WorldWideScience

Sample records for dentistry residency programs

  1. Perspectives of Residents of Mashhad School of Dentistry about the Curriculum of Residency Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Sarabadani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study was carried out to analyze the viewpoint of the residents of school of dentistry about the curriculum presented in the residency program to students of Mashhad School of Dentistry. Methods: To evaluate the perspectives of residents of dental school about the curriculum and regulations of residency program, a questionnaire was designed whose validity and reliability were confirmed by the authorities of School of Dentistry and test-retest reliability, respectively. The questionnaire was distributed among 100 residents and 80 of them completed the questionnaires. The data were analyzed by SPSS software (version 11.5. Results: A total of 43% of residents were informed of the curriculum (e.g. academic leave, transfer, removal of semester, etc.. As for the ability to write research proposal, 42.7% of residents were reported to have a favorable status, i.e. they were able to write more than 80% of their proposal. From among the residents, 30.4% had specialized English language certificate. Most of them (77% were satisfied with the professional staff, faculty members, of the faculty. Many students liked to participate in the teaching method courses of the residency program. Conclusion: Residents maintained that the curriculum in such domains as educational and research issues and special capabilities had some weak points. Thus, appropriate strategies are recommended to be applied to revise the curriculum using the residents’ views on these programs.

  2. Benefits of externships with pediatric dentistry programs for potential residents: program directors' and current residents' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Ulrich; Storey, Bryan; Hanson, Peter D

    2014-03-01

    This study's goal was to understand the extent, framework, and benefits of externships with prospective residency programs undertaken by predoctoral dental students or dentists interested in applying for a residency program. In 2012, a questionnaire was sent to all pediatric dentistry residents and program directors in the United States (63 percent and 74 percent return rate, respectively). Externships were offered by fifty-seven of the seventy-six programs. Most program directors (95 percent) agreed that externships are beneficial and compensate at least partially for the lack of numerical National Board Dental Examination scores or class rankings. Among the responding residents, 61 percent were female. The top reasons given by residents for choosing to extern with a certain program were its location and perceived reputation. Of the 249 respondents who did an externship, 47 percent externed with their current program. The acceptance rate into the number one choice of program was similar among those who did an externship vs. those who did not (73 percent vs. 75 percent). No relationship was found between gender and externships among the 341 respondents who were accepted into their top choice. Most of the residents (98.8 percent) felt that completing an externship was beneficial, and 88 percent got an increased understanding for the differences between university- and non-university-based residency programs.

  3. Preparedness of Entering Pediatric Dentistry Residents: Advanced Pediatric Program Directors' and First-Year Residents' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkauskas, John; Seale, N Sue; Casamassimo, Paul; Rutkauskas, John S

    2015-11-01

    For children to receive needed oral health care, adequate training at both the predoctoral and postdoctoral levels of dental education is required, but previous studies have found inadequacies in predoctoral education that lead to general dentists' unwillingness to treat certain young populations. As another way of assessing predoctoral preparation, the aim of this study was to determine the perspectives of first-year residents and pediatric program directors about residents' preparedness to enter advanced education programs in pediatric dentistry. Surveys were sent to all 74 U.S. program directors and 360 first-year residents. The survey focused on procedures related to prevention, behavior management, restorative procedures, pulp therapy, sedation, and surgery, as well as treating patients funded by Medicaid and with special health care needs. Among the first-year residents, 173 surveys were returned for a 48% response rate; 61 directors returned surveys for an 82% response rate. Only half of the residents (55%) reported feeling adequately prepared for their first year in residency; less than half cited adequate preparation to place stainless steel crowns (SSCs) (42%) and perform pulpotomies (45%). Far fewer felt adequately prepared to provide treatment for children six months to three years of age, including examinations (29%), infant oral exams (27%), and children with severe caries (37%). The program directors were even less positive about the adequacy of residents' preparation. Only 17% deemed them adequately prepared to place SSCs and 13% to perform pulpotomies. Approximately half reported their first-year residents were inadequately prepared to treat very young children and children with severe caries (55% each). This study found that the perceived inadequacy of predoctoral education in pediatric dentistry was consistent at both the learner and educator levels, supporting previous studies identifying inadequacies in this area.

  4. Alternative Strategies for Funding a General Dentistry Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralewski, John E.; Wiggins, Carla

    1987-01-01

    Three alternative program funding approaches used in other professions are examined: (1) the reorientation of selected dental schools toward graduate education, (2) emphasizing and marketing the service aspects of the programs, and (3) developing education programs as in-house training for large organizations. (MSE)

  5. Antibiotic prophylaxis for children with sickle cell disease: a survey of pediatric dentistry residency program directors and pediatric hematologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Anupama Rao; Norris, Chelita Kaye; Minniti, Caterina P

    2006-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to: (1) investigate the current clinical practice regarding the use of antibiotic prophylaxis by pediatric dentistry residency program directors and pediatric hematologists for children with sickle cell disease (SCD) requiring dental treatment; and (2) evaluate the perceived relative risk of bacteremia following specific dental procedures, as defined by pediatric dentistry residency program directors and pediatric hematologists. A written survey depicting various clinical scenarios of SCD children requiring common dental procedures was mailed to directors of pediatric dental advanced education programs and distributed to pediatric hematologists attending the 2003 Annual Sickle Cell Disease Association of America conference in Washington, DC. Surveys were returned by 60% (N=34/57) of the pediatric dentistry residency program directors. The surveys were obtained from 51% of pediatric hematologists at the meeting (N=72/140). At least 50% of all respondents recommended prophylaxis for the following clinical situations: dental extractions, treatment under general anesthesia, and status post splenectomy. The perceived risk of infectious complication was highest for extractions, followed by restorative treatment and tooth polishing. Dental residency program directors were more likely (71%, N=24/34) to recommend additional antibiotic therapy for patients taking penicillin prophylaxis if they required an invasive oral surgical procedure. Conversely, only 38% (N=25/66) of pediatric hematologists recommended additional antibiotic therapy (P=.001). Eighty-six percent of dental residency program directors (N=25/29) chose amoxicillin for prophylaxis whereas only 62% of pediatric hematologists (N=36/58) recommended amoxicillin. (P<.05). There is a lack of consensus on the appropriate use of antibiotic prophylaxis in SCD children undergoing dental treatments. Further research and risk/benefit assessment is needed to create a unified approach.

  6. SCDA task force on a special care dentistry residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Jeffery; Vishwanat, Lakshmi; Perry, Maureen; Messura, Judith; Dee, Kristin

    2016-07-01

    The Special Care Dentistry Association (SCDA) has acted on a proposal regarding the status of training in the care of patients with special needs. Two phases of action were undertaken. Phase 1: (a) examination of the literature on existing training and curricula in the care of patients with special needs and (b) a survey of existing postdoctoral programs in special needs. Phase 2: establish a group of experts who: (a) submitted to the Commission on Dental Accreditation a request to approve a postdoctoral general dentistry residency program in Special Care Dentistry and (b) created suggested accreditation standards for such postdoctoral programs. This article describes efforts by the SCDA to evaluate: The status of existing training of dental students in the care of patients with special needs. The number and characteristics of postdoctoral general dentistry programs offering formal training in the care of patients with special needs. Whether additional training in the care of patients with special needs is needed for dental students and -dentists. Possible actions by SCDA to impact the numbers of dentists trained each year in the care of patients with -special needs.

  7. Demand in Pediatric Dentistry for Sedation and General Anesthesia by Dentist Anesthesiologists: A Survey of Directors of Dentist Anesthesiologist and Pediatric Dentistry Residencies

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    Hicks, C. Gray; Jones, James E.; Saxen, Mark A.; Maupome,Gerardo; Sanders, Brian J.; Walker, LaQuia A.; James A. Weddell; Tomlin, Angela

    2012-01-01

    This study describes what training programs in pediatric dentistry and dental anesthesiology are doing to meet future needs for deep sedation/general anesthesia services required for pediatric dentistry. Residency directors from 10 dental anesthesiology training programs in North America and 79 directors from pediatric dentistry training programs in North America were asked to answer an 18-item and 22-item online survey, respectively, through an online survey tool. The response rate for the 1...

  8. Training needs for general dentistry residents to place and restore two-implant-retained mandibular overdentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmstrom, Hans; Xiao, Jin; Romanos, Georgios E; Ren, Yan-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Implant therapy is rapidly becoming a standard of care for replacing missing dentition. Predoctoral dental curricula include some training in the implant restorative phase but offer limited exposure to the surgical phase, so it is important for postdoctoral general dentistry residency programs to provide competency training in all phases of implant therapy. The aim of this study was to determine the training needed for general dentistry residents to achieve competence in this area, specifically by defining the number of clinical experiences necessary in both the surgical and prosthetic phases of implant-retained mandibular overdenture construction (IRMOD). Fifteen Advanced Education in General Dentistry (AEGD) residents at one academic dental institution placed two implants in a total of 50 patients with edentulous mandibles and subsequently restored them with IRMOD. The supervising faculty member and the residents evaluated the competency level on a five-point scale after each implant placement and prosthetic case completion. According to the faculty evaluations, the residents achieved surgical competence after placing two implants in four to six cases and prosthetic management competence after restoring two to four cases of IRMOD. All 50 patients were satisfied with the treatment outcomes of IRMOD. This study concluded that general dentistry residents could potentially achieve competence in both the surgical and prosthetic phases of implant therapy while enrolled in an AEGD program.

  9. Developing an Undergraduate Hospital Dentistry Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, G. B.; Swanson, A. E.

    1991-01-01

    The process used by the University of British Columbia to establish and improve an undergraduate hospital dentistry program is chronicled. The program's initial structure and objectives, use of student input for program improvement, and the success of the approach in developing an effective program are discussed. (MSE)

  10. Demand in pediatric dentistry for sedation and general anesthesia by dentist anesthesiologists: a survey of directors of dentist anesthesiologist and pediatric dentistry residencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, C Gray; Jones, James E; Saxen, Mark A; Maupome, Gerardo; Sanders, Brian J; Walker, Laquia A; Weddell, James A; Tomlin, Angela

    2012-01-01

    This study describes what training programs in pediatric dentistry and dental anesthesiology are doing to meet future needs for deep sedation/general anesthesia services required for pediatric dentistry. Residency directors from 10 dental anesthesiology training programs in North America and 79 directors from pediatric dentistry training programs in North America were asked to answer an 18-item and 22-item online survey, respectively, through an online survey tool. The response rate for the 10 anesthesiology training program directors was 9 of 10 or 90%. The response rate for the 79 pediatric dentistry training program directors was 46 of 79 or 58%. Thirty-seven percent of pediatric dentistry programs use clinic-based deep sedation/general anesthesia for dental treatment in addition to hospital-based deep sedation/general anesthesia. Eighty-eight percent of those programs use dentist anesthesiologists for administration of deep sedation/general anesthesia in a clinic-based setting. Pediatric dentistry residency directors perceive a future change in the need for deep sedation/general anesthesia services provided by dentist anesthesiologists to pediatric dentists: 64% anticipate an increase in need for dentist anesthesiologist services, while 36% anticipate no change. Dental anesthesiology directors compared to 2, 5, and 10 years ago have seen an increase in the requests for dentist anesthesiologist services by pediatric dentists reported by 56% of respondents (past 2 years), 63% of respondents (past 5 years), and 88% of respondents (past 10 years), respectively. Predicting the future need of dentist anesthesiologists is an uncertain task, but these results show pediatric dentistry directors and dental anesthesiology directors are considering the need, and they recognize a trend of increased need for dentist anesthesiologist services over the past decade.

  11. Survey of Advanced Education in Prosthodontics Directors and Residents on Practices in Esthetic Dentistry.

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    Sheets, James L; Yuan, Judy Chia-Chun; Sukotjo, Cortino; Wee, Alvin G

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the difference between the intended education by advanced education in prosthodontics (AEP) program directors and the perceived education received by AEP residents with respect to concepts of esthetic dentistry. Residents' confidence levels and current practices were also determined based on program level, with first- and second-year residents combined into "junior residents" and third- and fourth-year residents combined into "senior residents." Surveys were distributed to all U.S. and Canadian AEP program directors (N=52) in 2014 and residents (N=393) in 2015. The seven questions asked of directors and 20 asked of residents assessed resident training. The response rate for directors was 59.6% and for residents was 27.3%. Statistically significant results were found between the responding program directors' perceived education on esthetic principles and the responding residents' perceived education. The senior-level residents were more confident in each of the categories than residents at the junior level, although the difference was only significant for selecting porcelain systems to match inherent translucency, transfer of information to the laboratory, and surface staining or characterization. There was a difference between the program directors' intended teaching and the residents' perceptions with regards to bleaching, shade matching, selection of porcelain systems, transfer of information to the laboratory, and surface staining or characterization. The residents' confidence levels were higher at the senior level than those at the junior level in selecting porcelain systems, transfer of information to the laboratory, and staining/characterization. Faculty members in advanced prosthodontics programs may be able to use these findings to improve their residents' education in these areas.

  12. A review of pediatric dentistry program websites: what are applicants learning about our programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jenn-Yih; Lee, Jung; Davidson, Bo; Farquharson, Kara; Shaul, Cheryl; Kim, Sara

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: 1) to examine website content provided by U.S. and Canadian pediatric dentistry residency programs, and 2) to understand aspects of program websites that dental students report to be related to their interests. Sixty-eight program websites were reviewed by five interprofessional evaluators. A thirty-six-item evaluation form was organized into 1) program descriptive items listed on the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) website (n=21); 2) additional program descriptive items not listed on the AAPD website but of interest (n=9); and 3) items related to website interface design (n=5). We also surveyed fifty-four dental students regarding their interest in various aspects of program descriptions. The results of this study suggest that pediatric dentistry residency programs in general tend to provide identical or less information than what is listed on the AAPD website. The majority of respondents (76 percent) reported that residency program websites would be their first source of information about advanced programs. The greatest gap between the available website information and students' interests exists in these areas: stipend and tuition information, state licensure, and program strengths. Pediatric dentistry residency programs underutilize websites as a marketing and recruitment tool and should incorporate more information in areas of students' priority interests.

  13. Alternative careers in pediatric dentistry: a survey of pediatric dental residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinn, Courtney H; Edelstein, Burton L

    2010-10-01

    Pediatric dentistry has enjoyed growing popularity in recent years, yet there remains a need for leadership in academe, research, and public health. In November 2008, the first Maternal and Child Health Bureau-sponsored regional Leadership in Pediatric Dentistry convocation was held at the Columbia University College of Dental Medicine. Seventy-two pediatric dentistry trainees from thirteen programs in the New York City area participated in interactive presentations and exercises. Of the sixty- seven participants who completed a pre-event survey, 93 percent stated they would likely or very likely pursue careers that involved, at least in part, private practice, 55 percent in care of children in Medicaid, 51 percent academics, 36 percent dental public health, and 12 percent research. Barriers related to finances, competence, or work environment/location were perceived by 83 percent for careers involving research, 73 percent for dental public health, 66 percent for providing care to children in Medicaid, 46 percent for academics, and 9 percent for private practice. Results of a pair of pre-event and post-event surveys completed by sixty-three attendees showed no change in reported likelihood to pursue a career alternative except for an increase in the likelihood of working in a practice that accepts Medicaid. The challenge before dental educators is to provide consistent and meaningful opportunities throughout training that encourage residents to consider all career options and to discover how their individual interests mesh with their clinical learning.

  14. Demand in pediatric dentistry for sedation and general anesthesia by dentist anesthesiologists: a survey of directors of dentist anesthesiologist and pediatric dentistry residencies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hicks, C Gray; Jones, James E; Saxen, Mark A; Maupome, Gerardo; Sanders, Brian J; Walker, Laquia A; Weddell, James A; Tomlin, Angela

    2012-01-01

    This study describes what training programs in pediatric dentistry and dental anesthesiology are doing to meet future needs for deep sedation/general anesthesia services required for pediatric dentistry...

  15. Advanced general dentistry program directors' attitudes on physician involvement in pediatric oral health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raybould, Ted P; Wrightson, A Stevens; Massey, Christi Sporl; Smith, Tim A; Skelton, Judith

    2009-01-01

    Childhood oral disease is a significant health problem, particularly for vulnerable populations. Since a major focus of General Dentistry Program directors is the management of vulnerable populations, we wanted to assess their attitudes regarding the inclusion of physicians in the prevention, assessment, and treatment of childhood oral disease. A survey was mailed to all General Practice Residency and Advanced Education in General Dentistry program directors (accessed through the ADA website) to gather data. Spearman's rho was used to determine correlation among variables due to nonnormal distributions. Overall, Advanced General Dentistry directors were supportive of physicians' involvement in basic aspects of oral health care for children, with the exception of applying fluoride varnish. The large majority of directors agreed with physicians' assessing children's oral health and counseling patients on the prevention of dental problems. Directors who treated larger numbers of children from vulnerable populations tended to strongly support physician assistance with early assessment and preventive counseling.

  16. Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    The specialty of Dental Surgery has progressed from the "blood and acrylic" of the early seventies. Dentistry has undergone a quantum leap over the past twenty-five years, with improvements in both technique and technology, bringing us the sophisticated procedures used in today's practice.

  17. Critical Issues for Dentistry: PGD Program Directors Respond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchison, Kathryn A.; Cheffetz, Susan E.

    2002-01-01

    Surveyed directors of programs in postgraduate education in general dentistry (PGD) about critical issues facing their programs. Identified 12 themes: lack of postdoctoral applicants; student quality; professionalism and attitudes; number of postdoctoral positions; lack of funding; quality of facilities; special patient care; program curriculum;…

  18. A Distance Learning Program in Advanced General Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Timothy A.; Raybould, Ted P.; Hardison, J. David

    1998-01-01

    Describes a University of Kentucky program in advanced general dentistry offered by compressed video and computer in remote areas of the state. Topics discussed include program development, the technology, instructional design principles used, student recruitment, program evaluation, student evaluation, faculty evaluation, laboratory exercises,…

  19. Nursing and dental students' and pediatric dentistry residents' responses to experiences with interprofessional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecki, Gail A; Kloostra, Stephanie J; Boynton, James R; Inglehart, Marita R

    2014-09-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) has received increasingly more attention over recent years. The objectives of this study were to assess 1) how nursing students' considerations concerning their own oral health and oral health-related knowledge changed from before to after experiencing IPE; 2) how nursing students', dental students', and pediatric dentistry residents' IPE-related attitudes and Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS) scores changed after experiencing an IPE rotation; and 3) how these groups' attitudes and RIPLS scores were related. Data were collected from three groups who participated in an IPE rotation: thirty-eight of forty third-year dental students (95 percent response rate), all thirty-three nursing students (100 percent), and all six pediatric dentistry residents (100 percent) prior to the rotation, and 100 percent of each group after the rotation. As a control group, data were also collected at the beginning of the winter term from first-year dental students (104 out of 105; 99 percent response rate) and second-year dental students (102 out of 116; 88 percent); the same groups were surveyed at the end of term, with response rates of 98 percent for first-year students and 89 percent for second-year students. After the rotation, the nursing students' tooth brushing frequency increased, and their comfort level with dental visits and oral health-related knowledge improved. The dental students rated the importance of nurses' having oral health-related knowledge and skills lower than did the nursing students and pediatric dentistry residents. The groups' RIPLS scores correlated with these importance ratings. Overall, while the nursing students showed positive responses to IPE, the dental students' attitudes and RIPLS scores did not change as a result of the IPE experience. Future research should explore the conditions under which dental students are impacted by IPE.

  20. Incorporating resident research into the dermatology residency program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner RF Jr

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Richard F Wagner Jr, Sharon S Raimer, Brent C Kelly Department of Dermatology, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas, USA Abstract: Programmatic changes for the dermatology residency program at The University of Texas Medical Branch were first introduced in 2005, with the faculty goal incorporating formal dermatology research projects into the 3-year postgraduate training period. This curriculum initially developed as a recommendation for voluntary scholarly project activity by residents, but it evolved into a program requirement for all residents in 2009. Departmental support for this activity includes assignment of a faculty mentor with similar interest about the research topic, financial support from the department for needed supplies, materials, and statistical consultation with the Office of Biostatistics for study design and data analysis, a 2-week elective that provides protected time from clinical activities for the purpose of preparing research for publication and submission to a peer-reviewed medical journal, and a departmental award in recognition for the best resident scholarly project each year. Since the inception of this program, five classes have graduated a total of 16 residents. Ten residents submitted their research studies for peer review and published their scholarly projects in seven dermatology journals through the current academic year. These articles included three prospective investigations, three surveys, one article related to dermatology education, one retrospective chart review, one case series, and one article about dermatopathology. An additional article from a 2012 graduate about dermatology education has also been submitted to a journal. This new program for residents was adapted from our historically successful Dermatology Honors Research Program for medical students at The University of Texas Medical Branch. Our experience with this academic initiative to promote dermatology research by

  1. Global health training in pediatric residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Brett D; Lee, Anne Cc; Newby, P K; Chamberlin, M Robert; Huang, Chi-Cheng

    2008-07-01

    Our goal was to describe current resident interest, participation, curricula, resources, and obstacles related to global health training within pediatric residency programs. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of the 201 accredited pediatric residency programs in the United States, Puerto Rico, and the Caribbean from October 2006 to January 2007. Survey topics included resident interest and participation in electives, training opportunities, program support, and educational curricular content related to global health. Of the 201 surveyed pediatric residency programs, 106 (53%) responded. Fifteen percent of responding programs reported that a majority of their residents were interested in global health. Fifty-two percent offered a global health elective within the previous year, and 47% had formally incorporated global health into their training curricula. Six percent of the programs reported a formalized track or certificate in global health. The median number of residents per program participating in global health electives within the previous year was 0 during postgraduate year 1, 1 during postgraduate year 2, and 2 during postgraduate year 3. The median number of all residents per program participating in a global health elective in the previous year was 3 (7.4% of program size). Among programs that offered a global health elective, support to participating residents included prerequisite clinical training (36%), cultural orientation (36%), language training (15%), faculty mentorship (82%), and post-elective debriefing (77%). Fourteen percent of the programs provided full funding for resident electives. Characteristics of pediatric residency programs that were significantly associated with higher resident participation in a global health elective were larger program size, university affiliation, greater reported resident interest, and faculty involvement in global health. More than half of the pediatric residency programs surveyed offered a global health

  2. Attitude of Dental Prostheses Residents of Faculty of Dentistry of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences to Objective Structured Clinical Examination(OSCE

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    Ali Hafezeqoran

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE is one of the most authentic ways to evaluate clinical skills. The present study aimed at evaluating the attitude of dental prostheses residents of the faculty of dentistry of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences toward this kind of examination. Methods: In this cross sectional-descriptive study, two questionnaires were designed. One questionnaire dealt with nature of OSCE and the other dealt with the attitude of residents about OSCE. After holding the OSCE in July 2012, 2013, and 2014, the questionnaires were delivered to all dental prostheses residents of the Tabriz dental faculty. In total, 40 questionnaires were filled out within three years. Questions included five-choice items based on a Likert scale. Furthermore, the students’ scores in each exam were recorded to evaluate any possible relationship between the acquired grade and the student’s attitude toward the exam. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS17 software (α=5%. Results: Most residents (62.5% referred to the large number of questions as a positive factor. In addition, a majority of residents (90% suffered from high levels of stress during OSCE. There was a close relation between the grade acquired by the residents in the examination and their attitude to OSCE as well as their evaluation about the examination. The students with better grades had more positive attitudes toward OSCE. Conclusion: Considering the satisfaction level of the students in this study, OSCE was held efficiently and may be considered as part of the training program of the residents.

  3. A survey assessing the impact of a hospital-based general practice residency program on dentists and dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejani, Asif; Epstein, Joel B; Gibson, Gary; Le, Nhu

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this survey was to evaluate the outcome of completing a general practice hospital-based dental residency program. A survey was mailed to all individuals who had completed a general practice residency program (resident) between 1980 and 1996 and to dentists who had not completed a hospital program (undergraduate). The responses were evaluated by Fisher's exact test. Seventy-four percent of the resident group and 68% from the undergraduate sample group returned the questionnaire. Approximately half the residents were in general dental practice. Twenty-six percent were involved in specialty dentistry, 7% in hospital dentistry, and 20% in teaching at a dental school. Of the undergraduate dentists, more than three-quarters were in general practice, 5% were entered into specialty programs, 1% were involved in hospital dentistry, and 15% taught at a dental school. Half of the residents held staff privileges in a hospital or ambulatory setting, compared with 16% of undergraduates. Forty-three percent of the residents provided consultation in a hospital or long-term-care facility, compared with 21% of the undergraduates. Practice characteristics suggested enhanced clinical skills in oral surgery, periodontics, emergency dental care, and oral medicine/pathology in those completing the hospital program. The findings of this study confirm that the outcome of completing a hospital program is a change in practice profile, site of practice, services for complex patients, and continuing involvement in teaching.

  4. Effect of Doximity Residency Rankings on Residency Applicants’ Program Choices

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    Aimee M. Rolston

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Choosing a residency program is a stressful and important decision. Doximity released residency program rankings by specialty in September 2014. This study sought to investigate the impact of those rankings on residency application choices made by fourth year medical students. Methods: A 12-item survey was administered in October 2014 to fourth year medical students at three schools. Students indicated their specialty, awareness of and perceived accuracy of the rankings, and the rankings’ impact on the programs to which they chose to apply. Descriptive statistics were reported for all students and those applying to Emergency Medicine (EM. Results: A total of 461 (75.8% students responded, with 425 applying in one of the 20 Doximity ranked specialties. Of the 425, 247 (58% were aware of the rankings and 177 looked at them. On a 1-100 scale (100=very accurate, students reported a mean ranking accuracy rating of 56.7 (SD 20.3. Forty-five percent of students who looked at the rankings modified the number of programs to which they applied. The majority added programs. Of the 47 students applying to EM, 18 looked at the rankings and 33% changed their application list with most adding programs. Conclusion: The Doximity rankings had real effects on students applying to residencies as almost half of students who looked at the rankings modified their program list. Additionally, students found the rankings to be moderately accurate. Graduating students might benefit from emphasis on more objective characterization of programs to assess in light of their own interests and personal/career goals

  5. Putting "Rural" into Psychiatry Residency Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, William A.; Pomerantz, Andrew; Schwartz, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Evidence indicates disparities in the number of psychiatrists practicing in rural America compared to urban areas suggesting the need for a greater emphasis on rural psychiatry in residency training programs. The authors offer suggestions for integrating a rural focus in psychiatry residency training to foster greater competency and…

  6. The Chief Resident Role in Emergency Medicine Residency Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafner, John W. Jr., MD, MPH

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Study Objectives: Although other specialties have examined the role of the chief resident (CR, the role and training of the emergency medicine (EM CR has largely been undefined.Methods: A survey was mailed to all EM CRs and their respective program directors (PD in 124 EM residency programs. The survey consisted of questions defining demographics, duties of the typical CR, and opinions regarding the level of support and training received. Multiple choice, Likert scale (1 strong agreement, 5 strong disagreement and short-answer responses were used. We analyzed associations between CR and PD responses using Chi-square, Student’s T and Mann-Whitney U tests.Results: Seventy-six percent of CRs and 65% of PDs responded and were similar except for age (31 vs. 42 years; p<0.001. CR respondents were most often male, in year 3 of training and held the position for 12 months. CRs and PDs agreed that the assigned level of responsibility is appropriate (2.63 vs. 2.73, p=0.15; but CRs underestimate their influence in the residency program (1.94 vs. 2.34, p=0.002 and the emergency department (2.61 vs. 3.03, p=0.002. The majority of CRs (70% and PDs (77% report participating in an extramural training program, and those CRs who participated in training felt more prepared for their job duties (2.26 vs. 2.73; p=0.03.Conclusion: EM CRs feel they have appropriate job responsibility but believe they are less influential in program and department administration than PD respondents. Extramural training programs for incoming CRs are widely used and felt to be helpful. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(2:120-125.

  7. Self-Regulated Learning Using Multimedia Programs in Dentistry Postgraduate Students: A Multimethod Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloret, Miguel; Aguila, Estela; Lloret, Alejandro

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to study the effect of a multimedia computing program on the production of activities and self-regulated learning processes in 18 students of the Dentistry postdegree (Celaya, Mexico). A multi-method design (quasi-experimental, pretest-post-test and qualitative: Think aloud protocol) was used. Self-regulated…

  8. Impact of pharmaceutical company representatives on internal medicine residency programs. A survey of residency program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichstein, P R; Turner, R C; O'Brien, K

    1992-05-01

    To survey internal medicine residency program directors regarding interactions between their residents and pharmaceutical company (PC) representatives (PCRs) a questionnaire was sent to the directors of all Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-approved internal medicine residency programs. The survey included 444 program directors, of whom 272 (61.16%) responded. The majority of program directors, 228 (83.8%), allowed PCRs to meet with residents during working hours and 241 (88.6%) permitted PC sponsorship of conferences. About half of the program directors were "moderately" or "very" concerned about the potential adverse effects of PC marketing on resident attitudes and prescribing practices. Seventy percent "agreed" or "strongly agreed" that the benefits of PC sponsorship outweigh the adverse effects and 41.5% believed that refusal to allow PCRs to meet with residents would jeopardize PC funding of other departmental activities. Most program directors reported that alternate funds for conferences were available if PC support was withdrawn. "Unethical" marketing activities were observed by 14.3% of program directors and 37.5% reported that residents had participated in PC-sponsored trips during the 3 years prior to the survey. At the time of this survey, only 35.3% of programs had developed formal policies regulating PCR activities and 25.7% provided residents with formal instruction on marketing issues. Knowledge of the current extent of PCR interactions with residents may be helpful to program directors in developing policies regulating PC-marketing activities.

  9. Coping with disaster: relocating a residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlay, Lydia A; Searle, Nancy S; Gitlin, Melvin C

    2007-08-01

    In September 2005, in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, the Tulane University School of Medicine relocated temporarily from New Orleans to the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. For Tulane's residency program in anesthesiology, a training consortium was formed in Texas consisting of the University of Texas at Houston, Baylor College of Medicine, the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, and the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. The authors explain the collaborative process that allowed the consortium to find spaces to accommodate Tulane's 30 anesthesiology residents within 30 days after they left New Orleans, and they offer reflections and recommendations. The residents were grateful to continue training close to home, and for maintaining the Tulane program. The consortium successfully provided an administrative and academic framework, logistical support, clinical capacity for the residents to complete the required numbers and types of cases, and integration into preexisting didactic programs. Communications represented a major challenge; the importance of having an up-to-date disaster plan, including provisions for communication using more than one modality or provider, cannot be underestimated. Other challenges included resuming a training program without basic information regarding medical credentials or training status, competing for resources with businesses that had also relocated, maintaining a coordinated decision-making process, and managing the behavioral sequelae after the disaster. Of the original 30 Tulane residents, 23 (77%) relocated to Houston. Seventeen (74%) of those who relocated either graduated or returned with the program to New Orleans. The program has retained its status of full accreditation.

  10. Changing the education paradigm in pediatric dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Gomez, Francisco J

    2014-10-01

    Traditional curricula of pediatric dental residency programs have overemphasized restorative dentistry while failing to give adequate attention to early diagnosis, preventive disease management, risk assessment, cultural competency, advocacy, community partnerships and interprofessional education. The University of California, Los Angeles, Community Health and Advocacy Training Program in Pediatric Dentistry emphasizes these lesser-taught areas, integrating them within a structured education in classical restorative techniques and Commission on Dental Accreditation-approved standards, providing a diverse curriculum and preparing residents for practice in increasingly diverse communities.

  11. Analysis of Resident Case Logs in an Anesthesiology Residency Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamamoto, Satoshi; Tanaka, Pedro; Madsen, Matias Vested;

    2016-01-01

    Our goal in this study was to examine Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education case logs for Stanford anesthesia residents graduating in 2013 (25 residents) and 2014 (26 residents). The resident with the fewest recorded patients in 2013 had 43% the number of patients compared with the...

  12. Learning styles in two otolaryngology residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laeeq, Kulsoom; Weatherly, Robert A; Carrott, Alice; Pandian, Vinciya; Cummings, Charles W; Bhatti, Nasir I

    2009-12-01

    Kolb portrays four learning styles depending on how an individual grasps or transforms experience: accommodating, assimilating, diverging, and converging. Past studies in surgery, medicine, and anesthesia identified the predominant learning style in each of these specialties. The prevalence of different learning styles and existence of a predominant style, if any, has not been reported for otolaryngology residency programs. The purpose of our study was to determine if otolaryngology residents have a preferred learning style that is different from the predominant learning styles reported for other specialties. We conducted a survey of the otolaryngology-head and neck surgery residents at two residency programs. Kolb's Learning Style Index (LSI) version 3.1 was administered to 46 residents from Johns Hopkins University and Kansas University Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery programs. LSI is a widely used 12-item questionnaire, with each item followed by four options. The subjects graded the options depending on how the options applied to them. Forty-three otolaryngology residents completed the survey, with a response rate of 93.47%. The predominant learning style was converging (55.81%) followed by accommodating (18.61%), accounting for the learning styles of 74.42% of the total population. There were only 13.95% assimilating and 6.98% diverging learning styles. Two residents (4.65%) had their preference balanced across four learning styles. The predominant learning styles in otolaryngology were converging and accommodating, accounting for three fourths of the population. It would be desirable to modify our curriculum in a way that will optimize and facilitate learning.

  13. The Teacher-in-Residence Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poda, Janice H.

    1993-01-01

    South Carolina Center for Teacher Recruitment created the Teacher-in-Residence fellowship in 1986, when a classroom teacher and counselor became the first representative to the South Carolina Teacher Cadet Program--a project encouraging bright high school students to consider education careers. The representative helped plan curriculum training…

  14. OUTLINE OF THE PROGRAM FOR TRAINABLE RESIDENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunland Training Center, Gainesville, FL.

    PHILOSOPHY, GOALS, AND DESCRIPTION OF RESIDENTS PARTICIPATING IN THIS PROGRAM ARE PRESENTED. ACTIVITIES ARE OUTLINED FOR BEGINNERS, INTERMEDIATES, ADULT MEN, AND ADULT WOMEN IN THE FOLLOWING AREAS--(1) PERCEPTION DEVELOPMENT, (2) COMMUNICATION AND EXPRESSION SKILLS, (3) MOTOR SKILLS, (4) NUMBER CONCEPTS, (5) PERSONAL HEALTH AND GROOMING SKILLS,…

  15. Introduction of problem-based learning in undergraduate dentistry program in Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Rimal, Jyotsna; Paudel, Bishnu Hari; Shrestha, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    Context: Problem-based learning (PBL) is a methodology widely used in medical education and is growing in dental education. Initiation of new ideas and teaching methods requires a change in perception from faculty and institute management. Student-centered education is a need of the day and PBL provides the best outlet to it. Aim: To introduce PBL, assess feasibility and challenges in undergraduate dentistry program and evaluate the impact on their learning. Settings and Design: PBL was used ...

  16. Analysis of Resident Case Logs in an Anesthesiology Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Satoshi; Tanaka, Pedro; Madsen, Matias Vested; Macario, Alex

    2016-04-15

    Our goal in this study was to examine Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education case logs for Stanford anesthesia residents graduating in 2013 (25 residents) and 2014 (26 residents). The resident with the fewest recorded patients in 2013 had 43% the number of patients compared with the resident with the most patients, and in 2014, this equaled 48%. There were residents who had 75% more than the class average number of cases for several of the 12 case types and 3 procedure types required by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Also, there were residents with fewer than half as many for some of the required cases or procedure types. Some of the variability may have been because of the hazards of self-reporting.

  17. Case-Logging Practices in Otolaryngology Residency Training: National Survey of Residents and Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermody, Sarah M; Gao, William; McGinn, Johnathan D; Malekzadeh, Sonya

    2017-06-01

    Objective (1) Evaluate the consistency and manner in which otolaryngology residents log surgical cases. (2) Assess the extent of instruction and guidance provided by program directors on case-logging practices. Study Design Cross-sectional national survey. Setting Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education otolaryngology residency programs in the United States. Subjects and Methods US otolaryngology residents, postgraduate year 2 through graduating chiefs as of July 2016, were recruited to respond to an anonymous questionnaire designed to characterize surgical case-logging practices. Program directors of US otolaryngology residency programs were recruited to respond to an anonymous questionnaire to elucidate how residents are instructed to log cases. Results A total of 272 residents and 53 program directors completed the survey, yielding response rates of 40.6% and 49.5%, respectively. Perceived accuracy of case logs is low among residents and program directors. Nearly 40% of residents purposely choose not to log certain cases, and 65.1% of residents underreport cases performed. More than 80% of program directors advise residents to log procedures performed outside the operating room, yet only 16% of residents consistently log such cases. Conclusion Variability in surgical case-logging behaviors and differences in provided instruction highlight the need for methods to improve consistency of logging practices. It is imperative to standardize practices across otolaryngology residency programs for case logs to serve as an accurate measure of surgical competency. This study provides a foundation for reform efforts within residency programs and for the Resident Case Log System.

  18. Behavior Management Techniques in Predoctoral and Postdoctoral Pediatric Dentistry Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, Gary K.; Tilliss, Terri S.

    1993-01-01

    A survey determined the extent to which selected pediatric dental behavior management techniques are taught both didactically and clinically in 46 predoctoral and 45 postdoctoral programs. Results and trends are reported within the four categories of sedation, restraint, parental presence, and communications behavior management. (GLR)

  19. Radiology residents as teachers: Current status of teaching skills training in United States residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Andrea

    2010-07-01

    Radiology residents often teach medical students and other residents. Workshops developed with the goal of improving resident teaching skills are becoming increasingly common in various fields of medicine. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence and structure of resident-teacher training opportunities within radiology programs in the United States. Program directors with membership in the Association of Program Directors in Radiology (APDR) were surveyed to determine views on a panel of topics related to resident-teacher training programs. A total of 114 (56%) of 205 APDR members completed an online survey. Approximately one-third (32%) stated that their program provided instruction to residents on teaching skills. The majority of these programs (72%) were established within the last 5 years. Residents provided teaching to medical students (94%) and radiology residents (90%). The vast majority of program directors agreed that it is important for residents to teach (98%) and that these teaching experiences helped residents become better radiologists (85%). Ninety-four percent of program directors felt that the teaching skills of their residents could be improved, and 85% felt that residents would benefit from instruction on teaching methods. Only one-third of program directors felt their program adequately recognized teaching provided by residents. Program directors identified residents as being active contributors to teaching in most programs. Although teaching was viewed as an important skill to develop, few programs had instituted a resident-teacher curriculum. Program directors felt that residents would benefit from structured training to enhance teaching skills. Future studies are needed to determine how best to provide teaching skills training for radiology trainees. 2010 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Military and VA General Dentistry Training: A National Resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchison, Kathryn A.; Bachand, William; Buchanan, C. Richard; Lefever, Karen H.; Lin, Sylvia; Engelhardt, Rita

    2002-01-01

    Compared the program characteristics of the postgraduate general dentistry (PGD) training programs sponsored by the military and the Veterans Health Administration (VA). Gathered information on program infrastructure and emphasis, resident preparation prior to entering the program, and patients served and types of services provided. Programs…

  1. Core Competencies in Geriatric Dentistry Fellowship Programs: a Delphi Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Christie M; Andrade, Allen D; Ruiz, Jorge G; Gibson, Gretchen

    2016-07-01

    The healthcare workforce is challenged with preparing for the increasing number of older persons and complexities of their healthcare needs. Fellowship trained geriatric dentists are charged with the task of addressing the dental needs of this vastly growing cohort.The purpose of this study is to formulate a set of competencies for Geriatric Dental Fellowship Training Programs. The Delphi technique-a series of three rounds of anonymous questionnaires to obtain the opinions of experts without bringing them together. In Round 1, we proposed 45 competencies based on findings in previous literature. In Round 2, there were 19 respondents whose edits narrowed our list to 39 competencies proposed by the participants. In Round 3, based on group consensus we formulated a final list of 42 competencies. Utilizing the Delphi process, a panel of geriatric dental experts identified a set of core competencies for curriculums in dental fellowship programs. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  2. Enhancing teamwork between chief residents and residency program directors: description and outcomes of an experiential workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhillips, Heather A; Frohna, John G; Murad, M Hassan; Batra, Maneesh; Panda, Mukta; Miller, Marsha A; Brigham, Timothy P; Doughty, Robert A

    2011-12-01

    An effective working relationship between chief residents and residency program directors is critical to a residency program's success. Despite the importance of this relationship, few studies have explored the characteristics of an effective program director-chief resident partnership or how to facilitate collaboration between the 2 roles, which collectively are important to program quality and resident satisfaction. We describe the development and impact of a novel workshop that paired program directors with their incoming chief residents to facilitate improved partnerships. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education sponsored a full-day workshop for residency program directors and their incoming chief residents. Sessions focused on increased understanding of personality styles, using experiential learning, and open communication between chief residents and program directors, related to feedback and expectations of each other. Participants completed an anonymous survey immediately after the workshop and again 8 months later to assess its long-term impact. Participants found the workshop to be a valuable experience, with comments revealing common themes. Program directors and chief residents expect each other to act as a role model for the residents, be approachable and available, and to be transparent and fair in their decision-making processes; both groups wanted feedback on performance and clear expectations from each other for roles and responsibilities; and both groups identified the need to be innovative and supportive of changes in the program. Respondents to the follow-up survey reported that workshop participation improved their relationships with their co-chiefs and program directors. Participation in this experiential workshop improved the working relationships between chief residents and program directors. The themes that were identified can be used to foster communication between incoming chief residents and residency directors and to

  3. Pediatric training in emergency medicine residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, S; Fleisher, G; Henretig, F; Ruddy, R

    1982-04-01

    Endorsed emergency medicine (EM) residency programs were surveyed as to the nature and extent of training they provided in pediatric emergency care (PEC). In the surveys returned (82%) there were several important findings. The amount of time in PEC training was generally two months per year of training. This accounted for 16% of training time. However, the volume of pediatric patients was 25% of the overall patient population. There was wide variation in the sites of PEC training. Didactic sessions often did not cover even core topics. The training program directors were equally divided in their satisfaction with this aspect of their programs. Changes were recommended by 80% of the directors. Changes most often suggested were increasing pediatric patient exposure and obtaining PEC specialists as trainers.

  4. Residents' perceptions of implant surgical training in advanced education in prosthodontic programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Judy Chia-Chun; Lee, Damian J; Knoernschild, Kent L; Campbell, Stephen D; Sukotjo, Cortino

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess residents' perspectives on their implant surgical training in Advanced Education in Prosthodontic programs in the United States. Questionnaires were distributed to all prosthodontic residents (N = 442). The 27 questions assessed the subjective and objective aspects of implant surgical training from the view of prosthodontic residents. The data were compiled and reported as frequencies. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. One hundred and ninety-eight responses (44.8%) were received and analyzed. Forty-seven percent (94) of the respondents felt that the philosophy of their programs regarding implant placement in prosthodontics was "optional but encouraged," whereas 30% (60) felt that it was "mandatory." The majority of the respondents (73%, 144) stated that their programs allowed them to place implants for their own patients. For those respondents who placed their own implants, 40% (58) of them indicated that the level of their clinical training was "competent." Almost half of the respondents expressed that they would like to have a proficient level of clinical training in implant surgery by the completion of their residency programs. Forty-four percent (87) of the respondents felt their residency training adequately prepared them for implant surgery, whereas the other 37% (73) did not. For those who did not, 74% (55) felt their residency programs should have prepared them for implant surgical training. The current generation of prosthodontic residents has an opportunity to place implants in their programs and would like to be trained in surgical aspects of implant dentistry at the level of competency or higher. © 2010 by The American College of Prosthodontists.

  5. Pharmacist educators in family medicine residency programs: A qualitative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorgenson Derek

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 25-29% of North American family medicine residency programs utilize a pharmacist to teach residents. Little is known about the impact that these pharmacist educators have on residency training. The purpose of this study was to examine the experiences of residents, residency directors and pharmacists within Canadian family medicine residency programs that employ a pharmacist educator to better understand the impact of the role. Methods Recruitment from three cohorts (residents, residency directors, pharmacists within family medicine residency programs across Canada for one-on-one semi-structured interviews followed by thematic analysis of anonymized transcript data. Results 11 residents, 6 residency directors and 17 pharmacist educators participated in interviews. Data themes were: (1 strong value of the teaching with respect to improved resident knowledge, confidence and patient care delivery; (2 lack of a formal pharmacotherapy curriculum; (3 desire for expansion of pharmacist teaching; (4 impact of teaching on collaboration; (5 impact of teaching on residency program faculty; and (6 lack of criticism of the role. Conclusions The pharmacist educator role is valued within residency programs across Canada and the role has a positive impact on several important aspects of family medicine resident training. Suggestions for improvement focused on expanding the teaching role and on implementing a formal curriculum for pharmacist educators to follow.

  6. Teaching Residents and Program Directors about Physician Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broquet, Karen E.; Rockey, Paul H.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: Residents are at a higher risk than the general population for the development of stress-related problems, depression, or suicide. The authors describe a curriculum for educating PGY-1s and residency program directors about physician impairment. Methods: A resident wellness program was established with the goals of preventing resident…

  7. A residents' program for educating adolescents about mental health issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coverdale, J H; Battaglia, J; Bushong, C P

    1991-09-01

    This paper describes a school-based program in which psychiatry residents educate adolescents about a variety of mental health topics. Adolescents responded positively to the program and were principally concerned about drugs, depression, suicide, and family problems. Residents also liked presenting in the schools. Participation in this program allowed residents to learn about agency consultation and secondary prevention. Possibilities for program expansion are discussed.

  8. Maternity leave: existing policies in obstetrics and gynecology residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J L; Baillie, S; Hodgson, C S; Vontver, L; Platt, L D

    2001-12-01

    To survey program directors in obstetrics and gynecology regarding maternity leave and to determine how programs are dealing with maternity leave coverage. Questionnaires regarding impact and policy on maternity leave were mailed to accredited obstetrics and gynecology residency programs. A total of 188 of 274 (69%) questionnaires were returned completed. Respectively, 80% and 69% of respondents indicated that they have a formal maternity (maximum mean 8.7 weeks) and paternity (mean 5.27 days) leave policy. Approximately 75% of programs require residents to make up time if their leave exceeds 8 weeks during the first 3 years. Eighty-five percent of programs require residents to make up time if their leave exceeds 6 weeks during the fourth year. Ninety-three percent of programs require residents to make up time if their leave exceeds 20 weeks over the 4 years. Seventy-seven percent of respondents have other residents in their program cover for the absent resident. Thirty-seven percent of programs have schedules flexible enough to allow rearrangement so that some rotations go uncovered. Eighty-three percent of programs surveyed stated that maternity leave has a somewhat to very significant impact on the residents' schedules. Most residency programs have written maternity/paternity leave policies. A more flexible curriculum may help to accommodate the residents on leave without overburdening the residents who are left to cover.

  9. Radiology resident teaching skills improvement: impact of a resident teacher training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Andrea

    2011-04-01

    Teaching is considered an essential competency for residents to achieve during their training. Instruction in teaching skills may assist radiology residents in becoming more effective teachers and increase their overall satisfaction with teaching. The purposes of this study were to survey radiology residents' teaching experiences during residency and to assess perceived benefits following participation in a teaching skills development course. Study participants were radiology residents with membership in the American Alliance of Academic Chief Residents in Radiology or the Siemens AUR Radiology Resident Academic Development Program who participated in a 1.5-hour workshop on teaching skills development at the 2010 Association of University Radiologists meeting. Participants completed a self-administered, precourse questionnaire that addressed their current teaching strategies, as well as the prevalence and structure of teaching skills training opportunities at their institutions. A second postcourse questionnaire enabled residents to evaluate the seminar and assessed new knowledge and skill acquisition. Seventy-eight residents completed the precourse and postcourse questionnaires. The vast majority of respondents indicated that they taught medical students (72 of 78 [92.3%]). Approximately 20% of residency programs (17 of 78) provided residents with formal didactic programs on teaching skills. Fewer than half (46.8%) of the resident respondents indicated that they received feedback on their teaching from attending physicians (36 of 77), and only 18% (13 of 78) routinely gave feedback to their own learners. All of the course participants agreed or strongly agreed that this workshop was helpful to them as teachers. Few residency programs had instituted resident teacher training curricula. A resident teacher training workshop was perceived as beneficial by the residents, and they reported improvement in their teaching skills. Copyright © 2011 AUR. Published by

  10. Global Women's Health Education in Canadian Obstetrics and Gynaecology Residency Programs: A Survey of Program Directors and Senior Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, Heather C; Randle, Elizabeth A; Scott, Heather M; Shaw, Dorothy; Kent, Nancy; Nakajima, Amy K; Spitzer, Rachel F

    2015-10-01

    To become culturally competent practitioners with the ability to care and advocate for vulnerable populations, residents must be educated in global health priorities. In the field of obstetrics and gynaecology, there is minimal information about global women's health (GWH) education and interest within residency programs. We wished to determine within obstetrics and gynaecology residency programs across Canada: (1) current GWH teaching and support, (2) the importance of GWH to residents and program directors, and (3) the level of interest in a national postgraduate GWH curriculum. We conducted an online survey across Canada of obstetrics and gynaecology residency program directors and senior obstetrics and gynaecology residents. Of 297 residents, 101 (34.0%) responded to the survey and 76 (26%) completed the full survey. Eleven of 16 program directors (68.8%) responded and 10/16 (62.5%) provided complete responses. Four of 11 programs (36.4%) had a GWH curriculum, 2/11 (18.2%) had a GWH budget, and 4/11 (36.4%) had a GWH chairperson. Nine of 10 program directors (90%) and 68/79 residents (86.1%) felt that an understanding of GWH issues is important for all Canadian obstetrics and gynaecology trainees. Only 1/10 program directors (10%) and 11/79 residents (13.9%) felt that their program offered sufficient education in these issues. Of residents in programs with a GWH curriculum, 12/19 (63.2%) felt that residents in their program who did not undertake an international elective would still learn about GWH, versus only 9/50 residents (18.0%) in programs without a curriculum (P < 0.001). Obstetrics and gynaecology residents and program directors feel that GWH education is important for all trainees and is currently insufficient. There is a high level of interest in a national postgraduate GWH educational module.

  11. Self-regulated learning using multimedia programs in Dentistry posgraduate students. A multimethod approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Rivas LLORET

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to study the effect of a multimedia computing program on the production of activities and self-regulated learning processes in 18 students of the Dentistry postdegree (Celaya, Mexico. A multi-method design (quasi-experimental, pretest-post-test and qualitative: Think aloud protocol was used. Self-regulated activities were identified with the MSLQ questionnaire. Results of the MSLQ pretest/post-test questionnaire didn't show an intervention effect. In contrast, the qualitative methodology allowed the registration of a high frequency of self-regulated dimensions on the metacognitive area, on the making of inferences (cognitive area, and on the planning time and effort (behavioural area. Our data revealed the usefulness of a qualitative methodology for the understanding of the complex nature of the self-regulatory processes on learning environments based on computers.

  12. Self-regulated learning using multimedia programs in dentistry postgraduate students: A multimethod approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel LLORET

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to study the effect of a multimedia computing program on the production of activities and self-regulated learning processes in 18 students of the Dentistry postdegree (Celaya, Mexico. A multi-method design (quasi-experimental, pretest-post-test and qualitative: Think aloud protocol was used. Self-regulated activities were identified with the MSLQ questionnaire. Results of the MSLQ pretest/post-test questionnaire didn't show an intervention effect. In contrast, the qualitative methodology allowed the registration of a high frequency of self-regulated dimensions on the metacognitive area, on the making of inferences (cognitive area, and on the planning time and effort (behaviouralarea. Our data revealed the usefulness of a qualitative methodology for the understanding of the complex nature of the self-regulatory processes on learning environments based on computers.

  13. [Medical residency program: perceptions of medical residents in hospitals of Lima and Callao].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miní, Elsy; Medina, Julio; Peralta, Verónica; Rojas, Luis; Butron, Joece; Gutiérrez, Ericson L

    2015-01-01

    In order to rate the medical residency training program from the perceptions of residents, a structured survey, based on international literature, was applied to 228 participants. 48.2% of residents rated their training as “good,” 36.4% as “fair” and 15.4% as “poor”. Most of the residents had low supervision while on call, were overworked and did not have rest after being on call. Having a good annual curriculum (OR: 8.5; 95% CI: 4.1 to 7.4) and university promotion of research (OR 2.4, 95% CI: 1.1 to 5.2) were independent factors associated with higher ratings of training. In conclusion, the rating of residents about their training is mostly good, but this percentage does not exceed 50%. Training authorities could use these results to propose improvements in training programs for medical residents in Peru.

  14. Wellness: A Developmental Programming Model for Residence Halls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Mark J.

    1985-01-01

    Demonstrates how a Wellness model can be an effective vehicle for promoting developmental programs in residence halls. The Wellness model is examined in terms of marketing, student development theory, and balanced programming. (BL)

  15. Supplementary Educational Models in Canadian Neurosurgery Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Won Hyung A; Chan, Sonny; Sutherland, Garnette R

    2017-03-01

    The proposed implementation of work hour restrictions has presented a significant challenge of maintaining the quality of resident education and ensuring adequate hands-on experience that is essential for novice surgeons. To maintain the level of resident surgical competency, revision of the apprentice model of surgical education to include supplementary educational methods, such as laboratory and virtual reality (VR) simulations, have become frequent topics of discussion. We aimed to better understand the role of supplementary educational methods in Canadian neurosurgery residency training. An online survey was sent to program directors of all 14 Canadian neurosurgical residency programs and active resident members of the Canadian Neurosurgical Society (N=85). We asked 16 questions focusing on topics of surgeon perception, current implementation and barriers to supplementary educational models. Of the 99 surveys sent, 8 out of 14 (57%) program directors and 37 out of 85 (44%) residents completed the survey. Of the 14 neurosurgery residency programs across Canada, 7 reported utilizing laboratory-based teaching within their educational plan, while only 3 programs reported using VR simulation as a supplementary teaching method. The biggest barriers to implementing supplementary educational methods were resident availability, lack of resources, and cost. Work-hour restrictions threaten to compromise the traditional apprentice model of surgical training. The potential value of supplementary educational methods for surgical education is evident, as reported by both program directors and residents across Canada. However, availability and utilization of laboratory and VR simulations are limited by numerous factors such as time constrains and lack of resources.

  16. Incorporation of lean methodology into pharmacy residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Natalie; Snider, Holly; Edgerton, Lisa; Whalin, Laurie

    2017-03-15

    The implementation of lean methodology into pharmacy residency programs at a community teaching hospital is described. New Hanover Regional Medical Center, a community teaching hospital in southeastern North Carolina, fully adopted a lean culture in 2010. Given the success of lean strategies organizationally, this methodology was used to assist with the evaluation and development of its pharmacy residency programs in 2014. Lean tools and activities have also been incorporated into residency requirements and rotation learning activities. The majority of lean events correspond to the required competency areas evaluating leadership and management, teaching, and education. These events have included participation in and facilitation of various lean problem-solving and communication tools. The application of the 4 rules of lean has resulted in enhanced management of the programs and provides a set of tools by which continual quality improvement can be ensured. Regular communication and direct involvement of all invested parties have been critical in developing and sustaining new improvements. In addition to program enhancements, lean methodology offers novel methods by which residents may be incorporated into leadership activities. The incorporation of lean methodology into pharmacy residency programs has translated into a variety of realized and potential benefits for the programs, the preceptors and residents, and the health system. Specific areas of growth have included quality-improvement processes, the expansion of leadership opportunities for residents, and improved communication among program directors, preceptors, and residents. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Advanced airway management teaching in otolaryngology residency programs in Canada: A survey of residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, Valérie; Kus, Lukas H; Zhang, Xun; Richardson, Keith; Nguyen, Lily H

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a study to assess residents' levels of comfort with advanced airway management in Canadian otolaryngology residency programs. In October 2008, an electronic questionnaire was sent to all otolaryngology residents in Canada. Responses were voluntary and anonymous. The response rate was 64.8% (94 of 145 residents). Residents were asked about the amount of teaching they received and the amount they would like to receive each year in four areas: emergency surgical airway, pediatric airway, airway trauma, and management of complications during laryngoscopy/bronchoscopy. They were also asked how comfortable they were with their current level of knowledge in these areas. Overall, residents were not comfortable with difficult airway situations, scoring a mean of 3.08 on a 5-point Likert scale. Residents were most comfortable with the emergency airway and least comfortable with the pediatric airway. Overall, residents indicated that they had not received adequate teaching on advanced airway management, and they consistently desired more. With respect to the type of instruction, most residents requested more teaching via simulations, mannequins, and cadaver or animal models. Linear regression models revealed a positive relationship between their overall comfort with airway management and the number of airway teaching hours they received. Their consensus was that formal airway training should occur during postgraduate year (PGY) 2, with refresher courses offered every 2 years. This is the first wide-scale assessment of the status of airway teaching in otolaryngology residency programs in Canada. Overall, our findings suggest that otolaryngology residents in these programs are not comfortable with advanced airway management early in their training and feel they would benefit from a significant increase in airway teaching time. Comfort levels improved with increasing levels of training such that PGY5 residents indicated they were indeed comfortable with advanced

  18. A theory-informed, process-oriented Resident Scholarship Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satid Thammasitboon

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires residency programs to provide curricula for residents to engage in scholarly activities but does not specify particular guidelines for instruction. We propose a Resident Scholarship Program that is framed by the self-determination theory (SDT and emphasize the process of scholarly activity versus a scholarly product. Methods: The authors report on their longitudinal Resident Scholarship Program, which aimed to support psychological needs central to SDT: autonomy, competence, and relatedness. By addressing those needs in program aims and program components, the program may foster residents’ intrinsic motivation to learn and to engage in scholarly activity. To this end, residents’ engagement in scholarly processes, and changes in perceived autonomy, competence, and relatedness were assessed. Results: Residents engaged in a range of scholarly projects and expressed positive regard for the program. Compared to before residency, residents felt more confident in the process of scholarly activity, as determined by changes in increased perceived autonomy, competence, and relatedness. Scholarly products were accomplished in return for a focus on scholarly process. Conclusions: Based on our experience, and in line with the SDT, supporting residents’ autonomy, competence, and relatedness through a process-oriented scholarship program may foster the curiosity, inquisitiveness, and internal motivation to learn that drives scholarly activity and ultimately the production of scholarly products.

  19. Cosmetic Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you have stained, broken or uneven teeth, cosmetic dentistry can help. Cosmetic dentistry is different from orthodontic treatment, which can straighten your teeth with braces or other devices. Cosmetic dental procedures include Bleaching to make teeth whiter ...

  20. Using Reflections of Recent Resident Graduates and their Pediatric Colleagues to Evaluate a Residency Program

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    Robert K. Kamei, M.D.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purposes: In response to the new Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME mandate for residency programs to use feedback to improve its educational program, we piloted a novel evaluation strategy of a residency program using structured interviews of resident graduates working in a primary care practice and their physician associates. Methods: A research assistant performed a structured telephone interview. Quantitative data assessing the graduate’s self-assessment and the graduate’s clinical practice by the associate were analyzed. In addition, we performed a qualitative analysis of the interviews. Results: Thirteen resident graduates in primary care practice and seven physician practice associates participated in the study. Graduate self-assessment revealed high satisfaction with their residency training and competency. The associates judged our graduates as highly competent and mentioned independent decision-making and strong interpersonal skills (such as teamwork and communication as important. They specifically cited the graduate’s skills in intensive care medicine and adolescent medicine as well as communication and teamwork skills as important contributions to their practice. Conclusions: The ACGME Outcomes Project, which increases the emphasis on educational outcomes in the accreditation of residency education programs, requires programs to provide evidence of its effectiveness in preparing residents for practice. Direct assessment of the competency of our physician graduates in practice using structured interviews of graduates and their practice associates provide useful feedback information to a residency program as part of a comprehensive evaluation plan of our program’s curriculum and can be used to direct future educational initiatives of our training program

  1. Opioid Prescribing Education in Surgical Residencies: A Program Director Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorkgitis, Brian K; Bryant, Elizabeth; Raygor, Desiree; Brat, Gabriel; Smink, Douglas S; Crandall, Marie

    2017-09-04

    Opioid abuse and misuse is a public health crisis. A national effort to reduce this phenomenon is ongoing. Residents represent a large pool of opioid prescribers but, are often not the target for opioid prescribing education (OPE). We developed a survey to assess current opioid prescribing practices and education among surgical residents. An Institutional Review Board and Association of Program Directors in Surgery approved survey was electronically mailed to surgical program directors (PDs). The survey included questions regarding residency type, location, number of graduates per year, perceived value of OPE, residency policy on prescribing outpatients controlled substances, presence of OPE, and preferred method of OPE. A total of 248 PDs were e-mailed the survey with 110 complete responses (44.4%). Of all 104 (94.5%) allow residents to prescribe outpatient opioids with 24 (23.1%) limiting the opioid class prescribed. A total of 29 (27.9%) programs require residents to obtain their own Drug Enforcement Administration registration. Only 22 (20.0%) programs had in place mandatory OPE, 7 (6.4%) PDs were unsure if OPE was a mandatory educational requirement. Furthermore, 70 (79.5%) of programs currently without OPE are considering adding it. Didactic lecture (18, 81.8%) is the most common modality for OPE. The mode time dedicated to OPE was 1 hour. When PDs were asked about which method would be best to deliver OPE, the most common response was case-based scenarios (39, 35.5%). Bivariate statistics were performed and no association was found between OPE and program characteristics'. Most surgical residency programs allow residents to prescribe outpatient opioids, very few require OPE. The most common method of OPE was didactic lectures. To enhance a resident's knowledge in prescribing opioids, programs should incorporate OPE into their curriculum. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The development, implementation, utilization and outcomes of a comprehensive dental program for older adults residing in long-term care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Chris C L; So, Frankie H C; Williams, P Michele; Mithani, Akber; Zed, Christopher M; Yen, Edwin H K

    2006-06-01

    This paper documents the experience of the University of British Columbia's Geriatric Dentistry Program (GDP) with emphasis on the dental treatment needs of patients during its first year of operation. The GDP provided access to dental care for residents of longterm care facilities, education for hospital staff concerning daily mouth care, education of dental students and an opportunity for research. The first year of clinical activity saw a small, yet significant, improvement in oral health for residents using the dental services. We hope that the outcomes of this new dental program for long-term care facilities will encourage dentists to provide care for this vulnerable population.

  3. Global Health Education in US Pediatric Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butteris, Sabrina M; Schubert, Charles J; Batra, Maneesh; Coller, Ryan J; Garfunkel, Lynn C; Monticalvo, David; Moore, Molly; Arora, Gitanjli; Moore, Melissa A; Condurache, Tania; Sweet, Leigh R; Hoyos, Catalina; Suchdev, Parminder S

    2015-09-01

    Despite the growing importance of global health (GH) training for pediatric residents, few mechanisms have cataloged GH educational opportunities offered by US pediatric residency programs. We sought to characterize GH education opportunities across pediatric residency programs and identify program characteristics associated with key GH education elements. Data on program and GH training characteristics were sought from program directors or their delegates of all US pediatric residency programs during 2013 to 2014. These data were used to compare programs with and without a GH track as well as across small, medium, and large programs. Program characteristics associated with the presence of key educational elements were identified by using bivariate logistic regression. Data were collected from 198 of 199 active US pediatric residency programs (99.5%). Seven percent of pediatric trainees went abroad during 2013 to 2014. Forty-nine programs (24.7%) reported having a GH track, 66.1% had a faculty lead, 58.1% offered international field experiences, and 48.5% offered domestic field experiences. Forty-two percent of programs reported international partnerships across 153 countries. Larger programs, those with lead faculty, GH tracks, or partnerships had significantly increased odds of having each GH educational element, including pretravel preparation. The number of pediatric residency programs offering GH training opportunities continues to rise. However, smaller programs and those without tracks, lead faculty, or formal partnerships lag behind with organized GH curricula. As GH becomes an integral component of pediatric training, a heightened commitment is needed to ensure consistency of training experiences that encompass best practices in all programs. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  4. Benchmarks of support in internal medicine residency training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfsthal, Susan D; Beasley, Brent W; Kopelman, Richard; Stickley, William; Gabryel, Timothy; Kahn, Marc J

    2002-01-01

    To identify benchmarks of financial and staff support in internal medicine residency training programs and their correlation with indicators of quality. A survey instrument to determine characteristics of support of residency training programs was mailed to each member program of the Association of Program Directors of Internal Medicine. Results were correlated with the three-year running average of the pass rates on the American Board of Internal Medicine certifying examination using bivariate and multivariate analyses. Of 394 surveys, 287 (73%) were completed: 74% of respondents were program directors and 20% were both chair and program director. The mean duration as program director was 7.5 years (median = 5), but it was significantly lower for women than for men (4.9 versus 8.1; p =.001). Respondents spent 62% of their time in educational and administrative duties, 30% in clinical activities, 5% in research, and 2% in other activities. Most chief residents were PGY4s, with 72% receiving compensation additional to base salary. On average, there was one associate program director for every 33 residents, one chief resident for every 27 residents, and one staff person for every 21 residents. Most programs provided trainees with incremental educational stipends, meals while oncall, travel and meeting expenses, and parking. Support from pharmaceutical companies was used for meals, books, and meeting expenses. Almost all programs provided meals for applicants, with 15% providing travel allowances and 37% providing lodging. The programs' board pass rates significantly correlated with the numbers of faculty fulltime equivalents (FTEs), the numbers of resident FTEs per office staff FTEs, and the numbers of categorical and preliminary applications received and ranked by the programs in 1998 and 1999. Regression analyses demonstrated three independent predictors of the programs' board pass rates: number of faculty (a positive predictor), percentage of clinical work

  5. Leadership and business education in orthopaedic residency training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiesau, Carter D; Heim, Kathryn A; Parekh, Selene G

    2011-01-01

    Leadership and business challenges have become increasingly present in the practice of medicine. Orthopaedic residency programs are at the forefront of educating and preparing orthopaedic surgeons. This study attempts to quantify the number of orthopaedic residency programs in the United States that include leadership or business topics in resident education program and to determine which topics are being taught and rate the importance of various leadership characteristics and business topics. A survey was sent to all orthopaedic department chairpersons and residency program directors in the United States via e-mail. The survey responses were collected using a survey collection website. The respondents rated the importance of leadership training for residents as somewhat important. The quality of character, integrity, and honesty received the highest average rating among 19 different qualities of good leaders in orthopaedics. The inclusion of business training in resident education was also rated as somewhat important. The topic of billing and coding received the highest average rating among 14 different orthopaedically relevant business topics. A variety of topics beyond the scope of clinical practice must be included in orthopaedic residency educational curricula. The decreased participation of newly trained orthopaedic surgeons in leadership positions and national and state orthopaedic organizations is concerning for the future of orthopaedic surgery. Increased inclusion of leadership and business training in resident education is important to better prepare trainees for the future.

  6. Otolaryngology Residency Program Research Resources and Scholarly Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villwock, Jennifer A; Hamill, Chelsea S; Nicholas, Brian D; Ryan, Jesse T

    2017-06-01

    Objective To delineate research resources available to otolaryngology residents and their impact on scholarly productivity. Study Design Survey of current otolaryngology program directors. Setting Otolaryngology residency programs. Subjects and Methods An anonymous web-based survey was sent to 98 allopathic otolaryngology training program directors. Fisher exact tests and nonparametric correlations were used to determine statistically significant differences among various strata of programs. Results Thirty-nine percent (n = 38) of queried programs responded. Fourteen (37%) programs had 11 to 15 full-time, academic faculty associated with the residency program. Twenty (53%) programs have a dedicated research coordinator. Basic science lab space and financial resources for statistical work were present at 22 programs (58%). Funding is uniformly provided for presentation of research at conferences; a minority of programs (13%) only funded podium presentations. Twenty-four (63%) have resident research requirements beyond the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) mandate of preparing a "manuscript suitable for publication" prior to graduation. Twenty-five (67%) programs have residents with 2 to 3 active research projects at any given time. None of the investigated resources were significantly associated with increased scholarly output. There was no uniformity to research curricula. Conclusions Otolaryngology residency programs value research, evidenced by financial support provided and requirements beyond the ACGME minimum. Additional resources were not statistically related to an increase in resident research productivity, although they may contribute positively to the overall research experience during training. Potential future areas to examine include research curricula best practices, how to develop meaningful mentorship and resource allocation that inspires continued research interest, and intellectual stimulation.

  7. Compilation of Quality Improvement Standards of General Dentistry Program in Islamic Republic

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    Fakhrossadat Hosseini

    Full Text Available Introduction: The importance of quality assurance makes the standard compilation in educational systems as a high priority subject in medical education. The purpose of this study was to study the compilation of quality improvement standards in general dentistry program in Islamic Republic of Iran.Materials & Methods: This descriptive study was performed during the years of 2011 & 2012 in three phases. In the first phase, previous literature and similar standards were included in a comparative study and screened based on national health policies in Health map. Results were evaluated by 16 dental school representatives using modified Delphi methodology and open-closed questionnaires were filled by their faculty members and were reported back to the dental secretariat of ministry of health in the second phase. In the final phase, results were evaluated in the secretariat by a focus group and the final criteria were introduced based on the secretariat politics. Results: Fifty-eight criteria were created in the first phase. Data were collected from 13 faculties in the second phase (response rate=81%. Eighteen criteria had less than 90% agreement of the participants; however, all of the criteria were agreed by more than 70% of the participants. In the final phase, 48 quality improvement standards in seven areas were accepted and introduced in dental secretariat of the ministry of health.Conclusion: The final standard documents could be used as a national covenant of quality improvement based on their high agreement rate and dependence by national politics in the health map.

  8. Teaching atraumatic restorative treatment in U.S. dental schools: a survey of predoctoral pediatric dentistry program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kateeb, Elham T; Warren, John J; Damiano, Peter; Momany, Elizabeth; Kanellis, Michael; Weber-Gasparoni, Karin; Ansley, Tim

    2013-10-01

    The International Dental Federation and World Health Organization have promoted the use of Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) in modern clinical settings worldwide. In the United States, the practice of ART is not believed to be widely used, which may be a result of little attention given to ART training in predoctoral pediatric dentistry curricula in U.S. dental schools. This study investigated the extent of clinical and didactic instruction on ART provided in U.S. dental schools by surveying the predoctoral pediatric dentistry programs in 2010. Of the fifty-seven directors asked to complete the survey, forty-four responded for a response rate of 77 percent. Of these forty-four programs, 66 percent reported providing clinical training on ART, though only 14 percent provide this training often or very often. The types of ART training provided often or very often included interim treatment (18 percent) and single-surface cavities (14 percent) in primary teeth. However, ART was said to be rarely taught as a definitive treatment in permanent teeth (2 percent). Attitude was a major predictor, for clinical training provided and using professional guidelines in treatment decisions were associated with a positive attitude towards ART. These predoctoral pediatric dentistry programs used ART mainly in primary, anterior, and single-surface cavities and as interim treatment. As ART increases access of children to dental care, the incorporation of the ART approach into the curricula of U.S. dental schools should be facilitated by professional organizations.

  9. Penn State Diversity Residency Program Celebrates First Graduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara I. Dewey

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Two librarians reflect on their experiences as participants in Penn State's Diversity Residency Program. An introduction is provided by Barbara Dewey, Dean of University Libraries & Scholarly Communications.

  10. Parental leave for residents and pediatric training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is committed to the development of rational, equitable, and effective parental leave policies that are sensitive to the needs of pediatric residents, families, and developing infants and that enable parents to spend adequate and good-quality time with their young children. It is important for each residency program to have a policy for parental leave that is written, that is accessible to residents, and that clearly delineates program practices regarding parental leave. At a minimum, a parental leave policy for residents and fellows should conform legally with the Family Medical Leave Act as well as with respective state laws and should meet institutional requirements of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education for accredited programs. Policies should be well formulated and communicated in a culturally sensitive manner. The AAP advocates for extension of benefits consistent with the Family Medical Leave Act to all residents and interns beginning at the time that pediatric residency training begins. The AAP recommends that regardless of gender, residents who become parents should be guaranteed 6 to 8 weeks, at a minimum, of parental leave with pay after the infant's birth. In addition, in conformance with federal law, the resident should be allowed to extend the leave time when necessary by using paid vacation time or leave without pay. Coparenting, adopting, or fostering of a child should entitle the resident, regardless of gender, to the same amount of paid leave (6-8 weeks) as a person who takes maternity/paternity leave. Flexibility, creativity, and advanced planning are necessary to arrange schedules that optimize resident education and experience, cultivate equity in sharing workloads, and protect pregnant residents from overly strenuous work experiences at critical times of their pregnancies.

  11. Quality Improvement in Otolaryngology Residency: Survey of Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowe, Sarah N

    2016-02-01

    The Clinical Learning Environment Review focuses on the responsibility of the sponsoring institution for quality and patient safety. Very little information is known regarding the status of quality improvement (QI) education during otolaryngology training. The purpose of this survey is to evaluate the extent of resident and faculty participation in QI and identify opportunities for both resident curriculum and faculty development. Cross-sectional survey A 15-item survey was distributed to all 106 otolaryngology program directors. The survey was developed after an informal review of the literature regarding education in QI and patient safety. Questions were directed at the format and content of the QI curriculum, as well as barriers to implementation. There was a 39% response rate. Ninety percent of responding program directors considered education in QI important or very important to a resident's future success. Only 23% of responding programs contained an educational curriculum in QI, and only 33% monitored residents' individual outcome measures. Barriers to implementation of a QI program included inadequate number of faculty with expertise in QI (75%) and competing resident educational demands (90%). Every program director considered morbidity and mortality conferences as an integral component in QI education. Program directors recognize the importance of QI in otolaryngology practice. Unfortunately, this survey identifies a distinct lack of resources in support of these educational goals. The results highlight the need to generate a comprehensive and stepwise approach to QI for faculty development and resident instruction. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  12. Food and Wine Value Chains: The Fearne Residency in the Adelaide Thinkers in Residence Program

    OpenAIRE

    Ronan, Glenn

    2009-01-01

    Andrew Fearne, Professor of Food Marketing and Supply Chain Management and a Director of the dunnhumby Academy of Consumer Research at Kent University, UK, is a current Thinker in the Adelaide Thinkers in Residence (ATIR) program. Professor Fearne is the 14th person to undertake a Thinkers appointment. The residency theme, Food and Wine Value Chains: Prosperity through Collaboration, has provided a timely opportunity for partners, including wine companies, government agencies, universities, a...

  13. Evaluation of the orthopedic residency training program in Saudi Arabia and comparison with a selected Canadian residency program

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    Al-Ahaideb A

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Abdulaziz Al-Ahaideb,1 Hamza M Alrabai,1 Osama A Alrehaili,1 Abdulaziz N Aljurayyan,1 Ranyah M Alsaif,2 Nizar Algarni,1 Hazem M Al-Khawashki,1 Abdulrahman D Algarni1 1Department of Orthopedics, 2Department of Physiotherapy, King Khalid University Hospital, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Objective: The primary aim of the present study was to assess the quality of the Saudi Orthopedic Residency Program. Methodology: As a comparator, a cross-sectional survey involving 76 Saudi residents from different training centers in Saudi Arabia namely; Riyadh, Jeddah, Medina, Abha, and Dammam and 15 Canadian. Results: The results showed that Canadian residents read more peer-reviewed, scholarly articles compared with Saudi residents (P=0.002. The primary surgical role for residents was to hold retractors during surgery. The survey respondents strongly supported the ability to recommend removal of incompetent trainers. Saudi trainees were more apprehensive of examinations than Canadian trainees (P<0.0001. Most residents preferred studying multiple-choice questions before examinations. Saudi and Canadian participants considered their programs to be overcrowded. Unlike Canadian participants, Saudi trainees reported an inadequate level of training (P<0.0001. Conclusion: Educational resources should be readily accessible and a mentorship system monitoring residents' progress should be developed. The role of the resident must be clearly defined and resident feedback should not be ignored. Given the importance of mastering basic orthopedic operative skills for residents, meaningful remedial action should be taken with incompetent trainers. Keywords: evaluation, medical education, orthopedic board, residency program, training

  14. Emergency Medicine Resident Orientation: How Training Programs Get Their Residents Started

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Jillian; Barrie, Michael; Way, David P.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The first formal orientation program for incoming emergency medicine (EM) residents was started in 1976. The last attempt to describe the nature of orientation programs was by Brillman in 1995. Now almost all residencies offer orientation to incoming residents, but little is known about the curricular content or structure of these programs. The purpose of this project was to describe the current composition and purpose of EM resident orientation programs in the United States. Methods In autumn of 2014, we surveyed all U.S. EM residency program directors (n=167). We adapted our survey instrument from one used by Brillman (1995). The survey was designed to assess the orientation program’s purpose, structure, content, and teaching methods. Results The survey return rate was 63% (105 of 167). Most respondents (77%) directed three-year residencies, and all but one program offered intern orientation. Orientations lasted an average of nine clinical (Std. Dev.=7.3) and 13 non-clinical days (Std. Dev.=9.3). The prototypical breakdown of program activities was 27% lectures, 23% clinical work, 16% skills training, 10% administrative activities, 9% socialization and 15% other activities. Most orientations included activities to promote socialization among interns (98%) and with other members of the department (91%). Many programs (87%) included special certification courses (ACLS, ATLS, PALS, NRP). Course content included the following: use of electronic medical records (90%), physician wellness (75%), and chief complaint-based lectures (72%). Procedural skill sessions covered ultrasound (94%), airway management (91%), vascular access (90%), wound management (77%), splinting (67%), and trauma skills (62%). Conclusion Compared to Brillman (1995), we found that more programs (99%) are offering formal orientation and allocating more time to them. Lectures remain the most common educational activity. We found increases in the use of skills labs and specialty

  15. Evaluation of ethics education in obstetrics and gynecology residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, John; Straub, Heather; DiGiovanni, Laura; Chor, Julie

    2015-03-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the current status of ethics education in obstetrics-gynecology residency programs. A cross-sectional, web-based survey was designed in conjunction with a professional survey laboratory at the University of Chicago. The survey was piloted with a convenience sample of clinical medical ethics fellows to assess question content and clarity. The survey was deployed by e-mail to all obstetrics-gynecology residency program directors. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze participant responses. The University of Chicago's Institutional Review Board deemed this study exempt from institutional review board formal review. Of 242 eligible obstetrics-gynecology residency program directors, 118 (49%) completed the survey. Most respondents were from university-based programs (n = 78, 66%) that were not religiously affiliated (n = 98, 83%) and trained 4-6 residents per postgraduate year (n = 64, 70%). Although 50% of program directors (n = 60) reported having ethics as part of their core curriculum, most programs teach ethics in an unstructured manner. Fifty-seven percent of respondents (n = 66) stated their program dedicated 5 or fewer hours per year to ethics. The majority of program directors (n = 80, 73%) responded they would like more to a lot more ethics education and believed that ethics education should be required (n = 93, 85%) for residents to complete their training. Respondents identified that crowding in the curriculum was a significant barrier to increased ethics training (n = 50, 45%) and two-thirds (n = 74, 67%) reported a lack of faculty expertise as a moderate barrier to providing ethics education in the residency curriculum. This study found that a lack of structured curricula, inadequate faculty expertise, and limited time were important barriers for ethics education in obstetrics-gynecology programs across the nation. Despite these existing challenges, program directors have a strong interest in increasing ethics

  16. Learning on human resources management in the radiology residency program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Aparecido Ferreira de; Lederman, Henrique Manoel; Batista, Nildo Alves, E-mail: aparecidoliveira@ig.com.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina

    2014-03-15

    Objective: to investigate the process of learning on human resource management in the radiology residency program at Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, aiming at improving radiologists' education. Materials and methods: exploratory study with a quantitative and qualitative approach developed with the faculty staff, preceptors and residents of the program, utilizing a Likert questionnaire (46), taped interviews (18), and categorization based on thematic analysis. Results: According to 71% of the participants, residents have clarity about their role in the development of their activities, and 48% said that residents have no opportunity to learn how to manage their work in a multidisciplinary team. Conclusion: Isolation at medical records room, little interactivity between sectors with diversified and fixed activities, absence of a previous culture and lack of a training program on human resources management may interfere in the development of skills for the residents' practice. There is a need to review objectives of the medical residency in the field of radiology, incorporating, whenever possible, the commitment to the training of skills related to human resources management thus widening the scope of abilities of the future radiologists. (author)

  17. Learning on human resources management in the radiology residency program*

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Aparecido Ferreira; Lederman, Henrique Manoel; Batista, Nildo Alves

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the process of learning on human resource management in the radiology residency program at Escola Paulista de Medicina - Universidade Federal de São Paulo, aiming at improving radiologists' education. Materials and Methods Exploratory study with a quantitative and qualitative approach developed with the faculty staff, preceptors and residents of the program, utilizing a Likert questionnaire (46), taped interviews (18), and categorization based on thematic analysis. Results According to 71% of the participants, residents have clarity about their role in the development of their activities, and 48% said that residents have no opportunity to learn how to manage their work in a multidisciplinary team. Conclusion Isolation at medical records room, little interactivity between sectors with diversified and fixed activities, absence of a previous culture and lack of a training program on human resources management may interfere in the development of skills for the residents' practice. There is a need to review objectives of the medical residency in the field of radiology, incorporating, whenever possible, the commitment to the training of skills related to human resources management thus widening the scope of abilities of the future radiologists. PMID:25741056

  18. Learning on human resources management in the radiology residency program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparecido Ferreira de Oliveira

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the process of learning on human resource management in the radiology residency program at Escola Paulista de Medicina – Universidade Federal de São Paulo, aiming at improving radiologists' education. Materials and Methods Exploratory study with a quantitative and qualitative approach developed with the faculty staff, preceptors and residents of the program, utilizing a Likert questionnaire (46, taped interviews (18, and categorization based on thematic analysis. Results According to 71% of the participants, residents have clarity about their role in the development of their activities, and 48% said that residents have no opportunity to learn how to manage their work in a multidisciplinary team. Conclusion Isolation at medical records room, little interactivity between sectors with diversified and fixed activities, absence of a previous culture and lack of a training program on human resources management may interfere in the development of skills for the residents' practice. There is a need to review objectives of the medical residency in the field of radiology, incorporating, whenever possible, the commitment to the training of skills related to human resources management thus widening the scope of abilities of the future radiologists.

  19. Expansion of the coordinator role in orthopaedic residency program management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Richard E; Murphy, Laurie A; Murphy, James E

    2008-03-01

    The Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education's (ACGME) Data Accreditation System indicates 124 of 152 orthopaedic surgery residency program directors have 5 or fewer years of tenure. The qualifications and responsibilities of the position based on the requirements of orthopaedic surgery residency programs, the institutions that support them, and the ACGME Outcome Project have evolved the role of the program coordinator from clerical to managerial. To fill the void of information on the coordinators' expanding roles and responsibilities, the 2006 Association of Residency Coordinators in Orthopaedic Surgery (ARCOS) Career survey was designed and distributed to 152 program coordinators in the United States. We had a 39.5% response rate for the survey, which indicated a high level of day-to-day managerial oversight of all aspects of the residency program; additional responsibilities for other department or division functions for fellows, rotating medical students, continuing medical education of the faculty; and miscellaneous business functions. Although there has been expansion of the role of the program coordinator, challenges exist in job congruence and position reclassification. We believe use of professional groups such as ARCOS and certification of program coordinators should be supported and encouraged.

  20. Teaching-skills training programs for family medicine residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacasse, Miriam; Ratnapalan, Savithiri

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To review the literature on teaching-skills training programs for family medicine residents and to identify formats and content of these programs and their effects. DATA SOURCES Ovid MEDLINE (1950 to mid-July 2008) and the Education Resources Information Center database (pre-1966 to mid-July 2008) were searched using and combining the MeSH terms teaching, internship and residency, and family practice; and teaching, graduate medical education, and family practice. STUDY SELECTION The initial MEDLINE and Education Resources Information Center database searches identified 362 and 33 references, respectively. Titles and abstracts were reviewed and studies were included if they described the format or content of a teaching-skills program or if they were primary studies of the effects of a teaching-skills program for family medicine residents or family medicine and other specialty trainees. The bibliographies of those articles were reviewed for unidentified studies. A total of 8 articles were identified for systematic review. Selection was limited to articles published in English. SYNTHESIS Teaching-skills training programs for family medicine residents vary from half-day curricula to a few months of training. Their content includes leadership skills, effective clinical teaching skills, technical teaching skills, as well as feedback and evaluation skills. Evaluations mainly assessed the programs’ effects on teaching behaviour, which was generally found to improve following participation in the programs. Evaluations of learner reactions and learning outcomes also suggested that the programs have positive effects. CONCLUSION Family medicine residency training programs differ from all other residency training programs in their shorter duration, usually 2 years, and the broader scope of learning within those 2 years. Few studies on teaching-skills training, however, were designed specifically for family medicine residents. Further studies assessing the

  1. NRC/AMRMC Resident Research Associateship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Army position, policy or decision unless so designated by other documentation. REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public...here that Belgium is more than just about chocolate , beers and waffles. 18) APPRAISAL OF RESEARCH ASSOCIATESHIP PROGRAM On a scale of 1 – 10 (poor

  2. Web‐based interactive learning programs for dentistry concept and its evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitka Feberová

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The change in pedagogy relates partly to the development of electronic media and communication possibilities that are available in networked environments. This new technology dominates and supports the international educational content and learning. The aim of our study was to evaluate this progress in dental edu­cation. The education was compared parallel in two groups of Czech and international students. Groups and teaching hours were in the fourth year of the MD curriculum. Stomatology course materials were prepared and published on the portals of the individual dental study programs (http://dl.cuni.cz. The lectures had different access levels, ranging from materials that were freely available to all International WEB dental faculties’ sources to materials that were accessible only after receiving permission from the authors. A number of software tools were used for the creation of ­e-learning courses, such as, e.g., WebCT, Blackboard, Adobe Connect or Microsoft Class Server. The 291 students who were included in our study were divided into two groups according to the ­e-learning program. The goal of our study was to check student activities during the educational process, namely online work – lessons, articles, videos, lite­rature, quizzes and direct Internet access. The statisticaly significant differences were found in the results of the questionnaire based on five-point Likert scale. The Mann Whitney non-parametric test was used to evaluate students’ activities during the edu­cation process. The ­e-learning course had a direct influence on learning experiences, dental information, opinions and comments. Our results verified that satisfaction is an important and influential factor in determining whether a student decides to choose a dentistry and maxillofacial surgery course. Students prefer to have more time for practical therapy in the clinic. It was demonstrated that examination results did not correspond to the type of

  3. Prosthodontic program directors' perceptions regarding implant placement by prosthodontic residents: a 2004 survey conducted by the Educational Policy Subcommittee of the American College of Prosthodontists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukotjo, Cortino; Arbree, Nancy S

    2008-12-01

    In 2004, a survey regarding implant placement by prosthodontic residents was conducted by the Educational Policy Subcommittee of the American College of Prosthodontists (ACP). The aim of the survey was to assess the current trends in implant curricula at advanced graduate prosthodontics programs in the United States and Canada and determine the issues surrounding surgical implant training for prosthodontic residents. The survey was mailed to the prosthodontic/maxillofacial prosthetic program directors of the 59 prosthodontic graduate programs in the United States and Canada in 2004. Of these, 27 program directors replied, yielding a response rate of 46%. Of the replying programs, 43% either required residents to place or offered the option to have residents place implants. Forty-four percent reported that residents participate by functioning as first assistants for some of their implant patients, 40% have a specific curriculum to train residents in implant placement, 50% reported not having any institutional barriers that prevent program directors from training prosthodontic residents in implant placement, 51% provide implant training using plastic jaws, and 66% of the programs required residents to observe implant surgery in the clinic before they are permitted to place implants. Of prosthodontic residents who treated implant-related patients, the majority treated 11 to 20 patients during their residency. In 2004, 40% of program directors were not trained in the placement of dental implants, and if they did have the implant training, the majority (82%) stated that the nature of their training was 1- to 3-day course(s). This survey showed that implant dentistry has become an integral part of the postgraduate prosthodontic curriculum. The trends to incorporate implant placement into the postgraduate prosthodontic curriculum were already evident prior to 2004. To address the demand for implant treatment in patient care and enhance surgical implant knowledge, the ACP

  4. Firearm injury prevention training in Preventive Medicine Residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khubchandani, Jagdish; Price, James H; Dake, Joseph A

    2009-08-01

    Preventive medicine plays a central role in the reducing the number of deaths due to preventable causes of premature deaths. General Preventive Medicine Residency programs have not been studied in relation to training in this area. A three-wave mail survey was conducted with email and telephone follow-ups. The outcome measures were the portion of program directors involved in training residents on firearm injury prevention issues and their perceived benefits and barriers of training residents on firearm injury prevention issues. Only 25% of the programs provided formal training on firearm injury prevention. Program directors who provided formal training perceived significantly higher number of benefits to offering such training than did directors who did not provide such training but no significant difference was found between the two for number of perceived barriers. If preventive medicine residency graduates are to play a role in reducing premature morbidity and mortality from firearms it will require more residencies to offer formal training in this area. The Association for Prevention Teaching and Research needs to develop guidelines on specific curriculum topics regarding firearm injury prevention.

  5. Program director and resident perspectives of a competency-based medical education anesthesia residency program in Canada: a needs assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Boet

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In July 2015, the University of Ottawa introduced a competency-based medical education (CBME postgraduate program for anesthesia. Prior to program implementation, this study aimed to identify Canadian anesthesiology program directors perceptions of CBME and residents’ opinion on how the program should be designed and perceived consequences of CBME. Methods: This two-phase, qualitative study included semi-structured interviews with Canadian anesthesia program directors (Phase I and a focus group interview with residents enrolled in the University of Ottawa time-based anesthesia program (Phase II. Both phases sought to gauge participant’s perceptions of CBME. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and thematically analyzed. Results: Data was combined to protect anonymity of the six participants (three program directors and three residents. Participants spoke about the perceived advantages of CBME, the need to establish definitions, and challenges to a CBME program highlighting logistical factors, implications for trainees and the role assessment plays in CBME. Conclusion: These findings will inform CBME implementation strategies in anesthesia programs across the country, and may assist other residency programs in the design of their programs. Furthermore, our findings may help identify potential challenges and issues that other postgraduate specialties may face as they transition to a CBME model.

  6. Protected Resident Research Time Does Not Increase the Quantity or Quality of Residency Program Research Publications: A Comparison of 3 Orthopedic Residencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Chad A; Hoffman, Jeffery D; Balazs, George C; Johnson, Anthony E; Potter, Benjamin K; Belmont, Philip J

    The effect of dedicated resident research time in terms of residency program research productivity remains largely unknown. We hypothesize that the quantity and quality of a residency program's peer-reviewed publications (PRPs) increase proportionately with the amount of dedicated research time given to residents. Three residency programs (P1, P2, and P3) were examined. P1 has a mandatory research year for all residents between postgraduate years 3 and 4. P2 has an elective research year for 1 resident between postgraduate years 2 and 3. P3 has no dedicated research time for residents. All publications produced by residents and staff at each program from January 2007 through December were recorded from PUBMED. SCImago Journal Rankings were used as a proxy to measure research quality. There was no significant difference in the number of publications produced between the institutions on a per-staff (p = 0.27) and per-resident (p = 0.80) basis. There were no residents at P3 who graduated without at least 1 PRP, whereas there were 7 residents from P1 and 8 residents from P2 who graduated without a PRP. There were no significant differences between programs in terms of the SCImago Journal Ranking for the journals containing their publications (p = 0.135). Residency programs with dedicated research time did not produce significantly (p > 0.05) more, or higher quality, PRPs than residencies without dedicated research time. It may be that the quantity and quality of PRPs is related more to faculty engagement, research interest, and mentorship at individual programs rather than the number of residents given dedicated time to complete research. Level 3. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. [The new residency program in neurological surgery in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato, R D; Fernandez Alen, J; Alday, R; Gómez, P A; Lagares, A

    2003-09-01

    A new Residency Program in Neurological Surgery has been recently elaborated by the "Comisión Nacional de Neurocirugía" following the requirement of the National Council of Specialities. This new Program, which will replace the one proposed in 1992, has been designed in a similar way as those applied in countries providing the best neurosurgical training. Changes included deal with the definition of the speciality, and the introduction of new rotations,a resident Log Book, a Tutor with a well defined profil and commitments, a structured planning of academic and clinical objectives, a rotation or training in research, and a planning for continuous evaluation of the progress of the resident. It is likely that an appropriate application of the new Program in Spanish neurosurgical units with accreditation for training will result in formation of highly competent neurosurgeons. However, there are new challenges for improving neurosurgical training and the development of our speciality in Spain, as those related with new legislation regulating resident working hours, or some political decisions changing the mechanisms for controlling the number of resident positions per year.

  8. A dedicated scholarly research program in an adult and pediatric neurology residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Matthew S; Haut, Sheryl R; Lipton, Richard B; Milstein, Mark J; Ocava, Lenore C; Ballaban-Gil, Karen; Moshé, Solomon L; Mehler, Mark F

    2017-04-04

    To describe and assess the effectiveness of a formal scholarly activity program for a highly integrated adult and pediatric neurology residency program. Starting in 2011, all graduating residents were required to complete at least one form of scholarly activity broadly defined to include peer-reviewed publications or presentations at scientific meetings of formally mentored projects. The scholarly activity program was administered by the associate residency training director and included an expanded journal club, guided mentorship, a required grand rounds platform presentation, and annual awards for the most scholarly and seminal research findings. We compared scholarly output and mentorship for residents graduating within a 5-year period following program initiation (2011-2015) and during the preceding 5-year preprogram baseline period (2005-2009). Participation in scholarship increased from the preprogram baseline (24 of 53 graduating residents, 45.3%) to the postprogram period (47 of 57 graduating residents, 82.1%, p Neurology.

  9. An Ambulatory Program for Surgical Residents and Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Margaret

    1988-01-01

    A pilot program based in a freestanding ambulatory surgery center at the Chicago Medical School Department of Surgery is described, its curriculum outlined, and the daily activities of the residents and medical students are detailed. A brief history of ambulatory surgery is given. (Author/MLW)

  10. Training of Hysteroscopic Skills in Residency Program : The Dutch Experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janse, Julienne A.; Driessen, Sara R. C.; Veersema, Sebastiaan; Broekmans, Frank J. M.; Jansen, Frank W.; Schreuder, HWR

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective To evaluate whether hysteroscopy training in the Dutch gynecological residency program is judged as sufficient in daily practice, by assessment of the opinion on hysteroscopy training and current performance of hysteroscopic procedures. In addition, the extent of progress in comparis

  11. The graduate nurse experience: qualitative residency program outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Regina; Krugman, Mary; Casey, Kathy; Goode, Colleen

    2008-01-01

    Graduate nurses experience role conflict and stress as they begin practice in work environments of high complexity, nurse shortages, and expectations to become competent rapidly. The authors report outcomes from a study that evaluated qualitative responses to the Casey-Fink Graduate Nurse Experience Survey administered to graduate nurse residents in the University HealthSystem Consortium/American Association of Colleges of Nursing postbaccalaureate nurse residency program at 12 academic hospital sites. Qualitative analysis provided sufficient evidence to convert specific open-ended questions on the Casey-Fink Graduate Nurse Experience Survey instrument to a quantitative format for ease of administration and analysis.

  12. Army orthopaedic surgery residency program directors' selection criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Justin D; Hoffmann, Jeffrey D; Arrington, Edward D; Gerlinger, Tad L; Devine, John G; Belmont, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    Factors associated with successful selection in U.S. Army orthopaedic surgical programs are unreported. The current analysis includes survey data from all Army orthopaedic surgery residency program directors (PDs) to determine these factors. PDs at all Army orthopaedic surgery residency programs were provided 17 factors historically considered critical to successful selection and asked to rank order the factors as well as assign a level of importance to each. Results were collated and overall mean rankings are provided. PDs unanimously expressed that performance during the on-site orthopaedic surgery rotation at the individual program director's institution was most important. Respondents overwhelmingly reported that Steps 1 and 2 licensing exam scores were next most important, respectively. Survey data demonstrated that little importance was placed on letters of recommendation and personal statements. PDs made no discriminations based on allopathic or osteopathic degrees. The most important factors for Army orthopaedic surgery residency selection were clerkship performance at the individual PD's institution and licensing examination score performance. Army PDs consider both USMLE and COMLEX results, because Army programs have a higher percentage of successful osteopathic applicants.

  13. Effectiveness of a Core-Competency-based Program on Residents' Learning and Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Lesley; Triscott, Jean; Dobbs, Bonnie; Tian, Peter George; Babenko, Oksana

    2016-06-01

    The Care of the Elderly (COE) Diploma Program is a six-to-twelve-month enhanced skills program taken after two years of core residency training in Family Medicine. In 2010, we developed and implemented a core-competency-based COE Diploma program (CC), in lieu of one based on learning objectives (LO). This study assessed the effectiveness of the core-competency-based program on residents' learning and their training experience as compared to residents trained using learning objectives. The data from the 2007-2013 COE residents were used in the study, with nine and eight residents trained in the LO and CC programs, respectively. Residents' learning was measured using preceptors' evaluations of residents' skills/abilities throughout the program (118 evaluations in total). Residents' rating of training experience was measured using the Graduate's Questionnaire which residents completed after graduation. For residents' learning, overall, there was no significant difference between the two programs. However, when examined as a function of the four CanMEDS roles, there were significant increases in the CC residents' scores for two of the CanMEDS roles: Communicator/Collaborator/Manager and Scholar compared to residents in the LO program. With respect to residents' training experience, seven out of ten program components were rated by the CC residents higher than by the LO residents. The implementation of a COE CC program appears to facilitate resident learning and training experience.

  14. Step-by-step phacoemulsification training program for ophthalmology residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yulan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim was to analyze the learning curve of phacoemulsification (phaco performed by residents without experience in performing extra-capsular cataract extraction (ECCE in a step-by-step training program (SBSTP. Materials and Methods: Consecutive surgical records of phaco performed from March 2009 to Sept 2011 by four residents without previous ECCE experience were retrospectively reviewed. The completion rate of the first 30 procedures by each resident was calculated. The main intraoperative phaco parameter records for the first 30 surgeries by each resident were compared with those for their last 30 surgeries. Intraoperative complications in the residents′ procedures were also recorded and analyzed. Results: A total of 1013 surgeries were performed by residents. The completion rate for the first 30 phaco procedures was 79.2 μ 5.8%. The main reasons for halting the procedure were as follows: Anterior capsule tear, inability to crack the nucleus, and posterior capsular rupture during phaco or cortex removal. Cumulative dissipated energy of phaco power used during the surgeries was significantly less in the last 30 cases compared with the first 30 cases (30.10 μ 17.58 vs. 55.41 μ 37.59, P = 0.021. Posterior capsular rupture rate was 2.5 μ 1.2% in total (10.8 μ 4.2% in the first 30 cases and 1.7 μ 1.9% in the last 30 cases, P = 0.008; a statistically significant difference. Conclusion:The step-by-step training program might be a necessary process for a resident to transit from dependence to a self-supported operator. It is also an essential middle step between wet lab training to performing the entire phaco procedure on the patient both effectively and safely.

  15. Nurse manager residency program: an innovative leadership succession plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Amy; Wagner, Jennifer; Martin, Christina; Grant, Brandy; Maule, Katrina; Resh, Kimberly; King, Lisa; Eaton, Holly; Fetter, Katrina; King, Stacey L; Thompson, Elizabeth J

    2014-01-01

    To ensure succession planning within the ranks of nurse managers meet current and projected nursing management needs and organizational goals, we developed and implemented a nurse manager residency program at our hospital. By identifying, supporting, and mentoring clinical experts who express a desire and display an aptitude for nursing leadership, we are graduating individuals who can transition to a nurse manager position with greater ease and competence.

  16. Goals and Methodology for a Surgery Residency Program: A Committee Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht, Charles D.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Written goals of a small animal residency program established by Purdue University are identified and an elaborate list of methodology for goals is provided. Tables include: summary of required activities of residents, checklist of residency progress, and comparable effort for surgery residency and masters program. (Author/MLW)

  17. Resident designed intern orientation to address the new ACGME Common Program Requirements for resident supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rialon, Kristy L; Barfield, Michael E; Elfenbein, Dawn M; Lunsford, Keri E; Tracy, Elisabeth T; Migaly, John

    2013-01-01

    To design an orientation for surgical interns to meet the new Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Common Program Requirements regarding supervision, to test patient-management competencies, and to assess confidence on skills and tasks pre-orientation and post-orientation. Twenty-seven incoming surgical interns participated in a two-day orientation to clinical duties. Activities included a pre-test, lectures, simulation, oral examination, intern shadowing, and a post-test. Incoming interns were surveyed before and after orientation and two months later for confidence in patient-management and surgical intern skills. Paired t-tests were used to determine if confidence improved pre-orientation and post-orientation, and two months following orientation. The study took place at an academic training hospital. All (n = 27) postgraduate year-1 (PGY-1) surgical residents at our institution, which included the categorical and nondesignated preliminary general surgery, urology, orthopedic surgery, otolaryngology, and neurosurgery programs. All interns passed the oral and written examinations, and were deemed able to be indirectly supervised, with direct supervision immediately available. They reported increased confidence in all areas of patient management addressed during orientation, and this confidence was retained after two months. In surgical and floor-related tasks and skills, interns reported no increase in confidence directly following orientation. However, after two months, they reported a significant increase in confidence, particularly in those tasks that are performed often. New requirements for resident supervision require creative ways of verifying resident competency in basic skills. This type of orientation is an effective way to address the new requirements of supervision and teach interns the tasks and skills that are necessary for internship. Copyright © 2013 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  18. Dermatology Residency Selection Criteria with an Emphasis on Program Characteristics: A National Program Director Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzam Gorouhi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Dermatology residency programs are relatively diverse in their resident selection process. The authors investigated the importance of 25 dermatology residency selection criteria focusing on differences in program directors’ (PDs’ perception based on specific program demographics. Methods. This cross-sectional nationwide observational survey utilized a 41-item questionnaire that was developed by literature search, brainstorming sessions, and online expert reviews. The data were analyzed utilizing the reliability test, two-step clustering, and K-means methods as well as other methods. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the differences in PDs’ perception regarding the importance of the selection criteria based on program demographics. Results. Ninety-five out of 114 PDs (83.3% responded to the survey. The top five criteria for dermatology residency selection were interview, letters of recommendation, United States Medical Licensing Examination Step I scores, medical school transcripts, and clinical rotations. The following criteria were preferentially ranked based on different program characteristics: “advanced degrees,” “interest in academics,” “reputation of undergraduate and medical school,” “prior unsuccessful attempts to match,” and “number of publications.” Conclusions. Our survey provides up-to-date factual data on dermatology PDs’ perception in this regard. Dermatology residency programs may find the reported data useful in further optimizing their residency selection process.

  19. 25-year analysis of a dental undergraduate research training program (BSc Dent) at the University of Manitoba Faculty of Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, J E; de Vries, J; Iacopino, A M

    2008-12-01

    Research in the context of the dental school has traditionally been focused on institutional/faculty accomplishments and generating new knowledge to benefit the profession. Only recently have significant efforts been made to expand the overall research programming into the formal dental curriculum, to provide students with a baseline exposure to the research and critical thinking processes, encourage evidence-based decision-making, and stimulate interest in academic/research careers. Various approaches to curriculum reform and the establishment of multiple levels of student research opportunities are now part of the educational fabric of many dental schools worldwide. Many of the preliminary reports regarding the success and vitality of these programs have used outcomes measures and metrics that emphasize cultural changes within institutions, student research productivity, and student career preferences after graduation. However, there have not been any reports from long-standing programs (a minimum of 25 years of cumulative data) that describe dental school graduates who have had the benefit of research/training experiences during their dental education. The University of Manitoba Faculty of Dentistry initiated a BSc Dent program in 1980 that awarded a formal degree for significant research experiences taking place within the laboratories of the Faculty-based researchers and has continued to develop and expand this program. The success of the program has been demonstrated by the continued and increasing demands for entry, the academic achievements of the graduates, and the numbers of graduates who have completed advanced education/training programs or returned to the Faculty as instructors. Analysis of our long-term data validates many recent hypotheses and short-term observations regarding the benefits of dental student research programs. This information may be useful in the design and implementation of dental student research programs at other dental schools.

  20. Improving the Teaching Skills of Residents in a Surgical Training Program: Results of the Pilot Year of a Curricular Initiative in an Ophthalmology Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Yewlin E; Newman, Lori R; Loewenstein, John I; Kloek, Carolyn E

    2015-01-01

    To design and implement a teaching skills curriculum that addressed the needs of an ophthalmology residency training program, to assess the effect of the curriculum, and to present important lessons learned. A teaching skills curriculum was designed for the Harvard Medical School (HMS) Residency Training Program in Ophthalmology. Results of a needs assessment survey were used to guide curriculum objectives. Overall, 3 teaching workshops were conducted between October 2012 and March 2013 that addressed areas of need, including procedural teaching. A postcurriculum survey was used to assess the effect of the curriculum. Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, a tertiary care institution in Boston, MA. Overall, 24 residents in the HMS Residency Training Program in Ophthalmology were included. The needs assessment survey demonstrated that although most residents anticipated that teaching would be important in their future career, only one-third had prior formal training in teaching. All residents reported they found the teaching workshops to be either very or extremely useful. All residents reported they would like further training in teaching, with most residents requesting additional training in best procedural teaching practices for future sessions. The pilot year of the resident-as-teacher curriculum for the HMS Residency Training Program in Ophthalmology demonstrated a need for this curriculum and was perceived as beneficial by the residents, who reported increased comfort in their teaching skills after attending the workshops. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The development of a TED-Ed online resident research training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Katherine A; Pound, Catherine M; Peddle, Beth; Tokarewicz, Jaclyn; Eady, Kaylee

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric health research is important for improving the health and well-being of children and their families. To foster the development of physicians' research competencies, it is vital to integrate practical and context-specific research training into residency programs. To describe the development of a resident research training program at one tertiary care pediatric academic health sciences center in Ontario, Canada. We surveyed residents and pediatricians/research staff to establish the need and content for a resident research training program. Residents and resident research supervisors agreed or strongly agreed that research training is important for residents. However, few residents and supervisors believed that their academic health sciences center provided adequate training and resources to support resident research. As such, an online resident research training program was established. Residents and supervisors agreed that the program should focus on the following topics: 1) critically evaluating research literature, 2) writing a research proposal, 3) submitting an application for research funding, and 4) writing a manuscript. This highly accessible, context-specific, and inexpensive online program model may be of interest and benefit to other residency programs as a means to enhance residents' scholarly roles. A formal evaluation of the research training program is now underway.

  2. The First International Residency Program Accredited by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Qadheeb, Nada S.; Alissa, Dema A.; Al-Jedai, Ahmed; Ajlan, Aziza; Al-Jazairi, Abdulrazaq S.

    2012-01-01

    The processes by which the pharmacy residency program at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre-Riyadh, Saudi Arabia became the first American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) accredited program outside the United States is described. This article provides key points for a successful program for other pharmacy residency programs around the world. Additionally, it points out the need for establishing international standards for pharmacy residency programs.

  3. Enhancing pediatric residents' scholar role: the development of a Scholarly Activity Guidance and Evaluation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pound, Catherine M; Moreau, Katherine A; Ward, Natalie; Eady, Kaylee; Writer, Hilary

    2015-01-01

    Research training is essential to the development of well-rounded physicians. Although many pediatric residency programs require residents to complete a research project, it is often challenging to integrate research training into educational programs. We aimed to develop an innovative research program for pediatric residents, called the Scholarly Activity Guidance and Evaluation (SAGE) program. We developed a competency-based program which establishes benchmarks for pediatric residents, while providing ongoing academic mentorship. Feedback from residents and their research supervisors about the SAGE program has been positive. Preliminary evaluation data have shown that all final-year residents have met or exceeded program expectations. By providing residents with this supportive environment, we hope to influence their academic career paths, increase their research productivity, promote evidence-based practice, and ultimately, positively impact health outcomes.

  4. Equipping orthodontic residency programs for interactive distance learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engilman, William D; Cox, Thomas H; Bednar, Eric D; Proffit, William R

    2007-05-01

    Equipment for distance learning can be used to improve the quality of instruction in orthodontic programs. All departments now should have at least a point-to-point system to allow clinical faculty to provide instruction without being physically present on all occasions. For more instruction to be shared with other residency programs, a dual-streaming multipoint video conferencing system is needed. A basic system allows reception of this type of instruction, and an optimal system would allow originating and receiving such conferences. Recording interactive seminars so that they can be viewed later requires additional equipment so that postproduction editing and refinement can be accomplished. Lists of appropriate equipment for each level are provided.

  5. The development of a TED-Ed online resident research training program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A. Moreau

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pediatric health research is important for improving the health and well-being of children and their families. To foster the development of physicians’ research competencies, it is vital to integrate practical and context-specific research training into residency programs. Purpose: To describe the development of a resident research training program at one tertiary care pediatric academic health sciences center in Ontario, Canada. Methods: We surveyed residents and pediatricians/research staff to establish the need and content for a resident research training program. Results: Residents and resident research supervisors agreed or strongly agreed that research training is important for residents. However, few residents and supervisors believed that their academic health sciences center provided adequate training and resources to support resident research. As such, an online resident research training program was established. Residents and supervisors agreed that the program should focus on the following topics: 1 critically evaluating research literature, 2 writing a research proposal, 3 submitting an application for research funding, and 4 writing a manuscript. Discussion: This highly accessible, context-specific, and inexpensive online program model may be of interest and benefit to other residency programs as a means to enhance residents’ scholarly roles. A formal evaluation of the research training program is now underway.

  6. Total Extraperitoneal Hernia Repair: Residency Teaching Program and Outcome Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, Fabio; Mota-Moya, Pau; Munday, Andrew; Romy, Sébastien

    2017-01-01

    Total extraperitoneal (TEP) hernia repair has been shown to offer less pain, shorter postoperative hospital stay and earlier return to work when compared to open surgery. Our institution routinely performs TEP procedures for patients with primary or recurrent inguinal hernias. The aim of this study was to show that supervised senior residents can safely perform TEP repairs in a teaching setting. All consecutive patients treated for inguinal hernias by laparoscopic approach from October 2008 to June 2012 were retrospectively analyzed from a prospective database. A total of 219 TEP repairs were performed on 171 patients: 123 unilateral and 48 bilateral. The mean patient age was 51.6 years with a standard deviation (SD) of ± 15.9. Supervised senior residents performed 171 (78 %) and staff surgeons 48 (22 %) TEP repairs, respectively. Thirty-day morbidity included cases of inguinal paresthesias (0.4 %, n = 1), umbilical hematomas (0.9 %, n = 2), superficial wound infections (0.9 %, n = 2), scrotal hematomas (2.7 %, n = 6), postoperative urinary retentions (2.7 %, n = 6), chronic pain syndromes (5 %, n = 11) and postoperative seromas (6.7 %, n = 14). Overall, complication rates were 18.7 % for staff surgeons and 19.3 % for residents (p = 0.83). For staff surgeons and residents, mean operative times for unilateral hernia repairs were 65 min (SD ± 18.9) and 77.6 min (SD ± 29.8) (p = 0.043), respectively, while mean operative times for bilateral repairs were 115 min (SD ± 40.1) and 103.6 (SD ± 25.9) (p = 0.05). TEP repair is a safe procedure when performed by supervised senior surgical trainees. Teaching of TEP should be routinely included in general surgery residency programs.

  7. Administrative Restructuring of a Residency Training Program for Improved Efficiency and Output

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zyl, Louis T.; Finch, Susan J.; Davidson, Paul R.; Arboleda-Florez, Julio

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: Canadian residency training programs (RTP) have a program director (PD) and a residency program committee (RPC) overseeing program administration. Limited guidance is available about the ideal administrative structure of an RTP. This article describes administrative load in Canadian RTPs, presents a novel approach to delegating core…

  8. Minimally Invasive Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to your desktop! more... What Is Minimally Invasive Dentistry? Article Chapters What Is Minimally Invasive Dentistry? Minimally ... techniques. Reviewed: January 2012 Related Articles: Minimally Invasive Dentistry Minimally Invasive Veneers Dramatically Change Smiles What Patients ...

  9. [Efficiency assessment of preoperative preparatory programs in pediatric patients in dentistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milenin, V V; Tolasov, K R; Ostreikov, I F

    2013-01-01

    Research objective was to compare the efficiency of different preoperative preparatory programs which had been used for anxiety decrease in Pediatric patients before oral cavity sanation with general anaesthesia. Two preparatory programs were used. In the first program patients were informed about the treatment they were undergoing. Patients visited the operating unit and watched the videos about forthcoming procedure (group of Information Technologies (IT), n = 82). The second program included the tutorials (face mask use, acquaintance with equipment alarms etc.) in addition to Information Technologies (group of lnformation Technologies and tutorials (ITT) n = 83). Information Technologies and tutorials were not used in the control group (n = 86). Both used programs were effective. ITT program was the most effective.

  10. The impact of re-engineering a multi-institutional residency program on resident perceptions of the individual institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobkin, Eric; Fassler, Steven; Horowitz, Sheryl; Kirton, Orlando; Civetta, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    We report on the development of a survey tool used to assess resident perceptions of support and educational quality among multiple institutions in an integrated surgical residency, as well as its use in measuring the impact of re-engineering on that program. The University of Connecticut Integrated General Surgical Residency (UCIGSR) is a multisite program that was placed on probation by the Residency Review Committee in Surgery (RRC) in November 1998. This led to a re-evaluation and a re-engineering of the program. In order to better assess the residents' evaluation of the program, we serially examined their attitudes with a survey of 65 questions. A 4-point grading scale (1 = Poor, 4 = Excellent) was used, and each resident was required to complete a survey beginning shortly after RRC probation was announced and at 6-month intervals. Seven global questions in the survey, directed at residency program support and educational quality, were asked for each of the 4 individual adult hospitals, for a total of 28 questions. Statistical analysis of the data was performed using the Jonckhere-Terpstra and the Mann-Whitney U tests. The results demonstrated significant improvement for all 7 questions in all 4 hospitals between November 1998 (S1) and November 1999 (S3). Average scores for all 7 questions, Hospital Support (HS), Departmental Support (DS), Hospital Teaching (HT), Outpatient Teaching (OTC), Operating Room Teaching (ORT), Grand Rounds (GR), and Morbidity and Mortality Conferences (MM), improved in every hospital by 16-28%. In S1, 1 out of 28 questions received an average score greater than or equal to 3, whereas on the most recent survey, 17 of 28 scored greater than or equal to 3 and 78.5% of the questions demonstrated statistically significant improvement (p < 0.05). Three of the 4 hospitals now have a combined overall average score greater than or equal to 3 for all 7 questions. Areas of strength in each hospital had the least amount of improvement yet

  11. Factors influencing job satisfaction of new graduate nurses participating in nurse residency programs: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Patrice S; Viscardi, Molly Kreider; McHugh, Matthew D

    2014-10-01

    Nurse residency programs are designed to increase competence and skill, and ease the transition from student to new graduate nurse. These programs also offer the possibility to positively influence the job satisfaction of new graduate nurses, which could decrease poor nursing outcomes. However, little is known about the impact of participation in a nurse residency program on new graduate nurses' satisfaction. This review examines factors that influence job satisfaction of nurse residency program participants. Eleven studies were selected for inclusion, and seven domains influencing new graduate nurses' satisfaction during participation in nurse residency programs were identified: extrinsic rewards, scheduling, interactions and support, praise and recognition, professional opportunities, work environment, and hospital system. Within these domains, the evidence for improved satisfaction with nurse residency program participation was mixed. Further research is necessary to understand how nurse residency programs can be designed to improve satisfaction and increase positive nurse outcomes.

  12. Relationships Between Program Size, Training Experience, and Career Intentions: Pediatrics Resident Reports From 2010 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Daniel J; Frintner, Mary Pat; Cull, William

    2016-01-01

    To determine the relationship between pediatric residency program size and resident demographic characteristics, career intentions, and training experiences. Annual national random samples of 1000 graduating pediatrics residents were surveyed between 2010 and 2014. Response years were pooled for analysis, and trends in resident demographic characteristics, career intentions and job search, and training experiences were compared across program class size: small (training as program size decreases. These findings suggest that the training experiences of some residents do not optimally align with their future practice. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Child Welfare Training in Child Psychiatry Residency: A Program Director Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Terry G.; Cox, Julia R.; Walker, Sarah C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study surveys child psychiatry residency program directors in order to 1) characterize child welfare training experiences for child psychiatry residents; 2) evaluate factors associated with the likelihood of program directors' endorsing the adequacy of their child welfare training; and 3) assess program directors'…

  14. Nurse residency programs and the transition to child health nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delack, Sandi; Martin, Jean; McCarthy, Ann Marie; Sperhac, Arlene M

    2015-06-01

    Nurse residency programs for newly licensed RNs are a critical component in bridging the clinical practice gap between education and practice. In May 2013, the Institute of Pediatric Nursing invited leaders from pediatric nursing organizations and children's hospitals to attend a forum on nurse residency programs for pediatric nurses. This article presents a summary of the discussions that occurred during the forum and makes recommendations for addressing issues related to nurse residency programs.

  15. Factors that influence medical student selection of an emergency medicine residency program: implications for training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Jeffrey N; Howell, John M; Hegarty, Cullen B; McLaughlin, Steven A; Coates, Wendy C; Hopson, Laura R; Hern, Gene H; Rosen, Carlo L; Fisher, Jonathan; Santen, Sally A

    2012-04-01

    An understanding of student decision-making when selecting an emergency medicine (EM) training program is essential for program directors as they enter interview season. To build upon preexisting knowledge, a survey was created to identify and prioritize the factors influencing candidate decision-making of U.S. medical graduates. This was a cross-sectional, multi-institutional study that anonymously surveyed U.S. allopathic applicants to EM training programs. It took place in the 3-week period between the 2011 National Residency Matching Program (NRMP) rank list submission deadline and the announcement of match results. Of 1,525 invitations to participate, 870 candidates (57%) completed the survey. Overall, 96% of respondents stated that both geographic location and individual program characteristics were important to decision-making, with approximately equal numbers favoring location when compared to those who favored program characteristics. The most important factors in this regard were preference for a particular geographic location (74.9%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 72% to 78%) and to be close to spouse, significant other, or family (59.7%, 95% CI = 56% to 63%). Factors pertaining to geographic location tend to be out of the control of the program leadership. The most important program factors include the interview experience (48.9%, 95% CI = 46% to 52%), personal experience with the residents (48.5%, 95% CI = 45% to 52%), and academic reputation (44.9%, 95% CI = 42% to 48%). Unlike location, individual program factors are often either directly or somewhat under the control of the program leadership. Several other factors were ranked as the most important factor a disproportionate number of times, including a rotation in that emergency department (ED), orientation (academic vs. community), and duration of training (3-year vs. 4-year programs). For a subset of applicants, these factors had particular importance in overall decision-making. The vast majority

  16. Opportunity Knocks: Pipeline Programs Offer Minority Students a Path to Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauteux, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Minority students have traditionally been underrepresented in dental schools, which is why enrichment and pipeline programs aimed at helping minority students are necessary. That reality is reflected in their woeful underrepresentation among practicing dentists. Hispanics made up only 5.8 percent of practicing dentists in 2011, according to the…

  17. A Survey of the Interactions between Psychiatry Residency Programs and the Pharmaceutical Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varley, Christopher K.; Jibson, Michael D.; McCarthy, Mary; Benjamin, Sheldon

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors report a survey of the American Association of Directors of Psychiatry Residency Training (AADPRT) on interactions between the pharmaceutical industry and psychiatry residency programs. METHODS: American Association of Directors of Psychiatry Residency Training membership was anonymously surveyed by e-mail and by paper…

  18. A Survey of the Interactions between Psychiatry Residency Programs and the Pharmaceutical Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varley, Christopher K.; Jibson, Michael D.; McCarthy, Mary; Benjamin, Sheldon

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors report a survey of the American Association of Directors of Psychiatry Residency Training (AADPRT) on interactions between the pharmaceutical industry and psychiatry residency programs. METHODS: American Association of Directors of Psychiatry Residency Training membership was anonymously surveyed by e-mail and by paper…

  19. Pennsylvania SBIRT Medical and Residency Training: Developing, Implementing, and Evaluating an Evidenced-Based Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, Janice L.; Melczak, Michael; Johnjulio, William; Campopiano, Melinda; Gordon, Adam J.; Costlow, Monica

    2012-01-01

    Medical residents do not receive adequate training in screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment (SBIRT) for alcohol and other drug use disorders. The federally funded Pennsylvania SBIRT Medical and Residency Training program (SMaRT) is an evidence-based curriculum with goals of training residents in SBIRT knowledge and skills and…

  20. Implementation of a heart failure readmission reduction program: a role for medical residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie M. Pearson

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Congestive heart failure (CHF is one of the leading causes of hospital readmissions within 30 days of discharge. Due to the substantial costs associated with these readmissions, several interventions to reduce CHF readmissions have been developed and implemented. Methods:To reduce CHF readmissions at our community teaching hospital, the Smooth Transitions Equal Less Readmission (STELR program was developed. Utilizing the Plan-Do-Check-Act cycle for quality improvement, resident physicians tracked patients enrolled in the STELR program. The resident contribution to the program was substantial in that they were able to quantify the improvement in both physician practices and patient readmissions. This provided insight into program areas requiring further modification, which the hospital would not have obtained without resident participation. Results: The readmission rate for patients diagnosed with heart failure decreased from 32% prior to program implementation, to 24% hospital wide (including patients who were not tracked in the STELR program, and 21% among patients tracked by the residents. Conclusion: This effective CHF readmission reduction program requires less financial resources compared to government funded programs. The resident involvement in the STELR program helped to assess and improve the program and also allowed the residents to gain an awareness of the resources available to their patients to facilitate their transition home. The program exposed the residents to systems-based practice, a fundamental element of their residency training and, more generally, community care.

  1. [Work-related musculoskeletal disorders in dentistry professionals. 2. Prevention, ergonomic strategies and therapeutic programs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartorio, F; Franchignoni, F; Ferriero, G; Vercelli, S; Odescalchi, L; Augusti, D; Migliario, M

    2005-01-01

    In dental professionals the risk of developing work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSD) can be minimized through a combination of prevention, ergonomic strategies, and specific therapeutic programs. Prevention includes early identification of symptoms, analysis of working posture and activity, and the evaluation of equipment (such as dental instruments, position of the dental unit, patient and operator chairs, and lighting). The ergonomic strategies are based on identifying the best daily timetable (including periodic pauses) and most efficient team organization, as well as establishing the correct position that should be held at the patient chair. Finally specific therapeutic programs are very important in preventing or treating WMSD. In fact, fitness exercises such as mobilization, stretching or muscular and cardiovascular training are recognized as fundamental for dental professionals, and when WMSD occurs physiatric care and physical therapy are recommended.

  2. Perceptions of pediatric chief residents on minority house staff recruitment and retention in large pediatric residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardino, A P; Cooper, M C

    1999-08-01

    This study examined methods of recruiting and retaining minority house staff at US residency training programs. A 28-item questionnaire was mailed to pediatric chief residents at 78 US training programs with more than 35 residents. The response rate was 74%. Programs were characterized by patient populations served, number of ethnic/racial minority house staff and faculty, and the presence of minority house staff support systems within the institution. In this largely urban sample, minority recruitment and retention was reported as an explicit priority by 40% of pediatric chief residents. The majority (71%) reported that their house staff recruitment committees had no explicitly defined recruitment goals regarding minority house staff. Seventy-seven percent reported that within their departments, recruitment efforts toward minorities were no different than for nonminorities. Overall, few minority house staff and minority faculty were identified in the responding institutions. The most frequently reported intra-institutional support systems for minority house staff included individual pairing with faculty advisors from the same minority group (29%), an affirmative-action office located at the institution (8%), and the existence of a minority faculty support group (4%). These results indicate that pediatric chief residents may not be fully aware of the specific challenges related to the recruitment and retention of minority physicians, and most house staff recruitment committees do not have explicit goals in this regard.

  3. Non-Family Medicine Resident Training for Primary Care: A Comparative Evaluation of Federally and Non-Federally Supported Primary Care Oriented Medical Residency Programs. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosinski, Edwin F.; Dagenais, Fred

    Data collected as part of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation study of residency programs for training in primary medicine and pediatrics are analyzed. The seven residencies supported by the federal government and the nine residencies supported by the Foundation are compared. A brief description of the programs as they existed in 1978 are…

  4. Neurocritical care education during neurology residency: AAN survey of US program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, K N; Drogan, O; Manno, E; Geocadin, R G; Ziai, W

    2012-05-29

    Limited information is available regarding the current state of neurocritical care education for neurology residents. The goal of our survey was to assess the need and current state of neurocritical care training for neurology residents. A survey instrument was developed and, with the support of the American Academy of Neurology, distributed to residency program directors of 132 accredited neurology programs in the United States in 2011. A response rate of 74% (98 of 132) was achieved. A dedicated neuroscience intensive care unit (neuro-ICU) existed in 64%. Fifty-six percent of residency programs offer a dedicated rotation in the neuro-ICU, lasting 4 weeks on average. Where available, the neuro-ICU rotation was required in the vast majority (91%) of programs. Neurology residents' exposure to the fundamental principles of neurocritical care was obtained through a variety of mechanisms. Of program directors, 37% indicated that residents would be interested in performing away rotations in a neuro-ICU. From 2005 to 2010, the number of programs sending at least one resident into a neuro-ICU fellowship increased from 14% to 35%. Despite the expansion of neurocritical care, large proportions of US neurology residents have limited exposure to a neuro-ICU and neurointensivists. Formal training in the principles of neurocritical care may be highly variable. The results of this survey suggest a charge to address the variability of resident education and to develop standardized curricula in neurocritical care for neurology residents.

  5. Impact of a weekly reading program on orthopedic surgery residents' in-training examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weglein, Daniel G; Gugala, Zbigniew; Simpson, Suzanne; Lindsey, Ronald W

    2015-05-01

    In response to a decline in individual residents' performance and overall program performance on the Orthopaedic In-Training Examination (OITE), the authors' department initiated a daily literature reading program coupled with weekly tests on the assigned material. The goal of this study was to assess the effect of the reading program on individual residents' scores and the training program's OITE scores. The reading program consisted of daily review articles from the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, followed by a weekly written examination consisting of multiple-choice or fill-in-the-blank questions. All articles were selected and all questions were written by the departmental chair. A questionnaire was given to assess residents' perceptions of the weekly tests. As a result of implementing the reading program for a 10-month period, residents' subsequent performance on the OITE significantly improved (mean score increase, 4, Porthopedic surgery residents.

  6. Integrative Medicine in a Preventive Medicine Residency: A Program for the Urban Underserved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berz, Jonathan P B; Gergen Barnett, Katherine A; Gardiner, Paula; Saper, Robert B

    2015-11-01

    The Preventive Medicine Residency Program collaborated with the Department of Family Medicine's Program for Integrative Medicine and Health Disparities at Boston Medical Center to create a new rotation for preventive medicine residents starting in autumn 2012. Residents participated in integrative medicine group visits and consults, completed an online curriculum in dietary supplements, and participated in seminars all in the context of an urban safety net hospital. This collaboration was made possible by a federal Health Resources and Services Administration grant for integrative medicine in preventive medicine residencies and helped meet a need of the program to increase residents' exposure to clinical preventive medicine and integrative health clinical skills and principles. The collaboration has resulted in a required rotation for all residents that continues after the grant period and has fostered additional collaborations related to integrative medicine across the programs.

  7. Proposal for a unified selection to medical residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toffoli, Sônia Ferreira Lopes; Ferreira Filho, Olavo Franco; Andrade, Dalton Francisco de

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes the unification of entrance exams to medical residency programs (MRP) in Brazil. Problems related to MRP and its interface with public health problems in Brazil are highlighted and how this proposal are able to help solving these problems. The proposal is to create a database to be applied in MRP unified exams. Some advantages of using the Item Response Theory (IRT) in this database are highlighted. The MRP entrance exams are developed and applied decentralized where each school is responsible for its examination. These exams quality are questionable. Reviews about items quality, validity and reliability of appliances are not common disclosed. Evaluation is important in every education system bringing on required changes and control of teaching and learning. The proposal of MRP entrance exams unification, besides offering high quality exams to institutions participants, could be as an extra source to rate medical school and cause improvements, provide studies with a database and allow a regional mobility. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Experience of health-system pharmacy administration residents in a longitudinal human resource management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amerine, Lindsey B Poppe; Granko, Robert P; Savage, Scott W; Daniels, Rowell; Eckel, Stephen F

    2014-12-15

    The experience of health-system pharmacy administration (HSPA) residents in a longitudinal human resource (HR) management program is described. The subsequent benefits to the residents, department, and profession are also discussed. Postgraduate year 2 HSPA residents at an academic medical center desired more responsibility for managing an operational area. To this end, a program was created in which these residents directly manage a small group of pharmacy technicians and report to a clinical manager or assistant director with oversight responsibility. These "resident managers" are responsible, under the direction of the area's clinical manager, for the personnel, schedule, time and attendance, and HR activities of the area. Resident managers have led and sustained operational improvement projects in their areas. In addition to providing learning experiences to residents, the HSPA residency program has also improved the operations of the areas in which these residents work. Benefits to the residents include conducting annual performance evaluations for employees with whom they have a relationship as it is a task every administrator completes. Resident managers at UNC have consistently stated that this longitudinal HR experience is one of the most rewarding and most challenging experiences offered in the two-year HSPA residency. The involvement of HSPA residents in longitudinal management responsibilities furthers residents' leadership success by providing trained managers who are ready to immerse themselves into practice postresidency, having employee engagement and HR skills as well as experiences with leading operational improvements. A longitudinal HR management experience was successfully incorporated into an HSPA residency combined Master of Science degree program. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effecting Change in an Evidence-Based Medicine Curriculum: Librarians' Role in a Pediatric Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeblisky, Kathy; Birr, Rebecca A; Sjursen Guerrero, Anne Marie

    2015-01-01

    Librarians for the joint Phoenix Children's Hospital/Maricopa Medical Center Pediatric Residency Program were asked to assist on the Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) Subcommittee for the program. Faculty was open to recommendations for revising and improving the curriculum and desired librarian assistance in completing the task. The annual program review and conference evaluations revealed a gap between the objectives of the EBM curriculum and the residents' perceived abilities to integrate knowledge into meaningful literature searches. This column demonstrates how librarians can collaborate with their residency programs to revise and improve processes to effect change in their program's EBM curriculum.

  10. A Training Program for College Residence Hall Advisors: Rincon Hall, California State University, Northridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthias, Ruth

    This program was devised in an attempt to train more effective resident advisors for the 1972-73 school year at a dormitory at California State University. The special characteristics of the dormitory--racially mixed and discordant--seemed to indicate a need for a special kind of resident advisor training program, one that attempted to better…

  11. The evolution of racial, ethnic, and gender diversity in US otolaryngology residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Joseph S; Young, Meredith; Velly, Ana M; Nguyen, Lily H P

    2013-07-01

    To examine the evolution of racial, ethnic, and gender diversity in US otolaryngology-head and neck surgery residency programs and compare these figures with other residency programs. Retrospective database review. US residency programs. Information concerning minority and female representation in US residency programs was obtained from annually published graduate medical education reports by the Journal of the American Medical Association from 1975 to 2010. Minority representation among US population and university students was obtained from the US Census Bureau. The racial, ethnic, and gender diversity of otolaryngology residents was then compared with other medical fields (general surgery, family medicine, and internal medicine). Underrepresentation in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery is particularly disconcerting for African Americans (-2.3%/y, P = .09) and Native Americans (1.5%/y, P = .11) given their nonsignificant annual growth rates. Hispanic representation (17.3%/y, P otolaryngology but is half the rate of growth of the Hispanic American population (32.8%/y, P otolaryngology residents. Despite increasing gender, ethnic, and racial diversity among medical residents in general, female and certain minority group representation in US otolaryngology residency programs is lagging. These findings are in contrast to rising trends of diversity within other residency programs including general surgery.

  12. Residency Programs and Clinical Leadership Skills Among New Saudi Graduate Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dossary, Reem Nassar; Kitsantas, Panagiota; Maddox, P J

    2016-01-01

    Nurse residency programs have been adopted by health care organizations to assist new graduate nurses with daily challenges such as intense working environments, increasing patient acuity, and complex technologies. Overall, nurse residency programs are proven beneficial in helping nurses transition from the student role to independent practitioners and bedside leaders. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of residency programs on leadership skills of new Saudi graduate nurses who completed a residency program compared to new Saudi graduate nurses who did not participate in residency programs. The study design was cross-sectional involving a convenience sample (n = 98) of new graduate nurses from three hospitals in Saudi Arabia. The Clinical Leadership Survey was used to measure the new graduate nurses' clinical leadership skills based on whether they completed a residency program or not. Descriptive statistics, correlation, and multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to examine leadership skills in this sample of new Saudi graduate nurses. A significant difference was found between residents and nonresidents in their leadership skills (t = 10.48, P = .000). Specifically, residents were significantly more likely to show higher levels of leadership skills compared to their counterparts. Attending a residency program was associated with a significant increase in clinical leadership skills. The findings of this study indicate that there is a need to implement more residency programs in hospitals of Saudi Arabia. It is imperative that nurse managers and policy makers in Saudi Arabia consider these findings to improve nurses' leadership skills, which will in turn improve patient care. Further research should examine how residency programs influence new graduate nurses' transition from student to practitioner with regard to clinical leadership skills in Saudi Arabia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Attitudes toward professionalism education in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Brent G; Stadler, Michael E; Poetker, David M

    2015-02-01

    Resident professionalism development is important for physician training and patient care. Meaningful professionalism curriculum requires collaboration between learners and educators. We aimed to better understand attitudes of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (OHNS) program directors (PDs) and residents toward professionalism education. Prospective survey. We identified contemporary methods of professionalism evaluation and education and formulated questions to assess attitudes toward professionalism education. Surveys were electronically distributed to 104 PDs who were asked to forward a separate survey to residents. The resident survey was completed by 110 OHNS residents, and the PD survey was completed by 33 OHNS PDs. The majority of residents (78%) and faculty (84%) believed professionalism could be taught. Role modeling (93%) and morbidity and mortality conference (90%) were the most common methods of education. Faculty questionnaires (100%) and nursing/ancillary staff questionnaires (93%) were the most common methods of resident evaluation. The majority of residents considered faculty mentoring (66%) and small group discussions (56%) to be useful methods for teaching professionalism, whereas only 14% considered formal lectures useful. Residents valued questionnaires by faculty (98%), medical staff (97%), and patients (94%) for professionalism evaluation. We are the first to study OHNS residents and PDs attitudes toward professionalism evaluation and education. Residents value mentoring programs and small group sessions rather than formal didactics and value evaluation from multiple sources. Programs should consider incorporating these specific educational and evaluative methods into their professionalism curricula. N/A. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  14. Interview Day Environment May Influence Applicant Selection of Emergency Medicine Residency Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis, Jason

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure of the interview day affects applicant interactions with faculty and residents, which can influence the applicant’s rank list decision. We aimed to determine if there was a difference in matched residents between those interviewing on a day on which didactics were held and had increased resident and faculty presence (didactic day versus an interview day with less availability for applicant interactions with residents and faculty (non-didactic day. This was a retrospective study reviewing interview dates of matched residents from 2009-2015. Forty-two (61.8% matched residents interviewed on a didactic day with increased faculty and resident presence versus 26 (38.2% on a non-didactic interview day with less availability for applicant interactions (p = 0.04. There is an association between interviewing on a didactic day with increased faculty and resident presence and matching in our program.

  15. [Epidemiologic approaches, in school health education programs with particular attention to dentistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percoco, M; Fasiolo, P; Antonelli, A; Simonetti D'Arca, A

    1989-01-01

    At the request of the Cultural Union of the Upper Aniene Valley, the social-health workers dealing with school medicine of the Teaching District of Affile (Rome) have tried to define the programming lines for a health education intervention in the elementary schools of the district. The basic requisites of the intervention were pinpointed as: effectiveness, in terms of improvement of health conditions; short-term results; cognitive-transformative methodology having a spiral progression (cognitive, decision-making, implementative and of verification). The departure point of the intervention was the cognitive study on the social-health situation of the school population based on an analysis of the individual data contained in the medical files compiled by the school doctor, standardised and filled out with the pupils' social and family data. Out of 257 children, 212 were examined, namely 82.4% of the school population. The first social-anamnestic data on pupils' families was in respect of parents' level of education, giving the following results: 65% with elementary schooling only, 11% semi-illiterate and 10.5% diploma- or degree-holders. In respect of parents' working activities, on the other hand, a clear difference emerged: compared with 50.4% of worker or artisan fathers and about 33.3% engaged in the tertiary sector, almost all the mothers were still home-based (90.9% housewives). Another interesting fact emerged from the cards, namely that only 69% of the boys and girls have undergone the full cycle of antidiphtheria-antitetanus vaccinations, and only 80% of antipolio vaccinations. As regards pupils pathological anamnesis, cases of hospitalisation were for the following causes: 5.7% fractures and/or burns, followed by intestinal infections (4.5%). Whereas, as regards current pathology the high incidence of a cariogenic pathology emerged, with such high values as to indicate, in the field of prevention and health education, oral hygiene as the priority

  16. Resident selection criteria for advanced education in prosthodontic programs: program directors' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Judy Chia-Chun; Lee, Damian J; Knoernschild, Kent L; Campbell, Stephen D; Sukotjo, Cortino

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the criteria used by advanced education in prosthodontic program (AEPP) directors to select their residents, to rank them by perceived importance, and further assist prospective candidates with the application process for AEPP. Questionnaires were distributed to all prosthodontic program directors (N = 46). The program directors were requested to respond in five sections: (1) general information, (2) information obtained from applications and letters of recommendation, (3) interview process, (4) decision process, and (5) retrospective view of the selection process. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Data were collected and compiled into mean, standard deviation, and range. Results were tabulated and ranked. Thirty-eight responses (82.61%) were returned and analyzed. Most of the programs (75.77%) indicated that a combination of the program director, current residents, prosthodontic faculty, and staff members were involved in conducting the interview process. Factors considered very important when choosing applicants to the prosthodontic program were (1) interview process, (2) dental school class rank, (3) dental school grades (prosthodontics), (4) letters of recommendation, (5) dental school grades (clinical). Letters from the prosthodontic post-doc program director and prosthodontic faculty were considered the most important source of recommendation. Honesty, organization, and energy were ranked as the most positive characteristics of the applicants during the interview. Almost all respondents (97%) were satisfied with the current selection process. When asked about the current applicant pool, most program directors (91.67%) were satisfied. The most and least important factors in selecting applicants by the program directors were described and ranked. This study was intended to provide the profession with some insight on how advanced Prosthodontic programs select their applicants. It may also serve as a

  17. Development and implementation of a writing program to improve resident authorship rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemmons, Amber Bradley; Hoge, Stephanie C; Cribb, Ashley; Manasco, Kalen B

    2015-09-01

    The development, implementation, and evaluation of a writing program with a formalized writing project as a component of postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) and postgraduate year 2 (PGY2) pharmacy residencies are described. The writing program at Georgia Regents Medical Center/University of Georgia College of Pharmacy, a collaborative and jointly funded program, was initiated in the 2010-11 residency year. The goals of the program are to teach residents to communicate effectively, apply leadership skills, employ project management skills, and provide medication- and practice- related education and training. The program combines both writing experiences and mentorship. At the beginning of the residency year, trainees are presented with opportunities to participate in both research projects and writing projects. Specifically, opportunities within the writing program include involvement in review articles, case reports, drug information rounds, book chapters, letters to the editor, and high-quality medication-use evaluations for potential publication. The writing project is highly encouraged, and completion of a manuscript to be submitted for publication is expected by graduation. Nine papers were published by 8 of 18 PGY1 and PGY2 residents in the four years before program implementation. A total of 23 publications were published by 18 (72%) of the 25 PGY1 and PGY2 residents in the four years after implementation of the writing program. Implementation of a formal writing program increased the overall publication rate of residents. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Leadership training in a family medicine residency program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Erin; Moore, Ainsley; Schabort, Inge

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the current status of leadership training as perceived by family medicine residents to inform the development of a formal leadership curriculum. Design Cross-sectional quantitative survey. Setting Department of Family Medicine at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont, in December 2013. Participants A total of 152 first- and second-year family medicine residents. Main outcome measures Family medicine residents’ attitudes toward leadership, perceived level of training in various leadership domains, and identified opportunities for leadership training. Results Overall, 80% (152 of 190) of residents completed the survey. On a Likert scale (1 = strongly disagree, 4 = neutral, 7 = strongly agree), residents rated the importance of physician leadership in the clinical setting as high (6.23 of 7), whereas agreement with the statement “I am a leader” received the lowest rating (5.28 of 7). At least 50% of residents desired more training in the leadership domains of personal mastery, mentorship and coaching, conflict resolution, teaching, effective teamwork, administration, ideals of a healthy workplace, coalitions, and system transformation. At least 50% of residents identified behavioural sciences seminars, a lecture and workshop series, and a retreat as opportunities to expand leadership training. Conclusion The concept of family physicians as leaders resonated highly with residents. Residents desired more personal and system-level leadership training. They also identified ways that leadership training could be expanded in the current curriculum and developed in other areas. The information gained from this survey might facilitate leadership development among residents through application of its results in a formal leadership curriculum. PMID:28292816

  19. Sandarbh UK International Artist Residency Program Belper Derbyshire

    OpenAIRE

    White, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Sandarbh Artist Residency. Laura White participated in this residency. 2009. She was one of 13 international artists working in location together over 2 weeks. Each artist developed a separate project. Participating artists included: Ivan Smith UK, Laura White UK, Francis Gomila UK/GER, Lata Upadhyaya UK/IND, Istvan Eross HUN, Chintan Upadhyay IND, Liu Po-Chun TW, Tsai Kung-Lin TW, Dong-Hun Sung KR, Alvaro Verduzcos MEX, Abby Manock US, Anke Mellin, GER. Concept of Resi...

  20. Evaluating the need for alternative didactic learning options in pediatric dental residency training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keck, Douglas B; Rutkauskas, John S; Clothey, Rebecca A

    2009-06-01

    The need for an alternative means of delivery of a didactic curriculum to pediatric dental residents is described. It is our hope with this project to encourage a much-needed didactic curriculum for programs lacking faculty and to endorse other programs in which academicians exist but cannot cover all the material with which a resident needs to become familiar in the two years of postgraduate residency training. A decrease in faculty number due to retirement, debt burden, or marginal recruitment techniques along with an increase in positions in pediatric dentistry residency programs poses a unique educational dilemma. Using a mixed-method research methodology, we sent a twelve-question survey to 105 pediatric dentistry residency program directors and department chairs, followed by eight telephone interviews. Results from a 55 percent return rate show that the debt burden of most pediatric dental residents is well over $100,000 and that this affects a resident's decision to enter academia, as does the relative lack of positive recruitment techniques and poor faculty remuneration. The survey results affirm the need for improvement in the didactic curriculum of pediatric dentistry residents and show that program directors and department chairs also feel that an alternative delivery method using DVD or online/web-based programs would be welcomed. Despite their extremely heavy workloads, educators are willing to contribute by providing lectures or reading lists in their area of expertise.

  1. A program to improve communication and collaboration between nurses and medical residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, Ruth G; Hayes, Rosemarie; Stuart, Wendy; Cassell, Asenath; Farrell, Cheryl; Miller-Reyes, Charmin; Donaldson, Audeanne

    2010-04-01

    A program was implemented for nurses and medical residents to improve communication and collaboration. It has been noted that communication and collaboration between members of the health care team improve patient outcomes and job satisfaction among nurses. Nurses on the unit where medical residents trained attended a 2-hour educational program that reviewed effective communication styles and positive aspects of collaboration, including role-playing examples. Medical residents received a self-learning packet with a posttest that was returned to researchers when completed. Focus groups, including both nurses and medical residents, were held twice a month for 6 months after the educational program. Overall improvements in communication, collaboration, patient outcomes, and job satisfaction were noted from the focus group data. The educational program proved to be successful in improving collaboration and communication between nurses and medical residents, which in turn improved patient care.

  2. Neurology training program to the education of residents in psychiatry in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Wilkins Pereira Souza

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Psychiatry and neurology are intertwined specialties. The advance of neuropsychiatry allowed the incision of the functional-organic dichotomy, as well as the need to include contents of neurology discipline in training the psychiatrist. Objectives: To determine the content and methodology of neurology discipline in the formation of psychiatry residents. Methods: In 2011 to 2013 a theoretical and reflective research was held on the websites of the Brazilian Psychiatric Association (BPA, residencies in psychiatry in Brazil, PubMed and SciELO. The terms used were: medical residency program and residency in psychiatry; neurology and residency in psychiatry. We searched for skills, workload, hospital care or outpatient, supervisor, teaching method, thematic content, evaluation, research and recommended literature. Results and discussion: In Brazil, there are 66 residencies in psychiatry, concentrated in the Southeast and South regions (71.1%. Of the 840 residency positions, 80.1% are located in these regions. Only 8% of residencies publish their programs, even partial. Psychiatry residents accompany the service of neurology at specialized clinics as neurogeriatrics, headache and epilepsy. No residency discloses the thematic content and recommended literature. An internship reported the need for evaluation to completion. Conclusions: In Brazil, there is not a full program of neurology to form the psychiatrist. It is necessary that the residencies publish their programs and experiences. It is suggested that the BPA structure a national program so the institutions can adapt it to their reality. It is proposed that the preceptor of neurology be part of the psychiatry service, and not the resident pass by neurology subspecialty outpatients.

  3. A Survey of Simulation Utilization in Anesthesiology Residency Programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochlen, Lauryn R; Housey, Michelle; Gannon, Ian; Tait, Alan R; Naughton, Norah; Kheterpal, Sachin

    2016-06-01

    Given the evolution of competency-based education and evidence supporting the benefits of incorporating simulation into anesthesiology residency training, simulation will likely play an important role in the training and assessment of anesthesiology residents. Currently, there are little data available regarding the current status of simulation-based curricula across US residency programs. In this study, we assessed simulation-based training and assessment in US anesthesiology programs using a survey designed to elicit information regarding the type, frequency, and content of the simulation courses offered at the 132 Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education-certified anesthesiology training programs. The response rate for the survey was 66%. Although most of the responding programs offered simulation-based courses for interns and residents and during CA-1 orientation, the curriculum varied greatly among programs. Approximately 40% of responding programs use simulation for resident assessment and remediation. The majority of responding programs favored standard simulation-based training as part of residency training (89%), and the most common perceived obstacles to doing so were time, money, and human resources. The results from this survey highlight that there are currently large variations in simulation-based training and assessment among training programs. It also confirms that many program directors feel that standardizing some components of simulation-based education and assessment would be beneficial. Given the positive impact simulation has on skill retention and operating room preparedness, it may be worthwhile to consider developing a standard curriculum.

  4. Assessing Interpersonal and Communication Skills in Radiation Oncology Residents: A Pilot Standardized Patient Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Melody [Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Berman, Abigail T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Hwang, Wei-Ting [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); LaMarra, Denise [Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Baffic, Cordelia; Suneja, Gita [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Vapiwala, Neha, E-mail: Neha.Vapiwala@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: There is a lack of data for the structured development and evaluation of communication skills in radiation oncology residency training programs. Effective communication skills are increasingly emphasized by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and are critical for a successful clinical practice. We present the design of a novel, pilot standardized patient (SP) program and the evaluation of communication skills among radiation oncology residents. Methods and Materials: Two case scenarios were developed to challenge residents in the delivery of “bad news” to patients: one scenario regarding treatment failure and the other regarding change in treatment plan. Eleven radiation oncology residents paired with 6 faculty participated in this pilot program. Each encounter was scored by the SPs, observing faculty, and residents themselves based on the Kalamazoo guidelines. Results: Overall resident performance ratings were “good” to “excellent,” with faculty assigning statistically significant higher scores and residents assigning lower scores. We found inconsistent inter rater agreement among faculty, residents, and SPs. SP feedback was also valuable in identifying areas of improvement, including more collaborative decision making and less use of medical jargon. Conclusions: The program was well received by residents and faculty and regarded as a valuable educational experience that could be used as an annual feedback tool. Poor inter rater agreement suggests a need for residents and faculty physicians to better calibrate their evaluations to true patient perceptions. High scores from faculty members substantiate the concern that resident evaluations are generally positive and nondiscriminating. Faculty should be encouraged to provide honest and critical feedback to hone residents' interpersonal skills.

  5. Long-acting reversible contraception use among residents in obstetrics/gynecology training programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zigler RE

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rachel E Zigler,1 Jeffrey F Peipert,1,2 Qiuhong Zhao,1 Ragini Maddipati,1 Colleen McNicholas1 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Clinical Research and Family Planning, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, 2Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN, USA Background: The objective of the study was to estimate the personal usage of long-acting reversible contraception (LARC among obstetrics and gynecology (Ob/Gyn residents in the United States and compare usage between programs with and without a Ryan Residency Training Program (Ryan Program, an educational program implemented to enhance resident training in family planning. Materials and methods: We performed a web-based, cross-sectional survey to explore contraceptive use among Ob/Gyn residents between November and December 2014. Thirty-two Ob/Gyn programs were invited to participate, and 24 programs (75% agreed to participate. We divided respondents into two groups based on whether or not their program had a Ryan Program. We excluded male residents without a current female partner as well as residents who were currently pregnant or trying to conceive. We evaluated predictors of LARC use using bivariate analysis and multivariable Poisson regression. Results: Of the 638 residents surveyed, 384 (60.2% responded to our survey and 351 were eligible for analysis. Of those analyzed, 49.3% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 44.1%, 54.5% reported current LARC use: 70.0% of residents in Ryan Programs compared to 26.8% in non-Ryan Programs (RRadj 2.14, 95% CI 1.63–2.80. Residents reporting a religious affiliation were less likely to use LARC than those who described themselves as non-religious (RRadj 0.76, 95% CI 0.64–0.92. Of residents reporting LARC use, 91% were using the levonorgestrel intrauterine device. Conclusion: LARC use in this population of women’s health specialists is substantially

  6. Minerva: using a software program to improve resident performance during independent call

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itri, Jason N.; Redfern, Regina O.; Cook, Tessa; Scanlon, Mary H.

    2010-03-01

    We have developed an application called Minerva that allows tracking of resident discrepancy rates and missed cases. Minerva mines the radiology information system (RIS) for preliminary interpretations provided by residents during independent call and copies both the preliminary and final interpretations to a database. Both versions are displayed for direct comparison by Minerva and classified as 'in agreement', 'minor discrepancy' or 'major discrepancy' by the resident program director. Minerva compiles statistics comparing minor, major and total discrepancy rates for individual residents relative to the overall group. Discrepant cases are categorized according to date, modality and body part and reviewed for trends in missed cases. The rate of minor, major and total discrepancies for residents on-call at our institution was similar to rates previously published, including a 2.4% major discrepancy rate for second year radiology residents in the DePICTORS study and a 2.6% major discrepancy rate for resident at a community hospital. Trend analysis of missed cases was used to generate a topic-specific resident missed case conference on acromioclavicular (AC) joint separation injuries, which resulted in a 75% decrease in the number of missed cases related to AC separation subsequent to the conference. Using a software program to track of minor and major discrepancy rates for residents taking independent call using modified RadPeer scoring guidelines provides a competency-based metric to determine resident performance. Topic-specific conferences using the cases identified by Minerva can result in a decrease in missed cases.

  7. Teaching Humanities in Medicine: The University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Hugh; Shields, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Humanities in medicine (HIM) is an important aspect of medical education intended to help preserve humanism and a focus on patients. At the University of Massachusetts Family Medicine Residency Program, we have been expanding our HIM curriculum for our residents including orientation, home visit reflective writing, didactics and a department-wide…

  8. The Artist Residency Program in Eastern Oregon: Emphasizing the Rural.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Doug

    During a 1979-1980 pilot project, 13 nine-week residencies by professional artists were sponsored in 10 eastern Oregon school districts with Eastern Oregon State College serving as liaison, the Northwest Area Foundation of St. Paul (Minnesota) contributing $33,500, and participating school districts adding a total of $8,000 in funding. This low…

  9. A Four-Year Program to Train Residents in Emergency Medical Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, Edward J.; Zink, Brian J.

    1989-01-01

    The University of Cincinnati's comprehensive emergency medicine residency curriculum provides significant practical training in ground and aeromedical transport, disaster work, telemetry communications, and administrative matters. Initial program feedback has been very positive. (MSE)

  10. Teaching and Assessing Systems-based Competency in Ophthalmology Residency Training Programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Andrew G.; Beaver, Hilary A.; Greenlee, Emily; Oetting, Thomas A.; Boldt, H. Culver; Olson, Richard; Abramoff, Michael; Carter, Keith

    2007-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has mandated that residency programs, including ophthalmology, teach and assess specific competencies, including systems-based learning. We review the pertinent literature on systems-based learning for ophthalmology and recommend speci

  11. Success and Failure in a Family-Centered Comprehensive Care Teaching Program for Pediatric Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teberg, Annabel; Friedman, David Belais

    1970-01-01

    This Well Baby Clinic was designed to augment residency teaching program in evaluation of physical and emotional growth, in family counseling, and to gain data on response to varying immunizations. (IR)

  12. Patients' attitudes towards online dental information and a web-based virtual reality program for clinical dentistry: a pilot investigation in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jian; Luo, En; Song, Enming; Xu, Xiangyang; Tan, Hongbao; Zhao, Yi; Wang, Yining; Li, Zhiyong

    2009-03-01

    This research investigated (1) the attitudes of dental patients toward searching online for dental information and (2) patients attitudes and expectations towards a web-based 3D virtual reality program for clinical dentistry. A questionnaire survey was conducted in six clinics across two cities in China. Dental patients visiting the six clinics were invited to participate in the study. All subjects browsed a webpage containing the 3D virtual reality dental program. The new media was supplemented as a consultive system for patients into the traditional pattern of seeking dental care procedure. Subjects then completed a questionnaire detailing their attitudes toward their experience with the software. The questionnaire responses were then collected and analyzed. 45% of respondents reported having searched information online before receiving dental care. Respondents held different attitudes towards the online dental information, with a majority reporting a reliance on it but with reservations. Over 50% of respondents held positive attitudes to the web-based virtual reality dental information program, while 21% reported negative views toward the new method. Most respondents reported that the web-based virtual reality program was superior to traditional static web pages, but only as a supplementary material. Respondents also indicated that internet speed may likely be a major determinant to their future usage of such a system. These findings indicate that a considerable portion of respondents conduct their own internet searches for related dental information before seeking professional advice on dental care. Most of the respondents reported positive attitudes towards a web-based virtual reality program for clinical dentistry. However, the current speed of internet connections in China is a major area of concern for the future application and uptake of web-based virtual reality dental software.

  13. Description of a medical writing rotation for a postgraduate pharmacy residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jamie N; Tiemann, Kelsey A; Ostroff, Jared L

    2014-04-01

    To provide a description of a pharmacy residency rotation dedicated to medical writing developed at a tertiary care academic medical center. Contribution to the medical literature is an important component of professional pharmacy practice, and there are many benefits seen by practitioners actively involved in scholarly activities. Residency programs have an opportunity to expand beyond the standard roles of postgraduate pharmacist training but rarely is there formal instruction on medical writing skills or are scholarship opportunities provided to residents. In order to address this deficiency, a residency program may consider the implementation of a formal Medical Writing rotation. This rotation is designed to introduce the resident to medical writing through active discussion on medical writing foundational topics, engage the resident in a collaborative review of a manuscript submitted to a peer-reviewed professional journal, and support the resident in the design and composition of manuscript of publishable quality. A structured Medical Writing rotation during a pharmacy resident's training can help develop the skills necessary to promote scholarly activities and foster resident interest in future pursuit of professional medical writing.

  14. Geriatrics Education in Psychiatric Residencies: A National Survey of Program Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warshaw, Gregg A.; Bragg, Elizabeth J.; Layde, Joseph B.; Meganathan, Karthikeyan; Brewer, David E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe the current characteristics of geriatrics training within general psychiatry training programs. Methods: In the fall of 2006, a survey was mailed and made available online to all U.S. psychiatric residency program directors (N=181). Results: The response rate was 54% (n=97). Of the responding psychiatry programs,…

  15. Trends in the Medical Knowledge and Clinical Competence of Graduates of Internal Medicine Residency Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcini, John J.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A study assessed the effectiveness of medical resident training programs during 1983-88 by evaluating students' certification scores and comparing them to the program's evaluation of students' clinical competence. Results are reported and analyzed for top-rated, university-affiliated, and non-university-affiliated programs, focusing on trends over…

  16. Listening to Students: How I Came to Love My Low-Residency Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwood, Megan

    2009-01-01

    Finding an academic program that caters to children's literature is hard. Many people consider children's literature no more sophisticated than its audience--an arena for those who cannot hack it either as writers or as teachers of adult literature. This author, however, found a new program--a "low residency program"--at Hamline…

  17. Preventive Dentistry Conference - Public Health Aspects of Preventive Dentistry, 3-4 March 1983, Fort Sam Houston, Texas,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-04-01

    pockets in excess of 4-5 mm. e. Prosthetics: 1. Soldiers that require complete dentures or remo- vable partial dentures to properly masticate food. 2...Shulman ARMY COMMUNITY DENTISTRY - PROGRAM PLANNING .. ............... 7-1 Lieutenant Colonel John E. King HISTORY OF PREVENTIVE DENTISTRY IN THE ARMY... History of Preventive COL Barnes Dentistry in the Army 0900 ACO - Program Evaluation LTC King 1000 BREAK 1015 Dental Readiness Program Ms. Bowen at

  18. The resident scholar program: a research training opportunity for internal medicine house staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Abigail B; McCormack, Francis X; Diers, Tiffiny; Jazieh, Abdul-Rahman

    2007-01-01

    Housestaff research training is a challenging task that is complicated by the lack of a structured process and dedicated time. The Resident Scholar Program (RSP) at the University of Cincinnati, Department of Internal Medicine was created to overcome these challenges. Interested internal medicine house staff are required to submit an application to the residency research director including a project description signed by a faculty mentor. If the project is approved, a 4-month elective rotation is scheduled for the following year. Residents spend the first month on a consult service in the subspecialty area of their research and the remaining 3 months performing their research project. The RSP was launched in July 2003. The percentage of residents participating in research more than tripled. The subspecialty areas represented by RSP research were more diverse than those represented in prior years. Most participants participated in clinical research projects (84%), with 63% of projects being prospective in design. The RSP residents were twice as likely to obtain subspecialty fellowship positions compared to non-RSP residents (89% vs 46%, respectively). The RSP enables house staff to participate in research opportunities in their areas of interest. Development of a more systematic assessment method to study the impact of the program is underway, but the high participation rate reflects resident interest in such a program, particularly for residents with aspirations in pursuing fellowship training.

  19. The triumvirate: a new model for residency program directorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiselle, Phillip M; Donohoe, Kevin; Graham, David; Siewert, Bettina; Jennette, Richard; Hatabu, Hiroto; Kressel, Herbert Y

    2007-12-01

    The authors describe their initial 5-year experience with a new model of residency directorship: a triumvirate of shared leadership consisting of a director and 2 associate directors with specific areas of expertise and assigned responsibility. The major appeal of this model is its potential to draw on the diverse talents of 3 individuals with responsibilities matched to their specific areas of strength. A major benefit of the model is that each director has more time and energy to devote to specific duties, resulting in a greater opportunity for innovation and creativity. In this article, the authors describe the roles, responsibilities, and accomplishments of each of the 3 directors. They also discuss potential benefits of the triumvirate model in comparison with a traditional residency directorship and potential pitfalls to avoid when implementing this model.

  20. Nutrition intervention in general dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sintes, J L

    1990-12-01

    This article presents a nutrition program in general dentistry following an oral health nutrition care process, and provides a guideline for identifying patients at risk of developing marginal malnutrition as a result of oral health procedures. The program highlights the importance of assessing nutritional status by segregating high-risk patients from low-risk patients. A case report demonstrates the therapeutic dietary management of a patient whose jaws were immobilized as a result of trauma.

  1. Role of journal club in Canadian ophthalmology residency training: a national survey of program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Sarah J; Sabri, Kourosh

    2016-06-01

    To conduct a national survey of journal club curricula in Canadian ophthalmology residency programs. Cross-sectional web-based survey. Fifteen Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC) ophthalmology residency program directors. The 15 RCPSC ophthalmology residency program directors were invited to participate in a 31-item online survey. The survey inquired about the purpose, educational goals, and structure of journal club. Basic statistics were performed to compare responses across institutions. Thirteen of the 15 program directors replied, representing an 87% response rate. Twelve (92%) institutions maintained a journal club. All of the program directors surveyed felt that journal club had educational value. Resident attendance was typically mandatory (75%) and correspondingly high across programs. There was 100% agreement that randomized controlled trials were most often selected for review. The primary journal club objectives were for residents to develop critical appraisal skills and to conduct a literature search (67%). Formal teaching and evaluation of these skills were not prioritized by any program. Seventeen percent felt the most important objective was to impact clinical practice. Canadian ophthalmology program directors expressed high levels of satisfaction that journal club was effective in meeting its stated objectives. This indicates that the teaching model promoted resident critical appraisal skills; however, objective evaluation methods to assess resident competence in evidence-based medicine were not described by any respondents. As RCSPC ophthalmology programs transition to competency-based medical education, program directors may consider modifying journal club curriculum, broadening its utility toward a means of outcome assessment. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Ophthalmological Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Assessment of a residency training program in endocrinology and nutrition by physicians: results of a survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Fernández, Jesús; Gutiérrez-Alcántara, Carmen; Palomares-Ortega, Rafael; García-Manzanares, Alvaro; Benito-López, Pedro

    2011-12-01

    The current training program for resident physicians in endocrinology and nutrition (EN) organizes their medical learning. Program evaluation by physicians was assessed using a survey. The survey asked about demographic variables, EN training methods, working time and center, and opinion on training program contents. Fifty-one members of Sociedad Castellano-Manchega de Endocrinología, Nutrición y Diabetes, and Sociedad Andaluza de Endocrinología y Nutrición completed the survey. Forty-percent of them disagreed with the compulsory nature of internal medicine, cardiology, nephrology and, especially, neurology rotations (60%); a majority (>50%) were against several recommended rotations included in the program. The fourth year of residence was considered by 37.8% of respondents as the optimum time for outpatient and inpatient control and monitoring without direct supervision. The recommended monthly number of on-call duties was 3.8±1.2. We detected a positive opinion about extension of residence duration to 4.4±0.5 years. Doctoral thesis development during the residence period was not considered convenient by 66.7% of physicians. Finally, 97.8% of resident physicians would recommend residency in EN to other colleagues. Endocrinologists surveyed disagreed with different training program aspects such as the rotation system, skill acquisition timing, and on-call duties. Therefore, an adaptation of the current training program in EN would be required. Copyright © 2011 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. A survey of formal training in the care of children in family practice residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldor, R A; Luckmann, R

    1992-08-01

    Declining hospitalization rates for children and an increased emphasis on ambulatory care may be affecting the way family practice residency programs train their residents in the care of children. We surveyed all US family practice residency program directors to determine the nature of the child care training that programs currently provide to residents. Responses were received from 78% of the programs. Residencies required a mean of 5.2 months of formal pediatric training (range: 1 to 11 months). Thirty percent of programs noted a declining inpatient census on inpatient pediatric teaching services, but since 1978, the mean duration of inpatient pediatric training increased by 0.4 months to a required mean of 2.7 months of general pediatric inpatient training (range: 0 to 6 months). The mean time devoted to structured outpatient pediatric training was only 1.6 months (range: 0 to 6 months). Nine percent of responding programs required no formal pediatric outpatient training other than family health center experience. Despite declining inpatient census and increased emphasis on comprehensive ambulatory care, family practice residencies require more formal inpatient pediatric training than formal outpatient training.

  4. Methods and resources for physics education in radiology residency programs: survey results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresolin, Linda; Bisset, George S; Hendee, William R; Kwakwa, Francis A

    2008-11-01

    Over the past 2 years, ongoing efforts have been made to reevaluate and restructure the way physics education is provided to radiology residents. Program directors and faculty from North American radiology residency programs were surveyed about how physics is being taught and what resources are currently being used for their residents. Substantial needs were identified for additional educational resources in physics, better integration of physics into clinical training, and a standardized physics curriculum closely linked to the initial certification examination of the American Board of Radiology.

  5. The Flipped Classroom: A Modality for Mixed Asynchronous and Synchronous Learning in a Residency Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy P. Young

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A “flipped classroom” educational model exchanges the traditional format of a classroom lecture and homework problem set. We piloted two flipped classroom sessions in our emergency medicine (EM residency didactic schedule. We aimed to learn about resident and faculty impressions of the sessions, in order to develop them as a regular component of our residency curriculum. Methods: We evaluated residents’ impression of the asynchronous video component and synchronous classroom component using four Likert items. We used open-ended questions to inquire about resident and faculty impressions of the advantages and disadvantages of the format. Results: For the Likert items evaluating the video lectures, 33/35 residents (94%, 95% CI 80%-99% responded that the video lecture added to their knowledge about the topic, and 33/35 residents felt that watching the video was a valuable use of their time. For items evaluating the flipped classroom format, 36/38 residents (95%, 95% CI 82%-99% preferred the format to a traditional lecture on the topic, and 38/38 residents (100%, 95% CI 89%-100% felt that the small group session was effective in helping them learn about the topic. Most residents preferred to see the format monthly in our curriculum and chose an ideal group size of 5.5 (first session and 7 (second session. Residents cited the interactivity of the sessions and access to experts as advantages of the format. Faculty felt the ability to assess residents’ understanding of concepts and provide feedback were advantages. Conclusion: Our flipped classroom model was positively received by EM residents. Residents preferred a small group size and favored frequent use of the format in our curriculum. The flipped classroom represents one modality that programs may use to incorporate a mixture of asynchronous and interactive synchronous learning and provide additional opportunities to evaluate residents. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(7:-0.

  6. A new model for accreditation of residency programs in internal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goroll, Allan H; Sirio, Carl; Duffy, F Daniel; LeBlond, Richard F; Alguire, Patrick; Blackwell, Thomas A; Rodak, William E; Nasca, Thomas

    2004-06-01

    A renewed emphasis on clinical competence and its assessment has grown out of public concerns about the safety, efficacy, and accountability of health care in the United States. Medical schools and residency training programs are paying increased attention to teaching and evaluating basic clinical skills, stimulated in part by these concerns and the responding initiatives of accrediting, certifying, and licensing bodies. This paper, from the Residency Review Committee for Internal Medicine of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, proposes a new outcomes-based accreditation strategy for residency training programs in internal medicine. It shifts residency program accreditation from external audit of educational process to continuous assessment and improvement of trainee clinical competence.

  7. Factors Influencing Residency Program Selection by Medical Students Pursuing Obstetrics and Gynecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alston, Meredith J; Metz, Torri D; Fothergill, Russell; Meg Autry, Amy; Wagner, Sarah A; Allshouse, Amanda A; Stephenson-Famy, Alyssa

    2017-02-01

    Little is known about the factors that influence medical student selection of obstetrics and gynecology (ob-gyn) residency programs. We assessed the factors influencing residency program selection by fourth-year medical students pursuing ob-gyn training. A voluntary, anonymous, 19-question survey of residency selection factors was distributed to all fourth-year medical students interviewing at 1 of 5 academic ob-gyn departments for a residency position during the 2013-2014 interview season. Participants were surveyed about the relative importance (not important, somewhat important, important) of various residency selection factors, including operative experience, exposure to subspecialties, curricular experience, access to fellowships, and administrative aspects of residency, including adherence to duty hour restrictions. Of 322 potential respondents, 262 (81%) completed the survey. Surgical training and training in laparoscopic surgery were deemed "important" by nearly all respondents (98%, 258 of 262, and 97%, 253 of 262, respectively). Factors that were considered "not important" by a significant group of respondents included maternity/paternity leave policies (22%, 58 of 259); opportunity for international rotations/electives (20%, 51 of 259); exposure to quality and safety initiatives (13%, 34 of 259); and training in abortion (13%, 34 of 262). Fourth-year medical students identified surgical training as the most important factor in selecting an ob-gyn residency, a finding that is particularly relevant as decreasing and changing surgical volumes affect residency training in this specialty.

  8. Medical Education About the Care of Addicted Incarcerated Persons: A National Survey of Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Mark L.; Isaacson, J. Harry; Kahn, Ruth; Mundt, Marlon P.; Manwell, Linda Baier

    2001-06-01

    In June 1998, there were 1.8 million inmates in correctional facilities for adults; 1.2 million in state and federal prisons and 600,000 in municipal/county jails (668 persons per 100,000 U.S. population). Rates of TB, AIDS, mental illness, and substance abuse are 2-13 times higher in persons living in jails and prisons. This study was designed to assess the level of training offered to residents in seven medical specialties in the care of addicted incarcerated persons. The study design involved two stages. The first entailed a mailed survey to 1,831 residency directors in family medicine, internal medicine, osteopathic medicine, pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology, psychiatry, and emergency medicine. The second stage was a telephone interview, about substance use disorders, of faculty listed by the residency directors as teaching residents. The mailed survey was completed by 1,205 residency directors (66%). The 769 faculty from those identified programs, who participated in the telephone interview, reported that only 14% of their residency programs offered lectures or conferences on the care of incarcerated persons, yet 44% of the programs had residents caring for incarcerated persons with substance abuse problems, in a clinical setting. Only 22% offered clinical experiences for residents in a correctional facility.We recognize that our survey of correctional health and substance abuse training is limited, but as such, a greater number of respondents to our survey do not teach residents addiction medicine topics pertaining to prevention, evaluation, intervention, and management of the addicted criminal offender/patient in a correctional setting or give adequate clinical exposure to this special population. The data suggests a need to develop and implement educational programs on medical care for this high-risk and expanding population.

  9. Nanorobots: Future in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Neetha J; Swati, P; David, K

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the phenomenon of nanotechnology as it might apply to dentistry as a new field called nanodentistry. Treatment possibilities might include the application of nanotechnology to local anesthesia, dentition renaturalization, the permanent cure for hypersensitivity, complete orthodontic realignment in a single visit, covalently bonded diamondized enamel, and continuous oral health maintenance using mechanical dentifrobots. Dental nanorobots could be constructed to destroy caries-causing bacteria or to repair tooth blemishes where decay has set in, by using a computer to direct these tiny workers in their tasks. Dental nanorobots might be programed to use specific motility mechanisms to crawl or swim through human tissue with navigational precision, to acquire energy, to sense and manipulate their surroundings, to achieve safe cytopenetration, and to use any of a multitude of techniques to monitor, interrupt, or alter nerve-impulse traffic in individual nerve cells in real time.

  10. Current status of obstetrics and gynecology resident medical-legal education: a survey of program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Hunt, Carey; Gilbert, William M

    2005-12-01

    To assess the level and type of medical-legal education offered to obstetrics and gynecology residents and medical students. All obstetrics and gynecology program directors (n = 252) were asked to complete a survey questioning the availability of, type of, and desire for medical-legal education within their programs. Seventy-eight percent of the program directors answered the survey with 86% reporting some degree of formal medical-legal education. The most common formats were didactic lectures (38%), grand rounds (30%), case conferences (19%), mock trials (9%), and other (4%). These sessions most commonly contained information on proper documentation (48%), testifying (25%), and giving a deposition (24%). The average number of sessions per year was 4.1 with a median of 3 sessions per year. Despite this high percentage of some formal education, 88% expressed an interest in pursuing other educational options on these topics. Most obstetrics and gynecology residency programs provide some form of medical-legal instruction to residents, but the small number of sessions suggests that this is inadequate. Residency programs may benefit from a larger and more formal resident education program on medical-legal issues.

  11. A survey of pediatric resident training programs 5 years after the Task Force report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, H L; Oski, F A

    1984-10-01

    Twenty-nine pediatric residency training programs responded to a survey with detailed descriptions of the scheduled rotations before and after the Report of the Task Force on Pediatric Education. This survey documented some changes in the overall structure of residency programming in that all programs demand 3 years of general pediatric training. Little if any changes were noted in the traditional emphasis on inpatient and neonatal training. Some changes in content area have been noted, namely a modest increase in the experiences in adolescent medicine. The survey failed to demonstrate any trend indicating increased emphasis on training experiences in the "new morbidity."

  12. 21st Century-based Soft Skills: Spotlight on Non-cognitive Skills in a Cognitive-laden Dentistry Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie C. Quieng

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Teaching and learning in the 21st century aim to produce students proficient in content knowledge, specific abilities, literacy, numeracy, and technology uses. From these 21st century skills, soft skills were delineated from these learning outcomes; and defined as intra- and interpersonal skills vital for personal development, social participation, and workplace success. This study has two goals: to determine the perceived extent of integration of 21st century-based soft skills in the cognitive-laden dentistry curriculum, and to examine the perceived 21st century-based soft skills of the student participants to serve as baseline data for future research. Communication, and relationship and collaboration skills will be critical components to motivate students; in turn, when students are motivated, it will encourage them to think critically and initiate actions toward the achievement of their goals.

  13. Resident Development via Progress Testing and Test-Marking: An Innovation and Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiff, Karen; Williams, D. Josh; Pardhan, Alim; Preyra, Ian; Li, Shelly-Anne

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Since 2008, the McMaster University Royal College Emergency Medicine residency training program has run practice Short Answer Question (SAQ) examinations to help residents test their knowledge and gain practice in answering exam-style questions. However, marking this type of SAQ exam is time-consuming. Methods To help address this problem, we require that senior residents help mark at least one exam per year alongside faculty members. Examinees’ identities are kept anonymous by assigning a random number to each resident, which is only decoded after marking. Aggregation of marks is done by faculty only. The senior residents and faculty members all share sequential marking of each question. Each question is reviewed, and exemplar “best practice” answers are discussed. As novel/unusual answers appear, instantaneous fact-checking (via textbooks, or the internet) and discussions occur allowing for real-time modification to the answer keys as needed. Results A total of 22 out of 37 residents (post graduate year 1 to post graduate year 5 (PGY1 to PGY5)) participated in a recent program evaluation focus group. This evaluation showed that residents feel quite positive about this process. With the anonymization process, residents do not object to their colleagues seeing and marking their answers. Senior residents have found this process informative and have felt that this process helps them gain insight into better “examsmanship.” Conclusions Involving residents in marking short-answer exams is acceptable and perceived as useful experience for improving exam-taking skills. More studies of similar innovations would be required to determine to what extent this may be the case. PMID:28265528

  14. Transfer of communication skills to the workplace during clinical rounds: impact of a program for residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liénard, Aurore; Merckaert, Isabelle; Libert, Yves; Bragard, Isabelle; Delvaux, Nicole; Etienne, Anne-Marie; Marchal, Serge; Meunier, Julie; Reynaert, Christine; Slachmuylder, Jean-Louis; Razavi, Darius

    2010-08-26

    Communication with patients is a core clinical skill in medicine that can be acquired through communication skills training. Meanwhile, the importance of transfer of communication skills to the workplace has not been sufficiently studied. This study aims to assess the efficacy of a 40-hour training program designed to improve patients' satisfaction and residents' communication skills during their daily clinical rounds. Residents were randomly assigned to the training program or to a waiting list. Patients' satisfaction was assessed with a visual analog scale after each visit. Transfer of residents' communication skills was assessed in audiotaped actual inpatient visits during a half-day clinical round. Transcripted audiotapes were analyzed using content analysis software (LaComm). Training effects were tested with Mann-Whitney tests and generalized linear Poisson regression models. Eighty-eight residents were included. First, patients interacting with trained residents reported a higher satisfaction with residents' communication (Median=92) compared to patients interacting with untrained residents (Median=88) (p=.046). Second, trained residents used more assessment utterances (Relative Risk (RR)=1.17; 95% Confidence intervals (95%CI)=1.02-1.34; p=.023). Third, transfer was also observed when residents' training attendance was considered: residents' use of assessment utterances (RR=1.01; 95%CI=1.01-1.02; p=.018) and supportive utterances (RR=0.99; 95%CI=0.98-1.00; p=.042) (respectively 1.15 (RR), 1.08-1.23 (95%CI), pcommunication skills learning to the workplace. Transfer was directly related to training attendance but remained limited. Future studies should therefore focus on the improvement of the efficacy of communication skills training in order to ensure a more important training effect size on transfer.

  15. Transfer of Communication Skills to the Workplace during Clinical Rounds: Impact of a Program for Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liénard, Aurore; Merckaert, Isabelle; Libert, Yves; Bragard, Isabelle; Delvaux, Nicole; Etienne, Anne-Marie; Marchal, Serge; Meunier, Julie; Reynaert, Christine; Slachmuylder, Jean-Louis; Razavi, Darius

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose Communication with patients is a core clinical skill in medicine that can be acquired through communication skills training. Meanwhile, the importance of transfer of communication skills to the workplace has not been sufficiently studied. This study aims to assess the efficacy of a 40-hour training program designed to improve patients' satisfaction and residents' communication skills during their daily clinical rounds. Methods Residents were randomly assigned to the training program or to a waiting list. Patients' satisfaction was assessed with a visual analog scale after each visit. Transfer of residents' communication skills was assessed in audiotaped actual inpatient visits during a half-day clinical round. Transcripted audiotapes were analyzed using content analysis software (LaComm). Training effects were tested with Mann-Whitney tests and generalized linear Poisson regression models. Results Eighty-eight residents were included. First, patients interacting with trained residents reported a higher satisfaction with residents' communication (Median = 92) compared to patients interacting with untrained residents (Median = 88) (p = .046). Second, trained residents used more assessment utterances (Relative Risk (RR)  = 1.17; 95% Confidence intervals (95%CI)  = 1.02–1.34; p = .023). Third, transfer was also observed when residents' training attendance was considered: residents' use of assessment utterances (RR = 1.01; 95%CI = 1.01–1.02; p = .018) and supportive utterances (RR = 0.99; 95%CI = 0.98–1.00; p = .042) (respectively 1.15 (RR), 1.08–1.23 (95%CI), pcommunication skills learning to the workplace. Transfer was directly related to training attendance but remained limited. Future studies should therefore focus on the improvement of the efficacy of communication skills training in order to ensure a more important training effect size on transfer. PMID:20865055

  16. A Practical Approach to Implementing the Core Competencies in a Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Residency Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingle, Arden D.; Sexson, Sandra B.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe the development and implementation of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's core competencies in a child and adolescent psychiatry residency program. Method: The authors identify the program's organizational approach and participants and detail various strategies and methods of defining,…

  17. A Practical Approach to Implementing the Core Competencies in a Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Residency Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingle, Arden D.; Sexson, Sandra B.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe the development and implementation of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's core competencies in a child and adolescent psychiatry residency program. Method: The authors identify the program's organizational approach and participants and detail various strategies and methods of defining,…

  18. Finding an Analytic Frame for Faculty-Student Interaction within Faculty-in-Residence Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mara, Miriam; Mara, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    In this article we describe a case study analyzing how a Faculty-in-Residence program fosters student engagement. Using Cox & Orehovec's typology to add granularity to the National Study on Student Engagement's criteria for student engagement, we suggest best practices for the implementation of these in-situ faculty engagement programs.

  19. A Grounded Theory of Connectivity and Persistence in a Limited Residency Doctoral Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrell, Steven R.; Snyder, Martha M.; Dringus, Laurie P.; Maddrey, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Limited-residency and online doctoral programs have an attrition rate significantly higher than traditional programs. This grounded-theory study focused on issues pertaining to communication between students, their peers and faculty and how interpersonal communication may affect persistence. Data were collected from 17 students actively working on…

  20. Instruction in teaching and teaching opportunities for residents in US dermatology programs: Results of a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgin, Susan; Homayounfar, Gelareh; Newman, Lori R; Sullivan, Amy

    2017-04-01

    Dermatology residents routinely teach junior co-residents and medical students. Despite the importance of teaching skills for a successful academic career, no formal teaching instruction programs for dermatology residents have been described to our knowledge, and the extent of teaching opportunities for dermatology residents is unknown. We sought to describe the range of teaching opportunities and instruction available to dermatology residents and to assess the need for additional teaching training from the perspective of dermatology residency program directors nationwide. A questionnaire was administered to 113 US dermatology residency program directors or their designees. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze questionnaire item responses. The response rate was 55% (62/113). All program directors reported that their residents teach; 59% (33/56) reported offering trainees teaching instruction; 11% (7/62) of programs offered a short-term series of formal sessions on teaching; and 7% (4/62) offered ongoing, longitudinal training. Most program directors (74%, 40/54) believed that their residents would benefit from more teaching instruction. Response rate and responder bias are potential limitations. Dermatology residents teach in a broad range of settings, over half receive some teaching instruction, and most dermatology residency program directors perceive a need for additional training for residents as teachers. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Out of the wilderness: flipping the classroom to advance scholarship in an internal medicine residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Dale S

    2014-11-01

    Residents in an internal medicine residency program "flipped the classroom" in a series of learner-centered activities which included the creation of a medical student interest group, a continuing medical education symposium, and a journal supplement focused on wilderness medicine topics in Hawai'i and Asia Pacific. The project encompassed both scholarly activities (discovery, integration, application, and teaching) as well as scholarship (writing for publication). The project advanced the professional formation of residents by developing competencies and producing outcomes that are key features of the ACGME Next Accreditation System.

  2. Differential Factors That Influence Applicant Selection of a Prosthodontic Residency Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blissett, Ryan; Lee, Meng-Chieh; Jimenez, Monik; Sukotjo, Cortino

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The main objectives of this study were to identify current prosthodontic resident demographics and to analyze factors that may influence applicants in selecting prosthodontics as a career, as well as a specific prosthodontic program. We also investigated the influence of age, gender, relationship status, and year in program on applicant decisions. Materials and Methods Two questionnaires were mailed to all prosthodontic residents (N = 304) registered with the American College of Prosthodontists (ACP) Central Office. Part I assessed resident demographics and factors influencing choice of specialty. Part II assessed factors influencing the selection of a specific prosthodontic program. Results Completed surveys were obtained from 193 of 304 (63.4%) of all prosthodontic residents registered at the ACP Central Office. The completed surveys represented approximately 48% of the total population of prosthodontic residents in the United States. Demographic data revealed that 37% and 62% of the respondents were female and male, respectively (1% did not report gender). The mean age of the respondents was 30.3 years. More residents reported being married than either single or in a relationship. Most residents were accepted to their top choice program. Part I of the survey revealed that the complexity and challenge of treatment planning/treatment, ability to lead multidisciplinary cases, possession of skills/talents suited to the specialty, enjoyment of clinical work, and the intellectual content of the specialty were reported to be the five most influential factors in choosing prosthodontics as a career. Part II demonstrated that applicants place a high emphasis on clinical education, their impression of the program director, advice from predoctoral mentors, their impression of resident satisfaction and happiness, and the opportunity to place dental implants. The factors of least importance are climate and opportunities to moonlight, teach, and conduct research

  3. Effectiveness of a Formal Mentorship Program in Family Medicine Residency: The Residents’ Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Andrades

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Mentoring is a recognized form of teaching learning strategy in postgraduate medical education. This paper describes the effectiveness of a formal mentorship program from the residents’ perspective after a year of implementation. Methods. The Aga Khan University Family Medicine Residency Program is the first program in Pakistan to our knowledge to implement formal mentorship for all four years of residency. A mentorship program was developed, implemented, and evaluated a year later using a rating scale. The 10-point Likert scale consisted of questions on academics, clinical work, research, administrative issues, and personal/social issues. Results. The response rate was 95% (. Eighty percent ( were women. Satisfaction level in seeking help was the highest for academics (75%. Residents scored mentorship as low in helping to tackle their personal problems (20%. Barriers reported in rapport building with mentor were time constraints and gender difference. The most useful attributes of the mentor which helped rapport building were accessibility, active listening, support for emotional needs, and trustworthiness. Conclusion. Mentoring has a role in trainees’ personal and professional growth especially when their needs are addressed. The effectiveness of the mentorship program in residency can improve if the residents are allowed to choose their own mentors.

  4. Improving quality in an internal medicine residency program through a peer medical record audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asao, Keiko; Mansi, Ishak A; Banks, Daniel

    2009-12-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of a quality improvement project of a limited didactic session, a medical record audit by peers, and casual feedback within a residency program. Residents audited their peers' medical records from the clinic of a university hospital in March, April, August, and September 2007. A 24-item quality-of-care score was developed for five common diagnoses, expressed from 0 to 100, with 100 as complete compliance. Audit scores were compared by month and experience of the resident as an auditor. A total of 469 medical records, audited by 12 residents, for 80 clinic residents, were included. The mean quality-of-care score was 89 (95% CI = 88-91); the scores in March, April, August, and September were 88 (95% CI = 85-91), 94 (95% CI = 90-96), 87 (95% CI = 85-89), and 91 (95% CI = 89-93), respectively. The mean score of 58 records of residents who had experience as auditors was 94 (95% CI = 89-96) compared with 89 (95% CI = 87-90) for those who did not. The score significantly varied (P = .0009) from March to April and from April to August, but it was not significantly associated with experience as an auditor with multivariate analysis. Residents' compliance with the standards of care was generally high. Residents responded to the project well, but their performance dropped after a break in the intervention. Continuation of the audit process may be necessary for a sustained effect on quality.

  5. Clinical skills assessment of procedural and advanced communication skills: performance expectations of residency program directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik E. Langenau

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: High stakes medical licensing programs are planning to augment and adapt current examinations to be relevant for a two-decision point model for licensure: entry into supervised practice and entry into unsupervised practice. Therefore, identifying which skills should be assessed at each decision point is critical for informing examination development, and gathering input from residency program directors is important. Methods: Using data from previously developed surveys and expert panels, a web-delivered survey was distributed to 3,443 residency program directors. For each of the 28 procedural and 18 advanced communication skills, program directors were asked which clinical skills should be assessed, by whom, when, and how. Descriptive statistics were collected, and Intraclass Correlations (ICC were conducted to determine consistency across different specialties. Results: Among 347 respondents, program directors reported that all advanced communication and some procedural tasks are important to assess. The following procedures were considered ‘important’ or ‘extremely important’ to assess: sterile technique (93.8%, advanced cardiovascular life support (ACLS (91.1%, basic life support (BLS (90.0%, interpretation of electrocardiogram (89.4% and blood gas (88.7%. Program directors reported that most clinical skills should be assessed at the end of the first year of residency (or later and not before graduation from medical school. A minority were considered important to assess prior to the start of residency training: demonstration of respectfulness (64%, sterile technique (67.2%, BLS (68.9%, ACLS (65.9% and phlebotomy (63.5%. Discussion: Results from this study support that assessing procedural skills such as cardiac resuscitation, sterile technique, and phlebotomy would be amenable to assessment at the end of medical school, but most procedural and advanced communications skills would be amenable to assessment at the end of the

  6. Clinical skills assessment of procedural and advanced communication skills: performance expectations of residency program directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenau, Erik E.; Zhang, Xiuyuan; Roberts, William L.; DeChamplain, Andre F.; Boulet, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Background High stakes medical licensing programs are planning to augment and adapt current examinations to be relevant for a two-decision point model for licensure: entry into supervised practice and entry into unsupervised practice. Therefore, identifying which skills should be assessed at each decision point is critical for informing examination development, and gathering input from residency program directors is important. Methods Using data from previously developed surveys and expert panels, a web-delivered survey was distributed to 3,443 residency program directors. For each of the 28 procedural and 18 advanced communication skills, program directors were asked which clinical skills should be assessed, by whom, when, and how. Descriptive statistics were collected, and Intraclass Correlations (ICC) were conducted to determine consistency across different specialties. Results Among 347 respondents, program directors reported that all advanced communication and some procedural tasks are important to assess. The following procedures were considered ‘important’ or ‘extremely important’ to assess: sterile technique (93.8%), advanced cardiovascular life support (ACLS) (91.1%), basic life support (BLS) (90.0%), interpretation of electrocardiogram (89.4%) and blood gas (88.7%). Program directors reported that most clinical skills should be assessed at the end of the first year of residency (or later) and not before graduation from medical school. A minority were considered important to assess prior to the start of residency training: demonstration of respectfulness (64%), sterile technique (67.2%), BLS (68.9%), ACLS (65.9%) and phlebotomy (63.5%). Discussion Results from this study support that assessing procedural skills such as cardiac resuscitation, sterile technique, and phlebotomy would be amenable to assessment at the end of medical school, but most procedural and advanced communications skills would be amenable to assessment at the end of the first

  7. National Research Council Resident Research Associateship (NRC-RRA) program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    ASSOCIATESHIP PROGRAMS REVIEW Expected/Actual Associates Adv’sers Laboratory S§tarting Date NEKKANTI, Rama Manohara D. Dimiduck AFML July 1, 1988 PILLAI, P...da Idrogeno Neutro," Societa Italiana, di Fisica LXXII Corigresso C oae Padova 2-7 Oct. 1986. * 17. N/A 18. Researcher Dipartimerito di Fisica dell

  8. Evaluation of a Nutrition Education Program for Family Practice Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, David S.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A nutrition education program at the University of South Alabama Medical Center that was based on the "co-counseling model" as described by Moore and Larsen is described. Patients with one of three problem areas were selected for evaluation: hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and pregnancy. (MLW)

  9. Perceptions of professional practice and work environment of new graduates in a nurse residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratt, Marilyn Meyer; Felzer, Holly M

    2011-12-01

    New nurses continue to face challenging work environments and high expectations for professional competence as they enter practice. Nurse residency programs are gaining prominence as a mechanism to ease new graduates' transition to practice. This study examined new graduates' perceptions of their professional practice competence and work environment throughout a yearlong nurse residency program. Employing a repeated measures design, data were collected at baseline, at 6 months, and at 12 months. Results showed that job satisfaction was significantly lowest at 6 months and highest at 12 months. Job stress was found to be lowest at 12 months and organizational commitment was highest at baseline. Of the variables related to professional practice, clinical decision-making was highest at 12 months and quality of nursing performance significantly increased at each measurement point. These data add to the growing evidence supporting the efficacy of nurse residency programs.

  10. The learning styles of orthopedic residents, faculty, and applicants at an academic program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Raveesh Daniel; Deegan, Brian Francis; Klena, Joel Christian

    2014-01-01

    To train surgeons effectively, it is important to understand how they are learning. The Kolb Learning Style Inventory (LSI) is based on the theory of experiential learning, which divides the learning cycle into 4 stages: active experimentation (AE), abstract conceptualization (AC), concrete experience, and reflective observation. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the learning styles of orthopedic residents, faculty, and applicants at an east-coast residency program. A total of 90 Kolb LSI, Version 3.1 surveys, and demographic questionnaires were distributed to all residency applicants, residents, and faculty at an academic program. Data collected included age, sex, type of medical school (MD or DO), foreign medical graduate status, and either year since college graduation, postgraduate year level (residents only), or years since completion of residency (faculty only). Seventy-one completed Kolb LSI surveys (14 residents, 14 faculty members, and 43 applicants) were recorded and analyzed for statistical significance. The most prevalent learning style among all participants was converging (53.5%), followed by accommodating (18.3%), diverging (18.3%), and assimilating (9.9%) (p = 0.13). The applicant and resident groups demonstrated a high tendency toward AE followed by AC. The faculty group demonstrated a high tendency toward AC followed by AE. None of the 24 subjects who were 26 years or under had assimilating learning styles, in significant contrast to the 12% of 27- to 30-year-olds and 18% of 31 and older group (p learning style involves problem solving and decision making, with the practical application of ideas and the use of hypothetical-deductive reasoning. Learning through AE decreased with age, whereas learning through AC increased. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Duck Valley Resident Fish Stocking Program, 2000 Final Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodson, Guy; Pero, Vincent

    2002-01-01

    The Shoshone-Paiute Tribes fish-stocking program was begun in 1988 and is intended to provide a subsistence fishery for the tribal members. The program stocks catchable and fingerling size trout in Mt. View and Sheep Creek Reservoirs. Rainbow trout are purchased from only certified disease-free facilities to be stocked in our reservoirs. This project will help restore a fishery for tribal members that historically depended on wild salmon and steelhead in the Owyhee and Bruneau Rivers and their tributaries for their culture as well as for subsistence. This project is partial substitution for loss of anadromous fish production due to construction and operation of hydroelectric dams on the Columbia and Snake Rivers. Until anadromous fish can be returned to the Owyhee and Bruneau Rivers this project will continue indefinitely. As part of this project the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes will also receive income in the form of fees from non-tribal members who come to fish these reservoirs. Regular monitoring and evaluation of the fishery will include sampling for length/weight/condition and for signs of disease. A detailed Monitoring and evaluation plan has been put in place for this project. However due to budget limitations on this project only the fishery surveys and limited water quality work can be completed. A creel survey was initiated in 1998 and we are following the monitoring and evaluation schedule for this program (as budget allows) as well as managing the budget and personnel. This program has been very successful in the past decade and has provided enjoyment and sustenance for both tribal and non-tribal members. All biological data and stocking rates will be including in the Annual reports to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

  12. Color: Implications in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sikri Vimal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The success of restorative dentistry is determined on the basis of functional and esthetic results. To achieve esthetics, four basic determinants are required in sequence; viz., position, contour, texture and color. The knowledge of the concept of color is essential for achieving good esthetics. This review compiles the various aspects of color, its measurements and shade matching in dentistry.

  13. The link between quality and accreditation of residency programs: the surveyors' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Renato Antunes; Snell, Linda; Tenorio Nunes, Maria do Patrocinio

    2017-01-01

    Accreditation of medical residency programs has become globally important. Currently it is moving from the goal of attaining minimal standards to a model of continuous improvement. In some countries, the accreditation system engages peers (physicians) to survey residency programs. The surveyors are sometimes volunteers, usually engaged in multiple clinical and education activities. Few studies have investigated the benefits of residency program evaluation and accreditation from the perspective of the surveyors. As peers they both conduct and receive accreditation surveys, which puts them in a privileged position in that it provides the surveyor with an opportunity to share experiences and knowledge and apply what is learned in their own context. The objective of this study is to obtain the perceptions of these surveyors about the impact of an accreditation system on residency programs. Surveyors participated in semi-structured interviews. A thematic analysis was performed on the interview data, and resulting topics were grouped into five themes: Burden (of documentation and of time needed); Efficiency and efficacy of the accreditation process; Training and experience of surveyors; Being a peer; Professional skills and recognition of surveyors. These categories were organized into two major themes: 'Structure and Process' and 'Human Resources'. The study participants proposed ways to improve efficiency including diminish the burden of documentation to the physicians involved in the process and to increase efforts on training programs and payment for surveyors and program directors. Based on the results we propose a conceptual framework to improve accreditation systems.

  14. Development of a residency program in radiation oncology physics: an inverse planning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Rao F H; Dunscombe, Peter B

    2016-03-08

    Over the last two decades, there has been a concerted effort in North America to organize medical physicists' clinical training programs along more structured and formal lines. This effort has been prompted by the Commission on Accreditation of Medical Physics Education Programs (CAMPEP) which has now accredited about 90 residency programs. Initially the accreditation focused on standardized and higher quality clinical physics training; the development of rounded professionals who can function at a high level in a multidisciplinary environment was recognized as a priority of a radiation oncology physics residency only lately. In this report, we identify and discuss the implementation of, and the essential components of, a radiation oncology physics residency designed to produce knowledgeable and effective clinical physicists for today's safety-conscious and collaborative work environment. Our approach is that of inverse planning, by now familiar to all radiation oncology physicists, in which objectives and constraints are identified prior to the design of the program. Our inverse planning objectives not only include those associated with traditional residencies (i.e., clinical physics knowledge and critical clinical skills), but also encompass those other attributes essential for success in a modern radiation therapy clinic. These attributes include formal training in management skills and leadership, teaching and communication skills, and knowledge of error management techniques and patient safety. The constraints in our optimization exercise are associated with the limited duration of a residency and the training resources available. Without compromising the knowledge and skills needed for clinical tasks, we have successfully applied the model to the University of Calgary's two-year residency program. The program requires 3840 hours of overall commitment from the trainee, of which 7%-10% is spent in obtaining formal training in nontechnical "soft skills".

  15. Starting a new residency program: a step-by-step guide for institutions, hospitals, and program directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barajaz, Michelle; Turner, Teri

    2016-01-01

    Although our country faces a looming shortage of doctors, constraints of space, funding, and patient volume in many existing residency programs limit training opportunities for medical graduates. New residency programs need to be created for the expansion of graduate medical education training positions. Partnerships between existing academic institutions and community hospitals with a need for physicians can be a very successful means toward this end. Baylor College of Medicine and The Children's Hospital of San Antonio were affiliated in 2012, and subsequently, we developed and received accreditation for a new categorical pediatric residency program at that site in 2014. We share below a step-by-step guide through the process that includes building of the infrastructure, educational development, accreditation, marketing, and recruitment. It is our hope that the description of this process will help others to spur growth in graduate medical training positions. PMID:27507541

  16. SU-F-E-12: Elective International Rotations in Medical Physics Residency Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, D; Mundt, A; Einck, J; Pawlicki, T [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this educational program is to motivate talented, intelligent individuals to become stakeholders in the global effort to improve access to radiotherapy. Methods: The need to improve global access to radiotherapy has been clearly established and several organizations are making substantial progress in securing funding and developing plans to achieve this worthwhile goal. The incorporation of elective international rotations in residency programs may provide one possible mechanism to promote and support this future investment. We recently incorporated an elective 1-month international rotation into our CAMPEP accredited Medical Physics residency program, with our first rotation taking place in Vietnam. A unique aspect of this rotation was that it was scheduled collaboratively with our Radiation Oncology residency program such that Radiation Oncology and Medical Physics residents traveled to the same clinic at the same time. Results: We believe the international rotation substantially enhances the educational experience, providing additional benefits to residents by increasing cross-disciplinary learning and offering a shared learning experience. The combined international rotation may also increase benefit to the host institution by modeling positive multidisciplinary working relationships between Radiation Oncologists and Medical Physicists. Our first resident returned with several ideas designed to improve radiotherapy in resource-limited settings – one of which is currently being pursued in collaboration with a vendor. Conclusion: The elective international rotation provides a unique learning experience that has the potential to motivate residents to become stakeholders in the global effort to improve access to radiotherapy. What better way to prepare the next generation of Medical Physicists to meet the challenges of improving global access to radiotherapy than to provide them with training experiences that motivate them to be socially

  17. Laser in operative dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Yasini

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available Today laser has a lot of usage in medicine and dentistry. In the field of dentistry, laser is used in soft tissue surgery, sterilization of canals (in root canal therapy and in restorative dentistry laser is used for cavity preparation, caries removal, sealing the grooves (in preventive dentistry, etching enamel and dentin, composite polymerization and removal of tooth sensitivity. The use of Co2 lasers and Nd: YAG for cavity preparation, due to creating high heat causes darkness and cracks around the region of laser radiation. Also due to high temperature of these lasers, pulp damage is inevitable. So today, by using the Excimer laser especially the argon floride type with a wavelength of 193 nm, the problem of heat stress have been solved, but the use of lasers in dentistry, especially for cavity preparation needs more researches and evaluations.

  18. The implementation of the UHC/AACN new graduate nurse residency program in a community hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Karen L

    2011-03-01

    Transition into the workforce for the new graduate nurse is affected by many factors. New graduate nurses can benefit from support provided through participation in the UHC/AACN Residency Program. The retention of even one graduate nurse saves the employing institution up to an estimated $80,000 annually. St Joseph's Hospital has improved the retention of new graduate nurses from approximately 40% to 100% with the addition of the UHC/AACN Residency Program alongside other system changes. Data are being monitored at St Joseph's and on a national level through this multisite collaborative aimed at improving patient care and increasing nurse retention.

  19. Implementation of a Multifaceted Interactive Electrodiagnostic Medicine Workshop in a Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Jayne; van de Rijn, Marc; McCabe, Elizabeth L; Shih, Shirley; Paganoni, Sabrina

    2017-09-25

    Electrodiagnostic medicine is a required component of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation residency education, but limited resources exist to guide curriculum development. Our objective was to create a focused workshop to enhance our residency program's electrodiagnostic curriculum. We created two separate 1.5-day workshops, one basic and one advanced, for all residents. Each workshop included didactic sessions, case discussion, question and answer sessions, demonstrations, and hands-on participation with direct supervision and feedback. Presurveys and postsurveys were administered to evaluate the value of the workshops. We also assessed trends in electrodiagnostic self-assessment examination scores. Residents reported clinical electrodiagnostic rotations to be more valuable to their education than previous didactic sessions and independent learning. Self-reported knowledge of electrodiagnostic concepts, resident comfort level in planning, performing, and interpreting studies, and perceived value in independent learning of electrodiagnostic medicine improved after implementation of the workshops. There was a 7% improvement in the American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine electrodiagnostic self-assessment examination score compared with the previous year and a 15% improvement in the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation self-assessment examination electrodiagnostic subscore compared with the previous 5 yrs. All participants recommended similar educational experience for other residents. This successful workshop may serve as a resource for other training programs.

  20. Effectiveness of iterative interventions to increase research productivity in one residency program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Alweis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires residency programs to expose residents to research opportunities. Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of a series of iterative interventions to increase scholarly activity in one internal medicine residency. Methods: Retrospective analysis of the effectiveness of a series of interventions to increase resident and faculty scholarly productivity over a 14-year period was performed using quality improvement methodology. Outcomes measured were accepted regional and national abstracts and PubMed indexed manuscripts of residents and faculty. Results: Initially, regional meeting abstracts increased and then were supplanted by national meeting abstracts. Sustained gains in manuscript productivity occurred in the eighth year of interventions, increasing from a baseline of 0.01 publications/FTE/year to 1.57 publications/FTE/year in the final year measured. Run chart analysis indicated special cause variation associated with the interventions performed. Conclusions: Programs attempting to stimulate research production among faculty and residents can choose among many interventions cited in the literature. Since success of any group of interventions is likely additive and may take years to show benefit, measuring outcomes using quality improvement methodology may be an effective way to determine success.

  1. Adoption of robotics in a general surgery residency program: at what cost?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehaffey, J Hunter; Michaels, Alex D; Mullen, Matthew G; Yount, Kenan W; Meneveau, Max O; Smith, Philip W; Friel, Charles M; Schirmer, Bruce D

    2017-06-01

    Robotic technology is increasingly being utilized by general surgeons. However, the impact of introducing robotics to surgical residency has not been examined. This study aims to assess the financial costs and training impact of introducing robotics at an academic general surgery residency program. All patients who underwent laparoscopic or robotic cholecystectomy, ventral hernia repair (VHR), and inguinal hernia repair (IHR) at our institution from 2011-2015 were identified. The effect of robotic surgery on laparoscopic case volume was assessed with linear regression analysis. Resident participation, operative time, hospital costs, and patient charges were also evaluated. We identified 2260 laparoscopic and 139 robotic operations. As the volume of robotic cases increased, the number of laparoscopic cases steadily decreased. Residents participated in all laparoscopic cases and 70% of robotic cases but operated from the robot console in only 21% of cases. Mean operative time was increased for robotic cholecystectomy (+22%), IHR (+55%), and VHR (+61%). Financial analysis revealed higher median hospital costs per case for robotic cholecystectomy (+$411), IHR (+$887), and VHR (+$1124) as well as substantial associated fixed costs. Introduction of robotic surgery had considerable negative impact on laparoscopic case volume and significantly decreased resident participation. Increased operative time and hospital costs are substantial. An institution must be cognizant of these effects when considering implementing robotics in departments with a general surgery residency program. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Transfer of communication skills to the workplace during clinical rounds: impact of a program for residents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurore Liénard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Communication with patients is a core clinical skill in medicine that can be acquired through communication skills training. Meanwhile, the importance of transfer of communication skills to the workplace has not been sufficiently studied. This study aims to assess the efficacy of a 40-hour training program designed to improve patients' satisfaction and residents' communication skills during their daily clinical rounds. METHODS: Residents were randomly assigned to the training program or to a waiting list. Patients' satisfaction was assessed with a visual analog scale after each visit. Transfer of residents' communication skills was assessed in audiotaped actual inpatient visits during a half-day clinical round. Transcripted audiotapes were analyzed using content analysis software (LaComm. Training effects were tested with Mann-Whitney tests and generalized linear Poisson regression models. RESULTS: Eighty-eight residents were included. First, patients interacting with trained residents reported a higher satisfaction with residents' communication (Median=92 compared to patients interacting with untrained residents (Median=88 (p=.046. Second, trained residents used more assessment utterances (Relative Risk (RR=1.17; 95% Confidence intervals (95%CI=1.02-1.34; p=.023. Third, transfer was also observed when residents' training attendance was considered: residents' use of assessment utterances (RR=1.01; 95%CI=1.01-1.02; p=.018 and supportive utterances (RR=0.99; 95%CI=0.98-1.00; p=.042 (respectively 1.15 (RR, 1.08-1.23 (95%CI, p<.001 for empathy and 0.95 (RR, 0.92-0.99 (95%CI, p=.012 for reassurance was proportional to the number of hours of training attendance. CONCLUSION: The training program improved patients' satisfaction and allowed the transfer of residents' communication skills learning to the workplace. Transfer was directly related to training attendance but remained limited. Future studies should therefore focus on

  3. Promoting self-directed learning skills in residency: a case study in program development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothnagle, Melissa; Goldman, Roberta; Quirk, Mark; Reis, Shmuel

    2010-12-01

    Self-directed learning (SDL) skills are essential for the formation and ongoing competence of today's physicians who work in the context of expanding scientific knowledge and changing health care systems. In 2007-2008, the authors developed a program to promote SDL in the Brown University Family Medicine Residency. Through an iterative process, the project team juggled learning theories (i.e., Knowles' SDL model, Collins' cognitive apprenticeship model, and Quirk's expertise development model) with curricular goals, instructional options, and local constraints to design a practical and theoretically robust intervention.The intervention that emerged from this process features a faculty physician serving as a learning coach who meets individually each month with all second-year residents to assist them in generating learning goals, reflecting on their learning experiences, and practicing evidence-based medicine (EBM) skills. An electronic portfolio serves as a documentation tool that supports reflection; residents record their goals and reflections in the portfolio, which also contains their formative assessments, procedure logs, and special projects. To address the hidden curriculum, the program designers took special care to avoid increasing faculty and resident workload and created a forum for discussion and group reflection. Program evaluation combines qualitative and quantitative methods, such as surveys of and interviews with residents and faculty, to assess changes in residents' SDL and EBM skills and in the program's educational culture. The authors use Kern and colleagues' six-step model for curriculum development to describe both the unfolding of this complex project and the choices that resulted in the current program design.

  4. Academic Productivity of US Neurosurgery Residents as Measured by H-Index: Program Ranking with Correlation to Faculty Productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkiss, Christopher A; Riley, Kyle J; Hernandez, Christopher M; Oermann, Eric K; Ladner, Travis R; Bederson, Joshua B; Shrivastava, Raj K

    2017-03-29

    Engagement in research and academic productivity are crucial components in the training of a neurosurgeon. This process typically begins in residency training. In this study, we analyzed individual resident productivity as it correlated to publications across all Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited neurosurgery training programs in an attempt to identify how programs have developed and fostered a research culture and environment. We obtained a list of current neurosurgery residents in ACGME-accredited programs from the American Association of Neurological Surgeons database. An expanded PubMed and Scopus search was conducted for each resident through the present time. We tabulated all articles attributed to each resident. We then categorized the publications based on each neurosurgical subspecialty while in residency. A spreadsheet-based statistical analysis was performed. This formulated the average number of resident articles, h-indices, and most common subspecialty categories by training program. We analyzed 1352 current neurosurgery residents in 105 programs. There were a total of 10 645 publications, of which 3985 were resident first-author publications during the period of study. The most common subspecialties among all resident publications were vascular (24.9%), spine (16.9%), oncology (16.1%), pediatric (5.6%), functional (4.9%), and trauma (3.8%). The average resident published 2.9 first-author papers with average of 38.0 first-author publications by total residents at each program (range 0-241). The average h-index per resident is 2.47 ± 3.25. When comparing previously published faculty h-index program rankings against our resident h-index rankings, there is a strong correlation between the 2 datasets with a clear delineation between Top-20 productivity and that of other programs (average h-index 4.2 vs 1.7, respectively, P < .001). Increasing program size leads to a clear increase in academic productivity on both the

  5. Describing a residency program developed for newly graduated nurse practitioners employed in retail health settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thabault, Paulette; Mylott, Laura; Patterson, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Retail health clinics are an expanding health care delivery model and an emerging new practice site for nurse practitioners (NPs). Critical thinking skills, clinical competence, interprofessional collaboration, and business savvy are necessary for successful practice in this highly independent and autonomous setting. This article describes a pilot residency partnership program aimed at supporting new graduate NP transition to practice, reducing NP turnover, and promoting academic progression. Eight new graduate NPs were recruited to the pilot and paired with experienced clinical NP preceptors for a 12-month program that focused on increasing clinical and business competence in the retail health setting. The residency program utilized technology to facilitate case conferences and targeted Webinars to enhance learning and peer-to-peer sharing and support. An on-line doctoral-level academic course that focused on interprofessional collaboration in health care, population health, and business concepts was offered. Both NPs and preceptors were highly satisfied with the academic-service residency program between MinuteClinic and Northeastern University School of Nursing in Boston, MA. New NPs particularly valued the preceptor model, the clinical case conferences, and business Webinars. Because their priority was in gaining clinical experience and learning the business acumen relevant to managing the processes of care, they did not feel ready for the doctoral course and would have preferred to take later in their practice. The preceptors valued the academic course and felt that it enhanced their precepting and leadership skills. At the time of this article, 6 months post completion of the residency program, there has been no turnover. Our experience supports the benefits for residency programs for newly graduated NPs in retail settings. The model of partnering with academia by offering a course within a service organization's educational programs can enable academic

  6. Neurology Didactic Curricula for Psychiatry Residents: A Review of the Literature and a Survey of Program Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Claudia L.; Walaszek, Art

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Minimal literature exists on neurology didactic instruction offered to psychiatry residents, and there is no model neurology didactic curriculum offered for psychiatry residency programs. The authors sought to describe the current state of neurology didactic training in psychiatry residencies. Methods: The authors electronically…

  7. Neurology Didactic Curricula for Psychiatry Residents: A Review of the Literature and a Survey of Program Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Claudia L.; Walaszek, Art

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Minimal literature exists on neurology didactic instruction offered to psychiatry residents, and there is no model neurology didactic curriculum offered for psychiatry residency programs. The authors sought to describe the current state of neurology didactic training in psychiatry residencies. Methods: The authors electronically…

  8. Permanent health education based on research with professionals of a multidisciplinary residency program: case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Trivisiol da Silva

    Full Text Available This research aims to identify the perception of professional members of a multi-professional residency program on Permanent Health Education. It is a case study research using a qualitative approach, with sixteen members of a multi-professional residency program. The data were collected from January to May 2012, through semi-structured interviews, document analysis and systematic observation, and analyzed according to Thematic Content Analysis. Two categories were identified: Permanent Health Education establishing collective spaces of reflection of practices and Permanent Health Education that promotes integration between disciplines. The members of the multiprofessional residency team were found to be aware that permanent education permeates their training and enables reflection on their clinical practices and multidisciplinary action as producers of health actions.

  9. Design and Implementation of an Educational Program in Advanced Airway Management for Anesthesiology Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zana Borovcanin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Education and training in advanced airway management as part of an anesthesiology residency program is necessary to help residents attain the status of expert in difficult airway management. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME emphasizes that residents in anesthesiology must obtain significant experience with a broad spectrum of airway management techniques. However, there is no specific number required as a minimum clinical experience that should be obtained in order to ensure competency. We have developed a curriculum for a new Advanced Airway Techniques rotation. This rotation is supplemented with a hands-on Difficult Airway Workshop. We describe here this comprehensive advanced airway management educational program at our institution. Future studies will focus on determining if education in advanced airway management results in a decrease in airway related morbidity and mortality and overall better patients’ outcome during difficult airway management.

  10. Design and implementation of an educational program in advanced airway management for anesthesiology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovcanin, Zana; Shapiro, Janine R

    2012-01-01

    Education and training in advanced airway management as part of an anesthesiology residency program is necessary to help residents attain the status of expert in difficult airway management. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) emphasizes that residents in anesthesiology must obtain significant experience with a broad spectrum of airway management techniques. However, there is no specific number required as a minimum clinical experience that should be obtained in order to ensure competency. We have developed a curriculum for a new Advanced Airway Techniques rotation. This rotation is supplemented with a hands-on Difficult Airway Workshop. We describe here this comprehensive advanced airway management educational program at our institution. Future studies will focus on determining if education in advanced airway management results in a decrease in airway related morbidity and mortality and overall better patients' outcome during difficult airway management.

  11. Minimum intervention dentistry: periodontics and implant dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darby, I B; Ngo, L

    2013-06-01

    This article will look at the role of minimum intervention dentistry in the management of periodontal disease. It will discuss the role of appropriate assessment, treatment and risk factors/indicators. In addition, the role of the patient and early intervention in the continuing care of dental implants will be discussed as well as the management of peri-implant disease.

  12. Variations in the diagnosis and treatment of somatic dysfunction between 4 osteopathic residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hon, Gregory A; Snider, Karen T; Johnson, Jane C

    2015-05-01

    The American Osteopathic Association requires the integration of osteo-pathic principles and practice in all specialty residency training programs that it accredits, but the 4 residencies with the most integration of osteopathic manipulative medicine (OMM) have differences in training and emphasis on OMM as a primary treatment modality. To study differences in OMM use for spinal pain between the neuro-musculoskeletal medicine/OMM (NMM/OMM), the family practice/osteopath-ic manipulative treatment (FP/OMT), the integrated FP/OMT and NMM/OMM (FP/NMM), and the internal medicine and NMM/OMM (IM/NMM) specialty residency training programs. Medical records were reviewed for patient encounters from September 2011 through October 2013 at NMM/OMM, FP/OMT, FP/NMM, and IM/NMM residencies in a family medicine and OMM specialty clinic. Records were screened for a diagnosis of cervicalgia, thoracalgia, lumbago, or backache. The identifed encounters were compared to determine between-specialty differences in the number of chief complaints, non-somatic dysfunction assessments, body regions with diagnosed somatic dysfunction, body regions managed with OMT, and number and type of OMT techniques used. Eighteen residents had 2925 patient encounters that included 1 or more spinal pain diagnoses. Overall, 2767 patients (95%) received OMT. The probability (95% CI) of residents using OMT was 0.99 (0.98-0.99) for the NMM/OMM residents, 0.66 (0.55-0.77) for the FP/OMT residents, 0.94 (0.88-0.97) for the FP/NMM residents, and 0.997 (0.98-1.0) for the IM/NMM residents. The FP/OMT residents were less likely to manage spinal pain using OMT (P<.001) and documented fewer somatic dysfunction assessments and fewer musculoskeletal assessments (P<.001), but they documented significantly more non-somatic dysfunction assessments (P<.001). When using OMT, the FP/OMT residents diagnosed somatic dysfunction in fewer mean (95% CI) body regions (2.9 [2.4-3.5]) than the NMM/OMM (5.5 [4.9-6.2]), the FP/NMM (5

  13. Oral and maxillofacial surgery residents have poor understanding of biostatistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Al M; Laskin, Daniel M

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate residents' understanding of biostatistics and interpretation of research results. A questionnaire previously used in internal medicine residents was modified to include oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS) examples. The survey included sections to identify demographic and educational characteristics of residents, attitudes and confidence, and the primary outcome-knowledge of biostatistics. In 2009 an invitation to the Internet survey was sent to all 106 program directors in the United States, who were requested to forward it to their residents. One hundred twelve residents responded. The percentage of residents who had taken a course in epidemiology was 53%; biostatistics, 49%; and evidence-based dentistry, 65%. Conversely, 10% of OMS residents had taken none of these classes. Across the 6-item test of knowledge of statistical methods, the mean percentage of correct answers was 38% (SD, 22%). Nearly half of the residents (42%) could not correctly identify continuous, ordinal, or nominal variables. Only 21% correctly identified a case-control study, but 79% correctly identified that the purpose of blinding was to reduce bias. Only 46% correctly interpreted a clinically unimportant and statistically nonsignificant result. None of the demographic or experience factors of OMS residents were related to statistical knowledge. Overall, OMS resident knowledge was below that of internal medicine residents (Pbiostatistics and the interpretation of research and are thus unprepared to interpret the results of published clinical research. Residency programs should include effective biostatistical training in their curricula to prepare residents in evidence-based dentistry. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Scope of global health training in U.S. obstetrics and gynecology residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Kristin J; Tsai, Alexander C; Johnson, Timothy R B; Walensky, Rochelle P; Bangsberg, David R; Kerry, Vanessa B

    2013-11-01

    To enumerate global health training activities in U.S. obstetrics and gynecology residency programs and to examine the worldwide distribution of programmatic activity relative to the maternal and perinatal disease burden. Using a systematic, web-based protocol, we searched for global health training opportunities at all U.S. obstetrics and gynecology residency programs. Country-level data on disability-adjusted life-years resulting from maternal and perinatal conditions were obtained from the Global Burden of Disease study. We calculated Spearman's rank correlation coefficients to estimate the cross-country association between programmatic activity and disease burden. Of the 243 accredited U.S. obstetrics and gynecology residency programs, we identified 41 (17%) with one of several possible predefined categories of programmatic activity. Thirty-three residency programs offered their residents opportunities to participate in one or more elective-based rotations, eight offered extended field-based training, and 18 offered research activities. A total of 128 programmatic activities were dispersed across 64 different countries. At the country level, the number of programmatic activities had a statistically significant association with the total disease burden resulting from maternal (Spearman's ρ=0.37, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.14-0.57) and perinatal conditions (ρ=0.34, 95% CI 0.10-0.54) but not gynecologic cancers (ρ=-0.24, 95% CI -0.46 to 0.01). There are few global health training opportunities for U.S. obstetrics and gynecology residents. These activities are disproportionately distributed among countries with greater burdens of disease. II.

  15. The Scope of Global Health Training in U.S. Obstetrics and Gynecology Residency Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Kristin J.; Tsai, Alexander C.; Johnson, Timothy R.B.; MD, MPH, Rochelle P.; Bangsberg, David R.; Kerry, Vanessa B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To enumerate global health training activities in U.S. obstetrics and gynecology residency programs, and to examine the worldwide distribution of programmatic activity relative to the maternal and perinatal disease burden. Methods Using a systematic, Web-based protocol, we searched for global health training opportunities at all U.S. obstetrics and gynecology residency programs. Country-level data on disability-adjusted life years due to maternal and perinatal conditions were obtained from the Global Burden of Disease study. We calculated Spearman’s rank correlation coefficients to estimate the cross-country association between programmatic activity and disease burden. Results Of the 243 accredited U.S. obstetrics and gynecology residency programs, we identified 41 (17%) with one of several possible predefined categories of programmatic activity. Thirty-three residency programs offered their residents opportunities to participate in one or more elective-based rotations, eight offered extended field-based training, and 18 offered research activities. A total of 128 programmatic activities were dispersed across 64 different countries. At the country level, the number of programmatic activities had a statistically significant association with the total disease burden due to maternal (Spearman’s ρ=0.37; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.14-0.57) and perinatal conditions (ρ=0.34; 95% CI, 0.10-0.54) but not gynecologic cancers (ρ=−0.24; 95% CI, −0.46 to 0.01). Conclusions There are few global health training opportunities for U.S. obstetrics and gynecology residents. These activities are disproportionately distributed among countries with greater burdens of disease. PMID:24104785

  16. Orientation of Medical Residents to the Psychosocial Aspects of Primary Care: Influence of Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenthal, Sherman; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A survey of 63 general medical residents found most accepted the psychosocial role of the primary care physician, found it most appropriate in ambulatory care settings, felt ambivalent about their ability to perform it, and assigned it secondary priority in patient care. More attention by training programs to ambulatory care and psychosocial…

  17. Effects of intergenerational Montessori-based activities programming on engagement of nursing home residents with dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle M Lee

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Michelle M Lee1, Cameron J Camp2, Megan L Malone21Midwestern University, Department of Behavioral Medicine, Downers Grove, IL , USA; 2Myers Research Institute of Menorah Park Center for Senior Living, Beachwood, OH, USA Abstract: Fourteen nursing home residents on a dementia special care unit at a skilled nursing facility took part in one-to-one intergenerational programming (IGP with 15 preschool children from the facility’s on-site child care center. Montessori-based activities served as the interface for interactions between dyads. The amount of time residents demonstrated positive and negative forms of engagement during IGP and standard activities programming was assessed through direct observation using a tool developed for this purpose – the Myers Research Institute Engagement Scale (MRI-ES. These residents with dementia displayed the ability to successfully take part in IGP. Most successfully presented “lessons” to the children in their dyads, similar to the way that Montessori teachers present lessons to children, while persons with more severe cognitive impairment took part in IGP through other methods such as parallel play. Taking part in IGP was consistently related with higher levels of positive engagement and lower levels of negative forms of engagement in these residents with dementia than levels seen in standard activities programming on the unit. Implications of using this form of IGP, and directions for future research, are discussed.Keywords: Montessori-based activities, intergenerational programming, engagement, dementia

  18. Evaluation of an Evidence-Based Tobacco Treatment Curriculum for Psychiatry Residency Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prochaska, Judith J.; Fromont, Sebastien C.; Leek, Desiree; Hudmon, Karen Suchanek; Louie, Alan K.; Jacobs, Marc H.; Hall, Sharon M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Smokers with mental illness and addictive disorders account for nearly one in two cigarettes sold in the United States and are at high risk for smoking-related deaths and disability. Psychiatry residency programs provide a unique arena for disseminating tobacco treatment guidelines, influencing professional norms, and increasing access…

  19. Improving the Quality of Artists' Residency Programs: A Rubric for Teaching Artists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Janis

    2004-01-01

    How do you make something better? This is a fundamental question of professional development the national network of Young Audiences (YA) undertook to answer about its artist residency programs. The basic question assumes that those asking the question know what the "something" is, how effective it is in its current state, and what "it" is…

  20. Unpacking the Clinical and Participatory Dimensions of the Trump Math-Teacher-Residency-Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanuel-Noy, Dalia; Wagner, Tili

    2016-01-01

    The research presents a Residency Math teacher education program that has been developed in Israel in search of transforming initial teacher preparation on the Clinical-Participatory continuum. It is a "multi-phase" mixed-method research aiming to present the clinical and participatory dimensions of the TMR: the way in which they are…

  1. Ethical advertising in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graskemper, Joseph P

    2009-01-01

    Advertising in dentistry has steadily increased since the 1970s to become a leading choice of many dentists to promote their practices. The manner in which advertising progresses within the profession affects all dentists and how patients perceive dentistry as a profession. This paper presents ethical concepts that should be followed when dentists are pursuing practice promotion through advertising. It also raises questions that, hopefully, will increase attention and discussion on dental advertising. The paper concludes that ethical advertising is easily achieved by promoting patient education while not placing the dentist's self-interests ahead of the patient's. With this approach, dentistry may continue to be one of the most trusted professions.

  2. United States medical school graduate interest in radiology residency programs as depicted by online search tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Nora M; Kinsella, Stuart D; Morey, José M

    2014-02-01

    Recent media publications have indicated a tough job market in medical specialty positions for medical school graduates, specifically in the field of radiology. Internet search tools, such as Google Trends, have proved useful in the prediction of certain diseases on the basis of the search volume index for a specific term. The authors hypothesized that online search tools might be useful in the prediction of US medical school graduates' interest in residency positions in radiology. Google Trends indicated an increase over time in searches for "radiology salary" and a decrease over time in searches for "radiology residency." National Resident Matching Program results for diagnostic radiology showed an increase from 2004 to 2009 in the percentage of US graduates entering radiology but a dramatic drop from 2010 to 2013. This occurred even while the total number of US graduates active in the National Resident Matching Program increased. This finding might have been foretold on the basis of online query result trends. Online search data may be a useful insight into the interests of US medical school graduates and may be predictive of unfilled radiology residency positions and eventual increased shortages of community radiologists coming from US medical schools.

  3. Lifestyle medicine curriculum for a preventive medicine residency program: implementation and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haq Nawaz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The vast majority of the healthcare problems burdening our society today are caused by disease-promoting lifestyles (e.g., physical inactivity and unhealthy eating. Physicians report poor training and lack of confidence in counseling patients on lifestyle changes. Objective: To evaluate a new curriculum and rotation in lifestyle medicine for preventive medicine residents. Methods: Training included didactics (six sessions/year, distance learning, educational conferences, and newly developed lifestyle medicine rotations at the Institute of Lifestyle Medicine, the Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center, and the Integrative Medicine Center. We used a number of tools to assess residents’ progress including Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs, self-assessments, and logs of personal health habits. Results: A total of 20 residents participated in the lifestyle medicine training between 2010 and 2013. There was a 15% increase in residents’ discussions of lifestyle issues with their patients based on their baseline and follow-up surveys. The performance of preventive medicine residents on OSCEs increased each year they were in the program (average OSCE score: PGY1 73%, PGY2 83%, PGY3 87%, and PGY4 91%, p=0.01. Our internal medicine and preliminary residents served as a control, since they did participate in didactics but not in lifestyle medicine rotations. Internal medicine and preliminary residents who completed the same OSCEs had a slightly lower average score (76% compared with plural for resident, preventive medicine residents (80%. However, this difference did not reach statistical significance (p=0.11. Conclusion: Incorporating the lifestyle medicine curriculum is feasible for preventive medicine training allowing residents to improve their health behavior change discussions with patients as well as their own personal health habits.

  4. Lifestyle medicine curriculum for a preventive medicine residency program: implementation and outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Haq; Petraro, Paul V.; Via, Christina; Ullah, Saif; Lim, Lionel; Wild, Dorothea; Kennedy, Mary; Phillips, Edward M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The vast majority of the healthcare problems burdening our society today are caused by disease-promoting lifestyles (e.g., physical inactivity and unhealthy eating). Physicians report poor training and lack of confidence in counseling patients on lifestyle changes. Objective To evaluate a new curriculum and rotation in lifestyle medicine for preventive medicine residents. Methods Training included didactics (six sessions/year), distance learning, educational conferences, and newly developed lifestyle medicine rotations at the Institute of Lifestyle Medicine, the Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center, and the Integrative Medicine Center. We used a number of tools to assess residents’ progress including Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs), self-assessments, and logs of personal health habits. Results A total of 20 residents participated in the lifestyle medicine training between 2010 and 2013. There was a 15% increase in residents’ discussions of lifestyle issues with their patients based on their baseline and follow-up surveys. The performance of preventive medicine residents on OSCEs increased each year they were in the program (average OSCE score: PGY1 73%, PGY2 83%, PGY3 87%, and PGY4 91%, p=0.01). Our internal medicine and preliminary residents served as a control, since they did participate in didactics but not in lifestyle medicine rotations. Internal medicine and preliminary residents who completed the same OSCEs had a slightly lower average score (76%) compared with plural for resident, preventive medicine residents (80%). However, this difference did not reach statistical significance (p=0.11). Conclusion Incorporating the lifestyle medicine curriculum is feasible for preventive medicine training allowing residents to improve their health behavior change discussions with patients as well as their own personal health habits. PMID:27507540

  5. Measuring Nontechnical Aspects of Surgical Clinician Development in an Otolaryngology Residency Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jennifer J; Cunningham, Michael J; Emerick, Kevin G; Gray, Stacey T

    2016-05-01

    Surgical competency requires sound clinical judgment, a systematic diagnostic approach, and integration of a wide variety of nontechnical skills. This more complex aspect of clinician development has traditionally been difficult to measure through standard assessment methods. This study was conducted to use the Clinical Practice Instrument (CPI) to measure nontechnical diagnostic and management skills during otolaryngology residency training; to determine whether there is demonstrable change in these skills between residents who are in postgraduate years (PGYs) 2, 4, and 5; and to evaluate whether results vary according to subspecialty topic or method of administration. Prospective study using the CPI, an instrument with previously established internal consistency, reproducibility, interrater reliability, discriminant validity, and responsiveness to change, in an otolaryngology residency training program. The CPI was used to evaluate progression in residents' ability to evaluate, diagnose, and manage case-based clinical scenarios. A total of 248 evaluations were performed in 45 otolaryngology resident trainees at regular intervals. Analysis of variance with nesting and postestimation pairwise comparisons were used to evaluate total and domain scores according to training level, subspecialty topic, and method of administration. Longitudinal residency educational initiative. Assessment with the CPI during PGYs 2, 4, and 5 of residency. Among the 45 otolaryngology residents (248 CPI administrations), there were a mean (SD) of 5 (3) administrations (range, 1-4) during their training. Total scores were significantly different among PGY levels of training, with lower scores seen in the PGY-2 level (44 [16]) compared with the PGY-4 (64 [13]) or PGY-5 level (69 [13]) (P otolaryngology (mean [SD], 72 [14]) than in subspecialties (range, 55 [12], P = .003, to 56 [19], P < .001). Neither administering the examination with an electronic scoring system, rather than a

  6. The link between quality and accreditation of residency programs: the surveyors’ perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Renato Antunes; Snell, Linda; Tenorio Nunes, Maria do Patrocinio

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Accreditation of medical residency programs has become globally important. Currently it is moving from the goal of attaining minimal standards to a model of continuous improvement. In some countries, the accreditation system engages peers (physicians) to survey residency programs. The surveyors are sometimes volunteers, usually engaged in multiple clinical and education activities. Few studies have investigated the benefits of residency program evaluation and accreditation from the perspective of the surveyors. As peers they both conduct and receive accreditation surveys, which puts them in a privileged position in that it provides the surveyor with an opportunity to share experiences and knowledge and apply what is learned in their own context. The objective of this study is to obtain the perceptions of these surveyors about the impact of an accreditation system on residency programs. Surveyors participated in semi-structured interviews. A thematic analysis was performed on the interview data, and resulting topics were grouped into five themes: Burden (of documentation and of time needed); Efficiency and efficacy of the accreditation process; Training and experience of surveyors; Being a peer; Professional skills and recognition of surveyors. These categories were organized into two major themes: ‘Structure and Process’ and ‘Human Resources’. The study participants proposed ways to improve efficiency including diminish the burden of documentation to the physicians involved in the process and to increase efforts on training programs and payment for surveyors and program directors. Based on the results we propose a conceptual framework to improve accreditation systems. Abbreviations: PD: Program director PMID:28178919

  7. Goals of care conversation teaching in residency - a cross-sectional survey of postgraduate program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roze des Ordons, Amanda; Kassam, Aliya; Simon, Jessica

    2017-01-06

    Residents are commonly involved in establishing goals of care for hospitalized patients. While education can improve the quality of these conversations, whether and how postgraduate training programs integrate such teaching into their curricula is not well established. The objective of this study was to characterize perceptions of current teaching and assessment of goals of care conversations, and program director interest in associated curricular integration. An electronic survey was sent to all postgraduate program directors at the University of Calgary. Quantitative data was analyzed using descriptive statistics and qualitative comments were analyzed using thematic analysis. The survey response rate was 34% (22/64). Formal goals of care conversation teaching is incorporated into 63% of responding programs, and most commonly involves lectures. Informal teaching occurs in 86% of programs, involving discussion, direct observation and role modeling in the clinical setting. Seventy-three percent of programs assess goals of care conversation skills, mostly in the clinical setting through feedback. Program directors believe that over two-thirds of clinical faculty are prepared to teach goals of care conversations, and are interested in resources to teach and assess goals of care conversations. Themes that emerged include 1) general perceptions, 2) need for teaching, 3) ideas for teaching, and 4) assessment of goals of care conversations. The majority of residency training programs at the University of Calgary incorporate some goals of care conversation teaching and assessment into their curricula. Program directors are interested in resources to improve teaching and assessment of goals of care conversations.

  8. Ozone Therapy in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Sudarshan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available With the advancements in the field of dentistry, new treatment protocols are budding day by day to combat human ailments in a much natural better and simpler way. One such advancement is the application of ozone in dentistry. Ozone is a natural element protects us from ultraviolet rays. It has several properties including analgesics, immunostimulant and antimicrobial properties. In Dentistry its uses are abundance from gingival diseases, infection control, temporomandibular disorders, radiation and chemotherapy induced mucositis, lichen planus etc. Researchers believe that this therapy is in state of equilibrium with benefit and drawback. This review throws light on the history, properties, methods of administration, uses in the field of medicine and dentistry, toxicity, contraindications of ozone. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(1.000: 45-54

  9. [Chances and risks of a new residency program for orthopedics and trauma surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    The residency program for a specialist in orthopedics and trauma surgery is facing fundamental changes based on an initiative originating from the working group "medical training" of the German Medical Association (GMA). A survey indicated that 50 % of all trainees are dissatisfied with their current situation. It appears important to integrate the ideas and wishes of current orthopedic residents in a novel training concept. To assess this a survey was performed by the Young Forum of the German Society for Orthopedics und Trauma Surgery. The internet-based short survey was conducted in January 2013 among members of the professional societies (DGU, DGOU and DGOOC). 408 physicians participated. The majority of the participating physicians is interested in a career in orthopedics and trauma surgery with primarily operative contents. Accordingly the majority (62 %, n = 253) voted against a reduction of numbers of surgical interventions with 86 % (n = 351) confirming the necessity that these operations must be carried out by the trainee himself. The upcoming changes in residency program for orthopedics and trauma surgery offer the opportunity for a well structured and practical oriented residency program. It could be a further step in increasing satisfaction in this profession. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Effects of intergenerational Montessori-based activities programming on engagement of nursing home residents with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Michelle M; Camp, Cameron J; Malone, Megan L

    2007-01-01

    Fourteen nursing home residents on a dementia special care unit at a skilled nursing facility took part in one-to-one intergenerational programming (IGP) with 15 preschool children from the facility's on-site child care center. Montessori-based activities served as the interface for interactions between dyads. The amount of time residents demonstrated positive and negative forms of engagement during IGP and standard activities programming was assessed through direct observation using a tool developed for this purpose--the Myers Research Institute Engagement Scale (MRI-ES). These residents with dementia displayed the ability to successfully take part in IGP. Most successfully presented "lessons" to the children in their dyads, similar to the way that Montessori teachers present lessons to children, while persons with more severe cognitive impairment took part in IGP through other methods such as parallel play. Taking part in IGP was consistently related with higher levels of positive engagement and lower levels of negative forms of engagement in these residents with dementia than levels seen in standard activities programming on the unit. Implications of using this form of IGP, and directions for future research, are discussed.

  11. Magnets in prosthetic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, M A; Walmsley, A D; Harris, I R

    2001-08-01

    Magnetic retention is a popular method of attaching removable prostheses to either retained roots or osseointegrated implants. This review chronicles the development of magnets in dentistry and summarizes future research in their use. The literature was researched by using the Science Citation Index and Compendex Web from 1981 to 2000. Articles published before 1981 were hand researched from citations in other publications. Articles that discussed the use of magnets in relation to prosthetic dentistry were selected.

  12. Bridging the Otolaryngology Peer Review Knowledge Gap: A Call for a Residency Development Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalbach, Cecelia E

    2016-07-01

    Current otolaryngology literature and future scientific direction rely heavily on a rigorous peer review process. Just as manuscripts warrant thoughtful review with constructive feedback to the authors, the same can be said for critiques written by novice peer reviewers. Formal scientific peer review training programs are lacking. Recognizing this knowledge gap, Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery is excited to offer its new Resident Reviewer Development Program. All otolaryngology residents who are postgraduate year 2 and above and in excellent academic standing are eligible to participate in this mentored program, during which they will conduct 6 manuscript reviews under the direction of a seasoned reviewer in his or her subspecialty area of interest. By completing reviews alongside a mentor, participants gain the required skills to master the peer review process-a first step that often leads to journal editorial board and associate editor invitations.

  13. Advancing geriatrics fellowship programs through a community-based residency network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Kevin; Neuberger, Marolee; Noel, Mary; Sleight, Deborah; vanSchagen, John; Wadland, William

    2013-01-01

    Our nation faces unprecedented challenges in caring for older adults. Geriatricians who provide care and teach geriatrics are underrepresented in the workforce, especially in non-metropolitan communities. In Michigan, geriatricians and geriatrics fellowship (GF) programs are clustered in the Southeast, suggesting that training site demographics may influence fellows' career location decisions. A project was undertaken at Michigan State University to determine if an established family medicine residency network (FMRN) could facilitate the accreditation of new GF programs in non-metropolitan communities, recruit fellows, and retain graduates to practice and teach in neighboring areas. A team (department chair, appointed GF network director, site program directors, and education specialists) conducted participating site needs and readiness assessments, facilitated collaboration between GF programs, assisted with completion of new program applications, led development of a curriculum utilizing shared instructional resources and evaluation tools, and provided career counseling to fellows. Two GF programs were accredited and accepted applicants. Ongoing cooperative efforts resulted in the writing of a GF curriculum, organization of a joint Observed Structured Clinical Evaluation (OSCE), and monthly information-sharing teleconferences with program directors. Following training, graduates have chosen to practice in areas underserved by geriatricians in Michigan and elsewhere. Early experience with this model of GF development indicates that new fellowships can be established in community-based residencies that competitively recruit and train fellows who are inclined to practice in areas of greatest need. Creation of more non-metropolitan GF programs could provide a means to stabilize and redistribute the geriatrician workforce.

  14. Use and teaching of pneumatic otoscopy in a family medicine residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouedraogo, Eva; Labrecque, Michel; Côté, Luc; Charbonneau, Katerine; Légaré, France

    2013-09-01

    To determine to what extent FPs teach and use pneumatic otoscopy and to identify the chief influences on this behaviour. Mixed-methods descriptive study conducted between March and May 2011. The family medicine residency program at Laval University in Quebec city, Que. Directors of the family medicine teaching units (FMTUs), teachers, and residents. We used questionnaires to assess the availability of pneumatic otoscopy equipment in 12 FMTUs, current behaviour and behavioural intention among physicians (residents and teachers) to use or teach pneumatic otoscopy, and facilitators and barriers to these practices. We also conducted 2 focus groups to further explore the facilitators of and barriers to using pneumatic otoscopy. We used descriptive statistics for quantitative data, transcribed the qualitative material, and performed content analysis. Eight of the 12 FMTUs reported having pneumatic otoscopy equipment. Four had it in all of their consulting rooms, and 2 formally taught it. Nine (4%) of 211 physicians reported regular use of pneumatic otoscopy. Mean (SD) intention to teach or use pneumatic otoscopy during the next year was low (2.4 [1.0] out of 5). Teachers identified improved diagnostic accuracy as the main facilitator both for use and for teaching, while residents identified recommendation by practice guidelines as the main facilitator for use. All physicians reported lack of availability of equipment as the main barrier to use. The main barrier to teaching pneumatic otoscopy reported by teachers was that they did not use it themselves. In focus groups, themes of consequences, capabilities, and socioprofessional influences were most dominant. Residents clearly identified role modeling by teachers as facilitating the use of pneumatic otoscopy. Pneumatic otoscopy is minimally used and taught in the family medicine residency program studied. Interventions to increase its use should target identified underlying beliefs and facilitators of and barriers to its

  15. Lessons learned in developing family medicine residency training programs in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitamura Kazuya

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While family medicine is not well established as a discipline in Japan, a growing number of Japanese medical schools and training hospitals have recently started sougoushinryoubu (general medicine departments. Some of these departments are incorporating a family medicine approach to residency training. We sought to learn from family medicine pioneers of these programs lessons for developing residency training. Methods This qualitative project utilized a long interview research design. Questions focused on four topics: 1 circumstances when becoming chair/faculty member; 2 approach to starting the program; 3 how Western ideas of family medicine were incorporated; and 4 future directions. We analyzed the data using immersion/crystallization to identify recurring themes. From the transcribed data, we selected representative quotations to illustrate them. We verified the findings by emailing the participants and obtaining feedback. Results Participants included: five chairpersons, two program directors, and three faculty members. We identified five lessons: 1 few people understand the basic concepts of family medicine; 2 developing a core curriculum is difficult; 3 start with undergraduates; 4 emphasize clinical skills; and 5 train in the community. Conclusion While organizational change is difficult, the identified lessons suggest issues that merit consideration when developing a family medicine training program. Lessons from complexity science could inform application of these insights in other countries and settings newly developing residency training.

  16. Current trends in pulp therapy: a survey analyzing pulpotomy techniques taught in pediatric dental residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Laquia A; Sanders, Brian J; Jones, James E; Williamson, C Andrew; Dean, Jeffrey A; Legan, Joseph J; Maupome, Gerardo

    2013-01-01

    The study's purpose was to survey directors of pediatric dental residency programs in order to evaluate the materials currently being taught and used for pulpotomy procedures for primary teeth in educational and clinical settings. A web-based survey was emailed to all graduate pediatric dental residency program directors in the United States. Seventy one emails were sent to program directors, 47 responded but only 39 respondents (55%) were included in the study. Results suggested a slight decrease in utilization of formocresol 1:5 dilution (Pformocresol (18% of respondents) were systemic health concerns and carcinogenicity, in addition to evidence-based literature. Even though 25% of respondents have begun to use MTA for primary pulpotomy procedures, the most common reason for utilization of other medicaments over MTA was its higher cost. With 82% of graduate pediatric dental residency programs still utilizing formocresol 1:5 dilution for pulpotomy procedures in primary teeth, there has been no major shift away from its clinical use, in spite of increased usage of newer medicaments over the last 5 years.

  17. A meta-analysis of studies of publication misrepresentation by applicants to residency and fellowship programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Michael N

    2010-09-01

    Many studies from various fields of medicine about the accuracy of residency and fellowship applications have reported disturbing percentages of candidates with publication misrepresentation on their applications. However, other similar studies have found much lower percentages. No evaluation of these types of studies is currently available to explain this disparity. Therefore, this study evaluated the wide range of percentages of applicants with publication misrepresentation reported in the literature. Studies of residency and fellowship applicant misrepresentation were identified and reviewed. Using uniform inclusion criteria, the data reported by each study were recalculated to determine the percentage of candidates with misrepresentation. Thirteen out of 18 studies (eight residency and five fellowship) found in the literature from 1995 to 2008 reported sufficient details to perform a recalculation. The most common type of misrepresentation reported was listing nonexistent articles, followed by errors in authorship order and nonauthorship. After recalculation, the mean percentage of candidates with misrepresentation per applicant pool decreased significantly (7.2% to 4.9%, P = .03048). No study characteristic, such as sample size, was found to be predictive of the percentage of applicants with misrepresentation. No difference was found in the percentage of applicants with misrepresentation in residency versus fellowship programs. The variance in study results of misrepresentation decreases when uniform inclusion criteria are applied. Caution must be used in directly comparing the results of these studies as originally reported. Program directors should be aware that self-promotion in the authorship list is a common form of misrepresentation.

  18. Adoption and implementation of policies to support preventive dentistry initiatives for physicians: a national survey of Medicaid programs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sams, Lattice D; Rozier, R Gary; Wilder, Rebecca S; Quinonez, Rocio B

    2013-01-01

    .... We used Qualtrics to conduct a cross-sectional survey in 2008 of Medicaid dental program managers to determine organizational stage of adoption classified according to the Transtheoretical Model...

  19. Teaching maternity care in family medicine residencies: what factors predict graduate continuation of obstetrics? A 2013 CERA program directors study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Mary Beth; Prasad, Ramakrishna; Roberts, Mary B; Magee, Susanna R

    2015-06-01

    Maternity care is an essential component of family medicine, yet the number of residency graduates providing this care continues to decline. Residency programs have struggled to identify strategies to increase continuation of obstetric practice among graduates. Leaders in family medicine obstetrics previously proposed a tiered model of training to ensure adequate volume for those desiring to continue maternity care upon graduation. However, whether this approach will be successful is unknown. This study aimed to identify program characteristics and teaching methods that may influence residents to continue obstetrics practice upon graduation. A nationwide survey of family medicine residency program directors (PDs) was conducted as part of the 2013 CERA survey to characterize teaching in maternity care and identify program-level predictors of graduate continuation of obstetrics (OB). Family medicine programs, which were community-based, university-affiliated programs in the Midwest and West, contributed more trainees who continued to provide OB care upon graduation. Trainees at these programs received greater supervision by family medicine faculty preceptors on labor and delivery, reported at least 80 deliveries by graduates during residency, and experienced greater autonomy in decision-making during OB rotations. This study supports a targeted approach to teaching maternity care in family medicine residency programs. Prioritizing continuity delivery experiences and fostering resident independence are strategies toward promoting increased provision of obstetric care by family medicine graduates. Further research is needed to evaluate the impact of tiered or track systems in practice.

  20. Understanding the current anatomical competence landscape: Comparing perceptions of program directors, residents, and fourth-year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillmore, Erin P; Brokaw, James J; Kochhar, Komal; Nalin, Peter M

    2016-07-08

    A mixed methods survey of fourth-year medical students, resident physicians, and residency program directors at the Indiana University School of Medicine gathered perceptions of anatomical competence-defined as the anatomical education necessary for effective clinical practice. The survey items explored numerous aspects of anatomical competence, including the most effective modes of instruction, perceptions of readiness for clinical practice, and specific suggestions for improving anatomical education during medical school and residency. The response rate was 46% for fourth-year medical students, 47% for residents (as graduates from 137 medical schools), and 71% for program directors. A majority of students and residents reported that their course in Gross Anatomy prepared them well for clinical practice; that cadaveric dissection was important in the early development of their anatomical competence; and that placing a greater emphasis on clinical relevance in medical school would have improved their anatomical competence even further. However, in terms of anatomical preparedness upon entering residency, the program directors rated their residents less prepared than the residents rated themselves. All three groups agreed that there is need for additional opportunities for anatomical educational during medical school and residency. Suggestions for improving anatomical education included the following: providing more opportunities for cadaveric dissection during medical school and residency; more consistent teaching of anatomy for clinical practice; more workshops that review anatomy; and better integration of anatomy with the teaching of other subjects during medical school. Anat Sci Educ 9: 307-318. © 2015 American Association of Anatomists.

  1. Promoting the Congregate Meal Program to the Next Generation of Rural-Residing Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoerr, Kara A; Francis, Sarah L; Margrett, Jennifer A; Peterson, Marc; Franke, Warren D

    2016-01-01

    Despite a growing older adult population, Iowa Congregate Meal Program (CMP) participation has declined. Motivators and barriers to congregate mealsite participation and wellness programming preferences of baby boomers and older adults were examined to provide insight to how to revise and better promote the CMP for the next generation of older adults. Four focus group sessions were conducted with 27 primarily White, rural-residing adults, ages 48-88 years. Participation motivators included educational programs, food, and socialization while barriers included negative perceptions and stereotypes associated with congregate mealsites. Desired wellness programs were viewed as interactive and relevant. Healthcare was the leading wellness need with financial management and physical activity cited as the most-wanted topics of wellness programs. These results provide insight on factors, aside from funding, that may be adversely impacting CMP participation and identifies areas for further investigation.

  2. Where have all the cardiothoracic surgery residents gone? Placement of graduating residents by United States thoracic surgery training programs, 1998 to 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatley, Grayson H; Lee, Richard

    2006-01-01

    We studied the evolving job placement trends of graduating cardiothoracic surgery residents over a 5-year period from the perspective of the program director. Graduate placement questionnaires were sent to program directors of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited United States thoracic surgery residency programs (n = 92). Program directors were asked to categorize the type of job that each resident chose upon graduation (1998-2002). Of the program directors surveyed, 71.7% (66/92) responded, representing 76.4% (545/714) of the total graduating resident population during the study period. Three-year training programs constituted 24.2% (16/66) of the respondents and accounted for 20.2% (110/545) of the graduates. Annually, graduates most commonly chose private practice jobs. Between 2001 and 2002, the percentage of graduates entering fellowships increased (11.8% [13/110] versus 19.1% [21/110], P = .008) as the percentage of graduates choosing private practice positions decreased (56.4% [62/110] versus 45.5% [50/110], P = .15). In total, 12.8% (70/545) of the graduates pursued fellowships, with associated specialty choices being: 38.6% (27/70) adult cardiac, 37.1% (26/70) congenital, 15.7% (11/70) transplantation, and 8.6% (6/70) thoracic. There were no significant differences between 2-year and 3-year training program graduates in choice of private practice versus academic jobs. In 2002, a greater percentage of graduates chose to pursue fellowship training at the expense of private practice employment. This difference may in part result from fewer employment opportunities rather than graduate choice. Ongoing studies are needed to follow this trend. Annual analysis of the placement of all graduating residents would help to identify changes in employment.

  3. Review of the training program of pediatric residents: is it appropriate for their future careers?

    OpenAIRE

    Moravej, Hossein; Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    Background Training of pediatric residents is a dynamic process which should be changed as the nature andepidemiology of pediatric diseases change. In this study, we compared the training program of the pediatric residentswith the disorders of the pediatric patients who had referred to pediatric offices. Methods The study was conducted in pediatric offices in Shiraz, South of Iran. The main complaints of all thepatients who were referred to these offices in the first 3 days of the four season...

  4. Predictors of new graduate nurses' organizational commitment during a nurse residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratt, Marilyn Meyer; Felzer, Holly M

    2012-01-01

    Retaining newly graduated nurses is critical for organizations because of the significant cost of turnover. Since commitment to an organization is associated with decreased turnover intent, understanding factors that influence new graduates' organizational commitment is important. In a sample of nurse residency program participants, predictors of organizational commitment over time were explored. Perceptions of the work environment, particularly job satisfaction and job stress, were found to be most influential.

  5. Career prospects for graduating nuclear medicine residents: survey of nuclear medicine program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harolds, Jay A; Guiberteau, Milton J; Metter, Darlene F; Oates, M Elizabeth

    2013-08-01

    There has been much consternation in the nuclear medicine (NM) community in recent years regarding the difficulty many NM graduates experience in securing initial employment. A survey designed to determine the extent and root causes behind the paucity of career opportunities was sent to all 2010-2011 NM residency program directors. The results of that survey and its implications for NM trainees and the profession are presented and discussed in this article.

  6. Does intentional support of degree programs in general surgery residency affect research productivity or pursuit of academic surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshua Smith, Jesse; Patel, Ravi K; Chen, Xi; Tarpley, Margaret J; Terhune, Kyla P

    2014-01-01

    Many residents supplement general surgery training with years of dedicated research, and an increasing number at our institution pursue additional degrees. We sought to determine whether it was worth the financial cost for residency programs to support degrees. We reviewed graduating chief residents (n = 69) in general surgery at Vanderbilt University from 2001 to 2010 and collected the data including research time and additional degrees obtained. We then compared this information with the following parameters: (1) total papers, (2) first-author papers, (3) Journal Citation Reports impact factors of journals in which papers were published, and (4) first job after residency or fellowship training. The general surgery resident training program at Vanderbilt University is an academic program, approved to finish training 7 chief residents yearly during the time period studied. Chief residents in general surgery at Vanderbilt who finished their training 2001 through 2010. We found that completion of a degree during residency was significantly associated with more total and first-author publications as compared with those by residents with only dedicated research time (p = 0.001 and p = 0.017). Residents completing a degree also produced publications of a higher caliber and level of authorship as determined by an adjusted resident impact factor score as compared with those by residents with laboratory research time only (p = 0.005). Degree completion also was significantly correlated with a first job in academia if compared to those with dedicated research time only (p = 0.046). Our data support the utility of degree completion when economically feasible and use of dedicated research time as an effective way to significantly increase research productivity and retain graduates in academic surgery. Aggregating data from other academic surgery programs would allow us to further determine association of funding of additional degrees as a means to encourage academic

  7. Program planning for a community pharmacy residency support service using the nominal group technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Michael T

    2002-01-01

    To define programmatic objectives and initial operational priorities for CommuniRes, a university-based education and support service designed to help community pharmacists successfully implement and sustain community pharmacy residency programs (CPRPs). Advisory committee of nationally recognized experts in CPRPs in a small-group planning session. CPRPs are postgraduate clinical training experiences conducted in chain and independent community pharmacies. The nominal group technique (NGT), a structured approach to group planning and decision making, was used to identify and prioritize the needs of CPRPs. Results of the NGT exercise were used as input to a brainstorming session that defined specific CommuniRes services and resources that must be developed to meet high priority needs of CPRPs. Group consensus on the priority needs of CPRPs was determined through rank order voting. The advisory committee identified 20 separate CPRP needs that it believed must be met to ensure that CPRPs will be successful and sustainable. Group voting resulted in the selection of six needs that were considered to be consensus priorities for services and resources provided through CommuniRes: image parity for CPRPs; CPRP marketing materials; attractive postresidency employment opportunities; well-defined goals, objectives, and residency job descriptions; return on investment and sources of ongoing funding for the residency; and opportunities and mechanisms for communicating/networking with other residents and preceptors. The needs-based programmatic priorities defined by the advisory committee are now being implemented through a tripartite program consisting of live training seminars for CPRP preceptors and directors, an Internet site (www.communires.com), and a host of continuing support services available to affiliated CPRP sites. Future programmatic planning will increasingly involve CPRP preceptors, directors, and former residents to determine the ongoing needs of CPRPs.

  8. Brexit and dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, E; Stagnell, S; Shah, S

    2016-05-27

    On 23 June 2016, eligible UK voters will be asked to decide whether to vote in the EU referendum. The EU impacts on our daily lives in more ways than many people realise. Dentistry is affected by EU legislation. Examples include the movement of dental professionals, the import of dental equipment and materials, as well as health and safety legislation. Many more EU dentists and DCPs come to the UK to work than vice versa. These numbers have increased markedly since 2004. The result of the vote may affect how dentistry operates in the UK in future years. In addition, a vote to stay would not necessarily prevent change. There are attempts underway to increase the ease by which professionals can work in other member states, especially on a temporary basis. This too is likely affect dentistry at some point. Workforce planners and policy makers should factor in the impact of the EU in future dental policy.

  9. Lasers in aesthetic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Timothy C; Pang, Peter K

    2004-10-01

    This article focuses on lasers and aesthetic dentistry and their unique parallel in history from their early development to their present day usage and application. The demand for aesthetic dentistry has had a major impact not only on treatment planning but also on the choice of materials, techniques, and equipment. It is this demand that has married the use of lasers with aesthetic dentistry. A short literature review on the five basic laser types precedes the basic premise of smile design and its critical importance in attaining the desirable aesthetic end result. A short review on biologic width and biologic zone reinforces their importance when manipulating gingival tissue. Four case reports highlight the use of diode, erbium, and carbon dioxide lasers. The end results show the power of proper treatment planning and the use of a smile design guide when using these instruments and confirm a conservative, aesthetic treatment without compromising the health and function of the patients.

  10. Nurse residency programs: an evidence-based review of theory, process, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Gwen; Hair, Carole; Todero, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Nursing shortages exist worldwide while job stress, dissatisfaction, lack of peer support and limited professional opportunities still contribute to attrition. The aim of this systematic review is to describe and evaluate the quality of the science, report recommendations and lessons learned about implementing and evaluating nurse residency programs (NRPs) designed to improve new graduate transitioning. Databases were searched between 1980 and 2010 using five search terms: nurse, intern, extern, transition and residency programs. Twenty studies reporting programs for new RNs fit the inclusion criteria. Three major discoveries include: 1. Wide variation in content, teaching and learning strategies make comparison across programs difficult; 2. Lack of theory in designing the educational intervention has limited the selection and development of new instruments to measure program effectiveness; and 3. Well designed quasi-experimental studies are needed. As a major nursing education redesign, NRPs could be used to test the principles, concepts and strategies of organizational transformation and experiential-interactive learning theory. By focusing on fiscal outcomes, current administrators of NRPs are missing the opportunity to implement an organizational strategy that could improve workplace environments. Healthcare organizations need to envision NRPs as a demonstration of positive clinical learning environments that can enhance intra- and interprofessional education and practice.

  11. Adoption and Implementation of Policies to Support Preventive Dentistry Initiatives for Physicians: A National Survey of Medicaid Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozier, R. Gary; Wilder, Rebecca S.; Quinonez, Rocio B.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We determined the number of state Medicaid programs adopting initiatives to support preventive dental services provision by nondental health care professionals, their perceived attributes, and implementation barriers. Methods. We used Qualtrics to conduct a cross-sectional survey in 2008 of Medicaid dental program managers to determine organizational stage of adoption classified according to the Transtheoretical Model of Behavior Change with 3-year follow-up. We assessed perceptions of the influence of 18 initiative attributes on the decision to adopt, drawn from Roger’s diffusion of innovations theory. Stage and date of adoption are presented descriptively. Attributes and barriers were analyzed by stage of adoption by using analyses of variance or χ2 statistics. Results. By 2011, 42 states had adopted a policy. Only 9 states included a comprehensive set of preventive services, the most common being fluoride varnish. Adoption was affected by perceived initiative simplicity and its compatibility with other Medicaid programs. Administrative barriers were the most common among the 15 studied. Conclusions. State Medicaid policies to reimburse nondental providers for preventive dental services are becoming widespread. Interventions are needed to ensure oral health services delivery at the practice level. PMID:23763420

  12. Encouraging Reflexivity in a Residency Leadership Development Program: Expanding Outside the Competency Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, Justin T; Gordon, Emily K B; Baranov, Dimitry J; Trey, Beulah; Tilin, Felice Y; Fleisher, Lee A

    2017-09-14

    While leadership development is increasingly a goal of academic medicine, it is typically framed as competency acquisition, which can limit its focus to a circumscribed set of social behaviors. This orientation may also reinforce the cultural characteristics of academic medicine that can make effective leadership difficult, rather than training leaders capable of examining and changing this culture. Expanding leadership development so it promotes social reflexivity presents a way to bolster some of the weaknesses of the competency paradigm. In 2013-2016, the University of Penns-ylvania's Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care (DACC) carried out a leadership development program for residents, which included seminars focused on developing particular leadership skills and annual capstone sessions facilitating discussion between residents and attending physicians about topics chosen by residents. The capstone sessions proved to be most impactful, serving as forums for open conversation about how these groups interact when engaged in social behaviors such as giving/receiving feedback, offering support after an adverse event, and teaching/learning in the clinic. The success of the capstone sessions led to a 2016 DACC-wide initiative to facilitate transparency among all professional roles (faculty, residents, nurse anesthetists, administrative staff) and encourage widespread reflexive examination about how the manner in which these groups interact encourages or impedes leadership and teamwork. Further work is necessary to describe how leadership program formats can be diversified to better encourage reflexivity. There is also a need to develop mechanisms for assessing outcomes of leadership programs that expand outside the competency-based system.

  13. Nanomaterials in preventive dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannig, Matthias; Hannig, Christian

    2010-08-01

    The prevention of tooth decay and the treatment of lesions and cavities are ongoing challenges in dentistry. In recent years, biomimetic approaches have been used to develop nanomaterials for inclusion in a variety of oral health-care products. Examples include liquids and pastes that contain nano-apatites for biofilm management at the tooth surface, and products that contain nanomaterials for the remineralization of early submicrometre-sized enamel lesions. However, the treatment of larger visible cavities with nanomaterials is still at the research stage. Here, we review progress in the development of nanomaterials for different applications in preventive dentistry and research, including clinical trials.

  14. Polyamides in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shekhar Bhatia

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Thermoplastic resins have been used in dentistry for over 50 years. Since that time their applications have continued to grow, and the interest in nylon based materials have increased. With the development of new properties, there are certain to be additional new applications for thermoplastic resins in the future, to help patients with damaged or missing teeth. The dentists have to meet growing demands for prosthetic rehabilitation due to population aging and higher requirements on the quality of life. Herein in this article we will be discussing in detail properties of nylon based materials and their various implications in dentistry

  15. Educating residents in behavioral health care and collaboration: integrated clinical training of pediatric residents and psychology fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisani, Anthony R; leRoux, Pieter; Siegel, David M

    2011-02-01

    Pediatric residency practices face the challenge of providing both behavioral health (BH) training for pediatricians and psychosocial care for children. The University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry and Rochester General Hospital developed a joint training program and continuity clinic infrastructure in which pediatric residents and postdoctoral psychology fellows train and practice together. The integrated program provides children access to BH care in a primary care setting and gives trainees the opportunity to integrate collaborative BH care into their regular practice routines. During 1998-2008, 48 pediatric residents and 8 psychology fellows trained in this integrated clinical environment. The program's accomplishments include longevity, faculty and fiscal stability, sustained support from pediatric leadership and community payers, the development in residents and faculty of greater comfort in addressing BH problems and collaborating with BH specialists, and replication of the model in two other primary care settings. In addition to quantitative program outcomes data, the authors present a case example that illustrates how the integrated program works and achieves its goals. They propose that educating residents and psychology trainees side by side in collaborative BH care is clinically and educationally valuable and potentially applicable to other settings. A companion report published in this issue provides results from a study comparing the perceptions of pediatric residents whose primary care continuity clinic took place in this integrated setting with those of residents from the same pediatric residency who had their continuity clinic training in a nonintegrated setting.

  16. Resident resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, J L; Cleary, B

    1999-01-01

    Clearly, faculty must work hard with residents to explore the nature of their resistance to a program's learning and growth opportunities. Initial steps to a deeper, more effective, and longer-lasting change process must be pursued. If resident resistance is mishandled or misunderstood, then learning and professional growth may be sidetracked and the purposes of residency training defeated. Listening to the whole person of the resident and avoiding the trap of getting caught up in merely responding to select resident behaviors that irritate us is critical. Every faculty member in the family practice residency program must recognize resistance as a form of defense that cannot immediately be torn down or taken away. Resident defenses have important purposes to play in stress reduction even if they are not always healthy. Residents, especially interns, use resistance to avoid a deeper and more truthful look at themselves as physicians. A family practice residency program that sees whole persons in their residents and that respects resident defenses will effectively manage the stress and disharmony inherent to the resistant resident.

  17. The Perry Initiative's Medical Student Outreach Program Recruits Women Into Orthopaedic Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattanza, Lisa L; Meszaros-Dearolf, Laurie; O'Connor, Mary I; Ladd, Amy; Bucha, Amy; Trauth-Nare, Amy; Buckley, Jenni M

    2016-09-01

    Orthopaedic surgery lags behind other surgical specialties in terms of gender diversity. The percentage of women entering orthopaedic residency persistently remains at 14% despite near equal ratios of women to men in medical school classes. This trend has been attributed to negative perceptions among women medical students of workplace culture and lifestyle in orthopaedics as well as lack of exposure, particularly during medical school when most women decide to enter the field. Since 2012, The Perry Initiative, a nonprofit organization that is focused on recruiting and retaining women in orthopaedics, had conducted extracurricular outreach programs for first- and second-year female medical students to provide exposure and mentoring opportunities specific to orthopaedics. This program, called the Medical Student Outreach Program (MSOP), is ongoing at medical centers nationwide and has reached over 300 medical students in its first 3 program years (2012-2014). (1) What percentage of MSOP participants eventually match into orthopaedic surgery residency? (2) Does MSOP impact participants' perceptions of the orthopaedics profession as well as intellectual interest in the field? The percentage of program alumnae who matched into orthopaedics was determined by annual followup for our first two cohorts who graduated from medical school. All program participants completed a survey immediately before and after the program that assessed the impact of MSOP on the student's intention to pursue orthopaedics as well as perceptions of the field and intellectual interest in the discipline. The orthopaedic surgery match rate for program participants was 31% in our first graduating class (five of 16 participants in 2015) and 28% in our second class (20 of 72 participants in 2016). Pre/post program comparisons showed that the MSOP influenced students' perceptions of the orthopaedics profession as well as overall intellectual interest in the field. The results of our study suggest that

  18. Ready for Discharge? A Survey of Discharge Transition-of-Care Education and Evaluation in Emergency Medicine Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallahue, Fiona E; Betz, Amy E; Druck, Jeffrey; Jones, Jonathan S; Burns, Boyd; Hern, Gene

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to assess current education and practices of emergency medicine (EM) residents as perceived by EM program directors to determine if there are deficits in resident discharge handoff training. This survey study was guided by the Kern model for medical curriculum development. A six-member Council of EM Residency Directors (CORD) Transitions of Care task force of EM physicians performed these steps and constructed a survey. The survey was distributed to program residency directors via the CORD listserve and/or direct contact. There were 119 responses to the survey, which were collected using an online survey tool. Over 71% of the 167 American College of Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accredited EM residency programs were represented. Of those responding, 42.9% of programs reported formal training regarding discharges during initial orientation and 5.9% reported structured curriculum outside of orientation. A majority (73.9%) of programs reported that EM residents were not routinely evaluated on their discharge proficiency. Despite the ACGME requirements requiring formal handoff curriculum and evaluation, many programs do not provide formal curriculum on the discharge transition of care or evaluate EM residents on their discharge proficiency.

  19. Internal Medicine Residency Program Directors' Views of the Core Entrustable Professional Activities for Entering Residency: An Opportunity to Enhance Communication of Competency Along the Continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Steven V; Vu, T Robert; Willett, Lisa L; Call, Stephanie; Halvorsen, Andrew J; Chaudhry, Saima

    2017-06-01

    To examine internal medicine (IM) residency program directors' (PDs') perspectives on the Core Entrustable Professional Activities for Entering Residency (Core EPAs)-introduced into undergraduate medical education to further competency-based assessment-and on communicating competency-based information during transitions. A spring 2015 Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine survey asked PDs of U.S. IM residency programs for their perspectives on which Core EPAs new interns must or should possess on day 1, which are most essential, and which have the largest gap between expected and observed performance. Their views and preferences were also requested regarding communicating competency-based information at transitions from medical school to residency and residency to fellowship/employment. The response rate was 57% (204/361 programs). The majority of PDs felt new interns must/should possess 12 of the 13 Core EPAs. PDs' rankings of Core EPAs by relative importance were more varied than their rankings by the largest gaps in performance. Although preferred timing varied, most PDs (82%) considered it important for medical schools to communicate Core EPA-based information to PDs; nearly three-quarters (71%) would prefer a checklist format. Many (60%) would be willing to provide competency-based evaluations to fellowship directors/employers. Most (> 80%) agreed that there should be a bidirectional communication mechanism for programs/employers to provide feedback on competency assessments. The gaps identified in Core EPA performance may help guide medical schools' curricular and assessment tool design. Sharing competency-based information at transitions along the medical education continuum could help ensure production of competent, practice-ready physicians.

  20. A multimethod approach for cross-cultural training in an internal medicine residency program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa J. Staton

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cultural competence training in residency is important to improve learners’ confidence in cross-cultural encounters. Recognition of cultural diversity and avoidance of cultural stereotypes are essential for health care providers. Methods: We developed a multimethod approach for cross-cultural training of Internal Medicine residents and evaluated participants’ preparedness for cultural encounters. The multimethod approach included (1 a conference series, (2 a webinar with a national expert, (3 small group sessions, (4 a multicultural social gathering, (5 a Grand Rounds presentation on cross-cultural training, and (6 an interactive, online case-based program. Results: The program had 35 participants, 28 of whom responded to the survey. Of those, 16 were white (62%, and residents comprised 71% of respondents (n=25. Following training, 89% of participants were more comfortable obtaining a social history. However, prior to the course only 27% were comfortable caring for patients who distrust the US system and 35% could identify religious beliefs and customs which impact care. Most (71% believed that the training would help them give better care for patients from different cultures, and 63% felt more comfortable negotiating a treatment plan following the course. Conclusions: Multimethod training may improve learners’ confidence and comfort with cross-cultural encounters, as well as lay the foundation for ongoing learning. Follow-up is needed to assess whether residents’ perceived comfort will translate into improved patient outcomes.

  1. Program Directors' Responses to a Survey on Variables Used To Select Residents in a Time of Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagoner, Norma E.; Suriano, J. Robert

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 794 program directors in 14 specialties assessed actual and projected changes in the selection process for medical residents and determined the relative weights the directors assigned to personal and academic criteria. Results indicate significant changes in the selection process, including a continuing decrease in residency positions…

  2. Developing a Communication Curriculum and Workshop for an Internal Medicine Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salib, Sherine; Glowacki, Elizabeth M; Chilek, Lindsay A; Mackert, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Learning effective communication is essential for physicians. Effective communication has been shown to affect healthcare outcomes, including patient safety, adherence rates, patient satisfaction, and enhanced teamwork. The importance of these skills has become even more apparent in recent years, with value-based purchasing programs and federal measures of patient satisfaction in the form of Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems scores becoming an important part of measuring the performance of a healthcare facility. We conducted a communication workshop for internal medicine residents at the University of Texas. Topics covered included the Acknowledge, Introduce, Duration, Explanation, Thank You framework; managing up; resolving conflicts; error disclosure; new medication and discharge counseling; intercultural communication; understanding Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems scores; and avoiding burnout. Because it would have been logistically difficult to block whole days for the workshop, the various topics were offered to residents during their regular noon conference hour for several consecutive days. After the workshop, the residents completed an anonymous questionnaire regarding their perception of the importance of various aspects of communication in patient care. The majority of the participating residents perceived the various communication skills explored during the workshop to be highly important in patient care. Concurrently, however, most residents believed that they had initially overestimated their knowledge about these various communication issues. Some demographic differences in the responses also were noted. Our findings demonstrate a needs gap and an area of potential improvement in medical education. We anticipate that with the growing understanding of the importance of communication skills in the healthcare setting, there will be an enhanced role for teaching these skills at all levels of

  3. Win/win: creating collaborative training opportunities for behavioral health providers within family medicine residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddy, Nancy Breen; Borresen, Dorothy; Myerholtz, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Integrating behavioral health into primary healthcare offers multiple advantages for patients and health professionals. This model requires a new skill set for all healthcare professionals that is not emphasized in current educational models. The new skills include interprofessional team-based care competencies and expanded patient care competencies. Health professionals must learn new ways to efficiently and effectively address health behavior change, and manage behavioral health issues such as depression and anxiety. Learning environments that co-train mental health and primary care professionals facilitate acquisition of both teamwork and patient care competencies for mental health and primary care professional trainees. Family Medicine Residency programs provide an excellent opportunity for co-training. This article serves as a "how to" guide for residency programs interested in developing a co-training program. Necessary steps to establish and maintain a program are reviewed, as well as goals and objectives for a co-training curriculum and strategies to overcome barriers and challenges in co-training models.

  4. Preferences of Residents in Four Northern Alberta Communities Regarding Local Post-Secondary Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick J. Fahy

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The western Canadian province of Alberta has used some of the proceeds from exploitation of its extraordinary natural resources to make available a range of post-secondary training and education opportunities to residents. While these provisions appear comprehensive, this study examined how well they actually suit the express needs of the residents of remote, Northern areas of the province, many of them Aboriginal. The literature shows that while Aboriginal people are underrepresented in Canada in university enrollments, they are no longer underrepresented in college or other institutions, suggesting that gains have been made for some residents of rural and remote parts of Canada. Further, when Northern residents (especially Aboriginal males complete advanced training, Statistics Canada reports they are highly successful in employment and income. Access is the pivotal issue, however: leaving the local community to attend training programs elsewhere is often disruptive and unsuccessful. As will be seen, the issue of access arose in this study’s findings with direct implications for distance delivery and support.This study was conducted as part of Athabasca University’s Learning Communities Project (LCP, which sought information about the views and experiences of a broad range of northern Alberta residents concerning their present post-secondary training and education opportunities. The study addresses an acknowledged gap in such information in relation to Canada in comparison with other OECD countries.Results are based on input from 165 individuals, obtained through written surveys (some completed by the researchers in face-to-face exchanges with the respondents, interviews, discussions, and observations, conducted with full-time or part-time residents of the study communities during 2007 and 2008. The four northern Alberta communities studied were Wabasca, Fox Lake, Ft. McKay (sometimes MacKay, and Ft. Chipewyan, totaling just over 6

  5. An Electronic Mail List for a Network of Family Practice Residency Programs: A Good Idea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers Holtrop, Jodi

    2001-12-01

    The use of an electronic mailing list as a means of communication among faculty in a network of university-affiliated family practice residency programs was evaluated. Faculty were automatically subscribed to the list by the list owner. Messages were tracked for one year and a written evaluation survey was sent. Ninety two messages were sent, with 52% of the messages being posted information. While most (65%) survey respondents reported reading 61% or more of the messages, with only 33% ever actually posted at least one message to the list. Given that faculty were automatically subscribed and that there were only 84 total members, the list may have failed to reach a critical mass of active participants. It is concluded that an email list for network faculty did not function as an online discussion group, although it was extremely beneficial as a way of posting information to affiliated residency faculty.

  6. An Electronic Mail List for a Network of Family Practice Residency Programs: A Good Idea?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodi Summers Holtrop

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of an electronic mailing list as a means of communication among faculty in a network of university-affiliated family practice residency programs was evaluated. Faculty were automatically subscribed to the list by the list owner. Messages were tracked for one year and a written evaluation survey was sent. Ninety two messages were sent, with 52% of the messages being posted information. While most (65% survey respondents reported reading 61% or more of the messages, with only 33% ever actually posted at least one message to the list. Given that faculty were automatically subscribed and that there were only 84 total members, the list may have failed to reach a critical mass of active participants. It is concluded that an email list for network faculty did not function as an online discussion group, although it was extremely beneficial as a way of posting information to affiliated residency faculty.

  7. Plasma in dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Cha, Seunghee; Park, Young-Seok

    2014-01-01

    This review describes the contemporary aspects of plasma application in dentistry. Previous studies on plasma applications were classified into two categories, surface treatment and direct applications, and were reviewed, respectively according to the approach. The current review discussed modification of dental implant surface, enhancing of adhesive qualities, enhancing of polymerization, surface coating and plasma cleaning under the topics of surface treatment. Microbicidal activities, deco...

  8. Restorative dentistry for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donly, Kevin J

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses contemporary pediatric restorative dentistry. Indications and contraindications for the choice of different restorative materials in different clinical situations, including the risk assessment of the patient, are presented. The specific use of glass ionomer cement or resin-modified glass ionomer cement, resin-based composite, and stainless steel crowns is discussed so that preparation design and restoration placement is understood.

  9. Invisalign and aesthetic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Invisalign has been an integral part of dental practices for many years. Besides improving crowding and spacing in teeth, it is an excellent adjunct for many different aesthetic procedures. One such case is illustrated in this article, where the combination of Invisalign and minimally invasive dentistry allowed for a stellar outcome, and one very happy dental patient.

  10. History of the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Residency Program at Universidad el Bosque, Bogotá, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Núñez, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    The formal training of oral and maxillofacial surgeons in Colombia started in 1958 at Hospital Sanjos6, thanks to the titanic work of Waldemar Wilhelm, a German-born surgeon who settled in BogotA in 1950. Today there are seven institutions in Colombia that offer residency programs in oral and maxillofacial surgery. The aim of this article is to describe the history of the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Residency Program at Universidad El Bosque in Bogota.

  11. The Center for the Holographic Arts Begins a New Artist Workshop and Residency Program in Conjunction with Ohio State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrongovius, Martina; Kagan, Harris; Moree, Sam

    2013-02-01

    This year the Center for the Holographic Arts (Holocenter) kicked off a new Artist Workshop and Residency Program in conjunction with Ohio State University. The newly renovated holography facility houses the Holocenter's pulse laser camera and two recording tables with continuous wave lasers. This facility is being utilized for undergraduate and postgraduate courses in Art and Technology as well as the Artist Workshop and Residency Program.

  12. A Case Study of the Impact of a Sytematic Evaluation Process in a Graduate Medical Education Residency Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kromrei, Heidi T.

    2014-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has charged institutions that sponsor accredited Graduate Medical Education programs (residency and fellowship specialty programs) with overseeing implementation of mandatory annual program evaluation efforts to ensure compliance with regulatory requirements. Physicians receive scant, if…

  13. Something Larger than Ourselves: Redefining the Young Artists at Work Program as an Art-as-Activism Residency for Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Laurel

    2014-01-01

    The Young Artists at Work Program at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (YBCA) recently shifted its model from an afterschool arts program to a young artists' residency. This decision arose from a desire to reposition the youth program as a priority within the larger organization, coupled with a commitment to deepening the pedagogical values of…

  14. The Influence of an Orthopedic, Manual Therapy Residency Program on Improved Knowledge, Psychomotor Skills, and Clinical Reasoning in Nairobi, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Shala; McFelea, Joni

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the influence of a post-graduate orthopedic manual therapy residency program in Kenya on the development of physical therapists' (PTs) knowledge and clinical reasoning related to the performance of a musculoskeletal examination and evaluation as compared to an experience-matched control group of PTs waiting to enter the program. A cross-sectional design was utilized in which 12 graduating residents and 10 PTs entering the residency program completed a live-patient practical examination to assess the knowledge, clinical reasoning, and psychomotor skills related to the examination and evaluation of musculoskeletal conditions. The assessment utilized was based on the tasks, procedures, and knowledge areas identified as important to advanced clinicians in the US as outlined by the Orthopaedic Description of Specialty Practice. Inclusion criteria included participation in or acceptance to the residency program, practice as a PT between 3 and 25 years, and 50% of workday being involved in direct patient care. Overall pass rates were analyzed using the Pearson chi-square and Fisher's exact tests to determine if the graduating residents achieved significantly higher scores than experience-matched controls consisting of PTs entering the residency program. PTs completing a post-graduate orthopedic manual therapy residency in Nairobi, Kenya, achieved higher scores and passing rates compared to their colleagues who had not completed a residency program as determined by a live-patient practical examination. Graduating residents demonstrated statistically significant higher scores in the categories of examination, evaluation, and diagnosis. The average live-patient practical examination score for PTs without residency training was 38.2%, and their pass rate was 0.0%. The average live-patient practical examination score for residency-trained PTs was 83.4%, and their pass rate was 92.3%. These findings are statistically significant (p

  15. EL CONSENTIMIENTO INFORMADO EN ODONTÓLOGOS RESIDENTES DE LA FACULTAD DE ODONTOLOGÍA DE LA UNIVERSIDAD NACIONAL DE LA PLATA O CONSENTIMENTO INFORMADO EM ODONTÓLOGOS RESIDENTES DA FACULDADE DE ODONTOLOGIA DA UNIVERSIDADE NACIONAL DE LA PLATA INFORMED CONSENT IN ODONTOLOGY RESIDENTS AT THE DENTISTRY FACULTY, LA PLATA'S NATIONAL UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Miguel

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo se fundamenta en la necesidad de obtener datos sobre la práctica del consentimiento informado realizado por odontólogos. Los datos pertenecen al Programa de Residencias Odontológicas Universitarias (ROU de la Facultad de Odontología de la Universidad Nacional de La Plata (UNLP. La investigación tiene como intención conocer diferentes aspectos respecto a las fortalezas y debilidades de su utilización actual. A partir de los datos, se puede concluir que, a pesar de que los conocimientos teóricos sobre la práctica del consentimiento informado son escasos, existe una tendencia significativa a destinar tiempo en la consulta dental para su empleo, especialmente en la nueva generación. Se considera imperativo incluir en la malla curricular y en los programas académicos odontológicos principios éticos y legales en relación con el proceso de consentimiento informadoEste trabalho fundamenta a necessidade de se obter dados sobre a prática do consentimento informado realizado por odontólogos. Os dados pertencem ao Programa de Residencias Odontológicas Universitárias (ROU da Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade Nacional de la Plata (UNLP. A pesquisa tem como objetivo conhecer os diferentes aspectos, a respeito das forças e fraquezas de sua utilzação atual. A partir dos dados, se pode concluir que, apesar de serem escassos os conhecimentos teóricos sobre a prática do consentimento informado, existe uma tendencia significativa a destinar tempo na consulta dental para seu uso, especialmente na nova geração. Considera-se um imperativo incluir no curriculo de formação profissional e nos programas acadêmicos odontológicos, princípios éticos e legais relacionados com o processo do consentimento informadoThis work is based upon the need to obtain data on the practice of informed consent carried out by dentists. Data was generated from the University Residence Program at the Dentistry Faculty, L.P.N.U., Argentina. The

  16. Integrity of the National Resident Matching Program for Radiation Oncology: National Survey of Applicant Experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holliday, Emma B. [Division of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Thomas, Charles R., E-mail: thomasch@ohsu.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, OHSU Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Kusano, Aaron S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the experiences of radiation oncology applicants and to evaluate the prevalence of behaviors that may be in conflict with established ethical standards. Methods and Materials: An anonymous survey was sent to all 2013 applicants to a single domestic radiation oncology residency program through the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP). Questions included demographics, survey of observed behaviors, and opinions regarding the interview and matching process. Descriptive statistics were presented. Characteristics and experiences of respondents who matched were compared with those who did not match. Results: Questionnaires were returned by 87 of 171 applicants for a 51% response rate. Eighty-two questionnaires were complete and included for analysis. Seventy-eight respondents (95.1%) reported being asked at least 1 question in conflict with the NRMP code of conduct. When asked where else they were interviewing, 64% stated that this query made them uncomfortable. Forty-five respondents (54.9%) reported unsolicited post-interview contact by programs, and 31 (37.8%) felt pressured to give assurances. Fifteen respondents (18.3%) reported being told their rank position or that they were “ranked to match” prior to Match day, with 27% of those individuals indicating this information influenced how they ranked programs. Half of respondents felt applicants often made dishonest or misleading assurances, one-third reported that they believed their desired match outcome could be improved by deliberately misleading programs, and more than two-thirds felt their rank position could be improved by having faculty from their home institutions directly contact programs on their behalf. Conclusions: Radiation oncology applicants report a high prevalence of behaviors in conflict with written NRMP policies. Post-interview communication should be discouraged in order to enhance fairness and support the professional development of future

  17. An economic analysis of a safe resident handling program in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, Supriya; Latif, Saira; Punnett, Laura

    2013-04-01

    Occupational injuries, especially back problems related to resident handling, are common in nursing home employees and their prevention may require substantial up-front investment. This study evaluated the economics of a safe resident handling program (SRHP), in a large chain of skilled nursing facilities, from the corporation's perspective. The company provided data on program costs, compensation claims, and turnover rates (2003-2009). Workers' compensation and turnover costs before and after the intervention were compared against investment costs using the "net-cost model." Among 110 centers, the overall benefit-to-cost ratio was 1.7-3.09 and the payback period was 1.98-1.06 year (using alternative turnover cost estimates). The average annualized net savings per bed for the 110 centers (using company based turnover cost estimates) was $143, with a 95% confidence interval of $22-$264. This was very similar to the average annualized net savings per full time equivalent (FTE) staff member, which was $165 (95% confidence interval $22-$308). However, at 49 centers costs exceeded benefits. Decreased costs of worker injury compensation claims and turnover appear at least partially attributable to the SRHP. Future research should examine center-specific factors that enhance program success, and improve measures of turnover costs and healthcare productivity. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Development of a diabetes care management curriculum in a family practice residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuovo, Jim; Balsbaugh, Thomas; Barton, Sue; Davidson, Ellen; Fox-Garcia, Jane; Gandolfo, Angela; Levich, Bridget; Seibles, Joann

    2004-01-01

    Improving the quality of care for patients with chronic illness has become a high priority. Implementing training programs in disease management (DM) so the next generation of physicians can manage chronic illness more effectively is challenging. Residency training programs have no specific mandate to implement DM training. Additional barriers at the training facility include: 1) lack of a population-based perspective for service delivery; 2) weak support for self-management of illness; 3) incomplete implementation due to physician resistance or inertia; and 4) few incentives to change practices and behaviors. In order to overcome these barriers, training programs must take the initiative to implement DM training that addresses each of these issues. We report the implementation of a chronic illness management curriculum based on the Improving Chronic Illness Care (ICIC) Model. Features of this process included both patient care and learner objectives. These were: development of a multidisciplinary diabetes DM team; development of a patient registry; development of diabetes teaching clinics in the family practice center (nutrition, general management classes, and one-on-one teaching); development of a group visit model; and training the residents in the elements of the ICIC Model, ie, the community, the health system, self-management support, delivery system design, decision support, and clinical information systems. Barriers to implementing these curricular changes were: the development of a patient registry; buy-in from faculty, residents, clinic leadership, staff, and patients for the chronic care model; the ability to bill for services and maintain clinical productivity; and support from the health system key stakeholders for sustainability. Unique features of each training site will dictate differences in emphasis and structure; however, the core principles of the ICIC Model in enhancing self-management may be generalized to all sites.

  19. Required and Elective Experiences During the 4th Year: An Analysis of ACGME Accredited Psychiatry Residency Program Websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestal, Heather S; Belitsky, Richard; Bernstein, Carol A; Chaukos, Deanna; Cohen, Mitchell B; Dickstein, Leah J; Hilty, Donald M; Hutner, Lucy; Sakman, Ferda; Scheiber, Stephen C; Wrzosek, Marika I; Silberman, Edward K

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to assess and describe required and elective components of the 4th post-graduate year (PGY4) in psychiatry residency programs. We reviewed the websites of all 193 2014-2015 ACGME accredited psychiatry residency programs for content describing the specific components of the PGY4 year. Nearly all residency programs (99 %) had some form of required experiences during the PGY4 year. Ninety-four percent had clinical requirements for PGY4 residents, with longitudinal outpatient clinic being the most common (77 %). All programs offered some elective time during PGY4, but the amount of time ranged from 2 months to 100 %. Virtually all residency programs include some requirements in the 4th year (most commonly didactics and outpatient clinic) in addition to a broad array of elective experiences. Although 3 years may suffice for residents to complete ACGME requirements, a variety of factors may motivate programs to include required 4th year curricula. Future studies should explore the rationales for and possible benefits of programmatic requirements throughout 4 versus only 3 years of psychiatric training.

  20. In the SOAP: the Supplemental Offer and Acceptance Program (SOAP) from the perspective of a Community Hospital Residency

    OpenAIRE

    Detterline, Stephanie; Ferguson, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    The Supplemental Offer and Acceptance Program (SOAP) was developed by the National Residency Matching Program (NRMP) as a way to modernize and streamline the ‘Scramble’ process for unfilled positions during Match Week of the Main Residency Match. As we all know, competition for residency spots is becoming more fierce, and the number of total unmatched applicants to PGY-1 positions (8,794 in 2010) continues to rise as unfilled PGY-1 positions (1,060 in 2010) continue to fall (1). Historically,...

  1. A framework for quality improvement and patient safety education in radiation oncology residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Anamaria; Greenwalt, Julie

    2015-01-01

    In training future radiation oncologists, we must begin to focus on training future QI specialists. Our patients are demanding better quality and safer care, and accrediting bodies are requiring it. We must equip radiation oncology trainees to be leaders in this new world. To that end, a QI/PS educational program should contain 2 components: a didactic portion focused on teaching basic QI tools as well as an overview of the quality and safety goals of the institution, and an experiential component, ideally a resident-led QI project mentored by an expert faculty member and that is linked to the department's and institution's goals.

  2. An art therapy in-service program model for medical students and residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Rebecca Beers

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the author's experience implementing an art therapy in-service program into the training of medical students and residents in an urban hospital teaching facility. Emphasis is placed on specific aspects of planning and implementation, including formal and informal assessment, as well as methods of engaging medical students in art therapy experientials relevant to their experience as helping professionals. Benefits and challenges encountered throughout the process are also discussed. This paper is based on a presentation given at the 36th annual American Art Therapy Association conference.

  3. Cardiovascular Surgery Residency Program: Training Coronary Anastomosis Using the Arroyo Simulator and UNIFESP Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maluf, Miguel Angel; Gomes, Walter José; Bras, Ademir Massarico; Araújo, Thiago Cavalcante Vila Nova de; Mota, André Lupp; Cardoso, Caio Cesar; Coutinho, Rafael Viana dos S

    2015-01-01

    Engage the UNIFESP Cardiovascular Surgery residents in coronary anastomosis, assess their skills and certify results, using the Arroyo Anastomosis Simulator and UNIFESP surgical models. First to 6th year residents attended a weekly program of technical training in coronary anastomosis, using 4 simulation models: 1. Arroyo simulator; 2. Dummy with a plastic heart; 3. Dummy with a bovine heart; and 4. Dummy with a beating pig heart. The assessment test was comprised of 10 items, using a scale from 1 to 5 points in each of them, creating a global score of 50 points maximum. The technical performance of the candidate showed improvement in all items, especially manual skill and technical progress, critical sense of the work performed, confidence in the procedure and reduction of the time needed to perform the anastomosis after 12 weeks practice. In response to the multiplicity of factors that currently influence the cardiovascular surgeon training, there have been combined efforts to reform the practices of surgical medical training. 1 - The four models of simulators offer a considerable contribution to the field of cardiovascular surgery, improving the skill and dexterity of the surgeon in training. 2 - Residents have shown interest in training and cooperate in the development of innovative procedures for surgical medical training in the art.

  4. Cardiovascular Surgery Residency Program: Training Coronary Anastomosis Using the Arroyo Simulator and UNIFESP Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angel Maluf

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: Engage the UNIFESP Cardiovascular Surgery residents in coronary anastomosis, assess their skills and certify results, using the Arroyo Anastomosis Simulator and UNIFESP surgical models. METHODS: First to 6th year residents attended a weekly program of technical training in coronary anastomosis, using 4 simulation models: 1. Arroyo simulator; 2. Dummy with a plastic heart; 3. Dummy with a bovine heart; and 4. Dummy with a beating pig heart. The assessment test was comprised of 10 items, using a scale from 1 to 5 points in each of them, creating a global score of 50 points maximum. RESULTS: The technical performance of the candidate showed improvement in all items, especially manual skill and technical progress, critical sense of the work performed, confidence in the procedure and reduction of the time needed to perform the anastomosis after 12 weeks practice. In response to the multiplicity of factors that currently influence the cardiovascular surgeon training, there have been combined efforts to reform the practices of surgical medical training. CONCLUSION: 1 - The four models of simulators offer a considerable contribution to the field of cardiovascular surgery, improving the skill and dexterity of the surgeon in training. 2 - Residents have shown interest in training and cooperate in the development of innovative procedures for surgical medical training in the art.

  5. Taking a unified approach to teaching and implementing quality improvements across multiple residency programs: the Atlantic Health experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Donna M; Casey, Donald E; Levine, Jeffrey L; Kaye, Susan T; Dardik, Raquel B; Varkey, Prathibha; Pierce-Boggs, Kimberly

    2009-12-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education recently emphasized the importance of systems-based practice and systems-based learning; however, successful models of collaborative quality improvement (QI) initiatives in residency training curricula are not widely available. Atlantic Health successfully conceptualized and implemented a QI collaborative focused on medication safety across eight residency training programs representing 219 residents. During a six-month period, key faculty and resident leaders from 8 (of 10) Atlantic Health residency training programs participated in three half-day collaborative learning sessions focused on improving medication reconciliation. Each session included didactic presentations from a multidisciplinary team of clinical experts as well as the application of principles that identified challenges, barriers, and solutions to QI initiatives. The learning sessions emphasized the fundamental principles of medication reconciliation, its critical importance as a vital part of patient handoff in all health care settings, and the challenges of achieving successful medication reconciliation improvement in light of work hours restrictions and patient loads. Each residency program developed a detailed implementation and measurement plan for individual "action learning" projects, using the Plan-Do-Study-Act method of improvement. Each program then implemented its QI project, and expert faculty (e.g., physicians, nurses, pharmacists, QI staff) provided mentoring between learning sessions. Several projects resulted in permanent changes in medication reconciliation processes, which were then adopted by other programs. The structure, process, and outcomes of this effort are described in detail.

  6. Ohio osteopathic residency directors' self-reported administrative knowledge and skills before and after participation in an administrative training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Olivia Ojano; Brannan, Grace

    2013-04-01

    Residency directors require myriad skills to perform their jobs efficiently. However, many residency directors receive no training prior to obtaining their positions. To determine the effectiveness of the Residency Directors Residency Administration Program (RD RAP)--a 1-year fellowship training program for Ohio osteopathic residency directors sponsored by the Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine/Centers for Osteopathic Research and Education--by measuring the administrative knowledge and skills of Ohio osteopathic residency directors before and after completion of the program. The authors administered a 54-item self-assessment instrument to RD RAP participants before and after the 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 programs. The assessment asked participants to rank their knowledge and skills in administration on a 5-point Likert scale, with lower values indicating higher knowledge and skills. We analyzed data from the pre- and postprogram assessments by using the Wilcoxon signed rank nonparametric test. The 54 assessment items were categorized into 10 content domains. Ten RD RAP participants completed the assessments. Median scores were statistically significantly lower for each of the 10 content domains after the RD RAP program. The content domain with the greatest change between pre- and postprogram assessment Likert scale scores was Legal Issues in Residency Training, with a median change of 1.7 (P=.007). Role of Program Directors, Personality, and Professional Development had the smallest change in pre- and postprogram assessment Likert scores, with a median change of 0.8 (P=.011). Statistically significant improvements were found in the osteopathic residency directors' self-reported administrative knowledge and skills after participation in the RD RAP.

  7. Drug Testing Incoming Residents and Medical Students in Family Medicine Training: A Survey of Program Policies and Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Paul F; Semelka, Michael W; Bigdeli, Laleh

    2015-03-01

    Despite well-established negative consequences, high rates of substance use and related disorders continue to be reported. Physicians in training are not immune from this, or the associated risks to their health and careers, while impaired physicians are a threat to patient safety. We surveyed family medicine residency programs' practices relating to drug testing of medical students and incoming residents. The survey asked about the extent to which residency programs are confronted with trainees testing positive for prohibited substances, and how they respond. The survey was sent to the directors of family medicine residency programs. A total of 205 directors (47.2%) completed the survey. A majority of the responding programs required drug testing for incoming residents (143, 68.9%). Most programs did not require testing of medical students (161, 81.7%). Few programs reported positive drug tests among incoming residents (9, 6.5%), and there was only 1 reported instance of a positive result among medical students (1, 3.3%). Respondents reported a range of responses to positive results, with few reporting that they would keep open training spots or offer supportive services for a medical student who tested positive. Changing laws legalizing certain drugs may require corresponding changes in the focus on drug testing and associated issues in medical training; however, many residency program directors were not aware of their institution's current policies. Programs will need to reexamine drug testing policies as new generations of physicians, growing up under altered legal circumstances concerning drug use, progress to clinical training.

  8. Orthopaedic Surgery Residency: Perspectives of Applicants and Program Directors on Medical Student Away Rotations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Seth W; Drolet, Brian C; Brower, Jonathan P; LaPorte, Dawn; Eberson, Craig P

    2017-01-01

    Senior medical students frequently rotate at orthopaedic residency programs away from their home medical schools. However, to our knowledge, the perspective of program directors (PDs) and applicants on the value, objectives, and costs of these rotations has not been studied. Surveys evaluating the frequency, costs, benefits, and objectives of away rotations were distributed to all orthopaedic residency PDs in the United States and applicants in the 2014-2015 Match cycle. Data analysis was conducted to perform inferential and descriptive statistics; comparisons were made between and among PD and applicant groups using two-tailed means Student t-test and analysis of variance. A total of 74 PD (46.0%) and 524 applicant (49.3%) responses were obtained from a national distribution. Applicants completed an average of 2.4 away rotations, with an average cost of $2,799. When stratified on self-reported likelihood of Matching, there were no substantial differences in the total number of rotations performed. The only marked differences between these groups were the United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 score and the number of applications to residency programs. PDs reported that significantly fewer rotations should be allowed, whereas applicants suggested higher limits (2.42 rotations versus 6.24, P < 0.001). PDs and applicants had similar perspectives on the value of away rotations; both groups reported more value in finding a "good fit" and making a good impression at the program and placed less value on the educational impact. The value of orthopaedic away rotations appears more utilitarian than educational for both PDs and applicants. Rotations are performed regardless of perceived likelihood of Matching and are used by students and programs to identify a "good fit." Therefore, given the portion of an academic year that is spent on orthopaedic rotations, findings showing perceived low educational value and marked discrepancies between the expected number of

  9. Using optimization models to demonstrate the need for structural changes in training programs for surgical medical residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Jonathan; Kim, Kibaek; Mehrotra, Sanjay; DaRosa, Debra A; Daskin, Mark S; Rodriguez, Heron E

    2013-09-01

    The primary goal of a residency program is to prepare trainees for unsupervised care. Duty hour restrictions imposed throughout the prior decade require that residents work significantly fewer hours. Moreover, various stakeholders (e.g. the hospital, mentors, other residents, educators, and patients) require them to prioritize very different activities, often conflicting with their learning goals. Surgical residents' learning goals include providing continuity throughout a patient's pre-, peri-, and post-operative care as well as achieving sufficient surgical experience levels in various procedure types and participating in various formal educational activities, among other things. To complicate matters, senior residents often compete with other residents for surgical experience. This paper features experiments using an optimization model and a real dataset. The experiments test the viability of achieving the above goals at a major academic center using existing models of delivering medical education and training to surgical residents. It develops a detailed multi-objective, two-stage stochastic optimization model with anticipatory capabilities solved over a rolling time horizon. A novel feature of the models is the incorporation of learning curve theory in the objection function. Using a deterministic version of the model, we identify bounds on the achievement of learning goals under existing training paradigms. The computational results highlight the structural problems in the current surgical resident educational system. These results further corroborate earlier findings and suggest an educational system redesign is necessary for surgical medical residents.

  10. Considerations for Residency Programs Regarding Accepting Undocumented Students Who Are DACA Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakae, Sunny; Rojas Marquez, Denisse; Di Bartolo, Isha Marina; Rodriguez, Raquel

    2017-05-30

    The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) initiative provides for the temporary deferral of enforcement of immigration laws for certain undocumented individuals brought to the United States before age 16. More than 50 medical schools now consider applicants who are DACA recipients, and medical school graduates with DACA are eligible to continue their training in graduate medical education. In this article, the authors summarize current policy and provide data on DACA recipients in medical school. They then review the implications for considering DACA recipients in graduate medical education, including employment guidelines, employer responsibilities, training at Veterans Affairs facilities, research funding, and professional licensure. They conclude by discussing the future of the DACA program and best practices for supporting students who are DACA recipients.First, there are no employment restrictions for DACA recipients with valid work authorization documents as long as their employers use Form I-9 Employment Eligibility Verification. Second, unlike H-1B or J-1 visa holders, DACA recipients do not generate additional immigration-related costs for their residency programs. Next, provisions in the Civil Rights Act prohibit employers from discriminating against applicants based on national origin or, in some cases, citizenship status. Furthermore, trainees with DACA are eligible to rotate through Veterans Affairs facilities. Finally, some states, like California and New York, have adopted policies and regulations allowing trainees with DACA who meet all professional requirements to receive a medical license. Given this state of affairs, DACA recipients should have equal standing to their peers when being evaluated for residency positions.

  11. Nephrology elective experience during medical residency: a national survey of US nephrology fellowship training program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Hitesh H; Adams, Nancy Day; Mattana, Joseph; Kadiyala, Aditya; Jhaveri, Kenar D

    2015-07-01

    Interest in nephrology careers continues to decline in the United States. The reasons for this declining interest are not fully understood but it is plausible that inadequate exposure to the full spectrum of what a career in nephrology encompasses may be part of the explanation. Inpatient-based nephrology electives have been a common venue for residents to gain exposure to nephrology but little is known regarding the details of such electives and how often they include outpatient experiences. We carried out a national survey of nephrology fellowship training program directors to obtain data on the content of nephrology elective experiences as well as their ideas on how to promote interest in the field. The survey revealed the majority of elective experiences to be either exclusively or heavily inpatient based, with only a small percentage having a substantial outpatient component, particularly in outpatient dialysis or transplantation. Training program directors felt that providing greater outpatient experiences to residents during elective rotations would be an effective means to promote interest in nephrology, along with structured faculty mentoring. Our findings suggest that current approaches to the nephrology elective experience are heavily inpatient-based and might benefit from incorporating much more of the rich spectrum of activities a career in nephrology entails. Hopefully such efforts can create and enhance interest in careers in nephrology and potentially begin a sustained reversal of an unfortunate and serious decline in interest.

  12. Postural balance and falls in elderly nursing home residents enrolled in a ballroom dancing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Borges, Eliane Gomes; de Souza Vale, Rodrigo Gomes; Cader, Samária Ali; Leal, Silvania; Miguel, Francisco; Pernambuco, Carlos Soares; Dantas, Estélio H M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of a ballroom dancing program on the postural balance of institutionalized elderly residents. The sample consisted of 59 sedentary elderly residents of long-stay institutions who were randomly assigned to a ballroom dancing experimental group (EG, n=30) or a control group (CG, n=29). The ballroom dancing program consisted of three 50-min sessions each week on alternate days over a 12-week period. The dances included the foxtrot, waltz, rumba, swing, samba and bolero. The medical records of the subjects were reviewed to determine the number of falls they experienced in the three months prior to the intervention. Postural static balance was assessed using a Lizard (Med. EU., Italy, 2010) stabilometric and posturometric platform. Only patients in the EG lost a significant amount of weight (Δ=-2.85 kg) when comparing the pre- and post-test postural balance assessments. The intergroup comparison revealed a reduced lower limb weight distribution difference in the EG post-test compared to the CG post-test (p=0.012). In the intragroup comparison, the EG patients experienced significantly fewer falls post-test relative to pre-test (pfalls in the EG post-test compared to the CG post-test (pfalls in this elderly population.

  13. Aloe vera in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujatha, G; Kumar, G Senthil; Muruganandan, J; Prasad, T Srinivasa

    2014-10-01

    Aloe vera is a medicinal plant which has been used for thousands of years. The health benefits of aloe vera is well known and the dental uses of this plant is multiple. Interest is gathering among researchers regarding the use of this plant. Studies have proved the antiseptic, anti inflammatory, antiviral and antifungal properties of aloe vera and the use of this plant is proved beneficial. This plant is proved to be non allergic and very good in building up the immune system. Aloe vera is gaining popularity in dentistry as it is completely natural and there is no side effects being reported with its use. This paper gives an overview of the uses of this miracle plant and its uses in dentistry.

  14. Radiation incidents in dentistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovelock, D.J. [Dental Hospital and School, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom). Dept. of Radiology

    1996-12-31

    Most dental practitioners act as their own radiographer and radiologist, unlike their medical colleagues. Virtually all dental surgeons have a dental X-ray machine for intraoral radiography available to them and 40% of dental practices have equipment for dental panoramic tomography. Because of the low energy of X-ray equipment used in dentistry, radiation incidents tend to be less serious than those associated with other aspects of patient care. Details of 47 known incidents are given. The advent of the 1985 and 1988 Ionising Radiation Regulations has made dental surgeons more aware of the hazards of radiation. These regulations, and general health and safety legislation, have led to a few dental surgeons facing legal action. Because of the publicity associated with these court cases, it is expected that there will be a decrease in radiation incidents arising from the practice of dentistry. (author).

  15. Corporate dentistry in 2032?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Michael

    2012-07-01

    During the last 20 years, there has been considerable growth in the number of dental practices owned by corporate bodies. At present, well over 800 practices are owned by such bodies and they employ over 3000 dentists. This paper describes the factors that have led to this growth and explores the advantages and disadvantages of 'corporate' dentistry for patients, dentists, and the dental team. It then considers how and why dental practice may change over the next 20 years and concludes that by 2032 the small one-dentist practice may well be in the past. It is likely that smaller practices will have to work in some form of association if they are to survive. Although their current model is unstable, corporates are likely to adapt to a changing environment. By 2032, in some cases, dentistry may well be taken out of its conventional setting, into supermarkets or a school environment.

  16. Color vision and dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, W; Schuman, N

    1992-05-01

    Color vision is a critical component of restorative and esthetic dentistry, but dentists, as a group, do not have their color vision tested at any time during their careers. A study was undertaken to ascertain the color-vision status of practicing dental personnel at the University of Tennessee, College of Dentistry. One hundred fifty individuals, 75 men and 75 women, were screened. The results corroborated the existing medical data for the general population. It was found that 9.3% of the men and none of the women exhibited color-vision defect. Since most dentists are male, this study demonstrates an area of potential weakness for some practitioners. Once a color-vision problem is found, it is simple to remedy by employing a team approach to shade matching or mechanical means of matching shades (by the practitioner). No ethnic or racial distinctions were detected, although these have been reported in other studies.

  17. [Training of residents in obstetrics and gynecology: Assessment of an educational program including formal lectures and practical sessions using simulators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, A; El Haloui, O; Breaud, J; Chevalier, D; Antomarchi, J; Bongain, A; Boucoiran, I; Delotte, J

    2015-01-01

    Evaluate an educational program in the training of residents in gynecology-obstetrics (GO) with a theory session and a practical session on simulators and analyze their learning curve. Single-center prospective study, at the university hospital (CHU). Two-day sessions were leaded in April and July 2013. An evaluation on obstetric and gynecological surgery simulator was available to all residents. Theoretical knowledge principles of obstetrics were evaluated early in the session and after formal lectures was taught to them. At the end of the first session, a satisfaction questionnaire was distributed to all participants. Twenty residents agreed to participate to the training sessions. Evaluation of theoretical knowledge: at the end of the session, the residents obtained a significant improvement in their score on 20 testing knowledge. Obstetrical simulator: a statistically significant improvement in scores on assessments simulator vaginal delivery between the first and second session. Subjectively, a larger increase feeling was seen after breech delivery simulation than for the cephalic vaginal delivery. However, the confidence level of the resident after breech delivery simulation has not been improved at the end of the second session. Simulation in gynecological surgery: a trend towards improvement in the time realized on the peg-transfer between the two sessions was noted. In the virtual simulation, no statistically significant differences showed, no improvement for in salpingectomy's time. Subjectively, the residents felt an increase in the precision of their gesture. Satisfaction: All residents have tried the whole program. They considered the pursuit of these sessions on simulators was necessary and even mandatory. The approach chosen by this structured educational program allowed a progression for the residents, both objectively and subjectively. This simulation program type for the resident's training would use this tool in assessing their skills and develop

  18. From Blue to Green: The Development and Implementation of a Therapeutic Horticulture Program for Residents of a Battered Women's Shelter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renzetti, Claire M; Follingstad, Diane R

    2015-01-01

    The delivery of therapeutic services to clients is influenced by service providers' understanding of the "fit" of a specific program with their service mandate as well as their perceptions of the potential benefits of the program. This article discusses the development and implementation of a therapeutic horticulture (TH) program at a battered women's shelter that serves 17 counties in Central Kentucky. Through semistructured interviews, we gauge the shelter staff's perceptions of the relationship of the TH program to the shelter's overall mission; their sense of the program's benefits for residents, for the shelter as a community organization, and for themselves; and their concerns about the TH program. We consider how these findings may impact future programming at the shelter, and we discuss plans for further evaluation of the TH program in terms of its impact on shelter residents' long-term outcomes.

  19. Nanorobots: Future in dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Shetty, Neetha J.; Swati, P.; David, K.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the phenomenon of nanotechnology as it might apply to dentistry as a new field called nanodentistry. Treatment possibilities might include the application of nanotechnology to local anesthesia, dentition renaturalization, the permanent cure for hypersensitivity, complete orthodontic realignment in a single visit, covalently bonded diamondized enamel, and continuous oral health maintenance using mechanical dentifrobots. Dental nanorobots could be construc...

  20. Integral Rehabilitation in Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Lamas Lara, César; Cirujano Dentista, Docente del Área de Operatoria Dental y Endodoncia de la Facultad de OdontoIogía de la UNMSM.; Paz Fernández, Juan José; Paredes Coz, Gerson; Cirujano Dentista, Especialista en Rehabilitación Oral, Docente del Área de Rehabilitación Oral de la Facultad de Odontología de la UNMSM.; Angulo de la Vega, Giselle; Cirujano Dentista, Estudios de Especialidad de Rehabilitación Oral de la Facultad de Odontología de la UNMSM.; Cardoso Hernández, Sully; Estudiante de internado de la Facultad de Odontología de la UNMSM.

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays is fundamental the interrelationship of the diverse specialities of dentistry for the resolution of the treatments realized in the patients who come to the odontologic consultation, since the vision slanted of some area can deprive to offer a better possibility of treatment. Working with specialists in different areas carries to orientating adequately the treatments and to optimizing results. In the present article the integral rehabilitation of a patient is detailed by the participa...

  1. Tissue engineering in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Neel, Ensanya Ali; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Salih, Vehid M; Kim, Hae-Won; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2014-08-01

    of this review is to inform practitioners with the most updated information on tissue engineering and its potential applications in dentistry. The authors used "PUBMED" to find relevant literature written in English and published from the beginning of tissue engineering until today. A combination of keywords was used as the search terms e.g., "tissue engineering", "approaches", "strategies" "dentistry", "dental stem cells", "dentino-pulp complex", "guided tissue regeneration", "whole tooth", "TMJ", "condyle", "salivary glands", and "oral mucosa". Abstracts and full text articles were used to identify causes of craniofacial tissue loss, different approaches for craniofacial reconstructions, how the tissue engineering emerges, different strategies of tissue engineering, biomaterials employed for this purpose, the major attempts to engineer different dental structures, finally challenges and future of tissue engineering in dentistry. Only those articles that dealt with the tissue engineering in dentistry were selected. There have been a recent surge in guided tissue engineering methods to manage periodontal diseases beyond the traditional approaches. However, the predictable reconstruction of the innate organisation and function of whole teeth as well as their periodontal structures remains challenging. Despite some limited progress and minor successes, there remain distinct and important challenges in the development of reproducible and clinically safe approaches for oral tissue repair and regeneration. Clearly, there is a convincing body of evidence which confirms the need for this type of treatment, and public health data worldwide indicates a more than adequate patient resource. The future of these therapies involving more biological approaches and the use of dental tissue stem cells is promising and advancing. Also there may be a significant interest of their application and wider potential to treat disorders beyond the craniofacial region. Considering the

  2. Nanocharacterization in Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Shivani Sharma; Cross, Sarah E.; Carlin Hsueh; Ruseen P. Wali; Stieg, Adam Z.; James K Gimzewski

    2010-01-01

    About 80% of US adults have some form of dental disease. There are a variety of new dental products available, ranging from implants to oral hygiene products that rely on nanoscale properties. Here, the application of AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) and optical interferometry to a range of dentistry issues, including characterization of dental enamel, oral bacteria, biofilms and the role of surface proteins in biochemical and nanomechanical properties of bacterial adhesins, is reviewed. We also...

  3. Prevention of Prosthetic Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eremin O.V.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Prevention in prosthetic dentistry is not just a regular oral hygiene and the prevention of caries in the early stages of its development. The initial goal of orthopedic and dental should be the ability to convey to the patient's sense of pros-thetics that proteziruya one saved more. An example is included prosthetic dental arch defects with bridges or single artificial crowns on implants that will prevent movement of teeth and the continuity of the dentition

  4. Piezosurgery in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhruvakumar Deepa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Piezosurgery (piezoelectric bone surgery is a technique of bone surgery which is gaining popularity in the field of dentistry in the recent years. This device is being used in osteotomies, periodontology and implantology, and oral surgical procedures. Piezoelectric ultrasonic vibrations are utilized to perform precise and safe osteotomies. This article discusses the equipment, biological effects on bone, and advantages and disadvantages of this technology.

  5. Minimally legally invasive dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, R

    2014-12-01

    One disadvantage of the rapid advances in modern dentistry is that treatment options have never been more varied or confusing. Compounded by a more educated population greatly assisted by online information in an increasingly litigious society, a major concern in recent times is increased litigation against health practitioners. The manner in which courts handle disputes is ambiguous and what is considered fair or just may not be reflected in the judicial process. Although legal decisions in Australia follow a doctrine of precedent, the law is not static and is often reflected by community sentiment. In medical litigation, this has seen the rejection of the Bolam principle with a preference towards greater patient rights. Recent court decisions may change the practice of dentistry and it is important that the clinician is not caught unaware. The aim of this article is to discuss legal issues that are pertinent to the practice of modern dentistry through an analysis of legal cases that have shaped health law. Through these discussions, the importance of continuing professional development, professional association and informed consent will be realized as a means to limit the legal complications of dental practice.

  6. NON-MUSCULOSKELETAL SPORTS MEDICINE LEARNING IN FAMILY MEDICINE RESIDENCY PROGRAMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasqualino Caputo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite the increasing popularity of primary care sports medicine fellowships, as evidenced by the more than two-fold increase in family medicine sports medicine fellowships from a total of 31 accredited programs during the 1998/1999 academic year (ACGME, 1998 to 63 during the 2003/2004 academic year (ACGME, 2006, there are few empirical studies to support the efficacy of such programs. To the best of our knowledge, no studies have been conducted to assess the impact of primary care sports medicine fellowships on family medicine residents' learning of non-musculoskeletal sports medicine topics. Rigorous evaluations of the outcomes of such programs are helpful to document the value of such programs to both the lay public and interested medical residents. In order to evaluate such programs, it is helpful to apply the same objective standards to residents trained across multiple programs. Hence, we would like to know if there is a learning effect with respect to non-musculoskeletal sports medicine topics identified on yearly administered American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM in-training exams (ITE to family medicine residents in family medicine residency programs in the United States with and without primary care sports medicine fellowship programs. Review and approval for the research proposal was granted by the ABFM, who also allowed access to the required data. Permission to study and report only non-musculoskeletal sports medicine topics excluding musculoskeletal topics was granted at the time due to other ongoing projects at the ABFM involving musculoskeletal topics. ABFM allowed us access to examinations from 1998 to 2003. We were given copies of each exam and records of responses to each item (correct or incorrect by each examinee (examinees were anonymous for each year.For each year, each examinee was classified by the ABFM as either (a belonging to a program that contained a sports medicine fellowship, or (b not belonging to a program

  7. Minimal intervention dentistry - a new frontier in clinical dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mm, Jingarwar; Nk, Bajwa; A, Pathak

    2014-07-01

    Minimally invasive procedures are the new paradigm in health care. Everything from heart bypasses to gall bladder, surgeries are being performed with these dynamic new techniques. Dentistry is joining this exciting revolution as well. Minimally invasive dentistry adopts a philosophy that integrates prevention, remineralisation and minimal intervention for the placement and replacement of restorations. Minimally invasive dentistry reaches the treatment objective using the least invasive surgical approach, with the removal of the minimal amount of healthy tissues. This paper reviews in brief the concept of minimal intervention in dentistry.

  8. Residency Allocation Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Residency Allocation Database is used to determine allocation of funds for residency programs offered by Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAMCs). Information...

  9. A Graduate Program in Institutional Pharmacy Management Leading to an MS in Hospital Pharmacy, MBA and Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Jan N.; Lipman, Arthur G.

    1981-01-01

    A combined program leading to the MS in Hospital Pharmacy, MBA, and Certificate of Residency in Hospital Pharmacy established at the University of Utah in 1978 is described. The program provides coursework in both hospital pharmacy and management plus practical experience in hospital pharmacy practice management. (Author/MLW)

  10. The Effects of a Life Review Program on Disorientation, Social Interaction and Self-Esteem of Nursing Home Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabourne, Carla E. S.

    1995-01-01

    Examined the effects on veteran and novice participants of a life review program for nursing home residents with Alzheimers disease or severe cognitive dysfunction. Results confirm the impact of the Life Review Program on level of disorientation, social interaction, and life review. Evidence suggests that life improvements may be stored in memory…

  11. A Graduate Program in Institutional Pharmacy Management Leading to an MS in Hospital Pharmacy, MBA and Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Jan N.; Lipman, Arthur G.

    1981-01-01

    A combined program leading to the MS in Hospital Pharmacy, MBA, and Certificate of Residency in Hospital Pharmacy established at the University of Utah in 1978 is described. The program provides coursework in both hospital pharmacy and management plus practical experience in hospital pharmacy practice management. (Author/MLW)

  12. The Power of the Arts: Evaluating a Community Artist-in-Residence Program through the Lens of Studio Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter-Doniger, Tracey; Berlinsky, Robin

    2017-01-01

    This article takes an analytical look at Engaging Creative Minds, a pilot community program geared to enrich learning of common core standards through a local artist-in-residence partnership with public schools. This program was designed to increase the level of engagement and student growth in classes that typically relied on rote memory and…

  13. Training Program for Cardiology Residents to Perform Focused Cardiac Ultrasound Examination with Portable Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, Vicente N; Mancuso, Frederico J N; Campos, Orlando; De Paola, Angelo A; Carvalho, Antonio C; Moises, Valdir A

    2015-10-01

    Training requirements for general cardiologists without echocardiographic expertise to perform focused cardiac ultrasound (FCU) with portable devices have not yet been defined. The objective of this study was to evaluate a training program to instruct cardiology residents to perform FCU with a hand-carried device (HCD) in different clinical settings. Twelve cardiology residents were subjected to a 50-question test, 4 lectures on basic echocardiography and imaging interpretation, the supervised interpretation of 50 echocardiograms and performance of 30 exams using HCD. After this period, they repeated the written test and were administered a practical test comprising 30 exams each (360 patients) in different clinical settings. They reported on 15 parameters and a final diagnosis; their findings were compared to the HCD exam of a specialist in echocardiography. The proportion of correct answers on the theoretical test was higher after training (86%) than before (51%; P = 0.001). The agreement was substantial among the 15 parameters analyzed (kappa ranging from 0.615 to 0.891; P < 0.001). The percentage of correct interpretation was lower for abnormal (75%) than normal (95%) items, for valve abnormalities (85%) compared to other items (92%) and for graded scale (87%) than for dichotomous (95%) items (P < 0.0001, for all). For the final diagnoses, the kappa value was higher than 0.941 (P < 0.001; 95% CI [0.914, 0.955]). The training proposed enabled residents to perform FCU with HCD, and their findings were in good agreement with those of a cardiologist specialized in echocardiography. © 2015, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Resident-Assisted Montessori Programming (RAMP): training persons with dementia to serve as group activity leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Cameron J; Skrajner, Michael J

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of an activity implemented by means of Resident-Assisted Montessori Programming (RAMP). Four persons with early-stage dementia were trained to serve as leaders for a small-group activity played by nine persons with more advanced dementia. Assessments of leaders' ability to learn the procedures of leading a group, as well as their satisfaction with this role, were taken, as were measures of players' engagement and affect during standard activities programming and RAMP activities. Leaders demonstrated the potential to fill the role of group activity leader effectively, and they expressed a high level of satisfaction with this role. Players' levels of positive engagement and pleasure during the RAMP activity were higher than during standard group activities. This study suggests that to the extent that procedural learning is available to persons with early-stage dementia, especially when they are assisted with external cueing, these individuals can successfully fill the role of volunteers when working with persons with more advanced dementia. This can provide a meaningful social role for leaders and increase access to high quality activities programming for large numbers of persons with dementia. Copyright 2004 The Gerontological Society of America

  15. [Results of a physical therapy program in nursing home residents: A randomized clinical trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casilda-López, Jesús; Torres-Sánchez, Irene; Garzón-Moreno, Victor Manuel; Cabrera-Martos, Irene; Valenza, Marie Carmen

    2015-01-01

    The maintenance of the physical functionality is a key factor in the care of the elderly. Inactive people have a higher risk of death due to diseases associated with inactivity. In addition, the maintenance of optimal levels of physical and mental activity has been suggested as a protective factor against the development and progression of chronic illnesses and disability. The objective of this study is to assess the effectiveness of an 8-week exercise program with elastic bands, on exercise capacity, walking and balance in nursing home residents. A nursing home sample was divided into two groups, intervention group (n=26) and control group (n=25). The intervention group was included in an 8-week physical activity program using elastic bands, twice a week, while the control group was took part in a walking programme. Outcome measurements were descriptive variables (anthropometric characteristics, quality of life, fatigue, fear of movement) and fundamental variables (exercise capacity, walking and balance). A significant improvement in balance and walking speed was observed after the programme. Additionally, exercise capacity improved significantly (P≤.001), and the patients showed an improvement in perceived dyspnea after the physical activity programme in the intervention group. The exercise program was safe and effective in improving dyspnea, exercise capacity, walking, and balance in elderly. Copyright © 2014 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of the educational environment of the Saudi family medicine residency training program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah T Khoja

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The study was conducted to evaluate the educational environment (EE in Family Medicine Training Programs. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey, The Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure (PHEEM, was distributed to all residents at the four training centers in the central region. Cronbach′s alpha was used to test the reliability. The mean and standard deviation (SD for each item, the overall score and the three domains were calculated. A multiple linear regression model was developed with PHEEM scores as an outcome. The Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon test was used to compare each item based on the selected factors. Results: The overall score was 67.1/160 (SD: 20.1. The PHEEM′s domains scores: 24.2/56 (SD: 7.13 for perception of role autonomy; 25.3/60 (SD: 8.88, for perception of teaching; and 17/44 (SD: 5.6, for perception of social support. Training center and Level of training were the significant outcome predictors. Centre 1 (Joint Program significantly had better scores than Centre 2. The instrument showed great reliability with a Cronbach′s alpha of 0.92. Conclusions: There are many problems in the training program. Urgent actions are needed to improve the residents′ learning experience particularly during rotations. Also, the curriculum should be restructured, and effective training methods introduced using the Best Evidence in Medical Education to meet the expectations and learning needs of family physicians.

  17. [Full-scale simulation in German medical schools and anesthesia residency programs : Status quo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baschnegger, H; Meyer, O; Zech, A; Urban, B; Rall, M; Breuer, G; Prückner, S

    2017-01-01

    Simulation has been increasingly used in medicine. In 2003 German university departments of anesthesiology were provided with a full-scale patient simulator, designated for use with medical students. Meanwhile simulation courses are also offered to physicians and nurses. Currently, the national model curriculum for residency programs in anesthesiology is being revised, possibly to include mandatory simulation training. To assess the status quo of full-scale simulation training for medical school, residency and continuing medical education in German anesthesiology. All 38 German university chairs for anesthesiology as well as five arbitrarily chosen non-university facilities were invited to complete an online questionnaire regarding their centers' infrastructure and courses held between 2010 and 2012. The overall return rate was 86 %. In university simulation centers seven non-student staff members, mainly physicians, were involved, adding up to a full-time equivalent of 1.2. All hours of work were paid by 61 % of the centers. The median center size was 100 m(2) (range 20-500 m(2)), equipped with three patient simulators (1-32). Simulators of high or very high fidelity are available at 80 % of the centers. Scripted scenarios were used by 91 %, video debriefing by 69 %. Of the participating university centers, 97 % offered courses for medical students, 81 % for the department's employees, 43 % for other departments of their hospital, and 61 % for external participants. In 2012 the median center reached 46 % of eligible students (0-100), 39 % of the department's physicians (8-96) and 16 % of its nurses (0-56) once. For physicians and nurses from these departments that equals one simulation-based training every 2.6 and 6 years, respectively. 31 % made simulation training mandatory for their residents, 29 % for their nurses and 24 % for their attending physicians. The overall rates of staff ever exposed to simulation were 45 % of

  18. Resident clinical duties while preparing for the ABR core examination: position statement of the Association of Program Directors in Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeStigter, Kristen K; Mainiero, Martha B; Janower, Murray L; Resnik, Charles S

    2012-11-01

    Historically, diagnostic radiology residents have been allowed time off from clinical duties to study for the ABR oral board examination. This practice has resulted in a disruptive "board frenzy" at many programs. The new ABR examination structure gives programs an opportunity to evaluate this practice. This position statement of the Association of Program Directors in Radiology describes the rationale behind a recommendation of no time off from clinical service before the ABR core examination.

  19. Lasers In Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanth. S

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The uses of Lasers in dentistry have revolutionized several areas of treatment in the last three & a half decades of the 20th century. Initially it was used for ablating the hard tissues for acid etch treatment. Later Lasers were used for cutting, coagulation & cauterization of the soft tissues. It is also been used for the diagnosis of carious lesions& to test pulp vitality with Doppler. There are more than 40 uses for Laser. Initially Lasers were very expensive, but now they have become much cheaper. Portable models are available which have increased its versatility. Lasers will be the main weapon in the armamentarium of the dental surgeons.

  20. Interior design for dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unthank, M; True, G

    1999-11-01

    In the increasingly complex, competitive and stressful field of dentistry, effectively designed dental offices can offer significant benefits. Esthetic, functional and life-cycle cost issues to be considered when developing your interior design scheme include color, finishes, lighting, furnishings, art and accessories. An appropriately designed dental office serves as a valuable marketing tool for your practice, as well as a safe and enjoyable work environment. Qualified interior design professionals can help you make design decisions that can yield optimum results within your budget.

  1. Validating a set of tools designed to assess the perceived quality of training of pediatric residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Dalt, Liviana; Anselmi, Pasquale; Furlan, Sara; Carraro, Silvia; Baraldi, Eugenio; Robusto, Egidio; Perilongo, Giorgio

    2015-01-20

    The Paediatric Residency Program (PRP) of Padua, Italy, developed a set of questionnaires to assess the quality of the training provided by each faculty member, the quality of the professional experience the residents experienced during the various rotations and the functioning of the Resident Affair Committee (RAC), named respectively: "Tutor Assessment Questionnaire" (TAQ), "Rotation Assessment Questionnaire" (RAQ), and RAC Assessment Questionnaire". The process that brought to their validation are herein presented. Between July 2012 and July 2013, 51 residents evaluated 26 tutors through the TAQ, and 25 rotations through the RAQ. Forty-eight residents filled the RAC Assessment Questionnaire. The three questionnaires were validated through a many-facet Rasch measurement analysis. In their final form, the questionnaires produced measures that were valid, reliable, unidimensional, and free from gender biases. TAQ and RAQ distinguished tutors and rotations into 5-6 levels of different quality and effectiveness. The three questionnaires allowed the identification of strengths and weaknesses of tutors, rotations, and RAC. The agreement observed among judges was coherent to the predicted values, suggesting that no particular training is required for developing a shared interpretation of the items. The work herein presented serves to enrich the armamentarium of tools that resident medical programs can use to monitor their functioning. A larger application of these tools will serve to consolidate and refine further the results presented.

  2. Evaluating the Broad Educational Impact of an Arts Education Program: The Case of the Music Center of Los Angeles County's Artists-in-Residence Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfield, Doris L.

    A 1-year study was conducted to: document the effects of the Artists-in-Residence Program of the Music Center of Los Angeles County, Education Division (MCED); inform program planning and revision; and provide a compendium of evaluation strategies for future use. This study was divided into four phases and used a variety of methods: (1)…

  3. Designing and Implementing a Competency-Based Training Program for Anesthesiology Residents at the University of Ottawa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma J. Stodel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Competency-based medical education is gaining traction as a solution to address the challenges associated with the current time-based models of physician training. Competency-based medical education is an outcomes-based approach that involves identifying the abilities required of physicians and then designing the curriculum to support the achievement and assessment of these competencies. This paradigm defies the assumption that competence is achieved based on time spent on rotations and instead requires residents to demonstrate competence. The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC has launched Competence by Design (CBD, a competency-based approach for residency training and specialty practice. The first residents to be trained within this model will be those in medical oncology and otolaryngology-head and neck surgery in July, 2016. However, with approval from the RCPSC, the Department of Anesthesiology, University of Ottawa, launched an innovative competency-based residency training program July 1, 2015. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the program and offer a blueprint for other programs planning similar curricular reform. The program is structured according to the RCPSC CBD stages and addresses all CanMEDS roles. While our program retains some aspects of the traditional design, we have made many transformational changes.

  4. An Innovative Educational and Mentorship Program for Emergency Medicine Women Residents to Enhance Academic Development and Retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Kriti; Takayesu, James Kimo; Arbelaez, Christian; Peak, David; Nadel, Eric S

    2015-11-01

    Given the discrepancy between men and women's equal rates of medical school matriculation and their rates of academic promotion and leadership role acquisition, the need to provide mentorship and education to women in academic medicine is becoming increasingly recognized. Numerous large-scale programs have been developed to provide support and resources for women's enrichment and retention in academic medicine. Analyses of contributory factors to the aforementioned discrepancy commonly cite insufficient mentoring and role modeling as well as challenges with organizational navigation. Since residency training has been shown to be a critical juncture for making the decision to pursue an academic career, there is a need for innovative and tailored educational and mentorship programs targeting residents. Acknowledging residents' competing demands, we designed a program to provide easily accessible mentorship and contact with role models for our trainees at the departmental and institutional levels. We believe that this is an important step towards encouraging women's pursuit of academic careers. Our model may be useful to other emergency medicine residencies looking to provide such opportunities for their women residents.

  5. A novel flight surgeon training model at a joint military and civilian surgical residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSoucy, Erik S; Zakaluzny, Scott A; Galante, Joseph M

    2017-07-01

    Graduating military preliminary interns are often required to fill flight surgeon billets. General surgery preliminary interns get experience evaluating surgical and trauma patients, but receive very little training in primary care and flight medicine. At a joint military and civilian training program, we developed a supplemental curriculum to help transition our interns into flight medicine. From 2013 to 2016, we developed a lecture series focused on aerospace medicine, primary care, and specialty topics including dermatology, ophthalmology, orthopedics, pediatrics, psychiatry, and women's health. During the 2016 iteration attended by 10 interns, pre- and post-participation 10-item Likert scale surveys were administered. Questions focused on perceived preparedness for primary care role and overall enthusiasm for flight medicine. Open-ended surveys from 2013 to 2016 were also used to gauge the effect of the curriculum. The composite number of agreement responses (indicating increased comfort with presented material) increased 63% after course completion. Disagreement responses and neutral responses decreased 78% and 30%, respectively. Open-ended surveys from 14 participants showed an overall positive impression of the curriculum with all indicating it aided their transition to flight medicine. Survey responses indicate an overall perceived benefit from participation in the curriculum with more confidence in primary care topics and improved transition to a flight medicine tour. This model for supplemental aerospace medicine and primary care didactics should be integrated into any residency program responsible for training military preliminary interns who may serve as flight surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Modeling the hydrologic and economic efficacy of stormwater utility credit programs for US single family residences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertesz, Ruben; Green, Olivia Odom; Shuster, William D

    2014-01-01

    As regulatory pressure to reduce the environmental impact of urban stormwater intensifies, US municipalities increasingly seek a dedicated source of funding for stormwater programs, such as a stormwater utility. In rare instances, single family residences are eligible for utility discounts for installing green infrastructure. This study examined the hydrologic and economic efficacy of four such programs at the parcel scale: Cleveland (OH), Portland (OR), Fort Myers (FL), and Lynchburg (VA). Simulations were performed to model the reduction in stormwater runoff by implementing bioretention on a typical residential property according to extant administrative rules. The EPA National Stormwater Calculator was used to perform pre- vs post-retrofit comparisons and to demonstrate its ease of use for possible use by other cities in utility planning. Although surface slope, soil type and infiltration rate, impervious area, and bioretention parameters were different across cities, our results suggest that modeled runoff volume was most sensitive to percent of total impervious area that drained to the bioretention cell, with soil type the next most important factor. Findings also indicate a persistent gap between the percentage of annual runoff reduced and the percentage of fee reduced.

  7. Bedside Rounds Valued But Not Preferred: Perceptions of Internal Medicine Residents and Attending Physicians in a Diverse Academic Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Naseema B; Federman, Daniel G

    2017-08-01

    to the low frequency of BDR needs further consideration. Furthermore, each residency program may differ in the patterns of perception toward BDR and these should be formally assessed before implementing this patient-centered mode of rounding.

  8. Individualized Music Program is Associated with Improved Outcomes for U.S. Nursing Home Residents with Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kali S; Baier, Rosa; Kosar, Cyrus; Ogarek, Jessica; Trepman, Alissa; Mor, Vincent

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study was to compare resident outcomes before and after implementation of an individualized music program, MUSIC & MEMORY (M&M), designed to address the behavioral and psychological symptoms associated with dementia (BPSD). 98 nursing homes trained in the M&M program during 2013 and 98 matched-pair comparisons. Long-stay residents with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias (ADRD) residing in M&M participating facilities (N = 12,905) and comparison facilities (N = 12,811) during 2012-2013. M&M is a facility-level quality improvement program that provides residents with music specific to their personal histories and preferences. Discontinuation of anxiolytic and antipsychotic medications, and reductions in behavioral problems and depressed mood in 2012 (pre-intervention) and 2013 (intervention), calculated using Minimum Data Set (MDS) assessments. The proportion of residents who discontinued antipsychotic medication use over a 6-month period increased from 17.6% to 20.1% among M&M facilities, while remaining stable among comparison facilities (15.9% to 15.2%). The same trend was observed for anxiolytic medications: Discontinuation of anxiolytics increased in M&M facilities (23.5% to 24.4%), while decreasing among comparison facilities (24.8% to 20.0%). M&M facilities also demonstrated increased rates of reduction in behavioral problems (50.9% to 56.5%) versus comparison facilities (55.8% to 55.9%). No differences were observed for depressed mood. These results offer the first evidence that the M&M individualized music program is associated with reductions in antipsychotic medication use, anxiolytic medication use, and BPSD symptoms among long-stay nursing home residents with ADRD. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Exploring Inquiry in the Third Space: Case Studies of a Year in an Urban Teacher-Residency Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Emily J.; Taylor, Monica; Onore, Cynthia; Strom, Kathryn; Abrams, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Using case studies, we describe what happens from novice to apprentice when preservice teachers learn to teach in an urban teacher-residency (UTR) program with a focus on inquiry. Our UTR operates within a "third space" in teacher education, seeking to realign traditional power relationships and to create an alternate arena where the…

  10. Reframing in dentistry: Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivakumar Nuvvula

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The successful practice of dentistry involves a good combination of technical skills and soft skills. Soft skills or communication skills are not taught extensively in dental schools and it can be challenging to learn and at times in treating dental patients. Guiding the child′s behavior in the dental operatory is one of the preliminary steps to be taken by the pediatric dentist and one who can successfully modify the behavior can definitely pave the way for a life time comprehensive oral care. This article is an attempt to revisit a simple behavior guidance technique, reframing and explain the possible psychological perspectives behind it for better use in the clinical practice.

  11. [Ergonomic movement in dentistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos-Huizer, J J A; Bolderman, F W

    2014-02-01

    'Ergonomic movement in dentistry' is a recently developed ergonomic programme for dental healthcare professionals which is intended to prevent work-related complaints and assist in recovering from them. The programme is recommended by disability insurers in cases of specific physical complaints, limitations or disability, as a consequence of which a dental healthcare professional is unable to carry out his or her work. In a four-day training programme, in one's own workplace, skills are taught in the areas of work organization, work attitude and movement. These skills are directly applied in the treatment ofpatients and, if necessary, further improved. In this way, one advances step by step to an ergonomic way of working. Evaluations have shown that the programme is advantageous for the attitude toward work, the workplace and the work organization as well as the reduction of disability.

  12. Biological therapy and dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radfar, Lida; Ahmadabadi, Roshanak E; Masood, Farah; Scofield, R Hal

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, a new class of drugs has revolutionized the treatment of autoimmune, allergic, infectious and many more diseases. These drugs are classified into three groups, cytokines, monoclonal antibodies and fusion proteins. Biological drugs have less side effects compared to conventional drugs, and may target special damaged cells, but not all the cells. There may be side effects such as infection, hypersensitivity, hematological disorders, cancer, hepatotoxicity and neurological disorders, but there is not enough evidence or long term studies of the mechanism of action and side effects of these drugs. Patients on biological therapy may need some special consideration in dentistry. This paper is a review regarding the classification, mechanism of action and side effects of these drugs, and dental consideration for patients on biological therapy. PMID:26372436

  13. New technologies in dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanin, Fatima A. A.; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Pecora, Jesus D.

    1999-05-01

    The technology in dentistry has been developed significantly lately, increasing the technological level of new materials, methods and equipment have been developed. Undoubtedly the CO2 laser has contributed to this evolution particular to the treatment of the infected dentin. CO2 laser can sterilize and promote increase 6 to 8 times of dentin resistance, through the transformation the hydroxyapatite in calcium-phosphato-hydroxyapatite. We can reassure our patients about the use of pulsed CO2 laser due to better preservation of dental structure and its benefits permitting advanced esthetic treatments. The CEREC system, registers a tri-dimensional image of the preparation through a scan system, and sends it to the computer and the operator will edit the restorations so the equipment will finish porcelain restoration. The authors used a new laser 650 nm for caries detection and the other low lever laser (670 nm and 730 nm) considered an auxiliary method to prevent and treat the hypersensitivity in dentin.

  14. Nanocharacterization in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shivani; Cross, Sarah E; Hsueh, Carlin; Wali, Ruseen P; Stieg, Adam Z; Gimzewski, James K

    2010-06-17

    About 80% of US adults have some form of dental disease. There are a variety of new dental products available, ranging from implants to oral hygiene products that rely on nanoscale properties. Here, the application of AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) and optical interferometry to a range of dentistry issues, including characterization of dental enamel, oral bacteria, biofilms and the role of surface proteins in biochemical and nanomechanical properties of bacterial adhesins, is reviewed. We also include studies of new products blocking dentine tubules to alleviate hypersensitivity; antimicrobial effects of mouthwash and characterizing nanoparticle coated dental implants. An outlook on future "nanodentistry" developments such as saliva exosomes based diagnostics, designing biocompatible, antimicrobial dental implants and personalized dental healthcare is presented.

  15. Nanocharacterization in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivani Sharma

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available About 80% of US adults have some form of dental disease. There are a variety of new dental products available, ranging from implants to oral hygiene products that rely on nanoscale properties. Here, the application of AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy and optical interferometry to a range of dentistry issues, including characterization of dental enamel, oral bacteria, biofilms and the role of surface proteins in biochemical and nanomechanical properties of bacterial adhesins, is reviewed. We also include studies of new products blocking dentine tubules to alleviate hypersensitivity; antimicrobial effects of mouthwash and characterizing nanoparticle coated dental implants. An outlook on future “nanodentistry” developments such as saliva exosomes based diagnostics, designing biocompatible, antimicrobial dental implants and personalized dental healthcare is presented.

  16. Silver nanoparticles in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noronha, Victor T; Paula, Amauri J; Durán, Gabriela; Galembeck, Andre; Cogo-Müller, Karina; Franz-Montan, Michelle; Durán, Nelson

    2017-10-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been extensively studied for their antimicrobial properties, which provide an extensive applicability in dentistry. Because of this increasing interest in AgNPs, the objective of this paper was to review their use in nanocomposites; implant coatings; pre-formulation with antimicrobial activity against cariogenic pathogens, periodontal biofilm, fungal pathogens and endodontic bacteria; and other applications such as treatment of oral cancer and local anesthesia. Recent achievements in the study of the mechanism of action and the most important toxicological aspects are also presented. Systematic searches were carried out in Web of Science (ISI), Google, PubMed, SciFinder and EspaceNet databases with the keywords "silver nano* or AgNP*" and "dentist* or dental* or odontol*". A total of 155 peer-reviewed articles were reviewed. Most of them were published in the period of 2012-2017, demonstrating that this topic currently represents an important trend in dentistry research. In vitro studies reveal the excellent antimicrobial activity of AgNPs when associated with dental materials such as nanocomposites, acrylic resins, resin co-monomers, adhesives, intracanal medication, and implant coatings. Moreover, AgNPs were demonstrated to be interesting tools in the treatment of oral cancers due to their antitumor properties. The literature indicates that AgNPs are a promising system with important features such as antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and antitumor activity, and a potential carrier in sustained drug delivery. However, there are some aspects of the mechanisms of action of AgNPs, and some important toxicological aspects arising from the use of this system that must be completely elucidated. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Preparing New Graduates for Interprofessional Teamwork: Effectiveness of a Nurse Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Julie L; Bromley, Gail E

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this project was to determine whether a nurse residency program was effective in improving satisfaction with new graduates' performance competence in interprofessional collaboration. This was a cross-sectional survey design, comparing the satisfaction ratings of nurse leaders and staff nurses at a mid-western academic medical center to national benchmark data obtained from the 2007 Nursing Practice Readiness Tool. The sample consisted of 149 nurses who worked in inpatient units where new graduates practice. Thirty-five had 1 year or less of experience in nursing and 114 had at least 2 years of experience. Managers, experienced nurses, and new graduate nurses varied in their satisfaction ratings regarding interprofessional collaboration. Satisfaction of new graduates' competencies by nurse managers and staff nurses were rated higher in each category, compared with the national study, with 63% of nurse leaders satisfied with new graduates' ability to communicate with the interprofessional team, compared with the national average of 38%. Participants reported 56% satisfaction in the ability to work as a team, compared with 37% reported in the national study.

  18. Pilot Evaluation of a Communication Skills Training Program for Psychiatry Residents Using Standardized Patient Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditton-Phare, Philippa; Sandhu, Harsimrat; Kelly, Brian; Kissane, David; Loughland, Carmel

    2016-10-01

    Mental health clinicians can experience difficulties communicating diagnostic information to patients and their families/carers, especially about distressing psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia. There is evidence for the effectiveness of communication skills training (CST) for improving diagnostic discussions, particularly in specialties such as oncology, but only limited evidence exists about CST for psychiatry. This study evaluated a CST program specifically developed for psychiatry residents called ComPsych that focuses on conveying diagnostic and prognostic information about schizophrenia. The ComPsych program consists of an introductory lecture, module booklets for trainees, and exemplary skills videos, followed by small group role-plays with simulated patients (SPs) led by a trained facilitator. A standardized patient assessment (SPA) was digitally recorded pre- and post-training with a SP using a standardized scenario in a time-limited (15 min) period. Recorded SPAs were independently rated using a validated coding system (ComSkil) to identify frequency of skills used in five skills categories (agenda setting, checking, questioning, information organization, and empathic communication). Thirty trainees (15 males and 15 females; median age = 32) undertaking their vocational specialty training in psychiatry participated in ComPsych training and pre- and post-ComPsych SPAs. Skills increased post-training for agenda setting (d = -0.82), while questioning skills (d = 0.56) decreased. There were no significant differences in any other skills grouping, although checking, information organization, and empathic communication skills tended to increase post-training. A dose effect was observed for agenda setting, with trainees who attended more CST sessions outperforming those attending fewer. Findings support the generalization and translation of ComPsych CST to psychiatry.

  19. Taking Care of Our Own: A Multispecialty Study of Resident and Program Director Perspectives on Contributors to Burnout and Potential Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Emily G; Connolly, AnnaMarie; Putnam, Karen T; Penaskovic, Kenan M; Denniston, Clark R; Clark, Leslie H; Rubinow, David R; Meltzer-Brody, Samantha

    2017-04-01

    Rates of resident physician burnout range from 60 to 76 % and are rising. Consequently, there is an urgent need for academic medical centers to develop system-wide initiatives to combat burnout in physicians. Academic psychiatrists who advocate for or treat residents should be familiar with the scope of the problem and the contributors to burnout and potential interventions to mitigate it. We aimed to measure burnout in residents across a range of specialties and to describe resident- and program director-identified contributors and interventions. Residents across all specialties at a tertiary academic hospital completed surveys to assess symptoms of burnout and depression using the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, respectively. Residents and program directors identified contributors to burnout and interventions that might mitigate its risk. Residents were asked to identify barriers to treatment. There were 307 residents (response rate of 61 %) who completed at least one question on the survey; however, all residents did not respond to all questions, resulting in varying denominators across survey questions. In total, 190 of 276 residents (69 %) met criteria for burnout and 45 of 263 (17 %) screened positive for depression. Program directors underestimated rates of burnout, with only one program director estimating a rate of 50 % or higher. Overall residents and program directors agreed that lack of work-life balance and feeling unappreciated were major contributors. Forty-two percent of residents reported that inability to take time off from work was a significant barrier to seeking help, and 25 % incorrectly believed that burnout is a reportable condition to the medical board. Resident distress is common and most likely due to work-life imbalance and feeling unappreciated. However, residents are reluctant to seek help. Interventions that address work-life balance and increase access to support are urgently needed in academic

  20. ETHICAL CHALLENGES IN AESTHETIC DENTISTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius NEAGU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aesthetic dentistry is a branch of dentistry which aims primarily at improving patient’s physical appearance and, to a lesser extent, the functionality of teeth. This field raises particular ethical dilemmas and requires a careful evaluation of patient’s needs and wishes versus his/her clinical best interests. In this article, the authors discuss the main ethical challenges in the field of aesthetic dentistry in the light of the four “classical” principles of bioethics: autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence and justice. The authors conclude that the principles of medical ethics should be at the very foundation of the field of aesthetic dentistry, for establishing a patient-physician relationship which could lead to optimum clinical outcomes, while respecting the wishes of the patient and promoting his/her best interests.

  1. Differences in the perception of characteristics of excellence of clinical tutors among residents and consultants at an emergency medicine residency program a qualitative research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muna Saleem Aljahany

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Defining exactly what characterizes a clinical tutor as excellent and another less effective, is an important task in assessing the effectiveness of clinical training and guiding faculty development. Aim: We aimed to evaluate those characteristics and measure differences in their perception among accomplished and non-accomplished consultants and residents in the Emergency Department. We also compared perceptions between the different groups of participants. Methods: The characteristics measured were extracted from an extensive search of previously published studies summarized in a review article. A qualitative study was conducted, using a 20 item questionnaire piloted from the refined characteristics (good indicator of reliability; Cronbach′s Alpha = 0.86. The questionnaire was distributed among all consultants and residents in Saudi Board of Emergency Medicine. Results: No significant difference between consultants′ and residents′ perception was found. "Sincere" was an exception 87.8% versus 55.1%, P = 0.013. Consultants′ specifications did not seem to affect perception on overall scores and its component sub-scores. Conclusion: Since results showed no relation between accomplished and non-accomplished consultants in perceiving those qualities, we excluded the lack of knowledge of those characteristics as a cause of being accomplished or non-accomplished. We suggest a greater dedication from program developers towards creating more opportunities to involve more consultants in basic Emergency Medicine training.

  2. Results of a Multifaceted Intimate Partner Violence Training Program for Pediatric Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    McColgan, Maria D.; Cruz, Mario; McKee, Jessica; Dempsey, Sandra H.; Davis, Martha B.; Barry, Patricia; Yoder, Ana Lisa; Giardino, Angelo P.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of a multifaceted Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) intervention on knowledge, attitudes, and screening practices of pediatric residents. Methods: The intervention included: an on-site IPV counselor, IPV training for attending physicians, residents and social workers, and screening prompts. Evaluation included…

  3. Mapping of Primary Instructional Methods and Teaching Techniques for Regularly Scheduled, Formal Teaching Sessions in an Anesthesia Residency Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vested Madsen, Matias; Macario, Alex; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we examined the regularly scheduled, formal teaching sessions in a single anesthesiology residency program to (1) map the most common primary instructional methods, (2) map the use of 10 known teaching techniques, and (3) assess if residents scored sessions that incorporated active......; range, 0-9). Clinical applicability (85%) and attention grabbers (85%) were the 2 most common teaching techniques. Thirty-eight percent of the sessions defined learning objectives, and one-third of sessions engaged in active learning. The overall survey response rate equaled 42%, and passive sessions...... learning as higher quality than sessions with little or no verbal interaction between teacher and learner. A modified Delphi process was used to identify useful teaching techniques. A representative sample of each of the formal teaching session types was mapped, and residents anonymously completed a 5...

  4. Project to design and develop an energy-related program: For public housing residents and renters: Volume 1, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-05-01

    This demonstration project was undertaken as a result of an unsolicited proposal submitted by THE ASSIGNMENT GROUP (TAG) to the Office of Minority Economic Impact, Department of Energy (DOE). The problem to which the proposal responded was how to minimize the costs associated with public housing tenants in standard public housing as well as under homeownership transfers. A related problem was how to graduate the tenants to another level of responsibility and self-sufficiency through resident business developments and training in energy-related fields. The size and gravity of the problem necessitated a purpose or aim that had nationwide application, yet lent itself to a microscopic look. Consequently, the goal that emanated was the design and development of an energy-related demonstration program that educates public housing residents, facilitates indigenous business development where appropriate, and trains residents to provide needed services.

  5. Atenção odontológica no Programa de Saúde da Família de Campos dos Goytacazes Dentistry attention in the family's health program (FHP in Campos dos Goytacazes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José-Luiz Carvalho de Oliveira

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Durante décadas, a política de saúde bucal no Brasil foi centrada na prestação de assistência à doença, e ainda hoje grande parcela da população brasileira não tem acesso a cuidados odontológicos. Pela Portaria nº 1.444, de 28 de dezembro de 2000, o Ministério da Saúde estabelece incentivo financeiro para a reorganização da atenção à saúde bucal aos municípios. Insere-se, assim, a Odontologia no programa e, conseqüentemente, a possibilidade de ampliar e reorientar a atenção odontológica no Brasil. Dentro desse contexto, este estudo teve por objetivo avaliar a situação da equipe de saúde bucal inserida no Programa de Saúde da Família (PSF do município de Campos dos Goytacazes - RJ, em 2002. Os resultados demonstraram algumas limitações na inclusão e funcionamento da Odontologia no PSF da cidade. A atenção odontológica deve ser inserida no PSF, atendendo aos princípios básicos do Plano de Reorganização das Ações de Saúde Bucal na Atenção Básica, proposto pelo Ministério da Saúde, e à consolidação do Sistema Único de Saúde.Oral health policy in Brazil has been centred on giving assistance to diseases for decades and a great portion of the Brazilian population has not already had access to dentistry care. Through Edict 1.444, dated 28th December 2000, the Ministry established a financial incentive for attention re-organization given to oral health in municipalities. In this context, this study aimed at evaluating the situation of oral health teams inserted in the Family's Health Program (FHP in the city of Campos dos Goytacazes, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil, in 2002. The results show some limitations related to inclusion a working of dentistry at the FHP in that city. Dentistry attention must be attached to the FHP, in accordance with the basic principles of the Re-structuring Oral Health Action Plan in the Basic Attention proposed by the Health Ministry and the National Health System

  6. Implementation of a residency program in anesthesiology in the Northeast of Brazil: impact on work processes and professional motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Regina Fernandes

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: To understand, through the theory of social representations, the influence exerted by the establishment of a residency program in anesthesiology on anesthetic care and professional motivation in a tertiary teaching hospital in the Northeast of Brazil. METHOD: Qualitative methodology. The theoretical framework comprised the phenomenology and the social representation theory. Five multidisciplinary focus groups were formed with 17 health professionals (five surgeons, five anesthesiologists, two nurses, and five nursing technicians, who work in operating rooms and post-anesthesia care units, all with a prior and a posteriori experience to the establishment of residency. RESULTS: From the response content analysis, the following empirical categories emerged: motivation to upgrade, recycling of anesthesiologists and improving anesthetic practice, resident as an interdisciplinary link in perioperative care, improvements in the quality of perioperative care, and recognition of weaknesses in the perioperative process. It was evident from upper gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to prolonged intubation that the creation of a residency in anesthesiology brings advancements that are reflected in the motivation of anesthesiologists; the resident worked as an interdisciplinary link between the multidisciplinary team; there was recognition of weaknesses in the system, which were identified and actions to overcome it were proposed. CONCLUSION: The implementation of a residency program in anesthesiology at a tertiary education hospital in the Northeast of Brazil promoted scientific updates, improved the quality of care and processes of interdisciplinary care, recognized the weaknesses of the service, developed action plans and suggested that this type of initiative may be useful in remote areas of developing countries.

  7. [Implementation of a residency program in anesthesiology in the Northeast of Brazil: impact on work processes and professional motivation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Cláudia Regina; Sousa, Rafael Queiroz de; Arcanjo, Francisco Sávio Alves; Neto, Gerardo Cristino de Menezes; Gomes, Josenília Maria Alves; Giaxa, Renata Rocha Barreto

    2015-01-01

    Understand, through the theory of social representations, the influence exerted by the establishment a residency program in anesthesiology on anesthetic care and professional motivation in a tertiary teaching hospital in the Northeast of Brazil. Qualitative methodology. The theoretical framework comprised the phenomenology and the Social Representation Theory. Five multidisciplinary focus groups were formed with 17 health professionals (five surgeons, five anesthesiologists, two nurses, and five nursing technicians), who work in operating rooms and post-anesthesia care units, all with prior and posterior experience to the establishment of residency. From the response content analysis, the following empirical categories emerged: motivation to upgrade, recycling of anesthesiologists and improving anesthetic practice, resident as an interdisciplinary link in perioperative care, improvements in the quality of perioperative care, recognition of weaknesses in the perioperative process. It was evident upper gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to prolonged intubation that the creation of a residency in anesthesiology brings advancements that are reflected in the motivation of anesthesiologists; the resident worked as an interdisciplinary link between the multidisciplinary team; there was recognition of weaknesses in the system, which were identified and actions to overcome it were proposed. The implementation of a residency program in anesthesiology at a tertiary education hospital in the Northeast of Brazil promoted scientific updates, improved the quality of care and processes of interdisciplinary care, recognized the weaknesses of the service, developed action plans and suggested that this type of initiative may be useful in remote areas of developing countries. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Evidence-based dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David W

    2010-01-01

    Both panegyric and criticism of evidence-based dentistry tend to be clumsy because the concept is poorly defined. This analysis identifies several contributions to the profession that have been made under the EBD banner. Although the concept of clinicians integrating clinical epidemiology, the wisdom of their practices, and patients' values is powerful, its implementation has been distorted by a too heavy emphasis of computerized searches for research findings that meet the standards of academics. Although EBD advocates enjoy sharing anecdotal accounts of mistakes others have made, faulting others is not proof that one's own position is correct. There is no systematic, high-quality evidence that EBD is effective. The metaphor of a three-legged stool (evidence, experience, values, and integration) is used as an organizing principle. "Best evidence" has become a preoccupation among EBD enthusiasts. That overlong but thinly developed leg of the stool is critiqued from the perspectives of the criteria for evidence, the difference between internal and external validity, the relationship between evidence and decision making, the ambiguous meaning of "best," and the role of reasonable doubt. The strongest leg of the stool is clinical experience. Although bias exists in all observations (including searches for evidence), there are simple procedures that can be employed in practice to increase useful and objective evidence there, and there are dangers in delegating policy regarding allowable treatments to external groups. Patient and practitioner values are the shortest leg of the stool. As they are so little recognized, their integration in EBD is problematic and ethical tensions exist where paternalism privileges science over patient's self-determined best interests. Four potential approaches to integration are suggested, recognizing that there is virtually no literature on how the "seat" of the three-legged stool works or should work. It is likely that most dentists

  9. A novel program for clinical pathology training for residents emphasizing high-impact and attending-level learning opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranheim, Erik A

    2014-02-01

    Clinical pathology (CP) rotations in our residency program consistently received lower evaluations and lower scores on the Resident In-Service Exam (RISE) in comparison to anatomic pathology rotations. In 2010 to 2011, we instituted a new model for CP training, wherein the separate rotations for chemistry, transfusion medicine, molecular diagnostics, microbiology, and coagulation/immunology were combined into a 3-month "Superblock" in an effort to maximize and repeat high-impact learning opportunities in a team-based model. Resident and faculty satisfaction with the new curriculum and RISE scores were assessed in the 3 years before and after implementation of the curriculum. Large majorities of residents and faculty expressed increased satisfaction with the curriculum. Average RISE scores increased 8.3% in CP in the 3 years following introduction of the curriculum compared to the 3 years prior to introduction, while anatomic pathology average scores decreased by 1.5%. The CP Superblock provides a model of CP education which may address some of the difficulties in teaching CP topics and recruiting residents to CP specialization. The pros and cons of its implementation are discussed.

  10. Should dentists become 'oral physicians'? No, dentistry must remain dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assael, Leon A

    2004-04-01

    Dentistry is not an allied health profession. It is not a paramedical profession. It is time that dentistry be recognized as the profession that offers patients some of the most complex surgery performed on the human body--namely, restorative dentistry and rehabilitation of the masticatory system. Dentistry is the only anatomically focused health care profession that is university-based and for which primary care responsibility is maintained by the profession. An inferiority complex about what it means to be a dentist has served only to confuse the public and bring us further from our goal of improving the health of all our patients. This inferiority complex is driven by the public and the medical profession, neither of which understands how dentistry fits into overall health care. It is essential that every academic health center have oral health education as an integrated part of health care education for dentists, physicians, nurses, allied dental personel, physical therapists, psychologists and all who receive university-based health care education. In this way, all the health professions and the public will see dentistry and oral health as essential to patients' overall health. The idea of emulating those who do not have the strength of basic-science education, practice complexity, surgical skills or community status by seizing a new title will not elevate the profession for the future. The public knows what a dentist is. It is our task to inform the public about the capabilities of dentists and the value of oral health and our profession. We can accomplish this best by assuring that our profession's name, "dentistry," is understood to represent one of the world's most accomplished surgical endeavors, one that is thoroughly integrated into the fabric of health care. Thus, good oral health will be thoroughly integrated into what it means to be healthy.

  11. Resident selection for a physical medicine and rehabilitation program: feasibility and reliability of the multiple mini-interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlayson, Heather C; Townson, Andrea F

    2011-04-01

    The development of a process to select the best residents for training programs is challenging. There is a paucity of literature to support the implementation of an evidence-based approach or even best practice for program directors and selection committees. Although assessment of traditional academic markers such as clerkship grades and licensing examination scores can be helpful, these measures typically fail to capture performance in the noncognitive domains of medicine. In the specialty of physical medicine and rehabilitation, physician competencies such as communication, health advocacy, and managerial and collaborative skills are of particular importance, but these are often difficult to evaluate in admission interviews. Recent research on admission processes for medical schools has demonstrated reliability and validity of the "multiple mini-interview." The objective of our project was to develop and evaluate the multiple mini-interview for a physical medicine and rehabilitation residency training program, with a focus on assessment of the noncognitive physician competencies. We found that the process was feasible, time efficient, and cost-efficient and that there was good interrater reliability. The multiple mini-interview may be applied to other physical medicine and rehabilitation residency programs. Further research is needed to confirm reliability and determine validity.

  12. Thrombolytic utilization for ischemic stroke in US hospitals with neurology residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradiya, Yogesh; Crystal, Howard; Valsamis, Helen; Levine, Steven R

    2013-12-03

    We aimed to compare the rates of thrombolysis utilization for acute ischemic stroke in hospitals with neurology residency (NR) to those of other teaching (OT) and nonteaching (NT) hospitals. A retrospective serial cross-sectional cohort study of a nationally representative sample of stroke patients was conducted. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited NR program-affiliated hospitals in the United States were cross-matched to the hospitals in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample from 2000 to 2010. ICD-9-CM codes were used for case ascertainment. A total of 712,433 adult ischemic stroke patients from 6,839 hospital samples were included, of whom 10.1%, 29.1%, and 60.8% were treated in NR, OT, and NT hospitals, respectively. Stroke patients in NR received thrombolysis more frequently (3.74% ± 0.24% [standard error]) than in OT (2.28% ± 0.11%, p < 0.001) and NT hospitals (1.44% ± 0.06%, p < 0.001). The adjusted odds ratios (ORs) of thrombolysis rates in NR vs OT and NR vs NT increased with each decade increment in age. In multivariate analysis, NR was independently predictive of higher thrombolysis rate (adjusted OR 1.51; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.44-1.59 [NR vs OT], and adjusted OR 1.82; 95% CI 1.73-1.91 [NR vs NT]). Acute stroke care in NR hospitals is associated with an increased thrombolytic utilization. The disparities between the thrombolysis rate in NR and that in OT and NT hospitals are greater among elderly patients.

  13. Herbs in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, Jamile B; Azimi, Somayyeh; Rafieian, Nasrin; Zanjani, Hosein Akhavan

    2011-12-01

    Herbs have been used for centuries to prevent and control disease. Herbal extracts are effective because they interact with specific chemical receptors within the body and are in a pharmacodynamic sense, drugs themselves. By using herbal medicines, patients have averted the many side effects that generally come with traditional medicines, but this does not mean that side effects do not occur. Only knowledgeable practitioners can prescribe the right herb and its proper dosage. Herbal medicines had been considered in every culture, however, pharmaceutical companies overturned this type of thinking. Now, pharmaceuticals are called traditional and herbs are libeled as the 'alternative'. The biggest challenge and problem is lack of information about the effect of herbs in oral tissues, mechanism of effect, and side effects. Several popular conventional drugs on the market are derived from herbs. These include aspirin (from white willow bark), digitalis (from foxglove), and sudafed (modelled after a component in the plant ephedra). Herbal products can vary in their potency. Therefore, care must be taken in selecting herbs, even so, herbal medicines have dramatically fewer side effects and are safer to use than conventional medications. The herbs described in this article are Bloodroot, Caraway, Chamomile, Echinacea, Myrrh, Peppermint, Rosemary, Sage, Thyme, Aloe Vera, Propolis, and a summary of other herbs that are useful in dentistry. Herbs may be good alternatives to current treatments for oral health problems but it is clear that we need more research.

  14. Ultrasonics in Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, A. D.

    Ultrasonic instruments have been used in dentistry since the 1950's. Initially they were used to cut teeth but very quickly they became established as an ultrasonic scaler which was used to remove deposits from the hard tissues of the tooth. This enabled the soft tissues around the tooth to return to health. The ultrasonic vibrations are generated in a thin metal probe and it is the working tip that is the active component of the instrument. Scanning laser vibrometry has shown that there is much variability in their movement which is related to the shape and cross sectional shape of the probe. The working instrument will also generate cavitation and microstreaming in the associated cooling water. This can be mapped out along the length of the instrument indicating which are the active areas. Ultrasonics has also found use for cleaning often inaccessible or different surfaces including root canal treatment and dental titanium implants. The use of ultrasonics to cut bone during different surgical techniques shows considerable promise. More research is indicated to determine how to maximize the efficiency of such instruments so that they are more clinically effective.

  15. Piezosurgery in implant dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stübinger S

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Stefan Stübinger,1 Andres Stricker,2 Britt-Isabelle Berg3,4 1Hightech Research Center of Cranio-maxillofacial Surgery, University of Basel, Allschwil, Switzerland; 2Private Practice, Konstanz, Germany; 3Department of Cranio-maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland; 4Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Piezosurgery, or the use of piezoelectric devices, is being applied increasingly in oral and maxillofacial surgery. The main advantages of this technique are precise and selective cuttings, the avoidance of thermal damage, and the preservation of soft-tissue structures. Through the application of piezoelectric surgery, implant-site preparation, bone grafting, sinus-floor elevation, edentulous ridge splitting or the lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve are very technically feasible. This clinical overview gives a short summary of the current literature and outlines the advantages and disadvantages of piezoelectric bone surgery in implant dentistry. Overall, piezoelectric surgery is superior to other methods that utilize mechanical instruments. Handling of delicate or compromised hard- and soft-tissue conditions can be performed with less risk for the patient. With respect to current and future innovative surgical concepts, piezoelectric surgery offers a wide range of new possibilities to perform customized and minimally invasive osteotomies. Keywords: implantology, piezoelectric device, piezosurgery, maxillary sinus elevation, bone grafting, osteotomy, edentulous ridge splitting

  16. Enhancing Feedback on Professionalism and Communication Skills in Anesthesia Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, John D; Ku, Cindy; Diachun, Carol Ann B; DiLorenzo, Amy; Lee, Daniel E; Karan, Suzanne; Wong, Vanessa; Schell, Randall M; Brzezinski, Marek; Jones, Stephanie B

    2017-08-01

    Despite its importance, training faculty to provide feedback to residents remains challenging. We hypothesized that, overall, at 4 institutions, a faculty development program on providing feedback on professionalism and communication skills would lead to (1) an improvement in the quantity, quality, and utility of feedback and (2) an increase in feedback containing negative/constructive feedback and pertaining to professionalism/communication. As secondary analyses, we explored these outcomes at the individual institutions. In this prospective cohort study (October 2013 to July 2014), we implemented a video-based educational program on feedback at 4 institutions. Feedback records from 3 months before to 3 months after the intervention were rated for quality (0-5), utility (0-5), and whether they had negative/constructive feedback and/or were related to professionalism/communication. Feedback records during the preintervention, intervention, and postintervention periods were compared using the Kruskal-Wallis and χ tests. Data are reported as median (interquartile range) or proportion/percentage. A total of 1926 feedback records were rated. The institutions overall did not have a significant difference in feedback quantity (preintervention: 855/3046 [28.1%]; postintervention: 896/3327 [26.9%]; odds ratio: 1.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.95-1.18; P = .31), feedback quality (preintervention: 2 [1-4]; intervention: 2 [1-4]; postintervention: 2 [1-4]; P = .90), feedback utility (preintervention: 1 [1-3]; intervention: 2 [1-3]; postintervention: 1 [1-2]; P = .61), or percentage of feedback records containing negative/constructive feedback (preintervention: 27%; intervention: 32%; postintervention: 25%; P = .12) or related to professionalism/communication (preintervention: 23%; intervention: 33%; postintervention: 24%; P = .03). Institution 1 had a significant difference in feedback quality (preintervention: 2 [1-3]; intervention: 3 [2-4]; postintervention: 3 [2-4]; P

  17. Implementing a successful journal club in an anesthesiology residency program [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/xe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel D Pitner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Journal clubs are an integral element of residency training. We report the successful implementation of a monthly structured journal club in our anesthesia residency program. Based on resident surveys before and one year after its start, the journal club led to a significantly higher confidence in how to critically appraise literature and present a manuscript. The journal club also improved the residents' ability to search the literature and their statistical knowledge, skills that are essential in the practice of evidence-based medicine. We describe key features that may aid other training programs in organizing a stimulating an educational and sustainable journal club.

  18. Implementing a multidimensional geriatric curriculum in a physical medicine and rehabilitation residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulk, Clinton E; Lee, Tae Joon; Musick, David

    2012-10-01

    Residency training in physical medicine and rehabilitation may not contain a formal curriculum in geriatric patient care. A multidimensional geriatric curriculum to third and fourth year physical medicine and rehabilitation residents was implemented to enhance their knowledge in and attitude toward geriatrics. The curriculum consisted of a 12-wk clinical rotation at various sites of geriatric care including outpatient geriatric clinic, skilled nursing facility, continuing care retirement community, and home visits. Six online self-learning modules and multiple didactic sessions were also created. The residents' knowledge and attitude were assessed by pretest and posttest design using the Geriatric Knowledge Test, the Geriatric Attitude Scale, and the Attitudes Toward Teamwork in Healthcare Scale. In addition, the residents completed rotation evaluations to rate their learning experiences. Ten postgraduate year 3 and 4 physical medicine and rehabilitation residents participated in the geriatric curriculum, which included a required rotation. The Geriatric Knowledge Test score at baseline was 67.2%. With the completion of the curriculum, the Geriatric Knowledge Test scores showed improvement to 72.7%, although not statistically significant. The residents showed more favorable attitudes toward the geriatric population and interdisciplinary teamwork as measured by the Geriatric Attitude Scale and the Attitudes Toward Teamwork in Healthcare Scale. Overall, they rated the learning experiences highly on a 1-9 rating scale, with 9 being the highest rating; the residents assigned an average rating of 7.06 to specific learning activities within the rotation and an average rating of 6.89 to the organizational aspects of the rotation itself. The implementation of this geriatric curriculum allowed for improved geriatric training in physical medicine and rehabilitation residents.

  19. Preserving the educational value of call in a diagnostic radiology residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell, Carol M; Deloney, Linda A; Jambhekar, Kedar; Brandon, Hicks

    2014-01-01

    Our study was designed to determine residents' opinions of the advantages, disadvantages and educational value of a traditional "Tandem Call" (TC) model as compared to night float (NF). Because TC is more representative of adult learning principles and constructivist theory, we hypothesized that resident satisfaction and educational outcomes would demonstrate a preference for, and the educational efficacy of, the TC model. We surveyed all residents in a university-based radiology residency on their opinions of TC and its educational value. Aggregate data from annual Graduate Medical Education Committee institutional surveys (2008-2012) and annual radiology alumni surveys (2009-2012) were reviewed as measures of satisfaction with TC. Performance on the ABR oral exam was a proxy for educational outcome. Quality data for the year of study and prior years in which TC was in effect were reviewed as a measure of patient safety. The great majority of respondents attributed confidence/competence on call and added value to their education directly to TC. A majority believed that teamwork required for TC facilitated more positive relationships among residents and more peer teaching. Most said that they would not prefer NF. Almost all believed indirect supervision with attending backup aided in developing confidence in performance. Quality data confirmed a low number of discrepancies between preliminary resident and final attending reads. TC provides a more consistent call experience throughout residency than NF. TC is valued by residents, facilitates retrieval-based learning and development of independence and efficiency, and parallels essential elements of team-based learning. Quality data suggests that lack of 24-hour attending supervision is not detrimental to patient safety. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Sponsoring Institutions with Five or Fewer Residency Programs Produce a Larger Proportion of General Internists and Family Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemeida, Sarah; Klink, Kathleen; Bazemore, Andrew; Petterson, Stephen; Peterson, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Policymakers are increasingly interested in addressing the US primary care physician shortage and achieving measurable accountability for the products of the nation's $15 billion investment in graduate medical education (GME). Using one such measure, we found that sponsoring institutions (SIs) with ≤5 residency programs produce a higher percentage of general internists and family physicians than larger SIs. © Copyright 2016 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  1. Evaluating the quality of education at dentistry school of Tehran University of medical sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereshteh Farzianpour

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Educational evaluation is a process which deals with data collection and assessment of academic activities′ progress. In this research, educational evaluation of Dentistry School of Tehran University of Medical Sciences, which trains students in undergraduate and residency courses, was studied. Methods : This descriptive study was done with a model of educational evaluation in ten steps and 13 fields including purposes and mission objectives, management and organization, academic board members, students, human resources and support, educational, research, health and treatment spaces, educational, diagnostic, research and laboratory tools, educational, research, health and treatment programs and courses, process of teaching and learning, evaluation and assessment, alumni, and patients satisfaction. Data were collected using observation, interviews, questionnaires, and checklists. Results: Results of the study were mainly qualitative and in some cases quantitative, based on defined optimal situation. The total mean of qualitative results of educational evaluation of dentistry school in all 13 fields was 55.98% which is relatively desirable. In the case of quantitative ones, results of some fields such as treatment quality of patients and education and learning of the students were relatively desirable (61.32% and 60.16% respectively. Conclusion: According to the results, educational goals and missions, educational and research facilities and spaces which were identified as the weakest areas need to be considered and paid more serious attention.

  2. Evaluating the quality of education at dentistry school of tehran university of medical sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzianpour, Fereshteh; Monzavi, Abbas; Yassini, Esmaeil

    2011-01-01

    Educational evaluation is a process which deals with data collection and assessment of academic activities' progress. In this research, educational evaluation of Dentistry School of Tehran University of Medical Sciences, which trains students in undergraduate and residency courses, was studied. This descriptive study was done with a model of educational evaluation in ten steps and 13 fields including purposes and mission objectives, management and organization, academic board members, students, human resources and support, educational, research, health and treatment spaces, educational, diagnostic, research and laboratory tools, educational, research, health and treatment programs and courses, process of teaching and learning, evaluation and assessment, alumni, and patients satisfaction. Data were collected using observation, interviews, questionnaires, and checklists. Results of the study were mainly qualitative and in some cases quantitative, based on defined optimal situation. The total mean of qualitative results of educational evaluation of dentistry school in all 13 fields was 55.98% which is relatively desirable. In the case of quantitative ones, results of some fields such as treatment quality of patients and education and learning of the students were relatively desirable (61.32% and 60.16% respectively). According to the results, educational goals and missions, educational and research facilities and spaces which were identified as the weakest areas need to be considered and paid more serious attention.

  3. The surgical experience of general surgery residents: an analysis of the applicability of the specialty program in General and Digestive Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targarona Soler, Eduardo Ma; Jover Navalon, Jose Ma; Gutierrez Saiz, Javier; Turrado Rodríguez, Víctor; Parrilla Paricio, Pascual

    2015-03-01

    Residents in our country have achieved a homogenous surgical training by following a structured residency program. This is due to the existence of specific training programs for each specialty. The current program, approved in 2007, has a detailed list of procedures that a surgeon should have performed in order to complete training. The aim of this study is to analyze the applicability of the program with regard to the number of procedures performed during the residency period. A data collection form was designed that included the list of procedures from the program of the specialty; it was sent in April 2014 to all hospitals with accredited residency programs. In September 2014 the forms were analysed, and a general descriptive study was performed; a subanalysis according to the resident's sex and Autonomous region was also performed. The number of procedures performed according to the number of residents in the different centers was also analyzed. The survey was sent to 117 hospitals with accredited programs, which included 190 resident places. A total of 91 hospitals responded (53%). The training offered adapts in general to the specialty program. The total number of procedures performed in the different sub-areas, in laparoscopic and emergency surgery is correct or above the number recommended by the program, with the exception of esophageal-gastric and hepatobiliary surgery. The sub-analysis according to Autonomous region did not show any significant differences in the total number of procedures, however, there were significant differences in endocrine surgery (P=.001) and breast surgery (P=.042). A total of 55% of residents are female, with no significant differences in distribution in Autonomous regions. However, female surgeons operate more than their male counterparts during the residency period (512±226 vs. 625±244; P<.01). The number of residents in the hospital correlates with the number of procedures performed; the residents with more procedures

  4. Potential impact of a bedside procedure service on training procedurally competent hospitalists in a community-based residency program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montuno, Anthony; Hunt, Bijou R.; Lee, May M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The Society of Hospital Medicine has delineated procedures as one of the core competencies for hospitalists. Little is known about whether exposure to a medical procedure service (MPS) impacts the procedural certification rate in internal medicine trainees in a community hospital training program. Objective To determine whether or not exposure to an MPS would impact both the number of procedures performed and the rate of resultant certifications in a community hospital internal medicine training program. Design Retrospective review. Methods Five cohorts of resident physicians and their procedure data were analyzed comparing months where residents were unexposed to the intervention (pre-MPS) to months where residents were exposed to the intervention (post-MPS). We calculated the average number of procedures performed per month for pre- versus post-MPS periods. For procedural certification, we compared two proportions: the number of certifications over the number of 6-month pre-MPS periods and the number of certifications over the number of 6-month post-MPS periods. Setting/subjects The study was conducted at a community-based academic medical center. Subjects included all internal medicine residents. Results We found a statistically significant difference between the groups, with pre-MPS groups performing 4.3 procedures per month compared with post-MPS groups performing 6.7 procedures per month (p=0.0010). For certification rates, we found statistically significant differences in several categories – overall, paracentesis, femoral central lines, and jugular central lines. Conclusions This study demonstrated that resident exposure to an MPS statistically significantly increased the total number of procedures performed. This study also showed that overall certification rates were statistically significantly different between the pre- and post-MPS groups for several procedures. PMID:27406445

  5. What is minimally invasive dentistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericson, Dan

    2004-01-01

    Minimally Invasive Dentistry is the application of "a systematic respect for the original tissue." This implies that the dental profession recognizes that an artifact is of less biological value than the original healthy tissue. Minimally invasive dentistry is a concept that can embrace all aspects of the profession. The common delineator is tissue preservation, preferably by preventing disease from occurring and intercepting its progress, but also removing and replacing with as little tissue loss as possible. It does not suggest that we make small fillings to restore incipient lesions or surgically remove impacted third molars without symptoms as routine procedures. The introduction of predictable adhesive technologies has led to a giant leap in interest in minimally invasive dentistry. The concept bridges the traditional gap between prevention and surgical procedures, which is just what dentistry needs today. The evidence-base for survival of restorations clearly indicates that restoring teeth is a temporary palliative measure that is doomed to fail if the disease that caused the condition is not addressed properly. Today, the means, motives and opportunities for minimally invasive dentistry are at hand, but incentives are definitely lacking. Patients and third parties seem to be convinced that the only things that count are replacements. Namely, they are prepared to pay for a filling but not for a procedure that can help avoid having one.

  6. Evaluation of an online program to teach microbiology to internal medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarner, Jeannette; Burd, Eileen M; Kraft, Colleen S; Armstrong, Wendy S; Lenorr, Kenya; Spicer, Jennifer O; Martin, Donna; del Rio, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Microbiology rounds are an integral part of infectious disease consultation service. During microbiology rounds, we highlight microbiology principles using vignettes. We created case-based, interactive, microbiology online modules similar to the vignettes presented during microbiology rounds. Since internal medicine residents rotating on our infectious disease elective have limited time to participate in rounds and learn microbiology, our objective was to evaluate the use of the microbiology online modules by internal medicine residents. We asked residents to complete 10 of 25 online modules during their infectious disease elective. We evaluated which modules they chose and the change in their knowledge level. Forty-six internal medicine residents completed assessments given before and after accessing the modules with an average of 11/20 (range, 6 to 19) and 16/20 (range, 9 to 20) correct questions, respectively (average improvement, 5 questions; P = 0.0001). The modules accessed by more than 30 residents included those related to Clostridium difficile, anaerobes, Candida spp., Streptococcus pneumoniae, influenza, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and Neisseria meningitidis. We demonstrated improved microbiology knowledge after completion of the online modules. This improvement may not be solely attributed to completing the online modules, as fellows and faculty may have provided additional microbiology education during the rotation. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Straightforward Case of Dental Implant in General Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aji P. Tjikman

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dental implant has become a fast developing and dynamic field in dental practice. It is acknowledged as a predictable treatment modality with high clinical success rates. Conventional fixed prostheses are no longer considered to be the first choice of treatment for replacing a missing tooth. Despite the increasing number of patients requesting dental implant treatments, there are only some clinicians who are offering implant therapy in their daily practice. The International team for Implantology described a straightforward case as a simple case such as implant placements in adquate soft and hard tissue conditions and single-tooth restorations in a non-aesthetic zone. A review of the current literature discussed the implementation of implant dentistry in universities worldwide into their curriculum for both undergraduate and postgraduate programs in general dentistry. The European consensus in implant dentistry education concluded that it is desirable to include the surgical technique for implant placement for straightforward cases into the dental curriculum. The levels and limitations to which the various aspects of implant dentistry and related skills are taught to be determined by the academic community. This review aimed at promoting awareness amongst dental practitioners and institutions in Indonesia of the shifting treatment paradigm in the maangement of a missing tooth. Hence clinicians will be able to include implant dentistry in the treatment planning of their patients and also undertake a significant part in the execution of such treatments.

  8. Current state of professional and core competency in pediatric residency program at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences: A local survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Sedigheh; Rezaee, Rita

    2015-10-01

    Accreditation assesses performance, or capacity to perform, against predetermined standards. It typically combines external quality assurance, through a process of peers review, with elements of self-regulation through internal and self-directed assessment. This study is an attempt to identify the quality of pediatrics residency educational programs regarding predetermined standards. This descriptive-analytical evaluation study of applied type was conducted during 2010 and 2011 in the pediatrics department of Shiraz Medical School, Iran. The assessment process occurred in several phases; at first an assessment model for a residency educational development and a series of educational criteria and indices were created based on WFME Standards. Multiple methods including a self-assessment questionnaire and several checklists were used to collect data, whereas systematic site visit, peer review and document reviewing were conducted with survey team. Due to limitation of the statistical society, all faculty members (n=34) and residents (n=41) of the pediatric department were asked to complete the survey. At last, descriptive and deductive statistics data analysis was performed using SPSS version 14. According to the records available in assessing program quality, it seems that the input criteria were desirable for the program based on the residents' viewpoints (86.6 %).There were proper physical facilities for them to meet the residency program goals.  The study indicated that the learning environment needed to be revised for the educational needs (Likert scale: 2.96±1.05). The peer evaluation team demonstrated achievement of mission fulfillment in the context of the objectives and indicators by meeting the desired themes.  In spite of some weaknesses in the process criteria, the criteria for output indicators were good according to the report (more than desired level of 75-80%). Accreditation is an important step towards strengthening the quality of educational

  9. Business Education for Plastic Surgeons: A Systematic Review, Development, and Implementation of a Business Principles Curriculum in a Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrabi, Bahar; Burce, Karen K; Seal, Stella M; Lifchez, Scott D; Redett, Richard J; Frick, Kevin D; Dorafshar, Amir H; Cooney, Carisa M

    2017-05-01

    Rising health care costs, decreasing reimbursement rates, and changes in American health care are forcing physicians to become increasingly business-minded. Both academic and private plastic surgeons can benefit from being educated in business principles. The authors conducted a systematic review to identify existing business curricula and integrated a business principles curriculum into residency training. The authors anonymously surveyed their department regarding perceived importance of business principles and performed a systematic literature review from 1993 to 2013 using PubMed and Embase to identify residency training programs that had designed/implemented business curricula. Subsequently, the authors implemented a formal, quarterly business curriculum. Thirty-two of 36 physicians (88.9 percent; 76.6 percent response rate) stated business principles are either "pretty important" or "very important" to being a doctor. Only 36 percent of faculty and 41 percent of trainees had previous business instruction. The authors identified 434 articles in the systematic review: 29 documented formal business curricula. Twelve topics were addressed, with practice management/administration (n = 22) and systems-based practice (n = 6) being the most common. Four articles were from surgical specialties: otolaryngology (n = 1), general surgery (n = 2), and combined general surgery/plastic surgery (n = 1). Teaching formats included lectures and self-directed learning modules; outcomes and participant satisfaction were reported inconsistently. From August of 2013 to June of 2015, the authors held eight business principles sessions. Postsession surveys demonstrated moderately to extremely satisfied responses in 75 percent or more of resident/fellow respondents (n = 13; response rate, 48.1 percent) and faculty (n = 9; response rate, 45.0 percent). Business principles can be integrated into residency training programs. Having speakers familiar with the physician audience and a

  10. Cosmetic Dentistry - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Cosmetic Dentistry URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... W XYZ List of All Topics All Cosmetic Dentistry - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  11. What's new in paediatric dentistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, M. C.

    2016-03-01

    Since the early 80's, the use of laser has been introduced in the daily dental practice and the technological development has also provided over time to optimize its use. Various types of lasers with different wavelengths have been developed for use in a handy, easy and ergonomic manner. In daily paediatric dentistry, laser could be a very useful medical device which can completely replace the traditional high hand-piece and bur to realize a "micro-invasive" dentistry and a "clean" surgery, without bleeding and sutures. According to the international literature and in the light of recent researches, this work could give an overview on assisted laser therapy in paediatric dentistry, highlighting advantages and disadvantages of this new technology and pointing out the high compliance of the young patient.

  12. Developing patient safety in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemberton, M N

    2014-10-01

    Patient safety has always been important and is a source of public concern. Recent high profile scandals and subsequent reports, such as the Francis report into the failings at Mid Staffordshire, have raised those concerns even higher. Mortality and significant morbidity associated with the practice of medicine has led to many strategies to help improve patient safety, however, with its lack of associated mortality and lower associated morbidity, dentistry has been slower at systematically considering how patient safety can be improved. Recently, several organisations, researchers and clinicians have discussed the need for a patient safety culture in dentistry. Strategies are available to help improve patient safety in healthcare and deserve further consideration in dentistry.

  13. 3D printing in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery.

  14. Treatment regimens in preventive and restorative dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusavice, K J

    1995-06-01

    Due in part to a lack of appropriate training and the incentive of adequate compensation, preventive dentistry in the United States has focused on prophylaxis and fluoride application. Dentistry must shift its attention to developing standardized protocols for "preservative dentistry"--diagnosing caries, assessing and monitoring caries risk, arresting active caries and remineralizing non-cavitated lesions. This article addresses shortcomings in preventive dentistry and proposes a plan for treatment standardization that can ensure optimum treatment and, ideally, lead to adequate compensation.

  15. Health-related quality of life and happiness within an internal medicine residency training program: a longitudinal follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhonslidsuk, Abhasnee; Thakkinstian, Ammarin; Satitpornkul, Patchareeya

    2015-01-01

    While undergoing a hospital residency training program, residents often suffer anxiety and stress. This study aims to evaluate the change in health-related quality of life and happiness among internal medicine residents, and identify prognostic factors. Thirty-eight residents in the Ramathibodi Hospital internal medicine training program completed the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF and happiness Measures questionnaires at three time points: commencement, day 100, and the end of the second year of training. Confidence, expectations, anxiety, and general health were rated. Analyses were performed with mixed linear regression. Financial problems were reported for 16 residents (42.1%). At baseline, most residents had moderate-to-very high confidence, expectations, and general health but also moderate-to-very high anxiety. The health-related quality of life score was highest in the social domain followed by the environmental, psychological, and physical domains. Their psychological, physical, social, and environmental scores significantly decreased after enrollment. Their happiness and general health scores were significantly reduced after enrollment. The training program duration was negatively associated with all domains. Residents with greater confidence had higher health-related quality of life scores in the physical, psychological, and environmental domains. Moreover, their general health was positively associated with the social and environmental domains. A reduction in health-related quality of life and happiness under the internal medicine residency program is reported. High confidence and good physical health may counterbalance the decline in health-related quality of life and happiness.

  16. Geriatric Dentistry in the Predoctoral Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshman, Jack; And Others

    1985-01-01

    A survey of U.S. dental schools to determine the status of geriatric dentistry in the curriculum is discussed. Evidence of growing commitment is shown by deans who plan to give geriatric dentistry increasing priority in the future and by the fact that all schools now teach geriatric dentistry in some way. (MLW)

  17. [The elementary discussion on digital implant dentistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Y C

    2016-04-09

    It is a digital age today. Exposed to all kinds of digital products in many fields. Certainly, implant dentistry is not exception. Digitalization could improve the outcomes and could decrease the complications of implant dentistry. This paper introduces the concepts, definitions, advantages, disadvantages, limitations and errors of digital implant dentistry.

  18. Using technology to market cosmetic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltzer, S M

    1997-01-01

    The presentation of proposed dental treatment has been hampered by the absence of visual communication technologies. New high tech dentistry-related tools permit efficient production of case presentations for cosmetic dentistry and restorative dentistry. This review describes how to create computer-based case presentations using Microsoft PowerPoint (Microsoft Corp., Redmond, WA) and visual treatment proposals using Microsoft Word for Windows.

  19. Increasing Student Involvement through Residence Hall Lifestyle Assignments and Developmental Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Mark J.; Noftsinger, John B.

    1994-01-01

    This study investigated the usefulness of three dormitory lifestyle assignments (male-only, female-only, co-ed) in promoting student participation in residence hall activities at James Madison University (Virginia). Results showed assignment to coeducational dormitories fostered more and varied student involvement than did male-only or female-only…

  20. Effectiveness of a Three-Month Training Program in Psychotherapeutic Intervention for Family Practice Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Robert J.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A study among medical residents (n=50) at the University of Montreal and Laval University (Quebec) found that a structured series of 12 seminars dedicated to psychotherapeutic interventions by family doctors was effective in raising students' knowledge levels, perceived skills, and attitudes. Skills of the "how-to" type improved more than did…

  1. Videoconferencing of a national program for residents on evidence-based practice: early performance evaluation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Regan, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the medium of videoconferencing for the delivery of a course for radiology residents in practice-based learning (PBL), including evidence-based practice, at centers geographically separated from the principal teaching site.

  2. Effectiveness of a training program in supervisors' ability to provide feedback on residents' communication skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junod Perron, N.; Nendaz, M.; Louis-Simonet, M.; Sommer, J.; Gut, A.; Baroffio, A.; Dolmans, D.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2013-01-01

    Teaching communication skills (CS) to residents during clinical practice remains problematic. Direct observation followed by feedback is a powerful way to teach CS in clinical practice. However, little is known about the effect of training on feedback skills in this field. Controlled studies are sca

  3. Effectiveness of a training program in supervisors' ability to provide feedback on residents' communication skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junod Perron, N.; Nendaz, M.; Louis-Simonet, M.; Sommer, J.; Gut, A.; Baroffio, A.; Dolmans, D.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2013-01-01

    Teaching communication skills (CS) to residents during clinical practice remains problematic. Direct observation followed by feedback is a powerful way to teach CS in clinical practice. However, little is known about the effect of training on feedback skills in this field. Controlled studies are

  4. Developing and successfully implementing a competency-based portfolio assessment system in a postgraduate family medicine residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, Laura A; Griffiths, Jane; Schultz, Karen

    2015-11-01

    The use of portfolios in postgraduate medical residency education to support competency development is increasing; however, the processes by which these assessment systems are designed, implemented, and maintained are emergent. The authors describe the needs assessment, development, implementation, and continuing quality improvement processes that have shaped the Portfolio Assessment Support System (PASS) used by the postgraduate family medicine program at Queen's University since 2009. Their description includes the impetus for change and contextual realities that guided the effort, plus the processes used for selecting assessment components and developing strategic supports. The authors discuss the identification of impact measures at the individual, programmatic, and institutional levels and the ways the department uses these to monitor how PASS supports competency development, scaffolds residents' self-regulated learning skills, and promotes professional identity formation. They describe the "academic advisor" role and provide an appendix covering the portfolio elements. Reflection elements include learning plans, clinical question logs, confidence surveys, and reflections about continuity of care and significant incidents. Learning module elements cover the required, online bioethics, global health, and consult-request modules. Assessment elements cover each resident's research project, clinical audits, presentations, objective structured clinical exam and simulated office oral exam results, field notes, entrustable professional activities, multisource feedback, and in-training evaluation reports. Document elements are the resident's continuing medical education activities including procedures log, attendance log, and patient demographic summaries.The authors wish to support others who are engaged in the systematic portfolio-design process or who may adapt aspects of PASS for their local programs.

  5. Faith-based partnerships in graduate medical education: the experience of the Morehouse School of Medicine Public Health/Preventive Medicine Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Beverly D; Buckner, Ayanna V; Walker, Carla Durham; Blumenthal, Daniel S

    2011-10-01

    Faith-based organizations can be strategic partners in addressing the needs of low-income and underserved individuals and communities. The Morehouse School of Medicine (MSM) Public Health/Preventive Medicine Residency Program (PH/PMR) collaborates with faith-based organizations for the purpose of resident education, community engagement, and service. These partners provide guidance for the program's community initiatives and health promotion activities designed to address health inequities. Residents complete a longitudinal community practicum experience with a faith-based organization over the 2-year training period. Residents conduct a community health needs assessment at the organization and design a health intervention that addresses the identified needs. The faith-based community practicum also serves as a vehicle for achieving skills in all eight domains of the Public Health Competencies developed by the Council on Linkages and all six Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Core Competencies. The MSM PH/PMR Program has engaged in faith-based partnerships for 7 years. This article discusses the structure of these partnerships, how partners are identified, funding sources for supporting resident projects, and examples of resident health needs assessment and intervention activities. The MSM PH/PMR Program may serve as a model to other residency and fellowship programs that may have an interest in developing partnerships with faith-based organizations.

  6. The Utah Rural Residency Study: A Blueprint for Evaluating Potential Sites for Development of a 4-4-4 Family Practice Residency Program in a Rural Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catinella, A. Peter; Magill, Michael K.; Thiese, Steven M.; Turner, Deborah; Elison, Gar T.; Baden, Daniel J.

    2003-01-01

    Criteria were developed for evaluating rural Utah communities as potential sites for rural family practice residencies. Criteria were concerned with community facilities, physicians, numbers of patients, and physician and hospital commitment to teaching residents. Two of the 10 communities evaluated were found to be potentially capable of…

  7. Incidence and risk factors of functional upper airway complications of primary esthetic closed rhinoplasty in two residency programs: A 6-month preliminary prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Mohajerani

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions : High complication rates were observed in both residency programs. Failure to follow home care instructions might prevent/delay recovery. Further in-depth studies are needed to assess this.

  8. Assessment of laparoscopic skills of Gynecology and Obstetrics residents after a training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Carla Ferreira Kikuchi; Ruano, José Maria Cordeiro; Kati, Lea Mina; Noguti, Alberto Sinhiti; Girão, Manoel João Batista Castello; Sartori, Marair Gracio Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate laparoscopic skills of third-year Gynecology and Obstetrics residents after training at a training and surgical experimentation center. Use of a prospective questionnaire analyzing demographic data, medical residency, skills, competences, and training in a box trainer and in pigs. After the training, there was significant improvement in laparoscopic skills according to the residents (before 1.3/after 2.7; p=0.000) and preceptors (before 2.1/after 4.8; p=0.000). There was also significant improvement in the feeling of competence in surgeries with level 1 and 2 of difficulty. All residents approved the training. The training was distributed into 12 hours in the box trainer and 20 hours in animals, and led to better laparoscopic skills and a feeling of more surgical competence in laparoscopic surgery levels 1 and 2. Avaliar a habilidade laparoscópica dos residentes do terceiro ano de residência médica em Ginecologia e Obstetrícia após treinamento em um centro de treinamento e experimentação cirúrgica. Aplicação de questionário de forma prospectiva analisando dados demográficos, da residência médica, da habilidade, da competência e do treinamento em caixa preta e em porcas. Após o treinamento, houve melhora da habilidade em laparoscopia de forma significativa na avaliação dos residentes (antes 1,3/depois 2,7; p=0,000) e preceptores (antes 2,1/depois 4,8; p=0,000). Houve melhora significativa na sensação de competência em cirurgias de níveis 1 e 2 de dificuldade. Todos os residentes aprovaram o treinamento. O treinamento dividido em 12 horas de caixa preta e 20 horas em animais trouxe melhora na habilidade em laparoscopia e na sensação de melhora na competência cirúrgica em cirurgias laparoscópicas de níveis 1 e 2.

  9. The national post-baccalaureate graduate nurse residency program: a model for excellence in transition to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krugman, Mary; Bretschneider, Joan; Horn, Phyllis B; Krsek, Cathleen A; Moutafis, Roxanne A; Smith, Marion Oare

    2006-01-01

    The Chief Nursing Officers (CNOs) of the University HealthSystems Consortium (UHC) of Academic Hospitals desired to increase the numbers of baccalaureate graduate nurses hired by their facilities and provide a more consistent, uniform transition into practice for these graduate nurses. A partnership between the UHC CNOs and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) led to establishing a National Post-Baccalaureate Graduate Nurse Residency Program. The structure, curriculum, and outcomes measures were developed and the program was implemented, with growth from six original pilot sites to 34 academic hospitals. Outcomes from the first year of program operation at these six sites show a high rate of retention, decreased stress by graduate nurses over time, improved organization and prioritization of care, and increased satisfaction in the first year of practice.

  10. Dentistry and Dental Hygiene Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

    A reference guide to laws, rules, and regulations that govern dentistry and dental hygiene practice in New York State is presented. In addition to identifying licensing requirements/procedures for dentists and dental hygienists, general provisions of Title VIII of the Education Law are covered, along with state management, professional misconduct,…

  11. Curriculum Guidelines on Forensic Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1990

    1990-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' guidelines for curriculum design explain the scope of forensic dentistry and interrelationships with other fields, give an overview of the curriculum, and outline suggested primary educational goals, prerequisites, core content, specific behavioral objectives, sequencing, faculty and facility…

  12. Dentistry and Dental Hygiene Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

    The handbook contains laws, rules, and regulations of the New York State Education Department that govern dentistry and dental hygiene practice in the state. It describes licensure requirements and includes complete application forms and instructions for obtaining license and first registration as a dentist and dental hygienist. Applicants are…

  13. Knowledge of drug prescription in dentistry students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guzmán-Álvarez R

    2012-06-01

    .9%, ampicillin (n = 7, 10.6%, and penicillin V and clindamycin (n = 3, 4.5%. The most frequent errors reported by students were: lack of knowledge about drug posology (n = 49, 74.2%, improperly filled prescriptions (n = 7, 10.7%, not knowing the brand names and uncertainty about the correct drug indicated for each case (n = 3, 4.54%, not knowing the duration of treatment (n = 2, 3%, not asking the patient about possible allergies, and not giving prescriptions (n = 1, 1.5%. The sources of information used by students for prescribing drugs included the professors at the clinics (n = 49, 74.2%, the pharmacology course (n = 7, 10.7%, medical dictionary consultation (n = 15, 22.72%, classmate support (n = 3, 4.54%, and information provided by medical representatives from pharmaceutical companies (n = 1, 1.5%. Finally, only 20 students (30.3% followed the WHO Guide to Good Prescribing, 40 students acknowledged not following it (60.6%, and six students (9.1% had no knowledge of it.Conclusion: The knowledge of pharmacology among fourth-year students in the School of Dentistry has gaps that could affect patient safety. More studies are needed to determine whether this issue affects the quality of patient care and the effectiveness and safety of treatments. Since prescribing accurately is extremely important, it is necessary to develop therapeutic guidelines, and to provide pharmacological therapy courses. The implementation of educational programs, including the WHO Guide to Good Prescribing and Patient Safety Curriculum Guide, would be beneficial in helping students develop prescribing skills.Keywords: prescription, dentistry prescription, most used NSAIDs by dentists, most used antibiotics, dentist prescribing errors, sources of information for prescribing, WHO Guide to Good Prescribing

  14. Teaching trainees how to critically evaluate the literature - a crossover study at two pediatric residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Benjamin; Ingard, Catherine; Nelson, David

    2017-04-24

    The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of a concise, evidence based medicine curriculum in improving the knowledge of pediatric residents at two institutions. Sixty first and second year pediatric residents at MassGeneral Hospital for Children and MedStar Georgetown University Hospital participated in a crossover study. The evidence based medicine curriculum, consisting of 4 ninety minute sessions grounded in adult learning theory principles, was developed using the methodology described in the book 'Studying a Study'. A validated 20 question evidence based medicine multiple choice test was administered on three separate occasions to measure baseline knowledge, efficacy of the curriculum in improving knowledge, and long term retention of that knowledge. Post curriculum, the fall group's scores improved 23% from baseline (M=10.3, SD=2.4) to (M=12.7, SD=3.0) students (t(26)=-3.29, p=0.0018) while the spring group improved by 41% (M=10.0, SD=2.8) to (M=14.1, SD=2.2) students (t(32)=-6.46, ppediatric residents, and fostered long term retention of knowledge.  Based on these results, we believe this curriculum could be implemented at any institution.

  15. Beyond a curricular design of convenience: replacing the noon conference with an academic half day in three internal medicine residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batalden, Maren K; Warm, Eric J; Logio, Lia S

    2013-05-01

    Several residency programs have created an academic half day (AHD) for the delivery of core curriculum, and some program Web sites provide narrative descriptions of individual AHD curricula; nonetheless, little published literature on the AHD format exists. This article details three distinctive internal medicine residency programs (Cambridge Health Alliance, University of Cincinnati, and New York Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical College) whose leaders replaced the traditional noon conference curriculum with an AHD. Although each program's AHD developed independently of the other two, retrospective comparative review reveals instructive similarities and differences that may be useful to other residency directors. In this article, the authors describe the distinct approaches to the AHD at the three institutions through a framework of six core principles: (1) protect time and space to facilitate learning, (2) nurture active learning in residents, (3) choose and sequence curricular content deliberately, (4) develop faculty, (5) encourage resident preparation and accountability for learning, and (6) employ a continuous improvement approach to curriculum development and evaluation. The authors chronicle curricular adaptations at each institution over the first three years of experience. Preliminary outcome data, presented in the article, suggests that the transition from the traditional noon conference to an AHD may increase conference attendance, improve resident and faculty satisfaction with the curriculum, and improve resident performance on the In Training Examination.

  16. Program directors in their role as leaders of teaching teams in residency training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slootweg, I.A.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der; Heineman, M.J.; Scherpbier, A.; Lombarts, K.M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Program directors have a formal leading position within a teaching team. It is not clear how program directors fulfill their leadership role in practice. In this interview study we aim to explore the role of the program director as strategic leader, based on the research-question: What a

  17. Program directors in their role as leaders of teaching teams in residency training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slootweg, I.A.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der; Heineman, M.J.; Scherpbier, A.; Lombarts, K.M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Program directors have a formal leading position within a teaching team. It is not clear how program directors fulfill their leadership role in practice. In this interview study we aim to explore the role of the program director as strategic leader, based on the research-question: What

  18. Postdoctoral and Senior Postdoctoral Resident Research Associateship Program and Research Management Associateship Program for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    Information on the status of all Resident Research Associated and Research Management Associates is provided. All Associated whose tenure continued as of June 1, 1985 are listed alphabetically by laboratory. Also included are their countries of citizenship and dates of tenure. The status of reporting obligations are summarized. A list of progress reports received during this reporting period is also provided. All Associates who terminated during the reporting period are listed.

  19. Support for and aspects of use of educational games in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the US: a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Mark C

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evidence supporting the effectiveness of educational games in graduate medical education is limited. Anecdotal reports suggest their popularity in that setting. The objective of this study was to explore the support for and the different aspects of use of educational games in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the United States. Methods We conducted a survey of family medicine and internal medicine residency program directors in the United States. The questionnaire asked the program directors whether they supported the use of educational games, their actual use of games, and the type of games being used and the purpose of that use. Results Of 434 responding program directors (52% response rate, 92% were in support of the use of games as an educational strategy, and 80% reported already using them in their programs. Jeopardy like games were the most frequently used games (78%. The use of games was equally popular in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs and popularity was inversely associated with more than 75% of residents in the program being International Medical Graduates. The percentage of program directors who reported using educational games as teaching tools, review tools, and evaluation tools were 62%, 47%, and 4% respectively. Conclusions Given a widespread use of educational games in the training of medical residents, in spite of limited evidence for efficacy, further evaluation of the best approaches to education games should be explored.

  20. Support for and aspects of use of educational games in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the US: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akl, Elie A; Gunukula, Sameer; Mustafa, Reem; Wilson, Mark C; Symons, Andrew; Moheet, Amir; Schünemann, Holger J

    2010-03-25

    The evidence supporting the effectiveness of educational games in graduate medical education is limited. Anecdotal reports suggest their popularity in that setting. The objective of this study was to explore the support for and the different aspects of use of educational games in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs in the United States. We conducted a survey of family medicine and internal medicine residency program directors in the United States. The questionnaire asked the program directors whether they supported the use of educational games, their actual use of games, and the type of games being used and the purpose of that use. Of 434 responding program directors (52% response rate), 92% were in support of the use of games as an educational strategy, and 80% reported already using them in their programs. Jeopardy like games were the most frequently used games (78%). The use of games was equally popular in family medicine and internal medicine residency programs and popularity was inversely associated with more than 75% of residents in the program being International Medical Graduates. The percentage of program directors who reported using educational games as teaching tools, review tools, and evaluation tools were 62%, 47%, and 4% respectively. Given a widespread use of educational games in the training of medical residents, in spite of limited evidence for efficacy, further evaluation of the best approaches to education games should be explored.

  1. A Window to the Real World of Radiology From the Ivory Tower of Academia: The Value of Community Rotations and "Career Training" in Radiology Residency Programs in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabousi, Abdullah; Patlas, Michael N; Katz, Douglas S

    We highlight what we believe are 2 major areas of weakness in current Canadian radiology training programs: insufficient community radiology training and limited preparation of residents for the job market. Although focusing on Canadian radiology programs, we suspect that these are also 2 areas of substantial concern for radiology training programs in the United States and other countries. We offer suggestions to address these deficiencies, particularly by using pre-existing hybrid radiology practices and by making relatively small changes to the current curricula of radiology residency programs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mapping of Primary Instructional Methods and Teaching Techniques for Regularly Scheduled, Formal Teaching Sessions in an Anesthesia Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vested Madsen, Matias; Macario, Alex; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Tanaka, Pedro

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we examined the regularly scheduled, formal teaching sessions in a single anesthesiology residency program to (1) map the most common primary instructional methods, (2) map the use of 10 known teaching techniques, and (3) assess if residents scored sessions that incorporated active learning as higher quality than sessions with little or no verbal interaction between teacher and learner. A modified Delphi process was used to identify useful teaching techniques. A representative sample of each of the formal teaching session types was mapped, and residents anonymously completed a 5-question written survey rating the session. The most common primary instructional methods were computer slides-based classroom lectures (66%), workshops (15%), simulations (5%), and journal club (5%). The number of teaching techniques used per formal teaching session averaged 5.31 (SD, 1.92; median, 5; range, 0-9). Clinical applicability (85%) and attention grabbers (85%) were the 2 most common teaching techniques. Thirty-eight percent of the sessions defined learning objectives, and one-third of sessions engaged in active learning. The overall survey response rate equaled 42%, and passive sessions had a mean score of 8.44 (range, 5-10; median, 9; SD, 1.2) compared with a mean score of 8.63 (range, 5-10; median, 9; SD, 1.1) for active sessions (P = 0.63). Slides-based classroom lectures were the most common instructional method, and faculty used an average of 5 known teaching techniques per formal teaching session. The overall education scores of the sessions as rated by the residents were high.

  3. [Public health competencies and contents in Spanish university degree programs of physical therapy, occupational therapy, environmental science, dentistry and veterinary science].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davó-Blanes, M Carmen; Vives-Cases, Carmen; Alvarez-Dardet, Carlos; Segura-Benedicto A, Andreu; Bosch Llonch, Fèlix; G Benavides, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    To identify the basic competencies and contents related to public health to be included in degree programs according to the perspective of lecturers from various Spanish universities. In the context of the Second Workshop on Public Health Contents in Degree Programs (Mahon, 19 to 20 September 2012), 20 lecturers from different Spanish universities were distributed in five working groups. The lecturers had been selected from the instructional guides on public health and epidemiology published on the web sites of the Rectors' Conference of Spanish Universities. Each group worked on a degree program and the results were discussed in plenary sessions. The activities and competencies related to the three basic functions of public health were identified in all degree programs. Most of the professional competencies identified were related to the function of «assessment of population health needs». The contents proposed by the working groups related to epidemiology, basic concepts in public health, public health intervention, health management, and health policy. The main common topics among the degrees concerned the first three contents. Public health professional competencies and contents were identified in the degree programs examined. These results may serve as a starting point for a more detailed review of public health programs across degree levels and the search for a consensus on the common content that should be included in each of them. Copyright © 2013 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. Accreditation council for graduate medical education (ACGME annual anesthesiology residency and fellowship program review: a "report card" model for continuous improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Timothy R

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME requires an annual evaluation of all ACGME-accredited residency and fellowship programs to assess program quality. The results of this evaluation must be used to improve the program. This manuscript describes a metric to be used in conducting ACGME-mandated annual program review of ACGME-accredited anesthesiology residencies and fellowships. Methods A variety of metrics to assess anesthesiology residency and fellowship programs are identified by the authors through literature review and considered for use in constructing a program "report card." Results Metrics used to assess program quality include success in achieving American Board of Anesthesiology (ABA certification, performance on the annual ABA/American Society of Anesthesiology In-Training Examination, performance on mock oral ABA certification examinations, trainee scholarly activities (publications and presentations, accreditation site visit and internal review results, ACGME and alumni survey results, National Resident Matching Program (NRMP results, exit interview feedback, diversity data and extensive program/rotation/faculty/curriculum evaluations by trainees and faculty. The results are used to construct a "report card" that provides a high-level review of program performance and can be used in a continuous quality improvement process. Conclusions An annual program review is required to assess all ACGME-accredited residency and fellowship programs to monitor and improve program quality. We describe an annual review process based on metrics that can be used to focus attention on areas for improvement and track program performance year-to-year. A "report card" format is described as a high-level tool to track educational outcomes.

  5. Does Research Training During Residency Promote Scholarship and Influence Career Choice? A Cross-Sectional Analysis of a 10-Year Cohort of the UCSF-PRIME Internal Medicine Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlwes, Jeffrey; O'Brien, Bridget; Stanley, Marion; Grant, Ross; Shunk, Rebecca; Connor, Denise; Cornett, Patricia; Hollander, Harry

    2016-01-01

    The Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, the Alliance for Academic Internal Medicine, and the Carnegie Foundation report on medical education recommend creating individualized learning pathways during medical training so that learners can experience broader professional roles beyond patient care. Little data exist to support the success of these specialized pathways in graduate medical education. We present the 10-year experience of the Primary Care Medicine Education (PRIME) track, a clinical-outcomes research pathway for internal medicine residents at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF). We hypothesized that participation in an individualized learning track, PRIME, would lead to a greater likelihood of publishing research from residency and accessing adequate career mentorship and would be influential on subsequent alumni careers. We performed a cross-sectional survey of internal medicine residency alumni from UCSF who graduated in 2001 through 2010. We compared responses of PRIME and non-PRIME categorical alumni. We used Pearson's chi-square and Student's t test to compare PRIME and non-PRIME alumni on categorical and continuous variables. Sixty-six percent (211/319) of alumni responded to the survey. A higher percentage of PRIME alumni published residency research projects compared to non-PRIME alumni (64% vs. 40%; p = .002). The number of PRIME alumni identifying research as their primary career role was not significantly different from non-PRIME internal medicine residency graduates (35% of PRIME vs. 29% non-PRIME). Process measures that could explain these findings include adequate access to mentors (M 4.4 for PRIME vs. 3.6 for non-PRIME alumni, p < .001, on a 5-point Likert scale) and agreeing that mentoring relationships affected career choice (M 4.2 for PRIME vs. 3.7 for categorical alumni, p = .001). Finally, 63% of PRIME alumni agreed that their research experience

  6. A survey of the pediatric surgery program directors: optimizing resident research to make pediatric surgery training more efficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markel, Troy A; Rescorla, Frederick J

    2015-06-01

    Resident Research (RR) has been a presumed requirement for pediatric surgery fellowship candidates. We hypothesized that: 1) pediatric surgery leaders would no longer feel that RR was necessary for fellowship candidates, 2) the type of study performed would not impact a program's opinion of candidates, and 3) the timing of RR could be altered for those interested in a research career. An anonymous survey was sent to pediatric surgery fellowship program directors (PDs). Sixty-three percent responded, and answers were compared via Chi square analysis with ppediatric surgery fellowship candidates. Seventy-five percent had no preference between one or two years of research (p=0.0005), 79% placed no heavier weight on basic or clinical research (psurgery may not be necessary. Pediatric surgery candidates who partake in RR are not penalized for their choice of study. Increasing efficiency of training is important in today's era of medical training. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) survey of radiation biology educators in U.S. and Canadian radiation oncology residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenstein, Barry S; Held, Kathryn D; Rockwell, Sara; Williams, Jacqueline P; Zeman, Elaine M

    2009-11-01

    To obtain, in a survey-based study, detailed information on the faculty currently responsible for teaching radiation biology courses to radiation oncology residents in the United States and Canada. In March-December 2007 a survey questionnaire was sent to faculty having primary responsibility for teaching radiation biology to residents in 93 radiation oncology residency programs in the United States and Canada. The responses to this survey document the aging of the faculty who have primary responsibility for teaching radiation biology to radiation oncology residents. The survey found a dramatic decline with time in the percentage of educators whose graduate training was in radiation biology. A significant number of the educators responsible for teaching radiation biology were not fully acquainted with the radiation sciences, either through training or practical application. In addition, many were unfamiliar with some of the organizations setting policies and requirements for resident education. Freely available tools, such as the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Radiation and Cancer Biology Practice Examination and Study Guides, were widely used by residents and educators. Consolidation of resident courses or use of a national radiation biology review course was viewed as unlikely by most programs. A high priority should be given to the development of comprehensive teaching tools to assist those individuals who have responsibility for teaching radiation biology courses but who do not have an extensive background in critical areas of radiobiology related to radiation oncology. These findings also suggest a need for new graduate programs in radiobiology.

  8. Postdoctoral Education in Dentistry: Preparing Dental Practitioners To Meet the Oral Health Needs of America in the 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassman, Paul; Meyerowitz, Cyril

    1999-01-01

    Reviews the history of postdoctoral programs in dentistry and medicine, focusing on postdoctoral general dentistry education, and describes the changing health-care environment in which future dental professionals will practice, relating the dental postdoctoral experience to that in medicine. A strategy is presented to prepare dental practitioners…

  9. [Dr. Juan Ramon Beltran and his contribution to the School of Dentistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarranz, A

    1999-01-01

    He was in charge of the course of Legal Dentistry at the School of Dentistry from 1929 through 1932. He prepared the study program for this subject, basing it on the experience he had gained as professor in Legal Medicine at the Faculty of Medical Sciences in Buenos Aires. He published the book "Medicina Legal para la ensenanza de la Odontologia Legal y Social" (1932), and its second edition included an important contribution made by Dr. Juan Ubaldo Carrea, Main Professor of Orthodontics with Legal Dentistry at this school

  10. Program directors in their role as leaders of teaching teams in residency training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slootweg, Irene A; van der Vleuten, Cees; Heineman, Maas Jan; Scherpbier, Albert; Lombarts, Kiki M J M H

    2014-12-01

    Program directors have a formal leading position within a teaching team. It is not clear how program directors fulfill their leadership role in practice. In this interview study we aim to explore the role of the program director as strategic leader, based on the research-question: What are the experiences of program directors with strategic leadership? We conducted an interview study using the principles of phenomenography to explore program directors' experiences. In the period June 2012-May 2013, 16 program directors from different hospital organisations were invited to participate in an interview study. Iterative data collection and analysis were based on strategic leadership: (1) developing collective mindset, (2) focusing on collaborative learning and (3) designing teaching organisation. Fourteen program directors participated in this study. We identified four leadership profiles: (1) captains, (2) carers, (3) professionals and (4) team-players. The 'team-players' come closest to integrally applying strategic leadership. For all four profiles there seems to be a preference for developing collectivity by means of providing information. Program directors have less experience with promoting collaborative learning and the designing of teaching organisation is task-oriented. Promoting collaborative learning is the most important challenge for developing leadership within the teaching team.

  11. Use of an Information Retrieval Service in an Obstetrics/Gynecology Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    And Others; Gunning, John E.

    1980-01-01

    A program that uses the clinical librarian as a member of the patient care team has been developed by an obstetrics and gynecology department of a university medical center to keep faculty and hospital house staff knowledgeable about current developments and research. Program objectives, methodology, costs, evaluation, and information utilization…

  12. Biomaterials in Relation to Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Sanjukta; Chana, Simran

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries remains a challenge in the improvement of oral health. It is the most common and widespread biofilm-dependent oral disease, resulting in the destruction of tooth structure by the acidic attack from cariogenic bacteria. The tooth is a heavily mineralised tissue, and both enamel and dentine can undergo demineralisation due to trauma or dietary conditions. The adult population worldwide affected by dental caries is enormous and despite significant advances in caries prevention and tooth restoration, treatments continue to pose a substantial burden to healthcare. Biomaterials play a vital role in the restoration of the diseased or damaged tooth structure and, despite providing reasonable outcomes, there are some concerns with clinical performance. Amalgam, the silver grey biomaterial that has been widely used as a restorative material in dentistry, is currently in throes of being phased out, especially with the Minimata convention and treaty being signed by a number of countries (January 2013; http://mercuryconvention.org/Convention/) that aims to control the anthropogenic release of mercury in the environment, which naturally impacts the use of amalgam, where mercury is a component. Thus, the development of alternative restoratives and restoration methods that are inexpensive, can be used under different climatic conditions, withstand storage and allow easy handling, the main prerequisites of dental biomaterials, is important. The potential for using biologically engineered tissue and consequent research to replace damaged tissues has also seen a quantum leap in the last decade. Ongoing research in regenerative treatments in dentistry includes alveolar ridge augmentation, bone tissue engineering and periodontal ligament replacement, and a future aim is bioengineering of the whole tooth. Research towards developing bioengineered teeth is well underway and identification of adult stem cell sources to make this a viable treatment is advancing; however, this

  13. Potent Inhalational Anesthetics for Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satuito, Mary; Tom, James

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide and the volatile inhalational anesthetics have defined anxiety and pain control in both dentistry and medicine for over a century. From curious experimentation to spectacular public demonstrations, the initial work of 2 dentists, Horace Wells and William T. G. Morton, persists to this day in modern surgery and anesthesia. This article reviews the history, similarities, differences, and clinical applications of the most popular inhalational agents used in contemporary dental surgical settings.

  14. "Fit and fabulous": mixed-methods research on processes, perceptions, and outcomes of a yearlong gym program with assisted-living residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, Mary Ann; LeCompte, Michelle; Ramel, Lisa

    2014-04-01

    This study's mixed-methods design sought to understand how to encourage assisted-living (AL) residents to initiate and continue exercise in a gym setting. Ten residents participated in this yearlong program. Processes developed and perceived benefits were understood through interviews and observations. Changes in active time, lower body strength, and workload were evaluated using direct measures. Findings indicated that AL residents regularly used exercise machines (mean participation = 53.8%) and increased active time and lower body strength (p = .02) when adequately prepared and supported. Participants prioritized gym time and developed pride and ownership in the program. They described themselves as exercisers and developed a sense of belonging to their new home. Friendships with one another, staff, and university partners were nurtured in the gym setting. When provided space, equipment, trained staff, and additional resource support, AL residents' quality of life and life satisfaction were enhanced in several domains.

  15. Educators' and Applicants' Views of the Postdoctoral Pediatric Dentistry Admission Process: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricker, Kevin; Mihas, Paul; Lee, Jessica Y; Guthmiller, Janet M; Roberts, Michael W; Divaris, Kimon

    2015-11-01

    The postdoctoral application and matching process in dental education is a high-stakes and resource-intensive process for all involved. While programs seek the most qualified candidates, applicants strive to be competitive to increase their likelihood of being accepted to a desirable program. There are limited data regarding either subjective or objective factors underlying the complex interplay between programs and applicants. This qualitative study sought to provide insight into the stakeholders' experiences and views on the matching process. Telephone and in-person interviews were conducted with ten pediatric dentistry program directors and ten recent applicants to pediatric dentistry programs in the United States in 2013-14. Participants were selected to represent the geographic (five districts of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry) and institutional (hospital- or university-based) diversity of pediatric dentistry programs. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Veracity and need for more information were the themes most often articulated by both groups. The program directors most valued teachability and self-motivation as desirable applicant characteristics. The applicants relied primarily on subjective sources to gather information about programs and prioritized location and financial factors as pivotal for their rankings. Both groups appreciated the uniformity of the current application process and highlighted several weaknesses and areas for improvement. These results shed light on the postdoctoral matching process in pediatric dentistry via a qualitative description of stakeholders' experiences and viewpoints. These insights can serve as a basis for improving and refining the matching process.

  16. Filed and granted Indian Patents in dentistry from 2005-2009: A critical analysis and review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Nadeem Ahmed Bijle

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Contribution from Indian Nationals as inventors for patents in the field of Dentistry is limited, thus reducing the pace of progress and development. Indian inventors in the field of Dentistry have to go a long way to compete with the fellow mates of developed countries like USA and Europe. Continuing Dental Education programs on Intellectual property rights should be conducted on regular basis especially for Dentist′s involved in research.

  17. Health-related quality of life and happiness within an internal medicine residency training program: a longitudinal follow-up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhasnee Sobhonslidsuk

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: While undergoing a hospital residency training program, residents often suffer anxiety and stress. This study aims to evaluate the change in health-related quality of life and happiness among internal medicine residents, and identify prognostic factors. Methods: Thirty-eight residents in the Ramathibodi Hospital internal medicine training program completed the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF and happiness Measures questionnaires at three time points: commencement, day 100, and the end of the second year of training. Confidence, expectations, anxiety, and general health were rated. Analyses were performed with mixed linear regression. Results: Financial problems were reported for 16 residents (42.1%. At baseline, most residents had moderate-to-very high confidence, expectations, and general health but also moderate-to-very high anxiety. The health-related quality of life score was highest in the social domain followed by the environmental, psychological, and physical domains. Their psychological, physical, social, and environmental scores significantly decreased after enrollment. Their happiness and general health scores were significantly reduced after enrollment. The training program duration was negatively associated with all domains. Residents with greater confidence had higher health-related quality of life scores in the physical, psychological, and environmental domains. Moreover, their general health was positively associated with the social and environmental domains. Conclusion: A reduction in health-related quality of life and happiness under the internal medicine residency program is reported. High confidence and good physical health may counterbalance the decline in health-related quality of life and happiness.

  18. The feasibility of a holistic wellness program for HIV/AIDS patients residing in a voluntary inpatient treatment program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Vanessa

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this project was to examine the feasibility of an ongoing holistic wellness program in a residential facility treating persons with HIV/AIDS. The goal was to create a voluntary, four week holistic wellness intensive within the established inpatient behavioral health treatment program. Participants were given practicable holistic self care tools to effectively manage HIV related symptoms, general medical issues, addiction, depression, stress and anxiety. The program incorporated evidence-based holistic activities including yoga, therapeutic dance, meditation, Reiki, and reflective journaling. Narrative survey results and post-program evaluation support that an ongoing holistic wellness program within the existing treatment model is feasible and could have numerous potential beneficial effects. This project clearly exemplified the ideal opportunity for holistic nurses to implement innovative holistic interventions within the current healthcare delivery system. It is the author's observation that future studies with a larger participant group to further examine measurable benefits can lend valuable information and insight into the future development of holistic wellness programs for residential treatment facilities.

  19. Effectiveness of different memory training programs on improving hyperphagic behaviors of residents with dementia: a longitudinal single-blind study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kao CC

    2016-05-01

    significantly superior in the SR + M group than in the SR group. The improvement in distress to caregivers in both intervention groups lasted only until the posttest. Improvement in changes in eating habits of the two groups was not significantly different from that of the control group. Conclusion: SR and SR + M training programs can improve hyperphagic behavior of patients with dementia. The SR + M training program is particularly beneficial for the improvement of rapid eating. Caregivers can choose a suitable memory training program according to the eating problems of their residents. Keywords: dementia, hyperphagia, spaced retrieval training, Montessori-based activities, longitudinal research

  20. The concept of minimally invasive dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericson, Dan

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews Minimally Invasive Dentistry (MID) from a day-to-day dentistry perspective, focusing mostly on cariology and restorative dentistry, even though it embraces many aspects of dentistry. The concept of MID supports a systematic respect for the original tissue, including diagnosis, risk assessment, preventive treatment, and minimal tissue removal upon restoration. The motivation for MID emerges from the fact that fillings are not permanent and that the main reasons for failure are secondary caries and filling fracture. To address these flaws, there is a need for economical re-routing so that practices can survive on maintaining dental health and not only by operative procedures.

  1. The Family and Community Medicine Residency Program of the municipality of Rio de Janeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ricardo Soranz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Daniel Ricardo Soranz é Subsecretário de Atenção Primária, Vigilância e Promoção da Saúde do Município do Rio de Janeiro desde 2009, ano em que a Atenção Primária à Saúde (APS do município começou a ser reestruturada por meio da Estratégia Saúde da Família (ESF, ampliando de 3,5% (2009 para 42% (2013 a cobertura da APS dos mais de seis milhões de cariocas. Com a crescente ampliação surgiu, ao final de 2011, a necessidade de formar médicos de família e comunidade. Assim, em 2012, o município iniciou o Programa de Residência em Medicina de Família e Comunidade-Rio de Janeiro (PRMFC-RIO com abertura de 60 vagas. Em 2014, houve a ampliação para 100 vagas e a primeira turma da PRMFC-RIO acabou de formar no dia 01/02/2014 43 médicos de família.. Nesta entrevista, Dr. Daniel Soranz discorre sobre esta proposta desafiadora e suas perspectivas futuras.A RBMFC esteve com o Dr. Daniel Ricardo Soranz na Secretaria Municipal de Saúde do município do Rio de Janeiro em 23/01/2014. O tema da entrevista foi a formação em Medicina de Família e Comunidade e sua importância para a expansão e qualificação da Atenção Primária à Saúde no município. RBMFC: Em sua opinião, o que levou o município do Rio de Janeiro a investir na Atenção Primária à Saúde (APS na modalidade da Estratégia Saúde da Família (ESF? Daniel Soranz: O que levou o município a investir no ‘Saúde da Família’ foi a Política Nacional de Atenção Básica de 2006, que estabelece a Estratégia Saúde da Família como prioritária para a consolidação do Sistema Único de Saúde, bem como a análise das evidências de como funcionam os serviços de saúde em países que contam com um Sistema Universal de Saúde. Não há país hoje, com sistema único, universal e equânime, que não tenha a Atenção Primária como modelo forte e o ‘Saúde da Família’ como único modelo. Então, para nós, não existe outra possibilidade a não ser

  2. The hidden curriculum in radiology residency programs: A path to isolation or integration?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Deven, T. [Department of Medical Imaging, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry (Canada); Hibbert, K., E-mail: khibbert@uwo.ca [Faculty of Education, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry (Canada); Faden, L. [Faculty of Education, The University of Western Ontario (Canada); Chhem, R.K. [Institute of History, Philosophy and Ethics of Medicine, Ulm University, Ulm (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: In this qualitative case study involving five academic Radiology centres across Canada, the authors seek to identify the hidden curriculum. Methods: A qualitative case study methodology was used for its potential to explore and provide rich descriptions and allow for the in-depth analysis of multiple data sources that include official institutional documents, surveys, observations and interviews (including undergraduate students, postgraduate, radiologists, imaging scientists, residents, faculty and administrators). This study relied on 48 interviews and involved primary data analysis by the core research team, and a secondary analysis by external examiners. Results: The results revealed that in four of the five major centres studied, a hidden curriculum of isolation prevailed, reinforcing an image of the radiologist as an independent operator within an organization dependent upon collaboration for optimal performance. The fifth site exhibited a hidden curriculum of collaboration and support, although the messages received were conflicting when addressing issues around teaching. Conclusions: The authors conclude by noting two possibilities for medical imaging departments to consider that of isolation or that of integration. They examine the implications of each and propose a way forward that situates Radiology as the crossroads of medicine. As such, the need for a new, generative metaphor reasserts the importance of recognizing the role and function of scholarship in teaching and learning contexts across Canada.

  3. [Comprehensive Assessment of Psychiatric Residents: An Addition to the Program Admission Process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luis, E Jaramillo G; Elena, Martín C

    2012-01-01

    The training of medical specialists is a long and complex process. Its purpose is to guarantee the society that they are the right professionals to meet the health needs of the population. The first step to ensure this objective is the admission process. In psychiatry this process, monitoring resident students and the criteria for each one are different in each country. Admission in Colombia is a heterogeneous process, not standardized, which varies greatly from one university to another, even between private and public universities. At the National University of Colombia, the admissions process is handled by the Admissions Office and includes: a written test for which you must obtain a minimum score, a resume rating and an interview. The Teaching Committee and the Department of Psychiatry considered the admission procedure in general to be good, but in need of refinement. Due to the experience of some teachers and given the current rules, a "comprehensive assessment" for master and doctoral students was required and in 1996 it was decided that this method of assessment for admission to a specialization in Psychiatry would serve to complement the admission process. The article describes the experience of the process and its outcomes, strengths and weaknesses. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  4. Program for laparoscopic urological skills assessment: setting certification standards for residents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjiam, I.M.; Schout, B.M.; Hendrikx, A.J.M.; Muijtjens, A.M.M.; Scherpbier, A.J.J.A.; Witjes, J.A.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2013-01-01

    AIM: There is growing pressure from the government and the public to define proficiency standards for surgical skills. Aim of this study was to estimate the reliability of the Program for Laparoscopic Urological Skills (PLUS) assessment and to set a certification standard for second-year urological

  5. Evidence-based Dentistry and Its Role in Caring for Special Needs Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queen, Alan N

    2016-07-01

    Evidence-based dentistry is a concept ideally suited and applicable to special needs dentistry. As the special needs of patients varies according to the individual, so should the way we evaluate our patient, prescribe a course of treatment, and implement that treatment plan. Future generations of dental students and residents should be trained in these concepts not just for patients with special needs, but also for the general patient population. It is imperative that the dental community not retreat in the face of what many deem to be "difficult" patients with special needs. Knowledge and training can overcome many barriers to treatment.

  6. ‘Speed advising’ for medical students applying to residency programs: an efficient supplement to traditional advising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jillian L. McGrath

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Over time, Residency Match dynamics fluctuate with some specialties experiencing increases in medical student popularity. Academic departments with limited resources must devise methods for coping with increased demand for their specialty. Students perceive traditional programs on Match mechanics as inadequate. Subsequently, faculty are confronted with demands for more personal attention from more students. Objectives: We developed a strategy for providing specialty-specific residency match advising to large numbers of students. Methods: The ‘speed-advising’ session (SAS was developed to address the common questions and concerns that medical students pose during the Match process and to provide advisees with a breadth of faculty perspectives. Two SASs were offered over a 2-week period. After the sessions, students and faculty were surveyed regarding their experience. Results: Twenty-six students pursued our specialty in the 2015 Match (26 of 234, 11.1%. Twenty-three (89% participated in the SAS. Seventy-four percent of students (17 of 23 and all faculty completed the post-session survey. Students found the SAS to be informative, helpful and an efficient use of time. Common discussion topics included: career goals, to which programs and how many to apply, and how academic record impacts their likelihood of matching in our specialty. Students would have preferred more time with each faculty; however, most (77% conceded that their questions were adequately answered. Faculty-favored speed advising over traditional advising (86%, primarily due to estimated time savings of 7.3 h per faculty member. Conclusions: In preparing students for the Match, specialty-specific speed advising offers an efficient supplement to traditional advising.

  7. Integrative Medicine in Preventive Medicine Education: Competency and Curriculum Development for Preventive Medicine and Other Specialty Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jani, Asim A; Trask, Jennifer; Ali, Ather

    2015-11-01

    During 2012, the USDHHS's Health Resources and Services Administration funded 12 accredited preventive medicine residencies to incorporate an evidence-based integrative medicine curriculum into their training programs. It also funded a national coordinating center at the American College of Preventive Medicine, known as the Integrative Medicine in Preventive Medicine Education (IMPriME) Center, to provide technical assistance to the 12 grantees. To help with this task, the IMPriME Center established a multidisciplinary steering committee, versed in integrative medicine, whose primary aim was to develop integrative medicine core competencies for incorporation into preventive medicine graduate medical education training. The competency development process was informed by central integrative medicine definitions and principles, preventive medicine's dual role in clinical and population-based prevention, and the burgeoning evidence base of integrative medicine. The steering committee considered an interdisciplinary integrative medicine contextual framework guided by several themes related to workforce development and population health. A list of nine competencies, mapped to the six general domains of competence approved by the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education, was operationalized through an iterative exercise with the 12 grantees in a process that included mapping each site's competency and curriculum products to the core competencies. The competencies, along with central curricular components informed by grantees' work presented elsewhere in this supplement, are outlined as a roadmap for residency programs aiming to incorporate integrative medicine content into their curricula. This set of competencies adds to the larger efforts of the IMPriME initiative to facilitate and enhance further curriculum development and implementation by not only the current grantees but other stakeholders in graduate medical education around integrative medicine training.

  8. ‘Speed advising’ for medical students applying to residency programs: an efficient supplement to traditional advising

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Jillian L.; Bischof, Jason J.; Greenberger, Sarah; Bachmann, Daniel J.; Way, David P.; Gorgas, Diane L.; Kman, Nicholas E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Over time, Residency Match dynamics fluctuate with some specialties experiencing increases in medical student popularity. Academic departments with limited resources must devise methods for coping with increased demand for their specialty. Students perceive traditional programs on Match mechanics as inadequate. Subsequently, faculty are confronted with demands for more personal attention from more students. Objectives We developed a strategy for providing specialty-specific residency match advising to large numbers of students. Methods The ‘speed-advising’ session (SAS) was developed to address the common questions and concerns that medical students pose during the Match process and to provide advisees with a breadth of faculty perspectives. Two SASs were offered over a 2-week period. After the sessions, students and faculty were surveyed regarding their experience. Results Twenty-six students pursued our specialty in the 2015 Match (26 of 234, 11.1%). Twenty-three (89%) participated in the SAS. Seventy-four percent of students (17 of 23) and all faculty completed the post-session survey. Students found the SAS to be informative, helpful and an efficient use of time. Common discussion topics included: career goals, to which programs and how many to apply, and how academic record impacts their likelihood of matching in our specialty. Students would have preferred more time with each faculty; however, most (77%) conceded that their questions were adequately answered. Faculty-favored speed advising over traditional advising (86%), primarily due to estimated time savings of 7.3 h per faculty member. Conclusions In preparing students for the Match, specialty-specific speed advising offers an efficient supplement to traditional advising. PMID:27056564

  9. Evaluation of the Current Perspectives on Letters of Recommendation for Residency Applicants among Plastic Surgery Program Directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Shultz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The goals of this project were to evaluate the current perspective on letters of recommendation and to assess the need for, and acceptance of, a more standardized letter of recommendation (LOR. Methods. An eight-question survey was distributed to plastic surgery program directors. A five-point Likert scale was selected as a means of quantifying the participants’ responses to the survey. Results. Twenty-eight of 71 program directors (39.4% completed the survey. The majority of participants felt that current LOR did not offer a realistic way to compare applicants (mean±SD, 2.9±0.8. While most agreed that increasing the objectivity of LOR would be valuable in comparing applicants (mean±SD, 4.1±0.9, the overall average response to whether a more standardized letter format would improve the resident selection process remained only slightly better than neutral (mean±SD, 3.5±1.2. Most of the chairmen supported the notion that familiarity with the author of the LOR strengthened the recommendation (mean±SD, 4.5±0.6. Conclusion. The majority of plastic surgery program directors would like more objectivity in comparing applicants but are ambivalent about a standardized letter of recommendation.

  10. Are internal medicine residency programs adequately preparing physicians to care for the baby boomers? A national survey from the Association of Directors of Geriatric Academic Programs Status of Geriatrics Workforce Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warshaw, Gregg A; Bragg, Elizabeth J; Thomas, David C; Ho, Mona L; Brewer, David E

    2006-10-01

    Patients aged 65 and older account for 39% of ambulatory visits to internal medicine physicians. This article describes the progress made in training internal medicine residents to care for older Americans. Program directors in internal medicine residency programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education were surveyed in the spring of 2005. Findings from this survey were compared with those from a similar 2002 survey to determine whether any changes had occurred. A 60% response rate was achieved (n=235). In these 3-year residency training programs, 20 programs (9%) required less than 2 weeks of clinical instruction that was specifically structured to teach geriatric care principles, 48 (21%) at least 2 weeks but less than 4 weeks, 144 (62%) at least 4 weeks but less than 6 weeks, and 21 (9%) required 6 or more weeks. As in 2002, internal medicine residency programs continue to depend on nursing home facilities, geriatric preceptors in nongeriatric clinical ambulatory settings, and outpatient geriatric assessment centers for their geriatrics training. Training was most often offered in a block format. The mean number of physician faculty per residency program dedicated to teaching geriatric medicine was 3.5 full-time equivalents (FTEs) (range 0-50), compared with a mean of 2.2 FTE faculty in 2002 (PInternal medicine educators are continuing to improve the training of residents so that, as they become practicing physicians, they will have the knowledge and skills in geriatric medicine to care for older adults.

  11. 76 FR 13515 - Medicare Program; Revisions to the Reductions and Increases to Hospitals' FTE Resident Caps for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ... groups. We published final regulations implementing the process for reducing the FTE resident caps of...; Revisions to the Reductions and Increases to Hospitals' FTE Resident Caps for Graduate Medical Education... possible full-time equivalent resident cap reductions. DATES: Effective Date: These regulations...

  12. Predicting performance using background characteristics of international medical graduates in an inner-city university-affiliated Internal Medicine residency training program

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    Akhuetie Jane

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background IMGs constitute about a third of the United States (US internal medicine graduates. US residency training programs face challenges in selection of IMGs with varied background features. However data on this topic is limited. We analyzed whether any pre-selection characteristics of IMG residents in our internal medicine program are associated with selected outcomes, namely competency based evaluation, examination performance and success in acquiring fellowship positions after graduation. Methods We conducted a retrospective study of 51 IMGs at our ACGME accredited teaching institution between 2004 and 2007. Background resident features namely age, gender, self-reported ethnicity, time between medical school graduation to residency (pre-hire time, USMLE step I & II clinical skills scores, pre-GME clinical experience, US externship and interest in pursuing fellowship after graduation expressed in their personal statements were noted. Data on competency-based evaluations, in-service exam scores, research presentation and publications, fellowship pursuance were collected. There were no fellowships offered in our hospital in this study period. Background features were compared between resident groups according to following outcomes: (a annual aggregate graduate PGY-level specific competency-based evaluation (CBE score above versus below the median score within our program (scoring scale of 1 – 10, (b US graduate PGY-level specific resident in-training exam (ITE score higher versus lower than the median score, and (c those who succeeded to secure a fellowship within the study period. Using appropriate statistical tests & adjusted regression analysis, odds ratio with 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Results 94% of the study sample were IMGs; median age was 35 years (Inter-Quartile range 25th – 75th percentile (IQR: 33–37 years; 43% women and 59% were Asian physicians. The median pre-hire time was 5 years (IQR: 4–7

  13. Dental traumatology: an orphan in pediatric dentistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva; Daugaard-Jensen, Jette

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic dental injuries are very frequent during childhood and adolescence. In fact, 2 out of 3 children have suffered a traumatic dental injury before adulthood. This fact links dental traumatology to pediatric dentistry. Unfortunately, this is not reflected by active participation by pediatric dentists in acute treatment, follow-up, and research. To examine the status of pediatric dentistry in relation to dental trauma, a publication analysis was undertaken in 1980, 1990, 2000, and 2007 about trauma articles published in 4 pediatric journals: journal of Dentistry for Children, Pediatric Dentistry, The journal of Pedodontics, and the International journal of Pediatric Dentistry. This study shows an average publication rate of trauma articles of approximately 3 percent of all articles published and with no improvement in later decennia. If only clinical studies are considered (leaving out case reports), the publication rate is less than 1 percent--completely out of proportion to the size of the problem dental trauma impose in children.

  14. Dental traumatology: an orphan in pediatric dentistry?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva; Daugaard-Jensen, Jette

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic dental injuries are very frequent during childhood and adolescence. In fact, 2 out of 3 children have suffered a traumatic dental injury before adulthood. This fact links dental traumatology to pediatric dentistry. Unfortunately, this is not reflected by active participation by pediatric...... dentists in acute treatment, follow-up, and research. To examine the status of pediatric dentistry in relation to dental trauma, a publication analysis was undertaken in 1980, 1990, 2000, and 2007 about trauma articles published in 4 pediatric journals: journal of Dentistry for Children, Pediatric...... Dentistry, The journal of Pedodontics, and the International journal of Pediatric Dentistry. This study shows an average publication rate of trauma articles of approximately 3 percent of all articles published and with no improvement in later decennia. If only clinical studies are considered (leaving out...

  15. Dental traumatology: an orphan in pediatric dentistry?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva; Daugaard-Jensen, Jette

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic dental injuries are very frequent during childhood and adolescence. In fact, 2 out of 3 children have suffered a traumatic dental injury before adulthood. This fact links dental traumatology to pediatric dentistry. Unfortunately, this is not reflected by active participation by pediatric...... dentists in acute treatment, follow-up, and research. To examine the status of pediatric dentistry in relation to dental trauma, a publication analysis was undertaken in 1980, 1990, 2000, and 2007 about trauma articles published in 4 pediatric journals: journal of Dentistry for Children, Pediatric...... Dentistry, The journal of Pedodontics, and the International journal of Pediatric Dentistry. This study shows an average publication rate of trauma articles of approximately 3 percent of all articles published and with no improvement in later decennia. If only clinical studies are considered (leaving out...

  16. Implant marketing: cost effective implant dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohrle, P S; Levin, R P

    1996-01-01

    The application of the KAL-Technique to the field of implant dentistry allows both patients and dental practices to benefit. It is an exciting advance that decreases frustration and stress in providing implant procedures and lowers overall costs. Professionals using the KAL-Technique report significant predictability in achieving passive framework fit. They are also lowering overall cost of implant cases, which increases the number of patients who can accept implant treatment. It has been well established that the more individuals in a practice that receive implants, the more referrals a practice will gain. This is because implant patients find tremendous advances in the quality of life, and do not hesitate to tell others who can take advantage of this opportunity. Implant dentistry is one of the fastest growing fields in dentistry today. While some other areas of dentistry begin to decline in volume and need, implant dentistry provides the opportunity to keep practices strong and to insure long-term success.

  17. Regenerative Perspective in Modern Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihnea Ioan Nicolescu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This review aims to trace the contour lines of regenerative dentistry, to offer an introductory overview on this emerging field to both dental students and practitioners. The crystallized depiction of the concept is a translational approach, connecting dental academics to scientific research and clinical utility. Therefore, this review begins by presenting the general features of regenerative medicine, and then gradually introduces the specific aspects of major dental subdomains, highlighting the progress achieved during the last years by scientific research and, in some cases, which has already been translated into clinical results. The distinct characteristics of stem cells and their microenvironment, together with their diversity in the oral cavity, are put into the context of research and clinical use. Examples of regenerative studies regarding endodontic and periodontal compartments, as well as hard (alveolar bone and soft (salivary glands related tissues, are presented to make the reader further acquainted with the topic. Instead of providing a conclusion, we will emphasize the importance for all dental community members, from young students to experienced dentists, of an early awareness rising regarding biomedical research progress in general and regenerative dentistry in particular.

  18. Geriatrics Education Team Model Results in Sustained Geriatrics Training in 15 Residency and Fellowship Programs and Scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denson, Steven; Simpson, Deborah; Denson, Kathryn; Brown, Diane; Manzi, Gabriel; Rehm, Judith; Wessel, Bambi; Duthie, Edmund H

    2016-04-01

    Caring for the growing elderly population will require specialty and subspecialty physicians who have not completed geriatric medicine fellowship training to participate actively in patient care. To meet this workforce demand, a sustainable approach to integrating geriatrics into specialty and subspecialty graduate medical education training is needed. This article describes the use of a geriatrics education team (GET) model to develop, implement, and sustain specialty-specific geriatrics curricula using a systematic process of team formation and needs assessment through evaluation, with a unique focus on developing curricular interventions that are meaningful to each specialty and satisfy training, scholarship, and regulatory requirements. The GET model and associated results from 15 specialty residency and fellowship training programs over a 4-year period include 93% curriculum sustainability after initial implementation, more than half of the programs introducing additional geriatrics education, and more than 80% of specialty GETs fulfilling their scholarship requirements through their curriculum dissemination. Win-wins and barriers encountered in using the GET model, along with the model's efficacy in curriculum development, sustainability, and dissemination, are summarized. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  19. Dentistry in Korea during the Japanese Occupation

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    SHIN Jae-Eu

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The Japanese introduction of dentistry into Korea was for treating the Japanese residing in Korea Noda-Oji was the first Japanese dentist for Japanese people in Korea in 1893. and Narajaki doyoyo, an invited dentist was posted in the Korean headquarter of Japanese army in september, 1905. The imperialist Japan licensed the dental technicians(yipchisa without limit and controled them generously so they could practice dentistry freely. This measure was contrary to that in Japan. (In Japan no new dental technician was licensed. Komori, a dental technician opened his laboratory at Chungmuro in 1902. The dental technician had outnumerbered by 1920. In 1907, the first Korean dental technician Sung-Ryong Choi practiced dentistry in Jongno. The imperialist Japan made the regulation for dental technicians to set a limit to the advertisement and medical practice of dental technicians. The first Korean dentist Suk-Tae Ham was registered No. 1 in the dentist license. The Kyungsung dental school was established by Nagira Dasoni for the purpose of educating some korean people that contributed to Japanese colonization. It made progress with the help of Japan. it was given the approval of the establishment of the professional school in January the 25th, 1929. it was intended to produce Korean dentists in the first place but became the school for Japanese students later on. The association of Chosun dentist, which had been founded by Narajaki doyoyo, was managed by Japanese dentists in favor of the colonial ruling. The Hansung Association of Dentists established in 1925 was the organization made by the necessity of the association for Koreans only. the Japanese forcefully annexed the Association of Hansung Dentists (Koreans only to the Association of Kyungsung Dentists to avoid collective actions of Korean dentists in the name of 'Naesunilche'--'Japan and Korea are one'. Their invading intention was shown in the event of 'decayed tooth preventive day'. Japanese

  20. Structure, provenance and residence time of terrestrial organic carbon: insights from Programmed temperature Pyrolysis-Combustion of river sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, X.; Galy, V.; Rosenheim, B. E.; Roe, K. M.; Williams, E. K.

    2010-12-01

    The terrestrial organic carbon (OC) represents one of the largest reservoirs of C on earth and thus plays a crucial role in the global C cycle, participating to the regulation of atmospheric chemistry. While degradation of sedimentary OC (petrogenic C) is a source of CO2 for the atmosphere, burial of biospheric C (e.g. plant debris and soil OC) is a long-term sequestration of atmospheric CO2. Over short timescales, the atmospheric CO2 level is also sensitive to variations of the residence time of carbon in continental reservoirs. Fluvial transport plays a crucial role in the organic carbon cycle, constituting the connection between the different reservoirs and promoting the transfer of C from one reservoir to the other. Moreover, thanks to the integrating effect of erosion, studying river sediments allows the spatial and temporal integration of organic carbon exchanges occurring in a given basin. OC transported by rivers (riverine OC) is known to be extremely heterogeneous in nature and reactivity, however; ranging from extremely refractory petrogenic C (e.g. graphite) to soil complex OC to labile vegetation debris. Here we use a recently developed method, a programmed-temperature pyrolysis-combustion system (PTP-CS) coupled to multiisotopic analysis, to determine the reactivity, age and nature of OC in river sediments. The method takes advantage of the wide range of reactivity and radiocarbon content of different components of riverine OC. We submitted to PTP-CS a set of river sediments from 1) the Ganges-Brahmputra river system and, 2) the lower Mississippi river. Preliminary results highlight the heterogeneous nature of riverine OC. Different components of the riverine OC pool decompose at different temperature and are characterized by extremely variable isotopic compositions. The decomposition of radiocarbon dead petrogenic C at very high temperature allows estimating the respective contribution of biospheric and petrogenic C. Moreover, biospheric OC appears to

  1. Estudo dos programas de residência médica em Psiquiatria do Estado de São Paulo no ano de 1993 A study of psychiatric medicine residency programs in São Paulo, Brazil, in 1993

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Carlos Calil

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estudar programas de residência médica (PRM em psiquiatria do Estado de São Paulo e verificar se são cumpridas as exigências mínimas estabelecidas pelos órgãos normativos. MÉTODO: Estudou-se todos os PRM de psiquiatria no ano de 1993 (n = 7 por meio de visitas locais, entrevistas semi-estruturadas e questionários realizados com amostra de residentes (n=12 e de preceptores (n=7, verificando-se a existência de treinamento em serviço em ambulatórios, internação, urgências e estágios em neurologia e saúde mental, além de curso de psicofarmacologia. RESULTADOS: Verificou-se que todos PRM cumprem o treinamento ambulatorial; o treinamento em internação integral está presente em 71,4% da amostra; hospital-dia em 57%; urgências em 85,7%. Estágios em neurologia ocorrem em 43%. Não há estágios em programa de saúde mental. Curso obrigatório de psicofarmacologia é ministrado em todos os PRM com carga horária muito variável. Não há avaliações sistematizadas do aproveitamento em nenhum PRM. Existem modalidades não exigidas que estão presentes na maioria dos PRM. CONCLUSÃO: As modalidades de treinamento não são cumpridas integralmente como propostas pelos órgãos normativos. Representantes desses órgãos, das sociedades de especialistas e responsáveis pelos PRM deveriam definir o perfil de habilidades desejado na formação do psiquiatra, para obtenção de treinamento padronizado e passível de avaliação mais objetiva do processo de ensino.BACKGROUND: To study existing psychiatric medicine residency programs in São Paulo to ensure if they are in compliance with the requirements established by various governing bodies. METHODS: All psychiatric medicine residency programs were studied in 1993 (n=7. The study was conducted with local visits, semi-structured interviews, and questionnaires completed by a sample of residents (n=12 and preceptors (n=7 in order to verify the existence of formal training in

  2. Development of a 2-h suicide prevention program for medical staff including nurses and medical residents: A two-center pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagami, Yukako; Kubo, Hiroaki; Katsuki, Ryoko; Sakai, Tomomichi; Sugihara, Genichi; Naito, Chisako; Oda, Hiroyuki; Hayakawa, Kohei; Suzuki, Yuriko; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Hashimoto, Naoki; Kobara, Keiji; Cho, Tetsuji; Kuga, Hironori; Takao, Kiyoshi; Kawahara, Yoko; Matsumura, Yumi; Murai, Toshiya; Akashi, Koichi; Kanba, Shigenobu; Otsuka, Kotaro; Kato, Takahiro A

    2017-08-30

    Suicide is a crucial global health concern and effective suicide prevention has long been warranted. Mental illness, especially depression is the highest risk factor of suicide. Suicidal risk is increased in people not only with mental illness but also with physical illnesses, thus medical staff caring for physically-ill patients are also required to manage people with suicidal risk. In the present study, we evaluated our newly developed suicide intervention program among medical staff. We developed a 2-h suicide intervention program for medical staff, based on the Mental Health First Aid (MHFA), which had originally been developed for the general population. We conducted this program for 74 medical staff members from 2 hospitals. Changes in knowledge, perceived skills, and confidence in early intervention of depression and suicide-prevention were evaluated using self-reported questionnaires at 3 points; pre-program, immediately after the program, and 1 month after program. This suicide prevention program had significant effects on improving perceived skills and confidence especially among nurses and medical residents. These significant effects lasted even 1 month after the program. Design was a single-arm study with relatively small sample size and short-term follow up. The present study suggests that the major target of this effective program is nurses and medical residents. Future research is required to validate the effects of the program with control groups, and also to assess long-term effectiveness and actual reduction in suicide rates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Ayurveda in Dentistry: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Roopali; Ingle, Navin Anand; Kaur, Navpreet; Yadav, Pramod; Ingle, Ekta; Charania, Zohara

    2015-08-01

    Ayurvedic medicine was considered to be world's oldest medical system, which was originated in India dating back over thousands of years. There was a long history regarding plants for the improvement of dental health and oral hygiene. To study various plants and their products as effective medicines in the treatment of various ailments since ancient times. Data were performed in PubMed Central and Cochrane library using MeSH Terms - Dentistry, Herbal Medicine, Periodontitis. A total of 142 relevant articles were found in 2013 and 2014 followed by case reports. Various studies have mentioned the uses of herbs, which are found to be statistically significant in treatment and management of oral diseases. Current researches showed that herbal extracts are effective because of the interaction with specific chemical receptors within the body. Nowadays, there has been a sudden increase in the use of herbal extracts or plant products as an alternative approach to modern day medicines.

  4. Role of Triphala in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shobha Prakash

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ayurveda is considered as the "science of life," because the ancient Indian system of health care focused views of man and his illness. India has an age-old heritage of traditional herbal medicine. Conventional drugs usually provide effective antibiotic therapy for bacterial infections, but there is an increasing problem of antibiotic resistance and a continuing need for new solutions. Hence, now herbal drugs are being preferred to synthetic antibiotics. ′Triphala′ is a well-known powdered preparation in the Indian system of medicine (ISM. It consists of equal parts of the Emblica officinalis, Terminalia chebula, and Terminalia belerica. Currently, Triphala is being extensively researched for its various therapeutic effects including its anti-caries, antioxidant, anti-collagenase, and anti-microbial activities. The present review will focus on the comprehensive appraisal of Triphala and its several applications in dentistry.

  5. Decision analysis in restorative dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusavice, K J

    1992-12-01

    Standardization of clinical decisions in restorative dentistry should be based on the tenets of the Hippocratic Oath. Although there is wide variability in preventive and operative treatment decisions, some of these decisions may lead along parallel courses to similar, clinically ethical outcomes. However, what parameters must be considered in judging the relative magnitude of positive and negative outcomes? This paper proposes several decision-making strategies for selecting optimum treatment plans for preventive and restorative situations. The caries-risk level of patients must first be identified in a systematic way and then it must be coupled with treatment options that are consistent with the potential future caries increment. A decision-tree approach and/or the treatment-index concept can then be applied to specific clinical conditions and preventive-restorative options to derive an "expected value" for each possible outcome.

  6. Lasers and radiofrequency devices in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, James; Weiss, Adam; Stern, Avichai

    2011-07-01

    Advances in technology are changing the ways that patients experience dental treatment. Technology helps to decrease treatment time and makes the treatment more comfortable for the patient. One technological advance is the use of lasers in dentistry. Lasers are providing more efficient, more comfortable, and more predictable outcomes for patients. Lasers are used in all aspects of dentistry, including operative, periodontal, endodontic, orthodontic, and oral and maxillofacial surgery. Lasers are used for soft and hard tissue procedures in the treatment of pathologic conditions and for esthetic procedures. This article discusses how lasers work and their application in the various specialties within dentistry. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Nanomaterials for Tissue Engineering In Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chieruzzi, Manila; Pagano, Stefano; Moretti, Silvia; Pinna, Roberto; Milia, Egle; Torre, Luigi; Eramo, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The tissue engineering (TE) of dental oral tissue is facing significant changes in clinical treatments in dentistry. TE is based on a stem cell, signaling molecule, and scaffold triad that must be known and calibrated with attention to specific sectors in dentistry. This review article shows a summary of micro- and nanomorphological characteristics of dental tissues, of stem cells available in the oral region, of signaling molecules usable in TE, and of scaffolds available to guide partial or total reconstruction of hard, soft, periodontal, and bone tissues. Some scaffoldless techniques used in TE are also presented. Then actual and future roles of nanotechnologies about TE in dentistry are presented.

  8. Advances of Proteomic Sciences in Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurshid, Zohaib; Zohaib, Sana; Najeeb, Shariq; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail; Rehman, Rabia; Rehman, Ihtesham Ur

    2016-05-13

    Applications of proteomics tools revolutionized various biomedical disciplines such as genetics, molecular biology, medicine, and dentistry. The aim of this review is to highlight the major milestones in proteomics in dentistry during the last fifteen years. Human oral cavity contains hard and soft tissues and various biofluids including saliva and crevicular fluid. Proteomics has brought revolution in dentistry by helping in the early diagnosis of various diseases identified by the detection of numerous biomarkers present in the oral fluids. This paper covers the role of proteomics tools for the analysis of oral tissues. In addition, dental materials proteomics and their future directions are discussed.

  9. Advances of Proteomic Sciences in Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurshid, Zohaib; Zohaib, Sana; Najeeb, Shariq; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail; Rehman, Rabia; Rehman, Ihtesham Ur

    2016-01-01

    Applications of proteomics tools revolutionized various biomedical disciplines such as genetics, molecular biology, medicine, and dentistry. The aim of this review is to highlight the major milestones in proteomics in dentistry during the last fifteen years. Human oral cavity contains hard and soft tissues and various biofluids including saliva and crevicular fluid. Proteomics has brought revolution in dentistry by helping in the early diagnosis of various diseases identified by the detection of numerous biomarkers present in the oral fluids. This paper covers the role of proteomics tools for the analysis of oral tissues. In addition, dental materials proteomics and their future directions are discussed. PMID:27187379

  10. BOOK APPRAISAL: HISTORY OF DENTISTRY IN NIGERIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, O S

    2016-06-01

    The book appraised in this edition of Chronicles of Medical History, History of Dentistry in Nigeria, is a product of many years of painstaking research. The Author, Professor Eyitope Ogunbodede, has put together an excellent book that is a great work of art. Dentistry is one of the first specialties in medicine with a very long history; evidence of periodontal disease has been traced back to at least 100, 000 years in human remains. However, the book by Professor Ogunbodede is the first comprehensive record of the History of dentistry in Nigeria. It is a must-read for every medical professional practicing in Nigeria and a worthy addition to every library.

  11. Shift Schedules and Intern Work Hours, Patient Numbers, Conference Attendance, and Sleep at a Single Pediatric Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocolas, Irene; Day, Kristen; King, Marta; Stevenson, Adam; Sheng, Xiaoming; Hobson, Wendy; Bruse, Jaime; Bale, James

    2017-03-01

    The effects of 2011 Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) duty hour standards on intern work hours, patient load, conference attendance, and sleep have not been fully determined. We prospectively compared intern work hours, patient numbers, conference attendance, sleep duration, pattern, and quality in a 2011 ACGME duty hour-compliant shift schedule with a 2003 ACGME duty hour-compliant call schedule at a single pediatric residency program. Interns were assigned to shift or call schedules during 4 alternate months in the winter of 2010-2011. Work hours, patient numbers, conference attendance, sleep duration, pattern, and quality were tracked. Interns worked significantly fewer hours per week on day (73.2 hours) or night (71.6 hours) shifts than during q4 call (79.6 hours; P interns cared for significantly more patients/day (8.1/day shift vs 6.2/call; P interns. Night shift interns slept more hours per 24-hour period than call schedule interns (7.2 ± 0.5 vs 6.3 ± 0.9 hours; P intern work hours and improved sleep duration and pattern. Although intern didactic conference attendance declined significantly during high census months, opportunities for experiential learning remained robust with unchanged or increased intern patient numbers. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Knowledge attainment, perceptions, and professionalism in participants completing the didactic phase of an Army reserve critical care nursing residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynd, C A; Gotschall, W

    2000-04-01

    Combat hospitals in today's Army demand nurses with critical care nursing "8A" additional skills identifiers. The intensity of future wars and operations other than war, together with highly technological weapons, forecast a large number of casualties evacuated rapidly from combat with wounds that require skillful and intensive nursing care. Many of the critical care nurses providing future care are positioned in the reserve components and require creative approaches to education and training concentrated into one weekend per month. An Army Reserve critical care nursing residency program was designed in one midwestern combat support hospital. The didactic course, phase I, was evaluated for effectiveness in achieving outcomes of increased knowledge attainment, enhanced perceptions of critical care nursing, and higher degrees of professionalism. Twenty-seven registered nurses completed the course, and 30 nurses from the same hospital served as controls. A repeated-measures analysis examined outcomes before intervention (time 1), at course completion (time 2), and at a 6-month follow-up (time 3). The course was effective at increasing scores on knowledge attainment and perceptions of critical care nursing; however; professionalism scores were initially high and remained so throughout the study. This research extends information about critical care nursing education and evaluates a training mechanism for meeting the unique requirements and time constraints of nurses in the reserve components who need to provide a high level of skill to soldiers in combat.

  13. Adequação de recursos humanos ao PSF: percepção de formandos de dois modelos de formação acadêmica em odontologia The Family Health Program (FHP and human resources: perceptions of students from two different dentistry schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heriberto Fiúza Sanchez

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available O Programa Saúde da Família - PSF foi instituído pelo governo federal objetivando reverter o modelo assistencial. Os recursos humanos envolvidos devem estar preparados para alcançar os objetivos que o PSF propõe. O propósito desse artigo foi avaliar os desejos, percepções e preparo de acadêmicos de Odontologia, em relação aos princípios do PSF, de duas diferentes Faculdades de Odontologia, aqui denominadas Faculdades 1 e 2. Buscou-se ainda analisar se as faculdades tiveram potencial transformador sobre os acadêmicos, graduando-os com compromisso social e sensibilidade humanitária, considerados importantes para aqueles que querem trabalhar no PSF. Questionários individuais foram aplicados por um único pesquisador. As respostas foram analisadas pelo programa Epi-Info. Os resultados mostraram que prevalece entre os acadêmicos o desejo de trabalhar no PSF por razões ligadas às dificuldades do mercado de trabalho e os mesmos citam freqüentemente a técnica como a principal característica necessária a um dentista para que o mesmo atue no PSF. Por outro lado, diferenças estatisticamente significativas foram encontradas entre os acadêmicos, apontando uma provável influência do Estágio Supervisionado, ministrado sob a forma de internato rural, sobre a formação do acadêmico da Faculdade 1, possivelmente habilitando-o melhor para o PSF.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the perceptions and opinions of dental students from two different Dentistry Schools in Brazil, both known here as Dentistry Schools 1 and 2 about the Family Health Program - FHP. The study analyzed if the Dentistry Schools had any influence on the students, graduating professionals with humanitarian and social sensibility, which are considered very important prerequisites for those who wish to work on this governmental health program, as well as searching for professional expectation of the students. Individual questionnaires were applied by only one

  14. Local anesthetics: dentistry's most important drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamed, S F

    1994-12-01

    One hundred and fifty years ago, Horace Wells opened the door to local anesthetics. Since then, many advances have been made in pain control. The development of dentistry's most important drugs is highlighted here.

  15. Adhesive dentistry: 2013 and into the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleman, David S; Deliperi, Simone

    2013-10-01

    With the recent founding of the International Academy for Adhesive Dentistry (IAAD), scientific research, commercially available products, and clinically proven protocols will be brought together with the dental profession.

  16. Leadership training in a family medicine residency program: Cross-sectional quantitative survey to inform curriculum development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Erin; Moore, Ainsley; Schabort, Inge

    2017-03-01

    To assess the current status of leadership training as perceived by family medicine residents to inform the development of a formal leadership curriculum. Cross-sectional quantitative survey. Department of Family Medicine at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont, in December 2013. A total of 152 first- and second-year family medicine residents. Family medicine residents' attitudes toward leadership, perceived level of training in various leadership domains, and identified opportunities for leadership training. Overall, 80% (152 of 190) of residents completed the survey. On a Likert scale (1 = strongly disagree, 4 = neutral, 7 = strongly agree), residents rated the importance of physician leadership in the clinical setting as high (6.23 of 7), whereas agreement with the statement "I am a leader" received the lowest rating (5.28 of 7). At least 50% of residents desired more training in the leadership domains of personal mastery, mentorship and coaching, conflict resolution, teaching, effective teamwork, administration, ideals of a healthy workplace, coalitions, and system transformation. At least 50% of residents identified behavioural sciences seminars, a lecture and workshop series, and a retreat as opportunities to expand leadership training. The concept of family physicians as leaders resonated highly with residents. Residents desired more personal and system-level leadership training. They also identified ways that leadership training could be expanded in the current curriculum and developed in other areas. The information gained from this survey might facilitate leadership development among residents through application of its results in a formal leadership curriculum. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  17. Ultrasound: A Revenant Therapeutic Modality in Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    An ultrasound (US) gives a visible image of the organs that are present inside the body. In medicine it serves for diagnosing and also its therapeutic benefits are well established for bone healing, osteointegration and soft tissue healing. In dentistry it is widely used for diagnostic purposes. When it was discovered it was introduced for therapeutic purposes, but due to lack of clinical studies its use as therapy was remittent in dentistry. The aim of the present paper was to establish the ...

  18. The advantages of minimally invasive dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Gordon J

    2005-11-01

    Minimally invasive dentistry, in cases in which it is appropriate, is a concept that preserves dentitions and supporting structures. In this column, I have discussed several examples of minimally invasive dental techniques. This type of dentistry is gratifying for dentists and appreciated by patients. If more dentists would practice it, the dental profession could enhance the public's perception of its honesty and increase its professionalism as well.

  19. Growing quackery in dentistry: An indian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhvinder Singh Oberoi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental disease restricts activities in school, work, and home and often significantly diminishes the quality of life for many children and adults, especially those who have low income or are uninsured. Though the overall dentist population ratio in India is 1:10,000, at present in rural India, one dentist is serving 2.5 lakhs of people. Only 15-20% of people in India are able to get dental services through national schemes, and 80-85% are spending money from their pockets, providing an ideal breeding ground for quackery into dental practice in India. Dental quacks cater to the lower-middle and lower socioeconomic classes that cannot afford qualified dental practitioners. A large number of people visiting these quacks seek care only when in pain, have a restricted budget, and are not very quality conscious. Dentistry has come a long way in the last one and a half century; today it is ranked as one of the most respected professions. It is incumbent upon dentists everywhere to protect this hard-earned reputation by weeding out quacks from among them. The government should urge fresh graduates to practice in rural areas and provide more incentives to them. Public health dentists should take the initiative of adopting more community-oriented oral health programs to increase the awareness among rural populations.

  20. [Burnout in nursing residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Gianfábio Pimentel; de Barros, Alba Lúcia Bottura Leite; Nogueira-Martins, Luiz Antônio; Zeitoun, Sandra Salloum

    2011-03-01

    Nursing residents may experience physical and emotional exhaustion from the daily life of attending the Program. The aim of this study was to determine the Burnout incidence among Nursing Residents. An investigative, descriptive, analytical, longitudinal-prospective study was conducted with 16 Residents over two years. The Maslach Burnout Inventory was used, translated and validated for Brazil, as well as a sociodemographic/occupational data tool. Of all residents, 17.2% showed high rates in Emotional Exhaustion and Depersonalization; 18.8% showed impaired commitment in Personal Accomplishment, 75% of which belonged to specialty areas, such as Emergency Nursing, Adult and Pediatric Intensive Care. Age and specialty area were positively correlated with Personal Accomplishment. One of the Residents was identified with changes in three subscales of the Maslach Burnout Inventory, thus characterized as a Burnout Syndrome patient. Nursing Residents have profiles of disease. Knowing these factors can minimize health risks of these workers.

  1. Residents in difficulty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mette K.; O'Neill, Lotte Dyhrberg; Hansen, Dorthe H.;

    2016-01-01

    Background The majority of studies on prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty have been conducted in English-speaking countries and the existing literature may not reflect the prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty in other parts of the world such as the Scand......Background The majority of studies on prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty have been conducted in English-speaking countries and the existing literature may not reflect the prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty in other parts of the world...... of the topic. Methods We performed a mixed methods study. All regional residency program directors (N = 157) were invited to participate in an e-survey about residents in difficulty. Survey data were combined with database data on demographical characteristics of the background population (N = 2399...

  2. General anesthesia: as a challenge and treatment need option in pediatric dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Objetive. The purpose of this study was to determine the type and characteristics of the interventions, indications of dental treatment and procedures performed to patients treated under general anesthesia (GA) by pediatric dentistry residents, during the 1997-1999 period. Method. a sample of 57 hospital records of patientes treated as part of the Special Pediatric course at the Puerto rico Pediatric hostpial were reviewed. statistical analysis was done using the chi-square test for infere...

  3. Relationships between high-stakes clinical skills exam scores and program director global competency ratings of first-year pediatric residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik E. Langenau

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Responding to mandates from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME and American Osteopathic Association (AOA, residency programs have developed competency-based assessment tools. One such tool is the American College of Osteopathic Pediatricians (ACOP program directors’ annual report. High-stakes clinical skills licensing examinations, such as the Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Examination Level 2-Performance Evaluation (COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE, also assess competency in several clinical domains.The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationships between program director competency ratings of first-year osteopathic residents in pediatrics and COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE scores from 2005 to 2009.The sample included all 94 pediatric first-year residents who took COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE and whose training was reviewed by the ACOP for approval of training between 2005 and 2009. Program director competency ratings and COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE scores (domain and component were merged and analyzed for relationships.Biomedical/biomechanical domain scores were positively correlated with overall program director competency ratings. Humanistic domain scores were not significantly correlated with overall program director competency ratings, but did show moderate correlation with ratings for interpersonal and communication skills. The six ACGME or seven AOA competencies assessed empirically by the ACOP program directors’ annual report could not be recovered by principal component analysis; instead, three factors were identified, accounting for 86% of the variance between competency ratings.A few significant correlations were noted between COMLEX-USA Level 2-PE scores and program director competency ratings. Exploring relationships between different clinical skills assessments is inherently difficult because of the heterogeneity of tools used and overlap of constructs within the AOA and ACGME core competencies.

  4. Evaluating professionalism and interpersonal and communication skills: implementing a 360-degree evaluation instrument in an anesthesiology residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Li; Metro, David G; Patel, Rita M

    2009-12-01

    To implement a 360-degree resident evaluation instrument on the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) rotation and to determine the reliability, feasibility, and validity of this tool for assessing residents' professionalism and interpersonal and communication skills. Thirteen areas of evaluation were selected to assess the professionalism and interpersonal and communication skills of residents during their PACU rotation. Each area was measured on a 9-point Likert scale (1, unsatisfactory performance, to 9, outstanding performance). Rating forms were distributed to raters after the completion of the PACU rotation. Raters included PACU nurses, secretarial staff, nurse aides, and medical technicians. Residents were aware of the 360-degree assessment and participated voluntarily. The multiple raters' evaluations were then compared with those of the traditional faculty. Intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated to measure the reliability of ratings within each category of raters by the Pearson correlation coefficient. Four hundred twenty-nine rating forms were returned during the study period. Fifteen residents were evaluated. The response rate was 88%. Residents were ranked highest on availability and lowest on management skill. The average rating across all areas was high (8.23). The average mean rating across all items from PACU nurses was higher (8.34) than from secretarial staff (7.99, P > .08). The highest ranked resident ranked high with all raters and the lowest ranked was low with most raters. The intraclass coefficients of correlations were 0.8719, 0.7860, 0.8268, and 0.8575. This type of resident assessment tool may be useful for PACU rotations. It appears to correlate with traditional faculty ratings, is feasible to use, and provides formative feedback to residents regarding their professionalism and interpersonal and communication skills.

  5. Guidelines for resident teaching experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havrda, Dawn E; Engle, Janet P; Anderson, Keri C; Ray, Shaunta' M; Haines, Seena L; Kane-Gill, Sandra L; Ballard, Stephanie L; Crannage, Andrew J; Rochester, Charmaine D; Parman, Malinda G

    2013-07-01

    Postgraduate year one (PGY1) and postgraduate year two (PGY2) residencies serve to develop pharmacists into skillful clinicians who provide advanced patient-centered care in various general and specialized areas of pharmacy practice. Pharmacy residencies are a minimum requirement for many clinical pharmacy positions, as well as for positions in academia. The role of clinical pharmacists typically includes teaching, regardless of whether they pursue an academic appointment. Common teaching duties of pharmacist-clinicians include giving continuing education or other invited presentations, providing education to colleagues regarding clinical initiatives, precepting pharmacy students (early and advanced experiences) and residents, and educating other health care professionals. Although ASHP provides accreditation standards for PGY1 and PGY2 residencies, the standards pertaining to teaching or education training are vague. Through the years, teaching certificate programs that develop residents' teaching skills and better prepare residents for a diverse pharmacy job market have increased in popularity; moreover, teaching certificate programs serve as an attractive recruitment tool. However, the consistency of requirements for teaching certificate programs is lacking, and standardization is needed. The Task Force on Residencies developed two sets of guidelines to define teaching experiences within residencies. The first guideline defines the minimum standards for teaching experiences in any residency-training program. The second guideline is for programs offering a teaching certificate program to provide standardization, ensuring similar outcomes and quality on program completion. One of the main differences between the guidelines is the recommendation that residency programs offering a teaching certificate program be affiliated with an academic institution to provide the pedagogy and variety of teaching experiences for the resident. Residency program directors should

  6. Dentistry proteomics: from laboratory development to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Taia M B; Lima, Stella M F; Petriz, Bernardo A; Silva, Osmar N; Freire, Mirna S; Franco, Octávio L

    2013-12-01

    Despite all the dental information acquired over centuries and the importance of proteome research, the cross-link between these two areas only emerged around mid-nineties. Proteomic tools can help dentistry in the identification of risk factors, early diagnosis, prevention, and systematic control that will promote the evolution of treatment in all dentistry specialties. This review mainly focuses on the evolution of dentistry in different specialties based on proteomic research and how these tools can improve knowledge in dentistry. The subjects covered are an overview of proteomics in dentistry, specific information on different fields in dentistry (dental structure, restorative dentistry, endodontics, periodontics, oral pathology, oral surgery, and orthodontics) and future directions. There are many new proteomic technologies that have never been used in dentistry studies and some dentistry areas that have never been explored by proteomic tools. It is expected that a greater integration of these areas will help to understand what is still unknown in oral health and disease.

  7. Intranasal sedatives in pediatric dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSarheed, Maha A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To identify the intranasal (IN) sedatives used to achieve conscious sedation during dental procedures amongst children. Methods: A literature review was conducted by identifying relevant studies through searches on Medline. Search included IN of midazolam, ketamine, sufentanil, dexmedetomidine, clonidine, haloperidol and loranzepam. Studies included were conducted amongst individuals below 18 years, published in English, and were not restricted by year. Exclusion criteria were articles that did not focus on pediatric dentistry. Results: Twenty studies were included. The most commonly used sedatives were midazolam, followed by ketamine and sufentanil. Onset of action for IN midazolam was 5-15 minutes (min), however, IN ketamine was faster (mean 5.74 min), while both IN sufentanil (mean 20 min) and IN dexmedetomidine (mean 25 min) were slow in comparison. Midazolam was effective for modifying behavior in mild to moderately anxious children, however, for more invasive or prolonged procedures, stronger sedatives, such as IN ketamine, IN sufentanil were recommended. In addition, ketamine fared better in overall success rate (89%) when compared with IN midazolam (69%). Intranasal dexmedetomidine was only used as pre-medication amongst children. While its’ onset of action is longer when compared with IN midazolam, it produced deeper sedation at the time of separation from the parent and at the time of anesthesia induction. Conclusion: Intranasal midazolam, ketamine and sufentanil are effective and safe for conscious sedation, while intranasal midazolam, dexmedetomidine and sufentanil have proven to be effective premedications. PMID:27570849

  8. [Importance of psychology in dentistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñaranda, P

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, the venezuelan dentists express their necessities of knowing certain aspects of psychology that could be useful in the relations with their patients. In the investigation a 16 item questionnaire was elaborated, taking 5 areas in consideration: a. Psychological management of the dental patient. b. Psychological consequences of the dental disease. c. Dental disease psychogenesis. d. Patient first contact behavior. e. Aspects of work organization. 100 dentists and 100 dental students of the last 2 years were inquired, in order to compare these two populations at the XXXth Congress of the venezuelan dentists. The two proportion coefficient test was used with: P less than or equal to 0.01. As a result 4 groups of items had a significant difference: a. Patient dissertation. b. Children with problematic behavior. c. Anxious patients; and d. Professional fees. Quantitatively 16 items were recognized as items in with Psychology could be useful to be applied in dentistry. The article concludes with 6 recommendations underlining the important role of the dental psychology in the dental school as well as in private practice.

  9. Intranasal sedatives in pediatric dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSarheed, Maha A

    2016-09-01

    To identify the intranasal (IN) sedatives used to achieve conscious sedation during dental procedures amongst children. A literature review was conducted by identifying relevant studies through searches on Medline. Search included IN of midazolam, ketamine, sufentanil, dexmedetomidine, clonidine, haloperidol, and loranzepam. Studies included were conducted amongst individuals below 18 years, published in English, and were not restricted by year. Exclusion criteria were articles that did not focus on pediatric dentistry.  Twenty studies were included. The most commonly used sedatives were midazolam, followed by ketamine and sufentanil. Onset of action for IN midazolam was 5-15 minutes (min), however, IN ketamine was faster (mean 5.74 min), while both IN sufentanil (mean 20 min) and IN dexmedetomidine (mean 25 min) were slow in comparison. Midazolam was effective for modifying behavior in mild to moderately anxious children, however, for more invasive or prolonged procedures, stronger sedatives, such as IN ketamine, IN sufentanil were recommended. In addition, ketamine fared better in overall success rate (89%) when compared with IN midazolam (69%). Intranasal dexmedetomidine was only used as pre-medication amongst children. While its' onset of action is longer when compared with IN midazolam, it produced deeper sedation at the time of separation from the parent and at the time of anesthesia induction. Intranasal midazolam, ketamine, and sufentanil are effective and safe for conscious sedation, while intranasal midazolam, dexmedetomidine, and sufentanil have proven to be effective premedications.

  10. Significance of biofilms in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wróblewska, Marta; Strużycka, Izabela; Mierzwińska-Nastalska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    In the past decades significant scientific progress has taken place in the knowledge about biofilms. They constitute multilayer conglomerates of bacteria and fungi, surrounded by carbohydrates which they produce, as well as substances derived from saliva and gingival fluid. Modern techniques showed significant diversity of the biofilm environment and a system of microbial communication (quorum sensing), enhancing their survival. At present it is believed that the majority of infections, particularly chronic with exacerbations, are a result of biofilm formation, particularly in the presence of biomaterials. It should be emphasised that penetration of antibiotics and other antimicrobial agents into deeper layers of a biofilm is poor, causing therapeutic problems and necessitating sometimes removal of the implant or prosthesis. Biofilms play an increasing role in dentistry as a result of more and more broad use in dental practice of plastic and implantable materials. Biofilms are produced on the surfaces of teeth as dental plaque, in the para-nasal sinuses, on prostheses, dental implants, as well as in waterlines of a dental unit, constituting a particular risk for severely immunocompromised patients. New methods of therapy and prevention of infections linked to biofilms are under development.

  11. [Specialties in dentistry. 4. Post-academic specialization in geriatric dentistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaub, R.M.; Baat, C. de

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, a specialization in geriatric dentistry has been established and along with it an educational programme. A specialist in geriatric dentistry is a dentist general practitioner with special knowledge and skills for delivering oral care to frail elderly people. The educational programm

  12. Evaluating Success of Pediatric Dentistry Department at Mashhad Dental School (Iran in Clinical Skills Education from Students’ Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Nematollahi

    Full Text Available Introduction: Periodic evaluation of educational programs provides insight into the course and teaching effectiveness. Effective evaluation provides valuable information, which contributes to both student’s and course success. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the success of pediatric dentistry department at Mashhad dental school in clinical education from students’ perspectives.Materials & Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 116 fifth and sixth grade undergraduate dental students in pediatric dentistry at Mashhad dental school. A questionnaire including 21 multiple choice questions about 7 parts of clinical skills in pediatric dentistry was given to each student. Data were analyzed by Mann-Whitney in SPSS software. Results: According to the study results, among 7 different clinical skills in pediatric dentistry including: examination, behavior management, prevention, injection, restoration, pulp treatment and space management, the highest success rate of pediatric dentistry department was in prevention and injection and the lowest success rate in space management and behavior control. Furthermore, from the students’ perspective, male students compared to female students mentioned a higher rate of success in choosing the type of restoration material for pediatric dentistry department (P=0. 041. Conclusion: This study showed that the students’ self-reported clinical skills in different parts of pediatric dentistry has been adequate. Students reported a lack of confidence in “behavior management” and “space management” which warrants greater emphasis in the undergraduate curriculum.

  13. [Dentistry students' reasons for choosing dentistry as a career in Damascus University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashlah, A M

    2012-05-01

    This cross-sectional questionnaire survey assessed the motives for choosing dentist as a profession among dentistry students at Damascus University, Syrian Arab Republic. A total of 408 undergraduate students (233 males and 175 females) aged 18-23 years were selected randomly from students in the second, third and fourth years of dentistry study. They completed a questionnaire that enquired about their reasons for studying dentistry as well as their sociodemographic characteristics. The number of admissions in females had increased over the 3 years. Most parents of the students were university-educated. The main motivation for choosing dentistry was as a means to achieve personal goals, including getting a good job abroad, having financial independence, and attaining a good reputation. There were significant differences between the sexes with regard to the reasons for choosing dentistry.

  14. The Fundamentals of Resident Dismissal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenarts, Paul J; Langenfeld, Sean

    2017-02-01

    Residents have the rights and responsibilities of both students and employees. Dismissal of a resident from a training program is traumatic and has lasting repercussions for the program director, the faculty, the dismissed resident, and the residency. A review of English language literature was performed using PUBMED and OVID databases, using the search terms, resident dismissal, resident termination, student dismissal, student and resident evaluation, legal aspects of education, and remediation. The references of each publication were also reviewed to identify additional appropriate citations. If the Just Cause threshold has been met, educators have the absolute discretion to evaluate academic and clinical performance. Legal opinion has stated that it is not necessary to wait until a patient is harmed to dismiss a resident. Evaluations should be standard and robust. Negative evaluations are not defamatory as the resident gave consent to be evaluated. Provided departmental and institutional polices have been followed, a resident can be dismissed without a formal hearing. Residencies are entitled to modify academic requirements and dismissal is not considered a breach of contract. Although there is anxiety regarding resident dismissal, the courts have uniformly supported faculty having this role. When indicated, failure to dismiss a resident also places the program director and the faculty at risk for educational malpractice.

  15. Predictors of Success in an Anesthesiology Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrick, Shirley S.; Crumrine, Robert S.

    1986-01-01

    Factors that contributed to successful residency performance by anesthesiology residents were examined in order to assist the program's selection committee in developing selection criteria. The best predictor of a resident's academic average in the anethesiology program was the number of years the resident had spent in other specialities.…

  16. The residency program in social medicine of Montefiore Medical Center: 37 years of mission-driven, interdisciplinary training in primary care, population health, and social medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strelnick, A H; Swiderski, Debbie; Fornari, Alice; Gorski, Victoria; Korin, Eliana; Ozuah, Philip; Townsend, Janet M; Selwyn, Peter A

    2008-04-01

    Founded in 1970 to train physicians to practice in community health centers and underserved areas, the Residency Program in Social Medicine (RPSM) of Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York, has graduated 562 board-eligible family physicians, general internists, and pediatricians whose careers fulfill this mission. The RPSM was a model for federal funding for primary care residency programs and has received Title VII grants during most of its history. The RPSM has tailored its mission and structured its curriculum to promote a community and population orientation and to provide the requisite knowledge and skills for integrating social medicine into clinical practice. Six unique hallmarks of RPSM training are (1) mission-oriented resident recruitment/selection and self-management, (2) interdisciplinary collaborative training among primary care professionals, (3) community-health-center-based and community-oriented primary care education, (4) biopsychosocial and ecological family systems curriculum, (5) the social medicine core curriculum and projects, and (6) grant support through Title VII. These hallmark curricular, training, and funding elements, in which population health is deeply embedded, have been carefully evaluated, regularly revised, and empirically validated since the program's inception. Practice outcomes for RPSM graduates as leaders in and advocates for population health and the care of underserved communities are described and discussed in this case study.

  17. 76 FR 68770 - Proposed Eligibility Criteria for the Centers of Excellence Program in Health Professions...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-07

    ... schools are schools of allopathic medicine, osteopathic medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, and graduate... meet the program requirements. Centers of Excellence provide academic enhancement programs to URM...: Allopathic and osteopathic medicine; pharmacy; dentistry; and, behavioral or mental health....

  18. Leadership Training in Otolaryngology Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, John P; Fried, Marvin P; Smith, Richard V; Hsueh, Wayne; Choi, Karen

    2017-06-01

    Although residency training offers numerous leadership opportunities, most residents are not exposed to scripted leadership instruction. To explore one program's attitudes about leadership training, a group of otolaryngology faculty (n = 14) and residents (n = 17) was polled about their attitudes. In terms of self-perception, more faculty (10 of 14, 71.4%) than residents (9 of 17, 52.9%; P = .461) considered themselves good leaders. The majority of faculty and residents (27 of 31) thought that adults could be taught leadership ability. Given attitudes about leadership ability and the potential for improvement through instruction, consideration should be given to including such training in otolaryngology residency.

  19. The Importance of Exercise in the Well-Rounded Physician: Dialogue for the Inclusion of a Physical Fitness Program in Neurosurgery Resident Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fargen, Kyle M; Spiotta, Alejandro M; Turner, Raymond D; Patel, Sunil

    2016-06-01

    Exercise, diet, and personal fitness programs are essentially lacking in modern graduate medical education. In the context of long hours and alternating shift and sleep cycles, the lack of exercise and poor dietary choices may have negative consequences on physician physical and mental health. This opinion piece aims to generate important dialogue regarding the scope of the problem, the literature supporting the health benefits of exercise, potential solutions to enhancing diet and exercise among resident trainees, and possible pitfalls to the adoption of exercise programs within graduate medical education.

  20. Sports dentistry: a perspective for the future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Vinícius Soares

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Sports Dentistry (SD acts in the prevention, maintenance and treatment of oral and facial injuries, as well as the collection and dissemination of information on dental trauma, beyond stimulus to research. Establishes as a duty for the dentist detect problems related to the athlete’s stomatognathic system. This essay is based on the provided data from the literature related to SD, including definition, practice areas and research fields. To discuss the data, six areas were categorized: shares in sports dentistry; oral health of athlete; sports-related dental implications; dental-facial trauma; face shields; and mouthguards. The analyzed data show that the SD is still an underexplored field of action by dentists, but it is expanding, despite not being recognized specialty by the Federal Council of Dentistry, but the Brazilian Academy of Sports Dentistry has been created with a mission to show the real importance of Dentistry in sport. The dentist should be part of the group of professionals associated with the athlete to perform periodic checks in order to ensure oral health which may contribute to athletes´performance. When impact occurs, however, it would be possible reduce the severity of the impact related to injuries, by using helmets, masks, goggles, face shields and mouthguard. Additionally, it is imperative that dentists, sports coaching, athletes, and professional who work with athletes be aware of the benefits of incorporating SD as an important academic and professional subject.

  1. Global Health Simulation During Residency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane R. Rosenman MD

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Resident participation in international health electives (IHEs has been shown to be beneficial, yet not all residents have the opportunity to participate. We sought to determine whether participating in simulated global health cases, via the standardized Simulation Use for Global Away Rotations (SUGAR curriculum, was useful for all pediatric residents, not merely those planning to go on an IHE. Pediatric residents in our program took part in 2 SUGAR cases and provided feedback via an online survey. Thirty-six of 40 residents participated (90%; 72% responded to the survey. Three of 10 residents not previously planning to work in resource-limited settings indicated participation in SUGAR made them more likely to do so. Nearly all residents (88% felt SUGAR should be part of the residency curriculum. All felt better prepared for working cross-culturally. While designed to prepare trainees for work in resource-limited settings, SUGAR may be beneficial for all residents.

  2. A museum-based urban teacher residency program's approach to strengthening the STEM pipeline: Channeling highly qualified Earth Science teachers into high needs schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustunisik, G. K.; Zirakparvar, N. A.

    2015-12-01

    Channeling better prepared Earth Science teachers into secondary schools with low achievement rates in STEM subjects is essential to ensuring that the students attending these schools are ultimately afforded the opportunity to take advantage of projected growth in the global geoscience workforce. Here, a museum-based urban teacher residency (UTR) program's approach to building subject specific content knowledge and research experience in Earth Science teacher candidates is described. In the museum-based program, graduate-level science courses and research experiences are designed and implemented specifically for the UTR by active Earth and Space research scientists that account for almost half of the program's faculty. Because these courses and research experiences are designed specifically for the teacher candidates, they are different than many science courses and research experiences available to pre-service teachers in a university setting. At the same time, the museum-based program is the only UTR to incorporate such a rigorous science curriculum, and some possible advantages and disadvantages of the program's approach are also considered here. While the impact of the program's approach on student achievement rates has yet to be evaluated, there is promise in the well documented links between a teacher's own experience with the practice of science and that teacher's ability to leverage effective pedagogical content knowledge in the teaching of science. Because the museum-based program's science curriculum is balanced against the educational coursework and teaching residencies that necessarily form the program's backbone, the museum's approach to strengthening the teacher candidate's science background may also inform the faculty and administration of other UTRs in cases where one of their program goals is to further expand their teacher candidate's content knowledge and practical subject matter experience.

  3. Dental anxiety: a comparison of students of dentistry, biology, and psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storjord, Helene Persen; Teodorsen, Mari Mjønes; Bergdahl, Jan; Wynn, Rolf; Johnsen, Jan-Are Kolset

    2014-01-01

    Dental anxiety is an important challenge for many patients and clinicians. It is thus of importance to know more about dental students' own experiences with dental anxiety and their understanding of dental anxiety. The aim was to investigate differences in dental anxiety levels between dental students, psychology students, and biology students at a Norwegian university. A total of 510 students of dentistry, psychology, and biology at the University of Tromsø received a questionnaire consisting of the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale, demographic questions, and questions relating to their last visit to the dentist/dental hygienist; 169 students gave complete responses. Nonparametric tests were used to investigate differences between the student groups. The respondents were 78% female and 22% male; their mean age was 24 years. The dental students showed a significantly lower degree of dental anxiety than the psychology (Pbiology students (Ppsychology students and biology students. Experienced dental students also had less dental anxiety than novice dental students. This could indicate that the dentistry program structure at the university may influence dental anxiety levels. Dental anxiety seemed to be less frequent in dentistry students compared to students of biology or clinical psychology. The practice-oriented dentistry education at the university might contribute to the differences in anxiety levels between new and experienced dentistry students.

  4. Retrospective analysis of dental implants placed and restored by advanced prosthodontic residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barias, Pamela A; Lee, Damian J; Yuan, Judy Chia-Chun; Sukotjo, Cortino; Campbell, Stephen D; Knoernschild, Kent L

    2013-02-01

    The purposes of this retrospective clinical review were to: (1) describe the demographics of implant patients, types of implant treatment and implant-supported prostheses in an Advanced Education in Prosthodontic Program, (2) evaluate the survival rate of dental implants placed by prosthodontic residents from 2006 to 2008, and (3) analyze the relationship between resident year of training and implant survival rate. All patients who received dental implants placed by prosthodontic residents from January 2006 to October of 2008 in the Advanced Prosthodontic Program at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Dentistry were selected for this study. Age, gender, implant diameter, length, implant locations, surgical and restorative detail, and year of prosthodontic residency training were collected and analyzed. Life-table and Kaplan-Meier survival analyses were performed based on implants overall, locations, year of training, and use of a computer-generated surgical guide. A Logrank statistic was performed between implant survival and year of prosthodontic residency training, location, and use of computer-generated surgical guide (α= 0.05). Three hundred and six implants were placed, and of these, seven failed. Life-table and Kaplan-Meier analyses computed a cumulative survival rate (CSR) of 97% for overall implants and implants placed with a computer-generated surgical guide. No statistical difference was found in implant survival rates as a function of year of training (P= 0.85). Dental implants placed by prosthodontic residents had a CSR comparable to previously published studies by other specialties. The year of prosthodontic residency training and implant failure rate did not have any significant relationship. © 2012 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  5. 77 FR 36550 - Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

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