WorldWideScience

Sample records for dentists women

  1. Women's motivation to become dentists in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kfouri, Maria G; Moyses, Samuel J; Moyses, Simone Tetu

    2013-06-01

    There has been a marked increase of women in dentistry in Brazil and in many countries around the world. The behavioral mechanisms behind the choice of career differ between men and women, and the inclination to care for others is thought by some to be more present in women than it is in men. This article discusses the reasons that lead women to choose dentistry as a profession in Brazil and the impact of feminization on the current and future profile of the profession, based on the ethics of care. The authors' review of the relevant literature published between 2000 and 2011, primarily in Brazil, suggests that whereas men have tended to choose dentistry as a good business opportunity, women have tended to base their decision on relations with other people and the flexibility of practicing the profession. Many women dentists have been found to decide to work fewer hours, report more interruptions in their activities, and have less preference to work in private practice than men dentists. In the view of service users and dental auxiliaries in Brazil, women dentists invest more time in their patients and communicate in a more pleasant, sensitive, and friendly manner. The conclusion suggests that characteristics often associated with women can affect the dental profession in Brazil by introducing greater concern with the promotion of health and other people's well-being in contrast to traditional dentistry based on curative procedures.

  2. Women dentists: Changing the face of dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jammula Surya Prasanna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It was only toward the close of the last century that women emancipated themselves from their former small territory of usefulness in a strictly domestic life, and pushing forward, proved themselves often the business equal to men and sometimes their superior. If was long before this progression, when a women in business or professional ranks was almost a curiosity. When women first entered the profession, they faced many obstacles. Mentors or faculty in the dental organizations majority were male restraining women by all means. In the beginning, men were resentful because they feel women are inferior. It took a long time for women to become a consistent presence in dental schools. In the beginning, dental schools used to admit one or two women each year, later the number increased slowly. Olden day′s women used to relieve not even the tooth ache but also used to relieve others fret also. But histories of dentistry were not acknowledged the talent of women whatsoever. The efforts and achievements of women punch the clock in the future dentistry. The current scenario has totally changed now. Nearly, half of all dental students′ are women and 25% of them are practicing dentists. Only 3% women dentists were there before the 1970s. [1] Women struggled to obtain a degree, to establish practices, and are respected as professionals. Some women choose this rewarding occupation as career followed by their family members. The population tally of chosen work upbringing has changed over time. This paper reports in a delineative way of the amelioration, staggering presence, and intendment of dentistry practicing by worldwide women.

  3. Harmonizing professional, personal, and social responsibilities: Indian women dentists' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagda, Suhasini Jayantilal

    2015-05-01

    Women in Indian culture have a paradoxical status: on the one hand, goddesses are worshipped for power and prosperity; on the other hand, working women face challenges due to age-old beliefs and sociocultural norms. With 60% of the students enrolled in undergraduate dental education currently being women, there is a need to study the challenges these women are facing and how they tackle them. The aim of this survey study was to assess the barriers women dentists face in career advancement and how successfully they balance the personal, professional, and social aspects of their lives. Questionnaires, consisting of four qualitative and 24 quantitative items, were distributed to 500 women dentists: postgraduate residents and faculty members in dental colleges of Mumbai and Navi Mumbai, as well as private dental practitioners. Of the 500 women, 210 returned the survey, for an overall response rate of 42%. The results showed that 95% of the respondents believed they successfully balance the various spheres of their lives, but the most common challenges they faced continued to be traditional gender bias, dual professional and home responsibilities, and preconceived ideas about women.

  4. Gender impact on the socioprofessional identification of women dentists in Bulgaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katrova, Lydia G

    2004-07-01

    Women comprise 73 percent of all dentists in Bulgaria. Almost all of them started their careers as salaried, and now they are self-employed. The purpose of this study was to show how female dentists in Bulgaria met the challenges of the social and health reforms during the period of transition from totalitarian to democratic rule. A field sociological survey was carried out between October 1996 and June 1997, involving a sample of 842 dentists. The questionnaire was designed to give information on dental demography trends, pattern of participation and practice of female dentists, and their career development. The data were treated statistically using an SPSS package. Results show that for the period 1991-96 women dentists owned more than 50 percent of the newly opened private practices in Bulgaria. They were more interested in improving their qualifications and more successful in obtaining specialty status than male dentists. Dentists in Bulgaria by the late 1990 s, with no gender difference, tend to identify themselves as liberal practitioners within the pluralistic model of dental services delivery. The volume of services delivered and profile of women in professional practice and their social and professional mobility are highly competitive, despite the growing problems of maternity leave coverage and funding to re-enter the profession.

  5. Nigerian dentists and oral health-care of pregnant women: Knowledge, attitude and belief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes O Umoh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pregnant women seek preventive, interventional and rehabilitative oral health-care for their oral health and protection of their fetus and babies after delivery. The objective of the study was to determine the Nigerian Dentist′s knowledge, attitude and belief pertaining to the oral health-care of pregnant women. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional of Nigerian dentist was conducted between June and December, 2011 using Huebner et al., modified dentist′s attitude to the pregnant women questionnaire Results: The overall response rate of 92.5% (149/160. Receipt of continuing medical education (CME was reported among the participants on periodontal disease of pregnant patients (22.1%, oral hygiene of pregnant patients (20.1%, early childhood caries (35.6% and general dental problem (51.0%. The majority (92.6% agreed that Dentists have the skill to counsel pregnant patients, But only 73.8% of them provided oral hygiene instruction frequently to pregnant patients and even fewer (6.0% were involved in educational advice on oral health for young women. Many of the participants agreed that counseling pregnant patients about periodontal disease and its effect on the developing baby is of utmost importance. Participants also dominantly agreed that dental treatment should be part of prenatal care and 97.3% of them opined that physician recommendation will increase the likelihood of pregnant seeking dental care. More than half (56.4% of the participants reported that Dentists should be concerned about being sued if something goes wrong with the pregnancy. The recommended ways to improve oral health-care of pregnant women among the participants were through CME (92.6%, provision of educational materials on oral health-care of pregnant women (93.3% and information on ways to counsel pregnant women (98.0%. Conclusion: Data from this study revealed high preparedness, positive attitude and favorable disposition in dental care provision for

  6. [Women and work, with a specific focus on doctors and dentists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Doorne-Huiskes, A

    2017-11-01

    The differences between men and women in their participation in the labour force and education are diminishing: in 2015, 71% of all women between the ages of 20 and 65 had a paid job (in comparison with 82% of men) and the Emancipation monitor 2016 reveals that women more often receive higher education than men. In the study of medicine, this expresses itself in the fact that 68% of new students in 2015 were women. As a consequence the number of women doctors is increasing. The numbers for 2013 show that 65% of active dentists are men and 35% women. They, too, indicate an obvious increase of women. Statements that medicine, including dentistry, is feminising are incorrect because there are still more male doctors than female. The male-female ratio among medical specialists is 60:40 at the moment. It can be concluded that the medical and dental professions serve a well-educated and diverse public. It is precisely for this reason, that the medical and dental professions should offer positions to men and women and to people (m/f) with a Dutch and an immigrant background.

  7. Women in the Boardroom: Reflecting the Changing Gender Demographics of Dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Natasha Anne

    2017-01-01

    Even though there are more women in the workplace today than ever before and more women than men are now graduating from college, there are relatively few women who hold leadership positions, be it in government, academics or on corporate boards.

  8. Professional burnout and work engagement among dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Te Brake, Hans; Bouman, Anne-Marthe; Gorter, Ronald; Hoogstraten, Johan; Eijkman, Michiel

    2007-06-01

    A recent development within burnout research is the shift to its conceptual opposite: work engagement. This study aimed to unravel the concepts of burnout and work engagement, and to determine their levels among dentists. A representative sample of 497 Dutch general dental practitioners was included (survey response rate of 59%), consisting of 372 men and 121 women (the gender of 4 dentists remained unknown). The hypothesized three-factor structure of work engagement (vigor, dedication, and absorption), as measured by the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES), was substantiated among dentists. It was also found that work engagement was related negatively to burnout, as measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). However, a model consisting of a reduced ('core') burnout factor and an 'enhanced' engagement factor (composed of the three original factors plus the burnout factor, personal accomplishment) showed the best fit. Overall burnout levels among dentists are low, and the levels of engagement indicate that dentists have a positive working attitude.

  9. Occupational stress among dentists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    2011-01-01

    Dentists report a high degree of occupational stress.(Cooper, Mallinger, and Kahn, 1978;Coster, Carstens, and Harris, 1987;DiMatteo, Shugars, and Hays, 1993;Hakeberg et al., 1992;Möller and Spangenberg, 1996;Moore, 2000;Myers and Myers, 2004;O'Shea, Corah, and Ayer, 1984) This chapter reviews...... the literature of studies that elaborate on the circumstances of occupational stress of dentists. These will include the frequency of occurrence of occupational stress among dentists in several countries, frequency and intensity of identified stressors specific to dentistry, as well as the consequences...... of this occupational stress. The literature on consequences includes effects on dentists' physical health, personal and occupational performance, including "burnout" phenomena, as well as topics of alcohol or substance abuse and reports of suicidal behaviour among dentists. One specific and less conventionally...

  10. Occupational burnout in Birjand dentists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khazaie T

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aims: Occupational burnout is a psychological syndrome resulting from continuous tensions which causes absence, conflict, job changing, etc. In spite of much effort done in optimizing the work conditions and satisfying the employed persons, the dentists still suffer from this incident. The purpose of this study was to determine the degree of occupational burnout in Birjand dentists and to provide an approach."nMaterials and Methods: In this descriptive-analytical study by the census method, 38 dentists were investigated using Maslach questionnaire. Average values were compared with chi-square and comparison among the groups was performed by Tukey test using SPSS software. P≤0.05 was considered as the level of significance."nResults: In this study, there were 68.4% men and 31.6% women with average age of 37.9 ±7.6 years and average work experience of 12.5±7.3 years, 15.8% single and 84.2% married. Frequency of exhaustion, intense depersonalization, and intense feeling of being unsuccessful was 21.1%, 81.6%, and 100%, respectively. There were no significant differences between occupation burnout dimensions and the other variable, such as gender, sports, marital status, and workday hours (P>0.05."nConclusion: Protection of this stratum, providing educational programs and creating job variations are necessary for optimizing the work environment. Future studies with more sample size are suggested to determine the effect of factors.

  11. Going to the Dentist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Going to the Dentist KidsHealth / For Kids / Going to ... your teeth at home. Flossing involves using a piece of waxy string called dental floss to get ...

  12. Issues and Challenges Facing the Minority Woman Dentist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkford, Jeanne C.

    1992-01-01

    The status of minority women dentists is reviewed, and initiatives to improve it are noted. Issues and challenges for African-American female dentists are outlined, including negative racial/gender stereotypes, lack of advancement opportunities, difficulties in starting practices and securing professional and social support systems, lack of…

  13. Dentist-Patient Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Raftu

    2016-01-01

    In the dentist-patient relationship confidence comes from the assurance that personal information(belonging to the patient will remain confidential; this is in the interest of the patient and the patient'sautonomy is recognized. There were presented several behavioral types which can lead to a physicianpatientrelationship, based on trust.

  14. Less counseling on Early Childhood Caries transmission by dentists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgrom, Peter; Huebner, Colleen E.; Mancl, Lloyd; Garson, Gayle; Grembowski, David

    2013-01-01

    Objective High levels of Streptococcus mutans on teeth of young children are predictive of Early Childhood Caries (ECC). Transmission from mother-to-child is common and studies have demonstrated treatment of the mother results in less ECC. The objective of this study was to determine how dentists have adopted the practice of counseling about ECC. Methods In 2006 as part of a larger study on dental care for pregnant women, we surveyed 829 general dentists in Oregon. The questionnaire contained questions to capture the extent to which general dentists have adopted counseling pregnant women about ECC transmission, to describe personal and practice characteristics, and examine how dentists' views on the ease of adopting of new procedures related to ECC counseling. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify separate and additive effects of demographic and practice characteristics, attitudes, and beliefs. Results The adjusted odds of a dentist who strongly believed in the link between mothers and babies and provided ECC counseling were 1.60 (95% CI 1.3-2.0, P<0.01). The odds of a dentist who reported discussing ECC with staff members and provided counseling were 2.7 (95% CI 1.7-4.3, P<0.01). Male dentists were less likely to counsel patients than female dentists (Adjusted OR = 0.5, 95% CI 0.3-1.0, p<0.05). Conclusions The strongest predictors of counseling patients about ECC were dentists' belief in the evidence of caries transmission and dentists' discussion of ECC during staff meetings. PMID:22970775

  15. Counseling on Early Childhood Caries transmission by dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgrom, Peter; Huebner, Colleen E; Mancl, Lloyd; Garson, Gayle; Grembowski, David

    2013-01-01

    High levels of Streptococcus mutans on teeth of young children are predictive of Early Childhood Caries (ECC). Transmission from mother-to-child is common and studies have demonstrated treatment of the mother results in less ECC. The objective of this study was to determine how dentists have adopted the practice of counseling about ECC. In 2006 as part of a larger study on dental care for pregnant women, we surveyed 829 general dentists in Oregon. The questionnaire contained questions to capture the extent to which general dentists have adopted counseling pregnant women about ECC transmission, to describe personal and practice characteristics, and examine how dentists' views on the ease of adopting of new procedures related to ECC counseling. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify separate and additive effects of demographic and practice characteristics, attitudes, and beliefs. The adjusted odds of a dentist who strongly believed in the link between mothers and babies and provided ECC counseling were 1.60 (95% CI 1.3-2.0, P<0.01). The odds of a dentist who reported discussing ECC with staff members and provided counseling were 2.7 (95% CI 1.7-4.3, P<0.01). Male dentists were less likely to counsel patients than female dentists (Adjusted OR=0.5, 95% CI 0.3-1.0, p<0.05). The strongest predictors of counseling patients about ECC were dentists' belief in the evidence of caries transmission and dentists' discussion of ECC during staff meetings. © 2012 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  16. Practice patterns among male and female general dentists in a Washington State population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Aguila, Michael A; Leggott, Penelope J; Robertson, Paul B; Porterfield, Denise L; Felber, Gene D

    2005-06-01

    Women make up about 14 percent of general dentists in the United States, and the proportion is projected to exceed 29 percent by 2020. The authors obtained dental benefits claims data from the Washington Dental Service (WDS), Seattle, and used them to examine the practice patterns of 265 women and 1,947 men engaged in general dentistry for at least 26 days in 2001. Practice variables of interest included age, days worked, procedures performed and total income from WDS reimbursements and patient copayments. The number, age and sex of patients treated also were obtained. Using productivity data, the authors also estimated the potential impact of an increase in the percentage of female dentists in the state. The authors found no differences between male and female dentists in the number of procedures per patient, income per patient or income per day of work. Frequency distributions of various services were highly similar for both groups. Multiple regression models showed no influence of dentist's sex on total income. However, the mean and median numbers of days worked were about 10 percent lower for female dentists than for male dentists. This difference was consistent with the finding that female dentists treated approximately 10 percent fewer patients, performed about 10 percent fewer procedures and had a combined income of about 10 percent less than that of male dentists. Practice patterns of male and female dentists generally were equivalent in this WDS population. Female and male dentists provided a similar range of services and earned an equal income per patient treated and per day worked. However, women worked fewer days per year than did men, irrespective of age. If the dental work force and practice patterns remain unchanged otherwise, the total number of patients treated per dentist will decrease slightly as women make up an increasing proportion of dentists.

  17. Gender differences in dentists' working practices and job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, Kathryn M S; Thomson, W Murray; Rich, Alison M; Newton, J Timothy

    2008-05-01

    To describe the working practices and level of job satisfaction of male and female dentists. A nationwide postal survey of all dentists holding an annual practising certificate in New Zealand (response rate 78.1%). The mean number of hours worked per week was 29.1 for female and 36.0 for male dentists. The main reason for part-time practice given by women was caring for children (cited by 67.2%) and for men was personal choice (cited by 63.6%). A greater proportion of females than males were employed on a salary or as an associate in practice rather than owning their own practice. Male dentists were more active in continuing education than females. The mean career satisfaction score for male respondents was 7.6 and for females 7.1 (Pwomen than men had taken a career break, usually for child rearing. Two-thirds of women and one-third of men planned to retire from dentistry before 60 years of age. Male and female dentists differ in their working patterns and career satisfaction. There is a need for ongoing monitoring of the workforce, particularly as the gender distribution (and societal trends and expectations) continues to change.

  18. Gender Differences and Predictors of Work Hours in a Sample of Ontario Dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Julia C; Ahmad, Atyub; Shaw, Jodi L; Rashid, Faahim; Clancy, Alicia; David, Courtney; Figueiredo, Rafael; Quiñonez, Carlos

    2016-11-01

    To determine the influence of gender on weekly work hours of Ontario dentists. In 2012, a 52-item survey was sent to a random sample of 3000 Ontario dentists (1500 men and 1500 women) to collect information on personal, professional and sociodemographic characteristics. The resulting data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and linear regression modeling. The 867 respondents included 463 men, 401 women and 3 people whose gender was unreported, yielding a response rate of 29%.Most dentists worked full-time, with men working, on average, 2 h/week longer than women. Younger dentists worked more than older dentists. Practice ownership increased weekly work hours, and men reported ownership more often than women. Canadian-trained women worked significantly fewer hours than those trained internationally. Women were more likely than men to work part time and take parental leave and more often reported being primary caregivers and solely responsible for household chores. Women with partner support for such tasks worked more hours than those who were solely responsible. Dentists with children ≤ 3 years of age worked fewer hours than those without children; however, after controlling for spousal responsibility for caregiver duties, this effect was eliminated. More women than men reported making concessions in their career to devote time to family. Gender, age, practice ownership, training location and degree of spousal support for household and caregiving responsibilities were predictors of weekly work hours. For women specifically, training location and household and caregiving responsibilities predicted weekly work hours.

  19. Work‑Related Musculoskeletal Pain among Lebanese Dentists: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-14

    Sep 14, 2017 ... in the upper extremities is a serious concern that affects Lebanese dentists. Most of them often ... Improper work routines, inconvenient attitudes and monotonous ... The predictor variables of the study were age, gender, ..... high percentage of women with CTS is explained by .... the United Arab Emirates.

  20. Dentist education and labour market in Mexico: elements for policy definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Robledo, Luz María; González-Robledo, María Cecilia; Nigenda, Gustavo

    2012-09-13

    Here, the educational and labour market characteristics of Mexican dentists are revised. Dentistry is a health profession that has been scarcely studied in developing countries. This analysis attempts to understand the relationships and gaps between the supply and demand of dentists in the country. Around 5000 new dentists graduate every year looking for a place in the labour market. A cross-sectional study with exploratory, descriptive and correlational scope was carried out between 2006 and 2008. Analyses of quantitative data on dentists from national surveys and occupational statistics were complemented with qualitative information provided by 43 key informants in five Mexican states. The 2008 dentist labour market can be characterized as follows: 75% worked in the private sector, most of them independently; more than two-thirds were women; the proportion of specialists was low (slightly more than 10%); unemployment was more than 20% and labour wastage was nearly 40%, with most wastage corresponding with female dentists. The increase in the number of dentists entering the labour market during the last two decades is more related to the educational market than to the population's health needs and the number of dentists actually required to meet them. The problems identified in the Mexican dentist labour market necessitate urgent intervention on behalf of regulatory bodies in order to balance the tendencies of supply and demand in the number of trained professionals as well as in their incorporation into different market areas. Adequate policies are required to increase the likelihood of achieving this objective.

  1. [The organization of Jewish dentists in pre-Israel Palestine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keren-Kratz, M

    2016-04-01

    The first modern dental institutes were established in Europe and in the USA during the 1840s. At that period there wasn't a single qualified doctor in Palestine, not to mention a professional dentist. A couple of decades later, as the number of Christian pilgrims grew, some modern hospitals were established and a few non-Jewish dentists opened their clinics in Jerusalem, which was then and in the following decades, the region's largest city. In Europe, dentistry became a popular profession among Jews in general and among Jewish women in particular. The first Jewish dentist settled in Jerusalem in the mid-1880s. Other dentists were slow to arrive and their number began to grow only after the turn of the 20th century. Their professional education varied from those who were trained as apprentices by other dentists to those which studied a couple of years in an academic dental school. The devastation caused by WWI prompted American-Zionist organizations to send a special medical unit to Palestine in 1918. Along medical supplies it also brought a small group of doctors and dentists. The two American dentists that decided to remain in Palestine took upon themselves to spread their medical and scientific knowledge. They also organized the dentists, whose number grew considerably during the 1920s, and called the authorities to regulate the dental profession. In 1926 the British authorities issued a decree regulating all medical professions. It demanded that dental practitioners will be licensed after proving their previous studies and professional knowledge. In 1931, local dentists' organizations decided to establish the Palestine Dental Association. Five years later it was accepted as a member by the International Dental Federation (FDI) and was recognized by the local authorities. Since the 1930s, prominent Jewish dentists from abroad were invited to come to Palestine to lecture, and local dentists participated in international conferences. This prompted the first

  2. Ambulatory care visits by Taiwanese dentists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Hwa Su

    2013-06-01

    Conclusion: There were inequalities in risks of ambulatory care use among Taiwan's dentists. Further studies should be conducted to investigate the causes responsible for the observed geographic and institutional variations in the risk of morbidity among dentists in Taiwan.

  3. County-level characteristics as predictors of dentists? ECC counseling in the USA: a survey study

    OpenAIRE

    Milgrom, Peter; Huebner, Colleen E; Mancl, Lloyd A; Chi, Donald L; Garson, Gayle; Grembowski, David

    2013-01-01

    Background Transmission of Streptococcus mutans from mother-to-child can lead to Early Childhood Caries. A previous study identified characteristics and beliefs of general dentists about counseling pregnant women to reduce risk of infection and Early Childhood Caries. This study extends those findings with an analysis of county level factors. Methods In 2006, we surveyed 732 general dentists in Oregon, USA about dental care for pregnant women. Survey items asked about individual and practice ...

  4. Determinants of Dentists' Geographic Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beazoglou, Tryfon J.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A model for explaining the geographic distribution of dentists' practice locations is presented and applied to particular market areas in Connecticut. Results show geographic distribution is significantly related to a few key variables, including demography, disposable income, and housing prices. Implications for helping students make practice…

  5. Accessory tragus: a dentist's perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Khandelwal, Vishal; Banda, Naveen Reddy; Nayak, Ullal Anand; Banda, Vanaja Reddy

    2013-01-01

    Accessory tragus (AT) also referred as preauricular tag is a rudimentary tag of ear tissue This paper presents two specific cases: one hereditary and another sporadic case of AT. A general clinical description of AT, its associated syndromes, embryology aetiopathogenesis and management is discussed. A dentist can play an important role in spotting the AT during their head and neck examination. The presence of this defect can be correlated to other congenital defects of first branchial arch. O...

  6. Boundary work of dentists in everyday work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzén, Cecilia

    2012-08-01

    The Swedish policy objectives in dental care provision - to meet public demands for dental care and to increase the cost-effectiveness of the service - require dentists to work in teams with dental hygienists and dental nurses. This study focused on the role of dentists in the distribution of work tasks within teams in one Swedish Public Dental Service organisation. Dental clinics were viewed as micro-political arenas in which dentists attempt to demarcate professional boundaries in response to teamwork. Semi-structured interviews, observations and documents were used. The interviewed individuals were seven dentists employed at two clinics, the managers of each clinic and the general manager. The dentists were interviewed to investigate how they defend or blur professional boundaries. They were also observed at work. The clinic managers and the general manager were interviewed to identify their expectations of dentists concerning work division. The documents comprised organisational plans and annual reports. Dentists demarcated professional boundaries by utilising various power resources: treatment responsibility, specialist knowledge, discretion, and avoidance of work considered to be low status work. The dentists also contributed to blurred boundaries between themselves and the other dental professionals by discussing patient treatment, giving and receiving advice, and assisting the others in skill development. Although dentists' boundary work could obstruct implementation of policy objectives, dentists' behaviour contributed to effective collaboration within the teams. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. Health of dentists in United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Raghad; Al-Ali, Khalid

    2013-02-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence and nature of some health and lifestyle problems among dentists in United Arab Emirates (UAE). A cross-sectional study with a one-stage complex sampling technique using a self-reported questionnaire distributed to all 844 dentists, working in three cities (Abu Dhabi, Dubai and Sharjah) in UAE. Seven hundred and thirty-three (87%) dentists, aged 22-70 years, responded. More than half (n = 442, 61%) of dentists do not exercise regularly. Around one-seventh of the dentists are smokers. One hundred and eighteen dentists (16%) reported having some known systemic problem. The most common systemic health problems were cardiovascular diseases (n = 56, 8%). The present study indicates that the prevalence of exercise among dentists in UAE is relatively low and some systemic health problems, especially cardiovascular diseases, are present among dentists practicing in UAE. Cigarette consumption is relatively high in this population of dentist. Further continuing education and investigation of the appropriate intervention to improve rates of exercise and reduce the level of smoking among dentists in UAE is needed, and this may help reduce the level of systemic disease. © 2013 FDI World Dental Federation.

  8. County-level characteristics as predictors of dentists' ECC counseling in the USA: a survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgrom, Peter; Huebner, Colleen E; Mancl, Lloyd A; Chi, Donald L; Garson, Gayle; Grembowski, David

    2013-05-20

    Transmission of Streptococcus mutans from mother-to-child can lead to Early Childhood Caries. A previous study identified characteristics and beliefs of general dentists about counseling pregnant women to reduce risk of infection and Early Childhood Caries. This study extends those findings with an analysis of county level factors. In 2006, we surveyed 732 general dentists in Oregon, USA about dental care for pregnant women. Survey items asked about individual and practice characteristics. In the present study we matched those data to county level factors and used multinomial logistic regression to test the effects of the factors (i.e., dentist to population ratio, percentage of female dentists, percentage of females of childbearing age, and percentage of individuals living in poverty) on counseling behavior. County level factors were unrelated to counseling behavior when the models controlled for dentists' individual attitudes, beliefs, and practice level characteristics. The adjusted odds ratios for no counseling of pregnant patients (versus 100 percent counseling) were 1.1 (95% CI .8-1.7), 1.0 (1.0-1.1), 1.2 (.9-1.5), and 1.1 (1.0-1.2) for dentist/population ratio, percent female dentists, percent females of childbearing age, and percent in poverty, respectively Similar results were obtained when dentists who counseled some patients were compared to those counseling 100 percent of patients. Community level factors do not appear to impact the individual counseling behavior of general dentists in Oregon, USA regarding the risk of maternal transmission of Early Childhood Caries.

  9. [Suggestions to improve dentist-endodontist collaboration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabalegui, B; Zabalegui, I; Flores, L

    1989-01-01

    Referrals from the general dentist to the endodontist are in some occasions complicated with lack of proper communication among dentist-patient-specialist, resulting in the loss of confidence or even the patient. Suggestions to improve this communication are discussed, which will provide the patient a higher confidence in the indicated endodontic treatment and a better dental service. It will also enhance the prestige of the general dentists' and specialists' practice.

  10. The practice of marketing by dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, E W; Weller, R B

    1994-01-01

    The attitudes and practices of dentists regarding the implementation of all the strategic variables in the marketing mix is examined. Factor analysis is used to reduce the data to five factors which are used to describe the attitudes and practices of dentists. The importance of using other marketing variables besides promotion is pointed out along with the implications for influencing dentists to take a broader strategic perspective in the development of their practice.

  11. Medical emergency management among Iranian dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khami, Mohammad Reza; Yazdani, Reza; Afzalimoghaddam, Mohammad; Razeghi, Samaneh; Moscowchi, Anahita

    2014-11-01

    More than 18,000 patients need medical emergencies management in dental offices in Iran annually. The present study investigates medical emergencies management among Iranian dentists. From the list of the cell phone numbers of the dentists practicing in the city of Tehran, 210 dentists were selected randomly. A self-administered questionnaire was used as the data collection instrument. The questionnaire requested information on personal and professional characteristics of the dentists, as well as their knowledge and self-reported practice in the field of medical emergency management, and availability of required drugs and equipments to manage medical emergencies in their offices. Totally, 177 dentists (84%) completed the questionnaire. Less than 60% of the participants were knowledgeable about characteristics of hypoglycemic patient, chest pain with cardiac origin, and true cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) practice. Regarding practice, less than one quarter of the respondents acquired acceptable scores. In regression models, higher practice scores were significantly associated with higher knowledge scores (p < 0.001). The results call for a need to further education on the subject for dentists. Continuing education and changing dental curriculum in the various forms seems to be useful in enhancement of the self-reported knowledge and practice of dentists. To successful control of medical emergencies in the dental office, dentists must be prepared to recognize and manage a variety of such conditions. In addition to dentist's knowledge and skill, availability of necessary equipments and trained staff is also of critical importance.

  12. [Migration of dentists within Hungary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balázs, Péter

    2010-09-01

    Concerning the human resource management in the health care, Hungarian analysts focus mainly on cross-national migration, which was instigated considerably by joining the European Union in 2004. Contrasted to other health care professionals, dentists emphasized also the importance of in-country migration (mobility) indicating serious dangers of developing inequalities in the dental service. From the point of view of health system planning, the main problem is to balance the needs and the number of professionals in regions and areas with extremely different socio-economic conditions. Under dictatorial governments, this "balancing" (which was experienced also in Hungary) is a forced allocation of young professionals to the target regions. In political freedom and free market economy, these measures are unthinkable. The present domestic area distribution, concerning also the supply through vacancies by old age inactivity and cross-national migration, is ruled by personal decisions of actually graduated and immigrant professionals respectively. Therefore, it is unavoidable to investigate the interrelation of factors (dentists' births place, study migration and decisions for practice allocation) ruling the in-country geographic patterns of dental practices. This evidence-based knowledge can only explain the present situation and provide guidelines for health policy decision makers.

  13. Percutaneous Injuries in Nigerian Dentists | Utomi | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to assess the frequency of percutaneous injuries among Nigerian dentists and to describe the factors associated with the injuries. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire survey of 160 practicing dentists in Lagos, Ibadan, Ife and Benin. Result: A total of 208 injuries were reported by ...

  14. The dentist's operating posture - ergonomic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pîrvu, C; Pătraşcu, I; Pîrvu, D; Ionescu, C

    2014-06-15

    The practice of dentistry involves laborious high finesse dental preparations, precision and control in executions that require a particular attention, concentration and patience of the dentist and finally the dentist's physical and mental resistance. The optimal therapeutic approach and the success of practice involve special working conditions for the dentist and his team in an ergonomic environment. The meaning of the posture in ergonomics is the manner in which different parts of the body are located and thus the reports are established between them in order to allow a special task execution. This article discusses the posture adopted by dentists when they work, beginning with the balanced posture and going to different variants of posture. The ideal posture of a dentist gives him, on the one hand the optimal working conditions (access, visibility and control in the mouth) and on the other hand, physical and psychological comfort throughout the execution of the clinical acts. Although the theme of dentist posture is treated with great care and often presented in the undergraduate courses and the continuing education courses on ergonomics in dentistry, many dentists do not know the subject well enough nor the theoretical issues and therefore nor the practical applicability. The risk and perspective of the musculoskeletal disorders related to unbalanced postures should determine the dentists take postural corrective actions and compensation measures in order to limit the negative effects of working in a bad posture.

  15. Practice settings and dentists' job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Sasso, Anthony T; Starkel, Rebecca L; Warren, Matthew N; Guay, Albert H; Vujicic, Marko

    2015-08-01

    The nature and organization of dental practice is changing. The aim of this study was to explore how job satisfaction among dentists is associated with dental practice setting. A survey measured satisfaction with income, benefits, hours worked, clinical autonomy, work-life balance, emotional exhaustion, and overall satisfaction among dentists working in large group, small group, and solo practice settings; 2,171 dentists responded. The authors used logistic regression to measure differences in reported levels of satisfaction across practice settings. Dentists working in small group settings reported the most satisfaction overall. Dentists working in large group settings reported more satisfaction with income and benefits than dentists in solo practice, as well as having the least stress. Findings suggest possible advantages and disadvantages of working in different types of practice settings. Dentists working in different practice settings reported differences in satisfaction. These results may help dentists decide which practice setting is best for them. Copyright © 2015 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Dentist education and labour market in Mexico: elements for policy definition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Robledo Luz

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Here, the educational and labour market characteristics of Mexican dentists are revised. Dentistry is a health profession that has been scarcely studied in developing countries. This analysis attempts to understand the relationships and gaps between the supply and demand of dentists in the country. Around 5000 new dentists graduate every year looking for a place in the labour market. Methods A cross-sectional study with exploratory, descriptive and correlational scope was carried out between 2006 and 2008. Analyses of quantitative data on dentists from national surveys and occupational statistics were complemented with qualitative information provided by 43 key informants in five Mexican states. Results The 2008 dentist labour market can be characterized as follows: 75% worked in the private sector, most of them independently; more than two-thirds were women; the proportion of specialists was low (slightly more than 10%; unemployment was more than 20% and labour wastage was nearly 40%, with most wastage corresponding with female dentists. The increase in the number of dentists entering the labour market during the last two decades is more related to the educational market than to the population’s health needs and the number of dentists actually required to meet them. Conclusions The problems identified in the Mexican dentist labour market necessitate urgent intervention on behalf of regulatory bodies in order to balance the tendencies of supply and demand in the number of trained professionals as well as in their incorporation into different market areas. Adequate policies are required to increase the likelihood of achieving this objective.

  17. Pediatric dentists' perspective of general dentists' role in treating children aged 0-3 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coe, Julie M; Razdan, Shinjni; Best, Al M; Brickhouse, Tegwyn H

    2017-01-01

    This study examined pediatric dentists' perspectives on the types of dental services general dentists provide to children who are 0-3 years old. A web-based survey was sent to 5185 pediatric dentists and 769 (14.8%) responded. Among the respondents, 58% agreed with general dentists' providing an age 1 dental visit. Only 24% agreed with general dentists' performing complex behavior management techniques, such as sedation, to patients aged 0-3 years. Those respondents who taught pediatric dentistry full time were more likely to agree with general dentists' providing an age 1 dental visit (P = 0.0088). Those who reported that their own dental school had adequately prepared them for this type of age 1 visit were also more in agreement (P pediatric dentists' perceptions of the level of collaboration between general dentists and pediatric dentists; the types of oral health services general dentists can provide for children aged 0-3 years; and the anticipated level of competency of entry-level general dentists.

  18. Education of dentists in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komabayashi, Takashi; Zhu, Qiang; Jiang, Jin; Hu, De-Yu; Kim, Kang-Ju; Toda, Shinji; Tanne, Yuki; Tanimoto, Kotaro; Kirkland, Mark D; Bird, William F

    2006-10-01

    China is geographically located in the east of Asia and its population exceeds 1.3 billion. An understanding of dental education in China is thus of interest. However, as there is little published information on this topic, this paper provides information about China regarding its dental history, dental school system including curriculum and dental licensure. High school graduates take a nationwide entrance examination to apply for dental school, of which there are more than 50 in China. A five year dental education leads to the BDS degree. Dental school graduates must then pass the nationwide licensure examination to practise dentistry. Currently, there are not adequate numbers of dentists to provide the necessary oral health care for people living outside metropolitan areas.

  19. Risk-averse purchasing behavior of female dentists and innovation in dental practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J McGrath

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to see if there was any correlation between the variables of age, gender, practice location and longevity, and type of practice on the risk-taking behavior of dentists in Connecticut. Risk-taking behavior was defined as the willingness to adopt new technologies. A questionnaire was used to gather data, and a series of questions were then posed to estimate the degree to which the responding dentists would be willing to implement the technology into their practices. Materials and Methods: Three hundred Connecticut dentists were randomly selected from a list of dentists that was provided by Benco Dental Supply Company. A questionnaire was written and mailed to all 300 dentists with a return envelope inside. One hundred twenty-nine dentists responded. The questionnaire contained questions to gather demographic information about the respondents. It posed a hypothetical situation that described a new imaging technology that was recently brought into the market. The only differences between this technology and current imaging machines were that it did not emit any radiation, and it was twice as expensive as comparable imaging technologies. A risk score was calculated based on the responses to the three main questions. Those who would adopt the technology quickly or immediately received higher risk scores, and those who would wait or would not buy the technology at all received low risk scores. The data were then analyzed with SPSS software to detect if there were statistically significant differences between different groups of dentists. Results: Male dentists were found to have higher risk scores than their female counterparts. Men in the 30-39-years age range had the highest risk scores, while women in this age range had the lowest. As age increased, the difference between the sexes decreased. Specialists were found to have higher risk scores compared to general dentists of the same gender; however, male

  20. Dental sealant knowledge, opinion, values and practice of Spanish dentists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    San Martin Laura

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple guidelines and systematic reviews recommend sealant use to reduce caries risk. Yet, multiple reports also indicate that sealants are significantly underutilized. This study examined the knowledge, opinions, values, and practice (KOVP of dentists concerning sealant use in the southwest region of Andalusia, Spain. This is a prelude to the generation of a regional plan for improving children’s oral health in Andalusia. Methods The survey’s target population was dentists working in western Andalusia, equally distributed in the provinces of Seville, Cadiz, and Huelva (N=2,047. A convenience sample of meeting participants and meeting participant email lists (N=400 were solicited from the annual course on Community and Pediatric Dentistry. This course is required for all public health sector dentists, and is open to all private sector dentists. Information on the dentist’s KOVP of sealants was collected using four-part questionnaire with 31, 5-point Likert-scaled questions. Results The survey population demographics included 190 men (48% and 206 women (52% with an average clinical experience of 10.6 (± 8.4 years and 9.3 (± 7.5 years, respectively. A significant sex difference was observed in the distribution of place of work (urban/suburb (p=0.001, but no sex differences between working sector (public/private. The mean ± SD values for each of the four KOVP sections for pit and fissure sealants were: knowledge = 3.57 ± 0.47; opinion = 2.48 ± 0.47; value = 2.74 ± 0.52; and practice = 3.48 ± 0.50. No sex differences were found in KOVP (all p >0.4. Independent of sex: knowledge statistically differed by years of experience and place of work; opinion statistically differed by years of experience and sector; and practice statistically differed by years of experience and sector. Less experienced dentists tended to have slightly higher scores (~0.25 on a Likert 1–5 scale. Statistically significant correlations were

  1. Assessing Oral Cancer Awareness Among Dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebabcıoğlu, Özge; Pekiner, Filiz Namdar

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess oral cancer awareness among dentists who attended 101st FDI World Dental Congress, İstanbul, Turkey. Among 170 dentists who agreed to participate, there were 13 oral surgeons, 6 restorative dentists, 4 endodontists, 4 orthodontists, 6 periodontists, 5 pedodontists, and 14 prosthodontists. Knowledge of oral cancer risk factors and diagnosis procedures, dentists' attitude towards oral cancers, management practice regarding oral cancer, and oral cancer information sources were assessed using 25 questions. The data were analyzed with IBM SPSS Statistics 22.0 program. Among 170 participant dentists, there were 69 (40.6%) male dentists and 101 (59.4%) female dentists. Largest number of them identified tobacco (98.8%) and alcohol usage (91.2%), prior oral cancer lesions (95.3%), viral infections (90.0%), UV exposure (86.5%), and betel quid chewing (80.6%), and lower numbers reported older age (56.5%) and low consumption of fruit and vegetables (52.4%). Oral medicine specialists scored marginally higher in indicating erythroplakia and leukoplakia most likely to be precancerous and squamous cell carcinoma as the most common form of oral cancer (p ral cancer detection and prevention.

  2. Dentists' attitude to provision of care for people with learning disabilities in Udaipur, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajappa, Ramesh; Tak, Mridula; Sharda, Archana J; Asawa, Kailash; Jalihal, Sagar; Kakatkar, Gauri

    2013-03-01

    This study determines and compares the attitudes of dentists to the provision of care for people with learning disabilities according to gender, qualification, previous experience of treating patients with learning disabilities and work experience of dentists. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 247 dentists (166 men and 81 women) using a pretested structured questionnaire. This questionnaire assessed the respondent's attitude towards learning-disabled patients in five categories: beliefs about treating them, their capabilities, discrimination against these patients, their social behaviour and quality of care to be received by these patients. The information on dentist's gender, qualification, work experience and previous experience of treating patients with learning disabilities was also collected through questionnaire. The Student's t-test and anova test were used for statistical analysis. The mean attitude score was found to be 71.13 ± 8.97. A statistically significant difference was found in the mean attitude scores of dentists with work experience (p = 0.000). Study subjects with postgraduate qualification and previous experience of treating patients with learning disabilities had significantly greater mean attitude score than their counterparts (p = 0.000). The overall attitude of dentists towards provision of care for people with learning disabilities was favourable, which increased with higher qualification and past experience. © 2012 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences © 2012 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  3. Barriers to Medicaid Participation among Florida Dentists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Henrietta L.; Catalanotto, Frank; Guo, Yi; Marks, John; Dharamsi, Shafik

    2015-01-01

    Background Finding dentists who treat Medicaid-enrolled children is a struggle for many parents. The purpose of this study was to identify non-reimbursement factors that influence the decision by dentists about whether or not to participate in the Medicaid program in Florida. Methods Data from a mailed survey was analyzed using a logistic regression model to test the association of Medicaid participation with the Perceived Barriers and Social Responsibility variables. Results General and pediatric dentists (n=882) who identified themselves as either Medicaid (14%) or Non-Medicaid (86%) participants responded. Five items emerged as significant predictors of Medicaid participation, with a final concordance index of 0.905. Two previously unreported barriers to participation in Medicaid emerged: 1) dentists’ perception of social stigma from other dentists for participating in Medicaid, and 2) the lack of specialists to whom Medicaid patients can be referred. Conclusions This study provides new information about non-reimbursement barriers to Medicaid participation. PMID:25702734

  4. Oral cancer awareness among dentists in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Bobby K; Sundaram, Devipriya B; Sharma, Prem

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess oral cancer awareness among dentists in Kuwait. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 200 dentists working at the Ministry of Health Dental Centers and Kuwait University Dental Center using a structured questionnaire. Dentists' knowledge about risk factors of oral cancer and about diagnostic concepts, current practices and opinions, preferred point of referral as well as interest in continuing education were assessed and the responses were analyzed. Of the 200 dentists surveyed, 153 responded (76.5% response rate). The mean knowledge score of the respondents was 20.6 ± 4.0 out of a total score of 30. Thirty-five (22.9%) dentists had consistently high knowledge scores for both risk factors and diagnostic concepts. Of the 153 dentists, 132 (86.3%) were interested in obtaining further information about oral cancer. This study highlighted the need for improved knowledge and education of dental practitioners on oral cancer. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Androgyny in dentists: The contribution of masculinity and femininity to mental health and well-being

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeni L. Nikolaev

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. A dentist’s professional activity requires a high level of personality traits that are usually regarded as a combination of both female and male traits. Androgynous gender identity corresponds to dentists’ professional requirements and allows the dentists to retain mental stability and psychological well-being. Objective. The goal of this study is to determine the specificity of the androgynous identity in dentists in the context of gender differences as indicators of mental health and subjective well-being. Design. The first stage of the research covered 129 dentists of both sexes to reveal their androgynous gender type using the Bem Sex Role Inventory. During the second stage, 117 androgynous dentists were studied using the SCL-90-R and Brief Subjective Well-being Questionnaire in an effort to reveal the specificity of the dentists’ mental health and self-esteem. Results. According to the results, individuals with an androgynous type of gender identity constitute the largest part of dentists (90.70 %, regardless of their biological sex. The expression of masculinity does not statistically differ from the expression of femininity within the androgynous sample. Regardless of their sex, these dentists are characterized by a higher level of mental health. No significant differences were revealed between androgynous men and androgynous women in their subjective well-being indicators — self-estimation of health, satisfaction with material status and success motivation. Conclusion. We concluded that androgyny is the most common type of gender identity in the men and women engaged in dentistry. The basic gender characteristic in the structure of androgynous identity in dentists is masculinity, which is closely interrelated with mental health and subjective well-being regardless of biological sex.

  6. Use of communication techniques by Maryland dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maybury, Catherine; Horowitz, Alice M; Wang, Min Qi; Kleinman, Dushanka V

    2013-12-01

    Health care providers' use of recommended communication techniques can increase patients' adherence to prevention and treatment regimens and improve patient health outcomes. The authors conducted a survey of Maryland dentists to determine the number and type of communication techniques they use on a routine basis. The authors mailed a 30-item questionnaire to a random sample of 1,393 general practice dentists and all 169 members of the Maryland chapter of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry. The overall response rate was 38.4 percent. Analysis included descriptive statistics, analysis of variance and ordinary least squares regression analysis to examine the association of dentists' characteristics with the number of communication techniques used. They set the significance level at P communication techniques and 3.6 of the seven basic techniques, whereas pediatric dentists reported using a mean of 8.4 and 3.8 of those techniques, respectively. General dentists who had taken a communication course outside of dental school were more likely than those who had not to use the 18 techniques (P communication course outside of dental school were more likely than those who had not to use the 18 techniques (P communication techniques that dentists used routinely varied across the 18 techniques and was low for most techniques. Practical Implications. Professional education is needed both in dental school curricula and continuing education courses to increase use of recommended communication techniques. Specifically, dentists and their team members should consider taking communication skills courses and conducting an overall evaluation of their practices for user friendliness.

  7. Dentist's opinion toward treatment of pregnant patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlSadhan, Raed; AlManee, Abdullatif

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the awareness of dentists in Riyadh city about treatment alternatives available for pregnant patients. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed among 500 dentists practicing in Riyadh city. The questionnaire included data on dentists socio-demographic and practice characteristics in addition to management choices of the pregnant dental patient such as dental treatment practices and selected therapeutic choices. Out of the questionnaires distributed, 212 questionnaires were collected (42.5% response rate). Most of the participants were general practitioners, with less than 5 years clinical experience, who obtained their degree from local institutes and practiced in the government sectors. Over half of the participants stated that they would radiograph a pregnant patient who was suffering from pain from a tooth with doubtful diagnosis or would extract a non-restorable painful tooth. Two-thirds of the participating dentists would not replace a missing molar with a fixed partial denture during pregnancy. The majority of the participants (86%) would give oral hygiene instructions, prescribe a mouthwash and do scaling and/or root planing for a pregnant patient with gingival bleeding and calculus deposits. In respect to antibiotics, the majority of the dentists (96%) would prescribe amoxicillin to a pregnant patient. Of the four analgesic agents surveyed, paracetamol was the most popular analgesic agent (96.7%). On the use of local anesthetics, the majority of the dentists (75%) would use lidocaine without vasoconstrictor and would not use prilocaine with felypressin vasoconstrictor. The study showed that there was a lack of knowledge about the clinical management of the pregnant dental patients among the surveyed dentists regardless of their socio-demographic and practice characteristics necessitating continuous dental education programs on the dental management of pregnant dental patients. (author)

  8. Job satisfaction among 'migrant dentists' in Australia: implications for dentist migration and workforce policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, M; Spencer, A J; Short, S D; Watkins, K; Chrisopoulos, S; Brennan, D S

    2016-06-01

    Migrants occupy a significant proportion of the dental workforce in Australia. The objectives of this study were to assess the level of job satisfaction of employed migrant dentists in Australia, and to examine the association between various migrant dentist characteristics and job satisfaction. All migrant dentists resident in Australia were surveyed using a five-point Likert scale that measured specific aspects of job, career and satisfaction with area and type of practice. A total of 1022 migrant dentists responded to this study; 974 (95.4%) were employed. Responses for all scales were skewed towards strongly agree (scores ≥4). The overall scale varied by age group, marital status, years since arrival to Australia and specialist qualification (chi-square, p satisfaction amongst older age groups. Dentists who migrated through the examination pathway (mainly from low- and middle-income countries) had a lower probability of being satisfied with the area and type of practice (OR = 0.71; 0.51-0.98), compared with direct-entry migrant dentists (from high-income countries). The high level of job satisfaction of migrant dentists reflects well on their work-related experiences in Australia. The study offers policy suggestions towards support for younger dentists and examination pathway migrants, so they have appropriate skills and standards to fit the Australian health care environment. © 2016 Australian Dental Association.

  9. From ophthalmologist to dentist via radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilk, Grażyna; Modrzejewska, Monika; Lachowicz, Ewelina; Lisiecka-Opalko, Krystyna; Myśliwiec, Leszek; Rutkowski, Donald; Kotrych, Katarzyna; Burzyńska, Katarzyna; Gołubińska, Elżbieta

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to analyze the causes of orbital cellulitis in connection with covert dental changes as well as to establish the role of radiological procedures in the final diagnosis and further treatment of such cases. Thirty-two patients, aged 25–56, 22 women and 10 men were diagnosed and treated between January 2007 and April 2011 at the Pomeranian Medical University in Szczecin. The patients were examined in the infirmary of the ophthalmological department due to unilateral blepharo-oedema, abrupt pain and vision disturbances; in 5 cases, body temperature increased up to 37.8°C was observed. Next, the patients underwent conventional X-ray examinations of the orbit to exclude any foreign bodies in the eyeball, as well as pantomographies to evaluate the dental status. Visible periapical or periodontal changes in dentition were analyzed with intraoral X-rays with the use of DIGORA System 2.1. Changes found in 3 patients on pantomograms and connected with iatrogenic procedures were further evaluated with CT (64 lines and 128 layers) in frontal, sagittal and axial projections. Orbital disorders were also diagnosed by an ophthalmologist and radiologist with Doppler ultrasound (US) examinations. A linear transducer of 7.5–10 MHz to observe the morphology and vascularity of the eyeball was applied. Iatrogenic treatment was the cause of sinusitis and cellulitis in three cases: incorrectly implanted dental implant in one case, root of the 3 rd molar pushed into the sinus in the second case, and communication between the maxillary alveolar process and the sinus after extraction in case of the third patient. Asymptomatic periapical osteolysis, periodontal disease or dead teeth were found in all cases. Diagnosis of orbital cellulitis of dental origin was determined on the basis of clinical, radiographic and ultrasound findings. Ophthalmologic and dental treatment was applied simultaneously. Co-operation between ophthalmologists, radiologists and dentists is

  10. Stress in doctors and dentists who teach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, Harry; Herzberg, Joe; Paice, Elisabeth

    2002-06-01

    To explore the relationship between a teaching role and stress in doctors and dentists who teach. Medline, PubMed, BIDS database for social sciences literature, and the ERIC database for educational literature were searched using the key words 'stress' or 'burnout' with the terms doctor, physician, dentist, teacher, lecturer, academic staff, and university staff. Other books and journals known to the authors were also used. Many studies have shown high levels of stress in doctors, dentists, teachers, and lecturers. A large number of factors are implicated, including low autonomy, work overload, and lack of congruence between power and responsibility. Doctors and dentists who take on a teaching role in addition to their clinical role may increase their levels of stress, but there is also evidence that this dual role may reduce job-related stress. Working as a doctor or dentist may entail higher levels of stress than are experienced by the general population. In some situations adding in the role of teacher reduces this stress, but more research is needed to explain this finding.

  11. The Effects of Distance to Dentists and Dentist Supply on Children's Use of Dental Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehby, George L; Shane, Dan M; Joshi, Adweta; Momany, Elizabeth; Chi, Donald L; Kuthy, Raymond A; Damiano, Peter C

    2017-10-01

    To examine the effects of distance to dentists and dentist supply on dental services use among children with Medicaid coverage in Iowa. Iowa Medicaid claims for enrolled children between 2000 and 2009. The study sample included 41,554 children (providing 158,942 child-year observations) who were born in Iowa between 2000 and 2006 and enrolled from birth in the Iowa Medicaid program. Children were followed through 2009. We used logistic regression to simultaneously examine the effects of distance (miles to nearest dentist) and county-level dentist supply on a broad range of dental services controlling for key confounders. Additional models only used within-child variation over time to remove unobservable time-invariant confounders. Distance was related to lower utilization of comprehensive dental exams (2 percent lower odds per 1 mile increase in distance), an effect that also held in models using within-child variation only. Dentist supply was positively related to comprehensive exams and other preventive services and negatively related to major dental treatments; however, these associations became smaller and insignificant when examining within-child changes except for other preventive services. Longer distance to dentists is a barrier for use of comprehensive dental exams, conditional on dentist supply. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  12. Factors influencing variation in dentist service rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grembowski, D; Milgrom, P; Fiset, L

    1990-01-01

    In the previous article, we calculated dentist service rates for 200 general dentists based on a homogeneous, well-educated, upper-middle-class population of patients. Wide variations in the rates were detected. In this analysis, factors influencing variation in the rates were identified. Variation in rates for categories of dental services was explained by practice characteristics, patient exposure to fluoridated water supplies, and non-price competition in the dental market. Rates were greatest in large, busy practices in markets with high fees. Older practices consistently had lower rates across services. As a whole, these variables explained between 5 and 30 percent of the variation in the rates.

  13. Connecting With Your Dentist on Facebook: Patients' and Dentists' Attitudes Towards Social Media Usage in Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Nilesh; Dong, Lin; Eisingerich, Andreas Benedikt

    2018-06-29

    Social media has begun to proliferate across medical areas and transformed how medical professionals serve and interact with their patients. It offers a new communication avenue that has the potential to engage patients and, hence, may be used to create value for both medical professionals and patients. In dentistry, even though patients and dentists frequently use social media in their personal lives, little is known about their attitudes and expectations toward using social media for professional interactions. In this paper, we focus on the role of social media in dentistry. Specifically, we explore patients' and dentists' attitudes toward social media usage and their current online behaviors in this context. Furthermore, we examine potential challenges and opportunities regarding dentists' adoption of social media practices. This research employed a large-scale online survey of 588 patients and 532 dental professionals. We assessed the attitudes, expectations, and social media behaviors from both patients' and dentists' perspectives. We found that more than 55% (290/532) of dentists in our sample have accounts for their dental practice on various social media platforms. Interestingly, while 73% (374/511) of patients did not expect their dental practice to have a social media presence, and 44% (207/468) thought that establishing a friendship with their dentists is not appropriate, the findings show that 36% (164/460) of patients had searched for their dentists, and 44% (207/470) of them were happy to establish contacts with dentists on social media. Furthermore, the findings highlight that patients were interested in exploring additional information such as online reviews and the qualifications of their dentists on Facebook pages. For dentists, more than half (375/432, 83%) of them in our sample thought that social media marketing is more efficient compared to traditional marketing. Our findings revealed some key challenges and opportunities to utilize social

  14. Professional burnout and work engagement among dentists.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brake, H. te; Bouman, A-M.; Gorter, R.; Hoogstraten, J.; Eijkman, M.

    2007-01-01

    A recent development within burnout research is the shift to its conceptual opposite: work engagement. This study aimed to unravel the concepts of burnout and work engagement, and to determine their levels among dentists. A representative sample of 497 Dutch general dental practitioners was included

  15. THE ROLE OF FORENSIC DENTIST FOLLOWING MASS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and dental practitioners of the crucial role of dentist in victim's identification and ... role of forensic dental personnel in human identification following ... matrimonial, or financial reasons6. The first and .... chief physician during the systematic extermination of the Jews at ... of police officers with forensic pathologist and forensic.

  16. Burnout development among dentists : a longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    te Brake, H.; Smits, N.; Wicherts, J.M.; Gorter, R.C.; Hoogstraten, J.

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge on the development of burnout among dentists is important for purposes of prevention and intervention. Using a two-wave longitudinal design, this study examined the chronological sequence of the three dimensions of the Maslach Burnout Inventory: emotional exhaustion; depersonalization; and

  17. [Dentists' workforce in Hungary and international migration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balázs, Péter

    2012-06-01

    In Hungary, cross-national migration in dental care was performed rather by patients from abroad instead of the domestic dentists' migration for working abroad. Actually, this tacitly realized and so-called dental tourism experienced two basic changes. The National Medical Tourism Ltd. arranged the First Conference for Development of Dental Tourism on 21 April 2011. Hungary's prime minister addressed the meeting and finally signed an agreement with the organizing Ltd. about governmental financial support for development of dental tourism. On the other hand, Germany and Austria deleted all restrictions against the free cross-national workforce migration since 1 May this year. For understanding and prognosis of dentists' future migration, it is inevitable to collect and analyse relevant data of the previous years. This study is presenting data obtained from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2010. According to the net outcome, the dentists' human resource system was balanced down to the end of 2010. However, this state is unsure even for the near future, thus preventing the deficit of dentists all necessary measures must be taken to keep up the present level of the domestic dentral service.

  18. Stress among dentists in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamjoom, Hana M

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify various stress factors affecting dentists and to evaluate their stress manifestations and stress management. A questionnaire was distributed among dentists residing in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. The questionnaire classified stress factors into professional, patient-related, dental procedure-related, and office management factors. Sign and symptoms of stress manifestations and management were also evaluated. The sample included 80 females and 75 males, with 47% of them below the age of 30 years. Out of the total sample, the largest percentage (60.6%) were general practitioners, 47.7% had experience of less than 5 years and 32.2% had 11 years of experience. The highest mean scores of stress were related to professional factors and dental procedure-related factors. Among those, the main significant factors that caused stress in the surveyed sample were lack of time in relation to workload (76.1%), limited visibility and accessibility (67.7%). The most common manifestations of stress were nervousness (95%), musculoskeletal fatigue (72%) and anger (58%). Dentists predominantly managed their stress by praying and reading holy books (80%) and by spending time alone (75%) or with family and friends (70%). The most prevalent and significant causes of stress among dentists working in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia were professional in nature. Stress has been manifested by nervousness and musculoskeletal problem and was mainly managed by praying and spending time alone or with family and friends. (author)

  19. Incidence of work-related musculoskeletal pain among dentists in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dentists commonly experience musculoskeletal pain during the course of their career. This study investigated the incidence and mechanism of work-related musculoskeletal pain among practising dentists in Kwa-Zulu Natal. A descriptive survey was conducted among 94 dentists, who voluntarily consented to participate in ...

  20. The dentist workforce in Kuwait to the year 2020.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jarallah, K F; Moussa, M A A; Al-Duwairi, Y; Zaatar, E; Al-Khanfar, K F

    2010-09-01

    To project the future demand for dentists in Kuwait for the years 2007 to 2020 based on the period 1994 to 2006. The study addresses the supply of and demand for dentists in Kuwait in the light of emerging variables such as increasing population, economic growth, changes in dental care, education strategies, and changes in demographics of dentists. Population projections for the years 2007 to 2020 were derived using the average annual natural increase rate of the 1994-2006 populations. The future demand for dentists for the years 2007 to 2020 was projected using the average dentist to population ratios of the years 1994-2006. The average annual growth rate of indigenous Kuwaiti dentists during the period 1994-2006 was 5.58% compared to 31.9% for non-native expatriot dentists. There is a gap between the numbers of native and foreign dentists. In 2006, native dentists constituted 44.4% of the dental workforce in Kuwait, this is likely to affect the quality of provided dental care owing to language, religious and sociocultural barriers between foreign dentists and patients. The disparity between the total number of dentists needed and the number of native dentists is expected to decline from 54.41% in 2007 to 24.67% in 2020. The supply of native dentists is likely to remain insufficient to meet the projected demand until the year 2020. The supply of indigenous dentists should be increased through improvement in recruitment and retention of Kuwaiti national dentists and dental students.

  1. Career profile of dentists in Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashri, Nahid Y; AlAjaji Norah; AlMozainy, Mayyadah; AlSourani, Rasha

    2009-01-01

    The aims of the present survey were to determine whether differences existed between male and female dentists in Saudi Arabia in career development, positions occupied within their employment, and to analyze the effect of different variables on their career development in some of the provinces in Saudi Arabia. A self-conducted questionnaire was distributed among male and female dentists, general practitioners as well as specialists, working at several governmental hospitals in Saudi Arabia. The questionnaires consisted of 40 questions in the format of multiple choices and yes/no answer. Data were analyzed by gender with the significant difference level set at (P < 0.05). The response rate was 40.8% of which 51.9% were females and 48.1% males with 70% of them below 45 years of age. No significant difference was found between males and females in having higher education or additional degrees. The specialty that was highly reported among females was pedodontics and in males, orthodontics. Males were more likely to hold authorized administrative positions (63%), while females held administrative positions which were internally arranged by their departments (57%). Eighty-three percent of female respondents thought that there was favouritism towards males in appointment to administrative positions, while only 5.5% of male respondents reported that there was favouritism to females in occupying the same positions. There was no significant difference between male and female dentists in Saudi Arabia with respect to job opportunities, working hours and relationships with their colleagues. In addition, there is evidence of an intensifying determination of female dentists in Saudi Arabia, to pursue their chosen career while coping with the diverse demands of being a professional, a wife and mother. (author)

  2. Burnout and Work Engagement Among US Dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, Jean Marie; Kwatra, Japneet; Yansane, Alfa; Tokede, Oluwabunmi; Gorter, Ronald C; Kalenderian, Elsbeth

    2017-06-30

    Burnout is a threat to patient safety. It relates to emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and lack of personal accomplishment. Work engagement conversely composed of levels of vigor, dedication, and absorption in one's profession. The aim of this study was to examine burnout and work engagement among US dentists. This study used the extensively validated Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey and Utrecht Work Engagement Scale to measure burnout in a self-administered survey of 167 US dentists who attended continuing education courses held in Boston, Pittsburg, Iowa City, and Las Vegas. The mean scores on the 3 subscales of Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey and Utrecht Work Engagement Scale were computed. The interscale correlations between the components of burnout and work engagement were assessed using Pearson correlations. We used 1-way analysis of variance and independent 2 sample t tests to examine the relationship between burnout and work engagement across sex and various age categories. Prevalence of burnout in our study population was also computed. We observed that 13.2% of our study population experienced burnout and 16.2% of our study population was highly work engaged. There was a statistically significant, unadjusted association between burnout risk and work engagement (χ = 22.51, P work engagement. In this preliminary study, we observed some evidence of burnout among practicing US dentists. It is imperative that the dental profession understands this and works to promote professional practices that increase work engagement and decrease burnout.

  3. Factors supporting dentist leaders' retention in leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuononen, T; Lammintakanen, J; Suominen, A L

    2017-12-01

    The aim was to study factors associated with staying in a dentist leadership position. We used an electronic questionnaire to gather data from 156 current or former Finnish dentist leaders in 2014. Principal component analysis categorized statements regarding time usage and opportunities in managerial work into five main components. Associations between these main component scores and the tendency to stay as a leader were analyzed with logistic regression. Out of the five main components, two were significantly associated with staying as a leader: 'career intentions', which represented intent to continue or to leave the leadership position; and 'work time control opportunities', which represented how leaders could control their own work time. Other factors that supported staying were leadership education, more work time available for leadership work, and lower age. The main component 'work pressure' decreased, although not significantly, the odds of continuing; it included lack of leadership work time, and pressure from superiors or subordinates. Leaders have important roles in health care, ensuring everyday operations as well as developing their organizations to meet future challenges. Knowledge of these supporting factors will enable dentist leaders and their organizations to improve working conditions in order to recruit and retain motivated and competent persons. In addition, well-designed education is important to inspire and encourage future leaders. Copyright© 2017 Dennis Barber Ltd.

  4. Complementary and alternative therapies in dentistry and characteristics of dentists who recommend them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baatsch, Beatrice; Zimmer, Stefan; Rodrigues Recchia, Daniela; Büssing, Arndt

    2017-12-01

    The aims of this study were to analyse whether dentists offer or recommend complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) remedies in their clinical routine, and how effective these are rated by proponents and opponents. A second aim of this study was to give a profile of the dentists endorsing CAM. A prospective, explorative, anonymised cross-sectional survey was spread among practicing dentists in Germany via congresses, dental periodicals and online (n=250, 55% male, 45% female; mean age 49.1±11.4years). Of a set of 31 predefined CAM modalities, the dentists integrated plant extracts from Arnica montana (64%), chamomile (64%), clove (63%), Salvia officinalis (54%), but also relaxation therapies (62%), homeopathy (57%), osteopathic medicine (50%) and dietetics (50%). The effectiveness of specific treatments was rated significantly higher (peffective, namely ear acupuncture, osteopathic medicine and clove. For ear acupuncture these scores did not significantly differ between both groups. With respect to the characteristic of the proponents, the majority of CAM endorsing dentists were women. The mean age (50.4±0.9 vs 47.0±0.9years) and number of years of professional experience (24.2±1.0 vs 20.0±1.0years) were significantly higher for CAM proponents than the means for opponents (p<0.0001 respectively). CAM proponents worked significantly less (p<0.0001) and their perceived workload was significantly lower (p=0.008). Their self-efficacy expectation (SEE) and work engagement (Utrecht work engagement, UWE) were significantly higher (p≤0.01 and p<0.0001) compared to dentists who abandoned these treatment options. The logistic regression model showed (exploratively) an increased association from CAM proponents with the UWES subscale dedication, with years of experience, and that men are less likely to be CAM proponents than women. Various CAM treatments are recommended by German dentists and requested by their patients, but the scientific evidence for these

  5. Hannelore Loevy Taschini CS MS PhD, Pediatric Dentist and Dental Historian (1932-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelbier, Stanley

    2016-01-01

    This paper follows the story of an immigrant from Germany who came via South America to settle in the United States, Hannelore Loevy. She became a leading pediatric dentist, researcher, and advocate for women in dentistry, as well as a lauded dental historian. Dr. Hannelore Loevy was well respected in both the USA and abroad. Her love of the profession is demonstrated by the wide variety of positions she occupied and honors she received. Copyright American Academy of the History of Dentistry.

  6. Is the dentist an entrepreneur? Yes and no.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Roger

    2004-12-01

    Although dentists may have an entrepreneurial spirit, they are not true entrepreneurs. Simply by selecting dentistry as a profession, dentists have engaged in a business that has a high level of success and limited growth potential. By limited growth potential, I do not mean to imply that practices cannot be successful and create excellent lifestyles for dentists. As stated above, they will be limited in growth by the physical capacity of the dentist, the team and the facilities. There is a great deal of security in dental practice if basic management principles are followed and business systems are put in place. In my next column, I will continue to explore the similarities and differences between entrepreneurs and dentists, and how a dentist can take a practice through the multiple stages necessary to achieve the highest levels of dental practice success.

  7. Association between burnout and depressive symptoms among Turkish dentists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meral Huri

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: Dentists may face burnout and depressive symptoms during their professional life. Increased burnout level can give an idea on depressive symptoms, and may provide an opportunity to identify depression earlier. Creating and raising awareness about burnout are important to avoid and prevent depression among dentists. Further longitudinal studies analyzing the effects of interdisciplinary client-centered self-management programs for dentists on depressive symptoms and burnout must be planned.

  8. Digital radiography: a survey of pediatric dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Julie M; Russo, James A; Guelmann, Marcio

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to: (1) determine the popularity of digital radiography among members of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD); and (2) report the most common systems in use. An AAPD-approved, voluntary, and anonymous electronic survey was developed and sent to 923 board certified pediatric dentists. Years in practice and in-office x-ray technology (digital or conventional) were inquired about initially. If negative for the use of digital radiography, future consideration for converting to digital radiography was ascertained. For positive responses, more in-depth information was requested. Information on type of system (sensor or phosphor plate), user friendliness, diagnostic ability, patient's comfort, general costs, durability, and parental and overall satisfaction was collected. For most of the questions, a 5-point assessment scale was used. Opportunity for additional comments was provided upon survey completion. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics. A 32% (296/923) response rate was obtained. Twenty-six percent of practitioners (78/296) implemented digital radiography in their practices, whereas 71% considered future acquisition. Similar distribution for sensor and phosphor plate users was found. Sensor technology was reported to produce faster images, but was less tolerable by young children due to size and thickness. Phosphor plates were considered more children friendly, less expensive, and less durable. Parental satisfaction was very high with great marketing value. Picture quality was comparable to conventional film. Overall, digital radiography users would recommend it to other pediatric dentists. Digital radiography is not yet popular among pediatric dentists. Cost reduction and technology advancement may enhance utilization.

  9. A review of occupationally-linked suicide for dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, L M; Cotter, R; Birch, K M

    2016-06-01

    Suicide rates among dentists and a perceived elevated risk for suicide have been debated in the academic literature. It has filtered into the public psyche that dentists have the highest suicide rate of any occupation. The present review seeks support for both protagonist and antagonist positions from multidisciplinary perspectives. Contemporary risk factors and strategies for intervention and the prevention of suicide in dentistry are explored. An online database search for articles and reports, with selected target words, was conducted for peer reviewed publications on suicide in the dental profession, and for factors contributing to dentist suicide. Review guidelines from the American Psychological Association were used to clarify concepts, identify where most work was focussed, and to explore the superiority of any approach to the emotive topic over another. Findings suggest the dominant belief that dentists have an elevated risk of suicide may be historically, but not currently, accurate. Although dentists' suicide is trending down, diversity in methodology means no current consensus is possible. Factors found to be influencing dentists' suicide ranged from known occupational stressors, to toxins and substance abuse, and untreated mental health problems. The contemporary position in New Zealand shows dentists per sé are not more likely than other health professionals to commit suicide although they may have been in the past. Dentists should be aware of individual susceptibility to burnout and mental health problems. Future directions are outlined to address this including peer intervention, and programmes available for dentists to cope better with risks leading to suicide.

  10. Comparative analysis of rationale used by dentists and patient for final esthetic outcome of dental treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, S Varalakshmi; Madineni, Praveen Kumar; Sudheer, A; Gujjarlapudi, Manmohan Choudary; Sreedevi, B; Reddy, Patelu Sunil Kumar

    2013-05-01

    To compare and evaluate the perceptions of esthetics among dentists and patients regarding the final esthetic outcome of a dental treatment. Esthetics is a matter of perception and is associated with the way different people look at an object. What constitutes esthetic for a particular person may not be acceptable for another. Hence it is subjective in nature. This becomes more obvious during the post-treatment evaluation of esthetics by dentist and the concerned patient. Opinion seldom matches. Hence, the study is a necessary part of the process of understanding the mind of dentist and patient regarding what constitutes esthetics. A survey has been conducted by means of a questionnaire consisting of 10 questions, on two groups of people. First group consists of 100 dentists picked at random in Kanyakumari district of Tamil Nadu, India. Second group consisted of 100 patients who required complete denture prosthesis. The second group was divided into two subgroups A and B. Subgroup A consisting of 50 men and subgroup B consisting of 50 women. In each subgroup 25 patients were selected in age group of 40 to 50 and 25 patients were selected in the age group of 50 to 60. The questionnaire was given to both the groups and asked to fill up, which was then statistically analyzed to look for patterns of thought process among them. Results were subjected to statistical analysis by Student's t-test. Perceptions of esthetics differs from dentist who is educated regarding esthetic principles of treatment and a patient who is not subjected to such education. Since, the questions were formulated such that patients could better understand the underlying problem, the final outcome of survey is a proof that dentists need to take into account what the patient regards as esthetics in order to provide a satisfactory treatment. CLINICAL AND ACADEMIC SIGNIFICANCE: The current study helps the dentist to better educate the patient regarding esthetics so that patient appreciates the final

  11. Diabetes mellitus and periodontal health: dentists' knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khabbaz, Areej K; Al-Shammari, Khalaf F

    2011-01-01

    There is a strong body of evidence to support the relationship between periodontal diseases and diabetes mellitus. Unless dental practitioners are aware of this link, they cannot apply the information to their daily practice. The aim of the study was, therefore, to evaluate the knowledge of dental practitioners concerning the effect of diabetes on periodontal health. This was a cross-sectional survey of randomly selected dental practitioners in Kuwait. Participants were asked about specific periodontal complications which they believed that patients diagnosed with diabetes were more susceptible to. A total of 220 dental practitioners (133 general dental practitioners and 87 dental specialists) participated in the study. Less than 60% of all study participants reported that tooth loss due to periodontal reasons and periodontal abscess were frequent among diabetic patients. Dental specialists, especially periodontists, were significantly more aware of periodontal complications associated with diabetes. Factors significantly associated with having knowledge about the effect of diabetes on periodontal health in logistic regression analysis were dentists who were older and those who were specialists. The results of this study indicate that knowledge about the effects of diabetes on periodontal health among this sample of dental practitioners is generally low, and dentists may underestimate the outcomes of periodontal diseases in diabetic patients. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. 'Moças e senhoras dentistas': formação, titulação e mercado de trabalho nas primeiras décadas da República 'Young women and lady dentists': training, degrees, and the market in the first decades of the Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lucia Mott

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Desde a década de 1980, as faculdades de odontologia no Brasil têm formado mais mulheres do que homens. Poucas páginas, porém, foram escritas sobre a história do acesso das mulheres a essa profissão. Este artigo tem por objetivos fornecer subsídios para a análise da formação e inserção profissional das dentistas no Brasil nos primeiros anos da República; discutir a relação entre as transformações da profissão, as políticas de saúde e o sistema de gênero no período; contribuir para a discussão sobre a feminização da profissão. Foram utilizados como fontes textos publicados na imprensa (jornais e revistas e em periódicos especializados das áreas odontológica, farmacêutica e médica, bem como documentos que integram arquivos de diversos órgãos do governo e de universidades paulistas.Since the 1980s, more women than men have graduated from Brazil's dentistry schools, yet little has been written about women's access to the profession. This article provides background information useful in analyzing the training and professional roles of women dentists in Brazil during the first years of the Republic; discusses the relation between changes in the profession, health policies, and the gender system during that period; and contributes to the discussion on the feminization of the profession. The article is part of a broader project investigating training, professional roles, and the labor market in the health field in São Paulo. Sources include articles published in newspapers, magazines, and specialized journals devoted to dentistry, pharmacy, and medicine, along with government and university records covering the years 1892 through 1926.

  13. Diagnostic Dental Radiation Risk during Pregnancy: Awareness among General Dentists in Tabriz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahmineh Razi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Pregnant women often do not receive proper dental care in emergency visits due to a lack of awareness of the effect of radiation doses and the involved risks for the fetus. The aim of the present study was to assess the awareness of general dentists practicing in Tabriz, Iran, of the risks involved during exposure to diagnostic dental radiation in pregnant women. Materials and methods. In this descriptive/cross-sectional study, 250 general dentists, who had attended continuing education courses under the supervision of the Faculty of Dentistry, filled out questionnaires on their awareness of radiation risks. Data was analyzed by Spearman's correlation coefficient test. Results. The mean of correct answers was 6.47±1.66, with the least and highest correct answers of 2 and 10, respectively. The highest and the lowest levels of awareness were related to the use of a lead apron (92% and a long rectangular collimator (3.2%, respectively. There was a statistically significant correlation between the age of practitioners and awareness of radiation risks (P=0.02. However, no statistically significant correlation was observed between job experience (P=0.25 and the number of continuing education courses attended (P=0.16 and awareness of radiation risks. Conclusion. The studied population of dentists does not seem to have the sufficient knowledge regarding the diagnostic dental radiation risk during pregnancy. Further educational courses and pamphlets are recommended for increasing their awareness of this subject.

  14. Dentists' skills with fearful patients: education and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahm, Carl-Otto; Lundgren, Jesper; Carlsson, Sven G; Nilsson, Peter; Hultqvist, Johanna; Hägglin, Catharina

    2013-06-01

    The aims were to explore dentists' skills in dental fear, current strategies when treating fearful adult patients, and the possible need for additional education among dentists working in Sweden. A sample of 1,293 members of the Association of Public Health Dentists in Sweden were asked to respond to a Web survey concerning dental fear. The response rate was 69% (n = 889); 91% trained in Sweden and 9% trained in another country. The most frequently used pharmacological anxiety-reducing techniques were medication with a midazolame mixture (72%) and benzodiazepine tablets (77%), and the most commonly used psychological techniques were relaxation (68%), distraction (66%), and Tell-Show-Do (86%). A larger proportion of dentists trained in Sweden, compared with dentists who were trained in other countries, reported that they had received undergraduate training in dental fear. Dentists trained in Sweden more often reported competence in pharmacological and psychological anxiety-reducing techniques, compared with dentists who were trained in other countries. Higher levels of self-rated efficacy in treating fearful patients accompanied additional education in dental fear after graduation. In conclusion, Swedish dentists use a variety of techniques to meet the needs of fearful dental patients. Competence in anxiety-reducing techniques is associated with self-efficacy and the site of education. © 2013 Eur J Oral Sci.

  15. Knowledge and attitude of some Nigerian dentists concerning the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study was carried out to determine the knowledge and attitude of some Nigerian dentist concerning the use of space maintainers in dentistry. Method: Structured and self administered questionnaires were sent to 60 dentists in Ibadan and Ile -Ife towns in the South - West region of Nigeria. Information required ...

  16. Work-related musculoskeletal pain among Lebanese dentists: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and identify their associated factors among a group of Lebanese dentists. Materials and Methods: A total of 314 Lebanese, dentists completed an anonymous questionnaire that focused on occupational health problems.

  17. Effects of Modeling and Desensitation in Reducing Dentist Phobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, David W.; Thoresen, Carl E.

    1974-01-01

    Many persons avoid dentists and dental work. The present study explored the effects of systematic desensitization and social-modeling treatments with placebo and assessment control groups. Modeling was more effective than desensitization as shown by the number of subjects who went to a dentist. (Author)

  18. Alternative dispute resolution (ADR) for dentists: a better way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudman, L

    1998-06-01

    Any dentist faced with a legal or potential legal dispute should consider all the options available to handle the dispute. Selection of the appropriate process may be approached from a consumer's perspective, with the emphasis on service, value and satisfaction. Awareness of ADR and its proper utilization can assist the dentist in choosing the method that will result in the most satisfactory outcome.

  19. Exercise Prescriptions to Prevent Musculoskeletal Disorders in Dentists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dodda Kiran; Mohan, Sreevalli; Begum, Mohammadi; Prasad, Bhanu; Prasad, Eswar Ravi Vara

    2014-01-01

    Since the number of dental patients is increasing day by day dentists are forced to spend longer times in dental chairs. This is increasing the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in dentists. This article reviews the mechanisms causing musculoskeletal disorders among dentists and also covers the exercises that can be done to prevent them. Exercises that increase the fitness of a dentist are divided into aerobic exercises – concentrating on total body fitness, stretching exercises – that concentrate on the muscles that tend to tighten in prolonged dental postures and strengthening exercises – that concentrate on the muscles that are opposite to the tight muscles. These exercises are made simple and of minimal intensity so that a dentist can practice them independently. PMID:25177661

  20. Current employment characteristics and career intentions of Lithuanian dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janulyte, Vilija; Aleksejuniene, Jolanta; Puriene, Alina; Peciuliene, Vytaute; Benzian, Habib

    2014-12-20

    The present survey explored the current employment profile and future career intentions of Lithuanian general dentists and specialists. A census sampling method was employed with data collected by means of a structured questionnaire that inquired about demographics, different employment-related aspects (practice type and location, working hours, perceived lack of patients, etc.), and future career intentions (intent to emigrate, to change profession, or the timing of retirement). The final response rate was 67.6% corresponding to 2,008 respondents. The majority of all dentists work full or part-time in the private dental sector, more than one third of them owns a private practice or rents a dental chair. A minority of dentists works in the public dental sector. According to the survey, 26.6% of general dentists and 39.2% of dental specialists works overtime (> 40 hours per week; P 0.05). The majority (68.9% of general dentists and 65.9% of dental specialists) plans to work after the retirement age (P > 0.05). Emigration as an option for their professional career is being considered by 10.8% of general dentists and 8.3% of dental specialists (P > 0.05). Working either full or part-time in private practices (OR = 4.3) and younger age (≤ 35 years; OR = 2.2) are the two strongest predictors for a perceived insufficient number of patients. One third of dentists in Lithuania work long hours and lack patients. Many dentists practice in multiple locations and plan to retire after the official retirement age. Some dentists and dental specialists plan to emigrate. The perceived shortcomings within the dental care system and workforce planning of dentists need to be addressed.

  1. Private dentists assess treatment required as more extensive, demanding and costly, than public sector dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuominen, Risto; Eriksson, Anna-Leena; Vahlberg, Tero

    2012-08-01

    The aim was to evaluate whether contracted private practitioners assess required treatment more extensive, demanding and economically more rewarding than mainly salaried public sector dentists and to estimate the cost consequences of using these alternative providers. All dental services included in comprehensive treatments funded by the city of Turku and provided to adult patients during the year 2009 were recorded. Patients were distributed randomly without any determination of treatment needs before appointing them to different dentists. Treatment courses for 7432 patients in public clinics included 63 906 procedures and for 2932 patients assigned to treatment by contracted private practitioners included 21 194 procedures. Public sector dentists were mainly salaried with production incentives, and private practitioners worked purely on a fee-for-service basis. The cost estimates were based on the distributions of competence classifications recorded by the providers, which also formed the basis for reimbursement. For each studied treatment category with more than one competence classification, private contractors were less likely than their public sector counterparts to give an assessment of simple or less demanding: 8% versus 29% of examinations, 46% versus 69% of periodontal treatments, 63% versus 85% of extractions, 31% versus 46% of fillings, 18% versus 35% of root canals. The excess cost to society varied from 7.0% for root canal treatments to 21.3% for extractions, causing on average 14.4% higher cost level from use of private practitioners compared with public sector dentists. Private practitioners systematically classified the treatment procedures they provided as more demanding, and therefore more economically rewarding, than their public sector counterparts. The findings indicate that the costs of publicly funded dental care may be increased by the use of private dental contractors. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. [Dentists' Knowledge of Ethical Questions Regarding Dental Medicine - A Survey of Dentists from Saxony, Saxony-Anhalt and Thuringia (Germany)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schochow, M; Christel, A; Lautenschläger, C; Steger, F

    2016-12-01

    Background: Subjects regarding ethical questions in dental medicine are only slightly touched in the study of dental medicine or in the working regulations of the dentists' association. However, dentists are confronted with these matters in everyday working life. The empirical study at hand collects current data regarding the ethical knowledge about dental medicine in the practical experience of dentists in Saxony, Saxony-Anhalt, and Thuringia. Methods: The tool used in the survey was a structured questionnaire. Out of 600 randomly chosen and contacted dentists from Saxony, Saxony-Anhalt, and Thuringia, 290 replied (response rate: 48.3%). The anonymised assessment took place between June and November 2013. Results: Dentists frequently encounter ethical questions regarding dental matters. The dentists interviewed in the study are in favour of a participative relationship between patient and dentist. Simultaneously, the patient's health is predominantly seen as the good of higher value than his or her self-determination. The dentists show competent knowledge of ethical dental subjects, although increased uncertainties could be observed in more complex situations, e. g. considering contact with patients who are HIV-positive. Conclusions: Questions dealing with dental ethical questions do play a major role in the daily professional life of dentists. In order to further support and strengthen dentists in their individual dental ethical competence, we see a need for advanced training and further education regarding questions and problems in the area of ethics in dental medicine. Also, these topics should become a component in the curriculum of the study of dental medicine. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Child maltreatment: a survey of dentists in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Sousa Azevedo

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Child abuse is a serious public health problem and affects the victims' physical and mental health and development. The aims of this study were two-fold: to assess the attitudes and perceptions of dentists regarding child abuse, and to investigate professional characteristics associated with the identification of suspected child abuse. A questionnaire was sent to the 276 dentists of Pelotas, RS, Brazil , and 187 (68.0% were returned. Demographic characteristics and profiles of the dentists, and information about their knowledge and attitudes regarding child abuse were collected. Descriptive analysis was performed, and associations were tested by chi-square and Fisher's exact tests. From all dentists surveyed, 123 (71.9% reported providing treatment for children. Most dentists believed they could detect cases of child abuse (78.7%, but 85.7% had never suspected it. Among those who did suspect, 76.0% did not report the cases to authorities. No differences were observed between sexes, years of graduation, types of licenses, and the frequency at which children were treated. A higher proportion of dentists working at university had suspected child abuse. Even though dentists considered themselves able to identify suspicious cases, only a small percentage reported those suspicions, indicating a lack of awareness by these professionals in the adoption of protective measures for victims of aggression. It is necessary that dental professionals receive interdisciplinary training to enhance their ability to care for and protect children.

  4. Pediatric Dentist Density and Preventive Care Utilization for Medicaid Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidenreich, James F; Kim, Amy S; Scott, JoAnna M; Chi, Donald L

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate county-level pediatric dentist density and dental care utilization for Medicaid-enrolled children. This was a cross-sectional analysis of 604,885 zero- to 17-year-olds enrolled in the Washington State Medicaid Program for 11-12 months in 2012. The relationship between county-level pediatric dentist density, defined as the number of pediatric dentists per 10,000 Medicaid-enrolled children, and preventive dental care utilization was evaluated using linear regression models. In 2012, 179 pediatric dentists practiced in 16 of the 39 counties in Washington. County-level pediatric dentist density varied from zero to 5.98 pediatric dentists per 10,000 Medicaid-enrolled children. County-level preventive dental care utilization ranged from 32 percent to 81 percent, with 62 percent of Medicaid-enrolled children utilizing preventive dental services. County-level density was significantly associated with county-level dental care utilization (Slope equals 1.67, 95 percent confidence interval equals 0.02, 3.32, Pchildren who utilize preventive dental care services. Policies aimed at improving pediatric oral health disparities should include strategies to increase the number of oral health care providers, including pediatric dentists, in geographic areas with large proportions of Medicaid-enrolled children.

  5. What motivates dentists to work in prisons? A qualitative exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P A; Themessl-Huber, M; Akbar, T; Richards, D; Freeman, R

    2011-08-26

    To explore what motivates dentists to work in prisons using Vroom's theoretical model of motivation as an explanatory framework. In-depth interviews were conducted with ten of the 15 dentists working in Scottish prisons. The focus was to explore their motivations to work in Scottish prisons. The data were analysed using a thematic framework based on the three motivational dimensions of expectancy, instrumentality and valence. The dentists had the skills to help improve their prisoner-patients' oral health but their efforts were often hindered by institutional rationing and the requirement to fit in with prison routines and procedures (expectancy). Despite these institutional difficulties the dentists experienced work rewards associated with the improvement in the prisoners' oral health (instrumentality). Finally, the dentists experienced a feeling of personal worth and a sense of commitment to providing care to Scottish prisoners (valence). The dentists' motivation to work in Scottish prisons may be explained by Vroom's Expectancy Theory. The dentists' motivation is characterised by their beliefs that their work will improve clinical outcomes which will be rewarded by the satisfaction experienced when they overcome environmental obstacles and provide oral health care for their prisoner-patients.

  6. Factors related to job satisfaction among South Korean dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Seong-Hwa; Chung, Jae-Kyun; Choi, Youn-Hee; Sohn, Woosung; Song, Keun-Bae

    2006-12-01

    The purposes of this study were to investigate the level and distribution of job satisfaction and to explore work environment factors associated with job satisfaction of South Korean dentists. A stratified systematic random sample of 1029 dentists was selected from the 10 357 registered dentists in the Korean Dental Association. They were surveyed via a self-administered mail questionnaire. Job satisfaction was measured by a modified version of the Dentist Satisfaction Survey. The response rate was 62.2%. The mean score of overall job satisfaction among South Korean dentists was 3.2 out of 5. In terms of work environment factors, the most satisfying aspect was patient relations (3.7) and the least satisfying aspect was personal time (2.8). Multiple regression analysis identified a model including patient relations, perception of income, personal time, staff, and specialty training that accounted for 35% of variation in overall job satisfaction. The majority of the variance was explained by patient relations. This study suggests that patient relations, perception of income, personal time, staff, and specialty training are important work environment factors for job satisfaction among South Korean dentists. The findings of this study will be helpful to policy makers to design plans to increase the level of job satisfaction among South Korean dentists.

  7. [The competence of a female. Battle against the rise of the female dentist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bol, P

    1998-11-01

    The refusal of the Dutch Dental Society in 1898 to admit three female dentists to their ranks, was the reason for a polemic. Two important male dentists both wrote a pamphlet considering the competence of women for the study and the practice of learned professions like dentistry. Moreover, they deliberated the value of study and practice for both women and society. The authors are strongly influenced by Social Darwinism and their arguments would now be described as male chauvinism. They admit that women could do the job as well as men, if only after a long evolution. But that evolution is not to be welcomed at all: the best attribute of woman (maternal love) would be frustrated and her highest task (child care) would not be fulfilled. Her femininity would disappear and the new 'man-woman' would not be desired by men, which would be detrimental to the institution of marriage. Already now, they argue, marriages are diminishing, lose quality and divorces are on the increase. They know the cause of all evil: feminism and the women's rights movements.

  8. Jacob Hemet. Dentist to royalty and entrepreneur extraordinaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Malvin E

    2006-11-01

    One of the most prominent dentists in late-18th century London was Jacob Hemet, member of a long family of dentists. He was appointed royal dentist to Queen Charlotte, wife of George the Third, and to George's favorite daughter, Amelia, and the Prince of Wales. He advertised widely, both in this country and in several European countries, including his native France. However, what makes him noteworthy is the fact that he was the very first person to patent a dentifrice and the first to use marketing techniques similar to those used by the foremost toothpaste manufacturers of today.

  9. Stress in Irish dentists: developing effective coping strategies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rogers, Cathryn

    2012-02-01

    Recent research has highlighted the need to recognise occupation-specific risk factors contributing to stress and burnout. As health professionals, it is important for dentists to recognise the symptoms and the effects of stress on physical, psychological and professional well being. This article reviews the relevant scientific evidence, and provides practical cognitive psychological measures to guide improved well-being for dentists. Any stigma-related factors need to be acknowledged and addressed for the wellbeing of dentists and their patients, and the dental profession is well placed to provide leadership on this issue. Peer support is central to meeting this challenge.

  10. Contemporary Marketing Tools Used from Bulgarian Private Dentists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazakova S

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study examines the use of different marketing tools among dentists for the development of private dental practices. Material and methods A phone call survey was conducted. The survey consisted of questions related to the use of different marketing tools used by dentists for the development of their practices. Results The most used contemporary marketing tools from Bulgarian dentist are the presence of web site (24.3% and social media advertisement (21.57%. The less used tools are media advertisement (0.68% and the use of flyers (1.36%. Conclusion Dentists are not well acquainted with the contemporary marketing tools. The internal marketing is most secure tool for attracting new patients. Internet technology gives opportunity for additional form of rapid communication and advertisement on a moderate price.

  11. Dentists in the DTSS between July 2007 and July 2008.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lynch, Liam

    2013-10-03

    Recent attention in the media concerning the Dental Treatment Services Scheme (DTSS) centres on the number of contracting dentists as a surrogate measure of the availability of services to adult medical card holders in the Republic of Ireland.

  12. Contemporary Marketing Tools Used from Bulgarian Private Dentists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazakova S.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the use of different marketing tools among dentists for the development of private dental practices. Material and methods: A phone call survey was conducted. The survey consisted of questions related to the use of different marketing tools used by dentists for the development of their practices. Results: The most used contemporary marketing tools from Bulgarian dentist are the presence of web site (24.3% and social media advertisement (21.57%. The less used tools are media advertisement (0.68% and the use of flyers (1.36%. Conclusion: Dentists are not well acquainted with the contemporary marketing tools. The internal marketing is most secure tool for attracting new patients. Internet technology gives opportunity for additional form of rapid communication and advertisement on a moderate price.

  13. Retirement intentions of dentists in New South Wales, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Page Sue

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Australian dental workforce is ageing and current shortages have been predicted to worsen with the retirement of the growing contingent of older dentists. However, these predictions have been based on retirement trends of previous generations and little is known about the retirement intentions of today's older dentists. Methods The Dentist Retirement Intentions Survey was mailed to 768 NSW Australian Dental Association members aged over 50 and achieved a response rate of 20%. T-tests, ANOVAs and multivariate regression were used to analyse the data. Results On average, participants intend to retire at the age of 66, although they would prefer to do so earlier (p Conclusions The current generation of older dentists intends to retire later than their predecessors. Most wish to remain involved in dentistry in some capacity following retirement, and may assist in overcoming workforce shortages, either by practising part time or training dental students.

  14. Knowledge and attitudes of dentists toward shortened dental arch ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-08-03

    Aug 3, 2015 ... about dentists' opinion regarding function, esthetic, and comfort in patients with SDA. ... Restorative Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, University Technology MARA, Shah Alam, Malaysia ..... J Public Health Dent 1992;52:102‑10.

  15. Autistic spectrum disorder: the challenge for dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Marvin H

    2010-10-01

    Those who actively work with children are, with increasing frequency, encountering patients who have been diagnosed with autistic disorders. Often, dentists may be the first healthcare providers to recognize that a 1- or 2-year-old child has some type of extraordinary pervasive behavioral disorder that a parent, fearing the worst, may have suspected instinctively and emotionally but never faced objectively. Currently, there are no empirical biological tests (eg, blood tests or brain scans) for ASD that are reliable. The definitive diagnosis of ASD is usually made by pediatricians, psychologists, or psychiatrists who institute a process of analysis which involves a developmental and clinical history, tests for cognitive function, and assessment of receptive and expressive language skills. The etiology of ASD is an enigma. Highly regarded researchers are of the opinion that there is probably more than one cause since the disorder can have such disparate manifestations. Genetics, environmental poisons, neurologic psychopathy, dietary deficiencies, and allergies have all been implicated. Pervasive developmental disorders, Asperger's syndrome, Rett syndrome, and childhood degenerative disorders are all considered a part of the ASD group, but the distinction between the various entities is not always clear. Given the fact that the etiology and the increased incidence of the various ASDs are scientifically puzzling, treatment modalities tend to be wide ranging and very much trial and error, especially since there is no cure. Dental professionals who treat patients with ASDs should be knowledgeable about the special needs of not only these patients, but also of their parents.

  16. Root caries: a survey of Queensland dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garton, B J; Ford, P J

    2013-08-01

    Root caries stands to be a significant burden for Australia's ageing population. The objective of this study was to describe Queensland dental practitioners' perceptions of root caries prevalence, presentation and predisposing factors as well as diagnosis and recording practices. Using the Queensland Dental Board register, all 2,515 dentists and dental specialists practising in Queensland were invited to participate in a questionnaire-based postal survey. Of the 660 responses received, 638 were included for final analysis. Use of diagnostic measures such as surface elasticity and contour were reported frequently. A majority of respondents (77%) reported not recording root caries in a way that could be distinguished from coronal caries. Dietary analysis was the most commonly reported adjunctive aid for risk assessment. Recommendations for use of remineralizing agents were frequently reported (home use 90%; in office use 71%). Salivary impairment was reported to be an important risk factor for root caries by 93% of respondents, but only 18% reported performing salivary analysis. A large proportion of respondents (32%) considered patients with diabetes to be of low or no risk of root caries. While the Queensland dental practitioners who participated in this survey demonstrated an awareness of root caries and its predisposing factors, clinical risk assessment particularly for patients with diabetes should be further examined. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Dentists interacting and working with female dental nurses: a qualitative investigation of gender differences in primary dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, R; Gorter, R; Braam, A

    2004-02-14

    To investigate if women compared with men dentists experience deferential treatment from their female nurses, what workplace strategies women use to manage chair-side assistance and to examine if these were country related. A convenience sample of 22 male and female dentists of different ages working in general dental practice in The Netherlands and Northern Ireland participated. The sample framework was determined by saturation of the concepts. All informants were interviewed in a clinical setting. The data was subjected to rigorous line by line coding in order to identify clusters of codes, themes and concepts. Three themes were identified. These were: experiencing deferential nursing assistance; adopting 'friendly-like' working strategies and adopting business-like, hierarchical working strategies. Gender differences were shown for each of the themes. Women rather than men made friends with their nurses and attempted to reduce status inequalities. This led to workplace strategy inconsistencies. This suggested that it was not the type of strategy adopted but the inconsistency with which it was implemented that caused difficulties between younger women dentists and their nurses. Training dental students and young graduates how to interact appropriately in the clinical situation and to appreciate the nurses' work status will assist in improving working relationships.

  18. Dentists' and Parents' Attitude Toward Nitrous Oxide Use in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkandari, Sarah A; Almousa, Fatemah; Abdulwahab, Mohammad; Boynes, Sean G

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the attitude of dentists in Kuwait toward the use of nitrous oxide sedation as a behavior management technique (BMT) for pediatric patients and assess their training in nitrous oxide sedation. In addition, we assessed parents' knowledge of and attitude toward the use of nitrous oxide as a BMT for their children. The objective was to determine if nitrous oxide sedation is being provided and utilized as a means to enhance dental care for pediatric patients. A cross-sectional survey was randomly distributed to both groups of interest: parents accompanying their children to the dentist and licensed dentists in Kuwait. Participants had to meet certain inclusion criteria to be included in the survey and had to complete the entire questionnaire to be part of the analysis. A total of 381 parents completed the questionnaires. The majority of parents responded that they were unaware of nitrous oxide sedation and were not aware of it as a BMT (79%). Two thirds of the parent would accept nitrous oxide sedation if recommended by a dentist treating their children. Two hundred and one dentists completed the survey and met the inclusion criteria. The majority (74.5%) of dentists were willing to use nitrous oxide as a BMT. However, only 6% were utilizing nitrous oxide sedation and providing it to their child patient if indicated. The main reasons for this huge gap are lack of facilities/equipment and lack of training as indicated by the dentists. This study showed that parents are accepting nitrous oxide sedation as a BMT for their children. It also showed the willingness of the dentists to provide such BMT to their patients. The lack of training and lack of equipment are the main barriers to providing such service to the patients. More training courses and more facilities should be provided to eliminate such barriers.

  19. Awareness on smoking cessation counseling among dentists in Kerala, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benley George

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Although dentists are ideally placed to deliver smoking cessation advice and assistance to their patients, smoking cessation interventions are not often incorporated as a routine part of dental care. Aim: To assess the awareness on smoking cessation counseling among dental practitioners in Kerala. Materials and Methods: A pretested questionnaire was used for the study. Four hundred and sixteen registered dentists practicing all over Kerala participated in the survey. Results: Dentists are willing to ask and advise patients about smoking, but are less inclined to assist patients to quit or arrange follow-up. Dentists are more likely to implement one-off, opportunistic interventions rather than take a systematic preventive approach. Dentists are interested in attending further education and say they require training to be relevant to the context of their day-to-day running of the dental practice. Conclusions: Training should aim to legitimize the dentist′s role in smoking cessation and provide strategies and resources so that dentists can practice interventions as part of their day-to-day work.

  20. Management of dental anxiety: A survey of Nigerian dentists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akeredolu Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental anxiety is a major issue with respect to provisions of and access to dental care. We evaluated the knowledge and management of anxiety among Nigerian dentists. Materials and Methods: The study population included 192 Nigerian dentists recruited during an annual national dental conference in Abuja. The conference was a meeting point for dentists with post graduation experience ranging between 1 and 32 years and from different part of the country. They completed a structured questionnaire on dental anxiolysis. Data analysis was performed using SPSS version 16. Results: Of the interviewed dentists, 122 (55.1% practiced in teaching hospitals and 24% had their specialization in child dental health. A total of 34 (19.8% dentists had been exposed to formal trainings on the practice of dental anxiolysis. Of this number, 66% had basic life support training and only 11.8% had refresher training programs. The most preferred route of administration of anxiolytic drugs was oral (57.3%. Most of the respondents were of the view that dental anxiolysis should not be instituted for all dental patients. Conclusion: The interviewed Nigerian dentists were knowledgeable and managed dental anxiety. Although some of them had no formal training on dental anxiolysis, the major consensus is that dental anxiolysis should not be instituted for all dental patients.

  1. How Many Dentists Are Needed in 2040: Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailit, Howard L

    2017-08-01

    Five background articles in Section 2 of the "Advancing Dental Education in the 21 st Century" project examined some of the factors likely to impact the number of dentists needed in 2040: 1) the oral health of the population, 2) changes in the utilization of dental services, 3) new technologies, 4) the growth of large capitated dental group practices, and 5) the demand for dental care. With this information, a sixth background article estimated the number of dentists needed in 2040 compared to the number expected if current trends continue. This executive summary provides an overview of findings from these six articles. The data indicate major improvements in oral health, especially in upper income groups that account for 65% of practice revenues. At the same time, per capita utilization of restorative and prosthetic services has declined dramatically. No major new technologies are likely to impact the need for dentists by 2040. In a large capitated group practice, full-time general dentists treated an average of 2,100 patients per year; solo general dentists averaged 1,350. Based on the examined factors, growth in demand for traditional forms of care may slow substantially, raising the potential for a surplus of dentists in 2040. If these trends continue, the key national policy issue then would be: should schools reduce the number of graduates before market forces require them to downsize or close, or are other alternatives available?

  2. Dentists awareness and action towards domestic violence patients. A cross-sectional study among dentists in Western Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlAlyani, Wafa S; Alshouibi, Ehab N

    2017-01-01

    To identify the potential factors that would predict a dentist's awareness of domestic violence (DV), as well as the factors that influence the probability of dentists to take the required action. Also, to list the common barriers that dentists face when managing DV victims. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, a self-administered, structured questionnaire was sent randomly to dentists practicing in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. The online survey link was emailed with a cover message that illustrated the study context. Responses were accepted from January 2016 until the end of February 2016. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 22 was used for data analysis. Descriptive statistics, bivariate and multivariate analysis carried out to identify significant variables at p less than 0.05 level of significance.  Results: A sample size of 151 responses were recruited. The result of multivariate models indicated that the odds of dentists' awareness and taking actions towards DV victims were influenced by their education, clinical experience, gender, practicing sector, and qualification. Lack of training in identifying DV and embarrassment to bring up DV with patients were the most common barriers for the respondents when treating DV victims. Conclusion: Continuing education with regards to DV was found to be the most relevant predictor. More educational courses in this regard would empower dentists to support DV victims.

  3. Dentists' intention to report suspected violence: a cross-sectional study in eight Arab countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Tantawi, Maha; Gaffar, Balgis; Arheiam, Arheiam; AbdelAziz, Wafaa; Al-Batayneh, Ola B; Alhoti, Mansur F; Al-Maweri, Sadeq; Dama, Mai A; Zaghez, Mounir; Hassan, Khalid Saddiq; Al-Sane, Mona; AbdelSalam, Maha; Sabbah, Wael; Owais, Arwa I; Abdelgawad, Fatma; Aldhelai, Thiyezen Abdullah; El Meligy, Omar Abd El Sadek; AlHumaid, Jehan; Al-Harbi, Fahad

    2018-03-30

    This study assessed dentists' intention in eight Arab countries to report suspected exposure to violence among patients and factors associated with this intention based on the theory of planned behaviour. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2016 including a convenience sample of dentists practising in public, private and academic sectors in Algeria, Egypt, Jordan, Kuwait, Libya, Palestine, Saudi Arabia and Yemen. Respondents answered a self-administered questionnaire collecting information about personal and professional background and perceived ability to identify victims of violence. The questionnaire assessed (on a scale from 1 to 10 using six negative statements) dentists' perception of healthcare system mandated reporting of suspected violence. Six statements were used to assess professional attitude towards reporting suspected violence. Logistic regression was used to assess the association between intention to report suspected violence and perceived ability, perception and attitude adjusting for confounders. The response rate was 65.2% (n=2936/4506) from general practitioners (70.9%) of mean age=31 years with 56.7% women. Of those, 68.8% intended to report and 52.2% considered themselves able to identify violence victims. The mean (SD) negative perception score=5.3/10 (2.1) and the mean (SD) professional attitude score=7.5/10 (1.9). In multivariate regression, intention to report was associated with professional attitude (OR 1.08, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.14), ability to identify violence victims (OR 1.76, 95% CI 1.45 to 2.12) and negative perception that reporting is not mandated (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.85 to 0.94). Significant differences existed among countries in intention to report. Most dentists intended to report suspected violence and their intention could be explained by the theory of planned behaviour which offers a framework for professional development to support violence victims. Sharing of training resources, policies and guidelines is needed to ensure

  4. Parent perceptions of dentists' role in HPV vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazalde, Gabriela E; Gilkey, Melissa B; Kornides, Melanie L; McRee, Annie-Laurie

    2018-01-25

    Offering HPV vaccine in settings beyond the traditional medical home holds promise for increasing the currently low levels of coverage. As adolescents frequently visit dentists, dental practices may be one such alternative vaccination setting. This study assessed parent attitudes about the roles dental providers could play in HPV prevention, including vaccine provision. In September 2016, we conducted an online survey using a national sample (n = 1209) of U.S. parents of adolescent children aged 11-17. Adolescents' mean age was 14; 53% were male and 62% were non-Hispanic white. We identified correlates of parents' comfort with dentists as HPV vaccinators using multivariable logistic regression. Overall, 23% of parents reported that they would feel comfortable with their child receiving HPV vaccine from a dentist. In multivariable analyses, parents had greater odds of being comfortable if they had higher trust in their child's primary care provider (OR = 1.27, 95% CI: 0.96-1.68) and lower odds if their child was female (OR = 0.65, 95% CI: 0.50-0.86). Convenience (20%) and oral health expertise (20%) were the most commonly cited benefits of dentists administering the vaccine. Wanting their child's regular provider to administer and track vaccinations (61% and 58%, respectively), and lack of insurance coverage (30%) were the most commonly cited concerns. Parents expressed somewhat greater comfort with roles dentists might play in promoting HPV vaccination other than vaccine delivery, such as providing education. Parents in this sample had low comfort with dentists as HPV vaccinators. Findings from this study highlight potential concerns to be addressed before dental practices consider offering HPV vaccination in the future. Further research should assess dentists' perspectives and explore alternative roles for dental providers in HPV prevention efforts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Assessment of work engagement among dentists in Hyderabad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukkavilli, Madhuri; Kulkarni, Suhas; Doshi, Dolar; Reddy, Srikanth; Reddy, Padma; Reddy, Sahithi

    2017-01-01

    Work engagement has been conceptualized as a relatively stable phenomenon, partly explained by the presence of specific job and organizational characteristics. Work engagement is important to the dental workforce worldwide, and the lack of it has been known to cause burnout. Positivity among dentists is essential as it is directly proportional to the patient's satisfaction towards the dental care. To assess work engagement among dentists in the city of Hyderabad, India. A cross-sectional questionnaire study was conducted to assess work engagement among dentists enrolled with the local branch of the Indian Dental Association in the city of Hyderabad, India. The shortened form of the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES-9) questionnaire was employed for the assessment. The mean scores of total work engagement and its domains based on gender and educational qualifications were estimated using Student t- test. A total of 371 subjects participated in the study. Females reported higher mean scores than males for total work (p = 0.40) and its dimensions (Vigor; p = 0.23, Dedication; p = 0.53, Absorption; p = 0.69). Dentists with Master's degree had higher mean scores not only in the total work, but also in its dimensions. (p = 0.01). The present study reported that females had higher mean scores of total work engagement and its individual domains. In comparison with a Bachelor's degree, having a Master's degree enhanced work engagement among dentists in Hyderabad, India.

  6. Oral cancer: knowledge, practices and opinions of dentists in yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaizari, Nader Ahmed; Al-Maweri, Sadeq Ali

    2014-01-01

    Oral cancer presents with high mortality rates, and the likelihood of survival is remarkably superior when detected early. Dental professionals have an important role and responsibility in prevention and early detection of oral cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge, practices and opinions regarding oral cancer among dentists in Yemen. A cross-sectional survey was conducted using a self-administered questionnaire involving private and public dental practitioners, working in different governorates in Yemen. Of the 800 dentists surveyed, a total of 221 questionnaires were completed and returned (response rate 27.6%). A vast majority of dentists (96.38%) identified tobacco as the major risk factor for oral cancer, and 82.8% knew that squamous cell carcinoma is the most common form. While 47.1% of the dentists agreed that they were adequately trained in oral cancer screening, the majority (86%) believed that they need further training in oral cancer screening. These results suggest that additional training and continuing educational programs on prevention and early detection of oral cancer for dentists are to be highly recommended.

  7. Impact of stress on dentists' clinical performance. A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plessas, A; Delgado, M B; Nasser, M; Hanoch, Y; Moles, D R

    2018-03-01

    Dentistry is recognised as a stressful profession and dentists perceive their profession to be more stressful than other healthcare professions. While earlier studies have shown a link between stress and well-being among dentists, whether stress negatively impacts their clinical performance is an important and open question. We do know, however, that stress is associated with reduced performance in other health (and non-health) related professions. This systematic review aimed to answer the question: how does stress impact on dentists' clinical performance? This systematic review was registered in PROSPERO (CRD42016045756). The CINHAL, Embase, Medline, PsycINFO, EThOS and OpenGrey electronic databases were searched according to PRISMA guidelines. Two reviewers independently screened the citations for relevance. The citation list of potentially eligible papers was also searched. Prospective empirical studies were considered for inclusion. The inclusion criteria were applied at the full-text stage by the two same reviewers independently. The search yielded 3535 titles and abstracts. Twelve publications were considered potentially eligible, eleven of which were excluded as they did not meet the predefined inclusion criteria. This systematic review identified a gap in the literature as it found no empirical evidence quantifying the impact of stress on dentists' clinical performance. Prospective well-designed experimental simulation studies, comparing stress with non-stress situations on clinical performance and decision making, as well studies evaluating prospectively real-life dentists' performance under stress are warranted. Copyright© 2018 Dennis Barber Ltd.

  8. Pediatric dentists' job satisfaction: results of a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Lyndsay F; Buehler, Amy M; Boynton, James R; Majewski, Robert F; Inglehart, Marita R

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine pediatric dentists' level of job satisfaction and to explore which factors (demographic and practice/work/patient characteristics) are related to their satisfaction. Data were collected with mailed surveys from 385 and with web-based surveys from 966 pediatric dentists in the United States. Professional satisfaction was measured with the Professional Satisfaction Scale and the Dentists' Satisfaction Scale. Most respondents would choose dentistry (89 percent) and pediatric dentistry (92 percent) again and would recommend dentistry (85 percent) and pediatric dentistry (83 percent) to their child as a career. Male respondents were more satisfied with income, personal and professional time, staff, and practice management aspects, and female respondents were more satisfied with patient relations. The older the dentists were, the more satisfied they were. Respondents in academia were less stressed and less satisfied with their income than respondents in nonacademic settings. The more time spent in the operatory and the less administrative work, the more satisfied the respondents were. The fewer patients from a lower socioeconomic background they treated, the more satisfied they were. Overall, pediatric dentists have a high level of job satisfaction. Demographic factors and practice/work/patient characteristic are related to job satisfaction.

  9. Trends in the earnings gender gap among dentists, physicians, and lawyers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen Le, Thanh An; Lo Sasso, Anthony T; Vujicic, Marko

    2017-04-01

    The authors examined the factors associated with sex differences in earnings for 3 professional occupations. The authors used a multivariate Blinder-Oaxaca method to decompose the differences in mean earnings across sex. Although mean differences in earnings between men and women narrowed over time, there remained large, unaccountable earnings differences between men and women among all professions after multivariate adjustments. For dentists, the unexplained difference in earnings for women was approximately constant at 62% to 66%. For physicians, the unexplained difference in earnings for women ranged from 52% to 57%. For lawyers, the unexplained difference in earnings for women was the smallest of the 3 professions but also exhibited the most growth, increasing from 34% in 1990 to 45% in 2010. The reduction in the earnings gap is driven largely by a general convergence between men and women in some, but not all, observable characteristics over time. Nevertheless, large unexplained gender gaps in earnings remain for all 3 professions. Policy makers must use care in efforts to alleviate earnings differences for men and women because measures could make matters worse without a clear understanding of the nature of the factors driving the differences. Copyright © 2017 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Evidence-based dentistry: fundamentals for the dentist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Janet; Chiappelli, Francesco; Spackman, Sue; Prolo, Paolo; Stevenson, Richard

    2006-06-01

    This article explains the fundamentals of evidence-based dentistry for the dentist. Evidence-based dentistry is a discipline whose primary participant is the translational researcher. Recent developments have emphasized the importance of this discipline (clinical and translational research) for improving health care. The process of evidence-based dentistry is the reciprocation of new and existing evidence between dentists and quantitative and qualitative researchers, facilitated by the translational researcher. The product of this reciprocation is the clinical practice guideline, or best evidence, that provides the patient options in choosing treatments or services. These options are quantified and qualified by decision, utility, and cost data. Using shared decision-making, the dentist and patient arrive at a mutual understanding of which option best meets an acceptable and preferred treatment course that is cost effective. This option becomes the clinical decision.

  11. The role of dentist in palliative care team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rani P Mol

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The palliative doctor gives the ′touch of God′ as he/she takes care of the terminally ill patient. The oncologist encounters great difficulties in managing oral cavity problems of these patients. A trained dental doctor can help other doctors in dealing with these situations. But the general dental surgeon does not have enough idea about his part in these treatments. The community is also unaware of the role that a nearby dentist can play. Adequate training programs have to be conducted and awareness has to be created. A trained dentist will be a good team mate for the oncologist or radiotherapist or other doctors of the palliative care team. In this paper, a brief attempt is made to list a few areas in which a palliative care dentist can help other members of the palliative care team and also the patient in leading a better life.

  12. Dentists' use of digital radiographic techniques: Part I - intraoral X-ray: a questionnaire study of Swedish dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenson, Björn; Ståhlnacke, Katri; Karlsson, Reet; Fält, Anna

    2018-03-01

    The present study aims to gain knowledge about the dentist's use and choice of digital intraoral imaging methods. A questionnaire sent to 2481 dentists within the Swedish Dental Society contained questions about the type of X-ray technique used, problems experienced with digital radiography, and reasons for choosing digital technology, and about indications, clinic size and type of service. Response rate was 53%. Ninety-eight percent of the dentists had made the transition to digital radiography; only 2% used film technique, and solid-state detector (SSD) was the most used digital technique. More years in service decreases the likelihood of applying individual indications for performing a full mouth examination. More retakes were done with SSDs compared to storage phosphor plates. Reasons for choosing digital techniques were that work was easier and communication with the patients improved. However, dentists also experienced problems with digital techniques, such as exposure and projection errors and inadequate image quality. The Swedish Radiation Safety Authority states that all radiological examinations should be justified, something not always followed. This study showed that 98% of the respondents, Swedish dentists within the Swedish Dental Society, used digital techniques, and the most used was the solid-state technique.

  13. Brazilian dentists' attitudes about medical emergencies during dental treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsati, Franco; Montalli, Victor Angelo; Flório, Flavia Martão; Ramacciato, Juliana Cama; da Cunha, Fernanda Lopes; Cecanho, Rodrigo; de Andrade, Eduardo Dias; Motta, Rogério Heládio Lopes

    2010-06-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of emergencies in dental practices and the prepared-ness and the training experience in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) of Brazilian dentists in dealing with emergencies. The volunteer participants in the study were 498 Brazilian dentists who were present at the 27th International Congress of Dentistry in São Paulo. The most prevalent emergency was presyncope (reported by 54.20 percent of respondents), followed by orthostatic hypotension (44.37 percent), moderate allergic reactions (16.86 percent), hypertensive crisis (15.06 percent), asthma (15.06 percent), syncope (12.65 percent), angina (6.82 percent), convulsion (6.22 percent), hypoglycemia (5.62 percent), hyperventilation crisis (5.22 percent), choking (2.20 percent), and cerebrovascular accident (0.8 percent). Anaphylaxis, myocardial infarction, and cardiac arrest were the rarest emergencies, reported by only 0.4, 0.2, and 0.2 percent of dentists, respectively. Only 41 percent of the dentists judged themselves capable to diagnose the cause of an emergency during a dental visit. The majority responded that they would be capable of performing initial treatment of presyncope, syncope, orthostatic hypotension, convulsion, and choking. However, most of them felt unable to treat anaphylaxis, myocardial infarction, or cardiac arrest. Further, the majority felt unable to perform CPR or undertake an intravenous injection. It was concluded that the most prevalent medical emergencies in dental practice of Brazilian dentists are presyncope and orthostatic hypotension. The occurrence of life-threatening medical emergencies like anaphylaxis, myocardial infarction, cardiac arrest, and cerebrovascular accident is rare. Brazilian dentists are not fully prepared to manage medical emergencies and have insufficient experience training in CPR.

  14. Occupational Stress and Coping Behaviours Among Dentists in Kerman, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Pouradeli

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Recognising causes of stress can help prevent associated adverse effects. This study aimed to investigate causes of occupational stress and coping behaviours among general dentists in Iran. Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out from April to December 2014. A modified version of the Occupational Stress Indicator questionnaire was used to assess causes of stress and coping behaviours among 142 general dentists in Kerman, Iran. Results: A total of 93 dentists participated in the study (response rate: 65.5%. Of these, 58.9% reported often being stressed. The mean general stress score was 63.33 ± 19.99. The most common causes of stress were maintaining high levels of concentration while working (65.6%, time pressures (64.5%, concern over their ability to deliver dental services in future (60.2% and rising costs (59.1%. No significant relationships between stress and gender, age, workplace or working hours per week were noted (P >0.05. However, there was a significant correlation between general stress scores and years of job experience (P = 0.05 and number of patients treated daily (P = 0.03. The most common methods for coping with stress were resting (71.0%, sports (45.2% and entertainment (43.0%. Most dentists felt that stress management courses could help to reduce stress (89.7%. Conclusion: General dentists in Kerman were subject to many sources of stress in their workplaces, with significant relationships between stress scores and years of work experience and number of patients treated daily. Dentists should be encouraged to participate in stress management courses to help alleviate stress.

  15. Occupational stress and burnout among Hong Kong dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, H B; Wong, M Cm

    2017-10-01

    Professional burnout has been described as a gradual erosion of a person and may be one of the possible consequences of chronic occupational stress. Although occupational stress has been surveyed among dentists in Hong Kong, no study has been published about burnout in the profession. This study aimed to evaluate burnout among Hong Kong dentists and its association with occupational stress. We surveyed a random sample of 1086 registered dentists in Hong Kong, which formed 50% of the local profession. They were mailed an anonymous questionnaire about burnout and occupational stress in 2015. The questionnaire assessed occupational stress, coping strategies, effects of stress, level of burnout, and socio-demographic characteristics of the respondents. Occupational stress assessment concerned 33 stressors in five groups: patient-related, time-related, income-related, job-related, and staff-/technically related. Level of burnout was assessed by the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (22 items) with three scores: emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation, and personal accomplishment. Completed questionnaires were received from 301 dentists (response rate, 28.3%), of whom 25.4% had a high level of emotional exhaustion, 17.2% had a high level of depersonalisation, and 39.0% had a low level of personal accomplishment. Only 7.0% of respondents, however, had a high level of overall burnout (high emotional exhaustion, high depersonalisation, and low personal accomplishment). A high level of overall burnout was significantly associated with a higher mean score for job-related stressors and lack of postgraduate qualifications (Poccupational stressors experienced by dentists in Hong Kong. In spite of this, a low proportion of dentists have a high level of overall burnout. There was a positive association between occupational stress and level of burnout.

  16. Role of Dentists during Mass Disasters: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Vallamchetla

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mass disasters cause damage, ecological disruption, and loss of human life on a massive scale. The reasons for these ranges from natural causes such as volcanic eruptions and earthquakes to secondary human causes like wars. Such massive disruption of life demands help from people belonging to various sectors of healthcare, providing pre-identified, structured, and systematic aid to the victims of the disaster. This review article highlights the role of a dentist in such massive disasters. The dentist not only provides first aid to the victims but also aids in the identification of human remains.

  17. Determination of mercury in dentists through Neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padilla M, M.A.; Granados C, F.

    1999-01-01

    It was determined the mercury levels in urine through Neutron activation analysis to 25 dentists who have been exposed to mercury by several time periods, because of the routine manipulations of amalgams. The determined concentrations of mercury were less to 10 μ g Hg/l of urine. The results were founded inside the safety limits reported in the literature. The mercury levels in the dentists are associated with a wide variety of factors that contribute to their exposure as: number of years of dental practice, number of amalgams manipulated between others. (Author)

  18. Empowering Malaysian dentists to tobacco dependence treatment conduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Amer Siddiq Amer; Kadir, Rahimah Abdul; Yahya, Nurul Asyikin; Zakaria, Hazli; Rashid, Rusdi Abdul; Habil, Mohamed Hussain

    2014-08-01

    As a signatory to the World Health Organisation 2003 Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, Malaysia has policies in place and funded 300 public Quit clinics. Unfortunately, government dentists are not included to run tobacco dependence treatment. A cross-sectional exploratory survey was carried out to seek Malaysian dentists' opinion on their knowledge, perception and willingness to conduct tobacco dependence treatment. Participation was voluntary from those who attended a specially designed one-day, four-module workshop on tobacco cessation intervention. Data were collected using the Audience-Response-System equipment which tracked immediate responses covering four domains namely: smoking as a public health problem, smoking as an addiction, the role of dentists in the programme and confidence in conducting smoking cessation in the clinic. Sample comprised more female dentists (73.5%), mean age 33.6 (SD 8.99) years and with more than 3 years working experience. Findings indicated that the majority agreed Malaysia has a rising problem in the prevalence of smoking (71.6%) and predicted that it will affect mostly the young (81.9%). Only half of the dentists surveyed (58.9%) routinely recorded their patients' smoking habits. The majority (71.6%) believed that dentists are effective in helping their patient to stop smoking and 76.3% agreed that dentists should discuss the smoking habit with their patients; however, 60% agreed that doing so is too time consuming. In addition, only 24.7% knew of more ways to treat a smoking habit. The majority felt comfortable giving advice to patients about changing their habits (76.5%) or discussing treatment options (60.5%): 75% would opt for a combined programme of counselling and use of medication if they have to do, 15% would choose to go on counselling only, while 8% did not want to treat. In conclusion, the findings suggest that dentists have a strong potential to contribute significantly to providing smoking cessation

  19. A comparison of patient satisfaction and dentist evaluation of overdenture therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettinger, R L; Jakobsen, J R

    1997-06-01

    It has been argued that the retention of some teeth in the jaws as overdenture abutments prevents negative feelings about the loss of natural teeth. This study set out to evaluate how satisfied a group of patients were with wearing overdentures, and to compare their subjective evaluations with those of a dentist using objective criteria to examine the prostheses. A questionnaire was developed using questions adapted from several other studies. It was pretested, modified and used on all patients who were members of a longitudinal study of overdentures that started in 1974, and who returned on recall. At the end of 9 months, 101 subjects had completed the questionnaire and examination. The mean age of the patients was 65.9 years with an age range of 35 to 88 years. There were 68 men and 33 women in this study and 62 of them were satisfied with their dentures; 33 were satisfied, but felt they had some faults. Only 6 were unhappy about wearing the overdentures. The average length of time the dentures had been worn was 6.9 years, with a range of 1 to 15 years. The most frequent complaints were loss of retention (65.4%) and discomfort (62.2%) of the mandibular dentures. A number of correlations were evaluated and some significant relationships were found between dentist and patient evaluation of the dentures. The best predictor of patient satisfaction with denture wearing was the patient's perception of retention and appearance. In the maxilla the patient's ability to chew and the dentist's evaluation of occlusion were also significant predictors. In the mandible the only other factors apart from retention and appearance were patient comfort and age.

  20. Management of chronic orofacial pain: a survey of general dentists in german university hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wirz, Stefan; Ellerkmann, Richard K.; Buecheler, Marcus; Putensen, Christian; Nadstawek, Joachim; Wartenberg, Hans-Christian

    2010-01-01

    AIM: This survey assessed procedures performed by general dentists in German university hospitals treating patients with chronic orofacial pain (COP). METHODS: A standardized questionnaire was sent to dentists at all 42 German universities. Doctors were asked to describe demographics, diagnoses,

  1. Restoration of noncarious tooth defects by dentists in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nascimento, Marcelle M; Gordan, Valeria V; Qvist, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    The authors conducted a study to quantify the reasons for restoring noncarious tooth defects (NCTDs) by dentists in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) and to assess the tooth, patient and dentist characteristics associated with those reasons....

  2. Teens: Want a Brighter Smile? Visit the Dentist, Not the Shopping Mall

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Brighter Smile? Visit the Dentist, not the Shopping Mall Article Chapters Teens: Want a Brighter Smile? Visit the Dentist, not the Shopping Mall print full article print this chapter email this ...

  3. The characteristics and distribution of dentist workforce in Saudi Arabia: A descriptive cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulaziz A. AlBaker

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions: Most of the dental care in Saudi Arabia is provided by non-Saudi dentists in both private and public health sectors. With the rising unemployment rate among Saudi dentists, the governmental bodies that are responsible of dental labor market regulations such as the ministries of health, economy and planning, and labor should come up with a policy to gradually but carefully replace the non-Saudi dentists in both public and private sectors with Saudi dentists.

  4. Dentists' knowledge of occlusal splint therapy for bruxism and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-10-28

    Oct 28, 2015 ... bruxism, and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders and to assessment of treatment modalities. Materials ... While the dentists' with sufficient knowledge soft splint application rates were 11.6% ... might result in disease progression or the development of a different ... software “SPSS” version 15.0. (Inc.

  5. Dentists with extended skills: the challenge of innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Haboubi, M; Eliyas, S; Briggs, P F A; Jones, E; Rayan, R R; Gallagher, J E

    2014-08-01

    The aim was to obtain stakeholders' views on the former London Deanery's joint educational service development initiative to train dentists with a special interest (DwSIs) in endodontics in conjunction with the National Health Services (NHS) and examine the models of care provided. A convergent parallel mixed methods design including audit of four different models of care, semi-structured interviews of a range of key stakeholders (including the DwSI trainees) and questionnaire surveys of patients and primary care dentists. Eight dentists treated over 1,600 endodontic cases of moderate complexity over a two year training period. A retrospective audit of four schemes suggested that first molars were the most commonly treated tooth (57%; n = 341). Patients who received care in the latter stages of the initiative were 'satisfied' or 'very satisfied' with the service (89%; n = 98). Most dental practitioners agreed that having access to such services would support the care of their patients (89%; n = 215) with 88%; (n = 214) supporting the view that DwSIs should accept referrals from outside of their practice. This initiative, developed to provide endodontic care of medium complexity in a primary care setting, received wide support from stakeholders including patients and primary care dentists. The implications for care pathways, commissioning and further research are discussed.

  6. Awareness and attitude of Nigerian dentists to occupational HIV post ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The incidence of human immunodeficiency virus infection in Nigeria remains worrisome. Dentists are increasingly becoming at risk of occupational exposure to the virus. Post-exposure prophylaxis is known to reduce the risk of sero-conversion when appropriately administered. This study assessed the ...

  7. Knowledge and attitudes of dentists toward shortened dental arch ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The aim of this study was to assess and compare the knowledge and attitudes of dentists toward shortened dental arch (SDA) therapy in Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: In this cross‑sectional study, self‑designed‑structured questionnaires were distributed among specialists (SP), residents (RES), and ...

  8. Infections Disease in the Dental Clinical Nigerian Dentists ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The dental clinic is a potential source of transmission of infectious disease due to the invasive nature of many dental procedures. Infectious disease therefore constitutes serious occupational hazards to all oral health care workers. This descriptive study aims to assess the knowledge of dentists on common transmissible ...

  9. Dentists awareness and action towards domestic violence patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlAlyani, Wafa S.; Alshouibi, Ehab N.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To identify the potential factors that would predict a dentist’s awareness of domestic violence (DV), as well as the factors that influence the probability of dentists to take the required action. Also, to list the common barriers that dentists face when managing DV victims. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, a self-administered, structured questionnaire was sent randomly to dentists practicing in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. The online survey link was emailed with a cover message that illustrated the study context. Responses were accepted from January 2016 until the end of February 2016. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 22 was used for data analysis. Descriptive statistics, bivariate and multivariate analysis carried out to identify significant variables at p<0.05 level of significance. Results: A sample size of 151 responses were recruited. The result of multivariate models indicated that the odds of dentists’ awareness and taking actions towards DV victims were influenced by their education, clinical experience, gender, practicing sector, and qualification. Lack of training in identifying DV and embarrassment to bring up DV with patients were the most common barriers for the respondents when treating DV victims. Conclusion: Continuing education with regards to DV was found to be the most relevant predictor. More educational courses in this regard would empower dentists to support DV victims. PMID:28042635

  10. Awareness and attitude of Nigerian dentists to occupational HIV post ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    By geopolitical zone, Dental Surgeons from the South West (63.5%) were more aware of PEP than other zones while Dentists from the North Central and North West (88%) were most willing to accept post-exposure prophylaxis. Only 38.9% had attended continuing medical education on human immunodeficiency ...

  11. Adult dental anxiety and related dentist beliefs in Danish private practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, R.; Brødsgaard, I.

    1997-01-01

    anxiety problem to be primarily the fault of the patients' own personality, 40% blamed the problem on previous dentists and 10% pointed to a relationship problem between dentists and patients. The dentists expressed confidence about treating anxious patients, but also a need for more education about...

  12. Assessment of Postural Load Index Using LUBA Method and the Prevalence of Musculoskeletal Disorders in Dentists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab Baroonyzade

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives : High prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in dentistry represents the importance of investigation of working conditions in this profession to reduce musculoskeletal disorders.The purpose of this study was to determine the postural load on the upper limb postural using macro LUBA technique and the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders. Methods: This study was conducted on 30 post graduate dental students of Hamadan University of Medical Sciences . LUBA technique was used to evaluate the postural load. The Nordic questionnaire was used to assess the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders . The results were analyzed using SPSS version 16 . Results: The prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders was as follows neck( 63.3%, back ( 43.3%, back ( 30%, knee ( 20%, shoulder( 13%, wrist ( 10%, legs (10 %, elbows( 6.7% and thigh( 0%. The maximum postural load index was 23 for women and 21for men. In total, 50 % of dentists were in group 3 , 33 % of dentists in group 4 and 16.7 % in group 2 of the corrective measures . There was no significant association b etween demographic variables and presence of musculoskeletal disorders . Besides, there was no significant association between the presence of pain in upper limbs and the postural load index (Pvalue > 0.05. Conclusions: This study showed high levels of p ostural load index and musculoskeletal disorders among dental students of Hamadan University of Medical Sciences. High levels of p ostural load index indicate a high level of risk, which requires immediate corrective action and intervention.

  13. Practice Patterns of Dentist Anesthesiologists in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Andrew S; Fischer, Michael W; Lang, Nicholas S; Cooke, Matthew R

    2018-01-01

    This study provides trends in the discipline of dental anesthesiology. A questionnaire-based survey was sent to 338 members of the American Society of Dentist Anesthesiologists to evaluate practice patterns. One focus of the study was modality of sedation/anesthesia used for dentistry in North America. Age, gender, years in practice, and geographic region of practice were also obtained. Data gathered from the returned questionnaires were entered into an Excel spreadsheet and then imported into JMP Statistical Discovery Software (v12.2 Pro) for descriptive analysis. A total of 112 surveys were completed electronically and 102 surveys were returned via post, for a total response rate of 63.3% ( N = 214). Data from this survey suggested a wide variation of therapeutic practices among dentist anesthesiologists in North America. Of the surveyed dentist anesthesiologists, 58.7% (SE = 4.2%) practice as mobile providers, 32.2% (SE = 3.1%) provide care in an academic environment, and 27.7% (SE = 2.8%) function as operator/anesthetists. The majority of anesthesia is provided for pediatric dentistry (47.0%, SE = 4.2%), oral and maxillofacial surgery (18.5%, SE = 3.9%), and special needs (16.7%, SE = 3.6%). Open-airway (58.7%, SE = 5.5%) sedation/anesthesia was the preferred modality of delivery, compared with the use of advanced airway (41.3%, SE = 4.6%). The demographics show diverse practice patterns of dentist anesthesiologists in multiple regions of the continent. Despite concerns regarding specialty recognition, reimbursement difficulties, and competition from alternative anesthesia providers, the overall perceptions of dentist anesthesiologists and the future of the field seem largely favorable.

  14. Dentists awareness and action towards domestic violence patients. A cross-sectional study among dentists in Western Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wafa S. AlAlyani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To identify the potential factors that would predict a dentist’s awareness of domestic violence (DV, as well as the factors that influence the probability of dentists to take the required action. Also, to list the common barriers that dentists face when managing DV victims. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, a self-administered, structured questionnaire was sent randomly to dentists practicing in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. The online survey link was emailed with a cover message that illustrated the study context. Responses were accepted from January 2016 until the end of February 2016. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 22 was used for data analysis. Descriptive statistics, bivariate and multivariate analysis carried out to identify significant variables at p<0.05 level of significance. Results: A sample size of 151 responses were recruited. The result of multivariate models indicated that the odds of dentists’ awareness and taking actions towards DV victims were influenced by their education, clinical experience, gender, practicing sector, and qualification. Lack of training in identifying DV and embarrassment to bring up DV with patients were the most common barriers for the respondents when treating DV victims. Conclusion: Continuing education with regards to DV was found to be the most relevant predictor. More educational courses in this regard would empower dentists to support DV victims.

  15. Knowledge of Dentists on the Management of Tooth Avulsion Injuries in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Mariana Cezário; Carvalho, Ricardo G; Accorsi-Mendonça, Thais; De-Deus, Gustavo; Moreira, Edson J L; Silva, Emmanuel J N L

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate dentists' professional experience and knowledge of emergency management of tooth avulsion injuries in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. A total of 100 questionnaires were evaluated. The first part of the questionnaire consisted of questions regarding personal information. The second part evaluated dentists' knowledge of emergency management in cases of dental avulsion. The responses for each question were counted and expressed as percentages. All dentists had a college degree or above. Only three dentists had a Master's or PhD degree. Most of the dentists (94.5%) considered time and storage media important for the prognosis of avulsed teeth. However, the dentists did not show consistent responses about the adequate time and ideal storage media to transport avulsed teeth. The study highlighted Brazilian dentists' need for continuing education in order to improve current knowledge in emergency management of avulsed teeth.

  16. Professional responsibility and patient retention: alerts for the new dentist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitland, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Getting to know your patients, well beyond recognition of their specific chief dental complaint, is most important in operating a successful and satisfying practice. In addition to the clinical findings and pertinent history alerts, a good understanding of the person being treated can go a long way toward cementing lasting and rewarding doctor-patient relationships. Almost all new patients to the practice are welcome. However, an occasional "difficult" patient can be identified. This is the patient who you will not be able to satisfy, who cultivates misunderstandings, is unfairly over demanding, wastes office time in innumerable ways and eventually causes great frustration for the dentist. These patients may leave the practice in an unpleasant termination. Concerns of litigation arise, and one must also consider the waste of economic and emotional currency, as well as any other negative repercussions that may result. The dentist should become skilled at early identification of potentially risky, disruptive and problematic persons seeking treatment.

  17. Awareness and attitudes toward hepatitis B among Malaysian dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razak, I A; Latifah, R J; Nasruddin, J; Esa, R

    1991-01-01

    A questionnaire was mailed to 1217 dentists whose names appear in the Dentist Register of 1987 in order to assess their awareness and acceptance of hepatitis B vaccine and their pattern of glove usage. Almost all the respondents (99.6%) were aware of the availability of the hepatitis B vaccine yet only 44.8% have received the vaccine. This is in spite of the fact that the majority (61.2%) of the vaccine non-acceptors have no reservations concerning the vaccine. About 71% and 63% of the vaccine-acceptors and non-acceptors respectively believed that the risk of their contracting hepatitis B was high or very high. About 22% of the vaccine non-acceptors never used gloves when treating patients as compared to 9% among vaccine acceptors. Overall, about 78% of the respondents have experienced needleprick injuries in the 3 years preceding the survey.

  18. Occupational contact dermatitis amongst dentists and dental technicians

    OpenAIRE

    Lugović-Mihić, Liborija; Ferček, Iva; Duvančić, Tomislav; Bulat, Vedrana; Ježovita, Josip; Novak-Bilić, Gaby; Šitum, Mirna

    2016-01-01

    Since the working medical personnel including dentists and dental technicians mainly use their hands, it is understandable that the most common occupational disease amongst medical personnel is contact dermatitis (CD) (80%-90% of cases). Development of occupational CD is caused by contact of the skin with various substances in occupational environment. Occupational etiologic factors for dental personnel are foremost reactions to gloves containing latex, followed by various dental materials...

  19. Approach of Surgeons Dentists in Relation to Lightcuring Composite Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Cristine Scariot

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Apparatus and methods for polymerization of composite resins have been seeking to improve the restorations properties. This study aimed to assess the knowledge of dentists before the use of light curing units. Data collection was done through a questionnaire, administered to 34 dentists from course IMED Restorative Dentistry Specialization in the years 2015 and 2016. The results showed that 34 of the dentists interviewed , 35.30% used Gnatus brand, 23.53% RadiCall, and 20.58% Schuster. As for the year 35.3% had photopolymerizer the year 2015, 17.64% year 2010 and 11.77% year 2014. Regarding the type of lamp used, 91.14% used Led, 5,38% halogen and 2 94% Led and halogen. Regarding the consequences of polymerization shrinkage, 23.52% of dentists related postoperative sensitivity, marginal leakage, recurrent decay and enamel crack as consequences, 20.58% considered the microleakage the only consequence and 23, 52% only postoperative sensitivity. Of the total sample 29.4% said to reduce the stress of polymerization shrinkage used other curing techniques, 17.64% ramp type, 20.58% step type. It can be observed that 70.56% of respondents reported that less than half of the cases occurred sensitivity incidences after the restorative treatment, 20.58% never observed postoperative sensitivity, and 8.82% just in half of the cases. It was possible to observe the most types and brands of equipment used by professionals, and it was noted still a lack in the knowledge from professionals about the polymerization shrinkage consequences.

  20. Dental bioaerosol as an occupational hazard in a dentist's workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymańska, Jolanta

    2007-01-01

    Many-year studies on aerosols as an infection vector, despite their wide range, ignored dental aerosol. All procedures performed with the use of dental unit handpieces cause the formation of aerosol and splatter which are commonly contaminated with bacteria, viruses, fungi, often also with blood. Aerosols are liquid and solid particles, 50 microm or less in diameter, suspended in air. Splatter is usually described as a mixture of air, water and/or solid substances; water droplets in splatter are from 50 microm to several millimetres in diameter and are visible to the naked eye. The most intensive aerosol and splatter emission occurs during the work of an ultrasonic scaler tip and a bur on a high-speed handpiece. Air-water aerosol produced during dental treatment procedures emerges from a patient's mouth and mixes with the surrounding air, thus influencing its composition. Because air contained in this space is the air breathed by both dentist and patient, its composition is extremely important as a potential threat to the dentist's health. According to the author, insufficient awareness of health risk, working habits, and economic factors are the reasons why dentists do not apply the available and recommended methods of protection against the influence of bioaerosol and splatter. Behaviour protecting a dentist and an assistant from the threat resulting from the influence of dental aerosol cannot be limited to isolated actions. The author, on the basis of the literature and own research, characterizes bioaerosol and splatter in a dental surgery and reviews a full range of protective measures against these risk factors.

  1. Perception of dentists, dental students, and patients on dentogingival aesthetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Migueli DURIGON

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Patients’ demand for dentogingival aesthetics has increased significantly in recent years, and this is a complex concept due to numerous factors involved in obtaining patient/professional satisfaction. Some dentogingival features may alter smile harmony, such as excessive gingival display. Objective To evaluate whether the presence of gingival display has a negative influence on the perception of dentogingival aesthetics. Material and method 180 individuals (60 dentists, 60 dental students, and 60 patients evaluated images of volunteer smiles. These images were digitally altered by the Adobe Photoshop™ software, creating different situations of gingival display (4 mm, 2 mm, 0 mm, -2 mm, -4 mm, and graded by the evaluators with the following scores: (01 very pleasant smile, (02 pleasant smile, and 03 unpleasant smile. The scores assigned were analyzed using ANOVA (α=0.05. Result Gingival displays between 0 and 2 mm were considered aesthetically pleasing. Changes of -4 and +4 mm were defined as the most disharmonious smiles. The 0-mm female smile was considered the most harmonious for dentists (1.51 and dental students (1.77, by Student's t test (p<0.05. In the opinion of patients, the smile of +2 mm was considered the most aesthetic. In the image evaluations of men, the 0-mm smile was considered the most aesthetic (p <0.05 for dentists (1.85 and dental students (1.62. The patients considered +2 mm of gingival display the most harmonious smile. Conclusion The aesthetic perception of dental students and dentists was different when compared to the group of patients.

  2. Compliance of Iranian dentists with safety standards of oral radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahab, S; Kavosi, A; Nazarinia, H; Mehralizadeh, S; Mohammadpour, M; Emami, M

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Dentists use radiographs in their daily practice. Their knowledge and behaviour towards radiographic examination can affect patients' exposure to radiation. The aim of this study was to survey the knowledge and behaviour of Iranian dentists regarding oral radiology safety standards. Methods 1000 questionnaires were given to the participants of the 48th Annual Congress of the Iranian Dental Association, of which 700 were returned. The participants were asked about demographic data, primary knowledge of radiation protection, selection criteria, radiographic equipment and technique, methods of patient and personnel protection and management of radiographic waste. Descriptive analysis of data was performed. Results 44% of respondents said the initial radiograph they took was of the periapical view of a limited area. 12% preferred the periapical paralleling technique. F-speed film was used by 9% and E-speed film by 62%. Only 2% had digital receptors. Proper exposure time was selected by 26.5%. The use of long and rectangular collimators was 15% and 6%, respectively. 34% occasionally covered their patients with both thyroid shields and lead aprons. 36% used the position and distance rule correctly for their own protection. Proper disposal of the used processing solutions and the lead foils were done by only 1% and 3%, respectively. Conclusions It can be concluded that the majority of dentists in the study group did not select the proper method, material and equipment in order to minimize the exposure of their patient to unnecessary radiation in dental radiography. PMID:22301640

  3. Quality of life, perception and knowledge of dentists on noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Regina Lazarotto Schettini

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: to analyze the perception and knowledge of dentists on occupational noise, its prevention, and effects on their health and quality of life. Methods: a cross-sectional study carried out with 54 dentists of both genders. Two questionnaires were applied: one addressing issues of perception and knowledge on noise and its effects, and another on Quality of Life (SF 36. Results: the workplace noise was considered within medium intensity, and a health risk. Some professionals (59.2% reported knowing noise prevention methods, although they do not use them. Complaints and the most frequently reported symptoms were irritability, difficulty in understanding speech and tinnitus. The perception of the Quality of Life was worse among men. There was association between pain and perception of noise intensity. Conclusion: noise was considered, regardless of gender, harmful to health and associated with perception of musculoskeletal pain. Symptoms and complaints caused by noise have been reported to negatively impact the professional activity of dentists, however, most of them do not adopt preventive measures.

  4. Communicating with the New Generations. The Challenge for Pediatric Dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadia, Marc; Valencia, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Most of the children and parents are virtuous and will give us plenty of reasons to enjoy what we do. Unfortunately, we all know that something is somehow wrong with these new generations. Parents and children sometimes place Pediatric dentists in a dilemma. The social structure changes every few years causing a burden on how to deal with these families. For this reason, dentists might decide to sedate or go to the operating room when these children might be potentially good dental patients. Deciding this course of action, does not allow us to bond with them. Bonding with children must be worked and nurtured. This is part of what pediatric dentists are trained for. This manuscript will illustrate the major changes seen with the new generations of parents and children and how it affects us the way we work in our offices. We will show the importance of bonding with parents and children, moving beyond the biological aspects and venturing into the psycho-socio and cultural issues. Knowing our children and adolescents will allow us to detect potential physical or emotional hazardous behavior.

  5. Self-perceived mental well-being amongst Malaysian dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ab-Murat, Norintan; Mason, Lydia; Kadir, Rahimah Abdul; Yusoff, Noriah

    2018-06-01

    To assess Malaysian dentists' perceptions of their mental well-being. A self-administered questionnaire was developed based on a conceptual framework of mental health and well-being model. Two aspects were assessed, namely the physiological (two domains) and the psychological (six domains). Participants were asked to rate their experiences of the aforementioned aspects using a 5-point Likert scale ranging from all the time to never. The response rate was 81%. Most of the dentists (61.7%) perceived having positive mental well-being. Under the physiological aspect, most respondents reported that they were 'generally happy' (93.3%), but about 30% stated they were 'stressed physically and emotionally'. Of the six domains under the psychological aspect, positive well-being was observed in the 'sense of coherence' and 'behavioural stress' domains. Participants who were above 40 years old, married and had children reported having a more positive mental well-being when compared with their counterparts. Overall, most Malaysian dentists perceived having a positive mental well-being. It is crucial, however, to closely monitor and initiate early interventions for those with negative symptoms to ensure the safe practice of dentistry.

  6. Infection control practices across Canada: do dentists follow the recommendations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, G M; Koval, J J; John, M A; MacDonald, J K

    1999-10-01

    This study investigated provincial and territorial differences in dentists' compliance with recommended infection control practices in Canada (1995). Questionnaires were mailed to a stratified random sample of 6,444 dentists, of whom 66.4% responded. Weighted analyses included Pearson's chi-square test and multiple logistic regression. Significant provincial and territorial differences included testing for immune response after hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination, HBV vaccination for all clinical staff, use of infection control manuals and post-exposure protocols, biological monitoring of heat sterilizers, handwashing before treating patients, using gloves and changing them after each patient, heat-sterilizing handpieces between patients, and using masks and uniforms to protect against splatter of blood and saliva. Excellent compliance (compliance with a combination of 18 recommended infection control procedures) ranged from 0% to 10%; the best predictors were more hours of continuing education on infection control in the last two years, practice location in larger cities (> 500,000) and sex (female). Clearly, improvements in infection control are desirable for dentists in all provinces and territories. Extending mandatory continuing education initiatives to include infection control may promote better compliance with current recommendations.

  7. Comparative inter-institutional study of stress among dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozos-Radillo, Blanca E; Galván-Ramírez, Ma Luz; Pando, Manuel; Carrión, Ma De los Angeles; González, Guillermo J

    2010-01-01

    Dentistry is considered to be a stressful profession due to different factors caused by work, representing a threat to dentists'health. The objectives of this work were to identify and compare chronic stress in dentists among the different health institutions and the association of stress with risk factors. The study in question is observational, transversal and comparative; 256 dentists were included, distributed among five public health institutions in the city of Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico, namely: the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS), the Ministry of Health (SS), the Integral Development of the Family (DIF), the Social Security Services Institute for the Workers (ISSSTE) and the University of Guadalajara (U. de G) Data were obtained by means of the census technique. Stress was identified using the Stress Symptoms Inventory and the statistical analysis was performed using the Odds Ratio (O.R.) and the chi-square statistic. From the total population studied, 219 subjects presented high levels of chronic stress and 37, low levels. In the results of comparative analysis, significant differences were found between IMSS and U. de G and likewise between IMSS and SS. However, in the analysis of association, only U. de G was found to be associated with the high level of chronic stress.

  8. Constrained posture in dentistry - a kinematic analysis of dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlendorf, Daniela; Erbe, Christina; Nowak, Jennifer; Hauck, Imke; Hermanns, Ingo; Ditchen, Dirk; Ellegast, Rolf; Groneberg, David A

    2017-07-05

    How a dentist works, such as the patterns of movements performed daily, is also largely affected by the workstation Dental tasks are often executed in awkward body positions, thereby causing a very high degree of strain on the corresponding muscles. The objective of this study is to detect those dental tasks, during which awkward postures occur most frequently. The isolated analysis of static postures will examine the duration for which these postures are maintained during the corresponding dental, respectively non-dental, activities. 21 (11f/10 m) dentists (age: 40.1 ± 10.4 years) participated in this study. An average dental workday was collected for every subject. To collect kinematic data of all activities, the CUELA system was used. Parallel to the kinematic examination, a detailed computer-based task analysis was conducted. Afterwards, both data sets were synchronized based on the chronological order of the postures assumed in the trunk and the head region. All tasks performed were assigned to the categories "treatment" (I), "office" (II) and "other activities" (III). The angle values of each body region (evaluation parameter) were examined and assessed corresponding to ergonomic standards. Moreover, this study placed a particular focus on static positions, which are held statically for 4 s and longer. For "treatment" (I), the entire head and trunk area is anteriorly tilted while the back is twisted to the right, in (II) and (III) the back is anteriorly tilted and twisted to the right (non-neutral position). Static positions in (I) last for 4-10s, static postures (approx. 60%) can be observed while in (II) and (III) in the back area static positions for more than 30 s are most common. Moreover, in (II) the back is twisted to the right for more than 60 s in 26.8%. Awkward positions are a major part of a dentists' work. This mainly pertains to static positions of the trunk and head in contrast to "office work." These insights facilitate the quantitative

  9. [Dentistry and healthcare legislation 11. The dentist and the civil law judge: claims].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brands, W G; van der Ven, J M; Eijkman, M A J

    2014-09-01

    In contrast to the law governing complaints and to disciplinary law, a civil law judge can sentence dentists to the restoration of all damages to patients. For this to happen, there has to be evidence of damage, responsibility and a causal connection. For the assumption of responsibility as well as a causal connection, an important question is whether a dentist has violated a relevant guideline or protocol. Moreover, dentists are not only responsible for their own mistakes, but also, in principle, for those of their employees. Depending on the situation, dentists can also be held accountable for the mistakes of a dentist who is working in their practice on a self-employed basis. Dutch dentists do not yet have to fear American situations', because damages awarded in The Netherlands are still relatively low.

  10. Current biomedical waste management practices and cross-infection control procedures of dentists in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Balendra Pratap; Khan, Suleman A; Agrawal, Neeraj; Siddharth, Ramashanker; Kumar, Lakshya

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the knowledge, attitudes and behaviour of dentists working in dental clinics and dental hospitals regarding biomedical waste management and cross-infection control. A national survey was conducted. Self-administered questionnaires were sent to 800 dentists across India. A total of 494 dentists responded, giving a response rate of 61.8%. Of these, 228 of 323 (70.6%) general dentists reported using boiling water as a sterilising medium and 339 (68.6%) dentists reported disposing of hazardous waste such as syringes, blades and ampoules in dustbins and emptying these into municipal corporation bins. Dentists should undergo continuing education programmes on biomedical waste management and infection control guidelines. Greater cooperation between dental clinics and hospitals and pollution control boards is needed to ensure the proper handling and disposal of biomedical waste. © 2012 FDI World Dental Federation.

  11. Demand and supply of doctors and dentists in Bahrain, 1998-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, A A; Fateha, B; Benjamin, S

    2000-01-01

    We examined the supply and demand of medical doctors and dentists in Bahrain. Demand for physicians and dentists was based on the objective of having a physician-to-population ratio of 1:650, and a dentist-to-population ratio of 1:5000. Analysis of the current workforce and projected graduates in the period 1998-2005 indicated that the supply of Bahraini medical doctors and dentists until the year 2005 will not be sufficient to meet the projected demand in these categories. By the year 2005, Bahraini doctors and dentists will provide 82.5% and 75.9% of medical and dental demands respectively. The remaining 17.2% of physicians and 24.1% of dentists will have to be recruited from abroad. Thus, the prospect of oversupply of Bahrainis among these categories until the year 2005 is highly unlikely.

  12. Women

    OpenAIRE

    Annesley, Claire; Himmelweit, Susan

    2011-01-01

    This chapter examines the government's approach to fairness in its Comprehensive Spending Review and shows that it fails to acknowledge that men and women start from unequal positions, and that there are many barriers to social mobility other than lack of educational qualifications.\\ud Unequal employment opportunities and unpaid caring responsibilities are given as two examples. As a result women rely on public services to be able to combine care with employment and so cuts in public services...

  13. The characteristics and distribution of dentist workforce in Saudi Arabia: A descriptive cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlBaker, Abdulaziz A; Al-Ruthia, Yazed Sulaiman H; AlShehri, Mohammed; Alshuwairikh, Samar

    2017-12-01

    The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has shown steady growth in the dental workforce over the last 20 years. Although the number of dental colleges has significantly increased in the last decade, there is not any study so far that described the status of the licensed dentist workforce in the kingdom. The present study aimed to explore the demographic distribution and professional characteristics of licensed dentist workforce in Saudi Arabia. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study using the Saudi Commission for Health Specialties (SCFHS) database to identify the number of licensed dentists in Saudi Arabia as well as their professional and demographic characteristics as of December 2016. The data was categorized based on gender, nationality, dental specialty, health sector, geographic location, and professional rank. The number of licensed dentists working in the kingdom as of December 2016 was 16887 dentists, and the vast majority of them are professionally registered as general dentists (70.27%). The percentage of general dentists among the professionally registered female dentists is significantly higher than their male counterparts (79.71% vs. 64.80%; P  sector in comparison to only 20.46% of the non-Saudi dentists ( P  sectors. With the rising unemployment rate among Saudi dentists, the governmental bodies that are responsible of dental labor market regulations such as the ministries of health, economy and planning, and labor should come up with a policy to gradually but carefully replace the non-Saudi dentists in both public and private sectors with Saudi dentists.

  14. Repair or replacement of defective restorations by dentists in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordan, Valeria V; Riley, Joseph L; Geraldeli, Saulo

    2012-01-01

    The authors aimed to determine whether dentists in practices belonging to The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) were more likely to repair or to replace a restoration that they diagnosed as defective; to quantify dentists' specific reasons for repairing or replacing restorations......; and to test the hypothesis that certain dentist-, patient- and restoration-related variables are associated with the decision between repairing and replacing restorations....

  15. Motives underlying food choice: dentists, porters and dietary health promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, M L; Khan, S N

    2001-08-25

    Differences in dental decay and disease amongst socioeconomic groups are thought to derive, in part, from variations in dietary practices and differences in education. The aim of this exploratory study was to examine whether differences in motivating factors affecting food choice could be found in a comparison of two groups at very different ends of the social spectrum: dentists and porters/cleaners. A convenience sample of 100 people (51 porters/cleaners and 49 dentists) working in the dental school at a university in the North West of England were approached to interview face-to-face and complete the Food Choice Questionnaire (FCQ), a previously validated measure designed to assess nine main factors relevant to peoples' food choices. A sample size of 100 was chosen because it was adequate to test validity (using a two-group Chi-square test with a 0.050 two sided significance). Findings were analysed using independent sample t-test and multiple linear regression. Results indicated significant differences between porters/cleaners and dentists in terms of their motives for food choice on six of the nine FCQ factors. These included convenience (p motivational factors affecting food choice between different social groups is important to dental practitioners who are being taught to play an increasing role in health promotion. If dental practitioners are to partake meaningfully in such a role, it is necessary for them to be aware not only of their own motives in food selection, but also of the way in which those motives may differ from those of their clients.

  16. How Dentists Read a Technique Article: A Grounded Theory Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David W; Lyon, Lucinda J

    2017-12-01

    To conduct an empirical investigation using qualitative techniques of the way dentists engage in the process of reading a technique-oriented journal article and what they pay attention to in the process. Grounded theory was used to identify how dentists read an article describing the fabrication of an interim prosthesis in the esthetic zone. Twenty-one experienced practitioners were videotaped, and their verbatim reflections were coded. The sequence of attending to various features of the paper was noted. Ninety-five percent of readers voiced specific, multiple attempts to identify or refine the main purpose of the article as they processed the material. All readers engaged in various activities to navigate through the article, including skipping and backtracking, and none "read" the article straight through. All readers also made repeated observations about the relevance of the technique to their personal practice situation. Eighty percent used some form of "distancing," whereby the content and value of the article were accepted, but the reader reserved the privilege of not being bound by the results because of technical, sponsorship, or methodological issues that "might be present." The quality of photographs was accepted as a proxy for the quality of technical work performed. Dentists actively customized the reading of a journal article that described a technical procedure. They imposed a non-linear structure for absorbing information and a standard of personal relevance, and, while accepting the results, created reasons for not necessarily having to accept them as applicable. The approach clinicians use in reading a procedural article may be different from the structure writers use in preparing a paper. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  17. Does student debt affect dental students' and dentists' stress levels?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyles, J D; Ahmed, B

    2017-10-27

    Introduction Many studies have shown financial worries and debt to induce stress in individuals, this combined with the existing stress of being a dentist raises the question of how student debt affects students' and dentists' stress levels.Objectives Determine whether student debt has had any noticeable effect on student stress levels; investigate whether student debt has any effect on dentists' career choice; investigate whether the increase in tuition fees has influenced the number of applicants to study dentistry at the University of Birmingham.Method Anonymous questionnaires were completed by 70 4th year and 38 5th year BDS and 22 Dental Core Trainees (DCTs). Participants circled the response which best fitted their situation regarding statements on their level of stress and future career path. Ethical approval granted. Application figures to study dentistry obtained from head of admissions.Results Forty-two percent of males and 63% of females strongly agreed with the statement that having no debt would reduce their stress levels. Of those with debt >£40,000, 11% strongly agreed and 42% agreed that their total amount of student debt causes them stress. Whereas, those whose debt is stress. Seventy-seven percent of participants who had parental or family financial support reported this reduced their stress levels. Student debt was found to deter females from undertaking further study more than it deters males (P stressed about their total student loan(s) (P stress (P stress; students reporting a higher level of debt also report more stress and concern about paying off their student debt. Having no student debt would reduce stress levels, although to what extent is undetermined. Applications to study dentistry have fallen since the increase in tuition fees.

  18. Assessment of the knowledge of United Arab Emirates dentists of Child Maltreatment, protection and safeguarding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Hajeri, H; Al Halabi, M; Kowash, M; Khamis, A H; Welbury, R; Hussein, I

    2018-06-01

    Child safeguarding is society's responsibility. Dentists are uniquely positioned to recognise Child Abuse and Neglect (CAN) in dental practice and the wider society. The United Arab Emirates (UAE) introduced a child protection law in 2016. We aimed to assess the awareness of UAE dentists of child maltreatment, protection and safeguarding. Study Design A cross-sectional survey. We surveyed 381 UAE dentists about the knowledge and practice of CAN and safeguarding issues using a self-administered anonymous questionnaire. Statistical analysis was carried out using Chi-square, t-test, ANOVA and Pearson's correlation test and statistical significance was set as p knowledgeable about diagnosing CAN. Paediatric dentists attended more CAN-related postgraduate training (pprotection guidelines. Dentists barriers to child protection reporting were; fear of family violence (59.6%, n=227), lack of knowledge of referral process (60.2%, n=228) and lack of diagnosis certainty (54.9%, n=206). UAE dentists qualified in Western and Asian countries had fewer barriers for child protection reporting (p=0.022) than the Arab and Gulf Cooperation Council qualified dentists. A large minority of UAE dentists suspected CAN. Factors influencing child protection reporting were identified. Dentists' gender, specialty, and country of qualification affected their knowledge of CAN and practice of safeguarding. Child protection training is recommended.

  19. Dental Visits by Age One: General Dentist Availability for Privately Insured Children in a Rural State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKernan, Susan C; Singhal, Astha; Momany, Elizabeth T; Kuthy, Raymond A

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the availability of general dentists who treat very young children with private insurance in the context of recommendations for age one dental visit. Administrative data from Delta Dental of Iowa were analyzed to identify general dentists providing care to children younger than 18 years old in 2005 and 2012. Characteristics of dentists providing care to children younger than two years old were compared, examining changes over time. Geographical distribution of dentists who treated children younger than two years old was examined. The proportion of dentists treating children younger than two years old increased from six percent in 2005 to 18 percent in 2012. Younger dentists, females, graduates of The University of Iowa College of Dentistry, and those in metropolitan locations were significantly more likely to treat children younger than two years old. Fifty-one of 99 counties lacked any dentists who had provided care to privately insured children younger than two years old. The proportion of dentists in Iowa treating privately insured children younger than two years old has increased since 2005. However, relatively few general dentists provided care to very young children when compared to previous survey-based figures. Geographic distribution of providers supports the hypothesis that provider availability may pose a barrier to early dental visits.

  20. [Software support for automatic (computerized) work stations for dentists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokhonchukov, A A; Balashov, A N; Zhizhina, N A; Pelkovskiĭ, V Iu

    1997-01-01

    The authors describe the software for a basic computer unified system of working places for dentists specializing in oral, dental surgery and orthodontics with diaries and special entries for each section. The computer system head physician--registration office--primary examination room--rooms of dental treatment, physiotherapy, and x-ray examination--is intended for use as part of local computer network of dental clinics in the MS DOS and Windows systems. Application of the system improves the labor efficiency by up to 35% and the financial efficacy by almost 30%. It also warrants legal protection of both physicians and patients.

  1. Dentists' dietary perception and practice patterns in a dental practice-based research network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Yokoyama

    Full Text Available Dental caries are largely preventable, and epidemiological evidence for a relationship between diet and oral health is abundant. To date, however, dentists' perceptions about the role of diet and dentists' practice patterns regarding diet counseling have not been clarified.THE PURPOSES OF THIS STUDY WERE TO: (1 examine discordance between dentists' perception of the importance of diet in caries treatment planning and their actual provision of diet counseling to patients, and (2 identify dentists' characteristics associated with their provision of diet counseling.The study used a cross-sectional study design consisting of a questionnaire survey in Japan.The study queried dentists working in outpatient dental practices who were affiliated with the Dental Practice-Based Research Network Japan (JDPBRN, which aims to allow dentists to investigate research questions and share experiences and expertise (n = 282.Dentists were asked about their perceptions on the importance of diet and their practice patterns regarding diet counseling, as well as patient, practice, and dentist background data.The majority of participants (n = 116, 63% recognized that diet is "more important" to oral health. However, among participants who think diet is "more important" (n = 116, only 48% (n = 56 provide diet counseling to more than 20% of their patients. Multiple logistic regression analysis suggested that several variables were associated with providing diet counseling; dentist gender, practice busyness, percentage of patients interested in caries prevention, caries risk assessment, and percentage of patients who receive blood pressure screening.Some discordance exists between dentists' perception of the importance of diet in caries treatment planning and their actual practice pattern regarding diet counseling to patients. Reducing this discordance may require additional dentist education, including nutritional and systemic disease concepts; patient

  2. Demand in Pediatric Dentistry for Sedation and General Anesthesia by Dentist Anesthesiologists: A Survey of Directors of Dentist Anesthesiologist and Pediatric Dentistry Residencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, C. Gray; Jones, James E.; Saxen, Mark A.; Maupome, Gerardo; Sanders, Brian J.; Walker, LaQuia A.; Weddell, James A.; Tomlin, Angela

    2012-01-01

    This study describes what training programs in pediatric dentistry and dental anesthesiology are doing to meet future needs for deep sedation/general anesthesia services required for pediatric dentistry. Residency directors from 10 dental anesthesiology training programs in North America and 79 directors from pediatric dentistry training programs in North America were asked to answer an 18-item and 22-item online survey, respectively, through an online survey tool. The response rate for the 10 anesthesiology training program directors was 9 of 10 or 90%. The response rate for the 79 pediatric dentistry training program directors was 46 of 79 or 58%. Thirty-seven percent of pediatric dentistry programs use clinic-based deep sedation/general anesthesia for dental treatment in addition to hospital-based deep sedation/general anesthesia. Eighty-eight percent of those programs use dentist anesthesiologists for administration of deep sedation/general anesthesia in a clinic-based setting. Pediatric dentistry residency directors perceive a future change in the need for deep sedation/general anesthesia services provided by dentist anesthesiologists to pediatric dentists: 64% anticipate an increase in need for dentist anesthesiologist services, while 36% anticipate no change. Dental anesthesiology directors compared to 2, 5, and 10 years ago have seen an increase in the requests for dentist anesthesiologist services by pediatric dentists reported by 56% of respondents (past 2 years), 63% of respondents (past 5 years), and 88% of respondents (past 10 years), respectively. Predicting the future need of dentist anesthesiologists is an uncertain task, but these results show pediatric dentistry directors and dental anesthesiology directors are considering the need, and they recognize a trend of increased need for dentist anesthesiologist services over the past decade. PMID:22428968

  3. Demand in pediatric dentistry for sedation and general anesthesia by dentist anesthesiologists: a survey of directors of dentist anesthesiologist and pediatric dentistry residencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, C Gray; Jones, James E; Saxen, Mark A; Maupome, Gerardo; Sanders, Brian J; Walker, Laquia A; Weddell, James A; Tomlin, Angela

    2012-01-01

    This study describes what training programs in pediatric dentistry and dental anesthesiology are doing to meet future needs for deep sedation/general anesthesia services required for pediatric dentistry. Residency directors from 10 dental anesthesiology training programs in North America and 79 directors from pediatric dentistry training programs in North America were asked to answer an 18-item and 22-item online survey, respectively, through an online survey tool. The response rate for the 10 anesthesiology training program directors was 9 of 10 or 90%. The response rate for the 79 pediatric dentistry training program directors was 46 of 79 or 58%. Thirty-seven percent of pediatric dentistry programs use clinic-based deep sedation/general anesthesia for dental treatment in addition to hospital-based deep sedation/general anesthesia. Eighty-eight percent of those programs use dentist anesthesiologists for administration of deep sedation/general anesthesia in a clinic-based setting. Pediatric dentistry residency directors perceive a future change in the need for deep sedation/general anesthesia services provided by dentist anesthesiologists to pediatric dentists: 64% anticipate an increase in need for dentist anesthesiologist services, while 36% anticipate no change. Dental anesthesiology directors compared to 2, 5, and 10 years ago have seen an increase in the requests for dentist anesthesiologist services by pediatric dentists reported by 56% of respondents (past 2 years), 63% of respondents (past 5 years), and 88% of respondents (past 10 years), respectively. Predicting the future need of dentist anesthesiologists is an uncertain task, but these results show pediatric dentistry directors and dental anesthesiology directors are considering the need, and they recognize a trend of increased need for dentist anesthesiologist services over the past decade.

  4. Everyone Needs Regular Dental Care, but What if You Can't Get to the Dentist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumin, Scott

    2011-01-01

    This article features the three-dentist House Call Dentist (HCD) team, a division of the nationally known Blende Dental Group based in San Francisco, headed by Dr. David Blende. Dr. Blende is best known for providing dental care utilizing sleep and sedation modalities, and as a leader in the field of dentistry for patients with special needs. The…

  5. Malaysian government dentists' experience, willingness and barriers in providing domiciliary care for elderly people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Akmal Aida; Yusof, Zamros; Saub, Roslan

    2014-06-01

    To assess Malaysian government dentists' experience, willingness and barriers in providing domiciliary care for elderly people. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted using a self-administered postal questionnaire targeting government dentists working in the Ministry of Health in Peninsular Malaysia. Seven hundred and eleven out of 962 dentists responded with a response rate of 74.0%. Only 36.1% of the dentists had experience in providing domiciliary care for elderly people in the past 2 years with mean number of visit per year of 1. Younger dentists below the age of 30 and those with confidence in providing the service were the most willing to undertake domiciliary care for elderly patients (OR=13.5, pworking condition (64.4%). The majority of Malaysian government dentists had not been involved in providing domiciliary care for elderly patients. Apart from overcoming the barriers, other recommendations include improving undergraduate dental education, education for elderly people and carers, improving dentist's working condition, and introducing domiciliary financial incentive for dentist. © 2012 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Australian dentists: characteristics of those who employ or are willing to employ oral health therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempster, C; Luzzi, L; Roberts-Thomson, K

    2015-06-01

    There has been an increase in the availability of oral health therapists (OHTs) in the oral health workforce in the last decade. The impact these clinicians will have on the oral health of the general public is dependent on access pathways and utilization. This study aimed to profile Australian dentists who employ or are willing to employ OHTs and to explore the degree of association between dentist characteristics and employment decisions. This cross-sectional study used a random sample of Australian dentists (n = 1169) from the Federal Australian Dental Association register in 2009. Participants were sent a postal questionnaire capturing dentist characteristics and oral health practitioner employment information. An adjusted response rate of 55% was obtained. Dentists willing to employ OHTs included non-metropolitan dentists, dentists in multiple surgery practices and those considering practice expansion. Age, gender and sector of practice were not significantly associated with retrospective employment decisions or willingness to employ in the future. Certain characteristics of dentists or of their practice are associated with their history of employment and willingness to employ OHTs. Employment decisions are more commonly related to entrepreneurial aspirations (expressed as a willingness to expand), sector of practice, surgery capacity and regionality over gender and age. Understanding the factors that influence the employment of OHTs is important in enhancing access pathways to the services provided by OHTs. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  7. Antibiotic Prescription Knowledge of Dentists in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia: An Online, Country-wide Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halboub, Esam; Alzaili, Abdulaziz; Quadri, Mir Faeq Ali; Al-Haroni, Mohammed; Al-Obaida, Mohammad Ibrahim; Al-Hebshi, Nezar Noor

    2016-03-01

    Dentists are probably contributing to the development of bacterial resistance to certain antibiotics. Campaigns to promote prudent use of antibiotics in dentistry are, thus, needed but require proper identification of dentists' knowledge gaps. The objective here was to comprehensively evaluate antibiotic prescription knowledge of dentists in Saudi Arabia. A link to an online, previously validated questionnaire was emailed to 5199 dentists registered with the Saudi Dental Society. The questionnaire comprised 42 scorable items measuring antibiotics prescription knowledge in five different domains in addition to nonscorable questions regarding first-choice antibiotics and previous attendance of a course/workshop about antibiotic prescription. Each correct answer was given one mark. Mean scores were calculated as percentages and categorized as good (> 80%), intermediate (60-80%), or poor (antibiotic; 62% reported attending a course/workshop in the last 5 years. The average knowledge score was 69%, being highest for nonclinical indications (79%) and lowest for prophylactic use (56%). The worst per-item scores were noted for rheumatic heart disease (19%), trismus (28%), surgical extraction (30%), apicectomy (31%), and periodontal abscess (33%). Female dentists, dentists in governmental sector, and those with higher qualifications had significantly better knowledge. The level of knowledge was hardly intermediate and several deficits were identified, indicating an urgent need for educational campaigns and provision of guidelines promoting rational use of antibiotics by dentists. Irrational use of antibiotics by dentists can contribute to the problem of antibacterial resistance.

  8. A comparison of paediatric dentists' and general dental practitioners' care patterns in paediatric dental care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schorer-Jensma, M.A.; Veerkamp, J.S.J.

    2010-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to compare the care patterns of paediatric dentists and general dentists in the dental treatment of children in the Netherlands. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: A case control study was completed based on the financial records of one of the largest Dutch health insurance

  9. Access to Dental Care for Rural Children: A Survey of Nebraska General Dentists

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Kimberly K.; Salama, Fouad; Yaseen, Muhammad

    2011-01-01

    Background: Pediatric dentists are too few in number to care for all children. Therefore, the level of pediatric dental services provided by general dentists, especially in rural areas, is crucial to improving the dental health of children. Purpose: The objectives of the study were to establish a baseline in regard to the quantity of pediatric…

  10. Attitudes among dentists and dental hygienists towards extended scope and independent practice of dental hygienists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, Jan J.; Krijnen, Wim; Onclin, Pieter; van der Schans, Cees P.; Stegenga, Boudewijn

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: Attitudes of dentists and dental hygienists towards extended scope and independent dental hygiene practice are described in several studies, but the results are heterogenous. The purpose of this systematic review was to compare the attitudes of dentists and dental hygienists towards extended

  11. Attitudes among dentists and dental hygienists towards extended scope and independent practice of dental hygienists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, Jan J.; Krijnen, Wim P.; Onclin, Pieter; van der Schans, Cees P.; Stegenga, Boudewijn

    Aims: Attitudes of dentists and dental hygienists towards extended scope and independent dental hygiene practice are described in several studies, but the results are heterogenous. The purpose of this systematic review was to compare the attitudes of dentists and dental hygienists towards extended

  12. Dentists' knowledge of occlusal splint therapy for bruxism and temporomandibular joint disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candirli, C; Korkmaz, Y T; Celikoglu, M; Altintas, S H; Coskun, U; Memis, S

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate dentist's approaches to the use of splint therapy for myofascial pain, bruxism, and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders and to assessment of treatment modalities. A 12-item questionnaire was developed to determine dentists' knowledge of TMJ disorders and approaches for occlusal splint treatments. The researchers spoke with each dentist included in the study at his/her clinic or by telephone to assess their immediate knowledge and approach to the TMJ disorders. Chi-squared test was performed to analyze the values. The confidence interval was set as 95%. A total of 370 dentists working in Turkey were participated in this study. The most common splint application reason for occlusal splint treatment was bruxism (77.8%) while TMJ pain was very rare (%1.4). The use of hard splint ratios for 0-5 years of professional experience was 57.0%, 42.4.0%, and 26.8% for the experience of 5-15 years and over 15 years groups, respectively (P < 0.001). While the dentists' with sufficient knowledge soft splint application rates were 11.6%, hard splint application rates were 43.4% for the dentists with sufficient knowledge. Occlusion adjustment rate of dentists who practice in all three groups was under 16.0%. The knowledge of the dentists about TMJ disorders and occlusal splint therapy were found to be insufficient. Their knowledge decreased with increasing experience.

  13. HIV/AIDS: Knowledge and attitudes of dentists in South-Western ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the knowledge and attitudes of dentists in South-Western Nigeria in relation to HIV/AIDS. Materials and methods: A questionnaire survey of 164 dentists in Lagos, Ibadan and Benin The data was analyzed using Epi-info statistical software. Results: The modes of ...

  14. Knowledge of who a dentist is among patients in a government ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Lack of knowledge of a dentist by implication may mean lack of knowledge of its role in oral health care. This may affect patients' attitude towards oral health care. This study aimed at assessing patients' knowledge of a dentist and its effect on attitude towards oral health care. Methods: Cross-sectional study of ...

  15. Are Nigerian dentists willing to treat patients with HIV infection ? | Uti ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: HIV/AIDS is a modern day plague, which is a challenge to dentistry. The willingness of dentists to treat HIV positive patients is crucial in the provision of oral health care to this increasing population of patients. The purpose of this study was to assess the willingness of dentists and factors that influence willingness ...

  16. Business orientation and the willingness to distribute dental tasks of Dutch dentists.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruers, J.J.M.; Rossum, G.M.J.M. van; Felling, A.J.A.; Truin, G.J.; Hof, M.A. van 't

    2003-01-01

    AIM: Dentists have a dual professional role: they have to focus on good oral health in their patients and, at the same time, they have to organise their practices. The aim of this analysis was to assess the extent to which dentists can be seen as business-oriented and/or willing to delegate to

  17. Business orientation and the willingness to distribute dental tasks of Dutch dentists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruers, J.J.M.; Rossum, G.M.J.M. van; Felling, A.J.A.; Truin, G.J.; Hof, M.A. van 't

    2003-01-01

    Aim: Dentists have a dual professional role: they have to focus on good oral health in their patients and, at the same time, they have to organise their practices. The aim of this analysis was to assess the extent to which dentists can be seen as business-oriented and/or willing to delegate to

  18. Knowledge of General Dentists of Kermanshah about Root Canal Therapy in 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roohollah Sharifi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The present study was conducted to analyze the knowledge of general dentists of Kermanshah about root canal therapy in 2012. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, a two-part questionnaire was designed and given to 93 general dentists in Kermanshah to complete. The first part of the questionnaire comprised of personal and professional information of the participant dentists and the second part of the questionnaire determined the awareness of the dentists about root canal therapy. Data were analyzed by SPSS software (version 20 using Pearson correlation coefficient, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and independent t-test. Results: A total of 84 dentists with the mean age of 39.3±7.1 completed the questionnaires. The mean for 12 correct responses was 63.3%. The highest number of correct responses (86.2% belonged to using proper intra-canal medication (calcium hydroxide and the lowest number of correct responses (41.4% was associated with the number of root canals in maxillary first molar (four canals. There was a reverse correlation between awareness and work experience (P=0.002, r=-0.337. Also, participation in retraining courses did not have significant impact on the knowledge of the dentists (P =0.82. Conclusion: General dentists have average knowledge about root canal therapy. Higher quality regular training is recommended to promote the knowledge of the dentists about endodontic therapies.

  19. Low reproducibility between oral radiologists and general dentists with regards to radiographic diagnosis of caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakbaznejad Esmaeili, Elmira; Pakkala, Tuomas; Haukka, Jari; Siukosaari, Päivi

    2018-04-12

    Early clinical and radiological diagnosis of dental caries is one of the fundamental objectives of clinical dentistry because of the high frequency of the disease and severe complications if caries remains untreated, especially among the elderly and patients with immunodeficiency. Dental panoramic tomography (DPT) is a common radiographic method for evaluating dentition when indicated, especially in an adult population. The aim of this study was to assess the reproducibility of diagnosis between specialists in oral radiology and general dentists with regards to caries lesions based on DPTs of adults. One-hundred DPTs taken from adult patients (average age 35) and then analyzed and reported on by 42 general dentists were then analyzed independently by two specialists in oral radiology with respect to caries lesions in the premolar and molar areas using radiographic criteria established for caries diagnosis. The general dentists versus oral radiologists were not calibrated before. Level of agreement between specialists and general dentists was measured using Cohen's kappa. Comparison between observations of general dentists and specialists in oral radiology showed that 61% of the caries lesions on proximal surfaces of premolars and molars observed by specialists went unobserved by general dentists. Cohen's kappa value for specialists was 0.85 (p < .001) and for each specialist and general dentists 0.48 (p < .001) and 0.44 (p < .001). The reproducibility between specialists in oral radiology and general dentists for detecting caries in DPTs was low.

  20. Comparison of recognition about denture adhesive between Japanese and Indonesian dentists: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinsuke Sadamori

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare cross-national differences of the recognition of denture adhesive among dentists. The design of the research was cross-cultural differences. The research was done in Japan and Indonesia. One hundred and ten dentists from Japan and Indonesia were surveyed using a questionnaire regarding knowledge/comprehension of denture adhesive (in Japanese and Indonesian versions respectively. Logistic regression model (forward stepwise method showed that it was possible to distinguish Japanese dentists from Indonesian peers with a probability of 96.0 per cent by using 4 items out of 16. For the question of "How many domestic products of denture adhesive (DA do you know?" approximately a half of the Japanese dentists answered "less than 3", whereas 93 per cent of Indonesian subjects answered "nothing". It was concluded that there were much differences in dentists' understanding and experience of denture adhesive in the clinic, between Japan and Indonesia.

  1. How dentists diagnose and treat defective restorations: evidence from the dental practice-based research network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordan, Valeria V; Garvan, Cynthia W; Richman, Joshua S

    2009-01-01

    , Norway and Sweden. METHODS: A questionnaire was sent to all DPBRN practitioner-investigators who reported doing some restorative dentistry (n = 901). Questions included clinical case scenarios that used text and clinical photographs of defective restorations. Dentists were asked what type of treatment......OBJECTIVES: To (1) identify and quantify the types of treatment that dentists use to manage defective dental restorations and (2) identify characteristics that are associated with these dentists' decisions to replace existing restorations. The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) consists...... of dentists in outpatient practices from five regions: AL/MS: Alabama/Mississippi; FL/GA: Florida/Georgia; MN: dentists employed by HealthPartners and private practitioners in Minnesota; PDA: Permanente Dental Associates in cooperation with Kaiser Permanente's Center for Health Research and SK: Denmark...

  2. Angel or Devil? Dentists and Dental Students Conceptions of Pediatric Dental Patients through Metaphor Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buldur, B

    The aim of this qualitative study was to identify the conceptions of dentists and dental students (DSs) about pediatric dental patients (PDPs) using metaphor analysis. The study group (N = 259) consisted of dentists and DSs. Participants completed the sentence "A pediatric dental patient is like ... because …..." in order to reveal the metaphors they use about the concept of PDPs. The data were analyzed using the mixed-methods: qualitative (metaphor analysis) and quantitative (chi-square) data analysis techniques. The dentists and DSs produced 259 metaphors. These metaphors were gathered under six different conceptual categories that define a PDP as unpredictable, dangerous, uncontrollable, requiring care and sensitivity, valuable, and orientable. The most important factors leading to these conceptions were the uncooperativeness of some PDPs and the effectiveness of behavior management. The results of this study indicate that there was no significant difference among DSs, general dentists and specialist dentists with respect to six conceptual categories that identify the conceptions about PDPs.

  3. Job Satisfaction and Relocation Desire among Pediatric Dentists in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arévalo, Oscar; Saman, Daniel M; Tabares, Miguel; Hernández, Ana; Sanders-Ward, Rebecca

    2015-12-01

    To determine the levels of satisfaction, license status, and desire to relocate of pediatric dentists in Puerto Rico. Pediatric dentists in Puerto Rico were surveyed via telephone interviews. Data were collected through a 34-item questionnaire that explored satisfaction as related to income, continuing education, professional goals, and participation in the Mi Salud program. Frequencies, chi-square analysis, and Fisher's exact 2-tailed t-test were utilized to determine the relationships between satisfaction and the demographics of the pediatric dentists. Sixty pediatric dentists participated in our survey-77% of the total number of pediatric dentists practicing in Puerto Rico. Overall, 65% of the participating pediatric dentists expressed dissatisfaction. Male pediatric dentists were more dissatisfied than their female colleagues were. Most pediatric dentists participating in Mi Salud expressed dissatisfaction. When asked about whether or not they had considered migrating to the mainland, those who were dissatisfied were more likely to have considered that idea than were those who were satisfied. Overall, 57% of the pediatric dentists comprising our sample had considered relocating to the continental United States. In general, the pediatric dentists who participated in our study expressed dissatisfaction in most areas except when asked about their ability to reach professional goals. Determining the levels of satisfaction of health care providers is important in the maintaining of an adequate workforce. As current levels of dissatisfaction are high, it is important to determine what variables are related to satisfaction so that corrective measures can be taken to ensure that retention rates improve, thereby maintaining an adequate pediatric dental workforce.

  4. The knowledge and attitude of general dentists toward denture adhesives in Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhri Hamidreza

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study was to generate discussion and communication among a group of general dentists in Tehran on their viewpoints regarding denture adhesives. Have they accepted denture adhesive as a material to enhance denture retention, stability and function? Materials and Methods: In the summer of 2007, a questionnaire was mailed to 300 general dentists who were assigned with a random systematic sampling method from general dentists in Tehran. The questions were arranged in two parts of evaluating knowledge and attitude. In evaluation of knowledge, dentists were classified into groups of good, moderate, weak and lack of knowledge. In evaluation of attitude, dentists were classified into positive, moderate and negative groups. (Evaluating attitude was carried out in good and moderate groups of knowledge. Results: The study showed that 14%, 32% and 37% of the general dentists had respectively good, moderate and weak knowledge toward denture adhesive while 16.3% had no knowledge about this material. In evaluation of attitude through dentists with positive and moderate knowledge toward denture adhesive, 9.3%, 71.3% and 19.4% had respectively positive, moderate and negative attitude toward denture adhesive. The χ2 test showed a significant statistical relation between situation of knowledge and experiences of dentists. Discussion: This study demonstrated that the rate of knowledge of these 300 general dentists in Tehran towards denture adhesives has not been in a good situation. It is believed that denture adhesive be able to enhance the fitness of a denture and provide psychological relief to the patient. Dentists agreed that education, not only for practitioners but also for patients, would raise the advantageous features and reduce the misuse of denture adhesive. Education of the topic "Denture adhesive" should be more concerned in dental universities.

  5. Methods dentists use to diagnose primary caries lesions prior to restorative treatment: findings from The Dental PBRN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindal, D Brad; Gordan, Valeria V; Litaker, Mark S

    2010-01-01

    To (1) quantify the diagnostic techniques used by Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) dentists before they decide to treat primary caries lesions surgically and (2) examine whether certain dentist, practice, and patient characteristics are associated with their use.......To (1) quantify the diagnostic techniques used by Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) dentists before they decide to treat primary caries lesions surgically and (2) examine whether certain dentist, practice, and patient characteristics are associated with their use....

  6. Unicystic plexiform ameloblastoma: An insight for pediatric dentists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavagal C

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Ameloblastomas have been categorized broadly into three biologic variants: cystic (unicystic, solid, and peripheral. The term plexiform unicystic ameloblastoma refers to a pattern of epithelial proliferation that has been described in cystic lesions of the jaws. Although the histology suggests that cystic ameloblastomas follow a biologically low-grade course, recent evidence suggests that they may often behave clinically as biologically aggressive tumors. This is supported by the high incidence of cortical perforation, tooth resorption, lesion size, bony destruction, and a high rate of recurrence after simple enucleation. This article tries to provide an insight for pediatric dentists regarding this biologically distinct entity. A literature review on the topic has been added along with a case report highlighting the state-of-the-art approach and management of such ameloblastomas, in pediatric patients.

  7. Importance of the dentist in early diagnosis of pemphigus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago de Santana Santos

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The vulgar pemphigus is a chronic, rare, vesicle-bubble disease of autoimmune origin and with a possibility of following a dangerous clinical course when it is not diagnosed and treated in its initial stage. It usually affects people from 40 to 60 years old, being rare in children. In the majority of cases, oral manifestations are the first signs of the disease, so that dentists play an important rol in its early diagnosis. The authors present a case report of vulgar pemphigus in a 17 year-old patient, attended by the Bucco-Maxillo-Facial Surgery Service of the “Fundação de Beneficência Hospital de Cirurgia” in Aracaju-SE, Brazil. The patient was admitted with a complaint of the presence of numerous scattered painful ulcers in the mouth that had developed in approximately two months, and reported that at first, blisters that broke quickly appeared, leading to extremely painful ulcerations. Incisional biopsies were performed in the jugal mucosa and retromolar regions, and also a complete hemogram to discard the hypothesis of leukemia. In view of the clinical and histopathological findings, the final diagnosis of pemphigus vulgaris was made. Before receiving specialized treatment, the patient presented marked worsening of the clinical condition, with exacerbation of intraoral signs and symptoms and development of skin lesions around the body surface. The patient was hospitalized in the “Hospital Universitário da Universidade Federal de Sergipe” and treated with prednisone, cimetidine and nystatin, showing significant improvement of symptoms in approximately two weeks. At present, the patient is under the care of an interdisciplinary team that includes dermatologists and dentists.

  8. Ohio dentists' awareness and incorporation of the dental home concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammersmith, Kimberly J; Siegal, Mark D; Casamassimo, Paul S; Amini, Homa

    2013-06-01

    The authors measured the awareness of the dental home concept among pediatric dentists (PDs) and general practice dentists (GPs) in Ohio and determined whether they included dental home characteristics for children 5 years and younger into their practices. The authors sent a pretested 20-question survey to all Ohio PDs and to a random sample of approximately 20 percent of GPs in Ohio. The authors designed the survey to elicit information about dental home awareness and the extent to which dental home characteristics were incorporated into dental practices. More than 90 percent of both GPs and PDs incorporated or intended to incorporate into their dental practices the specific dental home characteristics mentioned in 20 of 41 items related to dental home characteristics. Of the respondents who did not already incorporate dental home characteristics into their practices, however, most did not intend to do so. Less than 50 percent of respondents in both groups responded positively to some items in the culturally effective group, and GPs were less likely than were PDs to provide a range of behavior management services and to provide treatment for patients with complex medical and dental treatment needs. PDs were more likely than were GPs to accept Ohio Medicaid (64 versus 33 percent). PDs were more likely than were GPs (78 versus 18 percent) to be familiar with the term "dental home." More recent dental school graduates were more familiar with the term. Most Ohio PDs' and GPs' practices included characteristics found in the definition of dental home, despite a general lack of concept awareness on the part of GPs. Research is needed to provide an evidence base for the dental home. Practical Implications. Once an evidence base is developed for the important aspects of the dental home and the definition is revised, efforts should be made to incorporate these aspects more broadly into dental practice.

  9. Child-management techniques. Are there differences in the way female and male pediatric dentists in Israel practice?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peretz Benjamin

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess differences in the management techniques used by Israeli female and male pediatric dentists. All 112 participants of the meeting of the Israeli Society of Dentistry for Children that was held in February 1999 received a questionnaire which sought information regarding age, sex, behavioral and pharmacological methods used to treat children, having a course in nitrous oxide, general anesthesia, and feelings towards pediatric patients. No differences between female and male dentists were found regarding most management techniques. The majority of dentists used tell-show-do, and gave presents at the end of the appointments. Hypnosis was the least used technique. Papoose board was more prevalent among male dentists than among female dentists. Most dentists reported having the parents present during treatment, and more male dentists used their assistance when restraint was needed. General anesthesia was significantly more prevalent among males than among females (p = 0.01. One-third of the dentists reported feeling aggression toward the pediatric patient. Although not statistically significant, more female dentists reported about feeling aggression than male dentists. Most dentists felt authority towards the pediatric patient. Our findings imply that female and male dentists use similar management techniques when treating children.

  10. [Investigation on level and influencing factors of first aid knowledge among dentists in Sichuan province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yu; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Tian-Guo; Chen, Yi-Ge; Kong, Jing-Jun; Pan, Jian

    2018-04-01

    The study aims to investigate the cognition degree and influencing factors of first aid knowledge among dentists in Sichuan province, and to provide suggestions for the training of oral clinician. A questionnaire was designed for this study. It included the basic situation of population, first aid knowledge level, emergency situation often encountered in stomatology clinic, first aid training situation, learning approach and attitude of first aid knowledge, etc. This questionnaire was used to investigate the dentists of medical institutions in various cities in Sichuan province. The survey results was statistical analyzed. There were 245 valid questionnaires. 1) The level of first aid knowledge of dentists was generally lower in Sichuan province. Work department and other departments work experience were the influencing factors of knowledge level of first aid knowledge among dentists. 2) 87.3% of dentists believed that it was very necessary to master the knowledge of first aid, but in the event of an emergency situation, 73.5% of dentists only can find other doctors to guide themselves to help. 3) The most common way to learn first aid knowledge was through work experience and medical school's first aid course. Dentists should strengthen the learning and training to improve the first aid skill.

  11. What do patients think about dental services in Quebec? Analysis of a dentist rating website.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Mary Ellen; Beaudin, Anne; Pineda, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Disparity exists between the public view of the "ideal" dentist and patient experiences of dental practice: dentists are expected to be altruistic and patient-centred, yet patient surveys suggest that the profession is overly motivated by profit. To determine how the public views dental care in Quebec. A random sample of comments about Quebec dentists made in 2011 was extracted from the public website RateMDs.com. Dentist characteristics and patient comments were analyzed using descriptive statistics and qualitative deductive and inductive thematic analysis. Eighty-six entries from a random sample of 47 of a possible 750 dentists were extracted and analyzed. Most dentists were men (66%) and worked in Montreal (51%). Patient comments were mainly positive (83%). Themes included overall impressions, communication and care, clinical competence, professionalism and office environment. Positive comments focused on patient-centred communication, in which the patient felt respected and involved in treatment planning; competence, seen as comprehensive, efficient and long-lasting treatment; and professionalism, which included ethical behaviour such as knowing professional limits. Negative comments focused on reticent communication styles that did not encourage patient input; incompetence, which included poor pain management and unnecessary treatment; and unprofessional conduct, such as lack of transparency in pricing. In contrast with the negative image of dentists reported from patient surveys, comments on one public website were primarily positive. Our findings reinforce the importance of patient-centred education and communication training for students and continuing education.

  12. Identifying dentists' attitudes towards prevention guidance using Q-sort methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witton, R V; Moles, D R

    2015-06-01

    To gain insight into the attitudes and motivating factors of dentists working in the English National Health Service (NHS) towards prevention guidance. Q-methodology: an established hybrid quantitative/qualitative technique used in the social sciences to categorise subjects based on their views by considering factors as part of their overall decision-making profile. General Dental Practices offering care under an NHS contract. NHS dentists (n = 26) placed 36 statements about prevention guidance derived from an earlier study into a distribution grid that ranked the statements from "most agree" to "most disagree". Principal components factor analysis was applied to determine the principal patterns in the rankings of statements. Analysis indicated a total of six distinct profiles within the responses, of which three profiles had at least six dentists loading onto them. The first profile was strongly characterised by dentists who appear motivated to provide prevention but financial and time constraints prevent them from doing so. The second was characterised by dentists using prevention guidance but restricting its use to only certain patients. The third was characterised by dentists who appeared "health-focused". They placed importance on working to prevention guidance, but were keen to have greater patient and professional support in achieving this. In this group of dentists Q-methodology identified three main profiles to the delivery of prevention guidance.

  13. Willingness of Rhode Island Dentists to Provide Limited Preventive Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Catherine Tuyet Mai; Shield, Renee R; Giddon, Donald B

    2016-07-01

    In response to the shortage of primary care physicians and the need for greater intercollaboration among health professionals, dentists with sufficient medical and surgical training are an untapped resource to provide limited preventive primary care (LPPC), such as chairside screening for chronic diseases. The objective of this study was to determine attitudes of Rhode Island dentists toward becoming more involved in the overall health of their patients. Using a 5-point scale (1 being highest), a pretested survey was administered to 92 respondent RI dentists who were asked to indicate their willingness to become more involved in patients' overall health, and undergo additional training to provide LPPC. Their moderate level of willingness was offset by great concern for liability, with older dentists being significantly more willing to assume these additional responsibilities than younger dentists (pstomiatrist was still dentist first, but with no significant difference between the mean ranks of dentist and oral physician.[Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2016-07.asp, free with no login].

  14. Assessing attitudes and actions of pediatric dentists toward childhood obesity and sugar-sweetened beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Robin; Casamassimo, Paul S

    2017-06-01

    Childhood obesity is a major US health concern, and oral health professionals have opportunities to participate in an interprofessional effort to intervene owing to their access to young patients and their abilities in addressing obesity-related dietary habits like consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs). This study determined attitudes, behaviors, future intentions, and perceived barriers of pediatric dentists regarding efforts to prevent childhood obesity and reduce children's consumption of SSBs. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry conducted an online electronic survey with a convenience sample of approximately 7,450 pediatric dentists and pediatric dental residents during spring 2016. Over 17 percent of pediatric dentists offer childhood obesity interventions. Of those not providing interventions, 67 percent were interested in offering obesity-prevention services. Nearly 94 percent of pediatric dentists offer information or other interventions on consumption of SSBs. Statistically significant barriers to providing healthy weight interventions were fear of offending parents, appearing judgmental, or creating parent dissatisfaction and a lack of parental acceptance of guidance about weight management from a dentist. Significant barriers to SSB interventions were sufficient time and health professional education. More pediatric dentists stated they offer childhood obesity interventions than in previous surveys reporting 6 percent, but respondents suggested that a child's weight is seen as a medical rather than dental issue. Most pediatric dentists provide interventions related to consumption of SSBs, perceiving the issue as integral to their care of children. © 2017 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  15. The importance of teaching communication in dental education. A survey amongst dentists, students and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woelber, J P; Deimling, D; Langenbach, D; Ratka-Krüger, P

    2012-02-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the subjective importance of teaching communication in the dental curriculum by conducting a survey amongst dentists, students and patients. Three questionnaires about communication-related issues were developed in which different questions could be rated on a five-point Likert scale. These questions included the subjective importance of the dental team's friendliness, an elaborated consultation, modern office equipment or the dentist's technical skills. Seven hundred and twenty-nine questionnaires were completed [233 by dentists (32%), 310 by students (43%) and 185 by patients (25%)]. Eighty-seven percentage of the dentists, 84% of the students and 84% of the patients supported an integration of communicational issues in dental education; 94.7% of the dentists and 77.2% of the patients attached vital importance to the dentist-patient relationship regarding the therapeutic outcomes. Dentists with prior communicational training experience would spend significantly (Pimportance of integrating aspects of communication in dental education. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Assessment of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing among a large cohort of general dentists in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durkin, Michael J; Feng, Qianxi; Warren, Kyle; Lockhart, Peter B; Thornhill, Martin H; Munshi, Kiraat D; Henderson, Rochelle R; Hsueh, Kevin; Fraser, Victoria J

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess dental antibiotic prescribing trends over time, to quantify the number and types of antibiotics dentists prescribe inappropriately, and to estimate the excess health care costs of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing with the use of a large cohort of general dentists in the United States. We used a quasi-Poisson regression model to analyze antibiotic prescriptions trends by general dentists between January 1, 2013, and December 31, 2015, with the use of data from Express Scripts Holding Company, a large pharmacy benefits manager. We evaluated antibiotic duration and appropriateness for general dentists. Appropriateness was evaluated by reviewing the antibiotic prescribed and the duration of the prescription. Overall, the number and rate of antibiotic prescriptions prescribed by general dentists remained stable in our cohort. During the 3-year study period, approximately 14% of antibiotic prescriptions were deemed inappropriate, based on the antibiotic prescribed, antibiotic treatment duration, or both indicators. The quasi-Poisson regression model, which adjusted for number of beneficiaries covered, revealed a small but statistically significant decrease in the monthly rate of inappropriate antibiotic prescriptions by 0.32% (95% confidence interval, 0.14% to 0.50%; P = .001). Overall antibiotic prescribing practices among general dentists in this cohort remained stable over time. The rate of inappropriate antibiotic prescriptions by general dentists decreased slightly over time. From these authors' definition of appropriate antibiotic prescription choice and duration, inappropriate antibiotic prescriptions are common (14% of all antibiotic prescriptions) among general dentists. Further analyses with the use of chart review, administrative data sets, or other approaches are needed to better evaluate antibiotic prescribing practices among dentists. Copyright © 2018 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  17. Pilot study to train dentists to communicate about oral cancer: the impact on dentists' self-reported behaviour, confidence and beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awojobi, O; Newton, J T; Scott, S E

    2016-01-22

    To evaluate the effect of a brief, focused training session on the use of an oral cancer communication guide on dentists' intentions, self-efficacy and beliefs with regards to communicating about oral cancer with patients. Pre-post intervention study. The training session took place in a lecture theatre at King's College London. Dentists working in various settings were trained on the use of the oral cancer communication guide via a structured session that included an update on oral cancer, modelling the use of the guide in practice, and role playing. Dentists (n = 39) completed questionnaires pre-training, immediately post-training (n = 31) and after 2 weeks (n = 23). Questionnaires assessed current practice, self-efficacy and barriers to discussing oral cancer. A significantly higher proportion of dentists reported that they informed patients that they were being screened for oral cancer post-training (44%) than pre-training (16%). Significantly fewer perceived barriers and higher self-efficacy to discuss oral cancer were also reported. Training dentists in the use of the guide showed positive impact by reducing perceived barriers and increasing self-efficacy.

  18. Mentoring. A quality assurance tool for dentists. Part 6: Outcomes: patient care, professional development and personal growth. Authentic happiness for dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Vernon P; Ladwa, Russ

    2010-01-01

    This paper is the last in a series of six papers that have described different aspects of mentoring. It considers the impact of mentoring when it is used in general dental practice, applying the technique of learning through positive psychology. The first part of the paper considers this approach from a patient's perspective, the second from the perspective of a dentist. Because the impact on the quality of care for the patient is largely mediated through the personality of the dentist, the quality of the dentist's own performance, during his/her professional relationship with the patient, is a critical ingredient. The way that this critical ingredient impacts on quality of care is considered and parallels are drawn between roles assumed in dental practice and those found in industry. The paper also considers the way in which mentoring, as a part of a professional development programme, can enhance dentists' personal skills and performance. It is an opportunity for great personal growth, with increased levels of job and life satisfaction, leading to greater levels of authentic happiness for all those involved, not least for dentists and the dental team.

  19. Assessment of Knowledge and Attitude of Dentists Toward Bioterrorism Awareness in Dhule (Maharashtra, India: A Cross-sectional Survey

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    Minal M Kshirsagar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Bioterrorism, as a major health problem, has received lots of attention in the recent years. It is the intentional use of microorganisms and toxins to produce disease and death in humans, livestock, and crops; their attraction in war and their use in terrorist attacks are attributed to various unique features. Aim: To assess the knowledge and attitude of graduate dentists and postgraduate dentists toward bioterrorism in Dhule city, Maharashtra (India. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study included graduate dentists and postgraduate dentists in Dhule, Maharashtra, India. The list of dentists of Dhule city was obtained from the Indian Dental Association office, Dhule branch. Among 110 dentists practicing in Dhule city, 97 responded. A structured, self-administered questionnaire consisting of 15 closed-ended questions was employed. The information regarding age, gender, and profession (specialty branch was collected. The data were tabulated and subjected to analysis using Pearson’s chi-square test. Results: Statistically significant difference was seen when knowledge and attitude of dentists and dentists with postgraduate qualification toward bioterrorism were compared (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Dentists with postgraduate qualification have better knowledge and attitude toward bioterrorism as compared to graduate dentists. Most of the dentists felt the need to educate the public regarding suspected bioterrorist attack, and they were willing to do so and had the confidence that it was preventable.

  20. Professional profile of dentists who are members of the Family Health Strategy city of Marília, São Paulo: the challenge of interprofessional work

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    Mirella Gonçalves Caldeira Padula

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The inclusion of oral health professionals within the Family Health Strategy was legislated in December, 2000, by the Ministery of Health. These professionals are included in a new context which challenges the traditional education of fragmented knowledge and presents the challenge of interprofessional work. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the profile and the interprofessional practice of dentists working in the FHS in the city of Marília, São Paulo. MATERIAL AND METHOD: In 2012, a structured questionnaire and an adaptation of the Readiness Interprofissional Learning Scale (RIPLS, given to 34 dentists working in the FHS in the city of Marília, São Paulo, were used to collect data. Descriptive statistics and the nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance with SNK multiple comparisons post-test, at a significance level of p < 0.05, were used for data analysis. RESULT: The dentists are in the 31 to 40 year age range (70.6%, are mostly women (82.4% and 79.41% hold a specialization in Public and Family Health. Comparisons of the differences of the mean scores of the responses among professionals, with and without graduate study in this area, were statistically significant in the statements regarding the amount of human resources and interprofessional work. CONCLUSION: Graduate study in Public and Family Health provides dentists with background on the integration of teamwork, the understanding about the process of interprofessional work, the enhancement of common and collaborative professional skills and thus minimizes the effects of an incomplete health team. It is considered that professionals without graduate study are restricted to their traditional and reductionist preparation.

  1. Danish dentists' career satisfaction in relation to perceived occupational stress and public image

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, R.

    2000-01-01

    The relationship between Danish dentists' perceptions of satisfaction with their career choice and beliefs about their occupational stress or public image was surveyed. A mailed questionnaire was completed by 216 randomly selected Danish private dentists in and around Århus. Of these, only 19% were...... dissatisfied and would not recommend dentistry as a career to young people, while almost 60% perceived dentistry as more stressful than other professions and 31% felt that dentists' public image was less than good or poor. Odds ratio (OR) analyses indicated that perceived career dissatisfaction was most...... prevalent in dentists aged >45 years (OR = 3.1) or who practiced more than 18 years (OR = 2.7), with perceived poor role image (OR = 3.0) or high perceived stress (OR = 2.1). The contribution of perceived high stress approached, but did not attain statistical significance. Adjusted odds ratios provided...

  2. German dentists' websites on periodontitis have low quality of information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwendicke, Falk; Stange, Jörg; Stange, Claudia; Graetz, Christian

    2017-08-02

    The internet is an increasingly relevant source of health information. We aimed to assess the quality of German dentists' websites on periodontitis, hypothesizing that it was significantly associated with a number of practice-specific parameters. We searched four electronic search engines and included pages which were freely accessible, posted by a dental practice in Germany, and mentioned periodontal disease/therapy. Websites were assessed for (1) technical and functional aspects, (2) generic quality and risk of bias, (3) disease-specific information. For 1 and 2, validated tools (LIDA/DISCERN) were used for assessment. For 3, we developed a criterion catalogue encompassing items on etiologic and prognostic factors for periodontitis, the diagnostic and treatment process, and the generic chance of tooth retention in periodontitis patients. Inter- and intra-rater reliabilities were largely moderate. Generalized linear modeling was used to assess the association between the information quality (measured as % of maximally available scores) and practice-specific characteristics. Seventy-one websites were included. Technical and functional aspects were reported in significantly higher quality (median: 71%, 25/75th percentiles: 67/79%) than all other aspects (p periodontitis are not fully trustworthy and relevant information are not or insufficiently considered. There is great need to improve the information quality from such websites at least with regards to periodontitis.

  3. Sleep bruxism: review and update for the restorative dentist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de-la-Hoz, José L

    2013-01-01

    Sleep bruxism (SB) is a parafunctional oromotor activity that can sometimes pose a threat to the integrity of the structures of the masticatory system if the magnitude and direction of the forces exerted exceed the system's adaptive capacity. Over the years science has tried to provide a consistent explanation of the etiopathogenesis and physiopathology of SB, although the pathophysiological mechanisms are, even now, not fully understood yet. There is at present no specific, effective treatment to permanently eliminate the habit of SB. There are only palliative therapeutic alternatives steered at preventing the pathological effects of SB on the stomatognathic system and alleviating the negative clinical consequences of the habit. The aim of this paper is to review and update the fundamental scientific concepts of SB based on the scientific literature and to furnish an approach to the main types of therapy available, in an attempt to assist the general and restorative dentist to manage those clinical situations in which SB is a significant risk factor for the oral health and/or dental treatment of the patient.

  4. OCCUPATIONAL CONTACT DERMATITIS AMONGST DENTISTS AND DENTAL TECHNICIANS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugović-Mihić, Liborija; Ferček, Iva; Duvančić, Tomislav; Bulat, Vedrana; Ježovita, Josip; Novak-Bilić, Gaby; Šitum, Mirna

    2016-06-01

    Since the working medical personnel including dentists and dental technicians mainly use their hands, it is understandable that the most common occupational disease amongst medical personnel is contact dermatitis (CD) (80%-90% of cases). Development of occupational CD is caused by contact of the skin with various substances in occupational environment. Occupational etiologic factors for dental personnel are foremost reactions to gloves containing latex, followed by various dental materials (e.g., metals, acrylates), detergents, lubricants, solvents, chemicals, etc. Since occupational CD is relatively common in dental personnel, its timely recognition, treatment and taking preventive measures is needed. Achieving skin protection at exposed workplaces is of special importance, as well as implementing necessary measures consequently and sufficiently, which is sometimes difficult to achieve. Various studies have shown the benefit of applying preventive measures, such as numerous protocols for reducing and managing latex sensitivity and other forms of CD in dentistry. Active involvement of physicians within the health care system, primarily dermatologists, occupational medicine specialists and general medicine doctors is needed for establishing an accurate medical diagnosis and confirmation of occupational skin disease.

  5. Reimbursing Dentists for Smoking Cessation Treatment: Views From Dental Insurers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Shana; McNeely, Jennifer; Rotrosen, John; Winitzer, Rebecca F.; Pollack, Harold; Abel, Stephen; Metsch, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Screening and delivery of evidence-based interventions by dentists is an effective way to reduce tobacco use. However, dental visits remain an underutilized opportunity for the treatment of tobacco dependence. This is, in part, because the current reimbursement structure does not support expansion of dental providers’ role in this arena. The purpose of this study was to interview dental insurers to assess attitudes toward tobacco use treatment in dental practice, pros and cons of offering dental provider reimbursement, and barriers to instituting a tobacco use treatment-related payment policy for dental providers. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 11 dental insurance company executives. Participants were identified using a targeted sampling method and represented viewpoints from a significant share of companies within the dental insurance industry. Results: All insurers believed that screening and intervention for tobacco use was an appropriate part of routine care during a dental visit. Several indicated a need for more evidence of clinical and cost-effectiveness before reimbursement for these services could be actualized. Lack of purchaser demand, questionable returns on investment, and segregation of the medical and dental insurance markets were cited as additional barriers to coverage. Conclusions: Dissemination of findings on efficacy and additional research on financial returns could help to promote uptake of coverage by insurers. Wider issues of integration between dental and medical care and payment systems must be addressed in order to expand opportunities for preventive services in dental care settings. PMID:22387994

  6. Rational use of medicine in dentistry: do dentists prescribe antibiotics in appropriate indications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyuncuoglu, Cenker Z; Aydin, Mehtap; Kirmizi, N Ipek; Aydin, Volkan; Aksoy, Mesil; Isli, Fatma; Akici, Ahmet

    2017-08-01

    There are concerns regarding appropriate use of antibiotics in dentistry practice. Data on dental antibiotic prescribing patterns by dentists is relatively limited. This nationwide study aimed to examine dentists' antibiotic prescriptions in a diagnosis-based manner in Turkey. This retrospective study on utilization of systemic antibiotics for dental problems was based on the national health data of the dentists obtained from Prescription Information System between January 2013 and August 2015. Only those prescriptions containing single diagnosis and at least one systemic antibiotic were included in the study. Antibiotic prescribing was compared by diagnoses and expertise of dentists. A total of 9,293,410 antibiotics were detected in 9,214,956 prescriptions that contained "single diagnosis and at least one antibiotic." The number of antibiotics per prescription was 1.01. "Periapical abscess without sinus" (28.1%), "dental examination" (20.7%), and "dental caries" (16.2%) were the three most common indications in which antibiotics were prescribed by dentists. While only 3.4% of antibiotics were prescribed upon the single and appropriate "cellulitis and abscess of mouth" diagnosis, the remaining 96.6% was prescribed for irrational/uncertain indications. Consistent in all diagnoses, "amoxicillin + enzyme inhibitor" (58.6%) was the mainly prescribed antibiotic. Analysis of the most preferred "amoxicillin + enzyme inhibitor" prescriptions by expertise of dentists showed significantly much higher prescription rates among Group A specialists and Group B specialists (67.0 and 67.8%, respectively) than those in unidentified dental practitioners (58.2%, p < 0.0001). This study showed that dentists prescribed antibiotics in an arbitrary and mostly unnecessary manner. In general, their antibiotic choices for examined diagnoses could be regarded as irrational. These results indicate the urgent need for improvement of rational antibiotic prescribing habits of dentists.

  7. Study on Anti-Hepatitis B Surface Antibody Titer and Specific Interferon Gamma Response Among Dentists

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    Manoochehr Makvandi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV is a major problem for healthcare workers worldwide, and among them, dentists are at risk of acquiring HBV infection. The prevalence of HBV infection has been reported among the dentists in different regions of the world. Since none of the available drugs can clear HBV infection, the presence of effective immunity against HBV infection is important to prevent HBV infection. Objectives This study aimed at determining HBs antibody and specific HBV gamma interferon among the dentists, who received hepatitis B vaccine. Methods The blood samples were collected from 40 dentists, including 7 endodontics, 2 oral and maxillofacial radiologist, 4 periodontics, 11 oral and maxillofacial surgeons, 6 implantologists, 3 orthodontics, 1 oral and maxillofacial pathologist, 2 esthetic and restorative dentists, and 4 doctors of dental surgery (DDS at from dental college of Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran during December, 2013. Overall, 31 (77.5% dentists had already received 3 doses of recombinant hepatitis B vaccine, and 9 (22.5% had received only two doses of the vaccine. Their sera were tested for HBsAb and anti-HBc-IgG by the Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA test. The lymphocyte of individuals was separated from their blood sample by Ficoll-Hypaque, cells were washed with phosphate buffered saline (PBS by centrifugation, and finally the pellet cells was resuspended in RPMI-1640 media. Separated cells were exposed to 2.5 µg of purified recombinant HBs antigen, and supernatants were collected after 72 hours and tested for detection of specific interferon γ level by ELISA test. Results Overall, 97.5% of dentists showed positive HBs antibody test results while 36 showed (90% positive test results for specific interferon γ against hepatitis B virus infection. Conclusions High coverage of 97.5% immune response against hepatitis B infection was found, indicating high efficacy of recombinant

  8. Child protection training, experience, and personal views of dentists in the prefecture of Attica, Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laud, Alexandra; Gizani, Sotiria; Maragkou, Sygklitiki; Welbury, Richard; Papagiannoulis, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    The abuse and neglect of children constitutes a social phenomenon that unfortunately is widespread irrespective of geographic, ethnic, or social background. Dentists may be the first health professionals to recognize signs of child maltreatment (CM) and have an important role in dealing with such incidents. To describe the training, experience, and personal views of dentists practicing in the Prefecture of Attica regarding the recognition and referral of abused and neglected children. A random sample was drawn from a target population of dentists registered with two of the largest dental associations in Greece. The dental practitioners were interviewed by two paediatric dentists using a specially designed questionnaire. Information was collected regarding their awareness on child maltreatment, the frequency of suspected incidents as well as the reasons for not reporting them. With a response rate of 83%, findings are reported from 368 interviews (54% male, mean age 43 years). Only 21% of respondents had received training on child protection at undergraduate level. Suspected abuse was 13% and suspected neglect was 35%. Only six of the 368 respondents made an official report of a suspected case of child maltreatment. The most common reason that might prevent a dentist from reporting a case was doubt over the diagnosis (44%). Ninety-seven per cent of dentists believed that recognition and referral of incidents should be part of undergraduate training. Dental practitioners did not feel adequately informed on recognizing and referring child abuse and neglect cases. The low percentage of reported incidents and the lack of legislation indicate a great need for continuously educating dentists on child maltreatment as well as for setting up an organized system in Greece for reporting such incidents to protect the dentist referring the case as well as the child being victimized. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Paediatric Dentistry © 2012 BSPD, IAPD and

  9. Prevalence and Associated Factors of Musculoskeletal Disorders among Young Dentists in Indonesia

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    Phedy P

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Musculoskeletal problems are often work related. Dentists have been reported to have a high prevalence of musculoskeletal problems. Dentists have to perform repetitive tasks, often in awkward and nonergonomic positions in their practice. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional study. Five-hundred copies of Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire were distributed to dentists who participated in a congress of a regional branch of the Indonesian Dentist Association. Data such as sex, length of practice, the presence of assistance, smoking, occupational stress, body mass index, hand dominance, and exercise were collected. Dentist who had practised for more than five years were excluded. Results: Two hundred and forty-one respondents fulfilled the research criteria. Musculoskeletal symptoms occurred in 63.5% respondents. Fatigue and pain were the most common manifestations of musculoskeletal symptoms among dentists (36.5 and 24.9% respectively. Prolonged sitting was the most common aggravating factor (26.6% while exercise successfully relieved symptoms in 35.3% of respondents. Neck, upper back and lower back were the most common sites involved with prevalence of 25.7, 22.4, and 20.7% respectively. Neck was also the most common site of the symptoms preventing normal work during the preceding 12 months (8.3%. Exercise and stress are associated with the presence of musculoskeletal symptoms (p=0.01 and p<0.01 respectively. Exercise is associated with fatigue (p<0.01 and click (p<0.01, stress is associated with pain (p=0.00, stiffness (p=0.00, fatigue (p<0.01, and discomfort (p<0.01. Conclusions: The prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in young dentists is 63.5%. Neck is the most common affected region. Stress and exercise are the main associated factor for musculoskeletal problems in dentists.

  10. Public attitude towards dentists and dental services in Bangalore city, India

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    Nagashree Savanur Ravindranath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Understanding public attitude towards dentists and dental services helps both dental service providers and planners. Hence, this study was conducted to assess public attitude toward dentists and dental services in Bangalore city, India. Methods: Two thousand residents of Bangalore city were selected through multistage cluster sampling method. A structured questionnaire containing statements pertaining to public attitude toward dentists and dental services in Bangalore city was administered to the subjects. Five point Likert scale was used to measure the attitude. Results: About 67.8% of the study subjects had visited a dentist in their lifetime. Negative attitudes were observed regarding waiting time, cleanliness of instruments and dentist advising patients to give up unhealthy practices such as smoking, drinking and pan chewing. Positive attitude was found regarding availability of dental services near place of residence or work, modern equipments being used for treatment and the nobleness of the dental professionals. About 67% of study subjects felt that dental services are expensive. Only 65% agree that regular check-ups prevent dental diseases and 33% of the study subjects agree that dental treatment can be delayed if there are other expenses. Conclusions: Subjects generally had positive attitude toward dentists and dental services. Certain factors like waiting time and cleanliness elicited negative response.

  11. Oral Cancer Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices among Dentists in Khartoum State, Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Nada H M; Naidoo, Sudeshni

    2017-11-18

    The dental professions hold an important responsibility in the control of oral cancer and the early diagnosis highly depends on their knowledge. The present study was developed to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice of dentists in Khartoum State regarding oral cancer prevention and early detection. An administered questionnaire was structured and sent to all licensed 130 dentists working in public dental clinics in Khartoum State. Responses to the questionnaire were analyzed using descriptive and analytical statistics. Although the majority of the dentists were knowledgeable about the major risk factors of oral cancer, more than half of the dentists reported they do not carry out any special examination to detect oral cancer in age 40 and above in asymptomatic patients. Dentists indicated their lack of training as the main barrier for conducting a comprehensive oral cancer examination. Interestingly, the vast majority of the dentists express their interest to have further oral cancer educational and training sessions. The findings of the present study suggested strongly that educational and training interventions are necessary to enhance preventive measures which may lead to reduce mortality and morbidity from oral cancer.

  12. Work stress, health behaviours and coping strategies of dentists from Cluj-Napoca, Romania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miron, Cristian; Colosi, Horaţiu Alexandru

    2018-06-01

    The recognition of work stressors and their links to sociodemographic characteristics, health behaviours and coping strategies is important for enhancing the working conditions of dentists. The aim of our study was to identify and rank work stressors in dentists from Cluj-Napoca, Romania, and to investigate their potential links to sociodemographic characteristics, health behaviours and coping strategies. A questionnaire based on the Work Stress Inventory for Dentists (WSID) was delivered to a cross-sectional sample of 250 dentists working in six neighborhoods across Cluj-Napoca, Romania, as well as at the local Faculty of Dentistry. We collected and analysed information on sociodemographic characteristics, work stressors, health behaviours and coping strategies. Time and scheduling pressure, concerns about the future and pay-related work stressors were found to rank highest among the categories of work stressors investigated. Higher work stress was significantly linked to higher workloads, lower job satisfaction, poorer eating and exercise habits, higher work pain and discomfort, lower perceived health and less sleep. Job satisfaction was the single best predictor variable of work stress scores. The most frequently used coping strategy to deal with work stress was resting and taking breaks. Only one-quarter of respondents used active coping strategies. Our findings suggest that work stress is linked to a number of detrimental attitudes in dentists and that there is room for dentists to make lifestyle improvements. © 2018 FDI World Dental Federation.

  13. Reporting child abuse cases by dentists working in the United Arab Emirates (UAE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amad, Suhail H; Awad, Manal A; Al-Farsi, Laila H; Elkhaled, Rawan H

    2016-05-01

    Reporting of suspicious cases of child abuse is a sensitive issue that is often hindered by uncertainty of diagnosis. This cross sectional study aimed to assess the UAE dentists' experiences in child abuse recognition, the factors that prevent them from reporting suspicious cases to authorities and their perceived training needs. A closed-ended, self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 350 dentists working in the UAE. Chi Square test was used to determine association between training needs on child abuse and its reporting rate. Logistic regression was used to determine the association between perceived training needs and other covariates. One hundred and ninety three respondents satisfied the inclusion criteria. Forty seven (25%) dentists reported encountering a suspicious child abuse case at least once in their career, but only 15 (32%) of those reported their suspicion. Fear of making the wrong diagnosis was the most frequent challenge hindering reporting and dentists who demonstrated a need for specialized training were more likely to express this fear (OR = 5.88, 95% CI: 0.07, 0.45; P = 0.00). The majority of UAE dentists do not report their suspicion to authorities and specialized training should be offered to build dentists' capacity in diagnosing and appropriately reporting suspicious child abuse cases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  14. A survey of the dentist attire and gender preferences in dentally anxious children

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    Alexander Asokan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anxiety about doctors among children is very common. White coat phobia which is a classical conditioning phenomenon is said to be prevalent among children. Objectives: To analyze the association between anxious states of children about dentists and their preference of dentist attire and gender in the dental office. Materials and Methods: The 9-12-year-old middle school children were selected for the study. Children were asked to fill a questionnaire containing children′s fear survey schedule-dental subscale (CFSS-DS and asked to prefer dental attire from four different pictures displaying the single anonymous dentist in four different attires in the same operator. The CFSS-DS gave the anxiety scale, and age, gender, and experience were also plotted against children preference in an apron, protective wear, and gender preference. Results were tabulated and statistically analyzed using Chi-square test. Results: About 718 (62% were scored as anxious children. Of all anxious children, 502 (69.9% had preference of colored attires of the dentist, and 408 (66.8% anxious children preferred dentist with protective wear. Female dentists were preferred by 452 (66% anxious children. Same gender preference was also prevalent.

  15. Dentists' use of validated child dental anxiety measures in clinical practice: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshammasi, Hussain; Buchanan, Heather; Ashley, Paul

    2018-01-01

    Assessing anxiety is an important part of the assessment of a child presenting for dental treatment; however, the use of dental anxiety scales in practice is not well-documented. To introduce child dental anxiety scales, and to monitor the extent to which dentists used them; to explore the experience and views of dentists regarding anxiety assessment. A mixed-methods design was employed. A protocol for child anxiety assessment was introduced to paediatric dentists in Eastman Dental Hospital. After 6 months, 100 patient files were audited to examine compliance with the protocol. Fourteen dentists were interviewed to explore their experience and views regarding anxiety assessment. Only five patients were assessed using the scales. Thematic analysis of the dentist interviews revealed three themes: 'Clinical observations and experience: The gold standard'; 'Scales as an estimate or adjunct'; and 'Shortcomings and barriers to using scales'. The dentists in our study did not use anxiety scales, instead they rely on their own experience/judgement. Therefore, scales should be recommended as an adjunct to judgement. Brief scales are recommended as clinicians lack time and expertise in administering anxiety questionnaires. Advantages of using scales and hands-on experience could be incorporated more in undergraduate training. © 2017 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Predictors of job satisfaction among practicing dentists at hospitals in Suez Canal Area, Egypt

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    Ayman Ekram Fahim

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to measure the level of job satisfaction and the work factors associated with it among practicing dentists in Suez Canal governorates hospitals. Materials and Methods: Four hundred forty nine dentists were contacted, and 277 agreed to participate (response rate 61.7%. They were surveyed through a self-administered questionnaire based on items from the Dentist Satisfaction Survey (DSS questionnaire, which included 29 questions covering items related to the overall satisfaction level and work environment factors; answers were reported on 5 point Likert scale. Results: The mean score of overall job satisfaction among studied dentists was 3.24 out of 5. As regards work environment factors, the most satisfying aspect was patient relations (3.71 and the least was personal time (2.71. Multiple regression analysis model verifi ed that patient relations, value of income, personal time, staff, and training opportunities accounted for 36% of variation in overall job satisfaction score. The majority of the variance was explained by patient relations. Conclusions: This study suggests that patient relations, perception of income, personal time, staff, and specialty training are important work environment factors for job satisfaction among the dentists. These fi ndings might help policy makers to design plans to increase the level of job satisfaction among dentists at their workplaces.

  17. Predictors of job satisfaction among practicing dentists at hospitals in Suez Canal Area, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahim, Ayman Ekram

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the level of job satisfaction and the work factors associated with it among practicing dentists in Suez Canal governorates hospitals. Four hundred forty nine dentists were contacted, and 277 agreed to participate (response rate 61.7%). They were surveyed through a self-administered questionnaire based on items from the Dentist Satisfaction Survey (DSS) questionnaire, which included 29 questions covering items related to the overall satisfaction level and work environment factors; answers were reported on 5 point Likert scale. The mean score of overall job satisfaction among studied dentists was 3.24 out of 5. As regards work environment factors, the most satisfying aspect was patient relations (3.71) and the least was personal time (2.71). Multiple regression analysis model verified that patient relations, value of income, personal time, staff, and training opportunities accounted for 36% of variation in overall job satisfaction score. The majority of the variance was explained by patient relations. This study suggests that patient relations, perception of income, personal time, staff, and specialty training are important work environment factors for job satisfaction among the dentists. These findings might help policy makers to design plans to increase the level of job satisfaction among dentists at their workplaces.

  18. How general dentists could manage a patient with oral lichen planus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robledo-Sierra, Jairo

    2018-01-01

    Background The literature hardly contains information on how patients suffering from oral lichen planus could be managed by dentists. Material and Methods Based on the limited available literature and particularly on the long-term clinical and histopathological experience of one of the authors, suggestions on how dentists could manage patients with oral lichen planus have been put forward. Results: In most cases, the dentist should be able to establish a correct diagnosis. Results In most cases, the dentist should be able to establish a correct diagnosis. Occasionally, the dentist may call upon a specialist, usually an oral medicine specialist or an oral and maxillofacial surgeon for confirmation of the diagnosis, possibly a biopsy procedure, and management of the patient in case of severe symptoms. Proper patient information is of utmost importance in the management. Conclusions General dentists can be expected to manage the majority of patients with oral lichen planus. Some patients may need to be referred for diagnostic purposes to a specialist; this is also the case for the rare patient with severe symptoms, possibly requiring systemic treatment. Key words:Oral mucosal disease, oral lichen planus. PMID:29476684

  19. Knowledge of correct prescription of radiographs among dentists in Yazd, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Ezoddini Ardakani

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. While the use of X-ray is increasing, professional responsibility of dentists entitles them to have sufficient and correct knowledge of using radiographs. The aim of this study was to assess the level of knowledge of correct prescription of radiographs among dentists in Yazd, Iran. Materials and methods. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study including 134 general dentists and dental specialists. A self-administered questionnaire was used to assess their level of knowledge in various sections pertaining to prescription of radiographs. Their level of knowledge was compared in each section on the basis of gender and educational status. Results. Participants showed a high level of awareness in prescription of panoramic, periapical radiographs, and computerized tomography, whereas it was moderate in the field of occlusal radiographs, susceptible patients to caries, patients with periodontal diseases, evaluation of growth condition and dental crypts and weak in the fields of bitewing radiographs and insusceptible patients to caries. There was no difference in level of knowledge between genders. The level of knowledge in specialists was higher than general dentists except for using X-ray for susceptible patients to caries where no significant difference was observed. Conclusion. Specialist dentists were more knowledgeable than general dentists in prescribing radiological examinations.

  20. Estimated quantity of mercury in amalgam waste water residue released by dentists into the sewerage system in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegbembo, Albert O; Watson, Philip A

    2004-12-01

    To estimate the quantity of dental amalgam that Ontario dentists release into waste water. Information from a self-administered postal survey of Ontario dentists was combined with the results of other experiments on the weight of amalgam restorations and the quantity of amalgam waste that bypasses solids separators in dental offices. Algorithms were developed to compute the quantity of amalgam waste leaving dental offices when dentists used or did not use ISO 11143 amalgam particle separators. A total of 878 (44.0%) of 1,994 sampled dentists responded to the survey. It was estimated that Ontario dentists removed 1,880.32 kg of amalgam (940.16 kg of mercury) during 2002, of which 1,128.19 kg of amalgam (564.10 kg of mercury) would have been released into waste water in Ontario if no dentists had been using a separator. Approximately 22% of the dentists reported using amalgam particle separators. On the basis of current use of amalgam separators, it was estimated that 861.78 kg of amalgam (430.89 kg of mercury or 170.72 mg per dentist daily) was released in 2002. The use of amalgam separators by all dentists could reduce the quantity of amalgam (and mercury) entering waste water to an estimated 12.41 kg (6.21 kg of mercury, or 2.46 mg per dentist per day). Amalgam particles separators can dramatically reduce amalgam and mercury loading in waste water released from dental offices.

  1. Understanding Pediatric Dentists' Dental Caries Management Treatment Decisions: A Conjoint Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kateeb, E T; Warren, J J; Gaeth, G J; Momany, E T; Damiano, P C

    2016-04-01

    When traditional ranking and rating surveys are used to assess dentists' treatment decisions, the patient's source of payment appears to be of little importance. Therefore, this study used the marketing research tool conjoint analysis to investigate the relative impact of source of payment along with the child's age and cooperativeness on pediatric dentists' willingness to use Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) to restore posterior primary teeth. A conjoint survey was completed by 707 pediatric dentists. Three factors (age of the child, cooperativeness, type of insurance) were varied across 3 levels to create 9 patient scenarios. The relative weights that dentists placed on these factors in the restorative treatment decision process were determined by conjoint analysis. "Cooperativeness" (52%) was the most important factor, "age of the child" (26%) the second-most important factor, followed by "insurance status of the child" (22%). For the third factor, insurance, pediatric dentists were least willing to use ART with publicly insured children (-0.082), and this was significantly different from their willingness to use ART with uninsured children (0.010) but not significantly different than their willingness to use ART for children with private insurance (0.073). Unlike traditional ranking and rating tools, conjoint analysis found that the insurance status of the patient appeared to be an important factor in dentists' decisions about different restorative treatment options. When pediatric dentists were forced to make tradeoffs among different patients' factors, they were most willing to use ART technique with young, uncooperative patients when they had no insurance. Knowledge Transfer Statement : The present study suggests the feasibility of using techniques borrowed from marketing research, such as conjoint analysis, to understand dentists' restorative treatment decisions. Results of this study demonstrate pediatric dentists' willingness to use a particular

  2. Encouraging dentists as agents of change in the fight against tobacco in Malaysia: An example of a dentist-psychiatrist collaborative effort

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    Amer Siddiq AN

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Dentist has long been recognized as a formal health profession. Health professionals have an important role to play in the fight against tobacco. Smoking tobacco is dangerous because it related disease and also due to it being labeled as a gateway to illicit drug abuse. As individuals, the dentist can help educate the population, as community members they can support anti-smoking policies and at a societal level, they can influence national and global tobacco control efforts. The associations between tobacco use and diseases affecting the oral cavity, such as periodontal disease and cancer, are now well recognized. This has lead to proposals from some members of the profession that members of the dental team should provide smoking cessation services. Before exploring effective ways to help smokers quit, it is important to understand the nature of the addictive process and how it affects both nicotine use and cessation attempts. The potential influence of dentists as agents of change is clear from even a brief consideration of the nature and conditions of the dentist-patient relationship. The dental practice setting provides a unique opportunity to assist tobacco users in achieving tobacco abstinence. The role of psychiatrists to support the effort, therefore, becomes all the more important.

  3. E-Cigarette Advice to Patients From Physicians and Dentists in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouin, Olivier; McMillen, Robert C; Klein, Jonathan D; Winickoff, Jonathan P

    2018-06-01

    To report on adults' recall of discussion by physicians and dentists about e-cigarettes. A nationally representative cross-sectional survey (Internet and random digit dialing) in the United States. Adults who ever used e-cigarettes. Participant-reported discussion about the potential benefits and harms of e-cigarettes with their doctor, dentist, or child's doctor in the past 12 months. Fisher exact test for the analysis between benefits and harms for each type of provider and for rates of advice between provider types. Among the 3030 adults who completed the survey, 523 (17.2%) had ever used e-cigarettes. Of those who had seen their doctor, dentist, or child's doctor in the last year, 7.3%, 1.7%, and 10.1%, respectively, reported discussing potential harms of e-cigarettes. Conversely, 5.8%, 1.7%, and 9.3% of patients who had seen their doctor, dentist, or child's doctor in the last year reported that the clinician discussed the potential benefits of e-cigarettes. Each clinician type was as likely to discuss harms as benefits. Rates of advice were similar between doctors and child's doctors but lower for dentists. Rates were comparable when the analysis was limited to current e-cigarette users, participants with children, or those who reported using both e-cigarettes and combusted tobacco. Few physicians and dentists discuss either the harms or benefits of e-cigarettes with their patients. These data suggest an opportunity to educate, train, and provide resources for physicians and dentists about e-cigarettes and their use.

  4. Nordic dentists' opinions on the safety of amalgam and other dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widström, E; Haugejorden, O; Sundberg, H; Birn, H

    1993-08-01

    The safety of amalgam and other restorative materials has caused concern among dental patients in recent years. The aim of this study was to obtain information on dentists' perceived competence in handling different filling materials and their opinions on the safety of these. A random sample of practising dentists in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden received a mail questionnaire in spring 1990. Answers were received from 1732 dentists (65%). The study showed that the respondents believed that their theoretic knowledge and clinical skills were generally at a high level regarding restorative materials. The risks of the side-effects of gold, ceramic materials, and glass ionomer were considered to be low by about 90% of the respondents. Amalgam was considered to be significantly more hazardous by the Swedish respondents than the others. Interestingly, composite was considered to be associated with a high risk of side-effects by about half of the dentists in all Nordic countries. The dentists' opinions were not found to be greatly influenced by their sex, age, or place of residence but rather by their country and service sector. Against the background of the present lack of scientific evidence on the hazardousness of amalgam or other restorative materials for patients' general health, these findings indicate that dentists are influenced by discussions in the mass media about dental treatment and materials and, of course, by the guidelines given by the health authorities in their own countries. Few dentists were shown to be concerned about occupational risks associated with the use of amalgam, and they had not had their own amalgam fillings replaced.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. A survey of cross-infection control procedures: knowledge and attitudes of Turkish dentists

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    Emir Yüzbasioglu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to investigate the knowledge, attitudes and behavior of Turkish dentists in Samsun City regarding cross-infection control. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A questionnaire was designed to obtain information about procedures used for the prevention of cross-infection in dental practices and determine the attitudes and perceptions of respondent dental practitioners to their procedures. The study population included all dentists in the city of Samsun, Turkey, in April 2005 (n=184. The questionnaire collected data on sociodemographic characteristics, knowledge and practice of infection control procedures, sterilization, wearing of gloves, mask, use of rubber dam, method of storing instruments and disposal methods of contaminated material, etc. Questionnaire data was entered into a computer and analyzed by SPSS statistical software. RESULTS: From the 184 dentists to whom the questionnaires were submitted, 135 participated in the study (overall response rate of 73.36%. As much as 74.10% dentists expressed concern about the risk of cross-infection from patients to themselves and their dental assistants. Forty-three percent of the participants were able to define "cross-infection" correctly. The greatest majority of the respondents (95.60% stated that all patients have to be considered as infectious and universal precautions must apply to all of them. The overall responses to the questionnaire showed that the dentists had moderate knowledge of infection control procedures. CONCLUSIONS: Improved compliance with recommended infection control procedures is required for all dentists evaluated in the present survey. Continuing education programs and short-time courses about cross-infection and infection control procedures are suitable to improve the knowledge of dentists.

  6. Practices and opinions on nitrous oxide/oxygen sedation from dentists licensed to perform relative analgesia in Brazil

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    Daher Anelise

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Relative analgesia (RA, defined as the use of inhalation sedation with nitrous oxide and oxygen, is one of the most common pharmacological behavior management techniques used to provide sedation and analgesia for dental patients. This study aimed to assess RA licensed Brazilian dentists’ practices and opinions about nitrous oxide/oxygen sedation in the dental setting. Methods A cross sectional national survey was conducted with 281 dentists who were certified to perform RA, using an electronically mailed self-administered questionnaire containing closed questions about their practices and opinions regarding RA. Practice and opinion were individually analyzed by descriptive statistics. Non-parametric tests assessed the relationships between RA practice and independent variables. To test the interplay between practices and opinions, a k-means clusters analysis was used to divide the group for statistical comparisons. Results The response rate was 45.2%. Women made up 64.6% of the respondents, the mean age was 39.1 years (SD = 9.8, and the mean time since graduation in dentistry was 16 years (SD = 9.7. Seventy-seven percent of respondents reported the use of RA in clinical practice, most of them ‘sometimes’ (53.5%, and focusing more on adult patients. Patients with certain physical or mental deficiencies were indications associated with RA practice. ‘Equipment acquisition’ (p  Conclusion Most of the RA licensed Brazilian dentists interviewed currently use RA. Current practice of RA and frequency of use determined the degree of favorable opinion about this inhalation sedation among this group of respondents.

  7. The Life Story Experience of "Migrant Dentists" in Australia: Potential Implications for Health Workforce Governance and International Cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Madhan; Spencer, A John; Short, Stephanie D; Watkins, Keith; Chrisopoulos, Sergio; Brennan, David S

    2016-10-10

    The migration of dentists is a major policy challenge facing both developing and developed countries. Dentists from over 120 countries migrate to Australia, and a large proportion are from developing countries. The aim of the study was to assess the life story experience (LSE) of migrant dentists in Australia, in order to address key policy challenges facing dentist migration. A national survey of all migrant dentists resident in Australia was conducted in 2013. Migrant experiences were assessed through a suite of LSE scales, developed through a qualitative-quantitative study. Respondents rated experiences using a five-point Likert scale. A total of 1022 migrant dentists responded to the survey (response rate = 54.5%). LSE1 (health system and general lifestyle concerns in home country), LSE2 (appreciation towards Australian way of life) and LSE3 (settlement concerns in Australia) scales varied by migrant dentist groups, sex, and years since arrival to Australia (chi-square, P international agenda to address dentist migration. Better integration of dentist migration with the mainstream health workforce governance is a viable and opportunistic way forward. © 2017 The Author(s); Published by Kerman University of Medical Sciences. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  8. Is advertising ethical for dentists? An insight into the Indian scenario

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    Dable RA

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Rajani A Dable1, MA Prasanth2, Shailendra B Singh1, Girish S Nazirkar11Department of Prosthodontics, Sau Mathurabai Bhausaheb Thorat (SMBT Dental College and Hospital, Sangamner, Maharashtra, India; 2Department of Pedodontics, Vyas Dental College and Hospital, Jodhpur, Rajasthan, IndiaBackground: The question of whether Indian dentists should advertise their services is an important issue with significant ethical and professional implications. Individual dentists may feel the need to advertise in order to establish or grow a dental practice, but what effect does this have on the standing of the profession as a whole? As health care professionals are bound by a code of ethics, should dentists be allowed to advertise?Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine the attitudes of Indian dentists to the issue of advertising. It also aims to explore whether advertising could have positive benefits (to increase the community's awareness of dental health care, encourage better quality dental services, decrease unemployment in the industry, and help consumers choose a dentist, or, on the contrary, whether advertising could have a negative impact by undermining the reputation of the industry, in particular the definition of dentistry as a medical profession.Methods: Of 1500 eligible participants, 423 dentists (28.2% participated in the study. The questionnaire, comprising 14 questions, was provided to the respondents. The data was collected and analyzed by applying the “Chi-squared test” of association and the “Z test” of difference between two proportions at 5% and 1% levels of significance (ie, P = 0.05 and P = 0.01.Results: A majority of 56.02% of the respondents were in favor of dentists advertising their services. The majority of dentists in favor of advertising were in the youngest age group (22–30 years, 75.86%. The older age groups were more likely to agree and comply with the government ban on advertising by dentists

  9. Occupational burnout and work engagement: a national survey of dentists in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, D A; Newton, J T; Bower, E J

    2008-10-11

    To determine the levels of burnout and work engagement among dentists in the United Kingdom.Study design Postal survey of 500 dentists selected at random from the General Dental Council register. Respondents completed a questionnaire pack comprising the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES-17) and the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS), together with questions on demographic characteristics. Approximately 8% of respondents had scores suggestive of burnout on all three scales of the MBI-HSS and a further 18.5% had high scores in two of the domains. Eighty-three percent of respondents had work engagement scores suggestive of moderate or high work engagement. Dentists with postgraduate qualifications and those who work in larger teams had lower burnout scores and more positive work engagement scores. Dentists who spend a greater proportion of their time in NHS practice showed lower work engagement and higher levels of burnout. Burnout affects a small but significant proportion of dental practitioners in the United Kingdom. A larger proportion of practitioners show low work engagement, suggesting a negative attitude to their work. Higher burnout scores and lower work engagement scores were found in dentists without postgraduate qualifications, those in small teams and in those who spend a greater proportion of their time in NHS practice.

  10. Current Trend of Antimicrobial Prescription for Oral Implant Surgery Among Dentists in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Rahul; Grewal, Yasmin; Batth, J S; Singh, Amandeep

    2014-12-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate antimicrobial prescription behaviour amongst dentists performing oral implant surgery in India. Dentists performing oral implant surgery from different parts of India were personally approached during various national events such as conferences and academic meetings and information regarding their prescription habits for antimicrobial agents in routine oral implant surgery was collected using a structured questionnaire. Out of a total sample of 332 dentists, 85.5 % prescribed 17 different groups or combinations of antibiotics routinely for oral implant surgery in the normal healthy patient. Majority preferred the peri-operative protocol of drug therapy (72.2 %) with variable and prolonged duration of therapy after surgery, ranging from 3 to 10 days. An antimicrobial mouthwash was routinely prescribed by all the doctors (14.5 %) not in favour of prescribing antimicrobials in a normal healthy patient. Our findings suggest that there is a trend of antimicrobial agent misuse by dentists performing oral implant surgery in India, both in terms of drugs used and the protocols prescribed. The majority of these dentists prescribed a variety of antimicrobial agents for prolonged durations routinely even in the normal, healthy patients.

  11. Use of Local Anesthesia During Dental Rehabilitation With General Anesthesia: A Survey of Dentist Anesthesiologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Janice A.; Hagan, Joseph L.; Smiley, Megann

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to document current practices of dentist anesthesiologists who are members of the American Society of Dentist Anesthesiologists regarding the supplemental use of local anesthesia for children undergoing dental rehabilitation under general anesthesia. A survey was administered via e-mail to the membership of the American Society of Dentist Anesthesiologists to document the use of local anesthetic during dental rehabilitations under general anesthesia and the rationale for its use. Seventy-seven (42.1%) of the 183 members responded to this survey. The majority of dentist anesthesiologists prefer use of local anesthetic during general anesthesia for dental rehabilitation almost always or sometimes (90%, 63/70) and 40% (28/70) prefer its use with rare exception. For dentist anesthesiologists who prefer the administration of local anesthesia almost always, they listed the following factors as very important: “stabilization of vital signs/decreased depth of general anesthesia” (92.9%, 26/28) and “improved patient recovery” (82.1%, 23/28). There was a significant association between the type of practice and who determines whether or not local anesthesia is administered during cases. The majority of respondents favor the use of local anesthesia during dental rehabilitation under general anesthesia. PMID:24697820

  12. How much dentists are ethically concerned about overtreatment; a vignette-based survey in Switzerland.

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    Kazemian, Ali; Berg, Isabelle; Finkel, Christina; Yazdani, Shahram; Zeilhofer, Hans-Florian; Juergens, Philipp; Reiter-Theil, Stella

    2015-06-19

    Overtreatment (or unnecessary treatment) is when medical or dental services are provided with a higher volume or cost than is appropriate. This study aimed to investigate how a group of dentists in Switzerland, a wealthy country known to have high standards of healthcare including dentistry, evaluated the meaning of unnecessary treatments from an ethical perspective and, assessed the expected frequency of different possible behaviors among their peers. A vignette describing a situation that is susceptible for overtreatment of a patient was presented to a group of dentists. The vignette was followed by five options. A questionnaire including the vignette was posted to 2482 dentists in the German-speaking areas of Switzerland. The respondents were asked to rate each option according to their estimation about its prevalence and their judgment about the degree to which the behavior is ethically sound. 732 completed questionnaires were returned. According to the responses, the most ethical and the most unethical options are considered to be the most and the least prevalent behaviors among dentists practicing in Switzerland, respectively. Suggesting unnecessary treatments to patients seems to be an ethically unacceptable conduct in the eyes of a sample of dentists in Switzerland. Although the respondents believed their colleagues were very likely to behave in an ethical way in response to a situation that is susceptible to overtreatment, they still seemed to be concerned about the prevalence of unethical behaviors in this regard.

  13. Rapid Deterioration of Basic Life Support Skills in Dentists With Basic Life Support Healthcare Provider.

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    Nogami, Kentaro; Taniguchi, Shogo; Ichiyama, Tomoko

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between basic life support skills in dentists who had completed the American Heart Association's Basic Life Support (BLS) Healthcare Provider qualification and time since course completion. Thirty-six dentists who had completed the 2005 BLS Healthcare Provider course participated in the study. We asked participants to perform 2 cycles of cardiopulmonary resuscitation on a mannequin and evaluated basic life support skills. Dentists who had previously completed the BLS Healthcare Provider course displayed both prolonged reaction times, and the quality of their basic life support skills deteriorated rapidly. There were no correlations between basic life support skills and time since course completion. Our results suggest that basic life support skills deteriorate rapidly for dentists who have completed the BLS Healthcare Provider. Newer guidelines stressing chest compressions over ventilation may help improve performance over time, allowing better cardiopulmonary resuscitation in dental office emergencies. Moreover, it may be effective to provide a more specialized version of the life support course to train the dentists, stressing issues that may be more likely to occur in the dental office.

  14. Comparative assessment of low back pain and its determinants among Iranian male general dentists and pharmacists

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    Omid Aminian

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Regarding the diversity of reported low- back pain among dentists in different countries and lack of control group in most of the previous studies, the purpose of this study was to compare low- back pain and related risk factors between male general dentists and pharmacists to determine the relation between dentistry and development of low back pain.   Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 261 male dentists were compared with 193 male pharmacists as a control group with Standardized Nordic Questionnaire (low back section. Subjects were at least one year in clinical practice after becoming qualified and did not suffer from connective tissue diseases and history of a traumatic event causing fracture in spinal column. The data were analyzed by Chi- square, T-test and logistic regression analyses.   Results: The prevalence of low back pain in the past 12 months was 54.8% in male dentists and 36.3% in male pharmacists (P=.001. Logistic regression analyses, adjustmenting for occupation, age, body mass index (BMI, smoking, working years and working hours per week, revealed that there was a significant association between being a dentist and having low- back pain (OR=2.54, P=0.001.   Conclusion: Dentistry as a profession in male gender is associated with low back pain, independent of age, body mass index (BMI, smoking, working years and working hours per week.

  15. Viewpoints of dentists on the use of bisphosphonates in rheumatology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daron, Coline; Deschaumes, Christophe; Soubrier, Martin; Mathieu, Sylvain

    2018-02-15

    Alhough typically prescribed in oncology, bisphosphonates (BPs) are also employed in rheumatology, particularly for the treatment of osteoporosis, sometimes resulting in complications, such as osteonecrosis of the jaw. Because of different opinions between rheumatologists and dentists on BP use, this study aimed to assess the views of dentists regarding administration of BPs in rheumatology. A questionnaire was sent to 880 dentists from the Auvergne region of France to determine their views on BP treatment. We obtained 382 (43.4%) responses and analysed 376 (58.7% men). In total, 156 (41.5%) of the responders analysed had attended an in-service training course (ISTC) on the topic. A total of 237 (63.0%) systematically inquired as to whether their patients were undergoing BP treatment; this proportion was higher among those who had been practicing for fewer than 10 years (P ISTC (62.6% vs. 50.7%; P < 0.03). Dentists feel ill at ease providing dental surgery to patients receiving BPs. Closer collaboration and better information-sharing between rheumatologists and dentists is necessary to facilitate the administration of BPs in rheumatology. © 2018 FDI World Dental Federation.

  16. Patients' Fear of Contracting the Blood-Borne Infections from Dentists

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    Fatemah Ayatollahi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There has been no recent assessment of public attitudes and opinions concerning risk of blood-borne pathogen transmission during health care. To assess public attitudes and opinions towards dentists infected with blood-borne viruses, this study was carried out.Materials and Methods: Six items in this cross-sectional survey were used to assess current attitudes and opinions about dentists infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV, Hepatitis B and CViruses, and the risk of blood-borne virus transmission during health care in a sample of 500 cases, in Yazd. Data were analyzed by SPSS (version 13 and chi-square tests were used, when appropriate.Results: Of 500 respondents, 94% agreed that they want to know whether their dentist is infectedwith HIV, HBV or HCV; 93.8% agreed that disclosure of HIV, HBV or HCV infection in a provider should be mandatory. However, 15.8% did not believe that HIV-infected dentists were more likely to infect patients than those dentists infected with HBV or HCV. Opinions were divided on whether HIV-infected providers should be able to care for patients as long as they use good infection control:only 41.6% thought that infected providers should be allowed to provide patient care.Conclusion: These findings suggest that improved public education and risk communication on health care-associated blood-borne infections is needed.

  17. State governance versus dentists' autonomy - the case of Swedish dental care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzén, Cecilia

    2018-03-01

    A trend towards the state governance of healthcare through quality indicators and national clinical guidelines has been observed, and it is argued that this trend can be a challenge to the autonomy of healthcare professionals. In Sweden, these regulatory tools have been implemented in combination with subsidies for adult dental care that are based on guideline recommendations which serve to ensure that dental care is evidence-based and cost-effective. This paper aims to analyse the implications of these changes regarding dentists' autonomy and whether the government's political intentions can be fulfilled. The paper is based on documents from government authorities and professional theories. The financial control over Swedish dental care has been strengthened, and it can be argued that this is a step in the right direction from a societal point of view, as public resources are limited. Dentists' professional autonomy with their patients is not affected, which is appropriate, as patients should be treated according to their individual needs and expectations. This article shows that the state's governance does not directly detail dentists' work, which indicates a balance between state governance and dentists' autonomy. However, further research is required to get knowledge on Swedish dentists' view of the governance.

  18. Perception of Saudi dentists and lay people to altered smile esthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talic, Nabeel; Alomar, Samar; Almaidhan, Asma

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate and compare the perceptions of Saudi dentists and lay people to altered smile features. Thirty-six digital smile photographs with altered features were used. Altered features included the following: crown length, width, gingival level of the lateral incisors, gingival display, midline diastema, and upper midline shift. The photographs were presented to a sample of 30 dentists and 30 lay people with equal gender distribution. Each participant rated each picture with a visual analogue scale, which ranged from 0 (very unattractive) to 100 (very attractive). Dentists were more critical than lay people when evaluating symmetrical crown length discrepancies. Compared to lay people, Saudi dentists gave lower ratings to a crown length discrepancy of >2 mm (P 1 mm (P lay people towards alterations in the gingival level of the lateral incisors or towards a space between the central incisors. No significant sex difference was seen across the groups. In this sample, Saudi dentists gave significantly lower attractiveness scores to crown length and crown width discrepancies, midline deviations, and changes in gingiva to lip distance compared to Saudi lay people.

  19. Burnout and occupational participation among dentists with teaching responsibilities in universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huri, Meral; Bağiş, Nilsun; Eren, Hakan; Başibüyük, Onur; Şahin, Sedef; Umaroğlu, Mutlu; Orhan, Kaan

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the levels of burnout and explore the relationships between burnout and occupational participation among dentists with teaching responsibilities. Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) was used to evaluate occupational participation with questions on demographic information among 155 dentists with teaching responsibilities. Age, gender, years of experience, academic position were the factors affecting level of burnout and occupational participation. Occupational performance score was negatively correlated with emotional exhausment (r = -.731) and depersonalization (r = -.693) while positively correlated with personal accomplishment (r = .611). Occupational satisfaction scores were negatively correlated with emotional exhausment (r = -.631) and depersonalization (r = -.625) while positively correlated with personal accomplishment (r = .614). Occupational participation level can effect burnout among dentists with teaching responsibilities. Further studies with a larger sample are needed to investigate these preliminary results deeply.

  20. Antifungal prescribing pattern and attitude towards the treatment of oral candidiasis among dentists in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shayyab, Mohammad H; Abu-Hammad, Osama A; Al-Omiri, Mahmoud K; Dar-Odeh, Najla S

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the attitude of Jordanian dentists towards the treatment of oral candidiasis and their current antifungal prescribing habits, shedding more light on the possible influence of their socio-professional factors on the pattern of prescribing and practice. A structured validated questionnaire was developed and tested; it was then emailed to a random sample of 600 Jordanian dental practitioners during the period of this cross-sectional survey. The questionnaire recorded practitioners' personal details and their attitude and prescribing of antifungal therapy for oral candidiasis. Statistical significance was based on probability values of oral candidiasis. Of the 423 questionnaires returned, only 330 were included. The attitude of respondents was significantly influenced by their experience [odds ratio (OR) = 0.14; P oral candidiasis is much better among the least-experienced dentists working in private practice. Nystatin and miconazole are the most popular choices of antifungal agents among Jordanian dentists. © 2015 FDI World Dental Federation.

  1. Safeguarding children in dentistry: 2. Do paediatric dentists neglect child dental neglect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J C; Elcock, C; Sidebotham, P D; Welbury, R R

    2009-05-09

    In this second part of a two-part report, further findings of a postal questionnaire sent in March 2005 to dentists with an interest in paediatric dentistry working in varied UK settings are presented and discussed in the context of current multi-agency good practice in safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children. Using insights gained from a survey of self-reported management of children with neglected dentitions, this paper explores whether paediatric dentists neglect child dental neglect. The authors conclude that current practice already includes much that contributes to promoting children's oral health and wellbeing. However, in a society where children continue to suffer as a result of abuse and neglect, they warn that improvements are needed in communication between dentists and other health and social care professionals if children's welfare is to be safeguarded and promoted effectively and future tragedies avoided.

  2. Knowledge About Chronic Orofacial Pain Among General Dentists of Kermanshah, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Fatemeh; Sharifi, Roohollah; Shahrezaee, Hamid R; Mozaffari, Hamid R

    2017-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of chronic orofacial pain are one of the most challenging issues in dentistry. The purpose of this study was to assess the knowledge of general dentists regarding orofacial pain in Kermanshah, Iran. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2016 including general dentists of Kermanshah city. A researcher-designed questionnaire was administered to collect demographic data as well as measuring knowledge of the dentists in four sections including etiology, clinical presentations, physical examination, and treatment of chronic orofacial pain. The questionnaire had acceptable validity (content validity > 0.9) and reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient= 0.857 for test re-test; Cronbach's alpha= 0.72 for internal consistency). The data were analyzed by the SPSS software (ver. 18.0) using Spearman's correlation coefficient ( P orofacial pain especially in the treatment field. Therefore, it is recommended to implement educational programs to improve their knowledge.

  3. Dentist and practice characteristics associated with restorative treatment of enamel caries in permanent teeth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fellows, Jeffrey L; Gordan, Valeria V; Gilbert, Gregg H

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Current evidence in dentistry recommends non-surgical treatment to manage enamel caries lesions. However, surveyed practitioners report they would restore enamel lesions that are confined to the enamel. Actual clinical data were used to evaluate patient, dentist, and practice...... characteristics associated with restoration of enamel caries, while accounting for other factors. METHODS: Data from a National Dental Practice-Based Research Network observational study of consecutive restorations placed in previously unrestored permanent tooth surfaces and practice/demographic data from 229...... participating network dentists were combined. ANOVA and logistic regression, using generalized estimating equations (GEE) and variable selection within blocks, were used to test the hypothesis that patient, dentist, and practice characteristics were associated with variations in enamel restorations of occlusal...

  4. Correlation of occupational stress with depression, anxiety, and sleep in Korean dentists: cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyung-Won; Choi, Won-Seok; Jee, Hee-Jung; Yuh, Chi-Sung; Kim, Yong-Ku; Kim, Leen; Lee, Heon-Jeong; Cho, Chul-Hyun

    2017-12-12

    This study aimed to investigate the degree of occupational stress and the clinical mental state of dentists. In addition, we investigated the correlation of occupational stress with depression, anxiety, and sleep among dentists in Korea. A cross-sectional survey on 231 dentists was conducted using the Doctor Job Stress Scale, Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), State-Trait Anxiety Index (STAI), and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Correlation of occupational stress with mental health was investigated by adjusted multiple regression analysis. The scores of CES-D, STAI, and PSQI revealed a significant correlation with the Doctor Job Stress Scale (t = 3.93, P stress management focusing on interpersonal relationship with patients and responsibility as an expert rather than the intensity of work should be considered.

  5. Characteristics and practice profiles of migrant dentist groups in Australia: implications for dental workforce policy and planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Madhan; Spencer, A John; Short, Stephanie D; Watkins, Keith; Chrisopoulos, Sergio; Brennan, David S

    2015-06-01

    Migrants comprise a growing proportion of the dental workforce in Australia. To date, research on migrant dentists is limited, raising policy questions regarding the motivations for migration, demographic profiles and work patterns. The purpose of this paper was to present findings from the first national survey of migrant dentists in Australia. All dentists with a primary dental qualification from an overseas institution and registered with the Australian Dental Association (n=1,872) or enrolled as a graduate student in any of the nine dental schools in Australia (n=105) were surveyed between January and May 2013. A total of 1,022 participants (response rate=54.5%) were classifiable into three migrant dentist groups: direct recognition (n=491); Australian Dental Council (ADC) (n=411); and alternative pathway (n=120). Overall, 41.8% of migrant dentists were female. More than half of the ADC group (54.1%) were from lower middle income countries. The most frequent motivation for migration according to the direct recognition group (21.1%) was 'adventure', whereas other groups migrated for 'better opportunity'. The majority of ADC respondents (65%) were under 45 years of age, and a larger proportion worked in the most disadvantaged areas (12.4%), compared with other groups. Gender, marital status, years since arrival in Australia and having children varied between the groups (chi square; Pmigrate to Australia for different reasons. The large proportion of the migrant dentist workforce sourced from lower middle income countries points towards deficiencies in oral health systems both for these countries and for Australia. The feminisation of the migrant dentist profile could in future affect dentist-practice activity patterns in Australia. Further research, especially on the settlement experiences of these dentists, can provide better insights into issues faced by these dentists, the nature of support that migrant dentists receive in Australia, the probable future

  6. Comparing esthetic smile perceptions among laypersons with and without orthodontic treatment experience and dentists

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Seong-Mu; Choi, Sun-Young; Chung, Young-Wook; Jang, Tae-Ho

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine whether orthodontic treatment experience affects the individual's perception of smile esthetics and to evaluate differences among orthodontically treated laypersons, non-treated laypersons, and dentists by using computerized image alterations. Methods A photograph of a woman's smile was digitally altered using a software image editing program. The alterations involved gingival margin height, crown width and length, incisal plane canting, and dental midline of the maxillary anterior teeth. Three groups of raters (orthodontically treated laypersons, non-treated laypersons, and dentists) evaluated the original and altered images using a visual analog scale. Results The threshold for detecting changes in maxillary central incisor gingival margin height among laypersons was 1.5 mm; the threshold of dentists, who were more perceptive, was 1.0 mm. For maxillary lateral incisor crown width and height, the threshold of all three groups was 3.0 mm. Canting of the incisal plane was perceived when the canting was 3.0 mm among non-treated laypersons, 2.0 mm among treated laypersons, and 1.0 mm among dentists. Non-treated laypersons could not perceive dental midline shifts; however, treated laypersons and dentists perceived them when the shift was ≥ 3.0 mm. Conclusions Laypersons with and without orthodontic treatment experience and dentists have different perceptions of smile esthetics. Orthodontically treated laypersons were more critical than non-treated laypersons regarding incisal plane canting and dental midline shifts. Based on these findings, it is suggested that orthodontic treatment experience improved the esthetic perceptions of laypersons. PMID:25473645

  7. Factors influencing the provision of removable partial dentures by dentists in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Finbarr

    2010-01-01

    Factors influencing clinical treatment of partially dentate patients are varied, and there is a need to identify factors influencing success in the provision of removable partial dentures. The aim of this study was to assess the attitudes of general dental practitioners (GDPs) in Ireland towards tooth replacement and use of RPDs, in partially dentate older adults. The sample frame was the Register of Dentists in Ireland; data were also collected from a sample of dentists practising under NHS regulations in Northern Ireland. Validated questionnaires were sent to all dentists on the Register of Dentists in the Republic of Ireland, and dentists working under NHS regulations registered with the Central Services Agency in Northern Ireland. Content of the questionnaire included details of the dentist themselves, their dental practice and the profile of partial denture provision. They were also asked to give their views on factors influencing the success or failure of an RPD, the process of providing RPDs and their attitudes to RPD provision. A total of 1,143 responses were received, a response rate of 45%. A mean number of 61 RPDs per annum were provided, with 75% of dentures provided being acrylic based. Respondents indicate their belief that cobalt-chromium based dentures had a longer prognosis than acrylic dentures, but less than half (46%) claim to design the frameworks themselves. Patients' attitudes are considered influential in the success of RPD provision, and their influence on appearance is considered the most important factor influencing success. The most important factors influencing failure are: the patient not requesting a denture; an RPD restoring unbounded saddles; and, lower RPDs. Although considered important, approximately 60% of the sample do not routinely organise follow-up appointments for patients provided with RPDs. The fee structures in the DTSS and DTBS are considered a barrier to quality in the provision of partial dentures.

  8. Expectations and final evaluation of complete dentures by patients, dentist and dental technician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marachlioglou, C R M Z; Dos Santos, J F F; Cunha, V P P; Marchini, Leonardo

    2010-07-01

    There is a poor association between the dentist's evaluation of denture quality and patients' satisfaction with their dentures. Possible differences between dental professionals and patients' expectations might help explain differences in outcome evaluations. This study compared scores given by a dentist, a dental technician and patients for their expectations before and their final evaluation after complete dentures treatment. Twenty completely edentulous patients, a prosthodontist and a dental technician provided scores for the expected aesthetic and functional results of their dentures based on a visual analogue scale at baseline. Post-treatment completion ratings were given after adjustments, by dentist and patients. The dental technician provided post-treatment completion ratings after completing the dentures. The patients had higher expectations than the dental technician and the dentist perceived for both aesthetic and function (P < 0.001). The patients also presented higher post-treatment completion ratings than the dental professionals perceived for final aesthetics (P = 0.016, Kendall's W = 0.207) and function (P = 0.002, Kendall's W = 0.303). Only the dentist presented a statistically significant difference between expectations (lower) and final (higher) outcomes for aesthetics (P = 0.017) and function (P = 0.003). There was no correlation between expectations and post-treatment completion ratings according to the patients' age. There was also no correlation between the patients' gender and expectation scores. Patients presented higher expectations regarding their dentures than dental professionals. The dentist believed that dentures would bring fewer benefits than patients did, but his perception of denture benefits post-treatment was significantly higher than his expectations.

  9. Knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors of dentists regarding child physical abuse in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogaddam, Meaad; Kamal, Iman; Merdad, Leena; Alamoudi, Najlaa

    2016-04-01

    A large proportion of child physical abuse cases go undocumented and unreported. Dentists can play an important role in identifying and reporting these cases, but little has been reported about this issue in Saudi Arabia. The aims of the study were to (1) assess dentists' knowledge of child physical abuse, (2) assess dentists' attitudes towards child physical abuse, and (3) assess the behaviors of dentists in identifying and reporting child physical abuse. A cross-sectional survey of pediatric dentists, pediatric dentistry residents, and dental interns practicing at all of the dental schools in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia was conducted using an anonymous, self-administered questionnaire. The participants in current study demonstrated insufficient knowledge of the signs and symptoms of child physical abuse, actions that should be taken in suspected cases, circumstances in which to report such cases, and the legal authorities to which they should be reported. The attitudes of participants towards detecting and reporting cases were generally positive. Only 11% of the participants had suspected a case of child abuse, and only 3% of them reported it. Lack of knowledge about referral procedures and fear of anger from family members were the main causes of underreporting. In conclusion, this study showed that dentists have insufficient knowledge about child physical abuse but positive attitudes towards their role in detecting and reporting it. This topic should be covered and emphasized in dental schools' curricula, and healthcare and academic institutes must have a clear protocol to be followed if a case of abuse is suspected. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Knowledge, Attitude and Performance of Shiraz General Dentists about Infection Control Principles during Preparing Intraoral Radiographies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolaziz Hagh Negahdar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Infection control in dental centers is affected by the persons’ attitude and knowledge about mechanisms of infection transmission. This study was designed to evaluate the knowledge and the attitude of Shiraz dentists about infection control during intraoral radiographies preparation. Materials & Methods: In this cross-sectional, and analytical research, the attitude and the knowledge of 45 male and 25 female, randomly selected dentists, were obtained through completion of a researcher- planed questioner which its validity and reliability had been confirmed. Data were analyzed using Cronbach`s alpha, one-way ANOVA, student’s t-test, and Pearson’s correlation coefficient in SPSS (V.21. Results: The average of the dentists’ age was 40.59±10.72 and their average occupational experience was 13.49±9.75 years. The mean score obtained for knowledge about infection control during intraoral radiographic procedures was less than fifty percent of total obtainable score, and was assessed as weak knowledge. There was no significant difference in the level of knowledge between studied male and female dentists (P>0.05. In addition, no significant relationship was detected between level, age/experience, and the university of education (P>0.05. The attitude of the dentists about infection control during intraoral radiography preparation assessed as moderate to good level. Conclusions: The results showed that the main reason for the present problems is insufficient knowledge of the dentists in related subjects. Therefore, the solution, which is recommended among dentists, is to raise their awareness and to change their attitudes and culture in order to improve their performance.

  11. Knowledge regarding prevention of infective endocarditis among dentists in Bushehr Province-1390

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Mirzaie

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infective endocarditis (IE is known as a life-threatening disease, with bacteremia inducing dental procedures considered to be one of the major factors. Thus, prevention of IE onset with antibiotics is widely recommended. AHA 2007 Guidelines for prevention and treatment are well known. The aim this study was assessment of knowledge regarding prevention of infective endocarditis among dentist in Bushehr Province. Material and Methods: In a cross sectional study, data was collected by using Self-administered Questionnaires which obtain according AHA 2007 guideline were distributed to dentists who occupied governmental or private clinic in Bushehr Province. Data was analyzed by Independent t test, Chi-Square by using SPSS software at level of significancy, 0.05. Results: From 72 questionnaires were distributed between all dentists who worked in Bushehr Province, 59 questionnaires were completed. (Response rate: 81.9%. Approximately 48% reported encountering fewer than several patients at risk for IE per year and only 60.4% of the respondents were aware of the guidelines for its prevention. Frequency of correct answer toward cardiac conditions which needed antibiotic prophylaxis weren’t higher than 43%. In all, kind, route, dosage and time of antibiotics administration were according to AHA 2007 guidelines. Generally, the level of knowledge of dentists toward antibiotic prophylaxis to prevention infective endocarditis was poor and the frequency of correct answer toward cardiac conditions that need antibiotic prophylaxis is less than 43%. Conclusion: These findings suggest that promotion of knowledge of dentists for prevention of IE is important, although the frequency of cases encountered by dentists is extremely low.

  12. Competency model for dentists in China: Results of a Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Yunxia; Zhao, Liying; Wang, Yu; Jiang, Yiyuan; Meng, Kai; Zheng, Dongxiang

    2018-01-01

    With the increasing awareness of the importance of oral health, patients have an increasing need for integrated care from dentists. In China, the dentistry examination consists of two parts: a practical skills examination and a comprehensive medical examination; to date, no assessment methods that are based on specialized dentistry competencies, unlike the United States, Canada, and other countries, have been established. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to construct a competency model for dentists in China in order to guide the development, admission, training and assessment of dentists. Using a literature review, focus group interviews and in-depth personal interviews, a dentist competency index was developed with an expert consultation questionnaire. A panel of 20 specialist experts was chosen from ten national medical universities to carry out two rounds of Delphi expert analysis, using the boundary value method to filter the indicators and the Analytic Hierarchy Process to calculate the weights of the primary indicators. Two rounds of Delphi results showed that the expert authority, enthusiasm, and coordination coefficients were high. Constructs of the competency model that included seven primary indicators and 62 secondary indicators determined the weight of each index. The seven primary indicators included the following: clinical skills and medical services, disease prevention and health promotion, interpersonal communication skills, core values and professionalism, medical knowledge and lifelong learning ability, teamwork ability and scientific research ability. In conclusion, the use of the Delphi method to construct an initial model of Chinese physician competency is scientific and feasible. The initial competency model conforms to the characteristics and quality requirements of dentists in China and has a strong scientific basis. The dentist competency model should be used in the National Dental Licensing Examination in China.

  13. Satisfaction among early and mid-career dentists in a metropolitan dental hospital in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui X

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Xiaoxi Cui,1 David G Dunning,2 Na An3 1College of Dentistry, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Lincoln, NE, USA; 2Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Lincoln, NE, USA; 3School of Stomatology, Department of General Dentistry II, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: A growing body of research has examined career satisfaction among dentists using a standardized instrument, dentist satisfaction survey (DSS. This project examined career satisfaction of early to mid-career dentists in China, a population whose career satisfaction, heretofore, has not been studied. This is an especially critical time to examine career satisfaction because of health care reform measures being implemented in China. A culturally sensitive Chinese-language version of the DSS (CDSS was developed and electronically administered to 367 early and mid-career dentists in a tertiary dental hospital in Beijing, China. One hundred and seventy respondents completed the survey. The average total career score was 123, with a range of 82–157. Data analysis showed some significant differences in total career score and several subscales based on gender, working hours per week, and years in practice. A stepwise regression model revealed that two variables predicted total career score: working hours per week and gender. Stepwise regression also demonstrated that four subscales significantly predicted the overall professional satisfaction subscale score: respect, delivery of care, income and patient relations. Implications of these results are discussed in light of the health care delivery system and dentist career paths in China. Keywords: job satisfaction, career satisfaction, early and mid-career dentists, Chinese health care reform

  14. Factors influencing the provision of removable partial dentures by dentists in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Allen, Finbarr

    2011-03-15

    Factors influencing clinical treatment of partially dentate patients are varied, and there is a need to identify factors influencing success in the provision of removable partial dentures. The aim of this study was to assess the attitudes of general dental practitioners (GDPs) in Ireland towards tooth replacement and use of RPDs, in partially dentate older adults. The sample frame was the Register of Dentists in Ireland; data were also collected from a sample of dentists practising under NHS regulations in Northern Ireland. Validated questionnaires were sent to all dentists on the Register of Dentists in the Republic of Ireland, and dentists working under NHS regulations registered with the Central Services Agency in Northern Ireland. Content of the questionnaire included details of the dentist themselves, their dental practice and the profile of partial denture provision. They were also asked to give their views on factors influencing the success or failure of an RPD, the process of providing RPDs and their attitudes to RPD provision. A total of 1,143 responses were received, a response rate of 45%. A mean number of 61 RPDs per annum were provided, with 75% of dentures provided being acrylic based. Respondents indicate their belief that cobalt-chromium based dentures had a longer prognosis than acrylic dentures, but less than half (46%) claim to design the frameworks themselves. Patients\\' attitudes are considered influential in the success of RPD provision, and their influence on appearance is considered the most important factor influencing success. The most important factors influencing failure are: the patient not requesting a denture; an RPD restoring unbounded saddles; and, lower RPDs. Although considered important, approximately 60% of the sample do not routinely organise follow-up appointments for patients provided with RPDs. The fee structures in the DTSS and DTBS are considered a barrier to quality in the provision of partial dentures.

  15. Factors influencing the provision of removable partial dentures by dentists in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Allen, Finbarr

    2010-10-01

    Factors influencing clinical treatment of partially dentate patients are varied, and there is a need to identify factors influencing success in the provision of removable partial dentures. The aim of this study was to assess the attitudes of general dental practitioners (GDPs) in Ireland towards tooth replacement and use of RPDs, in partially dentate older adults. The sample frame was the Register of Dentists in Ireland; data were also collected from a sample of dentists practising under NHS regulations in Northern Ireland. Validated questionnaires were sent to all dentists on the Register of Dentists in the Republic of Ireland, and dentists working under NHS regulations registered with the Central Services Agency in Northern Ireland. Content of the questionnaire included details of the dentist themselves, their dental practice and the profile of partial denture provision. They were also asked to give their views on factors influencing the success or failure of an RPD, the process of providing RPDs and their attitudes to RPD provision. A total of 1,143 responses were received, a response rate of 45%. A mean number of 61 RPDs per annum were provided, with 75% of dentures provided being acrylic based. Respondents indicate their belief that cobalt-chromium based dentures had a longer prognosis than acrylic dentures, but less than half (46%) claim to design the frameworks themselves. Patients\\' attitudes are considered influential in the success of RPD provision, and their influence on appearance is considered the most important factor influencing success. The most important factors influencing failure are: the patient not requesting a denture; an RPD restoring unbounded saddles; and, lower RPDs. Although considered important, approximately 60% of the sample do not routinely organise follow-up appointments for patients provided with RPDs. The fee structures in the DTSS and DTBS are considered a barrier to quality in the provision of partial dentures.

  16. The impact of intrinsic and extrinsic factors on the job satisfaction of dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, K; Campbell, S M; Broge, B; Dörfer, C E; Brodowski, M; Szecsenyi, J

    2012-10-01

    The Two-Factor Theory of job satisfaction distinguishes between intrinsic-motivation (i.e. recognition, responsibility) and extrinsic-hygiene (i.e. job security, salary, working conditions) factors. The presence of intrinsic-motivation facilitates higher satisfaction and performance, whereas the absences of extrinsic factors help mitigate against dissatisfaction. The consideration of these factors and their impact on dentists' job satisfaction is essential for the recruitment and retention of dentists. The objective of the study is to assess the level of job satisfaction of German dentists and the factors that are associated with it. This cross-sectional study was based on a job satisfaction survey. Data were collected from 147 dentists working in 106 dental practices. Job satisfaction was measured with the 10-item Warr-Cook-Wall job satisfaction scale. Organizational characteristics were measured with two items. Linear regression analyses were performed in which each of the nine items of the job satisfaction scale (excluding overall satisfaction) were handled as dependent variables. A stepwise linear regression analysis was performed with overall job satisfaction as the dependent outcome variable, the nine items of job satisfaction and the two items of organizational characteristics controlled for age and gender as predictors. The response rate was 95.0%. Dentists were satisfied with 'freedom of working method' and mostly dissatisfied with their 'income'. Both variables are extrinsic factors. The regression analyses identified five items that were significantly associated with each item of the job satisfaction scale: 'age', 'mean weekly working time', 'period in the practice', 'number of dentist's assistant' and 'working atmosphere'. Within the stepwise linear regression analysis the intrinsic factor 'opportunity to use abilities' (β = 0.687) showed the highest score of explained variance (R(2) = 0.468) regarding overall job satisfaction. With respect to the Two

  17. Evaluation of urine mercury level of dentists in Tehran and its influencial factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabatabaei M.

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Dentists are exposed to mercury from dental amalgam in their routine occupational practice. Excess exposure to mercury is harmful and the measurement of mercury content of urine is a reliable and valid assessment of the level of mercury exposure from dental amalgam. The aim of this study was the measurement of urine mercury in dentists of Tehran and assessment of some possible related factors. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed randomly on 211 dentists in all regions in Tehran city (center, north, south, west, and east between 1381 and 1383. Dentists were asked to give a sample of urine in the day of visit and to complete a questionnaire consisting of variables such as age, working history, handling of amalgam, environmental parameters and general health situation. Urine samples were analyzed by cold vapour atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Data were analyzed by Kruskall Walis, Kendall and Mann Whitney tests, with p<0.05 as the limit of significance. Results: The mean of urine mercury content in Tehran dentists was 3.1 (± 3.95 which was lower than the international TLV (Threshold Limit Value. There was a significant relation between urine mercury level and working hours per day (P=0.006. This relation was observed with working hours per week too (P=0.006. In general dentists, there was a positive relation between urine mercury and age (0.008 as well as the practicing years (P=0.034. A significant relation was found between urine mercury and the number of amalgam repairs and replacements in restorative specialists (p=0.039. There was a significant relation between the number of amalgam fillings in the mouth and urine mercury in general practitioners (p=0.027. The type of amalgam (predosed capsules or bulk powder had a significant effect on the urine mercury content (P=0.001. There was no significant relation between urine mercury and other variables of the study such as the squeezing of

  18. [Problems of dental services in closed administrative units assessed by a survey of dentists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujba, V V; Olesova, V N; Khavkina, E Yu; Novozemtseva, T N; Shmakov, A N; Chuyanova, E Yu

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the results of the survey of 150 dentists from 10 closed administrative units of FMBA health care system of Russia in connection with the dynamics of dental staff withdrawal and reduce of volume of preventive work in schools and factories. These problems were found to be associated with the lack of regulations on mandatory preventive dental examinations of workers with occupational hazards, low tariffs for dental services in obligatory medical insurance program, poor wages an lack of apartments for young dentists.

  19. I Am a Pediatric Dentist: Why Is Substance Abuse among My Patients My Concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, H Barry; Perlman, Steven P

    The rapidly evolving demographic base of our communities intensifies the need for an awareness which in the past seemed beyond the traditional concerns of pediatric dentists; in this case, substance abuse by teenagers. A review was carried out regarding evolving demographics, the proportion of teenagers involved with substance abuse, the rationale for the use of varying elicit substances and the associated symptoms. A series of options for action are considered given the potential for pediatric dentists to be involved in the care of teenagers using elicit substances.

  20. Retention system for implant-supported dentures used by brazilian dentists who work in implant dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Saturnino Aparecido Ramalho; Fábio Pontes Dantas

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To provide the dentists with support in the choice of the cement or screw type of retention for implant-supported dentures, according to the patient’s problem. Methods: An opinion questionnaire was applied to a sample of 468 participants, all dentists working in the field of Implant Dentistry, of whom 272 (58.1%) participated in the 4th International Congress of Osseointegration of APCD, held in São Paulo (SP) from 6 to 9 May 2004, 119 (25.4%) participated in the 2nd International ...

  1. Predictors of dentists' behaviours in delivering prevention in primary dental care in England: using the theory of planned behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Huda; Kolliakou, Anna; Ntouva, Antiopi; Murphy, Marie; Newton, Tim; Tsakos, Georgios; Watt, Richard G

    2016-02-08

    To explore the factors predicting preventive behaviours among NHS dentists in Camden, Islington and Haringey in London, using constructs from the Theory of Planned Behaviour. A cross-sectional survey of NHS dentists working in North Central London was conducted. A self-completed questionnaire based on the theoretical framework of the Theory of Planned Behaviour was developed. It assessed dentists' attitudes, current preventive activities, subjective norms and perceived behavioural control in delivering preventive care. In model 1, logistic regression was conducted to assess the relationship between a range of preventive behaviours (diet, smoking and alcohol) and the three TPB constructs attitude, subjective norms and perceived behavioural control. Model 2 was adjusted for intention. Overall, 164 questionnaires were returned (response rate: 55.0%). Dentists' attitudes were important predictors of preventive behaviours among a sample of dentists in relation to asking and providing diet, alcohol and tobacco advice. A dentist was 3.73 times (95 % CI: 1.70, 8.18) more likely ask about a patient's diet, if they had a positive attitude towards prevention, when adjusted for age, sex and intention. A similar pattern emerged for alcohol advice (OR 2.35, 95 % CI 1.12, 4.96). Dentists who had a positive attitude were also 2.59 times more likely to provide smoking cessation advice. The findings of this study have demonstrated that dentists' attitudes are important predictors of preventive behaviours in relation to delivery of diet, smoking and alcohol advice.

  2. Rationalisation in public dental care – impact on clinical work tasks and mechanical exposure for dentists – a prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonker, D.; Rolander, B.; Balogh, I.

    2013-01-01

    . In the present prospective study we assessed mechanical exposures among Swedish dentists in relation to specific rationalisations of clinical dental work during a six-year period. Body postures and movements of 12 dentists were assessed by inclinometry synchronised to video recordings of their work...

  3. Clinical accuracy data presented as natural frequencies improve dentists' caries diagnostic inference: Evidence from a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadanovsky, Paulo; Santos, Ana Paula Pires Dos; Lira-Junior, Ronaldo; Oliveira, Branca Heloisa de

    2018-01-01

    The authors assessed whether dentists' diagnostic inferences differ when test accuracy information is communicated using natural frequencies versus conditional probabilities. A parallel, randomized controlled trial with dentists was carried out in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The dentists received a question on the probability of a patient having interproximal caries, given a positive bite-wing radiograph. This question was asked using information that was formulated into either natural frequencies or conditional probabilities. Only 14 (13.9%) of the dentists gave the correct answer; 13 in the natural frequencies group, and 1 in the conditional probabilities group (P natural frequencies group and none in the conditional probabilities group (P = .005). Representing diagnostic test accuracy in natural frequencies substantially helped dentists make diagnostic inferences. Nearly twice as many dentists overestimated the presence of interproximal caries when given information in conditional probabilities. Our study findings show information shared using natural frequencies may be more accurately interpreted by dentists than that based on conditional probabilities. Patients will probably receive different standards of care depending on the format in which dentists receive diagnostic test accuracy information. Copyright © 2018 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Don't forget the dentist: Dental care use and needs of women with breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lo-Fo-Wong, Deborah N. N.; de Haes, Hanneke C. J. M.; Aaronson, Neil K.; van Abbema, Doris L.; den Boer, Mathilda D.; van Hezewijk, Marjan; Immink, Marcelle; Kaptein, Ad A.; Menke-Pluijmers, Marian B. E.; Reyners, Anna K. L.; Russell, Nicola S.; Schriek, Manon; Sijtsema, Sieta; van Tienhoven, Geertjan; Sprangers, Mirjam A. G.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with breast cancer may develop dental problems due to treatment. We examined the prevalence of their dental care use and needs, compared the prevalence of use with that of the general population, and examined which factors predict patients' dental care use. Patients with primary breast

  5. Don't forget the dentist : Dental care use and needs of women with breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lo-Fo-Wong, Deborah N. N.; de Haes, Hanneke C. J. M.; Aaronson, Neil K.; van Abbema, Doris L.; den Boer, Mathilda D.; van Hezewijk, Marjan; Immink, Marcelle; Kaptein, Ad A.; Menke-Pluijmers, Marian B. E.; Reyners, Anna K. L.; Russell, Nicola S.; Schriek, Manon; Sijtsema, Sieta; van Tienhoven, Geertjan; Sprangers, Mirjam A. G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with breast cancer may develop dental problems due to treatment. We examined the prevalence of their dental care use and needs, compared the prevalence of use with that of the general population, and examined which factors predict patients' dental care use. Methods: Patients with

  6. Attitude and awareness of dentist towards resin bonded bridges in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahim Ahmed Vohra

    2014-07-01

    Conclusion: In comparison to SPs, GDPs reported greater disagreement with current standards for RBB success factors. Moreover, 60% of SPs and 71% of GDPs used RBBs for less than 10% of their prosthodontic cases. Therefore, continuing education opportunities are needed for practicing dentists, and undergraduate students need to receive greater exposure to the clinical application of RBBs.

  7. Foreign trained dentist working in the Netherlands: motives and movements in cross-border behaviour.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batenburg, R.; Lee, I. van der; Heiligers, P.

    2012-01-01

    Context: The past decade globalization of markets and the development of free trade agreements have driven cross-border movements and international mobility of health professionals. Dentist seems to be one of the professions that are specifically willing and capable to work in different countries.

  8. Comparison of aesthetic perception of smile between dentists and general population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaidi, H.A.; Qazi, F.U.R.; Jat, S.A.

    2015-01-01

    To compare aesthetic perception of smile between general population and dentists by varying lengths of maxillary lateral incisors. Introduction: Patient perception and expectation of their smile plays a very important role when providing an anterior tooth restoration. The aim of conducting the study was to compare the perception of esthetic smile between general population and dentists by varying length of maxillary lateral incisors. Design: Cross sectional study. Materials and Methods: A photograph of a female smile from frontal view was digitally altered to produce images with varying lengths of maxillary lateral incisor. These images were arranged in descending order; from most attractive to least attractive by the participants. The participants of the study included two groups; first group comprised of Dental Surgeons where as second group consisted of general population. Results: Evaluation of the results showed a significant difference in aesthetic perception of smile between the Dentist and general population. Conclusion: Perception of aesthetics is not similar between the dentists and the general population. (author)

  9. Attitude of the Korean dentists towards radiation safety and selection criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Do; Ludlow, John B.

    2013-01-01

    X-ray exposure should be clinically justified and each exposure should be expected to give patients benefits. Since dental radiographic examination is one of the most frequent radiological procedures, radiation hazard becomes an important public health concern. The purpose of this study was to investigate the attitude of Korean dentists about radiation safety and use of criteria for selecting the frequency and type of radiographic examinations. The study included 267 Korean dentists. Five questions related to radiation safety were asked of each of them. These questions were about factors associated with radiation protection of patients and operators including the use of radiographic selection criteria for intraoral radiographic procedures. The frequency of prescription of routine radiographic examination (an example is a panoramic radiograph for screening process for occult disease) was 34.1%, while that of selective radiography was 64.0%. Dentists' discussion of radiation risk and benefit with patients was infrequent. More than half of the operators held the image receptor by themselves during intraoral radiographic examinations. Lead apron/thyroid collars for patient protection were used by fewer than 22% of dental offices. Rectangular collimation was utilized by fewer than 15% of dental offices. The majority of Korean dentists in the study did not practice radiation protection procedures which would be required to minimize exposure to unnecessary radiation for patients and dental professionals. Mandatory continuing professional education in radiation safety and development of Korean radiographic selection criteria is recommended.

  10. Jordanian dentists' knowledge and implementation of eco-friendly dental office strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Shatrat, Sabha M; Shuman, Deanne; Darby, Michele L; Jeng, Hueiwang A

    2013-06-01

    To investigate the implementation of eco-friendly dental office strategies by Jordanian dentists. Self-designed questionnaires were provided to 150 dentists working in private dental practices in the city of Amman, the capital of Jordan. Dentists' names and addresses were obtained from the Jordanian Dental Association. Overall, the level of knowledge about eco-friendly dental offices strategies was high for amalgam, radiology, paper waste, infection control and energy and water conservation. In terms of implementation, the majority of Jordanian dentists apply few eco-friendly dental offices strategies. The most frequently identified barriers to implementation of eco-friendly dental offices strategies were cost and lack of incentives from the government. Most Jordanian dental practices are not eco-friendly. A continued focus on the impact of dental practices on the environment is needed through formal and continuing dental education. Results of this study can guide policy development to encourage implementation of eco-friendly strategies. © 2013 FDI World Dental Federation.

  11. Prevention of HPV-Related Oral Cancer by Dentists: Assessing the Opinion of Dutch Dental Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poelman, Marcella R; Brand, Henk S; Forouzanfar, Thymour; Daley, Ellen M; Jager, Derk H Jan

    2017-07-24

    The aim of this study is to assess dental students' opinions of the dentists' role in primary prevention of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related oral cancer using a cross-sectional web-based survey. A questionnaire, containing questions about knowledge of HPV and oral cancer, confidence in head and neck examination and role of the dentist in preventing HPV-related oral cancer, was sent to all students of the Academic Centre of Dentistry Amsterdam (n = 912). One hundred and twenty-six (n = 126) students completed the questionnaire. Significantly, more master students (75%) than bachelor students (54.3%) were aware that HPV is a causative factor for oral cancer. Master students had more knowledge of HPV than bachelor students, but knowledge about HPV vaccination was irrespective of the study phase. The majority of dental students agreed that it is important to discuss HPV vaccination with patients. Eighty-nine percent of the students think that more education about symptoms of oral cancer will increase screening for oral cancer. Development of a protocol for screening in dental practices was considered even more important. According to dental students, dentists should discuss HPV as a risk factor for oral cancer with patients. Future dentists are willing to be involved in both primary and secondary prevention of HPV-related oral cancer. Therefore, screening for oral cancer and education about HPV vaccination should be integral elements of the dental curriculum.

  12. Turkish dental students' and dentists' ability to assess gingival health status with DAAGS software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camgoz, Melike; Gurgan, Cem A; Akkaya, Murat

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the ability of final-year Turkish dental students and dentists to assess the level of gingival health status by using the Development of Ability to Assess Gingival Status (DAAGS) computer program. Forty-eight students in their final year of dental education and 240 dentists participated in DAAGS tests in which they judged twenty-four photos. The participants were organized into one group of students and five groups of dentists: those who graduated in the last five years, in the last six to ten years, in the last eleven to fifteen years, in the last sixteen to twenty years, and twenty and/or more years ago. A gold standard of each photo was shown to participants after they completed test 1; then, test 2 was conducted immediately. Participants were asked to evaluate the DAAGS by written survey. There were significant differences between the parameters of two tests for all groups. Significance levels differed for each group and both tests considering correct answers, reproducibility, irrelevant answers, and overall ability. The findings from this study indicated that the DAAGS software is easier for more recently graduated dentists to use.

  13. Knowledge Gaps Exist Among Dentists Regarding Curing Lights and Personal Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Wanda G

    2017-09-01

    Light curing procedures - performance, knowledge level and safety awareness among dentists. Kopperud SE, Rukke HV, Kopperud HM, Bruzell EM. J Dent 2017;58:67-73. Information not available TYPE OF STUDY/DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Knowledge and practices of caries prevention among Taiwanese dentists attending a national conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-Hsien Lin

    2010-12-01

    Conclusions: A portion of Taiwanese dentists seemed to have limited up-to-date information about certain topics related to caries prevention. The frequency of treatments for caries prevention, such as topical fluoride and sealants, did not match the perceived effectiveness of these treatments by participants.

  15. Perceived Dentist and Dental Hygienist Task Distribution After Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' Team Intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, Jan J.; Krijnen, Wim P.; Stegenga, Boudewijn; van der Schans, Cees P.

    2017-01-01

    Attitudes of dental students regarding the provision of treatment tend to be dentist-centered; however, facilitating mixed student group formation could change such perceptions. The aim of this study was to investigate the perceived scope of practice of dental and dental hygiene students and whether

  16. Perceived dentist and dental hygienist task distribution after dental and dental hygiene students' team intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reinders, Jan J; Krijnen, Wim P; Stegenga, Boudewijn; van der Schans, Cees P

    Attitudes of dental students regarding the provision of treatment tend to be dentist-centered; however, facilitating mixed student group formation could change such perceptions. The aim of this study was to investigate the perceived scope of practice of dental and dental hygiene students and whether

  17. Relation of Gothic arch apex to dentist-assisted centric relation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, M; Dziejma, R; Goldberg, J; Ross, R; Sharry, J

    1980-07-01

    These data suggest that the widely held belief that thumb pressure can position the mandible consistently more posterior than the position indicated by the Gothic arch apex is unfounded. Furthermore, this study provides no evidence to support the contention that the dentist-assisted jaw relation is more reproducible than the relation indicated by the Gothic arch apex.

  18. Antibiotic-associated diarrhea and the older dental patient: how do dentists respond?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwetchkenbaum, Samuel R; Overbeck, Kevin J; Pomerantz, Sherry C

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal complications from antibiotic use, including Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), can have significant morbidity, especially among older patients. This descriptive study surveyed dentists to find out how they would respond to a patient with signs indicating potential CDI. A survey on prescribing medications for older patients was mailed to 1,000 dentists in New Jersey. Questions were asked regarding antibiotic selection, probiotic use, and approach to a patient scenario of diarrhea after antibiotic use. Respondents chose amoxicillin most frequently as an antibiotic, and clindamycin if penicillin allergy. When informed their patients had diarrhea, 64.5% advised them to stop the antibiotic. If the patient continued to have diarrhea on follow-up, 75.5% contacted the patient's physician. Most (61.6%) do not prescribe probiotics prophylactically. Most dentists respond appropriately to antibiotic-associated diarrhea in advising to stop the antibiotic, and seeking physician involvement if no improvement, but there are still many who make recommendations that could delay appropriate care. Dentists may wish to learn more about benefits of probiotics. © 2015 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Knowledge, perceptions and clinical application of the shortened dental arch concept among Malaysian government dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasim, Siti Kamilah Mohd; Razak, Ishak Abdul; Yusof, Zamros Yuzadi Mohd

    2018-02-01

    To assess the knowledge and perceptions of Malaysian government dentists regarding the shortened dental arch (SDA) concept and its application in clinical practice. The SDA concept refers to a specific type of dentition with intact anterior teeth and a reduction in posterior occlusal pairs. Dentists' knowledge and perceptions of the SDA concept can influence its application in clinical practice. A self-administered questionnaire on the SDA concept was distributed to 326 government dentists in the states of Selangor and Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The data were analysed using SPSS version 22 software. The response rate was 84.0%. The majority of respondents had good knowledge on five of six knowledge items and good attitudes towards 10 of 17 perception items. However, only one-fifth (20.4%) reported having applied the SDA concept in the clinic. A larger number of participants who graduated locally than who graduated abroad perceived that patients 5 years of work experience perceived that the SDA concept enables simpler treatment planning (P concept, it is not widely applied in the clinic. Concerted efforts in SDA training of dentists are needed to help to shorten denture waiting lists and reduce costs. © 2017 FDI World Dental Federation.

  20. Determinants of physical and mental health complaints in dentists : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ruijter, Rolf A. G.; Stegenga, Boudewijn; Schaub, Rob M. H.; Reneman, Michiel F.; Middel, Berrie

    Occupational determinants of ill health in dentists were systematically reviewed in literature. The methodological quality of the studies was evaluated. Studies were included if they evaluated health-related risk factors in dental practice by means of quantitative methods and statistical analysis of

  1. The adoption of social media and social media marketing by dentists in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyman, L; Visser, J H

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to identify and understand social media usage behaviour of dentists in South Africa, in general and in particular as part of their marketing strategy and to consider the potential determinants associated with these behaviours. Dentists who are members of the South African Dental Association were requested to anonymously complete an online questionnaire. Apart from demographic information, respondents were asked to report on their use of social media and their adoption of social media marketing. One-on-one interviews were also conducted with three dentists, to gain a deeper understanding of their adoption of this marketing option. South African dentists have started to embrace social media and 50.2% interact through these channels at least once a day. The most popular social media platforms are GooglePlus and Facebook. Respondents use social media mainly for personal purposes, including staying connected to family and friends.. Only 13.2% of those responding currently use social media as a marketing tool, but the majority (83.5%) predict that such usage will increase in future. Social media marketing is a growing trend and will become more significant in future. Although respondents used social media regularly for personal purposes, most are only now starting to use it as a marketing tool.

  2. Intrinsic rewards experienced by a group of dentists working with underserved populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, S P; Roberts-Thomson, K F; Winning, T A; Peterson, R

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore, using qualitative methods, the intrinsic reasons why dentists work with underserved groups. Minority and marginalized groups of Australians suffer a greater burden of dental disease than the general population due to disparities in accessing care. Recruitment and retention of dentists to care for underserved groups is problematic due to personal, professional and structural reasons. What drives dentists to work with underserved groups is not widely known. Sixteen dentists were recruited using 'snowball' purposeful sampling. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted. Thematic analysis was conducted on the transcriptions to identify themes. Five key themes emerged: (1) 'tapped on the shoulder', being personally approached or invited; (2) 'dental school experience', the challenges faced as a student; (3) 'empathic concern', the non-judgemental expressions of care toward others; (4) 'resilience', the ability to bounce back after setbacks; (5) 'intrinsic reward', the personal gain and satisfaction received. This study focuses on the intrinsic rewards which were found to be simple, unexpected, and associated with relieving pain, community engagement and making a difference. Emphasizing personal fulfilment and intrinsic reward could be useful when promoting dentistry as a career and when encouraging graduates to consider working with disadvantaged groups. © 2014 Australian Dental Association.

  3. Knowledge regarding antibiotic drug action and prescription practices among dentist in Jaipur city, Rajasthan

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    Dushyant Pal Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dentists prescribe antibiotics routinely to manage oral and dental infections. Unscrupulous antibiotic prescriptions can be associated with unfavorable side effects and the development of resistance. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the level of knowledge regarding antibiotic prescription use among dentists in Jaipur City, Rajasthan. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire survey was conducted among 300 dentists in Jaipur city. A validated, self-designed, 21-item, closed-ended questionnaire was used to collect data on knowledge regarding antibiotic prescription. Descriptive statistics were calculated. Results: A total of 300 dental practitioners were included in the study. The majority of the respondents seem to prescribe antibiotics that are broad spectrum or the ones that are commonly used. A considerable percentage of the respondents were not aware of the pregnancy drug risk categories by Food and Drug Administration. The most of the respondents said that they prescribe antibiotics on the basis of the diagnosis, whereas more than two-thirds of the respondents said that they never advise culture sensitivity test before prescribing the antibiotics. Conclusion: Our findings suggest the knowledge of dentists regarding antibiotic prescription is inadequate and more focus should be given to the ongoing training regarding the pharmacological aspects, pertinent medical conditions, and prophylactic use of antibiotics in dentistry.

  4. Attitude of the Korean dentists towards radiation safety and selection criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung Do [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology and Wonkwang Dental Research Institute, College of Dentistry, Wonkwang University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Ludlow, John B. [Graduate Program in Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States)

    2013-09-15

    X-ray exposure should be clinically justified and each exposure should be expected to give patients benefits. Since dental radiographic examination is one of the most frequent radiological procedures, radiation hazard becomes an important public health concern. The purpose of this study was to investigate the attitude of Korean dentists about radiation safety and use of criteria for selecting the frequency and type of radiographic examinations. The study included 267 Korean dentists. Five questions related to radiation safety were asked of each of them. These questions were about factors associated with radiation protection of patients and operators including the use of radiographic selection criteria for intraoral radiographic procedures. The frequency of prescription of routine radiographic examination (an example is a panoramic radiograph for screening process for occult disease) was 34.1%, while that of selective radiography was 64.0%. Dentists' discussion of radiation risk and benefit with patients was infrequent. More than half of the operators held the image receptor by themselves during intraoral radiographic examinations. Lead apron/thyroid collars for patient protection were used by fewer than 22% of dental offices. Rectangular collimation was utilized by fewer than 15% of dental offices. The majority of Korean dentists in the study did not practice radiation protection procedures which would be required to minimize exposure to unnecessary radiation for patients and dental professionals. Mandatory continuing professional education in radiation safety and development of Korean radiographic selection criteria is recommended.

  5. Why the general dentist needs to know how to manage oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Stephanie M; Murrah, Valerie A

    2015-01-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is a frequently mismanaged chronic disease that requires care throughout a patient's life, and therefore a condition the general dentist must know how to manage. Patients with OLP often suffer considerable physical discomfort and an inability to perform proper oral hygiene, eventually resulting in poor periodontal health. In addition, these patients are confronted with the psychological stress of knowing that OLP is not curable. This is accompanied by a fear of other negative health developments, particularly oral cancer. The objective of this study was to identify major issues surrounding the management of OLP by the general dentist. A literature review of over 1100 articles was performed. An eclectic compilation of the issues revealed 12 major areas of concern. This article reviews those concerns and presents strategies for coping with the myriad signs, symptoms, and complications associated with this disease, as well as educational approaches and legal considerations. A rationale is provided to place the responsibility for the management of these patients under the person best positioned to coordinate care for this condition--the general dentist. A general dentist can contribute to the overall oral health of an OLP patient with timely diagnosis, effective treatment, thorough patient education, and the orchestration of efforts by a team of health care providers.

  6. Preference for using posts to restore endodontically treated teeth: findings from a survey with dentists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarkis-Onofre, R.; Pereira-Cenci, T.; Opdam, N.J.M.; Demarco, F.F.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if clinical experience, whether in relation to length of practice time and/or level of specialization influences the dentist's preference for using posts to restore endodontically treated teeth. A cross sectional study was carried out using a questionnaire with

  7. Preference for using posts to restore endodontically treated teeth: findings from a survey with dentists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarkis-Onofre, R.; Pereira-Cenci, T.; Opdam, N.J.M.; Demarco, F.F.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate if clinical experience, whether in relation to length of practice time and/or level of specialization influences the dentist's preference for using posts to restore endodontically treated teeth. A cross sectional study was carried out using a questionnaire with

  8. Role of the dentist in the management of patients with HIV/AIDS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the relationship between HIV and dentistry; the role of the dentist, the size of the pandemic and its implication to the dental profession, especially regarding infection control. Ethical issues in the management of HIV patients are also addressed by highlighting areas of conflict. The aim of this paper is to ...

  9. Criteria adopted by dentists to indicate the extraction of periodontally involved teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Heitor Cunha Moreira

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available When dealing with patients with periodontal disease of variable severities, dentists must often choose between treating and restoring the involved tooth or indicating its extraction. Different criteria have been adopted in this decision-making process. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the criteria adopted by dentists to indicate the extraction of teeth with periodontitis. Dentists were interviewed at their private practices in three cities of the state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The evaluated criteria included severity of attachment loss, tooth mobility, furcation involvement, prosthetic planning, periodontal-endodontic lesion, possible systemic involvement due to the presence of periodontitis, referral to a periodontist for evaluation, radiographic bone loss greater than 50%, presence of extensive caries, socio-economic and cultural status of the patient, among others. The most often adopted criteria to indicate the extraction of periodontally affected teeth were the presence of mobility (37.5%, severity of attachment loss (24.3% and radiographic bone loss greater than 50% (21.2%. The results of the present study demonstrated the difficulties faced by dentists to indicate the extraction of teeth with severe attachment loss, in addition to the establishment of an adequate prognosis. Aspects associated with the past disease were still the most often reported to indicate the extraction of teeth for periodontal reasons.

  10. Dentists with enhanced skills (Special Interest) in Endodontics: gatekeepers views in London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghotane, Swapnil G; Al-Haboubi, Mustafa; Kendall, Nick; Robertson, Claire; Gallagher, Jennifer E

    2015-09-21

    Dentists with a special interest hold enhanced skills enabling them to treat cases of intermediate complexity. The aim of this study was to explore primary dental care practitioners' views of dentists with a special interest (DwSIs) in Endodontics in London, with reference to an educational and service initiative established by (the former) London Deanery in conjunction with the NHS. A cross-sectional postal survey of primary care dentists working across different models of care within London was conducted, with a target to achieve views of at least 5 % of London's dentists. The questionnaire instrument was informed by qualitative research and the dental literature and piloted prior to distribution; data were analysed using SPSS v19 and STATA v12.0. Six per cent of London's primary care dentists (n = 243) responded to the survey; 53 % were male. Just over one third (37 %; n = 90) were aware of the DwSI service being provided. Most practitioners reported that having access to a DwSI in Endodontics would support the care of their patients (89 %; n = 215), would carry out more endodontic treatment in the NHS primary dental care if adequately reimbursed (93 %; n = 220), and had more time (76 %; n = 180). Female respondents appeared to be less confident in doing endodontic treatment (p = 0.001). More recently qualified respondents reported greater need for training/support for performing more endodontic treatment in the NHS primary dental care (p = 0.001), were more dissatisfied with access to endodontic service in the NHS primary dental care (p = 0.007) and more interested to train as a DwSI in endodontics (p = 0.001) compared with respondents having a greater number of years of clinical experience since qualification. The findings lend support to the concept of developing dentists with enhanced skills as well as ensuring additional funding, time and support to facilitate more routine endodontics through the NHS primary care to meet

  11. Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders in Iranian Dentists: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

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    Hamid Reza ZakerJafari

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Work-related musculoskeletal disorders are the most important problems among professions particularly, dentists. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in various parts of the body in Iranian dentists by using systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods: This systematic review and meta-analysis was based on preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA guidelines and searching in national databases such as SID, Magiran, Irandoc, IranMedex, and Medlib, and international databases such as MedLine, Web of Sciences, Scopus, PubMed, ScienceDirect, Cochrane, Embase, Springer, Wiley Online Library, Ebsco, CEBM, and Google Scholar search engine which were published by January 1, 2017. Researched keywords were in Persian and their standard English equivalents were in accordance with their MeSH. The obtained documents were analyzed using Comprehensive Meta-analysis version 2. Results: According to 23 studies through 2,531 Iranian dentists which took part in this study, prevalence of skeletal disorders in Iranian dentists has been 17.6% [confidence interval (CI 95%:11.7–25.5] in knees, 33.2% (CI 95%:24.1–43.8 in shoulders, 33.4% (CI 95%: 26.8–40.8 in the thorax, 51.9% (CI 95%:46.7–57.2 in necks, 33.7% (CI 95%:28.2–39.6 in wrists/hands, 12.9% (CI 95%:7.7–20.6 in elbows, 37.3% (CI 95%: 31.5–43.5 in lower back, 11.9% (CI 95%:8.7–16.1 in thighs, 12.9% (CI 95%:3.8–36 in the foot, and 10.5% (CI 95%:7–15.4 in legs. Conclusion: Considering the high prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in Iranian dentists, ergonomics should be included as a lesson in preclinic and also, reeducation courses for ergonomics basics should be executed for graduate dentists. Keywords: discomforts, Iran, musculoskeletal diseases, occupational dentists, prevalence

  12. CONCEPTION OF USERS OF HEALTH CENTERS ABOUT ESSENTIAL CHARACTERISTICS OF THE DENTIST: STUDY IN A CITY OF THE NORTH COAST OF SANTA CATARINA

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    Elisabete Rabaldo Bottan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify and to analyze the essential characteristics to the exercise of the dentist profession in view of users of dental services of Health Centers. The approach of the exploratory study was qualitative and quantitative. The target population consisted of adults living in a city in the north coast of Santa Catarina. Data collection was performed through the words of Free Association Technique. The participants were 384 subjects (66% women; 34% men. The age group ranged from 21 to 79 years. Nine hundred and forty-eight (948 evocations, distributed into two categories, were considered. Of all evocations, 47% (n=449 belonged to the category technical and scientific skills and 53% (n=499 to the interpersonal relationship category. The category of interpersonal relationship, compared to the category technical and scientific skills, was less evoked in the first order, but with positive growth for second and third order. It not identified significant differences in the frequency of categories in age function and sex. The group showed that the professional practice of the dentist requires technical and scientific competence and personal interactions based on dialogue, which complement each other without overlapping in relation to each other

  13. Career satisfaction of Pennsylvanian dentists and dental hygienists and their plans to leave direct patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vick, Brandon

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study is to explore a number of practice-related dynamics between dentists and dental hygienists, including their career dissatisfaction, plans to leave direct patient care, hiring difficulties, and full-time work. Data come from the 2013 Pennsylvania Health Workforce Surveys, a sample of 5,771 dentists and 6,023 dental hygienists, and logistic regression is used to estimate the relationships between outcome areas - dissatisfaction, plans to leave patient care, and hiring/job outcomes - and a number of explanatory variables, including demographic and practice characteristics. Dentists working in practices that employ hygienists have lower odds of reporting overall dissatisfaction and of leaving patient care in the next 6 years than those that do not employ hygienists. Dental hygienists that work full-time hours across two or more jobs have higher odds of dissatisfaction than those who work full-time in one job only. Part-time work in a single hygienist job is associated with higher odds of leaving the career, relative to having a single, full-time job. Results suggest that employment of dental hygienists is associated with lower career dissatisfaction and extended careers for dentists. However, a number of dentist characteristics are associated with difficulty hiring hygienists, including rural practice, nonwhite race, and solo ownership. Only 37.5 percent of hygienists work in a single, full-time job, an outcome related to lower dissatisfaction and extended careers for hygienists. Characteristics associated with this job outcome include having an associate degree, having a local anesthesia permit, and not working for a solo practice. © 2015 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  14. Reasoning process characteristics in the diagnostic skills of beginner, competent, and expert dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Kathleen E; Torres, José E; Recio, María E

    2004-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate qualitative differences in the diagnostic reasoning process at different developmental stages of expertise. A qualitative design was used to study cognitive processes that characterize the diagnosis of oral disease at the stages of beginner (five junior students who had passed the NBDE I), competent (five GPR first-year residents), and expert dentists (five general dentists with ten or more years of experience). Individually, each participant was asked to determine the diagnosis of an oral condition based on a written clinical case, using the think aloud technique and retrospective reports. A subsequent interview was conducted to obtain the participants' diagnostic process model and pathophysiology of the case. The analysis of the verbal protocols indicated that experts referred to the patient's sociomedical context more frequently, demonstrated better organization of ideas, could determine key clinical findings, and had an ability to plan for the search of pertinent information. Fewer diagnostic hypotheses were formulated by participants who used forward reasoning, independent of the stage of development. Beginners requested additional diagnostic aids (radiographs, laboratory tests) more frequently than the competent/expert dentists. Experts recalled typical experiences with patients, while competent/beginner dentists recalled information from didactic courses. Experts evidenced cognitive diagnostic schemas that integrate pathophysiology of disease, while competent and beginner participants had not achieved this integration. We conclude that expert performance is a combination of a knowledge base, reasoning skills, and an accumulation of experiences with patients that is qualitatively different from that of competent and beginner dentists. It is important for dental education to emphasize the teaching of cognitive processes and to incorporate a wide variety of clinical experiences in addition to the teaching of

  15. Knowledge and reported practice of antibiotic prescription by dentists for common oral problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanwir, F.; Marrone, G.; Lundborg, C. S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the knowledge and reported practice in relation to antibiotic prescribing regarding common oral problems by dentists in Karachi, Pakistan. Study Design: Cross-sectional survey. Place and Duration of Study: Three Dental Colleges of Karachi, from July to December 2010. Methodology: The cross-sectional study was conducted in Karachi, Pakistan in the Outpatient Departments (OPD) of three dental colleges. Inclusion criteria were full time employed dentists working in their respective OPDs (n = 100). The dentists were asked to fill a questionnaire. The questionnaire included (i) general information, (ii) perception and knowledge of antibiotic resistance, (iii) reported management of oral problems, (iv) perceptions about oral infections and (v) perceptions of how people perceive oral problems. To assess dentist's ability to relate knowledge to practice regarding the management of the most common oral problems, written simulated case scenarios with related questions were also included. Scores were given for each correct answer. Results: The response rate was 85%. Of the total respondents, 65 (76%) were under the age of 30 years, 53 (62%) were males and 32 (38%) females. Out of 85 respondents 53% (n = 45) reported prescribing of antibiotics 4 - 5 times a week, 87% (n = 74) prescribe antibiotics based upon symptoms and 64% (n = 54) prescribed antibiotics in abscess condition. The total score for all four scenarios showed that nearly two thirds (61%) of all respondents scored sub-optimally. Conclusion: A substantial number of dentists had suboptimal knowledge regarding antibiotic use. This might lead to the provision of suboptimal care of patients with dental infections. Therefore, continuing education, training and supervision are recommended to improve the quality of dental management. (author)

  16. Correlation between working positions and lactic acid levels with musculoskeletal complaints among dentists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiory Dioptis Putriwijaya

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Musculoskeletal complaints have been common for dentists since their body is unknowingly often in inappropriate positions when caring for patients. For example, they bend towards patients, suddenly move, and then rotate from one side to another. The repetitive movements are done in long term. High activities and sufficient recovery time can cause a buildup of lactic acid in their blood leading to obstruction of the energy intake from the aerobic system in their muscle cells, resulting in fatigue. As a result, such conditions trigger decreased muscle performances. Purpose: This study aimed to determine the correlation between working positions and lactic acid levels with the risk of musculoskeletal disorders among dentists at Public Health Centers in Surabaya. Method: This research was an analytical observational research using cross sectional approach. Sampling technique used in this research was cluster random sampling with nineteen samples. To evaluate the working positions of those samples, a rapid entire body assessment (REBA method was used. Meanwhile, to observe the musculoskeletal disorders of those samples, a Nordic body map was used. Data obtained then were analyzed using Pearson correlation test with a significance level (p<0.05. Result: Results of data analysis using the Pearson correlation test showed that the significance value obtained was 0.036. It indicates that there was a correlation between the working positions and the lactic acid levels with the musculoskeletal disorders in those dentists. The results of the Pearson correlation test also revealed that there was a correlation between the working positions and the lactic acid levels among those dentists with a significance value of 0.025. Conclusion: It may be concluded that the wrong body positions during working can increase lactic acid level in the body of dentists. The increased level of lactic acid then can affect their muscles, leading to the high risk of

  17. A comparison of expectations and impressions of ethical characteristics of dentists: results of a community primary care survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Kevin; Humeniuk, Katherine M; Hellyer, Joan Henriksen; Thorsteinsdottir, Bjorg; Tilburt, Jon C

    2014-08-01

    To better define potential challenges in dental professional ethics, the authors gathered data regarding patients' characterizations of an ideal dentist and compared them with their impressions of dentists in general. The authors invited 500 consecutively seen primary care patients at an academic medical center to participate in the study. Participants completed a 32-item survey assessing key domains of ethical characteristics of health care professionals: trustworthiness, honesty, beneficence, nonmaleficence, respect for autonomy, empathy, compassion, patience, courage, humility and dedication. The authors used the McNemar paired t test to compare respondents' ratings of ideal dentists with their ratings of dentists in general. Two hundred eight-five patients returned completed surveys, for a response rate of 57 percent. The authors found statistically significant differences between ideal and perceived characteristics in all but one domain. The area of greatest difference related to the domain of trustworthiness (that is, dentists should not "propose unnecessary treatments just so they can make money"). For this survey item, 98 percent of patients reported that it was very or extremely important, but only 57 percent of respondents moderately or strongly agreed that dentists in general were engaging in this practice (P dental profession and their actual impressions of dentists in general. Addressing these discrepancies may be crucial if dentistry is to continue to enjoy the public's trust.

  18. The use of office-based sedation and general anesthesia by board certified pediatric dentists practicing in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olabi, Nassim F; Jones, James E; Saxen, Mark A; Sanders, Brian J; Walker, Laquia A; Weddell, James A; Schrader, Stuart M; Tomlin, Angela M

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the use of office-based sedation by board-certified pediatric dentists practicing in the United States. Pediatric dentists have traditionally relied upon self-administered sedation techniques to provide office-based sedation. The use of dentist anesthesiologists to provide office-based sedation is an emerging trend. This study examines and compares these two models of office-based sedations. A survey evaluating office-based sedation of diplomates of the American Board of Pediatric Dentistry (ABPD) based on gender, age, years in practice, practice types, regions, and years as a diplomate of the ABPD was completed by 494 active members. The results were summarized using frequencies and percentages. Relationships of dentist age, gender, and number of years in practice with the use of intravenous (IV) sedation was completed using two-way contingency tables and Mantel-Haenszel tests for ordered categorical data. Relationships of office-based sedation use and the type of one's practice were examined using Pearson chi-square tests. Of the 1917 surveys e-mailed, 494 completed the survey for a response rate of 26%. Over 70% of board-certified US pediatric dentists use some form of sedation in their offices. Less than 20% administer IV sedation, 20 to 40% use a dentist anesthesiologist, and 60 to 70% would use dentist anesthesiologists if one were available.

  19. Evaluation of dentist-patient relationship toward the treatment of oral diseases after the usage of internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourav Sen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Among all innovative technologies, net is one among the recent and also the most innovative media by that one will keep connected with the remainder of the planet. This facility provides huge volume of oral health consciousness at the side of oral health info to net users who eventually have an effect on the dentist–patient relationship. Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the attitude of patients and dentists for the treatment of oral diseases after the use of internet by the patient. Materials and Methods: In a cross-sectional study, data were collected from 153 dentists and 449 patients. The data from the dentists were collected from hospitals and private practices. Data from the patients were collected in urban area. The questions asked to dentists and patients were such that each respective question in both the questionnaires gave the same conclusion. Results: Dentists (56.2% agreed changes in patients thinking after the usage of internet. Within 21–40 years, 40.4% of dentists agreed that internet represents a threat to dentist–patient relationship. Conclusion: The usage of internet by the patients had brought about changes in patients thinking and the dentists had modified or guided patients in the use of oral health information obtained from the internet.

  20. Knowledge of HIV and willingness to conduct oral rapid HIV testing among dentists in Xi'an China.

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    Lirong Wang

    Full Text Available China is considered a country of low HIV prevalence (780,000 people living with HIV, however, HIV infections among high-risk populations continue to grow at alarming rates. Voluntary Counseling and Testing services were first implemented in 2003, and oral rapid HIV testing (ORHT began in 2012. Dentists, as oral health experts, would be well placed to conduct ORHT. We assessed willingness of dentists to undertake ORHT in their clinical practice.A cross-sectional, paper-based survey of dentists from the Xi'an region of China was conducted from April to June 2013. Dentists were recruited from Shaanxi Stomatological Association using a stratified sampling methodology. A 40-item survey was used to measure knowledge of HIV, attitudes toward people living with HIV and willingness to conduct ORHT.477 dentists completed the survey with a mean HIV knowledge test score of 13.2/18 (SD 1.9. If made available in the dental setting, 276 (57.9% preferred to use blood to diagnose HIV, only 190 (39.8% preferred saliva or both. Four hundred and thirty-five (91.2% thought that ORHT was needed in dental clinics. Female dentists felt more accepting of ORHT than males (93.8% vs. 87.8%; χ2=5.145; p<0.05. 42.6% of the participants who responded thought that lack of education on ORHT for dentists was the most urgent problem to solve for ORHT, 144 (31.3% thought that lack of support for ORHT from patients was the most urgent problem. There was statistically significant difference among dental hospital, dentistry and department of dentistry (χ2=24.176; p<0.05.The majority of Chinese dentists thought that ORHT was needed in the dental setting. Providing opportunities for dentists and dental students to learn about HIV testing guidelines and practices is needed as well as feasibility and implementation science research.

  1. A survey on the Knowledge, Attitude and Practices of dentists in Bushehr Province about HIV/AIDS

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    kamran Mirzaie

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dentists are at high risk of blood borne infections since they are often exposed to blood and other body fluids. This study evaluated knowledge, attitudes and behaviour of dentists in Bushehr Province about HIV/AIDS. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, in the year 2007, all dentists who worked in Bushehr Province were evaluated by a self- administered questionnaire. The questionnaire had 20 items about contact and treatment and 7 items about the practices for reducing infection rates after contact with HIV/AIDS subjects in dentistry. Results: From a total of 101 dentists who were working in Bushehr port, 77 dentists (76.2% participated in this study. The mean age was 33.52 (± 6.15 and the mean duration of working activity was 7.41 (± 5.24 years. The overall knowledge about HIV infection, transmission ways and attitude towards infection control were low and had no correlation with demographic data. Most dentists believed that they had professional (62.1% and moral duty (96.1% to treat HIV positive patients. While gloves and face masks were worn routinely by the majority of the dentists (83.3%, and 89.7%, respectively, but were not always changed between patients (75.5% and 50.0%, respectively, p<0.002. Hand washing was performed by 59.0% of dentists before treatment and by 66.2% after treatment. The practice of recapping needles was common, 94.9% and only 39.5% of them bended the needles after using. Conclusion: Educational programs are needed to improve dentists' skill and knowledge about HIV characteristics, routes of transmission, proper practice of infection control and Universal Precautions for preventing infections.

  2. Therapies most frequently used for the management of bruxism by a sample of German dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ommerborn, Michelle A; Taghavi, Jalleh; Singh, Preeti; Handschel, Joerg; Depprich, Rita A; Raab, Wolfgang H M

    2011-03-01

    At present, there is little information available on how practicing dentists manage bruxism patients with respect to conservative, reversible techniques as compared to irreversible techniques. The purpose of this study was to determine the most commonly applied therapies used for the management of bruxism by German general dentists (GDs) and dental specialists. In addition, efforts were made to gather information on the knowledge and opinion of GDs and specialists regarding the role of occlusal interferences, in particular, on the development of sleep bruxism. A 13-item questionnaire was developed and mailed to all active members of the statutory dental insurance providers of the German North Rhine (n=5500; 2006 roster) and the German Westphalia-Lippe area (n=4984; 2006 roster). Group differences were statistically analyzed using chi-square tests for the qualitative variables and Mann-Whitney U tests for the quantitative variables (α=.05). Occlusal splints were by far the most frequently prescribed therapy for the management of bruxism, followed by relaxation techniques, occlusal equilibration, physiotherapy, and prosthodontic reconstruction. The occlusal stabilization splint with canine protected articulation was the splint type most often prescribed, whereas respondents used unadjusted soft splints for approximately 8% of their bruxism patients. Comparison of the opinions of all responding practicing dentists with that of experts in regard to the statement that "sleep bruxism is caused by occlusal interferences" showed a significant difference between the 2 groups (P=.021). Eighty-five percent of the experts disagreed with this statement, and only 47.7% of the practicing dentists had the same opinion as the experts. Most practicing dentists seem to concur with current scientific recommendations, and express the opinion that the management of bruxism should predominantly be conservative and reversible; however, the findings of the present survey reveal diverse

  3. J. M. W. Turner's painting "The unpaid bill, or the dentist reproving his son's prodigality".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, M; Gelbier, S; King, J

    2004-12-25

    In November 2002, the BDA News carried an item, illustrated with a colour reproduction, describing a painting of a Georgian dentist's rooms by Joseph Mallord William Turner (1775-1851), one of the most respected of English artists, which was shortly to come up for auction at Christies' Rooms in London. This work, first exhibited in 1808, was entitled "The unpaid bill, or the dentist reproving his son's prodigality", and had originally been commissioned by the connoisseur Richard Payne Knight (1750-1824). "The examiner", a contemporary London journal, identifies the 'cradle-piece' for the commission as being a Rembrandt which Payne Knight owned, and the journalist Robert Hunt said that Turner had more than come up to the task of showing that a modern could handle light as well as the old master, 'for a picture of colouring and effect, it is ... inestimable'.

  4. Reasons for placement of restorations on previously unrestored tooth surfaces by dentists in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nascimento, Marcelle M; Gordan, Valeria V; Qvist, Vibeke

    2010-01-01

    The authors conducted a study to identify and quantify the reasons used by dentists in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) for placing restorations on unrestored permanent tooth surfaces and the dental materials they used in doing so....

  5. Interest and satisfaction of dentists in practicing periodontics: A survey based on treatment of gingival recession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Vishakha; Kapoor, Anoop; Malhotra, Ranjan; Sachdeva, Sonia

    2012-07-01

    Gingival recession is a common occurrence and patients often report to dental clinic with associated problems such as root surface hypersensitivity, esthetic concerns, cervical root abrasions, and root caries that make it a concern for patients. Based upon the fact that gingival recession is an enigma for clinicians because of multitude of etiological factors and plethora of treatment modalities present for its treatment, a survey was conducted to assess knowledge as well as opinion about most common etiology, classification, and preferred treatment of gingival recession and to evaluate the interest and satisfaction of dentists in practicing periodontics. Study design consisted of a cross-sectional online survey, conducted among dentists practicing in state of Punjab, India, in the month of April 2011. A structured online questionnaire consisting of 17 questions evaluating the interest of dentists in periodontics based on knowledge about gingival recession (most of them giving the possibility of multiple choices of answers) was sent to about 300 dentists. Pearson Chi-Square and Mann-Whitney U tests were used for statistical analysis of data collected. P ≤ 0.05 was considered as statistically significant and P ≤ 0.01 considered as highly significant. A greater proportion of periodontists had better knowledge about etiology (P = 0.07), classification (P = 0.000), and treatment of gingival recession (P = 0.000). A greater number of periodontists opted for the surgical modalities to correct the defects produced by gingival recession as compared to non-periodontists and had better interest (P = 0.000) and satisfaction (P = 0.000) in practicing periodontics. The results elucidated that periodontists had better interest and satisfaction in practicing periodontics, and were more inclined towards surgical correction of gingival recession as compared to non-periodontists.

  6. Treatment decisions on Molar-Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH) by Norwegian dentists - a questionnaire study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopperud, Simen E; Pedersen, Cecilie Gravdahl; Espelid, Ivar

    2016-07-04

    The study aimed to explore the variability between the treatment decisions dentists make for MIH-affected teeth. In 2009, a pre-coded questionnaire was sent electronically to all dentists employed by the Public Dental Service (PDS) in Norway (n = 1061). The questions were related to treatment of MIH-affected teeth, including three patient cases illustrated by photographs and written case descriptions. Replies were obtained from 61.5 % of the respondents after two reminders. In the first case, showing a newly erupted first permanent molar with moderate hypomineralization and no disintegration of the surface enamel, the preferred treatment among the majority of the respondents (53.5 %) was application of fluoride varnish, while 19.6 % would seal the fissure with GIC material. In the second case, showing a severely damaged first permanent molar in a six year old child, more than half of the respondents (57.5 %) would place a conventional glass ionomer restoration and 10.5 % would use a stainless steel crown (SSC). In the third case, showing a severely damaged permanent first molar in a nine year old child, 43.8 % of the dentists would remove only the parts with soft, damaged enamel; while 35.2 % would remove more and 21.0 % would remove all affected enamel and leave the cavity margins in sound enamel. The survey shows that there is a wide disparity between clinicians' views on how MIH affected teeth should be treated. In a severely affected first permanent molar, only a minority of dentists would remove as much tooth substance as needed to get the full benefit of the acid etch pattern in sound enamel.

  7. Importance of recognizing Ehlers Danlos syndrome by dentists: a case report

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    F. Jamali

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available This syndrome is a genetical disorder with symptoms result from deficit in the formation of connective tissue, especially collagen fiber biosynthesis. In these patients, there is hyperelasticity and fragility of the skin and mucosa. Injuries sever bleeding, internal bleeding and hemartrosis may be seen in these patients. Wounds leave scars after healing. There is recurrent dislocation of the joints, especially knee and temporomandibular joints. Dentists should know the symptoms of this syndrome and its complications during dental treatments.

  8. International College of Dentists-USA Section: a brief history, 1934-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Richard G; Galeone, Richard J

    2011-01-01

    Inspiration for the International College of Dentists can be traced to a Tokyo dinner in 1920, with the College being founded in 1927 and the USA Section following in 1934. The College has always held a focus on international relations and service. The USA Section has also developed a firm commitment to leadership. The origins of the College are traced in this article, and the organizational structure and a sampling of its many programs are also presented.

  9. Quality of Impressions and Work Authorizations Submitted by Dental Students Supervised by Prosthodontists and General Dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbery, Terence A; Diaz, Nicholas; Greenfield, Kristy; Janus, Charles; Best, Al M

    2016-10-01

    Preclinical fixed prosthodontics is taught by Department of Prosthodontics faculty members at Virginia Commonwealth University School of Dentistry; however, 86% of all clinical cases in academic year 2012 were staffed by faculty members from the Department of General Practice. The aims of this retrospective study were to quantify the quality of impressions, accuracy of laboratory work authorizations, and most common errors and to determine if there were differences between the rate of errors in cases supervised by the prosthodontists and the general dentists. A total of 346 Fixed Prosthodontic Laboratory Tracking Sheets for the 2012 academic year were reviewed. The results showed that, overall, 73% of submitted impressions were acceptable at initial evaluation, 16% had to be poured first and re-evaluated for quality prior to pindexing, 7% had multiple impressions submitted for transfer dies, and 4% were rejected for poor quality. There were higher acceptance rates for impressions and work authorizations for cases staffed by prosthodontists than by general dentists, but the differences were not statistically significant (p=0.0584 and p=0.0666, respectively). Regarding the work authorizations, 43% overall did not provide sufficient information or had technical errors that delayed prosthesis fabrication. The most common errors were incorrect mountings, absence of solid casts, inadequate description of margins for porcelain fused to metal crowns, inaccurate die trimming, and margin marking. The percentages of errors in cases supervised by general dentists and prosthodontists were similar for 17 of the 18 types of errors identified; only for margin description was the percentage of errors statistically significantly higher for general dentist-supervised than prosthodontist-supervised cases. These results highlighted the ongoing need for faculty development and calibration to ensure students receive the highest quality education from all faculty members teaching fixed

  10. Antibiotic overusage and resistance: A cross-sectional survey among pediatric dentists

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    Sapna Konde

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Most human orofacial infections originate from odontogenic infections and prescribing antibiotics has become a ubiquitous phenomenon. The World Health Organization (WHO has recognized the inappropriate, indiscriminate, and irrational use of antibiotics leading to antibiotic resistance as a global problem. Objective: The objective of this survey is to compare the antibiotic prescription pattern and the awareness of antibiotic resistance among Bachelor of Dental Surgery (BDS practitioners and pediatric dentists. Materials and methods: A hundred BDS practitioners and 100 pediatric dentists included in the study were given a questionnaire containing both open-ended and closed-ended questions. The questionnaire comprised information pertaining to antibiotic prescription for most common oral conditions, commonly prescribed antibiotics, their dosage, etc. Results: The majority of the practitioners prescribed antibiotics for managing oral diseases. On comparing the prescription patterns between the BDS practitioners and pediatric dentists, there was an overprescription in the BDS group for many conditions, which was statistically significant. Amoxicillin was the most commonly prescribed drug in both the groups. In the presence of an anaerobic infection, the most preferred drug was a combination of amoxicillin and clavulanic acid with metronidazole. With regard to the duration of antibiotic prescription, 74% BDS practitioners prescribed antibiotics as a 3-day course and 60% pediatric dentists resorted to a 5-day course, which was statistically significant. The awareness regarding antibiotic prophylaxis and antibiotic resistance was found to be adequate in both the groups. However, there was a general lack of awareness with regard to the guidelines for antibiotic prescribing in both the groups. Conclusion: Practitioners should prescribe antibiotics in accordance with the guidelines to curb antibiotic resistance, an emerging public health

  11. Dentists' perceptions of difficulties encountered in providing dental care for British Asians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, S A; Godson, J H; Ahmed, I A

    1995-03-01

    British Asians represent a substantial proportion of the population in some parts of the United Kingdom, yet many fail to use dental services regularly. This study aimed to investigate dentists' concerns about providing care for this client group. Following a pilot study, a postal questionnaire was sent to general dental practitioners and community dental officers working in seven family health services authority localities. Of 1546 questionnaires circulated, 639 (41 per cent) were returned. The language barrier was most frequently identified as a major impediment to care (78 per cent), followed by patients' understanding of treatment proposed (67 per cent), while 64 per cent found difficulty obtaining medical histories. Only 20 per cent considered that gaining consent for treatment was a problem. Other issues concerned attendance as casual patients (65 per cent) and, in terms of treatment provided, difficulties with preventive (77 per cent), periodontal (66 per cent) and orthodontic care (27 per cent). The proportion of dentists identifying barriers to care reflected the English-speaking abilities of different Asian populations. Compared with the high percentage mentioning language, understanding and medical history, the small proportion of dentists who thought that consent was of concern suggests that concepts of consent may need to be questioned. Despite the low response rate, the high proportion of respondents identifying these issues implies that the present position may put patients' health at risk, restrict treatment options and offer a potential for litigation. Future initiatives to overcome barriers to appropriate care must address the perspectives of dentists treating British Asians, as well as that of the client group.

  12. Deep Brain Stimulation Salvages a Flourishing Dental Practice: A Dentist with Essential Tremor Recounts his Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Giacopuzzi, Guy; Lising, Melanie; Halpern, Casey H

    2016-01-01

    In recounting his experience with deep brain stimulation (DBS), a practicing dentist challenged with long-standing bilateral essential tremor of the hands?shares insights into his diagnosis, treatments, and ultimately successful DBS surgery at Stanford University Medical Center, CA, USA. Now nearly one year after his surgery, his practice continues to flourish and he encourages others in his profession to consider the possibility of DBS as a definitive?treatment for tremors of the hand, which...

  13. Dentists' leadership-related educational experiences, attitudes, and past and current behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taichman, L Susan; Taichman, Russell S; Inglehart, Marita R

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess practicing dentists' perceptions of their leadership-related educational experiences during predoctoral education and after graduation, to investigate if these perceptions differed as a function of the respondents' graduation year and gender, and to explore the relationships between educational experiences and the respondents' understanding/perceptions of leadership, leadership-related attitudes, self-perceived effectiveness, and past and current leadership- related behavior. Of the 3,000 general dentist members of the American Dental Association who were invited to participate, 593 returned the survey for a response rate of 20 percent. Between 37 and 65 percent of the respondents indicated that their predoctoral dental education had not prepared them well on a series of factors related to being leaders in their practice, community, state, or at the national level. However, 33 to 77 percent of these dentists responded that educational experiences after graduation prepared them well for different types of leadership activities. Overall, respondents rated their predoctoral experiences significantly less positively than their experiences after graduation for each content area. The more recently the respondents had graduated, the higher they rated their leadership-related educational experiences. The better their educational experiences, the more important the respondents evaluated leadership activities in their practice, organized dentistry, and research/teaching, the more important they assessed leadership to be, and the more effective they evaluated themselves to be as leaders. The perceived quality of the respondents' predoctoral education was not correlated with their past and current leadership activities. The results of this study may suggest that improving leadership training during predoctoral education could positively affect future dentists' attitudes about leadership and ratings of their own effectiveness as leaders.

  14. Knowledge and behavior of Nigerian dentists concerning the treatment of children with special needs

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    Sanu Oluwatosin O

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children with special needs (CSN are reported to receive less adequate dental care due to various behavioral problems and barriers created by dental professionals. This study was carried out to determine the knowledge and behaviour of Nigerian dentists concerning the treatment of CSN. Methods Questionnaires consisting of open and closed ended questions requesting socio-demographic information, type of practice, undergraduate and postgraduate training, self-rated knowledge and behaviour concerning care of CSN, were hand delivered to 359 dentists in the 3 geographical zones of Nigeria over a period of 8 weeks. Responses were compared across age groups, gender, type of practice and training received. Result Two hundred and eighty questionnaires were returned completed, constituting 79.9% response rate. Most of the respondents were aged 30 – 39 years (44.3%. There were more males (56.1% and more recent graduates of 10 years and below (78.5%. Over 80% of respondents had treated children with disabilities, those with physical disabilities being most encountered. Only 19.3% of respondents rated their knowledge of management of CSN as adequate, with no significant difference across age groups and gender, but with a significantly higher number of older graduates reporting to have adequate knowledge (p Conclusion From this study, very few dentists reported to have adequate knowledge of management of CSN, irrespective of age, gender and place of practice. A significant number of those with more experience rated their knowledge as adequate. Although most dentists rated the children's behaviour as challenging, they indicated their willingness to treat them in their practices.

  15. An Australian government dental scheme: Doctor-dentist-patient tensions in the triangle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerakoon, Arosha; Fitzgerald, Lisa; Porter, Suzette

    2014-11-30

    Autonomy of participants is challenged when legislation to provide a public health service is weakly designed and implemented. Australia's Chronic Disease Dental Scheme was instigated to provide a government subsidy for private dental treatment for people suffering chronic illness impacting their oral health or vice versa. They were allocated AUD$4250 towards comprehensive treatment over 2 years with their eligibility determined by their general medical doctor. A qualitative research study was conducted to explore the experiences from the perspectives of the patient, medical and dental practitioner. One of the research outcomes identified a frequently reported level of discomfort in the patient/doctor/dentist triangle. Doctors and dentists reported feeling forced by patients into positions that compromised their autonomy in obeying the intent (if not the law) of the scheme. Additionally, dentists felt under pressure from doctors and patients to provide subsidized treatment to those eligible. In turn, the patients reported difficulties in gaining access to the scheme and in some cases, experiencing full or partially unmet oral health needs. REASON FOR CONFLICT: Poor inter-professional communication and lack of understanding about profession-unique patient-driven pressures, ultimately contributed to dissonance. Ill-defined eligibility guidelines rendered the doctor's ability to gate-keep challenging. OUTCOME OF CONFLICT: Inefficient gate-keeping led to exponential increase in referrals, resulting in unprecedented cost blow-outs. Ensuing government-led audits caused political tensions and contributed to the media-induced vilification of dentists. In December 2013, government financing of dental treatment through Chronic Disease Dental Scheme was discontinued, leaving many Australians without a viable alternative. There is a need for qualitative research methods to help identify social issues that affect public health policy process. In order to succeed, new health

  16. The Importance of The Dentist – Patient Relationship in Oral Cancer Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Indrayadi Gunardi; Rahmi Amtha

    2017-01-01

    Background: There are many instances in oral cancer cases in which a lack of patient cooperation was found to be a hampering factor in the overall case management. A good relationship between dentists and patients should therefore be built in conjunction with other treatment modalities. Case Report: Three complete oral cancer cases with dentist–patient relationship problems are presented. One of the common basic ways to build a good relationship is through communication and empathy. A relatio...

  17. How information systems should support the information needs of general dentists in clinical settings: suggestions from a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wali Teena

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major challenge in designing useful clinical information systems in dentistry is to incorporate clinical evidence based on dentists' information needs and then integrate the system seamlessly into the complex clinical workflow. However, little is known about the actual information needs of dentists during treatment sessions. The purpose of this study is to identify general dentists' information needs and the information sources they use to meet those needs in clinical settings so as to inform the design of dental information systems. Methods A semi-structured interview was conducted with a convenience sample of 18 general dentists in the Pittsburgh area during clinical hours. One hundred and five patient cases were reported by these dentists. Interview transcripts were coded and analyzed using thematic analysis with a constant comparative method to identify categories and themes regarding information needs and information source use patterns. Results Two top-level categories of information needs were identified: foreground and background information needs. To meet these needs, dentists used four types of information sources: clinical information/tasks, administrative tasks, patient education and professional development. Major themes of dentists' unmet information needs include: (1 timely access to information on various subjects; (2 better visual representations of dental problems; (3 access to patient-specific evidence-based information; and (4 accurate, complete and consistent documentation of patient records. Resource use patterns include: (1 dentists' information needs matched information source use; (2 little use of electronic sources took place during treatment; (3 source use depended on the nature and complexity of the dental problems; and (4 dentists routinely practiced cross-referencing to verify patient information. Conclusions Dentists have various information needs at the point of care. Among them, the needs

  18. Restorative treatment thresholds: factors influencing the treatment thresholds and modalities of general dentists in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaf, Mai E; Alomari, Qasem D; Ngo, Hien; Doméjean, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the thresholds at which general dentists in Kuwait would restore approximal and occlusal carious lesions and examined the demographic characteristics of the dentists in relation to their decision making. The study population consisted of a random sample of 185 general dentists practicing in the Ministry of Health of Kuwait. A survey questionnaire was administered. The questionnaire presented different stages and locations of carious lesions; the participants were asked to identify the stage at which a restoration is required under different conditions, the preparation technique, and their choice of restorative material. For approximal carious lesions, 74 (40%) of the participants reported that they would restoratively intervene when the carious lesion reached the outer third of the dentin. A total of 91 (49.2%) reported the use of traditional class II restorations. For occlusal carious lesions, 128 (69.2%) said they would intervene when lesions reached the middle third of the dentin. 146 (78.9%) said they would remove the carious tissue only in their preparation. For both approximal and occlusal lesions, the participants preferred resin composite as the material for restoration. The respondents tended to delay restorative intervention until dentinal penetration of the caries. Resin restorative materials were used in conservatively prepared cavities. Participants chose a conservative approach for occlusal lesions but still believed in a traditional approach when it concerned approximal lesions. Experience, university dental education, and participation in continuous education courses were most significantly related to restorative treatment. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Evaluation of Microbial Contamination of Mobile Phone among Dentists in College of Dentistry in Baghdad University

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    Batool H. Al-Ghurabi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mobiles have become one of the most indispensable accessories of profession and social life. The mobiles make life easier, but they pose a number of new hazards also. Objectives: The principle aim of this study was to evaluate the microbial contamination of mobile phones belonging to dentists in College of Dentistry in Baghdad University. Materials and Methods: 35 dentists (20 female and 15 male were enrolled in this study. Sampling was taken from each participant’s mobile by using moist sterile swab impregnated by normal saline for microbial analyses. Results: The findings of this study revealed that the growth of microorganisms has found in all samples taken from the mobile phones of dentists. The most common microorganisms detected were Staphylococcus epidermidis, Micrococcus spp., Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger. On the other hand, there was no significant difference (P>0.05 in the microorganisms isolated and their percentage frequency of occurrence between mobile phones for male and female. Concussions: The current results indicated that mobile phones can serve as a vector for crosstransmission of community-acquired pathogenic organisms for human.

  20. The effect of education debt on dentists' career decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Sean; Vujicic, Marko; Wanchek, Tanya; Ziebert, Anthony; Menezes, Adriana

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine whether there is an association between the amount of education debt on completing dental school (initial debt) and certain career decisions. The authors surveyed 1,842 practicing dentists who completed dental school between 1996 and 2011 to ascertain their initial education debt, the balance on their debt in 2013, and a variety of specialization and practice decisions made during their careers. Data also included demographic characteristics and parental income and education levels. Dentists with higher initial debt were less likely to specialize and more likely to enter private practice, accept high-paying jobs on graduation, and work longer hours. Choice of employment setting, practice ownership, and whether to provide Medicaid and charity care were associated with dentists' sexes and races but not debt. High debt levels influenced some career decisions, but the magnitude of these effects was small compared with the effects of demographic characteristics, including race and sex, on career choices. Policy makers concerned about the influence of student debt on the professional decisions of dental school graduates should recognize that students' demographic characteristics may be more powerful in driving career choices. Copyright © 2015 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The dentist's care-taking perspective of dental fear patients - a continuous and changing challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyllensvärd, K; Qvarnström, M; Wolf, E

    2016-08-01

    The aim was to analyse the care taking of dental fear patients from the perspective of the dentist, using a qualitative methodology. In total, 11 dentists from both the private and public dental service were selected through a purposive sampling according to their experience of treating dental fear patients, their gender, age, service affiliation and location of undergraduate education. Data were obtained using one semi-structured interview with each informant. The interviews were taped and verbatim transcribed. The text was analysed using qualitative content analysis. The theme, 'The transforming autodidactic process of care taking', covering the interpretative level of data content was identified. The first main category covering the descriptive level of data was 'The continuous and changing challenge', with the subcategories 'The emotional demand' and 'The financial stress'. The second main category identified was 'The repeated collection of experience', with the subcategories 'The development of resources' and 'The emotional change'. The dentists' experience of treating dental fear patients was considered a challenging self-taught process under continuous transformation. The competence and routine platform expanded over time, parallel to a change of connected emotions from frustration towards safety, although challenges remained. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. [Comparative study of three Western models of deontological codes for dentists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson Mayol, Ignacio; Roqué Sánchez, María Victoria; Gonzalvo-Cirac, Margarita; de Ribot, Eduard

    2013-01-01

    We performed a comparative analysis of the codes of ethics of three official organizations in Dentistry professional ethics: Code of Ethics for Dentists in the European Union, drawn up by the Council of European Dentists (CED); Código Español de Ética y Deontología Dental, published by the Consejo General de Colegios de Odontólogos y Estomatólogos de España (CGCOE); and Principles of Ethics and Code of Professional Conduct, of the American Dental Association (ADA). The analysis of the structure of the codes allows the discovery of different approaches governing professional ethics according to the ethical and legislative tradition from which they derive. While there are common elements inherent in Western culture, there are nuances in the grounds, the layout and wording of articles that allows to deduce the ethical foundations that underlie each code, and reflects the real problems encountered by dentists in the practice of their profession.

  3. Martin Van Butchell (1735-1814): the eccentric, "kook" dentist of old London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, A G; Christen, J A

    1999-11-01

    This article is a thumbnail sketch of the life and times of Martin Van Butchell (1735-1814), an eccentric, "kook" advertising dentist of Old London. Van Butchell earned these descriptive labels by displaying an unorthodox lifestyle, an outrageous personal appearance and outlandish, extreme and socially unacceptable personal and professional behaviors. While the general populace seemed to be fascinated by his strange ways, dentists and physicians were generally alienated by them. Nevertheless, he was considered a good dentist for his time, and he was extremely popular with his patients. Martin practiced dentistry for 23 years, and he practiced medicine as well, specializing in the treatment of ruptures and anal fistulas. Van Butchell interacted greatly with both John and William Hunter, who became two of the most famous and talented physicians, surgeons, anatomists and biologists of all time. When his first wife, Mary died, Martin arranged for her body to be embalmed and publicly displayed in his dental office for advertising purposes. Her preserved body was shown at the Museum of the Royal College of Surgeons (London), until it was destroyed by a German fire bomb in May, 1941. Mary's remains were on public display for a total of 166 years.

  4. Establishing a good dentist-patient relationship: skills defined from the dental faculty perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsini, Cesar A; Jerez, Oscar M

    2014-10-01

    The importance of developing good dentist-patient relationships has been well documented, but previous studies have focused on social techniques, not considering the psychological and behavioral characteristics of patients, and have used definitions and instruments that were not dental-specific. Therefore, the aims of this study were to propose a definition of dentist-patient relationship skills, derived from dental faculty members' criteria and informed by Emotional Intelligence concepts, and to propose a preliminary dental-specific, face-valid, and reliable self-assessment instrument. The study was conducted in three phases. Phases I and II defined dentist-patient relationship competence through literature analysis and semi-structured interviews with expert key informants, establishing the outcome skills. In Phase III, the instrument was constructed and piloted. Communication skills and basic psychological tools resulted in core topics for use in practice. The definition both specifies and broadens social interactions in dentistry by including dental faculty members' criteria and topics such as psychological tools and pre-, intra-, and postoperative topics appropriate for use during consultation, examination, and treatment. The instrument was found suitable, reasonable, and accessible with a Cronbach's alpha level of 0.95. Future studies are needed to confirm the definition, as well as the instrument's validity, reliability, transference, and sensitivity to the dental educational environment.

  5. Survey of Endodontic Irrigants Used by Dentists With Varying Years of Professional Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharkov Nikolai

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim: The aim of the present study was to describe the use of irrigants by dentists in Bulgaria in relation to their years of professional experience. Material and Methods: The data were collected with the help of a questionnaire. The survey included questions concerning frequency of irrigants applied, their respective concentrations, as well as spectrum of disinfectants used in endodontics. In addition, information about respondents’ age, years of professional experience, gender, and main areas of continuing education was collected. The statistical analysis was performed with the help of IBM SPSS Statistics 22.0. Results: 219 replies were analysed (response rate 27,3%. The majority of the respondents (31.1% had 21 to 30 years of professional experience. 18.7% had over 30 years. Most of the practitioners reported their continuing education to be in the area of general dentistry - 52%, while about 1.2 % had specialised in endodontics. Dentists with long-standing professional experience use predominantly H2O2 - 78%. Dentists with least experience use 17% EDTA - 53.6%. No significant differences were established for the use of sodium hypochlorite and 2% chlorhexidine. 82% of the respondents use conventional needle 27G for intracanal irrigation; 60% never use ultrasonic irrigation. Conclusions: The analysis of the usage of irrigants shows that many general dental practitioners do not follow the quality recommended protocols for endodontic irrigation protocols.

  6. The Effect of New Oral Care Technologies on the Need for Dentists in 2040.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgrom, Peter M; Horst, Jeremy A

    2017-08-01

    This article addresses changes in technology of oral self-care or professional care that may increase or decrease the demand for dentists by 2040. The focus is on dental caries, periodontitis, and temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD), as the first two are the main areas of current practice and because TMD is an area for growth. To address this question, the authors examined the scientific literature and government registries to identify recent or soon-to-be-available technologies. They also examined the state of translational efficiency, dissemination, and adoption of advances into dental practice. The pipeline of applicable technology is limited. Nevertheless, between now and 2040, emerging technologies will continue to reduce the need for training more dentists, while no technologies are emerging that will significantly increase the need. Technology in dentistry is adopted slowly as is true in other medical specialties. If a breakthrough product did appear, the results of industry-sponsored trials would be viewed skeptically by the profession, and considerable time would be required to establish the applicability of the findings to the broader population. Greater integration of dentistry into preventive medicine, with dentists offering point-of-service medical testing for systemic disease as suggested by the American Dental Association (ADA), would require a paradigm shift, can occur only over a lengthy period, and is unlikely to impact this assessment. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21 st Century."

  7. Work conditions and occupational health of dentists in Brazilian Public Health System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzely Adas Saliba Moimaz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: work healthy conditions are essential for a great professional performance. Objective: To verify the perception of dentists regarding structural and healthy conditions of dental offices in the Brazilian Public Health System (SUS and their satisfaction with work and public job. Material and Method: In this cross-sectional study, type inquiry, 24 Brazilian dentists were interviewed. The follow variables were asked: cleaning and asepsis; maintenance and time of use of dental equipment; satisfaction with work and public job. Results: The professionals were "satisfied" or "very satisfied" with cleaning and asepsis (66.67%; Dental equipment (54.17%, reflectors (54.17% and the dental chairs (54.17% had more than 24 years of use; 20% of all professionals said that the equipment had maintenance but only to fix them. Of total, 58.33% had already given no attendance for patients and broken equipment was the most frequent cause (92.86%. It was observed satisfaction with work (79.1% and public job (95.83%. It was concluded that dentists who worked in SUS were satisfied with public job, although they had said the need for improvement on structural and healthy work conditions.

  8. Awareness of forensic odontology among dentists in Australia; are they keeping forensically valuable dental records?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Azri, Abdul Rahman; Harford, Jane; James, Helen

    2015-03-30

    Forensic odontologists provide an important service to the community by identifying unknown deceased people, allowing both legal outcomes and family closure. Non-visual identification may be achieved by comparison of post-mortem data with ante-mortem dental records provided by oral health practitioners. Success is dependent largely on the accuracy and adequacy of data in the dental records. An online self-administered questionnaire evaluated Australian dentists' knowledge and behaviours relevant to forensic odontology. Reported record keeping practices were assessed for detail, legibility, accessibility and retention. Behaviours were classified according to the frequency of response. Dentists reported overall reasonable awareness of the major applications of forensic odontology. Personal information and details of restorative treatment were recorded at high levels, while tooth anomalies, photography, additional patient details and denture marking were recorded inadequately. Legible tooth coding was reported at a high level, while other key legibility practices were recorded inadequately. Few of the behaviours related to retention or to maximise accessibility were recorded at a high level. Australian dentists have high expectations of the forensic value of their dental records; however many practices that would enhance the diagnostic, medico-legal and forensic value of dental records are not routinely applied. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. The role of dentists on medically compromised children’s oral and dental prophylaxis in Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roosje Rosita Oewen

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: One of dentist’s main roles is to coordinate the management of medically compromised children. The term of medically compromised refers to those children who have medical conditions which affect the dental treatment or manifest as a specific oral and dental problem. Patient’s visit to Special Care for Dentistry Clinic Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital Bandung showed a remarkable increase. From under 10 new visit in 2003, now July–December 2008 showed 81 new visit. Purpose: This paper discusses several medical problems (cardiovascular, hematology, respiratory system, and genetic disorder in children and the role of dentist in the treatment of those patients in the hospital. Review: The increase of attention by all level to these medically compromised children in the hospital also increases the dentist’s role in supporting the prognosis of the disease and patient’s quality of life. The most important effort is oral and dental prophylaxis to prevent oral pathology which is caused by the manifestation of disease as well as the side effects of treatment. Conclusion: It is, concluded that role of the dentist in managing these patients is giving preventive efforts and dental treatment that may be improve patient’s quality of life. The preventive effort and dental treatment is customize according to the patients condition. Nevertheless, cooperation from the dentist and other professional is needed in treating these patients.

  10. Dental Students', Alumni, and Dentists' Perspectives on Leadership: Impact of the Scholars Program in Dental Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemchick, Audrey L; Delgado, Jessica; Taichman, Russell S; Inglehart, Marita R

    2017-01-01

    In 2006, the Scholars Program in Dental Leadership (SPDL) was created at the University of Michigan School of Dentistry with the aim of preparing dental students to take on leadership roles in their profession and communities. The aims of this quantitative study were to investigate how SPDL alumni and current participants evaluated this program; to assess whether SPDL alumni evaluated their leadership-related educational experiences, leadership perceptions, and attitudes towards leadership activities in dentistry more positively than did non-SPDL dental students and general dentists; and to explore if leadership-related educational/clinical experiences were correlated with these constructs. Participants were 218 of 431 dental students across all four years (response rate 51%), 32 of whom were participants in the SPDL; 32 of 53 SPDL alumni (response rate 60%); and 595 of 3,000 general dentists invited to participate (response rate 20%). Both current and past SPDL participants evaluated the program on average positively (3.75 and 3.92, respectively, on a five-point scale). Non-SPDL students and alumni evaluated leadership-related educational experiences more positively than did the dentists (3.65/3.61 vs. 2.49; pleadership differed as well. Students and alumni evaluated being recognized (4.40/4.60 vs. 4.20; ppractice efficiency (4.61/4.53 vs. 4.36; pleadership-related constructs. These results showed that the SPDL positively affected alumni perceptions of leadership indicators and attitudes.

  11. Analysis of the knowledge and opinions of students and qualified dentists regarding the use of computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelló Castañeda, Coral; Ríos Santos, Jose Vicente; Bullón, Pedro

    2008-01-01

    Dentists are currently required to make multiple diagnoses and treatment decisions every day and the information necessary to achieve this satisfactorily doubles in volume every five years. Knowledge therefore rapidly becomes out of date, so that it is often impossible to remember established information and assimilate new concepts. This may result in a significant lack of knowledge in the future, which would jeopardize the success of treatments. To remedy this situation and to prevent it, we nowadays have access to modern computing systems, with an extensive data base, which helps us to retain the information necessary for daily practice and access it instantaneously. The objectives of this study are therefore to determine how widespread the use of computing is in this environment and to determine the opinion of students and qualified dentists as regards its use in Dentistry. 90 people were chosen to take part in the study, divided into the following groups (students) (newly qualified dentists) (experts). It has been demonstrated that a high percentage (93.30%) use a computer, but that their level of computing knowledge is predominantly moderate. The place where a computer is used most is the home, which suggests that the majority own a computer. Analysis of the results obtained for evaluation of computers in teaching showed that the participants thought that it saved a great deal of time and had great potential for providing an image (in terms of marketing) and they considered it a very innovative and stimulating tool.

  12. Retention system for implant-supported dentures used by brazilian dentists who work in implant dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saturnino Aparecido Ramalho

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To provide the dentists with support in the choice of the cement or screw type of retention for implant-supported dentures, according to the patient’s problem. Methods: An opinion questionnaire was applied to a sample of 468 participants, all dentists working in the field of Implant Dentistry, of whom 272 (58.1% participated in the 4th International Congress of Osseointegration of APCD, held in São Paulo (SP from 6 to 9 May 2004, 119 (25.4% participated in the 2nd International Congress of Implant Dentistry of Minas Gerais, between 10 and 12 June 2004 and 77 (16.5% were professors and specialization and master students from São Leopoldo Mandic. Results: The results showed that 254 participants opted for the screw-retained system while 214 opted for the cement-retained system. Conclusion: There was a preference for the use of the screw-retained system, and that both cemented and screw-retained systems have advantages and disadvantages, so that the dentist is left to decide and evaluate them in order to indicate and use them with confidence in different clinical cases.

  13. Root canals and retailing. When it comes to merchandising activities in a dental office, dentists are their own worst critics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, S J; Pickett, G M; Finn, D W

    1994-01-01

    As professional service providers continue to face an increasingly competitive environment, marketing becomes a more attractive prospect. One marketing activity that has emerged in recent years is the retailing of products related to one's profession directly from the office. The authors explore the retailing phenomenon from the perspective of dentists and dental patients and find that patients are less critical of the practice than dentists are themselves.

  14. Association between perception of dentist oversupply and expectations of dentistry: a survey of dental graduates in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takeshi; Hanioka, Takashi; Yamamoto, Mito; Haresaku, Satoru; Shimada, Kaoru; Naito, Toru

    2013-06-01

    The perception that there is a surplus of dentists may be an opportunity to explore attractive career options in dentistry in Japan. A self-administered questionnaire was mailed to 2,114 graduates of a private dental school in Japan. We asked about the perception of oversupply, rated by a visual analogue scale, work environment factors, potential areas of dentistry and necessary medical subjects for their dental practice. The association of a strong perception of dentist oversupply with work environment factors, dental areas and medical subjects was examined by multivariate logistic regression analyses. The response rate was 66%, and data from 1,203 community dentists were analysed. Most respondents (76%) perceived either a strong or very strong surplus of dentists. A very strong perception was significantly associated with work environment factors, including practising in large cities and earning the second lowest of four levels of annual income, but no further associations were found with either the number of patients treated or with the other two ranges of income. This perception was negatively associated with the number of necessary medical subjects, specifically otorhinolaryngology, but no significant association was seen with the number of potential areas of dentistry. The negative correlation between the aspiration to acquire medical knowledge and the perception of dentist oversupply under the circumstance of the possibly excessive perception among community dentists invites further research on the benefits of teaching oral medicine to graduate entry students to build future working satisfaction. © 2013 FDI World Dental Federation.

  15. Is complementary and alternative medicine effective in job satisfaction among dentists with musculoskeletal disorders? A cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Devanand; Bhaskar, Dara John; Gupta, Rajendra Kumar; Jain, Ankita; Yadav, Priyanka; Dalai, Deepak Ranjan; Singh, Rajeshwar; Singh, Nisha; Chaudhary, Varunjeet; Singh, Ankit; Yadav, Ankit; Karim, Bushra

    2014-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders have serious impact on the profession of dentistry. There is common occurrence of pain due to incorrect posture in dental professionals. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies may cast a new light on preventing and intercepting musculoskeletal disorders (MSD). An epidemiological study was conducted in an effort to contribute to the prevention of musculoskeletal disorders in dentistry. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of MSD at dentists using CAM as a treatment and preventive modality for MSD and to compare job/career satisfaction between dentists who use CAM and conventional therapy (CT). Dentists registered in Uttrakhand state, India, under the Dental Council of India and registered members of the Indian Dental Association, Uttrakhand branch (N = 1496) were surveyed. Statistical analysis was conducted using SPSS 17. A response rate of 84% (N = 1257) was obtained, revealing that 90% (N = 1131) had the problem of MSD. Seventy three percentage (N = 826) of dentists with MSD reported the use of CAM and CT. Complementary and alternative medicine users reported greater overall health (72.7% vs. 51%, p alternative medicine therapies may improve quality of life, reduce work interruption and enhance job satisfaction for dentists who suffers from MSD. Through the course of their studies, dentists should be equipped with knowledge on ergonomics and CAM therapies, such as yoga and others, to help them prevent musculoskeletal disorders more effectively.

  16. Factors affecting occupational exposure to needlestick and sharps injuries among dentists in Taiwan: a nationwide survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Chung Cheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although the risks of needlestick and sharps injuries (NSIs for dentists are well recognized, most papers published only described the frequency of occupational exposure to NSIs. Less has been reported assessing factors contributing to exposure to NSIs. The purpose of this study was to update the epidemiology of NSIs among dentists in Taiwan and identify factors affecting NSIs in order to find preventive strategies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A nationwide survey was conducted in dentists at 60 hospitals and 340 clinics in Taiwan. The survey included questions about factors supposedly affecting exposure to NSIs, such as dentist and facility characteristics, knowledge and attitudes about infectious diseases, and practices related to infection control. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to determine the association between risk factors and exposure to NSIs. In total, 434 (74.8% of 580 dentists returned the survey questionnaires, and 100 (23.0% reported that they had experienced more than one NSI per week. Our data showed that the risk of occupational NSIs is similarly heightened by an older age (odds ratio [OR], 3.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.62-6.25, more years in practice (OR, 2.57; 95% CI, 1.41-4.69, working in clinics (OR, 1.73; 95% CI, 1.08-2.77, exhibiting less compliance with infection-control procedures (OR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.04-3.18, having insufficient knowledge of blood-borne pathogens (OR, 1.67; 95% CI, 1.04-2.67, and being more worried about being infected by blood-borne pathogens (OR, 1.82; 95% CI, 1.05-3.13. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: High rates of NSIs and low compliance with infection-control procedures highly contribute to the chance of acquiring a blood-borne pathogen infection and threaten occupational safety. This study reveals the possible affecting factors and helps in designing prevention strategies for occupational exposure to NSIs.

  17. How do dentists and their teams incorporate evidence about preventive care? An empirical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbaraini, Alexandra; Carter, Stacy Marie; Evans, Robin Wendell; Blinkhorn, Anthony

    2013-10-01

    To identify how dentists and their teams adopt evidence-based preventive care. A qualitative study using grounded theory methodology was conducted. We interviewed 23 participants working in eight dental practices about their experience and work processes, while adopting evidence-based preventive care. During the study, Charmaz's grounded theory methodology was employed to examine the social process of adopting preventive dental care in dental practices. Charmaz's iteration of the constant comparative method was used during the data analysis. This involved coding of interview transcripts, detailed memo-writing and drawing diagrams. The transcripts were analyzed as soon as possible after each round of interviews in each dental practice. Coding was conducted primarily by AS, supported by team meetings and discussions when researchers compared their interpretations. Participants engaged in a slow process of adapting evidence-based protocols and guidelines to the existing logistics of the practices. This process was influenced by practical, philosophical, and historical aspects of dental care, and a range of barriers and facilitators. In particular, dentists spoke spontaneously about two deeply held 'rules' underpinning continued restorative treatment, which acted as barriers to provide preventive care: (i) dentists believed that some patients were too 'unreliable' to benefit from prevention; and (ii) dentists believed that patients thought that only tangible restorative treatment offered 'value for money'. During the adaptation process, some dentists and teams transitioned from their initial state - selling restorative care - through an intermediary stage - learning by doing and educating patients about the importance of preventive care - and finally to a stage where they were offering patients more than just restorative care. Resources were needed for the adaptation process to occur, including: the ability to maintain the financial viability of the practice

  18. Managing chronic orofacial pain: A qualitative study of patients', doctors', and dentists' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Sarah; Goldthorpe, Joanna; McElroy, Cheryl; King, Elizabeth; Javidi, Hanieh; Tickle, Martin; Aggarwal, Vishal R

    2015-11-01

    Persistent pain in the face, mouth, and jaws is a common presentation to dental and medical services. The aetiology remains unclear, but a growing evidence base recognizes the effectiveness of psychological rather than biomedical interventions. To understand how this approach might be implemented into clinical practice, knowledge is needed of patients' and clinicians' experience of chronic orofacial pain (COFP). The aim of this study was to explore the experience and understanding of COFP by patients and primary and secondary care medical and dental practitioners. Qualitative interview study. Audio-recorded semi-structured interviews with a purposive sample of 12 dentists, 11 general practitioners, and seven patients were thematically analysed. Clinicians and patients recognized the role that psychological factors could play in the development and maintenance of COFP, yet management and self-management strategies were largely limited to biomedical interventions. Achieving a diagnosis proved problematic but largely functional for both parties. GPs and dentists viewed COFP as a non-dental problem and felt inadequately equipped to manage the condition. GPs, unlike dentists, felt obligated to support patients using techniques for managing patients with other long-term conditions. Frustration at the current inadequacy of COFP management often led to conflict with (or disengagement from) the clinician-patient relationship. Current management of COFP is ineffective and unsatisfactory for patients and practitioners, which impacts on their relationship. Fundamental barriers to accessing and implementing psychological interventions for COFP arise from ineffective communication between physicians and patients, and between medical and dental practitioners. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? COFP is characterized by persistent pain in the face, mouth, or jaws that are not the result of organic disease or physical trauma. Patients with COFP present

  19. Prevalence of pain in the orofacial regions in patients visiting general dentists in the Northwest Practice-based REsearch Collaborative in Evidence-based DENTistry research network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Orapin V; Cunha-Cruz, Joana; Zhou, Lingmei; Manning, Walter; Mancl, Lloyd; DeRouen, Timothy A

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to measure prevalence of pain in the orofacial regions and determine association with demographics, treatment history, and oral health conditions in dental patients visiting clinics in the Northwest Practice-based REsearch Collaborative in Evidence-based DENTistry (PRECEDENT) research network. Data were recorded in a survey with systematic random sampling of patients (n = 1,668, 18 to 93 years old, 56% female) visiting 100 general dentists in the Northwest PRECEDENT research network. Prevalence ratios (PR) of orofacial pain by each variable were estimated by generalized estimating equations for Poisson regression. The prevalence of orofacial pain during the past year was 16.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 13.4-18.9), of which the most prevalent pain locations were dentoalveolar (9.1%; 95% CI, 7.0-11.2) and musculoligamentous tissues (6.6%; 95% CI, 4.5-8.7). Other locations included soft tissues (0.5%; 95% CI, 0.2-0.8) and nonspecific areas (0.6%; 95% CI, 0.2-1.0). The prevalence of dentoalveolar but not musculoligamentous pain decreased with age. When comparing the 18- to 29-year-old patients, dentoalveolar pain decreased significantly in 45- to 64-year-old patients (PR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.4-0.9) and in those 65 years or older (PR, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.3-0.9). Sex significantly affected the prevalence of musculoligamentous but not dentoalveolar pain. Women (PR, 3.2; 95% CI, 2.0-5.1) were more likely to have musculoligamentous pain. The prevalence of dentoalveolar and musculoligamentous pain did not vary significantly by ethnicity. Dentoalveolar pain was reported more frequently in patients who did not receive dental maintenance (PR, 2.9; 95% CI, 2.1-4.2) and those visiting community-based public health clinics (PR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.2-3.7). One in 6 patients visiting a general dentist had experienced orofacial pain during the past year. Dentoalveolar and musculoligamentous pains were the most prevalent types of pain. Pain in the muscles and

  20. A pilot study of dentists' assessment of caries detection and staging systems applied to early caries: PEARL Network findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Van P; Schenkel, Andrew B; Penugonda, Bapanaiah; Wolff, Mark S; Zeller, Gregory G; Wu, Hongyu; Vena, Don; Grill, Ashley C; Curro, Frederick A

    2016-01-01

    The International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS II) and the Caries Classification System (CCS) are caries stage description systems proposed for adoption into clinical practice. This pilot study investigated clinicians' training in and use of these systems for detection of early caries and recommendations for individual tooth treatment. Patient participants (N = 8) with a range of noncavitated lesions (CCS ranks 2 and 4 and ICDAS II ranks 2-4) identified by a team of calibrated examiners were recruited from the New York University College of Dentistry clinic. Eighteen dentists-8 from the Practitioners Engaged in Applied Research and Learning (PEARL) Network and 10 recruited from the Academy of General Dentistry-were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: 5 dentists used only visual-tactile (VT) examination, 7 were trained in the ICDAS II, and 6 were trained in the CCS. Lesion stage for each tooth was determined by the ICDAS II and CCS groups, and recommended treatment was decided by all groups. Teeth were assessed both with and without radiographs. Caries was detected in 92.7% (95% CI, 88%-96%) of the teeth by dentists with CCS training, 88.8% (95% CI, 84%-92%) of the teeth by those with ICDAS II training, and 62.3% (95% CI, 55%-69%) of teeth by the VT group. Web-based training was acceptable to all dentists in the CCS group (6 of 6) but fewer of the dentists in the ICDAS II group (5 of 7). The modified CCS translated clinically to more accurate caries detection, particularly compared to detection by untrained dentists (VT group). Moreover, the CCS was more accepted than was the ICDAS II, but dentists in both groups were open to the application of these systems. Agreement on caries staging requires additional training prior to a larger validation study.

  1. Recall intervals and time used for examination and prevention by dentists in child dental care in Denmark, Iceland, Norway and Sweden in 1996 and 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, N J; Petersen, P E; Sveinsdóttir, E G

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the present study was to explore intervals between regular dental examination and the time dentists spent for examination and preventive dental care of children in 1996 and 2014. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: In Denmark, Norway and Sweden, random samples of dentists working...... examinations in three of the four countries in 2014 than in 1996. CONCLUSIONS: This study of trends in dental care delivered by dentists during recent decades showed moves towards extended recall intervals and preventive care individualized according to caries risk. In addition, extending intervals could...... dentists used ample time delivering preventive care to children. Dentists reported spending significantly more time providing preventive care for caries risk children than for other children both in 1996 and 2014. Concurrent with extended intervals, dentists reported spending longer performing routine...

  2. Designing and Implementation of a Course on Successful Dental Practice for Dentists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaser Safi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We aimed to design, implement and evaluate the efficacy of a comprehensive course on non-clinical competencies that dentists must possess for a successful dental practice.Materials and Methods: In this interventional before-after study an expert panel of five academic staff members and five general practitioners derived the topics for a course on successful dental practice, and aggregated them in the form of a two-day course. It was held for 46 randomly selected dentists in January 2010, at the School of Dentistry, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The participants completed an anonymous questionnaire asking about their self-perceived need to receive training in each of the proposed topics and their self-assessed knowledge about each topic before and after attending the course.Results: Participants gave a higher priority to the necessity of training on “ergonomics and professional health” and communication skills in post-test compared to pre-test (P<0.05. The self-assessed knowledge of dentists improved significantly after attending the course in seven domains: ergonomics and occupational health, workplace design, documentation principles and IT applications in dentistry, national rules and regulations of dental practice, medical emergencies, dental ethics and communication skills (P<0.05. More than 70% of the participants were completely satisfied or satisfied with practical implication of the course, conformity of the contents with the title and course settings.Conclusion: The designed course seemed to be successful in revealing the need of participants for further education. Considering the high satisfaction rate of the attendants, this course can serve as a model for continuing education purposes.

  3. Are dentists happy? A study among dental practitioners in coastal Andhra Pradesh using subjective happiness scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhakar Kaipa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The role of dental professionals in the society is vital. This profession allows the flexibility to balance a professional and personal life. Practice of dentistry at times is quite stressful, and stress impedes happiness and subjective well-being. Several studies have reported about stress among dental professionals and their various effects; however, studies evaluating the level of happiness (happiness index among dentists are few and lack in this geographic region. Objectives: The present study was conducted to assess the subjective happiness level among dental professionals. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 194 dentists in Andhra Pradesh, India. A questionnaire measuring dimensions of professional satisfaction by Subjective Happiness Scale was used to assess the happiness level. The results were expressed in percentages, means, and mean rank. Independent samples nonparametric tests (Mann–Whitney U-test and Kruskal–Wallis test and multivariable analyses were used to assess the determinants of happiness. Results: The mean happiness index of the respondents was 21.71 (0.26 standard error. Overall 67% of the respondents had an above average happiness score. Higher happiness score was found to be significantly associated with age, postgraduate degree, male gender, type of professional attachment, duration of practice, urban location of practice, and spouse employment status in univariate analysis. However, multivariable analysis showed association with type of professional attachment only. Conclusion: Although dentistry has been recognized as a stressful profession, majority of the dentists under study had a happiness score above the mean, and the level of satisfaction was influenced by various sociodemographic factors.

  4. Awareness about medico legal aspects and Consumer Protection Act among dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhika, T; Nadeem, J; Arthi, R; Nithya, S

    2017-07-01

    The practice of medicine in India has undergone considerable change affecting delivery of health in both positive and negative directions. As a result, there was a growing feeling that medical treatment should be made accountable and this led to doctors and dentists becoming subject to the process of law. Patients have become more aware of their right to compensation and as a consequence doctors and dentists should be knowledgeable about the laws that govern them. To assess the awareness about Medico legal aspects and Consumer Protection Act [CPA] among Dental professionals. A self-structured validated questionnaire comprising of 20 questions related to medico legal aspects and CPA was designed. A total of 450 dental professionals were surveyed from 4 prime dental institutions in Chennai, India. Of the 450 professionals that were surveyed 150 were MDS faculty, 150 were BDS faculty and 150 were PG students. The data was subjected to SPSS, version 16 and statistically analysed using Chi square test and Fisher's exact test. A- p value less than 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. BDS faculty, MDS faculty and PG students were found to possess similar level of understanding and there was no significant difference between the groups. Knowledge was found to be equal between male and female dentists. The young practitioners were found to be more informed about CPA than the senior practitioners. It was found that most of the participants were aware of relevant Medico legal aspects, but were less aware of CPA. This study emphasises the need for education relevant to Medico legal aspects and CPA for dental professionals.

  5. Influence of scanning system and dentist's level of training in the accuracy of digital impressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hategan, Simona; Gabor, Alin; Zaharia, Cristian; Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Jivanescu, Anca

    2016-03-01

    Background: The principal aim of our study was to evaluate digital impressions, taken with spray powder and powderfree scan systems, in order to determine the influence of the dentist's commitment to training as a critical factor regarding quality. Material and method: Two digital intraoral impression systems from the same manufacture (Sirona) : Apollo DI and CEREC Omnicam, were used to scan 16 crown preparations on teeth on a typodont maxillary model. Because an Apollo Di intraoral camera is a powder system, an adhesive was applied before using the powder spray. Three groups were used to scan the crown preparations in order to determine coating thickness homogeneity. One group consisted of senior year dental students, a second consisted of prosthodontics residents, and the third consisted of prosthodontics specialists. The same procedure was applied with a CEREC Omnicam intraoral camera, which is a powder-free system. By using the two systems software parameters we were able to determine the scanning precision. Results: Homogeneity scores for Apollo Di regarding the spray layer was significantly thinner for all dental surfaces in the first group, while the second group had thinner coatings for buccal and distal surfaces. For the third group, the crown preparations were coated more homogeneously than the first two groups. The powder-free system CEREC Omnicam can, to a degree, mask the lack of experience in direct optical impressions by avoiding the poor quality coating, which can lead to defective marginal adaptation of definitive restoration. Conclusions: The dentist's lack of experience can be mitigated, and partially avoided, by using powder-free systems. At the same time, the dentist can give more time towards learning how to integrate computerized fabricated restoration into the practice. The commitment to training is a critical factor in the successful integration of the technology. In addition, scanning marginal preparation details needs time in order to

  6. Oral complaints and dental care of haematopoietic stem cell transplant patients: a qualitative survey of patients and their dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos-den Braber, Jacolien; Potting, Carin M J; Bronkhorst, Ewald M; Huysmans, Marie-Charlotte D N J M; Blijlevens, Nicole M A

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the understanding of the oral and dental needs of haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) patients or about dentists' views and experiences regarding this patient group. This information is essential if we want to improve the standard of peri-HSCT dental care. The primary objective of this qualitative survey was to explore the following: (1) The understanding of dental care pre- and post-HSCT (2) The subjective oral complaints of HSCT patients both short- and long-term (3) The relationship of these oral complaints to the severity of oral mucositis during hospitalization The secondary objective was to explore the opinions of dentists regarding dental care before and after HSCT. All adult patients who survived HSCT at the Radboud University Medical Centre between 2010 and 2011 (n = 101) received a questionnaire. During hospitalization, mucositis scores were recorded daily in the patient's chart. The patients' dentist (n = 88) was also sent a questionnaire after permission of the patient. Ninety-six out of 101 patients (95%) responded. The average period since HSCT was 19 months (range 8-31 months). The overall mean maximum mucositis score was 6.6 (sd = 3.3). Only eight patients reported not having visited a dentist pre-HSCT. The majority of the patients (59%) reported short-term oral complaints, and 28% reported long-term oral complaints. Fifty-two dentists responded (59%). Nine had not performed pre-HSCT screening and eight dentists reported screening their patients but could not complete the necessary treatments. Only 44 dentists succeeded in completing the required treatments. The most important advice of the dentist was to reinforce the importance of regular dental care. Most patients report short-term and/or long-term oral complaints after HSCT. Most dentists stress the importance of regular dental care before and after HSCT but report not being familiar with the particular dental care needs of this patient group. The high

  7. [Legal consequences in the dentist-patient relationship. A plea in favor of deontology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentiste, T M

    1995-01-01

    In the dental sphere, the most common type of civil suite would be a 'tort' relating to professional negligence, where an aggrieved patient claims to have suffered damage through a breach of dentist's duty of care. Actually, the patients, who are more and more demanding concerning their oral rehabilitation are influenced by the media. Therefore they ask an entirely different and complex treatment. Not only can this harm the profession but also the patient. Indeed the loss of trust will result in discontinuation and frequently lead to decay. The early detection of a dissatisfied patient will enhanced a settlement out of court.

  8. Introducing high-cost health care to patients: dentists' accounts of offering dental implant treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernazza, Christopher R; Rousseau, Nikki; Steele, Jimmy G; Ellis, Janice S; Thomason, John Mark; Eastham, Jane; Exley, Catherine

    2015-02-01

    The decision-making process within health care has been widely researched, with shared decision-making, where both patients and clinicians share technical and personal information, often being cited as the ideal model. To date, much of this research has focused on systems where patients receive their care and treatment free at the point of contact (either in government-funded schemes or in insurance-based schemes). Oral health care often involves patients making direct payments for their care and treatment, and less is known about how this payment affects the decision-making process. It is clear that patient characteristics influence decision-making, but previous evidence suggests that clinicians may assume characteristics rather than eliciting them directly. The aim was to explore the influences on how dentists' engaged in the decision-making process surrounding a high-cost item of health care, dental implant treatments (DITs). A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews was undertaken using a purposive sample of primary care dentists (n = 25). Thematic analysis was undertaken to reveal emerging key themes. There were differences in how dentists discussed and offered implants. Dentists made decisions about whether to offer implants based on business factors, professional and legal obligations and whether they perceived the patient to be motivated to have treatment and their ability to pay. There was evidence that assessment of these characteristics was often based on assumptions derived from elements such as the appearance of the patient, the state of the patient's mouth and demographic details. The data suggest that there is a conflict between three elements of acting as a healthcare professional: minimizing provision of unneeded treatment, trying to fully involve patients in shared decisions and acting as a business person with the potential for financial gain. It might be expected that in the context of a high-cost healthcare intervention for which

  9. Position paper: appropriate use of pharmacotherapeutic agents by the orofacial pain dentist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heir, Gary M; Haddox, J David; Crandall, Jeffrey; Eliav, Eli; Radford, Steven Graff; Schwartz, Anthony; Jaeger, Bernadette; Ganzberg, Steven; Aquino, Carlos M; Benoliel, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Orofacial Pain Dentistry is concerned with the prevention, evaluation, diagnosis, treatment, and management of persistent and recurrent orofacial pain disorders. The American Dental Association, through the Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA), now recognizes Orofacial Pain as an area of advanced education in Dentistry. It is mandated by CODA that postgraduate orofacial pain programs be designed to provide advanced knowledge and skills beyond those of the standard curriculum leading to the DDS or DMD degrees. Postgraduate programs in orofacial pain must include specific curricular content to comply with CODA standards. The intent of CODA standards is to assure that training programs develop specific educational goals and objectives that describe the student/resident’s expected knowledge and skills upon successful completion of the program. A standardized core curriculum, required for accreditation of dental orofacial pain training programs, has now been adopted.Among the various topics mandated in the curriculum are pharmacology and, specifically, pharmacotherapeutics. The American Academy of Orofacial Pain (AAOP) recommends, and the American Board of Orofacial Pain (ABOP) requires, that the minimally competent orofacial pain dentist* be knowledgeable in the management of orofacial pain conditions using medications when indicated. Basic knowledge of the appropriate use of pharmacotherapeutics is essential for the orofacial pain dentist and, therefore, constitutes part of the examination specifications of the ABOP. The minimally competent orofacial pain clinician must demonstrate knowledge, diagnostic skills, and treatment expertise in many areas, such as musculoskeletal, neurovascular, and neuropathic pain syndromes; sleep disorders related to orofacial pain; orofacial dystonias; and intraoral, intracranial, extracranial, and systemic disorders that cause orofacial pain or dysfunction. The orofacial pain dentist has the responsibility to diagnose and treat

  10. Deep Brain Stimulation Salvages a Flourishing Dental Practice: A Dentist with Essential Tremor Recounts his Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacopuzzi, Guy; Lising, Melanie; Halpern, Casey H

    2016-10-22

    In recounting his experience with deep brain stimulation (DBS), a practicing dentist challenged with long-standing bilateral essential tremor of the hands shares insights into his diagnosis, treatments, and ultimately successful DBS surgery at Stanford University Medical Center, CA, USA. Now nearly one year after his surgery, his practice continues to flourish and he encourages others in his profession to consider the possibility of DBS as a definitive treatment for tremors of the hand, which may salvage their practice.

  11. Mercury determination in dentist's hair and nails by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzilli, B.; Munita, C.S.

    1986-01-01

    The mercury in scalp hair and fingernails of a group of dentists who usually handle with this toxic element in their profession is determined. The results were obtained by instrumental neutron activation analysis. The experimental procedure was based on the evaluation of the 197 Hg photopeak area, whose half life is 65h. After at a neutron fluxo of 5x10 12 n.cm -2 .sec -1 , the activity of the samples were measured by using a solid state Ge (Li) detector coupled to a 4.096 channel pulse height analyser. (M.A.C.) [pt

  12. General Dentist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... History of Dental Advances Pacifiers Have Negative and Positive Effects What is Orofacial Pain? How Do I Care for My Child's Baby Teeth? Learn what those dental words mean. Check out how your teeth and mouth ...

  13. A survey to assess knowledge, practice, and attitude of dentists in the Western region of Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sebaei, Maisa O; Jan, Ahmed M

    2016-04-01

    To assess knowledge regarding the management of odontogenic infections by dentists in Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. In this cross-sectional study, 150 practitioners responded to a 26-item paper-based questionnaire between August and December 2014. The questionnaire evaluated knowledge and current clinical practices in managing odontogenic infections, as well as the attitude towards antibiotic use and resistance in the community. Basic medical knowledge (BMK) and critical knowledge (CK) scores were calculated from the dentists' response to these questions and were compared according to educational level (bachelor and postgraduate degree holders). The mean BMK score was 1.98 ± 0.4 and CK score was 1.89 ± 0.3. Dentists with bachelor's degrees had higher BMK scores than those with a postgraduate degree (p=0.005), but CK was not significantly different (p=0.400). Most dentists (77%) would prescribe antibiotics after a routine dental extraction, and would undertake definitive surgical treatment (49.2%) only after a localized space infection developed. Although 82.2% agreed that routine prescription of antibiotics increases bacterial resistance in the community, 71% believe that prescribing an antibiotic after routine oral surgical procedures prevents odontogenic infections. Dentists in Jeddah require further education through lectures and workshops to stay up to date on current concepts in odontogenic infection management.

  14. With a little help from my assistant: buffering the negative effects of emotional dissonance on dentist performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, Alma M; Hakanen, Jari J; Perhoniemi, Riku; Salanova, Marisa

    2013-10-01

    In this study, we hypothesized that dentist' interpersonal resources (good cooperation with one's assistant) together with their personal resources (optimism) buffer the negative effects of emotional dissonance (a demand that occurs when there is a difference between felt and displayed emotions) on job performance (in-role and extra-role performance) over time. We carried out Hierarchical Regression Modeling on a sample of 1954 Finnish dentists who participated in a two-wave 4-year longitudinal study. Results showed that good cooperation with dental assistants buffered the negative effects of emotional dissonance on both in-role and extra-role performance among the dentists in the long term. However, unexpectedly, dentists' high optimism did not buffer their in-role nor extra-role performance over time under conditions of experiencing high emotional dissonance. We conclude that interpersonal job resources such as good cooperation with one's colleagues may buffer the negative effect of emotional dissonance on dentists' job performance even in the long term, whereas the role of personal resources (e.g., optimism) may be less important for maintaining high job performance under conditions of emotional dissonance. The study novelties include the test of the negative effects of emotional dissonance on long-term performance in dentistry and the identification of the job rather than personal resources as the buffers against the negative effects of emotional dissonance on long-term performance. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. A Survey over the Dentists' and Endodntists' Approaches towards the Management of Endodontic Emergencies in Mashhad, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidar, Maryam; Gharechahi, Maryam; Soleimani, Tayebeh; Eslami, Neda

    2015-01-01

    Pain or swelling caused by various stages of inflammation/infection of the pulp/periradicular area is among endodontic emergencies. Determining the most effective method of emergency treatment is a challenging issue in endodontics. The goal of this study was to determine and compare the level of knowledge in general dentists and endodontists about endodontic emergency treatment plan in Mashhad, Iran in 2012-2013. In this cross-sectional descriptive study, 152 questionnaires were distributed among 120 general dentists and 32 endodontists of Mashhad. The questionnaire contained two separate parts. The first part included demographic information and in the second part different treatment protocols were suggested for 12 various conditions of pulp/periapical emergencies, and the participants were asked to choose the correct option(s). To determine the relationship between qualitative variables, the chi-square analysis was used. The level of significance was set at 0.05. There were significant differences between treatment plans presented by general dentists and endodontists about endodontic emergencies, especially in cases of necrotic pulp and subsequent swelling. Level of knowledge of dentists about the indications of incision and drainage, intra-canal medicament, root filing beyond the apical foramen and antibiotic prescription was not enough. These findings highlight the importance of refreshing courses for general dentists to improve their competency in the management of endodontic emergencies.

  16. The effects of physical and psychosocial factors and ergonomic conditions on the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders among dentists in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taib, Mohd Firdaus Mohd; Bahn, Sangwoo; Yun, Myung Hwan; Taib, Mohd Syukri Mohd

    2017-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) have been recognized as one of the main occupational health problems for dentists. Many studies have suggested that dentists experience work-related pain or discomfort in the neck, shoulder, and back, as well as in other parts of the body. This study aimed to examine the relationship between specific physical and psychosocial factors and/or ergonomic conditions on MSD symptoms among dentists in Malaysia. A group of 85 dentists was asked to complete a questionnaire to determine whether their complaints were related to physical and psychosocial factors and/or ergonomic conditions in their practices. Among the nine reviewed body areas, the shoulders were most often affected by symptoms of MSDs (92.7%). Moreover, MSDs of the neck and upper back were most likely to prevent these practitioners from engaging in normal activities (32.9%). In general, no significant differences were found in the prevalence of MSD symptoms in relation to gender, age, body mass index, years in practice, number of patients, and frequency of breaks. Our results were consistent with those reported in other studies that focused on MSD problems among dentists in other countries. To reduce the prevalence of MSDs, more attention should be paid to instituting ergonomically sensible approaches in the dental practice setting.

  17. Risk factors influencing dentists' hepatitis B-related knowledge and attitudes and their willingness to treat hepatitis B positive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravanifard, B; Rakhshan, V; Sherafat, S; Najafi-Salehi, L

    2015-02-25

    This study assessed factors that could predict dentists' knowledge, attitudes and behaviour towards hepatitis B virus (HBV). A total of 300 dentists in Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran were surveyed and their demographic, educational and office characteristics were analysed in relation to their scores on knowledge about HBV, self-reported attitudes towards treating people infected with HBV and actual behaviour towards treating simulated HBV-positive patients. Having a Master's degree, faculty membership, taking ≥ 3 continuing education courses, wearing eye-shields, spending more time on preparing dental units and higher self-confidence about knowledge predicted better knowledge. A positive attitude was associated with having attended more courses and working in group practice. The number of courses and a shorter dental unit preparation time positively affected dentists' behaviour.

  18. A Survey of Knowledge, Attitude and Practice of Iranian Dentists and Pedodontists in Relation to Child Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanimoghadam, Fatemeh; Kalantari, Mahsa; Horri, Azadeh; Ahmadipour, Habibeh; Pourmorteza, Ehsan

    2017-12-01

    Since almost half of the child abuse cases affect the head and neck region, dentists have an important role in the diagnosis and report of oral and dental aspects of child abuse cases. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the knowledge, attitude and practice of the general dentists and pedodontists regarding child abuse and child neglect. This cross-sectional study was carried out on the participants of the 12 th congress of pedodontists of Iran. A self-administered questionnaire was used for evaluating their knowledge, attitude and practice toward child abuse. T-test and ANOVA were applied to analyze the data by SPSS software. p 0.05). Dentists had a moderate knowledge, poor attitude and moderate practice regarding child abuse. Considering this fact, improvements in child abuse education for undergraduate students and continuing post-graduate training in this field are recommended.

  19. Restorative treatment thresholds for occlusal primary caries among dentists in the dental practice-based research network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordan, Valeria V; Bader, James D; Garvan, Cynthia W

    2010-01-01

    : The investigators surveyed dentists enrolled in a dental practice-based research network who reported performing at least some restorative dentistry. In the survey, dentists were asked to indicate whether they would intervene surgically in a series of cases involving occlusal caries. Each case presentation included...... a photograph of an occlusal surface displaying typical characteristics of caries penetration and a written description of a patient at a specific level of risk of developing caries. Using logistic regression, the authors analyzed associations between surgical treatment with dentists' and practices......' characteristics and patients' caries risk levels. RESULTS: A total of 517 DPBRN practitioner-investigators responded to the questionnaire. Sixty-three percent of the respondents (326 of 517) indicated that in patients at low risk of developing caries, they would surgically restore teeth with lesions located...

  20. The Top 10 ethical challenges in dental practice in indian scenario: Dentist perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanishree M Kemparaj

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This exploratory qualitative research is an attempt to assess the health care ethical challenges in dental practice in an Indian scenario. Methodology: Qualitative indepth interview was conducted on 20 dental professionals to assess the ethical challenges prevailing in dental practice in Indian scenario. After obtaining the responses the verbatims were categorized into categories and finally 36 themes emerged. Later from two group of 6 panellists each after conducting focus group discussion the themes of ethical issues occurring in dental practice were ranked based on order of significance impact on the practice, patient and society using Delphi method. Result: The top ten ethical challenges listed by the panellists are inadequate sterilization and waste management in dental clinics, poor knowledge and attitude towards ethics among our dental practitioners, in competence among dental professional, increase in cost of oral health service, poor informed consent process, requirement of consensus about the treatment procedures among dentists, Conflict in Advertising, clustering of dental clinics in urban areas, disagreement with treatment modalities among dentist and patient, poor medical record maintenance among our dental practitioners. Conclusion: The study attempts to bring the prevailing ethical challenges in oral health care practice in Indian scenario.

  1. How dentists account for social responsibility: economic imperatives and professional obligations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharamsi, Shafik; Pratt, Daniel D; MacEntee, Michael I

    2007-12-01

    This study explores how dentists explain the concept of social responsibility and its relationship to issues affecting access to oral health care by vulnerable segments of the population. Analysis of open-ended interviews with thirty-four dentists, including dental educators, and administrators and officials of dental public health programs in Canada and the United States revealed that four main themes-economics, professionalism, individual choice, and politics-influenced the respondents' sense of social responsibility in dentistry. There was a belief that social responsibility in dentistry is dominated by economic imperatives that impact negatively on the policies and practices directing access to care. Yet, despite the highly critical stance on dentistry as a business, there was practical recognition of the economic realities of dental practice. Nevertheless, those who focused on social responsibility as a professional obligation highlighted the privileges of self-governance along with the accompanying duty to serve the welfare of everyone and not just those who are socioeconomically advantaged.

  2. Information resources and material selection in bonded restorations among Korean dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Juhea; Kim, Hae-Young; Cho, Byeong Hoon; Lee, In Bog; Son, Ho Hyun

    2009-12-01

    To elucidate how dentists access knowledge sources when choosing adhesive agents for bonded restoration and whether these resources influenced the selection of materials. A national survey was carried out involving dentists in South Korea. The questionnaire included the status of the operator, clinical techniques, and materials. A total of 12,193 e-mails were distributed, 2632 were opened by recipients, and 840 responses were collected. For primary information resources in material selection, 55.8% (n = 469) of the responders mentioned continuing education. This selection criteria varied according to the working status of the clinician (p choice of bonding system was influenced by of the length of the career (p < 0.0001), and the preferred bonding systems differed according to the source of the information (p = 0.035). The popular bonding systems were not ranked according to the bonding strategy, but a preference was found for specific brands or manufacturers. To decrease the confusion of clinicians related to the selection of bonding materials, evidence-based guidelines need to be comprehensibly organized and efficiently approached in clinics.

  3. Study on Personality Types of Dentists in different Disciplines of Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dlaigan, Yousef H; Alahmari, Albatool S; Almubarak, Sara H; Alateeq, Sahar A; Anil, Sukumaran

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the most common personality type among dentists in seven selected clinical dentistry specialties using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) and to compare between these different types of personalities. A survey containing the MBTI and demographic and practice questions was used to assess the personality styles of 243 dental specialists in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The survey results were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The results of the MBTI for 243 specialist dentists revealed, generally, a higher percentage of scoring for introversion (I) with an average of 65% than extroversion (E). The study identified 10 common personality types among these specialists: ISTJ, ISFJ, INFJ, ISTP, INFP, INTP, ENFP, ENTP, ENFJ, and ENTJ (extraversion-introversion (E-I), sensing-intuition (S-N), thinking-feeling (T-F), and judging-perception (J-P)). The dominant personality type in all seven clinical specialties in dentistry was ISTJ, with an average of 54%. The personality types showed variation among the seven clinical dentistry specialties. However, among these seven clinician's specialties in dentistry, more than 50% of the individuals shared one common type of personality (ISTJ). The identification of the personality type might help in their association with coworkers, students, and patients as well as knowing the individual preferences toward different specialties in dentistry.

  4. Dentists' approach to patients on anti-platelet agents and warfarin: a survey of practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, James

    2010-04-23

    In everyday practice, dentists are confronted with the dilemma of patients on anti-platelet agents and warfarin who require invasive dental procedures and, more pertinently, dental extractions. There may be a divergence of opinion among dentists regarding how they manage these patients. AIMS: To assess general dental practitioners\\' approach to the management of patients taking anti-platelet agents and\\/or warfarin who are undergoing invasive dental procedures. METHODS AND DATA: A semi-structured questionnaire was designed to survey general dental practitioners in a large Irish urban area. RESULTS: A response rate of 89% was achieved in a study population of 54 general dental practitioners. A total of 25% of respondents who carry out extractions on warfarinised patients do not check the INR prior to invasive dental procedures. Some 90% of respondents stop anti-platelet agents prior to extractions. CONCLUSIONS: A significant proportion of respondents fail to check warfarinised patients\\' INR prior to invasive dental procedures. Furthermore, a trend of stopping anti-platelet agents was noted, which is in contrast with current recommendations in the dental literature. Certain practices in this small study population proved alarming and highlight the need for improved awareness of current guidelines. A further large-scale study may be justified, as variation in practice may have clinical and medico-legal repercussions.

  5. Oral conditions in renal disorders and treatment considerations – A review for pediatric dentist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megha Gupta

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the current understanding of the oral and dental aspects of chronic renal disease (CRD. A PubMed literature search was performed and all relevant studies were assessed. As the number of people suffering from CRD increases worldwide, dentists are expected to encounter more patients with CRD who need oral care. In children, CRD can elicit a wide spectrum of oral manifestations in the hard and soft tissues. Bleeding, altered drug metabolism, impaired immune function, and an increased risk of dentally induced bacterial endocarditis are some important features that require attention. Dental management of patients with CRD requires that clinicians appreciate that multiple systems can be affected by the disease. Dentists should consult with nephrologists regarding the specific precautions required for each patient. Medical treatments in these patients may need to be postponed due to an unfavorable oral health status or potential risk of life-threatening infection after surgery. Improving oral hygiene and performing necessary dental and oral treatment before hemodialysis or transplantation may prevent endocarditis and septicemia in these patients. Hence, treatment plans should be formulated to restore the patient’s dentition and protect them from potentially severe infections of dental origin.

  6. The proposal of permanent education in the formation of dentists in std/hiv/aids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Fátima Nunes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to report the experience of the "Project for the formation of dentists as facilitators of Permanent Education in Health in the area of STD/HIV/AIDS" developed in partnerships with the National Program of STD/AIDS, the Technical Area of Oral Health of the Ministry of Health, Public Universities and Municipal and State Secretaries of Health. The objective of the program was to capacitate dentists of the public health system in Brazilian states and cities to provide integral and humanized attendance for people living with HIV/AIDS. The methodology of choice for the form of teams of facilitators was Permanent Education in Health through semi-presential courses focusing on the problematization of local and professional realities. Thus, seeking to construct a process of education to modify and reorient the hegemonic dental practice, strengthening the process of attendance and management and the partnerships, guaranteeing the sustainability of the actions in the states and cities.

  7. DENTAL PATIENT KNOWLEDGE ABOUT THE EFFECTS OF SMOKING AND ATTITUDES ABOUT THE ROLE OF DENTISTS IN SMOKING CESSATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahya, Nurul Asyikin; Saub, Roslan; Nor, Mariani Md; Yusoff, Noriah

    2017-03-01

    Dentists can offer their patients who smoke tobacco assistance with smoking cessation. We conducted this study to assess dental patient knowledge about the effects of smoking and perceptions and attitudes regarding the role of dentists in smoking cessation counselling. We conducted this study to inform tobacco cessation programs that could potentially include dentists. We conducted a cross-sectional study using a self-administered questionnaire among 375 patients. The mean age of subjects was 33.4 years; females comprised 51.5%. Participants were divided into 3 groups: those who never smoked (n = 263, 70.7%), smokers (n = 92, 24.7%), and ex-smokers (n = 17, 4.5%). Significantly more participants (p = 0.046) who never smoked (92.9%) knew smoking can cause bad breath than smokers (86.9%). Significantly more participants (p = 0.002) who never smoked (74.8%) knew smoking can cause periodontal disease than smokers (57.6%). Significantly more participants (p smoked (84.5%) knew smoking can cause oral cancer than smokers (66.7%). Significantly more participants (p smoked (86.7%) knew smoking can cause lung cancer than smokers (69.7%). Significantly more participants who never smoked (85.5%) felt dentists should be interested in the smoking status of their patients (p = 0.004) than smokers (72.6%). Significantly more participants (p = 0.08) who never smoked (69.6%) stated dentists should give smoking cessation advice than smokers/ex-smokers (59.0%). Smoker/ ex-smokers had less knowledge about the effects of smoking on oral and general health than non-smokers. Both smokers/ex-smokers and non-smokers felt dentists should provide smoking cessation advice.

  8. Dentist Material Selection for Single-Unit Crowns: Findings from The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhija, Sonia K.; Lawson, Nathaniel C.; Gilbert, Gregg H.; Litaker, Mark S.; McClelland, Jocelyn A.; Louis, David R.; Gordan, Valeria V.; Pihlstrom, Daniel J.; Meyerowitz, Cyril; Mungia, Rahma; McCracken, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Dentists enrolled in the National Dental Practice-Based Research Network completed a study questionnaire about techniques and materials used for single-unit crowns and an enrollment questionnaire about dentist/practice characteristics. The objectives were to quantify dentists’ material recommendations and test the hypothesis that dentist’s and practice’s characteristics are significantly associated with these recommendations. Methods Surveyed dentists responded to a contextual scenario asking what material they would use for a single-unit crown on an anterior and posterior tooth. Material choices included: full metal, porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM), all-zirconia, layered zirconia, lithium disilicate, leucite-reinforced ceramic, or other. Results 1,777 of 2,132 eligible dentists responded (83%). The top 3 choices for anterior crowns were lithium disilicate (54%), layered zirconia (17%), and leucite-reinforced glass ceramic (13%). There were significant differences (p<0.05) by dentist’s gender, race, years since graduation, practice type, region, practice busyness, hours worked/week, and location type. The top 3 choices for posterior crowns were all-zirconia (32%), PFM (31%), and lithium disilicate (21%). There were significant differences (p<0.05) by dentist’s gender, practice type, region, practice busyness, insurance coverage, hours worked/week, and location type. Conclusions Network dentists use a broad range of materials for single-unit crowns for anterior and posterior teeth, adopting newer materials into their practices as they become available. Material choices are significantly associated with dentist’s and practice’s characteristics. Clinical Significance Decisions for crown material may be influenced by factors unrelated to tooth and patient variables. Dentists should be cognizant of this when developing an evidence-based approach to selecting crown material. PMID:27693778

  9. Prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal complaints among dentists in India: A national cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijaya K Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMSD had been previously reported to have a high prevalence among dentists in different parts of the world. Aims: The study aimed to assess the prevalence of self-reported WRMSD among dental professionals in India. Material and Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 646 dentists (response rate of 82.97% was done using self-administered questionnaire which consisted of 27 items based on Nordic questionnaire for screening WRMSDs. Additional items of the questionnaire were added after preliminary content validation from six experienced dentists. Participant socio-demographic characteristics, work-related physical load characteristics, musculoskeletal symptom characteristics were evaluated. Statistical analysis used: All data were analyzed descriptively using percentiles and association between work-related physical load and WRMSD prevalence was done using Chi-square test. Results: All 536 dentists had at least one work-related musculoskeletal symptom in the previous year with an overall period prevalence rate of 100%. The type of symptoms present were pain (99.06%, stiffness (3.35%, fatigue (8.39%, discomfort (12.87%, clicks/sounds (4.1%, and other neurogenic (20.14%. The regions of symptoms were neck (75.74%, wrist/hand (73.13%, lower back (72.01%, shoulder (69.4%, hip (29.85%, upper back (18.65%, ankle (12.31%, and elbow (7.46%. Number of regions affected were two (82.83%, three (51.86%, four, or more (15.11%. Recurrent symptoms were present in 76.11%. Strong association was noted between sustained work postures and symptom regions for pain in WRMSD. Conclusion: The study found an overall one-year period prevalence rate of 100% for WRMSDs among Indian dentists. Measures for improving education and ergonomic evaluations are indicated on a large scale to prevent decline in work performance and incidence of WRMSDs among Indian dentists.

  10. Survey of Michigan dentists and radiation oncologists on oral care of patients undergoing head and neck radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Yoshita; Bahlhorn, Hannah; Zafar, Saniya; Zwetchkenbaum, Samuel; Eisbruch, Avraham; Murdoch-Kinch, Carol Anne

    2012-07-01

    Oral complications of radiation therapy for head and neck cancer (HNC) are associated with a significant decline in oral health-related quality of life (OHQOL). The dentist, working with the radiation oncologist and the rest of the health care team, plays an important role in the prevention and management of these complications, but patients do not always receive care consistent with current guidelines. This study investigated barriers to recommended care. There is variability in knowledge and practice among dentists and radiation oncologists regarding the dental management of patients treated with head and neck radiotherapy (HNRT), and inadequate communication and collaboration between members of the patient's health care team contribute to inconsistencies in application of clinical care guidelines. There is on interest and need for continuing dental (CDE) and medical education (CME) on this topic. A questionnaire was developed to assess dentists' knowledge and practice of dental management of HNC patients and their interest in CDE on this topic. All members of the Michigan Dental Association (MDA) with email addresses were asked to complete the survey online, and a random sample of MDA members without email addresses was invited to complete a paper version of the same survey. All Michigan members of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) were invited to complete an online version of the survey modified for radiation oncologists. The response rate for dentists was 47.9% and radiation oncologists was 22.3%. Of the dentists who responded, 81% reported that a major barrier to providing dental treatment before radiotherapy was a lack of time between initial dental consultation and the start of radiation; inadequate communication between health care providers was blamed most frequently for this. Ten percent of the dentists and 25% of the radiation oncologists reported that they did not treat HNC patients because they lacked adequate training, and 55% of

  11. Determination of mercury in dentists through Neutron activation analysis; Determinacion de mercurio en odontologos mediante Analisis por activacion neutronica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padilla M, M.A.; Granados C, F. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Departamento de Quimica, A.P. 18-1027, C.P. 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    It was determined the mercury levels in urine through Neutron activation analysis to 25 dentists who have been exposed to mercury by several time periods, because of the routine manipulations of amalgams. The determined concentrations of mercury were less to 10 {mu} g Hg/l of urine. The results were founded inside the safety limits reported in the literature. The mercury levels in the dentists are associated with a wide variety of factors that contribute to their exposure as: number of years of dental practice, number of amalgams manipulated between others. (Author)

  12. Early Childhood Caries-Related Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice: Discordance between Pediatricians and Dentists toward Medical Office-Based Prevention in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dima, Shinechimeg; Chang, Wei-Jen; Chen, Jung-Wei; Teng, Nai-Chia

    2018-05-24

    The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge, attitude, and practice regarding early childhood caries (ECC) prevention and implementation of medical setting-based caries prevention among pediatricians and dentists in Taiwan. Data were collected from currently practicing pediatricians and general and pediatric dentists using self-administered questionnaires. A total of 301 questionnaires were completed by the pediatricians ( n = 105), general dentists ( n = 117), and pediatric dentists ( n = 79). The pediatric dentists obtained significantly higher knowledge and practice scores than the general dentists and pediatricians ( p < 0.0001). The pediatricians' attitude score related to engaging physicians in medical office-based caries prevention was significantly higher than the attitude scores of the general and pediatric dentists ( p < 0.05). A Spearman rank correlation analysis indicated a significant positive correlation between knowledge and practice among the general dentists (r s = 0.271, p < 0.01) and pediatricians (r s = 0.262, p < 0.01). The correlation between knowledge and attitude among the pediatricians was significantly positive (r s = 0.242, p < 0.05). Attitude and practice among the pediatricians were significantly positively correlated (r s = 0.271, p < 0.01). Pediatricians lacked ECC-related knowledge; however, they had a more positive attitude toward medical office-based prevention when they had a higher level of knowledge. Oral health-related education for pediatricians is necessary if such medical office-based caries prevention programs are to be implemented in Taiwan.

  13. Esthetic Evaluation of Anterior Single-Tooth Implants with Different Abutment Designs - Patients' Satisfaction Compared to Dentists' Observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patil, Ratnadeep; Gresnigt, Marco M M; Mahesh, Kavita; Dilbaghi, Anjali; Cune, Marco S

    Purpose: To correlate patients' satisfaction and dentists' observations regarding two abutment designs used for single crowns in the esthetic zone: a divergent one (control) and a curved one (experimental), with special emphasis on muco-gingival esthetics. Materials and Methods: Twenty-six patients

  14. Perspectives on providing good access to dental services for elderly people: patient selection, dentists' responsibility and budget management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grytten, Jostein; Holst, Dorthe

    2013-06-01

    To suggest a model for organizing and financing dental services for elderly people so that they have good access to services. There are few studies on how dental services for elderly people should be organized and financed. This is surprising if we take into consideration the fact that the proportion of elderly people is growing faster than any other group in the population, and that elderly people have more dental diseases and poorer access to dental services than the rest of the adult population. In several countries, dental services are characterized by private providers who often operate in a market with competition and free price-setting. Private dentists have no community responsibility, and they are free to choose which patients they treat. Literature review and critical reasoning. In order to avoid patient selection, a patient list system for elderly people is recommended, with per capita remuneration for the patients that the dentist is given responsibility for. The patient list system means that the dentist assumes responsibility for a well-defined list of elderly people. Our model will lead to greater security in the dentist/patient relationship, and patients with great treatment needs will be ensured access to dental services. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Dentists' use of caries risk assessment in children: findings from the Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riley, Joseph L; Qvist, Vebeke; Fellows, Jeffrey L

    2010-01-01

    This study surveyed Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) member dentists (from four regions in the U.S. and Scandinavia) who perform restorative dentistry in their practices. The survey asked a range of questions about caries risk assessment in patients aged 6 to 18. Among respondents, 73...

  16. Oral complaints and dental care of haematopoietic stem cell transplant patients: a qualitative survey of patients and their dentists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos-den Braber, J.; Potting, C.M.J.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.; Blijlevens, N.M.A.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Little is known about the understanding of the oral and dental needs of haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) patients or about dentists' views and experiences regarding this patient group. This information is essential if we want to improve the standard of peri-HSCT dental care. The

  17. A survey to assess knowledge, practice, and attitude of dentists in the Western region of Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maisa O. Al-Sebaei

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess knowledge regarding the management of odontogenic infections by dentists in Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 150 practitioners responded to a 26-item paper-based questionnaire between August and December 2014. The questionnaire evaluated knowledge and current clinical practices in managing odontogenic infections, as well as the attitude towards antibiotic use and resistance in the community. Basic medical knowledge (BMK and critical knowledge (CK scores were calculated from the dentists’ response to these questions and were compared according to educational level (bachelor and postgraduate degree holders. Results: The mean BMK score was 1.98 ± 0.4 and CK score was 1.89 ± 0.3. Dentists with bachelor’s degrees had higher BMK scores than those with a postgraduate degree (p=0.005, but CK was not significantly different (p=0.400. Most dentists (77% would prescribe antibiotics after a routine dental extraction, and would undertake definitive surgical treatment (49.2% only after a localized space infection developed. Although 82.2% agreed that routine prescription of antibiotics increases bacterial resistance in the community, 71% believe that prescribing an antibiotic after routine oral surgical procedures prevents odontogenic infections. Conclusion: Dentists in Jeddah require further education through lectures and workshops to stay up to date on current concepts in odontogenic infection management.

  18. Study on self-assessment regarding knowledge of temporomandibular disorders in children/adolescents by Swedish and Saudi Arabian dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khotani, Amal; Björnsson, Olof; Naimi-Akbar, Aron; Christidis, Nikolaos; Alstergren, Per

    2015-01-01

    To estimate the degree of self-assessed knowledge among dentists in Sweden and Saudi Arabia regarding temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in children and adolescents using a summative form of assessment and further to investigate the possible factors that may influence the self-assessed knowledge. A questionnaire survey covering four domains (Etiology; Diagnosis and classification; Chronic pain and pain behavior; Treatment and prognosis) regarding TMD knowledge was used. Out of 250 questionnaires (125 in each country) a total of 65 (52%) were returned in Sweden and 104 (83%) in Saudi Arabia. Self-assessed individual knowledge was significantly associated to the level of actual knowledge among the Swedish groups in the domains Etiology; Diagnosis and classification and Treatment and prognosis (p self-assessment of own knowledge between the dentists in Sweden and Saudi Arabia. The Swedish dentists have a better ability to assess their level of knowledge compared to Saudi Arabian dentists regarding TMD in children and adolescents. This difference could be related to several factors such as motivation, positive feedback, reflection, psychomotor, and interpersonal skills, which all are more dominant in the Swedish educational tradition.

  19. Antibiotic-prescribing habits among Norwegian dentists: a survey over 25 years (1990-2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preus, Hans R; Fredriksen, Karen W; Vogsland, Andrea E; Sandvik, Leiv; Grytten, Jostein I

    2017-08-01

    Bacterial antibiotic resistance is a steadily growing global problem, which today is compared with issues such as global warming, ozone depletion, and extinction of species. Consequently, calls come from global, Pan-European, and national authorities to gain insight into, limit, and stringently qualify the use of antibiotics in human and veterinary medicine, as well as in food production. Dentists are not considered to be frequent prescribers of antibiotics. However, few studies have identified how much, and in which situations, dentists prescribe such drugs. The aims of the present study were to survey Norwegian dentists' antibiotic-prescribing habits in 2015 and to compare the findings with previous studies (1990 and 2004) and with the actual numbers of dispensed prescriptions obtained from the 'Norwegian National Prescription Register'. The results from 1990 to 2004 show that there was a general increase in antibiotic prescriptions by Norwegian dentists, followed by a reduction or flattening of the prescription volume curve from 2004 to 2015. Despite this, possibilities for further improvements have been identified and recommendations given for targeted campaigns to reduce the prescription volume in dentistry by a further 30%, which has been ordered by the Norwegian National Assembly. © 2017 Eur J Oral Sci.

  20. Dentists' Preferences for Diagnosis, Management and Referral of Chronic Oro-Facial Pain: Results from a National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Vishal R.; Joughin, Amy; Zakrzewska, Joanna; Appelbe, Priscilla; Tickle, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To explore the diagnosis, treatment and referral patterns of chronic oro-facial pain patients by generalist primary care dentists (GDPs) in the UK. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted using a non-stratified random sample of 500 GDPs who were selected from the General Dental Council register. A self-complete postal questionnaire…

  1. The Prevalence of ADHD Patients among Pediatric Dentists in Israel and Knowledge of Dental and Behavioral Aspects of Treating Them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumer, Sigalit; Khoury, Rula Shehadi; Peretz, Benjamin

    2018-01-01

    There are no clear guidelines for managing the dental treatment of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The use of sedation in combination with chronic ADHD medication use is also not well defined. This study surveyed the prevalence of ADHD children, management techniques and knowledge of pharmacologic therapies of these children among Israeli dentists. A specially designed questionnaire was distributed to all Israeli dentists attending a national conference in 2016. Of the 160 dentists who attended the conference, 96 completed the survey (60% response rate), and they included 46 (51%) pediatric dental specialists and 50 (49%) general dental practitioners. The medications Ritalin and Concerta were most familiar to the respondents (98.9%). Eighty-seven (91.1%) of the practitioners responded that their ADHD patients take their usual doses of any drug for treating ADHD symptoms, regardless of whether or not the dentists intended to use sedatives. The practitioners invented their own behavior management techniques with varying degrees of success. There are no specific guidelines for the most effective pharmacologic protocol (co-administration of ADHD drugs and dental sedatives) or behavior management techniques for the provision of optimal dental care to children with ADHD.

  2. The establishment of the Croatian Dental Crops: the front-line experience of a dentist volunteer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelaca-Bagić, S; Sipina, J; Visković, R; Cakarun, Z; Vlatković, I; Biloglav, D

    1997-01-01

    The establishment of the first dental office of the Croatian Dental Corps (CDC) in the city of Zadar represented at the same time the beginning of the CDC. This article describes the front-line experience of a dentist who volunteered to provide basic medical help, which eventually laid the groundwork for providing general dental care and establishing the first CDC dental office. The office was opened on December 16, 1991, and provided general dental care except prosthetics. Although faced with numerous problems and extremely difficult conditions, the office staff completed 1,913 initial and 1,157 control checkups and performed 4,002 services by treating 12 to 16 patients per day. The main causes for emergencies were caries (59%) and endodontic complications (28%). This variety of services in the proximity of the front line is considered extensive even for advanced medical corps of modern armies.

  3. Development and retention of fine psychomotor skills: implications for the aging dentist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Janice K T; Gardner, Karen; Rucker, Lance M

    2010-01-01

    Dentistry is a profession that involves the acquisition and maintenance of fine psychomotor skills. The many components of the motor system in the brain work together during all movements, but each area is activated to a varying degree depending on whether an individual is learning, training or maintaining expertise. The transition from nonexpert to expert involves practice and experience to allow imprinting of neuronal connections within the brain, which in turn causes those practised movements to become automated. With age, many people slowly lose memory, but are the fine motor movements that a dentist has mastered over a lifetime also lost? The aging expert experiences the same deterioration as an aging nonexpert in tasks that are unrelated to the expertise, but tasks that an expert has selectively maintained through decades of practice are retained through aging.

  4. The Importance of The Dentist – Patient Relationship in Oral Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrayadi Gunardi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are many instances in oral cancer cases in which a lack of patient cooperation was found to be a hampering factor in the overall case management. A good relationship between dentists and patients should therefore be built in conjunction with other treatment modalities. Case Report: Three complete oral cancer cases with dentist–patient relationship problems are presented. One of the common basic ways to build a good relationship is through communication and empathy. A relationship is also influenced by psychological distress, experience from previous treatments, socioeconomic factors, the healthcare system, time constraints, and belief. Conclusion: No single intervention strategy can improve the compliance of an oral cancer patient. An assessment of patient knowledge and understanding of the regimen along with clear and effective communication and trust in the therapeutic relationship are important in the overall patient management.

  5. Radiology at dentist surgery: from the X radiation discovery to the actual regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cattier, K.

    2006-05-01

    The objective of this work is to present the radiology evolution, from the first use to the actual regulations. In first part, are shown the circumstances of the discovery of the radiology principle, the immediate reactions, the improvements brought afterward as the revealing of negative consequences of an intensive use and without protection. Then, in second part, are detailed the different techniques among the most used today within the framework of a practice to the dentist office. Then, in third part, are tackled the radiobiology that studies the reactions of an organism under x radiation and the effects at more or less long term, then radiation protection that establishes the rules of correct practice so that a daily use can pull fewer risks. (N.C.)

  6. The Graduating European Dentist: Contemporaneous Methods of Teaching, Learning and Assessment in Dental Undergraduate Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, J C; Walmsley, A D; Paganelli, C; McLoughlin, J; Szep, S; Kavadella, A; Manzanares Cespedes, M C; Davies, J R; DeLap, E; Levy, G; Gallagher, J; Roger-Leroi, V; Cowpe, J G

    2017-12-01

    It is often the case that good teachers just "intuitively" know how to teach. Whilst that may be true, there is now a greater need to understand the various processes that underpin both the ways in which a curriculum is delivered, and the way in which the students engage with learning; curricula need to be designed to meet the changing needs of our new graduates, providing new, and robust learning opportunities, and be communicated effectively to both staff and students. The aim of this document is to draw together robust and contemporaneous methods of teaching, learning and assessment that help to overcome some of the more traditional barriers within dental undergraduate programmes. The methods have been chosen to map specifically to The Graduating European Dentist, and should be considered in parallel with the benchmarking process that educators and institutions employ locally. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. 'Vacation for your teeth' - dental tourists in Hungary from the perspective of Hungarian dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, E; Szocska, G

    2013-10-01

    Hungary has become a popular destination for foreign patients in the last two decades, particularly in dental care. Since 2008, increasing prices in Western Europe coupled with Hungary's accessibility and availability of dental treatment, has meant the country has become a leader in 'dental tourism'. As the quality of care in Hungary is high and prices are more affordable than in Western Europe, and due to the freedom of movement of people, services and goods within the EU, patient flow into Hungary has increased progressively. The aim of this article is to provide comprehensive empirical evidence from the perspective of a recipient country in dental tourism. A questionnaire survey was conducted among Hungarian dentists (n = 273). Qualitative in-depth interviews were conducted with representatives of dental professional bodies (n = 10). Both research methods aimed to elicit dentists' views on the presence of dental tourism - particularly the push and pull factors (for example, source countries, competitors, information sources, patient motivation). The findings show that there are several reasons why Hungary could maintain a leading position in dental tourism. First, the cost/benefit ratio is outstanding. The affordable price and value for money were already recognised in the early 1990s and were appreciated even before Hungary joined the EU. Secondly, the high quality of Hungary's dental profession: a) dental professionals in Hungary are well-qualified dental practitioners who have received high level dental training; b) dental professional standards are up-to-date and often supervised; c) in Hungary dental technology, the quality of materials and equipment used in dental practices is of European level quality. The rate of complications in dental care is around 5%, similar to other European countries. Finally, previous treatment experiences are positive and patient satisfaction levels are high. More and more patients seek care in Hungary, and more and more

  8. PSYCHOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF PATIENTS INFLUENCING ON THE COMMITMENT TO IMPLEMENT THE RECOMMENDATIONS OF DENTISTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Sitkina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The psychological peculiarities of dental patients with periodontal disease are summarized here. Also, the article presents the description of patients with positive and negative dynamics of treatment.Objective  – to identify relationships between the characteristics of the patient’s personality and their implementation to the recommendations of dentist.Materials  and Methods. 45 people were examined, an average age of 43 years. The following psychodiagnostic methods were used: 1 the multidimensional questionnaire on health; 2 the test «Diagnosis of interpersonal relationships»; 3 characterological questionnaire by K. Leonhard&T. Shmishek; 4 individually-typological questionnaire by Sobchik L.N.; 5 the questionnaire of self-evaluation status;  6 personality Inventory of Bekhterev Institute. These dental indexes of oral health were measured: 1 CPITN; 2 PMA; 3 Saxer & Muhlemann; 4 Silness & Loe; 5 OHI-S.Results.  According to the results of two measurements of dental indexes, 3 groups of patients were identified: 1 with good oral hygiene; 2 with poor hygiene and positive dynamics (improving dental health index; 3 with poor hygiene and negative dynamics (deterioration indexes. The interrelation of the recommendations  of a dentist with the personal characteristics of patients was found.Summary.  Most patients have tried to follow the dentist’s recommendations for oral care, as evidenced by the decline in dental health indexes in the second survey. Differences in personal characteristics of patients, following and not following the recommendations were revealed, also, the gender differences in the groups with improvement and deterioration indexes were found.

  9. The experience of dentists who gained enhanced skills in endodontics within a novel pilot training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliyas, S; Briggs, P; Gallagher, J E

    2017-02-24

    Objective To explore the experiences of primary care dentists following training to enhance endodontic skills and their views on the implications for the NHS.Design Qualitative study using anonymised free text questionnaires.Setting Primary care general dental services within the National Health Service (NHS) in London, United Kingdom.Subjects and methods Eight primary care dentists who completed this training were asked about factors affecting participant experience of the course, perceived impact on themselves, their organisation, their patients and barriers/facilitators to providing endodontic treatment in NHS primary care. Data were transferred verbatim to a spreadsheet and thematically analysed.Intervention 24-month part-time educational and service initiative to provide endodontics within the NHS, using a combination of training in simulation lab and treatment of patients in primary care.Results Positive impacts were identified at individual (gains in knowledge, skills, confidence, personal development), patient (more teeth saved, quality of care improved) and system levels (access, value for money). Suggested developments for future courses included more case discussions, teaching of practical skills earlier in the course and refinement of the triaging processes. Barriers to using the acquired skills in providing endodontic treatment in primary care within the NHS were perceived to be resources (remuneration, time, skills) and accountability. Facilitators included appropriately remunerated contracts, necessary equipment and time.Conclusion This novel pilot training programme in endodontics combining general practice experience with education/training, hands-on experience and a portfolio was perceived by participants as beneficial for extending skills and service innovation in primary dental care. The findings provide insight into primary dental care practitioners' experience with education/training and have implications for future educational initiatives in

  10. The effectiveness of an initial continuing education course in leadership for dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roig Jornet, P; Kalenderian, E

    2018-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the effectiveness of a continuing education course in leadership presented to postdoctoral dentist-leaders. The authors developed a 3-day course on leadership and management with topics including self-awareness, leadership qualities, emotional intelligence, communication skills, social skills, conflict management, personal branding, quality improvement and team motivation. Twenty-two course participants with a median age of 37.5 years and an average of 13.7 years of professional experience were assessed using three different metrics: satisfaction with the course and presenters immediately following the course; pre-course and post-course tests on knowledge of leadership topics; and self-assessments of leadership competency skills prior to the course, immediately following the course and then 6 months after the course. Participant satisfaction with both instructors' effectiveness and the overall course design was very high. A survey 6 months following the course showed that participants were very positive regarding the practical use of the leadership skills they acquired in the course. The average of all participants' scores on the objectively assessed leadership knowledge test showed a statistically significant (P<.001) difference between pre-course and post-course scores. At 6-month follow-up, participant self-assessment of leadership competency significantly improved following the course. A well-designed course in leadership skills can have a positive impact on the leadership knowledge and competency of dentist-leaders. This unique leadership course was effective in increasing leadership knowledge and self-perceived leadership competency. The course and the skilled instructors were rated very highly by participants. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Professional identity, career choices, and working conditions of future and young dentists in Germany - study design and methods of a nationwide comprehensive survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettler, Nele; Frenzel Baudisch, Nicolas; Micheelis, Wolfgang; Klingenberger, David; Jordan, A Rainer

    2017-10-18

    Little is known regarding young and future dentists' career choices, professional identity, and working conditions in Germany. While the dental healthcare environment and demands in treatment are changing, it remains unclear what job perceptions young dentists have developed at the beginning of their work life and if and how these perceptions change during the subsequent years. The aim of this study was to survey future and young dentists regarding their professional identity, planned career paths, and working conditions and strains to understand career decisions and choices and enable policy makers to include future dentists' views and expectations in their decisions. This study is a longitudinal nationwide survey over a time span of 4 years of dental students and young dentists in Germany and is comprised of three waves. The first wave focuses on dental students in their final year before the state examination and is composed of a qualitative pre-study in the form of focus groups and a quantitative main survey in the form of a questionnaire. The end points were established to analyse (1) the professional identity of the young future dentists; (2) their career paths, preparation for a career, and basic career conditions; and (3) perceived conditions and strains. The aim of the overall survey was to depict the development of these three aspects during the first years of work life. All of the questions were evaluated with a descriptive univariate analysis. The analysed subgroups were grouped according to gender, target working condition (employed/self-employed), and primary socialisation (parents dentists/parents not dentists). To our knowledge, this is the only study which focuses on career choices, professional identity, and working conditions of future and young dentists in Germany. The longitudinal observation provides information that is essential for professional and purposive dental health care planning, and to meet the oral health demands and needs of the

  12. Dentist–patient communication: what do patients and dentists remember following a consultation? Implications for patient compliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misra S

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Sara Misra, Blánaid Daly, Stephen Dunne, Brian Millar, Mark Packer, Koula AsimakopoulouDental Institute, King's College London, London, UKBackground: There is a lack of information about the extent to which patients recall key facts of dental consultations. Forgetting health advice undermines adherence with such instructions and is a potential problem. This study assessed the quantity and type of information recalled in a dental consultation, dentist–patient agreement over the contents of the consultation, and the relationship of such recall with patient satisfaction.Methods: Using a cross-sectional design, questionnaire data were obtained from patients recruited through a letter and presenting for a routine dental consultation. General issues discussed, specific information about oral health given, dentist-performed procedures, and agreed future actions were reported independently in writing, by patients and also by the treating dentist immediately postconsultation. Additionally, patients completed a dental visit satisfaction questionnaire.Results: Responses (n = 26, 55% response rate were content-analyzed, and data on the number and type of information that was recalled were obtained. Interrater reliability was established. Inferential testing showed differences in dentist–patient recall, dentist–patient agreement, and the association between patient recall and satisfaction. Dentists recalled more information than patients (P = 0.001. Dentists further reported giving more dental health education (P = 0.006 and discussing more future actions (P = 0.002 than patients actually remembered. Technical (eg, crowns/bridges rather than psychosocial (eg, pain/embarrassment issues were reported more often (P = 0.001 by both dentists and patients. Dentist–patient agreement over issues discussed and procedures performed was higher (kappa = 0.210–0.310 than dental health education agreement and agreed future actions (kappa = 0.060–0.110. There

  13. Hearing loss and its association with occupational noise exposure among Saudi dentists: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabdulwahhab, Bander M; Alduraiby, Raneem I; Ahmed, May A; Albatli, Lamya I; Alhumain, Maram S; Softah, Nada A; Saleh, Shaza

    2016-01-01

    Dental practitioners are prone to hearing loss due to noise exposure encountered in dental clinics. The aim of this study was to determine whether the persistent high-frequency sounds produced by the dental equipment could cause hearing decrement among the Saudi dental practitioners. This cross-sectional study included 38 randomly selected Saudi dentists from different specialties who were exposed to noise during working hours and 38 individuals as a control group. The participants underwent four audiometric tests that included an otoscopic examination, tympanometry, pure tone audiometry and the distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) test. The data revealed that ~15.8% of the dentists and 2.6% of the control group had some hearing loss. No significant difference was found between the two groups in the pure tone audiometry test; however, qualitative analysis revealed a higher percentage of hearing loss among the dentists' group as compared with their control counterparts. A statistically significant difference was found in DPOAEs between the two groups in the left ear ( P =0.002), and between the right and left ears ( P =0.005). In the present cross-sectional study, the prevalence of hearing loss among dentists as assessed with the pure tone audiometry test was 15.8%. Which was in accordance with a previous study performed by Khaimook et al ., which revealed the prevalence of hearing loss in dental personnel to be 17.7%; however, no significant differences were observed compared to the control group in both studies. The otoacoustic emission test in the left ear exhibited significant changes. These changes could have been due to the presence and continuity of the sounds produced by high- and low-velocity suction devices on the left side of the dental unit knowing that 97% of the dentists are right handed. Evidence suggests that noise from dental clinics can cause hearing problems, which had a greater effect on the left ear than the right; however, these

  14. Lesões por esforços repetitivos/distúrbios osteomusculares relacionados ao trabalho em cirurgiões-dentistas Work related musculoskeletal disorders in dentists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilsée Ivan Regis Filho

    2006-09-01

    mechanical compression of structures in that area, because of adopting incorrect postures and excessive force, and in most cases due time pressure. This study has employed a cross-sectional epidemiological method to look for evidence on the relation between the tasks dentists perform and CTD/WRMD. Empirical studies have shown the presence of a statistically significant association between both genders and the conditions. Women have presented a greater number of lesions compared to men. Shoulder/arm (39.40%, wrist/hand (18.30%, and neck (17.20% are the most frequently affected regions. In the present study, analysis of cinematic data has revealed that the main activities dentists perform force two or more regions of the body to positions considered of medium and high risk. Analysis of electromyography signs showed great compromise of flexor and extensor muscle groups of carpi and trapezius. Finally, the present study is one more indication that the tasks carried out are exposing professionals to a considerable risk of acquiring CTD/WRMD.

  15. Evaluating the ability of dental technician students and graduate dentists to match tooth color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinmazisik, Gulden; Trakyali, Goksu; Tarcin, Bilge

    2014-12-01

    The ability of dental technician students to match tooth shade with the Vita 3D-Master shade guide and Toothguide Training Box has not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the shade-matching ability of dental technician students and graduate dentists using the Vita 3D-Master shade guide. Twenty-nine dental technician students (DTS group) and 30 graduate dentists (GD group) participated in this study. The Toothguide Training Box (TTB) was used to train the participants and test their shade-matching abilities. Shade-matching ability was evaluated with 3 exercises and a final test, all of which are components of the TTB. The number of mistakes for each participant for value (L), chroma (c), and hue (h) were recorded during the exercises and the final test, and the mistake ratios were calculated. Color difference (ΔE) values for each shade were calculated from the L*, a*, and b* values of the Vita 3D-Master shade guide for each participant in both groups. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to determine statistically significant differences between the L, c, and h mistake ratios of the 2 groups, and the Student t test was used to determine statistically significant differences between the final test scores and the ΔE values of the groups (α=.05). The mistake ratio for L in the GD group was significantly higher than that of the DTS group (P.05). With regard to the final test scores and the ΔE values, no significant differences were found between the groups (P<.001), and the DTS group received higher scores than the GD group (912 and 851). The mean ΔE values for the DTS and GD groups were 1.72 and 2.92. DTSs made more mistakes in the h parameter than GDs, and GDs made more mistakes in the L parameter than DTSs. With regard to the final test scores and the ΔE values, DTSs were more successful in shade matching than GDs. Copyright © 2014 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  16. Determination of mercury in urine through Neutron activation analysis in dentists, as a measure of occupational exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padilla M, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    The mercury level was studied in urine to a dentists group belonging at the Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico to determine the grade of contamination to the exposure of this element during their occupational activity. It was used the Neutron activation analysis which is an analytical method based in the irradiation with neutrons toward a stable nuclide. This can suffer a nuclear transformation to produce a radioactive nuclide and so it will be able to realize a quantitative analysis of itself. The TRIGA Mark III Reactor at the Nuclear Center in Mexico was used to realize this type of analysis due to the neutron fluxes which can be obtained as well as to the facilities in the irradiation of the sample.The purpose of this work is to determine the concentrations of mercury in the occupational exposed personnel such as dentists and so giving the recommendations of safety required to their production. (Author)

  17. Results of a peer review process: the distribution of codes by examining dentists in the Republic of Ireland 2006-2007.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lynch, Liam

    2009-02-01

    The Health Service Executive (HSE) appointed 20 examining dentists in April 2006 under contract for one year as part of a probity assurance initiative by peer review in the Dental Treatment Services Scheme (DTSS) in the Republic of Ireland.

  18. A survey of experience-based preference of Nickel-Titanium rotary files and incidence of fracture among general dentists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WooCheol Lee

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The purpose was to investigate the preference and usage technique of NiTi rotary instruments and to retrieve data on the frequency of re-use and the estimated incidence of file separation in the clinical practice among general dentists. Materials and Methods A survey was disseminated via e-mail and on-site to 673 general dentists. The correlation between the operator's experience or preferred technique and frequency of re-use or incidence of file fracture was assessed. Results A total of 348 dentists (51.7% responded. The most frequently used NiTi instruments was ProFile (39.8% followed by ProTaper. The most preferred preparation technique was crown-down (44.6%. 54.3% of the respondents re-used NiTi files more than 10 times. There was a significant correlation between experience with NiTi files and the number of reuses (p = 0.0025. 54.6% of the respondents estimated experiencing file separation less than 5 times per year. The frequency of separation was significantly correlated with the instrumentation technique (p = 0.0003. Conclusions A large number of general dentists in Korea prefer to re-use NiTi rotary files. As their experience with NiTi files increased, the number of re-uses increased, while the frequency of breakage decreased. Operators who adopt the hybrid technique showed less tendency of separation even with the increased number of re-use.

  19. Paget's disease of jaw bones as primary manifestation: A case report of a proper diagnosis made by general dentist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campolongo, Martin G; Cabras, Marco; Bava, Luca; Arduino, Paolo G; Carbone, Mario

    2018-06-01

    To present a case of early diagnosis mandibular Paget's disease of bone (PDB), recognised by a general dentist. PDB is responsible of rapid bone resorption and disorganised bone formation. The patient was a 72-year-old female patient complaining of dental malposition and blatant prognathism. Clinicians should consider PDB in differential diagnosis for an elderly patient undergoing unexplained alteration in face profile and occlusion. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS): a survey of knowledge and opinions of Nigerian dentists' in Lagos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeniyi, A A; Onajole, A T

    2010-03-01

    This study was designed to assess the knowledge and perceptions of Nigerian dentists to the National Health Insurance scheme (NHIS). A cross-sectional descriptive survey was conducted amongst 250 dentists employed in private and public dental clinics in Lagos State, Nigeria. The survey instrument was a self-administered questionnaire designed to assess their knowledge and attitudes towards the scheme. Data analysis was done using the Epi-Info statistical software (version 6.04). Statistical tools used included measures of central tendency, frequency distribution and chi-square test. A total of 216 dentists (response rate of 82.4%) participated in this study. Most 132 (61.1%) of the respondents had a fair knowledge of the NHIS, while 22 (10.2%) and 62 (28.7%) had poor and good knowledge respectively. Majority (70.4%) viewed the NHIS as a good idea that will succeed if properly implemented. Most (76.6%) respondents also believed that the scheme will improve access to oral health services, affordability of services (71.4%), availability of the services (68.3%) and recognition of dentistry as a profession (62.4%). Most of the respondents (66.2%) considered oral health care as not properly positioned in the NHIS and 154 respondents (74.4%) found the current position of oral health on the NHIS unacceptable. A good number of the respondents (77.3%) would like dentistry to operate at the primary care level on the NHIS. Majority of the dentists involved in this study had some knowledge of the NHIS and were generally positively disposed towards the scheme and viewed it as a good idea.

  1. Perceptions of Altered Smile Esthetics: A Comparative Evaluation in Orthodontists, Dentists, and Laypersons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shagmani, Muftah; Al Kaddah, Fatma

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The current investigation was proposed to determine the impression of trained dental professionals and laypeople towards the modified smile esthetics. Materials and Methods. Twenty-six images were randomized in a survey and graded according to attractiveness by the orthodontists, general dentists, and laypeople. Photographs of gingival display, midline diastema, central incisor crown length, and lateral incisor crown width were manipulated with five minor changes in each. For smile arc and buccal corridor, two major changes were incorporated besides the ideal photograph. One-way ANOVA and Post Hoc analysis of the responses were measured for each group. Results. Most evaluators opined that the ideal smile in each category was the most acceptable. Orthodontists were more perceptive and exacting in accepting variations in the smile arc and buccal corridors. Dental professionals and laypeople indicated that either complete absence or a 0.5 mm of alterations in a gingival display, midline diastema, and crown length makes a smile beautiful and pleasant. Changes in crown width were not perceivable by all the three groups. Conclusion. Eastern Arabic laymen are more conscious about alterations in gingival display, midline diastema, and crown length in their smile. Hence, the orthodontist should pay attention to these factors during any orthodontic treatment. PMID:27774105

  2. Retention and recruitment of general dentists in an adjunct teaching model-A pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J Howe

    Full Text Available Retention and recruitment of part time clinical adjunct faculty members in dental education is becoming increasingly difficult as dental schools come to rely on this workforce for their increased involvement in clinical education. Contributing factors include full time faculty shortage, aging workforce, practice and student debt, practice and family commitments, and financial compensation. This study attempts to ascertain barriers to teaching so appropriate strategies can be formulated to address this issue.In the spring of 2016 an email survey was sent to current and former adjunct faculty members to ascertain demographics and retention and recruitment strategies. Descriptive analyses were completed for all variables in the sample.Twenty nine of forty six subjects responded to the survey with a response rate of 63%. Subjects over the age of sixty comprised 55% with only 17% being under the age of forty five. Overall family and practice commitments along with compensation were the primary barriers to teaching part time. For new dentists, student loan debt was the primary barrier to teaching. Travel to teach was also a barrier as 70% of respondents drove 200 miles or less to the dental school.The study demonstrated that the aging part time work force is a great concern and new part time clinical adjunct faculty members must be recruited. Barriers to recruitment and retention of faculty must be considered and addressed to sustain this teaching model.

  3. Defensive dentistry and the young dentist - this isn't what we signed up for.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, A Al

    2017-11-24

    Why did I want to become a dentist? I wanted a job where I would be respected as a professional and could change the lives of others, using my hands. This, I thought, would be my ideal profession; one where I could walk into work with a smile on my face every day. Cue dental school a place where one is trained to become competent in all areas of general dentistry. As readers will appreciate, dentistry is a vast field and the question that comes to mind is how so many diverse and varied topics can be jam packed into a five-year course. There has always been a debate about what to put in, and therefore leave out. At my particular dental school, the first two years covered basic scientific theory, leaving three years to get into clinical dentistry with some 'other' aspects sprinkled in. Some of these aspects included general communication skills, record keeping and one or two practice visits at fancy dental practices to see how good life was as a general dental practitioner. In light of the profession's current climate and the rise of defensive dentistry, I aim to reflect on why many young graduates from all over the country feel out of touch with the profession so early on in their careers, and why some of these 'other' aspects of dentistry should have been covered much more comprehensively to prepare us for the big wide world.

  4. Are we eliminating cures with antibiotic abuse? A study among dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goud, S R; Nagesh, L; Fernandes, S

    2012-01-01

    The theme of "World Health Day 2011" is "combat drug resistance- No action today, No cure tomorrow" which is very pertinent. The present study emphatically demonstrates the current issues related to the overwhelming concerns regarding indiscriminate use of antibiotics, leading to a bleak tomorrow where cures may be few. To know the prescription pattern of antibiotics for various dental procedures by dental practitioners. A pretested questionnaire was used which contained two sections pertaining to prescription of antibiotics for healthy and medically compromised patients during various dental procedures, with therapeutic and prophylactic considerations. Questionnaire response rate of 66.6% was observed. Amoxicillin emerged as the most preferred antibiotic for dental procedures both as a therapeutic and a prophylactic drug. 50% of the endodontists and 40% of the general dentists opted to prescribe antibiotics during root canal therapy where ideally operative intervention would have sufficed. Overuse of antibiotics for routine scaling and extraction was observed. The dental profession as a whole needs to acquire a deeper understanding of the global effects of superfluous antibiotic prescription. Antibiotics when judiciously used are precise life-saving drugs.

  5. Expected Changes in Regulation and Licensure: Influence on Future Education of Dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalanotto, Frank A

    2017-09-01

    This article is based on the following assumptions about dental care in the United States: there is an access to oral health care problem; the number of individuals with dental insurance is increasing; the demographics of the dental profession does not mirror the overall demographics of the U.S. population; and emerging oral health workforce models may help improve access to care. Based on these assumptions, this article explores related licensure and regulatory factors that will influence the education and practice of dentists in the future. The issues discussed are licensure of emerging oral health practitioners, mobility of the dental health care workforce, corporate ownership of dental practices, ethical issues related to use of human subjects in dental licensure examinations, interprofessional education and practice, and health care reform. The licensure and regulatory bodies discussed are the Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA), state legislatures and boards of dentistry, federal legislative activities, judicial activities, and the Federal Trade Commission. Recommendations based on this discussion are presented. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21 st Century."

  6. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices of Pediatric Dentists Regarding Speech Evaluation of Patients: Implications for Dental Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eyndhoven, Lisa; Chussid, Steven; Yoon, Richard K

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to determine pediatric dentists' attitudes about speech evaluation in the dental setting and assess their knowledge of speech development and pathology. In October 2013, members of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry were invited to participate in an electronic questionnaire. Categories of questions were demographics, attitudes and confidence in speech pathology, and theoretical and practical knowledge of speech development and speech pathology. Theoretical knowledge was assessed using questions about phonetics and speech milestones. Practical knowledge was determined with three 30-second interview-style video clips. A total of 539 responses were received for a response rate of 10.4%. The majority of respondents reported feeling that speech evaluation should be part of the pediatric dental visit (72.8%) and felt confident in their ability to detect speech issues (73.2%). However, they did poorly on the theoretical knowledge questions (41.9%) as well as the practical knowledge questions (8.5%). There was a statistically significant difference in theoretical score between gender and type of occupation (pspeech issues, they currently have insufficient training and knowledge to do so.

  7. Edgar Buchanan: dentist and popular character actor in movies and television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, A G; Christen, J A

    2001-07-01

    Edgar Buchanan, D.D.S., pursued a diverse mix of careers during his lifetime: as he practiced dentistry, he also worked as a popular film and television actor. Although he eventually relinquished a full-time dental practice for acting, he continued his commitment to clinical dentistry. Acting in 100 films and four television series across a 35-year span (1939-1975). He personified a scheming, yet well-meaning rustic who specialized in "cracker-barrel" philosophy. Typically, he was cast in classic western movies as a bewhiskered character actor. In several films he played a frontier dentist who was always portrayed in a sympathetic and authentic manner. His unique gravelly voice, subtle facial expressions, folksy mannerisms and portly build enabled Buchanan to step into a wide variety of character roles. His most memorable television role was in the classic situation comedy, "Petticoat Junction," (1963-1970), where he played Uncle Joe, a folksy, lovable, free-loader whose many entertaining schemes created chaos.

  8. Creating a new generation of pediatric dentists: a paradigm shift in training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Gomez, Francisco J; Silva, Daniela Rodrigues P; Law, Clarice S; Pizzitola, Rebecca L; John, Brendan; Crall, James J

    2014-12-01

    The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) School of Dentistry has implemented a Health Resources and Services Administration-funded program to prepare dentists for the complex and comprehensive needs of pediatric patients within rapidly changing demographics and a paradigm shift in dentistry. Traditional dental education has focused on how to respond to oral disease, whereas UCLA's program shifts the paradigm to emphasize early assessment, risk-based prevention, and disease management. A holistic approach to dental care that considers social and environmental determinants is used with minimally invasive techniques for restorative care. To support this change, pediatric dental residents receive traditional training combined with new didactics, advocacy opportunities, and applied learning experiences at community-based organizations. These new elements teach residents to recognize the causal factors of disease and to identify interventions that promote oral health at the individual, family, community, and policy level. Consequently, they are better prepared to treat a diverse group of patients who historically have faced the greatest burden of disease as well as an increased number of barriers to accessing oral health care; these consist of low-income, minority, and/or pediatric populations including children with special health needs. The program's ultimate goal is for residents to deploy these skills in treating vulnerable populations and to demonstrate greater interest in collaborating with non-dental health providers and community organizations to increase access to dental services in private or public health practice settings.

  9. B. T. Whitney. Physician, dentist, inventor, entrepreneur and dedicated figther for dentistry and dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Malvin E

    2004-02-01

    In the mid-1850s, Western New York had become one of the most highly industrialized areas of the nation, largely because it was the terminus of the Erie Canal. Buffalo was among the foremost cities in the country; and its dentists were actively establishing a professional association. What was lacking, however, was a dental school to serve the whole area, including the territory to the west. Four leading men in the profession, who also started one of America's greatest and most innovative dental manufacturing companies, struggled to achieve that goal. Foremost among them was Benajah Ticknor Whitney, a physician, who had received his M.D. at the first medical school west of the Hudson River. But his interest in dentistry developed early in his training, and Dr. Whitney went on to become one of the state's outstanding dental leaders. Sadly, he didn't live to see his dream fulfilled. It would take 20 more years--and a hard fight to overcome opposition within the profession--until a university-affiliated school was established in Buffalo.

  10. Postures of pediatric dentists toward endodontic standards and acceptance of novel technology in Udaipur city: A questionnaire survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chirag M Raiyani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To ascertain the current clinical practice of pediatric dentists involves utilization of a variety of materials and recent technological advances. Materials and Methods: A total of 218 pediatric dentists (118 males and 100 females were selected for the study those are registered in IDA Udaipur and surveyed using a self-administered questionnaire. Participants were divided into three groups according to their year of experience in the clinical practice. A total of 11 structured questions presented through a pilot study done among the 10% of the total participant′s related to endodontic procedure were used for the study. Frequency and percentage distribution were calculated. Results: The results showed that glass bead sterilization (41.3% was the most commonly used method for sterilization. Isolation during the pulpectomy procedure performed using cotton rolls and suction tip (40.4%. Most of them used hand instruments (58.3% among those; K-file (42.7% was widely used. Radiographic method (53.7% was most common procedure for determination of working length. Single sitting pulpectomy was not commonly preferred. Conclusion:The results of this study indicated that endodontic technology and materials for pulpectomy procedures are slowly being adapted in clinical practice in India. Therefore, pediatric dentist should update their knowledge and practice with current technology.

  11. [Through the North of France: Laveran's dynasty (from the dentist surgeons to the 1907 Nobel prize of Medicine)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulinier, G

    1997-01-01

    The historians of dentistry met two men named Laveran - both with unknown surnames - among the 18th century Parisian "experts" for teeth. Having discovered some notarial documents concerning them, the author was anxious to know more about them and was driven to investigate their possible relationship with Alphonse Laveran, who was born however more than one century later. A special impulse to this research resulted from the fact - learnt from the Lille archives - that Louis Laveran, the grand-father of Alphonse, was born in the same tiny place as one of the two Parisians mentioned above, and was himself a dentist surgeon. At last, the author could identify the ties existing between these Laverans, and collect a lot of informations about their family, from which a selection is given here. In short, the great-great-grand-father of Alphonse was established as a weaver in a small town of the south-West of France (Montesquieu-Volvestre, Haute-Garonne). Among his sons were the two Laverans mentioned above, who became dentist surgeons in Paris. One of them was Pierre Laveran. He was the specialist who was called to straighten the teeth of the young archduchess Marie-Antoinette, before her wedding with the future Louis XVI, in 1770. Then he was appointed as the dentist surgeon of Their Imperial and Royal Majesties in Vienna. Married with Anna Theresia Peska, he died there in 1796, leaving four children born between 1781 and 1787. ...

  12. Dentists' training and willingness to treat adolescents with learning disabilities: the mediating role of social and clinical factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, C F; Humphris, G M; Freeman, R

    2013-12-01

    To test a theoretical model based on Cohen's dental profession factors (training; practitioner attitudes; geography) to investigate practitioners' willingness to treat adolescents with learning disabilities (LD) in primary dental care. A sample of all 537 primary care dentists working in a mainly urban area of Northern Ireland and a more rural area of Scotland. Willingness to treat adolescents with LD. Questionnaire survey of demographic profile, undergraduate education, current knowledge, attitudes towards individuals with LD and willingness to treat this patient group. A path analytical approach (multiple meditational model) was used. Three hundred dentists participated giving a valid response rate of 61%. Undergraduate education and current knowledge (training) strengthened a social model perspective promoting positive attitudes and willingness to treat adolescents with LD. Undergraduate education and current knowledge about disability did not significantly contribute to dentists whose attitudes were underpinned by the medical model of disability. Therefore geography (rural or urban location) was not an influential factor in willingness to treat adolescents with LD. This does not exclude the possibility that area of work may have an influence as a consequence of undergraduate university attended. This model identifies the importance of undergraduate and continuing dental education with regard to modifying professional attitudes (social and clinical factors) to assist practitioners treat adolescents with LD and provide them with inclusive dental services in primary dental care.

  13. Role models and professional development in dentistry: an important resource: The views of early career stage dentists at one academic health science centre in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed Osama, O; Gallagher, J E

    2018-02-01

    The importance of role models, and their differing influence in early, mid- and late careers, has been identified in the process of professional development of medical doctors. There is a paucity of evidence within dentistry on role models and their attributes. To explore the views of early career dentists on positive and negative role models across key phases of professional development, together with role models' attributes and perceived influence. This is a phenomenological study collecting qualitative data through semi-structured interviews based on a topic guide. Dentists in junior (core training) hospital posts in one academic health science centre were all invited to participate. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using framework analysis. Twelve early career stage dentists, 10 of whom were female, reported having role models, mainly positive, in their undergraduate and early career phases. Participants defined role models' attributes in relation to three distinct domains: clinical attributes, personal qualities and teaching skills. Positive role models were described as "prioritising the patient's best interests", "delivering learner-centred teaching and training" and "exhibiting a positive personality", whilst negative role models demonstrated the converse. Early career dentists reported having largely positive dentist role models during- and post-dental school and report their impact on professional values and aspirations, learning outcomes and career choice. The findings suggest that these early career dentists in junior hospital posts have largely experienced and benefitted from positive role models, notably dentists, perceived as playing an important and creative influence promoting professionalism and shaping the career choices of early career stage dentists. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Besøget hos tandlægen og tandlægeskræk [The visit at the dentist and dental fear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Rod

    2006-01-01

    English summary: This chapter contributes in simple terms to a better understanding of dental fears and provides among other things the following advice for patients: 1) Ask questions. It saves you and the dentist time in the long run. 2) Make precise deals and make sure you know that the dentist...... understands your expectations. 3) Take frequent pauses and set up handsignals if you have to stop in the middle of treatment....

  15. Comparative Evaluation of the Complementary and Alternative Medicine Therapy and Conventional Therapy Use for Musculoskeletal Disorders Management and Its Association with Job Satisfaction among Dentists of West India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Devanand; Batra, Renu; Mahajan, Shveta; Bhaskar, Dara John; Jain, Ankita; Shiju, Mohammed; Yadav, Ankit; Chaturvedi, Mudita; Gill, Shruti; Verma, Renuka; Dalai, Deepak Ranjan; Gupta, Rajendra Kumar

    2014-10-01

    Musculoskeletal problems have become a significant issue in the profession of dentistry. There are currently no recommended effective disease-preventing and modifying remedies. High prevalence rates for musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among dentists have been reported in the literature. Complementary and alternative medicine can be helpful in managing and preventing the MSDs. The purpose of this study was to determine if dentists in the western part of India are using complementary and alternative medicine therapies for MSDs, and also to find if those who use complementary and alternative medicine therapies have greater job/career satisfaction compared to conventional therapy (CT) users. Dentists of western India registered under the Dental Council of India (N = 2166) were recruited for the study. Data were analyzed using univariate and bivariate analyses and logistic regression. A response rate of 73% (n = 1581) was obtained, of which 79% (n = 1249) was suffering from MSDs. The use of complementary and alternative medicine or CT was reported by 90% (n = 1124) of dentists with MSDs. Dentists using complementary and alternative medicine reported greater health (P alternative medicine therapies may improve the quality of life and enhance job satisfaction for a dentist who suffers from MSDs.

  16. Prenatal dental care: evaluation of professional knowledge of obstetricians and dentists in the cities of Londrina/PR and Bauru/SP, Brazil, 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Régia Luzia Zanata

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess the current knowledge and recommendations of obstetricians and dentists as to the dental care to pregnant patients in the cities of Londrina/PR and Bauru/SP, Brazil. Questionnaires were distributed to professionals of both cities, arguing on the following issues: oral health during pregnancy; contact between prenatal care and dental care providers; prenatal fluoride supplementation; selection of therapeutic agents for local anesthesia, pain control and treatment of infection; and dental procedures that can be performed during each trimester. Data were analyzed by frequency of responses and statistical analyses were carried out using X² (type of workplace/service and t test (time since graduation, significant if p<0.05. Seventy-nine obstetricians and 37 dentists responded the questionnaires. Most physicians referred the patient to dental care only when a source of dental problem was mentioned, limiting the adoption of a preventive approach. Forty-three percent of dentists and 34% of obstetricians did not know the potential contribution of periodontal infection as a risk factor for preterm low birth-weight babies. There was divergence from scientific literature as to the recommendation of local anesthetics (dentists and obstetricians, prenatal fluoride supplementation (obstetricians and dental radiographs (dentists. The findings of this survey with dentists and obstetricians showed that dental management during pregnancy still presents some deviations from scientific literature recommendations, indicating the need to update these health care professionals in order to establish guidelines for prenatal dental care.

  17. Musculoskeletal disorders and perception of working conditions: A survey of Brazilian dentists in São Paulo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artênio José Ísper Garbin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate the prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders amongst dentists who work in public clinics in São Paulo, Brazil, to investigate their awareness of the presence of risk factors in the workplace, disability due to pain, and the influence of pain on this awareness and disability. Material and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 204 dentists who work in public health clinics in the northwest of São Paulo, Brazil. The data was collected through interviews, using the Nordic Questionnaire and the Work-Related Activities that May Contribute to Job-Related Pain Questionnaire. In the case of workers who reported pain, the Pain Disability Questionnaire (PDQ and the Numeric Pain Scale were also administered. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 21.0. Results: Most dentists (81.4% had musculoskeletal disorders, especially in the neck, shoulders and lower back. We found that the presence of symptoms in the neck (15.7%, shoulders (12.7% and lower back (15.7% were the major causes of absenteeism over the past 12 months. Occupational risk factors perceived as the most problematic ones were: bending or twisting the back in an awkward way, continuing to work when injured or hurt and working in the same position for long periods. Comparison between the symptomatic and asymptomatic dentists showed a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05 in the perception of occupational risk factors. The analysis of the intensity of pain and disability with PDQ in the symptomatic dentists showed an average pain intensity of 3.8. Mean scores of the PDQ total (11.46 and its dimensions – functional condition (7.1 and psychosocial condition (4.4 – suggest a moderate disability in the dental surgeons. There was a strong t correlation (r = 0.697 between pain intensity and the total score of disability caused by pain. Conclusions: Pain and work-related musculoskeletal disorders interfere significantly with the

  18. Exposure control practices for administering nitrous oxide: A survey of dentists, dental hygienists, and dental assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiano, James M; Steege, Andrea L; Sweeney, Marie H

    2017-06-01

    Engineering, administrative, and work practice controls have been recommended for many years to minimize exposure to nitrous oxide during dental procedures. To better understand the extent to which these exposure controls are used, the NIOSH Health and Safety Practices Survey of Healthcare Workers was conducted among members of professional practice organizations representing dentists, dental hygienists and dental assistants. The anonymous, modular, web-based survey was completed by 284 dental professionals in private practice who administered nitrous oxide to adult and/or pediatric patients in the seven days prior to the survey. Use of primary engineering controls (i.e., nasal scavenging mask and/or local exhaust ventilation (LEV) near the patient's mouth) was nearly universal, reported by 93% and 96% of respondents who administered to adult (A) and pediatric (P) patients, respectively. However, adherence to other recommended precautionary practices were lacking to varying degrees, and were essentially no different among those administering nitrous oxide to adult or pediatric patients. Examples of work practices which increase exposure risk, expressed as percent of respondents, included: not checking nitrous oxide equipment for leaks (41% A; 48% P); starting nitrous oxide gas flow before delivery mask or airway mask was applied to patient (13% A; 12% P); and not turning off nitrous oxide gas flow before turning off oxygen flow to the patient (8% A; 7% P). Absence of standard procedures to minimize worker exposure to nitrous oxide (13% of all respondents) and not being trained on safe handling and administration of nitrous oxide (3%) were examples of breaches of administrative controls which may also increase exposure risk. Successful management of nitrous oxide emissions should include properly fitted nasal scavenging masks, supplemental LEV (when nitrous oxide levels cannot be adequately controlled using nasal masks alone), adequate general ventilation, regular

  19. Diet, exercise and mental-wellbeing of healthcare professionals (doctors, dentists and nurses in Pakistan

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    Waqas Ahmad

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. “Health is wealth” is a time tested adage. Health becomes more relevant when it comes to professionals whose job is to provide people with services that maintain an optimum state of mental, physical and social well-being. Healthcare professionals (HCP differ from general population in regards to the nature of their work, stress, burnout etc. which begs the need to have a robust state of health for the ones who provide it to others. We initiated this study to see if healthcare professionals “practice what they preach others.”Methods. We employed a cross-sectional study design with convenience-sampling technique. Questionnaires were administered directly to the three groups of healthcare professionals (Doctors, Dentists and Nurses across the province Punjab after their consent. 1,319 healthcare professionals took part in the study (response rate of 87.35. Warwick Edinburg Mental Wellbeing Scale (WEMWBS was used to assess mental wellbeing. USDA Dietary Guidelines-2010 were employed to quantify diet. American Heart Association (AHA guidelines were employed for the analysis of exercise.Results. A total of 1,190 healthcare professionals formed the final sample with doctors and nurses forming the major proportion. Out of 1,190 participants only one healthcare professional was found to eat according to USDA Dietary Guidelines; others ate more of protein group and less of fruits, dairy and vegetable groups. 76% did not perform any exercise. 71.5% worked >48 h/week. More than 50% of healthcare professionals were sleeping <7 h/day. WEMWBS score of the entire sample was 47.97 ± 9.53 S.D.Conclusion. Our findings suggest that healthcare professionals do not practice what they preach. Their mental wellbeing, diet and exercise habits are not up to the mark and should be improved to foster the whole healthcare system for individual and community benefits.

  20. Investigation of musculoskeletal disorders and its related factors in dentists by REBA method among dental clinics faculties in Tehran in 2014

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    Sara Koosha

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Constant dynamic and static activities are considered as the main cause of musculoskeletal problems among dentists. The aim of this study was to evaluate the musculoskeletal problems and related factors among dentists in specialized clinics and dental schools in Tehran in 2014 using the REBA method. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, the dentists from clinics of dental schools in Tehran were selected as individual targets. Nordic anddemopghrphic questionnaire were completed through interview from dentists. In order to assess the musculoskeletal disorders, REBA method (Rapid Entire Body Assessment was used. In this method, positions and postures of the dentists during their work was observed and recorded. Data was analyzed using Regression Logestic test. Results: The obtained results showed that among 100 dentist, 6% were in the very high risk (15-11 for musculoskeletal problems and 17% and 25% were in high-risk (10-8 and average risk (7-4, respectively. Based on the findings from Nordic questionnaire, the most skeletal- muscle travail were related to the neck (60%, lumbar (58% and rear (46% consequently. It seemed that factors such as gender, body mass index (BMI, height, specialty, body posture during the work (standing or sitting, smoking and using the direct or indirect vision, had an impact on the musculoskeletal disorders. Conclusion: Findings from the final scoring of REBA showed that a high percentage of dentists were struggling with skeletal- muscle problems and they were in moderate to high range of risk for these type of disorders.

  1. Persepsi anak terhadap dokter gigi pada Rumah Sakit Gigi Mulut Halimah Dg. Sikati di Makassar(Children’s perception of their dentist at Halimah Dg.Sikati Dental Hospital in Makassar)

    OpenAIRE

    Ayub Irmadani Anwar

    2014-01-01

    Management of child behavior begins when the children enters the dental environment and continues until they leave it . Fear of dentist and dental treatment have been considered a major hindrance to provide a quality dental services. Establish a friendly relationship with children is important for dentist to combat patient’s fears and to deliver effective and efficient treatment. The aim of this study was to assess children’s feelings and attitudes toward their dentist in Halim...

  2. Esthetic Evaluation of Anterior Single-Tooth Implants with Different Abutment Designs-Patients' Satisfaction Compared to Dentists' Observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Ratnadeep; Gresnigt, Marco M M; Mahesh, Kavita; Dilbaghi, Anjali; Cune, Marco S

    2017-07-01

    To correlate patients' satisfaction and dentists' observations regarding two abutment designs used for single crowns in the esthetic zone: a divergent one (control) and a curved one (experimental), with special emphasis on muco-gingival esthetics. Twenty-six patients with nonadjacent missing teeth in the esthetic zone were enrolled in a randomized clinical trial (within-subject comparison). Two implants placed in each were restored using abutments of different geometry. Patients' appreciation was assessed on a visual analog scale (VAS) by recording answers to three questions, and dentists' appreciation was determined by means of the Pink Esthetic Score (PES) at T0 (crown cementation, baseline) and at T12 (1 year post-cementation). ANOVA with post hoc analysis was used to identify differences between groups and at different moments in time. Pearson correlations were calculated between all variables, both at T0 and at T12. No statistically significant differences were found at any time between the control and experimental abutment design, either for the PES or for the VAS score. PES slightly improved after 1 year, as did the VAS rating related to functioning with the implant-crown compared to the natural teeth. All PES and VAS scores demonstrated highly significant correlation. Both patient satisfaction and professional appreciation of muco-gingival conditions after single implant treatment in the esthetic zone were high; however, the curved, experimental abutment design performed no better than the conventional, divergent type. Curved abutment design does not significantly impact crown or gingival esthetics as assessed by PES and VAS scored by dentists and patients, respectively. © 2016 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  3. The 'global interconnectedness' of dentist migration: a qualitative study of the life-stories of international dental graduates in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Madhan; Brennan, David S; Spencer, A John; Short, Stephanie D

    2015-05-01

    The migration of dentists is a major challenge contributing to the oral health system crisis in many countries. This paper explores the origins of the dentist migration problem through a study on international dental graduates, who had migrated to Australia. Life-stories of 49 international dental graduates from 22 countries were analysed in order to discern significant themes and patterns. We focused on their home country experience, including stories on early life and career choice; dental student life; professional life; social and political life; travels; and coming to Australia. Our participants exhibited a commitment to excellence in earlier stages of life and had cultivated a desire to learn more and be involved with the latest technology. Dentists from low- and middle-income countries were also disappointed by the lack of opportunity and were unhappy with the local ethos. Some pointed towards political unrest. Interestingly, participants also carried prior travel learnings and unforgettable memories contributing to their migration. Family members and peers had also influenced participants. These considerations were brought together in four themes explaining the desire to migrate: 'Being good at something', 'Feelings of being let down', 'A novel experience' and 'Influenced by someone'. Even if one of these four themes dominated the narrative, we found that more than one theme, however, coexisted for most participants. We refer to this worldview as 'Global interconnectedness', and identify the development of migration desire as a historical process, stimulated by a priori knowledge (and interactions) of people, place and things. This qualitative study has enriched our understanding on the complexity of the dental migration experience. It supports efforts to achieve greater technical co-operation in issues such as dental education, workforce surveillance and oral health service planning within the context of ongoing global efforts on health professional

  4. Transcultural adaptation and reliability of the Spanish version of a questionnaire about oral hygiene advice given by dentists in Chile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilze Maldupa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To adapt and evaluate validity and reliability of the Spanish version of a questionnaire about oral hygiene advice given by dentists in Chile Materials and methods: A validation study was conducted according to recommendations of COSMIN. The original questionnaire was adapted from English into Spanish using translation, back translation, expert review and pilot test sample by 56 dentists. The instrument consisted of 3 sections: recommendations for oral hygiene, relevance given to delivery of oral hygiene instruction and training and experience in delivering oral hygiene recommendations. It was reapplied in 5 of them a week later. Reliability was measured with internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha, test-retest reliability (Cohen’s kappa and weighted kappa and measurement error (limits of agreement, LdA. Content validity was evaluated by experts and construct validity by using convergent validity (Pearson correlation. Results: A good level of internal consistency that applies to 5 items (Cronbach’s alpha=0.73 was obtained. For items on a nominal scale, Cohen Kappa coefficient was 0.80 (95% CI=0.64 to 0.95 and for ordinal items weighted kappa coefficient (linear weighting was 0.76 (95% CI=0.65 to 0.88. The difference between the scores calculated for the measurements was 1 standard deviation 2.35. Ninety five percent of the differences were between -5.7 to 3.7 (+/-4.7 LoA=1 and the variance of the total score was 29- 41. A good level of convergent validity (Pearson correlation=0.63 was obtained. Conclusion: The final questionnaire is valid and reliable to be applied to Chilean dentists with a profile like those included in this study in order to identify and quantify the oral hygiene instruction they provide to patients. Future studies should assess validity and reliability of this adaptation for other Spanish-speaking countries.

  5. Women's Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Women have unique health issues. And some of the health issues that affect both men and women can affect women differently. Unique issues ... and men also have many of the same health problems. But these problems can affect women differently. ...

  6. Why dentists don't use rubber dam during endodontics and how to promote its usage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madarati, Ahmad A

    2016-02-25

    This survey study aimed at investigating the frequency of rubber dam use during root canal treatment, identifying influencing factors for not using it by Saudi general dental practitioners (GDPs) and endodontists. It also aimed at identifying measures that increase rubber dam usage. After obtaining an ethical approval, two pilot studies were conducted on staff members at Taibah University College of Dentistry and a group of GDPs. A final online survey was constructed comprising 17 close-ended questions divided into six categories: demographics, endodontic practice, rubber dam use, alternative isolation methods, reasons for not using rubber dam, and measures and policies that increase its usage. The survey was emailed to 375 GDPs randomly selected from the dental register and all endodontists (n = 53) working in the western province, Saudi Arabia. Data were analyzed using the Chi-square and Linear-by-Linear association tests at p ≤ 0.05. The proportion of endodontists who used rubber dam (84.8 %) was significantly greater than that of GDPs (21.6 %) (p < 0.001). Significantly the highest proportion (40.5 %) did not use rubber dam because of unavailability at working place. Most rubber dam none-users (69.25 %) used a combination of other isolation means. The highest proportion of those who used rubber dam were working in the governmental sector (54.3 %). Among rubber dam users, the greatest proportion graduated from Saudi Arabia (57.8 %) compared to those graduated from Egypt (34.3 %) and Syria (22.4 %). There was a significant correlation between the patterns of rubber dam use during undergraduate training and its usage after graduation (p = 0.001). The highest proportion of participants (48.1 %) reported better undergraduate education as the most important factor that would increase rubber dam use in dental practice. Using of rubber dam was not common in Saudi general dental practice. Dentists must follow the recommended standards of care. Place of work and

  7. Clinician-related factors behind the decision to extract an asymptomatic lower third molar. A cross-sectional study based on Spanish and Portuguese dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves-Pereira, D; Pereira-Silva, D; Figueiredo, R; Gay-Escoda, C; Valmaseda-Castellón, E

    2017-09-01

    Scientific literature estimates that around 18 to 40 % of asymptomatic third molars are extracted. The aims of the present study were to determine the indications for extraction of asymptomatic lower third molars in a sample of Spanish and Portuguese dentists, and to relate these indications to the clinicians' training and professional experience. A survey consisting of 15 cases of asymptomatic lower third molars was emailed to Portuguese and Spanish dentists. The clinicians were asked to assess the level of difficulty of the extractions and to make a reasoned recommendation based on the panoramic radiographs, gender and age of the patients. 381 clinicians filled in the questionnaires. Most of the professionals had over 13 years of clinical experience. The number of Spanish clinicians with postgraduate degrees in Oral Surgery was significantly higher. On average, 42% of respondents recommended extraction of asymptomatic third molars. The indication for extraction was significantly higher among Portuguese dentists. Clinical experience was negatively correlated with the perceived extraction difficulty (pPortuguese dentists were more in favour of removing asymptomatic lower third molars than the Spanish dentists, although the latter had a higher proportion of professionals with postgraduate studies in Oral Surgery.

  8. Molar incisor hypomineralisation: experience and perceived challenges among dentists specialising in paediatric dentistry and a group of general dental practitioners in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkani, M; Balmer, R C; Homer, R M; Day, P F; Duggal, M S

    2016-04-01

    To assess the views and experience of the UK dentists specialising in paediatric dentistry (trainees) about molar incisor hypomineralisation (MIH) and compare the findings with the responses from a group of UK general dental practitioners. A web-based questionnaire was sent to dentists undergoing specialist training in paediatric dentistry. The same questionnaire was completed by a group of general dentists who stated an interest in treating children, with various levels of experience. The questionnaire sought information on clinical experience and the views of the dentists on the impact of MIH on children and families. Specialty trainees (37) from different paediatric dental departments in the UK completed the online survey, giving a total response rate of 71%. The questionnaire was also completed by 31 general dental practitioners. There was difficulty in distinguishing MIH from other conditions for both groups. Increased sensitivity of affected teeth was the most frequently encountered problem with 51% of the trainees and 76% of the dentists saying this was often or always a challenge. The trainees were particularly concerned about the pain children experienced and about the appearance of the condition. Both groups felt that parental anxiety occurred in almost all cases. Both groups felt that MIH presents several clinical challenges and has a negative effect on the quality of life of the affected children and their families. There were significant differences in the views and perceptions between the two groups.

  9. [Study of the labor market for dentists who recieved Norwegian authorization during 1972-1975. I. Waiting time and alternative employment before the 1st relevant job].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugejorden, O

    1977-07-01

    The purpose of the investigation was to monitor changes in the labour market situation for dentists who received authorization to practise dentistry in Norway during the years 1972-1975. Data was collected by postal questionnaire during April/May of the year following authorization, except for the 1972 cohort, which was contacted the second year after authorization. A 92-95 per cent response rate was achieved using one follow-up (Table 1). The percentage of respondents who waited 8 weeks or more to acquire a job in dentistry increased from 15 for those authorized in 1972 to 36 for the 1975 group (Table 3). The proportion of dentists who took paid employment other than dentistry, increased from just over 3 per cent for the 1973 to 14 per cent for the 1975 cohort (Table 4). This development has occured despite a decrease in the number of dentists receiving authorization each year and has resulted in a limited emigration of dentists. It is suggested that the favourable supply of dentists in relation to existing demand for dental services presents an ideal opportunity for attempting to solve dental health problems which have received inadequate attention in the past.

  10. [A labor market survey among dentists with Norwegian authorization from 1972-1976. IV. Geographical distribution according to place of work].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugejorden, O

    1978-06-01

    The 740 dentists authorized to practise dentistry in Norway during the years 1972-1976 were contacted by postal questionnaires in April/May the first and second year following authorization. Those authorized in 1972 and 1976 were surveyed only once, in 1972 and 1977, respectively. The response rate was always higher than 89%. Urban/rural and regional maldistribution of civilian dentists was reduced during the years 1972-1977 (Tables 1-7). The dentist/population ratio fails to allow for variation in need and demand for dental care, the use of ancillary personnel, demographic, socio-economic and cultural factors. Consequently, care should be exercised when judging the adequacy or otherwise of the supply of dentists by these results. The proportion of respondents whose place of work and home address at the start of dental studies, was the same county, increased during the observation period (Fig. 1), when in fact an opposite trend had been expected because of the progressively more difficult job situation for newly authorized dentists. It was concluded that this tendency to return "home" might be made use of in the efforts to make dental health services equally available and accessible to all citizens.

  11. Statistical survey of ten criteria established by Portaria 453 of Brazilian Ministry of Health for dentists who use X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Claudio Domingues de

    2005-01-01

    In July 1998, the Ministry of Health (MS) published the Guidelines for Radiological Protection in Medical and Dental Radiodiagnosis that became known as Portaria 453 - Ordinance 453. This study is designed to evaluate the dentists of Rio de Janeiro on the knowledge and application of the criteria laid down by Ordinance. For this, it was sent to dentists, a form with 13 questions. The issues are related to the use of personal protective clothing (VPI), working procedures for the exam and processing of the image, radioprotection training and quality control. Of 1528 dentists, only 40% have a copy of the Ordinance. Regarding the use of VPI, 94% has lead apron and 76% thyroid shield. Only 63% of dentists observe patients during exposure to X-rays. In 96% of doctor's rooms the revelation of the film is made in a portable box, 71% of these use the visual method to stop processing. The results show the need for greater dissemination of the Ordinance by the odontologist's associations; for an educational work on the topics discussed and training that allow the dentists be prepared to apply the correct work procedures in the production of diagnostic imaging with X-rays

  12. Periodontal disease and women's health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Maria Luisa; Brandi, Maria Luisa; Martelli, Marialaura; Nobili, Piero; Medico, Enzo; Martelli, Francesco

    2017-06-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) is a multifactorial inflammatory condition in which inappropriate interaction between the host immune response and specific groups of bacterial pathogens leads to destruction of connective and bone tissues supporting the tooth. Dissemination of pathogens, toxins, and immune complexes from and to periodontal lesions is at the basis of the increasingly recognized association between PD and various systemic diseases (SDs). Considering the growing attention of the medical community to "gender medicine", this review focuses on the association between PD and six systemic conditions heavily impacting women's health, with the aim of providing evidence in support of a joint effort between physicians and dentists to improve clinical management of these conditions. We considered systematic reviews, meta-analyses and narrative reviews evaluating all possible associations between periodontitis, systemic diseases and women. Gender prevalence for PD is discordant, but the literature strongly supports an association between PD and female infertility and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Moreover, PD is bidirectionally linked to several systemic diseases characterized by an established female gender bias, i.e. osteoporosis (OP), cardiovascular diseases (CVD), autoimmunity, Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cancer. Overall, the literature data reviewed here provides a strong foundation for further characterization of molecular and microbial drivers of PD and of several female-prevalent systemic diseases, highlighting the possible importance of a good oral condition in preventing or attenuating women's systemic diseases.

  13. Women in dentistry in South Africa: a survey of their experiences and opinions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, S

    2005-08-01

    Women form an increasingly important part of the dentally trained workforce in South Africa. However, little is known about the professional issues and work-related problems affecting women dentists. A postal survey was undertaken of registered female dental practitioners in the country, with the aim to document their experiences. The survey (i) ascertained their current pattern of work, (ii) identified factors influencing their work patterns and (iii) identified factors that would help women remain in the profession or re-enter it more easily after an absence. A self-administered 50-item questionnaire containing open and closed-ended questions was used. Questions related to professional status, working patterns, practice ownership, postgraduate qualifications and career satisfaction. Nine hundred and sixty questionnaires were sent out and 280 were returned (29% response rate). Although a significant majority were currently practicing (96%), about 20% were employed or worked part-time and 7 reported that they were not in practice at the time of the survey for various reasons including maternity leave, ill-health, retirement or that they were now working outside the dental field. Major factors identified in this study were the women's dual responsibility at home and at work. Few women find themselves in specialist practice, although 68% indicated that they would liked to have specialised. Home responsibilities and inflexible working conditions were commonly reported difficulties experienced with further studies. In addition, the lack of part-time training and the geographical location of training facilities also played a role. Women dentists need more flexible working schedules and conditions of employment. Part-time training and part-time career options should be extended. Retraining and refresher courses for Women dentists who have had a break in their careers should be available to enable them to return sooner and more easily to practice. Tertiary training dental

  14. Working conditions, health and productivity among dentists in Swedish public dental care - a prospective study during a 5-year period of rationalisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolander, B.; Jonker, D.; Winkel, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    ' working conditions, health and productivity during a 5-year period. In 2003 and 2008, 65 dentists responded to questionnaires measuring work conditions and health. Treatment times for patients and productivity were tracked in electronic registers. Paired t-tests showed that the number of treated adult...... patients per dentist increased, and perceived physical working conditions improved while perceived work control and leadership deteriorated. Structural equation modelling showed that physical factors were important for health and productivity. When assessing risks in the work environment, there is a need...... to understand the interaction of effects on working conditions and health due to rationalisations so as to increase the sustainability of production systems. Practioner Summary: Dentistry in Sweden has undergone considerable change. Questionnaire surveys with dentists, undertaken in 2003 and 2008, found...

  15. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in Caxias do Sul’s dentists Prevalência de desordens musculoesqueléticas em odontologistas de Caxias do Sul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Nunes Ávila

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is to identify the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders which affect Caxias do Sul’s dentists, correlating the significant findings. Materials and Methods: Observational, transversal and descriptive study in which a semi-structured questionnaire survey was carried out, containing social-demographic questions, as well as clinical and labor ones (sex, age, position adopted at work, a day’s work, time of performance and corporeal region, prepared on the basis of questionnaires used in other researches. The data was analyzed at the SSPS 11.0 program and, in order to check the association between the symptoms and the variables of the study, the chi-square test was used, with a significance of 5%. Results: The survey was carried out among 71 dentists, 46 men and 25 women, being in average 36 years old. The results show high prevalence (98,6% of musculoskeletal disorders in this professionals, whose most affected areas were: the cervical spine (77,5%, the lumbar spine (73,3% and the shoulders (69%. The relation between musculoskeletal disorders and concomitant sympton was statistically significant for the cervical column (p=0,014, in the elbows (p=0,002, in the forearms (p=0,002 and in the fists/hands/fingers (p=0,015. The possible associations between musculoskeletal disorders and demographic, clinical and labour variables were verified. Conclusions: The conclusion is that the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in such professionals was high and it is probably associated with the characteristics of the professional practice of Dentistry.Objetivo: Identificar a prevalência de desordens musculoesqueléticas que acometem Odontologistas de Caxias do Sul, correlacionando os achados significativos. Materiais e métodos: estudo do tipo observacional transversal descritivo onde foi aplicado um questionário semi-estruturado com questões sócio-demográficas, clínicas e laborais, elaborado com base em question

  16. Measuring the Influence of Galilean Loupe System on Near Visual Acuity of Dentists under Simulated Clinical Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Urlić

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this study was to compare near visual acuity of dentists without optical aids (VSC with near visual acuity of those using the Galilean telescope system (VGA2 with magnification of x 2.5, and the distance of 350 mm in simulated clinical conditions. Methods: The study included 46 dentists (visual acuity 1.0 without correction. A visual acuity testing was carried out using a miniaturized Snellen visual acuity chart which was placed in the cavity of molar teeth mounted in a phantom head in simulated clinical conditions. Near visual acuity for the vicinity was examined: 1 without correction at a distance of 300-400 mm (VSC; 2 with Galilean loupes with magnification of x2.5, focal length of 350mm. Results: The distributions of near visual acuity recorded using VSC and VGA2, 5 systems were compared by the Wilcoxon Signed Rank test. The results obtained by Wilcoxon Signed Rank test pointed to a statistically significant difference in the distribution of recorded visual acuity between the VSC and VGA2 optical systems (W = - 403.5; p <0.001. Conclusion: If using the VGA2, 5 systems, higher values of the near visual acuity were recorded and subsequently compared to near visual acuity without magnifying aids (VSC.

  17. A qualitative evaluation of foundation dentists' and training programme directors' perceptions of clinical audit in general dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornley, P; Quinn, A; Elley, K

    2015-08-28

    This study reports on an investigation into clinical audit (CA) educational and service delivery outcomes in a dental foundation training (DFT) programme. The aim was to investigate CA teaching, learning and practice from the perspective of foundation dentists (FDs) and to record suggestions for improvement. A qualitative research methodology was used. Audio recordings of focus group interviews with FDs were triangulated by an interview with a group of training programme directors (TPDs). The interviews were transcribed and thematically analysed using a 'Framework' approach within Nvivo Data Analysis Software. FDs report considerable learning and behaviour change. However, TPDs have doubts about the long-term effects on service delivery. There can be substantial learning in the clinical, managerial, communication and professionalism domains, and in the development of time management, organisational and team-working skills. Information is provided about use of resources and interaction with teachers and colleagues. CA provides learning opportunities not produced by other educational activities including 'awkward conversations' with team-members in the context of change management and providing feedback. This is relevant when applying the recommendations of the Francis report. This paper should be useful to any dentist conducting audit or team training. Suggestions are made for improvements to resources and support including right touch intervention. Trainers should teach in the 'Goldilocks Zone'.

  18. Fatores associados à sintomatologia dolorosa e qualidade de vida em odontólogos da cidade de Teresina - PI Factors associated with pain symptoms and quality of life of dentists in the city of Teresina - PI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivaldo Coelho Carmo

    2011-03-01

    sociodemographic (age, sex and professional information (time working in profession, work schedule to characterize dentists. The McGILL Protocol of Painful Symptoms was used to evaluate the presence of pain. The WHOQOL-Bref was used to assess quality of life through physical, psychological, social and environmental domains. RESULTS/CONCLUSION: Pain symptoms were reported in 69.7% of individuals, being observed in 77.3% of women and 60.3% of men. The body regions with more prevalent presence of pain were the neck (69.2% and lumbar (69.7% regions. The dentists had high levels of self-perceived satisfaction of quality of life and health. Most subjects reported their quality of life as very good (96%, and only 16.6% reported dissatisfaction with their health. The domains and physical environment of the WHOQOL-Bref showed lower scores than the psychological and social domains. Through multivariate analysis by logistic regression after adjustment for the study, only pain symptoms (OR = 2.51, 95% 1.21-5.21 remained associated with the quality of life of these professionals.

  19. Opinions of dentists on the barriers in providing oral health care to community-dwelling frail older people: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bots-VantSpijker, Pieternella C; Bruers, Josef J M; Bots, Casper P; Vanobbergen, Jacques N O; De Visschere, Luc M J; de Baat, Cees; Schols, Jos M G A

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate to what extent dentists in the Netherlands experience barriers in providing oral health care to community-dwelling older people. As most publications on the barriers in providing oral health care to older people consist of surveys on oral health care in care homes, it was decided to investigate the barriers dentists experience in their own dental practices while providing oral health care to community-dwelling frail older people. A representative sample of 1592 of the approximately 8000 dentists in the Netherlands aged 64 or younger were invited to respond to a questionnaire online. The dentists were asked to respond to 15 opinions concerning oral healthcare provision to community-dwelling frail older people aged 75 years or more who experience problems in physical, psychological and social areas, as well as possible financial problems. The total response rate was 37% (n = 595; male=76%; average age 49). The majority of those who responded agreed that the reimbursement of oral health care to older people is poor. Two thirds of those who responded (66%) agreed that there are limited opportunities to refer the frail and elderly with complex oral healthcare problems to a colleague with specific knowledge and skills. Dentists experienced barriers in two domains; a lack of knowledge and practical circumstances. It was concluded that the dentist's gender, age, year of graduation and the number of patients aged 75 years or more treated weekly were in some respect, related to the barriers encountered. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The Changes in Dentists' Perception and Patient's Acceptance on Amalgam Restoration in Kurdistan-Iraq: A Questionnaire-based Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraj, Bestoon Mohammad; Mohammad, Hawzhen Masoud; Mohammad, Kale Masoud

    2015-04-01

    There has been considerable controversy concerning the health risks and benefits of utilizing mercury-containing amalgam. Across the developing countries, a reduction in the use of dental amalgam in oral health care provision is expected. Assessment of dentists' and patient's attitude of dental amalgam regarding attractiveness, perceived health, and treatment preferences in Kurdistan, Iraq. A 4-page questionnaire comprised two parts, specific for dentist and patient were structured and delivered to each dentist oneself. Both open-ended and close-ended questions about the treatment needs of patients, uses of amalgam and its alternative, the properties and usefulness of different materials. Patient's acceptance was assessed by means of structured questionnaire prepared based on commonly asked questions from routinely daily practice. Questions on the type of filling material in their mouth, previous knowledge of mercury in dental amalgam and disappointment due to mercury hazard and toxicity. They were to indicate their acceptance with filling their cavities by dental amalgam with or without prior information about its mercury content. This part was also accomplished by the dentists participated in this survey. Out of 185 dentists shared, only 39 (21.1%) indicated that amalgam presents no harm for the dentists and patients. While majority of dentists 85 (45.9%) were uncertain about this issue. Amalgam was selected most often 107 (57.8%) as the material of choice for restoring posterior teeth. About 94(50.8%) and 85(45.9%) of the practitioners primarily used glass ionomer/resin-reinforced glass ionomer and composite, respectively. Among 1850 patients received treatment, only 450 (24.32%) claimed to have heard about adverse reactions to dental amalgams. Those who believed it to be safe were 200 (10.82%).Acceptance towards amalgam was 62%. While amalgam was the most common material used for posterior restorations, direct tooth-coloured restorative materials were also

  1. Self-reported oral health, oral hygiene habits and dental service utilization among pregnant women in United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, R

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to describe self-reported oral health, oral hygiene habits and frequency of visits to a dentist among pregnant women visiting maternity hospitals in the United Arab Emirates. A cross-sectional study was conducted, with anonymous structured questionnaires distributed to 800 pregnant women who were chosen at random from attendants of three maternity and child health centres from various geographical areas of UAE, during January-March 2010. The response rate was 93.7% (n = 750). Less than quarter of the participated pregnant women were in their first trimester. Almost a quarter (23.5%) of the women believed that they had periodontal problem currently, while 46.3% reported having carious teeth. More than 44% reported having dental pain, and about 40% women felt that her oral health was poor. About 60% reported having heard about the possible connection between pregnancy and the oral health. About 94% of the women were brushing their teeth at least once a day. More than half of the women (58.3%) visited the dentist during their most recent pregnancy, mostly for dental pain. A large proportion of the pregnant women in this study had oral health problems; however, more than 40% of those women had not visited a dentist during their pregnancy, and the majority of those utilized dental services when they had dental pain only. To provide better oral health care, more knowledge needs to be made available to the pregnant women and the medical community. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Tandlægers erfaringer med at foreslå og få gennemført behandling med kroner og broer i privat praksis [Experiences of Danish dentists in private practice in motivating treatment with crowns and bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isidor, F.; Moore, R.

    2003-01-01

    and bridges, or lack of success in getting treatment completed hung mostly with practice type and location. Almost 76% of the dentists felt that it should be possible to learn how to motivate patients for the expensive treatments (eg bridges). More than 90% of the dentists felt the need for a better insurance...

  3. 'Newness-struggle-success' continuum: a qualitative examination of the cultural adaptation process experienced by overseas-qualified dentists in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Madhan; Brennan, David S; Spencer, A John; Short, Stephanie D

    2016-04-01

    Objectives Overseas-qualified dentists constitute a significant proportion of the Australian dental workforce (approximately one in four). The aim of the present study was to provide a better understanding of the cultural adaptation process of overseas-qualified dentists in Australia, so as to facilitate their integration into the Australian way of life and improve their contribution to Australian healthcare, economy and society. Methods Life stories of 49 overseas-qualified dentists from 22 countries were analysed for significant themes and patterns. We focused on their settlement experience, which relates to their social and cultural experience in Australia. This analysis was consistent with a hermeneutic phenomenological approach to qualitative social scientific research. Results Many participants noted that encounters with 'the Australian accent' and 'slang' influenced their cultural experience in Australia. Most of the participants expressed 'fascination' with the people and lifestyle in Australia, primarily with regard to the relaxed way of life, cultural diversity and the freedom one usually experiences living in Australia. Few participants expressed 'shock' at not being able to find a community of similar religious faith in Australia, as they are used to in their home countries. These issues were analysed in two themes; (1) language and communication; and (2) people, religion and lifestyle. The cultural adaptation process of overseas-qualified dentists in Australia is described as a continuum or superordinate theme, which we have entitled the 'newness-struggle-success' continuum. This overarching theme supersedes and incorporates all subthemes. Conclusion Family, friends, community and organisational structures (universities and public sector) play a vital role in the cultural learning process, affecting overseas-qualified dentist's ability to progress successfully through the cultural continuum. What is known about the topic? Australia is a popular host

  4. Perception of Acceptable Range of Smiles by Specialists, General Dentists and Lay Persons and Evaluation of Different Aesthetic Paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Mainak Kanti; Khatri, Margie; Saha, Suparna Ganguly; Dubey, Sandeep; Saxena, Divya; Vijaywargiya, Neelam; Kala, Shubham

    2017-02-01

    One of the most important goals of restorative dentistry is to restore the patient's aesthetic. Smile analysis is subjective and it differs from person to person. An aesthetic smile involves a harmonious relationship between various parameters including the hard and soft tissues. The aim of the study was to identify the acceptable range of several smiles (alone and in conjunction with the face) by specialists, general dentists as well as lay persons; and to identify the values of different criteria i.e., the Golden Proportion (GP), the Recurrent Esthetic Dental proportion (RED), Width to Height ratio (W/H ratio), the Apparent Contact Dimension (ACD), and lateral incisor position in a smile. Hundred photographs of 50 subjects were taken, 50 of the smile alone and 50 of the individual's frontal view of face. The photographs of the smiles and the faces were assessed for the aesthetic acceptability by 30 evaluators including 10 specialists with advanced training, 10 general dentists and 10 lay persons. Irreversible hydrocolloid impressions were made of the dentitions of all the individuals using stock trays and were poured in dental stone. Measurements were made on the facial surface of the teeth on the models and were recorded in millimeters using a sharp tipped digital vernier calliper. Data was analyzed to evaluate the presence of different parameters assessed in the smiles. Mean and standard deviation values for the percentage of only the agreeable smiles were calculated in both individual smile analysis and in conjunction with the face. The non agreeable smiles were excluded from further statistical analysis. Pearson Correlation Coefficient was calculated to compare the values obtained in all the three groups. More number of smiles were considered agreeable by the general dentists when compared to the specialists and the number even increased in case of evaluation by lay persons. Greater number of smiles was found to be agreeable when they were evaluated in

  5. Antibiotic prophylaxis for bacterial endocarditis: A study of knowledge of guidelines among dentists participated in the 47th international congress of dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashemipour M.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Infective endocarditis is a rare disease resulted in mortality and morbidity in 10-80% of patients. The purpose of present study was to investigate the knowledge of guidelines on antibiotic prophylaxis for bacterial endocarditis in a group of Iranian dentists. "nMaterials and Methods: This was a descriptive study in which the population under study was 205 who were participated in the 47th international congress of dentistry (Tehran-Spring 2007 and they were chosen by census sampling methods. Nameless questionnaires were designed and were given to the dentists to complete. The t-test, χ² and spearman with the SPSS 13.5 program were used in the data analysis. P<0.05 was considered as the level of significance. "nResults: Regarding to the prescribing of prophylactic antibiotic for patients with prosthetic cardiac valves, 94.6% of all answers were correct. Also, the most common procedures in which the prophylaxis antibiotic was distinguished to be necessary were periodontal surgery, scaling, dental extraction and using subgingival cord, respectively. More than half of the dentists (65.8% had chosen amoxicillin as a prophylactic antibiotic. Mean knowledge score was 38.77±12.4. "nConclusion: Results of the present study showed that the knowledge of dentists about prescribing antibiotics for prevention of bacterial endocarditis is relatively low. It was also found that the level of knowledge decreases by passing time from graduation.

  6. An Analysis of the Geographic Distribution of Recently Graduated Dentists from the University of Western Australia: The World's Most Isolated Dental School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurbuxani, Amit; Kruger, Estie; Tennant, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the geographic distribution of all new dentists who graduated over a period of six years. Perth, the capital city of Western Australia, is one of the world's most isolated cities, with a population of approximately 1.6 million people, situated over 2000km from its nearest next major capital…

  7. An Assessment of Direct Restorative Material Use in Posterior Teeth by American and Canadian Pediatric Dentists: III. Preferred Level of Participation in Decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varughese, Rae E; Andrews, Paul; Sigal, Michael J; Azarpazhooh, Amir

    2016-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess Canadian and American pediatric dentists' preferred level of participation in clinical decision-making. A web-based survey was used to collect the opinions of all active Royal College of Dentists of Canada members and American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry members on the use of direct restorative materials in posterior teeth (n equals 4,648; 19.3 percent response rate). The main survey also included a domain to elicit participants' preferred role in clinical decision-making, ranging from an active role (the dentist takes the primary role in decision-making while considering patients/caregivers opinions) to a passive role (the dentist prefers to have the patient guide the decision-making). Bivariate and multivariate analyses for the preferred role and its predictor were performed (two-tailed Pparticipants preferred an active role. The passive role was chosen three times more by those who worked in a hospital-based setting (odds ratio [OR] equals 3.15, 95 percent confidence interval [CI] equals 1.13 to 8.79) or a university-based setting versus a combined setting (OR equals 3.61, 95 percent CI equals 1.11 to 11.77). The majority of participants preferred an active role in decision-making, a role that may not be consistent with a patient-centered practice that emphasizes patient autonomy in decision-making.

  8. A qualitative study examining the experience of primary care dentists in the detection and management of potentially malignant lesions. 1. Factors influencing detection and the decision to refer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocklehurst, P R; Baker, S R; Speight, P M

    2010-01-23

    Many oral squamous cell carcinomas present as late stage disease and so the detection of early and pre-malignancy is considered to be of paramount importance. The majority of research examining primary care dentists' experience of the detection and management of early disease has been undertaken using questionnaires, with the inherent bias this introduces. The aim of this study was to use qualitative methods to develop a richer account of practitioners' views about screening and what factors influence the decision to refer a patient. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with eighteen dentists in Sheffield, transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis. Ten codes were identified according to the aims of the study and organized into four overarching themes. Although many dentists were screening regularly, some did not appear to be adopting a rigorous and systematic approach. A number of participants also placed more reliance on 'classical' presentations rather than the more varied presentation of potentially malignant lesions and were more influenced by the clinical history of the lesion rather than risk factors. Overall, the present research suggests that for some dentists, more rigour is required when examining for early disease.

  9. The dentist's armamentarium: a collection of 19th century instruments in the Louisiana State University School of Dentistry Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheramie, Toby J; Strother, Elizabeth A

    2008-01-01

    A small collection of antique dental instruments located in the LSU School of Dentistry Library (LSUSD) provides a glimpse into the world of the 19th century dentist. The instruments in this collection, with handles carved from common and rare early materials such as bone, wood, ivory, ebony, cameo, shell and pearl, provide a striking contrast to all-steel instruments of the 20th century. An understanding of their development and function substantially increases appreciation of these instruments, which can be categorized as instruments for oral surgery, prophylaxis, restoration, and general use. In this article, the authors summarize the historical development of each type of instrument and describe the specific items in the LSUSD Library collection.

  10. Provision of dental care for special care patients: the view of Irish dentists in the Republic of Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smith, G

    2010-04-01

    Part 2 of the Disability Act 2005 requires that all people with a disability are entitled to a needs assessment and, by implication, provision of identified care needs. This process started with children aged 0-6 in 2007 and will roll out to all people with disabilities by 2011. Oral health is part of that needs assessment but it may be that dentists are not in a position to provide that care, by virtue of a lack of education, training or facilities. The majority of dental care delivered would seem, from information gathered as part of this study, to be of an emergency nature. This study aimed to identify the shortfalls in service provision, and their potential causes, to inform what it is hoped will be a positive directive on special care dentistry (SCD) in the proposed National Oral Health Strategy.

  11. [Analysis of Possible Sociodemographic and Occupational Risk Factors and the Prevalence of Professional Exhaustion Syndrome (Burnout) in Mexican Dentists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda Aguilera, Enrique; García de Alba García, Javier E

    2013-06-01

    To determine the prevalence of professional exhaustion syndrome (burnout) in dentists and to analyze possible sociodemographic and occupational risk factors . An observational, descriptive and cross-sectional survey of 203 dental staff of the Metropolitan Zone of Guadalajara, Mexico, from the Mexican Social Security Institute, University of Guadalajara, and those in private practice. A self-reported identification form and the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey were used to gather data. Descriptive statistics and inferential analyzes were performed using SPSS 15.0 support and EpiInfo V6.1. There was an 88.3% response. Professional exhaustion syndrome (burnout) was detected in 52.2% of them. Significant differences were obtained depending on the employment contract. A negative correlation was observed between the subscales emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, and a positive one between the lack of personal accomplishment at work. Professional exhaustion syndrome (burnout) is common (52.2%) for dentists, their possible risk factors: working in a public institution, being male, over 40 years, without a regular partner, and with more than 15 years with a partner, not having children, being a specialist with 10 years or more in an institution and the current job, morning shift, permanent recruitment, and having another job. The involvement of emotional exhaustion behaves like the syndrome. Average levels of the subscales are generally near normal. A negative correlation was found between the subscales emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, and positive between the lack of personal fulfillment at work with the presence of the syndrome. This leads us to consider the need for preventive measures in the workplace and personnel, as well as intervention programs at an individual, social or organizational level to reduce the prevalence found. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  12. Performance of experienced dentists in Switzerland after an e-learning program on ICDAS occlusal caries detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Jonas Almeida; de Oliveira, Renata Schlesner; Hug, Isabel; Neuhaus, Klaus; Lussi, Adrian

    2013-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of an e-learning program on the validity and reproducibility of the International Caries Detection and Assessment System (ICDAS) in detecting occlusal caries. For the study, 170 permanent molars were selected. Four dentists in Switzerland who had no previous contact with ICDAS examined the teeth before and after the e-learning program and scored the sites according to ICDAS. Teeth were histologically prepared and assessed for caries extension. The significance level was set at 0.05. Sensitivity before and after the e-learning program was 0.80 and 0.77 (D1), 0.72 and 0.63 (D2), and 0.74 and 0.67 (D3,4), respectively. Specificity was 0.64 and 0.69 (D1), 0.70 and 0.81 (D2), and 0.81 and 0.87 (D3,4). A McNemar test did not show any difference between the values of sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, and area under the ROC curve (AUC) before and after the e-learning program. The averages of wK values for interexaminer reproducibility were 0.61 (before) and 0.66 (after). Correlation with histology presented wK values of 0.62 (before) and 0.63 (after). A Wilcoxon test showed a statistically significant difference between before and after the e-learning program. In conclusion, even though ICDAS performed well in detecting occlusal caries, the e-learning program did not have any statistically significant effect on its performance by these experienced dentists.

  13. Removable partial denture models and comunication among dentists and laboratory technicians in the city of de Teresina, Piauí, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmem Dolores Vilarinho Soares de Moura

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the quality of models for making removable partial dentures. Methods: In this Study, 140 models were analysed in 05 dental prosthesis laboratories in the city of Teresina, Piauí, Brazil, registered with the Conselho Regional de Odontologia. A form containing 14 closed questions was applied, and the data collected were submitted to statistical analysis using the SPSS program. The models were analysed under natural or artificial light and photographed for record and illustration purposes. Results: The results showed that in 100% of the cases the molding material used was alginate, and 93.43% of the models were poured by the dentist. Of these, 64.47% were poured in stone plaster and 36.43% in special plaster. According to criteria such as surface quality, reproduction of details, presence of bubbles and/or nodules, adequate reproduction of the edentulous area, 78.57% of the models were considered inadequate. The majority of the models (96.43%, were mounted in an articulator by the Dental Laboratory Technician, but only 1 dentist sent the record for mounting the models. The hinge type articulator was used in 97.14% of the mountings. In 94.29% of the cases, the planning and design were not executed by the dentist and in 87.86% of the cases no evidence of mouth preparation was found. In 80% of the cases, communication between the dentist and the Dental Laboratory Technician was done by telephone. Conclusion: Thus it was verified that the removable partial denture continues to be neglected as regards its clinical and laboratorial fabrication, through an excessive transfer of responsibilities from the dentist to the Dental Laboratory Technician and an inefficient communication between the two.

  14. Prenuptial dental extractions in Acadian women: first report of a cultural tradition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Sara C; Kaste, Linda M; Barasch, Andrei; Safford, Monika M; Foong, W Choong; ElGeneidy, Adry

    2011-12-01

    Prenuptial tooth extractions, extractions of all teeth in at least one dental arch before marriage, are not identified in the dental literature. Driven by a professional encounter, the purpose of this study was to confirm the existence of this practice among Acadian women. An 8-item survey instrument with space for comments was mailed to 182 dentists from traditionally Acadian regions of Canada. The survey was provided in English and French. Ninety dentists responded (50.3%); 8 of them (9%) had been asked to perform prenuptial extractions, and an additional 9 volunteered awareness of this practice. Awareness and requests were associated with dental practice in a county with a ≥20% French-speaking population. Prenuptial extractions in this population have been confirmed by the current cohort of dentists. The potential public health, clinical, and systemic health research implications for women who are edentulous for most of their adult life merit further study. Additionally, it is important to determine if interventions are needed to curtail cultural expectations of such practices.

  15. The Sjögren’s syndrome – an interdisciplinary problem viewed by a dentist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Barczyk

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Sjögren’s syndrome is common and chronic disease. So far there is no effective therapy. In 90% of cases, it affects women, usually in the peri-menopausal period. Many systems and organs may be involved in the course of the disease, thus it is interesting for many medical specialists. There are primary and secondary Sjögren’s syndromes, both characterized mainly by xerostomia and keratoconjunctivitis. The paper reviews basic symptoms in the oral cavity involving the oral mucosa, lips, tongue, gingiva, teeth and periodontium. Treatment and prevention in a dental clinic are also described. Lifestyle and pharmacotherapy to avoid symptom aggravation are additionally considered.

  16. Detrimental consequences of women life cycle on the oral cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jammula Surya Prasanna

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The majority of us visit a dentist only when we experience a toothache, as visiting the dentist regularly is the last thing that strikes our mind. Many clinical studies have concluded that oral bacteria can lead to a genre of health conditions which may sometimes be very serious. As females go, through certain stages in their reproductive life cycle, alterations arise in the level of sex steroid hormones circulating in their bloodstream. Specifically, variations in levels of progesterone and estrogen in women may adversely affect the periodontal tissues in the mouth. Extensive research suggests a relationship between periodontal diseases and puberty, menstruation, pregnancy, oral contraceptive use, and menopause. Estrogen and progesterone affect the entire body, including the oral tissues. The gingival tissues respond to this increased level of estrogen and progesterone by undergoing vasodilatation and increased capillary permeability. Consequently, there is an increased migration of fluid and white blood cells out of blood vessels. Also associated with increased progesterone levels are alterations in the existing microbial populations. The levels of Gram-negative anaerobic bacteria, such as Prevotella intermedia, increase as a result of the high concentration of hormones available as a nutrient for growth. This article discusses the plethora of causes which affect the oral health of women as they undergo the different life cycles.

  17. Women's series: by women, for women?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuitert, L.; Spiers, J.

    2011-01-01

    One of the striking phenomena in the 19th century publishing history is the abundant publication of publisher''s series. This contribution concerns series specifically meant for women. The focus is on Dutch literary series for women, mostly 19th century.

  18. Practices participating in a dental PBRN have substantial and advantageous diversity even though as a group they have much in common with dentists at large

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makhija, Sonia K; Gilbert, Gregg H; Rindal, D Brad

    2009-01-01

    , their importance is even further elevated. Our objective was to determine whether we met a key objective for The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN): to recruit a diverse range of practitioner-investigators interested in doing DPBRN studies. METHODS: DPBRN participants completed an enrollment...... DPBRN-participating dentists, their practices, and their patient populations. CONCLUSION: Although as a group, participants have much in common with practices at large; their substantial diversity offers important advantages, such as being able to evaluate how practice differences may affect treatment...... outcomes, while simultaneously offering generalizability to dentists at large. This should help foster knowledge transfer in both the research-to-practice and practice-to-research directions....

  19. Continuing professional development of dentists through distant learning: An Indira Gandhi National Open University-Dental Council of India experiment a report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchika Kuba

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To keep themselves updated with all the advancements in the field of dentistry, dentists should involve themselves in some kind of professional development. Distance learning is the most appropriate way to serve the growing demand due to technological advancements. Indira Gandhi National Open University in collaboration with Dental Council of India (DCI developed and launched two continuing professional development programs in Endodontics (postgraduate certificate in endodontics and postgraduate certificate in oral implantology and has trained over 400 and 280 BDS dentists respectively till date. The program package consists of self-instructional material, assignments, videos and practical training. The training is conducted in premiere dental colleges and institutions recognized by DCI. The certificate is awarded after a term end examination, both in theory and practical. The pass percentages of the theory courses ranged from around 63% to 98%, and 90% of the candidates cleared the practical exam.

  20. Comparison of knowledge and perspectives toward cone-beam computed tomography among dentists in three Middle East regions: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebtihal H Zain-Alabdeen

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: This study showed that having a higher education level and being in a tertiary workplace improved CBCT knowledge, and better knowledge about CBCT increased the number of patient referrals when the indications justified it. With the increasing demand for CBCT, there have been more changes in diagnoses and treatment plans, and thus, more dentists are requesting DMFR board programs in the region to avoid medicolegal issues.

  1. Dental CT in the planning of surgery. Role in the oromaxillofacial area from the dentist's point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solar, P.; Gahleitner, A.

    1999-01-01

    Dental computer assisted tomography (Dental CT) represents a valuable addition to the diagnostic spectrum for planning oral and maxillofacial surgery. High resolution CT and specially designed computer software allow representation of the jaws in different planes that are easy to match. They further allow the display of very small structures relevant to oral surgical interventions and reveal their spatial relationship in three dimensions. Thus, communication between dentists and radiologists may be intensified and supported by usage of modern telecommunication systems. Dental CT is indicated, when clinical and conventional radiological techniques will not allow exact interpretation of the situation. It is modern oral implantology that primarily benefits from computer software enabling the assessment of surgical sites in the presurgical phase. Such planning was not yet possible using two dimensional radiographic techniques. The dental-implantological part expects from radiography sharply defined contours of the external bony contours and the mandibular canal, exactly defined relation between slices and planes, no distortion in the orthoradial planes, tools for reliable measurements of distances, angles and volumes, possibility to transmit pictures electronically or on hardcopy without loss of quality. (orig.) [de

  2. Dentist-Perceived Barriers and Attractors to Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment Provided by Mental Health Providers in Dental Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyman, R E; Wojda, A K; Eddy, J M; Haydt, N C; Geiger, J F; Slep, A M Smith

    2018-02-01

    Over 1 in 5 dental patients report moderate to severe dental fear. Although the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) for dental fear has been examined in over 20 randomized controlled trials-with 2 meta-analyses finding strong average effect sizes ( d > 1)-CBT has received almost no dissemination beyond the specialty clinics that tested it. The challenge, then, is not how to treat dental fear but how to disseminate and implement such an evidence-based treatment in a way that recognizes the rewards and barriers in the US health care system. This mixed-method study investigated the potential of disseminating CBT through care from a mental health provider from within the dental home, a practice known as evidence-based collaborative care (EBCC). Two preadoption studies were conducted with practicing dentists drawn from a self-organized Practice-Based Research Network in the New York City metropolitan area. The first comprised 3 focus groups ( N = 17), and the second involved the administration of a survey ( N = 46). Focus group participants agreed that CBT for dental fear is worthy of consideration but identified several concerns regarding its appeal, feasibility, and application in community dental practices. Survey participants indicated endorsement of factors promoting the use of EBCC as a mechanism for CBT dissemination, with no factors receiving less than 50% support. Taken together, these findings indicate that EBCC may be a useful framework through which an evidence-based treatment for dental fear treatment can be delivered.

  3. The economic burden of opioid prescription by dentists: A 12-month survey of consumer expenditure in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Tulio Eduardo; Lino, Patrícia Azevedo; Martins, Maria Auxiliadora Parreiras; Silva, Maria Elisa Souza; Leles, Claudio Rodrigues; Abreu, Mauro Henrique Nogueira Guimarães

    2017-09-01

    To describe consumer expenditure on opioids prescribed by dentists in Brazil during a 12-month period. We surveyed individual dispensed prescriptions of opioids in private pharmacies from October 2012 to September 2013. A descriptive analysis of costs included a calculation of the overall and mean maximum price to consumers. Monetary costs were converted from local currency units (Brazilian Real - BRL) to international dollars using purchasing power parity (PPP) exchanging rates. 129,708 prescriptions were retrieved from the database. The overall expenditure on opioids was R$4,316,383.46 BRL or $2,721,315.82 (PPP). The mean cost of an individual prescription was R$33.27 BRL ($20.98 PPP), ranging from 14.19 to 3,255.60 BRL. Codeine was frequently prescribed (87.2 percent). The expenditure on opioids is a significant cost to Brazilian patients, especially given that the Brazilian Public Health System should dispense these drugs free of charge. Codeine was the most prescribed opioid. © 2017 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  4. Oral involvement in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome. Multidisciplinary care by dentists and rheumatologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Pintor, Rosa María; Fernández Castro, Mónica; Hernández, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    Primary Sjögren's syndrome is a chronic systemic autoimmune disease that causes destruction of lacrimal and salivary glands. The most common and earliest symptoms are oral and ocular dryness. Dry mouth makes talking difficult, tasting and chewing properly, impairing quality of life of these patients. The most common oral signs and symptoms are hyposialia with or without xerostomia, tooth decay, fungal infections, traumatic oral lesions, dysphagia, dysgeusia, and inflammation of salivary glands. There are different therapeutic strategies, depending on the severity of each case, and the increase in the amount of saliva, to reduce the number of cavities and oral infections. It is particularly important to establish a close relationship between the dentist and the rheumatologist in order to make an early and correct diagnosis, promoting appropriate dietary and hygiene measures, as well as to treat and prevent potential oral complications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  5. Women boxers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gems, Gerald; Pfister, Gertrud Ursula

    2014-01-01

    of women as the weak sex. Vaudeville provided women with an opportunity to present physical performances that surpassed the restrictions placed on women within the mainstream middle-class society. This article includes biographical sketches of some of the outstanding female boxers of the era by drawing......This article fills a gap in the very limited literature on women's boxing by examining the gendered space in which women engaged in the sport as participants in saloons, vaudeville theatres and the prize ring. In doing so, they challenged the contemporary gender order and disputed the notion...

  6. Quantifying Appointments, Treatment Time, Impressions, and Diagnostic Data of Cases Staffed by General Dentists and Prosthodontists in a Dental School Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbery, Terence A; Greenfield, Kristy; Diaz, Nicholas; Janus, Charles; Best, Al M

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to quantify differences between general dentists and prosthodontists regarding appointments, treatment time, impressions, and preoperative diagnostic data in teaching predoctoral clinical fixed prosthodontics. Electronic dental records (n=356) of patients treated at one dental school in academic year 2012 were randomly selected for review to obtain the following data: faculty and student demographics, number of appointments and treatment time from preparation to cementation, number of impressions made, completion of oral disease control treatment (ODCT), and presence of preoperative periapical radiographs and diagnostic casts. The results showed that ODCT was completed in 78%, preoperative radiographs were present in 76%, and diagnostic casts made in 53% of the cases reviewed. There was no statistically significant difference in number of appointments, treatment time, or number of final impressions when students were staffed by general dentists or prosthodontists. When students were supervised by multiple faculty members, there was generally an increase in treatment time and number of appointments and final impressions. Although this study found no statistically significant differences between general dentists and prosthodontists regarding the criteria evaluated, the results suggest that faculty development and calibration are needed to ensure ODCT is completed and preoperative radiographs are present prior to initiating fixed prosthodontic procedures.

  7. Análise de comportamentos do odontólogo no contexto de atendimento infantil The dentist's behavior analysis in the context of children treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo S. Rolim

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A pesquisa comportamental em odontologia tem permitido reconhecer padrões de interação do cirurgião-dentista com seu cliente, assim como, propor formas de intervenção sistemática que contribuam para a facilitação do atendimento clínico. Este trabalho teve como objetivo analisar funcionalmente os comportamentos do cirurgião-dentista em uma seqüência de sessões de atendimento odontológico de uma criança. Todas as sessões foram registradas em vídeo e os episódios de interação comportamental profissional-cliente descritos na íntegra. Os comportamentos foram classificados em categorias conforme sua funcionalidade. Os resultados mostraram que o tratamento odontológico envolve um controle bidirecional entre seus participantes ativos. O dentista utiliza-se da instrução e distração, enquanto estratégias de manejo de comportamentos colaborativos, assim como, de contenção física e punição verbal para o controle de eventos não-colaborativos. Os resultados permitiram supor que o que leva o dentista a atuar de modo particular, parece ser o padrão comportamental da criança, assim como sua história de aprendizagem ao contexto de tratamento.Behavioral research in Dentistry has created possibilities of knowing different patterns of interaction between dentist and patient as well as procedures to improve dental care. The aim of the present study was to analyze the behavior of two dentists and a five-year old child, during clinical dental treatment. Dental treatment events were recorded and then described based on a functional analysis framework. Behaviors were classified into categories and analyzed in terms of actions-antecedent and consequential events. Results showed that dental treatment involves a bi-directional control of patient and dentists' behavior. Instruction and distraction were the main management procedures of cooperative behavior. Physical restraint and verbal punishment were often used to control uncooperative

  8. Oral health and oral diseases in pregnancy: a multicentre survey of Italian postpartum women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, A; Abati, S; Pileri, P; Calabrese, S; Capobianco, G; Strohmenger, L; Ottolenghi, L; Cetin, I; Campus, G G

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the oral hygiene practices and oral health status of Italian postpartum women. A self-administered questionnaire assessed socio-demographic information, oral hygiene habits and frequency of dental visits. All women received a thorough oral examination within five days after delivery. Logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for exposures of interest and the presence of 'severe' periodontitis. Seven hundred and fifty women participated in the study; 99.1% brushed their teeth everyday and 59.9% visited the dentist annually. The mean frequency of sites with bleeding on probing was 16.1% and the median clinical attachment level was 2.1 mm. The mean caries experience score (DMFT) was 8. Severe periodontal disease was present in 21.9% of individuals. Patients who reported visiting a dentist only when in pain and women with three dental caries or more were significantly more likely to have periodontitis (OR: 1.6; 95% CI: 1.1-2.2; p brushing techniques and the importance of dental visits. © 2013 Australian Dental Association.

  9. Self-reported oral hygiene habits, dental attendance and attitudes to dentistry during pregnancy in a sample of immigrant women in North London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hullah, Esther; Turok, Yaroslava; Nauta, Maud; Yoong, Wai

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this study was to describe self-reported oral health, oral hygiene habits, frequency of visits to a dentist and factors associated with dental attendance among pregnant women at a North London Hospital, the majority of whom are immigrants. Peridontal disease is associated with an increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. The aim of this study is to describe self-reported oral health, oral hygiene habits, frequency of visits to a dentist and factors associated with dental attendance among pregnant women at a North London Hospital, the majority of whom are immigrants. A questionnaire designed by the authors was completed by postnatal women within 3 days of delivery. Data collected included past dental attendance, reasons for attendance and information about age, parity and socio-economic group. In total, 206 women completed the questionnaires within 3 days of delivery; 74.2% of the mothers were not born in the UK and 38.3% were Black African. The mean age of was 28.19 +/- 6.07 years. The majority reported good oral hygiene habits such as brushing their teeth twice a day (73.7%) and using mouthwash (51%). However, their dental attendance was poor and the average time since their last visit to a dentist was 1.8 +/- 1.61 years. Over a third of the women questioned did not know about the availability of free dental care during pregnancy and for 12 months after; 33% visited a dentist in pregnancy and half of them needed and received treatment; 15% of mothers had more than one pregnancy and yet were still unaware of free dental care provided during pregnancy and 12 months after birth. Only 36% of questioned women regularly visited a dentist. Pregnancy did little to change their attitudes to dental care. There appears no difference in attitudes to dental care between immigrant and British born pregnant women. Efforts to improve the uptake of dental care should be directed towards immigrant groups in order to promote better maternal health. Further research is

  10. Attitudes towards Prosthodontic Clinical Decision-Making for Edentulous Patients among South West Deanery Dental Foundation Year One Dentists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Barber

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to describe Dental Foundation year one dentists’ attitudes towards prosthodontic decision making for edentulous patients, and identify whether there are gender differences in these attitudes. All South West Deanery trainees were invited to take part in the study between May and June 2011 and a previously piloted questionnaire was administered to the trainees by their training programme directors. The questionnaire posed questions based upon a clinical scenario of discussing treatment options with patients. Seventy-two questionnaires were used in the analysis (91% overall response rate. Trainees perceived their own values to be less important than the patient’s values (p < 0.001 in decision making, but similar to the patient’s friend’s/relative’s values (p = 0.1. In addition, the trainees perceived the patient’s values to be less important than their friend’s/relatives (p < 0.001. Sixty-six per cent of trainees acknowledged an influence from their own personal values on their presentation of material to patients who are in the process of choosing among different treatment options, and 87% thought their edentulous patients were satisfied with the decision making process when choosing among different treatment options. Fifty-eight per cent of trainees supported a strategy of negotiation between patients and clinicians (shared decision making. There was no strong evidence to suggest gender had an influence on the attitudes towards decision making. The finding of a consensus towards shared decision making in the attitudes of trainees, and no gender differences is encouraging and is supportive of UK dental schools’ ability to foster ethical and professional values among dentists.

  11. Ethical proceedings against dentists in Espírito Santo for infringements to the code of dental ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos Pacheco, Karina Tonini dos; Silva Junior, Manoelito Ferreira; Meireles, Naiara Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Just like any other profession, dentistry requires ethical and moral responsibilities that must be fulfilled, and the duty of every professional is to meet his obligations under the law. In light of the Código de Ética Odontológica (CEO-Code of Dental Ethics), this research aims to expound on the ethical violations committed by dentists in their practice, according to the ethical review process proposed by the Conselho Regional de Odontologia do Estado do Espírito Santo (CRO/ES-Regional Council of Dentistry of the State of Espírito Santo). The study is both retrospective and descriptive, using a quantitative approach. Data collection comprised all the ethical proceedings filed at the CRO/ES, between the years 2000 and 2011. Considering the 529 cases examined, the most frequent reason for infringement was illicit advertising (39.7%), followed by technical error (18.7%), irregular registration (16.8%), patient/professional relationship (11.3%) tax lien foreclosure (6.6%), professional/professional relationship (4.0%), irregular/illegal cover up practice (0.9%), consumer relations (0.8%), failure to provide care (0.6%), false certification (0.4%), and disrespect for authority and colleagues (0.2%). Most (59.2%) of the dental surgeons (DSs) involved were male, 35.5% were between 31 and 40 years of age, 85.8% had graduated over five (5) years prior, and 73.2% were general practitioners. Only 22 (4.2%) cases went to trial, resulting in 8 (36.4%) acquittals and 14 (63.6%) convictions. The most commonly applied penalties were private warning+pecuniary penalty (8 or 57.1%). It was concluded that the CEO must be followed with more discipline, and that professionals should seek information about their duties and obligations under the law, on behalf of patient welfare.

  12. Ethical proceedings against dentists in Espírito Santo for infringements to the code of dental ethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Tonini dos Santos Pacheco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Just like any other profession, dentistry requires ethical and moral responsibilities that must be fulfilled, and the duty of every professional is to meet his obligations under the law. In light of the Código de Ética Odontológica (CEO - Code of Dental Ethics, this research aims to expound on the ethical violations committed by dentists in their practice, according to the ethical review process proposed by the Conselho Regional de Odontologia do Estado do Espírito Santo (CRO/ES - Regional Council of Dentistry of the State of Espírito Santo. The study is both retrospective and descriptive, using a quantitative approach. Data collection comprised all the ethical proceedings filed at the CRO/ES, between the years 2000 and 2011. Considering the 529 cases examined, the most frequent reason for infringement was illicit advertising (39.7%, followed by technical error (18.7%, irregular registration (16.8%, patient/professional relationship (11.3% tax lien foreclosure (6.6%, professional/professional relationship (4.0%, irregular/illegal cover up practice (0.9%, consumer relations (0.8%, failure to provide care (0.6%, false certification (0.4%, and disrespect for authority and colleagues (0.2%. Most (59.2% of the dental surgeons (DSs involved were male, 35.5% were between 31 and 40 years of age, 85.8% had graduated over five (5 years prior, and 73.2% were general practitioners. Only 22 (4.2% cases went to trial, resulting in 8 (36.4% acquittals and 14 (63.6% convictions. The most commonly applied penalties were private warning + pecuniary penalty (8 or 57.1%. It was concluded that the CEO must be followed with more discipline, and that professionals should seek information about their duties and obligations under the law, on behalf of patient welfare.

  13. Competency Assessment of the Last Year Students of Tabriz Dentistry School in the Major Skills Needed for a New Dentist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Pourabbas

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Assessment of educational courses has a critical impact on quality improvement in all curricula. Surveys aimed at alumni and graduating students may be useful for the evaluation of the program outcomes and revision. The aims of this study were to describe levels of competency of last year students of an Iranian dental school in the major skills needed for a new dentist and to investigate its relationship with background factors such as gender, marriage status, entrance exam score , entrance quotas and their economic status.Methods: In this cross-sectional descriptive analytic study, 55 last year dental students filled out a valid and reliable questionnaire including demographic characteristics and 132 competencies that could be rated on a four point Likert’s Scale. The data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA, independent-samples ttest and Pearson correlation coefficient.Results: Students' total competencies mean score was 47.48±2.03 out of 100. The lowest and highest score belonged to oral diseases diagnosis (%18.48 and Preventive dentistry (%66.06 respectively. The past dental hygiene students continued their education as a doctoral degree were more competent than the others but there were no significant differences between competency levels of other quotas. The competency score had no significant relationship with marriage and economic statuses of students aswell as their entrance exam score.Conclusion: responses to the students’ self-reported preparedness described the general state of competency of the last year dental students as fairly satisfactory. However, the theoretical backgrounds related to some subjects need to be more emphasized.Key words: COMPETENCY, DENTISTRY STUDENTS EDUCATION

  14. The role of women in dental education: monitoring the pipeline to leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Michael J; Corry, Ann Marie; Liu, Ying W

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze data collected by the American Dental Association and the American Dental Education Association over the past two decades relating to changes in the number of women active in dental education and dental practice. The concept of a pipeline of women in dentistry was explored by analyzing predoctoral, postdoctoral, dental practice, and dental education domains for the inclusion of women. Statistical analyses show that there has been a consistent and progressive increase in the number of women in all stages of the pipeline. Over the past two decades, the number of female students attending and graduating from dental school has steadily increased. In 1984-85, 23.7 percent of all predoctoral students were women; in 2009-10, 45.1 percent were women. Similarly, in 1999, the graduating class was 35.3 percent women; in 2009, it was 46.1 percent women. In the postdoctoral domain, in 1996, 29.9 percent of all residents were women; in 2010, this had increased to 39.0 percent. In dental practice, the number of actively licensed women dentists in 1999 was 15.3 percent of the workforce; in 2010, this percentage had grown to 24.0 percent. In dental education, the number of women clinical faculty members has gradually increased from 669 in 1997-98 to 902 in 2007-08. Until 2000, there had been only two women deans and very few associate/assistant deans, with only sixteen in 1990. In 2000, major changes began with three women deans and seventy-two women associate/assistant deans. In 2009-10, there were 111 associate/assistant women deans and twelve women deans. These data show a progressive increase in the presence of women in all domains of dentistry, especially in leadership positions in dental education.

  15. Empowering Women

    OpenAIRE

    UNCTAD; World Bank

    2018-01-01

    This note addresses practices for reducing gender inequalities and for empowering women to make a positive contribution to development through agricultural investments. Women make a crucial contribution to the agriculture sector and account for over 40 percent of agricultural labor in developing countries. However, they are frequently marginalized and their contributions under-acknowledged...

  16. Women's studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlowicz, Michael

    On March 31, 1997, the Association for Women Geoscientists will award two Chrysalis Scholarships to women who have returned to school after an interruption in their education for a year or longer. The $750 awards will be given to geoscience master's or Ph.D. candidates to cover expenses in finishing their theses.The application deadline is February 28, 1997.

  17. More Rhode Island Adults Have Dental Coverage After the Medicaid Expansion: Did More Adults Receive Dental Services? Did More Dentists Provide Services?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwetchkenbaum, Samuel; Oh, Junhie

    2017-10-02

    Under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) Medicaid expansion since 2014, 68,000 more adults under age 65 years were enrolled in Rhode Island Medicaid as of December 2015, a 78% increase from 2013 enrollment. This report assesses changes in dental utilization associated with this expansion. Medicaid enrollment and dental claims for calendar years 2012-2015 were extracted from the RI Medicaid Management Information System. Among adults aged 18-64 years, annual numbers and percentages of Medicaid enrollees who received any dental service were summarized. Additionally, dental service claims were assessed by provider type (private practice or health center). Although 15,000 more adults utilized dental services by the end of 2015, the annual percentage of Medicaid enrollees who received any dental services decreased over the reporting periods, compared to pre-ACA years (2012-13: 39%, 2014: 35%, 2015: 32%). From 2012 to 2015, dental patient increases in community health centers were larger than in private dental offices (78% vs. 34%). Contrary to the Medicaid population increase, the number of dentists that submitted Medicaid claims decreased, particularly among dentists in private dental offices; the percentage of RI private dentists who provided any dental service to adult Medicaid enrollees decreased from 29% in 2012 to 21% in 2015. Implementation of Medicaid expansion has played a critical role in increasing the number of Rhode Islanders with dental coverage, particularly among low-income adults under age 65. However, policymakers must address the persistent and worsening shortage of dental providers that accept Medicaid to provide a more accessible source of oral healthcare for all Rhode Islanders. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2017-10.asp].

  18. Evaluation of Musculoskeletal Disorders in Dentists and Application of DMAIC Technique to Improve the Ergonomics at Dental Clinics and Meta-Analysis of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedi, H S; Moon, Ninad Joshirao; Bhatia, Vineet; Sidhu, Gagandeep Kaur; Khan, Nadia

    2015-06-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) result in discomfort, pain and illness that can result in disruption or impairment of dental practice. A cross-sectional study consisting of 60 dentists was carried out to determine musculoskeletal work related pain in major cities of Northern India. The study was planned in two phases. In the first phase, the subjects were given questionnaire related to the musculoskeletal pain happened over the last twelve months. In the second phase of study, improvement was carried out by recommending the subjects to implement ergonomics at their workplace. After three months subjects were again approached and given questionnaire about the musculoskeletal disorders. DMAIC (define, measure, analyse, improve and control) methodology of six sigma strategy was used to access the MSDs. Chi-square test was used for the analysis and a p-value of less than or equal to 0.05 was considered statistically significant. The overall prevalence of musculoskeletal problems in the present study was found to be 68.3%. After three months only 23 respondents applied ergonomics at their work place, prevalence of pain was reduced in neck from 47.8% to 21.7% out of total 23 respondents, shoulder pain 39.1% to 17.3%, pain in elbows from 26% to 21.7%, as well as in other locomotor organs. The p-value was significant with p <0.05. MSD represents a major occupational health issue for dentists in India as well as worldwide and result revealed necessitates the need of workshops to create awareness of ergonomics as effective measures for reducing MSD among dentists.

  19. Five questiouns dentists should ask about their money. Question 4: how do the communities (family, practice, profession, culture, neighborhood, etc.) in which I live affect my financial decisions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Troy E

    2006-11-01

    Communities, and the personal value you place on them, affect all your spending, both business and personal. Once you begin questioning and analyzing how they affect your financial decisions, you will begin making more complete choices - the better-informed, the greater chance of success. Society has attached many financial expectations to dentists - both good and bad. By participating in this part of the Five Questions process, you will be able to separate the business of dentistry from the practice of dentistry and your persona beliefs from the beliefs of your communities'.

  20. An audit of cavity and crown preparations and two direct restorations carried out by foundation dentists in the Oxford and Wessex Deaneries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, F J T; Mackenzie, L; Falcon, H; Priest, N; Palin, W M

    2014-04-01

    It is likely that many foundation dentists (FDs) will have completed only minimal amounts of restorative dentistry for a number of months immediately prior to commencing work as FDs. Thus this audit aimed to assess the performance of the FDs when they carried out a number of simulated clinical exercises: amalgam cavities and restoration; Class IV resin composite restorations; and full crown preparations for metal-ceramic restorations. A total of 67 FDs completed the assessments and some results did indicate a high level of concern and need for further evaluation of restorative practice.

  1. A model of professional self-identity formation in student doctors and dentists: a mixed method study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivekananda-Schmidt, Pirashanthie; Crossley, James; Murdoch-Eaton, Deborah

    2015-04-29

    Professional self-identity [PSI] can be defined as the degree to which an individual identifies with his or her professional group. Several authors have called for a better understanding of the processes by which healthcare students develop their professional identities, and suggested helpful theoretical frameworks borrowed from the social science and psychology literature. However to our knowledge, there has been little empirical work examining these processes in actual healthcare students, and we are aware of no data driven description of PSI development in healthcare students. Here, we report a data driven model of PSI formation in healthcare students. We interviewed 17 student doctors and dentists who had indicated, on a tracking questionnaire, the most substantial changes in their PSI. We analysed their perceptions of the experiences that had influenced their PSI, to develop a descriptive model. Both the primary coder and the secondary coder considered the data without reference to the existing literature; i.e. we used a bottom up approach rather than a top down approach. The results indicate that two overlapping frames of reference affect PSI formation: the students' self-perception and their perception of the professional role. They are 'learning' both; neither is static. Underpinning those two learning processes, the following key mechanisms operated: [1] When students are allowed to participate in the professional role they learn by trying out their knowledge and skill in the real world and finding out to what extent they work, and by trying to visualise themselves in the role. [2] When others acknowledge students as quasi-professionals they experience transference and may respond with counter-transference by changing to meet expectations or fulfil a prototype. [3] Students may also dry-run their professional role (i.e., independent practice of professional activities) in a safe setting when invited. Students' experiences, and their perceptions of those

  2. Nudges at the Dentist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altmann, Steffen; Traxler, Christian

    2014-01-01

    We implement a field experiment to study the impact of reminder messages on dental health prevention. Patients who are due to schedule a check-up receive no reminder, a neutral reminder postcard, or reminders including additional information on the benefits of prevention. Our results document...... a strong impact of reminders. Within one month after receiving a reminder, the fraction of patients who make a check-up appointment more than doubles. The effect declines slightly over time, but remains economically and statistically significant. Including additional information in the reminders does...

  3. Find a Pediatric Dentist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AAPD AAPD Publications Advertising Brochures Journals & Publications Full Journal Archives Access Pediatric Dentistry Today Practice Management and Marketing Newsletter Pediatric Dentistry Journal Open Access Articles Oral ...

  4. Women's health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nurse midwives This list may not be all-inclusive. References Freund K. Approach to women's health. In: ... of Gynecology and Obstetrics at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. Review provided by VeriMed ...

  5. women's entrepreneurship

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-05-17

    May 17, 2016 ... It describes the economic benefits to women's economic empowerment, .... Public procurement makes up a significant proportion of a ...... vides a comparison of cost effectiveness of programs), Cho and Honorati (2013),.

  6. Leibniz's women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fara, Patricia

    2004-12-01

    Enlightenment natural philosophers were linked to one another in an extended correspondence network, but the female participants in this international Republic of Letters are rarely mentioned. Gottfried Leibniz relied on several such women not only for financial patronage, but also for intellectual stimulation. Although this hardworking and underpaid librarian at the Hanoverian Court is now one of the world's most famous mathematical philosophers, the women on whom he depended for ideas as well as support have been largely forgotten.

  7. Involving women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbo, J

    1994-01-01

    I am a primary health care (PHC) coordinator working with the May Day Rural project, a local NGO involved in integrated approaches and programs with rural communities in the Ga District of the Greater-Accra region in Ghana. When we talk about the community development approach we must first and foremost recognize that we are talking about women, because in the developing world frequent childbirths mean that her burden of mortality is higher than a man's; her workload is extremely heavy--whether in gardening, farming, other household duties, caring for the sick, or the rearing of children; she has a key role in PHC and community development, because men are always looking for greener pastures elsewhere, leaving the women behind. Women's concerns are critical in most health care projects and women and children are their main beneficiaries. Why not include women in the management team, project design, implementation and evaluation processes? That is what the May Day Rural project is practicing, encouraging women's participation and creating a relationship of trust. full text

  8. [Influences of Oral Health Behaviors, Depression and Stress on Periodontal Disease in Pregnant Women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hae Jin; Lee, Hae Jung; Cho, Soo Hyun

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the influences of oral health behaviors, depression, and stress on periodontal disease in pregnant women. The participants in this study were 129 pregnant women. Data were collected using questionnaires which included individual characteristics, oral health care behaviors, the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale (CES-D), a global measure of perceived stress, and pregnancy stress. A dentist measured periodontal probing depth and classified stages of periodontal disease according to the Community Periodontal Index (CPI). Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Pearson correlation, and multiple regression. Periodontal disease had significant correlations with oral health care behaviors (r=-.56, pstress (r=.44 pstress (r=.37 phealth behaviors (β=-.30, pstress (β=.17, p=.028). The explanation power of this regression model was 61.6% (F=15.52, phealth care behaviors and reducing perceived stress are indicated as effective strategies to reduce periodontal disease in pregnant women.

  9. [Perceptions and attitudes of public health service dentists in the face of family violence in 24 municipalities in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, 2013-2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbin, Cléa Adas Saliba; Rovida, Tânia Adas Saliba; Costa, Adriana Alves; Garbin,