarizes the recent developments in soft liners.

  11. 21 CFR 872.3560 - OTC denture reliner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... OTC denture reliner is a device consisting of a material such as plastic resin that is intended to be... 10993 ‘Biological Evaluation of Medical Devices—Part I: Evaluation and Testing,’ ” and (2) “OTC Denture...

  12. Mechanical properties of denture base resins: An evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooran Chand

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion: The heat cure denture base material D (Trevalon "HI" was the strongest and C (Trevalon was the weakest among all materials used in this study. The study showed that the deflection of various denture base resins (A to D increases proportionately with the increase in load.

  13. New clinical technique for fabrication immediate partial denture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulsalam Ali Zwiad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Immediate partial denture is a choice of treatment due to various cases of teeth extraction such as badly carious teeth, periodontal disease, eruption problems, trauma, and other reasons. Many choices are used to replace the lost teeth; one of these choices is a removable plastic denture in which hot cured acrylic resin should be used to fabricate such denture. Aim of Study: To provide an applicable technique to fabricate an immediate partial denture by reducing and declining the prosthetic steps and some materials in proportional to the conventional method. Clinical Procedures: Maxillary and mandibular stone casts are mounted to a simple articulator and the procedures are explained as step by step to fabricate an immediate partial denture without using the conventional methods and material, just using a small quantity of white cold cure acrylic resin to fabricate the artificial teeth, hot cure acrylic resin for the denture base and mold made of a silicon impression material are used to fabricate an immediate partial denture. Conclusion: The finished immediate partial denture showed a good retention and produced the exact shapes and sizes of the extracted teeth with low cost and less time for a dentist and patient.

  14. Trial of an experimental castor oil solution for cleaning dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Ingrid Machado de; Andrade, Kelly Machado de; Pisani, Marina Xavier; Silva-Lovato, Cláudia Helena; de Souza, Raphael Freitas; Paranhos, Helena de Freitas Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Denture hygiene is essential because denture biofilm is involved in oral infections and systemic diseases. Although there are chemical agents available on the market, none of them have ideal properties and research on such products is still necessary. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a castor bean (Ricinus communis)-based solution for removing denture biofilm, compared to two traditional products (sodium hypochlorite and alkaline peroxide). Fifty maxillary complete denture wearers were instructed to brush their dentures after meals and to immerse their dentures once a day in the following solutions: Saline (20 min; control), Polident alkaline peroxide (3 min), NaOCl (20 min) and 2% castor oil solution (20 min). Participants used each solution for a period of 7 consecutive days, according to a random sequence. After each period, the internal surfaces of maxillary complete dentures were stained with a disclosing solution (1% neutral red), photographed and the disclosed biofilm was quantified with the aid of specific software. The influence of treatments on results was verified by the Friedman test (α=0.05). Tested solutions presented significant difference (Fr=51.67; pcastor oil presented intermediate results (median: 1.0% and 1.5%, respectively). It can be concluded that the castor oil solution tested in this study was comparable to alkaline peroxide in terms of efficiency in denture biofilm removal.

  15. The Antifungal Activity and Cytotoxicity of Silver Containing Denture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-10-30

    Oct 30, 2015 ... cytotoxicity of denture base material containing silver microparticles. Materials and Methods: The polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) denture base material was used, and silver microparticles were added to the polymer ... The antifungal properties of these. A Kurt, G Erkose-Genc1, M Uzun1, Z Emrence2, ...

  16. [Oral mucosa reaction in patients adapting to removable dentures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iordanishvili, A K; Soldatova, L N; Pihur, O L; Mihajlova, E S; Peremyshlenko, A S; Soldatov, V S

    Oral mucosa reaction of prosthetic bed to the removable acrylic dentures was evaluated in 43 patients (12 male and 31 female) aged 56-69 years with partial and full teeth loss in one or both jaws. Patients of the first (control) group (17 patients) were not using additional tools improving fixation of the removable dentures during adaptation period, while patients of the second (main) group (26 patients) used Corega cream for dentures fixation for 30 days follow-up. Oral mucosa assessment was carried out on 3-4 and 28-30 day of dentures use by 3 end points: pain syndrome, moisture level, inflammation of a prosthetic bed. The results proved Corega cream to improve prosthetic bed mucosa condition reducing inflammatory response to polymeric materials of removable dentures basis.

  17. Clinical evaluation of a new resilient denture liner in long-term use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkawa, S; Matsukawa, T; Nagasawa, T; Tsuru, H

    1989-12-01

    The new resilient denture liner "M" was evaluated for adhesion, color stability, surface texture, tissue response, deterioration and denture base stability, at periods of 1 month, 3 months and about 30 months after denture liner application. At the observation of approximately 30 months, the usage of 17 dentures had been discontinued within 2 years, and 6 dentures continued to be used. It could be considered that the main reasons why 17 dentures were discontinued were poor fitting caused by deterioration, and a decrease in the strength of the denture base caused by the denture liner lining. It was suggested that "M" was appropriate for long-term use (about 2 to 3 years), if patients faithfully practice denture cleaning, and if the strength of denture base is considered.

  18. Maxillary zirconia implant fixed partial dentures opposing an acrylic resin implant fixed complete denture: a two-year clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Paul P; Henegbarth, Ernst A; Lang, Lisa A

    2007-06-01

    The fabrication of fixed implant-supported prostheses for edentulous patients may be performed using all-ceramic or acrylic resin materials. This clinical report describes the fabrication and 2-year follow-up of maxillary zirconia implant fixed partial dentures opposing a mandibular acrylic resin screw-retained fixed complete denture.

  19. Do flexible acrylic resin lingual flanges improve retention of mandibular complete dentures?

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed Elmorsy, Ayman Elmorsy; Ahmed Ibraheem, Eman Mostafa; Ela, Alaa Aboul; Fahmy, Ahmed; Nassani, Mohammad Zakaria

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the retention of conventional mandibular complete dentures with that of mandibular complete dentures having lingual flanges constructed with flexible acrylic resin ?Versacryl.? Materials and Methods: The study sample comprised 10 completely edentulous patients. Each patient received one maxillary complete denture and two mandibular complete dentures. One mandibular denture was made of conventional heat-cured acrylic resin and the other had its ...

  20. The behavior of implant-supported dentures and abutments using the cemented cylinder technique with different resinous cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivete Aparecida de Mathias Sartori

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluate the behavior of implant-supported dentures and their components, made by cemented cylinder technique, using threetypes of resin cements. Methods: Fifty three patients, of whom 26 were women and 27 men, aged between 25 and 82 years. Results: With partial (54.43% and total (45.57% implant-supported dentures, of the Cone Morse, external and internal hexagon types (Neodent®, Curitiba, Brazil, totaling 237 fixations, were analyzed. The resin cements used were Panavia® (21.94%, EnForce® (58.23% and Rely X® (19.83% and the components were used in accordance with the Laboratory Immediate Loading - Neodent® sequence. The period of time of denture use ranged between 1 and 5 years. The results reported that 5(2.1% cylinders were loosened from metal structure (both belonging to Rely X group, 2(0.48% implants were lost after the first year of use, 16(6.75% denture retention screws wereloosened and 31(13.08% abutment screws were unloosened.Conclusion: The reasons for these failures probably are: metal structure internal retention failure, occlusal pattern, cementation technique and loading conditions. The cemented cylinder technique was effective when used in partial and total implant-supported rehabilitations, keeping prosthetic components stable, despite the resin cement utilized. However, further clinical studies must be conducted.

  1. Comparison of bond strength of auto polymerizing, heat cure soft denture liners with denture base resin - An In Vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Neerja; Datta, Kusum

    2010-03-01

    Optimum bond strength between denture soft liner and denture base resin is very important for the success of any denture prosthesis. The tensile bond strength of two commercially available silicone-based heat cured (Molloplast B) and auto polymerizing (Mollosil) was compared with denture base material (trevalon). Molloplast B-trevalon bond in both un-polymerized (dough stage) and already polymerized forms were also compared. Lloyds Universal testing machine was used to test 60 samples. Molloplast B bond strength was greater than Mollosil soft denture liner; it was even greater when packed against trevalon in an un-polymerized form than an already polymerized trevalon using primo adhesive. Both the soft lining materials used are acceptable for clinical usage.

  2. Scratch test of thermoplastic denture base resins for non-metal clasp dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawara, Misao; Iwata, Yoshihiro; Iwasaki, Masatoshi; Komoda, Yoshihiro; Iida, Takashi; Asano, Takashi; Komiyama, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    Several thermoplastic denture base resins have been introduced for the fabrication of non-metal clasp dentures. Although the surface of these materials is easily damaged, the surface roughness and characteristics of scratches created have not been evaluated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the surface roughness of thermoplastic resins using a scratch test for the development of future materials. Four thermoplastic (polyamide: Valplast(®); VLP and Lucitone FRS(®); FRS, polyethylene terephthalate: EstheShot(®); ES, and polyester: EstheShot Bright(®); ESB) and two conventional acrylic (Heat-polymerizing: Urban(®); HC, and Pour type auto-polymerizing: Pro-Cast DSP(®); PR) denture base resins were examined. Eight specimens, approximately 10mm×10mm×30mm in size, of each material were fabricated. Scratch test was performed by a scratch tester with a diamond indenter of 10-μm radius and cone angle 90°, applying a constant load of 500mN, and 2-mm-long scratches were made. The scratch marks were studied under 3D laser measuring microscope and cross-section profiles at approximately 0.5mm, 1.0mm, and 1.5mm from the starting point were extracted and measured with analysis software. Data from 24 cross-section profiles in each denture base material were analyzed. The maximum depths of ES, ESB and FRS were greater than VLP, PR and HC, and the scratch widths of ES, ESB, FRS and VPL were greater than PR and HC. The results showed that the surface of thermoplastic denture base resins was easily damaged compared to polymethyl methacrylate. Copyright © 2013 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. COMPARISON OF BOND STRENGTH OF THREE DENTURE TEETH MADE IN IRAN WITH RESIN BASES AND IVOCLAR DENTURE TEETH

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    R MOSHARRAF

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. One of the most common repairs in removable prostheses is, substitution debonded teeth in their places. In the other hand, with the incrased use of implants & the commensurate increase in force applied to prosthetic components, it is probable that tooth debonding will become an even greater clinical problem. Therefore in this study we are trying to select the strongest bond strength of Iranian denture teeth with respect to lvoclar denture teeth (Approved and recommended by ADA. Methods. In this study the upper anterior set of three Iranian denture teeth (called Berelian, Marjan and Supernevoclar and lvoclar denture teeth were used. of each type of denture teeth, 21 specimens was selected and the denture teeth glaze was removed in each specimen. Then the laboratory procedures (removal of wax & resin packing according to British Standard 3990 (BS 3990 or ISO 3336 was done. Each specimen was tested by an Instron machine. The tensile test used with the cross-head speed of 5mm/min until fracture occured. Results. The mean bond strength in Berelian teeth uppermost, afterward Marjan, Ivoclar and Super nevoclared in second, third and fourh rank respectively. But statistical analysis showed no significanrt difference among the mean bond strength in four groups of denture teeth. The percentage of cohesive fracture (sum of acrylic farcture and dental fracture in Berelian specimens was uppermost, afterward Supernevoclar and Marjan were placed in second, third & fourth rank respectively. But statistical analysis showed no significant difference among the percentage of cohesive fracture in different groups of denture teeth. Discussion. The bond strength and the percentage of cohesive fracture of Iranian denture teeth is the same & competitive to lvoclar denture teeth (approved and recommended by ADA.

  4. Effects of resilient denture liner in mandibular complete denture on the satisfaction ratings of patients at the first appointment following denture delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto, Suguru; Kimoto, Katsuhiko; Gunji, Atsuko; Kawai, Yasuhiko; Murakami, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Kinya; Syu, Kazuyoshi; Aoki, Hiromichi; Tani, Masaaki; Toyoda, Minoru; Kobayashi, Kihei

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether edentulous patients with a permanent acrylic resilient liner denture (RLD) in mandibles exhibit significant improvements in their satisfaction ratings at the first appointment following the delivery of RLD dentures when compared to those with conventional heat-activated acrylic resin dentures (ARD) in mandibles. Seventy-four subjects were randomly allocated into RLD and ARD groups by a random permuted block within the strata method after written informed consent. A parallel-randomized controlled clinical trial at two centers was conducted from April 2004 to July 2006. The outcomes were satisfaction ratings with a 100 mm visual analog scale (VAS) involving general satisfaction as well as satisfaction related to chewing, speaking, cleaning, stability, retention, comfort, and esthetics. The pain rating was also measured by the VAS. The outcomes were analyzed by Student t-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient. A significant difference between the RLD and ARD group in the maxillary denture was only obtained in the satisfaction rating of speaking. A significant difference between the RLD and ARD groups for the mandibular dentures was obtained in every satisfaction rating. The pain rating of the RLD group was significantly lower than that of the ARD group. The satisfaction ratings of mandibular denture functions significantly correlated with ratings of comfort and pain. Despite the limitation of a short-term observation, the mandibular satisfaction ratings were dramatically higher in RLD wearers than in ARD wearers.

  5. Denture hygiene knowledge, attitudes, and practices toward patient education in denture care among dental practitioners of Jabalpur city, Madhya Pradesh, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Suresan

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: It may be concluded that the study subjects had limited knowledge of denture cleansing materials and denture hygiene importance. Attitudes varied among the subjects when it came to sharing information with their patients.

  6. Polyamide as a Denture Base Material: A Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojdani, Mahroo; Giti, Rashin

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this article was to review the biocompatibility, physical, and mechanical properties of the polyamide denture base materials. An electronic search of scientific papers from 1990-2014 was carried out using PubMed, Scopus and Wiley Inter Science engines using the search terms "nylon denture base" and "polyamide denture base". Searching the key words yielded a total of 82 articles. By application of inclusion criteria, the obtained results were further reduced to 24 citations recruited in this review. Several studies have evaluated various properties of polyamide (nylon) denture base materials. According to the results of the studies, currently, thermo-injectable, high impact, flexible or semi-flexible polyamide is thought to be an alternative to the conventional acrylic resins due to its esthetic and functional characteristics and physicochemical qualities. It would be justifiable to use this material for denture fabrication in some cases such as severe soft/ hard tissue undercuts, unexplained repeated fracture of denture, in aesthetic-concerned patients, those who have allergy to other denture base materials, and in patients with microstomia.  Although polyamide has some attractive advantages, they require modifications to produce consistently better properties than the current polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) materials. Moreover, since there is a very limited knowledge about their clinical performance, strict and careful follow-up evaluation of the patients rehabilitated with polyamide prosthesis is recommended.

  7. Clinical evaluation of failures in removable partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Janaina H; Quishida, Cristiane C C; Vergani, Carlos E; Machado, Ana L; Pavarina, Ana C; Giampaolo, Eunice T

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this clinical study was to evaluate the effects of removable partial dentures on the support tissues and changes occurring in lower tooth-supported and bilateral distal-extension dentures, 5 years after placement. The study involved analysis of a total of 53 patients who received prosthetic treatment for removable partial dentures. The patients were divided into two groups. In group 1, the patients had a completely edentulous maxilla and an edentulous area with natural teeth remaining in both the anterior and posterior regions. In group 2, the patients had a completely edentulous maxilla and partially edentulous mandible with preserved anterior teeth. Tooth mobility, prevalence of caries, fracture of the abutment teeth, fracture and/or deformation of the removable partial denture components and stability of the denture base were evaluated. The use of a removable partial denture increased tooth mobility, reduced the prevalence of caries, and did not cause loss or fracture of the abutments or damage to their components, when compared with the baseline. It was concluded that there was no difference between the groups as evaluated in terms of tooth mobility, prevalence of caries, loss and fracture of the abutments or damage to the components of the removable partial denture.

  8. Complication rates and patient satisfaction with removable dentures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilhan, Hakan; Erdogan, Ozge; Ergin, Selen; Celik, Melahat; Ates, Gokcen

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this clinical study was to evaluate the frequency and type of prosthetic complications in relation to type and properties of removable dentures and to investigate the influence of these complications and several data about the existing dentures on patient satisfaction. MATERIALS AND METHODS Ninety nine patients (44 males and 55 females) wearing removable dentures have been included in the study. The complications of the patients were recorded; patient satisfaction was determined with a Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and the relationship of complications and patient satisfaction with several data about the dentures such as denture age, type of denture, centric relation and vertical dimension was investigated. Kruskal Wallis, Mann Whitney U and Chi square tests were used for statistical analyses. The results were evaluated statistically at a significance level of Pdentures with correct centric relations was found to be significantly lower than dentures with wrong centric relations (Pdentures with wrong centric relations caused need for addition of artificial teeth. PMID:22737317

  9. The adhesive strength and initial viscosity of denture adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jian-Min; Hong, Guang; Dilinuer, Maimaitishawuti; Lin, Hong; Zheng, Gang; Wang, Xin-Zhi; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2014-11-01

    To examine the initial viscosity and adhesive strength of modern denture adhesives in vitro. Three cream-type denture adhesives (Poligrip S, Corect Cream, Liodent Cream; PGS, CRC, LDC) and three powder-type denture adhesives (Poligrip Powder, New Faston, Zanfton; PGP, FSN, ZFN) were used in this study. The initial viscosity was measured using a controlled-stress rheometer. The adhesive strength was measured according to ISO-10873 recommended procedures. All data were analyzed independently by one-way analysis of variance combined with a Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparison test at a 5% level of significance. The initial viscosity of all the cream-type denture adhesives was lower than the powder-type adhesives. Before immersion in water, all the powder-type adhesives exhibited higher adhesive strength than the cream-type adhesives. However, the adhesive strength of cream-type denture adhesives increased significantly and exceeded the powder-type denture adhesives after immersion in water. For powder-type adhesives, the adhesive strength significantly decreased after immersion in water for 60 min, while the adhesive strength of the cream-type adhesives significantly decreased after immersion in water for 180 min. Cream-type denture adhesives have lower initial viscosity and higher adhesive strength than powder type adhesives, which may offer better manipulation properties and greater efficacy during application.

  10. Comparison of bond strength of auto polymerizing, heat cure soft denture liners with denture base resin — An In Vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Mahajan, Neerja; Datta, Kusum

    2010-01-01

    Optimum bond strength between denture soft liner and denture base resin is very important for the success of any denture prosthesis. The tensile bond strength of two commercially available silicone-based heat cured (Molloplast B) and auto polymerizing (Mollosil) was compared with denture base material (trevalon). Molloplast B-trevalon bond in both un-polymerized (dough stage) and already polymerized forms were also compared. Lloyds Universal testing machine was used to test 60 samples. Mollop...

  11. Determination of the effective anticandidal concentration of denture cleanser tablets on some denture base resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeliz Hayran

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Although the effectiveness of chemical cleansing against Candida albicans biofilm has been shown, the effective concentration of denture cleanser tablets has not been studied. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of three denture materials against Candida albicans biofilm and to determine effective concentrations of denture cleanser tablets. Material and methods The surface-roughness of Acron-hi™, QC-20™ and Deflex™ (n=45 per resin resins was standardized by using a profilometer and their contact angle or surface free energy was calculated. C. albicans biofilm was formed on all three resins and were treated with Polident 3 min™, Corega™ and Fittydent™ cleanser solutions at various concentrations and both resin-biofilm and cleanser-biofilm interest were determined by using a MTT protocol according to the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing's antifungal susceptibility testing (AFST-EUCAST. Scanning electron microscopy was used to compare the efficacy of different resin materials against C. albicans biofilm. Anticandidal activity and surface free energy statistical parameters were calculated by using 3-way and 1-way ANOVA, respectively (p<0.05. Results Polident 3 min™ and Corega™ tablets significantly inhibited (p<0.05 the proliferation of C. albicans against all denture resins at 27-37 mg/mL. Scanning electron microscopy results indicated that there was no significant difference among resin specimens regarding biofilm formation on dentures. We failed to find a significant relationship between surface free energy and the anticandidal effect of resin types. However, the polarity value of the resins was statistically associated with their anticandidal activity. Conclusions The polarity of the resins, the concentrations of tablets and the chemical content of the cleanser may directly affect C. albicans biofilm formations. Polident 3 min™ and Corega™ tablets should be suggested for

  12. Effects of different surface treatments on the bond strength of acrylic denture teeth to polymethylmethacrylate denture base material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Hakan; Kirmali, Omer; Tugut, Faik; Coskun, Mehmet Emre

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of various surface pretreatments in the ridge lap area of acrylic resin denture teeth on the shear bond strength to heat-polymerized polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) denture base resin. Tooth debonding of the denture is a major problem for patients with removable prostheses. A total of 84 central incisor denture teeth were used in this study. Seven test groups with 12 specimens for each group were prepared as follows: untreated (control, group C), ground, with a tungsten carbide bur (group H), airborne-particle abrasion (group AA), primed with methyl methacrylate (group M), treated with izobutyl methacrylate (group iBMA), Eclipse Bonding Agent applied (group E), and Er:YAG laser irradiated (group L). Test specimens were produced according to the manufacturers' instructions and mounted to a universal testing machine for shear testing with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were evaluated by one way variance analysis (ANOVA) and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Similar bond strength values were found between groups L and M, and these were the highest shear bond strengths among the groups. The lowest one was observed in group E. All surface treatments, except group E, exhibited significant difference when compared with group C (pacrylic resin denture teeth to PMMA denture base resin might be an alternative to wetting with MMA monomer. To overcome tooth debonding, surface treatment of the ridge lap area should be performed as part of denture fabrication.

  13. Effect of surface treatment on the bonding of an autopolymerizing soft denture liner to a denture base resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Shiro; Ohashi, Hirohumi; Kurashige, Hisanori; Tanaka, Takuo

    2004-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effects of surface treatments and thermocycling on the bonding of autopolymerizing silicone soft denture liner (Sofreliner) to denture base resin. The bonding surfaces of denture base cylinders were polished with 600-grit silicon carbide paper and pretreated with applications of Sofreliner Primer, Sofreliner Primer after air abrasion, Reline Primer, or Reline Primer after air abrasion. Failure loads and elongation at failure were measured after subjecting specimens to 0, 10,000, 20,000, and 30,000 thermocycles. Failure modes were assessed for all specimens. Seven specimens were fabricated for each of 16 groups, including four pretreatments and four thermocycle groups. Failure loads of the Sofreliner Primer group were significantly higher than those of the air-abrasion group up to 20,000 thermocycles; both groups showed cohesive failures of the soft denture liner. Failure loads of the Reline Primer group were significantly higher than with Reline Primer after air abrasion up to 10,000 thermocycles. Failure mode after 10,000 thermocycles was cohesive for the Reline Primer group and mixed cohesive/adhesive for Reline Primer after air abrasion. Failure loads of the Sofreliner Primer group were significantly higher than those of the Reline Primer group at each thermocycling interval. Elongation values decreased after 10,000 thermocycles for all groups. Air abrasion on the denture base resin surface was not effective in enhancing failure load. Cyclic thermal stress is one factor degrading the bond between soft denture liner and acrylic resin denture base.

  14. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis of Candida albicans isolates colonizing acrylic dentures before and after denture replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Khai How; Lee, Hee Ji; Knight, Nicholas J; Holmes, Ann R; Cannon, Richard D

    2017-08-01

    Yeast, in particular Candida albicans, are the principal fungal cause of denture stomatitis, and can also be present as a commensal in many individuals. Few studies, however, have examined oral retention of yeast strains over time. We analyzed the yeast present in saliva samples and from the dentures of 10 individuals colonized with yeast but with no signs of stomatitis, before new complete maxillary dentures were fitted and also at 1, 3, and 6 months after denture replacement. Yeast species were presumptively identified on selective agar plates and were present in nine individuals before denture replacement and in six at the 6-month time point. C. albicans was detected in seven individuals pre-replacement, and in three by 6 months post-replacement. Sixty-two isolates (up to five from each C. albicans-positive sample) were analyzed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) (33 from saliva and 29 from dentures). Six MLST allele profiles were identified that were common to several individuals. These profiles included three previously reported diploid sequence types (DSTs) and three novel DSTs. Two of the novel DSTs were closely related variants of a previously reported DST, and both showed loss of heterozygosity polymorphisms within one of the seven MLST gene sequences. For three individuals, at least one DST that was present before denture replacement was still detected in either saliva or on dentures at subsequent sampling times. Our results indicate that denture replacement reduces but does not remove, colonising yeast and confirm previous observations of C. albicans strain microevolution. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Evaluate the Effect of Commercially Available Denture Cleansers on Surface Hardness and Roughness of Denture Liners at Various Time Intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Hilal S.; Singh, Sumeet; Hari, Prasad A.; Amarnath, G. S.; Kundapur, Vinaya; Pasha, Naveed; Anand, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective: Chemical cleansing by denture cleansers is first choice for denture plaque control. The most common problems while using denture cleansers are hardening, porosity, odor sorption, water sorption, solubility, and colour change, bacterial and fungal growth. Chemical cleansing procedures have been found to have an effect on the physical and mechanical properties of denture liners. Thus, this study was conducted to evaluate the effect of commercially available denture cleansers on surface hardness and roughness of acrylic and silicon based denture liners at various time interval. Method: Two autopolymerising denture liners Kooliner (acrylic) and GC reline soft (silicon) were tested with two commercially available denture cleansers, polident and efferdent plus. Total of 120 specimens were prepared and all the specimens were divided into six groups based on the relining materials and denture cleansers used. Surface hardness and surface roughness was tested using Shore A durometer and profilometer respectively at the end of day 1, day 7, day 30 and day 90. All the specimens were stored in artificial saliva throughout the study. Cleanser solution was prepared daily by adding Polident and Efferdent plus denture cleanser tablet into 250ml of enough very warm (not hot) water. Acrylic and silicon liner groups were cleansed in a solution of denture cleanser and water for 15 minutes daily, rinsed with water and stored in artificial saliva at room temperature. The data was analyzed with one way ANOVA and independent t-test. Result: The acrylic soft lining showed gradual hardening and increase in surface roughness after immersion in denture cleanser and also with time. Acrylic liner material showed maximum hardness and roughness with Polident followed by Efferdent plus and water (control group). Silicone lining material showed a slight difference in hardness and roughness between the test group and control group. There was a slight increase in hardness in

  16. Characteristics of denture thermoplastic resins for non-metal clasp dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takabayashi, Yota

    2010-08-01

    Six thermoplastic resins and conventional acrylic resin were examined to characterize their mechanical and physical properties, water sorption, solubility, flexural strength, modulus of elasticity, tensile strength and color stability. Thermoplastic resins for non-metal clasp dentures exhibiting low water sorption and solubility offer hygienic advantages. Since they have a low modulus of elasticity and are easily manipulated, these materials make it possible for larger undercuts to be used for retention compared to acrylic resin. Not all of the thermoplastic resins tested fractured after the bending test in contrast to the conventional denture base resin, which fractured when tested beyond its proportional limit. It was also found that clinically noticeable staining may occur on the polyamide resins and polyethylene terephtalate resins.

  17. Effects of different denture cleaning methods to remove Candida albicans from acrylic resin denture based material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huey-Er Lee

    2011-12-01

    Conclusion: Compared to other methods, brushing, soaking in a commercial cleansing tablet solution, or a combination of both methods can significantly reduce the adherence of C albicans to denture samples. Compared to soaking in distilled water, soaking in a commercial mouthwash solution or irradiation with UV-light had more significant cleaning effects, but these methods were not as effective as the aforementioned three methods.

  18. Peel strength of denture liner to PMMA and polyamide: laser versus air-abrasion

    OpenAIRE

    Korkmaz, Fatih Mehmet; Bagis, Bora; ?zcan, Mutlu; Durkan, Rukiye; Turgut, Sedanur; Ates, Sabit Melih

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study investigated the effect of laser parameters and air-abrasion on the peel strength of silicon-based soft denture liner to different denture resins. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Specimens (N=180) were prepared out of three different denture base resins (Rodex, cross-linked denture base acrylic resin; Paladent, heat-cured acrylic resin; Deflex, Polyamide resin) (75 mm × 25 mm × 3 mm). A silicon-based soft denture liner (Molloplast B) was applied to the denture resins after the f...

  19. The effect of denture design and fixatives on the retention of mandibular complete dentures tested on a novel in-vitro edentulous model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A; Al-Kaisy, N; Miller, C A; Martin, N

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of the design (extension and adaptation) of a mandibular complete acrylic denture and the use of denture adhesives using a novel in-vitro edentulous model. The model is a highly anatomically accurate replica based on a moderately resorbed human mandibular edentulous arch. The model has been designed and fabricated by means of an elaborate clinical and technical process that employs synthetic elastomeric materials with properties that attempts to reproduce in-vitro characteristics of the soft tissues overlying the ridges and immediate reflected tissues. This model was used to measure and compare the retention of mandibular dentures ofvarying designs (well-fitting, over- and under-extended) with and without the aid of denture fixatives. Retention tests were conducted with different volumes of artificial saliva at a cross head speed of 50 mm/min with 4 equidistant holding points on the denture occlusal surface, using a universal tensile testing machine in an axial pull direction. The effect of three denture adhesives on denture retention was also tested on the same denture types at different times over a period of 5 hours and beyond. The in-vitro model presented can be effectively used to test the retention of mandibular complete dentures. The speed of dislodgement force and amount of saliva are important variables in mandibular denture retention. The retention of well-fitting dentures was statistically higher than that of ill-fitting dentures. A significantly higher retention force was needed to dislodge mandibular dentures (well and ill-fitting dentures) when using a denture adhesive.

  20. Electromyography of masticatory muscles after denture relining with soft and hard denture liners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisani, Marina X; Segundo, Antonio L M; Leite, Vanessa M F; de Souza, Raphael F; da Silva, Marco A M R; da Silva, Cláudia H L

    2013-09-01

    We evaluated electromyograms of masticatory muscles after denture relining with soft and hard liners. In total, 44 patients with complete dentures were studied: 22 underwent chairside relining of mandibular dentures with a soft, silicone-based liner (Mucopren Soft); the other 22 underwent relining with a hard, acrylic resin-based liner (Kooliner). Electromyograms of the masseter and temporal muscles were obtained before (T0) and 90 days after (T90) relining. Participants performed a maximum voluntary contraction (static test), on which percentage-overlapping coefficient (%), mandibular displacement (%), and standardized electromyographic activity, i.e., impact, (µV ⁄ µVs %) were analyzed. Participants were also asked to chew a wafer, cereal bar, and peanuts (dynamic test) to determine symmetrical mastication index (SMI%), frequency (Hz), and impact. The data were analyzed using a generalized linear model (α= 0.05). On the static test, mandibular displacement was lower and impact was higher at T90, as compared with baseline. On the dynamic test, SMI and impact were higher after relining for all foods. Frequency at T90 was higher only during cereal and peanut mastication. There were no differences between groups except for greatest impact during wafer chewing in patients with hard liners. Relining with hard and soft materials increased electromyographic activity and improved masticatory function. There was little difference between groups.

  1. The Use of Implants to Improve Removable Partial Denture Function

    OpenAIRE

    Pimentel, Marcele Jardim; Arréllaga, Juan Pablo; Bacchi, Ataís; Del Bel Cury, Altair A.

    2013-01-01

    The oral rehabilitation with conventional removable partial dentures in Kennedy class I patients allows continuous bone resorption, dislodgment of the prosthesis during the mastication caused by the resilience of the mucosa, and rotation of the prosthesis. Thus, the associations of distal implants become an attractive modality of treatment for these patients. This case report presented an association of removable partial dentures, milled crowns and osseointegrated implants to rehabilitate a p...

  2. Removable complete digital dentures: A workflow that integrates open technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Russo, Lucio; Salamini, Angelo

    2017-09-28

    Digitalization of the design and manufacture of removable complete dentures has numerous advantages. The workflow as presented integrates current open digital technologies into a functional protocol, enabling complete dentures to be designed and fabricated without system-specific trays or instruments. This is done by using a conventional technique to acquire anatomic information. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical applications of a polyphosphazene-based resilient denture liner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, R; Khan, Z; Haeberle, C B; Beam, D

    1993-12-01

    The use of resilient denture liners provides an invaluable modality in removable prosthodontic treatment. Treatment of atrophic mandibles, preoperative and postoperative soft tissue management, and retention of removable prosthesis are a few applications of these materials. This article describes the clinical application of a polyphosphazene-based liner (Novus, Hygenic Corp, Dayton, OH) as a denture liner and retentive material in conventional and implant overdenture rehabilitation.

  4. Denture identification using unique identification authority of India barcode

    OpenAIRE

    Sudhindra Mahoorkar; Anoop Jain

    2013-01-01

    Over the years, various denture marking systems have been reported in the literature for personal identification. They have been broadly divided into surface marking and inclusion methods. In this technique, patient's unique identification number and barcode printed in the patient's Aadhaar card issued by Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI) are used as denture markers. This article describes a simple, quick, and economical method for identification of individual.

  5. Denture identification using unique identification authority of India barcode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoorkar, Sudhindra; Jain, Anoop

    2013-01-01

    Over the years, various denture marking systems have been reported in the literature for personal identification. They have been broadly divided into surface marking and inclusion methods. In this technique, patient's unique identification number and barcode printed in the patient's Aadhaar card issued by Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI) are used as denture markers. This article describes a simple, quick, and economical method for identification of individual.

  6. Effect of Stone Cast Type on Complete Denture Base Adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salman Hamdan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Few researches have been conducted researches on the influence of the type of dental stone used for fabrication of casts on the adaptation of denture bases. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of two types of stone casts on the accuracy of fit in complete denture bases. Methods: Using sixty fully replicated master casts obtained by duplicating a metal die representing an edentulous maxillary arch, 30 casts were poured in type III dental stone and 30 made from type V dental stone. All dentures were completely waxed using a same thickness of base plate wax and teeth were made for the purpose of accuracy. Following polymerization in the same working conditions, dentures were trimmed. After silicone injection between each denture and metal die was performed, weighing the elastomeric silicone layer was performed to study adaptation of dentures. Metal die was used both before copying the casts and   after storing them in water for two months. Results: The values ​​for silicone layer weight (in grams in the group with dental stone type III were greater than the values in type V  regardless of the studied period (both after polymerization and after water immersion for a period of two months in the sample (p

  7. Survival analysis of mandibular complete dentures with acrylic-based resilient liners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto, Suguru; Kimoto, Katsuhiko; Murakami, Hiroshi; Gunji, Atsuko; Ito, Nana; Kawai, Yasuhiko

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this long-term randomised controlled trial was to compare the longevity of dentures constructed using a conventional acrylic resin (CAR) to that of dentures constructed using an acrylic-based resilient liner (ARL). The follow-up study was essentially carried out by annual telephone calls to each of the 67 participants. The Kaplan-Meier method and life-table analysis were used for univariate analyses. The Cox proportional-hazards test was used as a final model for statistically adjusting predictor variables such as sex, clinician type, mandibular denture type and age at denture delivery. The denture type was likely to affect the survival time of the dentures, while the sex and clinician type were not. The group using acrylic-based resilient denture liners had twice the risk of having shorter denture-survival times than those using conventional acrylic resin dentures. Younger participants were likely to have a reduced risk of having shorter denture-survival times than older participants. We conclude that mandibular complete dentures constructed using ARL are twice as likely as dentures constructed using CAR to have shorter denture survival times, mainly because of material deterioration. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Effects of cigarette smoke and denture cleaners on the surface roughness and color stability of different denture teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayaz, Elif Aydogan; Altintas, Subutay Han; Turgut, Sedanur

    2014-08-01

    Denture teeth have the most effect on the esthetics of complete dentures. However, extrinsic factors can change their roughness and color. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of smoking and denture cleaners on the roughness and color (CIE [Commission International de I'Eclairage] L*a*b*) of denture teeth. Maxillary central incisors made of acrylic resin, high-strength acrylic resin, and porcelain (Acrylux, SR, Orthosit PE-O, and Enta) were divided into 4 groups (n=10): control, denture cleaner, cigarette smoke, and cigarette smoke and denture cleaner. The dental cleaner group and cigarette smoke and dental cleaner group were immersed in denture cleaner (Protefix; Queisser Pharma) for 15 minutes; the cigarette smoke group and cigarette smoke and dental cleaner group were exposed to smoke from 20 cigarettes for 10 minutes per cigarette. The roughness was measured with a profilometer, and the color was measured with a colorimeter. The CIE L*a*b* values were recorded. The data were analyzed with a 3-way ANOVA and the Fisher least significant difference test (α=.05). The roughness of Acrylux, SR Orthosit PE-O (P<.001), and Enta (P<.01) was significantly higher in the cigarette smoke group and dental cleaner group than in the control group. Immersion in denture cleaner after exposure to cigarette smoke decreased the roughness of Acrylux, SR Orthosit PE-O (P<.001), and Enta (P<.01). The greatest color change (7.94) was observed in Acrylux in the cigarette smoke group, whereas the smallest color change (0.24) was in Enta in the control group. The color change of all of the teeth in the cigarette smoke group decreased after exposure to denture cleaner (P<.05). The L* decreased, and the a* and b* increased after exposure to smoke (P<.05). Smoking and denture cleaner increased the roughness and discolored the teeth, whereas denture cleaners after exposure to smoke decreased the roughness. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic

  9. Disinfection of denture base acrylic resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J J; Cameron, S M; Runyan, D A; Craft, D W

    1999-02-01

    During repair or adjustments of acrylic resin removable complete and partial dentures, particles of the acrylic resin from the interior of the prosthesis may expose dental personnel to microbial health hazards if the prosthesis has not been thoroughly disinfected. This study investigates the efficacy of a commercially prepared microbial disinfectant (Alcide) on the external and internal surfaces of acrylic resins. Four groups of acrylic resin were incubated in an experimental model to simulate the oral environment over time. Specimens were treated in 2 groups, disinfected and not disinfected, and then further grouped by breaking and not breaking. Analysis was performed with microbial colony counts, SEM, and statistical analyses. Viable microorganisms still remain on the internal and external surfaces of treated resins. Chlorine dioxide reduces, but does not eliminate, viable microorganisms on these dental prostheses.

  10. An alternative impression technique for complete dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Burak; Özçelik, Tuncer Burak

    2014-02-01

    This article describes a technique for creating adequate space for an even thickness of polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) impression material at the periphery during complete denture impression making. A PVS border molding material is injected around the borders of a custom tray, a 17-μm-thick stretch wrap film is folded into 4 layers, and a tray-shaped piece slightly larger than the size of the custom tray is placed on the tray covering the borders. After the border molding procedure is completed, the film is removed and the definitive impression completed with a medium-viscosity PVS impression material. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Trends in complete denture impressions in pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vohra, F.; Rashid, H.; Hanif, A.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple materials and techniques have been reported for complete denture impressions in literature. The aim of the study was to assess the trends in complete denture impression materials and techniques among general dental practitioners (GDP) and specialists (SP) in Pakistan. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, self-designed-structured questionnaires were distributed among 500 dentists in Pakistan. The three-part questionnaire enquired about the demographic features, preferred impression materials, impression techniques and related procedures commonly used in their clinical practice. A comparison between the responses of SP and GDP was also drawn. Frequency distribution and Chi-square test were performed to compare the responses. Results: A total of 294 questionnaires were completed at a response rate of 58.8%. 75% of GDP used alginate for primary impressions and 66% of SP preferred impression compound for the same. A majority of both SP and GDP favoured the used of custom trays (SP 81%, GDP 85%) and selective pressure technique (SP 84%, GDP 53%) for final impression. However, 85% of GDP used zinc-oxide eugenol and 62% of SP favoured elastomeric materials for the same. Most of the SP and GDP used chemical cured resin custom trays (SP 54%, GDP 75%), however, 86% of SP used spaced trays and almost 60% of GDP preferred close-fitting trays. Conclusions: The practice of GDP and SP with regards to CD impression materials and techniques differed significantly. Continued education and training for GDP and SP with respect to procedures and techniques related to CD is recommended. (author)

  12. Comparative analysis of unilateral removable partial denture and classical removable partial denture by using finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radović Katarina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Various mobile devices are used in the therapy of unilateral free-end saddle. Unilateral dentures with precise connectivity elements are not used frequently. In this paper the problem of applying and functionality of unilateral freeend saddle denture without major connector was taken into consideration. Objective. The aim was to analyze and compare a unilateral RPD (removable partial denture and a classical RPD by calculating and analyzing stresses under different loads. Methods. 3D models of unilateral removable partial denture and classical removable partial denture with casted clasps were made by using computer program CATIA V5 (abutment teeth, canine and first premolar, with crowns and abutment tissues were also made. The models were built in full-scale. Stress analyses for both models were performed by applying a force of 300 N on the second premolar, a force of 500 N on the first molar and a force of 700 N on the second molar. Results. The Fault Model Extractor (FME analysis and calculation showed the complete behavior of unilateral removable partial denture and abutments (canine and first premolar, as well as the behavior of RPD under identical loading conditions. Applied forces with extreme values caused high stress levels on both models and their abutments within physiological limits. Conclusion. Having analyzed stresses under same conditions, we concluded that the unilateral RPD and classical RPD have similar physiological values.

  13. Occlusion and Temporomandibular Function among Subjects with Mandibular Distal Extension Removable Partial Dentures.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creugers, N.H.J.; Witter, D.J.; Spijker, A. van 't; Gerritsen, A.E.; Kreulen, C.M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To quantify effects on occlusion and temporomandibular function of mandibular distal extension removable partial dentures in shortened dental arches. Methods. Subjects wearing mandibular extension removable partial dentures (n = 25) were compared with subjects with shortened dental arches

  14. Evaluation of the rigidity of dentures made of injection-molded materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadachi, Juro; Sato, Masayuki; Igarashi, Yoshimasa

    2013-01-01

    Dentures made of 2 different types of injection-molded thermoplastic resins (polyamide resin and polyester resin) and a denture made of conventional heat-polymerized resin were used to create an experimental model of a mandibular molar region with a two-tooth gap. In the experimental model, a force of 100 N was applied onto the mesial fossa of the first molars of the dentures, and comparisons were performed by measuring the pressure applied under the denture base and the subsidence rate of the denture. The polyamide resin denture showed the highest subsidence, exerted the highest pressure on the underlying mucosa, and showed significant differences with the other types of dentures. The findings showed that polyamide resins have the lowest degree of elasticity, and that when resins with such low elasticities are used in the denture base, they should preferably be reinforced with metals.

  15. Reestablishment of Occlusal Vertical Dimension in Complete Denture Wearing in Two Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Omar Mendoza Marin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The assessment and reestablishment of the occlusal vertical dimension (OVD are considered important factors in the treatment of complete denture wearers. The long-time use of a complete denture can result in jaw displacement due to abrasion of the artificial teeth and residual ridge resorption, causing esthetic complications. Most patients with old dentures and incorrect OVD accept reestablishment of the OVD with new complete dentures, even if they were used to their old dentures. The present clinical report describes a method of gradual reestablishment of OVD using a diagnostic acrylic splint on artificial teeth in old complete dentures before the manufacture of new complete dentures. Clinical Significance. The use of a reversible treatment for reestablishment of the OVD in old complete dentures with a diagnostic occlusal acrylic splint allows for the reestablishment of the intermaxillary relationship, providing physiological conditions of masticatory performance associated with the recovery of facial esthetics in edentulous patients.

  16. Elastic modulus and flexural strength comparisons of high-impact and traditional denture base acrylic resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nour M. Ajaj-ALKordy

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that the high-impact acrylic resin is a suitable denture base material for patients with clinical fracture of the acrylic denture.

  17. Effect of repeated immersion solution cycles on the color stability of denture tooth acrylic resins

    OpenAIRE

    Paulo Maurício Batista da Silva; Emílio José Tabaré Rodríguez Acosta; Matheus Jacobina; Luciana de Rezende Pinto; Vinícius Carvalho Porto

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Chemical solutions have been widely used for disinfection of dentures, but their effect on color stability of denture tooth acrylic resins after repeated procedures is still unclear. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate whether repeated cycles of chemical disinfectants affected the color stability of two denture tooth acrylic resins. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty disc-shaped specimens (40 mm x 3 mm) were fabricated from two different brands (Artiplus and Trilux) of denture ...

  18. Inhibitory Effect of Alpha-Mangostin on Adhesion of Candida albicans to Denture Acrylic

    OpenAIRE

    Kaomongkolgit, Ruchadaporn; Jamdee, Kusuma

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Candida-associated denture stomatitis is a very common disease affecting denture wearers. It is characterized by the presence of yeast biofilm on the denture, primarily associated with C. albicans. The investigation of agents that can reduce C. albicans adhesion may represent a significant advancement in the prevention and treatment of this disease. This study aims to investigate the effect of alpha-mangostin on the in vitro adhesion of C. albicans to denture acrylic and germ tube ...

  19. A multispecies probiotic reduces oral Candida colonization in denture wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Karin H; Mayer, Marcia P A; Miyazima, Tatiana Y; Matsubara, Victor H; Silva, Eriques G; Paula, Claudete R; Campos, Tomie T; Nakamae, Atlas E M

    2015-04-01

    The prevalence of Candida infections has been rising with an increasingly aging population and a larger population of immunocompromised individuals. The use of probiotics may be an alternative approach to antifungal agents in the prevention and treatment of oral candidiasis. This study aimed to evaluate the short-term effect of probiotics in reducing the infection level of oral Candida in candidiasis-asymptomatic elderly denture wearers. In a double-blind randomized study, 59 denture wearers harboring Candida spp. in the oral cavity with no clinical symptoms were allocated into two groups: probiotic and placebo. All patients were instructed to clean the denture daily. The probiotic group poured a capsule containing lyophilized Lactobacillus rhamnosus HS111, Lactobacillus acidophillus HS101, and Bifidobacterium bifidum daily on the palatal surface of the maxillary denture, whereas the placebo group was submitted to the same regimen using placebo capsules. Candida spp. infection levels were evaluated in palate mucosa samples obtained before and after a 5-week experimental period. All patients harbored Candida in the palate mucosa at baseline. Fifty-five individuals completed the experimental period. The detection rate of Candida spp. was 92.0% in the placebo group after the experimental period, whereas it was reduced to 16.7% in the probiotic group. The reduction promoted by the probiotic regimen was independent of baseline characteristics such as Candida infection level and colonizing species, age of denture, and other variables. The probiotic product was effective in reducing the colonization of the oral cavity with Candida in candidiasis-asymptomatic elderly denture wearers, suggesting that this multispecies probiotic could be used to prevent oral candidiasis. Colonization of oral surfaces by Candida is considered a risk factor for invasive fungal infections. The use of a product with L. rhamnosus, L. acidophilus, and B. bifidum may represent an alternative

  20. Influence of denture adhesives on occlusion and disocclusion times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelnabi, Mohamed Hussein; Swelem, Amal Ali; Al-Dharrab, Ayman A

    2016-03-01

    The effectiveness of adhesives in enhancing several functional aspects of complete denture performance has been well established. The direct influence of adhesives on occlusal contact simultaneity has not yet been investigated. The purpose of this crossover clinical trial was to evaluate quantitatively the influence of adhesives on occlusal balance by recording timed occlusal contacts; namely occlusion time (OT) and disocclusion time during right (DT-right) and left (DT-left) excursions by using computerized occlusal analysis. A crossover clinical trial was adopted. Assessments were carried out while participants (n=49) wore their dentures first without then with adhesives. Computerized occlusal analysis using the T-Scan III system was conducted to perform baseline computer-guided occlusal adjustment for conventionally fabricated dentures. Retention and stability assessment using the modified Kapur index and recording of OT and DT-right and DT-left values using the T-Scan III were subsequently carried out for all dentures, first without adhesives and then after application of adhesive. All T-Scan procedures were carried out by the same clinician. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to analyze the Kapur index scores and occlusal parameters (α=.05). Stability and retention of conventional dentures ranged initially from good to very good. However, adhesive application resulted in significant improvement (Pstability and retention and a significant decrease in duration of all occlusal parameters (OT [P=.003], DT-right [P=.003], and DT-left [P=.008]). Adhesives significantly decreased OT and DT durations in initially well-fitting complete dentures with fairly well balanced occlusion, and further enhanced denture stability and occlusal contact simultaneity. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Investigating oral health-related quality of life and self-perceived satisfaction with partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuzar, Menaka A; Kahwagi, Esperance; Yamakawa, Takeshi

    2012-05-01

    To investigate the prevalence and severity of oral health-related quality of life in patients treated with removable partial dentures at a publicly-funded dental hospital. The association between patients' demographic profiles, denture-related, variables and oral health-related quality of life was also investigated. A questionnaire was designed to investigate the use and satisfaction of removable partial dentures, and oral health-related quality of life of removable partial denture wearers using the Oral Health Impact Profile-14. The questionnaire was administered to 740 randomly-selected patients who received removable partial dentures during 2005-2008. The response rate was 31.35%. Non-parametric tests and a logistic regression model were used to analyze the association between denture-related variables and oral health-related quality of life. A question on symptoms unrelated to dentures was also analyzed. The Oral Health Impact Profile-14 prevalence calculated was 43.1%. The removable partial denture experience and frequency of use was inversely associated with Oral Health Impact Profile-14 scores. Metal-based removable partial dentures were associated with lower Oral Health Impact Profile prevalence and severity scores. No significant association was found between demographic profile, circumstance for provision of removable partial dentures and Oral Health Impact Profile-14 score. The participants of this study indicated that perceived denture performance, removable partial dentures material, experience, and frequency of use are associated with oral health-related quality of life. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. Chewing efficiency and occlusal forces in PMMA, acetal and polyamide removable partial denture wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macura-Karbownik, Anna; Chladek, Grzegorz; Żmudzki, Jarosław; Kasperski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Thermoplastic materials, such as acetal (AC) and polyamide (PA), constitute an alternative to polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) based resins as the materials for removable partial dentures. However, none of the previous studies compared chewing efficiency and occlusal forces in the wearers of dentures made of various materials. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine and compare the chewing efficiency and occlusal forces in PMMA, PA and AC RPDs' wearers. The hypothesis was that the type of denture base material shows a significant effect on chewing efficiency (expressed as a degree of food fragmentation) and occlusal force. The experiment included the group of 30 patients using removable partial dentures. The dentures made of PMMA, acetal and polyamide were tested in each patient. Each denture was worn for 90 days, with a random sequence of the denture manufacturing and insertion. After 7, 30 and 90 days of each denture wear, chewing efficiency coefficient was determined with the aid of a sieving method, and occlusal force was measured with a dynamometer. The use of dentures made of PMMA or acetal was reflected by a marked increase in chewing efficiency and occlusal force. None of these parameters changed significantly with the time of denture wear. Moreover, no significant correlation was found between chewing efficiency and occlusal forces. Denture base material exerts significant effects on the degree of food fragmentation and the level of occlusal forces. The use of dentures and clasps made of materials with lower modulus of elasticity is associated with lower chewing efficiency and lower occlusal forces.

  3. Effect of denture adhesive on the micro-organisms in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozkan, Yasemin Kulak; Ucankale, Mert; Ozcan, Mutlu; Uner, Nurver

    Background: Denture adhesives increase the retention and stability of dentures in edentulous patients, especially in cases where salivary flow is impaired or in the management of traumatised oral mucosa. Objectives: The effect of a denture adhesive on the oral flora at different time intervals.

  4. Photoelastic analysis of stresses transmitted by complete dentures lined with hard or soft liners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Izabella P; Consani, Rafael L X; Mesquita, Marcelo F; Nóbilo, Mauro A A

    2015-10-01

    Stresses transmitted on the alveolar bone ridge by lined conventional complete mandibular dentures can decrease the bone absorption level. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the stresses induced on the alveolar bone ridge of lined conventional complete mandibular dentures by using photoelastic analysis. One maxillary and three mandibular conventional dentures were developed for the following treatments: 1 - Unlined denture (control), 2 - Denture lined with resin-based material, and 3 - Denture lined with silicone-based material. The photoelastic analysis took place with the dentures in the position of maximum intercuspation, and the mandibular photoelastic models were axially loaded with 10 kgf (98 N). Unlined denture (control) presented stresses along the model, especially on the anterior and left lateral sides with less stresses on the right side. On the left lateral side, the denture base lined with resin-based material demonstrated similar stresses to that of the control; however, lower stresses occurred in the premolar and retromolar regions. Denture bases lined with silicone-based material showed decreased fringe orders and homogeneous distribution of induced stresses. Both lined dentures exhibited lower stresses when compared to unlined dentures. Silicone-based material provided a more homogeneous distribution of stresses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Electromyographic Evaluation of the Effect of Lined Dentures on Masticatory Muscle Activity in Edentulous Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Abhishek; Srivastava, Shitij; Gaur, Abhishek; Dupare, Arun; Rastogi, Shiksha; Kamatagi, Laxmikant

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine changes in relative electromyographic (EMG) activities of temporal and masseter muscles after relining the dentures with silicone and acrylic-resin based denture liners. Conventional complete dentures were fabricated for 20 edentulous patients. One month after completing adjustments of the dentures, electromyography of the masseter and temporalis muscle during maximum intercuspation was recorded. The dentures were then relined with a silicone denture liner and after an adaptation period of one month, were again subjected for electromyographic evaluation. Further, the dentures were relined with acrylic denture liner and subjected to electromyographic evaluation. Data was analysed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 15.0. Intergroup comparisons were done using ANOVA followed by post-hoc assessments using Tukey HSD test. Mean amplitude and duration with conventional dentures was found to be significantly lower as compared to silicone lined and acrylic lined dentures for all the comparisons. Statistically, no significant difference between silicone lined and acrylic lined dentures was observed for any of the comparisons. Within the limitations of this experimental design, it was concluded that relining significantly increases electromyographic activity of the masseter and temporalis muscles. Thus, resulting in an improved biting force, chewing efficiency and masticatory performance. There were no significant differences between silicone and acrylic based denture liners for both electromyographic variables.

  6. Spectrogram analysis of complete dentures with different thickness and palatal rugae materials on speech production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki Mahross, Hamada; Baroudi, Kusai

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the influence of reproduction of different thickness and palatal rugae materials on complete dentures speech using Computerized Speech Lab (CSL) (spectrogram). Materials and Methods. Three completely edentulous male patients (aged 50-60 years) were selected for reading a paragraph. Twelve upper dentures were constructed, four for each patient. The patients' speech groups were divided into five groups, Group I: patients without dentures; Group II: patients rehabilitated with conventional acrylic dentures; Group III: patients with conventional acrylic dentures with rugae reproduction; Group IV: patients with dentures with metallic framework of minimal thickness and direct ragged metallic palatal surface at rugae area; Group V: patients with dentures with palatal rugae constructed from resilient acrylic resin material with thickness less than conventional denture. Speech samples were recorded after insertion of each denture for groups using Computerized Speech Lab (CSL) (spectrogram). The sounds selected were lingopalatal /s/z/sh/t/d/ and /l/. Results. Group III produced high mean significant difference with /sh/t/ sound. For Group IV, the difference was noticed with /s/z/sh/t/ and /d/ sounds, while for Group V the difference was shown with /z/l/ sound (P rugae area in complete denture because the phonetic quality of complete denture with rugae is superior to the conventional denture.

  7. Spectrogram Analysis of Complete Dentures with Different Thickness and Palatal Rugae Materials on Speech Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamada Zaki Mahross

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the influence of reproduction of different thickness and palatal rugae materials on complete dentures speech using Computerized Speech Lab (CSL (spectrogram. Materials and Methods. Three completely edentulous male patients (aged 50–60 years were selected for reading a paragraph. Twelve upper dentures were constructed, four for each patient. The patients’ speech groups were divided into five groups, Group I: patients without dentures; Group II: patients rehabilitated with conventional acrylic dentures; Group III: patients with conventional acrylic dentures with rugae reproduction; Group IV: patients with dentures with metallic framework of minimal thickness and direct ragged metallic palatal surface at rugae area; Group V: patients with dentures with palatal rugae constructed from resilient acrylic resin material with thickness less than conventional denture. Speech samples were recorded after insertion of each denture for groups using Computerized Speech Lab (CSL (spectrogram. The sounds selected were lingopalatal /s/z/sh/t/d/ and /l/. Results. Group III produced high mean significant difference with /sh/t/ sound. For Group IV, the difference was noticed with /s/z/sh/t/ and /d/ sounds, while for Group V the difference was shown with /z/l/ sound (P<0.05. Conclusion. It is recommended to reproduce the rugae area in complete denture because the phonetic quality of complete denture with rugae is superior to the conventional denture.

  8. 21 CFR 872.3400 - Karaya and sodium borate with or without acacia denture adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... denture adhesive. 872.3400 Section 872.3400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... and sodium borate with or without acacia denture adhesive. (a) Identification. A karaya and sodium borate with or without acacia denture adhesive is a device composed of karaya and sodium borate with or...

  9. 21 CFR 872.3420 - Carboxymethylcellulose sodium and cationic polyacrylamide polymer denture adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... polyacrylamide polymer denture adhesive. 872.3420 Section 872.3420 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION....3420 Carboxymethylcellulose sodium and cationic polyacrylamide polymer denture adhesive. (a) Identification. A carboxymethylcellulose sodium and cationic polyacrylamide polymer denture adhesive is a device...

  10. Denture-induced stomatitis and associated factors in a group of patients attending a university dental hospital in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thilakumara, Indika P; Jayatilake, Jayalath A M S; Pallegama, Ranjith W; Ellepola, Arjuna N B

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate factors associated with denture-induced stomatitis (DIS) among denture wearers and their oral and hand carriage of Candida. Sociodemographics and denture and oral hygiene practices were investigated using an interviewer-administered questionnaire in denture wearers with DIS (n = 60) and without DIS (n = 60) selected using a convenience sampling of patients attending the Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka. Denture and oral hygiene practices and denture quality were scored. DIS and denture hygiene were classified. Oral and hand carriage of Candida was assessed. Middle-aged females were more prone to DIS. The most common DIS pattern was Newton type ΙΙ. The mean age of existing denture of DIS patients was significantly higher than the control. Denture hygiene practice was significantly low in DIS patients. Poor denture hygiene practice and sleep wear of dentures were significantly associated with DIS. The risk of Candida hand carriage in a DIS patient carrying oral Candida was significantly higher than the risk of Candida hand carriage in a healthy denture wearer who carried oral Candida. Old dentures, poor denture hygiene, and sleep wear of dentures might contribute to DIS. Oral Candida in denture wearers could lead to Candida hand carriage. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Mechanical properties of injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamanaka, Ippei; Takahashi, Yutaka; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2011-03-01

    To investigate the mechanical properties of injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins. Four injection-molded thermoplastic resins (two polyamides, one polyethylene terephthalate, one polycarbonate) and, as a control, a conventional heat-polymerized polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), were used in this study. The flexural strength at the proportional limit (FS-PL), the elastic modulus, and the Charpy impact strength of the denture base resins were measured according to International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 1567 and ISO 1567:1999/Amd 1:2003. The descending order of the FS-PL was: conventional PMMA > polyethylene terephthalate, polycarbonate > two polyamides. The descending order of the elastic moduli was: conventional PMMA > polycarbonate > polyethylene terephthalate > two polyamides. The descending order of the Charpy impact strength was: polyamide (Nylon PACM12) > polycarbonate > polyamide (Nylon 12), polyethylene terephthalate > conventional PMMA. All of the injection-molded thermoplastic resins had significantly lower FS-PL, lower elastic moduli, and higher or similar impact strength compared to the conventional PMMA. The polyamide denture base resins had low FS-PL and low elastic moduli; one of them possessed very high impact strength, and the other had low impact strength. The polyethylene terephthalate denture base resin showed a moderately high FS-PL, moderate elastic modulus, and low impact strength. The polycarbonate denture base resin had a moderately high FS-PL, moderately high elastic modulus, and moderate impact strength.

  12. Comparison of patient satisfaction with acrylic and flexible partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinyamoju, Clara Arianta; Ogunrinde, Tunde Joshua; Taiwo, Juliana Obontu; Dosumu, Oluwole Oyekunle

    2017-01-01

    Restoration of partial edentulous mouth may be done using a variety of treatment options. Removable partial denture (RPD) is commonly used because of its availability. RPDs from flexible resins unlike those from acrylic engage hard and soft tissue undercuts and feel more comfortable in the mouth. The aim of the study was to compare satisfaction with dentures made from these two types of materials. It was a quasi-experimental study among thirty patients at the Prosthetics Clinic, University College Hospital, Ibadan. Patients aged 16 years or more, requiring RPDs with one to three missing teeth in the anterior region of either the upper or lower arch participated. A modified semi-structured interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to collect data on sociodemographics and oral health variables. The level of satisfaction was assessed using a visual analogue scale. Data were analysed using descriptive and multivariate statistics at a significance level of P dentures, 6 (20.0%) with acrylic dentures while 3 (10.0%) were equally satisfied with both types of dentures (P = 0.04). Subjects were more satisfied with the flexible RPD than the acrylic resin RPD.

  13. Effect of Surface Treatment on the Flexural Strength of Denture Base Resin and Tensile Strength of Autopolymerizing Silicone Based Denture Liner Bonded to Denture Base Resin: An In Vitro Study

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Saloni

    2010-01-01

    Silicone based denture liners are superior to acrylic based denture liners but it has a problem of failure of adhesion with the denture base. To evaluate the effect on the tensile bond strength of silicone based liner and flexural strength of denture base resin when the latter is treated with different chemical etchants prior to the application of the resilient liner. Rectangular specimens of heat cured PMMA (65 × 10 × 3.3 mm3) for flexural strength and (10 × 10 × 40 mm3) for tensile strength...

  14. Live broadcast lectures on complete denture prosthodontics at Tokyo Medical and Dental University: comparison of two years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaki, Maiko; Kanazawa, Manabu; Sunaga, Masayo; Kinoshita, Atsuhiro; Minakuchi, Shunsuke

    2013-03-01

    A live broadcasting system was developed as part of dental education with Information and Communication Technology (ICT) at Tokyo Medical and Dental University. The purpose of this study was to utilize this system in complete denture prosthodontics, especially for the procedure of making a definitive impression with custom tray border molding in edentulous patients, and to evaluate its effectiveness. Live broadcast lectures on complete denture prosthodontics were given to fourth-year students in 2009 (fifty-nine students) and in 2010 (sixty-five students). To evaluate this lecture, a questionnaire was distributed to the students and faculty members after the lecture. Almost all the students and faculty members rated the lecture as good. Students commented that the lecture was "intelligible," "inspiring," "improved understanding," "good because they could ask questions in real time," "helped to know the actual time," "good for all the students to see the same case," and "close to real experience and induced a sense of tension." The results of this study suggested that a live broadcast lecture would help students experience the real clinical situation and aid in teaching complete denture prosthodontics.

  15. [Routine oral examinations and specific after-care for removable partial dentures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Baat, C; Witter, D J; Keltjens, H M A M; Creugers, N H J

    2011-01-01

    Following treatment with a removable partial denture, routine oral examinations are required to stabilize the existing condition in a sustainable way and to make possible the timely treatment of anomalies which have appeared. In cases of problems assessed during a routine oral examination in relation to the removable partial dentures, maintenance, restorative and prosthetic treatment may be indicated. Maintenance treatments are indicated for small and easily retrievable alterations. In removable partial denture treatment, adequate space between prepared tooth and denture is essential. Possible prosthetic treatments of a removable partial denture are relining, rebasing, improving or renewing the maxillomandibular relation, repairment, and extension.

  16. Liquid-Supported Dentures: A Soft Option—A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoop Jain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Liquid-supported denture technique allows continued adaptation of denture to the mucosa both at resting and functional state. A complete denture prosthesis is unacceptable if it violates the foundation on which it rests. In this case, a technique for fabrication of a complete denture prosthesis that eliminates the disadvantages of tissue conditioners and soft liners (i.e., poor bond strength to acrylic, candidal colonization, etc. and preserves the remaining tissues is described. Liquid-supported denture can be a permanent solution to some patients with problematic conditions like diabetes, xerostomia, atrophied ridge, and so forth.

  17. A comparative Study of the Masticatory Efficiency in Complete Dentures Using Acrylic and Metal Occlusal Posterior Teeth—Photocolorimetric Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Awinashe, Vaibhav N.; Nagda, Suhasini J.

    2010-01-01

    Masticatory efficiency is always compromised in complete denture patients. The denture teeth with compromised occlusal anatomy and material further compound the inherent limitations of complete dentures. To compare the masticatory efficiency of patients with complete denture using acrylic and metal occlusal posterior teeth. Ten edentulous patients with well-formed ridges were selected. Complete dentures using acrylic and metal occlusal posterior teeth were fabricated. The masticatory efficien...

  18. Deterioration of polymethyl methacrylate dentures in the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Hiroshi; Suenaga, Hanako; Takahashi, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Osamu; Sasaki, Keiichi; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA)-made prostheses used in the oral cavity were evaluated by multimodal assessment in order to elucidate the biodeterioration of PMMA. In used dentures (UD), the micro-Vickers hardness of the polished denture surface and denture basal surface was lower than that of the torn surface (p<0.05), whereas the shaved surface approximately 100 µm from the polished surface showed a similar value to the torn surface. By contrast, there were no differences among these surfaces in new resin (NR). The volatile content of UD was higher than that of NR (p<0.05). Component analysis by ATR-FTIR showed specific spectra (1,700-1,400 cm(-1)) only in UD. This study revealed that PMMA deteriorated during long-term use in the oral cavity in terms of hardness and volatile content with component alteration, and suggests the involvement of biodeterioration, possibly due to saliva and oral microbiota.

  19. Acrylic partial dentures--interim or permanent prostheses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, V J

    2009-11-01

    An acrylic partial denture (APD) is one option for replacing missing teeth and is also the most cost effective treatment option. Dentists are faced with the demand for replacing missing teeth from patients with limited financial resources; therefore the replacement of missingteeth with an APD is a common occurrence. One of the disadvantages of APD's is its poor strength. Dentists and dental technicians tend to design and construct acrylic partial dentures with little or no tooth support. This can have a detrimental effect on the surrounding hard as well as soft tissue. This article argues that APD's can be considered as a permanent prosthesis, provided that proper patient selection, education and the principles of partial denture design are adhered to.

  20. The Rheological Properties of Fluid Denture-Base Resins,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-03-17

    Prosthet Dent, 24:662—668, 1970. 4. Mirza, F. D.: Dimensional stability of acrylic resin dentures . J Prosthet Dent, 11:848—857, 1961. 5. Winkler, S...SC) . 3 i~~ C I P I E N T S C A r A L O G NUM~~~ .~ - 5. T Y P E O F RE PO N T & PER(OO COV EREQ Rheo logical Properties of Fluid Denture ...resins; pour resins and denture resins. c_fl; \\ 10. A~~~T P A C T (Continue on revere. eid~ if n.c.saary end Identity by block number) Li.. The pour

  1. Complete denture analyzed by optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrutiu, Meda L.; Sinescu, Cosmin; Todea, Carmen; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2008-02-01

    The complete dentures are currently made using different technologies. In order to avoid deficiencies of the prostheses made using the classical technique, several alternative systems and procedures were imagined, directly related to the material used and also to the manufacturing technology. Thus, at the present time, there are several injecting systems and technologies on the market, that use chemoplastic materials, which are heat cured (90-100°C), in dry or wet environment, or cold cured (below 60°C). There are also technologies that plasticize a hard cured material by thermoplastic processing (without any chemical changes) and then inject it into a mold. The purpose of this study was to analyze the existence of possible defects in several dental prostheses using a non invasive method, before their insertion in the mouth. Different dental prostheses, fabricated from various materials were investigated using en-face optical coherence tomography. In order to discover the defects, the scanning was made in three planes, obtaining images at different depths, from 0,01 μm to 2 mm. In several of the investigated prostheses we found defects which may cause their fracture. These defects are totally included in the prostheses material and can not be vizualised with other imagistic methods. In conclusion, en-face OCT is an important investigative tool for the dental practice.

  2. [Stomatitis from dentures: etiopathological and therapeutic considerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejerina Lobo, J M; Bagan Sebastián, J V; Ramón Muñiz, J

    1989-05-01

    Infection of the oral mucous membrane is frequent in patients with removable prostheses, either totally of partially, and particularly when the prostheses is palatal. The principal etiological factor causing the infection is accepted to be "Candidas" aided by the presence of plaque bacteria (in patients with poor oral hygiene care), and a poor fit of the prostheses to the soft tissues. Treatment of the infection must proceed in the following order: a) use of effective medication against oral fungus such as Nystatin or Ketoconazole. b) Meticulous oral hygiene care in the mucous membrane as well as in the prostheses, but using the prostheses as little as possible during the treatment period. c) A total cure of the infection (denture stomatitis) before proceeding to the next phase of the treatment. d) Determination of the adjustment and occlusion of the prostheses in order to determine those areas of the prostheses which need to be refilled because of maladjustment of the prostheses to the soft tissues of the patient.

  3. Designing for Safety: Implications of a Fifteen Year Review of Swallowed and Aspirated Dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Samuel J W; Mackie, James; Macfarlane, Tatiana V

    2016-01-01

    Dentures are worn by around 20% of the population, yet if they become displaced they may enter the gastrointestinal or respiratory system, sometimes with grave consequences. The aim of this study was to review recent published literature in order to identify the epidemiology of patients and characteristics of swallowed and aspirated dental prostheses, and propose strategies to minimise these risks. A fifteen year retrospective of published case series and case reports was carried out. Photographs, radiographs and descriptions of the dental prostheses were gathered, as well as the patient's presenting complaint, the anatomical site where the denture was caught and the procedure required to remove the denture. Ninety one separate events of swallowed or aspirated dentures were identified from 83 case reports and series from 28 countries. Average age was 55 years, and these were 74% male. Photographs were retrieved for 49 of these dentures. Clasps were present in 25 of the dentures. There was no significant difference between clasped and unclasped dentures for perforation rates, need for open surgery and spontaneously passed dentures. We discuss the implications of this study regarding denture designs, specifically the importance of using a radiopaque acrylic, using clasps when required even if there is a risk of aspiration, advising patients to return if a denture is loose or damaged, and finally that all patients who wear a denture are at risk of aspiration and swallowing events, and associated morbidity and mortality.

  4. In Vitro Analysis of the Fracture Resistance of CAD/CAM Denture Base Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto Steinmassl

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM denture base manufacturers claim to produce their resin pucks under high heat and pressure. Therefore, CAD/CAM dentures are assumed to have enhanced mechanical properties and, as a result, are often produced with lower denture base thicknesses than conventional, manually fabricated dentures. The aim of this study was to investigate if commercially available CAD/CAM denture base resins have more favourable mechanical properties than conventionally processed denture base resins. For this purpose, a series of three-point bending tests conforming to ISO specifications were performed on a total of 80 standardised, rectangular CAD/CAM denture base resin specimens from five different manufacturers (AvaDent, Baltic Denture System, Vita VIONIC, Whole You Nexteeth, and Wieland Digital Dentures. A heat-polymerising resin and an autopolymerising resin served as the control groups. The breaking load, fracture toughness, and the elastic modulus were assessed. Additionally, the fracture surface roughness and texture were investigated. Only one CAD/CAM resin showed a significantly increased breaking load. Two CAD/CAM resins had a significantly higher fracture toughness than the control groups, and all CAD/CAM resins had higher elastic moduli than the controls. Our results indicate that CAD/CAM denture base resins do not generally have better mechanical properties than manually processed resins. Therefore, the lower minimum denture base thicknesses should be regarded with some caution.

  5. Designing for Safety: Implications of a Fifteen Year Review of Swallowed and Aspirated Dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel J. W. Kent

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Dentures are worn by around 20% of the population, yet if they become displaced they may enter the gastrointestinal or respiratory system, sometimes with grave consequences. The aim of this study was to review recent published literature in order to identify the epidemiology of patients and characteristics of swallowed and aspirated dental prostheses, and propose strategies to minimise these risks. Material and Methods: A fifteen year retrospective of published case series and case reports was carried out. Photographs, radiographs and descriptions of the dental prostheses were gathered, as well as the patient’s presenting complaint, the anatomical site where the denture was caught and the procedure required to remove the denture. Results: Ninety one separate events of swallowed or aspirated dentures were identified from 83 case reports and series from 28 countries. Average age was 55 years, and these were 74% male. Photographs were retrieved for 49 of these dentures. Clasps were present in 25 of the dentures. There was no significant difference between clasped and unclasped dentures for perforation rates, need for open surgery and spontaneously passed dentures. Conclusions: We discuss the implications of this study regarding denture designs, specifically the importance of using a radiopaque acrylic, using clasps when required even if there is a risk of aspiration, advising patients to return if a denture is loose or damaged, and finally that all patients who wear a denture are at risk of aspiration and swallowing events, and associated morbidity and mortality.

  6. Biofilm formation on denture liners in a randomised controlled in situ trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Fernanda; Luz, Murilo Souza; Boscato, Noéli; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana

    2013-05-01

    This randomised clinical trial assessed how biofilm development and composition is affected by time and denture material type in denture wearers with and without denture stomatitis. Specimens of acrylic resin (control) and denture liners (silicone-based or acrylic resin based, depending on the experimental phase) were inserted into the surface intaglio of 30 denture wearers. Biofilm was formed in two phases of 21 days, and counts of viable micro-organisms in the accumulating biofilm were determined after 7, 14 and 21 days of biofilm formation. Data were analysed by three-way ANOVA followed by Tukey test to assess differences among health condition (healthy or with denture stomatitis), materials and time point. Non-albicans Candida species counts were higher in diseased patients with silicone-based denture liners (p=0.01). Denture stomatitis patients showed higher mutans streptococci counts after 7 days (p=0.0041). Longer biofilm formation time periods did not result in differences on biofilm composition. The denture liners evaluated in this study accumulate greater amount of biofilm, and therefore their use should be carefully planned. The silicone-based denture liner tested should be used cautiously in patients with denture stomatitis as it showed increased non-albicans species counts, known to be difficult to treat. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of Microwave Cured Acrylic Resin on Candidal Growth in Complete denture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmy, A.H.M.

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of heat-cured acrylic resin denture base and microwave-cured acrylic resin denture base on Candidal growth. Seven completely edentulous male patients with no history of denture wearing participated in this study. All the selected patients were re-habilitated by mucosa supported complete dentures. The dentures were constructed from conventional heat-cured acrylic resin denture base following monoplane concept of occlusion. Before dismissing the patients and one month after denture insertion, salivary samples were collected according to oral rinse technique. One month resting period was allowed so as Candidal count can reach to normal. Then dentures were re based using microwave-cured acrylic denture base, before denture insertion and one month after denture insertion, salivary sample were collected before and one month following the same oral rinse technique. In the oral rinse technique, the patients were instructed to rinse their mouths with 10 mL of sterile phosphate buffered saline for 60 seconds. The rinse was then expectorated into a universal container and immediately transported to the laboratory for concentration by centrifugation, then cultured on sabouraud's dextrose agar plates which were incubated at 37 degree C for 48 hours. Microscopic examination and germ tube test were carried out for laboratory investigations. In addition, the morphological features of the isolated Candida from the samples tested in this study, were investigated using the scanning electron microscope(SEM)

  8. In Vitro Analysis of the Fracture Resistance of CAD/CAM Denture Base Resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmassl, Otto; Offermanns, Vincent; Stöckl, Wolfgang; Dumfahrt, Herbert; Grunert, Ingrid; Steinmassl, Patricia-Anca

    2018-03-08

    Computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) denture base manufacturers claim to produce their resin pucks under high heat and pressure. Therefore, CAD/CAM dentures are assumed to have enhanced mechanical properties and, as a result, are often produced with lower denture base thicknesses than conventional, manually fabricated dentures. The aim of this study was to investigate if commercially available CAD/CAM denture base resins have more favourable mechanical properties than conventionally processed denture base resins. For this purpose, a series of three-point bending tests conforming to ISO specifications were performed on a total of 80 standardised, rectangular CAD/CAM denture base resin specimens from five different manufacturers (AvaDent, Baltic Denture System, Vita VIONIC, Whole You Nexteeth, and Wieland Digital Dentures). A heat-polymerising resin and an autopolymerising resin served as the control groups. The breaking load, fracture toughness, and the elastic modulus were assessed. Additionally, the fracture surface roughness and texture were investigated. Only one CAD/CAM resin showed a significantly increased breaking load. Two CAD/CAM resins had a significantly higher fracture toughness than the control groups, and all CAD/CAM resins had higher elastic moduli than the controls. Our results indicate that CAD/CAM denture base resins do not generally have better mechanical properties than manually processed resins. Therefore, the lower minimum denture base thicknesses should be regarded with some caution.

  9. Isolation of Candida species from the oral cavity and fingertips of complete denture wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaral, Suresh; Desai, Raviraj G; Kamble, Vikas; Patil, Anand Kumar G

    2014-11-01

    Wearing a dental prosthesis is known to increase oral candidal colonization and predispose the wearer to oral candidosis. Denture wearers frequently use fingers to take the prosthesis out of their mouth. Oral Candida, if present may contaminate wearer's finger. The objective of this study was to investigate the simultaneous candidal colonization of oral cavity and fingertips of complete denture wearers. A total of 25 apparently healthy male subjects who had worn complete dentures for at least 1 year were selected. Information about each patient's denture age, denture hygiene, handling, and wearing habits, and hand washing habits after denture handling were be obtained. Intraoral examination of all the patients was done. For microbiological examination samples were collected from the fingertip and oral rinse of each patient. Candida species were identified with use of germ tube test and commercially available yeast identification system. Data was statistically analyzed. Significance was set at p < 0.05. It was found that frequency of hand washing, denture handling and denture stomatitis with respect to fingertip candidal isolation was not statistically significant. But poor denture hygiene and denture stomatitis with respect to oral candidal colonization was statistically significant. Denture wearers with oral Candida had a higher prevalence of Candida contamination on their fingers. Patients with removable prostheses should be informed about the importance of proper prosthesis and personal hygiene and the possibility of microbial contamination of the hands and other parts of the body.

  10. A Randomised Controlled Trial of complete denture impression materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, T.P.; Craddock, H.L.; Gray, J.C.; Pavitt, S.H.; Hulme, C.; Godfrey, M.; Fernandez, C.; Navarro-Coy, N.; Dillon, S.; Wright, J.; Brown, S.; Dukanovic, G.; Brunton, P.A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives There is continuing demand for non-implant prosthodontic treatment and yet there is a paucity of high quality Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT) evidence for best practice. The aim of this research was to provide evidence for best practice in prosthodontic impressions by comparing two impression materials in a double-blind, randomised, crossover, controlled, clinical trial. Methods Eighty-five patients were recruited, using published eligibility criteria, to the trial at Leeds Dental Institute, UK. Each patient received two sets of dentures; made using either alginate or silicone impressions. Randomisations determined the order of assessment and order of impressions. The primary outcome was patient blinded preference for unadjusted dentures. Secondary outcomes were patient preference for the adjusted dentures, rating of comfort, stability and chewing efficiency, experience of each impression, and an OHIP-EDENT questionnaire. Results Seventy-eight (91.8%) patients completed the primary assessment. 53(67.9%) patients preferred dentures made from silicone impressions while 14(17.9%) preferred alginate impressions. 4(5.1%) patients found both dentures equally satisfactory and 7 (9.0%) found both equally unsatisfactory. There was a 50% difference in preference rates (in favour of silicone) (95%CI 32.7–67.3%, p alginate as their material of choice for secondary impressions for complete dentures. Trial Registration: ISRCTN 01528038.

 This article forms part of a project for which the author (TPH) won the Senior Clinical Unilever Hatton Award of the International Assocation for Dental Research, Capetown, South Africa, June 2014. PMID:24995473

  11. Flexural strength and moduli of hypoallergenic denture base materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Peter; Rolleke, Christian; Sherif, Lamia

    2005-04-01

    Hypoallergenic denture base materials show no residual methyl methacrylate (MMA) or significantly lower residual MMA monomer content compared to polymethyl methacrylate-based (PMMA) heat-polymerizing acrylic resin. There is insufficient knowledge of the mechanical properties of hypoallergenic denture base materials to warrant their use in place of PMMA-based acrylic resins for patients with allergic reaction to MMA. This in vitro study compared flexural strength and flexural modulus of 4 hypoallergenic denture base materials with flexural strength/modulus of a PMMA heat-polymerizing acrylic resin. The following denture base resins were examined: Sinomer (heat-polymerized, modified methacrylate), Polyan (thermoplastic, modified methacrylate), Promysan (thermoplastic, enterephthalate-based), Microbase (microwave-polymerized, polyurethane-based), and Paladon 65 (heat-polymerized, methacrylate, control group). Specimens of each material were tested for flexural strength and flexural modulus (MPa, n = 5) according to ISO 1567:1999. The data were analyzed with 1-way analysis of variance and the Bonferroni-Dunn multiple comparisons post hoc analysis for each test variable (alpha=.05). Flexural strength of Microbase (67.2 +/- 5.3 MPa) was significantly lower than Paladon 65 (78.6 +/- 5.5 MPa, P denture base materials fulfilled the requirements regarding flexural strength (>65 MPa). With the exception of Sinomer, the tested denture base resins passed the requirements of ISO 1567 regarding flexural modulus (>2000 MPa). Flexural modulus of Promysan was significantly higher than the PMMA material. Microbase and Sinomer exhibited significantly lower flexural strength and flexural modulus, respectively, than PMMA. The other groups did not differ significantly from the control group.

  12. Phonetics and tongue position to improve mandibular denture retention: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnenkamp, David M; Garcia, Lily T

    2007-11-01

    The fabrication, use, and wear instructions for complete dentures are often the factors determining success. The dentist must help guide the mental attitude of the skeptical patient to foster acceptance and success of complete dentures. A "feeling of looseness" may be a condition experienced while patients learn to wear a new mandibular complete denture. Some patients may not understand the reasons given by dentists for the lack of retention of a new mandibular denture. This type of patient requires more explanation, more advice, and more instruction. A phonetic training technique, to demonstrate to the patient how to retain and stabilize the mandibular denture, may be needed for some denture patients. This article reports the clinical use of phonetics and its effect on tongue position to improve the retention and stability of a mandibular complete denture.

  13. A revised technique for fabrication of hollow mandibular denture: A solution to severely resorbed residual ridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varun Baslas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Prosthodontic rehabilitation of elderly patients with severely resorbed ridges is difficult due to compromised ridge height, increased inter-arch distance and altered insertion of associated jaw muscles. Planning dentures in such cases often require dentures that are lightweight to reduce the risk of further ridge resorption, which could otherwise complicate the situation. The purpose of the present technique is to fabricate a light weight lower denture by a revision of previously described technique in the literature. Materials and Methods: This article elucidates a simple technique for the fabrication of lightweight denture (hollow denture in elderly patients with severely resorbed mandibular ridge. The minimum thickness of denture base acrylic resin for structural durability is ensured by a wax shim of 2 mm. The adequate hollow space indenture for optimal weight reduction is created by condensation silicone impression material. Conclusion: Condensation silicone putty material can be successfully used as a spacer for hollow dentures to combat severe ridge resorption.

  14. Effect of surface treatment on the flexural strength of denture base resin and tensile strength of autopolymerizing silicone based denture liner bonded to denture base resin: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Saloni

    2010-12-01

    Silicone based denture liners are superior to acrylic based denture liners but it has a problem of failure of adhesion with the denture base. To evaluate the effect on the tensile bond strength of silicone based liner and flexural strength of denture base resin when the latter is treated with different chemical etchants prior to the application of the resilient liner. Rectangular specimens of heat cured PMMA (65 × 10 × 3.3 mm(3)) for flexural strength and (10 × 10 × 40 mm(3)) for tensile strength were fabricated and divided into four subgroups each. One subgroup of each type acted as a control and the rest were subjected to surface treatment with acetone for 30 s, MMA monomer for 180 s, methylene chloride for 15 s, respectively. Silicone based denture liner was processed between 2 PMMA specimens (10 × 10 × 40 mm(3)) in the space provided by a spacer, thermocycled (5(-)55°C) for 500 cycles and then their tensile strength measurements and flexural strength measurements were done. 180 s of MMA monomer treatment was found to be most effective in improving the bonding between the liner and denture base resin as well as producing the lowest decrease in flexural strength of denture base resin. Chemical treatment of denture base resin improves the bond strength of denture liner but it also decreases the flexural strength of denture base. So careful selection of chemical etchant should be done so as to produce minimum decrease in flexural strength of denture base resin.

  15. OVERLAY DENTURES: A REVIEW AND REPORT OF FOUR CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deeksha SHARMA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Patients with ectodermal dysplasia or having under‑ gone cleft surgery with anodontia or hypodontia, hypo‑ plastic conical teeth and patients with severely worn dentition are difficult to treat because of the poor remaining tooth structure. These patients often exhibit loss of vertical dimension of occlusion and aesthetic problems and usually need complex prosthetic treatments. Financial constraints or other priorities often restrict one from choosing the most desirable treatment. The overlay removable denture is a covering prosthesis partially supported by natural teeth, tooth roots, or dental implants, providing an efficient alter‑ native of treatment. Clinical reports describe the various applications of overlay dentures.

  16. Randomized controlled clinical trial for verifying the effect of silicone-based resilient denture liner on the masticatory function of complete denture wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto, Suguru; So, Kunio; Yamamoto, Shirou; Ohno, Yousuke; Shinomiya, Mayako; Ogura, Kyoko; Kobayashi, Kihei

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether application of permanent silicone-based resilient denture liner (SR) to mandibular complete dentures significantly improves patients' masticatory ability compared to conventional heat-activated acrylic resin (AR). Twenty-eight edentulous patients were randomly placed into 1 of 2 crossover groups (AR-SR/SR-AR) by using a random permuted block within strata method. The AR-SR group received AR denture treatments followed by SR denture treatments. The SR-AR group received treatments in the reverse sequence. The outcomes were classified by matiscatory performance, mandibular movement, electromyographic activity, and maximum occlusal force. No significant differences were observed in any of the baseline characteristic measurements between groups. SR denture wearers exhibited significantly higher masticatory performance than AR denture wearers. SR denture wearers exhibited a longer early-stage occluding period than AR denture wearers. There were no differences in electromyographic activity between the AR and SR groups. There were no significant differences in maximum occlusal force between the AR and SR groups. This study showed that the application of SR to mandibular complete dentures resulted in significant improvements to the patients' masticatory ability compared to AR.

  17. Oral health-related quality of life in patients treated by implant-supported fixed dentures and removable partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuyama, Chisako; Takaba, Masayuki; Inukai, Mika; Mulligan, Roseann; Igarashi, Yoshimasa; Baba, Kazuyoshi

    2012-08-01

    This study investigated the association between denture status [implant-supported fixed dentures (IDs) and removable partial dentures (RPDs)] and oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL). Consecutive patients with IDs and RPDs were recruited from the Prosthodontics Departments at Showa University and Tokyo Medical and Dental University. The Japanese version of the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-J-49) was administered to each subject. For each OHIP-J-49 question, the subjects were asked to indicate the frequency with which they had experienced a dental problem during the last month. Responses were recorded on a 5 point Likert rating scale, with 0 being never and 4, very often. Summary scores were calculated and regression analyses conducted to investigate the association between denture status and OHIP-J-49 summary score. In total 79 ID subjects (mean age±SD of 51.7±12.4 years, 44.3% men) and 109 RPD subjects (mean age of 66.5±8.6 years, 30% men) participated after giving informed consent. The regression analysis between the type of treatment and the OHIP-J-49 summary score revealed a significant association with a coefficient of 17.0 (Confidence interval, CI: 10.9-23.1). When age and duration of denture usage, which had significant associations with OHIP-J-49, were included in this model, the regression coefficient remained virtually unchanged at 17.4 (CI: 9.75-25.0), thus indicating little potential confounding by them. OHRQoL in patients with implant-supported fixed dentures is generally less impaired than it is in those patients with RPDs. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  18. Comparative Evaluation of Sorption, Solubility and Microhardness of Heat Cure Polymethylmethacrylate Denture Base Resin & Flexible Denture Base Resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulbule, Nilesh; Kulkarni, Shilpa; Shah, Riddhi; Kakade, Dilip

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate and compare sorption, solubility and microhardness of heat cure polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) denture base resin and flexible (thermoplastic polyamide nylon) denture base resin. Materials and Methods: Sorption, solubility and microhardness were assessed to determine compliance with ADA Specification no. 12. Results were assessed using statistical and observational analyses. Result: All materials satisfied ADA requirements for sorption, solubility and microhardness. Heat cure PMMA showed more sorption, solubility and microhardness than flexible (thermoplastic polyamide nylon). Conclusion: Flexible (thermoplastic polyamide nylon) resin absorbs less water, is less soluble and is more flexible than PMMA. PMID:25302291

  19. Utilization of Teeth Replacement Service Among the Elderly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hanumantp

    removable acrylic based dentures, implants and teeth supported (fixed) prosthesis. Fixed prostheses, though excellent options are quite expensive and may not be affordable options for most Nigerians.[12]. In a study done among older adult living in Japan, the percentage of utilization of tooth replacement services was.

  20. Bonding of acrylic denture teeth to MMA/PMMA and light-curing denture base materials: the role of conditioning liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palitsch, Anne; Hannig, Matthias; Ferger, Paul; Balkenhol, Markus

    2012-03-01

    The connection between resin denture teeth and the denture base is essential for the integrity of partial and full dentures. The aim of the present study was to analyse the bond strength of acrylic denture teeth to two light curing denture base materials compared to the gold-standard (MMA/PMMA) using different conditioning liquids. The ridge laps of 220 identical denture teeth were ground and pre-treated using different conditioning liquids (MMA, an experimental conditioning liquid as well as the two commercially available liquids Palabond and Versyo.bond). The denture base materials (PalaXpress, Versyo.com, Eclipse) were applied using a split mould to obtain tensile bond strength specimens of identical shape. Ten specimens per test group were either stored in water for 24h or thermocycled (5000×, 5-55°C) prior to tensile bond strength testing (cross-head speed 10mm/min). Data was subjected to parametric statistics (α=0.05). The three-way ANOVA revealed a significant influence of the material, pre-treatment as well as the storage. PalaXpress showed the highest bond strength (24.3MPa) of all materials tested after TC, whereas the use of MMA led to the most constant results. Lower values were recorded for Versyo.com (17.5MPa) and Eclipse (10.4MPa) bonded with Versyo.bond. The results indicate that MMA/PMMA based denture base resins provide reliable and durable bond strength to acrylic denture teeth. Using light-curing denture base materials requires the application of appropriate conditioning liquids to obtain acceptable bond strength. The use of MMA affects bond strength to light-curing denture base materials. The pre-treatment of denture teeth is critical regarding their bond-strength to denture base materials and in turn for the integrity of removable full and partial dentures. Light-curing denture base resins are more sensitive to the correct tooth pre-treatment compared to conventional MMA/PMMA materials, requiring specific conditioning liquids. Copyright

  1. Effect of denture cleansers on metal ion release and surface roughness of denture base materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davi, Letícia Resende; Felipucci, Daniela Nair Borges; de Souza, Raphael Freitas; Bezzon, Osvaldo Luiz; Lovato-Silva, Cláudia Helena; Pagnano, Valéria Oliveira; Paranhos, Helena de Freitas Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Chemical disinfectants are usually associated with mechanical methods to remove stains and reduce biofilm formation. This study evaluated the effect of disinfectants on release of metal ions and surface roughness of commercially pure titanium, metal alloys, and heat-polymerized acrylic resin, simulating 180 immersion trials. Disk-shaped specimens were fabricated with commercially pure titanium (Tritan), nickel-chromium-molybdenum-titanium (Vi-Star), nickel-chromium (Fit Cast-SB Plus), and nickel-chromium-beryllium (Fit Cast-V) alloys. Each cast disk was invested in the flasks, incorporating the metal disk to the heat-polymerized acrylic resin. The specimens (n=5) were immersed in these solutions: sodium hypochlorite 0.05%, Periogard, Cepacol, Corega Tabs, Medical Interporous, and Polident. Deionized water was used as a control. The quantitative analysis of metal ion release was performed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ELAN DRC II). A surface analyzer (Surftest SJ-201P) was used to measure the surface roughness (µm). Data were recorded before and after the immersions and evaluated by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). The nickel release proved most significant with the Vi-Star and Fit Cast-V alloys after immersion in Medical Interporous. There was a significant difference in surface roughness of the resin (p=0.011) after immersion. Cepacol caused significantly higher resin roughness. The immersion products had no influence on metal roughness (p=0.388). It could be concluded that the tested alloys can be considered safe for removable denture fabrication, but disinfectant solutions as Cepacol and Medical Interporous tablet for daily denture immersion should be used with caution because it caused greater resin surface roughness and greater ion release, respectively.

  2. Fabricating of full denture acrylic protheses with palatine torus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ima Hariyati

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Full denture acrylic protheses can substitute all maxillary or mandibulary teeth naturally. The objective of fabricating full denture protheses is to substitute the tissue lost that was occupied by teeth or connective tissue before ward. This is a case of a 43 year old female with lost of all her upper and lower teeth. At the maxilla there is a palatine torus spreading along the midline with 25 mm length, 10 mm width and 6mm height. She has never worn prothese before. The process of full denture protheses fabrication were carried out in several steps, starting from making anatomical impression  to get study model, making of individual stock tray, making functional impression to get working model, choosing the design, making of midline, making of bite rim, inserting the model on articulator, preparing artificial teeth arrangement, fitting the wax, countoring wax, flasking, boiling out, packing, curing, deflasking, finishing, polishing and inserting the protheses. The process of this full denture protheses fabrication used tin foil as reducer to prevent overpressure of the tissue around the thin torus area so the prothesis will be more comfortable for the patient. The result was the protheses can be used by the patient, nicely and comfortably.

  3. Reservoir Complete Denture in a Patient with Xerostomia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reservoir Complete Denture in a Patient with Xerostomia Secondary to Radiotherapy for Oral Carcinoma: A Case Report and Review of Literature. ... In severe xerostomia salivary substitutes can be used and if the xerostomic patient is edentulous, then reservoir space for artificial salivary substitute can be created in partial ...

  4. Implant-supported removable partial dentures in the mandible

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwerse, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    Conventional removable partial dentures (RPD) in a free-ending situation in the lower jaw (i.e. only front teeth left) have a poor reputation. Several problems like discomfort and functional problems are frequently encountered, resulting in dissatisfied patients and desperate dentists. By supporting

  5. Patient's Satisfaction with Removable Partial Dentures: A Retrospective Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shala, Kujtim Sh; Dula, Linda J; Pustina-Krasniqi, Teuta; Bicaj, Teuta; Ahmedi, Enis F; Lila-Krasniqi, Zana; Tmava-Dragusha, Arlinda

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective clinical study aimed to assess patient's satisfaction with removable partial dentures (RPDs), as retention, chewing ability, aesthetics during the observation period. A total of 63 patients with RPDs, participated in this study. The following data was collected: Kennedy classification, denture design, denture support, satisfaction and success of RPD. The results showed that 73.6% of patients were wearing RPD for the first time and were finally satisfied. According to the denture support of RPDs, clasp-retained quadrangular RPDs were 100% effective, followed by triangular dental support 81% and linear dental support 47.7%. Comparison of RPDs with attachment with RPDs with claps assessed through Fisher exact test, confirmed statistically significant difference (P=0.008), despite retention; however, chewing ability and aesthetics showed no statistically significant difference with X 2 test on patient's satisfaction with RPD with or without attachment. Patients often would prefer not showing the anterior buccal clasps of RPD, therefore are generally satisfied more with RPD with attachment based on level of retention, chewing ability and aesthetics.

  6. Sectional removable partial denture design for the treatment of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sectional removable partial denture design for the treatment of partial mandibulectomy patient: a case report. ... mandibulectomy with no surgical reconstruction. The case was challenging and the prosthesis was well tolerated during a 6 months follow-up review. (Afr. J. Biomed. Res. 10: 197 - 201). Keywords: Removable ...

  7. Uncaria tomentosa Gel against Denture Stomatitis: Clinical Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Lidia Y; Dos Santos, Fabio A; Jorge, Janaina H

    2015-02-09

    The objective of this study is to report the clinical use of 2% Uncaria tomentosa gel against denture stomatitis (DS) as an alternative treatment. The patient was a 65-year-old, denture-wearing woman. At the clinical examination, her palate showed hyperplasic and erythematous mucosa indicating DS type II. DS is a chronic oral disease that affects denture wearers. It occurs as an inflammatory reaction in denture-wearing patients under maxillary prostheses. Candida albicans has been reported as the principal etiological agent. An alternative treatment, the topical application of a gel of 2% U. tomentosa three times a day for 1 week was given to the patient. After 1 week of this treatment, she had significantly reduced signs of the disease. Despite the existence of a great number of antifungal agents, treatment failure is observed frequently. Phytotherapy is becoming more popular worldwide. Currently, the most promising medicinal Amazonian herb is U. tomentosa (Willd.) DC., known as Cat's Claw. Studies of the chemical and pharmacological properties of this medicinal plant have allowed researchers to develop indications for its use. This report demonstrates the effectiveness of U. tomentosa against DS. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  8. [Complete denture occlusion considered from occlusal contacts during mastication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tetsuya

    2004-12-01

    Few reports describe the functional superiority of full balanced occlusion to that of lingualized occlusion. Recently, a bilateral balanced scheme has been much more generally applied than a unilateral balanced scheme in lingualized occlusion as well as in full balanced occlusion. Occlusal contacts on the non-chewing side occur earlier than on the chewing side;in the order of second molar, first molar, and then premolars. The contact on the balancing side contributes to the prevention of denture dislocation and guidance from eccentric positions to the centric occlusal position during mastication. Therefore, bilateral balanced occlusion was shown to be effective for denture stability during mastication with complete dentures. Today's typical edentulous patients have greater mean age than in the past, and thus are seen with severe alveolar bone resorption, thin mucosa and sometimes abnormalities of the maxillomandibular relation. Their occlusal positions are often unstable and changeable after insertion of complete dentures. Because lingualized occlusion allows for easier accommodation and correction, lingualized occlusion is more suitable for such cases than full balanced occlusion, which requires a strict occlusal relationship. In light of the standard Japanese diet, there is some doubt about why lingualized occlusion might be suitable for Japanese edentulous patients in terms of the sense of mastication. A method of evaluating the sense of mastication needs to be established.

  9. Fiber-reinforced composites in fixed partial dentures | Garoushi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... to whether FRC prostheses will replace metal-ceramic or full-ceramic prostheses, attention should be focused on the additional treatment options brought by the use of fibers. However, more clinical experience is needed. Keywords: fiber-reinforced composite, fixed partial dentures, particulate resin composite, framework

  10. Load transfer characteristics of unilateral distal extension removable partial dentures with polyacetal resin supporting components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, T; Chang, T; Caputo, A A

    2009-03-01

    To photoelastically examine load transfer by unilateral distal extension removable partial dentures with supporting and retentive components made of the lower stiffness polyacetal resins. A mandibular photoelastic model, with edentulous space distal to the right second premolar and missing the left first molar, was constructed to determine the load transmission characteristics of a unilateral distal extension base removable partial denture. Individual simulants were used for tooth structure, periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone. Three designs were fabricated: a major connector and clasps made from polyacetal resin, a metal framework as the major connector with polyacetal resin clasp and denture base, and a traditional metal framework I-bar removable partial denture. Simulated posterior bilateral and unilateral occlusal loads were applied to the removable partial dentures. Under bilateral and left side unilateral loading, the highest stress was observed adjacent to the left side posterior teeth with the polyacetal removable partial denture. The lowest stress was seen with the traditional metal framework. Unilateral loads on the right edentulous region produced similar distributed stress under the denture base with all three designs but a somewhat higher intensity with the polyacetal framework. The polyacetal resin removable partial denture concentrated the highest stresses to the abutment and the bone. The traditional metal framework I-bar removable partial denture most equitably distributed force. The hybrid design that combined a metal framework and polyacetal clasp and denture base may be a viable alternative when aesthetics are of primary concern.

  11. Fracture resistance of maxillary complete dentures subjected to long-term water immersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yutaka; Yoshida, Kaneyoshi; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    This study investigated the fracture resistance of maxillary acrylic resin complete dentures subjected to long-term water immersion. Maxillary acrylic resin complete dentures were fabricated from five denture base resins. Half of the dentures were stored in water for 50 h, and the other half were kept in water for 180 days before testing. Ten specimens were fabricated per group. The flexural load at the proportional limit (FL-PL) of the dentures was tested. A two-way anova revealed a significant difference in FL-PL because of the denture base material variable. There were no significant differences in FL-PL because of the effect of water immersion and the interaction between the effect of water immersion and the denture base material. The FL-PLs of the dentures fabricated with the two conventional heat-processed resins, the pour-type autopolymerizing resin and the microwave energy-processed resin were not significantly different from each other; they were significantly higher than the light-activated resin in regard to their FL-PL. The FL-PLs of the maxillary acrylic resin complete dentures did not change after long-tern water immersion, and the FL-PL of the denture fabricated from the light-activated resin was lower than those of the other materials. © 2012 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Application of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to nondestructive inspection of dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumi, Yasunori; Ozawa, Nobuyoshi; Nagaosa, Shuichiro; Minakuchi, Shunsuke; Umemura, Osami

    2011-01-01

    The porosity of denture base resins continues to be one of the undesirable characteristics of acrylic resins. It is commonly accepted that porosity of the denture not only often leads to denture fractures, but also may function as a reservoir of potential pathogens. The purpose of this study was to present the first OCT images of finished dentures using a new advanced-type OCT scanner we have developed, and to discuss the application of our new OCT system for nondestructive inspection of dentures. Ten newly fabricated full dentures of outpatient of the National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology in Japan were selected for this study. Two types of denture base resins were used for inspection by OCT, which provided clear images of all the dentures examined. Internal structures, not visually detectable, inspection, can be observed using this OCT system. It is concluded that OCT can detect nonvisible internal structures in dentures, a finding not reported to date. OCT may, therefore, be an appropriate method for detecting interior defects in dentures nondestructively. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Prevalence of Candida spp. among healthy denture and nondenture wearers with respect to hygiene and age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharathi Prakash

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dentures are inert and nonshading surfaces and therefore get easily colonized by Candida species. Subsequent biofilm produced by them lead to denture stomatitis and candidiasis. This study was aimed to understand the prevalence of Candida species among healthy denture and nondenture wearers with respect to their age and hygiene status. Swabs were collected from 50 complete dentures and 50 non-denture wearers and processed on Sabouraud′s dextrose agar. Identification of Candida species was done by staining and a battery of biochemical tests. Data obtained was correlated with age & oral hygiene and statistical analysis was performed. Candida was isolated from both denture and nondenture wearers. Prevalence of different Candida species was significantly higher in denture wearers and found predominated by C. albicans, C. tropicalis, C. dubliensis and C. glabrata. Among nondenture wearers, C. albicans and C. tropicalis were isolated. Prevalence of Candida increased with increasing age among denture wearers. Men presented declining denture hygiene compared to women with increasing age. In comparison to nondenture wearers, multispecies of Candida colonized the dentures thus presenting higher risk of candidiasis especially with increasing age.

  14. Design of Complete Dentures by Adopting CAD Developed for Fixed Prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanfeng; Han, Weili; Cao, Jing; Iv, Yuan; Zhang, Yue; Han, Yishi; Shen, Yi; Ma, Zheng; Liu, Huanyue

    2018-02-01

    The demand for complete dentures is expected to increase worldwide, but complete dentures are mainly designed and fabricated manually involving a broad series of clinical and laboratory procedures. Therefore, the quality of complete dentures largely depends on the skills of the dentist and technician, leading to difficulty in quality control. Computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) has been used to design and fabricate various dental restorations including dental inlays, veneers, crowns, partial crowns, and fixed partial dentures (FPDs). It has been envisioned that the application of CAD/CAM technology could reduce intensive clinical/laboratory work for the fabrication of complete dentures; however, CAD/CAM is seldom used to fabricate complete dentures due to the lack of suitable CAD software to design virtual complete dentures although the CAM techniques are in a much advanced stage. Here we report the successful design of virtual complete dentures using CAD software of 3Shape Dental System 2012, which was developed for designing fixed prostheses instead of complete dentures. Our results demonstrated that complete dentures could be successfully designed by the combination of two modeling processes, single coping and full anatomical FPD, available in the 3Shape Dental System 2012. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  15. Clinical study on thermography, as modern investigation method for Candida-associated denture stomatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iosif, Laura; Preoteasa, Cristina Teodora; Murariu-Măgureanu, Cătălina; Preoteasa, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Candida-associated denture stomatitis is an infectious inflammatory condition of the oral mucosa, with frequent recurrences. The aim of this study was to assess the use of infrared thermography as investigation method for Candida-associated denture stomatitis (as inflammatory disorder of the maxillary denture bearing area), by comparing disease and non-disease groups. An observational study was conducted on maxillary edentulous patients treated by acrylic dentures, with and without Candida-associated denture stomatitis. Diagnostic test methods used were clinical examination for denture stomatitis and conventional microbiological culture method for oral candidiasis. Thermography analysis of the maxillary denture bearing area was made using the ThermaCAM PM350 infrared camera (Inframetrics, Flir Systems) and ThermaGram Pro 95 software, data being acquired by usage of standard protocol of thermographic registrations. The sample included 52 patients, 21 with and 31 without Candida-associated denture stomatitis. The temperature of the maxillary mucosa corresponding to the denture bearing area was found to be statistically significantly higher in Candida-associated denture stomatitis (mean 36.20°C), compared to healthy oral mucosa (mean 34.85°C). The thermal threshold value of 35.44°C was identified as best differentiating a pathological from normal state of the maxillary mucosa corresponding to the denture bearing area. In conclusion, infrared thermography, a rapid non-invasive investigation method, has the premises to bring valuable data in inflammatory disorders of the maxillary denture bearing area, as Candida-associated denture stomatitis that may be used for screening, diagnostic or monitoring purposes.

  16. Photodynamic antimicrobial therapy in the treatment of denture stomatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senna, Andre Machado de

    2012-01-01

    Denture stomatitis (DS), also called chronic atrophic candidiasis, is the most common oral fungal infection in denture wearers. It has a multifactorial etiology, but the presence of Candida spp. biofilm on the denture is considered the most important factor for the establishment of the DS. This study aimed to evaluate the treatment of DS through the use of photodynamic antimicrobial therapy (PAT), mediated by methylene blue. For this purpose, preclinical studies and clinical trials were performed. Simulators prototypes dentures were made of methyl methacrylate polymer to serve as a basis for biofilm growth of the following species of Candida: C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. dubliniensis, C. krusei, C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis and C. guilliermondii. Methylene blue solution at a concentration of 450 μg/mL was used as a photosensitizer. The prototypes and biofilms were irradiated with a laser of wavelength of 660 nm, potency of 100 mW, for 80 seconds. For the clinical study, subjects were divided into two groups. The first group received conventional treatment based on the use of antifungal Miconazole. The second group received the treatment by PAT. The preclinical results showed that all species of the genus Candida were susceptible to PAT, with a reduction in colonies that ranged from 2.48 to 3.93 log 10 . Clinical outcomes were evaluated for the reduction of colonies of Candida spp. located in the mucosa and in the prosthesis and relative to the improvement of the clinical aspect of the affected mucosa. Both the conventional therapy and PAT were effective in treating DS. There was no significant statistical difference between PAT and conventional treatment for any of the factors evaluated. Thus, it was concluded that PAT is effective in the treatment of denture stomatitis. (author)

  17. A follow-up study on removable partial dentures in undergraduate program: part I. participants and denture use by telephone survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Eiko; Fueki, Kenji; Igarashi, Yoshimasa

    2011-07-04

    The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical outcome of removable partial dentures (RPDs) designed to minimize denture mobility during function. Using archived files of the undergraduate program between 2003 and 2005 at Tokyo Medical and Dental University, a list of 169 patients treated with 184 RPDs was created. The RPDs had either an acrylic resin-base or a cobalt-chrome framework-base. Two examiners telephoned all the listed patients and interviewed 118 patients (70%) regarding the use of their RPDs. Of 118 patients, 42 (36%) had stopped using, mainly due to problems with abutment teeth in resin-based dentures, and replacement in cobalt-chrome-based dentures. There was no significant difference in mean age, gender distribution, mean number of remaining/abutment teeth, distribution of denture arch, and Kennedy classification between denture use and nonuse groups (p>0.05). The nonuse group showed a significantly higher percentage of resin-base compared to the use group (p = 0.006). Logistic regression analysis indicated that resin-base was a significant risk factor for nonuse (p = 0.008). The present findings suggest that abutment teeth should be selected carefully, especially in this type of resin-based RPDs, and that the denture base material may be a critical factor which determines denture use.

  18. Antifungal properties of sodium peroxide and sodium hypochlorite as a denture cleanser for full acrylic denture in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gantini Subrata

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Widely used materials are reported as denture cleansers are peroxide and hypochlorite. Many contradictions on the effectiveness of the commercial peroxide base solution against Candida albicans (C. albicans. Low concentration sodium hypochlorite (0.5% is used as a household sanitizer. But it is still unknown whether it has an antifungal effect, what is the optimum concentration and contact time to destroy the yeast. The purpose of this study is to examine the antifungal efficacy of commercial peroxide-based soaking solution and low concentration sodium hypochlorite against C. albicans, to determine the optimum concentration and contact time, and at the end, to obtain an effective denture soaking solution which is safe to use, easy to get, affordable and could be used to destroy C. albicans on dentures. The research conducted was an in vitro practical test for surface disinfectant. Sixty plates of acrylic which were already incubated with C. albicans are immersed in peroxide and hypochlorite base soaking solution in different concentration and contact time. The result showed that peroxide base was not effective to C. albicans and hypochlorite base solution can destroy C. albicans in 10 minutes at a concentration of 0,125%. Thus, the use of low concentration sodium hypochlorite as a denture soaking solution can be suggested.

  19. Dentures with phonetically contoured palate: a simple technique of adding customized rugae and palatal contours to the maxillary denture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Vamsi; Reddy, V Vamsi Krishna; Kumar, N Praveen; Raju, K Venkata Krishnam

    2012-03-01

    Speech is essential to human activity, therefore phonetics must be considered with mechanics and esthetics as the cardinal factors contributing to the success of the dental prosthesis. The aim of this following procedure is to produce dentures that are mechanically functional, esthetically pleasing and permit normal speech.

  20. Comparison of denture tooth movement between CAD-CAM and conventional fabrication techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodacre, Brian J; Goodacre, Charles J; Baba, Nadim Z; Kattadiyil, Mathew T

    2018-01-01

    Data comparing the denture tooth movement of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) and conventional denture processing techniques are lacking. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the denture tooth movement of pack-and-press, fluid resin, injection, CAD-CAM-bonded, and CAD-CAM monolithic techniques for fabricating dentures to determine which process produces the most accurate and reproducible prosthesis. A total of 50 dentures were evaluated, 10 for each of the 5 groups. A master denture was fabricated and milled from prepolymerized poly(methyl methacrylate). For the conventional processing techniques (pack-and-press, fluid resin, and injection) a polyvinyl siloxane putty mold of the master denture was made in which denture teeth were placed and molten wax injected. The cameo surface of each wax-festooned denture was laser scanned, resulting in a standard tessellation language (STL) format file. The CAD-CAM dentures included 2 subgroups: CAD-CAM-bonded teeth in which the denture teeth were bonded into the milled denture base and CAD-CAM monolithic teeth in which the denture teeth were milled as part of the denture base. After all specimens had been fabricated, they were hydrated for 24 hours, and the cameo surface laser scanned. The preprocessing and postprocessing scan files of each denture were superimposed using surface-matching software. Measurements were made at 64 locations, allowing evaluation of denture tooth movement in a buccal, lingual, mesial-distal, and occlusal direction. The use of median and interquartile range values was used to assess accuracy and reproducibility. Levene and Kruskal-Wallis analyses of variance were used to evaluate differences between processing techniques (α=.05). The CAD-CAM monolithic technique was the most accurate, followed by fluid resin, CAD-CAM-bonded, pack-and-press, and injection. CAD-CAM monolithic technique was the most reproducible, followed by pack-and-press, CAD

  1. Effect of denture cleaning on abrasion resistance and surface topography of polymerized CAD CAM acrylic resin denture base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinawi, Lana Ahmed

    2017-05-01

    The application of computer-aided design computer-aided manufacturing (CAD CAM) technology in the fabrication of complete dentures, offers numerous advantages as it provides optimum fit and eliminates polymerization shrinkage of the acrylic base. Additionally, the porosity and surface roughness of CAD CAM resins is less compared to conventionally processed resins which leads to a decrease in the adhesion of bacteria on the denture base, which is associated with many conditions including halitosis and aspiration pneumonia in elderly denture wearers. To evaluate the influence of tooth brushing with dentifrices on CAD CAM resin blocks in terms of abrasion resistance, surface roughness and scanning electron photomicrography. This experimental study was carried out at the Faculty of Dentistry of King Abdulaziz University during 2016. A total of 40 rectangular shaped polymerized CAD CAM resin samples were subjected to 40.000 and 60.000 brushing strokes under a 200-gram vertical load simulating three years of tooth brushing strokes using commercially available denture cleaning dentifrice. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 20, using descriptive statistics and ANOVA. ANOVA test revealed a statistical significant weight loss of CAD CAM acrylic resin denture base specimens following 40.000 and 60.000 brushing strokes as well as a statistical significant change (p=0.0.5) in the surface roughness following brushing. The CAD CAM resin samples SEM baseline imaging revealed a relatively smooth homogenous surface, but following 40,000 and 60,000 brushing strokes, imaging displayed the presence of small scratches on the surface. CAD CAM resin displayed a homogenous surface initially with low surface roughness that was significantly affected following simulating three years of manual brushing, but despite the significant weight loss, the findings are within the clinically acceptable limits.

  2. Effect of denture cleaning on abrasion resistance and surface topography of polymerized CAD CAM acrylic resin denture base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinawi, Lana Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Background The application of computer-aided design computer-aided manufacturing (CAD CAM) technology in the fabrication of complete dentures, offers numerous advantages as it provides optimum fit and eliminates polymerization shrinkage of the acrylic base. Additionally, the porosity and surface roughness of CAD CAM resins is less compared to conventionally processed resins which leads to a decrease in the adhesion of bacteria on the denture base, which is associated with many conditions including halitosis and aspiration pneumonia in elderly denture wearers. Aim To evaluate the influence of tooth brushing with dentifrices on CAD CAM resin blocks in terms of abrasion resistance, surface roughness and scanning electron photomicrography. Methods This experimental study was carried out at the Faculty of Dentistry of King Abdulaziz University during 2016. A total of 40 rectangular shaped polymerized CAD CAM resin samples were subjected to 40.000 and 60.000 brushing strokes under a 200-gram vertical load simulating three years of tooth brushing strokes using commercially available denture cleaning dentifrice. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 20, using descriptive statistics and ANOVA. Results ANOVA test revealed a statistical significant weight loss of CAD CAM acrylic resin denture base specimens following 40.000 and 60.000 brushing strokes as well as a statistical significant change (p=0.0.5) in the surface roughness following brushing. The CAD CAM resin samples SEM baseline imaging revealed a relatively smooth homogenous surface, but following 40,000 and 60,000 brushing strokes, imaging displayed the presence of small scratches on the surface. Conclusion CAD CAM resin displayed a homogenous surface initially with low surface roughness that was significantly affected following simulating three years of manual brushing, but despite the significant weight loss, the findings are within the clinically acceptable limits. PMID:28713496

  3. SECTIONAL MANDIBULAR COMPLETE DENTURE FOR A TOTAL MAXILLECTOMY PATIENT WITH TRISMUS: A CLINICAL REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer ÇELAKIL

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the case of a 60-year-old male patient with trismus induced by radiotherapy and fabrication of a sectional mandibular complete denture to allow the insertion of the denture into the mouth. A mandibular sectional denture was designed in two pieces with a locking mechanism by using mini anchor and ball abutment housing with cap. Patients who have undergone maxillectomy often have constricted mouth openings, as a result of surgical intervention and radiotherapy, and complain of an inability to insert or remove dentures. A new approach is vital for sectional dentures because existing sectional denture fabrication techniques cannot meet the ongoing needs of trismus patients. The mini anchor system with ball abutment housing has better mechanical retention in acrylic resin and can provide favorable stabilization during masticatory function; thus, additional framework is not required for assisting in stabilization and retention.

  4. Sectional mandibular complete denture for a total maxillectomy patient with trismus: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celakil, Tamer; Demir, Azize; Keskin, Haluk

    2017-01-01

    This report presents the case of a 60-year-old male patient with trismus induced by radiotherapy and fabrication of a sectional mandibular complete denture to allow the insertion of the denture into the mouth. A mandibular sectional denture was designed in two pieces with a locking mechanism by using mini anchor and ball abutment housing with cap. Patients who have undergone maxillectomy often have constricted mouth openings, as a result of surgical intervention and radiotherapy, and complain of an inability to insert or remove dentures. A new approach is vital for sectional dentures because existing sectional denture fabrication techniques cannot meet the ongoing needs of trismus patients. The mini anchor system with ball abutment housing has better mechanical retention in acrylic resin and can provide favorable stabilization during masticatory function; thus, additional framework is not required for assisting in stabilization and retention.

  5. The Effect of Repeated Microwaving Disinfection on the Dimensional Stability of Acrylic Dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polychronakis, Nick; Yannikakis, Stavros; Zissis, Alcibiades

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of repeated microwave disinfections on the dimensional stability of acrylic dentures. Three groups of dentures made of a heat polymerized acrylic resin were tested. I: dentures kept in water (control group). II: dentures microwaved daily while being immersed into water (wet disinfection). III: dentures microwaved daily without being immersed into water (dry disinfection).
Measurements were taken across three reference points, on two occasions: after curing and immersion in water for 24 hours, and one week later.
Data obtained were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Scheffe's multiple range test. The results showed that the microwave disinfection provokes dimensional changes of the same pattern (shrinkage). The dentures which underwent wet disinfection exhibited the greatest shrinkage (pdentures.
The microwave "dry disinfection" method can be safely applied in everyday practice since the dimensional changes which occurred seem to be of no clinical significance.

  6. Characterization and bacterial anti-adherent effect on modified PMMA denture acrylic resin containing platinum nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Nam, Ki-Young

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE This study characterized the synthesis of a modified PMMA (Polymethyl methacrylate) denture acrylic loading platinum nanoparticles (PtN) and assessed its bacterial inhibitory efficacy to produce novel antimicrobial denture base material. MATERIALS AND METHODS Polymerized PMMA denture acrylic disc (20 mm × 2 mm) specimens containing 0 (control), 10, 50, 100 and 200 mg/L of PtN were fabricated respectively. The obtained platinum-PMMA nanocomposite (PtNC) was characterized by TEM (transm...

  7. Color stability, water sorption and cytotoxicity of thermoplastic acrylic resin for non metal clasp denture

    OpenAIRE

    Jang, Dae-Eun; Lee, Ji-Young; Jang, Hyun-Seon; Lee, Jang-Jae; Son, Mee-Kyoung

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to compare the color stability, water sorption and cytotoxicity of thermoplastic acrylic resin for the non-metal clasp dentures to those of thermoplastic polyamide and conventional heat-polymerized denture base resins. MATERIALS AND METHODS Three types of denture base resin, which are conventional heat-polymerized acrylic resin (Paladent 20), thermoplastic polyamide resin (Bio Tone), thermoplastic acrylic resin (Acrytone) were used as materials for this study...

  8. Spectrogram Analysis of Complete Dentures with Different Thickness and Palatal Rugae Materials on Speech Production

    OpenAIRE

    Hamada Zaki Mahross; Kusai Baroudi

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the influence of reproduction of different thickness and palatal rugae materials on complete dentures speech using Computerized Speech Lab (CSL) (spectrogram). Materials and Methods. Three completely edentulous male patients (aged 50?60 years) were selected for reading a paragraph. Twelve upper dentures were constructed, four for each patient. The patients' speech groups were divided into five groups, Group I: patients without dentures; Group II: patients rehabilitat...

  9. Prevalence of Chronic Erythematous Candidiasis in Lebanese Denture Wearers: a Clinico-microbiological Study

    OpenAIRE

    Aoun, Georges; Berberi, Antoine

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Chronic erythematous candidiasis also known as denture-related stomatitis refers to inflammatory changes of the denture-bearing mucosa. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of chronic erythematous candidiasis in a Lebanese population using clinical and microbiological examinations. Materials and Methods: Ninety-eight patients wearing full acrylic maxillary denture (50 women and 48 men) were included in this study. A clinical oral assessment and a microbiological exa...

  10. Relationship between viscoelastic properties of soft denture liners and clinical efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroshi Murata; Taizo Hamada; Shinsuke Sadamori

    2008-01-01

    Soft denture liners are applied for denture wearers who cannot tolerate a hard-based denture due to a thin and non-resilient oral mucosa and/or severe alveolar resorption. This material distributes and absorbs masticatory forces by means of the cushioning effect. Clinical success of the materials depends both on their viscoelastic properties and on durability. Acrylic resins and silicones are mainly available for permanent soft liners. The acrylic permanent soft liners demonstrate viscoelasti...

  11. The effect of disinfection procedures on flexural properties of denture base acrylic resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asad, T; Watkinson, A C; Huggett, R

    1992-07-01

    This study evaluates the effects of long-term disinfection immersion on the flexural properties of denture base resins; it was conducted against a background of increasing awareness of the importance of cross-infection control in dental clinics and laboratories. The transverse bend testing procedure used followed that specified in the International Standard for denture base polymers. The results demonstrate that alcohol-based disinfectants are not suitable for use with denture base materials of non-cross-linked acrylic resin.

  12. [Longitudinal survey and analysis among Chengdu residents on cognition and acceptance of implant dentures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Yanping; Wang, Yongyue; Wang, Luming; Du, Bing

    2014-08-01

    This study aims to survey the cognition and acceptance of implant dentures among Chengdu residents in 2005 and 2013 and to comparatively analyze the differences and influencing factors. A questionnaire was designed for this study. Its main content included basic demographics of respondents (gender, age, cultural level, and income level), cognition level of implant dentures (concept and main characteristics of implant dentures), main concern of respondents regarding implant dentures and medical institutions, and acceptance level of the price of implant dentures, among others. The sampling survey was carried out among Chengdu residents in 2005 and 2013 using the designed questionnaire. The results were then statistically analyzed. Up to 908 valid questionnaires in 2005 and 905 valid questionnaires in 2013 were obtained. The level of cognition of implant dentures was higher in 2013 than in 2005, and the correlation between cognition and cultural level and that between cognition and income level were both positive. However, the correlation between cognition and age was negative. The success rate for implant dentures and medical treatment technology of medical institutions were the factors that the respondents were mainly concerned with. The main methods for disseminating information on implant dentures were the internet, television, newspapers, magazines, and introduction by friends. With the development of the society's economy and the improvement of culture and income level of Chengdu residents, the cognition and acceptance level of implant dentures have gradualy increased. Meanwhile, health education and medical technology still need to be strengthened.

  13. Inhibitory effects of Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus casei on Candida biofilm of denture surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Young-Gyun; Lee, Sung-Hoon

    2017-04-01

    Candida albicans biofilm is associated with denture-related stomatitis and oral candidiasis of elderly. Probiotics are beneficial bacteria and have antibacterial activity against pathogenic bacteria. The purpose of this study was to investigate the antifungal activity of various probiotics against C. albicans and the inhibitory effects of probiotics on Candida biofilm on the denture surface. The spent culture media of various probiotics were investigated the antifungal efficacy against C. albicans. Candida biofilm was formed on a denture base resin and was then treated with Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus casei. Also, the biofilms of L. rhamnosus and L. casei were formed and were sequentially treated with C. albicans. Colony-forming units of C. albicans on the denture surface were counted after spreading on agar plate. The denture base resin was treated with the spent culture media for 30days, after which the denture surface roughness was analyzed with an atomic force microscope. L. rhamnosus and L. casei exhibited stronger antifungal activity than other probiotics. The spent culture medium of L. rhamnosus and L. casei exhibited the antifungal activity against blastoconidia and biofilm of C. albicans. L. rhamnosus and L. casei showed the antifungal activity against Candida biofilm, and the biofilm of L. rhamnosus and L. casei inhibited formation of Candida biofilm on denture surface. Neither of the probiotics affected the surface roughness of the denture base resin. L. rhamnosus and L. casei may be the ideal probiotics for the prevention and treatment of denture-related stomatitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Functionally generated amalgam stops for single complete denture: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravinkumar G Patil

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Single complete denture opposing natural dentition is a common occurrence in clinical practice. This article reports a case of a single complete denture with a technique of occlusal refinement by func-tionally generated amalgam stops condensed in prepared resin teeth after initial balancing of the den-ture with semi-adjustable articulator. This technique provides intimacy of contact in all excursions by carving the amalgam in plastic stage. Amalgam stops improve the efficiency of the resin teeth. Den-tures fabricated using this technique require fewer and simpler post-insertion adjustments.

  15. The effect of various factors on the masticatory performance of removable denture wearer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratama, S.; Koesmaningati, H.; Kusdhany, L. S.

    2017-08-01

    An individual’s masticatory performance concerns his/her ability to break down food in order to facilitate digestion, and it therefore plays an important role in nutrition. Removable dentures are used to rehabilitate a loss of teeth, which could jeopardize masticatory performance. Further, there exist various other factors that can affect masticatory performance. The objective of this research is to analyze the relationship between various factors and masticatory performance. Thirty-four removable denture wearers (full dentures, single complete dentures, or partial dentures) participated in a cross-sectional study of masticatory performance using color-changeable chewing gum (Masticatory Performance Evaluating Gum Xylitol®). The volume of saliva was evaluated using measuring cups, while the residual ridge heights were measured using a modified mouth mirror no. 3 with metric measurements. The residual ridge height and removable-denture-wearing experience exhibited a significant relationship with masticatory performance. However, age, gender, saliva volume, denture type, and the number and location of the missing teeth did not have a statistically significant association with masticatory performance. The residual ridge height influences the masticatory performance of removable denture wearers, since the greater the ridge height, the better the performance. The experience of using dentures also has a statistically significant influence on masticatory performance.

  16. Connection of functional quality of partial removable dentures and the degree of patients' phonetic adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artjomenko, Victoria; Vidzis, Aldis; Zigurs, Guntis

    2015-01-01

    Phonetic adaptation is a complex biological phenomenon with a highly individual course, depending on the patient's motivation to use prosthesis, on the functional quality of removable dentures. The aim of the study was to estimate phonetic adaptation in patients with partial dentures, connecting it to alteration in speech quality and dentures functional value. We examined some peculiarities of phonetic adaptation in 50 patients with removable dentures (50 patients with natural dentition were invited for the control group). The standardized evaluation protocols (12 speech quality determining parameters) were developed separately for Latvian and Russian native speakers. 500 speech video samples were recorded and analysed according to pre-established guidelines. The connection of speech quality and the functional quality of the dentures was assessed. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 20.0. P values equal to or less than 0.05 were considered to be statistically significant. In patients with appropriate functional quality of removable dentures distorted speech production was detected in 25% (pk=0.008) cases and in patients with inappropriate functional quality of the prosthesis - in 40% (pkdentures functional value were satisfied with their speech performance in 96% (pk=0.674), in the group with inappropriate dentures functional value only 59% (premovable dentures depends on the patient's individual adaptation capacity, prosthetic design and functional value. Thus statistically significant correlation between removable partial dentures functional value, duration of usage and the degree of patients' phonetic adaptation (p<0.001) may be considered to be confirmed.

  17. Alternative procedure to improve the stability of mandibular complete dentures: a modified neutral zone technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehmann, Peter; Zenginel, Martha; Wostmann, Bernd

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this report is to describe an alternative technique to record the neutral zone. An acrylic resin base with posterior occlusal rims was applied using a thermoplastic denture adhesive. After being worn for 2 days, the base was transferred into an acrylic resin complete denture. Most patients reported an improvement in denture stability and a reduction of pressure sores. This procedure seems to be helpful to improve denture function, especially in the mandible, in patients who cannot be treated with implants. However, because of its complexity, this neutral zone technique cannot be recommended for routine clinical use.

  18. Improving mechanical properties of maxillary complete dentures through a bioinspired engineering design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, James A P; Bond, Ian P; Jagger, Daryll C

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated how ribbed design features, including palatal rugae, may be used to significantly improve the structural performance of a maxillary denture under load. A computer-aided design model of a generic maxillary denture, incorporating various rib features, was created and imported into a finite element analysis program. The denture and ribbed features were assigned the material properties of standard denture acrylic resin, and load was applied in two different ways: the first simulating a three-point flexural bend of the posterior section and the second simulating loading of the entire palatal region. To investigate the combined use of ribbing and reinforcement, the same simulations were repeated with the ribbed features having a Young modulus two orders of magnitude greater than denture acrylic resin. For a prescribed load, total displacements of tracking nodes were compared to those of a control denture (without ribbing) to assess relative denture rigidity. When subjected to flexural loading, an increase in rib depth was seen to result in a reduction of both the transverse displacement of the last molar and vertical displacement at the centerline. However, ribbed features assigned the material properties of denture acrylic resin require a depth that may impose on speech and bolus propulsion before significant improvements are observed. The use of ribbed features, when made from a significantly stiffer material (eg, fiber-reinforced polymer) and designed to mimic palatal rugae, offer an acceptable method of providing significant improvements in rigidity to a maxillary denture under flexural load.

  19. Oral health-related quality of life of edentulous patients after complete dentures relining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krunić Nebojša

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Tooth loss affects oral health-related life quality. More than a third of edentulous patients are not fully satisfied with their complete dentures and mainly complain of insufficient stability, retention, and pain during mastication. Solving the problem may include relining by materials that are based on silicone or acrylic. The aim of this study was to determine the level of patients’ satisfaction before and after relining upper dentures with soft and rigid liners. Methods. The patients (n = 24 were divided into two study groups. Maxillary denture relining of the first group of patients was performed with hard acrylic based resins while in the second group of patients complete denture was relined with a silicone-based soft liner. They were asked the questions from the specifically adapted the Oral Health Impact Profile Questionnaire for edentulous patients before and three months after relining dentures. Results. After relining the patients showed a higher degree of satisfaction with their dentures in all the tested domains (masticatory function, psychological discomfort, social disability and retention and hygiene. The patients with soft denture relines were more satisfied. Conclusion. Relining of maxillary complete dentures significantly positively impacts the quality of life of patients in all the tested domains (masticatory function, psychological discomfort, social disability, pain and oral hygiene. Better results were achieved using a silicone-based soft liner, which recommends it as the material of choice for relining dentures.

  20. Oral health-related quality of life of edentulous patients after complete dentures relining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krunić, Nebojsa; Kostić, Milena; Petrović, Milica; Igić, Marko

    2015-04-01

    Tooth loss affects oral health-related life quality. More than a third of edentulous patients are not fully satisfied with their complete dentures and mainly complain of insufficient stability, retention, and pain during mastication. Solving the problem may include relining by materials that are based on silicone or acrylic. The aim of this study was to determine the level of patients' satisfaction before and after relining upper dentures with soft and rigid liners. The patients (n=24) were divided into two study groups. Maxillary denture relining of the first group of patients was performed with hard acrylic based resins while in the second group of patients complete denture was relined with a silicone-based soft liner. They were asked the questions from the specifically adapted the Oral Health Impact Profile Questionnaire for edentulous patients before and three months after relining dentures. After relining the patients showed a higher degree of satisfaction with their dentures in all the tested domains (masticatory function, psychological discomfort, social disability and retention and hygiene). The padents with soft denture relines were more satisfied. Refining of maxillary complete dentures significantly positively impacts the quality of life of patients in all the tested domains (masticatory function, psychological discomfort, social disability, pain and oral hygiene). Better results were achieved using a silicone-based soft liner, which recommends it as the material of choice for relining dentures.

  1. Design and fabrication of complete dentures using CAD/CAM technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Weili; Li, Yanfeng; Zhang, Yue; Lv, Yuan; Zhang, Ying; Hu, Ping; Liu, Huanyue; Ma, Zheng; Shen, Yi

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to test the feasibility of using commercially available computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology including 3Shape Dental System 2013 trial version, WIELAND V2.0.049 and WIELAND ZENOTEC T1 milling machine to design and fabricate complete dentures.The modeling process of full denture available in the trial version of 3Shape Dental System 2013 was used to design virtual complete dentures on the basis of 3-dimensional (3D) digital edentulous models generated from the physical models. The virtual complete dentures designed were exported to CAM software of WIELAND V2.0.049. A WIELAND ZENOTEC T1 milling machine controlled by the CAM software was used to fabricate physical dentitions and baseplates by milling acrylic resin composite plates. The physical dentitions were bonded to the corresponding baseplates to form the maxillary and mandibular complete dentures.Virtual complete dentures were successfully designed using the software through several steps including generation of 3D digital edentulous models, model analysis, arrangement of artificial teeth, trimming relief area, and occlusal adjustment. Physical dentitions and baseplates were successfully fabricated according to the designed virtual complete dentures using milling machine controlled by a CAM software. Bonding physical dentitions to the corresponding baseplates generated the final physical complete dentures.Our study demonstrated that complete dentures could be successfully designed and fabricated by using CAD/CAM.

  2. Randomized controlled clinical trial on satisfaction with resilient denture liners among edentulous patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto, Suguru; Kitamura, Manabu; Kodaira, Maria; Yamamoto, Shirou; Ohno, Yousuke; Kawai, Yasuhiko; Kawara, Misao; Kobayashi, Kihei

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure patients' satisfaction and their preference between mandibular dentures with permanent silicone-based resilient denture liner (SR) and conventional heat-activated acrylic resin (AR), both opposed by acrylic resin-based maxillary complete dentures. Twenty-eight edentulous patients who had fulfilled selection criteria and provided informed consent were enrolled in this trial. Subjects were allocated randomly to either arm of cross-over groups (AR-SR/SR-AR), stratified by gender, using a random permuted block within the strata method. The AR-SR group received AR denture treatment followed by SR denture treatment. The SR-AR group received treatment in the reverse sequence. The primary outcome was patient satisfaction measured on 100-mm VAS, analyzed by two-way ANOVA and the Bonferroni multiple comparison as a post hoc test. The secondary outcome was patients' preference, evaluated by chi-square goodness-of-fit test. An intention-to-treat analysis was performed. Twenty-five subjects were enrolled in the analysis. There were no significant differences between AR and SR dentures 1, 2, and 3 months after the completion of control. Eighteen of 25 patients preferred SR dentures. Although there were no significant differences in patient satisfaction ratings between the two types of dentures, a significant majority of patients preferred those with a resilient denture liner.

  3. Complete denture services: clinical technique, lab costs, manpower, and reimbursement. One-year review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewoldsen, Nels

    2011-01-01

    Complete denture services at comprehensive care public health clinics are not common in part because of clinician concerns regarding outcomes. Educational debt forgiveness has attracted recent dental graduates to public health dentistry; however, not all recent graduates receive denture education experiences necessary to attain proficiency. While fundamental patient assessment and denture construction are taught, psychological assessment and communication with denture patients requires experience. A thorough understanding of occlusion, phonetics, esthetics and laboratory steps is also necessary. Expecting recent dental graduates to become proficient providing complete dentures at minimal reimbursement levels, with no mentorship or on-site laboratory support, is unrealistic. Public health dental clinics operate at full capacity performing emergency, preventive and restorative procedures. Complete dentures come with a laboratory fee approximately one-half the total reimbursement, meaning a remake drops clinic revenue to zero while doubling expenses. It is understandable that full schedules, marginal reimbursement, unpredictability and the risk of an occasional failure block clinician interest in providing denture services. This one-year report of services describes a three-appointment complete denture technique offering improved patient and laboratory communication, reduced chair time and controlled cost, resulting in high-quality complete dentures.

  4. The Prevalence of Oral Inflammation Among Denture Wearing Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybyłowska, D; Rubinsztajn, R; Chazan, R; Swoboda-Kopeć, E; Kostrzewa-Janicka, J; Mierzwińska-Nastalska, E

    2015-01-01

    Oral inflammation is an important contributor to the etiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, which can impact patient's health status. Previous studies indicate that people with poor oral health are at higher risk for nosocomial pneumonia. Denture wearing is one promoting factor in the development of mucosal infections. Colonization of the denture plaque by Gram-negative bacteria, Candida spp., or other respiratory pathogens, occurring locally, may be aspirated to the lungs. The studies showed that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients treated with combinations of medicines with corticosteroids more frequently suffer from Candida-associated denture stomatitis. Treatment of oral candidiasis in patients with COPD constitutes a therapeutic problem. Therefore, it is essential to pay attention to the condition of oral mucosal membrane and denture hygiene habits. The guidelines for care and maintenance of dentures for COPD patients are presented in this paper. The majority of patients required improvement of their prosthetic and oral hygiene. Standard oral hygiene procedures in relation to dentures, conducted for prophylaxis of stomatitis complicated by mucosal infection among immunocompromised patients, are essential to maintain healthy oral tissues. The elimination of traumatic denture action in dental office, compliance with oral and denture hygiene, proper use and storage of prosthetic appliances in a dry environment outside the oral cavity can reduce susceptibility to infection. Proper attention to hygiene, including brushing and rinsing the mouth, may also help prevent denture stomatitis in these patients.

  5. Influence of vertical dimension of occlusion changes on the electroencephalograms of complete denture wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Risa; Yoneyama, Yoshikazu; Morokuma, Masakazu; Ohkubo, Chikahiro

    2014-04-01

    The present study was conducted to identify how changes in the vertical dimension of occlusion (VDO) affect the sensory perception and activity of the brain in complete denture wearers using an electroencephalogram (EEG). Subjects were 21 individuals wearing complete dentures who regularly visited the Division of Prosthodontics at Tsurumi University Dental Hospital for checkups (12 males and 9 females, average age: 76.6). Based on their original dentures, two duplicate dentures with different VDO (-3mm and +5mm) were fabricated. EEG activity and occlusal force were measured before and after gum chewing with each denture in all subjects. Negative indicator scores for psychological conditions and stable neuronal activity (Dα) were calculated using EEG data. Statistical analysis was performed using the Wilcoxon test to compare changes in the sensory perception, activity of the brain, and occlusal force (α=0.05). After gum chewing with the +5-mm denture, a significant increase was observed in the negative indicator score (p0.05). A significant decrease was observed in the occlusal force between the original denture and the -3-mm denture (pocclusal force were influenced by immediate changes in the VDO of the complete denture. Copyright © 2014 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Poor oral hygiene, wearing dentures at night, perceptions of mouth dryness and burning, and lower educational level may be related to oral malodor in denture wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Neal R

    2010-03-01

    The study sample was recruited from edentulous patients seeking new dentures at the Kirikkale University Denture Clinic, Turkey. Male (n = 56) and female (n = 49) participants were enrolled and ranged from 50 to 78 years of age (mean age 60.7 6 7.7 years). All 105 completed baseline evaluations, new denture therapy, and follow-up examination approximately 4 weeks after denture treatment completion. The study was approved by the institution's Ethics Committee. Dates for patient recruitment and conduct of the study were not provided. For the prognostic component of the study, the primary factors of interest were sociodemographic characteristics, medical conditions previously related to oral malodor, and self-reported oral hygiene habits. The primary exposure for the interventional component was oral hygiene instruction, including brushing the tongue, cleaning the denture, and not wearing the denture at night. After treatment with new dentures, participants were instructed to follow these hygiene instructions daily and were evaluated 4 weeks later. The primary outcome measure was the degree of oral malodor with the original conventional dentures and following new denture treatment and oral hygiene instruction with 4 weeks of self-administered hygiene care. Oral malodor was expressed both quantitatively as the number of parts per billion (ppb) of volatile sulfide compounds (VSCs) and as a binary measure (present/absent) based on a threshold for oral malodor of greater than 110 ppb. Significant relationships with oral malodor (level of VSCs) at baseline with the original denture were found for education (those having only primary school education were more likely to have higher VSC level, odds ratio [OR] 8.6, P = .046), self-reported oral dryness (OR 2.5, P = .037), self-reported overnight denture wear (OR 0.342 [likely a typographical error in the table; based on the 95% CI of 1.59 to 8.35, the OR is probably 3.42], P = .002), and level of bacterial plaque coverage on

  7. Correlation in the mechanical properties of acrylic denture base resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hae-Hyoung; Lee, Chung-Jae; Asaoka, Kenzo

    2012-02-03

    The aim of the present study was to measure various mechanical properties of acrylic denture base resins, including flexural modulus, flexural strength, fracture toughness, Barcol and Vickers hardness and their related properties, and to investigate correlations between different mechanical properties. Resin specimens were prepared according to manufacturers' recommended instructions. The mechanical properties were measured under specified standards. Data from the mechanical tests were examined using correlation tests. In general, the mean results for mechanical properties of each specimen group were differently ranked depending on the tested mechanical property. The flexural modulus value showed strong or reasonable positive correlation with those of proportional limit, flexural strength, and surface hardness. In contrast, fracture toughness revealed strong negative correlations with the flexural parameters and hardness values. Results of correlation tests for the different parameters can be used for estimation of mechanical performance of acrylic denture bases in clinical situation and for quality control purposes.

  8. Finishing and polishing of a poly (fluoroalkoxyphosphazene) resilient denture liner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loney, R W; Moulding, M B; Hacker, C H; Ritsco, R G

    1994-01-01

    A raised ridge of Novus resilient denture liner was removed from samples using one of three burs, three stones, or a coarse sandpaper disc. Samples were polished using pumice alone, tin oxide alone, or both agents. A flat, unfinished sample served as a control. Average surface roughness of control samples was 0.96 microns. Average surface roughness measurements for reduced samples ranged from 7.21 microns (sandpaper disc) to 3.34 microns (Prolastic wheel). Without polishing, sandpaper discs and serrated burs produced rougher surfaces than stones or the nonserrated bur. The sandpaper disc reduced the liner the quickest. There were no significant differences between treatments or controls after the use of pumice alone or after the use of a combination of pumice and tin oxide. An acceptable finishing protocol for this poly(fluoroalkoxyphosphazene) resilient liner appears to differ from that previously established for a silicone resilient denture liner.

  9. Overlay removable denture for treatment of worn teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyth, Nurit; Tamari, Israel; Buller Sharon, Anat

    2014-01-01

    Rehabilitation of partially edentulous patients with excessively worn dentitions can be challenging. Factors including medical history as well as the cost of the treatment and patient wishes for simpler approaches must be considered. This manuscript describes the use of an overlay partial denture to treat patients with excessive wear of the maxillary teeth. We describe a technique to restore severely worn teeth using heat-cured acrylic as part of a partial or full denture. Minimal preparations of the teeth are required, and the restoration provides protection from further wear, and stabilizes the occlusion. This solution was functionally and esthetically suitable to the patients. The technique can be used in medically complex patients where extractions are contraindicated, such as post radiation therapy or bisphosphonate treatment. © 2014 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Gingival necrosis due to the ill-fitting denture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boras, Vucicevic

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of an 80-year-old male who was referred to the Department of Oral Medicine, School of Dental Medicine University of Zagreb, Croatia due to gingival ulcer which was present for eight days. Clinical examination has revealed exposed bone on the toothless alveolar ridge in the lower molar region on the right side of 0.8 cm in diameter. Otherwise, the patient was taking doxazosin due to urinary problems and ipatropium bromide due to respiratory problems. The patient wore a 6-year-old partial lower denture. He was initially treated with periodontal bandage (Resopack, HagenWerken, Germany) for the first three days and was instructed not to wear the denture; however, no benefit could be seen. Therefore, we added a local corticosteroid (betamethasone) and am oral antiseptic (chlorhexidine digluconate) applied three times a day. After 3 weeks the lesion healed. A list of possible causative factors regarding gingival ulcers is included. PMID:27688371

  11. Clinical application of removable partial dentures using thermoplastic resin-part I: definition and indication of non-metal clasp dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fueki, Kenji; Ohkubo, Chikahiro; Yatabe, Masaru; Arakawa, Ichiro; Arita, Masahiro; Ino, Satoshi; Kanamori, Toshikazu; Kawai, Yasuhiko; Kawara, Misao; Komiyama, Osamu; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Hosoki, Maki; Masumi, Shin-Ichi; Yamauchi, Mutsuo; Aita, Hideki; Ono, Takahiro; Kondo, Hisatomo; Tamaki, Katsushi; Matsuka, Yoshizo; Tsukasaki, Hiroaki; Fujisawa, Masanori; Baba, Kazuyoshi; Koyano, Kiyoshi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2014-01-01

    This position paper proposes a definition and naming standard for removable partial dentures (RPDs) using thermoplastic resin, and presents a guideline for clinical application. A panel of 14 experts having broad experience with clinical application of RPDs using thermoplastic resin was selected from members of the Japan Prosthodontic Society. At a meeting of the panel, "non-metal clasp denture" was referred as the generic name of RPDs with retentive elements (resin clasps) made of thermoplastic resin. The panel classified non-metal clasp dentures into two types: one with a flexible structure that lacks a metal framework and the other having a rigid structure that includes a metal framework. According to current prosthetic principles, flexible non-metal clasp dentures are not recommended as definitive dentures, except for limited cases such as patients with a metal allergy. Rigid non-metal clasp dentures are recommended in cases where patients will not accept metal clasps for esthetic reasons. Non-metal clasp dentures should follow the same design principles as conventional RPDs using metal clasps. Copyright © 2013 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Tensile bond strength of silicone-based soft denture liner to two chemically different denture base resins after various surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Hakan; Tugut, Faik; Guney, Umit; Kirmali, Omer; Akar, Turker

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of various surface treatments on the tensile bond strength of a silicone-based soft denture liner to two chemically different denture base resins, heat-cured polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), and light-activated urethane dimethacrylate or Eclipse denture base resin. PMMA test specimens were fabricated and relined with a silicone-based soft denture liner (group AC). Eclipse test specimens were prepared according to the manufacturer's recommendation. Before they were relined with a silicone-based soft denture liner, each received one of three surface treatments: untreated (control, group EC), Eclipse bonding agent applied (group EB), and laser-irradiated (group EL). Tensile bond strength tests (crosshead speed = 5 mm/min) were performed for all specimens, and the results were analyzed using the analysis of variance followed by Tukey's test (p = 0.05). Eclipse denture base and PMMA resins presented similar bond strengths to the silicone-based soft denture liner. The highest mean force was observed in group EL specimens, and the tensile bond strengths in group EL were significantly different (p < 0.05) from those in the other groups.

  13. [Follow-up studies and clinical evaluation of model cast dentures with periodontal and periodonto-gingival support].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebersbach, W; Lesche, M

    1977-11-01

    The authors examined 746 cast denture constructions with an average wearing time of 6 years to study the influence of cast denture constructions on caries increment. The mode of wear of the cast denture constructions had no influence on caries incidence, whereas effects exerted by the duration of wear and the presence of soft deposits could be detected. The evaluation of the functional performance of cast denture constructions showed that the clinical serviceability amounts to more than 8 years.

  14. Rresence of different Candida species at denture wearers with type 2 diabetes and clinically healthy oral mucosa: Pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Matić-Petrović, Sanja; Barać, Milena; Kuzmanović-Pfićer, Jovana; Radunović, Milena; Jotić, Aleksandra; Pucar, Ana

    2018-01-01

    Background/Aim: The aim of this study was to examine prevalence of different Candida spp. at diabetics and nondiabetics wearing dentures without clinical signs of Denture Stomatitis (DS) and to study if some local and systematic factors are confounders for harboring Candida at these subjects. Material and Methods: Total of 60 subjects wearing partial or complete upper acrylic denture having at least half of palatal mucosa covered by denture were selected and stratified into three experimental...

  15. Antifungal Effect of Henna against Candida albicans Adhered to Acrylic Resin as a Possible Method for Prevention of Denture Stomatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Nawasrah, Amal; AlNimr, Amani; Ali, Aiman A.

    2016-01-01

    Denture stomatitis is a very common disease affecting the oral mucosa of denture wearers. The aim of this study was to measure the antifungal effect of henna against Candida albicans adhered to acrylic resin as a possible method for prevention of denture stomatitis. One-hundred-eighty acrylic plates were prepared of heat-cured acrylic denture resin. The specimens were divided into six groups of 30 samples each. The first group was only polymer and monomer following the conventional manufactur...

  16. Effect of cooling procedure on final denture base adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganzarolli, S M; Rached, R N; Garcia, R C M R; Del Bel Cury, A A

    2002-08-01

    Well-fitted dentures prevent hyperplasic lesions, provide chewing efficiency and promote patient's comfort. Several factors may affect final adaptation of dentures, as the type of the acrylic resin, the flask cooling procedure and the water uptake. This investigation evaluated the effect of water storage and two different cooling procedures [bench cooling (BC) for 2 h; running water (RW) at 20 degrees C for 45 min] on the final adaptation of denture bases. A heat-cured acrylic resin (CL, Clássico, Clássico Artigos Odontológicos) and two microwave-cured acrylic resins [Acron MC, (AC) GC Dent. Ind. Corp.; Onda Cryl (OC), Clássico Artigos Odontológicos] were used to make the bases. Adaptation was assessed by measuring the weight of an intervening layer of silicone impression material between the base and the master die. Data was submitted to ANOVA and Tukey's test (0.05). The following means were found: (BC) CL=0.72 +/- 0.03 a; AC=0.70 +/- 0.03 b; OC=0.76 +/- 0.04 c//(RW) CL= 1.00 +/- 0.11 a; AC=1.00 +/- 0.12 a; OC=0.95 +/- 0.10 a. Different labels join groups that are not statistically different (P > 0.05). Comparisons are made among groups submitted to the same cooling procedure (BC or RW). The conclusions are: interaction of type of material and cooling procedure had a statistically significant effect on the final adaptation of the denture bases (P 0.05) on the final adaptation.

  17. Clinical evaluation of isolated abutment teeth in removable partial dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarrati S

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aims: Nowadays, removable partial dentures are applied to patients who are not able to use dental implants or fixed prosthesis. Although based on the studies the users of removable partial dentures are in the risk of plaque accumulation and unacceptable changes such as gingivitis, periodontitis and mobility in abutment tooth. It is not clear whether the negative effects of removable partial dentures are more on the isolated teeth which are a kind of abutment adjacent to endentulous area in both sides. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical condition of isolated abutment teeth without splinting in comparison to control abutment from the aspects of B.O.P (bleeding on probing, mobility, pocket depth and gingivitis."nMaterials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, the prepared questionnaires were filled out by 50 patients who received removable partial dentures in department of removable prosthodontics of dental school of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The patients had isolated abutment tooth and did not have any systemic disease. The obtained data were analyzed. Using Wilcoxon, exact Fisher and Kruskal-Wallis test."nResults: B.O.P (P=0.004, pocket depth (P=0.035, and mobility (P<0.001 in isolated abutments were more than those in control abutments, but there were not significant differences in the degree of caries (P=0.083 and gingivitis (P=0.07."nConclusion: This study showed that clinical condition of isolated abutments is worse than that of control abutments. More attention should be paid to healthiness of isolated teeth without splinting and periodic follow ups should be done in these cases.

  18. INCIDENCE AND CAUSES OF FRACTURE OF ACRYLIC RESIN COMPLETE DENTURE

    OpenAIRE

    Sampa; Pradip Kumar; Manabendra; Saibal Kumar

    2014-01-01

    CONTEXT (BACKGROUND): Replacement of missing teeth and the associated structures are done with the help of artificial prosthesis. Acrylic resin, by virtue of its excellent properties is widely used as a material of choice for fabrication of denture base. In spite of its higher esthetic quality, tissue compatibility and ease of manipulation, it has an inherent deficiency of proneness to fracture. AIMS: The present study was being undertaken to find out the incidence of frac...

  19. Use of a complete denture as a radiation carrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herring, H.W. Jr.; Greene, P.E.

    1983-01-01

    When surgical resection of intraoral neoplasms is contraindicated, treatment by surface mold irradiation may be used. Success or failure of this mode of treatment may depend on the fabrication of a surface mold that can deliver the prescribed amount of therapeutic radiation in the desired amount of time. A technique for modification of an existing complete denture prosthesis for use as a surface mold has been described. Patient cooperation is essential for successful use of this modified prosthesis

  20. Impact of Denture Cleaning Method and Overnight Storage Condition on Denture Biofilm Mass and Composition: A Cross-Over Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joke Duyck

    Full Text Available Appropriate oral hygiene is required to maintain oral health in denture wearers. This study aims to compare the role of denture cleaning methods in combination with overnight storage conditions on biofilm mass and composition on acrylic removable dentures.In a cross-over randomized controlled trial in 13 older people, 4 conditions with 2 different mechanical cleaning methods and 2 overnight storage conditions were considered: (i brushing and immersion in water without a cleansing tablet, (ii brushing and immersion in water with a cleansing tablet, (iii ultrasonic cleaning and immersion in water without a cleansing tablet, and (iv ultrasonic cleaning and immersion in water with a cleansing tablet. Each test condition was performed for 5 consecutive days, preceded by a 2-days wash-out period. Biofilm samples were taken at baseline (control and at the end of each test period from a standardized region. Total and individual levels of selected oral bacteria (n = 20, and of Candida albicans were identified using the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR technique. Denture biofilm coverage was scored using an analogue denture plaque score. Paired t-tests and Wilcoxon-signed rank tests were used to compare the test conditions. The level of significance was set at α< 5%.Overnight denture storage in water with a cleansing tablet significantly reduced the total bacterial count (p<0.01. The difference in total bacterial level between the two mechanical cleaning methods was not statistically significant. No significant effect was observed on the amount of Candida albicans nor on the analogue plaque scores.The use of cleansing tablets during overnight denture storage in addition to mechanical denture cleaning did not affect Candida albicans count, but reduced the total bacterial count on acrylic removable dentures compared to overnight storage in water. This effect was more pronounced when combined with ultrasonic cleaning compared to brushing

  1. Physical properties of a new denture lining material containing a fluoroalkyl methacrylate polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Iwao; Akiba, Norihisa; Keh, EnSheng; Kasuga, Yuta

    2006-07-01

    A new fluoride-containing, methacrylate-based denture lining material has been introduced. Because of the fluoride content, this material is expected to demonstrate low water sorption and solubility and high stain resistance, but these attributes remain untested. This study investigated a wide range of clinically relevant properties for a new fluoroalkyl methacrylate denture base liner product (Maxfit) and compared these properties with those of 3 other commercial products. Four denture lining materials were tested: Maxfit, Kooliner, Tokuyama Rebase (fast set), and Denture Liner. Water sorption (microg/mm(3)) and solubility (microg/mm(3)) were tested according to International Organization for Standardization (ISO) Standard No. 1567. Stain resistance was evaluated by measuring color change (DeltaE) after immersion in 2 solutions (coffee and turmeric solution). Microhardness was determined using Knoop indentation testing according to American National Standards Institute/American Dental Association Specification No. 17. Relined denture fit was evaluated by measuring the gap (mm) occurring between the relined denture base and the cast after polymerization. Shear bond strength (MPa) to denture base materials (polymethyl methacrylate, cobalt-chromium alloy, and titanium) was tested according to ISO Standard No. 11405. Data were statistically analyzed using nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis (alpha=.05) and Mann-Whitney U tests combined with the Bonferroni correction (alpha=.008). Maxfit showed the lowest water sorption and solubility (8.0 +/- 0.1, 0.5 +/- 0.1 microg/mm(3), respectively). The color change from coffee immersion of Maxfit was significantly less than Tokuyama Rebase and Denture Liner, and significantly less than Tokuyama Rebase and Denture Liner in a turmeric solution (PDenture Liner (Pdenture liner (Maxfit) showed the lowest water sorption and solubility, and superior stain resistance. In spite of the addition of the fluoride content, this product exhibited no

  2. Cytocompatible antifungal acrylic resin containing silver nanoparticles for dentures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-Torres, Laura Susana; Mendieta, Irasema; Nuñez-Anita, Rosa Elvira; Cajero-Juárez, Marcos; Castaño, Víctor M

    2012-01-01

    Background Inhibition of Candida albicans on denture resins could play a significant role in preventing the development of denture stomatitis. The safety of a new dental material with antifungal properties was analyzed in this work. Methods Poly(methyl methacrylate) [PMMA] discs and PMMA-silver nanoparticle discs were formulated, with the commercial acrylic resin, Nature-CrylTM, used as a control. Silver nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, dispersive Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The antifungal effect was assessed using a luminescent microbial cell viability assay. Biocompatibility tests were carried out using NIH-3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblasts and a Jurkat human lymphocyte cell line. Cells were cultured for 24 or 72 hours in the presence or absence of the polymer formulations and analyzed using three different tests, ie, cellular viability by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, and cell proliferation by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay BrdU, and genomic DNA damage (Comet assay). Finally, the samples were evaluated mechanically, and the polymer-bearing silver nanoparticles were analyzed microscopically to evaluate dispersion of the nanoparticles. Results The results show that PMMA-silver nanoparticle discs significantly reduce adherence of C. albicans and do not affect metabolism or proliferation. They also appear not to cause genotoxic damage to cells. Conclusion The present work has developed a new biocompatible antifungal PMMA denture base material. PMID:22969297

  3. Missing Aspirated Impacted Denture Requiring Tracheotomy for Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sampan-Singh Bist

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:                                                     Aspirated foreign bodies continue to present challenges to otorhinolaryngologists. Removal of impacted airway foreign bodies via conventional methods can at times pose difficulty. This may berelated to the location and type of foreign body, experience of the surgeon and anesthetist, and the availability of appropriate instruments. In adults, especially in edentulous patients, a swallowed denture usually gets lodged in the esophagus and entrance into the airway is uncommon.   Case Report:  We report a case of an uncommon foreign body (3-toothed artificial denture plate impacted in the trachea of a 40-year-old male following an acute episode of an epileptic attack in which conventional methods of foreign body removal had failed. It was eventually removed via a direct laryngoscopy and tracheotomy technique.   Conclusion: This type of impaction of a large denture in the trachea is uncommon and late presentation after aspiration is even more rare. This unusual case of a foreign body in the airway is interesting due to its rarity, mode of entry, site of impaction, variable clinical presentation, and method of removal; and hence, prompted the authors to report this case.

  4. Cytocompatible antifungal acrylic resin containing silver nanoparticles for dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-Torres, Laura Susana; Mendieta, Irasema; Nuñez-Anita, Rosa Elvira; Cajero-Juárez, Marcos; Castaño, Víctor M

    2012-01-01

    Inhibition of Candida albicans on denture resins could play a significant role in preventing the development of denture stomatitis. The safety of a new dental material with antifungal properties was analyzed in this work. Poly(methyl methacrylate) [PMMA] discs and PMMA-silver nanoparticle discs were formulated, with the commercial acrylic resin, Nature-Cryl™, used as a control. Silver nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, dispersive Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The antifungal effect was assessed using a luminescent microbial cell viability assay. Biocompatibility tests were carried out using NIH-3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblasts and a Jurkat human lymphocyte cell line. Cells were cultured for 24 or 72 hours in the presence or absence of the polymer formulations and analyzed using three different tests, ie, cellular viability by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, and cell proliferation by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay BrdU, and genomic DNA damage (Comet assay). Finally, the samples were evaluated mechanically, and the polymer-bearing silver nanoparticles were analyzed microscopically to evaluate dispersion of the nanoparticles. The results show that PMMA-silver nanoparticle discs significantly reduce adherence of C. albicans and do not affect metabolism or proliferation. They also appear not to cause genotoxic damage to cells. The present work has developed a new biocompatible antifungal PMMA denture base material.

  5. Conventional Complete Denture in Patients with Ectodermal Dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Soares Reis Vilanova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectodermal dysplasia is described as heritable conditions that involve anomalies of structures derived from the ectoderm, including hypodontia. In the cases of edentulous young patients, who did not finish their craniofacial growth, treatment with conventional complete denture is a suitable alternative. The aim of this study was to report a case of mandibular edentulism treated with conventional complete denture in a thirteen-year-old patient diagnosed with hidrotic ectodermal dysplasia. Typical features, such as frontal bossing, depressed nasal bridge, protuberant lips, scarce hair, and brittle nails, were visualized during the extraoral examination. The intraoral inspection and radiographic analysis revealed oligodontia, dental malformation, and prolonged retention of deciduous teeth at maxilla and total edentulism at mandible. A conventional complete denture was planned and constructed following the same steps of technique as recommended in adults. Although this option is not a definitive treatment, the patient and his parents were satisfied with his improvement in chewing and speech, as well as with the aesthetic benefits.

  6. Evaluation of psychological guidance impact on complete denture wearer's satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yun; Zhan, Desong

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of psychological intervention on edentulous patients' satisfaction with complete clinically satisfactory complete dentures. The survey was conducted in China Medical University involving 84 individuals receiving complete dentures at this institution from August 2013 to March 2014. Participants were randomly allocated to intervention and control groups consisting of 42 subjects, respectively. In the intervention group, individuals received oral health education and psychological intervention before and after the whole process. In the control group, 42 cases received doctor's regular advice after treatment. Satisfaction regarding aesthetic, speech, mastication, retention and comfort was rated in the first and third month after prosthesis treatment. Patients overall aesthetic, speech, mastication and retention were significantly improved in both intervention and control groups in 3 months later after prosthesis treatment when compared with the first month (P evaluations (P  0·05) in first and third month. The study concludes that psychological intervention plays a significant role in improving patient satisfaction with complete dentures. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Fracture strength and bending of all-ceramic and fiber-reinforced composites in inlay-retained fixed partial dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan Saridag

    2012-06-01

    Conclusions: Zirconia-based ceramic inlay-retained fixed partial dentures demonstrated the highest fracture strength. The fiber-reinforced composite inlay-retained fixed partial dentures demonstrated higher bending values than did the all-ceramic inlay-retained fixed partial dentures.

  8. Evaluation of adhesion of reline resins to the thermoplastic denture base resin for non-metal clasp denture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Hye; Choe, Han Cheol; Son, Mee Kyoung

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the tensile and transverse bond strength of chairside reline resins (Tokuyama Rebase II, Mild Rebaron LC) to a thermoplastic acrylic resin (Acrytone) used for non metal clasp denture. The results were compared with those of a conventional heat polymerized acrylic resin (Paladent 20) and a thermoplastic polyamide resin (Biotone). The failure sites were examined by scanning electron microscopy to evaluate the mode of failure. As results, the bond strength of reline resins to a thermoplastic acrylic resin was similar to the value of a conventional heat polymerized acrylic resin. However, thermoplastic polyamide resin showed the lowest value. The results of this study indicated that a thermoplastic acrylic resin for non metal clasps denture allows chairside reline and repair. It was also found that the light-polymerized reline resin had better bond strength than the autopolymerizing reline resin in relining for a conventional heat polymerized acrylic resin and a thermoplastic acrylic resin.

  9. Effect of silica coating and silane surface treatment on the bond strength of soft denture liner to denture base material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atsü, Saadet; Keskın, Yasemin

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of different surface treatments on the tensile bond strength of an autopolymerizing silicone denture liner to a denture base material after thermocycling. Fifty rectangular heat-polymerized acrylic resin (QC-20) specimens consisting of a set of 2 acrylic blocks were used in the tensile test. Specimens were divided into 5 test groups (n=10) according to the bonding surface treatment as follows: Group A, adhesive treatment (Ufi Gel P adhesive) (control); Group S, sandblasting using 50-µm Al2O3; Group SCSIL, silica coating using 30-µm Al2O3 modified by silica and silanized with silane agent (CoJet System); Group SCA, silica coating and adhesive application; Group SCSILA, silica coating, silane and adhesive treatment. The 2 PMMA blocks were placed into molds and the soft lining materials (Ufi Gel P) were packed into the space and polymerized. All specimens were thermocycled (5,000 cycles) before the tensile test. Bond strength data were analyzed using 1-way ANOVA and Duncan tests. Fracture surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS) and Fourier Transform Infrared spectrometer (FTIR) analysis were used for the chemical analysis and a profilometer was used for the roughness of the sample surfaces. The highest bond strength test value was observed for Group A (1.35±0.13); the lowest value was for Group S (0.28±0.07) and Group SCSIL (0.34±0.03). Mixed and cohesive type failures were seen in Group A, SCA and SCSILA. Group S and SCSIL showed the least silicone integrations and the roughest surfaces. Sandblasting, silica coating and silane surface treatments of the denture base resin did not increase the bond strength of the silicone based soft liner. However, in this study, the chemical analysis and surface profilometer provided interesting insights about the bonding mechanism between the denture base resin and silicone soft liner.

  10. 21 CFR 872.3410 - Ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or carboxymethylcellulose sodium denture adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or....3410 Ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or carboxymethylcellulose sodium denture adhesive. (a) Identification. An ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or carboxymethylcellulose sodium denture adhesive is a device...

  11. 21 CFR 872.3450 - Ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or karaya denture adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or karaya denture... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3450 Ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or karaya denture adhesive. (a) Identification. Ethylene oxide homopolymer and/or karaya...

  12. Complete Denture Impression Techniques Practiced by Private Dental Practitioners: A Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Kakatkar, Vinay R.

    2012-01-01

    Impression making is an important step in fabricating complete dentures. A survey to know the materials used and techniques practiced while recording complete denture impressions was conducted. It is disheartening to know that 33 % practitioners still use base plate custom trays to record final impressions. 8 % still use alginate for making final impressions. An acceptable technique for recording CD impressions is suggested.

  13. Correlation between factors associated with the removable partial dentures use and Candida spp. in saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusmão, João Milton Rocha; Ferreira dos Santos, Silvana Soleo; Neisser, Maximiliano Piero; Jorge, Antônio Olavo Cardoso; Faria, Ms Ivan

    2011-12-01

    To correlate the presence and number of Candida spp. in the saliva of wearers of removable partial dentures retained with precision attachments with the proportion of metal/acrylic resin present in the dentures. Saliva samples from 40 removable partial denture wearers (test) and one paired sample of individuals, non-wearers of any type of removable denture (control) were collected, seeded, and the colony forming units of Candida counted and identified. The metal/acrylic resin proportion of each denture was quantified, using silicone plates pressed over each denture. Candida spp. was found in the saliva of 80% of the individuals in the test group and 65% of the control, with C. albicans being the most prevalent species. The test group presented with the highest number of colony forming units of Candida per ml of saliva, and there was weak correlation between this number and the metal and resin area of the denture (Pearson's coefficient of correlation). Greater prevalence and a higher number of colony forming units of Candida per ml of saliva occurred in removable partial denture wearers (p = 0.04) with a weak positive correlation between the metal and resin area and the number of colony forming units of Candida per ml of saliva. However, this correlation was more significant for the area of resin. © 2010 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Socio-Demographic and Economic Factors Affecting the Acceptance of Removable Dentures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, İlgi; Ergün, Gülfem; Semiz, Mustafa

    2007-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate relationships between the socio-demographic and economic factors of patients and the reasons of admission, usage periods of the two types of clinics, frequencies of denture changes, satisfaction levels and preferences of prosthetic dental treatment. Materials and Methods 510 partially and/or totally edentulous patients were studied using a questionnaire. The questionnaire consisted of questions; age, gender, education level, income status, problems with dentures, necessity for new dentures. Also asked was the place that the subjects would prefer to get their denture treatment, irrespective of their income level. In this study, Z-test was used to analyze two-sample proportions, T-test was used to determine two-sample means and Chi-square test was used to determine relationship between two classified variables. Results The number of male patients with complete dentures was more than the number of females, with an opposing trend for partial dentures. Irrespective of gender, each patient had had nearly two dentures by the time of questioning. It was also observed that the university clinics were generally preferred by patients from higher income levels with a higher educational level (x2=25.206, Pdenture treatment, regardless of cost, private practice was the preferred-choice. Conclusions With respect to dental condition and the acceptance of removable dentures, there were differences among gender, educational level and income status. PMID:19212485

  15. Occlusal Pressure Analysis of Complete Dentures after Microwave Disinfection: A Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Michael Frederico Manzolli; Giampaolo, Eunice Teresinha; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo; Pavarina, Ana Cláudia; Machado, Ana Lúcia; Jorge, Janaina Habib

    2017-10-01

    This clinical study evaluated the effect of microwave disinfection protocols on the occlusal pressure pattern of dentures. Dentures were constructed for 40 patients and evaluated as follows (n = 20). Group 1: Patients had the maxillary dentures submitted to microwave disinfection, once a week, for 4 weeks. Group 2: Patients had the maxillary dentures submitted to microwave disinfection, three times a week, for 4 weeks. Occlusal contacts were recorded on five occasions: 30 days after denture insertion and before first disinfection (baseline or control group); 1 week after disinfection; 2 weeks after disinfection; 3 weeks after disinfection; 4 weeks after disinfection. Occlusal contacts were analyzed by T-Scan III. Intergroup analysis was performed using the Mann-Whitney test and intragroup analysis using the Friedman test with significance of 5%. The results showed no significant difference between groups during the periods. The data on parameters loss of denture adaptation or complaints showed that patients used their dentures regularly for eating and expressed comfort and satisfaction in all experimental periods. The evaluation of functional occlusion revealed that the distribution of the occlusal contacts remained unaltered after disinfection. Microwave disinfection protocols as studied in this report did not influence occlusal contacts of the complete dentures. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  16. Subjective assessment by patients of the efficiency of two denture adhesive pastes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kulak, Y.; Ozcan, M.; Arikan, A.

    2005-01-01

    : PURPOSE: This study evaluated the subjective responses of 30 denture wearers with regard to the effectiveness of two denture adhesive pastes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty patients responded to questions related to retention, chewing ability, taste, duration of adhesives in the mouth, and removal;

  17. Total CAD/CAM Supported Method for Manufacturing Removable Complete Dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Furtado de Mendonça

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The incorporation of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM technology into complete denture fabrication brings about several advantages to the fabrication process, providing better predictability of the desired outcomes and high accuracy of denture fit, mainly because the milling of prepolymerized acrylic resin eliminates the shrinkage of the acrylic base. Also, there is a decrease in the porosity when compared to a conventionally processed denture, and consequently there is a decrease in the retention of Candida albicans on the denture base. The presented workflow for complete denture fabrication presents a totally wax-free manufacturing process, combining rapid prototyping (RP and rapid milling. With the presented technique, the maxillomandibular relation (MMR and the ideal setup of the tooth arrangement are developed by using occlusion rims and trial setup made with RP. For the definitive final denture, the denture base and the basal surfaces of the conventional denture teeth were milled according to the individual clinical situation. Posteriorly, the teeth were adapted and bonded into the milled sockets of the milled base.

  18. Denture impaction in the oesophagus experience of a young ENT practice in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adedeji, Taiwo Olugbemiga; Olaosun, Adedayo Olugbenga; Sogebi, Olusola Ayodele; Tobih, James E

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The effect of dental loss and associated desire to restore its function and aesthesis has led to an increase in the number of people wearing dentures. This study therefore reviews the cases of impacted acrylic dentures in the oesophagus. Methods A retrospective review of patients that were managed for oesophageal denture impaction at Ladoke Akintola University of Technology Teaching Hospital, Osogbo, Osun State, Nigeria, over an eight year period from 2005 to 2012. Results A total of 14 patients (M: F 2.5: 1). The age ranged from 32 - 75 years. Majority 64.3%) were 51 years and above. Over 70% presented early. Major presenting symptoms were throat pain (100%), odynophageal (92.9%) and dysphageal (78.6%). The radiographic findings were air entrapment (64.3%) and increase in prevertebral soft tissue shadow (78.6%). Majority (87.5%) were impacted at the upper (cervical) oesophagus. Over 78% had successful extraction with rigid oesophagoscopy. Two (14.3%) had spontaneous expulsion of the denture and 1 (7.1%) discharged himself against medical advice. Complications were mucosa tear (28.6%), laryngeal spasm/ airway obstruction (14.3%), mucosa oedema/ erythema (57.1%), neck abscess (7.1%). Conclusion Impaction of esophageal dentures is relatively common in our locality; most patients present early for medical attention and associated with successful rigid oesophagoscopies and denture extraction under GA, and generally good outcome. Education of the wearers of dentures was emphasized as a way of preventing dentures impaction. PMID:25478051

  19. 21 CFR 872.3760 - Denture relining, repairing, or rebasing resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Denture relining, repairing, or rebasing resin. 872.3760 Section 872.3760 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN..., repairing, or rebasing resin. (a) Identification. A denture relining, repairing, or rebasing resin is a...

  20. The effect of bioburden on in-depth disinfection of denture base acrylic resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, T R; Guillory, V L; Gregoire, S T; Pimsler, M; Mitchell, M S

    1998-11-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of three different disinfectant solutions against denture bioburden absorbed within the depth of acrylic resin. Specimens were taken from dentures that had been worn by the patients for 15 to 20 years and were scheduled for replacement.

  1. Evaluation of adhesive properties of three resilient denture liners by the modified peel test method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, Yasuhiro; Saeki, Hiroyuki; Kimoto, Suguru; Nishiwaki, Tsuyoshi; Nishiyama, Norihiro

    2009-02-01

    The characteristics of adhesive properties between a denture base and resilient denture liner were investigated by a modified peel test with an L-shaped metal attachment. Three commercially resilient denture lining materials, namely GC Reline Soft (S), GC Reline Extra Soft (ES), and GC Reline Ultra Soft (US), were evaluated. Acrylic resin (GC Acron) was used as denture base material. Peel specimens consisting of the denture base acrylic resin and resilient denture liner were tested after storage for 1 and 30 days in distilled water at 37 degrees C. The modified peel test method gave load-displacement curves and work of adhesion (W(A)) values of the denture base material and resilient denture liner. The W(A) of specimens after 1 day of storage ranged from 1.71 to 2.55 N mm(-1) and increased in the order from US to S to ES. On the other hand, the W(A) of specimens after 30 day of storage ranged from 1.44 to 2.47 N mm(-1) and increased in the order from US to ES to S. US had significantly lower W(A) after 1 and 30 days of storage than did S and ES (Pdenture liner.

  2. A Novel Design of a Transitional Complete Denture in Full Arch Fixed Implant Restoration

    OpenAIRE

    Arun Kumar, G.; Sapna, B.

    2012-01-01

    The transitional denture given in a full arch fixed implant restoration should not disturb the healing and osseointegration process. This is made possible by lining the denture with a uniform thickness of soft liner. The article describes a method of achieving uniform thickness of soft liner and minimizing the load transmitted to the area where implants were placed.

  3. Vinegar as an antimicrobial agent for control of Candida spp. in complete denture wearers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telma Maria Silva Pinto

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of denture is known to increase the carriage of Candida in healthy patients, and the proliferation of Candida albicans strains can be associated with denture-induced stomatitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of vinegar as an antimicrobial agent for control of Candida spp. in complete upper denture wearers. Fifty-five patients were submitted to a detailed clinical interview and oral clinical examination, and were instructed to keep their dentures immersed in a 10% vinegar solution (pH less than 3 overnight for 45 days. Before and after the experimental period, saliva samples were collected for detection of Candida, counting of cfu/mL and identification of species by phenotypical tests (germ tube formation, chlamidoconidia production, and carbohydrate fermentation and assimilation. The results were analyzed using Spearman's correlation and Student's t-test (p£0.05. Candida yeasts were present in 87.3% of saliva samples before the treatment. A significant reduction was verified in CFU/mL counts of Candida after treatment. A positive correlation between Candida and denture stomatitis was verified, since the decrease of cfu/mL counts was correlated with a reduction in cases of denture stomatitis. Although it was not able to eliminate C. albicans, the immersion of the complete denture in 10% vinegar solution, during the night, reduced the amounts (cfu/mL of Candida spp. in the saliva and the presence of denture stomatitis in the studied patients.

  4. 21 CFR 872.3480 - Polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... adhesive. 872.3480 Section 872.3480 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive. (a) Identification. A polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) denture adhesive is a device composed of polyacrylamide polymer (modified cationic) intended to...

  5. Comparison of digital surface displacements of maxillary dentures based on noninvasive anatomic landmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norvell, Nicholas G; Korioth, Tom V; Cagna, David R; Versluis, Antheunis

    2018-02-08

    Artificial markers called fiducials are commonly used to orient digitized surfaces for analysis. However, when these markers are tangible and placed in the region of interest, they may alter surface topography and influence data analysis. The purpose of this in vitro study was to apply a modified digital surface fitting method based on anatomic landmarks to evaluate denture accuracy and to use 2 different denture processing techniques to evaluate the method. The goal was to noninvasively measure and describe any surface differences in denture processing techniques at the intaglio and denture tooth levels. Twenty standardized maxillary complete dentures were waxed on standardized edentulous casts and processed by using acrylic resin compression (COM, n=10) and injection molding (INJ, n=10) methods. Digital scans were recorded of the anatomic surface of the cast, the intaglio and cameo surfaces of the acrylic resin dentures, and the cameo surface of the wax dentures. Three anatomic fiducials were identified on denture intaglio and cast scans and 4 on the cameo surfaces of waxed and acrylic resin denture scans. These fiducials were then used to digitally align the anatomic with the processed intaglio surfaces and the waxed with the processed cameo surfaces. Surface displacements were compared among processed dentures expressed at specific points (9 tissue landmarks and 8 tooth landmarks). The accuracy of surface displacements was assessed by changes in the number and location of anatomic fiducials. The scanning precision and the intraobserver repeatability in the selection of dental landmarks were also determined. For each landmark, the spatial (x, y, and z) mean differences between the 2 processing techniques were calculated for the intaglio and the cameo surfaces and presented on each orthogonal plane. Statistical nonparametric comparison of these means was analyzed with the Mann-Whitney U test (α=.05). Benjamini-Hochberg corrections for multiple comparisons were

  6. [The paper summarizes data on laboratory and clinical assessment of Corega dent Laboratory and clinical analysis of Corega denture adhesive cream mechanical properties].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalivradzhiyan, E S; Podoprigora, A V; Kaverina, E Yu; Bobeshko, M N

    The paper summarizes data on laboratory and clinical assessment of Corega denture adhesive cream adhesive properties: adhesion strength and time of adhesive material fixing. Clinical assessment was based on Ulitovsky-Leontyev denture fixation index evaluated in 18 edentulous patients with full removable dentures 1 and 12 months after denture manufacturing. After one year of evaluation denture fixation in patients using Corega denture adhesive cream was 8-15% better (depending on alveolar bed anatomy) than in controls proving that Corega improves full denture adaptation to physiological atrophy of alveolar bone.

  7. Influence of water sorption on mechanical properties of injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamanaka, Ippei; Iwamoto, Misa; Lassila, Lippo; Vallittu, Pekka; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Yutaka

    2014-11-01

    This study investigated the influence of water sorption on certain mechanical properties of injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins. Six thermoplastic resins (two polyamides, two polyesters, one polycarbonate, one polymethylmethacrylate) and a polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) conventional heat-polymerized denture-based polymer, selected as a control, were tested. Specimens of each denture base material were fabricated according to ISO 1567 specifications and were either dry or water-immersed for 30 days (n = 10). The ultimate flexural strength, the flexural strength at the proportional limit and the elastic modulus of the denture base materials were calculated. Water sorption significantly decreased the ultimate flexural strength, the flexural strength at the proportional limit and the elastic modulus of one of the polyamides and the PMMAs. It also significantly increased the ultimate flexural strength of the polycarbonate. The mechanical properties of some injection-molded thermoplastic denture base resins changed after water sorption.

  8. Technique for fabricating individualized dentures with a gingiva-shade composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Beom-Woo; Kim, Nam-Jin; Lee, Jonghyuk; Lee, Hae-Hyoung

    2016-05-01

    More natural dental esthetics have been sought by patients who wear conventional complete or partial dentures. Recently, gingiva-shade composite resins (GSCRs) have become available for replicating soft tissue for both fixed and removable prostheses. The technique presented is for fabricating individualized complete dentures. First the acrylic resin is mixed with a coloring agent and processed to modify the base shade of the denture. GSCRs are light polymerized onto a prepared space on the buccal surfaces of denture base to replicate the appearance of gingival tissues including blood vessels. The technique provides an outstanding natural, gingiva-like, appearance and allows complete dentures to harmonize with the individual patient's surrounding oral tissues. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cytological response of palatal epithelium to TiN-coated CoCr alloy denture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Sokołowski

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the impact of titanium nitride coatings on CoCr alloy metal parts in framework dentures on human palatal epithelium cytology compared to framework dentures made with the same alloy but without titanium nitride coating, and to acrylic dentures. Every prosthetic restoration introduced into the oral cavity and remaining in direct contact with the palate exhibits a varied and harmful effect on the state of the palatal epithelium by disturbing its keratinization. CoCr alloy dentures produce a significantly greater perturbation of keratinization compared to acrylic dentures. There is no evidence showing that a titanium nitride coating of the CoCr alloy plays a protective role in the environment of the oral cavity.

  10. The role of tinting and characterization of denture base in removable prostheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarrati S

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Esthetic is a natural necessity among all human beings, and the reconstruction of the natural features of prosthesis is considered an important aspect in dentistry. Reconstruction of the natural features in removable prosthesis by characterization of denture base is one of the most important factors. In this regard esthetic, in removable prostheses, is achieved through different techniques such as: tooth selection and arrangement, designing the denture base and acrylic base color. The final goal for ail these effects is to achieve a natural appearance for denture. However, other factors such as treatment limitations, different personal needs and general health principles, should be taken into consideration. This article not only reviews the natural appearance of oral mucosa that is replaced by the denture base, but also discusses about the materials used in tinting acrylic denture base and their application techniques.

  11. Lost and found…Tracking a swallowed denture: Role of radiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogita Khalekar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Denture ingestion or aspiration is a problem requiring awareness of different specialists including dentists, surgeons, otolaryngologists, and anesthesiologists for prevention, early diagnosis and adequate treatment. Complications of swallowed dentures include hollow viscous necrosis, perforation, and penetration to neighbouring organs leading to fistulae, bleeding and obstruction. Here, we present the case of a 65 year old female patient who swallowed the denture, which was detected by barium swallow and removed by endoscopy. Hence, the management of swallowed denture needs a multidisciplinary approach with the help of a dentist, otolaryngologist and anesthesiologists. Dentists should recommend patients to visit them for planned check ups or revisit them in case of denture dislodgement or loosening as soon as possible to prevent such life threatening events.

  12. Custom Metal Occlusal Surface for Acrylic Resin Denture Teeth to Enhance Wear Resistance: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizwan Ali Shivji

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Wear of the occlusal surface of the denture is a known fact which leads to subsequent changes in jaw relation, vertical dimension, loss of aesthetics, aged looks, and decrease in masticatory efficiency. Treatment modalities includes, change of denture set after a regular interval of 4-5 years, use of wear resistant denture teeth that includes wear resistant resin or porcelain teeth, teeth with cast metal occlusal surface, and altering occlusal contact areas of denture teeth by use of silver amalgam fillings. A case report of a patient who had increased tendency of occlusal wear was treated with custom made metal occlusal surface of denture teeth to enhance wear resistance and to improve the masticatory efficiency.

  13. The use of a soft denture liner for chronic residual ridge soreness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, J D; Clark, L L

    1985-07-01

    Chronic residual ridge soreness in patients with complete dentures can be caused by various factors. A differential diagnosis between physiologic or anatomic problems (or both) and functional deficiencies in the patient's present dentures must be made. The functional deficiencies can often be eliminated easily, whereas physiologic and anatomic problems may be more difficult to correct, especially in the geriatric patient. If the functional deficiencies in the patient's dentures have been corrected and surgical procedures are not a viable alternative, placement of a long-term resilient liner can often resolve the chronic residual ridge soreness that is present in denture patients. Properly placed and properly cared for silicone or silicone rubber resilient denture liners can provide comfort for over 70% of patients with chronic residual ridge soreness for 3 to 5 years and often longer.

  14. APPLICATION OF DIRECT CONTACT TEST IN EVALUATION OF CYTOTOXICITY OF ACRYLIC DENTURE BASE RESINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Kostić

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of acrylic denture base resins is widely spread in dental practice. They belong to the group of biomaterials due to their role of morphological and functional substituent in the mouth. However, clinical practice has shown that some toxic ingredients of these materials may lead to adverse local and even systemic changes. The aim of the study was to evaluate cytotoxic effect of various denture base resins on cell culture using direct contact test. The effect of four different acrylic materials on HeLa cell structure was evaluated. Upon light microscopy analysis, MTT test was performed without previous removal of material samples. The obtained values of MTT indicate that cell proliferation is dependant on the type of acrylic denture base resins. Cold polymerization denture base resins showed mild inhibitory effect on the cell culture growth. The signs of toxicity were not observed in heat polymerization denture base resins.

  15. The residual monomer content and mechanical properties of CAD\\CAM resins used in the fabrication of complete dentures as compared to heat cured resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayman, Al-Dharrab

    2017-07-01

    The utilization of computer-assisted designing and computer-assisted milling CAD\\CAM resins in the fabrication of removable prostheses is a modern-day concept that offers many advantages over the use of the traditional polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). This study instigated some of the mechanical properties of CAD\\CAM denture base resin including the amount of residual monomer. This study was conducted at the Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University from October 2016 to February 2017. A total of seventy rectangular specimens were fabricated (group A: 35 heat-cured PMMA and group B: 35 CAD/CAM pre-polymerized acrylic resin blocks). The flexural strength and surface hardness were tested while the residual monomer content at baseline, two-day and seven-day intervals was estimated using gas chromatography (GC). Means and standard deviations were determined for each group as well as independent-samples t-test and ANOVA with repeated measures for comparison between the groups and subgroups of varying time intervals. Heat cured PMMA (A), displayed higher flexural strength and low value flexural modulus compared to CAD/CAM acrylic resin denture base material (B). Student t-test indicated highly significant differences (pCAD/CAM resin may be considered suitable for use in the construction of denture bases.

  16. Tensile and shear bond strength of hard and soft denture relining materials to the conventional heat cured acrylic denture base resin: An In-vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Mayank; Amarnath, G S; Muddugangadhar, B C; Swetha, M U; Das, Kopal Anshuraj Ashok Kumar

    2014-04-01

    The condition of the denture bearing tissues may be adversely affected by high stress concentration during function. Chairside Denture (Hard and Soft) reliners are used to distribute forces applied to soft tissues during function. Tensile and shear bond strength has been shown to be dependent on their chemical composition. A weak bond could harbor bacteria, promote staining and delamination of the lining material. To investigate tensile and shear bond strength of 4 different commercially available denture relining materials to conventional heat cured acrylic denture base resin. 4 mm sections in the middle of 160 Acrylic cylindrical specimens (20 mm x 8 mm) were removed, packed with test materials (Mollosil, G C Reline Soft, G C Reline Hard (Kooliner) and Ufi Gel Hard and polymerized. Specimens were divided into 8 groups of 20 each. Tensile and shear bond strength to the conventional heat cured acrylic denture base resin were examined by Instron Universal Tensile Testing Machine using the equation F=N/A (F-maximum force exerted on the specimen (Newton) and A-bonding area= 50.24 mm2). One-way ANOVA was used for multiple group comparisons followed by Bonferroni Test and Hsu's MCB for multiple pairwise comparisons to asses any significant differences between the groups. The highest mean Tensile bond strength value was obtained for Ufi Gel Hard (6.49+0.08 MPa) and lowest for G C Reline Soft (0.52+0.01 MPa). The highest mean Shear bond strength value was obtained for Ufi Gel Hard (16.19+0.1 MPa) and lowest for Mollosil (0.59+0.05 MPa). The Benferroni test showed a significant difference in the mean tensile bond strength and the mean shear bond strength when the two denture soft liners were compared as well as when the two denture hard liners were compared. Hsu's MCB implied that Ufi gel hard is better than its other closest competitors. The Tensile and Shear bond strength values of denture soft reliners were significantly lower than denture hard reliners. How to cite the

  17. In vitro evaluation of the effect of thermal and mechanical fatigues on the bonding of an autopolymerizing soft denture liner to denture base materials using different primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Shiro; Minesaki, Yoshito; Kurashige, Hisanori; Tanaka, Takuo

    2008-07-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of priming procedures on bonding of an autopolymerizing silicone denture liner (Sofreliner) to a denture base material after fatigue processes using cyclic thermal stressing and repetitive mechanical stressing. Denture base specimens were fabricated by use of an autopolymerizing denture base resin and Co-Cr alloy into a cylinder shape 8-mm diameter and 4-mm high. The bonding surfaces of denture base specimens were polished with 600-grit silicon carbide paper. Resin denture base specimens were pretreated with applications of resin primer (Sofreliner Primer or Reline Primer for resin). Metal specimens were pretreated with application of metal primer (Reline Primer for metal) or coated with adhesive resin (C&B Metabond) followed by application of resin primer (Sofreliner Primer). Tensile specimens were fabricated by polymerizing a 2-mm thickness of Sofreliner between a pair of pretreated denture base cylinders. Repetitive mechanical stressing was performed by using a University of Alabama-type wear-testing apparatus as a stress generator. Vertical 75 N load with 15 degrees rotation was applied 66,700, 133,300, 266,700, and 400,000 times, then residual tensile resistance to failure was measured. Seven specimens were fabricated for 16 groups--four cyclic loading groups for four pretreatment groups. Residual tensile resistance to failure of specimens before the fatiguing process and after 5000, 10,000, 20,000, and 30,000 thermocycles were used as reference. The mean values of each group were statistically analyzed by three-way ANOVA and Bonferroni/Dunn test at a 95% confidence level. Failure modes were assessed for all specimens measured. In the denture-bonded groups, residual tensile resistance to failure of Sofreliner Primer-treated group was significantly higher than that of the Reline Primer at each thermocycling interval (p denture liner after cyclic loading. Application of Sofreliner Primer for a resin denture base provided

  18. Causes and pattern of fracture of acrylic dentures among patients seen in a Nigerian teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunrinde, T J; Ajayi, D M; Dosumu, O O

    2007-12-01

    There is little information on the causes and pattern of fracture of acrylic dentures in Nigerian patients despite being the most frequently employed design in Nigeria. The aim of this study was to determine the average life span of acrylic dentures before fracture, the causes and pattern of fracture of acrylic dentures in a Nigerian population. All consecutive patients that presented with fractured acrylic dentures at the Dental Centre, University College Hospital, Ibadan between January and July 2006 and were willing to participate were recruited into the study. A structured interviewer-administered questionnaire was used to record data from the patients. The questionnaire focused on patients' demographic data, age of acrylic denture as at the time of fracture, causes and pattern of fractures. The data were analysed using SPSS Version 11. A total of sixty-two patients were included in the study. They presented with sixty-nine fractured dentures. Five were complete dentures while 64 were partial dentures. The average life span was 7.4 years +/- 6.6 (SD) years. Early fracture was seen in 9 (13.4%), intermediate fracture in 29 (42%), and late fracture in 31 (44.9%) cases. The commonest cause of fracture was mastication as seen in 30.4% of the cases while the least cause was fight (4.3%). The commonest site of fracture (34.8%) was the palatal plate around the crest of the edentulous ridge while fracture of wrought metal clasps was the least, occurring in 1.4% of cases. We recommend proper design with balanced articulation and more emphasis on compliance to post insertion instructions by patients to prevent early fracture of acrylic dentures. Also, reinforcing the acrylic denture base especially in stress bearing area may prolong the life span of these prostheses.

  19. Investigation of bonding properties of denture bases to silicone-based soft denture liner immersed in isobutyl methacrylate and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate

    OpenAIRE

    Akin, Hakan; Tugut, Faik; Mutaf, Burcu; Guney, Umit

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to investigate the bonding properties of denture bases to silicone-based soft denture liners immersed in isobutyl methacrylate (iBMA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) for various lengths of time. MATERIALS AND METHODS Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) test specimens were fabricated (75 mm in length, 12 mm in diameter at the thickest section, and 7 mm at the thinnest section) and then randomly assigned to five groups (n=15); untreated (Group 1), resilie...

  20. Two-Implant-Supported Mandibular Overdentures: Do Clinical Denture Quality and Inter-Implant Distance Affect Patient Satisfaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfadda, Sara A; Al Amri, Mohammad D; Al-Ohali, Amal; Al-Hakami, Arwa; Al-Madhi, Noura

    To investigate the following three null hypotheses in patients rehabilitated with a mandibular overdenture supported by two unsplinted implants: (1) patient satisfaction is not related to the clinical quality of the dentures; (2) inter-implant distance (IID) has no effect on the clinical quality of the dentures; and (3) IID does not influence patient satisfaction. Forty edentulous patients who were rehabilitated with a two-implant-supported mandibular overdenture participated in the study. Independent investigators evaluated the dentures on the basis of five clinical criteria using the validated Denture Quality Evaluation Form, and the patients completed the validated Denture Satisfaction Scale. Irreversible hydrocolloid impressions of the mandible were made and poured immediately in die stone. The IID was measured by adapting an orthodontic wire to the mandibular alveolar ridge crest, extending from the center of one implant to the center of the other. Spearman correlation analyses were used to identify possible correlations, with a significance level set at P patient satisfaction with mandibular denture retention, stability, and comfort. None of the 12 denture satisfaction items were significantly associated with IID. Similarly, IID did not have an effect on the quality of either denture in terms of retention, stability, or occlusion. Denture stability was the feature that had the most influence on patient satisfaction with the mandibular overdenture and with the maxillary conventional denture. IID had no effect on the clinical quality of either denture and did not influence patient satisfaction.

  1. A Comparative Clinical Study of the Effect of Denture Cleansing on the Surface Roughness and Hardness of Two Denture Base Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, Amani Ramadan; Dehis, Wessam Mohamed; Elboraey, Asmaa Nabil; ElGabry, Hisham Samir

    2016-09-15

    This study aimed to verify the influence of oral environment and denture cleansers on the surface roughness and hardness of two different denture base materials. A total of sixteen identical removable disc specimens (RDS) were processed. Eight RDS were made from heat-cured acrylic resin (AR) and the other eight were fabricated from thermoplastic injection moulded resin (TR). Surface roughness and hardness of DRS were measured using ultrasonic profilometry and Universal testing machine respectively. Then the four RDS (two AR and two of TR) were fixed to each maxillary denture, after three months RDS were retrieved. Surface roughness and hardness of RDS have measured again. The surface roughness measurements revealed no significant difference (p >0.05) for both disc groups at baseline. However, both groups showed a significant increase in the surface roughness after three months with higher mean value for (TR) group. On the other hand, the (AR) group showed higher hardness mean value than (TR) group at baseline with no significant decrease in the hardness values (p >0.05) following three months follow-up period. Denture cleansers have an effect on the denture's surface roughness and hardness concurrently with an oral condition which will consequently influence the complete dentures' lifetime and patients' satisfaction.

  2. Restoring Anterior Aesthetics by a Rotational Path Cast Partial Denture: An Overlooked Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Bala Saraswati; Arora, Himanshu

    2016-01-01

    Cast Partial Dentures (CPD) has long been known to restore missing teeth in patients with minimal invasion on hard and soft tissues. Although satisfactory otherwise, the main concern in CPD is the anterior display of metal. Also the technique sensitive lab procedures, together with the esthetic concern have built an iceberg around the frequent utilization of this treatment modality. With the advent of various techniques to get rid of the metallic display, it was predicted to have more CPD’s done in the dental arena. But the conceptual technicalities of the procedure took away the limelight from this treatment modality and focused on the fixed prosthodontics. Although feasible in a large number of patients, fixed prosthesis still has areas of restriction. It is here, when we apply our knowledge and skill of esthetic CPD. Esthetic CPD eliminates the metal display by utilizing desirable undercuts. The engaging action of the framework into these undercuts paves way for a rotational motion to seat the remaining prosthesis. Hence dual path of insertion helps eliminating the anterior clasp. In this case report dual path of insertion is discussed for replacing anterior teeth in an old male patient who had mild esthetic concerns. Following the conservative approach of CPD (over FPD) esthetic and restorative treatment was planned with patient’s consent. PMID:27437375

  3. Epidemiological Data and Survival Rate of Removable Partial Dentures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Amália; Haddad, Marcela Filié; Rocha, Eduardo Passos; Assunção, Wirley Gonçalves; Filho, Humberto Gennari; Santos, Emerson Gomes Dos; Sonego, Mariana Vilela; Santos, Daniela Micheline Dos

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The use of removable partial denture (RPD) is considered as low-cost and common treatment option to rehabilitate edentulous areas. Aim This study aimed to investigate the epidemiological data of patients rehabilitated with removable partial denture (RPD) in order to assess treatment survival rate and failures. Materials and Methods Epidemiological data and medical records of patients treated with RPD between 2007 and 2012 at the RPD discipline of a Brazilian University (Aracatuba Dental School- UNESP) were evaluated as well as dental records of patients who underwent RPD treatments (fabrication or repairs) between 2000 and 2010. Factors such as gender, age, presence of systemic disease, main complaint, edentulous arch, period and cause of denture replacement and the prosthesis characteristics were recorded. The chi-square test was used to assess the differences between the variables and the Kaplan Meyer to assess the survival of the RPDs evaluated. Results A total of 324 maxillary RPD and 432 mandibular RPD were fabricated. Most of the patients were women aging 41 to 60-year-old. The number of mandibular RPD Kennedy class I (26%) was statistically higher for the maxillary arch (p<.05). There was no association between main complaint to gender or the presence of systemic disease. The lingual plate was the most common major connector used in the mandible (32%). The main reason for altering the design of replaced RPDs were changes during treatment plan. Conclusion The number of patients who require RPD is large; most of RPDs are Kennedy Class I. A good treatment plan is very important for achieving a positive treatment outcome, and it is strictly related to the survival rate. PMID:27437367

  4. Effectiveness of coating acrylic resin dentures on preventing Candida adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Aiman A; Alharbi, Fahad A; Suresh, C S

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to prevent the adhesion of C. albicans on acrylic resin dentures by modifying their surfaces. Ninety acrylic resin plates were divided into three groups. Group I: conventionally processed acrylic resin plates. Group II: plates painted with 2-Octyl Cyanoacrylate adhesive. Group III: plates painted with Adper Single Bond Adhesive. All specimens were immersed separately in containers filled with artificial saliva that contained C. albicans and then incubated for 11 days at 37°C. Three methods of evaluation were used to count the adhered Candida: direct culture, slide count, and serial dilutions. C. albicans in 1/10, 1/10², and 1/10³ dilutions showed overgrowth in group I, while overgrowth was noted only with 1/10 dilution in group III. For group III, mean colony numbers of 123, 22, 3.4, and 0 were found for the 1/10², 1/10³, 1/10⁴, and 1/10⁵ dilutions, respectively. Regarding the slide counts, group I showed a mean fungal count of 166 compared to 40 for group III with 1/10 dilution, 21 compared to 9 with 1/10³ dilution, 8.6 compared to 0.7 with 1/10³ dilution, and 1.2 compared to 0 with 1/10⁴ dilution. No plates in group II showed any candidal colonies regardless of the method of evaluation (0%). These differences were statistically significant (p acrylic resin dentures with Adper Single Bond Adhesive was effective in reducing C. albicans adhesion to dentures, while coating with 2-Octyl Cyanoacrylate adhesive completely inhibited such adhesion. © 2013 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  5. Overeruption of teeth opposing removable partial dentures: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Ken-Ichi; Miyashita, Yuji; Ikebe, Kazunori; Enoki, Kaori; Kurushima, Yuko; Mihara, Yusuke; Maeda, Yoshinobu

    2014-01-01

    One of the purposes of prosthodontic treatment is to prevent overeruption of opposing teeth, but there is currently minimal literature describing the efficacy of removable partial dentures (RPDs) in performing this function. This study investigated overeruption following RPD treatment. The study participants were 33 patients treated with RPDs, and overeruption was evaluated by comparing the surface computeraided design data of dental casts made at two different time points-before and after RPD treatment. Overeruption was observed in 38.1% of teeth opposed by the RPD, which was much less than the proportion of teeth that overerupted when not opposed by the RPD.

  6. Bonding auto-polymerising acrylic resin to acrylic denture teeth.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nagle, Susan

    2009-09-01

    This study investigated the effect of surface treatments on the shear bond strength of an auto-polymerising acrylic resin cured to acrylic denture teeth. The surface treatments included a combination of grit-blasting and\\/or wetting the surface with monomer. Samples were prepared and then stored in water prior to shear testing. The results indicated that the application of monomer to the surface prior to bonding did not influence the bond strength. Grit blasting was found to significantly increase the bond strength.

  7. [The development of light-curing soft denture liner].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, X; Shi, C

    1997-07-01

    In this study, a visible light-curing soft denture liner was developed, and 6 methacrylate polyurethane elastomer and a diluent were synthesised, their effect on tensile strength, compression set, Shore A hardness, absorption and solubility were also investigated. The results showed that the elastomer made of polyethylene adipate or polybutylene ether glycol possessed the highest tensile strength and hardness, the elastomer made of polypropylene ether glycol showed low tensile strength and low shore A hardness, the elastomer made of hydroxyl-terminated liquid polybutadiene rubber had a moderate tensile strength and hardness.

  8. Occlusion and Temporomandibular Function among Subjects with Mandibular Distal Extension Removable Partial Dentures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creugers, N. H. J.; Witter, D. J.; Van 't Spijker, A.; Gerritsen, A. E.; Kreulen, C. M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To quantify effects on occlusion and temporomandibular function of mandibular distal extension removable partial dentures in shortened dental arches. Methods. Subjects wearing mandibular extension removable partial dentures (n = 25) were compared with subjects with shortened dental arches without extension (n = 74) and with subjects who had worn a mandibular extension removable partial denture in the past (n = 19). Subjects with complete dentitions (n = 72) were controls. Data were collected at baseline and at 3-, 6-, and 9-year observations. Results. Occlusal activity in terms of reported awareness of bruxism and occlusal tooth wear of lower anterior teeth did not differ significantly between the groups. In contrast, occlusal tooth wear of premolars in shortened dental arches with or without extension dentures was significantly higher than in the controls. Differences amongst groups with respect to signs and symptoms related to temporomandibular disorders were not found. Occlusal support of the dentures did not influence anterior spatial relationship. Occlusal contacts of the denture teeth decreased from 70% for second premolars via 50% for first molars, to 30% for second molars. Conclusions. Mandibular distal extension removable partial dentures in moderate shortened dental arches had no effects on occlusion and temporomandibular function. PMID:20671961

  9. Occlusion and Temporomandibular Function among Subjects with Mandibular Distal Extension Removable Partial Dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. H. J. Creugers

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To quantify effects on occlusion and temporomandibular function of mandibular distal extension removable partial dentures in shortened dental arches. Methods. Subjects wearing mandibular extension removable partial dentures (n=25 were compared with subjects with shortened dental arches without extension (n=74 and with subjects who had worn a mandibular extension removable partial denture in the past (n=19. Subjects with complete dentitions (n=72 were controls. Data were collected at baseline and at 3-, 6-, and 9-year observations. Results. Occlusal activity in terms of reported awareness of bruxism and occlusal tooth wear of lower anterior teeth did not differ significantly between the groups. In contrast, occlusal tooth wear of premolars in shortened dental arches with or without extension dentures was significantly higher than in the controls. Differences amongst groups with respect to signs and symptoms related to temporomandibular disorders were not found. Occlusal support of the dentures did not influence anterior spatial relationship. Occlusal contacts of the denture teeth decreased from 70% for second premolars via 50% for first molars, to 30% for second molars. Conclusions. Mandibular distal extension removable partial dentures in moderate shortened dental arches had no effects on occlusion and temporomandibular function.

  10. Clinical evaluation of removable partial dentures on the periodontal health of abutment teeth: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dula, Linda J; Ahmedi, Enis F; Lila-Krasniqi, Zana D; Shala, Kujtim Sh

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the effect of removable partial dentures in periodontal abutment teeth in relation to the type of denture support and design of RPD in a five-year worn period. Methods : A total of 64 patients with removable partial dentures (RPDs), participated in this study. It were examined ninety-one RPDs. There were seventy-five RPDs with clasp-retained and sixteenth were RPDs with attachments. There were 28 females and 36 males, aged between 40-64 years, 41 maxillary and 50 mandible RPDs. For each subjects the following data were collected: denture design, denture support, and Kennedy classification. Abutment teeth were assessed for plaque index (PI), calculus index (CI), blending on probing (BOP), probing depth (PD), gingival recession (GR), tooth mobility (TM). Level of significance was set at pdenture support of RPD, BOP, PD, PI, GR, CI and TM-index showed no statistically significant difference. Based on the denture design of RPD's, BOP, PD, PI, CI, and TM-index proved no statistically significant difference. Except GR-index according to denture design confirmed statistically significant difference in RPD with clasp pdentures and below the clasp arms in abutment teeth.

  11. Color stability, water sorption and cytotoxicity of thermoplastic acrylic resin for non metal clasp denture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Dae-Eun; Lee, Ji-Young; Jang, Hyun-Seon; Lee, Jang-Jae; Son, Mee-Kyoung

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the color stability, water sorption and cytotoxicity of thermoplastic acrylic resin for the non-metal clasp dentures to those of thermoplastic polyamide and conventional heat-polymerized denture base resins. Three types of denture base resin, which are conventional heat-polymerized acrylic resin (Paladent 20), thermoplastic polyamide resin (Bio Tone), thermoplastic acrylic resin (Acrytone) were used as materials for this study. One hundred five specimens were fabricated. For the color stability test, specimens were immersed in the coffee and green tee for 1 and 8 weeks. Color change was measured by spectrometer. Water sorption was tested after 1 and 8 weeks immersion in the water. For the test of cytotoxicity, cell viability assay was measured and cell attachment was analyzed by FE-SEM. All types of denture base resin showed color changes after 1 and 8 weeks immersion. However, there was no significant difference between denture base resins. All specimens showed significant color changes in the coffee than green tee. In water sorption test, thermoplastic acrylic resin showed lower values than conventional heat-polymerized acrylic resin and thermoplastic polyamide resin. Three types of denture base showed low cytotoxicity in cell viability assay. Thermoplastic acrylic resin showed the similar cell attachment but more stable attachment than conventional heat-polymerized acrylic resin. Thermoplastic acrylic resin for the non-metal clasp denture showed acceptable color stability, water sorption and cytotoxicity. To verify the long stability in the mouth, additional in vitro studies are needed.

  12. The effect of repeated microwave irradiation on the dimensional stability of a specific acrylic denture resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, David A; Pipko, Donald J

    2015-01-01

    To determine the dimensional stability of a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) acrylic resin when subjected to multiple sessions of repeated microwave irradiation at power settings of 700 and 420 W. Twenty standardized denture bases were fabricated using a PMMA resin. Points of measurement were marked on each denture base with a standardized template, and the distances between points were recorded using a digital microscope. The denture bases were randomly placed into two experimental groups of 10 bases each. Individual denture bases were placed into a glass beaker containing 200 ml of room temperature deionized water and then exposed to either 700 or 420 W of microwave radiation for 3 minutes. The denture bases were allowed to cool to room temperature, and measurements between points were recorded. This process was carried out for two microwave periods with measurements being completed after each period. The data were then analyzed for any significant changes in distances between points using a Student's t-test. All denture bases experienced 1.0 to 2.0 mm or approximately 3% linear dimensional change after each period of microwaving. Results were significant with all t-tests having values of p denture bases deformed significantly under experimental conditions at either 700 W for 3 minutes in 200 ml of water or 420 W for 3 minutes in 200 ml of water. © 2014 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  13. Numerical investigation of complete mandibular dentures stabilized by conventional or mini implants in patient individual models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, Anna; Keilig, Ludger; Heinemann, Friedhelm; Bourauel, Christoph; Hasan, Istabrak

    2018-02-08

    Poor stability of a complete denture is a common problem due to bone atrophy of the edentulous ridge. The aim of the present study was to analyze denture stability after receiving implants and to study the biomechanical properties of denture implants and the bone bed using conventional or mini implants. Five models based on computed tomography (CT) data of edentulous patients were created. The overdentures' connection to the implants was assured by means of ball head abutments and rubber rings. In three models, the denture was supported by two to four conventional implants and in two models, the overdenture was supported by three to five mini implants. The dentures were loaded according to the individual biting forces which was clinically measured by means of pressure sheets. After implantation, the biting forces and displacements of overdentures increased in comparison to complete dentures. Displacements and stresses were higher with mini implants than with conventional ones. Stress in the implants was markedly below the yield stress of titanium grade 5 (880 MPa). An increase in the stress in the bone around the implants was noticed as compared to the situation with complete dentures which was below the physiological range of bone loading (<4 MPa).

  14. Quantification and identification of bacteria in acrylic resin dentures and dento-maxillary obturator-prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Yasuhisa; Nakajo, Kazuko; Sato, Takuichi; Koyama, Shigeto; Sasaki, Keiichi; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2012-06-01

    To quantify and identify bacteria detected in acrylic resin dentures and dento-maxillary obturator-prostheses after long-term use. The internal layer of denture bases from 13 daily-use removable acrylic resin dentures was sampled, while the inner fluid samples/no-fluid samples of obturators were collected from 11 in-use acrylic resin dento-maxillary obturator-prostheses. Samples were cultured, and isolated bacteria were counted and identified by molecular biological methods. Bacteria were detected in five (38.5%) acrylic resin dentures and six (54.5%) acrylic resin obturators. Four Lactobacillus species and one Propionibacterium species were isolated from three repaired denture bases, and from two non-repaired dentures, two Actinomyces species and Streptococcus mutans were isolated. On the other hand, 17 bacterial species, belonging to the family and genera of Olsenella, Bacillus, Citrobacter, Enterobacteriaceae, Lactobacillus, Pantoea, Peptoniphilus, Klebsiella and Pseudomonas, were isolated from obturators. Several species of viable bacteria were detected in acrylic resin denture bases and obturators.

  15. Efficacy of Denture Cleansers on Impact Strength of Heat polymerized Acrylic Resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragher, Mallikarjuna; Prabhu, Uma Mayoor; Ittigi, Jaya Prakash; Naik, Ravi; Mahesh, C S; Pradeep, M R

    2017-11-01

    The study was aimed to compare and evaluate the changes in the impact strength of heat cure denture base resins when treated using denture cleansers. Study was conducted with sample size of 40 and dimesion 65 mm length, 10 mm width, and 3 mm thickness as per the ISO 1567. Distilled water has been used as control group, in which 10 samples were immersed of 40 samples. Of remaining 30 samples, 10 were treated with Clinsodent, 10 were treated with VI-Clean, and 10 were treated with Clanden denture cleansers. The impact strength of these specimens from each group was tested with the help of Charpy-type pendulum impact strength tester. The energy absorbed to fracture the specimens was recorded, and impact strength was calculated and was analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA and Mann-Whitney test. Impact strength of samples was significantly reduced after immersion in denture cleansers Clinsodent, VI-Clean, and Clanden solutions when compared to control group. Clinsodent, VI-Clean, and Clanden denture cleansers decrease the impact strength of heat cure denture base resin after immersion. Hence, the study concludes that denture cleansers should be used with caution and advised to follow manufacturer's instructions.

  16. Efficacy of denture cleansers on impact strength of heat polymerized acrylic resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mallikarjuna Ragher

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The study was aimed to compare and evaluate the changes in the impact strength of heat cure denture base resins when treated using denture cleansers. Methodology: Study was conducted with sample size of 40 and dimesion 65 mm length, 10 mm width, and 3 mm thickness as per the ISO 1567. Distilled water has been used as control group, in which 10 samples were immersed of 40 samples. Of remaining 30 samples, 10 were treated with Clinsodent, 10 were treated with VI-Clean, and 10 were treated with Clanden denture cleansers. The impact strength of these specimens from each group was tested with the help of Charpy-type pendulum impact strength tester. The energy absorbed to fracture the specimens was recorded, and impact strength was calculated and was analyzed using Kruskal–Wallis ANOVA and Mann–Whitney test. Results: Impact strength of samples was significantly reduced after immersion in denture cleansers Clinsodent, VI-Clean, and Clanden solutions when compared to control group. Conclusion: Clinsodent, VI-Clean, and Clanden denture cleansers decrease the impact strength of heat cure denture base resin after immersion. Hence, the study concludes that denture cleansers should be used with caution and advised to follow manufacturer's instructions.

  17. Influence of defective complete dentures renewal on TMD; an MRI and clinical controlled prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelnabi, Mohamed H; Swelem, Amal A

    2015-09-01

    The influence of complete denture occlusion on temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is controversial. Some studies found that defective occlusion contributes to the development of TMD, while others found no correlation. This prospective controlled study evaluated the relationship between renewal of old defective complete dentures and TMD as evidenced both by clinical examination and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. The study included 25 complete denture patients with signs and symptoms of TMD and 21 asymptomatic controls. Clicking was a common finding in all symptomatic joints. All selected participants needed complete denture renewal. MRI and clinical assessment following research diagnostic criteria for TMD guidelines (RDC/TMD) were carried out at baseline and 2 years after new complete denture insertion. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain, muscle pain, clicking and movement limitation were the assessed signs and symptoms. MRIs were conducted to evaluate the TMJs for disc displacement, disc morphology and joint effusion. Complete denture renewal significantly improved the signs and symptoms of TMD in symptomatic group (p displaying superior (normal) disc position (symptomatic p findings was not one to one. New complete dentures had a positive impact on TMD signs and symptoms, disc position and joint effusion but not on disc morphology. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Microwave disinfection of maxillary and mandibular denture bases contaminated with Candida Albican.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamigboye, S A; Dosumu, O O; Ajayi, D M

    2015-09-01

    Oral environment is not sterile, and dentures worn by the patients can be infected and therefore needs disinfection. Solution disinfectants such as sodium hypochlorite and glutaraldehyde can be used but they have side effects. Microwave disinfection method is more recent, however, there are conflicting reports at the moment on the appropriate power and time regimen for disinfection of denture. To determine the power and time regimen at which the disinfection of dentures can be achieved using microwave. Forty-five acrylic denture bases were fabricated for each of the jaws and infected with solution of a stock Candida albicans and 30 infected bases were employed as control. These were placed in normal saline and then subjected to different microwave power and time regimen. Aliquots from these post-microwave solution were titrated against sabauraud agar which was subsequently incubated at 37 degrees C for 48 hours. The agar were examined for candida growth. The denture bases subjected to microwave disinfection at 350W showed Candida growth after microwave treatment irrespective of the time employed. Conversely, those microwaved at 650W and 690W for four and six minutes showed no microbial growth. The microwave regimen of 650W at 4 and 6 minutes completely disinfected the denture bases. Disinfection at higher microwave energy should be done with caution as distortion of the denture may occur.

  19. The effect of long-term disinfection procedures on hardness property of resin denture teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanha, Nara Hellen; Pavarina, Ana Cláudia; Jorge, Janaina Habib; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo; Machado, Ana Lucia; Giampaolo, Eunice Teresinha

    2012-06-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of long-term disinfection procedures on the Vickers hardness (VHN) of acrylic resin denture teeth. Five acrylic resin denture teeth (Vipi Dent Plus-V, Trilux-T, Biolux-B, Postaris-P and Artiplus-A) and one composite resin denture teeth (SR-Orthosit-O) were embedded in heat-polymerised acrylic resin within polyvinylchloride tubes. Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 48 h. Measurements of hardness were taken after the following disinfection procedures: immersion for 7 days in 4% chlorhexidine gluconate or in 1% sodium hypochlorite (CIm and HIm group, respectively) and seven daily cycles of microwave sterilisation at 650 W for 6 min (MwS group). In the WIm group, specimens were maintained in water during the time used to perform the disinfection procedures (7 days). Data were analysed with anova followed by the Bonferroni procedure (α = 0.01). Microwave disinfection decreased the hardness of all acrylic resin denture teeth (p acrylic resin denture teeth A (p disinfection procedures decrease the hardness of the composite resin denture teeth (p Disinfection procedures changed the hardness of resin denture teeth. © 2011 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. Biofilm formation and Candida albicans morphology on the surface of denture base materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susewind, Sabine; Lang, Reinhold; Hahnel, Sebastian

    2015-12-01

    Fungal biofilms may contribute to the occurrence of denture stomatitis. The objective of the study was to investigate the biofilm formation and morphology of Candida albicans in biofilms on the surface of denture base materials. Specimens were prepared from different denture base materials. After determination of surface properties and salivary pellicle formation, mono- and multispecies biofilm formation including Candida albicans ATCC 10231 was initiated. Relative amounts of adherent cells were determined after 20, 44, 68 and 188 h; C. albicans morphology was analysed employing selective fluorescence microscopic analysis. Significant differences were identified in the relative amount of cells adherent to the denture base materials. Highest blastospore/hyphae index suggesting an increased percentage of hyphae was observed in mono- and multispecies biofilms on the soft denture liner, which did not necessarily respond to the highest relative amount of adherent cells. For both biofilm models, lowest relative amount of adherent cells was identified on the methacrylate-based denture base material, which did not necessarily relate to a significantly lower blastospore/hyphae index. The results indicate that there are significant differences in both biofilm formation as well as the morphology of C. albicans cells in biofilms on the surface of different denture base materials. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  1. Influence of lining design of three processed soft denture liners on cushioning effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, F; Ohguri, T; Koran III, A; Matsumoto, N; Ichikawa, T

    1999-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of the lining design of a soft denture liner on its cushioning effect, using a free drop test and an accelerometer. The peak instantaneous acceleration value was computed. The materials tested were SuperSoft(R) (SS), Kurepeet-Dough(R) (KD), and Molloplast-B(R) (MB). Soft denture liners 2 mm in thickness were placed in test denture bases using three different configurations. Specimens were tested at 24 h and at 180 days after storage in distilled water at 37 degrees C. A three-way ANOVA was used to analyse the data (P=0.05) and Tukey intervals were computed. It was found that all three materials were effective in reducing the impact force. The lining design that had the soft denture liner extended to the periphery of the denture base demonstrated the greatest shock absorbability of all the tested designs. A silicone denture liner using lining design 1 was the most effective in reducing the shock transmitted to the denture bases.

  2. [Selection of occlusal scheme on the basis of pressure distribution on supporting structures under complete dentures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Kan; Kawano, Fumiaki; Ichikawa, Tetsuo

    2004-12-01

    In case of making complete dentures, we have to consider not only denture stability but also the restoration of aesthetics and function such as mastication and speech. However these are contradictory theoretically from the point of view of denture stability, and it is very difficult to satisfy both requirements in the case of a patient who has poor upper and lower alveolar ridges. We investigated the effect of artificial posterior teeth form and occlusal scheme on the distribution of pressure on supporting structures under complete dentures during mastication with upper and lower edentulous simulators. In this report, a guideline for the selection of occlusal scheme for complete dentures, based on our previous investigations, is described. The occlusal scheme remarkably affected the distribution of pressure under simulated complete dentures, as shown by comparing the distribution of pressure using two different occlusal schemes:fully balanced occlusion and lingualized occlusion. However other factors such as posterior teeth form and position affect the distribution of pressure as well, and are related to each other. Therefore, not only occlusal scheme but also posterior artificial teeth form has to be considered, and the form of posterior teeth should be carefully and comprehensively decided when making complete dentures.

  3. Influence of balanced occlusion in complete dentures on the decrease in reduction of an edentulous ridge

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    Poštić Srđan D.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Balanced occlusal arrangement of artificial teeth and balanced occlusion is a specific type of occlusion that preserves the stability of complete dentures. Balanced occlusion comprises realization of tooth contacts at the working side as well as at the balancing side, at the same time. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of balanced occlusal arrangement of artificial teeth on the decrease in reduction of edentulous alveolar ridge. Methods. A longitudinal study on 91 fully edentulous patients was conducted using their panoramic radiographs and parameters of vertical dimension of edentulous ridges. All the patients were clinically examined by the same and a qualified dental practitioner. Numerical values of parameters of vertical dimensions of edentulous ridges and lines were statistically processed and compared using the Student’s t-test. Results. Vertical dimensions and heights of edentulous ridges were different after comparison of parameters in complete denture wearers with balanced occlusion and complete denture wearers without bilaterally balanced occlusion, as well as between male and female edentulous patients. Statistically significant differences of heights were established in complete denture wearers’ with a set of artificial teeth without balanced occlusion, at the baseline and 12 months after wearing of complete dentures. Conclusion. Balanced occlusion is a favored occlusal design in setting of artificial teeth in conventional complete dentures, which preserves edentulous ridge and influence the stability of dentures.

  4. The Oral Microbiome of Denture Wearers Is Influenced by Levels of Natural Dentition

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Donnell, Lindsay E.; Robertson, Douglas; Nile, Christopher J.; Cross, Laura J.; Riggio, Marcello; Sherriff, Andrea; Bradshaw, David; Lambert, Margaret; Malcolm, Jennifer; Buijs, Mark J.; Zaura, Egija; Crielaard, Wim; Brandt, Bernd W.; Ramage, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The composition of dental plaque has been well defined, whereas currently there is limited understanding of the composition of denture plaque and how it directly influences denture related stomatitis (DS). The aims of this study were to compare the microbiomes of denture wearers, and to understand the implications of these towards inter-kingdom and host-pathogen interactions within the oral cavity. Methods Swab samples were obtained from 123 participants wearing either a complete or partial denture; the bacterial composition of each sample was determined using bar-coded illumina MiSeq sequencing of the bacterial hypervariable V4 region of 16S rDNA. Sequencing data processing was undertaken using QIIME, clustered in Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) and assigned to taxonomy. The dentures were sonicated to remove the microbial flora residing on the prosthesis, sonicate was then cultured using diagnostic colorex Candida media. Samples of unstimulated saliva were obtained and antimicrobial peptides (AMP) levels were measured by ELISA. Results We have shown that dental and denture plaques are significantly distinct both in composition and diversity and that the oral microbiome composition of a denture wearer is variable and is influenced by the location within the mouth. Dentures and mucosa were predominantly made up of Bacilli and Actinobacteria. Moreover, the presence of natural teeth has a significant impact on the overall microbial composition, when compared to the fully edentulous. Furthermore, increasing levels of Candida spp. positively correlate with Lactobacillus spp. AMPs were quantified, though showed no specific correlations. Conclusions This is the first study to provide a detailed understanding of the oral microbiome of denture wearers and has provided evidence that DS development is more complex than simply a candidal infection. Both fungal and bacterial kingdoms clearly play a role in defining the progression of DS, though we were unable to

  5. Candida colonization on the denture of diabetic and non-diabetic patients

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    Mohammad Hossein Lotfi-Kamran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral candidiasis is a common opportunistic infection in diabetic patients. Presence of denture in the oral cavity of diabetic patients can promote Candida colonization and results in the higher incidence of oral and systemic candidiasis. The general purpose of the present study was to evaluate and compare Candida colonization in denture of diabetic patients and non-diabetic control group. Methods: In current case-control study, samples for mycological examinations were collected from the palatal impression surface of maxillary dentures from 92 edentulous patients including 46 dia-betic and 46 non-diabetic denture wearers. All samples were cultured directly on sabouraud agar me-dium and isolated colonies were counted and identified based on specific tests. Data were statistically analyzed using Mann-Whitney and Spearman correlation tests. Results: The higher density of isolated colonies was seen in diabetic group in compare with control group (P = 0.0001. There was a statistically significant correlation between the blood glucose level (P = 0.0001 and the duration of denture usage (P = 0.022 with the colonization of Candida on den-ture of diabetic patients. C. albicans was the most common isolated Candida species in both groups, though diabetic patients with dentures had more non-albicans Candida isolated from their dentures compared to non-diabetic patients. Conclusions: Mycological findings from the present study revealed that diabetes mellitus can in-crease colonization of Candida in denture and mouth. By elimination of local and systemic factors in diabetic patients and improving their oral health care, Candida colonization and the risk of oral and systemic candidiasis will be decreased.

  6. Maxillary Complete Denture Outcomes: A Systematic Review of Patient-Based Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thalji, Ghadeer; McGraw, Kate; Cooper, Lyndon F

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to report on the current knowledge regarding patient satisfaction as a primary outcome for maxillary complete denture therapy. We asked, "For the maxillary edentulous patient treated using maxillary dentures, what are the patient-based outcomes regarding quality of life and treatment satisfaction." An electronic search of publications up to March 2014 was established using four databases: PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, and Embase. To meet the ultimate goal of establishing clinical guidelines based on available information, prospective comparative studies, cohort prospective studies, and retrospective studies on more than 10 subjects were included. The electronic search identified 4,530 articles that were evaluated at the title, abstract, and article level to include 31 articles of interest. The patient-based outcomes and satisfaction data included were examined and reported. The studies included 5,485 participants. Of these, 2,685 were identified as wearing maxillary complete dentures. Reported mean ages ranged from 59.7 to 73.6 years. A systematic review indicated that the provision of new maxillary complete dentures for edentulous patients results in improved self-reported satisfaction and oral health-related quality of life. The included reports, while providing evidence that complete denture satisfaction of participants and new dentures improve self-reported outcomes, did not include variables that influence these positive outcomes. A broad range of evidence supports the use of complete dentures for rehabilitation of the edentulous maxilla. When considering treatment of the edentulous maxilla, the expectations of patients for esthetic and phonetic (social) rehabilitation are high and can be met using maxillary complete dentures as the mode of prosthetic rehabilitation. Patients dissatisfied with new complete dentures may be referred for dental implant therapies involving fixed or removable prostheses.

  7. Prevention and treatment of Candida colonization on denture liners: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skupien, Jovito Adiel; Valentini, Fernanda; Boscato, Noéli; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana

    2013-11-01

    Denture liners are well known for their poor physical properties that favor the accumulation of plaque and colonization by Candida species, which can irritate the oral tissues and lead to denture stomatitis. A systematic review was conducted to determine the feasibility of a prevention protocol for Candida colonization in denture liners and an effective treatment after the fungi has colonized the material. Clinical and in vitro investigations that assessed the treatment and/or prevention of Candida colonization and biofilm formation in denture liners were selected according to the PRISMA statement. Seven electronic databases were searched from 1950 to April 2012 with the keywords "denture liner" OR "reline*" OR "tissue conditioner" AND "Candida" OR "denture stomatitis" OR "oral candidiasis" OR "antifungal agents" OR "denture clean*". The incorporation of nystatin (in general, 500 000 units) into tissue conditioners to prevent the onset of the disease and immersion in sodium hypochlorite for disinfection were the methods most often described in this systematic review, and both methods were able to prevent or inhibit Candida colonization, depending on their concentrations. The 0.5% sodium hypochlorite concentration can disinfect tissue conditioners and denture liners. Microwave irradiation has also been described an alternative method of disinfection. Because of a lack of standardized results (especially with regard to the method used to perform microbial counts), a meta-analysis could not be performed. The literature suggests that the use of 0.5% sodium hypochlorite can help disinfect denture liners and tissue conditioners. The incorporation of nystatin in those materials is also able to treat or prevent oral candidiasis. However, as most of the studies were in vitro, there is insufficient reliable evidence to truly provide recommendations regarding the ideal cleaning method or whether the addition of antifungal agents is worthwhile. Well-designed randomized

  8. Inhibitory Effect of Alpha-Mangostin on Adhesion of Candida albicans to Denture Acrylic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaomongkolgit, Ruchadaporn; Jamdee, Kusuma

    2015-01-01

    Candida-associated denture stomatitis is a very common disease affecting denture wearers. It is characterized by the presence of yeast biofilm on the denture, primarily associated with C. albicans. The investigation of agents that can reduce C. albicans adhesion may represent a significant advancement in the prevention and treatment of this disease. This study aims to investigate the effect of alpha-mangostin on the in vitro adhesion of C. albicans to denture acrylic and germ tube formation by C. albicans and to compare its activity with clotrimazole which is a topical antifungal agent commonly used for the treatment of Candida-associated denture stomatitis. Alpha-mangostin was extracted by thin layer chromatography. The effect of alpha-mangostin on adhesion of C. albicans to denture acrylic was determined by using a colorimetric tetrazolium assay and germ tube formation by C. albicans was determined by using the counting chamber. A significant reduction of C. albicans adhesion to denture acrylic was evident after exposure to 2,000 µg/ml of alpha-mangostin for only 15 min. In addition, the 2,000 µg/ml of the alpha-mangostin-treated C. albicans had a reduced ability for germ tube formation. These inhibitory effects of alpha-mangostin were as effective as clotrimazole. Alpha-mangostin has antifungal property against C. albicans by inhibiting the adhesion to denture acrylic and germ tube formation in vitro. These results suggest the potential application of alpha-mangostin as a topical medication or a natural oral hygiene product for treatment of Candida-associated denture stomatitis.

  9. Impact of mandibular conventional denture and overdenture on quality of life and masticatory efficiency

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    Rachel Gomes CARDOSO

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this non-randomized controlled clinical trial was to evaluate the oral health-related quality of life and masticatory efficiency of patients rehabilitated with mandibular two-implant overdentures with immediate loading or conventional dentures. Fifty completely edentulous patients wearing bimaxillary conventional dentures, for at least one year, were recruited. The patients were then assigned to either two treatment groups: mandibular overdentures supported by two implants with bar-clip system and a maxillary conventional denture (n = 25, and new maxillary and mandibular conventional complete dentures (n = 25. Masticatory efficiency and oral health-related quality of life were assessed before and 3 months after denture insertion. The Brazilian version of OHIP-Edent questionnaire was used to assess the oral health-related quality of life. Masticatory efficiency was evaluated with chewing capsules through a colorimetric method. The results revealed fewer oral health–related quality of life problems in patients wearing mandibular two-implant overdentures compared to the conventional dentures group. In addition, the implant overdenture group presented statistically significant improvement in masticatory efficiency (p = 0.001. There was no correlation between masticatory efficiency and OHIP in the implant group (p > 0.05, however a correlation was found in the conventional denture group (p < 0.05. Therefore, these short-term results suggest that mandibular overdenture retained by 2 implants with immediate loading combined with maxillary conventional dentures provide better masticatory efficiency and oral health–related quality of life than mandibular conventional dentures.

  10. Linear dimensional change of heat-cured acrylic resin complete dentures after reline and rebase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pow, E H; Chow, T W; Clark, R K

    1998-08-01

    Relining and rebasing of complete dentures are common procedures to improve the fit of the prostheses. After relining or rebasing, adjustments may be required because of dimensional change that occurs during reprocessing of the denture when new denture base material is polymerized. This study analyzed the linear dimensional change of heat cured acrylic resin that occurs during reline and rebase procedures for complete dentures. Twenty-two maxillary and mandibular complete denture bases with artificial teeth were saturated by immersion in distilled water at 37 degrees C +/- 1 degree C. Fine crosses were marked on the incisal edges of the central incisors and the supporting cusps of the second molar teeth. Distances between the marks were measured with a high resolution traveling microscope. Heat-cured acrylic resin was processed by a long curing cycle of 72 degrees C for 6.5 hours, then heated to 100 degrees C for over 30 minutes and kept at 100 degrees C for 1 hour. The relined or rebased denture was allowed to cool slowly in the water bath for 48 hours to reach ambient temperature. The reference-crosses were measured immediately after careful deflasking. In the relining procedure, all incisor-molar and intermolar distances exhibited shrinkage of 0.3%, despite different shapes of maxillary and mandibular dentures. Results of the rebasing procedure were similar to that of the reline expect that only 0.1% intermolar shrinkage was found on the maxillary denture. Shrinkage was approximately 0.15 mm for an interarch distance of 50 mm. This degree of change is both clinically undetectable and insignificant. Using this processing cycle for acrylic resin in reline or rebase procedures did not cause clinically significant dimensional changes to complete dentures.

  11. Effect of surface treatments on the bond strength of soft denture lining materials to an acrylic resin denture base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundogdu, Mustafa; Yesil Duymus, Zeynep; Alkurt, Murat

    2014-10-01

    Adhesive failure between acrylic resin and resilient liner material is commonly encountered in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface treatments on the bond strength of 2 different resilient lining materials to an acrylic resin denture base. Ninety-six dumbbell-shaped specimens were fabricated from heat-polymerized acrylic resin, and 3 mm of the material was cut from the thin midsection. The specimens were divided into 6 groups according to their surface treatments: no surface treatment (control group), 36% phosphoric acid etching (acid group), erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser (laser group), airborne-particle abrasion with 50-μm Al2O3 particles (abrasion group), an acid+laser group, and an abrasion+laser group. The specimens in each group were divided into 2 subgroups according to the resilient lining material used: heat-polymerized silicone based resilient liner (Molloplast B) and autopolymerized silicone-based resilient liner (Ufi Gel P). After all of the specimens had been polymerized, they were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 1 week. A tensile bond strength test was then performed. Data were analyzed with a 2-way ANOVA, and the Sidak multiple comparison test was used to identify significant differences (α=.05). The effects of the surface treatments and resilient lining materials on the surface of the denture base resin were examined with scanning electron microscopy. The tensile bond strength was significantly different between Molloplast B and Ufi Gel P (Presin. Molloplast B exhibited significantly higher bond strength than Ufi Gel P. Altering the surface of the acrylic resin denture base with 36% phosphoric acid etching increased bond strength. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of an antifungal denture liner on the saliva yeast count in patients with denture stomatitis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerts, G A V M; Stuhlinger, M E; Basson, N J

    2008-09-01

    Although in vitro studies on the release of antifungal agents from tissue conditioners have been done, no in vivo research on the topic could be found. The purpose of this study was to determine the in vivo effect of an antifungal agent released from a tissue conditioner on the salivary yeast count. Forty edentulous patients with denture stomatitis caused by Candida albicans were divided in two groups. Group 1 (control) was treated with a tissue conditioner only. Group 2 was treated with a tissue conditioner incorporating 500,000 U nystatin. Oral rinses were performed by both groups before treatment and every second day during treatment for a period of 14 days. Total yeast counts of the oral rinses were performed and the averages and standard deviations for both groups calculated and logarithm-transformed data of the counts over time were statistically analysed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The average oral rinse yeast count of the control group decreased up to day 4. Thereafter, the count increased till the end of the test period. At day 14, the oral rinse yeast level was higher than the pre-treatment level. The average yeast count of the test group decreased up to day 7. Thereafter, the count increased but remained significantly lower (P=0.01) than the control group and did not return to its pre-treatment level. A nystatin-containing short-term denture liner significantly decreases the salivary yeast count of patients with denture stomatitis compared with a liner without nystatin.

  13. Effect of silica coating and silane surface treatment on the bond strength of soft denture liner to denture base material

    Science.gov (United States)

    ATSÜ, Saadet; KESKİN, Yasemin

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the effects of different surface treatments on the tensile bond strength of an autopolymerizing silicone denture liner to a denture base material after thermocycling. Material and Methods Fifty rectangular heat-polymerized acrylic resin (QC-20) specimens consisting of a set of 2 acrylic blocks were used in the tensile test. Specimens were divided into 5 test groups (n=10) according to the bonding surface treatment as follows: Group A, adhesive treatment (Ufi Gel P adhesive) (control); Group S, sandblasting using 50-µm Al2O3; Group SCSIL, silica coating using 30-µm Al2O3 modified by silica and silanized with silane agent (CoJet System); Group SCA, silica coating and adhesive application; Group SCSILA, silica coating, silane and adhesive treatment. The 2 PMMA blocks were placed into molds and the soft lining materials (Ufi Gel P) were packed into the space and polymerized. All specimens were thermocycled (5,000 cycles) before the tensile test. Bond strength data were analyzed using 1-way ANOVA and Duncan tests. Fracture surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS) and Fourier Transform Infrared spectrometer (FTIR) analysis were used for the chemical analysis and a profilometer was used for the roughness of the sample surfaces. Results The highest bond strength test value was observed for Group A (1.35±0.13); the lowest value was for Group S (0.28±0.07) and Group SCSIL (0.34±0.03). Mixed and cohesive type failures were seen in Group A, SCA and SCSILA. Group S and SCSIL showed the least silicone integrations and the roughest surfaces. Conclusion Sandblasting, silica coating and silane surface treatments of the denture base resin did not increase the bond strength of the silicone based soft liner. However, in this study, the chemical analysis and surface profilometer provided interesting insights about the bonding mechanism between the denture base resin and silicone soft liner

  14. Effect of silica coating and silane surface treatment on the bond strength of soft denture liner to denture base material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saadet Atsu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the effects of different surface treatments on the tensile bond strength of an autopolymerizing silicone denture liner to a denture base material after thermocycling. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Fifty rectangular heat-polymerized acrylic resin (QC-20 specimens consisting of a set of 2 acrylic blocks were used in the tensile test. Specimens were divided into 5 test groups (n=10 according to the bonding surface treatment as follows: Group A, adhesive treatment (Ufi Gel P adhesive (control; Group S, sandblasting using 50-µm Al2O3; Group SCSIL, silica coating using 30-µm Al2O3 modified by silica and silanized with silane agent (CoJet System; Group SCA, silica coating and adhesive application; Group SCSILA, silica coating, silane and adhesive treatment. The 2 PMMA blocks were placed into molds and the soft lining materials (Ufi Gel P were packed into the space and polymerized. All specimens were thermocycled (5,000 cycles before the tensile test. Bond strength data were analyzed using 1-way ANOVA and Duncan tests. Fracture surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS and Fourier Transform Infrared spectrometer (FTIR analysis were used for the chemical analysis and a profilometer was used for the roughness of the sample surfaces. RESULTS: The highest bond strength test value was observed for Group A (1.35±0.13; the lowest value was for Group S (0.28±0.07 and Group SCSIL (0.34±0.03. Mixed and cohesive type failures were seen in Group A, SCA and SCSILA. Group S and SCSIL showed the least silicone integrations and the roughest surfaces. CONCLUSION: Sandblasting, silica coating and silane surface treatments of the denture base resin did not increase the bond strength of the silicone based soft liner. However, in this study, the chemical analysis and surface profilometer provided interesting insights about the bonding mechanism between the denture base resin and silicone

  15. Coverage of denture teeth with tin foil for radiographic guide fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhashim, Abdulmohsin; Chesla, Edward Robert

    2014-06-01

    A novel technique using the patient's existing complete dentures as a radiographic guide for diagnosis and treatment planning in implant dentistry is presented. Tin foil is used to cover the denture teeth before the radiographic scan is performed. Advantages of the described technique include its cost-effectiveness, simplicity, efficiency, and lack of need to modify or duplicate the patient's existing dentures. A disadvantage of the technique is that it serves only as a radiographic guide. © 2013 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  16. [Sectional acrylic dentures for a partially edentulous patient with microstomia: a clinical report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Midori

    2006-01-01

    The patient was a 48-year-old partially edentulous male with microstomia. His chief complaints were masticatory disturbance and aesthetic problems caused by missing teeth. After trayless impressions for diagnostic casts were made, sectional trays and a sectional record block were used for the definitive impression and maxillomandibular registration. Maxillary and mandibular acrylic sectional dentures were simultaneously delivered. Low caries activity, minimal occlusal force, appropriate plaque control, and simple designs for connecting portions of the two halves of the sectional dentures might lead to satisfactory results in this case. No problems have been observed for approximately 6 years after delivery of the acrylic sectional dentures for this microstomic patient.

  17. Fibres reinforced dentures investigated with en-face optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrutiu, Meda L.; Sinescu, Cosmin; Hughes, Michael; Bradu, Adrian; Goguta, Luciana; Rominu, Mihai; Negru, Radu; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2008-04-01

    The complete dentures are currently made using different technologies. In order to avoid deficiencies of the prostheses made using the classical technique, several alternative procedures have been devised. In order to enhance the mechanical strength, complete denture bases are reinforced with fibres. Their material and structure vary wildly, which makes the investigation difficult. In this study, optical coherence tomography (OCT) is evaluated as a possible non-invasive technique to assess the biomechanical behaviour of the reinforcing fibres. OCT images demonstrate structural defects between fibres and the acrylic material in all dentures bases investigated. We conclude that OCT can successfully be used as a noninvasive analysis method.

  18. Prosthodontic management of worn dentition in pediatric patient with complete overlay dentures: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prince; Rastogi, Jyoti; Jain, Chandni; Singh, Harkanwal Preet

    2012-11-01

    Overlay complete dentures are simple, reversible and economical treatment modality for patients with congenital or acquired disorders that severely affect the tooth development. It satisfies both the esthetic and functional demands where the extraction of teeth is not generally indicated. In pediatric patients, the overlay dentures establish a relatively stable occlusion that improves patient's tolerance to the future treatment procedures for worn dentition. This clinical report highlights the imperative need of appropriate treatment strategy and application of maxillary and mandibular overlay dentures in a pediatric patient who suffered from congenitally mutilated and worn dentition.

  19. Detection of improvement in the masticatory function from old to new removable partial dentures using mixing ability test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakawa, A; Fueki, K; Ohyama, T

    2005-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the sensitivity of the Mixing Ability Test to detect improvement of masticatory function in subjects on transition from old to new removable partial dentures. Thirty-two subjects (seven males, 25 females, mean age 65.0 years) with distal extension partially edentulous area in mandible and/or maxilla participated in the study. The following reasons were presented for replacing the old removable partial dentures with new ones: fracture and/or poor fitness of retainers, extraction of abutment teeth, poor fitness of denture base, severe wear of artificial teeth and request for metal base dentures. Masticatory function with old and new removable partial dentures after an adaptation period (mean 27.4 weeks) was evaluated by the Mixing Ability Test. Subjects were asked to masticate five two-coloured wax cubes with each removable partial denture. Mixing Ability Index was obtained from the colour mixture and shape of the masticated cubes. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to test the difference of Mixing Ability Indexes between old and new removable partial dentures. The mixing ability indexes with new removable partial dentures (mean+/- s.d.: 0.70+/- 0.68) was significantly higher (Premovable partial dentures (-0.11+/-1.13). The results suggest that the Mixing Ability Test was capable of detecting improvement in masticatory function with new removable partial dentures.

  20. A Comparison of Masticatory Performance and Efficiency of Complete Dentures Made with High Impact and Flexible Resins: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazari, Puja; Bhoyar, Anjali; Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Yadav, Naveen S; Mahajan, Harsh

    2015-06-01

    In patients with extensive tooth loss, restoration of masticatory function and aesthetics is main concern for a prosthodontist. This study aimed to evaluate and compare differences in masticatory efficiency of patients treated with complete dentures made with either high impact or flexible resins. The sample size consisted of 10 study subjects. Two sets of dentures first conventional followed by flexible dentures were fabricated for each subject and both the sets of dentures were accessed for masticatory performance and efficiency. This study compared the masticatory performance and efficiency of dentures by means of standardized mesh sieves. Masticatory efficiency was calculated by recording the total number of chewing cycles and time required to completely swallow a standardized food item. A patient satisfaction questionnaire was given and evaluated. The statistical analyses were performed using Z-test of Proportion and Paired t-test. The masticatory performance ratio was found to be more for hard food in conventional dentures. The values of masticatory performance ratios for soft food, time and number of masticatory strokes were indicating better masticatory efficiency of conventional dentures. Though masticatory efficiency and performance were found to be better for patient's dentures made with Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), a statistically significant number of patients reported that the flexible dentures were more satisfying than the conventional dentures.

  1. Prevalence of yeast other than Candida albicans in denture wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaleiro, Inês; Proença, Luis; Félix, Sérgio; Salema-Oom, Madalena

    2013-07-01

    The isolation of yeast species other than Candida albicans from the oral mucosa has been increasing in frequency, suggesting that those may constitute emerging potential oral colonizers. The purpose of this work was to determine whether yeast species other than C. albicans are associated with factors related to wearing of dental prostheses. tRNA-PCR fingerprinting and sequencing of the 26S rDNA D1/D2 domain were used to identify all yeasts isolated from CHROMagar™ Candida cultures of oral swabs collected from 178 patients. Besides C. albicans, 13 other species were identified, corresponding to 34% of the yeast isolates. The majority of the non-C. albicans species were not detected as single colonizers but rather in co-colonization with one or two other yeasts, often with C. albicans. No significant associations were found with non-C. albicans species. On the contrary, the best-fitted logistic regression model predicts that either wearing a denture (adjusted odds = 4.6) or insufficient oral hygiene (adjusted odds = 2.3) are risks for colonization by yeast, in general. The colonization with non-C. albicans species and co-colonization were not independently associated with any of the analyzed host-related factors. In particular, neither wearing a removable denture nor being elderly were significant predictors. © 2012 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  2. THE EFFECT OF KAVINER ON THE FIXED DENTURES BONDING STRENGHT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nebojša Krunić

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available A layer of agents used to protect polished teeth is applied to a stump prior to the final cementation of the fixed denture for the purpose of alleviating postoperative sensibility. The objective of this paper was to establish, under the in vitro conditions, whether application of one layer of the agent (Kaviner intended to isolate polished teeth decreases the fixed denture bonding strength. Used as a material were 40 intact human premolars extracted for orthodox reasons, polished by a high capacity machine using a cold water spray cooling. Experimental crowns were made by a standard method from NiCrMo alloy and cemented by zinc phosphate and glass ionomer cements on the corresponding stumps (20 in each group. After seven days, the bond strength between the polished teeth and crowns was mechanically tested, first without and then after application of Kaviner. The results obtained have shown a decrease in the bonding strength with both cements used, higher decrease in the retention force being observed with the glass ionomer cement. However, the retention force values obtained after the application of Kaviner for both observed dental cements are still clinically acceptable.

  3. Effect of disinfectant solutions on a denture base acrylic resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Cristiane F; Vanderlei, Aleska D; Marocho, Susana M Salazar; Pereira, Sarina M B; Nogueira, Lafayette; Paes-Júnior, Tarcisio J Arruda

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the hardness, roughness and mass loss of an acrylic denture base resin after in vitro exposure to four disinfectant solutions. Forty specimens (Clássico, Brazil) were prepared and randomly assigned to 4 groups n = 10) according to the disinfectant solution: G1: control, stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C; G2: 1% sodium hypochlorite; G3: 2% glutaraldehyde; G4: 4% chlorhexidine. G2 to G4 were immersed for 60 minutes in the disinfectant solution. Measurements were carried out both before and after immersion in the solution. The surface was analyzed with a surface roughness tester (Surfcorder SE 1700 KOZAKALAB), a microdurometer FM-700 (Future Tech) and a scanning electron microscope (DSM 962-ZEISS). Loss of mass was determined with a digital weighing scale. After disinfection procedures, values were analyzed statistically. The acrylic denture base resin may be vulnerable to surface changes after in vitro immersion in the disinfectant solutions studied.

  4. Setting characteristics of silicone-based resilient denture liners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Koichi; Arikawa, Hiroyuki; Kanie, Takahito; Ban, Seiji; Inoue, Mitsuko

    2004-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the setting characteristics of seven silicone-based resilient denture liners during setting. Maximum extrusion force--at the flow rate of 1 cm/min--ranged from 0.183 to 1.26 MPa. Working time and setting time ranged from 2.0 to 5.0 minutes and 1.9 to 6.8 minutes respectively. Consistency as described in JIS T6519-2000 was 32.4 to 46.5 mm. As normal load of 1 kgf was applied to a specimen held between two glass plates after mixing, the time at which film thickness reached up to 1 mm was 4.0 to 13.0 minutes at 23 degrees C and 2.2 to 5.5 minutes at 37 degrees C. These results suggested that the reaction rate of materials used in this study differed from one brand to another. Against this backdrop of differing reaction rates amongst brands, it is therefore vital that a denture liner material's setting characteristics be carefully considered whenever it is used in clinical dentistry to prevent any undesirable or unexpected results and outcome.

  5. Complete Overlay Denture for Pedodontic Patient with Severe Dentinogenesis Imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syriac, Gibi; Joseph, Elizabeth; Rupesh, Suresh; Mathew, Josey

    2017-01-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI) is a hereditary condition that may affect both primary and permanent dentition and is characterized by abnormal dentin formation. The teeth may be discolored with chipping of enamel and, in untreated cases, the entire dentition may wear off to the gingiva. This may lead to the formation of abscesses, tooth mobility, and early loss of teeth. In the Indian population, DI is found to have an incidence of 0.09%. Treatment of DI should aim to remove infection, if any, from the oral cavity; restore form, function, and esthetics; and protect posterior teeth from wear for maintaining the occlusal vertical dimension. Treatment strategies should be selected based on the presenting complaint of the patient, patient's age, and severity of the problem. This case report presents the management of severe DI with tooth worn off until gingival level in a very young patient using complete overlay denture, which has not been reported earlier. How to cite this article: Syriac G, Joseph E, Rupesh S, Mathew J. Complete Overlay Denture for Pedodontic Patient with Severe Dentinogenesis Imperfecta. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2017;10(4):394-398.

  6. Effect of location of glass fiber-reinforced composite reinforcement on the flexural properties of a maxillary complete denture in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yutaka; Yoshida, Kaneyoshi; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2011-07-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effect of the location of glass fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) reinforcement on the flexural load at the proportional limit (FL-PL) and the flexural deflection of a maxillary acrylic resin complete denture. Material and methods. Maxillary acrylic resin complete dentures strengthened with and without FRC reinforcement were tested. The polymerized FRC was embedded in the denture base resin in the doughy state and placed (1) under the ridge lap region, (2) in the anterior region, (3) in the middle region or (4) in the anterior and posterior regions. The FL-PL and flexural deflection value at the 100-N loading point of the reinforced maxillary denture specimens were tested. Results. All of the reinforced dentures had a higher FL-PL than the denture without reinforcement but the FL-PL values of all the dentures were not significantly different from each other. The efficiency of the FRC reinforcement compared to the unreinforced denture was 1.54-1.75 times greater. All of the reinforced dentures showed significantly lower deflection compared to the unreinforced denture, but the flexural deflections of all the dentures were not significantly different from each other. Conclusions. The location of the FRC reinforcement did not affect the fracture resistance of the maxillary acrylic resin complete denture. All of the reinforced dentures had higher FL-PL and lower flexural deflection than the denture without reinforcement.

  7. Effect of reline material and denture base surface treatment on the impact strength of a denture base acrylic resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cruz Perez, Luciano Elias; Machado, Ana Lucia; Canevarolo, Sebastião Vicente; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo; Giampaolo, Eunice Teresinha; Pavarina, Ana Cláudia

    2010-03-01

    In this study, the effect of relining and surface treatment on the impact strength (IS) of a heat-polymerising denture base acrylic resin (Lucitone 550-L) was evaluated. Rectangular bars of L were made (60 x 6 x 2 mm) and relined (2 mm) with the relining resins Ufi Gel Hard (UH) and Tokuso Rebase Fast (TR). Specimens relined with L and intact L, TR and UH specimens were also made (60 x 6 x 4 mm), for comparison. Before relining, the L surface was left untreated or wetted with methyl methacrylate monomer and/or the bonding agents (BA) supplied by manufacturers of the reline resins. V-notches were machined at the midpoint of the length of all specimens. The notches were made either across the width (Nw) or across the thickness of the specimens (Nth). The Charpy impact test was performed using a 0.5-J pendulum, which had been specially designed and constructed. Data were analysed separately for each notch position using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey honestly significant difference post-hoc test (p = 0.05). The IS of L was similar to that of L/L. For the Nw notch, treating the denture base L with TR BA and relining with TR reline material produced the highest IS. The IS of specimens made from heat polymerising acrylic resin Lucitone 550 was increased after relining using the hard chairside reline resin TR with its proprietary BA.

  8. The effect of processing methods and acrylic resins on the accuracy of maxillary dentures and toothless denture bases: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venus, Henrike; Boening, Klaus; Peroz, Ingrid

    2011-09-01

    To compare the dimensional changes of two autopolymerising denture base resins using three different processing techniques. Sixty edentulous denture bases were made from the polymethylmethacrylates FuturaGen and PalaXpress. Ten bases were made from each resin using a manual injection technique (MI), a pneumatic injection technique (PI), and the fluid resin technique (F). Posterior palatal gap widths between casts and denture bases were measured. For an additional three-dimensional examination of occlusal changes, 10 maxillary dentures were made using FuturaGen/MI and 10 using PalaXpress/PI. Intermolar widths and changes in vertical dimension were determined. In all groups, measurements were taken after polymerization, after removal and repositioning, after polishing, and after storage in water for 1 and 3 weeks. Data were analyzed by using two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (P dentures were ⋜ 0.04 mm and below the recommended depth for carving a posterior palatal seal (0.4 to 3.0 mm). The processing technique rather than the choice of the two resins seems to be the dominate variable with respect to dimensional changes.

  9. Single tooth replacement using a ceramic resin bonded fixed partial denture: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Kara, Haluk Baris; Aykent, Filiz

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the use of an all ceramic resin-bonded fixed partial denture as a conservative solution for the replacement of an incisor. It is a minimally invasive technique that does not discolor the abutment teeth.

  10. Single tooth replacement using a ceramic resin bonded fixed partial denture: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Haluk Baris; Aykent, Filiz

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the use of an all ceramic resin-bonded fixed partial denture as a conservative solution for the replacement of an incisor. It is a minimally invasive technique that does not discolor the abutment teeth.

  11. Development of a device to study fatigue life of fixed partial dentures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, S. C.; Meseguer, M. D.; Estal, R.; Folguera, F.; Vidal, V.

    2012-04-01

    Fixed partial dentures can be fabricated by means of different materials and with different manufacturing processes. In order to establish possible differences among them, their behaviour, as fatigue life or cement shear bond strength, have to be evaluated. This article presents a modular, economic and robust device to evaluate fixed partial dentures and dental crowns. A base to support the fixed partial dentures and a device to simulate masticatory loads have been developed. The device has got a simple design. It is based on a pneumatic piston, with a pressure regulator to control masticatory loads. On a first stage, only vertical forces have been taking into account. However, the device will allow simulating tangential masticatory loads on the other axis, studying the behaviour of the fixed partial dentures submerged in a solution similar to saliva, changing masticatory load application, etc. with little modifications.

  12. Evaluation of articulation of Turkish phonemes after removable partial denture application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özbeki Murat

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the adaptation of patients to removable partial dentures was evaluated related to articulation of Turkish phonemes. Articulation of /t,d,n,l,r/, /g,k/, /b,p,m/ and /s,z,Õ,v,f,y,j,h,c/ phonemes were evaluated by three speech pathologists, on records taken from 15 patients before the insertion of a removable partial denture, just after insertion, and one week later. The test consisted of evaluation of phoneme articulation of independent syllables in terms of distortion, omission, substitution, mass effect, hypernasality and hyponasality. Data were evaluated with Cochrane Q, McNemar and Kruskal-Wallis tests. The results showed that for some phonemes, problems in articulation occurred after the insertion of a removable partial denture while for others a significant amelioration was observed after the insertion of a removable partial denture. In general, problems in articulation of evaluated phonemes were resolved after one week of use.

  13. Multicentre prospective evaluation of implant-assisted mandibular bilateral distal extension removable partial dentures: patient satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wismeijer, D.; Tawse-Smith, A.; Payne, A.G.T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the levels of patient satisfaction with either conventional mandibular bilateral distal extension partial dentures or those assisted by bilateral distal implants. Materials and methods Forty-eight participants who were dissatisfied with their existing conventional mandibular

  14. A Simple Chairside Technique of Removing Crown and Fixed Partial Denture Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhinav Gupta

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Retrieving failed cemented crowns and fixed partial dentures with minimum discomfort to the patient has always been a clinical concern. This article describes a technique which will allow easy and predictable removal of these restorations.

  15. Allergic effects of the residual monomer used in denture base acrylic resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Haroon; Sheikh, Zeeshan; Vohra, Fahim

    2015-01-01

    Denture base resins are extensively used in dentistry for a variety of purposes. These materials can be classified as chemical, heat, light, and microwave polymerization materials depending upon the factor which starts the polymerization reaction. Their applications include use during denture base construction, relining existing dentures, and for fabrication of orthodontic removable appliances. There have been increased concerns regarding the safe clinical application of these materials as their biodegradation in the oral environment leads to harmful effects. Along with local side effects, the materials have certain occupational hazards, and numerous studies can be found in the literature mentioning those. The purpose of this article is to outline the cytotoxic consequences of denture base acrylic resins and clinical recommendations for their use. PMID:26929705

  16. Effect of three investing materials on tooth movement during flasking procedure for complete denture construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa’a M. Salloum

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The study results indicate that the use of dental stone or a 50:50 mixture of plaster and stone for investing of dentures is an important factor in efforts to control the magnitude of tooth movement.

  17. Implant-retained mandibular overdentures versus conventional dentures : 10 years of care and aftercare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, A; Meijer, HJA; Raghoebar, GM; Vissink, A

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This 10-year prospective, randomized, clinical trial investigated the treatment outcome of edentulous patients treated with mandibular overdentures retained by 2 endosseous implants compared with conventional dentures in patients with or without vestibuloplasty. Materials and Methods: One

  18. Influence of composition on the adhesive strength and initial viscosity of denture adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jian-min; Hong, Guang; Hayashida, Kentaro; Maeda, Takeshi; Murata, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Keiichi

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effect of composition on the initial viscosity and adhesive strength between denture adhesives and the denture base. Two types of water-soluble polymers (methoxy ethylene maleic anhydride copolymer [PVM-MA] and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose [CMC]) were used. Samples were divided into three groups. Group 1 contained only PVM-MA; Group 2 contained only CMC; and Group 3 contained PVM-MA and CMC. The initial viscosity and adhesive strength were measured. For Group 1, the initial viscosity increased significantly as PVM-MA content increased. The adhesive strength of Group 1 lasted longer than Group 2. The adhesive strength of Group 3 varied greatly. The ratio of CMC and PVM-MA has a significant effect on the initial viscosity and adhesive strength of denture adhesives. Our results suggest that it is possible to improve the durability of a denture adhesive by combining different water-soluble polymers.

  19. Cast Metal Occlusals: A Vital Tool for Single Complete Denture: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dipti S Shah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Occlusal surface of the acrylic teeth of a single complete denture in opposition to natural dentition wears out with its use for a longer period of time, which may lead to decrease in the chewing efficiency, loss of vertical dimension of occlusion, change in centric occlusion, denture instability, temporomandibular joint disturbances etc. Re-fabrication of new denture set over a period of time, inclusion of highly cross linked acrylic teeth, amalgam or metal inserts on occlusal surface, use of composite, gold or metal occlusal surface, etc. are some of the treatment options available to counteract that problem. Several articles have described methods to construct gold and metal occlusal surfaces, some of which are time-consuming, expensive and require many cumbersome steps. This clinical case describes the sequence of steps for construction of metal occlusal surfaces on single complete denture using the lost wax technique.

  20. A simple technique for increasing the occlusal vertical dimension of removable denture wearers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulun, Tonguc; Geckili, Onur

    2011-12-01

    This article describes a simple and efficient technique for increasing the occlusal vertical dimension of removable denture wearers. Functionally generated path technique is carried out by using gothic arch tracing, and the existing mandibular overdenture is modified for interim use.

  1. A method for correction of increased vertical dimension in complete dentures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharat, D.U.

    1989-01-01

    Increased vertical dimension of occlusion [VDO] in complete dentures is a common occurrence due to the fact that a method for its accurate, reliable, and convenient determination is unavailable. An approach to the re-establishment of a correct VDO is described in this study. The suggested method involves shortening of the denture teeth using guides, which is simple, time-saving, and inexpensive. (author)

  2. Candida Colonization on the Denture of Diabetic and Non-diabetic Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Lotfi-Kamran, Mohammad Hossein; Jafari, Abbas Ali; Falah-Tafti, Abbas; Tavakoli, Ehsan; Falahzadeh, Mohammad Hossein

    2009-01-01

    Background: Oral candidiasis is a common opportunistic infection in diabetic patients. Presence of denture in the oral cavity of diabetic patients can promote Candida colonization and results in the higher incidence of oral and systemic candidiasis. The general purpose of the present study was to evaluate and compare Candida colonization in denture of diabetic patients and non-diabetic control group. Methods: In current case-control study, samples for mycological examinations were collect...

  3. Residual methyl methacrylate monomer, water sorption, and water solubility of hypoallergenic denture base materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Peter; Rosenbauer, Ernst-Ulrich

    2004-07-01

    Denture base materials have the potential to cause irritation and allergic reaction to the oral mucosa. Water sorption and water solubility of denture base resins affect dimensional behavior and denture stability. A correlation between residual monomer and water sorption exists. This in vitro study compared the amount of residual monomer, quantity of water sorption, and solubility of 4 denture base materials purported to be hypoallergenic with those of a polymethyl methacrylate-based (PMMA) heat-polymerizing acrylic resin. The denture base resins Sinomer (heat-polymerized, modified methacrylate), Polyan (thermoplastic, modified methacrylate), Promysan (thermoplastic, enterephthalate-based), and Microbase (microwave polymerized, polyurethane-based), which are purported to be hypoallergenic, and Paladon 65 (heat-polymerized, methacrylate, control group) were examined. Specimens of each material were tested for residual methyl methacrylate (MMA) monomer (% wt, n=3), amount of water sorption (microg/mm3, n=5) and water solubility (microg/mm3, n=5), according to ISO 1567:2000. The residual MMA monomer concentrations were determined by gas chromatography (GC). The data were analyzed with 1-way ANOVA and the Bonferroni-Dunn multiple comparisons post hoc analysis for each test variable (alpha=.05). Significantly lower residual MMA monomer was shown for Sinomer and Polyan compared to the PMMA control group (0.90 +/- 0.20% wt, Pdenture base materials (0.34-0.84 +/- 0.05-0.09 microg/mm3) was not significantly lower than the PMMA material (0.40 +/- 0.06 microg/mm3, P>.05). Except for Sinomer, the tested denture base resins passed the requirements of ISO 1567 regarding residual MMA monomer (denture base materials fulfilled the requirements regarding water sorption (denture base materials exhibited significantly lower residual monomer content than PMMA. Promysan and Microbase showed no detectable residual MMA.

  4. Long-term clinical evaluation of the color stability and stainability of acrylic resin denture teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barão, Valentim Adelino Ricardo; Ogawa, Erika Shiguematsu; Moreno, Amália; Mesquita, Marcelo Ferraz; Wee, Alvin G; Assunção, Wirley Gonçalves

    2015-06-01

    The color stability and staining of acrylic resin denture teeth remains an esthetic problem for complete denture wearers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the long-term clinical color stability and stainability of acrylic resin denture teeth in complete denture wearers over a period of 5 years. Fifty participants rehabilitated with complete dentures from February 2008 to December 2013 were selected. The demographic data and the clinical characteristics of participants were recorded. Color change (ΔE) in 3 regions of the denture teeth (incisal, middle, and cervical) was evaluated by spectrophotometry in the CIE L*a*b* system. Participants were asked whether they had noticed any changes in the coloring of the teeth in their dentures. Hierarchical clustering analysis was used to identify groups formed from variables related to demographic questions and color analysis. Two-way ANOVA among the color cluster groups was performed and the Tukey-Kramer test was used as a post hoc test (α=.05). A chi-square test and Fisher exact test were used to identify the association between the study variables and color changes in the participants' responses (α=.05). Four cluster groups from 50 participants were identified in the clustering analysis. The ΔE was statistically significant for the interaction between the dental third and cluster groups (P.05). Although the acrylic resin denture teeth exhibited color instability and staining in vivo, the participants were unable to identify the color change. The cluster groups with higher color change values consumed more staining solutions. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of three investing materials on tooth movement during flasking procedure for complete denture construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salloum, Alaa'a M

    2016-01-01

    Tooth movement has been shown to occur during and after the processing of complete dentures. An understanding of this phenomenon may permit one to construct functional complete dentures that require less occlusal adjustment in the articulator and in the patient's mouth. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of three different investing methods on tooth movement occurring during the processing of simulated maxillary complete dentures. Forty-five similar maxillary dentures were made using heat-polymerized acrylic resin, and assigned randomly to three experimental groups (n = 15 each) according to investing method: plaster-plaster-plaster (P-P-P), plaster-stone-stone (P-S-S), and plaster-mix (P-M). Specimens in all experimental groups were compression molded with denture base resin. Transverse interincisor (I-I) and intermolar (M-M) distances, and anteroposterior incisor-molar (LI-LM and RI-RM) distances, were measured with digital calipers at the wax denture stage (pre-polymerization) and after denture decasting (post-polymerization). Analysis of variance and Tukey's test were used to compare the results. M-M, LI-LM, and RI-RM movement was significantly greater in the P-P-P group than in the P-S-S and P-M groups; no significant difference in I-I movement was observed among groups. Transverse movement along M-M and I-I was significantly greater than anteroposterior movement in the P-P-P group; no significant difference among measurements was observed in the other two groups. The study results indicate that the use of dental stone or a 50:50 mixture of plaster and stone for investing of dentures is an important factor in efforts to control the magnitude of tooth movement.

  6. Digital Relief of the Mental Foramen for a CAD/CAM-Fabricated Mandibular Denture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkubo, Chikahiro; Park, Eun-Jin; Kim, Tae Hyung; Kurtz, Kenneth S

    2018-02-01

    Relief of the intaglio surface of a denture base is conventionally performed using thin wax and soft metal foil attached to the master cast. The following report highlights a new relief procedure for the mental foramen using a CT double scan technique on the CAD/CAM dentures fabricated for the patient with paresthesia of the left lower lip and chin during mastication. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  7. Changes in occlusal vertical dimension in microwave processing of complete dentures

    OpenAIRE

    Barbosa,Débora Barros; Compagnoni,Marco Antonio; Leles,Cláudio Rodrigues

    2002-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of different microwave curing cycles on the changes in occlusal vertical dimension of complete dentures. Four test groups with 12 maxillary dentures each were evaluated. Groups 1, 2 and 3 were polymerized with different cycles by microwave radiation and Group 4 was the control and cured by water bath. The average pin opening for all groups was less than 0.5 mm. There was no significant difference between the groups polymerized by the microwave method and the...

  8. The Effect of Microwave Disinfection on Denture Base Polymers, Liners and Teeth: A Basic Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsimpali, Aspasia; Polyzois, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to overview the current scientific knowledge concerning the effect of microwave disinfection on denture related material properties. Cross-infection control in dentistry is a significant issue in everyday clinical practice due to the recent increase in some infectious diseases such as hepatitis B, C and AIDS and therefore numerous methods of disinfection have been used. The most widespread method of disinfection used in everyday practice is chemical, however, studies have suggested that chemical disinfectants alter the physical and mechanical properties of the acrylic resins and enable the growth and proliferation of certain bacteria. Therefore, microwaves were introduced as an easy to use-and-access, low cost, chemical free alternative. The question that arose was if and in what way the microwave irradiation affected the denture related material properties. Microwaving affects the denture resin bases, liners and teeth in different ways. The results showed that microwave disinfection could be a safe alternative for the disinfection of denture bases and liners compared to the chemical one, when the procedure is carried out in dry conditions, but could possibly cause dimensional changes of clinical significance on them when the irradiation takes place in wet environment. It also seems to have no detrimental effects of clinical importance on the flexural properties, impact strength and hardness of denture resins and the bond, flexural strength, porosity and hardness of denture liners. The effects of microwave disinfection on the hardness of denture teeth and teeth/denture bond strength are still controversial and no safe conclusions can be drawn. PMID:27688409

  9. Peel strength of denture liner to PMMA and polyamide: laser versus air-abrasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Fatih Mehmet; Bagis, Bora; Ozcan, Mutlu; Durkan, Rukiye; Turgut, Sedanur; Ates, Sabit Melih

    2013-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of laser parameters and air-abrasion on the peel strength of silicon-based soft denture liner to different denture resins. Specimens (N=180) were prepared out of three different denture base resins (Rodex, cross-linked denture base acrylic resin; Paladent, heat-cured acrylic resin; Deflex, Polyamide resin) (75 mm × 25 mm × 3 mm). A silicon-based soft denture liner (Molloplast B) was applied to the denture resins after the following conditioning methods: a) Air-abrasion (50 µm), b) Er,Cr:YSGG laser (Waterlase MD Turbo, Biolase Technology) at 2 W-20 Hz, c) Er,Cr:YSGG laser at 2 W-30 Hz, d) Er,Cr:YSGG laser at 3 W-20 Hz, e) Er,Cr:YSGG laser at 3 W-30 Hz. Non-conditioned group acted as the control group. Peel test was performed in a universal testing machine. Failure modes were evaluated visually. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=.05). Denture liner tested showed increased peel strength after laser treatment with different parameters (3.9±0.4 - 5.58±0.6 MPa) compared to the control (3.64±0.5 - 4.58±0.5 MPa) and air-abraded groups (3.1±0.6 - 4.46±0.3 MPa), but the results were not statistically significant except for Paladent, with the pretreatment of Er,Cr:YSGG laser at 3 W-20 Hz. Polyamide resin after air-abrasion showed significantly lower peel strength than those of other groups (3.1±0.6 MPa). Heat-cured acrylic resin, PMMA, may benefit from Er,Cr:YSGG laser treatment at 3 W-20 Hz irradiation. Air-abrasion of polyamide resins should be avoided not to impair their peel bond strengths to silicon-based soft denture liners.

  10. Factors associated with mandibular movement and vertical dimension of occlusion in elderly complete-denture wearers

    OpenAIRE

    Luiz Otávio Behrensdorf Reis; Rita de Cássia Costa Ribeiro de Almeida; Thiago Britto Ribeiro; Angélica Gonzatti; Noéli Boscato

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the effect of age, duration of edentulism, and duration of current complete-denture use on the extent of mandibular movements and on reestablishment of vertical dimension of occlusion in elderly complete-denture wearers. Methods: Thirty volunteers were selected based on predetermined inclusion criteria. Extent of mandibular movements was assessed using intraoral Gothic arch tracings while the study participants were still wearing their o...

  11. Diminished Antimicrobial Peptide and Antifungal Antibiotic Activities against Candida albicans in Denture Adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber M. Bates

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The underlying causes of denture stomatitis may be related to the long-term use of adhesives, which may predispose individuals to oral candidiasis. In this study, we hypothesize that antimicrobial peptides and antifungal antibiotics have diminished anti-Candida activities in denture adhesive. To show this, nine antimicrobial peptides and five antifungal antibiotics with and without 1.0% denture adhesive were incubated with Candida albicans strains ATCC 64124 and HMV4C in radial diffusion assays. In gels with 1.0% adhesive, HNP-1, HBD2, HBD3, IP-10, LL37 (only one strain, histatin 5 (only one strain, lactoferricin B, and SMAP28 showed diminished activity against C. albicans. In gels with 1.0% adhesive, amphotericin B and chlorhexidine dihydrochloride were active against both strains of C. albicans. These results suggest that denture adhesive may inactivate innate immune mediators in the oral cavity increasing the risk of C. albicans infections, but inclusion of antifungal antibiotics to denture adhesive may aid in prevention or treatment of Candida infections and denture stomatitis.

  12. Method of Retention Control for Compromised Periodontal Bone Support Abutment of Conical Crown Retained Denture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chau-Hsiang Wang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Conical crown-retained dentures (CCRD show a higher survival rate and greater patient satisfaction than transitional removable partial dentures during long-term follow-up. However, unsustainable denture retention force on supporting abutments after initial delivery and loss retention are frequently seen in long-term follow-up of clinical cases. The main causes are insufficient information concerning denture retention designs and the retention-tolerance of the supporting abutments. Monitoring by dental technicians of the quality of dental prostheses is critical. This case report describes an optimal method for CCRD construction that determines and distributes an optimal denture retention force on the supporting abutments to allow the patient to easily remove the denture while ensuring that the CCRD remains in place during physiologic activities. Oral rehabilitation with CCRD should consider the condition of the abutment periodontal support, the interarch occlusal relationship, supplemental fatigue of the terminal abutment, and patient's estimated bite force. The effects of friction on the abutment's inner crown were based on an optimal a angle. The dental laboratory used these measurements to fabricate a CCRD using a Koni-Meter to adjust the retention of the inner crown. This method protects the abutments and reduces the wear between the inner and outer crowns. The CCRD achieved good esthetic results and physiologic functions. Periodic long-term follow-up of the patient and CCRD after initial placement is recommended.

  13. [Effects of removable partial dentures on the quality of life in people with shortened dental arches].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armellini, D B; Heydecke, G; Witter, D J; Creugers, N H J

    2009-12-01

    In order to assess the enhanced value of removable partial dentures on the quality of life, patients at 2 university clinics were screened for the presence of complete or shortened dental arches. Those selected were assigned to 1 of 5 subgroups: 1) a shortened dental arch with all frontal teeth, 2) a shortened dental arch with one or more frontal diastemas, 3) a shortened dental arch with all frontal teeth, restored by a removable partial denture, 4) a shortened dental arch and several diastemas, restored by a removable partial denture, 5) a complete dental arch. The participants completed the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-49) and the Short Form Health Survey (SF-36). Clinical data recorded were: whether any teeth were missing and if so which, whether or not these had been replaced by a removable partial denture, and the number of occluding pairs of (pre)molars. The results revealed that a shortenend dental arch has a certain impact on the quality of life. However, the participants only experienced benefits from a removable partial denture if the denture also replaced frontal teeth.

  14. Removable Partial Denture Supported by Implants with Prefabricated Telescopic Abutments - A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Komal

    2014-01-01

    Implants have been designed to rehabilitate edentulous patients with fixed prosthesis or implant supported overdentures. Implant-supported single crowns and fixed partial dentures have become successful treatment alternatives to removable and fixed partial dentures. However, it is common to have clinical situations which make it impossible to use conventional as well as implant supported fixed partial dentures. The implant supported removable partial dentures can be a treatment modality that offers the multitude of benefits of implant-based therapy—biologic, biomechanical, social, and psychological to such patients. The aim of this article is to present a case report describing the fabrication and advantages of removable partial denture supported by teeth and implants for a patient with long edentulous span. The patient was satisfied with his dentures in terms of function and aesthetics. Regular follow-up visits over a period of three years revealed that the periodontal condition of remaining natural dentition and peri-implant conditions were stable. There was no evidence of excessive residual ridge resorption or mobility of the teeth, nor were any visible changes in the bone levels of the natural teeth or implants noted on radiographs. PMID:25121066

  15. Multicentre prospective evaluation of implant-assisted mandibular bilateral distal extension removable partial dentures: patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wismeijer, Daniel; Tawse-Smith, Andrew; Payne, Alan G T

    2013-01-01

    To compare the levels of patient satisfaction with either conventional mandibular bilateral distal extension partial dentures or those assisted by bilateral distal implants. Forty-eight participants who were dissatisfied with their existing conventional mandibular distal extension dentures opposing complete maxillary dentures were selected for a multicentre prospective study in New Zealand, Colombia and the Netherlands. A control group of 12 participants in New Zealand received conventional mandibular partial dentures. Three test groups involving 36 participants in New Zealand (12), Colombia (12) and the Netherlands (12) received bilateral distal implants in the second molar regions. After conventional loading, the test group participants initially had healing caps placed on the distal implants providing support only, followed after approximately 6 months by ball abutments (retentive anchors) for support and retention. Patient outcomes were determined with questionnaires completed at specific stages of the study for up to 3 years. Visual analogue scale, Likert and oral health impact questionnaires before and after treatment indicated improved results. There were significantly improved parameters of overall satisfaction, stability, chewing and appearance after 3 years (P removable partial dentures are a preferable treatment option for patients with complaints about their conventional distal extension partial dentures. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Usage of removable partial dentures in Saudi male patients after 1 year telephone interview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akeel, Riyadh

    2010-01-01

    Objective The success of removable partial dentures (RPDs) is partly dependent on patients’ acceptance and compliance in using them. The purpose of this study was to describe the usage of removable partial dentures (RPDs) by patients 1 year after insertion and to evaluate the factors that influence their denture usage. Methods Forty-seven patients who received 75 new RPDs at the undergraduate clinic of College of Dentistry, King Saud University, were contacted by telephone 1 year later for an interview. The questions covered denture usage, patient’s satisfaction and reasons for non-use. Results Results showed that 36% of patients discarded or occasionally used their RPDs. There was no significant association between denture usage and RPD experience, location or Kennedy classification. A significantly more RPD rejection was found when it was opposed by natural teeth or complete denture. The most quoted reason for RPD rejection was pain and discomfort. Conclusion Despite the short follow-up period, RPDs were poorly accepted by patients treated by undergraduate students. PMID:23960487

  17. A survey of complete denture patients experiencing difficulties with their prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosavi, Sandesh S; Ghanchi, Mohsin; Malik, Shambhvi Anil; Sanyal, Pronob

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the problems faced by patients having complete dentures and the cleanliness of dentures by the patients. This cross-sectional study is done with a sample of 178 patients having complete prosthesis since 1 year. A self-administered structured questionnaire pretested through a pilot survey was used in the study. The data were analyzed using the SPSS version 16.0. The Student's t-test, ANOVA and post hoc test were used as test of significance. Mastication discomfort and looseness of denture were the most common complaints followed by lack of retention (35.4%), bad breath (29.8%), tongue restriction (26.4%) and food accumulation (24.7%). There was a significant relationship of complaints with age groups (p=0.00). This study concluded that most of the patients were present with complaints due to dentures. So, dental professionals should pay serious attention to their patients for subjective acceptable result of the dentures and also advice them to properly maintain hygiene of dentures.

  18. A simple method for obtaining a uniform thickness for long-term soft denture linings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeson, M G; Jepson, N J

    1998-03-01

    The thickness of long-term soft denture linings influences both their compliance and durability. Increasing the thickness of the lining material increases its perceived softness but makes the restoration more likely to fail through weakening of the acrylic resin denture base. Such effects have led to broad recommendations as to an appropriate thickness, advice that assumes a constant thickness of the lining material within the same denture. Several procedures used to produce such a constant thickness have been described. The necessary spacer is produced by manually adapting materials in their plastic state to the cast. Such procedures are liable to distortion and variation in spacer thickness and can be considered unreliable. This article describes a method for obtaining a uniform thickness of soft denture lining through the use of a vacuum-formed, thermoplastic blank as a spacer. The method is simple, applicable to all ridge forms, and reliably results in a soft lining of a known, uniform thickness. The method can be applied to long-term soft linings placed in both old and newly fabricated dentures. The spacer can be modified to allow variations in the prescribed extension of the soft lining within the denture base.

  19. Relationship between viscoelastic properties of soft denture liners and clinical efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Murata

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Soft denture liners are applied for denture wearers who cannot tolerate a hard-based denture due to a thin and non-resilient oral mucosa and/or severe alveolar resorption. This material distributes and absorbs masticatory forces by means of the cushioning effect. Clinical success of the materials depends both on their viscoelastic properties and on durability. Acrylic resins and silicones are mainly available for permanent soft liners. The acrylic permanent soft liners demonstrate viscoelastic behavior while silicone permanent soft liners demonstrate elastic behavior. The improvement in masticatory function is greater in dentures lined with the acrylic materials than in those lined with silicone products. However, the acrylic materials exhibit a more marked change in viscoelastic properties and loss of cushioning effect over time than silicones. From the standpoint of durability, the silicones are preferred. It is important to understand viscoelastic properties and durability of each soft denture liner and to select the material according to the clinical situations and purposes. The ideal permanent soft liners have a relatively high value of loss tangent and storage modulus, and high durability. Further research is necessary to develop the ideal soft denture liner.

  20. Endoscopic Removal of Ingested Dentures and Dental Instruments: A Retrospective Analysis

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    Ken-ichi Mizuno

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dentures and dental instruments are frequently encountered ingested foreign bodies. The aim of the present study was to assess the safety and efficacy of endoscopically removing ingested dental objects. Methods. Twenty-nine consecutive patients with 29 dental objects who were treated at the Niigata University Medical and Dental Hospital from August 2009 to December 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Characteristics of the patients and the ingested dental objects, the clinical features and findings of radiological imaging tests, and outcomes of endoscopic removal were analyzed. Results. Patients’ mean age was 62.9±21.0 years. The ingested dental objects included 23 dentures (13 crowns, 4 bridges, 4 partial dentures, and 2 other dentures and 6 dental instruments. Twenty-seven upper gastrointestinal endoscopies and 2 colonoscopies were performed, and their success rates were 92.6% and 100%, respectively. There were 2 cases of removal failure; one case involved an impacted partial denture in the cervical esophagus, and this case required surgical removal. Conclusions. Endoscopic removal of ingested dentures and dental instruments is associated with a favorable success rate and acceptable complications. The immediate intervention and appropriate selection of devices are essential for managing ingested dental objects.

  1. Etiological factors correlated with temporomandibular disorder in complete denture wearers: a comparative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Alexandre Zavanelli

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to make a comparative evaluation of the prevalence of temporomandibular disorder in complete denturewearers, with regard to the etiological factors, such as gender, age, and complete dentures clinical conditions, according to the anamnestic(Ai and clinical (Di dysfunction index, developed by Helkimo.Methods: The randomized sample was composed of 90 institutionalized patients and bimaxillary complete denture wearers, with a mean ageof 67.2 years, who were included in this study. The collected data were tabulated and the Kruskal-Wallis and Chi-square statistical tests were applied, at the level of significance of 5% (p<0.05.Results: Statistically significant difference in the prevalence of temporomandibular disorder was observed with regard to the ages of the current complete dentures, free-way space, wear of the occlusal surfaces of the artificial teeth, and the conditions of retention and stability of the maxillary and mandibular complete dentures, according to both the indexes. Conclusion: The patients who wore complete dentures in adequate clinical conditions presented fewer signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder than the patients who wore complete dentures in poor clinical conditions.

  2. Full Mouth Oral Rehabilitation by Maxillary Implant Supported Hybrid Denture Employing a Fiber Reinforced Material Instead of Conventional PMMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ala Hassan A. Qamheya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Many people have life-long problems with their dentures, such as difficulties with speaking and eating, loose denture, and sore mouth syndrome. The evolution of dental implant supported prosthesis gives these patients normal healthy life for their functional and esthetic advantages. This case report presents the fabrication of maxillary implant supported hybrid prosthesis by using Nanofilled Composite (NFC material in teeth construction to rehabilitate a complete denture wearer patient.

  3. A Technique to Guide and Measure the Reduction of a Processed Mandibular Complete Denture for Resilient Soft Liner

    OpenAIRE

    Rachana J Shah; Sujal G Shah

    2014-01-01

    A resilient soft liner (RSL) has been used in processed complete dentures but controlling its thickness has always been a challenge because of uneven reduction of the denture’s intaglio surface. Use of a thermoplastic vacuum-formed template and an endodontic K-file, as guides, for the reduction of a processed mandibular complete denture to receive RSL is described in the present report. A processed mandibular complete denture is prepared by reducing its borders and drilling holes in its surfa...

  4. Correlation of masticatory muscle activity with masticatory ability in complete denture patients with canine guidance and balanced occlusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, D.; Odang, R. W.; Koesmaningati, H.

    2017-08-01

    Balanced occlusion is commonly used in complete denture occlusion scheme; however, canine guidance offers a simpler process and reduces alveolar ridge resorption. Correlative research of these two occlusion schemes is required. This study was done to analyze the correlation between masticatory muscle activity and masticatory ability of the subjects with canine guidance and balanced occlusion complete dentures. Ten denture wearers participated in this cross-over clinical trial, and five subjects were randomly selected to wear balanced occlusion followed by canine guidance complete dentures and vice versa. Electromyogram (EMG) activities of superficial masseter and anterior temporal muscles were measured and masticatory ability questionnaires were collected 30 days after the subjects wore each occlusal scheme. There were significant differences between the EMG activities of masticatory muscles in subjects who were given canine guidance and balanced occlusion complete dentures (p canine guidance dentures (p = 0.046). There was a significant and strong correlation (p = 0.045; r = 0.642) between the EMG activity of anterior temporal muscles and masticatory ability when the subjects wore balanced occlusion dentures and between the EMG activity of superficial masseter muscles and masticatory ability (p = 0.043; r = 0.648) when wearing canine guidance dentures. Masticatory ability is better when using canine guidance dentures. There is a significant and strong correlation between masticatory muscle activity and masticatory ability.

  5. Analysis of stainless steel clasp wire tensile strength and its effect after immersion on denture cleanser solution (A research)

    OpenAIRE

    Endang Prawesthi; Handoko Tirta

    2016-01-01

    Clasp wire is one of the important components in partial denture acrylic which serves as  a  retention. After the use of denture everyday, patient is advised to always clean it. Cleaning of denture by immersing in a solution of denture cleanser which containing organic acids in long term may be  cause corrosion. While corrosion can resulted changes in mechanical properties, among others, a reduction in tensile strength of stainless steel. The purpose of this research is to investigate the inf...

  6. Guide-Plane Retention in Designing Removable Partial Dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothopi-Peri, Matshediso; Owen, C Peter

    To compare the influence of abutment teeth guide planes and guiding surfaces on retention of a removable partial denture (RPD). Extracted teeth embedded into a maxillary cast in the first premolar and second molar positions simulated two bounded saddles. Acrylic resin RPDs were made with no guide planes, then with guide planes, then with guiding surfaces added to directly contact the guide planes. The maximum loads on removal from the cast were recorded. There was a significant increase in retention force of 1.6 times when only guide planes were present and of 10.2 times when guiding surfaces intimately contacted the guide planes. The retention of acrylic resin RPDs can be substantially increased by making their guiding surfaces intimately contact the guide planes of the teeth.

  7. Implant-assisted removable partial dentures: practical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omura, Aaron J; Latthe, Vaibhav; Marin, Mark M; Cagna, David R

    2016-01-01

    At the heart of prosthodontic treatment planning must be a sound understanding of the quality and reliability of the prosthodontic foundation. Implant prosthodontics relies almost entirely on the biological and mechanical properties of an osseous foundation. Initiation of therapy in the absence of a healthy and stable prosthodontic foundation risks unintended and suboptimal treatment outcomes. For conventional removable partial denture (RPD) therapy, consideration must be given to interactions between the soft and hard tissues available to support and stabilize planned prostheses. The strategic addition of implants to the partially edentulous foundation can improve the support, comfort, and esthetics of an RPD, resulting in elevated patient satisfaction and greater therapeutic success. This article discusses aspects of diagnosis, treatment planning, clinical management, laboratory execution, and maintenance that must be considered in order to obtain optimal results with implant-assisted RPDs.

  8. [Dimensional accuracy and stability of the complete denture impression tray].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitge, M L; Vrijhoef, M M

    1989-08-01

    When recording final impressions for complete dentures, the dimensional stability of the tray material is of significance for the final result. The aim of this study was to measure the dimensional changes in different tray materials prior to and after border moulding. Self-curing acrylic, thermoplastic acrylic and shellac were measured at fixed intervals with the aid of a measuring microscope. The trays were constructed on metal master models with respectively nine reference points for the upper tray and eight points for the lower tray. Self-curing acrylic produces the most contraction as a function of time, followed by thermoplastic acrylic. Shellac exhibits the least contraction c.q. dimensional change. Thermoplastic acrylic material proved to be the most stable after border moulding. Shellac was totally unreliable due to the major changes following border moulding.

  9. REMOVABLE PARTIAL DENTURE MANAGEMENT ON POST-MENOPAUSE OSTEOPOROTIC FEMALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Ariani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is a condition of generalised skeletal fragility caused by diminishing bone amount and disturbance in bone microarchitecture with implication that the bone's ability to withstand forces is decreased. This condition leads to more bone resorption. Some researchers show that this condition also affects jaw bone. Therefore we must take this condition into consideration during prothodontic treatment. Dental prostheses are made to restore stomatognatic function as well as to preserve what was left including alveolar bone. The ability of dental prostheses to preserve residual alveolar bone differs according to type of prostheses. The case presented here propose the treatment of osteoporotic female in Prosthodontics Clinic FKG UI with removable partial denture. Considerations in selecting the type and design of dental prostheses and attempts to modify factors that might play a role in bone resorption in connection with the patient's physical and psychological status will be discussed. Thorough examination, careful planning and good communication with the patient can provide optimum results.

  10. Versatility of PEEK as a fixed partial denture framework

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    Nikita Sinha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Materials used for fixed partial denture (FPD frameworks have had properties of excellent strength, durability, and biocompatibility. Some of the materials which have been used till date include alloys, ceramics, and high-performance polymers such as zirconia, Ni–Cr, lithium disilicate, and so on. All these, though excellent, have their advantages and disadvantages. Hence, the search has always been on for a better material. One such material, which has made its foray into dentistry in the recent times, is polyetheretherketone (PEEK. It is a semicrystalline thermoplastic material. PEEK has an excellent chemical resistance and mechanical properties that are retained at high temperatures. The versatility of PEEK as a dental material for FPD framework was evaluated in this case report.

  11. Versatility of PEEK as a fixed partial denture framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Nikita; Gupta, Nidhi; Reddy, K Mahendranadh; Shastry, Y M

    2017-01-01

    Materials used for fixed partial denture (FPD) frameworks have had properties of excellent strength, durability, and biocompatibility. Some of the materials which have been used till date include alloys, ceramics, and high-performance polymers such as zirconia, Ni-Cr, lithium disilicate, and so on. All these, though excellent, have their advantages and disadvantages. Hence, the search has always been on for a better material. One such material, which has made its foray into dentistry in the recent times, is polyetheretherketone (PEEK). It is a semicrystalline thermoplastic material. PEEK has an excellent chemical resistance and mechanical properties that are retained at high temperatures. The versatility of PEEK as a dental material for FPD framework was evaluated in this case report.

  12. Fiber-reinforced composites in fixed partial dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vallittu P

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Fiber-reinforced composite resin (FRC prostheses offer the advantages of good esthetics, minimal invasive treatment, and an ability to bond to the abutment teeth, thereby compensating for less-than-optimal abutment tooth retention and resistance form. These prostheses are composed of two types of composite materials: fiber composites to build the framework and hybrid or microfill particulate composites to create the external veneer surface. This review concentrates on the use of fiber reinforcement in the fabrication of laboratory or chairside-made composite-fixed partial dentures of conventional preparation. Other applications of FRC in dentistry are briefly mentioned. The possibilities fiber reinforcement technology offers must be emphasized to the dental community. Rather than limiting discussion to whether FRC prostheses will replace metal-ceramic or full-ceramic prostheses, attention should be focused on the additional treatment options brought by the use of fibers. However, more clinical experience is needed.

  13. Bond strength and degree of infiltration between acrylic resin denture liner after immersion in effervescent denture cleanser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisani, Marina Xavier; Silva-Lovato, Cláudia Helena; Malheiros-Segundo, Antônio de Luna; Macedo, Ana Paula; Paranhos, Helena Freitas Oliveira

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of sodium perborate on the bond strength and degree of infiltration between acrylic resin/resilient denture liners. Three denture liners (Elite Soft, Mucopren Soft, Kooliner) were investigated. Twenty specimens (83 x 10 x 10 mm(3)) of each material were made by processing the denture liners against two polymerized PMMA blocks. Ten specimens for each material were stored in artificial saliva at 37 degrees C (control group: TBS1), and the other ten specimens were stored in artificial saliva at 37 degrees C combined with sodium perborate (experimental group: TBS2). All specimens were placed under tension until failure in a Universal Testing Machine at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min after 7 (T7) and 60 (T60) days (n = 5). Failure strength (MPa) was recorded, and mode of failure was characterized as cohesive, adhesive, or cohesive/adhesive. For the infiltration tests, ten circular specimens (14-mm diameter x 2-mm thick) of each material were stored in artificial saliva and 0.5% methylene blue at 37 degrees C (control group: I1), and ten specimens were stored in artificial saliva and 0.5% methylene blue at 37 degrees C combined with daily immersions for 5 minutes in an effervescent solution of sodium perborate (experimental group: I2). The degree of infiltration was obtained through photographs and using Software Image Tool after 120 days. For Kooliner, the statistical test did not show a significant difference in the bond strength due to the influence of the immersion period or to the use of sodium perborate. Elite Soft presented a significant increase in the average tension in T7 and in T60 in both TBS1 and TBS2. Inversely, the Mucopren suffered a significant decrease in the tension value in the same period as the TBS1 group as well as in the TBS2. The infiltration percentage was analyzed with the Kruskal-Wallis test (26.18; p < 0.05), which indicated significant differences between the compared averages for the

  14. Effect of finishing and polishing procedures on the gap width between a denture base resin and two long-term, resilient denture liners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesun, Igor J; Hodges, James; Lai, Juey H

    2002-03-01

    The junction between a long-term, resilient denture liner and the denture base is difficult to finish and polish due to differences in the hardness of the materials. Gaps tend to form during finishing and polishing procedures. This study measured the junctional gap between 2 long-term, resilient denture liners and a denture base material after different finishing and polishing procedures were performed. The surface smoothness of the 2 liner materials also was evaluated. Molloplast-B and an experimental, heat-polymerized methyl siloxane-resin-based denture liner were processed (according to the manufacturer's instructions) against Lucitone 199 acrylic resin. Control specimens (n = 20) were 2 mm thick and flat. Experimental specimens (n = 64) were fabricated with a raised center section: a 3- x 5- x 15-mm half-cylindrical ridge with a junction at the top of the cylinder between the liner material and acrylic resin. The specimens were finished with 1 of 6 types of burs and polished with different combinations of rubber-impregnated acrylic polishers, pumice, and tin oxide. The finished specimens were examined and photographed with a scanning electron microscope, and the largest gap along the liner/denture base junction on each specimen was measured. Three-way analysis of variance without replication (P<.05) and post-hoc t tests were used to analyze the data and compare groups. RESULTS; Averaged across finishing and polishing techniques, a larger gap was recorded for the experimental liner material (22 microm) than for Molloplast-B (14 microm) (P<.00005). Qualitative evaluation suggested that the experimental liner material polished better than Molloplast-B. The smoothest surfaces were obtained when specimens were finished with fine-tooth cross-cut carbide burs and polished with both pumice and tin oxide. A comparison between polished and unpolished specimens, averaged over materials and finishing techniques, revealed that polishing reduced gap size (P=.015). Within the

  15. Influence of adaptation of removable partial denture on masticatory performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Nakouzi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the masticatory performance (MP of patients with old removable partial denture (RPD, recently inserted RPD and already adapted RPD by means of the simple sieve test. Material and Methods: Twenty-nine adult (>18 years old volunteer patients were recruited, with lower and upper RPD, excluding total edentulous subjects in the upper and lower jaw, with temporomandibular disorders, severe periodontal disease, mental disability or systemic disease compromising the masticatory or nervous system. Dentures were designed and fabricated by an expert operator. MP was evaluated in old RPD (MP1, recently inserted RPD (MP2 and adapted RPD (MP3. The simple sieve test used was Edlund-Lamm in percentage of MP, using Optosil® Comfort condensation silicone tablets, with standard sizes (5.0x20mm. In each phase, the patient chewed the tablet with 20 masticatory strokes. The crushed fragments were dried at 80°C for 60 minutes and weighed on an analytical scale. A multiple vibration sieve analysis was performed, using sieves with opening sizes of 2.8mm and 1.4mm. Shapiro-Wilk test and Anova test with Bonferroni correction were performed. Results: It was observed that MP1 presented a mean of 8.40% (SD±5.59, MP2 a mean of 8.56% (SD±5.56, and MP3 a mean of 18.26% (SD±8.12. There was a significant difference (p<0.05 between the MP1-MP3 groups, as well as between the MP2-MP3 (p<0.05. Conclusion: There is a significant increase in MP thirty days after the insertion of RPD, checkups, and adjustments performed by the dentist.

  16. Removable partial dentures: The clinical need for innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Stephen D; Cooper, Lyndon; Craddock, Helen; Hyde, T Paul; Nattress, Brian; Pavitt, Sue H; Seymour, David W

    2017-09-01

    The number of partially dentate adults is increasing, and many patients will require replacement of missing teeth. Although current treatment options also include fixed partial dentures and implants, removable partial dentures (RPDs) can have advantages and are widely used in clinical practice. However, a significant need exists to advance materials and fabrication technologies because of the unwanted health consequences associated with current RPDs. The purpose of this review was to assess the current state of and future need for prosthetics such as RPDs for patients with partial edentulism, highlight areas of weakness, and outline possible solutions to issues that affect patient satisfaction and the use of RPDs. The data on treatment for partial edentulism were reviewed and summarized with a focus on currently available and future RPD designs, materials, means of production, and impact on oral health. Data on patient satisfaction and compliance with RPD treatment were also reviewed to assess patient-centered care. Design, materials, ease of repair, patient education, and follow-up for RPD treatment all had a significant impact on treatment success. Almost 40% of patients no longer use their RPD within 5 years because of factors such as sociodemographics, pain, and esthetics. Research on RPD-based treatment for partial edentulism for both disease-oriented and patient-centered outcomes is lacking. Future trials should evaluate new RPD materials and design technologies and include both long-term follow-up and health-related and patient-reported outcomes. Advances in materials and digital design/production along with patient education promise to further the application of RPDs and improve the quality of life for patients requiring RPDs. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Investigation of the cytotoxicity of thermoplastic denture base resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Soo-Kyung; Kim, Si-Chul; Okubo, Chikahiro

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to investigate the in vitro cytotoxicity of thermoplastic denture base resins and to identify the possible adverse effects of these resins on oral keratinocytes in response to hot water/food intake. MATERIALS AND METHODS Six dental thermoplastic resin materials were evaluated: three polyamide materials (Smile tone, ST; Valplast, VP; and Luciton FRS, LF), two acrylic materials (Acrytone, AT; and Acryshot, AS), and one polypropylene resin material (Unigum, UG). One heat-polymerized acrylic resin (Vertex RS, RS) was chosen for comparison. After obtaining extracts from specimens of the denture resin materials (Φ=10 mm and d=2 mm) under different extraction conditions (37℃ for 24 hours, 70℃ for 24 hours, and 121℃ for 1 hour), the extracts (50%) or serial dilutions (25%, 12.5%, and 6.25%) in distilled water were co-cultured for 24 hours with immortalized human oral keratinocytes (IHOKs) or mouse fibroblasts (L929s) for the cytotoxicity assay described in ISO 10993. RESULTS Greater than 70% viability was detected under all test conditions. Significantly lower IHOK and L929 viability was detected in the 50% extract from the VP (70℃) and AT (121℃) samples (P<.05), but only L929 showed reduced viability in the 50% and 25% extract from LF (37℃) (P<.05). CONCLUSION Extracts obtained from six materials under different extraction conditions (37℃, 70℃, and 121℃) did not exhibit severe cytotoxicity (less than 70% viability), although their potential risk to oral mucosa at high temperatures should not be ignored. PMID:29279765

  18. Comparison of Fit of Dentures Fabricated by Traditional Techniques Versus CAD/CAM Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, J Bryan; Ramos, Van; Dickinson, Douglas P

    2017-11-14

    To compare the shrinkage of denture bases fabricated by three methods: CAD/CAM, compression molding, and injection molding. The effect of arch form and palate depth was also tested. Nine titanium casts, representing combinations of tapered, ovoid, and square arch forms and shallow, medium, and deep palate depths, were fabricated using electron beam melting (EBM) technology. For each base fabrication method, three poly(vinyl siloxane) impressions were made from each cast, 27 dentures for each method. Compression-molded dentures were fabricated using Lucitone 199 poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA), and injection molded dentures with Ivobase's Hybrid Pink PMMA. For CAD/CAM, denture bases were designed and milled by Avadent using their Light PMMA. To quantify the space between the denture and the master cast, silicone duplicating material was placed in the intaglio of the dentures, the titanium master cast was seated under pressure, and the silicone was then trimmed and recovered. Three silicone measurements per denture were recorded, for a total of 243 measurements. Each silicone measurement was weighed and adjusted to the surface area of the respective arch, giving an average and standard deviation for each denture. Comparison of manufacturing methods showed a statistically significant difference (p = 0.0001). Using a ratio of the means, compression molding had on average 41% to 47% more space than injection molding and CAD/CAM. Comparison of arch/palate forms showed a statistically significant difference (p = 0.023), with shallow palate forms having more space with compression molding. The ovoid shallow form showed CAD/CAM and compression molding had more space than injection molding. Overall, injection molding and CAD/CAM fabrication methods produced equally well-fitting dentures, with both having a better fit than compression molding. Shallow palates appear to be more affected by shrinkage than medium or deep palates. Shallow ovoid arch forms appear to benefit from

  19. Factors influencing the provision of removable partial dentures by dentists in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Finbarr

    2010-01-01

    Factors influencing clinical treatment of partially dentate patients are varied, and there is a need to identify factors influencing success in the provision of removable partial dentures. The aim of this study was to assess the attitudes of general dental practitioners (GDPs) in Ireland towards tooth replacement and use of RPDs, in partially dentate older adults. The sample frame was the Register of Dentists in Ireland; data were also collected from a sample of dentists practising under NHS regulations in Northern Ireland. Validated questionnaires were sent to all dentists on the Register of Dentists in the Republic of Ireland, and dentists working under NHS regulations registered with the Central Services Agency in Northern Ireland. Content of the questionnaire included details of the dentist themselves, their dental practice and the profile of partial denture provision. They were also asked to give their views on factors influencing the success or failure of an RPD, the process of providing RPDs and their attitudes to RPD provision. A total of 1,143 responses were received, a response rate of 45%. A mean number of 61 RPDs per annum were provided, with 75% of dentures provided being acrylic based. Respondents indicate their belief that cobalt-chromium based dentures had a longer prognosis than acrylic dentures, but less than half (46%) claim to design the frameworks themselves. Patients' attitudes are considered influential in the success of RPD provision, and their influence on appearance is considered the most important factor influencing success. The most important factors influencing failure are: the patient not requesting a denture; an RPD restoring unbounded saddles; and, lower RPDs. Although considered important, approximately 60% of the sample do not routinely organise follow-up appointments for patients provided with RPDs. The fee structures in the DTSS and DTBS are considered a barrier to quality in the provision of partial dentures.

  20. Characterization and bacterial anti-adherent effect on modified PMMA denture acrylic resin containing platinum nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Ki-Young

    2014-06-01

    This study characterized the synthesis of a modified PMMA (Polymethyl methacrylate) denture acrylic loading platinum nanoparticles (PtN) and assessed its bacterial inhibitory efficacy to produce novel antimicrobial denture base material. Polymerized PMMA denture acrylic disc (20 mm × 2 mm) specimens containing 0 (control), 10, 50, 100 and 200 mg/L of PtN were fabricated respectively. The obtained platinum-PMMA nanocomposite (PtNC) was characterized by TEM (transmission electron microscopy), SEM/EDX (scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy), thermogravimetric and atomic absorption spectrophotometer analysis. In antimicrobial assay, specimens were placed on the cell culture plate, and 100 µL of microbial suspensions of S. mutans (Streptococcus mutans) and S. sobrinus (Streptococcus sobrinus) were inoculated then incubated at 37℃ for 24 hours. The bacterial attachment was tested by FACS (fluorescence-activated cell sorting) analysis after staining with fluorescent probe. PtN were successfully loaded and uniformly immobilized into PMMA denture acrylic with a proper thermal stability and similar surface morphology as compared to control. PtNC expressed significant bacterial anti-adherent effect rather than bactericidal effect above 50 mg/L PtN loaded when compared to pristine PMMA (P=.01) with no or extremely small amounts of Pt ion eluted. This is the first report on the synthesis and its antibacterial activity of Pt-PMMA nanocomposite. PMMA denture acrylic loading PtN could be a possible intrinsic antimicrobial denture material with proper mechanical characteristics, meeting those specified for denture bases. For clinical application, future studies including biocompatibility, color stability and warranting the long-term effect were still required.

  1. An evaluation of acrylic complete dentures using the discrimination of elastic bodies or viscous fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, K; Fujii, K; Kanie, T; Kadokawa, A; Tsukada, G

    1999-07-01

    The discrimination test on elastic bodies and viscous fluids was carried out for 16 young dentists and 13 denture patients, because it is considered that dentures affect the ability to discriminate food. The materials used in this test were six thermoplastic polyurethane elastomers with compressive elastic moduli from 11.8 to 62.0 MPa and six silicone impression pastes with coefficients of viscosity from 1.77 x 10(-2) to 23.0 x 10(-2) MPa x s. The subjects (dentists and patients) discriminated the materials based on differences in elastic moduli or coefficients of viscosity by chewing the materials for 10 s. From these experiments, it became clear that the ability to discriminate between elastic bodies or viscous fluids upon chewing, of subjects who use complete-dentures in combination with their own teeth and either an upper or lower complete-denture (S/D) or who have a set of complete-dentures in both jaws (D/D) decreased considerably, compared with that of subjects who have their own teeth in upper and lower jaws (S/S). The ratios of S/D and D/D against S/S were 0.5 and 0.3, respectively. This indicates that with an increase in the area occupied by dentures in the oral cavity, the value of the differential threshold increased markedly and made food discrimination more difficult. In addition, discriminating viscous fluids was 2.4 to 3.1 times more difficult compared with the discrimination of elastic bodies, independent of denture placement.

  2. Factors influencing the provision of removable partial dentures by dentists in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Allen, Finbarr

    2011-03-15

    Factors influencing clinical treatment of partially dentate patients are varied, and there is a need to identify factors influencing success in the provision of removable partial dentures. The aim of this study was to assess the attitudes of general dental practitioners (GDPs) in Ireland towards tooth replacement and use of RPDs, in partially dentate older adults. The sample frame was the Register of Dentists in Ireland; data were also collected from a sample of dentists practising under NHS regulations in Northern Ireland. Validated questionnaires were sent to all dentists on the Register of Dentists in the Republic of Ireland, and dentists working under NHS regulations registered with the Central Services Agency in Northern Ireland. Content of the questionnaire included details of the dentist themselves, their dental practice and the profile of partial denture provision. They were also asked to give their views on factors influencing the success or failure of an RPD, the process of providing RPDs and their attitudes to RPD provision. A total of 1,143 responses were received, a response rate of 45%. A mean number of 61 RPDs per annum were provided, with 75% of dentures provided being acrylic based. Respondents indicate their belief that cobalt-chromium based dentures had a longer prognosis than acrylic dentures, but less than half (46%) claim to design the frameworks themselves. Patients\\' attitudes are considered influential in the success of RPD provision, and their influence on appearance is considered the most important factor influencing success. The most important factors influencing failure are: the patient not requesting a denture; an RPD restoring unbounded saddles; and, lower RPDs. Although considered important, approximately 60% of the sample do not routinely organise follow-up appointments for patients provided with RPDs. The fee structures in the DTSS and DTBS are considered a barrier to quality in the provision of partial dentures.

  3. Factors influencing the provision of removable partial dentures by dentists in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Allen, Finbarr

    2010-10-01

    Factors influencing clinical treatment of partially dentate patients are varied, and there is a need to identify factors influencing success in the provision of removable partial dentures. The aim of this study was to assess the attitudes of general dental practitioners (GDPs) in Ireland towards tooth replacement and use of RPDs, in partially dentate older adults. The sample frame was the Register of Dentists in Ireland; data were also collected from a sample of dentists practising under NHS regulations in Northern Ireland. Validated questionnaires were sent to all dentists on the Register of Dentists in the Republic of Ireland, and dentists working under NHS regulations registered with the Central Services Agency in Northern Ireland. Content of the questionnaire included details of the dentist themselves, their dental practice and the profile of partial denture provision. They were also asked to give their views on factors influencing the success or failure of an RPD, the process of providing RPDs and their attitudes to RPD provision. A total of 1,143 responses were received, a response rate of 45%. A mean number of 61 RPDs per annum were provided, with 75% of dentures provided being acrylic based. Respondents indicate their belief that cobalt-chromium based dentures had a longer prognosis than acrylic dentures, but less than half (46%) claim to design the frameworks themselves. Patients\\' attitudes are considered influential in the success of RPD provision, and their influence on appearance is considered the most important factor influencing success. The most important factors influencing failure are: the patient not requesting a denture; an RPD restoring unbounded saddles; and, lower RPDs. Although considered important, approximately 60% of the sample do not routinely organise follow-up appointments for patients provided with RPDs. The fee structures in the DTSS and DTBS are considered a barrier to quality in the provision of partial dentures.

  4. Effect of repeated immersion solution cycles on the color stability of denture tooth acrylic resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    da SILVA, Paulo Maurício Batista; ACOSTA, Emílio José Tabaré Rodríguez; JACOBINA, Matheus; PINTO, Luciana de Rezende; PORTO, Vinícius Carvalho

    2011-01-01

    Objective Chemical solutions have been widely used for disinfection of dentures, but their effect on color stability of denture tooth acrylic resins after repeated procedures is still unclear. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate whether repeated cycles of chemical disinfectants affected the color stability of two denture tooth acrylic resins. Material and Methods Sixty disc-shaped specimens (40 mm x 3 mm) were fabricated from two different brands (Artiplus and Trilux) of denture tooth acrylic resin. The specimens from each brand (n=30) were randomly divided into 6 groups (n=5) and immersed in the following solutions: distilled water (control group) and 5 disinfecting solutions (1% sodium hypochlorite, 2% sodium hypochlorite, 5.25% sodium hypochlorite, 2% glutaraldehyde, and 4% chlorhexidine gluconate). Tooth color measurements were made by spectrophotometry. Before disinfection, the initial color of each tooth was recorded. Further color measurements were determined after subjecting the specimens to 7, 21, 30, 45, 60, and 90 immersion cycles in each tested solution. Color differences (ΔE*) were determined using the CIE L*a*b* color system. Data were analyzed using two-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey tests. The significance level was set at 5%. Results There were statistically significant differences in ΔE* among the 5 disinfectants and water during the 90 cycles of immersion for both denture tooth acrylic resins. Distilled water promoted the greatest color change in both denture tooth acrylic resins, nevertheless none of tested disinfectants promoted ΔE* values higher than 1.0 on these acrylic materials during the 90 cycles of disinfection. Conclusions Repeated immersion cycles in disinfecting solutions alter ∆E* values, however these values do not compromise the color of the tested denture tooth acrylic resins because they are imperceptible to the human eye. PMID:22230997

  5. Effect of repeated immersion solution cycles on the color stability of denture tooth acrylic resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Maurício Batista da Silva

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Chemical solutions have been widely used for disinfection of dentures, but their effect on color stability of denture tooth acrylic resins after repeated procedures is still unclear. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate whether repeated cycles of chemical disinfectants affected the color stability of two denture tooth acrylic resins. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty disc-shaped specimens (40 mm x 3 mm were fabricated from two different brands (Artiplus and Trilux of denture tooth acrylic resin. The specimens from each brand (n=30 were randomly divided into 6 groups (n=5 and immersed in the following solutions: distilled water (control group and 5 disinfecting solutions (1% sodium hypochlorite, 2% sodium hypochlorite, 5.25% sodium hypochlorite, 2% glutaraldehyde, and 4% chlorhexidine gluconate. Tooth color measurements were made by spectrophotometry. Before disinfection, the initial color of each tooth was recorded. Further color measurements were determined after subjecting the specimens to 7, 21, 30, 45, 60, and 90 immersion cycles in each tested solution. Color differences (ΔE* were determined using the CIE L*a*b* color system. Data were analyzed using two-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA followed by Tukey tests. The significance level was set at 5%. RESULTS: There were statistically significant differences in ΔE* among the 5 disinfectants and water during the 90 cycles of immersion for both denture tooth acrylic resins. Distilled water promoted the greatest color change in both denture tooth acrylic resins, nevertheless none of tested disinfectants promoted ΔE* values higher than 1.0 on these acrylic materials during the 90 cycles of disinfection. CONCLUSIONS: Repeated immersion cycles in disinfecting solutions alter ΔE* values, however these values do not compromise the color of the tested denture tooth acrylic resins because they are imperceptible to the human eye.

  6. Effect of repeated immersion solution cycles on the color stability of denture tooth acrylic resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Paulo Maurício Batista da; Acosta, Emílio José Tabaré Rodríguez; Jacobina, Matheus; Pinto, Luciana de Rezende; Porto, Vinícius Carvalho

    2011-01-01

    Chemical solutions have been widely used for disinfection of dentures, but their effect on color stability of denture tooth acrylic resins after repeated procedures is still unclear. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate whether repeated cycles of chemical disinfectants affected the color stability of two denture tooth acrylic resins. Sixty disc-shaped specimens (40 mm x 3 mm) were fabricated from two different brands (Artiplus and Trilux) of denture tooth acrylic resin. The specimens from each brand (n=30) were randomly divided into 6 groups (n=5) and immersed in the following solutions: distilled water (control group) and 5 disinfecting solutions (1% sodium hypochlorite, 2% sodium hypochlorite, 5.25% sodium hypochlorite, 2% glutaraldehyde, and 4% chlorhexidine gluconate). Tooth color measurements were made by spectrophotometry. Before disinfection, the initial color of each tooth was recorded. Further color measurements were determined after subjecting the specimens to 7, 21, 30, 45, 60, and 90 immersion cycles in each tested solution. Color differences (ΔE*) were determined using the CIE L*a*b* color system. Data were analyzed using two-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey tests. The significance level was set at 5%. There were statistically significant differences in ΔE* among the 5 disinfectants and water during the 90 cycles of immersion for both denture tooth acrylic resins. Distilled water promoted the greatest color change in both denture tooth acrylic resins, nevertheless none of tested disinfectants promoted ΔE* values higher than 1.0 on these acrylic materials during the 90 cycles of disinfection. Repeated immersion cycles in disinfecting solutions alter ΔE* values, however these values do not compromise the color of the tested denture tooth acrylic resins because they are imperceptible to the human eye.

  7. Variation in blood flow of supporting tissue during use of mandibular complete dentures with hard acrylic resin base and soft relining: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocabalkan, Engin; Turgut, Mehmet

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of hard and resilient polymerized acrylic resin base materials on the blood flow of the supporting underlying mucosa of mandibular denture wearers during different denture-wearing periods. Measurements were carried out on 20 complete denture wearers, 10 with hard bases and 10 with soft ones. The mucosal blood flow underlying the dentures was measured bilaterally in the canine and molar regions using a laser Doppler flowmeter. Baseline measurements were performed before denture wearing and after the dentures were worn for 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months. Mean blood flow to the mucosa after 1 week was significantly lower in the measured regions than that obtained before the dentures were worn. Blood flow in the canine region returned to almost normal levels 6 months after beginning to wear complete dentures. However, blood flow in the molar region of the denture wearers in the hard base group increased after 6 months, whereas blood flow values did not return to the levels recorded before denture insertion in the soft lining group. It appears that wearing dentures hinders blood flow to denture-supporting tissues, even when soft liners are used.

  8. A Comparative Clinical Study of the Effect of Denture Cleansing on the Surface Roughness and Hardness of Two Denture Base Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amani Ramadan Moussa

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: This study aimed to verify the influence of oral environment and denture cleansers on the surface roughness and hardness of two different denture base materials. METHODS: A total of sixteen identical removable disc specimens (RDS were processed. Eight RDS were made from heat-cured acrylic resin (AR and the other eight were fabricated from thermoplastic injection moulded resin (TR. Surface roughness and hardness of DRS were measured using ultrasonic profilometry and Universal testing machine respectively. Then the four RDS (two AR and two of TR were fixed to each maxillary denture, after three months RDS were retrieved. Surface roughness and hardness of RDS have measured again. RESULTS: The surface roughness measurements revealed no significant difference (p >0.05 for both disc groups at baseline. However, both groups showed a significant increase in the surface roughness after three months with higher mean value for (TR group. On the other hand, the (AR group showed higher hardness mean value than (TR group at baseline with no significant decrease in the hardness values (p >0.05 following three months follow-up period. CONCLUSIONS: Denture cleansers have an effect on the denture’s surface roughness and hardness concurrently with an oral condition which will consequently influence the complete dentures’ lifetime and patients’ satisfaction.

  9. Investigation of bonding properties of denture bases to silicone-based soft denture liner immersed in isobutyl methacrylate and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Hakan; Tugut, Faik; Mutaf, Burcu; Guney, Umit

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the bonding properties of denture bases to silicone-based soft denture liners immersed in isobutyl methacrylate (iBMA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) for various lengths of time. Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) test specimens were fabricated (75 mm in length, 12 mm in diameter at the thickest section, and 7 mm at the thinnest section) and then randomly assigned to five groups (n=15); untreated (Group 1), resilient liner immersed in iBMA for 1 minute (Group 2), resilient liner immersed in iBMA for 3 minutes (Group 3), resilient liner immersed in HEMA for 1 minute (Group 4), and resilient liner immersed in HEMA for 3 minutes (Group 5). The resilient liner specimens were processed between 2 PMMA blocks. Bonding strength of the liners to PMMA was compared by tensile test with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. Data were evaluated by 1-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey-Kramer multiple comparisons tests (α=0.05). The highest mean value of force was observed in Group 3 specimens. The differences between groups were statistically significant (P<.05), except between Group 1 and Group 4 (P=.063). Immersion of silicone-based soft denture liners in iBMA for 3 minutes doubled the tensile bond strength between the silicone soft liner and PMMA denture base materials compared to the control group.

  10. Overnight storage of removable dentures in alkaline peroxide-based tablets affects biofilm mass and composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duyck, J; Vandamme, K; Muller, P; Teughels, W

    2013-12-01

    Clinical guidelines for denture care are available, but evidence for optimal nocturnal storage is scarce. The aim of the study was to compare the role of the overnight storage state on plaque growth and composition on acrylic removable dentures. In a parallel-group randomized controlled trial of 51 institutionalized participants, 3 denture overnight preservation methods were considered: (i) in water, (ii) dry or (iii) in water with added alkaline peroxide-based cleansing tablet. Biofilm samples were taken on day 7 (developing biofilm - dBF) and day 14 (maturing biofilm - mBF) from a mechanically uncleaned, standardized region, situated distally to the second lower premolars. Total and individual levels of selected perio-pathogenic and commensal species (n=20), and of Candida albicans were calculated by PCR. Differences between storage conditions (water/dry/tablet) and between the samples (dBF/mBF) were assessed by means of unpaired and paired t-tests respectively, with α=5%. Overnight denture storage with cleansing tablet significantly decreased the total bacterial level of dBF and mBF up to 13.8%. Fn, Ec, Cs, Sc, Ao and Vp counts were particularly affected by tablet care. Significant lower amounts of Candida albicans for tablet storage compared to water preservation were recorded in dBF and mBF (-69.3 ± 3.8% and -75.9 ± 3.2% respectively). The mass and pathogenicity of dBF and mBF was equal, irrespective of the overnight storage intervention. The use of cleansing tablets for acrylic removable denture overnight storage reduces denture biofilm mass and pathogenicity compared to dry and water preservation, and may contribute to the overall systemic health. Evidence-based clinical guidelines for overnight storage of removable acrylic dentures are lacking. The findings of this study indicate that alkaline peroxide-based cleansing tablets decrease bacterial and Candida levels in denture biofilms in case of poor oral hygiene. This provides evidence for a clinical

  11. Microtensile bond strength of different acrylic teeth to high-impact denture base resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colebeck, Amanda C; Monaco, Edward A; Pusateri, Christopher R; Davis, Elaine L

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of denture base acrylic, denture tooth composition, and ridge-lap surface treatment on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of three commercially available denture teeth and two injection denture processing systems. Sixteen experimental groups were formed (n = 3), according to denture tooth surface treatment (no treatment or surface treatment recommended by the manufacturer), denture base processing technique and acrylic (SR-Ivocap-Ivocap Plus or Success-Lucitone 199), and tooth type-composition at bonding interface (BlueLine DCL-PMMA, Portrait IPN-PMMA, Phonares II-PMMA, Phonares II-NHC). Rectangular bar specimens with a 1 mm(2) cross sectional area were fabricated and subsequently thermocycled at 10,000 cycles between 5°C and 55°C with a 15-second dwell time. Select specimens underwent μTBS testing in a universal testing machine with a 1 kN load cell at 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed. Data were analyzed statistically by two and three-way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc test (α = 0.05). Mean μTBS ranged between 56.2 ± 5.6 and 60.8 ± 5.0 N/mm(2) for the Ivocap Plus specimens and 13.3 ± 5.12 to 60.1 ± 6.0 N/mm(2) for the Lucitone 199 specimens. Among the Ivocap specimens, BlueLine DCL and Phonares II NHC had significantly higher μTBS than Portrait IPN to Ivocap Plus acrylic. There were no statistically significant differences among Blueline, Phonares II PMMA, and Phonares II NHC, or between Phonares II PMMA and Portrait IPN. Within the Luctione 199 specimens, there was a significantly higher μTBS for BlueLine DCL and Phonares II NHC denture teeth with the manufacturer-recommended surface treatment when compared to control surface. BlueLine, Portrait, and Phonares II PMMA groups achieved significantly higher mean μTBS than the Phonares II NHC group. There were no statistically significant differences among BlueLine, Portrait, and Phonares II PMMA groups. When evaluating the μTBS of PMMA and NHC denture teeth to base resins, a

  12. Influence of the mechanical properties of resilient denture liners on the retention of overdenture attachments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Keitaro; Koike, Takashi; Ueda, Takayuki; Sakurai, Kaoru

    2018-03-15

    Information is lacking about the selection criteria for silicone resilient denture liners applied as a matrix material for attachments on overdentures. The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate the mechanical properties of silicone resilient denture liners and their influence on the initial retention force of overdenture attachments and the reduction in retention force over time. Nine types of silicone resilient denture liner were injected and fixed to the matrix section of an experimental denture base. They were then fitted to an epoxy resin model that simulated the residual ridge with a patrix ball attachment (n=10). The retention force of the denture was measured with a digital force gauge, and the maximum force of traction (N) was regarded as the initial retention force. The retention force reduction (N) after repeated insertion and removal (n=5) was calculated by subtracting the retention force after 3348 cycles (3-year simulated insertion and removal) from the initial retention force. The intaglio of the matrix was observed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) before and after the 3348 cycles. Four mechanical properties (hardness, strain-in-compression, tensile strength, and arithmetic mean roughness) of the resilient denture liners were measured. One-way ANOVA of the initial retention force of each lining material was performed, followed by the Scheffe test (α=.05). Pearson correlation analysis was used (α=.05) to analyze correlations of the initial retention force with the retention force reduction after insertion and removal and the mechanical properties of each material. Multiple regression analysis with the stepwise method extracted the initial retention force and the retention force reduction as dependent variables, and the resilient denture liner mechanical properties as explanatory variables (α=.05). The initial retention force of the resilient denture liners was 1.3 to 5.4 N. Multiple comparisons showed significant differences in

  13. Analysis of the effects of removable dentures on the psychological status, quality of life, and masticatory function of the elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyas, R.; Nathanael, M.; Indrasari, M.; Masulili, C.; Rahardjo, T. B.; Agustin, D.; Hogervorst, E.; Kusdhany, L.

    2017-08-01

    Older age is a major risk factor for diseases of the teeth and mouth and dementia. Diseases of the teeth and mouth can lead to tooth loss. The use of removable dentures can help the elderly to replace lost teeth; therefore, dentures are expected to improve the masticatory function, quality of life, and psychological status of the elderly. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of removable denture usage on the improvement of the psychological status, quality of life, and masticatory function of elderly people. The data was obtained from 30 respondents. The patients answered questionnaires before they used the dentures, 2 weeks after they began using dentures, and 2 months after they started wearing dentures. Four different questionnaires were used: EuroQol Five Dimensions questionnaire (EQ-5D) and Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), to measure psychological status; a mastication questionnaire to measure masticatory function; and a validated quality of life questionnaire. Based on the results of this study, it is clear that after 2 months of denture usage, removable dentures in the elderly can significantly improve their quality of life, masticatory function, and psychological status(p<0.05).

  14. Pressure transmission area and maximum pressure transmission of different thermoplastic resin denture base materials under impact load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasution, Hubban; Kamonkhantikul, Krid; Arksornnukit, Mansuang; Takahashi, Hidekazu

    2018-01-01

    The purposes of the present study were to examine the pressure transmission area and maximum pressure transmission of thermoplastic resin denture base materials under an impact load, and to evaluate the modulus of elasticity and nanohardness of thermoplastic resin denture base. Three injection-molded thermoplastic resin denture base materials [polycarbonate (Basis PC), ethylene propylene (Duraflex), and polyamide (Valplast)] and one conventional heat-polymerized acrylic resin (PMMA, SR Triplex Hot) denture base, all with a mandibular first molar acrylic resin denture tooth set in were evaluated (n=6). Pressure transmission area and maximum pressure transmission of the specimens under an impact load were observed by using pressure-sensitive sheets. The modulus of elasticity and nanohardness of each denture base (n=10) were measured on 15×15×15×3mm 3 specimen by using an ultramicroindentation system. The pressure transmission area, modulus of elasticity, and nanohardness data were statistically analyzed with 1-way ANOVA, followed by Tamhane or Tukey HSD post hoc test (α=.05). The maximum pressure transmission data were statistically analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis H test, followed by Mann-Whitney U test (α=.05). Polymethyl methacrylate showed significantly larger pressure transmission area and higher maximum pressure transmission than the other groups (Pdenture bases (Pthermoplastic resin denture base materials. Differences in the modulus of elasticity and nanohardness of each type of denture base were demonstrated. Copyright © 2017 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison of changes in vertical dimension of the upper and lower complete dentures processed using two investing methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharat, D.U.; Fakiha, Z.

    1990-01-01

    Standardized compression molding technique was used to process 14 sets of complete dentures. Seven sets of dentures were invested by the conventional method and the other seven were invested by a modified method. In the latter method, the second layer of the investment extended occlusally only up to the maximum convexity on the labial/buccal and lingual surfaces of the teeth. In the beginning, only the upper or the lower denture was processed and changes in the vertical dimension of occlusion were measured. After that, the other denture was also processed and the increase in the vertical dimension of occlusion of the sets of dentures was measured. All measurements were made at the incisal guide pin using a leaf gauge. Statistical analysis using t-test showed no difference in the changes of vertical dimension of the dentures processed by the two different methods of investing. However, both of the methods of investing showed significantly more increase in vertical dimension of the upper complete dentures than that of the lower complete dentures. (author)

  16. Evaluation of tensile bond strength of heat cure and autopolymerizing silicone-based resilient denture liners before and after thermocycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishtha Madan

    2012-01-01

    Clinical Implications: Although heat-polymerized denture liners require more processing time than autopolymerizing liners, but they display much better adhesion properties to denture base resin and should thus be preferred when soft liner has to be used for a longer duration of time.

  17. Comparison of the occlusal vertical dimension after processing complete dentures made with lingualized balanced occlusion and conventional balanced occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Michael Frederico Manzolli; Nogueira, Sergio Sualdini; Arioli-Filho, Joao Neudenir

    2006-09-01

    An increase in occlusal vertical dimension (OVD) may occur after processing complete dentures. Although many factors that generate this change are known, no information is available in the dental literature regarding the effect that the occlusal scheme may have on the change in OVD. This in vitro study compared the increase in OVD, after processing, between complete dentures with teeth arranged in lingualized balanced occlusion and conventional balanced occlusion. Thirty sets of complete dentures were evaluated as follows: 15 sets of complete dentures were arranged in conventional balanced occlusion (control) and 15 sets of complete dentures were arranged in lingualized balanced occlusion. All dentures were compression molded with a long polymerization cycle. The occlusal vertical dimension was measured with a micrometer (mm) before and after processing each set of dentures. Data were analyzed using an independent t test (alpha=.05). The mean increase in the OVD, after processing, was 0.87 +/- 0.21 mm for the control group and 0.90 +/- 0.27 mm for the experimental group. There was no significant difference between the groups. After processing, dentures set in lingualized balanced occlusion showed an increase in OVD similar to those set in conventional balanced occlusion. Although the 2 occlusal concepts resulted in similar increases in the OVD after processing, the lingualized balanced occlusion may result in easier occlusal adjustments, as the less complicated occlusal scheme uses a smaller number of centric occlusion contact points.

  18. Effect of Different Surface Treatments and Thermocycling on Bond Strength of a Silicone-based Denture Liner to a Denture Base Resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhaei, Mohammadreza; Dashti, Hossein; Ahrari, Farzaneh; Vasigh, Samaneh; Mushtaq, Shazia; Shetty, Rohit Mohan

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of three different surface treatments and thermocycling on the tensile strength of a silicone lining material to denture resin. A total of 96 cube-shaped specimens were fabricated using heat-cured polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) denture base resin. Three millimeters of the material was cut from the midsection. The specimens were divided into four groups. The bonding surfaces of the specimens in each group received one of the following surface treatments: no surface treatment (control group), airborne particle abrasion with 110 pirn alumina particles (air abrasion group), Er:yttrium aluminum garnet laser irradiation (laser group), and air abrasion + laser. After the lining materials were processed between the two PMMA blocks, each group was divided into two subgroups (n = 12), either stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours or thermocycled between 5 and 55°C for 5,000 cycles. The specimens were tested in tensile and shear strength in a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed with two-way analysis of variance and Tamhane's post hoc tests (α = 0.05). The mode of failure was determined, and one specimen in each group was examined by scanning electron microscopy. Surface-treated groups demonstrated significantly higher tensile strengths compared to the control group (p 0.05). The tensile strength was significantly different between thermocycled and water-stored specimens (p = 0.021). Altering the surface of the acrylic denture base resin with air abrasion, laser, and air abrasion + laser increased the tensile strength. Thermocycling resulted in decrease in bond strength of silicone-based liner to surface-treated acrylic resin. Pretreatment of denture base resins before applying the soft liner materials improves the bond strength. However, thermocycling results in decrease in bond strength of soft denture liner to surface-treated acrylic resin.

  19. The removable acrylic partial denture in primary care: the experience and satisfaction of dental surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita de Cássia SILVA

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The guidelines of the National Politics of Oral Health have led to the inclusion of elemental prostheses in the list of Primary Care procedures. Objective This paper aimed to evaluate the performance and satisfaction of dental surgeons with the implementation of Acrylic Partial Dentures. Metodology The sample was composed by 159 dental surgeons (sample calculation, in Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil, selected via raffle (simple random sampling. A structured questionnaire was built with 72 questions on the daily practice of the performance of dental surgeons, using the SurveyMonkey platform. Result The results showed that for most of dental surgeons, the inclusion on the list of primary care procedures was a positive initiative and they have enjoyed the experience of using Acrylic Partial Dentures. Dental surgeons who had graduated in private institutions reported to have had more failures than those who had graduated in public institutions. The better prepared dental surgeons reported less difficulties and failures, and the more satisfied professionals with the performance of Acrylic Partial Dentures related had also experienced fewer failures. Considering the indication, the majority of participants did it according to the protocol of the institution (only for anterior teeth but many revealed the use of dentures also for premolars. Conclusion Acrylic partial dentures have been a reality in the Brazilian social context even before their inclusion in the list of Primary Care procedures. Such inclusion indicates their relevance; however, it is necessary to have their confection systematized by a protocol in public services.

  20. The effect of cyclic drying on dimensional changes of acrylic resin maxillary complete dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukor, S S A B D; Juszczyk, A S; Clark, R K F; Radford, D R

    2006-09-01

    Poly(methyl methacrylate) dentures may exhibit dimensional changes when drying. Drying has been shown to destroy Candida albicans. This study investigates the effect of simulating overnight cyclic drying on dimensional changes of four complete denture base materials. Denture specimens used in this study had been prepared for a previous study. All dentures had been kept hydrated at room temperature for 2 years. The materials used were, group 1, conventionally packed and cured Trevalon, group 2 was injection moulded and conventionally cured (Trevalon Success), group 3 (Acron MC) and group 4 was Microbase, which is injection moulded and microwave cured. The measurements of the inter-molar and inter-premolar width, and anterior posterior dimension between the premolars and molars were recorded after 8 h drying and then after four cycles of dehydration and rehydration. The dentures were more dimensionally stable in the anterior posterior than the cross arch dimension. There was a statistically significant (P < 0.02) increase in the intermolar width for Trevalon, Trevalon Success and Acron after 8 h drying and after four cycles. There was a statistically significantly difference between Microbase and the other materials after 8 h drying and there was a significant difference between the injection moulded groups in the interpremolar width (Trevalon Success versus Acron, Trevalon Success versus Microbase) after cyclic drying. Although statistically significant dimensional changes were observed for all materials these were small and were considered not to be clinically significant. Microbase was the least dimensionally stable material during air-drying.

  1. Evaluation of Sensibility Threshold for Interocclusal Thickness of Patients Wearing Complete Dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shala, Kujtim Sh; Dula, Linda J; Pustina-Krasniqi, Teuta; Bicaj, Teuta; Ahmedi, Enis F; Lila-Krasniqi, Zana; Tmava-Dragusha, Arlinda

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate sensibility threshold for interocclusal thickness in experienced and nonexperienced denture wearers after the insertion of new complete dentures. A total of 88 patients with complete dentures have participated in this study. The research was divided into two experimental groups, compared with the previous experience prosthetic dental treatment. The sensibility threshold for interocclusal thickness was measured with metal foil with 8  μ m thickness and width of 8 mm, placed between the upper and lower incisor region. Statistical analysis was performed using standard software package BMDP (biomedical statistical package). Results suggest that time of measurement affects the average values of the sensibility threshold for interocclusal thickness ( F = 242.68, p = 0.0000). Gender appeared to be a significant factor when it interacted with time measurement resulting in differences in sensibility threshold for interocclusal thickness (gender: F = 9.84, p = 0.018; F = 4.83, p = 0.0003). The sensibility threshold for interocclusal thickness was the most important functional adaptation in patient with complete dentures. A unique trait of this indicator is the progressive reduction of initial values and a tendency to reestablish the stationary state in the fifteenth week after dentures is taken off.

  2. Clinical evaluation of the essential oil of "Satureja Hortensis" for the treatment of denture stomatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mohammad Sabzghabaee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of denture stomatitis has been shown to vary from 15 to 65% in complete denture wearers. Satureja hortensis L. has been considered to have antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory, antifungal and antimicrobial activities in vitro and exhibits strong inhibitory effect on the growth of periodontal bacteria. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a 1% gel formulation of S. hortensis essential oil for the treatment of denture stomatitis. Materials and Methods: A randomized, controlled clinical trial study was conducted on 80 patients (mean age 62.91±7.34 in two parallel groups treated either with S. hortensis essential oil 1% gel or placebo applied two times daily for two weeks. Denture stomatitis was diagnosed by clinical examination and paraclinical confirmation with sampling the palatal mucosa for Candida albicans. Data were analyzed using Chi-squared or Student′s t tests. Results: The erythematous lesions of palatal area were significantly reduced (P<0.0001 in the treatment group who applied 1% topical gel of S. hortensis essential oil and Candida colonies count were reduced significantly (P=0.001. Conclusion: Topical application of the essential oil of S. hortensis could be considered as an effective agent for the treatment of denture stomatitis.

  3. Silver nanoparticle incorporation effect on mechanical and thermal properties of denture base acrylic resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köroğlu, Ayşegül; Şahin, Onur; Kürkçüoğlu, Işın; Dede, Doğu Ömür; Özdemir, Tonguç; Hazer, Baki

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the mechanical and thermal characteristics of two denture base acrylic resins containing silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). Two different acrylic denture base resins (heat-polymerized and microwave polymerized) containing 0.3, 0.8 and 1.6 wt% AgNPs were evaluated for flexural strength, elastic modulus and impact strength. The glass transition temperature (Tg) and relative heat capacity (Cp) of the samples were determined from the Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) results. For statistical analysis, two-way ANOVA and Tukey-HSD tests were performed. Addition of 0.8% and 1.6% AgNPs in microwave-polymerized resin significantly decreased the transverse strength and elastic modulus. In terms of impact strength, the addition of AgNPs has no effect on both resin groups. Glass transition temperature (Tg) was decreased with the addition of AgNPs for both denture base resins. The incorporation of AgNPs, generally used for antimicrobial efficiency, affected the transverse strength of the denture base acrylic resins depending on the concentration of nanoparticles. Tg was decreased with the addition of AgNPs for both denture base resins.

  4. In vivo biofilm formation on a soft denture liner in elderly patients with controlled diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faccio, Daniela R; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana; Cenci, Maximiliano S; Demarco, Flávio F; Moraes, Rafael R; Boscato, Noéli

    2012-06-01

    This in vivo study evaluated the influence of controlled diabetes on biofilm formation on a soft denture liner in elderly patients. Soft denture lining materials are more susceptible to microbial colonisation than denture base acrylic resins. Especially in the elderly, several predisposing factors may accumulate leading to an increased probability of biofilm development that may result in candidiasis, a significant clinical oral disease. Volunteers wearing complete dentures were divided into two groups (n = 20): diabetic patients with controlled glycaemia, and healthy patients. In both groups, a silicone-based soft liner was placed in a recess created at the base of the maxillary dentures. Subjects cleaned the prosthesis three times a day. Biofilm formed on the liner was quantified at various time points (baseline, two, four and six weeks). Data were analysed by two-way repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). There was no statistical difference in biofilm formation for any of the time points between controlled diabetes patients and healthy patients. The results suggest that the control of diabetes in elderly patients provides the same levels of biofilm formation when compared to healthy individuals. © 2010 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Effect of triazine derivative added to denture materials on a microcosm biofilm model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moraes, Aline Pinheiro; Barwaldt, Caroline Konzgen; Nunes, Thaís Zorzoli; Sarkis-Onofre, Rafael; Ogliari, Fabrício Aulo; Boscato, Noéli; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of triazine incorporation to denture materials on biofilm formation of saliva derived from microcosms of patients who are positive for Candida albicans. Biofilms were formed on microwave-cured acrylic resin, one hard denture liner, and two soft denture liners containing 0, 2.5, 5, and 10% triazine. For experimental subset (n = 10), mechanical properties of the materials and colony-forming unit counts from the biofilms formed on the materials were assessed. Flexural strength and modulus decreased with the addition of 2.5% triazine (p < 0.01). In general, the addition of 5 and 10% triazine leaded to more soluble materials (p < 0.001). Saliva donor with candidiasis resulted in higher counts of total microorganisms (p = 0.0294) and Streptococci (p = 0.0008). Soft denture liners showed the highest counts for total microorganisms, Streptococci, and Candida species (p < 0.001). The addition of triazine directly to denture materials was not beneficial in reducing biofilm formation in a complex biofilm model. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Long-term efficacy of denture cleansers in preventing Candida spp. biofilm recolonization on liner surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Coelho Vieira

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the long-term efficacy of denture cleansers against Candida spp. biofilm recolonization on liner surface. Specimens were fabricated of a poly(methyl methacrylate-based denture liner and had their surface roughness evaluated at baseline and after cleansing treatments. C. albicans or C. glabrata biofilms were formed on liner surface for 48 h, and then the specimens were randomly assigned to one of cleaning treatments: two alkaline peroxides (soaking for 3 or 15 min, 0.5% sodium hypochlorite (10 min or distilled water (control; 15 min. After the treatments, the specimens were sonicated to disrupt the biofilm, and residual cells were counted (cell/mL. Long-term effectiveness of the cleaning processes was determined by submitting a set of cleaned specimens to biofilm growth conditions for 48 h followed by estimation of cell counts. The topography of specimens after cleaning treatments was analyzed by SEM. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (α; = 0.05. Results of cell count estimation showed significant differences in cleanliness among the treatments (p 0.05 was observed among the Candida species regarding the recolonization condition. Alkaline denture cleansers showed similar cleaning performance and both differed from the control (p < 0.001. Sodium hypochlorite was the only treatment that removed biofilm efficiently, since no viable cells were found after its use. In conclusion, alkaline peroxide denture cleansers were not effective in removing Candida spp. biofilm from denture liner surfaces and preventing biofilm recolonization.

  7. Determination of occlusal vertical dimension for complete dentures patients: an updated review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhajj, M N; Khalifa, N; Abduo, J; Amran, A G; Ismail, I A

    2017-11-01

    Determination of the occlusal vertical dimension (OVD) is an integral part of complete dentures fabrication. Due to the lack of teeth, the clinician faces the challenge of how to accurately establish the OVD of the new denture. Therefore, the purpose of this review article was to present, discuss and critique the available methods used in determining the OVD for complete dentures patients. This review identified two main streams to determine the OVD: (i) pre-extraction methods and (ii) post-extraction methods. For the pre-extraction methods, the OVD of the natural dentition is transferred to the new dentures mainly by intra-oral measurements, profile tracing and cephalometric analysis. The post-extraction methods rely on mandibular rest position, facial aesthetic appearance, swallowing pattern, craniofacial landmarks measurements, cephalometric analysis, phonetics and existing dentures. In general, all the available techniques have merits and are helpful for routine clinical use. However, they are empirical in nature, controversial and lack the scientific support. Further, there is no single accurate method for OVD determination. To overcome the limitations of the techniques, the clinician will benefit from applying combination of techniques to approximate the OVD. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Evaluation of the occlusion vertical dimension of complete dentures after microwave disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Michael F M; Giampaolo, Eunice T; Machado, Ana L; Pavarina, Ana C; Vergani, Carlos E

    2012-06-01

    An increase in occlusal vertical dimension (OVD) after microwave disinfection may result in the need for adjustments in the complete dentures. This in vitro study evaluated the increase in OVD of maxillary complete dentures submitted to microwave disinfection protocols. Thirty sets of complete dentures were evaluated as follows: Group 1-15 sets had the maxillary complete dentures submitted to microwave disinfection (650 W/3 min), once a week, for 4 weeks. Group 2-15 sets had the maxillary complete dentures submitted to microwave disinfection (650 W/3 min), three times a week, for 4 weeks. The vertical dimension was measured with a micrometre (in mm) before disinfection protocols (baseline readings) and after each week of disinfection. Data were analysed using Wilcoxon and Friedman tests (α = 0.05). For Group 1, no significant difference was found between the increases in OVD and zero, and no significant difference was found between the weeks. For Group 2, the increases in OVD were significantly greater than zero, and the Friedman test showed that weeks 3 and 4 had significantly greater changes than week 1 and that week 4 had significantly greater change than week 2. Microwave disinfection only promoted significant increase in OVD in Group 2, in which the values increased progressively. © 2011 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. Effect of embedded metal reinforcements and their location on the fracture resistance of acrylic resin complete dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kaneyoshi; Takahashi, Yutaka; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2011-07-01

    This study evaluated the effect of metal reinforcement and its location on the flexural load at the proportional limit (FL-PL) and the flexural deflection of maxillary acrylic resin complete dentures. Maxillary acrylic resin complete dentures reinforced with Remanium and without reinforcement were tested. The reinforcing material was embedded in the denture base resin in the doughy state and placed (1) under the ridge lap region; (2) in the anterior region; (3) in the middle region; and (4) in the anterior and posterior regions. The FL-PL (N) and the flexural deflection (mm) at 100 N of the reinforced maxillary denture specimens were tested using a load testing machine at a 5.0 mm/min crosshead speed. The data were analyzed statistically using one-way ANOVA; Tukey's post hoc comparisons test was applied when appropriate (95% confidence level). The FL-PL of the dentures without reinforcement (909 ± 195 N) and the dentures reinforced at the ridge lap (1094 ± 176 N) and in the middle (977 ± 215 N) regions were not significantly different (p > 0.05). The dentures reinforced in the anterior (1348 ± 205 N) and the anterior and posterior (1190 ± 191 N) regions had a higher FL-PL than the dentures without reinforcement (p 0.05). The efficiency (times) of the reinforcing material on the dentures without reinforcement was 1.08 to 1.48. The flexural deflection of the dentures without reinforcement (0.133 ± 0.014 mm), the dentures reinforced at the ridge lap (0.125 ± 0.014 mm), in the anterior (0.122 ± 0.009 mm), and in the middle (0.132 ± 0.015 mm) regions were not significantly different (p > 0.05), and the dentures reinforced in the anterior and posterior (0.117 ± 0.011 mm) regions had significantly lower deflection than the dentures without reinforcement (p acrylic resin complete dentures. © 2011 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  10. Dimensional change of heat-cured acrylic resin dentures with three different cooling regimes following a standard curing cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moturi, Bhanodaya; Juszczyk, Andrzej S; Radford, David R; Clark, Robert K F

    2005-12-01

    The aim of the study was to compare dimensional changes in poly(methylmethacrylate) complete denture bases resulting from three different cooling regimens following a standard heating cycle. Changes in three separate dimensions were measured on ten dentures within each cooling regimen after curing, and before and after removing the denture from the cast using a computer imaging system. No consistent differences occurred as a result of removing the denture from the cast. The results indicated that there was greater change in dimension of dentures with the quenching cooling method than with either overnight cooling in the water bath or bench cooling. This was particularly evident after removal from the cast after curing (p<0.001). It is concluded that slow cooling results in less dimensional change.

  11. Pareto utility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ikefuji, M.; Laeven, R.J.A.; Magnus, J.R.; Muris, C.H.M.

    2013-01-01

    In searching for an appropriate utility function in the expected utility framework, we formulate four properties that we want the utility function to satisfy. We conduct a search for such a function, and we identify Pareto utility as a function satisfying all four desired properties. Pareto utility

  12. Evaluation of the Periodontal Status of Abutment Teeth in Removable Partial Dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, André Ricardo Maia; da Silva Lobo, Fábio Daniel; Miranda, Mónica Célia Pereira; Framegas de Araújo, Filipe Miguel Soares; Santos Marques, Tiago Miguel

    2017-12-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the use of removable partial dentures affects the periodontal status of abutment teeth. An observational cross-sectional study was done on a sample of patients rehabilitated with removable partial dentures (2010 to 2013). At a recall appointment, a clinical examination was done to collect data related to the rehabilitation and periodontal status of the abutment teeth. Of 145 invited patients, 54 attended the requested follow-up appointment (37.2%). Mean patient age was 59.1 years, and the study population was 42.6% male and 57.4% female. The mean follow-up time for the prosthesis was 26 months. Abutment teeth had higher values in all periodontal variables (P removable partial dentures is affected by these rehabilitations. A recall program for these patients involving removable prosthodontics and periodontology appointments is mandatory.

  13. [The reproducibility of the manual checkbite in the wearers of complete dentures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utz, K H; Bernard, N; Hültenschmidt, R; Wegmann, U; Kurbel, R

    1993-01-01

    Thirty-six new complete dentures were remounted by means of check bite records at the time of placement. The mandibular position was recorded three times in each patient by two clinicians using Bite Compound, a thermoplastic material, for the records. After individual transverse horizontal axis localization, the dentures were mounted in an articulator, and subsequently three-dimensional, electronic and computerized measurements were made with a special measuring instrument. In intraindividual comparison the reproducibility of the check bite records resulted in a mean value of 0.37 +/- 0.33 mm, whereby maximum deviations of up to 1.8 mm were observed. Repeated insertion of the maxillary dentures into the hardened impressions of the thermoplastic compound led to an error of 0.04 +/- 0.06 mm. The results of the two clinicians differed only slightly.

  14. An autopsy case of prolonged asphyxial death caused by the impacted denture in the esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funayama, Kazuhisa; Fujihara, Junko; Takeshita, Haruo; Takatsuka, Hisakazu

    2016-11-01

    A foreign body impacted in the esophagus is not a rare incident among adults or children. In adults, a dental prosthesis is prone to become impacted in the esophagus. The diagnostic difficulty of this often causes a delay in its removal, which can lead to serious complications, including death. This report describes the autopsy case of a man who died of prolonged asphyxiation induced by the delayed removal of an impacted denture, which was misdiagnosed on his first visit notwithstanding that a part of the denture could be seen on X-rays. Cases in which an impacted denture led to death have rarely been reported in contrast to numerous papers about recovered cases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. PMMA denture base material enhancement: a review of fiber, filler, and nanofiller addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gad, Mohammed M; Fouda, Shaimaa M; Al-Harbi, Fahad A; Näpänkangas, Ritva; Raustia, Aune

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews acrylic denture base resin enhancement during the past few decades. Specific attention is given to the effect of fiber, filler, and nanofiller addition on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) properties. The review is based on scientific reviews, papers, and abstracts, as well as studies concerning the effect of additives, fibers, fillers, and reinforcement materials on PMMA, published between 1974 and 2016. Many studies have reported improvement of PMMA denture base material with the addition of fillers, fibers, nanofiller, and hybrid reinforcement. However, most of the studies were limited to in vitro investigations without bioactivity and clinical implications. Considering the findings of the review, there is no ideal denture base material, but the properties of PMMA could be improved with some modifications, especially with silanized nanoparticle addition and a hybrid reinforcement system. PMID:28553115

  16. Effect of microwave disinfection on mechanical properties of denture base acrylic resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamouda, Ibrahim M; Ahmed, Sabry A

    2010-10-01

    The microwave oven was used for sterilizing dentures contaminated with Candida albicans and other communicable diseases instead of disinfectant solutions. This study was carried out to evaluate the flexural properties, toughness, and impact strength of heat-cured acrylic resin sterilized by microwave oven either immersed in water or non-immersed for 5 and 15 min at full power. The results indicated that the microwave oven sterilization technique resulted in reduction of the load necessary to fracture the specimens, deformation at fracture, transverse strength, modulus of elasticity except disinfection at 5 min dry condition, toughness, and impact strength. This study concluded that the microwave oven is not acceptable for sterilization of dentures because of its weakening effects on the dentures that prone for fracture during clinical use. This method of sterilization increased the brittleness of acrylic resin specimens. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Complete denture base assessments using holograms: dimensional alterations after different activation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dughir, Ciprian; Popovschi, Ana Maria; Cojocariu, Andreea Codruta; Topala, Florin Ionel; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Sinescu, Cosmin; de Sabata, Aldo; Duma, Virgil-Florin

    2016-03-01

    Holography is a well-developed method with a large range of applications, including dentistry. This study uses holographic methods for the study of total dental prosthesis. The issue is that the transformation of wax denture base in polymethylacrylate causes dimensional alterations and retractions in the final dental constructs. These could cause the failure of the stability of the complete denture in the oral cavity. Thus, the aim of this study is to determine and to compare using holography, total prosthesis obtained using three different manufacturing methods: pressing, injection, and polymerization. Each of the three types of dentures thus produced were recorded over the previously wax complete base holographic plates. The dimensional alterations that appear after using the different activation methods were thus determined. The most significant modification was remarked in the custom press technology, while the smallest variations were detected in the injection alternative.

  18. Implant-supported prostheses versus conventional permanent and removable dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koszuta Agnieszka

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Social, economic and technological progress results in an increasing range of treatment and rehabilitation methods for patients with partial or complete edentulism. The role of the dentist is to inform the patient about the full range of available missing teeth treatment options leading to complete rehabilitation of the masticatory organ in agreement with the patient’s aesthetic and functional expectations. The aim of the paper was to identify the type of prostheses used by patients before opting for implantsupported teeth replacements, according to the patients’ age, sex, marital status, place of residence and education. The study covered 464 patients, women and men, aged 20-74, treated with dental implants. The patients answered questions in an anonymous questionnaire. The influence of the prosthetic replacement type according to age and marital status was highly statistically significant, whereas it was statistically significant according to sex, place of residence and education. The female respondents who previously used tissue-borne complete or partial dentures opted for implant treatment more frequently. The respondents younger than 40 and between 40-60 years of age who did not previously used any prosthetic replacements opted for implant treatment more frequently. The respondents who did not use any prosthetic replacements decided to undergo implant treatment most frequently, regardless of their marital status, education and place of residence. The patients opted for implant treatment to improve their quality of life, despite the high cost of such therapy.

  19. Failures in the rehabilitation treatment with removable partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benso, Bruna; Kovalik, Ana C; Jorge, Janaina H; Campanha, Nara H

    2013-11-01

    Despite being functional and having aesthetic benefits, the acceptance of patients regarding the use of removable partial dentures (RPDs) has been low. In part, this is due to the deleterious effects that causes discomfort to the patient. Success depends not only on the care expended by the patient, including daily care and oral hygiene, but also on common goals set by their professional and clinical staff, aiming beyond aesthetics, to incorporate issues of functionality and the well-being of patients. For rehabilitation treatment with RPDs to reach the desired level of success without damaging the support structure, all the steps (diagnose, cavity preparation, adaptation of the metal structures, functional of distal extension and posterior follow-up) in the rehabilitative treatment should be carefully developed. A literature review was carried out, searching through MEDLINE (PubMed) articles published between 1965 and December 2012 including clinical trials and reviews about the use of RPDs. This study describes factors that lead to failures and complications in oral rehabilitation through the use of RPDs and suggests possible solutions.

  20. Effect of complete and partial removable dentures on chewing movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, T M S V; Vilanova, L S R; Gonçalves, L M; Rodrigues Garcia, R C M

    2014-03-01

    Partial or complete edentulism impairs mastication. However, it is unclear how the chewing cycle is affected by prosthetics. We evaluated the chewing movements of patients fitted with complete (CD) or removable partial denture (RPD). A total of 29 subjects were kinesiographically evaluated during chewing of peanuts and Optocal portions in a random sequence. The subjects were divided into two groups according to prosthesis type. Group RPD was composed of 14 partially edentulous patients using a lower distal extension RPD (mean age 61 ± 8 years), and group CD contained 15 completely edentulous patients using CD (mean age 65·9 ± 7·9 years) in both jaws. Opening, closing, occlusal and masticatory cycle times, movement angle (opening and closing), maximum velocity (opening and closing), total area and chewing cycle amplitudes were evaluated. The results were subjected to anova and Tukey's HSD test at a significance level of 5%. The RPD group exhibited shorter opening and closing phases and masticatory cycle time (P  0·05). RPD wearers use a faster chewing sequence with greater vertical and lateral jaw excursions compared with CD wearers. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Color stability of provisional crown and fixed partial denture resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haselton, Debra R; Diaz-Arnold, Ana M; Dawson, Deborah V

    2005-01-01

    Provisional resins are used extensively during fixed prosthodontic treatment and exhibit varying degrees of color change/discoloration over time. Data are needed to help predict color stability of provisional resins. The purpose of this in vitro study was to measure the color change of 12 provisional prosthodontic materials after immersion in artificial saliva and artificial saliva-coffee solutions for 1, 2, and 4 weeks. Twelve provisional materials were studied. Methacrylates consisted of Alike, Jet, Temporary Bridge Resin, Unifast, and Zeta CC. Bis-acryl resins included Instatemp, Integrity, Luxatemp, Protemp Garant, Provipont, Provitec, and Temphase. Ten specimens (25.4 mm x 25.4 mm x 2.4 mm) of each material were fabricated. Five specimens were stored at 37 degrees C in artificial saliva and 5 were stored in a solution of artificial saliva (400 cc) and coffee (800 cc). Baseline color was measured using a colorimeter. Further color measurements were made after 1, 2, and 4 weeks of immersion. CIE L *a *b * values were recorded and color differences (DeltaE) between baseline and each storage interval were calculated using a 2-way ANOVA with Bonferroni adjustment for multiple comparisons in conjunction with an overall alpha=.05. Results indicated the presence of strong interaction between material and storage solution regardless of the aspect of color considered (Pprovisional crown and fixed partial denture resins demonstrated varying tendency to discolor over a range of time periods when immersed in artificial saliva and artificial saliva-coffee solutions.

  2. Short implants to support mandibular complete dentures - photoelastic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, Marcele Jardim; Silva, Wander José da; Del Bel Cury, Altair Antoninha

    2017-02-23

    This study evaluated the stress behavior around short implants in edentulous atrophic mandibles. Six groups included implants with two diameters regular and wide (4 and 5 mm) and three lengths (5, 7 and 9 mm) as follows: Ci9 (9 x 4 mm), Ci7 (7 x 4 mm), Ci5 (5 x 4 mm), Wi9 (9 x 5 mm), Wi7 (7 x 5 mm) and Wi5 (5 x 5 mm). These groups were compared to the control group CG (11 x 4 mm). The analysis was performed with the photoelastic method (n = 6). Each model comprised 4 implants with the same length and diameter connected by a chromium-cobalt bar that simulates a fixed denture. A 0.15 kg force was applied at the end of the cantilever (15 mm), and the maximum shear stress was recorded around the distal and subsequent implants. The stress values were determined, and the quantitative data (Fringes®) were submitted to statistical analysis with one-way ANOVA and the Dunnett test (p implant length increased stress values with a significant difference (p implant diameter reduced the stress values without any differences found between short and long implants. Implants with 5 and 7 mm with regular diameter increased stress levels while short implants with larger diameters experienced similar stress to that of longer implants.

  3. The adhesion of modern soft relining materials to acrylic dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Więckiewicz, Włodzimierz; Kasperski, Jacek; Więckiewicz, Mieszko; Miernik, Marta; Król, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Silicone-based liners are widespread materials in prosthetic dentistry. Their mechanical properties have to meet several key requirements such as adequate adhesion to denture base polymers in order to provide right function of masticatory system and oral hygiene. The aim of this paper was to evaluate and compare tensile and shear bond strengths values of three modern autopolimeryzed silicone relining materials bonded to acrylic plates. Three silicone-based soft relining materials were investigated in this study (A-Soft Line 30, Bosworth Dentusil and Elite Super Soft). A total of 78 specimens were prepared: 13 of each material (total: 39) for testing tensile bond strength and 13 of each material for testing shear bond strength (total: 39). The obtained data were analyzed statistically. The average tensile bond strength results were 0.86 MPa for Bosworth Dentusil, 1.00 MPa for Elite Super Soft and 1.25 MPa for A-Soft Line 30. The silicone-based relining materials had different average values of shear bond strength: 0.67 MPa Elite Super Soft; 1.32 MPa A-Soft Line 30 and 1.57 MPa Bosworth Dentusil. As the result of the study it can be concluded that all tested materials have acceptable adhesion values to acrylic resin. According to tensile and shear bond strengths tests the best adhesive properties has A-Soft Line 30.

  4. Fabricating Complete Dentures with CAD/CAM and RP Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Mehmet Selim; Erdem, Ali; Aglarci, Osman Sami; Dilber, Erhan

    2015-06-01

    Two techological approaches for fabricating dentures; computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) and rapid prototyping (RP), are combined with the conventional techniques of impression and jaw relation recording to determine their feasibility and applicability. Maxillary and mandibular edentulous jaw models were produced using silicone molds. After obtaining a gypsum working model, acrylic bases were crafted, and occlusal rims for each model were fabricated with previously determined standard vertical and centric relationships. The maxillary and mandibular relationships were recorded with guides. The occlusal rims were then scanned with a digital scanner. The alignment of the maxillary and mandibular teeth was verified. The teeth in each arch were fabricated in one piece, or set, either by CAM or RP. Conventional waxing and flasking was then performed for both methods. These techniques obviate a practitioner's need for technicians during design and provide the patient with an opportunity to participate in esthetic design with the dentist. In addition, CAD/CAM and RP reduce chair time; however, the materials and techniques need further improvements. Both CAD/CAM and RP techniques seem promising for reducing chair time and allowing the patient to participate in esthetics design. Furthermore, the one-set aligned artificial tooth design may increase the acrylic's durability. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  5. Effect of Patient’s Personality on Satisfaction with Their Present Complete Denture and after Increasing the Occlusal Vertical Dimension: A Study of Edentulous Egyptian Patients

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    Shaimaa M. Fouda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Complete denture wearers often find it difficult to accept a new denture. Personality traits are among the factors that possibly affect patient satisfaction with a complete denture. Our aim was to investigate the influence of patients’ personality on satisfaction with their present denture and after an increase in the occlusal vertical dimension (OVD. Sixty edentulous patients with complete dentures (22 men and 38 women, mean age 66 years, and range 50–75 years participated in the study. The age of their complete dentures ranged from 5 to 16 years. Patients’ personalities were evaluated using the Arabic version of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire. Their satisfaction with their dentures before and after restoration of the OVD and relining of the mandibular denture was evaluated using two questionnaires (I and II, Patients with a high score of neuroticism were less satisfied with their original dentures and after relining and an increase of OVD compared with patients with an average score in that trait. The personality trait of psychoticism was significant to patients’ acceptance of an increase in OVD; that is, patients with a high score were less satisfied with their dentures after increase of OVD than patients with an average score. It is concluded that personality traits affect patients’ acceptance of their complete dentures.

  6. Pressure distribution of implant-supported removable partial dentures with stress-breaking attachments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Kentaro; Kurihara, Daisuke; Suzuki, Yasunori; Ohkubo, Chikahiro

    2014-04-01

    This in vitro study investigated the pressure distribution of the implant-supported removable partial dentures (RPDs) with the stress-breaking attachments under the occlusal force. The experimental model of bilateral missing premolars and molars was modified from a commercial simulation model. Five pressure sensors were embedded near the bilateral first molars, first premolars, and medio-lingual alveolar crest. Two implants were placed near the second molars, and they were connected to the denture base using the following conditions: complete separation between the denture base and implant with cover screws (CRPD), flexible connection with a stress-breaking ball (SBB) attachment, and rigid connection without stress breaking with healing caps (HC). The pressure at five different areas of the soft tissue and the displacement of the RPDs were simultaneously measured, loading up to 50 N. The coefficient of variation (CV) for each connection was calculated from all data of the pressure at five areas to evaluate the pressure distribution. The pressure on medio-lingual alveolar crest and molars of the HC was less than SBB and CRPD. In contrast, the pressure on premolars of SBB was greater than for the HC and CRPD. The CV of SBB was less than that of HC and CRPD. Denture displacement of HC and SBB was less than for CRPD. Within the in vitro limitations, precise denture settlements and pressure distribution under the denture base could be controlled using an SBB attachment. An SBB attachment might be able to protect the implant from harmful force. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A review of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacture techniques for removable denture fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Mehmet Selim; Baytaroğlu, Ebru Nur; Erdem, Ali; Dilber, Erhan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review was to investigate usage of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacture (CAD/CAM) such as milling and rapid prototyping (RP) technologies for removable denture fabrication. An electronic search was conducted in the PubMed/MEDLINE, ScienceDirect, Google Scholar, and Web of Science databases. Databases were searched from 1987 to 2014. The search was performed using a variety of keywords including CAD/CAM, complete/partial dentures, RP, rapid manufacturing, digitally designed, milled, computerized, and machined. The identified developments (in chronological order), techniques, advantages, and disadvantages of CAD/CAM and RP for removable denture fabrication are summarized. Using a variety of keywords and aiming to find the topic, 78 publications were initially searched. For the main topic, the abstract of these 78 articles were scanned, and 52 publications were selected for reading in detail. Full-text of these articles was gained and searched in detail. Totally, 40 articles that discussed the techniques, advantages, and disadvantages of CAD/CAM and RP for removable denture fabrication and the articles were incorporated in this review. Totally, 16 of the papers summarized in the table. Following review of all relevant publications, it can be concluded that current innovations and technological developments of CAD/CAM and RP allow the digitally planning and manufacturing of removable dentures from start to finish. As a result according to the literature review CAD/CAM techniques and supportive maxillomandibular relationship transfer devices are growing fast. In the close future, fabricating removable dentures will become medical informatics instead of needing a technical staff and procedures. However the methods have several limitations for now. PMID:27095912

  8. A review of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacture techniques for removable denture fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Mehmet Selim; Baytaroğlu, Ebru Nur; Erdem, Ali; Dilber, Erhan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review was to investigate usage of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacture (CAD/CAM) such as milling and rapid prototyping (RP) technologies for removable denture fabrication. An electronic search was conducted in the PubMed/MEDLINE, ScienceDirect, Google Scholar, and Web of Science databases. Databases were searched from 1987 to 2014. The search was performed using a variety of keywords including CAD/CAM, complete/partial dentures, RP, rapid manufacturing, digitally designed, milled, computerized, and machined. The identified developments (in chronological order), techniques, advantages, and disadvantages of CAD/CAM and RP for removable denture fabrication are summarized. Using a variety of keywords and aiming to find the topic, 78 publications were initially searched. For the main topic, the abstract of these 78 articles were scanned, and 52 publications were selected for reading in detail. Full-text of these articles was gained and searched in detail. Totally, 40 articles that discussed the techniques, advantages, and disadvantages of CAD/CAM and RP for removable denture fabrication and the articles were incorporated in this review. Totally, 16 of the papers summarized in the table. Following review of all relevant publications, it can be concluded that current innovations and technological developments of CAD/CAM and RP allow the digitally planning and manufacturing of removable dentures from start to finish. As a result according to the literature review CAD/CAM techniques and supportive maxillomandibular relationship transfer devices are growing fast. In the close future, fabricating removable dentures will become medical informatics instead of needing a technical staff and procedures. However the methods have several limitations for now.

  9. Tensile Bond Strength between Soft Liners and Two Chemically Different Denture Base Materials: Effect of Thermocycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugut, Faik; Coskun, Mehmet Emre; Dogan, Derya Ozdemir; Kirmali, Omer; Akin, Hakan

    2016-06-01

    The bond strength of soft denture liner to a recently introduced denture base resin after thermocycling has not been compared to traditional denture base materials. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of thermocycling on the tensile bond strength of soft denture liners to two chemically different denture base resins, polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA). A total of 48 PMMA and UDMA tensile test specimens were fabricated by attaching two different soft denture liners (Molloplast-B, Permaflex) according to the manufacturers' instructions and assigned to two groups. Half of the specimens for each group were stored in water for 1 week, and the other half were thermocycled (5000 cycles) between baths of 5°C and 55°C. Specimens were mounted on a universal testing machine with a 5 mm/min crosshead speed. The data were analyzed with three-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey-Kramer multiple comparisons tests (α = 0.05). The highest bond strength was measured in the specimens from the UDMA/Molloplast groups, and the lowest was seen in the PMMA/Permaflex group. No significant difference in bond strength was detected in PMMA/Permaflex groups after thermocycling (p = 0.082), whereas other groups exhibited significant differences after thermocycling (p < 0.05). Thermocycling decreased the bond strength values in both the PMMA and UDMA groups. Regardless of types of soft liners, PMMA specimens presented lower bond strength values than UDMA specimens, both before and after thermocycling. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  10. Effect of denture-coating composite on Candida albicans biofilm and surface degradation after disinfection protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Matheus Jacobina; de Oliveira, Denise G; Marcillo, Oscar O; Neppelenbroek, Karin H; Lara, Vanessa S; Porto, Vinícius C

    2016-04-01

    Denture stomatitis is the most common pathology affecting denture wearers and its main cause is colonisation of dentures with Candida albicans. This study investigated the effectiveness of two commercial composite surface sealants (Biscover(®) LV and Surface Coat(®)) to reduce C. albicans biofilm colonisation on denture resin, as well as their surface integrity after disinfection cycles with 1% sodium hypochlorite solution. Heat-cured acrylic resin specimens were manufactured (10 mm × 10 mm × 1 mm). The specimen surfaces were mechanically polished to simulate rough or smooth denture surfaces. Four surface-treatment groups were tested: smooth surfaces [0.3 μm of mean roughness (Ra)]; rough surfaces (3 μm of Ra); rough surfaces treated with Biscover(®) LV; and rough surfaces treated with Surface Coat(®). Specimens of each group were randomly divided to undergo immersion in distilled water or 1% sodium hypochlorite for 30 or 90 cycles each. Specimens of all groups in each immersion solution were tested using a crystal violet (CV) staining assay for biofilm quantification and by scanning electron microscopy for visual analyses of surface integrity and biofilm structure. CV assay data were analysed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey's multiple comparison test (P surface integrity of Biscover(®) LV-treated surfaces were similar to those of smooth surfaces, whereas Surface Coat(®) -treated surfaces presented a similar performance to rough surfaces in all solutions and cycles. These results suggest the possibility of clinical use of Biscover(®) LV for denture coating on surfaces in which mechanical polish is not indicated, such as the fitting surface. © 2016 FDI World Dental Federation.

  11. Patient satisfaction with occlusal scheme of conventional complete dentures: A randomised clinical trial (part I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradpoor, H; Arabzade Hoseini, M; Savabi, O; Shirani, M

    2018-01-01

    Occlusal scheme can affect denture retention, stability, occlusal force distribution, aesthetics, masticatory function, patient comfort and general patient satisfaction with dentures. This study aimed to compare the patient satisfaction with 3 types of complete denture occlusion including fully bilateral balanced occlusion (FBBO), newly presented buccalised occlusion (BO) and lingualised occlusion (LO). In this parallel randomised clinical trial, new conventional complete dentures were fabricated for 86 volunteers. Participants were randomly allocated to 3 groups with 3 different occlusal schemes. All patients were recalled at 1 and 3 months after delivery for data collection. The 19-item version of Oral Health Impact Profile for Edentulous Patients questionnaire was used in this study. The visual analogue scale (VAS) was used for assessment of the prosthodontist's attitude towards denture quality, patient's attitude towards different occlusal schemes and evaluation of patient satisfaction. Data were analysed using the Wilcoxon signed rank test, the Kruskal-Wallis test and the post hoc Dunn test via SPSS version 18.0 (P ≤ .05). Eighty-six patients completed the study, and their data were analysed (mean age ± standard deviation = 57.78 ± 9.98 years). The only significant difference when comparing the 3 groups was physical pain, which was significantly higher in FBBO group. No significant differences were found for the VAS scores of patient and prosthodontist satisfaction or the domain scores among the 3 occlusal schemes either at 1 or at 3 months post-delivery. The VAS score of patient satisfaction and prosthodontist satisfaction increased at third compared to first month after delivery. The results of this randomised clinical trial provided evidence that BO is as effective as LO for the fabrication of complete dentures. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Measurement of Mucosal Thickness in Denture-bearing Area of Edentulous Mandible

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    Jian Dong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The thickness of the alveolar mucosa influences the probability of the occurrence of denture-induced irritations. Thick denture-supporting tissues offer relief from mucosal tenderness and ulcers; however, the uniformity of the thickness across the entire mandibular alveolar mucosa cannot be accurately determined in edentulous patients. This study aimed to assess the mucosal thickness of the denture-bearing area in the edentulous mandible. Methods: Twenty-seven edentulous patients underwent cone-beam computed tomography scanning, wherein the patients wore a record base to retract soft tissues away from the alveolar mucosa. The measured regions were the central incisor (IC, lateral incisor (IL, canine (Ca, first premolar (P1, second premolar (P2, first molar (M1, and second molar (M2 regions. The thickness was measured in the alveolar ridge crest (T, buccal (B1-B4, and lingual (L1-L4 alveolar ridge mucosa. The average thickness of the mucosa at buccal sides (B and lingual sides (L were also assessed. Results: The differences in the mucosal thickness between the left and right sides were not significant. In the Ca-M2 regions, T was the thickest, and L3 was the thinnest of all the measured points in the same regions. L was significantly less than B in posterior regions (P < 0.01. On the other hand, M2 at L4 was thinnest of all the measured regions from Ca to M2 (P < 0.01, and was thicker than IC, IL, P1, and P2 at B2. Conclusions: Since the mucosal thickness of denture-bearing area in the edentulous mandible is not uniform; the tissue surface of the denture base or custom tray should be selectively relieved, which may reduce the risk of denture-induced irritations.

  13. Clinical strategies for complete denture rehabilitation in a patient with Parkinson disease and reduced neuromuscular control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haralur, Satheesh B

    2015-01-01

    The dentist has a large role in geriatric health care for the ever increasing elder population with associated physical and neurological disorders. The Parkinson disease is progressive neurological disorder with resting tremor, bradykinesia, akinesia, and postural instability. The psychological components of disease include depression, anxiety, and cognitive deficiency. Poor oral hygiene, increased susceptibility for dental caries, and periodontal diseases predispose them to early edentulism. The number of Parkinson affected patients visiting dental clinic seeking complete denture is growing. This case report explains the steps involved in the complete denture rehabilitation of Parkinson patient. The effective prosthesis will help in alleviating functional, aesthetic, and psychological disabilities of the patient.

  14. Clinical Strategies for Complete Denture Rehabilitation in a Patient with Parkinson Disease and Reduced Neuromuscular Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satheesh B. Haralur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The dentist has a large role in geriatric health care for the ever increasing elder population with associated physical and neurological disorders. The Parkinson disease is progressive neurological disorder with resting tremor, bradykinesia, akinesia, and postural instability. The psychological components of disease include depression, anxiety, and cognitive deficiency. Poor oral hygiene, increased susceptibility for dental caries, and periodontal diseases predispose them to early edentulism. The number of Parkinson affected patients visiting dental clinic seeking complete denture is growing. This case report explains the steps involved in the complete denture rehabilitation of Parkinson patient. The effective prosthesis will help in alleviating functional, aesthetic, and psychological disabilities of the patient.

  15. Evaluating stress distribution in two different designs of class I partial removable dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Geramipanah

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available In Present study a digital model of hemimaxillectomy was reconstructed by computer and stress distribution of removable partial dentures in tissues, periodontal ligament and bone were thoroughly evaluated. The maximum stress of two different removable partial denture designs which contained buccal and lingual c-shaped clasps respectively were analyzed and compared. It was assumed that a 90 gram force which is equal to an average obturator’s weight is applied outwardly. The results showed that the maximum stress distribution in these two designs is not significantly different.

  16. Case report: management of the flabby ridge: re-visiting the principles of complete denture construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Christopher D; Allen, P Finbarr

    2003-12-01

    Displaceable tissue on edentulous ridges may present a considerable clinical challenge to dental practitioners when providing complete dentures. Surgical excision techniques or use of dental implants has provided clinicians with methods of addressing this particular difficulty. However careful consideration and application of the principles of complete denture construction can provide a less invasive and less complex form of treatment. This article describes one such clinical scenario, and demonstrates the use of a suitable impression technique that is based on successful manipulation of the thermoplastic nature of the impression material.

  17. A Technique for Removing Implant-Retained Denture: Direct Relining Complication

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    İbrahim Duran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this case report is to present a technique for removing the denture which locked to ball-attachment because of excessive hard relining resin material flows around the ball-attachment. An alternative method was used in the present case. A cylindrical resin was removed with a diamond bur at the level of matrix and by this way the matrix was removed safely. The advantage of the presented method is that it may be extended to other clinical situations when facing a similar complication for implant supported dentures and also that the technique is simple and does not require special equipment.

  18. Complete Dentures Fabricated with CAD/CAM Technology and a Traditional Clinical Recording Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadica Janeva

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM technology into complete denture (CD fabrication ushered in a new era in removable prosthodontics. Commercially available CAD/CAM denture systems are expected to improve upon the disadvantages associated with conventional fabrication. The purpose of this report is to present the workflow involved in fabricating a CD with a traditional clinical recording method and CAD/CAM technology and to summarize the advantages to the dental practitioner and the patient.

  19. The influence of polishing techniques on pre-polymerized CAD\\CAM acrylic resin denture bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alammari, Manal Rahma

    2017-10-01

    Lately, computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) has broadly been successfully employed in dentistry. The CAD/CAM systems have recently become commercially available for fabrication of complete dentures, and are considered as an alternative technique to conventionally processed acrylic resin bases. However, they have not yet been fully investigated. The purpose of this study was to inspect the effects of mechanical polishing and chemical polishing on the surface roughness (Ra) and contact angle (wettability) of heat-cured, auto-cured and CAD/CAM denture base acrylic resins. This study was conducted at the Advanced Dental Research Laboratory Center of King Abdulaziz University from March to June 2017. Three denture base materials were selected: heat cure poly-methylmethacrylate resin, thermoplastic (polyamide resin) and (CAD\\CAM) denture base resin. Sixty specimens were prepared and divided into three groups, twenty in each. Each group was divided according to the polishing techniques into (Mech P) and (Chem P), ten specimens in each; surface roughness and wettability were investigated. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 22, using one-way ANOVA and Pearson coefficient. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc tests were used for comparing the surface roughness values between three groups which revealed a statistical significant difference between them (p 1 CAD\\CAM denture base material (group III) showed the least mean values (1.08±0.23, 1.39±0.31, Mech P and Chem P respectively). CAD/CAM showed the least contact angle in both polishing methods, which were statistically significant at 5% level (p=0.034 and pCAD\\CAM denture base resin with superior smooth surface compared to chemical polishing. Mechanical polishing is considered the best effective polishing technique. CAD/CAM denture base material should be considered as the material of choice for complete denture construction in the near future, especially for older dental

  20. Nanopigmented Acrylic Resin Cured Indistinctively by Water Bath or Microwave Energy for Dentures

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    L. S. Acosta-Torres

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The highlight of this study was the synthesis of nanopigmented poly(methyl methacrylate nanoparticles that were further processed using a water bath and/or microwave energy for dentures. The experimental acrylic resins were physicochemically characterized, and the adherence of Candida albicans and biocompatibility were assessed. A nanopigmented acrylic resin cured by a water bath or by microwave energy was obtained. The acrylic specimens possess similar properties to commercial acrylic resins, but the transverse strength and porosity were slightly improved. The acrylic resins cured with microwave energy exhibited reduced C. albicans adherence. These results demonstrate an improved noncytotoxic material for the manufacturing of denture bases in dentistry.

  1. Hinged and sectional complete dentures for restricted mouth opening: A case report and review

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    Aditi Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Restricted mouth opening is a definite prosthodontic hindrance to carry out treatment successfully. Restricted mouth opening can be due to many reasons such as microstomia, oral submucous fibrosis, some genetic disorder, and as a result of some surgical treatment. In the past, various techniques for prosthetic rehabilitation of limited oral opening have been tried such as surgeries, use of dynamic opening devices, magnetic devices, and modification of denture design. Here we present; a simplified technique and simple design for fabrication of maxillary hinged and mandibular hinged and sectional complete denture for a patient with restricted mouth opening due to oral submucous fibrosis.

  2. Effects of complete denture wearing on the head posture and posterior airway space: A cephalometric study†

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    Hasan Suat Gokce

    2011-03-01

    Conclusion: Airway protection maintenance with extension and flexion of the head is vital because any rehabilitation involves the head and neck region. Correlation coefficients indicated significant changes in dynamic measurements of the natural head position related to complete dentures. Immediate head extension and alterations of posterior airway dimensions were observed following airway obstruction because of the insertion of complete dentures. The significant changes found in the study should help practitioners understand the mechanisms of craniofacial and cranio-vertical features before planning massive rehabilitations that reduce the oral cavity space.

  3. Occlusal designs on masticatory ability and patient satisfaction with complete denture: a systematic review.

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    Zhao, Ke; Mai, Qing-Qing; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Yang, Wen; Zhao, Li

    2013-11-01

    To systematically review clinical outcomes of different occlusal designs of complete dentures. Using a various key words, an electronic search of clinical trials published in English and Chinese literature was performed from four databases: Medline/PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and CBM. Furthermore, a manual searching of the relevant journals and the bibliographies of reviews was performed. General satisfaction, masticatory ability, retention, and stability were major criteria for the evaluation of the outcomes. Studies met these criteria were selected for a full-text reading. The whole processes were performed by two reviewers independently. This systematic review started with 1030 articles, which were finally narrowed down to seven, according to the inclusion criteria. The following occlusal designs were included and analyzed: anatomic occlusion, balanced occlusion, canine guidance occlusion, lingualized occlusion, monoplane occlusion, and bilateral-balanced and canine-guided design. Three of the seven studies showed that lingualized occlusion had ratings of higher patients' satisfaction than other occlusion designs. On the other hand, the canine-guided occlusion dentures demonstrated equal or better clinical performances than bilateral-balanced dentures. Because of the heterogeneity and bias of the studies, it was not possible to analyze the data statistically. Lingualized occlusion and canine-guided occlusion can be successfully applied in the fabrication of complete dentures. Canine guided occlusion has also been shown to be satisfactory. More well-controlled randomized trials are needed regarding canine-guided occlusion and the relationship between alveolar ridge resorption, different occlusal schemes and patient satisfaction. The conventional prosthodontic wisdom that complete dentures require a balanced occlusal design is not supported by the included literature. A suitable occlusal scheme would be a critical factor for a successful complete denture

  4. Inlay fixed partial denture as a conservative approach for restoring posterior missing teeth: a clinical report.

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    Iglesia-Puig, Miguel A; Arellano-Cabornero, Alfonso

    2003-05-01

    Inlay fixed partial dentures luted by use of adhesive procedures offer a clinical alternative for the restoration of single missing posterior teeth. The introduction of ceromers and fiber-reinforced composites and the continuous improvement of adhesive systems and luting agents make this type of restoration possible, offering good aesthetic and functional results. The procedure is minimally invasive and conservative. This clinical report reviews the factors influencing the diagnosis and the clinical indications for an inlay fixed partial denture. In addition, a patient treatment is presented to illustrate the clinical procedures involved.

  5. Complete Dentures Fabricated with CAD/CAM Technology and a Traditional Clinical Recording Method.

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    Janeva, Nadica; Kovacevska, Gordana; Janev, Edvard

    2017-10-15

    The introduction of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology into complete denture (CD) fabrication ushered in a new era in removable prosthodontics. Commercially available CAD/CAM denture systems are expected to improve upon the disadvantages associated with conventional fabrication. The purpose of this report is to present the workflow involved in fabricating a CD with a traditional clinical recording method and CAD/CAM technology and to summarize the advantages to the dental practitioner and the patient.

  6. Relevance of variations in the opposing dentition for the functionality of fixed and removable partial dentures: a systematic review.

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    Pommer, Bernhard; Krainhöfner, Martin; Watzek, Georg; Tepper, Gabor; Dintsios, Charalabos-Markos

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the functionality of fixed and removable partial dentures as test interventions in relation to variations in the opposing dentition and their prosthetic restoration. The abstracts identified in the respective databases were screened independently by two investigators. RCTs and uncontrolled studies were considered, provided the patients were included consecutively and the confounding variables were adequately monitored. Seventeen papers were included. The study and publication quality was assessed using a "biometric quality" tool showing an overall poor quality. The reported outcomes, such as survival rates, were in each case obtained from a single study. Two possible trends could be deduced for the endpoint longevity: (a) the first trend in favor of removable partial dentures, compared to fixed partial dentures, with a fully edentulous opposing arch fitted with a removable prosthesis; (b) the second trend in favor of implant-supported partial dentures, compared to conventionally fixed partial dentures, with natural opposing dentition or with a removable partial denture in the opposing arch. No evidence could be generated as to whether, and if so how, variations in the opposing dentition have a bearing on the decision to fit a partially edentulous arch with a fixed or removable partial denture.

  7. Relevance of Variations in the Opposing Dentition for the Functionality of Fixed and Removable Partial Dentures: A Systematic Review

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    Bernhard Pommer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the functionality of fixed and removable partial dentures as test interventions in relation to variations in the opposing dentition and their prosthetic restoration. The abstracts identified in the respective databases were screened independently by two investigators. RCTs and uncontrolled studies were considered, provided the patients were included consecutively and the confounding variables were adequately monitored. Seventeen papers were included. The study and publication quality was assessed using a “biometric quality” tool showing an overall poor quality. The reported outcomes, such as survival rates, were in each case obtained from a single study. Two possible trends could be deduced for the endpoint longevity: (a the first trend in favor of removable partial dentures, compared to fixed partial dentures, with a fully edentulous opposing arch fitted with a removable prosthesis; (b the second trend in favor of implant-supported partial dentures, compared to conventionally fixed partial dentures, with natural opposing dentition or with a removable partial denture in the opposing arch. No evidence could be generated as to whether, and if so how, variations in the opposing dentition have a bearing on the decision to fit a partially edentulous arch with a fixed or removable partial denture.

  8. A comparative Study of the Masticatory Efficiency in Complete Dentures Using Acrylic and Metal Occlusal Posterior Teeth-Photocolorimetric Analysis.

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    Awinashe, Vaibhav N; Nagda, Suhasini J

    2010-06-01

    Masticatory efficiency is always compromised in complete denture patients. The denture teeth with compromised occlusal anatomy and material further compound the inherent limitations of complete dentures. To compare the masticatory efficiency of patients with complete denture using acrylic and metal occlusal posterior teeth. Ten edentulous patients with well-formed ridges were selected. Complete dentures using acrylic and metal occlusal posterior teeth were fabricated. The masticatory efficiency was calculated using photo colorimeter. Complete dentures with 20° acrylic resin posterior teeth were fabricated for ten edentulous patients and masticatory efficiency was measured using raw beetroot as test food on a photocolorimeter after 10, 15, 20 strokes. The acrylic resin posterior teeth were replaced with metal occlusal posterior teeth on the same denture base. The masticatory efficiency was measured by the same method. The mean average percentage of masticatory efficiency with acrylic resin teeth and metal occlusal teeth were first calculated and statistical analysis was done using students unpaired t test. The average masticatory efficiency with acrylic teeth was 46.46% and metal occlusal teeth was 65.62, 't' = 5.38. The difference between the mean average masticatory performance percentage with acrylic teeth and metal occlusal teeth was significant at 1% i.e. P acrylic teeth without any alteration in position or relation.

  9. Color degradation of acrylic resin denture teeth as a function of liquid diet: ultraviolet-visible reflection analysis.

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    Hipólito, Ana Carolina; Barão, Valentim A; Faverani, Leonardo P; Ferreira, Mayara B; Assunção, Wirley G

    2013-10-01

    The effect of different beverages on acrylic resin denture teeth color degradation is evaluated. Ten acrylic resin denture teeth brands were evaluated: Art Plus (AP), Biolux (BX), Biotone IPN (BI), Magister (MG), Mondial 6 (MD), Premium 6 (PR), SR Vivodent PE (SR), Trilux (TR), Trubyte Biotone (TB), and Vipi Dent Plus (VP). Teeth were immersed in staining solutions (coffee, cola, and orange juice) or artificial saliva (control) (n=6) for 1, 7, 15, or 30 days. Specimen colors were evaluated spectrophotometrically based on the Commission Internationale d'Eclairage L*a*b* system. Color differences (ΔE) were calculated between the baseline and post-staining results. Data were evaluated by analysis of variance and Tukey test (α = 0.05). BI (1.82 ± 0.95) and TR (1.78 ± 0.72) teeth exhibited the greatest ΔE values, while BX (0.88 ± 0.43) and MD (1.09 ± 0.44) teeth were the lowest, regardless of solution and measurement period, and were different from BI and TR teeth (P denture teeth color alterations than orange juice and saliva (P denture teeth color alterations. Greater immersion times caused higher denture teeth color changes. The lifespan of removable dentures and the aesthetic satisfaction of several edentulous patients may be increased with the use of stain-resistant artificial denture teeth.

  10. Influence of balanced occlusion in complete dentures on the decrease in the reduction of an edentulous ridge.

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    Postić, Srdjan D

    2012-12-01

    Balanced occlusal arrangement of artificial teeth and balanced occlusion is a specific type of occlusion that preserves the stability of complete dentures. Balanced occlusion comprises realization of tooth contacts at the working side as well as at the balancing side, at the same time. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of balanced occlusal arrangement of artificial teeth on the decrease in reduction of edentulous alveolar ridge. A longitudinal study on 91 fully edentulous patients was conducted using their panoramic radiographs and parameters of vertical dimension of edentulous ridges. All the patients were clinically examined by the same and a qualified dental practitioner. Numerical values of parameters of vertical dimensions of edentulous ridges and lines were statistically processed and compared using the Student's t-test. Vertical dimensions and heights of edentulous ridges were different after comparison of parameters in complete denture wearers with balanced occlusion and complete denture wearers without bilaterally balanced occlusion, as well as between male and female edentulous patients. Statistically significant differences of heights were established in complete denture wearers' with a set of artificial teeth without balanced occlusion, at the baseline and 12 months after wearing of complete dentures. Balanced occlusion is a favored occlusal design in setting of artificial teeth in conventional complete dentures, which preserves edentulous ridge and influence the stability of dentures.

  11. Presence of Different Candida Species at Denture Wearers With Type 2 Diabetes and Clinically Healthy Oral Mucosa-Pilot Study

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    Petrović Sanja Matić

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: The aim of this study was to examine prevalence of different Candida spp. at diabetics and nondiabetics wearing dentures without clinical signs of Denture Stomatitis (DS and to study if some local and systematic factors are confounders for harboring Candida at these subjects. Material and Methods: Total of 60 subjects wearing partial or complete upper acrylic denture having at least half of palatal mucosa covered by denture were selected and stratified into three experimental groups: systematically health subjects; patients with diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes (T2D and good glycoregulation; and T2D subjects with poorly regulated blood sugar level. Cotton swab samples were obtained from each patient from hard palate mucosa and denture surface. Swab cultures were made on Sabouraud dextrose agar and ChromAgar Media for distinciton of various Candida spp. Density growth was also measured. Results: Frequency of Candida spp. findings were similar between groups. At healthy subjects, only C.albicans was detected. At diabetics, C.albicans was the most common isolated species, followed by C.glabrata and C.tropicalis. Negative finding of yeasts on palatal mucosa, but positive on denture surface were detected at all groups, with the highest frequency (33.4% at diabetics with poor glycoregulation. Denture surface was heavier colonized than hard palate mucosa. Duration of diabetes in years were only independent predictors for harboring Candida spp. at denture surface (Exp B=1.186, CI=1.047-1.344, p=0.007. Conclusions: Prosthesis of denture wearers without DS may serve as reservoir of Candida spp. Presence of more pathogenic and resistant non-albicans species are related to diabetics, even without clinical signs of DS.

  12. Clinical trial of an experimental cleaning solution: antibiofilm effect and integrity of a silicone-based denture liner.

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    Segundo, Antonio de Luna Malheiros; Pisani, Marina Xavier; Nascimento, Céssio do; Souza, Raphael Freitas; Paranhos, Helena de Freitas Oliveira; Silva-Lovato, Cléudia Helena

    2014-09-01

    This study evaluated the antibiofilm effect of an experimental solution of 2% Ricinus communis (R. communis) on a silicone-based denture liner by means of a randomized clinical trial, as well as the integrity of such liner following a cleansing regimen with such solution. About 30 complete denture wearers had their lower dentures relined with a silicone-based denture liner and randomly allocated to cleanse their dentures by means of: (A) a specific toothbrush for complete dentures and dentifrice; (B) soaking in an experimental 2% R. communis solution; and (C) association of A and B. Considered outcomes were biofilm coverage area (%), microbial counts by means of the deoxy-ribonucleic acid (DNA) checkerboard hybridization technique and physical integrity of the soft liner, assessed during a time interval of 60 days. Mean group values were compared by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey tests or generalized linear method (α = 0.05). The mechanical method presented the lowest biofilm percentage (1.45 ± 1.03) if compared to the chemical method (2.96 ± 1.98) and the associated one (2.71 ± 1.76). After 60 days (3.37 ± 2.04), biofilm accumulation was higher than at 15 days (1.28 ± 0.77) and 30 days (2.46 ± 1.54). The denture liner was less deteriorated and kept its physical integrity when the mechanical method was applied. The chemical method presented higher effectiveness against microorganisms, including some Candida species. The 2% R. communis solution presented stronger antimicrobial capacity than brushing on a silicone-based denture liner after immersion. However, it was not superior to the mechanical method in preserving the physical integrity of the material and in biofilm removal. Soft denture liners hygiene is a very important issue and not conclusive in the literature. The experimental solution of 2% R. communis evaluated presented promising antimicrobial potential and should be more explored to be recommended as cleanser.

  13. Association between dentures and the rate of falls in dementia

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    Eshkoor SA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Sima Ataollahi Eshkoor,1 Tengku Aizan Hamid,1 Siti Sa'adiah Hassan Nudin,2 Chan Yoke Mun11Institute of Gerontology, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, 2Institute for Behavioral Research, Kuala Lumpur, MalaysiaBackground: Poor oral health, chronic diseases, functional decline, and low cognitive ability can increase the risk of falls in the elderly.Objectives: The current study aimed to show the effects of oral health, diabetes mellitus (DM, hypertension (HT, heart disease, functional status, and sociodemographic factors on the risk of falls in elderly with dementia.Materials and methods: The sample comprised 1,210 Malaysian elderly who were demented and noninstitutionalized. This study was a national cross-sectional survey entitled “Determinants of Health Status among Older Malaysians”. The effects of age, ethnicity, sex differences, marital status, educational level, oral health, DM, HT, heart disease, and functional status on the risk of falls were evaluated. The multiple logistic regression model was used to estimate the effects of contributing variables on the risk of falls in samples.Results: The prevalence of falls was approximately 17% in subjects. It was found that age (odds ratio [OR] 1.02, non-Malay ethnicity (OR 1.66, heart disease (OR 1.92, and functional decline (OR 1.58 significantly increased the risk of falls in respondents (P<0.05. Furthermore, having teeth (OR 0.59 and dentures (OR 0.66 significantly decreased the rate of falls (P<0.05.Conclusion: It was concluded that age, non-Malay ethnicity, functional decline, heart disease, and oral health significantly affected falls in dementia.Keywords: chronic diseases, dementia, fall, functional decline, oral health

  14. In vitro resistance of reinforced interim fixed partial dentures.

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    Pfeiffer, Peter; Grube, Lars

    2003-02-01

    Comprehensive restorative dental treatment often necessitates the use of interim fixed partial dentures (FPDs) with high stiffness, especially in long-span restorations or areas of heavy occlusal stress. This in vitro study evaluated the fracture load of interim FPDs made with various materials and span lengths. Groups (n = 3) of interim FPDs were fabricated with prosthodontic resin materials on 2 abutments with 3 different pontic widths of 3 units (12 mm), 4 units (19 mm), and 5 units (30 mm). The following materials were tested: (1) a thermoplastic polymer (Promysan Star), (2) Promysan Star with a veneering composite (Vita Zeta), (3) a nonimpregnated polyethylene fiber reinforced resin (Ribbond) with a veneering composite (Sinfony), (4) an impregnated fiber reinforced composite system (Targis/Vectris), and (5) a conventional polymethyl methacrylate, Biodent K+B, (control group). After 5000 thermocycles in 2 water baths at 5 degrees and 55 degrees C, the FPDs were temporarily fixed with a provisional cement on the corresponding abutments and subjected to 3-point bending until fracture by a universal testing machine. Statistical analysis consisted of an analysis of variance (ANOVA, 1-way, 2-way) and Bonferroni-Dunn's multiple comparisons post hoc analysis for test groups (alpha = .05). Fracture resistance (N) differed significantly for 3 (mean: 640 +/- 146 N), 4 (626 +/- 229 N), and 5 unit (658 +/- 98 N) Targis/Vectris FPDs compared with the corresponding Promysan (284 +/- 21 N to 125 +/- 73 N), Biodent K+B (247 +/- 91 N to 218 +/- 85 N), and Promysan/Vita Zeta (95 +/- 15 N to 82 +/- 6 N) groups (P < .05). Significant differences were obtained for the 4 and 5 unit Targis/Vectris FPDs compared with the Sinfony/Ribbond FPDs (281 +/- 25 N - 252 +/- 74 N) for the corresponding pontic spans. Within the limitations of this in vitro study the impregnated fiber reinforcement may considerably enhanced the fracture resistance of interim FPDs of different span lengths.

  15. Prevalence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in patients wearing bimaxillary complete dentures, removable partial dentures and in students with natural dentition.

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    Bordin, Thaisa B; Conci, Ricardo A; Pezzini, Maristela M G; Pezzini, Rolando P; Mendonça, Márcio J

    2013-01-01

    Temporomandibular Disorder (TMD) has attained a prominent role within the context of dental care due to its high prevalence. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of signs and symptoms of TMD in students at the State University of West of Paraná (UNIOESTE) with natural dentition, and in patients with removable partial dentures and double complete dentures. A total of 210 randomly selected individuals of both genders were evaluated, being divided into three groups: seventy students at the UNIOESTE with natural dentition (Group 1), seventy patients with removable partial dentures (Group 2) and seventy patients with bimaxillary complete dentures (Group 3). The data were collected by a single examiner using the American Academy of Orofacial Pain questionnaire for triage, where a single affirmative response to any of the situations mentioned was enough to carry out clinical evaluation. Kolmogorov Smirnov, Mann Whitney, Chi-Square, ANOVA and Tukey's statistical tests were performed. The most prevalent signs and symptoms of TMD in Group 1 were pain or difficulty in chewing or talking, perception of recent change in bite and deviations during the course of mandibular movements. In Group 2 they were perceptions of recent changes in the bite, deflections in the mandibular movements, presence of joint sounds, pain during excursive movements and muscle tenderness. The most prevalent signs and symptoms in Group 3 were limited to mouth opening and poor stability and retention of at least one of the prostheses. Group 3 also reported having received treatment for headaches or facial pain with a high prevalence. Group 2 had the highest prevalence of signs and symptoms. Prevalence was similar in Groups 1 and 3.

  16. Physical and mechanical properties of pressure-molded and injection-molded denture base acrylics in different conditions

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    Yousef A Shibat Al Hamd

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: The three tested denture base acrylics did not show any significant differences in processing shrinkage. However, ProBase Hot showed significantly lower bending deflection values than Lucitone 199 and SR-Ivocap. Compared to Lucitone 199 and SR-Ivocap, ProBase Hot is a tougher and a stiffer material. Hence, it is more likely to fracture readily if subjected to extreme loading conditions due to the accidental fall of the denture on a hard surface or if the denture wearer inadvertently bites on a particularly hard particle.

  17. The study of the condition of the oral prosthesis field epithelium in persons wearing dentures of polypropylene and acrylic bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuturminskiy, V; Chulack, L

    2013-12-01

    The goal of the study was to make a comparative assessment of the effect of the partial removable polypropylene and acrylic dentures on the prosthetic bed epithelium. The material of this study was smears-scrapes of the oral mucosa obtained from 316 patients. The results of the investigation of the morphological cell composition of the oral mucosa epithelium obtained from the prosthesis field and after prosthesis show a negative influence of the acrylic denture bases on the epithelium of the oral mucosa. The most optimal was the correlation of epithelial cells in the oral mucosa in the patients with dentures from "Tipplen R 359", processed in plasma of the glow discharge.

  18. Flipped clinical training: a structured training method for undergraduates in complete denture prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    K, Anbarasi; K, Kasim Mohamed; Vijayaraghavan, Phagalvarthy; Kandaswamy, Deivanayagam

    2016-12-01

    To design and implement flipped clinical training for undergraduate dental students in removable complete denture treatment and predict its effectiveness by comparing the assessment results of students trained by flipped and traditional methods. Flipped training was designed by shifting the learning from clinics to learning center (phase I) and by preserving the practice in clinics (phase II). In phase I, student-faculty interactive session was arranged to recap prior knowledge. This is followed by a display of audio synchronized video demonstration of the procedure in a repeatable way and subsequent display of possible errors that may occur in treatment with guidelines to overcome such errors. In phase II, live demonstration of the procedure was given. Students were asked to treat three patients under instructor's supervision. The summative assessment was conducted by applying the same checklist criterion and rubric scoring used for the traditional method. Assessment results of three batches of students trained by flipped method (study group) and three traditionally trained previous batches (control group) were taken for comparison by chi-square test. The sum of traditionally trained three batch students who prepared acceptable dentures (score: 2 and 3) and unacceptable dentures (score: 1) was compared with the same of flipped trained three batch students revealed that the number of students who demonstrated competency by preparing acceptable dentures was higher for flipped training (χ 2 =30.996 with pflipped training in enhancing students competency and hence recommended for training various clinical procedures.

  19. PMMA denture base material enhancement: a review of fiber, filler, and nanofiller addition

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    Gad MM

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Mohammed M Gad,1 Shaimaa M Fouda,1,2 Fahad A Al-Harbi,1 Ritva Näpänkangas,2,3 Aune Raustia2,3 1Department of Substitutive Dental Sciences, College of Dentistry, University of Dammam, Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 2Research Unit of Oral Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland; 3Medical Research Center, Oulu, Oulu University Hospital and University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland Abstract: This paper reviews acrylic denture base resin enhancement during the past few decades. Specific attention is given to the effect of fiber, filler, and nanofiller addition on poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA properties. The review is based on scientific reviews, papers, and abstracts, as well as studies concerning the effect of additives, fibers, fillers, and reinforcement materials on PMMA, published between 1974 and 2016. Many studies have reported improvement of PMMA denture base material with the addition of fillers, fibers, nanofiller, and hybrid reinforcement. However, most of the studies were limited to in vitro investigations without bioactivity and clinical implications. Considering the findings of the review, there is no ideal denture base material, but the properties of PMMA could be improved with some modifications, especially with silanized nanoparticle addition and a hybrid reinforcement system. Keywords: denture base, PMMA, reinforcement, nanoparticles, fibers, fillers

  20. Study on Antibacterial Property of PMMA Denture Base Materials with Negative Ion Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meitian; Zhang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Jingting; Zheng, Qian; Liu, Bin

    2018-01-01

    To prepare the denture base resin with negative ion powder and evaluate the antibacterial effect of denture base resin with different contents of negative ion powder for clinical application. Method: Denture base material with negative ion powder was prepared by in-situ polymerization method, 50mm * 50mm * 2mm standard samples were prepared respectively. Antibacterial properties were tested with the film contact method. Experimental bacteria: Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC6538), Escherichia coli (ATCC8099).Result:With the increase of the amount of negative ion powder, the inhibition rate of the composite material to Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus showed an increasing trend, and the number of residual bacteria on the surface showed a decreasing trend. When the content of negative ion powder was 2%, the composite material Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli were 77.9% and 80.3% respectively. When the addition ratio was 5%, the bactericidal rate of the composite material to Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli reached 98.2% and 99.1% respectively. Conclusion: The denture base material containing more than 2%wt negative ion powder has strong sterilization.