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Sample records for dentistry graduate library

  1. Graduate and undergraduate geriatric dentistry education in a selected dental school in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, N; Sato, Y; Komabayashi, T

    2011-11-01

    Geriatric dentistry and its instruction are critical in a rapidly ageing population. Japan is the world's fastest-ageing society, and thus, geriatric dentistry education in Japan can serve as a global model for other countries that will soon encounter the issues that Japan has already confronted. This study aimed at evaluating geriatric dental education with respect to the overall dental education system, undergraduate geriatric dentistry curricula, mandatory internships, and graduate geriatric education of a selected dental school in Japan. Bibliographical data and local information were collected. Descriptive and statistical analyses (Fisher and chi-squared test) were conducted. Japanese dental schools teach geriatric dentistry in 10 geriatric dentistry departments as well as in prosthodontic departments. There were no significant differences found between the number of public and private dental schools with geriatric dentistry departments (P = 0.615). At Showa University School of Dentistry, there are more didactic hours than practical training hours; however, there is no significant didactic/practical hour distribution difference between the overall dental curriculum and fourth-year dental students' geriatric dental education curriculum (P = 0.077). Graduate geriatric education is unique because it is a 4-year PhD course of study; there is neither a master's degree programme nor a certificate programme in geriatric dentistry. Overall, both undergraduate and graduate geriatric dentistry curricula are multidisciplinary. This study contributes to a better understanding of geriatric dental education in Japan; the implications of this study include developing a clinical/didactic curriculum, designing new national/international dental public health policies, and calibrating the competency of dentists in geriatric dentistry. 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. EVALUATION OF DISTANCE EDUCATION IN DENTISTRY GRADUATION COURSE

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    Helbert Eustáquio Cardoso da Silva

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The curricula of Dentistry are in the process of modernization , to suit the labor market geared to the needs of the population . The changes seek a teaching method that is conducive to student elfmanagement of their knowledge through a transdisciplinary vision. Objective: To examine about the training of teachers responsible for the disciplines of dentistry , as well as new possibilities of knowledge transmission . In this context, the distance is shown as an alternative to the continuing education of future dentists , covering new technologies and new methods of teaching adults. Methods: Through a literature review , we discuss about the goals of the national curriculum guidelines and the training of teachers of courses in dentistry and also surveys are presented in distance education in healthcare. Results: The study shows successful application of distance learning for adult learners courses in Dentistry .

  3. Graduate Student Needs in Relation to Library Research Skills

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    Young, Shawna; Jacobs, Warren

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, graduate study includes a research component, requiring library skills to locate relevant literature. Upon matriculation into graduate programs, many students are underprepared in library research skills, making library instruction a priority for the success of graduate students. This qualitative study, utilizing emergent design,…

  4. Perceived competency towards preventive dentistry among dental graduates: the need for curriculum change

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    Arheiam Arheiam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A previous study has shown that dental practitioners in Benghazi believed that the less prevention-oriented education system is one of the barriers to applying preventive dentistry. Objective: To assess attitudes and perceived competence of the dental graduates in Benghazi towards prevention and early management of dental caries. Methods: A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based survey was conducted among internship students attending the Department of Community and Preventive Dentistry in Faculty of Dentistry, Benghazi, Libya. The participants were asked to provide demographic information, to respond to statements about their attitudes towards preventive dentistry, and to answer questions regarding their perceived competence in applying preventive dentistry procedures. Results: Data from 108 Libyan dental graduates were analysed for this study, of which 64% of them were females and 42.1% of them passed their final year with grade: acceptable. The most acknowledged aspects of preventive dentistry were being useful and essential to the community (95.4 and 90.8%, respectively. The percentage of participants expressing a proficiency in providing oral hygiene instructions was the highest (95.4%. There were differences between study subgroups in their perceived competence of preventive dental practices by gender and academic performance (p≤0.05. Conclusion: This study highlighted that the currently implemented undergraduate education programme in Benghazi dental school does not provide dentists with the required attitude and skills to fulfil their role in providing preventive-oriented health services.

  5. Educational Outcomes: Their Impact on Graduate Pediatric Dentistry Education.

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    Adair, Steven M.

    1990-01-01

    Six outcomes of professional competence that can be applied to postdoctoral pediatric dentistry training are: conceptual, contextual, technical, interpersonal communications, integrative, and adaptive competence. Questionnaire-type surveys are probably the best means of assessing the contextual, interpersonal, and adaptive competencies of…

  6. Tracer Study of Dentistry Graduates of one Higher Education Institution in the Philippines from 2008 to 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer D. Maderazo

    2016-01-01

    This tracer study determines the employment status of the graduates of Doctor of Dental Medicine of Lyceum of the Philippines University (LPU) from 2008-2012. It assessed the relevance of the Dentistry curriculum, knowledge, skills and attitude acquired by the graduates deemed to be relevant for their employment; identify the personal and professional characteristics and job placement of Dentistry graduates and the school related factors associated with their employment. This trac...

  7. Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    The specialty of Dental Surgery has progressed from the "blood and acrylic" of the early seventies. Dentistry has undergone a quantum leap over the past twenty-five years, with improvements in both technique and technology, bringing us the sophisticated procedures used in today's practice.

  8. Graduate Students Library Satisfaction Survey: Miller F. Whittaker Library, South Carolina State University.

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    Agingu, Beatrice O.; Johnson, Minnie M.

    This article reports the findings of a library user satisfaction survey of graduate students conducted by the library staff at South Carolina State University. The survey evaluated the effectiveness of the library's programs, resources, and services in meeting the informational needs of graduate students at this institution. The objectives of the…

  9. Tracer Study of Dentistry Graduates of one Higher Education Institution in the Philippines from 2008 to 2012

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    Jennifer D. Maderazo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This tracer study determines the employment status of the graduates of Doctor of Dental Medicine of Lyceum of the Philippines University (LPU from 2008-2012. It assessed the relevance of the Dentistry curriculum, knowledge, skills and attitude acquired by the graduates deemed to be relevant for their employment; identify the personal and professional characteristics and job placement of Dentistry graduates and the school related factors associated with their employment. This tracer study used a descriptive research design. The study described the experiences of the graduates before and after employment. The graduates conveyed their personal observations regarding the situations they faced after graduation. The findings showed that majority of the Dentistry graduate-respondents are presently employed except for one whose primary reason is family concern and decided not to find a job. Most of the graduates had their first job as associate dentist with recommendation from the department or alumni of the college and opted to put up their own private practice after 6 months. Rewarding salaries and benefits are the main reason for staying on the job and are all enjoying a professional career in dentistry with initial gross income of 25,000 pesos and above. The following school related factors for job placement such as curriculum and instruction for the general education and professional subjects, student services and faculty instruction were found to be relevant in meeting the demands of the graduates’ dental profession. And the following are the work related values gained by the graduates such a love for God, honesty and truth, professional integrity and leadership. These values were found to be very relevant in the practice of the profession.

  10. Graduate and Post-MLS Study in Digital Libraries

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    Blummer, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    As librarians confront the Information Age, it is imperative that they remain aware of the issues that affect the profession. Traditional library skills are no longer adequate for maintaining a competitive edge in the field. Post-graduate education in digital libraries offers information professionals an opportunity to broaden their knowledge of…

  11. Graduate and Post-MLS Study in Digital Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blummer, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    As librarians confront the Information Age, it is imperative that they remain aware of the issues that affect the profession. Traditional library skills are no longer adequate for maintaining a competitive edge in the field. Post-graduate education in digital libraries offers information professionals an opportunity to broaden their knowledge of…

  12. Service with Style: Micki McIntyre--Health Sciences Library, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Library Journal, 2005

    2005-01-01

    After a brief career in musical theater, Micki McIntyre entered the graduate library program at Columbia University, where she noticed a poster advertising free tuition to library employees. "There was a vacancy at the health sciences library, and that's how a theater major became a medical librarian." She's a medical librarian with…

  13. Incoming Graduate Students in the Social Sciences: How Much Do They Really Know about Library Research?

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    Monroe-Gulick, Amalia; Petr, Julie

    2012-01-01

    Academic librarians provide information literacy instruction and research services to graduate students. To develop evidence-based library instruction and research services for incoming graduate students, the authors interviewed fifteen incoming graduate students in the social sciences and analyzed the interviews using the Association of College &…

  14. Library science education and the competitiveness of its graduates:A survey and an analysis of Chinese library directors’ perceptions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO; Ximing; WU; Gang; LI; Zhuozhuo

    2008-01-01

    These authors have made a sampling survey of professional qualifications of library directors of various types of libraries in China.The subject coverage of this survey includes but not limited to the pattern of library position distribution and work conditions of those library science degree holders.It also studies such matters as the occupational roles of library science graduates in the library,the influencing factors of their professional competency(as it is perceived by library directors),library directors’opinion about the core curriculum of library science educational programs,etc.On the basis of this survey result and analysis,these authors attempt to show how Chinese librarians’professional competency can be identified and nurtured to a higher level of attainment.

  15. Graduate education of library science in China:Current status and recommendations for improvement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KE; Ping; WANG; Ping; TANG; Chengxiu

    2008-01-01

    More than twenty years ago,Wuhan University and Nanjing University offered library science(LS)graduate programs.Since then,LS graduate education has been growing quickly in many aspects.At the same time,however,LS graduate education was also facing enormous challenges stemming from the dynamic development and wide applications of information technologies into the pedagogical arena of teaching and learning at all levels.Social evolution also made it necessary for LS educators to re-examine once again their graduate education model,curricular composition,educational philosophy and educational missions.In analyzing the present situation of LS graduate education in China,this paper focuses on the following issues:1)Growing size of LS graduate education(quantity and quality);2)educational objectives,including research direction and placement for graduates;3)structure of knowledge and curricular construction;4)conditions of administering a library school of high quality and 5)the management of teaching resources.The keystone of this paper is to pinpoint where current library science curricular deficiencies are lying.It is hoped that more serious scholarly discussions and perhaps also even concerted efforts among LS scholars and library practioners may be evoked in having the graduate education system of library and information science thoroughly realigned for the informational needs of the 21stcentury.

  16. The dentist's armamentarium: a collection of 19th century instruments in the Louisiana State University School of Dentistry Library.

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    Cheramie, Toby J; Strother, Elizabeth A

    2008-01-01

    A small collection of antique dental instruments located in the LSU School of Dentistry Library (LSUSD) provides a glimpse into the world of the 19th century dentist. The instruments in this collection, with handles carved from common and rare early materials such as bone, wood, ivory, ebony, cameo, shell and pearl, provide a striking contrast to all-steel instruments of the 20th century. An understanding of their development and function substantially increases appreciation of these instruments, which can be categorized as instruments for oral surgery, prophylaxis, restoration, and general use. In this article, the authors summarize the historical development of each type of instrument and describe the specific items in the LSUSD Library collection.

  17. Chinese Graduate Students and the Canadian Academic Library: A User Study at the University of Windsor

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    Liu, Guoying; Winn, Danielle

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a pilot study that examined the information seeking behaviors of Chinese graduate students at the University of Windsor. Findings on current Chinese students' perceptions, expectations, and use of library services are highlighted including implications for academic libraries to meet international students' information needs.

  18. The Relationship between Dimensions of Personality and Library Anxiety in Graduate Students

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    Vernon, Nicola A.; Evans, M. Max; Frissen, Ilja

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that library anxiety is a phenomenon experienced by many university-level students that impedes successful information retrieval, thereby negatively impacting academic performance. This study examines the relationship between library anxiety and personality in graduate students at the master's level. Students from various…

  19. Just a Book in a Library? The Sybil Campbell Library Collection Fostering International Friendship amongst Graduate Women

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    Spencer, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    In 1927 the British Federation of University Women (BFUW) established Crosby Hall in London as a hall of residence for women graduates from overseas. The Federation aimed to foster international understanding and peace at a time of social and political turmoil. Accessions to the library at the Hall were on a somewhat ad hoc basis and provide an…

  20. Craft and Job Satisfaction: North Carolina Library and Information Science Graduates

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    Morgan, Chad Henderson

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation examines the sources of job satisfaction among 1,833 library and information science (LIS) master's program graduates in North Carolina from 1964-2009. Only respondents who identified themselves as librarians were included in the analysis. The study first examined the effects of traditional work-related variables such as income,…

  1. Providing Library Instruction to Graduate Students: A Review of the Literature

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    Blummer, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    This paper traces library instructional programs available to graduate students in academic institutions in North America from the late 1950s to the present. Three chronological perspectives provide the framework for this analysis. The first includes programs from 1958 to 1989 that offered traditional bibliographic instruction of print resources…

  2. Multi-Cultural Graduate Library Education. Historical Paper 5

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    Carter, Jane Robbins

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines factors influencing the number of minority students enrolling in library schools during the 10 years prior to 1978. Robbins notes that there are four categories of barriers likely obstructing recruitment of students of color into LIS programs: financial, educational, psychosocial, and cultural. [For the commentary on this…

  3. Multi-Cultural Graduate Library Education. Historical Paper 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Jane Robbins

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines factors influencing the number of minority students enrolling in library schools during the 10 years prior to 1978. Robbins notes that there are four categories of barriers likely obstructing recruitment of students of color into LIS programs: financial, educational, psychosocial, and cultural. [For the commentary on this…

  4. Work-Study and the Graduate School of Library Science.

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    Reinwand, Louis

    Historically American librarians were trained by practical methods. As the twentieth century progressed, academic training became the primary method of educating librarians. In the late 1960's the need for balance between theory and practice in library education started a movement toward the renewal of technical education to supplement the…

  5. A Longitudinal Assessment of Graduate Student Research Behavior and the Impact of Attending a Library Literature Review Workshop

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    Rempel, Hannah Gascho

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses findings from a longitudinal research study that examined the way graduate students carry out the literature review and how they were impacted by attending a library literature review workshop. The literature review research process serves as an important gateway for graduate students into their scholarly communities'…

  6. Life in the "Real World": A Profile of Queensland University of Technology Library and Information Science Graduates

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    Powell, Tracey; Partridge, Helen

    2010-01-01

    A graduate destination survey can provide a snap shot in time of a graduate's career progression and outcome. This paper will present the results of a Queensland University of Technology study exploring the employment outcomes of students who had completed a library and information science course from the Faculty of Information Technology between…

  7. Evaluation of the Dentistry course of UNIVILLE students’ knowledge about the use of the extracted teeth in the graduation and the teeth bank

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    Débora ZUCCO

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was, through a questionnaire, evaluate the levelof knowledge of the students from graduation in Dentistry course –UNIVILLE –, about the teeth bank: its activities and functioning,biosecutity in teeth manipulation and, especially, to find out the reason why the students do not donate spontaneously extracted teeth to the bank.A questionnaire was elaborated and applied to the studentsfrom the first to the fifth year of graduation with pertinent questions about the teeth bank, such as the use of teeth in the disciplines of the course, biosecurity and donation of dental elements. After the questionnaire was applied, it was possible to evidence that: all the interviewed students (100% had needed extracted dental elements to use in laboratory assignments; 84,2% have reported difficulty in the obtainment of the requested teeth; about biosecurity, 66.6% of the students have stated that they had already manipulated extracted teeth without individual protection equipment; even knowing that the pulp and periodontal tissues can present sanguineous pathogenic microorganisms transmissible to the human being (86,8%. It was evidenced that the main reason why students did not participate effectively in the donation of “private supplies”, is the unfamiliarity with the activities of the teeth bank, its norms of procedure, protocols of donation and, mainly, the withdrawal of dental elements.

  8. [The orthodontic department in opinion of graduates of Faculty of Dentistry of Pomeranian Medical University in years 2006/2007].

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    Syryńska, Maria; Post, Marcin; Tsynkel, Pavel; Durka-Zajac, Magdalena

    2008-01-01

    The verification of methods of conducting clinical and theoretical classes has influence on improvement of work organization. The aim of this paper was to collect and analyze information about didactics in Department of Orthodontics of Pomeranian Medical University and perspectives in the field of professional work. At the end of academic year 2006/2007, 5th year students of Faculty of Dentistry evaluated classes conducted in Department of Orthodontics. All (69) 5th year students were included in the investigation. The material was collected by an anonymous questionnaire distributed after orthodontic final exam. Students assessed well didactics in Orthodontic Department. Compared to previous years percentage of students that wanted to work abroad has increased and the number of student that wanted to work in Poland as employees has decreased. More students are going to develop their own dental practice. The yearly character of the questionnaire investigations allows to observe that professional plans of future dentists are changing together with the situation on job market in dental branch.

  9. Cosmetic Dentistry

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    If you have stained, broken or uneven teeth, cosmetic dentistry can help. Cosmetic dentistry is different from orthodontic treatment, which can straighten your teeth with braces or other devices. Cosmetic dental procedures include Bleaching to make teeth whiter ...

  10. Testing an Academic Library Website for Usability with Faculty and Graduate Students

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    Monica Claassen‐Wilson

    2009-12-01

    searching for e‐journal content.Conclusions – This study provides evidence regarding the usability of a library website with a population already familiar with library resources. It demonstrated that faculty and graduate students are not interested in experimenting with new discovery tools but are amenable to their potential value to undergraduate students. The recent trend toward minimizing content and links on websites satisfies this population, one which is already comfortable with the basic attributes of a library’s website.

  11. Review of Trends in Employing Library and Information Science Graduates in Slovenia for the Period from 2000 to 2012

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    Maja Božič

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available AbstractPurpose: The purpose of this paper is to show the trends in employing LIS graduates in Slovenia in the period from 2000 to 2012.Methodology/Approach: We collected, presented and analysed the publicly available data on the number and fluctuation of LIS graduates registered as job seekers at the national employment service. The paper also presents the fluctuation in the number of related job advertisements, and the number of employees in Slovenian libraries.Results: According to the Employment Service of Slovenia, the number of job seekers has been rising but it does not exceed the number of tendered study positions or the number of ads for job vacancies. Until 2012, only a third of job seekers were first time job seekers under 26 years of age. In recent years, the ratio of advertisements for the fixed-term employment has been increasing compared to those for the permanent employment. The majority of the ads offer employment in the central region of Slovenia, usually in the capital city which is the economic, political and university centre where the majority of all the libraries are concentrated. In addition, there is an increase in the number of ads during the summer months. The number of employees in Slovenian libraries has been rising year by year, in parallel to the increased proportion of library and information science graduates.Limitations of the research: We cannot make any conclusions about graduates of the Bologna study programmes, on one hand the first degree graduates are not very numerous on the job market and on the other hand many of them enrol the second degree Bologna study programme.Originality/practical implications of the research: For the first time in Slovenia, the research provides quantitative data on the number of the unemployed LIS graduates and on the number of job vacancy ads for LIS graduates.

  12. Holding Your Hand From a Distance: Online Mentoring and the Graduate Library and Information Science Student

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    Elizabeth A. Buchanan

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of online education in colleges and universities brings with it a variety of issues and concerns for the remote student. One such issue is online mentoring. This paper presents a study that examines perceptions of the impact and role of online mentoring by online graduate students in a Master of Library and Information Science program. The guiding research question asked “what impact does online mentoring have on the online student experience?” A survey using open and closed-ended response questions was administered. Findings indicate that the participants see the need for online mentors in at least two forms—peer mentors to assist with the “institutional maze” surrounding distance education programs, and secondly, professional mentors to assist with career planning and development. Institutions should thus consider a two-tiered mentor network to meet the needs of students at various points in their academic lives.

  13. The role of modern academic libraries : survey of perceptions and experiences of graduate students in social sciences and humanities

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    Gordana Gašo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary academic libraries have experienced profound changes lately under the influence of information and communication technology and changed approaches to teaching and learning. If academic libraries are to remain integral parts of educational experience of students, librarians and managers of academic institutions need to think anew their physical and virtual spaces and services The paper presents results of a survey which aimed to investigate the perceptions and experiences of graduate students in humanities and social sciences regarding physical and virtual library spaces and services, and to assess their satisfaction with them. Results of the study show that the largest number of respondents ue their academic library regularly (several time a month or week and that more than half consider physical library spaces and services important for their successful learning. Interestingly, students reported that electronic library sources are more important to them than physical library spaces and services, although they prefer print material over electronic sources of information. Respondents had split opinions regarding their favourite learning place in the library: slightly more respondents preferred silent reading room over the group study room. The study has shown that perception adn use of academic library is influenced by gender, academic success and personal approach to the studying.

  14. Desenvolvimento moral em formandos de um curso de odontologia: uma avaliação construtivista Moral development of graduates from an dentistry course: a constructivist evaluation

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    Sérgio Fernando Torres de Freitas

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available O desenvolvimento moral de formandos de um curso de odontologia foi analisado a partir de um modelo construtivista. Foi apresentado aos alunos um dilema de fundo moral a ser resolvido. Por meio de entrevistas, estabeleceu-se a qualificação dos alunos em um dos cinco níveis de desenvolvimento moral. Os resultados mostram que: a 66% dos formandos estão nos dois primeiros estágios de desenvolvimento moral, onde não há capacidade de relativizar situações e dilemas morais, ou estes são resolvidos na lógica de interesse pessoal; b o reconhecimento de que normas e valores morais podem ser relativizados e devem ser orientados para o bem comum foi atingido por menos de 10% dos entrevistados; c os valores de lei prevaleceram aos de vida para a maioria; d o conjunto de valores que orientou a escolha do dilema foi majoritariamente definido pela busca de recompensa e a preocupação com a própria reputação. Foram discutidas as potenciais conseqüências deste perfil de desenvolvimento moral sobre a odontologia, as relações éticas do cotidiano da prática profissional, e a incapacidade dos cursos em resolver este problema, considerado fundamental para uma reorientação do perfil de recursos humanos necessário ao País: o de um dentista com boa capacidade técnica e responsabilidade social.A debate is conducted on the moral development of graduates from an odontology course, based on a constructivist model. A problem was offered to the students, asking for the solution of a morally based dilemma. By means of interviews, it was possible to qualify the students in one of the five levels of moral development. Main results showed that: a about 66% of graduates fit the first two stages of moral development. At this level, there is no capacity to make situations and moral dilemmas relative, or solution is found within a logic of personal interest; b just a little less than 10% of the subjects acknowledged that moral norms and values can be made

  15. Percepções de formandos do curso de odontologia sobre as diretrizes curriculares nacionais Perceptions of dentistry course graduates about the national curriculum guidelines

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    Cristina Berger Fadel

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo teve por objetivo avaliar a percepção de acadêmicos formandos do curso de Odontologia da Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, no Paraná, quanto ao atual projeto pedagógico. Participaram 91 formandos, os quais responderam a um questionário autoaplicado. A maioria dos alunos mostrou conhecer o projeto pedagógico do curso, com uma percepção positiva, e identificou que contempla as características das Diretrizes Curriculares Nacionais. As competências e habilidades, expressas nas Diretrizes e proporcionadas pelo curso, aquelas nas quais os formandos se consideram mais aptos a desempenhar são: ações de prevenção, promoção, proteção e reabilitação da saúde; disposição ao aprendizado contínuo; e tomada de decisões e atuação em equipes multiprofissionais. Quanto à estrutura curricular, grande parte dos alunos percebeu duplicação de conteúdos entre as disciplinas e dificuldades em oferecer atenção integral aos pacientes. No entanto, a maioria identifica a integração entre teoria e prática como ideal ou satisfatória. Os resultados deste estudo, somados à avaliação institucional, mostram que, apesar da percepção positiva da comunidade acadêmica, existem algumas fragilidades no atual projeto pedagógico do curso que indicam a necessidade de se avançar na construção de um currículo integrado.This study aimed to evaluate the perception graduates have of the current pedagogical project in place at the College of Dentistry at the Ponta Grossa State University State of Paraná, southern Brazil. A total of 91 students took part in the study by completing a selfadministered questionnaire. Most students were knowledgeable about the course's pedagogical project, had a positive view of it, and considered that it includes the features of the National Curriculum Guidelines. The skills and abilities, expressed in the Guidelines and provided by the course, those in which the students consider themselves as

  16. The Comparison of Iranian and Foreign Students’ Motivations to Choose Dentistry Field of Study

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    Abdolreza Gilavand

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Because of some special and privileged attractions of dentistry discipline, the first choice of volunteers who want to enter university is dentistry. The students usually choose it regardless to their interests and talents. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate Iranian and Foreign student’s motivations to choose dentistry field of study. Materials and Methods We searched international databases such as PubMed, Scopus, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and Iranian databases such as SID, Magiran, Iranmedex using a searching strategy during 2000 to 2015 years. Database without language restriction, since 2000 sources, with the MeSH term "Choose dentistry field" AND "Students". At first, in the initial search,152 articles were found, and finally, 51 of them which were related to the subject of this research were used. Results In general, the motivation of students to choose field of study in Iranain and Foreign students include the following:: an independent office or job independence, high economic income, appropriate social status,  job attractiveness of dentistry, appropriate job position, individual longing, help others, top rank of student in the university entrance exam, continue to study at specialized PhD in one of dentistry trends, successful marriage nd interest in the field of dentistry. Conclusion It seems that with regard to the high unemployment rate of university graduates in Iran, the most important incentives of applicants who want to enter the dentistry discipline are high income and  particular social prestige at this major. Moreover, high income and independent job situations are the most important factors in Foreign students for choosing this filed of study in the overseas studies.

  17. Creating Tomorrow's Technologists: Contrasting Information Technology Curriculum in North American Library and Information Science Graduate Programs against Code4lib Job Listings

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    Maceli, Monica

    2015-01-01

    This research study explores technology-related course offerings in ALA-accredited library and information science (LIS) graduate programs in North America. These data are juxtaposed against a text analysis of several thousand LIS-specific technology job listings from the Code4lib jobs website. Starting in 2003, as a popular library technology…

  18. Creating Tomorrow's Technologists: Contrasting Information Technology Curriculum in North American Library and Information Science Graduate Programs against Code4lib Job Listings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maceli, Monica

    2015-01-01

    This research study explores technology-related course offerings in ALA-accredited library and information science (LIS) graduate programs in North America. These data are juxtaposed against a text analysis of several thousand LIS-specific technology job listings from the Code4lib jobs website. Starting in 2003, as a popular library technology…

  19. Professional Identity Development among Graduate Library and Information Studies Online Learners: A Mixed Methods Study

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    Croxton, Rebecca A.

    2015-01-01

    This study explores how factors relating to fully online Master of Library and Information Studies (MLIS) students' connectedness with peers and faculty may impact their professional identity development as library and information studies professionals. Participants include students enrolled in a fully online MLIS degree program in the…

  20. Minimally Invasive Dentistry

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    ... to your desktop! more... What Is Minimally Invasive Dentistry? Article Chapters What Is Minimally Invasive Dentistry? Minimally ... techniques. Reviewed: January 2012 Related Articles: Minimally Invasive Dentistry Minimally Invasive Veneers Dramatically Change Smiles What Patients ...

  1. What Is The Role of Thesis In Dentistry? Evaluation of the View Point of Senior and Graduated Students and Supervisor Teachers of Mashhad Dental School in 2010

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    Samane Habibi

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the education system in the country, thesis works as a way to solve research problems and thesis presentation is based as part of the research. To improve the quality of dissertations, it is essential to have an accurate evaluation of the objectives, practical process, process and efficiency of the course by supervisors, graduates and students. The purpose of this study was evaluation of the view point of senior and graduated students and supervisor teachers of Mashhad dental school about thesis.Materials & Methods: Forty eight supervisors, 40 students and 50 graduates from Mashhad dental school participated in this cross sectional descriptive study in the year 2010. Three questionnaires, which proved to be valid and reliable, were used for data collection. Results were analyzed according to the frequency distribution of variable and average of description. Common questions were compared by Kruskal-Wallis test at a significance level of 95%.Results: The data indicated that the effect of thesis presentation on the activities leading to production and basic science and increase in professional knowledge and skills were average while it was very effective in teaching research methods. Students, graduates and supervisors together agreed on the completion of a joint research project in the early years of school and covering an education subject about thesis goals. Supervisors estimated the effect of thesis result in community to be more than that of the graduates (P=0.03. In addition, supervisors had less agreement on thesis as a voluntary course compared to students and graduates (P=0.01.Conclusion: Based on findings of this study, because of the great amount of budget and time spent on thesis, it is better to optimize the presented results and recommendations in this regard. It also seems that the greatest impact on improving the process would be created through revising the rules, creating supportive organizations actively and

  2. erceptions of U.S. Academic Library Services of First-year Graduate Students from Taiwan—A Photo-elicitation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Chen Lin

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study investigating international students’ perceptions of U.S. academic libraries, a qualitative method, photo-elicitation, is for the first time used to study how previous library experiences influence international students’ current perceptions of U.S. academic libraries. This study focuses on four dimensions of library service including access to information, affect of service, library as place, and personal control; these four dimensions are adapted from the LibQUAL+™, a web-based survey tool used among academic libraries for measuring users’ perceptions of library services.Five first-year graduate students from Taiwan were interviewed about how they perceived the library services of Center for Instructional Materials and Computing (CIMC, an academic library serving the students and faculty of School of Education at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. The findings of this study confirm the findings of previous studies both on international students’ in U.S. academic libraries and on photo-elicitation studies, and add empirical examples and insights for the claims in the limited body of research on international students in U.S. academic libraries. [Article content in Chinese

  3. Librarians Aren’t Born with Information Superpowers: Leveling the Playing Field for Incoming Library Science Graduate Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Lamb

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Students enter the library science graduate program with a wide range of information and technology skills. Today’s graduate courses require students to be able to build web-based pathfinders, use social media, and search databases. This article examines the design and development of an introductory course for incoming library science graduate students that personalizes instruction and ensures that each student is ready for the rigors of graduate school. Taken during the first semester of the program, this introductory course teaches information and technology skills and concepts that are core to library science. The author explores the process of creating a computer-based course that addresses the diverse needs of this student population. Using a systematic approach to instructional design and development, the author outlines the steps in designing, developing, implementing, and evaluating an online, self-paced graduate course. Based on the Dick and Carey model, the process included identifying the instructional goals, conducting an instructional analysis, analyzing learners and contexts, writing performance objectives, developing assessment instruments, developing instructional strategies, developing and selecting instructional materials, designing and conducting formative evaluation of instruction, revising instruction, and designing and conducting summative evaluation. This process produced effective, efficient, and appealing instructional materials. Les étudiants entament un programme d’études supérieures en sciences de l’information avec une panoplie d’habiletés en matière d’information et de technologie. Les cours d’études supérieures requièrent aujourd’hui que les étudiants puissent créer des guides en ligne, utiliser des médias sociaux et interroger des bases de données. Cet article porte sur la conception et le développement d’un cours d’introduction qui est offert aux nouveaux étudiants diplômés en

  4. BOOK APPRAISAL: HISTORY OF DENTISTRY IN NIGERIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, O S

    2016-06-01

    The book appraised in this edition of Chronicles of Medical History, History of Dentistry in Nigeria, is a product of many years of painstaking research. The Author, Professor Eyitope Ogunbodede, has put together an excellent book that is a great work of art. Dentistry is one of the first specialties in medicine with a very long history; evidence of periodontal disease has been traced back to at least 100, 000 years in human remains. However, the book by Professor Ogunbodede is the first comprehensive record of the History of dentistry in Nigeria. It is a must-read for every medical professional practicing in Nigeria and a worthy addition to every library.

  5. Continued medication use in dentistry: the importance of dental records

    OpenAIRE

    de Medeiros, Glaucia Helena Faraco; Brüning, Vanessa

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Appoint the main chronic diseases and the most frequent medications used by the patients by the graduation students of Dentistry between 2012 and 2014/A,through patients’dentistry records.Material and Methods: Two studies were performed: one retrospective in patients’ dentistry records, attended at the Clinical School of Dentistry and a cross-sectional study with the students enrolled between the 6th and 9th semester in 2014/B. After the record, the data were inserted on an Excel® spread...

  6. There is a Significant Relationship Between Computer Attitudes and Library Anxiety Among African American Graduate Students. A review of: Jiao, Qun G., and Anthony J. Onwuegbuzie. “The Impact of Information Technology on Library Anxiety: The Role of Computer Attitudes.” Information Technology & Libraries 23.4 (Dec. 2004: 138 ‐44.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gill Needham

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To investigate whether African American students’ computer attitudes predict levels of library anxiety. Design – A user study in which two instruments were administered to a group of graduate students to measure computer attitudes and library anxiety. Setting – The College of Education at an historically black college and university in the United States of America. Subjects – Ninety ‐four, predominantly female, African American graduate students, ranging in age from 22 ‐62 years old, and enrolled in either a statistics or a measurement course. Methods – Two instruments, the Computer Attitude Scale (CAS and the Library Anxiety Scale (LAS were administered to all the study participants. The Computer Anxiety Scale contains forty Likert ‐type items that assess individuals’ attitudes toward computers and their use. It includes four scales which can be administered separately: 1. Anxiety or fear of computers 2. Confidence in the ability to use computers 3. Liking or enjoying working with computers 4. Computer usefulnessThe LAS contains forty ‐three, 5 ‐point, Likert ‐format items that assess levels of library anxiety experienced by college students. It also has five subscales as follows: 1. Barriers with staff 2. Affective barriers 3. Comfort with the library 4. Knowledge of the library 5. Mechanical barriers Main results – There were twenty correlations between the library anxiety subscale scores and the computer attitude subscale scores. Four of these correlations were statistically significant. Liking or enjoying working with computers was statistically significantly linked to affective barriers, comfort with the library, and knowledge of the library. There was also a statistically significant association between an attitude of computer usefulness and knowledge of the library. Conclusion – These findings suggest that in this group of students there is a medium to strong relationship between computer

  7. Color: Implications in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sikri Vimal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The success of restorative dentistry is determined on the basis of functional and esthetic results. To achieve esthetics, four basic determinants are required in sequence; viz., position, contour, texture and color. The knowledge of the concept of color is essential for achieving good esthetics. This review compiles the various aspects of color, its measurements and shade matching in dentistry.

  8. Laser in operative dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Yasini

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available Today laser has a lot of usage in medicine and dentistry. In the field of dentistry, laser is used in soft tissue surgery, sterilization of canals (in root canal therapy and in restorative dentistry laser is used for cavity preparation, caries removal, sealing the grooves (in preventive dentistry, etching enamel and dentin, composite polymerization and removal of tooth sensitivity. The use of Co2 lasers and Nd: YAG for cavity preparation, due to creating high heat causes darkness and cracks around the region of laser radiation. Also due to high temperature of these lasers, pulp damage is inevitable. So today, by using the Excimer laser especially the argon floride type with a wavelength of 193 nm, the problem of heat stress have been solved, but the use of lasers in dentistry, especially for cavity preparation needs more researches and evaluations.

  9. Information Seeking Behavior of Library and Information Science Faculty in Research with a Special Reference to the Use of Networked Information Sources and Services: A Case Study Performed at the Graduate School of Library And Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (Modified Version)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouserie, Hossam Eldin Mohamed Refaat

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore and investigate the ways faculty at the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign use Networked Information Sources And Services to support their research task. Library and Information Sciences faculty at the University of Illinois were chosen as…

  10. Information Seeking Behavior of Library and Information Science Faculty in Research with a Special Reference to the Use of Networked Information Sources and Services: A Case Study Performed at the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouserie, Hossam Eldin Mohamed Refaat

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore and investigate the ways faculty at the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign use Networked Information Sources and Services to support their research task. Library and Information Sciences faculty at the University of Illinois were chosen as…

  11. Minimum intervention dentistry: periodontics and implant dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darby, I B; Ngo, L

    2013-06-01

    This article will look at the role of minimum intervention dentistry in the management of periodontal disease. It will discuss the role of appropriate assessment, treatment and risk factors/indicators. In addition, the role of the patient and early intervention in the continuing care of dental implants will be discussed as well as the management of peri-implant disease.

  12. Expanding services in a shrinking economy: desktop document delivery in a dental school library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gushrowski, Barbara A

    2011-07-01

    How can library staff develop and promote a document delivery service and then expand the service to a wide audience? The setting is the library at the Indiana University School of Dentistry (IUSD), Indianapolis. A faculty survey and a citation analysis were conducted to determine potential use of the service. Volume of interlibrary loan transactions and staff and equipment capacity were also studied. IUSD Library staff created a desktop delivery service (DDSXpress) for faculty and then expanded the service to practicing dental professionals and graduate students. The number of faculty using DDSXpress remains consistent. The number of practicing dental professionals using the service is low. Graduate students have been quick to adopt the service. Through careful analysis of capacity and need for the service, staff successfully expanded document delivery service without incurring additional costs. Use of DDSXpress is continually monitored, and opportunities to market the service to practicing dental professionals are being investigated.

  13. Expanding services in a shrinking economy: desktop document delivery in a dental school library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gushrowski, Barbara A

    2011-01-01

    Question: How can library staff develop and promote a document delivery service and then expand the service to a wide audience? Setting: The setting is the library at the Indiana University School of Dentistry (IUSD), Indianapolis. Method: A faculty survey and a citation analysis were conducted to determine potential use of the service. Volume of interlibrary loan transactions and staff and equipment capacity were also studied. Main results: IUSD Library staff created a desktop delivery service (DDSXpress) for faculty and then expanded the service to practicing dental professionals and graduate students. The number of faculty using DDSXpress remains consistent. The number of practicing dental professionals using the service is low. Graduate students have been quick to adopt the service. Conclusion: Through careful analysis of capacity and need for the service, staff successfully expanded document delivery service without incurring additional costs. Use of DDSXpress is continually monitored, and opportunities to market the service to practicing dental professionals are being investigated. PMID:21753911

  14. Ethical advertising in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graskemper, Joseph P

    2009-01-01

    Advertising in dentistry has steadily increased since the 1970s to become a leading choice of many dentists to promote their practices. The manner in which advertising progresses within the profession affects all dentists and how patients perceive dentistry as a profession. This paper presents ethical concepts that should be followed when dentists are pursuing practice promotion through advertising. It also raises questions that, hopefully, will increase attention and discussion on dental advertising. The paper concludes that ethical advertising is easily achieved by promoting patient education while not placing the dentist's self-interests ahead of the patient's. With this approach, dentistry may continue to be one of the most trusted professions.

  15. Ozone Therapy in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Sudarshan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available With the advancements in the field of dentistry, new treatment protocols are budding day by day to combat human ailments in a much natural better and simpler way. One such advancement is the application of ozone in dentistry. Ozone is a natural element protects us from ultraviolet rays. It has several properties including analgesics, immunostimulant and antimicrobial properties. In Dentistry its uses are abundance from gingival diseases, infection control, temporomandibular disorders, radiation and chemotherapy induced mucositis, lichen planus etc. Researchers believe that this therapy is in state of equilibrium with benefit and drawback. This review throws light on the history, properties, methods of administration, uses in the field of medicine and dentistry, toxicity, contraindications of ozone. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(1.000: 45-54

  16. Magnets in prosthetic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, M A; Walmsley, A D; Harris, I R

    2001-08-01

    Magnetic retention is a popular method of attaching removable prostheses to either retained roots or osseointegrated implants. This review chronicles the development of magnets in dentistry and summarizes future research in their use. The literature was researched by using the Science Citation Index and Compendex Web from 1981 to 2000. Articles published before 1981 were hand researched from citations in other publications. Articles that discussed the use of magnets in relation to prosthetic dentistry were selected.

  17. Ayurveda in Dentistry: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Roopali; Ingle, Navin Anand; Kaur, Navpreet; Yadav, Pramod; Ingle, Ekta; Charania, Zohara

    2015-08-01

    Ayurvedic medicine was considered to be world's oldest medical system, which was originated in India dating back over thousands of years. There was a long history regarding plants for the improvement of dental health and oral hygiene. To study various plants and their products as effective medicines in the treatment of various ailments since ancient times. Data were performed in PubMed Central and Cochrane library using MeSH Terms - Dentistry, Herbal Medicine, Periodontitis. A total of 142 relevant articles were found in 2013 and 2014 followed by case reports. Various studies have mentioned the uses of herbs, which are found to be statistically significant in treatment and management of oral diseases. Current researches showed that herbal extracts are effective because of the interaction with specific chemical receptors within the body. Nowadays, there has been a sudden increase in the use of herbal extracts or plant products as an alternative approach to modern day medicines.

  18. Dentistry students' perceptions of learning management systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handal, B; Groenlund, C; Gerzina, T

    2010-02-01

    This paper reports an exploratory survey study about students' perceptions of learning management systems (LMS) at the Faculty of Dentistry, University of Sydney. Two hundred and fifty-four students enrolled in the Bachelor of Dentistry and the Bachelor of Oral Health programmes participated in an online survey aimed at exploring their beliefs and attitudes as well as their preferences for eLearning tools. Results indicated a strong preference of students for using LMSs as resource repositories rather than for higher-order learning activities such as online discussion forums. This finding holds importance for consideration of the development of the educational resources modalities that support development of essential graduate attributes such as information literacy and collaborative learning.

  19. Authoritarianism and Censorship: Attitudes and Opinions of Students in the Graduate Library School of Indiana University. A Report of an Exploratory Project Conducted as a Preliminary for a Proposed Nationwide Study of American Public Librarians and Intellectual Freedom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busha, Charles H.

    This study attempts to measure the attitudes toward intellectual freedom held by a group of future librarians and to correlate these findings with certain syndromes of authoritarianism as reported in "The Authoritarian Personality," by T. W. Adorno, and others (New York, Harper, 1950). The hypothesis is that graduate library students who…

  20. Library and Information Professionals as Knowledge Engagement Specialists. Theories, Competencies and Current Educational Possibilities in Accredited Graduate Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Javier Calzada; Marzal, Miguel Angel

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The role of library and information science professionals as knowledge facilitators is solidly grounded in the profession's theoretical foundations as much as connected with its social relevance. Knowledge science is presented in this paper as a convenient theoretical framework for this mission, and knowledge engagement…

  1. Brexit and dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, E; Stagnell, S; Shah, S

    2016-05-27

    On 23 June 2016, eligible UK voters will be asked to decide whether to vote in the EU referendum. The EU impacts on our daily lives in more ways than many people realise. Dentistry is affected by EU legislation. Examples include the movement of dental professionals, the import of dental equipment and materials, as well as health and safety legislation. Many more EU dentists and DCPs come to the UK to work than vice versa. These numbers have increased markedly since 2004. The result of the vote may affect how dentistry operates in the UK in future years. In addition, a vote to stay would not necessarily prevent change. There are attempts underway to increase the ease by which professionals can work in other member states, especially on a temporary basis. This too is likely affect dentistry at some point. Workforce planners and policy makers should factor in the impact of the EU in future dental policy.

  2. Lasers in aesthetic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Timothy C; Pang, Peter K

    2004-10-01

    This article focuses on lasers and aesthetic dentistry and their unique parallel in history from their early development to their present day usage and application. The demand for aesthetic dentistry has had a major impact not only on treatment planning but also on the choice of materials, techniques, and equipment. It is this demand that has married the use of lasers with aesthetic dentistry. A short literature review on the five basic laser types precedes the basic premise of smile design and its critical importance in attaining the desirable aesthetic end result. A short review on biologic width and biologic zone reinforces their importance when manipulating gingival tissue. Four case reports highlight the use of diode, erbium, and carbon dioxide lasers. The end results show the power of proper treatment planning and the use of a smile design guide when using these instruments and confirm a conservative, aesthetic treatment without compromising the health and function of the patients.

  3. Nanomaterials in preventive dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannig, Matthias; Hannig, Christian

    2010-08-01

    The prevention of tooth decay and the treatment of lesions and cavities are ongoing challenges in dentistry. In recent years, biomimetic approaches have been used to develop nanomaterials for inclusion in a variety of oral health-care products. Examples include liquids and pastes that contain nano-apatites for biofilm management at the tooth surface, and products that contain nanomaterials for the remineralization of early submicrometre-sized enamel lesions. However, the treatment of larger visible cavities with nanomaterials is still at the research stage. Here, we review progress in the development of nanomaterials for different applications in preventive dentistry and research, including clinical trials.

  4. Polyamides in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shekhar Bhatia

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Thermoplastic resins have been used in dentistry for over 50 years. Since that time their applications have continued to grow, and the interest in nylon based materials have increased. With the development of new properties, there are certain to be additional new applications for thermoplastic resins in the future, to help patients with damaged or missing teeth. The dentists have to meet growing demands for prosthetic rehabilitation due to population aging and higher requirements on the quality of life. Herein in this article we will be discussing in detail properties of nylon based materials and their various implications in dentistry

  5. Plasma in dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Cha, Seunghee; Park, Young-Seok

    2014-01-01

    This review describes the contemporary aspects of plasma application in dentistry. Previous studies on plasma applications were classified into two categories, surface treatment and direct applications, and were reviewed, respectively according to the approach. The current review discussed modification of dental implant surface, enhancing of adhesive qualities, enhancing of polymerization, surface coating and plasma cleaning under the topics of surface treatment. Microbicidal activities, deco...

  6. Restorative dentistry for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donly, Kevin J

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses contemporary pediatric restorative dentistry. Indications and contraindications for the choice of different restorative materials in different clinical situations, including the risk assessment of the patient, are presented. The specific use of glass ionomer cement or resin-modified glass ionomer cement, resin-based composite, and stainless steel crowns is discussed so that preparation design and restoration placement is understood.

  7. Invisalign and aesthetic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Invisalign has been an integral part of dental practices for many years. Besides improving crowding and spacing in teeth, it is an excellent adjunct for many different aesthetic procedures. One such case is illustrated in this article, where the combination of Invisalign and minimally invasive dentistry allowed for a stellar outcome, and one very happy dental patient.

  8. A Graduate Degree in Library or Information Science Is Required, but not Sufficient, to Enter the Profession. A Review of: Reeves, R., & Hahn, T. (2010. Job advertisements for recent graduates: Advising, curriculum, and job-seeking implications. Journal of Education for Library and Information Science, 51(2, 103-119.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazi Torabi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To analyze the current state of the job market for recent MLS or MLIS graduates.Design – Content analysis of job postings.Setting – Online library or archival job advertisements published between 15 April, 2006 and 10 May, 2009 and collected from two national library publications (American Libraries and Library Journal, two electronic lists (Maryland's iSchool Discussion list and the Archives and Archivists list sponsored by the Society of American Archivists, two Internet job banks (USAJobs.gov and LISJobs.com, and several local chapters of library and archival organizations in the South Atlantic region of the United States.Subjects – 1,042 online library or archival job advertisements. Salary data were obtained from 401 available online job advertisements.Methods – The methodology for collection and content analysis of job ads was adapted from earlier studies, with slight modification wherever appropriate. The following criteria for selecting the ads were applied:• Ad says "entry-level"• No mention of professional experience• No experience or duties impossible for entry-level librarians to gain• Only ads that required an MLS or MLIS degree from an ALA-accredited institution• Part-time or temporary positions of less than nine months were excluded The authors removed duplicated job postings and identified three major areas of content analysis. Table 1 lists a brief summary of these areas and further sub-categories for each area. The content analysis was performed using a custom Microsoft Access database for data organization and storage and Microsoft Excel spreadsheet for data manipulation. SPSS was used for statistical analysis.Main Results – The two largest represented institution types for library positions were academic (63.6% and public (17.5%. For archival positions, the academic (62.7% and "other" (25.4% institutions rank first and second. When the job ads were broken down into the position types, which

  9. Laying the Groundwork for a New Library Service: Scholar-Practitioner & Graduate Student Attitudes Toward Altmetrics and the Curation of Online Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Reed

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective – In order to inform a library service related to creating and maintaining online scholarly profiles, we sought to assess the knowledge base and needs of our academic communities. Participants were queried about use, issues, and attitudes toward scholarly profile and altmetric tools, as well as the role librarians could play in assisting with the curation of online reputation. Methods – Semi-structured interviews with 18 scholar-practitioners and 5 graduate students from two mid-sized universities. Results – While all participants had Googled themselves, few were strategic about their online scholarly identity. Participants affirmed the perception that altmetrics can be of value in helping to craft a story of the value of their research and its diverse outputs. When participants had prior knowledge of altmetrics tools, it tended to be very narrow and deep, and perhaps field-specific. Participants identified time as the major barrier to use of scholarly profile and altmetrics tools. Conclusions – Librarians are well-placed to assist scholar-practitioners who wish to curate an online profile or use altmetrics tools. Areas of assistance include: personalized support, establishment of goals, orientation to specific tools, orientation to altmetrics and scholarly promotion landscape, preparing users for potential difficulties, discussing copyright implications, Open Access education, and guidance with packaging content for different venues and audiences.

  10. The rationale for and implementation of learner-centered education: experiences at the Ostrow School of Dentistry of the University of Southern California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navazesh, Mahvash; Rich, Sandra K; Tiber, Arnold

    2014-02-01

    This report describes the design, implementation, and function of integrated, learner-centered education at the Ostrow School of Dentistry of the University of Southern California. The 190 required courses of the previous curriculum have been condensed to forty-four courses. Four courses, presented for each of eleven trimesters of the four-year D.D.S. program, are entitled Human Structure, Human Function, Human Behavior, and Human Clinical Dentistry. An integrated biomedical sciences curriculum is supported by small-group, facilitator-based, problem-based learning (PBL) and an electronic PBL case library. Modules, rotations, and preclinical and clinical sessions make up remaining instructional units of the curriculum. Selected assessment outcomes measuring student knowledge, behavior, and skill development are discussed. As an external measure, first-attempt pass rates on the National Board Dental Examination (NBDE) Part I show a range of 87-96 percent over a ten-year period (for Classes 2005-14). First-attempt pass rates on the NBDE Part II for Classes 2005-12 ranged from 74 percent to 93 percent. Perceived barriers and opportunities for better performance on the NBDE Part II are addressed. Additionally, an exit survey, administered over the past four years, indicates a high level of student satisfaction with "depth and breadth" of their education (82-93 percent) and that graduates feel well prepared to enter the practice of dentistry (94-97 percent).

  11. Aloe vera in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujatha, G; Kumar, G Senthil; Muruganandan, J; Prasad, T Srinivasa

    2014-10-01

    Aloe vera is a medicinal plant which has been used for thousands of years. The health benefits of aloe vera is well known and the dental uses of this plant is multiple. Interest is gathering among researchers regarding the use of this plant. Studies have proved the antiseptic, anti inflammatory, antiviral and antifungal properties of aloe vera and the use of this plant is proved beneficial. This plant is proved to be non allergic and very good in building up the immune system. Aloe vera is gaining popularity in dentistry as it is completely natural and there is no side effects being reported with its use. This paper gives an overview of the uses of this miracle plant and its uses in dentistry.

  12. Radiation incidents in dentistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovelock, D.J. [Dental Hospital and School, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom). Dept. of Radiology

    1996-12-31

    Most dental practitioners act as their own radiographer and radiologist, unlike their medical colleagues. Virtually all dental surgeons have a dental X-ray machine for intraoral radiography available to them and 40% of dental practices have equipment for dental panoramic tomography. Because of the low energy of X-ray equipment used in dentistry, radiation incidents tend to be less serious than those associated with other aspects of patient care. Details of 47 known incidents are given. The advent of the 1985 and 1988 Ionising Radiation Regulations has made dental surgeons more aware of the hazards of radiation. These regulations, and general health and safety legislation, have led to a few dental surgeons facing legal action. Because of the publicity associated with these court cases, it is expected that there will be a decrease in radiation incidents arising from the practice of dentistry. (author).

  13. Corporate dentistry in 2032?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Michael

    2012-07-01

    During the last 20 years, there has been considerable growth in the number of dental practices owned by corporate bodies. At present, well over 800 practices are owned by such bodies and they employ over 3000 dentists. This paper describes the factors that have led to this growth and explores the advantages and disadvantages of 'corporate' dentistry for patients, dentists, and the dental team. It then considers how and why dental practice may change over the next 20 years and concludes that by 2032 the small one-dentist practice may well be in the past. It is likely that smaller practices will have to work in some form of association if they are to survive. Although their current model is unstable, corporates are likely to adapt to a changing environment. By 2032, in some cases, dentistry may well be taken out of its conventional setting, into supermarkets or a school environment.

  14. Color vision and dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, W; Schuman, N

    1992-05-01

    Color vision is a critical component of restorative and esthetic dentistry, but dentists, as a group, do not have their color vision tested at any time during their careers. A study was undertaken to ascertain the color-vision status of practicing dental personnel at the University of Tennessee, College of Dentistry. One hundred fifty individuals, 75 men and 75 women, were screened. The results corroborated the existing medical data for the general population. It was found that 9.3% of the men and none of the women exhibited color-vision defect. Since most dentists are male, this study demonstrates an area of potential weakness for some practitioners. Once a color-vision problem is found, it is simple to remedy by employing a team approach to shade matching or mechanical means of matching shades (by the practitioner). No ethnic or racial distinctions were detected, although these have been reported in other studies.

  15. Nanorobots: Future in dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Shetty, Neetha J.; Swati, P.; David, K.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the phenomenon of nanotechnology as it might apply to dentistry as a new field called nanodentistry. Treatment possibilities might include the application of nanotechnology to local anesthesia, dentition renaturalization, the permanent cure for hypersensitivity, complete orthodontic realignment in a single visit, covalently bonded diamondized enamel, and continuous oral health maintenance using mechanical dentifrobots. Dental nanorobots could be construc...

  16. Integral Rehabilitation in Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Lamas Lara, César; Cirujano Dentista, Docente del Área de Operatoria Dental y Endodoncia de la Facultad de OdontoIogía de la UNMSM.; Paz Fernández, Juan José; Paredes Coz, Gerson; Cirujano Dentista, Especialista en Rehabilitación Oral, Docente del Área de Rehabilitación Oral de la Facultad de Odontología de la UNMSM.; Angulo de la Vega, Giselle; Cirujano Dentista, Estudios de Especialidad de Rehabilitación Oral de la Facultad de Odontología de la UNMSM.; Cardoso Hernández, Sully; Estudiante de internado de la Facultad de Odontología de la UNMSM.

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays is fundamental the interrelationship of the diverse specialities of dentistry for the resolution of the treatments realized in the patients who come to the odontologic consultation, since the vision slanted of some area can deprive to offer a better possibility of treatment. Working with specialists in different areas carries to orientating adequately the treatments and to optimizing results. In the present article the integral rehabilitation of a patient is detailed by the participa...

  17. Tissue engineering in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Neel, Ensanya Ali; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Salih, Vehid M; Kim, Hae-Won; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2014-08-01

    of this review is to inform practitioners with the most updated information on tissue engineering and its potential applications in dentistry. The authors used "PUBMED" to find relevant literature written in English and published from the beginning of tissue engineering until today. A combination of keywords was used as the search terms e.g., "tissue engineering", "approaches", "strategies" "dentistry", "dental stem cells", "dentino-pulp complex", "guided tissue regeneration", "whole tooth", "TMJ", "condyle", "salivary glands", and "oral mucosa". Abstracts and full text articles were used to identify causes of craniofacial tissue loss, different approaches for craniofacial reconstructions, how the tissue engineering emerges, different strategies of tissue engineering, biomaterials employed for this purpose, the major attempts to engineer different dental structures, finally challenges and future of tissue engineering in dentistry. Only those articles that dealt with the tissue engineering in dentistry were selected. There have been a recent surge in guided tissue engineering methods to manage periodontal diseases beyond the traditional approaches. However, the predictable reconstruction of the innate organisation and function of whole teeth as well as their periodontal structures remains challenging. Despite some limited progress and minor successes, there remain distinct and important challenges in the development of reproducible and clinically safe approaches for oral tissue repair and regeneration. Clearly, there is a convincing body of evidence which confirms the need for this type of treatment, and public health data worldwide indicates a more than adequate patient resource. The future of these therapies involving more biological approaches and the use of dental tissue stem cells is promising and advancing. Also there may be a significant interest of their application and wider potential to treat disorders beyond the craniofacial region. Considering the

  18. Nanocharacterization in Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Shivani Sharma; Cross, Sarah E.; Carlin Hsueh; Ruseen P. Wali; Stieg, Adam Z.; James K Gimzewski

    2010-01-01

    About 80% of US adults have some form of dental disease. There are a variety of new dental products available, ranging from implants to oral hygiene products that rely on nanoscale properties. Here, the application of AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) and optical interferometry to a range of dentistry issues, including characterization of dental enamel, oral bacteria, biofilms and the role of surface proteins in biochemical and nanomechanical properties of bacterial adhesins, is reviewed. We also...

  19. Prevention of Prosthetic Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eremin O.V.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Prevention in prosthetic dentistry is not just a regular oral hygiene and the prevention of caries in the early stages of its development. The initial goal of orthopedic and dental should be the ability to convey to the patient's sense of pros-thetics that proteziruya one saved more. An example is included prosthetic dental arch defects with bridges or single artificial crowns on implants that will prevent movement of teeth and the continuity of the dentition

  20. Piezosurgery in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhruvakumar Deepa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Piezosurgery (piezoelectric bone surgery is a technique of bone surgery which is gaining popularity in the field of dentistry in the recent years. This device is being used in osteotomies, periodontology and implantology, and oral surgical procedures. Piezoelectric ultrasonic vibrations are utilized to perform precise and safe osteotomies. This article discusses the equipment, biological effects on bone, and advantages and disadvantages of this technology.

  1. Minimally legally invasive dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, R

    2014-12-01

    One disadvantage of the rapid advances in modern dentistry is that treatment options have never been more varied or confusing. Compounded by a more educated population greatly assisted by online information in an increasingly litigious society, a major concern in recent times is increased litigation against health practitioners. The manner in which courts handle disputes is ambiguous and what is considered fair or just may not be reflected in the judicial process. Although legal decisions in Australia follow a doctrine of precedent, the law is not static and is often reflected by community sentiment. In medical litigation, this has seen the rejection of the Bolam principle with a preference towards greater patient rights. Recent court decisions may change the practice of dentistry and it is important that the clinician is not caught unaware. The aim of this article is to discuss legal issues that are pertinent to the practice of modern dentistry through an analysis of legal cases that have shaped health law. Through these discussions, the importance of continuing professional development, professional association and informed consent will be realized as a means to limit the legal complications of dental practice.

  2. Minimal intervention dentistry - a new frontier in clinical dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mm, Jingarwar; Nk, Bajwa; A, Pathak

    2014-07-01

    Minimally invasive procedures are the new paradigm in health care. Everything from heart bypasses to gall bladder, surgeries are being performed with these dynamic new techniques. Dentistry is joining this exciting revolution as well. Minimally invasive dentistry adopts a philosophy that integrates prevention, remineralisation and minimal intervention for the placement and replacement of restorations. Minimally invasive dentistry reaches the treatment objective using the least invasive surgical approach, with the removal of the minimal amount of healthy tissues. This paper reviews in brief the concept of minimal intervention in dentistry.

  3. Space maintainers placed from 2008 to 2011 at the School of Dentistry, University of Costa Rica

    OpenAIRE

    Gutiérrez Marín, Natalia; López Soto, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to determinate both the type and quantity of space maintainers in pediatric dentistry performed by three generations of graduates from 2008 to 2011 at the School of Dentistry of the University of Costa Rica. 146 student registers were analyzed with a population of 1646 patients. The students placed 340 space maintainers; including band and loop, lingual arch, Nance arch, distal shoe, fixed prosthesis, transpalatal and removables. The most commonly used ...

  4. Techniques to administer oral, inhalational, and IV sedation in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Krystyna Harbuz

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Sedation in dentistry is a controversial topic given the variety of opinions regarding its safe practice. Aims This article evaluates the various techniques used to administer sedation in dentistry and specific methods practiced to form a recommendation for clinicians. Methods An extensive literature search was performed using PubMed, Medline, Google Scholar, Google, and local library resources. Results Most of the literature revealed a consensus that light sedation on low-risk American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA groups, that is ASA I, and possibly II, is the safest method for sedation in a dental outpatient setting. Conclusion Formal training is essential to achieve the safe practice of sedation in dentistry or medicine. The appropriate setting for sedation should be determined as there is an increased risk outside the hospital setting. Patients should be adequately assessed and medication titrated appropriately, based on individual requirements.

  5. Creating an evidence-based dentistry culture at Baylor College of Dentistry: the winds of change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, Robert J; Dechow, Paul C; Abdellatif, Hoda; Jones, Daniel L; McCann, Ann L; Schneiderman, Emet D; D'Souza, Rena

    2011-03-01

    In the early years of the new millennium, the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research of the National Institutes of Health began funding Oral Health Research Education Grants using the R25 mechanism to promote the application of basic and clinical research findings to clinical training and to encourage students to pursue careers in oral health research. This report describes the impact of an R25 grant awarded to the Texas A&M Health Science Center's Baylor College of Dentistry (BCD) on its curriculum and faculty development efforts. At BCD, the R25 grant supports a multipronged initiative that employs clinical research as a vehicle for acquainting both students and faculty with the tools of evidence-based dentistry (EBD). New coursework and experiences in all four years of the curriculum plus a variety of faculty development offerings are being used to achieve this goal. Progress on these fronts is reflected in a nascent EBD culture characterized by increasing participation and buy-in by students and faculty. The production of a new generation of dental graduates equipped with the EBD skill set as well as a growing nucleus of faculty members who can model the importance of evidence-based practice is of paramount importance for the future of dentistry.

  6. The evidence-based dentistry initiative at Baylor College of Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Daniel L; Hinton, Robert J; Dechow, Paul C; Abdellatif, Hoda; McCann, Ann L; Schneiderman, Emet D; D'Souza, Rena

    2011-02-01

    This report describes the impact of an R25 Oral Health Research Education Grant awarded to the Texas A&M Health Science Center-Baylor College of Dentistry (BCD) to promote the application of basic and clinical research findings to clinical training and encourage students to pursue careers in oral health research. At Baylor, the R25 grant supports a multi-pronged initiative that employs clinical research as a vehicle for acquainting both students and faculty with the tools of evidence-based dentistry (EBD). New coursework and experiences in all 4 years of the curriculum plus a variety of faculty development offerings are being used to achieve this goal. Progress on these fronts is reflected in a nascent "EBD culture" characterized by increasing participation and buy-in by students and faculty. The production of a new generation of dental graduates equipped with the EBD skill set as well as a growing nucleus of faculty who can model the importance of evidence-based practice is of paramount importance for the future of dentistry.

  7. Lasers In Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanth. S

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The uses of Lasers in dentistry have revolutionized several areas of treatment in the last three & a half decades of the 20th century. Initially it was used for ablating the hard tissues for acid etch treatment. Later Lasers were used for cutting, coagulation & cauterization of the soft tissues. It is also been used for the diagnosis of carious lesions& to test pulp vitality with Doppler. There are more than 40 uses for Laser. Initially Lasers were very expensive, but now they have become much cheaper. Portable models are available which have increased its versatility. Lasers will be the main weapon in the armamentarium of the dental surgeons.

  8. Interior design for dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unthank, M; True, G

    1999-11-01

    In the increasingly complex, competitive and stressful field of dentistry, effectively designed dental offices can offer significant benefits. Esthetic, functional and life-cycle cost issues to be considered when developing your interior design scheme include color, finishes, lighting, furnishings, art and accessories. An appropriately designed dental office serves as a valuable marketing tool for your practice, as well as a safe and enjoyable work environment. Qualified interior design professionals can help you make design decisions that can yield optimum results within your budget.

  9. Graduate Opportunities for Black Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paynter, Julie, Ed.

    This document catalogues graduate opportunities specifically for black students in 1969-70 at 42 universities, 96 additional graduate departments (social sciences, natural sciences, mathematics, and humanities), and 111 additional professional schools (particularly social work, education, law, medicine, theology, business, and library science).…

  10. Dentistry & Oral Sciences Source (DOSS): a collection for dental research and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swogger, Susan E; Samsky, Monica

    2014-01-01

    Dentistry & Oral Sciences Source from EBSCO Information Services provides indexing and full-text access to an extensive selection of dental journal literature, as well some full-text dental monographs. As stated by EBSCO, titles are chosen from those commonly held in dental school libraries. The database aims to support practitioners, researchers, and advanced dental education. This column includes sample searches from Dentistry & Oral Sciences Source as well as a discussion of its special content and features.

  11. Reframing in dentistry: Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivakumar Nuvvula

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The successful practice of dentistry involves a good combination of technical skills and soft skills. Soft skills or communication skills are not taught extensively in dental schools and it can be challenging to learn and at times in treating dental patients. Guiding the child′s behavior in the dental operatory is one of the preliminary steps to be taken by the pediatric dentist and one who can successfully modify the behavior can definitely pave the way for a life time comprehensive oral care. This article is an attempt to revisit a simple behavior guidance technique, reframing and explain the possible psychological perspectives behind it for better use in the clinical practice.

  12. [Ergonomic movement in dentistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos-Huizer, J J A; Bolderman, F W

    2014-02-01

    'Ergonomic movement in dentistry' is a recently developed ergonomic programme for dental healthcare professionals which is intended to prevent work-related complaints and assist in recovering from them. The programme is recommended by disability insurers in cases of specific physical complaints, limitations or disability, as a consequence of which a dental healthcare professional is unable to carry out his or her work. In a four-day training programme, in one's own workplace, skills are taught in the areas of work organization, work attitude and movement. These skills are directly applied in the treatment ofpatients and, if necessary, further improved. In this way, one advances step by step to an ergonomic way of working. Evaluations have shown that the programme is advantageous for the attitude toward work, the workplace and the work organization as well as the reduction of disability.

  13. Biological therapy and dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radfar, Lida; Ahmadabadi, Roshanak E; Masood, Farah; Scofield, R Hal

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, a new class of drugs has revolutionized the treatment of autoimmune, allergic, infectious and many more diseases. These drugs are classified into three groups, cytokines, monoclonal antibodies and fusion proteins. Biological drugs have less side effects compared to conventional drugs, and may target special damaged cells, but not all the cells. There may be side effects such as infection, hypersensitivity, hematological disorders, cancer, hepatotoxicity and neurological disorders, but there is not enough evidence or long term studies of the mechanism of action and side effects of these drugs. Patients on biological therapy may need some special consideration in dentistry. This paper is a review regarding the classification, mechanism of action and side effects of these drugs, and dental consideration for patients on biological therapy. PMID:26372436

  14. New technologies in dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanin, Fatima A. A.; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Pecora, Jesus D.

    1999-05-01

    The technology in dentistry has been developed significantly lately, increasing the technological level of new materials, methods and equipment have been developed. Undoubtedly the CO2 laser has contributed to this evolution particular to the treatment of the infected dentin. CO2 laser can sterilize and promote increase 6 to 8 times of dentin resistance, through the transformation the hydroxyapatite in calcium-phosphato-hydroxyapatite. We can reassure our patients about the use of pulsed CO2 laser due to better preservation of dental structure and its benefits permitting advanced esthetic treatments. The CEREC system, registers a tri-dimensional image of the preparation through a scan system, and sends it to the computer and the operator will edit the restorations so the equipment will finish porcelain restoration. The authors used a new laser 650 nm for caries detection and the other low lever laser (670 nm and 730 nm) considered an auxiliary method to prevent and treat the hypersensitivity in dentin.

  15. Nanocharacterization in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shivani; Cross, Sarah E; Hsueh, Carlin; Wali, Ruseen P; Stieg, Adam Z; Gimzewski, James K

    2010-06-17

    About 80% of US adults have some form of dental disease. There are a variety of new dental products available, ranging from implants to oral hygiene products that rely on nanoscale properties. Here, the application of AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) and optical interferometry to a range of dentistry issues, including characterization of dental enamel, oral bacteria, biofilms and the role of surface proteins in biochemical and nanomechanical properties of bacterial adhesins, is reviewed. We also include studies of new products blocking dentine tubules to alleviate hypersensitivity; antimicrobial effects of mouthwash and characterizing nanoparticle coated dental implants. An outlook on future "nanodentistry" developments such as saliva exosomes based diagnostics, designing biocompatible, antimicrobial dental implants and personalized dental healthcare is presented.

  16. Nanocharacterization in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivani Sharma

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available About 80% of US adults have some form of dental disease. There are a variety of new dental products available, ranging from implants to oral hygiene products that rely on nanoscale properties. Here, the application of AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy and optical interferometry to a range of dentistry issues, including characterization of dental enamel, oral bacteria, biofilms and the role of surface proteins in biochemical and nanomechanical properties of bacterial adhesins, is reviewed. We also include studies of new products blocking dentine tubules to alleviate hypersensitivity; antimicrobial effects of mouthwash and characterizing nanoparticle coated dental implants. An outlook on future “nanodentistry” developments such as saliva exosomes based diagnostics, designing biocompatible, antimicrobial dental implants and personalized dental healthcare is presented.

  17. Nanorobots: Future in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Neetha J; Swati, P; David, K

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the phenomenon of nanotechnology as it might apply to dentistry as a new field called nanodentistry. Treatment possibilities might include the application of nanotechnology to local anesthesia, dentition renaturalization, the permanent cure for hypersensitivity, complete orthodontic realignment in a single visit, covalently bonded diamondized enamel, and continuous oral health maintenance using mechanical dentifrobots. Dental nanorobots could be constructed to destroy caries-causing bacteria or to repair tooth blemishes where decay has set in, by using a computer to direct these tiny workers in their tasks. Dental nanorobots might be programed to use specific motility mechanisms to crawl or swim through human tissue with navigational precision, to acquire energy, to sense and manipulate their surroundings, to achieve safe cytopenetration, and to use any of a multitude of techniques to monitor, interrupt, or alter nerve-impulse traffic in individual nerve cells in real time.

  18. Silver nanoparticles in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noronha, Victor T; Paula, Amauri J; Durán, Gabriela; Galembeck, Andre; Cogo-Müller, Karina; Franz-Montan, Michelle; Durán, Nelson

    2017-10-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been extensively studied for their antimicrobial properties, which provide an extensive applicability in dentistry. Because of this increasing interest in AgNPs, the objective of this paper was to review their use in nanocomposites; implant coatings; pre-formulation with antimicrobial activity against cariogenic pathogens, periodontal biofilm, fungal pathogens and endodontic bacteria; and other applications such as treatment of oral cancer and local anesthesia. Recent achievements in the study of the mechanism of action and the most important toxicological aspects are also presented. Systematic searches were carried out in Web of Science (ISI), Google, PubMed, SciFinder and EspaceNet databases with the keywords "silver nano* or AgNP*" and "dentist* or dental* or odontol*". A total of 155 peer-reviewed articles were reviewed. Most of them were published in the period of 2012-2017, demonstrating that this topic currently represents an important trend in dentistry research. In vitro studies reveal the excellent antimicrobial activity of AgNPs when associated with dental materials such as nanocomposites, acrylic resins, resin co-monomers, adhesives, intracanal medication, and implant coatings. Moreover, AgNPs were demonstrated to be interesting tools in the treatment of oral cancers due to their antitumor properties. The literature indicates that AgNPs are a promising system with important features such as antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and antitumor activity, and a potential carrier in sustained drug delivery. However, there are some aspects of the mechanisms of action of AgNPs, and some important toxicological aspects arising from the use of this system that must be completely elucidated. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. ETHICAL CHALLENGES IN AESTHETIC DENTISTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius NEAGU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aesthetic dentistry is a branch of dentistry which aims primarily at improving patient’s physical appearance and, to a lesser extent, the functionality of teeth. This field raises particular ethical dilemmas and requires a careful evaluation of patient’s needs and wishes versus his/her clinical best interests. In this article, the authors discuss the main ethical challenges in the field of aesthetic dentistry in the light of the four “classical” principles of bioethics: autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence and justice. The authors conclude that the principles of medical ethics should be at the very foundation of the field of aesthetic dentistry, for establishing a patient-physician relationship which could lead to optimum clinical outcomes, while respecting the wishes of the patient and promoting his/her best interests.

  20. The Role of Academic Libraries in Facilitating Undergraduate and Post-Graduate Studies: A Case Study of the University of Peshawar, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amjid Khan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study surveyed students’ utilization of resources, services, and facilities of the Central Library of the University of Peshawar, Pakistan. The findings reveal that most of the respondents visited the library to study course books, consult reference materials, and to retrieve unpublished documents for information needs. The majority of the respondents indicated that the library provided effective services. They were satisfied with the lighting system, ventilation facilities, reading tables, and staff behavior with end users. However, lack of e-resources, inadequate collections, and insufficient physical facilities were identified as major issues in the effective use of library collections and services.

  1. Evidence-based dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David W

    2010-01-01

    Both panegyric and criticism of evidence-based dentistry tend to be clumsy because the concept is poorly defined. This analysis identifies several contributions to the profession that have been made under the EBD banner. Although the concept of clinicians integrating clinical epidemiology, the wisdom of their practices, and patients' values is powerful, its implementation has been distorted by a too heavy emphasis of computerized searches for research findings that meet the standards of academics. Although EBD advocates enjoy sharing anecdotal accounts of mistakes others have made, faulting others is not proof that one's own position is correct. There is no systematic, high-quality evidence that EBD is effective. The metaphor of a three-legged stool (evidence, experience, values, and integration) is used as an organizing principle. "Best evidence" has become a preoccupation among EBD enthusiasts. That overlong but thinly developed leg of the stool is critiqued from the perspectives of the criteria for evidence, the difference between internal and external validity, the relationship between evidence and decision making, the ambiguous meaning of "best," and the role of reasonable doubt. The strongest leg of the stool is clinical experience. Although bias exists in all observations (including searches for evidence), there are simple procedures that can be employed in practice to increase useful and objective evidence there, and there are dangers in delegating policy regarding allowable treatments to external groups. Patient and practitioner values are the shortest leg of the stool. As they are so little recognized, their integration in EBD is problematic and ethical tensions exist where paternalism privileges science over patient's self-determined best interests. Four potential approaches to integration are suggested, recognizing that there is virtually no literature on how the "seat" of the three-legged stool works or should work. It is likely that most dentists

  2. Should dentists become 'oral physicians'? No, dentistry must remain dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assael, Leon A

    2004-04-01

    Dentistry is not an allied health profession. It is not a paramedical profession. It is time that dentistry be recognized as the profession that offers patients some of the most complex surgery performed on the human body--namely, restorative dentistry and rehabilitation of the masticatory system. Dentistry is the only anatomically focused health care profession that is university-based and for which primary care responsibility is maintained by the profession. An inferiority complex about what it means to be a dentist has served only to confuse the public and bring us further from our goal of improving the health of all our patients. This inferiority complex is driven by the public and the medical profession, neither of which understands how dentistry fits into overall health care. It is essential that every academic health center have oral health education as an integrated part of health care education for dentists, physicians, nurses, allied dental personel, physical therapists, psychologists and all who receive university-based health care education. In this way, all the health professions and the public will see dentistry and oral health as essential to patients' overall health. The idea of emulating those who do not have the strength of basic-science education, practice complexity, surgical skills or community status by seizing a new title will not elevate the profession for the future. The public knows what a dentist is. It is our task to inform the public about the capabilities of dentists and the value of oral health and our profession. We can accomplish this best by assuring that our profession's name, "dentistry," is understood to represent one of the world's most accomplished surgical endeavors, one that is thoroughly integrated into the fabric of health care. Thus, good oral health will be thoroughly integrated into what it means to be healthy.

  3. Herbs in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, Jamile B; Azimi, Somayyeh; Rafieian, Nasrin; Zanjani, Hosein Akhavan

    2011-12-01

    Herbs have been used for centuries to prevent and control disease. Herbal extracts are effective because they interact with specific chemical receptors within the body and are in a pharmacodynamic sense, drugs themselves. By using herbal medicines, patients have averted the many side effects that generally come with traditional medicines, but this does not mean that side effects do not occur. Only knowledgeable practitioners can prescribe the right herb and its proper dosage. Herbal medicines had been considered in every culture, however, pharmaceutical companies overturned this type of thinking. Now, pharmaceuticals are called traditional and herbs are libeled as the 'alternative'. The biggest challenge and problem is lack of information about the effect of herbs in oral tissues, mechanism of effect, and side effects. Several popular conventional drugs on the market are derived from herbs. These include aspirin (from white willow bark), digitalis (from foxglove), and sudafed (modelled after a component in the plant ephedra). Herbal products can vary in their potency. Therefore, care must be taken in selecting herbs, even so, herbal medicines have dramatically fewer side effects and are safer to use than conventional medications. The herbs described in this article are Bloodroot, Caraway, Chamomile, Echinacea, Myrrh, Peppermint, Rosemary, Sage, Thyme, Aloe Vera, Propolis, and a summary of other herbs that are useful in dentistry. Herbs may be good alternatives to current treatments for oral health problems but it is clear that we need more research.

  4. Ultrasonics in Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, A. D.

    Ultrasonic instruments have been used in dentistry since the 1950's. Initially they were used to cut teeth but very quickly they became established as an ultrasonic scaler which was used to remove deposits from the hard tissues of the tooth. This enabled the soft tissues around the tooth to return to health. The ultrasonic vibrations are generated in a thin metal probe and it is the working tip that is the active component of the instrument. Scanning laser vibrometry has shown that there is much variability in their movement which is related to the shape and cross sectional shape of the probe. The working instrument will also generate cavitation and microstreaming in the associated cooling water. This can be mapped out along the length of the instrument indicating which are the active areas. Ultrasonics has also found use for cleaning often inaccessible or different surfaces including root canal treatment and dental titanium implants. The use of ultrasonics to cut bone during different surgical techniques shows considerable promise. More research is indicated to determine how to maximize the efficiency of such instruments so that they are more clinically effective.

  5. Piezosurgery in implant dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stübinger S

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Stefan Stübinger,1 Andres Stricker,2 Britt-Isabelle Berg3,4 1Hightech Research Center of Cranio-maxillofacial Surgery, University of Basel, Allschwil, Switzerland; 2Private Practice, Konstanz, Germany; 3Department of Cranio-maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland; 4Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Piezosurgery, or the use of piezoelectric devices, is being applied increasingly in oral and maxillofacial surgery. The main advantages of this technique are precise and selective cuttings, the avoidance of thermal damage, and the preservation of soft-tissue structures. Through the application of piezoelectric surgery, implant-site preparation, bone grafting, sinus-floor elevation, edentulous ridge splitting or the lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve are very technically feasible. This clinical overview gives a short summary of the current literature and outlines the advantages and disadvantages of piezoelectric bone surgery in implant dentistry. Overall, piezoelectric surgery is superior to other methods that utilize mechanical instruments. Handling of delicate or compromised hard- and soft-tissue conditions can be performed with less risk for the patient. With respect to current and future innovative surgical concepts, piezoelectric surgery offers a wide range of new possibilities to perform customized and minimally invasive osteotomies. Keywords: implantology, piezoelectric device, piezosurgery, maxillary sinus elevation, bone grafting, osteotomy, edentulous ridge splitting

  6. What is minimally invasive dentistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericson, Dan

    2004-01-01

    Minimally Invasive Dentistry is the application of "a systematic respect for the original tissue." This implies that the dental profession recognizes that an artifact is of less biological value than the original healthy tissue. Minimally invasive dentistry is a concept that can embrace all aspects of the profession. The common delineator is tissue preservation, preferably by preventing disease from occurring and intercepting its progress, but also removing and replacing with as little tissue loss as possible. It does not suggest that we make small fillings to restore incipient lesions or surgically remove impacted third molars without symptoms as routine procedures. The introduction of predictable adhesive technologies has led to a giant leap in interest in minimally invasive dentistry. The concept bridges the traditional gap between prevention and surgical procedures, which is just what dentistry needs today. The evidence-base for survival of restorations clearly indicates that restoring teeth is a temporary palliative measure that is doomed to fail if the disease that caused the condition is not addressed properly. Today, the means, motives and opportunities for minimally invasive dentistry are at hand, but incentives are definitely lacking. Patients and third parties seem to be convinced that the only things that count are replacements. Namely, they are prepared to pay for a filling but not for a procedure that can help avoid having one.

  7. Dumping the "Library."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Bill

    1998-01-01

    Discusses an alternative to abandoning the word "library" for "information" in graduate education. Recommends patient, consistent effort by library- and information-science educators to convince academic librarians that if they accept the standards of the teaching/research faculty, including the need to earn a Ph.D., it will raise the prestige of…

  8. Libraries on the Way

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    An NGO campaigns to help rural students find the joy of reading Tan Li joined the Gan Quan Library,a Trural library in Chengde,north China’s Hebei Province,after graduating from the Shanxi University of Finance and Economics in July.

  9. Cosmetic Dentistry - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Cosmetic Dentistry URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... W XYZ List of All Topics All Cosmetic Dentistry - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  10. What's new in paediatric dentistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, M. C.

    2016-03-01

    Since the early 80's, the use of laser has been introduced in the daily dental practice and the technological development has also provided over time to optimize its use. Various types of lasers with different wavelengths have been developed for use in a handy, easy and ergonomic manner. In daily paediatric dentistry, laser could be a very useful medical device which can completely replace the traditional high hand-piece and bur to realize a "micro-invasive" dentistry and a "clean" surgery, without bleeding and sutures. According to the international literature and in the light of recent researches, this work could give an overview on assisted laser therapy in paediatric dentistry, highlighting advantages and disadvantages of this new technology and pointing out the high compliance of the young patient.

  11. Developing patient safety in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemberton, M N

    2014-10-01

    Patient safety has always been important and is a source of public concern. Recent high profile scandals and subsequent reports, such as the Francis report into the failings at Mid Staffordshire, have raised those concerns even higher. Mortality and significant morbidity associated with the practice of medicine has led to many strategies to help improve patient safety, however, with its lack of associated mortality and lower associated morbidity, dentistry has been slower at systematically considering how patient safety can be improved. Recently, several organisations, researchers and clinicians have discussed the need for a patient safety culture in dentistry. Strategies are available to help improve patient safety in healthcare and deserve further consideration in dentistry.

  12. 3D printing in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery.

  13. Treatment regimens in preventive and restorative dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusavice, K J

    1995-06-01

    Due in part to a lack of appropriate training and the incentive of adequate compensation, preventive dentistry in the United States has focused on prophylaxis and fluoride application. Dentistry must shift its attention to developing standardized protocols for "preservative dentistry"--diagnosing caries, assessing and monitoring caries risk, arresting active caries and remineralizing non-cavitated lesions. This article addresses shortcomings in preventive dentistry and proposes a plan for treatment standardization that can ensure optimum treatment and, ideally, lead to adequate compensation.

  14. Geriatric Dentistry in the Predoctoral Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshman, Jack; And Others

    1985-01-01

    A survey of U.S. dental schools to determine the status of geriatric dentistry in the curriculum is discussed. Evidence of growing commitment is shown by deans who plan to give geriatric dentistry increasing priority in the future and by the fact that all schools now teach geriatric dentistry in some way. (MLW)

  15. [The elementary discussion on digital implant dentistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Y C

    2016-04-09

    It is a digital age today. Exposed to all kinds of digital products in many fields. Certainly, implant dentistry is not exception. Digitalization could improve the outcomes and could decrease the complications of implant dentistry. This paper introduces the concepts, definitions, advantages, disadvantages, limitations and errors of digital implant dentistry.

  16. Using technology to market cosmetic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltzer, S M

    1997-01-01

    The presentation of proposed dental treatment has been hampered by the absence of visual communication technologies. New high tech dentistry-related tools permit efficient production of case presentations for cosmetic dentistry and restorative dentistry. This review describes how to create computer-based case presentations using Microsoft PowerPoint (Microsoft Corp., Redmond, WA) and visual treatment proposals using Microsoft Word for Windows.

  17. Dentistry and Dental Hygiene Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

    A reference guide to laws, rules, and regulations that govern dentistry and dental hygiene practice in New York State is presented. In addition to identifying licensing requirements/procedures for dentists and dental hygienists, general provisions of Title VIII of the Education Law are covered, along with state management, professional misconduct,…

  18. Curriculum Guidelines on Forensic Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1990

    1990-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' guidelines for curriculum design explain the scope of forensic dentistry and interrelationships with other fields, give an overview of the curriculum, and outline suggested primary educational goals, prerequisites, core content, specific behavioral objectives, sequencing, faculty and facility…

  19. Dentistry and Dental Hygiene Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

    The handbook contains laws, rules, and regulations of the New York State Education Department that govern dentistry and dental hygiene practice in the state. It describes licensure requirements and includes complete application forms and instructions for obtaining license and first registration as a dentist and dental hygienist. Applicants are…

  20. Empathetic Orientation in Dentistry students from Latin America. Literature review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constanza Vera

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Empathy, defined as ‘the capacity to relate to someone else’s perspective or mental state’, has a strong impact on the physician-patient relationship and has the potential to improve the quality of health care. The Jefferson Scale of Empathy (JSE measures empathy in terms of quantity. It was created to assist medical students, physicians, and people related to health care in general and it has been validated into Spanish showing adequate psychometric properties. The concern for empathy in dentistry students is related to the need for training not only technically, but also socially skilled professionals, since social abilities have a strong impact on performance as well as in the patient’s appreciation and satisfaction. The goal of this report is to show all the studies using the JSE scale for measuring empathy in dentistry students from Latin America.The reviewed studies show the empathy levels vary in Latin-American dentistry students when comparing gender and class year variables. Also, there is a tendency to find higher empathy levels when it comes to women’s performance and that of those soon to be graduate. However, the criteria did not account for more than 20% of the variance of empathy in these studies. Therefore, it would be necessary to keep researching in this field, taking different predictor variables into consideration in order to understand what factors are associated with the presence and intensity of empathy, and their impact in clinical practice.

  1. Collaboration among Faculty Members and Community Partners: Increasing the Quality of Online Library and Information Science Graduate Programs through Academic Service-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, Christine M.

    2016-01-01

    Finding innovative ways to deliver effective classroom instruction resulting in demonstration of student proficiency of the eight American Library Association core competencies within the online learning environment is challenging. While the use of technology is very important in the delivery of course content, focusing on the pedagogy of teaching…

  2. Growing quackery in dentistry: An indian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhvinder Singh Oberoi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental disease restricts activities in school, work, and home and often significantly diminishes the quality of life for many children and adults, especially those who have low income or are uninsured. Though the overall dentist population ratio in India is 1:10,000, at present in rural India, one dentist is serving 2.5 lakhs of people. Only 15-20% of people in India are able to get dental services through national schemes, and 80-85% are spending money from their pockets, providing an ideal breeding ground for quackery into dental practice in India. Dental quacks cater to the lower-middle and lower socioeconomic classes that cannot afford qualified dental practitioners. A large number of people visiting these quacks seek care only when in pain, have a restricted budget, and are not very quality conscious. Dentistry has come a long way in the last one and a half century; today it is ranked as one of the most respected professions. It is incumbent upon dentists everywhere to protect this hard-earned reputation by weeding out quacks from among them. The government should urge fresh graduates to practice in rural areas and provide more incentives to them. Public health dentists should take the initiative of adopting more community-oriented oral health programs to increase the awareness among rural populations.

  3. Biomaterials in Relation to Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Sanjukta; Chana, Simran

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries remains a challenge in the improvement of oral health. It is the most common and widespread biofilm-dependent oral disease, resulting in the destruction of tooth structure by the acidic attack from cariogenic bacteria. The tooth is a heavily mineralised tissue, and both enamel and dentine can undergo demineralisation due to trauma or dietary conditions. The adult population worldwide affected by dental caries is enormous and despite significant advances in caries prevention and tooth restoration, treatments continue to pose a substantial burden to healthcare. Biomaterials play a vital role in the restoration of the diseased or damaged tooth structure and, despite providing reasonable outcomes, there are some concerns with clinical performance. Amalgam, the silver grey biomaterial that has been widely used as a restorative material in dentistry, is currently in throes of being phased out, especially with the Minimata convention and treaty being signed by a number of countries (January 2013; http://mercuryconvention.org/Convention/) that aims to control the anthropogenic release of mercury in the environment, which naturally impacts the use of amalgam, where mercury is a component. Thus, the development of alternative restoratives and restoration methods that are inexpensive, can be used under different climatic conditions, withstand storage and allow easy handling, the main prerequisites of dental biomaterials, is important. The potential for using biologically engineered tissue and consequent research to replace damaged tissues has also seen a quantum leap in the last decade. Ongoing research in regenerative treatments in dentistry includes alveolar ridge augmentation, bone tissue engineering and periodontal ligament replacement, and a future aim is bioengineering of the whole tooth. Research towards developing bioengineered teeth is well underway and identification of adult stem cell sources to make this a viable treatment is advancing; however, this

  4. Potent Inhalational Anesthetics for Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satuito, Mary; Tom, James

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide and the volatile inhalational anesthetics have defined anxiety and pain control in both dentistry and medicine for over a century. From curious experimentation to spectacular public demonstrations, the initial work of 2 dentists, Horace Wells and William T. G. Morton, persists to this day in modern surgery and anesthesia. This article reviews the history, similarities, differences, and clinical applications of the most popular inhalational agents used in contemporary dental surgical settings.

  5. Nutrition intervention in general dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sintes, J L

    1990-12-01

    This article presents a nutrition program in general dentistry following an oral health nutrition care process, and provides a guideline for identifying patients at risk of developing marginal malnutrition as a result of oral health procedures. The program highlights the importance of assessing nutritional status by segregating high-risk patients from low-risk patients. A case report demonstrates the therapeutic dietary management of a patient whose jaws were immobilized as a result of trauma.

  6. Dental student perception and assessment of their clinical knowledge in educating patients about preventive dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, M J; Miller, C J; Lin, W S; Abdel-Azim, T; Zandinejad, A; Crim, G A

    2015-05-01

    In today's dental school curricula, an increasing amount of time is dedicated to technological advances, and preventive dentistry topics may not be adequately addressed. Freshman (D1) students participated in a new Introduction to Preventive Dentistry course, which consisted of didactic lectures, active learning breakout sessions and case-based studies. The goal of this study was to determine if D1 dental students completing the course had a better knowledge and comfort level with basic preventive dentistry concepts and caries risk assessment than the upcoming graduating senior dental students. Following the completion of the course, D1 students were administered a survey that assessed their comfort level describing preventive dentistry topics to patients. This was immediately followed by an unannounced examination over the same topics. Senior (D4) students, who had not taken a formal course, reported statistically significant higher comfort levels than D1 students. However, the D4s scored significantly lower in all of the examination areas than the D1 students. Higher scores in D1s may have been due to recent exposure to the course material. However, the basic nature of the content-specific questions should be easily answered by novice practitioners educating their patients on oral disease prevention. As the current data shows lower content-specific scores of basic preventive dentistry knowledge amongst graduating D4 students, this may indicate a need for more guidance and education of students during the patient care. This study showed that implementation of a formalised course for D1 students can successfully ameliorate deficiencies in knowledge of preventive dentistry topics.

  7. Information Source Preferences of Education Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earp, Vanessa J.

    2008-01-01

    In recent decades the literature dealing with graduate students and library use, including bibliographic instruction, information-seeking behavior, and information literacy has grown. However, there still appears to be a lack of research and resources available on the information-seeking behavior skills of graduate education students, which can…

  8. Information Source Preferences of Education Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earp, Vanessa J.

    2008-01-01

    In recent decades the literature dealing with graduate students and library use, including bibliographic instruction, information-seeking behavior, and information literacy has grown. However, there still appears to be a lack of research and resources available on the information-seeking behavior skills of graduate education students, which can…

  9. 学生论文撰写与图书馆指导服务%Thesis Writing for Graduates of English Major with Library Information Service

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李静

    2012-01-01

    Selecting materials are important for thesis writing. With the aid of library information Service, undergraduates'ability of information research will be improved, undergraduates from english major are sure to complete a nice thesis.%文献资料收集对本科生毕业论文撰写具有重要意义,图书馆需要帮助学生正确掌握文献检索方法,整体提升学生信息素质。

  10. The concept of minimally invasive dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericson, Dan

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews Minimally Invasive Dentistry (MID) from a day-to-day dentistry perspective, focusing mostly on cariology and restorative dentistry, even though it embraces many aspects of dentistry. The concept of MID supports a systematic respect for the original tissue, including diagnosis, risk assessment, preventive treatment, and minimal tissue removal upon restoration. The motivation for MID emerges from the fact that fillings are not permanent and that the main reasons for failure are secondary caries and filling fracture. To address these flaws, there is a need for economical re-routing so that practices can survive on maintaining dental health and not only by operative procedures.

  11. Drowned in information yet starved for knowledge; evidence-based dentistry, what's in it for me?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gune, Abhijit

    2010-01-01

    A graduate of the ADA Evidence-based Dentistry Champions Conference explains what he has learned about the techniques of EBD literature and literature searches. EBD is the area of overlap among the literature, clinical experience, and patient characteristics. This paper focuses on evidence from the literature. Sources of summarized evidence are mentioned that can be accessed via the Internet, especially those that summarize evidence of the greatest research rigor that have been summarized systematically.

  12. Best of the Literature: Graduate Student Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkins, Kaijsa J.

    2007-01-01

    The recent literature on college and university library instruction largely focuses on undergraduate and, more specifically, first-year students. During a review, the author found that discussion of graduate students in library and information science literature is dominated by studies of information behavior and much less often on instruction…

  13. Dimensions of Library Anxiety and Social Interdependence: Implications for Library Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Qun G.; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a study of graduate students that examined the relationship between library anxiety and social interdependence. Discusses use of the Library Anxiety Scale and Social Interdependence Scale; and considers the effects of barriers with staff, comfort with the library, knowledge of the library, individual attitudes, affective barriers, and…

  14. Teaching of bioethics in dental graduate programs in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aires, Carolina Patrícia; Hugo, Fernando Neves; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz; Marcondes, Fernanda Klein

    2006-01-01

    In the field of human research, researchers are faced with unexpected moral dilemmas, as a result of the development of technologies applied to health. Due to the great importance of this issue, our objective was to evaluate bioethics instruction in the education of researchers in Brazilian graduate programs in dentistry. Eighty-seven graduate programs in dentistry, recognized by CAPES (Coordination for the Improvement of Higher Education Personnel) were evaluated in this study. Data were extracted independently by two researchers from the CAPES website, and from the websites of the graduate programs, directly or via links to the programs available at the CAPES website. Forty-eight out of 87 programs had an ethics/bioethics course as part of their curricula. Of the graduation programs graded 5, 6 or 7 by CAPES, 38% included bioethics courses, while 62% of the programs graded 3 or 4 by CAPES had bioethics courses as part of their curricula. These findings are an alert to those involved in dental research education, as they showed that, although resolution 196/96 by the National Council of Health regulating human research in Brazil was published ten years ago, bioethics instruction in Brazilian graduate programs in dentistry is still at an incipient stage. This situation indicates a need for ethics pedagogy in the education of young researchers.

  15. Dental traumatology: an orphan in pediatric dentistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva; Daugaard-Jensen, Jette

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic dental injuries are very frequent during childhood and adolescence. In fact, 2 out of 3 children have suffered a traumatic dental injury before adulthood. This fact links dental traumatology to pediatric dentistry. Unfortunately, this is not reflected by active participation by pediatric dentists in acute treatment, follow-up, and research. To examine the status of pediatric dentistry in relation to dental trauma, a publication analysis was undertaken in 1980, 1990, 2000, and 2007 about trauma articles published in 4 pediatric journals: journal of Dentistry for Children, Pediatric Dentistry, The journal of Pedodontics, and the International journal of Pediatric Dentistry. This study shows an average publication rate of trauma articles of approximately 3 percent of all articles published and with no improvement in later decennia. If only clinical studies are considered (leaving out case reports), the publication rate is less than 1 percent--completely out of proportion to the size of the problem dental trauma impose in children.

  16. Dental traumatology: an orphan in pediatric dentistry?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva; Daugaard-Jensen, Jette

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic dental injuries are very frequent during childhood and adolescence. In fact, 2 out of 3 children have suffered a traumatic dental injury before adulthood. This fact links dental traumatology to pediatric dentistry. Unfortunately, this is not reflected by active participation by pediatric...... dentists in acute treatment, follow-up, and research. To examine the status of pediatric dentistry in relation to dental trauma, a publication analysis was undertaken in 1980, 1990, 2000, and 2007 about trauma articles published in 4 pediatric journals: journal of Dentistry for Children, Pediatric...... Dentistry, The journal of Pedodontics, and the International journal of Pediatric Dentistry. This study shows an average publication rate of trauma articles of approximately 3 percent of all articles published and with no improvement in later decennia. If only clinical studies are considered (leaving out...

  17. Dental traumatology: an orphan in pediatric dentistry?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva; Daugaard-Jensen, Jette

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic dental injuries are very frequent during childhood and adolescence. In fact, 2 out of 3 children have suffered a traumatic dental injury before adulthood. This fact links dental traumatology to pediatric dentistry. Unfortunately, this is not reflected by active participation by pediatric...... dentists in acute treatment, follow-up, and research. To examine the status of pediatric dentistry in relation to dental trauma, a publication analysis was undertaken in 1980, 1990, 2000, and 2007 about trauma articles published in 4 pediatric journals: journal of Dentistry for Children, Pediatric...... Dentistry, The journal of Pedodontics, and the International journal of Pediatric Dentistry. This study shows an average publication rate of trauma articles of approximately 3 percent of all articles published and with no improvement in later decennia. If only clinical studies are considered (leaving out...

  18. Implant marketing: cost effective implant dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohrle, P S; Levin, R P

    1996-01-01

    The application of the KAL-Technique to the field of implant dentistry allows both patients and dental practices to benefit. It is an exciting advance that decreases frustration and stress in providing implant procedures and lowers overall costs. Professionals using the KAL-Technique report significant predictability in achieving passive framework fit. They are also lowering overall cost of implant cases, which increases the number of patients who can accept implant treatment. It has been well established that the more individuals in a practice that receive implants, the more referrals a practice will gain. This is because implant patients find tremendous advances in the quality of life, and do not hesitate to tell others who can take advantage of this opportunity. Implant dentistry is one of the fastest growing fields in dentistry today. While some other areas of dentistry begin to decline in volume and need, implant dentistry provides the opportunity to keep practices strong and to insure long-term success.

  19. Information Resources and Information Service of the Library of Standford Graduate School of Business%斯坦福商学院图书馆的信息资源与信息服务

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宁浩

    2014-01-01

    斯坦福商学院图书馆的信息资源与服务是互相联系、不可分割的。信息资源以服务为导向进行建设,包括商务数据库、电子图书、电子期刊、印刷型图书、印刷型期刊、音像资料等。服务也是帮助用户快速准确地获取相关的信息,包括文献服务、课程支持服务、研究指导服务。%Information resources and services of the Library of Standford Graduate School of Business is mutual connected inseparably. Information resources construction is guided by the service, including business database, electronic books, electronic journals, printed books, printed periodicals, audio-visual materials. The service is to help users quickly and accurately obtain relevant information, including Material Requests service, Class Support service, Research Guide service.

  20. Regenerative Perspective in Modern Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihnea Ioan Nicolescu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This review aims to trace the contour lines of regenerative dentistry, to offer an introductory overview on this emerging field to both dental students and practitioners. The crystallized depiction of the concept is a translational approach, connecting dental academics to scientific research and clinical utility. Therefore, this review begins by presenting the general features of regenerative medicine, and then gradually introduces the specific aspects of major dental subdomains, highlighting the progress achieved during the last years by scientific research and, in some cases, which has already been translated into clinical results. The distinct characteristics of stem cells and their microenvironment, together with their diversity in the oral cavity, are put into the context of research and clinical use. Examples of regenerative studies regarding endodontic and periodontal compartments, as well as hard (alveolar bone and soft (salivary glands related tissues, are presented to make the reader further acquainted with the topic. Instead of providing a conclusion, we will emphasize the importance for all dental community members, from young students to experienced dentists, of an early awareness rising regarding biomedical research progress in general and regenerative dentistry in particular.

  1. Succession Planning for Library Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Karen; Drewry, Josiah

    2015-01-01

    Detailed succession planning helps libraries pass information from one employee to the next. This is crucial in preparing for hiring, turnover, retirements, training of graduate teaching assistants in academic libraries, and other common situations. The authors of this article discuss succession planning for instruction programs in academic…

  2. Succession Planning for Library Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobel, Karen; Drewry, Josiah

    2015-01-01

    Detailed succession planning helps libraries pass information from one employee to the next. This is crucial in preparing for hiring, turnover, retirements, training of graduate teaching assistants in academic libraries, and other common situations. The authors of this article discuss succession planning for instruction programs in academic…

  3. Role of Triphala in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shobha Prakash

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ayurveda is considered as the "science of life," because the ancient Indian system of health care focused views of man and his illness. India has an age-old heritage of traditional herbal medicine. Conventional drugs usually provide effective antibiotic therapy for bacterial infections, but there is an increasing problem of antibiotic resistance and a continuing need for new solutions. Hence, now herbal drugs are being preferred to synthetic antibiotics. ′Triphala′ is a well-known powdered preparation in the Indian system of medicine (ISM. It consists of equal parts of the Emblica officinalis, Terminalia chebula, and Terminalia belerica. Currently, Triphala is being extensively researched for its various therapeutic effects including its anti-caries, antioxidant, anti-collagenase, and anti-microbial activities. The present review will focus on the comprehensive appraisal of Triphala and its several applications in dentistry.

  4. Decision analysis in restorative dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusavice, K J

    1992-12-01

    Standardization of clinical decisions in restorative dentistry should be based on the tenets of the Hippocratic Oath. Although there is wide variability in preventive and operative treatment decisions, some of these decisions may lead along parallel courses to similar, clinically ethical outcomes. However, what parameters must be considered in judging the relative magnitude of positive and negative outcomes? This paper proposes several decision-making strategies for selecting optimum treatment plans for preventive and restorative situations. The caries-risk level of patients must first be identified in a systematic way and then it must be coupled with treatment options that are consistent with the potential future caries increment. A decision-tree approach and/or the treatment-index concept can then be applied to specific clinical conditions and preventive-restorative options to derive an "expected value" for each possible outcome.

  5. Lasers and radiofrequency devices in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, James; Weiss, Adam; Stern, Avichai

    2011-07-01

    Advances in technology are changing the ways that patients experience dental treatment. Technology helps to decrease treatment time and makes the treatment more comfortable for the patient. One technological advance is the use of lasers in dentistry. Lasers are providing more efficient, more comfortable, and more predictable outcomes for patients. Lasers are used in all aspects of dentistry, including operative, periodontal, endodontic, orthodontic, and oral and maxillofacial surgery. Lasers are used for soft and hard tissue procedures in the treatment of pathologic conditions and for esthetic procedures. This article discusses how lasers work and their application in the various specialties within dentistry. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Nanomaterials for Tissue Engineering In Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chieruzzi, Manila; Pagano, Stefano; Moretti, Silvia; Pinna, Roberto; Milia, Egle; Torre, Luigi; Eramo, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The tissue engineering (TE) of dental oral tissue is facing significant changes in clinical treatments in dentistry. TE is based on a stem cell, signaling molecule, and scaffold triad that must be known and calibrated with attention to specific sectors in dentistry. This review article shows a summary of micro- and nanomorphological characteristics of dental tissues, of stem cells available in the oral region, of signaling molecules usable in TE, and of scaffolds available to guide partial or total reconstruction of hard, soft, periodontal, and bone tissues. Some scaffoldless techniques used in TE are also presented. Then actual and future roles of nanotechnologies about TE in dentistry are presented.

  7. Advances of Proteomic Sciences in Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurshid, Zohaib; Zohaib, Sana; Najeeb, Shariq; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail; Rehman, Rabia; Rehman, Ihtesham Ur

    2016-05-13

    Applications of proteomics tools revolutionized various biomedical disciplines such as genetics, molecular biology, medicine, and dentistry. The aim of this review is to highlight the major milestones in proteomics in dentistry during the last fifteen years. Human oral cavity contains hard and soft tissues and various biofluids including saliva and crevicular fluid. Proteomics has brought revolution in dentistry by helping in the early diagnosis of various diseases identified by the detection of numerous biomarkers present in the oral fluids. This paper covers the role of proteomics tools for the analysis of oral tissues. In addition, dental materials proteomics and their future directions are discussed.

  8. Advances of Proteomic Sciences in Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurshid, Zohaib; Zohaib, Sana; Najeeb, Shariq; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail; Rehman, Rabia; Rehman, Ihtesham Ur

    2016-01-01

    Applications of proteomics tools revolutionized various biomedical disciplines such as genetics, molecular biology, medicine, and dentistry. The aim of this review is to highlight the major milestones in proteomics in dentistry during the last fifteen years. Human oral cavity contains hard and soft tissues and various biofluids including saliva and crevicular fluid. Proteomics has brought revolution in dentistry by helping in the early diagnosis of various diseases identified by the detection of numerous biomarkers present in the oral fluids. This paper covers the role of proteomics tools for the analysis of oral tissues. In addition, dental materials proteomics and their future directions are discussed. PMID:27187379

  9. Graduate Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Howard S.

    1987-01-01

    Maintains that graduate training in sociology is an uneasy compromise between teaching new sociologists practical knowledge and doing what a department's various constituencies demand. Suggests that faculty should develop a continuing dialogue with students and incorporate them, formally and informally, in their work. (Author/DH)

  10. Local anesthetics: dentistry's most important drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamed, S F

    1994-12-01

    One hundred and fifty years ago, Horace Wells opened the door to local anesthetics. Since then, many advances have been made in pain control. The development of dentistry's most important drugs is highlighted here.

  11. Adhesive dentistry: 2013 and into the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleman, David S; Deliperi, Simone

    2013-10-01

    With the recent founding of the International Academy for Adhesive Dentistry (IAAD), scientific research, commercially available products, and clinically proven protocols will be brought together with the dental profession.

  12. Ultrasound: A Revenant Therapeutic Modality in Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    An ultrasound (US) gives a visible image of the organs that are present inside the body. In medicine it serves for diagnosing and also its therapeutic benefits are well established for bone healing, osteointegration and soft tissue healing. In dentistry it is widely used for diagnostic purposes. When it was discovered it was introduced for therapeutic purposes, but due to lack of clinical studies its use as therapy was remittent in dentistry. The aim of the present paper was to establish the ...

  13. The advantages of minimally invasive dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Gordon J

    2005-11-01

    Minimally invasive dentistry, in cases in which it is appropriate, is a concept that preserves dentitions and supporting structures. In this column, I have discussed several examples of minimally invasive dental techniques. This type of dentistry is gratifying for dentists and appreciated by patients. If more dentists would practice it, the dental profession could enhance the public's perception of its honesty and increase its professionalism as well.

  14. [Comparative study about the conceptions of health and disease between social science and dentistry students from a public university of Rio de Janeiro State].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Myrna de Faria Magalhães; Carvalho, Fernanda Ribeiro; Martins, Marisa Drumond

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to compare the social representation between dentistry and social sciences students, concerning the process of health and disease, and the conception of health professional position in our society, aiming a contribution to improve dentistry students' social formation. It is a qualitative research and its methodology was based in interviews performed by two researchers with one free association question and five open questions directed to ten first and ten last year students from both graduation courses of a public university. The first year students from both courses said that health and disease was based in the World Health Organization (WHO) concept. The social sciences students showed more engagement about social questions while dentistry's cared more about the individual than the community. Considering that, we can conclude that dentistry students from the last year did not show social sensitivity either worried about Brazilian's population problems, while social sciences students do.

  15. Evidence-based dentistry as it relates to dental materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayne, Stephen C; Fitzgerald, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based dentistry (EBD) is reviewed in depth to underscore the limitations for evidence-based dental materials information that exist at this time. Anecdotal estimates of evidence for dental practice are in the range of 8 percent to 10 percent. While the process of evaluating the literature base for dental evidence began 20 years ago, it was not practical to implement it until high-speed wireless connections, open access to journals, and omnipresent connections via smart phones became a reality. EBD includes five stages of information collection and analysis, starting with a careful definition of a clinical question using the PICO(T) approach. Clinical evidence in randomized control trials is considered the best. Clinical trial perspectives (prospective, cross-sectional, retrospective) and outcome designs (RCTs, SCTs, CCTs, cohort studies, case-control studies) are quite varied. Aggregation techniques (including meta-analyses) allow meaningful combinations of clinical data from trials with similar designs but with fewer rigors. Appraisals attempt to assess the entire evidence base without bias and answer clinical questions. Varying intensities to these approaches, Cochrane Collaboration, ADA-EBD Library, UTHSCSA CATs Library, are used to answer questions. Dental materials evidence from clinical trials is infrequent, short-term, and often not compliant with current guidelines (registration, CONSORT, PRISMA). Reports in current evidence libraries indicate less than 5 percent of evidence is related to restorative dental materials.

  16. Dentistry proteomics: from laboratory development to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Taia M B; Lima, Stella M F; Petriz, Bernardo A; Silva, Osmar N; Freire, Mirna S; Franco, Octávio L

    2013-12-01

    Despite all the dental information acquired over centuries and the importance of proteome research, the cross-link between these two areas only emerged around mid-nineties. Proteomic tools can help dentistry in the identification of risk factors, early diagnosis, prevention, and systematic control that will promote the evolution of treatment in all dentistry specialties. This review mainly focuses on the evolution of dentistry in different specialties based on proteomic research and how these tools can improve knowledge in dentistry. The subjects covered are an overview of proteomics in dentistry, specific information on different fields in dentistry (dental structure, restorative dentistry, endodontics, periodontics, oral pathology, oral surgery, and orthodontics) and future directions. There are many new proteomic technologies that have never been used in dentistry studies and some dentistry areas that have never been explored by proteomic tools. It is expected that a greater integration of these areas will help to understand what is still unknown in oral health and disease.

  17. Library School Educators and Academic Librarians: A Symbiotic Relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Virgil L. P.

    1995-01-01

    Outlines common problems facing the academic library and graduate schools of library/information studies and examines the relationship between librarians and faculty. Topics include the image of academic librarians, including faculty status and research; library collections, services, and instruction; and involvement of librarians in library and…

  18. Intranasal sedatives in pediatric dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSarheed, Maha A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To identify the intranasal (IN) sedatives used to achieve conscious sedation during dental procedures amongst children. Methods: A literature review was conducted by identifying relevant studies through searches on Medline. Search included IN of midazolam, ketamine, sufentanil, dexmedetomidine, clonidine, haloperidol and loranzepam. Studies included were conducted amongst individuals below 18 years, published in English, and were not restricted by year. Exclusion criteria were articles that did not focus on pediatric dentistry. Results: Twenty studies were included. The most commonly used sedatives were midazolam, followed by ketamine and sufentanil. Onset of action for IN midazolam was 5-15 minutes (min), however, IN ketamine was faster (mean 5.74 min), while both IN sufentanil (mean 20 min) and IN dexmedetomidine (mean 25 min) were slow in comparison. Midazolam was effective for modifying behavior in mild to moderately anxious children, however, for more invasive or prolonged procedures, stronger sedatives, such as IN ketamine, IN sufentanil were recommended. In addition, ketamine fared better in overall success rate (89%) when compared with IN midazolam (69%). Intranasal dexmedetomidine was only used as pre-medication amongst children. While its’ onset of action is longer when compared with IN midazolam, it produced deeper sedation at the time of separation from the parent and at the time of anesthesia induction. Conclusion: Intranasal midazolam, ketamine and sufentanil are effective and safe for conscious sedation, while intranasal midazolam, dexmedetomidine and sufentanil have proven to be effective premedications. PMID:27570849

  19. [Importance of psychology in dentistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñaranda, P

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, the venezuelan dentists express their necessities of knowing certain aspects of psychology that could be useful in the relations with their patients. In the investigation a 16 item questionnaire was elaborated, taking 5 areas in consideration: a. Psychological management of the dental patient. b. Psychological consequences of the dental disease. c. Dental disease psychogenesis. d. Patient first contact behavior. e. Aspects of work organization. 100 dentists and 100 dental students of the last 2 years were inquired, in order to compare these two populations at the XXXth Congress of the venezuelan dentists. The two proportion coefficient test was used with: P less than or equal to 0.01. As a result 4 groups of items had a significant difference: a. Patient dissertation. b. Children with problematic behavior. c. Anxious patients; and d. Professional fees. Quantitatively 16 items were recognized as items in with Psychology could be useful to be applied in dentistry. The article concludes with 6 recommendations underlining the important role of the dental psychology in the dental school as well as in private practice.

  20. Intranasal sedatives in pediatric dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSarheed, Maha A

    2016-09-01

    To identify the intranasal (IN) sedatives used to achieve conscious sedation during dental procedures amongst children. A literature review was conducted by identifying relevant studies through searches on Medline. Search included IN of midazolam, ketamine, sufentanil, dexmedetomidine, clonidine, haloperidol, and loranzepam. Studies included were conducted amongst individuals below 18 years, published in English, and were not restricted by year. Exclusion criteria were articles that did not focus on pediatric dentistry.  Twenty studies were included. The most commonly used sedatives were midazolam, followed by ketamine and sufentanil. Onset of action for IN midazolam was 5-15 minutes (min), however, IN ketamine was faster (mean 5.74 min), while both IN sufentanil (mean 20 min) and IN dexmedetomidine (mean 25 min) were slow in comparison. Midazolam was effective for modifying behavior in mild to moderately anxious children, however, for more invasive or prolonged procedures, stronger sedatives, such as IN ketamine, IN sufentanil were recommended. In addition, ketamine fared better in overall success rate (89%) when compared with IN midazolam (69%). Intranasal dexmedetomidine was only used as pre-medication amongst children. While its' onset of action is longer when compared with IN midazolam, it produced deeper sedation at the time of separation from the parent and at the time of anesthesia induction. Intranasal midazolam, ketamine, and sufentanil are effective and safe for conscious sedation, while intranasal midazolam, dexmedetomidine, and sufentanil have proven to be effective premedications.

  1. Significance of biofilms in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wróblewska, Marta; Strużycka, Izabela; Mierzwińska-Nastalska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    In the past decades significant scientific progress has taken place in the knowledge about biofilms. They constitute multilayer conglomerates of bacteria and fungi, surrounded by carbohydrates which they produce, as well as substances derived from saliva and gingival fluid. Modern techniques showed significant diversity of the biofilm environment and a system of microbial communication (quorum sensing), enhancing their survival. At present it is believed that the majority of infections, particularly chronic with exacerbations, are a result of biofilm formation, particularly in the presence of biomaterials. It should be emphasised that penetration of antibiotics and other antimicrobial agents into deeper layers of a biofilm is poor, causing therapeutic problems and necessitating sometimes removal of the implant or prosthesis. Biofilms play an increasing role in dentistry as a result of more and more broad use in dental practice of plastic and implantable materials. Biofilms are produced on the surfaces of teeth as dental plaque, in the para-nasal sinuses, on prostheses, dental implants, as well as in waterlines of a dental unit, constituting a particular risk for severely immunocompromised patients. New methods of therapy and prevention of infections linked to biofilms are under development.

  2. [Specialties in dentistry. 4. Post-academic specialization in geriatric dentistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaub, R.M.; Baat, C. de

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, a specialization in geriatric dentistry has been established and along with it an educational programme. A specialist in geriatric dentistry is a dentist general practitioner with special knowledge and skills for delivering oral care to frail elderly people. The educational programm

  3. Adequacy of patient pools to support predoctoral students' achievement of competence in pediatric dentistry in U.S. dental schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casamassimo, Paul S; Seale, N Sue

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the current status of predoctoral pediatric dentistry patient pools in U.S. dental schools and compare their status to that in 2001. A 2014 survey of school clinic-based and community-based dental patient pools was developed, piloted, and sent to pediatric predoctoral program directors in 57 U.S. dental schools via SurveyMonkey. Two follow-up contacts were made to increase the response rate. A total of 49 surveys were returned for a response rate of 86%. The responding program directors reported that their programs' patient pools had declined in number and had changed in character with more diversity and fewer procedures. They attributed the changes to competition, cost, and location of the dental school. The respondents reported that community-based dental education clinical sites continued to provide additional service experiences for dental students, with contributions varying by the nature of the site. A large number of the respondents felt that their graduates lacked some basic pediatric dentistry clinical skills and were not ready for independent practice with children. The results of this study suggest that the predoctoral pediatric dentistry patient pool has changed and general dentists may be graduating with inadequate experiences to practice dentistry for children.

  4. [Dentistry students' reasons for choosing dentistry as a career in Damascus University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashlah, A M

    2012-05-01

    This cross-sectional questionnaire survey assessed the motives for choosing dentist as a profession among dentistry students at Damascus University, Syrian Arab Republic. A total of 408 undergraduate students (233 males and 175 females) aged 18-23 years were selected randomly from students in the second, third and fourth years of dentistry study. They completed a questionnaire that enquired about their reasons for studying dentistry as well as their sociodemographic characteristics. The number of admissions in females had increased over the 3 years. Most parents of the students were university-educated. The main motivation for choosing dentistry was as a means to achieve personal goals, including getting a good job abroad, having financial independence, and attaining a good reputation. There were significant differences between the sexes with regard to the reasons for choosing dentistry.

  5. Sports dentistry: a perspective for the future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Vinícius Soares

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Sports Dentistry (SD acts in the prevention, maintenance and treatment of oral and facial injuries, as well as the collection and dissemination of information on dental trauma, beyond stimulus to research. Establishes as a duty for the dentist detect problems related to the athlete’s stomatognathic system. This essay is based on the provided data from the literature related to SD, including definition, practice areas and research fields. To discuss the data, six areas were categorized: shares in sports dentistry; oral health of athlete; sports-related dental implications; dental-facial trauma; face shields; and mouthguards. The analyzed data show that the SD is still an underexplored field of action by dentists, but it is expanding, despite not being recognized specialty by the Federal Council of Dentistry, but the Brazilian Academy of Sports Dentistry has been created with a mission to show the real importance of Dentistry in sport. The dentist should be part of the group of professionals associated with the athlete to perform periodic checks in order to ensure oral health which may contribute to athletes´performance. When impact occurs, however, it would be possible reduce the severity of the impact related to injuries, by using helmets, masks, goggles, face shields and mouthguard. Additionally, it is imperative that dentists, sports coaching, athletes, and professional who work with athletes be aware of the benefits of incorporating SD as an important academic and professional subject.

  6. The graduate entry generation: a qualitative study exploring the factors influencing the career expectations and aspirations of a graduating cohort of graduate entry dental students in one London institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Nairn HF

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dentistry in the UK has a number of new graduate-entry programmes. The aim of the study was to explore the motivation, career expectations and experiences of final year students who chose to pursue a dental career through the graduate entry programme route in one institution; and to explore if, and how, their intended career expectations and aspirations were informed by this choice. Method In-depth interviews of 14 graduate entry students in their final year of study. Data were transcribed verbatim and analysed using framework analysis. Results There were three categories of factors influencing students' choice to study dentistry through graduate entry: 'push', 'pull' and 'mediating'. Mediating factors related to students' personal concerns and circumstances, whereas push and pull factors related to features of their previous and future careers and wider social factors. Routes to Graduate Entry study comprised: 'early career changers', 'established career changers' and those pursuing 'routes to specialisation'. These routes also influenced the students' practice of dentistry, as students integrated skills in their dental studies, and encountered new challenges. Factors which students believed would influence their future careers included: vocational training; opportunities for specialisation or developing special interests and policy-related issues, together with wider professional and social concerns. The graduate entry programme was considered 'hard work' but a quick route to a professional career which had much to offer. Students' felt more could have been made of their pre-dental studies and/or experience during the programme. Factors perceived as influencing students' future contribution to dentistry included personal and social influences. Overall there was strong support for the values of the NHS and 'giving back' to the system in their future career. Conclusion Graduate entry students appear to be motivated to enter

  7. The graduate entry generation: a qualitative study exploring the factors influencing the career expectations and aspirations of a graduating cohort of graduate entry dental students in one London institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Paul; Cabot, Lyndon; Wilson, Nairn H F; Gallagher, Jennifer E

    2011-09-24

    Dentistry in the UK has a number of new graduate-entry programmes. The aim of the study was to explore the motivation, career expectations and experiences of final year students who chose to pursue a dental career through the graduate entry programme route in one institution; and to explore if, and how, their intended career expectations and aspirations were informed by this choice. In-depth interviews of 14 graduate entry students in their final year of study. Data were transcribed verbatim and analysed using framework analysis. There were three categories of factors influencing students' choice to study dentistry through graduate entry: 'push', 'pull' and 'mediating'. Mediating factors related to students' personal concerns and circumstances, whereas push and pull factors related to features of their previous and future careers and wider social factors. Routes to Graduate Entry study comprised: 'early career changers', 'established career changers' and those pursuing 'routes to specialisation'. These routes also influenced the students' practice of dentistry, as students integrated skills in their dental studies, and encountered new challenges.Factors which students believed would influence their future careers included: vocational training; opportunities for specialisation or developing special interests and policy-related issues, together with wider professional and social concerns.The graduate entry programme was considered 'hard work' but a quick route to a professional career which had much to offer. Students' felt more could have been made of their pre-dental studies and/or experience during the programme. Factors perceived as influencing students' future contribution to dentistry included personal and social influences. Overall there was strong support for the values of the NHS and 'giving back' to the system in their future career. Graduate entry students appear to be motivated to enter dentistry by a range of factors which suit their preferences and

  8. The graduate entry generation: a qualitative study exploring the factors influencing the career expectations and aspirations of a graduating cohort of graduate entry dental students in one London institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Dentistry in the UK has a number of new graduate-entry programmes. The aim of the study was to explore the motivation, career expectations and experiences of final year students who chose to pursue a dental career through the graduate entry programme route in one institution; and to explore if, and how, their intended career expectations and aspirations were informed by this choice. Method In-depth interviews of 14 graduate entry students in their final year of study. Data were transcribed verbatim and analysed using framework analysis. Results There were three categories of factors influencing students' choice to study dentistry through graduate entry: 'push', 'pull' and 'mediating'. Mediating factors related to students' personal concerns and circumstances, whereas push and pull factors related to features of their previous and future careers and wider social factors. Routes to Graduate Entry study comprised: 'early career changers', 'established career changers' and those pursuing 'routes to specialisation'. These routes also influenced the students' practice of dentistry, as students integrated skills in their dental studies, and encountered new challenges. Factors which students believed would influence their future careers included: vocational training; opportunities for specialisation or developing special interests and policy-related issues, together with wider professional and social concerns. The graduate entry programme was considered 'hard work' but a quick route to a professional career which had much to offer. Students' felt more could have been made of their pre-dental studies and/or experience during the programme. Factors perceived as influencing students' future contribution to dentistry included personal and social influences. Overall there was strong support for the values of the NHS and 'giving back' to the system in their future career. Conclusion Graduate entry students appear to be motivated to enter dentistry by a range of

  9. Which factors influence students' selection of advanced graduate programs? One institution's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Sophia; Jimenez, Monik; Howell, Howard; Karimbux, Nadeem; Sukotjo, Cortino

    2008-06-01

    The reasons that students choose certain specialties may be integral to the quality of specialty programs and the future of those specialties. The Harvard School of Dental Medicine (HSDM) has a high percentage (87.6 percent) of students who enroll in postgraduate programs. The goals of this study were to establish a baseline of factors that affect postgraduate program selection at HSDM and to determine if there was a significant difference in factor selection by gender, relationship status, graduation year, or choice to specialize versus choice to pursue advanced training in general dentistry. As a pilot study, we asked HSDM graduates from the classes of 2005 to 2007 to rank the importance of forty-two factors in selecting a field of dentistry and a particular program or institution within a specialty. Overall, students felt that intellectual content, challenging diagnostic problems, and possessing a special skill or talent unique to a specialty were the most important factors in choosing a field of dentistry. Influence of family members in dentistry was ranked as least important. In choice of a certain program or institution within a given field, clinical training and philosophy of training were ranked most highly. Students felt that the opportunity to moonlight was least important. Significant differences (p<0.05) were found regarding gender, relationship status, and students who chose to specialize versus those pursuing advanced general dentistry training. No significant differences were found among the students in different graduating classes.

  10. Novice Academic Librarians Provide Insight into Choosing Their Careers, Graduate School Education, and First Years on the Job. A Review of: Sare, L., Bales, S., & Neville, B. (2012. New academic librarians and their perceptions of the profession. portal: Libraries and the Academy, 12(2, 179-203. doi: 10.1353/pla.2012.0017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol D. Howe

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To study the ways in which noviceacademic librarians’ perceptions oflibrarianship develop from the time theydecide to attend library school through theirfirst 6 to 24 months of library work.Design – Grounded theory method utilizingtwo qualitative research techniques: one-onone,face-to-face interviews and documentanalysis.Setting – The libraries of three Texasuniversities, three Texas four-year colleges,and one Texas community college.Subjects – 12 professional academic librarianswho graduated from eight different graduateschools. Participants were 6 to 24 months intotheir professional careers and had little or nopre-professional experience.Methods – The researchers sought participantsthrough mailings, emails, electronic mailinglist postings, and referrals from otherparticipants. They conducted a small pilotstudy with two novice librarians to refine theirresearch methodology. The researchersinterviewed additional participants andanalyzed the interview transcripts untilcategories of interest were identified andsaturated. Saturation occurred at 12participants, not including the pilotparticipants. Each interview was 30-45minutes. The researchers recorded theinterviews and systematically coded thetranscripts using activist imagery. Four of the participants gave the researchers their “statement of purpose” essay that they used when applying for graduate school. These documents were also discussed with participants and analyzed.Main Results – From the data they collected, the researchers identified six categories of interest regarding librarians’ perceptions of librarianship: deciding upon a career, experiencing graduate school, continuing education, defining the work, evaluating the work, and (reimagining the future. In considering librarianship as a career, the participants had not been entirely sure what it entailed, but they utilized what they did know about libraries and librarianship to generally deem the

  11. Didactic Community Dentistry Curricula in U.S. Dental Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Marsha A.

    1987-01-01

    A national survey of predoctoral community dentistry faculty members provided ratings of importance for 32 community dentistry topics and information on clock hours of didactic instruction in each topic. (MSE)

  12. Recent advances in imaging technologies in dentistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naseem; Shah; Nikhil; Bansal; Ajay; Logani

    2014-01-01

    Dentistry has witnessed tremendous advances in all its branches over the past three decades. With these advances, the need for more precise diagnostic tools,specially imaging methods, have become mandatory.From the simple intra-oral periapical X-rays, advanced imaging techniques like computed tomography, cone beam computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound have also found place in modern dentistry. Changing from analogue to digital radiography has not only made the process simpler and faster but also made image storage, manipulation(brightness/contrast, image cropping, etc.) and retrieval easier. The three-dimensional imaging has made the complex cranio-facial structures more accessible for examination and early and accurate diagnosis of deep seated lesions. This paper is to review current advances in imaging technology and their uses in different disciplines of dentistry.

  13. Plasma rich in growth factors in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Glavina

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF has wider use in many fields of dentistry due to its endogenous biocompatible regenerative potential i.e., their potential to stimulate and accelerate tissue healing and bone regeneration. Aims This review shows the increasing use of PRGF technology in various fields of dentistry. Methods In the last nine years PubMed has been searched in order to find out published articles upon PRGF in dentistry and 36 papers have been included. Results PRGF technology has many advantages with positive clinical and biological outcomes in tissue healing and bone regeneration. Conclusion In order to determine the most effective therapeutic value for patients, further research is required.

  14. Evidence-based equine dentistry: preventive medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmalt, James L

    2007-08-01

    Dental problems are some of the most common reasons for a horse to be presented to an equine veterinarian. Despite the importance of anecdotal evidence as a starting point, the science of equine dentistry (especially prophylactic dentistry) has remained poorly supported by evidence-based approaches to diagnosis and treatment. In the 21st century, veterinarians have an ethical responsibility to promote and use the results of evidence-based research and not propagate statements attesting to the purported benefits of intervention without supporting research. Consider also that society is becoming more litigious and therefore is basing treatment plans and advice on published research, which protects the profession from legal challenges concerning our professional conduct. This article reviews the current published evidence concerning the role of equine dentistry in feed digestibility and performance.

  15. Advances in Nanotechnology for Restorative Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohaib Khurshid

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Rationalizing has become a new trend in the world of science and technology. Nanotechnology has ascended to become one of the most favorable technologies, and one which will change the application of materials in different fields. The quality of dental biomaterials has been improved by the emergence of nanotechnology. This technology manufactures materials with much better properties or by improving the properties of existing materials. The science of nanotechnology has become the most popular area of research, currently covering a broad range of applications in dentistry. This review describes the basic concept of nanomaterials, recent innovations in nanomaterials and their applications in restorative dentistry. Advances in nanotechnologies are paving the future of dentistry, and there are a plenty of hopes placed on nanomaterials in terms of improving the health care of dental patients.

  16. Nanotechnology in dentistry: prevention, diagnosis, and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abou Neel EA

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ensanya Ali Abou Neel,1–3 Laurent Bozec,3 Roman A Perez,4,5 Hae-Won Kim,4–6 Jonathan C Knowles3,5 1Division of Biomaterials, Operative Dentistry Department, Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 2Biomaterials Department, Faculty of Dentistry, Tanta University, Tanta, Egypt; 3UCL Eastman Dental Institute, Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, London, UK; 4Institute of Tissue Regenerative Engineering (ITREN, 5Department of Nanobiomedical Science and BK21 Plus NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, 6Department of Biomaterials Science, College of Dentistry, Dankook University, Cheonan, Republic of Korea Abstract: Nanotechnology has rapidly expanded into all areas of science; it offers significant alternative ways to solve scientific and medical questions and problems. In dentistry, nanotechnology has been exploited in the development of restorative materials with some significant success. This review discusses nanointerfaces that could compromise the longevity of dental restorations, and how nanotechnolgy has been employed to modify them for providing long-term successful restorations. It also focuses on some challenging areas in dentistry, eg, oral biofilm and cancers, and how nanotechnology overcomes these challenges. The recent advances in nanodentistry and innovations in oral health-related diagnostic, preventive, and therapeutic methods required to maintain and obtain perfect oral health, have been discussed. The recent advances in nanotechnology could hold promise in bringing a paradigm shift in dental field. Although there are numerous complex therapies being developed to treat many diseases, their clinical use requires careful consideration of the expense of synthesis and implementation. Keywords: nanotechnology, nanointerfaces, biofilm-related oral diseases, tissue engineering, drug delivery, toxicity

  17. Changing the education paradigm in pediatric dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Gomez, Francisco J

    2014-10-01

    Traditional curricula of pediatric dental residency programs have overemphasized restorative dentistry while failing to give adequate attention to early diagnosis, preventive disease management, risk assessment, cultural competency, advocacy, community partnerships and interprofessional education. The University of California, Los Angeles, Community Health and Advocacy Training Program in Pediatric Dentistry emphasizes these lesser-taught areas, integrating them within a structured education in classical restorative techniques and Commission on Dental Accreditation-approved standards, providing a diverse curriculum and preparing residents for practice in increasingly diverse communities.

  18. Use of DNA technology in forensic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Ricardo Henrique Alves; Sales-Peres, Arsenio; de Oliveira, Rogério Nogueira; de Oliveira, Fernando Toledo; Sales-Peres, Sílvia Helena de Carvalho

    2007-06-01

    The established importance of Forensic Dentistry for human identification, mainly when there is little remaining material to perform such identification (e.g., in fires, explosions, decomposing bodies or skeletonized bodies), has led dentists working with forensic investigation to become more familiar with the new molecular biology techniques. The currently available DNA tests have high reliability and are accepted as legal proofs in courts. This article presents a literature review referring to the main studies on Forensic Dentistry that involve the use of DNA for human identification, and makes an overview of the evolution of this technology in the last years, highlighting the importance of molecular biology in forensic sciences.

  19. A multidisciplinary approach to esthetic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear, Frank M; Kokich, Vincent G

    2007-04-01

    Today's dentist does not just repair teeth to make them better for chewing. Increasingly, his or her work involves esthetics. With patients demanding more attractive teeth, dentists now must become more familiar with the formerly independent disciplines of orthodontics, periodontics, restorative dentistry, and maxillofacial surgery. This article provides a systematic method of evaluating dentofacial esthetics in a logical, interdisciplinary manner. In today's interdisciplinary dental world, treatment planning must begin with well-defined esthetic objectives. By beginning with esthetics, and taking into consideration the impact on function, structure, and biology, the clinician will be able to use the various disciplines in dentistry to deliver the highest level of dental care to each patient.

  20. Bioeconomy analysis in Aesthetic Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea Dana Tudose

    2015-12-01

    technical report of treatment ( labor - price, average duration, satisfaction, relative to direct restoration techniques versus indirect techniques . In conclusion, SWOT analysis can be successfully applied to a better targeting of treatments, applying a plan lines for management in dental treatment units. None of direct techniques can not fit the bioeconomy principles (saves time, money, dental tissue in the short term. All maneuvers efficient in terms of functional aesthetics dentistry win at time saving and lost tooth structure chapter to the cost issue. In the long run costs can be amortized, especially since the restoration increases predictability.

  1. The role of coaching in the business of dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, T C

    2007-09-08

    Coaching is a subject dentistry appears to have let slip by, yet as this article outlines, it has so much to offer in many different aspects of dentistry, but particularly in fulfilling the Standards for dental professionals determined by the General Dental Council (GDC). Evidence suggests that coaching has produced tremendous benefits to business, and dentistry is a business.

  2. Employment and Learning Outcomes of LIS Graduates: A Case of Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warraich, Nosheen Fatima; Ameen, Kanwal

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the perceptions of Library and Information Science (LIS) graduates about their learning outcomes in the Master of Library and Information Science (MLIS) programme at the University of the Punjab and their employment outcomes in the marketplace. Why do LIS graduates choose librarianship as a profession in Pakistan? What is their…

  3. Nursing Faculty Collaborate with Embedded Librarians to Serve Online Graduate Students in a Consortium Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillot, Ladonna; Stahr, Beth; Meeker, Bonnie Juve'

    2010-01-01

    Nursing and library faculty face many information literacy challenges when graduate nursing programs migrate to online course delivery. The authors describe a collaborative model for providing cost-effective online library services to new graduate students in a three-university consortium. The embedded librarian service links a health sciences…

  4. Latex allergy in dentistry: clinical cases report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raggio, D.P.; Camargo, L.B.; Naspitz, G.M.C.C.; Politano, G.T.; Bonifacio, C.C.; Mendes, F.M.; Kierstman, F.

    2010-01-01

    Generally natural rubber latex (NRL) allergy is detected after some exposition to the material. As NRL is commonly found in different materials used daily in dental clinic, the allergy can be manifested in the pediatric dentistry clinic. The first clinical manifestation can be smooth but also severe

  5. Dentistry and Dental Hygiene Handbook. 1988 Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

    The laws, rules and regulations of the New York State Education Department governing dentistry and dental hygiene practice in the state are presented. In addition, the requirements and procedures for obtaining licensure and first registration as a dentist and dental hygienist in New York are discussed. The following chapters are provided: (1)…

  6. Computerized implant-dentistry: Advances toward automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Minkle; Anand, Vishal; Salaria, Sanjeev Kumar; Jain, Nikil; Gupta, Shilpi

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in the field of implantology such as three-dimensional imaging, implant-planning software, computer-aided-design/computer-aided-manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology, computer-guided, and navigated implant surgery have led to the computerization of implant-dentistry. This three-dimensional computer-generated implant-planning and surgery has not only enabled accurate preoperative evaluation of the anatomic limitations but has also facilitated preoperative planning of implant positions along with virtual implant placement and subsequently transferring the virtual treatment plans onto the surgical phase via static (guided) or dynamic (navigated) systems aided by CAD/CAM technology. Computerized-implant-dentistry being highly predictable and minimally invasive in nature has also allowed implant placement in patients with medical comorbidities (e.g. radiation therapy, blood dyscrasias), in patients with complex problems following a significant alteration of the bony anatomy as a result of benign or malignant pathology of the jaws or trauma and in patients with other physical and emotional problems. With significant achievements accomplished in the field of computerized implant-dentistry, attempts are now been made toward complete automation of implant-dentistry. PMID:25810585

  7. Evidence-Based Dentistry: What's New?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ballini, S. Capodiferro, M. Toia, S. Cantore, G. Favia, G. De Frenza, F.R. Grassi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of evidence for every branch of medicine in teaching in order to orient the practitioners among the great amount of most actual scientific information's, and to support clinical decisions, is well established in health care, including dentistry. The practice of evidence-based medicine is a process of lifelong, self-directed, problem-based learning which leads to the need for clinically important information about diagnosis, prognosis, therapy and other clinical and health care issues. Nowadays the practice of dentistry is becoming more complex and challenging because of the continually changing in dental materials and equipments, an increasingly litigious society, an increase in the emphasis of continuing professional development, the information explosion and the consumer movement associated with advances on the Internet. The need for reliable information and the electronic revolution have come together to allow the “paradigm shift” towards evidence-based health care. Recent years have seen an increase in the importance of evidence-based dentistry, aiming to reduce to the maximum the gap between clinical research and real world dental practice. Aim of evidence-based practice is the systematic literature review, which synthesizes the best evidences and provides the basis for clinical practice guidelines. These practice guidelines give a brief review of what evidence-based dentistry is and how to use it.

  8. Nanotechnology in dentistry: Current achievements and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramandeep Singh Gambhir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology offers advances particularly in each and every field of human activity such as electronics, industry, telecommunications, environmental science, etc., The field of nanotechnology has got remarkable potential that can bring considerable improvements to the human health, enhanced use of natural resources, and reduced environmental pollution. Since 1990s, nanotechnology has been exploited for potential medical and dental applications. Nanotechnology holds promise for advanced diagnostics, targeted drug delivery, and biosensors. Dentistry is undergoing yet another change to benefit mankind, this time by transforming itself to the nanodentistry. A variety of nanostructures such as nanorobots, nanospheres, nanofibers, nanorods, etc., have been studied for various applications in dentistry and medicine. Preventive dentistry has also utilized nanodentistry to develop the nanomaterials for inclusion in a variety of oral health-care products. However, due to insufficient evidence on potential hazards on human health and environment, nanotechnology has become a controversial issue. It is documented that nanomaterials can enter the human body through several routes and can pose a threat to human health by interacting with the DNA. The present article focuses on the current status and the future implications of nanotechnology in dentistry.

  9. Developing an Undergraduate Hospital Dentistry Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, G. B.; Swanson, A. E.

    1991-01-01

    The process used by the University of British Columbia to establish and improve an undergraduate hospital dentistry program is chronicled. The program's initial structure and objectives, use of student input for program improvement, and the success of the approach in developing an effective program are discussed. (MSE)

  10. Patient autonomy in evidence-based dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritwik, Priyanshi

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based dentistry is the judicious integration of scientific information relating to the patient's oral health and medical condition with the dentist's clinical expertise and the patient's own treatment needs and preferences. In this triad of factors, we (the dentists) are least likely to be formally trained in recognizing our patient's preferences. Do we understand what shapes these preferences?

  11. Biological and hardware complications in implant dentistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wismeijer, D.; Buser, D.; Chen, S.

    2015-01-01

    The ITI Treatment Guide series, a unique compendium of evidence-based treatment methods in implant dentistry in daily practice, written by renowned clinicians, provides a comprehensive overview of various therapeutic options. Using an illustrated step-by-step approach, the ITI Treatment Guide shows

  12. Computerized implant-dentistry: Advances toward automation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minkle Gulati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Advancements in the field of implantology such as three-dimensional imaging, implant-planning software, computer-aided-design/computer-aided-manufacturing (CAD/CAM technology, computer-guided, and navigated implant surgery have led to the computerization of implant-dentistry. This three-dimensional computer-generated implant-planning and surgery has not only enabled accurate preoperative evaluation of the anatomic limitations but has also facilitated preoperative planning of implant positions along with virtual implant placement and subsequently transferring the virtual treatment plans onto the surgical phase via static (guided or dynamic (navigated systems aided by CAD/CAM technology. Computerized-implant-dentistry being highly predictable and minimally invasive in nature has also allowed implant placement in patients with medical comorbidities (e.g. radiation therapy, blood dyscrasias, in patients with complex problems following a significant alteration of the bony anatomy as a result of benign or malignant pathology of the jaws or trauma and in patients with other physical and emotional problems. With significant achievements accomplished in the field of computerized implant-dentistry, attempts are now been made toward complete automation of implant-dentistry.

  13. Latex allergy in dentistry: clinical cases report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raggio, D.P.; Camargo, L.B.; Naspitz, G.M.C.C.; Politano, G.T.; Bonifacio, C.C.; Mendes, F.M.; Kierstman, F.

    2010-01-01

    Generally natural rubber latex (NRL) allergy is detected after some exposition to the material. As NRL is commonly found in different materials used daily in dental clinic, the allergy can be manifested in the pediatric dentistry clinic. The first clinical manifestation can be smooth but also

  14. Evidence-based dentistry: what's new?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballini, A; Capodiferro, S; Toia, M; Cantore, S; Favia, G; De Frenza, G; Grassi, F R

    2007-06-06

    The importance of evidence for every branch of medicine in teaching in order to orient the practitioners among the great amount of most actual scientific information's, and to support clinical decisions, is well established in health care, including dentistry. The practice of evidence-based medicine is a process of lifelong, self-directed, problem-based learning which leads to the need for clinically important information about diagnosis, prognosis, therapy and other clinical and health care issues. Nowadays the practice of dentistry is becoming more complex and challenging because of the continually changing in dental materials and equipments, an increasingly litigious society, an increase in the emphasis of continuing professional development, the information explosion and the consumer movement associated with advances on the Internet. The need for reliable information and the electronic revolution have come together to allow the "paradigm shift" towards evidence-based health care. Recent years have seen an increase in the importance of evidence-based dentistry, aiming to reduce to the maximum the gap between clinical research and real world dental practice. Aim of evidence-based practice is the systematic literature review, which synthesizes the best evidences and provides the basis for clinical practice guidelines. These practice guidelines give a brief review of what evidence-based dentistry is and how to use it.

  15. Information Literacy and Research-Intensive Graduate Students: Enhancing the Role of Research Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Marni R.

    2009-01-01

    This article investigates how psychology graduate students find information for coursework and research, who teaches them how to find it, and whether differences emerge over the course of their graduate careers. Findings indicate that these graduate students are comfortable using campus libraries, prefer electronic resources, ask supervisors when…

  16. Evaluation of undergraduate clinical learning experiences in the subject of pediatric dentistry using critical incident technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Vyawahare

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In pediatric dentistry, the experiences of dental students may help dental educators better prepare graduates to treat the children. Research suggests that student′s perceptions should be considered in any discussion of their education, but there has been no systematic examination of India′s undergraduate dental students learning experiences. Aim: This qualitative investigation aimed to gather and analyze information about experiences in pediatric dentistry from the students′ viewpoint using critical incident technique (CIT. Study Design: The sample group for this investigation came from all 240 3 rd and 4 th year dental students from all the four dental colleges in Indore. Using CIT, participants were asked to describe at least one positive and one negative experience in detail. Results: They described 308 positive and 359 negative experiences related to the pediatric dentistry clinic. Analysis of the data resulted in the identification of four key factors related to their experiences: 1 The instructor; 2 the patient; 3 the learning process; and 4 the learning environment. Conclusion: The CIT is a useful data collection and analysis technique that provides rich, useful data and has many potential uses in dental education.

  17. Math Branding in a Community College Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantz, Malcolm; Sadowski, Edward B.

    2010-01-01

    As a strategy to promote the Arapahoe Community College Library's collections and services, the Library undertook to brand itself as a math resource center. In promoting one area of expertise, math was selected to help address the problem of a large portion of high school graduates' inability to work at college-level math. A "Math…

  18. Research Data Management: A Library Practitioner's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Siu Hong

    2017-01-01

    The Future Voices in Public Services column is a forum for students in graduate library and information science programs to discuss key issues they see in academic library public services, to envision what they feel librarians in public service have to offer to academia, to relate their visions for the profession, or to describe research that is…

  19. Math Branding in a Community College Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantz, Malcolm; Sadowski, Edward B.

    2010-01-01

    As a strategy to promote the Arapahoe Community College Library's collections and services, the Library undertook to brand itself as a math resource center. In promoting one area of expertise, math was selected to help address the problem of a large portion of high school graduates' inability to work at college-level math. A "Math Saturday"…

  20. Developing an undergraduate curriculum in Special Care Dentistry - by consensus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dougall, A

    2013-02-01

    It has been reported that healthcare providers often lack the skills set to provide care for people with disabilities, leading to inequalities in health and reduced access to health care. Newly graduating dentists are likely to see a significant number of patients with special healthcare needs in the course of their practicing lives. However, there is evidence of national and international variation in the availability of education and training at the undergraduate level in this important, emerging area. The quality and content of undergraduate education in Special Care Dentistry has been shown to correlate with students\\' confidence and their expressed willingness, towards providing care for patients with special healthcare needs in their future practice. The aim of this study was to use information from a three-round Delphi process, continued into a face-to-face meeting, to establish consensus on what constitutes the essential core knowledge, skills and attitudes required by a newly qualified dentist so that they are able to deliver patient care to diverse populations following graduation. A high level of agreement was established amongst an international panel of experts from 30 countries. The final core items identified by the panel showed a paradigm shift away from the traditional emphasis on medical diagnosis within a curriculum towards an approach based on the International Classification of Functioning (ICF) with patient-centred treatment planning for people with disabilities and special healthcare needs according to function or environment. Many of the core skills identified by the panel are transferable across a curriculum and should encourage a person-centred approach to treatment planning based on the function, needs and wishes of the patient rather than their specific diagnosis.

  1. Musculoskeletal pain in Dentistry students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Batista e Silva

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the frequency of musculoskeletal pain in dental students. Methods: A descriptive study of observational and cross-sectional approach in which was used an Ergonomics and Posture Questionnaire for Dentists adapted by the researchers, associated with the Cooler Quiz. The sample comprised 43 students who attended between the 6th, 8th and 10th academic periods. The data were submitted to descriptive analysis and expressed as percentages, means and standard deviations, also maximum and minimum. For the comparative analysis between the variables, we used the chi-square test, chi-square test with Yates correction or Fisher exact test, when necessary, considering the significance level of 5%. Results: Among the students surveyed 20 (46.51% were men and 23 (53.5% women with a mean age of 23.14 ± 10.24 years, maximum of 35 years and minimum of 19. It was found that 40 (93.02% reported pain in some part of the body, 23 (53.5% in the upper limbs, 20 (46.5% in the lower limbs and 37 (86% in axial skeleton, with no difference between genders (p = 0.59. Pain intensity was classified as mild 10 (25%, moderate 21(52.5% and severe 7 (17.5%. In the assessment we evidenced the direct correlation between the hours of trainning and the intensity of pain. Conclusions: The results of the survey showed that the students assessed developed high frequency of musculoskeletal pain and that pain was associated with hours of daily training held during graduation at the dental clinic.

  2. Pain and disease according to integral anthroposophical dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia Regina Lulo Galitesi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available From an academic standpoint, the university format, in general, has been nurturing a "paradigm of expertise" and, consequently, the relationship between specialties has declined. The upshot is that recent college dental graduates have adopted a clinical performance focusing on system parts and their specificities, in detriment to a more comprehensive view of the mouth and of the patient as a whole, with his/her vital, emotional and individual attributes. An interaction between the several different areas of human knowledge is needed imminently to decrease the dichotomy in professional behavior, because the demand for professionals and dental patients interested in a more comprehensive approach are increasing day by day. Patients want to know: "What, in fact, is behind the etiological extrinsic and intrinsic factors that maintain neuropathic pain, recurrent thrush, or persistent halitosis," among other questions, "even under the care of a dentist?" or "Why is this disease affecting me?" There are several issues composing the paradigm of salutogenesis: What are the essential aspects that constitute a healthy individual, overlapping the usual investigation: How to destroy, avoid and quell the pathological agents? A proposed approach is based on salutogenesis, which examines such issues. According to this approach, anthroposophical dentistry includes determinant factors, determinants of health, basic research and the development of oral health promotion, thus connecting dental academia with integrative thinking, while also complementing and gathering information that subsidizes basic research with the primordial concepts on laws governing the parameters involved in the vital processes of nature.

  3. Employment Sources on the Internet; Placements and Salaries 2001: Salaries Rebound, Women Break Out; Accredited Master's Programs in Library and Information Studies; Library Scholarship Sources; Library Scholarship and Award Recipients, 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Catherine; Terrell, Tom

    2003-01-01

    These five articles report on library and information science employment sources on the Internet; librarians' placement and salary trends, including library school graduates, gender differences, and minorities; a list of accredited Mater's programs; a list of library scholarship sources; and a list of library scholarship and award recipients. (LRW)

  4. Library Automation

    OpenAIRE

    Dhakne, B. N.; Giri, V. V.; Waghmode, S. S.

    2010-01-01

    New technologies library provides several new materials, media and mode of storing and communicating the information. Library Automation reduces the drudgery of repeated manual efforts in library routine. By use of library automation collection, Storage, Administration, Processing, Preservation and communication etc.

  5. Rapid prototyping: An innovative technique in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakeba Quadri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Emergence of advanced digital technology has opened up new perspectives for design and production in the field of dentistry. Rapid prototyping (RP is a technique to quickly and automatically construct a three-dimensional (3D model of a part or product using 3D printers or stereolithography machines. RP has various dental applications, such as fabrication of implant surgical guides, zirconia prosthesis and molds for metal castings, maxillofacial prosthesis and frameworks for fixed and removable partial dentures, wax patterns for the dental prosthesis and complete denture. Rapid prototyping presents fascinating opportunities, but the process is difficult as it demands a high level of artistic skill, which means that the dental technicians should be able to work with the models obtained after impression to form a mirror image and achieve good esthetics. This review aims to focus on various RP methods and its application in dentistry.

  6. [iPS cells in dentistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egusa, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of the induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell technology, which enables us to produce pluripotent stem cells by introducing a few genetic factors, commands considerable attention in the field of dentistry. These iPS cells may be of particular importance for developing innovative technologies to regenerate missing jaw bones and lost teeth, and there are expectations that several types of tissue stem cells and mucosal cells in the oral area can be used as an ideal iPS cell source. We previously reported that the gingiva, which is often resected during general dental treatments and treated as biomedical waste, is a promising source of iPS cells. In this review, the current trends in iPS cell research in dentistry are outlined, and future aspects of potential applications of the iPS cell technologies to dental treatments will be discussed.

  7. Nanotechnology in dentistry: prevention, diagnosis, and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Neel, Ensanya Ali; Bozec, Laurent; Perez, Roman A; Kim, Hae-Won; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology has rapidly expanded into all areas of science; it offers significant alternative ways to solve scientific and medical questions and problems. In dentistry, nanotechnology has been exploited in the development of restorative materials with some significant success. This review discusses nanointerfaces that could compromise the longevity of dental restorations, and how nanotechnolgy has been employed to modify them for providing long-term successful restorations. It also focuses on some challenging areas in dentistry, eg, oral biofilm and cancers, and how nanotechnology overcomes these challenges. The recent advances in nanodentistry and innovations in oral health-related diagnostic, preventive, and therapeutic methods required to maintain and obtain perfect oral health, have been discussed. The recent advances in nanotechnology could hold promise in bringing a paradigm shift in dental field. Although there are numerous complex therapies being developed to treat many diseases, their clinical use requires careful consideration of the expense of synthesis and implementation.

  8. Dentistry and medicine, then and now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formicola, Allan J

    2002-01-01

    Two factors have, at times, pushed dentistry and medicine together and pulled them apart. The factor acting to create a symbiosis is the common biomedical or scientific foundation for these fields. The factor causing independence deals with socio-cultural matters impacting on the professions and the public. These two factors will be examined at three points in time when the relationship between the two professions was significantly important for the welfare of the public: the 1920s and '30s, the 1960s and '70s, and our own time. Contemporary major discussion about the alignment of dental education, scientific advances, and societal needs point to a need for a new look at how dentistry and medicine relate to one another.

  9. Evidence-based dentistry: a clinician's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Janet; Spackman, Sue; Chiappelli, Francesco; Prolo, Paolo; Stevenson, Richard

    2006-07-01

    Evidence-based dentistry is a discipline that provides best, explicit-based evidence to dentists and their patients in shared decision-making. Currently, dentists are being trained and directed to adopt the role of translational researchers in developing evidence-based dental practices. Practically, evidence-based dentistry is not usable in its current mode for the provision of labor-intensive services that characterize current dental practice. The purpose of this article is to introduce a model of evidence-based dental practice. This model conceptualizes a team approach in explaining problems and solutions to change current dental practice. These changes constitute an evidence-based dental practice that involves the electronic chart, centralized database, knowledge management software, and personnel in optimizing effective oral health care to dental patients.

  10. Direct reimbursement. The future for organized dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, D P

    2001-10-01

    Direct reimbursement, or DR, has been a popular topic in organized dentistry for much of the last decade, and the concept is beginning to be more widely known. This article explores the underpinnings of and future for DR. TYPES OF LITERATURE REVIEWED: This article is based on an online review of the dental, medical and business literature. The author explores the advantages of DR for patients, employers and dentists. He also presents purported disadvantages of DR, and refutes them. Organized dentistry's marketing efforts and the importance of third-party administrators also are examined. During the next several years, DR has the potential to become the vehicle of choice for financing much of the dental care provided in the United States. Dentists need to become more aware of what DR is and what it can offer the public. They then will be better able to promote DR, which is a significantly better payment system for dental care than any other available today.

  11. Composite resin in medicine and dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Pamela S; Sullivan, Jennifer; Haubenreich, James E; Osborne, Paul B

    2005-01-01

    Composite resin has been used for nearly 50 years as a restorative material in dentistry. Use of this material has recently increased as a result of consumer demands for esthetic restorations, coupled with the public's concern with mercury-containing dental amalgam. Composite is now used in over 95% of all anterior teeth direct restorations and in 50% of all posterior teeth direct restorations. Carbon fiber reinforced composites have been developed for use as dental implants. In medicine, fiber-reinforced composites have been used in orthopedics as implants, osseous screws, and bearing surfaces. In addition, hydroxyapatite composite resin has become a promising alternative to acrylic cement in stabilizing fractures and cancellous screw fixation in elderly and osteoporotic patients. The use of composite resin in dentistry and medicine will be the focus of this review, with particular attention paid to its physical properties, chemical composition, clinical applications, and biocompatibility.

  12. Patent law in dentistry: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Nadeem A Bijle

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dentistry in recent years has developed interest in the field of intellectual property rights (IPR and Patents due to extensive research in the fraternity and existing competition. There have been various patent applications and grants in the field of dentistry abroad due to better understanding of IPR but India still has very few patent grants and applications on the subject matter. This review article in particular deals with the understanding of IPR and Patents as a whole, especially for dental professionals involved in research and development. Hence, this would also act as an asset for dental researchers to explore and expand their scope of activities, with special privileges empowered for their work.

  13. Periosteum: A Highly Underrated Tool in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Mahajan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The ultimate goal of any dental treatment is the regeneration of lost tissues and alveolar bone. Under the appropriate culture conditions, periosteal cells secrete extracellular matrix and form a membranous structure. The periosteum can be easily harvested from the patient's own oral cavity, where the resulting donor site wound is invisible. Owing to the above reasons, the periosteum offers a rich cell source for bone tissue engineering; hence, the regenerative potential of periosteum is immense. Although the use of periosteum as a regenerative tool has been extensive in general medical field, the regenerative potential of periosteum is highly underestimated in dentistry; therefore, the present paper reviews the current literature related to the regenerative potential of periosteum and gives an insight to the future use of periosteum in dentistry.

  14. Application of Calcium Phosphate Materials in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jabr S. Al-Sanabani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium phosphate materials are similar to bone in composition and in having bioactive and osteoconductive properties. Calcium phosphate materials in different forms, as cements, composites, and coatings, are used in many medical and dental applications. This paper reviews the applications of these materials in dentistry. It presents a brief history, dental applications, and methods for improving their mechanical properties. Notable research is highlighted regarding (1 application of calcium phosphate into various fields in dentistry; (2 improving mechanical properties of calcium phosphate; (3 biomimetic process and functionally graded materials. This paper deals with most common types of the calcium phosphate materials such as hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate which are currently used in dental and medical fields.

  15. The changing face of dentistry: nanotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanaparthy R

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Rosaiah Kanaparthy1, Aruna Kanaparthy2 1Department of Periodontics, 2Conservative Dentistry, Peoples Dental Academy, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India Abstract: The human body comprises molecules; hence, the availability of molecular nanotechnology will permit dramatic progress to address medical problems and will use molecular knowledge to maintain and improve human health at the molecular scale. Nanomedicine could develop devices that are able to work inside the human body in order to identify the early presence of a disease, and to identify and quantify toxic molecules and tumor cells, for example. Nanodentistry will make possible the maintenance of comprehensive oral health by employing nanomaterials, including tissue engineering and, ultimately, dental nanorobots. This review is an attempt to highlight the possible applications of nanotechnology and the use of nanomaterials in dentistry. Keywords: nanotechnology, molecule, nanomedicine, nanodentistry, nanorobots

  16. Nanotechnology in dentistry: Present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Archana; Bhardwaj, Abhishek; Misuriya, Abhinav; Maroli, Sohani; Manjula, S; Singh, Arvind Kumar

    2014-02-01

    Nanotechnology is the manipulation of matter on the molecular and atomic levels. It has the potential to bring enormous changes into the fields of medicine and dentistry. A day may soon come when nanodentistry will succeed in maintaining near-perfect oral health through the aid of nanorobotics, nanomaterials and biotechnology. However, as with all developments, it may also pose a risk for misuse. Time, economical and technical resources, and human needs will determine the direction this revolutionizing development may take. This article reviews the current status and the potential clinical applications of nanotechnology, nanaomedicine and nanodentistry. How to cite the article: Bhardwaj A, Bhardwaj A, Misuriya A, Maroli S, Manjula S, Singh AK. Nanotechnology in dentistry: Present and future. J Int Oral Health 2013;6(1):121-6.

  17. LASER USED IN PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY : A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avanindra

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In 1960 , Theodore Harold Maiman , an American of Hughes Aircraft corporation , observed the stimulated emission in the visible portion of the spectrum by using an excited synthetic ruby rod , and generated the first “LASER” beam an acronym for “Light Amplification by Stimulated Emis sion of Radiation”. 1 The acceptance of lasers as viable alternatives to traditional methods in medicine was one of the events that created an explosion of interest in the last decade in the role of lasers in dentistry. 2 Dentistry has entered the 1990s an e ra of high technology . W e are fortunate to have at our disposal many technological innovations to enhance treatment , including intraoral video cameras , computer imaging , and air abrasive units. However no instruments are more representative of the term high - tech than the laser. 3

  18. APPLICATIONS OF REPRAP THREE-DIMENSIONAL PRINTERS IN DENTISTRY- A LITERATURE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru-Victor BURDE

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – This paper is intended to summarize the current available literature in which low-cost, open-source RepRap 3D printers are incorporated in the field of dentistry in an attempt to improve or replace conventional clinical and/or laboratory procedures. Methodology– An electronic search of publications from January 2004 to July 2014 was performed, by two researchers, in two electronic databases: Medline (PubMed and EMBASE Library. All searches were limited to human subjects investigations, published in English. Search terms included general and specific terms from the field of dentistry and additive manufacturing. Findings – The contribution of RepRap 3D printers to the field of dentistry is so far limited to only two applications, respectively reconstruction of study models for orthodontic measurements and reconstruction of skull segments. Originality/value – This review brings focus on the few researches and applications of low-cost RepRap printers in the dental field. In spite of the promising results reported, there still remains a sizable sector in which the capabilities of these low-cost, open source 3d printers are to be tested.

  19. MRI in Dentistry- A Future Towards Radiation Free Imaging – Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patthi, Basavaraj; Singla, Ashish; Gupta, Ritu; Ali, Irfan; Dhama, Kuldeep; Kumar, Jishnu Krishna; Prasad, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), being a technique with huge potential, has become the primary diagnostic investigation for many clinical problems. Its application now has been successfully used in dentistry to maximize the diagnostic certainty. Aim The present review aims to analyze the applicability, feasibility and efficacy of MRI in the field of dentistry. Materials and Methods A literature search was performed in main databases like Pub Med Central, Cochrane Library, Embase and Google Scholar from 1970 up to December 2015. The 2672 titles that appeared, 25 fulfilled the criteria and were included in the review. Two articles were hand searched and three articles through e-mail were also included. Results The review highlights the increasing role of MRI in dentistry. In the available literature, it was found that T1 and T2 weighted images were the acceptable diagnostic images for detection of dental related diseases. Conclusion MRI can be used in diagnosis and treatment planning of implants, jaw lesions, diseases of Temporomandibular Joints (TMJ), orthodontic treatment, endodontic treatment etc., to achieve better prognosis. PMID:27891491

  20. Position paper on digital communication in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David W

    2012-01-01

    Digital communication offers advantages and challenges to dental practice. As dentistry becomes comfortable with this technology, it is essential that commercial and other values not be accepted on a par with professional ones and that the traditional dentist-patient relationship not be compromised by inserting third parties that introduce nonprofessional standards. The Officers and Regents of the American College of Dentist have prepared this background and position paper as a guide to the ethical use of digital communication in dental practice.

  1. Application and development of ultrasonics in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Liang; Chang, Hao-Hueng; Chiang, Yu-Chih; Lin, Chun-Pin

    2013-11-01

    Since the 1950s, dentistry's ultrasonic instruments have developed rapidly. Because of better visualization, operative convenience, and precise cutting ability, ultrasonic instruments are widely and efficiently applied in the dental field. This article describes the development and improvement of ultrasonic instruments in several dental fields. Although some issues still need clarification, the results of previous studies indicate that ultrasonic instruments have a high potential to become convenient and efficient dental tools and deserve further development.

  2. Use of DNA technology in forensic dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardo Henrique Alves da Silva; Arsenio Sales-Peres; Rogério Nogueira de Oliveira; Fernando Toledo de Oliveira; Sílvia Helena de Carvalho Sales-Peres

    2007-01-01

    The established importance of Forensic Dentistry for human identification, mainly when there is little remaining material to perform such identification (e.g., in fires, explosions, decomposing bodies or skeletonized bodies), has led dentists working with forensic investigation to become more familiar with the new molecular biology techniques. The currently available DNA tests have high reliability and are accepted as legal proofs in courts. This article presents a literature review referring...

  3. Laser in dentistry: Biostimulation and surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzè, Franco; Palmieri, Beniamino; Scalise, Lorenzo; Rottigni, Valentina

    2012-09-01

    Laser therapy has achieved an important rule in cosmetic dentistry especially in the treatment of several complications such as leukoplakia, oral lichen planus, glossitis, oral mucositis, labial herpes virus, stomatitis, frenulum and oral hemangioma. In our study we enrolled 40 patients affected by these diseases to treat them with a new infrared dental laser demonstrating that it is extremely safe and effective in pain and postoperative discomforts reduction.

  4. [Dental restoration materials in pediatric dentistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, C L

    1997-02-01

    Restorative materials in pediatric dentistry have to fulfill special requirements. They should be easy to handle and applicable in a not always dry mouth. They should potentially be adhesive in order to avoid too much mechanical preparation. They do not have to be extremely wear resistant as the dwell time of the restorations is relatively short. Glass-ionomer cements and in particular the resin modified types possess properties which make them almost ideal for the required purpose.

  5. Minimally invasive dentistry: a review and update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brostek, Andrew M; Bochenek, Andrew J; Walsh, Laurence J

    2006-06-01

    The term "Minimal Invasive (MI) Dentistry" can best be defined as the management of caries with a biological approach, rather than with a traditional (surgical) operative dentistry approach. Where operative dentistry is required, this is now carried out in the most conservative manner with minimal destruction of tooth structure. This new approach to caries management changes the emphasis from diagnosing carious lesions as cavities (and a repeating cycle of restorations), to one of diagnosing the oral ecological imbalance and effecting biological changes in the biofilm. The goal of MI is to stop the disease process and then to restore lost tooth structure and function, maximizing the healing potential of the tooth. The thought process which underpins this new minimal invasive approach can be organized into three main categories: (1) Recognize, which means identify patient caries risk, (2) Remineralize, which means prevent caries and reverse non-cavitated caries, and (3) Repair, which means control caries activity, maximize healing and repair the damage. The disease of dental caries is not just demineralization, but a process of repeated demineralization cycles caused by an imbalance in the ecological and chemical equilibrium of the biofilm /tooth interface (the ecological plaque hypothesis). Dietary and lifestyle patterns, especially carbohydrate frequency, water intake and smoking, play an important role in changing the biofilm ecology and pathogenicity. Tools for chairside assessment of saliva and plaque, allow risk to be assessed and patient compliance monitored. The remineralizing properties of saliva can be enhanced using materials which release biologically available calcium, phosphate and fluoride ions (CPP-ACP and CPP-ACFP). Use of biocides can also alter the pathogenic properties of plaque. Use of these MI treatment protocols, can repair early lesions and improve patient understanding and compliance. This review article introduces some of the key concepts

  6. Palaeontology: early Neolithic tradition of dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppa, A; Bondioli, L; Cucina, A; Frayer, D W; Jarrige, C; Jarrige, J-F; Quivron, G; Rossi, M; Vidale, M; Macchiarelli, R

    2006-04-01

    Prehistoric evidence for the drilling of human teeth in vivo has so far been limited to isolated cases from less than six millennia ago. Here we describe eleven drilled molar crowns from nine adults discovered in a Neolithic graveyard in Pakistan that dates from 7,500-9,000 years ago. These findings provide evidence for a long tradition of a type of proto-dentistry in an early farming culture.

  7. APPLICATION OF NANOBIOMATERIALS IN RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Maya Lyapina; Mariana Cekova; Maria Dencheva; Assya Krasteva; Mariela Yaneva-Deliverska; Jordan Deliverski; Angelina Kisselova

    2016-01-01

    Nanodentistry is defined as the science and technology of diagnosing, treating and preventing oral and dental diseases, relieving pain, preserving and improving dental health using nanostructured material. Varieties of new dental products are available that rely on nanoscale properties, ranging from implants to oral hygiene products. Nanodentistry encourages the concept of minimally invasive dentistry, creating a more dentist friendly atmosphere. However, patient awareness and education is im...

  8. Advances in local anesthesia in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogle, Orrett E; Mahjoubi, Ghazal

    2011-07-01

    Local pain management is the most critical aspect of patient care in dentistry. The improvements in agents and techniques for local anesthesia are probably the most significant advances that have occurred in dental science. This article provides an update on the most recently introduced local anesthetic agents along with new technologies used to deliver local anesthetics. Safety devices are also discussed, along with an innovative method for reducing the annoying numbness of the lip and tongue following local anesthesia.

  9. Evidence-Based Dentistry: What's New?

    OpenAIRE

    A. Ballini, S. Capodiferro, M. Toia, S. Cantore, G. Favia, G. De Frenza, F.R. Grassi

    2007-01-01

    The importance of evidence for every branch of medicine in teaching in order to orient the practitioners among the great amount of most actual scientific information's, and to support clinical decisions, is well established in health care, including dentistry. The practice of evidence-based medicine is a process of lifelong, self-directed, problem-based learning which leads to the need for clinically important information about diagnosis, prognosis, therapy and other clinical and health care ...

  10. Laser and radiosurgery in veterinary dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellows, Jan

    2013-05-01

    Lasers and radiosurgery frequently used in human dentistry are rapidly entering veterinary dental use. The carbon dioxide, diode, and low-level therapy lasers have features including hemostasis control, access to difficult to reach areas, and decreased pain, that make them useful for oral surgery. Periodontal pocket surgery, gingivectomy, gingivoplasty, gingival hyperplasia, operculectomy, tongue surgery, oropharyngeal inflammation therapy, oral mass surgery, crown, and frenectomy laser surgeries are described, including images.

  11. Stem cell-based approaches in dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Mitsiadis, T A; Orsini, G.; Jimenez-Rojo, L

    2015-01-01

    Repair of dental pulp and periodontal lesions remains a major clinical challenge. Classical dental treatments require the use of specialised tissue-adapted materials with still questionable efficacy and durability. Stem cell-based therapeutic approaches could offer an attractive alternative in dentistry since they can promise physiologically improved structural and functional outcomes. These therapies necessitate a sufficient number of specific stem cell populations for implantation. Dental m...

  12. Digital photoelastic analysis applied to implant dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, K.; Hariprasad, M. P.; Bhuvanewari, S.

    2016-12-01

    Development of improved designs of implant systems in dentistry have necessitated the study of stress fields in the implant regions of the mandible/maxilla for better understanding of the biomechanics involved. Photoelasticity has been used for various studies related to dental implants in view of whole field visualization of maximum shear stress in the form of isochromatic contours. The potential of digital photoelasticity has not been fully exploited in the field of implant dentistry. In this paper, the fringe field in the vicinity of the connected implants (All-On-Four® concept) is analyzed using recent advances in digital photoelasticity. Initially, a novel 3-D photoelastic model making procedure, to closely mimic all the anatomical features of the human mandible is proposed. By choosing appropriate orientation of the model with respect to the light path, the essential region of interest were sought to be analysed while keeping the model under live loading conditions. Need for a sophisticated software module to carefully identify the model domain has been brought out. For data extraction, five-step method is used and isochromatics are evaluated by twelve fringe photoelasticity. In addition to the isochromatic fringe field, whole field isoclinic data is also obtained for the first time in implant dentistry, which could throw important information in improving the structural stability of the implant systems. Analysis is carried out for the implant in the molar as well as the incisor region. In addition, the interaction effects of loaded molar implant on the incisor area are also studied.

  13. Rapid Prototyping and its Application in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. V. Madhav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical implants and biological models have three main characteristics: low volume, complex shape, and can be customized. These characteristics suit very well with Rapid Prototyping (RP and Rapid Manufacturing (RM processes. RP/RM processes are fabricated part layer- by-layer until complete shape finished from 3D model. Biocompatible materials, such as Titanium and Titanium alloy, Zirconium, Cobalt Chromium, PEEK, etc, are used for fabrication process. Reverse Engineering (RE technology greatly affects RP/RM processes. RE is used to capture or scan image of the limb, cranium, tooth, and other biological objects. Three common methods to get the image are 3D laser scanning, Computer Tomography (CT, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI. Main RP/RM techniques used in Dentistry are Stereotype Lithography Apparatus (SLA, Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM, Selective Laser Sintering (SLS, and ink jet printing. This article reviews the changing scenario of technology in dentistry with special emphasis on Rapid Prototyping and its various applications in Dentistry.

  14. YouTube, dentistry, and dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knösel, Michael; Jung, Klaus; Bleckmann, Annalen

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to systematically assess the informational value, intention, source, and bias of videos related to dentistry available on the video-sharing Internet platform YouTube. YouTube (www.youtube.com) was searched for videos related to dentistry, using the system-generated sorts "by relevance" and "most viewed" and two categories (All and Education). Each of the first thirty results was rated by two assessors filling out a questionnaire for each (total: 120). The data were subjected to statistical analysis using Cohen's kappa, Pearson's correlation coefficient tau, Mann-Whitney U-tests, and a nonparametric three-way ANOVA, including an analysis of the interaction between the sorting and category effect, with an α-level of 5 percent. The scan produced 279,000 results in the category All and 5,050 in the category Education. The analysis revealed a wide variety of information about dentistry available on YouTube. The purpose of these videos includes entertainment, advertising, and education. The videos classified under Education have a higher degree of usefulness and informational value for laypersons, dental students, and dental professionals than those found in a broader search category. YouTube and similar social media websites offer new educational possibilities that are currently both underdeveloped and underestimated in terms of their potential value. Dentists and dental educators should also recognize the importance of these websites in shaping public opinion about their profession.

  15. Plasma in dentistry: a review of basic concepts and applications in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Hoon; Lee, Mi-Ae; Han, Geum-Jun; Cho, Byeong-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Plasma-related technologies are essential in modern industries. Recently, plasma has attracted increased attention in the biomedical field. This paper provides a basic knowledge of plasma and a narrative review of plasma applications in dentistry. To review plasma applications in dentistry, an electronic search in PubMed, SCOPUS and Google scholar up to December 2012 was done. This was followed by extensive hand searching using reference lists from relevant articles. There have been attempts to apply plasma technology in various fields of dentistry including surface modifications of dental implants, adhesion, caries treatment, endodontic treatment and tooth bleaching. Although many studies were in early stages, the potential value of plasma for dental applications has been demonstrated. To enlarge the scope of plasma applications and put relevant research to practical use, interdisciplinary research with participation of dental professionals is required.

  16. [The rise and development of general dentistry in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongchen

    2016-02-01

    General dentistry is an important part of the dental medicine and general dentists and general dentistry form the basis of clinical dental medicine. China's general dentistry has a long history, which started as an independent specialist in the 1990s. At present, the Chinese general dental medicine has received more and more attention as an independent profession. General dental medical model has been rapidly developed in the general hospital department of dentistry, private practice and community dentistry institutions, dental specialist hospitals and so on. In this paper, we will review the rise and development of China's general dentistry, and report its theoretical characteristics, institutional framework, academic progress, member development report, and look forward to its development in the future.

  17. Clinical Challenges on Adhesive Dentistry on its 60th Anniversary

    OpenAIRE

    Sartori MS, PhD, Neimar

    2015-01-01

    Adhesive dentistry allowed restoring lost tooth structures using Minimally Invasive direct or indirect bonded restorations. Adhesive systems and bonding techniques have been constantly evolving since the introduction of Sevriton Cavity Seal, in 1940 by Oskar Hagger. As we celebrate the 60th anniversary of adhesive dentistry in 2015 the future of the Minimally Invasive Adhesive Dentistry is more promising than ever. A better understanding of long-term resin-dentin bonds interaction is guiding ...

  18. A new dimension to conservative dentistry: Air abrasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hegde Vivek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Air abrasion dentistry has evolved over a period of time from a new concept of an alternative means of cavity preparation to an essential means of providing a truly conservative preparation for preservation of a maximal sound tooth structure. The development of bonded restorations in combination with air abrasion dentistry provides a truly minimal intervention dentistry. This article reviews the development of air abrasion, its clinical uses, and the essential accessories required for its use.

  19. A new dimension to conservative dentistry: Air abrasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Vivek S; Khatavkar, Roheet A

    2010-01-01

    Air abrasion dentistry has evolved over a period of time from a new concept of an alternative means of cavity preparation to an essential means of providing a truly conservative preparation for preservation of a maximal sound tooth structure. The development of bonded restorations in combination with air abrasion dentistry provides a truly minimal intervention dentistry. This article reviews the development of air abrasion, its clinical uses, and the essential accessories required for its use.

  20. Research in dentistry: Question, search and studies design.

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro Aravena

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based dentistry (EBD) concept has caused great impact and interest in the field of dentistry. For its development is important to use research protocols and study designs according to the research problem. The aim of this review is to present basic aspects for the start of a quantitative research in dentistry.It presents the topics necessary to transform a research problem to a question with clinical approach. Then, concepts about finding relevant scientific articles in the electroni...

  1. Information Anxiety and African-American Students in a Graduate Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katopol, Patricia Fields

    2012-01-01

    Library anxiety has been cited as one factor affecting academic performance, but library use is only part of obtaining information for academic needs. This paper expands the concept of library anxiety to "information anxiety" by an examination of the information behavior of black graduate students when using a variety of information resources,…

  2. Reconsidering Graduate Employability: The "Graduate Identity" Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Len

    2001-01-01

    Elaborates a cogent alternative to the skills agenda as an approach to graduate employability--the graduate identity approach. Using a conceptual and theoretical examination of the key notion of performance, presents the twin concepts of practices and identity as significant for understanding human behavior. Offers suggestions for curriculum…

  3. Factors Related to Increase in Women Graduates from Professional Schools in U.S., 1960-1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler-Meehan, Linda; Hiatt, Diana Buell

    Changes in the percentage of women graduating from six male-intensive professions during 1960-1980 were analyzed, and the opinions of professional school deans about the causes of these changes were surveyed. The professions were medicine, veterinary medicine, dentistry, law, engineering, and architecture. Data were obtained from the National…

  4. Annual ADEA Survey of Dental School Seniors: 2016 Graduating Class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanchek, Tanya; Cook, Bryan J; Valachovic, Richard W

    2017-05-01

    This report examines the results of the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Survey of Dental School Seniors graduating in 2016. Data were collected from 4,558 respondents at all 59 U.S. dental schools with graduating classes that year. This annual survey asks graduating students about a variety of topics in order to understand their motivation for attending dental school, educational experiences while in school, debt incurred, and plans following graduation. Motivations for choosing to attend dental school typically involved family or friends who were dentists or students' personal experiences. The timing of the decision to enter dentistry has been getting earlier over time. Similar to previous years, the average graduating student had above $200,000 in student debt. However, for the first time in two decades, inflation-adjusted debt decreased slightly. The reduction in debt was due to students from private schools reducing their average debt by $23,401. Immediately after graduation, most seniors planned to enter private practice (50.5%) or advanced dental education (33.8%). Approximately half of the respondents planned to work in underserved areas at some point in their careers. These findings underscore the continued value of the senior survey to offer a unique view of the diverse characteristics and career paths of the future dental workforce.

  5. Preventive Dentistry Conference - Public Health Aspects of Preventive Dentistry, 3-4 March 1983, Fort Sam Houston, Texas,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-04-01

    pockets in excess of 4-5 mm. e. Prosthetics: 1. Soldiers that require complete dentures or remo- vable partial dentures to properly masticate food. 2...Shulman ARMY COMMUNITY DENTISTRY - PROGRAM PLANNING .. ............... 7-1 Lieutenant Colonel John E. King HISTORY OF PREVENTIVE DENTISTRY IN THE ARMY... History of Preventive COL Barnes Dentistry in the Army 0900 ACO - Program Evaluation LTC King 1000 BREAK 1015 Dental Readiness Program Ms. Bowen at

  6. Graduate Identity and Employability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinchliffe, Geoffrey William; Jolly, Adrienne

    2011-01-01

    This paper develops the concept of graduate identity as a way of deepening the understanding of graduate employability. It does this through presenting research in which over 100 employers in East Anglia were asked to record their perceptions of graduates in respect of their employability. The findings suggest a composite and complex graduate…

  7. Knowledge of drug prescription in dentistry students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guzmán-Álvarez R

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available R Guzmán-Álvarezv,1 M Medeiros,2,3 LI Reyes Lagunes,4 AE Campos-Sepúlveda11Pharmacology Department, UNAM School of Medicine and Dentistry, Mexico City, 2Pharmacology Clinical Seminar, UNAM School of Medicine, Mexico City, 3Medical Sciences Department, Mexico Federico Gómez Children's Hospital, Mexico City, 4Measuring and Evaluation Unit, UNAM School of Psychology, Mexico City, MexicoBackground: Students in schools of dentistry attend to patients with illnesses, and often prescribe medication. Because students are still learning, they are influenced by a variety of factors: the different teaching approaches of the professors at the clinics and in the pharmacology course, fellow students, and even the information provided by the pharmaceutical industry.Objectives: The aim of this pilot study was to assess the prescription knowledge and common mistakes in fourth-year students at the School of Dentistry at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México.Methods: In March 2010, a survey was conducted among 66 fourth-year students at the School of Dentistry, applying a previously validated questionnaire consisting of six open-ended questions The following factors were assessed: the most frequent illness requiring dental prescription; the most prescribed nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and antibiotics; the most frequent errors; sources of information used for prescribing drugs; and whether the students knew and followed the World Health Organization Guide to Good Prescribing.Results: The most frequent response for each question was considered the most significant. The most common reason for prescribing medication was infection (n = 37, 56%, followed by pain (n = 24, 38%; the most used painkillers were ibuprofen and acetaminophen at equal levels (n = 25, 37.8%, followed by ketorolac (n = 7, 10.6%, naproxen (n = 6, 9.1%, diclofenac (n = 2, 3%, and aspirin (n = 1, 1.5%; the most widely prescribed antibiotics were amoxicillin (n = 52, 78

  8. [Five star dentistry - IV Congress of European Federation for the Advancement of Anesthesia in Dentistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovich, S A; Anisimova, E N; Zavodilenko, L A

    2015-01-01

    The Russian delegation of the European Federation for the Advancement of Anesthesia in Dentistry (EFAAD) participated in IV Congress of EFAAD where were considered such problems of dental and anxiolysis in patients with severe concomitant diseases and training dentists improvements on such problems as anesthesia, sedation, prophylaxis and emergency management inpatients with accompanying diseases.

  9. National Museum of Dentistry exhibition: the future is now! African Americans in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dummett, Clifton O

    2003-09-01

    Inspired by recently published NDA II: The Story of America's Second National Dental Association and sponsored jointly by the National Dental Association Foundation and the Colgate-Palmolive Company, an historical exhibit on dentistry in the African-American community was one of the celebrations for the Golden Anniversary of the American Academy of the History of Dentistry. This exhibit premiered on Sept. 27, 2002 in the National Museum of Dentistry located on the medical/dental campus of the University of Maryland in Baltimore. The Museum recently became an affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution. Contents of the exhibit were photographs, charts, artifacts, memorabilia, etc. These materials presented an overview of African-American activities in dental education, research, patient care, general practice, dental specialities, military service, and public health. Also included were inter-racial relationships, socioeconomic developments, and participation in civil rights endeavors that played a major role in changing out-dated accepted customs. The exhibit's purpose was to celebrate dentistry's ministrations as a health professional among African Americans in particular and the nation at large over the past two centuries. Respect for and progress of black dentists paralleled that of black physicians who were instrumental in including dentist and pharmacists as equal members in the National Medical Association since the latter's inception in 1895.

  10. Professionalism: challenges for dentistry in the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozar, D T

    2012-11-01

    While countries varies significantly in the financing of dental care, they are much more alike in the delivery of dentistry. Dental care is principally provided in dental offices and clinics that are independent business entities whose business leaders are most often the dentists themselves. However society expects from dentists a level of professionalism (i.e. habitually acting ethically, both in terms of competence and conduct) in contrast to the methods and motivations of the marketplace. This is why the single most important challenge of dental professional ethics continues to be giving proper priority to patients' well being and building ethically correct decision-making relationships with patients while, at the same time, trying to maintain a successful business operation. If we look into dentistry's future, the centrality of this aspect of professional ethics is not likely to change, although the ways in which dentists might violate this trust will probably multiple as funding mechanisms become increasingly complex. It is important that dentists reflect with fresh eyes on their ethical commitments. One challenge is the increased availability of oral health information to the public and the fact that so many people are uncritical of the accuracy of information in the media and on the web. A second is the increase in the amount of health care advertising in many societies. A third is the growth of aesthetic dentistry that differs from standard oral health care in important and ethically significant ways. The fourth is insurance that frequently complicates the explanation of a patient's treatment alternatives and often brings a third party into the treatment decision relationship. The ethical challenges of each of these factors will be considered and ultimately tying it to the central theme of dental professionalism.

  11. Women dentists: Changing the face of dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jammula Surya Prasanna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It was only toward the close of the last century that women emancipated themselves from their former small territory of usefulness in a strictly domestic life, and pushing forward, proved themselves often the business equal to men and sometimes their superior. If was long before this progression, when a women in business or professional ranks was almost a curiosity. When women first entered the profession, they faced many obstacles. Mentors or faculty in the dental organizations majority were male restraining women by all means. In the beginning, men were resentful because they feel women are inferior. It took a long time for women to become a consistent presence in dental schools. In the beginning, dental schools used to admit one or two women each year, later the number increased slowly. Olden day′s women used to relieve not even the tooth ache but also used to relieve others fret also. But histories of dentistry were not acknowledged the talent of women whatsoever. The efforts and achievements of women punch the clock in the future dentistry. The current scenario has totally changed now. Nearly, half of all dental students′ are women and 25% of them are practicing dentists. Only 3% women dentists were there before the 1970s. [1] Women struggled to obtain a degree, to establish practices, and are respected as professionals. Some women choose this rewarding occupation as career followed by their family members. The population tally of chosen work upbringing has changed over time. This paper reports in a delineative way of the amelioration, staggering presence, and intendment of dentistry practicing by worldwide women.

  12. Introduction to the library and information professions

    CERN Document Server

    Greer, Roger; Fowler, Susan

    2013-01-01

    In this rapidly changing, knowledge-based society, library and information professionals require a broad understanding of the profession. Introduction to the Library and Information Professions, Second Edition presents a toolbox of models that enable this essential understanding for undergraduate and graduate students in library and information science programs as well as practicing professionals seeking continuing education. The materials in this second edition reflect the latest trends in the library and information profession, including services and issues that stem from new advances in te

  13. Library Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Library Computing, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Special supplement to "Library Journal" and "School Library Journal" covers topics of interest to school, public, academic, and special libraries planning for automation: microcomputer use, readings in automation, online searching, databases of microcomputer software, public access to microcomputers, circulation, creating a…

  14. Digital Libraries

    CERN Document Server

    Papy, Fabrice

    2008-01-01

    Of vital interest to all librarians and information specialists, this book presents all aspects of the effects of digitization of today's and tomorrow's libraries. From social to technical issues, Digital Libraries includes chapters on the growth of the role of librarian, the reader experience, cataloging, search engines, OPAC, law, ergonomic studies, and the future of libraries.

  15. Biomedical Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizer, Irwin H.

    1978-01-01

    Biomedical libraries are discussed as a distinct and specialized group of special libraries and their unique services and user interactions are described. The move toward professional standards, as evidenced by the Medical Library Association's new certification program, and the current state of development for a new section of IFLA established…

  16. Lasers: The Magic Wand in Esthetic Dentistry!!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shajahan, P A; Kumar, P Ranjith; Hariprasad, A; Mathew, Jyothis; Shaji, A P; Ahammed, M Fazeel

    2015-01-01

    In this era of fast developing technologies and innovative ideas, the need for faster treatment has become a necessity. Treatment with lasers that is much less time-consuming and painless is accepted and appreciated by the patient. Use of Lasers is not new; they have been in use for decades since their development by Maiman in 1960. Lasers have travelled a long way from ruby lasers to erbium lasers and are being fondly used in every aspect of dental treatment. This article aims at elaborate the use and applications of lasers in the field of esthetic dentistry. PMID:26124614

  17. ON PSYCHOLOGICAL DISTRESS AND FEAR OF DENTISTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena IORGA

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety and fear are normal reactions in humans when situations are evaluating as being painful. In medical dentistry, anxiety and fear characterize in fact o problematic patient with special reactions during dental interventions and avoidance behavior, both behaviors having a great impact on patient’s dental health. The paper presents some aspects on the psychological profile of odontophobics, causes and consequences of dental fear on patient’s dental health, and some considerations on psychological interventions meant at reducing anxiety and fear during dental treatment.

  18. Forensic dentistry in a terrorist world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, R Thomas

    2005-04-01

    While body identification by dental means has not changed substantially since 9/11, or even since the bombing of the Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City in 1995, the conditions and potential risks of a bioterrorism action to the dental personnel is new. The purpose of this article is to review general forensic dentistry disaster responses and to address the impact a bioterrorism action might have on primary, secondary and tertiary dental responders. It will also examine the triage role that dental offices might play in the event of such a disaster.

  19. Applications of ozone therapy in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ozone is an allotropic form of oxygen, which is effectively used in the treatment of different diseases for more than 100 years. In the present era of increasing antibiotic resistance, ozone therapy is an alternative medical treatment that rationales to increase the amount of oxygen to the body through institution of ozone into the body. Owing to its beneficial biological properties including antimicrobial and immune-stimulating effects, ozone therapy has opened new vistas in treatment modalities of dental pathologies for patients of all ages. The objective of this article is to review the literature available on applications of ozone in dentistry.

  20. Current Concepts in Restorative Implant Dentistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Prof.Marchack

    2009-01-01

    Patients today are incteasingly aware of dental implants.and their expectations are for esthetically and functionally pleasingimplant restorations that mimic natural teeth.This presentation will give both the experienced and novice practitioner a better understand-ing of how restorative implant dentistry has evolved.Treatment planning and restorative options for single implants.multiple implants andfully edentulons arches will be discussed,and the use of modern materials and CADCAM technology in fabricating the most contemporaryfixed implant supported prostheses will be demonstrated.

  1. Resin composites in minimally invasive dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    The concept of minimally invasive dentistry will provide favorable conditions for the use of composite resin. However, a number of factors must be considered when placing composite resins in conservatively prepared cavities, including: aspects on the adaptation of the composite resin to the cavity walls; the use of adhesives; and techniques for obtaining adequate proximal contacts. The clinician must also adopt an equally conservative approach when treating failed restorations. The quality of the composite resin restoration will not only be affected by the outline form of the preparation but also by the clinician's technique and understanding of the materials.

  2. Conscious Sedation: Emerging Trends in Pediatric Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attri, Joginder Pal; Sharan, Radhe; Makkar, Vega; Gupta, Kewal Krishan; Khetarpal, Ranjana; Kataria, Amar Parkash

    2017-01-01

    Dental fear and anxiety is a common problem in pediatric patients. There is considerable variation in techniques used to manage them. Various sedation techniques using many different anesthetic agents have gained considerable popularity over the past few years. Children are not little adults; they differ physically, psychologically, and emotionally. The purpose of this review is to survey recent trends and concerning issues in the rapidly changing field of pediatric sedation. We will study the topic from the perspective of an anesthesiologist. It will also provide information to practitioners on the practice of conscious sedation in dentistry and will also outline the route of administration, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of various drugs used.

  3. The changing face of dentistry: nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaparthy, Rosaiah; Kanaparthy, Aruna

    2011-01-01

    The human body comprises molecules; hence, the availability of molecular nanotechnology will permit dramatic progress to address medical problems and will use molecular knowledge to maintain and improve human health at the molecular scale. Nanomedicine could develop devices that are able to work inside the human body in order to identify the early presence of a disease, and to identify and quantify toxic molecules and tumor cells, for example. Nanodentistry will make possible the maintenance of comprehensive oral health by employing nanomaterials, including tissue engineering and, ultimately, dental nanorobots. This review is an attempt to highlight the possible applications of nanotechnology and the use of nanomaterials in dentistry.

  4. Graduates' perceived preparedness for dental practice from PBL and traditional curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiu, Cynthia K Y; McGrath, Colman; Bridges, Susan; Corbet, Esmonde F; Botelho, Michael; Dyson, John; Chan, L K

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to compare dental graduates' perceived preparedness for practice after being educated in a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum with those who graduated from a traditional undergraduate curriculum, both at the University of Hong Kong. A cohort of graduates from the traditional dental curriculum (1997-2001) and a cohort of graduates from the PBL curriculum (2004-08) rated their self-perceived preparedness for dental practice in fifty-nine aspects of dentistry across nine domains. Perceived preparedness for dental practice was compared at domain and item levels (accounting for multiple comparisons) using chi-square statistics. Both cohorts felt well prepared for the "bread and butter" aspects of dentistry, but less so for specific specialty disciplines. There was no significant difference between PBL and traditional graduates' self-perceived preparedness in eight of the nine domains of dental practice (P>0.05). However, in the area of orthodontics, both cohorts felt ill-prepared for practice and more so among the PBL cohort (P<0.01). For the most part, regardless of curriculum design, these dental graduates perceived themselves to be well prepared for dental practice.

  5. Entrepreneurial Knowledge and Aspirations of Dentistry Students in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brijlal, Pradeep; Brijlal, Priscilla

    2013-01-01

    An investigation of the intentions and knowledge of entrepreneurship of final-year university dentistry students is reported, with particular regard to the factors of gender and race. A questionnaire survey was used with final-year dentistry students, over two years, at the University of the Western Cape in South Africa. The findings show that…

  6. Bioactive Glasses in Dentistry: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbasi Z

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive glasses are silicate-based and can form a strong chemical bond with the tissues. These biomaterials are highly biocompatible and can form a hydroxyapatite layer when implanted in the body or soaked in the simulated body fluid. Due to several disadvantages, conventional glass processing method including melting of glass components, is replaced by sol-gel method with a large number of benefits such as low processing temperature, higher purity and homogeneity and therefore better control of bioactivity. Bioactive glasses have a wide range of applications, particularly in dentistry. These glasses can be used as particulates or monolithic shapes and porous or dense constructs in different applications such as remineralization or hypersensitivity treatment. Some properties of bioactive glasses such as antibacterial properties can be promoted by adding different elements into the glass. Bioactive glasses can also be used to modify different biocompatible materials that need to be bioactive. This study reviews the significant developments of bioactive glasses in clinical application, especially dentistry. Furthermore, we will discuss the field of bioactive glasses from beginning to the current developments, which includes processing methods, applications, and properties of these glasses.

  7. Probiotics and its Applications in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vagish Kumar L S

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics are living bacteria that can benefit our health. They may reduce the overgrowth of pathogens and are used in the form of food and food supplements. Probiotics which is being commonly used for the management of intestinal tract problems has recently been used to promote oral health. The concept of administering beneficial bacteria with a view to replace harmful microbes by useful ones is revived by probiotic concept. In oral cavity probiotics form a biofilm that is protective against oral diseases. Probiotics can compete for adhesion sites as well as for nutrients and growth factors with cariogenic, halithogenic, fungal and periodontal pathogens thereby inhibiting their growth. Thus they may be useful in preventing and treating various oral diseases. Probiotics with gene therapy are capable of yielding amazing success in intercepting and treating diseases. A literature search in Pub-Med, Google scholar, EBSCO HOST, SciELO, ScienceDirect database was done for English articles, using the following search terms: and ldquo;probiotics and rdquo; , and ldquo;oral health and rdquo;, and ldquo;dentistry and rdquo;; no restrictions were used for publication dates. The aim of article is to provide an insight about probiotics and their applications in dentistry. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2014; 23(4.000: 703-723

  8. Clinical aplications of ozone in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haroldo José Mendes

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The ozone is an allotropic form of oxygen whose unique properties offer a wide application to biological systems and clinical treatments. Although discovered in the year 1840, its clinical use is current, finding applicability in various specialties in the dentistry pratice. This article aims to review the clinical applications of ozone in various dental specialties. The compound provides a high purifying capacity, responsible for microbicides actions (bacteria, fungi and viruses, through oxidation mechanisms not yet elucidated, makes it an alternative against the diseases. In dentistry practice, the ozone can be employed in process of sterilization of instruments and purification system of irrigation to dental unit, serving as a good strategy in the control and prevention of cross-infection in the dental environment. However, the administration of ozone at low concentration by systemic way induces tissue proliferation and neovascularization, and thus inducing a healing, a characteristic that makes it attractive from the clinical, as it allows both the elimination of bacteria such as the repair of anatomical structures. It has limited use in treating endodontic infections and tooth decay. The ozone can be used in the treatment of various oral diseases, reducing the clinical course of disease, achieving superior results in comparison to conventional therapies. Despite the literature showing positive results with the use of ozone in cariology, surgery, periodontics and endodontics, there is need for further studies with standardized methodologies to reach a definitive conclusion about its applicability

  9. Neuromuscular dentistry: Occlusal diseases and posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohd Toseef; Verma, Sanjeev Kumar; Maheshwari, Sandhya; Zahid, Syed Naved; Chaudhary, Prabhat K

    2013-01-01

    Neuromuscular dentistry has been a controversial topic in the field of dentistry and still remains debatable. The issue of good occlusion and sound health has been repeatedly discussed. Sometimes we get complains of sensitive teeth and sometimes of tired facial muscles on getting up in the morning. Owing to the intimate relation of masticatory apparatus with the cranium and cervico-scapular muscular system, the disorders in any system, draw attention from concerned clinicians involved in management, to develop an integrated treatment protocol for the suffering patients. There may be patients reporting to the dental clinics after an occlusal restoration or extraction, having pain in or around the temporomandibular joint, headache or neck pain. Although their esthetic demands must not be undermined during the course of treatment plan, whenever dental treatment of any sort is planned, occlusion/bite should be given prime importance. Very few dentist are able to diagnose the occlusal disease and of those who diagnose many people resort to aggressive treatment modalities. This paper aims to report the signs of occlusal disease, and discuss their association with TMDs and posture.

  10. Biosmart materials: breaking new ground in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badami, Vijetha; Ahuja, Bharat

    2014-01-01

    By definition and general agreement, smart materials are materials that have properties which may be altered in a controlled fashion by stimuli, such as stress, temperature, moisture, pH, and electric or magnetic fields. There are numerous types of smart materials, some of which are already common. Examples include piezoelectric materials, which produce a voltage when stress is applied or vice versa, shape memory alloys or shape memory polymers which are thermoresponsive, and pH sensitive polymers which swell or shrink as a response to change in pH. Thus, smart materials respond to stimuli by altering one or more of their properties. Smart behaviour occurs when a material can sense some stimulus from its environment and react to it in a useful, reliable, reproducible, and usually reversible manner. These properties have a beneficial application in various fields including dentistry. Shape memory alloys, zirconia, and smartseal are examples of materials exhibiting a smart behavior in dentistry. There is a strong trend in material science to develop and apply these intelligent materials. These materials would potentially allow new and groundbreaking dental therapies with a significantly enhanced clinical outcome of treatments.

  11. Epigenetics: a new frontier in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, S D; Hughes, T E; Adler, C J; Brook, A H; Townsend, G C

    2014-06-01

    In 2007, only four years after the completion of the Human Genome Project, the journal Science announced that epigenetics was the 'breakthrough of the year'. Time magazine placed it second in the top 10 discoveries of 2009. While our genetic code (i.e. our DNA) contains all of the information to produce the elements we require to function, our epigenetic code determines when and where genes in the genetic code are expressed. Without the epigenetic code, the genetic code is like an orchestra without a conductor. Although there is now a substantial amount of published research on epigenetics in medicine and biology, epigenetics in dental research is in its infancy. However, epigenetics promises to become increasingly relevant to dentistry because of the role it plays in gene expression during development and subsequently potentially influencing oral disease susceptibility. This paper provides a review of the field of epigenetics aimed specifically at oral health professionals. It defines epigenetics, addresses the underlying concepts and provides details about specific epigenetic molecular mechanisms. Further, we discuss some of the key areas where epigenetics is implicated, and review the literature on epigenetics research in dentistry, including its relevance to clinical disciplines. This review considers some implications of epigenetics for the future of dental practice, including a 'personalized medicine' approach to the management of common oral diseases.

  12. Biosmart Materials: Breaking New Ground in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijetha Badami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available By definition and general agreement, smart materials are materials that have properties which may be altered in a controlled fashion by stimuli, such as stress, temperature, moisture, pH, and electric or magnetic fields. There are numerous types of smart materials, some of which are already common. Examples include piezoelectric materials, which produce a voltage when stress is applied or vice versa, shape memory alloys or shape memory polymers which are thermoresponsive, and pH sensitive polymers which swell or shrink as a response to change in pH. Thus, smart materials respond to stimuli by altering one or more of their properties. Smart behaviour occurs when a material can sense some stimulus from its environment and react to it in a useful, reliable, reproducible, and usually reversible manner. These properties have a beneficial application in various fields including dentistry. Shape memory alloys, zirconia, and smartseal are examples of materials exhibiting a smart behavior in dentistry. There is a strong trend in material science to develop and apply these intelligent materials. These materials would potentially allow new and groundbreaking dental therapies with a significantly enhanced clinical outcome of treatments.

  13. Nano Era Of Dentistry-An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maman, Paramjot; Nagpal, Manju; Gilhotra, Ritu Mehra; Aggarwal, Geeta

    2017-08-25

    Management of the health of oral tissues is a prime requirement in dentistry. The prevention of tooth decay and the treatment of lesions and cavities are ongoing challenges. The limitations in dental materials, medications, instruments, procedures put off the accomplishment of this goal. Rationalization of science and technology has made possible to work out these limitations. Nanotechnology which is the outcome of this rationalization has become one of the most favored technologies in medical and dental application. The substantial contribution of nano dental materials is the identification of oral health related problems by better diagnosis and management of dental disorders by bionanomaterials. Application of nanodentistry holds promise for comprehensive dental care by utilizing nanomaterials ans ultimately by nanorobots. This review discusses the rationale of nanodentistry, nanocarriers researched in treatment of different dental diseases, the latest innovations in nanomaterials in various disciplines of dentistry; patent literature and related marketed products. Advances in nanotechnology have placed plenty of hopes in terms of improving the oral health care of dental patients. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Lasers in Dentistry: Is It Really Safe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Mortazavi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lasers are used in various disciplines in dentistry such as restorative dentistry, endodontics, periodontics, pedodontics, and oral and maxillofacial surgery. Despite many advantages of dental lasers, this method might have some adverse effects. The aim of this review article is to debate about the impacts of lasers on orodental tissues. Methods: An electronic search was accomplished using specialized databases such as Google Scholar, PubMed, PubMed Central, Science Direct, and Scopus to find relevant studies by using keywords such as “laser”, “dentistry”, “adverse effect”, and “side effect”. Results: Several adverse effects of laser were identified such as impacts on dental pulp, effects on tooth surface, subcutaneous and submucosal effects, histopathological changes, and infection transmission due to laser smoke. During dental procedures, necrosis of the pulp, periodontal ligament and odontoblasts, cemental lysis, bone resorption, hypo/hyperpigmentation, burns, itching, and scarring might occur. In addition, laser can weaken the dentin by inducing surface cracks. Restorative procedures by laser might increase microleakage and decrease shear bond strength, as well as microhardness of tooth walls. Meanwhile, laser surgery might cause emphysema after abscess incision and drainage, frenectomy, flap elevation, and gingivoplasty. Conclusion: Practitioners should be very cautious in treatment planning and case selection during laser-based therapeutic procedures.

  15. Geriatric Dentistry and the Alzheimer Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Coelho GOIATO

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The world population is getting old, mainly in countries in development like Brazil. So, the number of pathologies, which appears in the elderly, will happen in a higher frequency. Among these diseases, we can point Alzheimer, an irreversible dementia, that has been related to age, cerebral vascular disease, stroke, immunological defects and to genetic factors (Down Syndrome. It is known that with the progression of dementia, patients present difficulties of oral hygiene caused by decrease of motor and cognitive functions of Alzheimer's bearers. These patients demand specific strategies for a dental treatment without bigger difficulties. Objective: the aim of this paper was to review the articles about the relationship of geriatric dentistry and Alzheimer disease focusing and the characteristics of the patients with this kind of dementia and the cares to them. For this purpose, a peer-reviewed literature was completed using Medline database for the period from 1972 to 2006, including alzheimer disease and dentistry, and BBO for the period from 1987 to 2004, with geriatric keyword. Conclusion: The available data indicate that individuals with Alzheimer disease have more oral health problems than individuals without dementia.

  16. Students and Graduates Learn Library Educational Content from Interactive Multimedia Tutorials. A review of: Markey, Karen, Annie Armstrong, Sandy De Groote, Michael Fosmire, Laura Fuderer, Kelly Garrett, Helen Georgas, Linda Sharp, Cheri Smith, Michael Spaly, and JoniE. Warner. “Testing the Effectiveness of Interactive Multimedia for Library‐User Education.” portal: Libraries & the Academy 5.4 (Oct. 2005: 527‐54

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Herron

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective –To demonstrate the effectiveness of interactive multimedia tutorials in delivering library educational content, and to evaluate librarian experiences of developing multimedia tutorials, both aspart of the LUMENS (Drabenstott project.Design – User study (questionnaire and interviews using pretest‐posttest design.Setting – Four academic libraries in the United States. One library dropped out during the course of the project.Subjects – Ninety university students from the University of Illinois Chicago (UIC, Purdue University, and the University of Notre Dame participated in the main study to evaluate three of the tutorials: “Doing research an introduction to the concepts of online searching,” “How to read a scientificp aper,” and “Hungry for information?” Another group of 15 subjects from UIC, consisting of 10 graduate students, 2 faculty, 2 librarians, and one fellow, assessed a fourth tutorial “Keeping current in your field.” Librarians were interviewed about their experiences producing the interactive multimedia tutorials.Methods – The 90 students were given a pretest containing questions about library educational content and five demographic questions. The students used the multimedia tutorial for 15‐30 minutes and immediately afterward were given a posttest containing comparable questions to the pretest in terms of content and difficulty. The students were also asked to rate their experiences of using the tutorials in various ways on a scale from 0‐10. At UIC, the experiences of the subjects using the multimedia tutorial were assessed by personal interviews. Librarians producing the multimedia tutorials were asked about their experiences of developing multimedia tutorials through e‐mail, listserv discussion, phone calls, and face‐to‐face personal and group interviews.Main results – All three libraries measured a significant increase (using a one sample t test, p75% of students were familiar

  17. The Use of Digital Library Skills in the Emergent Information Market in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojedokun, Ayoku A.; Moahi, Kgomotso H.

    2007-01-01

    This study probed the use of digital library skills by MLIS graduates, and their perception of employment preparation for the emergent information market in Botswana. The study used a survey approach. The study was carried out in 2004. A total of 32 MLIS graduates (1996-2003) of the Department of Library and Information Studies in employment were…

  18. Ethics Instruction in Library and Information Science: The Role of "Ethics across the Curriculum"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Bernie Todd

    2010-01-01

    Ethics is an important element of most graduate professional training programs. In the field of Library and Information Science (LIS) the inclusion of ethics in the curriculum is supported by a position paper by library educators and is monitored in the accreditation of graduate programs. Despite the many LIS programs which claim to integrate…

  19. A Comparative Study of Digital Library Use: Factors, Perceived Influences, and Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ziming; Luo, Lili

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the extent to which undergraduate and graduate students in China differ in their digital library use. Unlike the factors promoting digital library use, non-use factors, perceived influences, and degree of satisfaction are quite different between undergraduate and graduate students due to their differing emphases and…

  20. Social dentistry in the context of Health Promotion - doi:10.5020/18061230.2008.p75

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edjane Tenório de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To argue upon the social hole of Dentistry in health promotion. Data Synthesis: It is necessary to understand health promotion as a process by which people and communities are enabled to analyze and to reflect over their real problems for, only then, think strategies for overcoming such difficulties. As oral diseases are direct products of the social insertion of affected people/communities, the dentist can greatly contribute to the increase in the quality of life of these groups. What is observed in the dentist professional acting is the unfamiliarity on how to make health strictu sensu. Therein, academic changes in graduation courses are proposed, in which subjects directed to the social aspects of the profession may be adequately explored. It is understood that such alterations may be reflected in health services practice, contributing for the conceptual change of hegemonic attention model. Final considerations: Dentistry has a relevant social role, as it can contribute, beyond clinical procedures in the oral cavity, for the real increment of people/communities quality of life.

  1. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry and the specialty of pediatric dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Largent, Beverly A

    2009-01-01

    Founded in 1947, the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) is a not-for-profit membership association representing the specialty of pediatric dentistry. The AAPD's 7,500 members are primary oral health care providers who offer comprehensive specialty treatment for millions of infants, children, adolescents, and individuals with special healthcare needs. The AAPD also represents general dentists who treat a significant number of children in their practices. As advocates for children's oral health, the AAPD develops and promotes evidence-based policies and guidelines, fosters research, contributes to scholarly work concerning pediatric oral health, and educates healthcare providers, policymakers, and the public on ways to improve children's oral health. The academy's philanthropic arm, Healthy Smiles, Healthy Children: The Foundation of the AAPD, advances the AAPD mission through the support and promotion of education, research, service, and policy development.

  2. A historical perspective on the University of Nebraska Medical Center's College of Dentistry Class of 1961.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Mary S; Badakhsh, Roshan A

    2006-06-01

    We conducted a retrospective analysis of the University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC) College of Dentistry (COD) Class of 1961 to glean information that might be useful in the design of dental education programs in Nebraska and elsewhere. We scanned annual class newsletters, demographic statistics for students entering the UNMC dental program for each decade from 1961 to 2001, and UNMC COD alumni data for patterns and themes among thirty-two dental professionals. Eighty-four percent of those contacted provided responses to a survey. We found that, like current dental cohorts nationwide, the UNMC COD Class of 1961 is mostly of European ancestry (non-Hispanic) and male. But in contrast to current dental college graduates, the UNMC Class of '61 were able to rely upon self-employment and spousal and/or military support (GI Bill) to cover the costs of their dental education. They also were more likely to enter dental school before completion of an undergraduate degree and have a substantial work history before entering the UNMC dental program. Although the most common reason for attending dental school related to independence and financial security, "time with family" and "family vacations" were the next most important reasons cited for becoming dental professionals. Among '61 graduates, the average number of years spent in the dental profession is thirty-seven years. Despite the notable changes in dental technology and the continual need for updating knowledge and skill, eight members of the UNMC COD Class of 1961 continue to practice dentistry. Most maintain contact with other class members, providing support to former classmates and maintaining an identity with their alma mater, the University of Nebraska.

  3. Library Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh locations including address, coordinates, phone number, square footage, and standard operating hours.

  4. America's Star Libraries: Top-Rated Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lance, Keith Curry; Lyons, Ray

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal"'s national rating of public libraries, the "LJ" Index of Public Library Service 2009, Round 2, identifies 258 "star" libraries. Created by Keith Curry Lance and Ray Lyons and based on 2007 data from the IMLS, it rates 7,268 public libraries. The top libraries in each group get five, four, or three stars. All included libraries,…

  5. America's Star Libraries: Top-Rated Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lance, Keith Curry; Lyons, Ray

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal"'s national rating of public libraries, the "LJ" Index of Public Library Service 2009, Round 2, identifies 258 "star" libraries. Created by Keith Curry Lance and Ray Lyons and based on 2007 data from the IMLS, it rates 7,268 public libraries. The top libraries in each group get five, four, or three stars. All included libraries,…

  6. Thermography: A New Diagnostic Tool in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarbani Deb Sikdar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The various biochemical processes in the human body generate heat, which must be dissipated. Skin is the major route for heat dissipation using blood as the heat exchange fluid. Skin temperature is an indicator of aberrations in metabolism, hemodynamis or in neuronal thermoregulatory processes. Since most of the heat dissipation of skin is by infrared black body emission skin temperature should be measured without contact, by monitoring the emitted infrared radiation. This has been the basis of telethermography Thermography is being used to detect various pathological conditions in the medical field. There are also various orofacial conditions in which thermography can be used. This paper deals with the history of thermography and its various uses in dentistry.

  7. Piezoelectric surgery in implant dentistry: clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Masako Ferreira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Pizosurgery has therapeutic characteristics in osteotomies, such as extremely precise, selective and millimetric cuts and a clear operating field. Piezoelectricity uses ultrasonic frequencies, which cause the points specially designed for osteotomy to vibrate. The points of the instrument oscillate, allowing effective osteotomy with minimal or no injury to the adjacent soft tissues, membranes and nerve tissues. This article presents the various applications of piezoelectricity in oral implant surgery such as: removal of autogenous bone; bone window during elevation of the sinus membrane and removal of fractured implants. The cavitational effect caused by the vibration of the point and the spray of physiological solution, provided a field free of bleeding and easy to visualize. The study showed that the piezoelectric surgery is a new surgical procedurethat presents advantages for bone cutting in many situations in implant dentistry, with great advantages in comparison with conventional instrumentation. Operating time is longer when compared with that of conventional cutters.

  8. APPLICATION OF NANOBIOMATERIALS IN RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Lyapina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanodentistry is defined as the science and technology of diagnosing, treating and preventing oral and dental diseases, relieving pain, preserving and improving dental health using nanostructured material. Varieties of new dental products are available that rely on nanoscale properties, ranging from implants to oral hygiene products. Nanodentistry encourages the concept of minimally invasive dentistry, creating a more dentist friendly atmosphere. However, patient awareness and education is important to make them understand the developments in the field and the options available in the treatment. Following the progress of nanotechnology, current dental research is exploring designs for restorative systems. During the last decades, an increasing variety of dental restorative materials were developed. The paper reviews the most innovative nanocomposites, their structure, antibacterial and remineralizing capabilities, economical and ethical aspects and safety issues.

  9. Nanotechnology in dentistry: reduction to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ure, David; Harris, Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    The speed at which advances are being made in science has catapulted nanotechnology from its theoretical foundations straight into the real world. There are now many examples of commercially available products demonstrating that, in given situations, the technology really does work and that its scope for further application is wide. Healthcare, along with society as a whole, is facing a major revolution in the wake of ongoing technological developments in the field of nanotechnology. Dentistry as an individual healthcare discipline is not exempt, having already been targeted directly with novel 'nano-materials' at the same time as indirectly enjoying the benefits of nano-related advances in the electronics industry through the ongoing computerization of the modern practice. This article examines current practical applications of nanotechnology alongside proposed applications in the future and aims to demonstrate that, as well as a good deal of science fiction, there is some tangible science fact emerging from this novel multi-disciplinary science.

  10. Ozone applications in dentistry: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junaid Ahmed

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Ozone therapy has been successfully used in the medical field for treatment of various diseases, for more than 100 years. Researches have shown the efficacy of both gaseous and dissolved ozone in eradicating a wide range of bacteria, bacterial spores and viruses. Ozone could also help in healing wounds, treatment of radiation-induced mucositis and osteoradionecrosis by increasing the blood supply and through modulation of inflammatory mediators. Despite of these advantages, therapeutic ozone’s application in dentistry is limited because of its possible side effects on upper respiratory system. Dental practitioners need to know the proper usage of modern pharmaceutical methods like ozone, that can provide better patient care and considerably cut down the time and cost of treatment. [J Exp Integr Med 2013; 3(3.000: 171-176

  11. Nanotechnology applications in medicine and dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Jyoti

    2011-05-01

    Nanotechnology, or nanoscience, refers to the research and development of an applied science at the atomic, molecular, or macromolecular levels (i.e. molecular engineering, manufacturing). The prefix "nano" is defined as a unit of measurement in which the characteristic dimension is one billionth of a unit. Although the nanoscale is small in size, its potential is vast. As nanotechnology expands in other fields, clinicians, scientists, and manufacturers are working to discover the uses and advances in biomedical sciences. Applications of nanotechnology in medical and dental fields have only approached the horizon with opportunities and possibilities for the future that can only be limited by our imagination. This paper provides an early glimpse of nanotechnology applications in medicine and dentistry to illustrate their potentially far-reaching impacts on clinical practice. It also narrates the safety issues concerning nanotechnology applications.

  12. Gene Therapy and its applications in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Lakhanpal Manisha

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This era of advanced technology is marked by progress in identifying and understanding the molecular and cellular cause of a disease. With the conventional methods of treatment failing to render satisfactory results, gene therapy is not only being used for the cure of inherited diseases but also the acquired ones. The broad spectrum of gene therapy includes its application in the treatment of oral cancer and precancerous conditions and lesions, treatment of salivary gland diseases, bone repair, autoimmune diseases, DNA vaccination, etc. The aim of this article is to throw light on the history, methodology, applications and future of gene therapy as it would change the nature and face of dentistry in the coming years.

  13. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, C; Greenspan, J S

    2006-09-01

    HIV transmission in the health-care setting is of concern. To assess the current position in dentistry, we have reviewed the evidence to November 1, 2005. Transmission is evidently rare in the industrialized nations and can be significantly reduced or prevented by the use of standard infection control measures, appropriate clinical and instrument-handling procedures, and the use of safety equipment and safety needles. We hope that breaches in standard infection control will become vanishingly small. When occupational exposure to HIV is suspected, the application of post-exposure protocols for investigating the incident and protecting those involved from possible HIV infection further reduces the likelihood of HIV disease, and also stress and anxiety.

  14. [The fight over dentistry 1919-1924].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindblom, C

    1997-01-01

    In the history of many professions there are periods of more or less pronounced borderline fights against other professions and/or charlatans. This article is about such an example from the profession of dentistry in Sweden. From the middle of the second decade of this century, there was an increasing discrepancy between the need for dental care and the too low number of dentists. Furthermore: the majority of the Swedish people could not afford dental care at all. In the public debate the concept "dental misery" was created. In 1919 a famous Swedish paediatric professor, Isak Jundell, presented a debate article in "Allmänna Svenska Läkartidningen" (Journal of the Swedish Medical Association), with a proposal for building up a corps of dental assistants with shorter training than dentists, but still with competence for tooth cleaning, extraction and some operative dentistry. The aim of the proposal was to give people easier available and cheaper dental care. The dental profession had been questioned and threatened and the reaction from the advocates of the dentists was immediate and intense. Now followed an almost five year long struggle, with the Swedish Dental Association on one side and parts of the medical profession, dental technicians, even some dentists and a number of politicians on the other. The controversy ended up in the Swedish Parliament in 1924 where many members in both the chambers had signed motions concerning authorisation of dental technicians. The dentists won the fight thanks to the resolution in the Parliament not to authorise the technicians. But still more important, from a social political point of view, was a statement from the Parliament with a commission to the Government to analyse the prerequisites for building up a Public Dental Health Service organisation in Sweden. After a series of committees this was finally a reality fourteen years later, in 1938, when the Parliament in a resolution initiated "folktandvården".

  15. Current applications of nanotechnology in dentistry: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavikatti, Shaeesta Khaleelahmed; Bhardwaj, Smiti; Prabhuji, M L V

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing demand for advances in diagnosis and treatment modalities, nanotechnology is being considered as a groundbreaking and viable research subject. This technology, which deals with matter in nanodimensions, has widened our views of poorly understood health issues and provided novel means of diagnosis and treatment. Researchers in the field of dentistry have explored the potential of nanoparticles in existing therapeutic modalities with moderate success. The key implementations in the field of dentistry include local drug delivery agents, restorative materials, bone graft materials, and implant surface modifications. This review provides detailed insights about current developments in the field of dentistry, and discusses potential future uses of nanotechnology.

  16. Surveillance of viral contamination of invasive medical instruments in dentistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Lin-fu; ZHU Hai-hong; LIN Jun; HU Min-jun; CHEN Feng; CHEN Zhi

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the viral contamination of invasive medical instruments in dentistry and to provide health administrative institutions with surveillance data. Methods: Sterilized samples were randomly collected from the department of dentistry to detect HBV-DNA, HCV-RNA, HIV-RNA and HBsAg. Results: Of the invasive medical instruments that were sterilized with 2% glutaraldehyde, one of the samples was positive for HBV-DNA, and another sample was positive for HBsAg.Conclusion: Though massive virus contamination of invasive medical instruments in dentistry has been reduced to a low level, the occurrence of contamination still remains.

  17. Systematic Review and Quality Appraisal of Economic Evaluation Publications in Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonmukayakul, U; Calache, H; Clark, R; Wasiak, J; Faggion, C M

    2015-10-01

    Economic evaluation (EE) studies have been undertaken in dentistry since the late 20th century because economic data provide additional information to policy makers to develop guidelines and set future direction for oral health services. The objectives of this study were to assess the methodological quality of EEs in oral health. Electronic searching of Ovid MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, and the NHS Economic Evaluation Database from 1975 to 2013 were undertaken to identify publications that include costs and outcomes in dentistry. Relevant reference lists were also searched for additional studies. Studies were retrieved and reviewed independently for inclusion by 3 authors. Furthermore, to appraise the EE methods, 1 author applied the Drummond 10-item (13-criteria) checklist tool to each study. Of the 114 publications identified, 79 studies were considered full EE and 35 partial. Twenty-eight studies (30%) were published between the years 2011 and 2013. Sixty-four (53%) studies focused on dental caries prevention or treatment. Median appraisal scores calculated for full and partial EE studies were 11 and 9 out of 13, respectively. Quality assessment scores showed that the quality of partial EE studies published after 2000 significantly improved (P = 0.02) compared to those published before 2000. Significant quality improvement was not found in full EE studies. Common methodological limitations were identified: absence of sensitivity analysis, discounting, and insufficient information on how costs and outcomes were measured and valued. EE studies in dentistry increased over the last 40 y in both quantity and quality, but a number of publications failed to satisfy some components of standard EE research methods, such as sensitivity analysis and discounting.

  18. Graduate Students' Usage of and Attitudes towards E-Books: Experiences from Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ming-der; Chen, Shih-chuan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: University libraries are increasing their e-book collections. The purpose of this study is to investigate graduate students' usage of and attitudes towards e-books at National Taiwan University. Design/methodology/approach: A total of 20 graduate students from the fields of humanities, social sciences, science and technology, and medicine…

  19. Library Use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konzack, Lars

    2012-01-01

    A seminar paper about a survey of role-playing games in public libraries combined with three cases and a presentation of a model.......A seminar paper about a survey of role-playing games in public libraries combined with three cases and a presentation of a model....

  20. Library Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Nancy Kirkpatrick

    This workbook, designed for a Library Research course at Yavapai College, provides 15 lessons in advanced library reference skills. Each lesson provides explanatory text and reinforcement exercises. After Lesson I introduces specialized dictionaries and encyclopedias (e.g., for foreign languages, medicine, music, economics, social sciences, and…

  1. Privatizing Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerrard, Jane; Bolt, Nancy; Strege, Karen

    2012-01-01

    This timely special report from ALA Editions provides a succinct but comprehensive overview of the "privatization" of public libraries. It provides a history of the trend of local and state governments privatizing public services and assets, and then examines the history of public library privatization right up to the California…

  2. Privatizing Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerrard, Jane; Bolt, Nancy; Strege, Karen

    2012-01-01

    This timely special report from ALA Editions provides a succinct but comprehensive overview of the "privatization" of public libraries. It provides a history of the trend of local and state governments privatizing public services and assets, and then examines the history of public library privatization right up to the California legislation…

  3. Exploring graduate education reform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ An opening ceremony was held for new students at the Yuquan Campus of the Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences (GUCAS) on Sept. 12, 2006 in the westem outskirt of Beijing. Some 11,350 graduate students enrolled this year, including about 5,000 doctoral candidates, will set out their journey for scientific investigations in the coming semesters.

  4. Graduation in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warburg, Margit

    2009-01-01

    all the characteristics of a rite of passage. The graduates wear a traditional cap with a cross as cockade emblem; this special cross is a symbol of Denmark. For graduates of non-Christian background, alternative cockade emblems are available, e.g. a Star of David or a crescent; this shows...

  5. Revitalizing Traditional Information Literacy Instruction: Exploring Games in Academic Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margino, Megan

    2013-01-01

    The Future Voices in Public Services column is a forum for students in graduate library and information science programs to discuss key issues they see in academic library public services, to envision what they feel librarians in public service have to offer to academia, to tell of their visions for the profession, or to tell of research that is…

  6. Catalog It! A Guide to Cataloging School Library Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Allison G.; Riedling, Ann Marlow

    This book is designed for courses that prepare college and university students for undergraduate or graduate degrees in school library media. Its objectives are to present the theory and practice of cataloging and classification in the school library environment. The manual is divided into eight chapters. Chapter 1: A Brief History of Cataloging…

  7. El mercado laboral de los titulados en Bibliotecología y Documentación: análisis de las ofertas de empleo publicadas en Argentina The job market for graduates in library and information science: analysis of job advertisements published in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Hugo Artaza

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Con el objetivo de conocer las características que presentan las ofertas laborales destinadas a titulados en Bibliotecología y Documentación de la Argentina se analizaron los ofrecimientos publicados en dos listas de interés de la especialidad (ABGRA, ABDAM durante el periodo 2000-2007. Con las ofertas de cada lista se efectuaron análisis estadísticos referidos a: número de empleos ofertados, tipología de las organizaciones demandantes, requisitos solicitados y modalidad de los contratos. Se concluye que la mayor demanda de empleos proviene de organizaciones bibliotecarias. Las organizaciones demandantes son mayormente del ámbito estatal y el tipo de contrato ofrecido de carácter permanente. En relación a lo conocimientos requeridos, las áreas de Tecnología de la Información, Organización y Tratamiento de la Información e Idiomas figuran entre los más demandados por los empleadores.In order to determine the characteristics that have the job offers for graduates in Library and Information Science of Argentina were analyzed the jobs advertised on two lists of interest of the specialty (ABGRA, ABDAM during the period 2000-2007. With offers from each list were performed statistical analysis in relation to: number of jobs offered, typology of organizations applying, qualification requirements and type of contracts. In conclusion that the increased demand of jobs comes from library organizations. The applicants are mostly state organizations and the type of contract offered is permanent. In relation to the knowledge required, the areas of Information Technology, Organization and Information Processing and Language, are among the most demanded by employers.

  8. Current state of sedation/analgesia care in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitch, Jason; Macpherson, Avril

    2007-08-01

    Dentistry treatment is one of the most anxiety-inducing events in people's lives. The development of pain and anxiety-control techniques has always been very closely aligned to the development of dentistry. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recent literature in this field. The literature in the last 12 months falls into four main categories: dental anxiety and its influence on patient care, dental sedation for children, sedation with benzodiazepines for dentistry, and intravenous propofol sedation for dentistry. Considerable progress is being made with a number of innovative techniques. Oral midazolam for children and patient-controlled propofol show very promising results. More research is needed before propofol can be recommended for use without anaesthetic staff. The recently published systematic review of sedation in children outlines gaps in the literature and contains recommendations for future work.

  9. Overall pattern of publication in Journal of Conservative Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmani, Umesh Kumar; Devi, T. Premlata; Sh. Priyadarshini; Jadhav, Ganesh; Dharmani, Charan Kamal Kaur; Singh, Bishnupati; Kumar, Vinay

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Journal of Conservative Dentistry (JCD) has been online since 2008. Materials and Methods: This paper reviews the publication in this journal over a 5-year period (2011–2015). It assesses the types of articles published, coverage of various types of subjects of endodontics, and conservative dentistry in the journal and explores the authorship patterns in the publication and citation of the journal over this period. Results and Conclusion: JCD has delivered broad-based, balanced coverage of endodontics and conservative dentistry between 2011 and 2015, with contributions from all over India, as well as abroad. Although a maximum number of articles were from India, the publications from other countries are also on an increase. Thus, the widespread coverage of this journal suggests that JCD has begun to represent the global face of the Indian Association of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics. PMID:27656069

  10. Antibacterial activity in adhesive dentistry: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Memarpour, Mahtab

    2012-01-01

    This literature review summarizes the published research regarding the antibacterial agents used in adhesive dentistry. This article provides information about the clinical applications, beneficial effects, and possible disadvantages of antibacterials when used in various bonding situations.

  11. Factors affecting anxiety-fear of surgical procedures in dentistry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors affecting anxiety-fear of surgical procedures in dentistry. ... the questions concerning previous dental experience, education level, and previous ... structure and gender are the significantly effective factors on dental anxiety and fear.

  12. A short account of forensic dentistry in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaud, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    The earliest records and more recent cases where forensic dentistry has been used to identify bodies in France are described. The establishment of the French Society of Forensic Odontology is detailed.

  13. Why be an evidence-based dentistry champion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, Jan E; Bonetti, Debbie

    2009-09-01

    Evidence-based dentistry champions are committed to improving the quality, effectiveness, and appropriateness of dental care through the application of evidence-based principles and tools. They share knowledge and skills to promote evidence-based dentistry (EBD) in practice, guiding colleagues, patients and policy makers in the application of critical thinking skills and evidence-based decision-making. Being an evidence-based champion requires furthering an understanding of the full process and the challenges of evidence based dentistry, including the development of an evidence base, evidence synthesis and summary, the creation of best practice guidelines, as well as evidence implementation. Efforts to improve the quality, effectiveness, and appropriateness of dental care need to occur at, and be coordinated across, multiple levels of dentistry, including the patient, clinician, team, organization, and policy.

  14. Research in dentistry: Question, search and studies design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Aravena

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Evidence-based dentistry (EBD concept has caused great impact and interest in the field of dentistry. For its development is important to use research protocols and study designs according to the research problem. The aim of this review is to present basic aspects for the start of a quantitative research in dentistry.It presents the topics necessary to transform a research problem to a question with clinical approach. Then, concepts about finding relevant scientific articles in the electronic databases available on the Internet. It also presents observational and experimental research designs, their classification and topics for your choice. These elements represents simple and clear recommendations for research in dentistry.

  15. Demand in pediatric dentistry for sedation and general anesthesia by dentist anesthesiologists: a survey of directors of dentist anesthesiologist and pediatric dentistry residencies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hicks, C Gray; Jones, James E; Saxen, Mark A; Maupome, Gerardo; Sanders, Brian J; Walker, Laquia A; Weddell, James A; Tomlin, Angela

    2012-01-01

    This study describes what training programs in pediatric dentistry and dental anesthesiology are doing to meet future needs for deep sedation/general anesthesia services required for pediatric dentistry...

  16. Types of Lasers and Their Applications in Pediatric Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Nazemisalman, Bahareh; Farsadeghi, Mahya; Sokhansanj, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Laser technology has been recently introduced into the dental field with the idea to replace drilling. Having a less painful first dental experience by the use of modern instruments like laser can be an efficient preventive and therapeutic strategy in pediatric dentistry. Pedodontists need to learn the new less invasive technologies and adopt them in their routine practice. This study aimed to review the available types of lasers and their applications in pediatric dentistry. An electronic se...

  17. Different clinical applications of bondable reinforcement ribbond in pediatric dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuloglu, Nuray; Bayrak, Sule; Tunc, Emine Sen

    2009-10-01

    Ribbond is a bondable, biocompatible, esthetic, translucent and easy-to-use reinforced ribbon. By virtue of its wide spectrum of intended properties, it enjoys various applications in clinical dentistry. This case report demonstrates usage of Ribbond as a space maintainer, a fixed partial denture with a natural tooth pontic, an endodontic post and cores and a splint material in children. Ribbond can be used as an alternative to conventional treatment in pediatric dentistry.

  18. Ozone- A Biological Therapy in Dentistry- Reality or Myth?????

    OpenAIRE

    Saraswathi V Naik; K, Rajeshwari; Kohli, Shivani; Zohabhasan, Sayyad; Bhatia, Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    The usage of ozone in dentistry has been proposed because of its antimicrobial, disinfectant, biocompatibility and healing properties. In the last decade a number of therapeutic protocols with ozone have been developed to address common dental infections associated with periodontal disease, RCT and caries. Despite these advantages, therapeutic ozone’s application in dentistry is limited because of its possible side effects. Hence, dental practitioners need to know the proper usage of ozone th...

  19. Nanostructural analysis of the adhesive interface in dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Frassetto, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the stability of the adhesive interface in dentistry. Success in adhesive dentistry means long lasting restorations. However, there is substantial evidence that this ideal objective is not achieved. Current research in this field aims at increasing the resin-dentin bond durability. This doctoral research examines the fundamental processes responsible for the aging mechanisms involved in the degradation of resin-bonded interfaces, as well as some potential approac...

  20. Use of Polyethylene Fiber (Ribbond in Pediatric Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eda Arat Maden

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Polyethylene fiber (Ribbond is a bondable, biocompatible, esthetic, translucent material. By virtue of its wide spectrum of intended properties, it enjoys various applications in clinical dentistry. Different clinical applications of Ribbond include space maintainers, fixed partial dentures with a natural tooth pontic, endodontic posts and cores and splint materials in children. Ribbond can be used as an alternative to conventional treatment in pediatric dentistry. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2012; 1(2.000: 110-115

  1. Different Clinical Applications of Bondable Reinforcement Ribbond in Pediatric Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuloglu, Nuray; Bayrak, Sule; Tunc, Emine Sen

    2009-01-01

    Ribbond is a bondable, biocompatible, esthetic, translucent and easy-to-use reinforced ribbon. By virtue of its wide spectrum of intended properties, it enjoys various applications in clinical dentistry. This case report demonstrates usage of Ribbond as a space maintainer, a fixed partial denture with a natural tooth pontic, an endodontic post and cores and a splint material in children. Ribbond can be used as an alternative to conventional treatment in pediatric dentistry. PMID:19826607

  2. Ethical and legal implications of marketing in Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Luiz Renato Paranhos; Eduardo de Novaes Benedicto; Mário Marques Fernandes; Fábio Roberto de Souza Viotto; Eduardo Daruge Júnior

    2011-01-01

    Introduction and objective: The aim of this study was to discuss the ethical and legal use of marketing in dentistry by the professionals. Marketing itself is very important for solving the problems of competitiveness of daily private practice, but in several times its application methods may raise concern due to the current regulations. Literature review: The marketing concepts have been frequently reported, and this literature review shows that the methods of marketing in Dentistry are v...

  3. Profile of special needs patients at a pediatric dentistry clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Sílvio Augusto Fernandes de Menezes; Helder Henrique Costa Pinheiro; Luciana Teixeira Passos; Camila de Almeida Smith; Tatiany Oliveira de Alencar Menezes

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the characteristics of special needs patients assisted at the Clinic of Pediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Federal University of Pará. Methods: A descriptive observational study conducted from March 2007 to December 2009, assessing 137 records of which were extracted the following data: gender, age, origin, current and past medical history, type of special needs and major oral diseases. We applied descriptive statistics, one-dimensional frequency table and prepare...

  4. Library Loans to the Schools of Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Miriam A.; Kulm, Joan

    To examine library usage by faculty and students in the Schools of Engineering at Purdue University, data was analyzed from a sample of 12,000 loans during a three month period. User level (graduate student, undergraduate, faculty, or staff) and subject of borrowed material as indicated by Dewey Decimal Classification were examined for each major…

  5. Local Citation Analysis of Graduate Biology Theses: Collection Development Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laura Newton

    2011-01-01

    This paper will focus on the citation analysis of graduate masters theses from Carleton University's Biology Department with implications for library collection management decisions. Twenty-five masters theses were studied to determine citation types and percentages, ranking of journals by frequency of citation and by number of authors citing, and…

  6. Improving Graduates' Employment Competitiveness: A Practice in Peking University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yanli

    2011-01-01

    The paper introduces data on the employment of postgraduates in the Department of Information Management of Peking University in 2000-2009. Master's graduates in LIS in Peking University have a wide job choice. In China, the job market for postgraduates in LIS is composed of enterprises and business organizations, rather than libraries and…

  7. Dentistry in Korea during the Japanese Occupation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHIN Jae-Eu

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The Japanese introduction of dentistry into Korea was for treating the Japanese residing in Korea Noda-Oji was the first Japanese dentist for Japanese people in Korea in 1893. and Narajaki doyoyo, an invited dentist was posted in the Korean headquarter of Japanese army in september, 1905. The imperialist Japan licensed the dental technicians(yipchisa without limit and controled them generously so they could practice dentistry freely. This measure was contrary to that in Japan. (In Japan no new dental technician was licensed. Komori, a dental technician opened his laboratory at Chungmuro in 1902. The dental technician had outnumerbered by 1920. In 1907, the first Korean dental technician Sung-Ryong Choi practiced dentistry in Jongno. The imperialist Japan made the regulation for dental technicians to set a limit to the advertisement and medical practice of dental technicians. The first Korean dentist Suk-Tae Ham was registered No. 1 in the dentist license. The Kyungsung dental school was established by Nagira Dasoni for the purpose of educating some korean people that contributed to Japanese colonization. It made progress with the help of Japan. it was given the approval of the establishment of the professional school in January the 25th, 1929. it was intended to produce Korean dentists in the first place but became the school for Japanese students later on. The association of Chosun dentist, which had been founded by Narajaki doyoyo, was managed by Japanese dentists in favor of the colonial ruling. The Hansung Association of Dentists established in 1925 was the organization made by the necessity of the association for Koreans only. the Japanese forcefully annexed the Association of Hansung Dentists (Koreans only to the Association of Kyungsung Dentists to avoid collective actions of Korean dentists in the name of 'Naesunilche'--'Japan and Korea are one'. Their invading intention was shown in the event of 'decayed tooth preventive day'. Japanese

  8. Publicity in dentistry: assessment of the ethical aspects involved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artênio José Isper Garbin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To verify whether the professionals who make use of advertising in Dentistry by means of billboards respect the ethical aspects determined by the Federal Council of Dentistry Resolution No 71, 2006. Methods: This was an observational study in which 178 billboards of dental clinics in the municipality of São Paulo were assessed. Results: Among the billboards analyzed, 91.4% belonged to private persons and 9.6% to corporate bodies. With regard to the ethical aspects related to the advertisement, only 44.9% of the billboards presented all the mandatory items in accordance with the Federal Council of Dentistry. The item found the least number of times in the advertisements was the registration number in the Regional Council of Dentistry (34.8%. Among the items allowed by the Federal Council of Dentistry, the telephone number (65.2% was the most commonly found. Among the ethical infractions, 1.7% of the billboards advertised the terms of payment. Conclusion: Professionals are not following the ethical precepts established by the Code of Ethics in Dentistry, and awareness of these professionals needs to be aroused, so that information about their services is communicated and divulged in an ethical manner.

  9. Practice of preventive dentistry for nursing staff in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Valeria Jimenez-Baez

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Determine the domain of preventive dentistry in nursing personnel assigned to a primary care unit. Methods: Prospective descriptive study, questionnaire validation, and prevalence study. In the first stage, the questionnaire for the practice of preventive dentistry (CPEP, for the term in Spanish was validated; consistency and reliability were measured by Cronbach's alpha, Pearson's correlation, factor analysis with intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC. In the second stage, the domain in preventive dental nurses was explored. Results: The overall internal consistency of CPEP is α= 0.66, ICC= 0.64, CI95%: 0.29-0.87 (p >0.01. Twenty-one subjects in the study, average age 43, 81.0% female, average seniority of 12.5 were included. A total of 71.5% showed weak domain, 28.5% regular domain, and there was no questionnaire with good domain result. The older the subjects were, the smaller the domain; female nurses showed greater mastery of preventive dentistry (29%, CI95%: 0.1-15.1 than male nurses. Public health nurses showed greater mastery with respect to other categories (50%, CI95%: 0.56-2.8. Conclusions: The CDEP has enough consistency to explore the domain of preventive dentistry in health-care staff. The domain of preventive dentistry in primary care nursing is poor, required to strengthen to provide education in preventive dentistry to the insured population. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE

  10. Exploring leadership in the context of dentistry in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willcocks, Stephen George

    2016-05-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore selective leadership approaches in the context of dentistry in the UK. Design/methodology/approach This is a conceptual paper utilising published sources from relevant literature about leadership theory and practice and the policy background to dentistry in the UK. Findings This paper suggests that there is merit in identifying and applying an eclectic mix of leadership theory to the case of dentistry. It offers insight into individual aspects of the leadership role for dentists and applies this to the dental context. It also contrasts these individual approaches with shared leadership and suggests this may also be relevant to dentistry. It highlights the fact that leadership will be of growing concern for dentistry in the light of recent policy changes. Research limitations/implications This paper points out that there are developmental implications depending on the particular approach taken. It argues that leadership development will become increasingly important in dentistry in the UK. Originality/value This paper addresses a topic that has so far received limited attention in the literature.

  11. New library buildings: Creighton University Bio-Information Center.

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    In May 1977 the newly constructed Creighton University Bio-Information Center, costing over $4 million and containing more than 57,000 square feet of space, officially began to provide services. This facility houses three educational support programs--the Health Sciences Library, the Learning Resources Center, and the Biomedical Communications Center--that primarily serve the University's health sciences schools of medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, nursing, and allied health, and the University'...

  12. A library-based bioinformatics services program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarfitz, S; Ketchell, D S

    2000-01-01

    Support for molecular biology researchers has been limited to traditional library resources and services in most academic health sciences libraries. The University of Washington Health Sciences Libraries have been providing specialized services to this user community since 1995. The library recruited a Ph.D. biologist to assess the molecular biological information needs of researchers and design strategies to enhance library resources and services. A survey of laboratory research groups identified areas of greatest need and led to the development of a three-pronged program: consultation, education, and resource development. Outcomes of this program include bioinformatics consultation services, library-based and graduate level courses, networking of sequence analysis tools, and a biological research Web site. Bioinformatics clients are drawn from diverse departments and include clinical researchers in need of tools that are not readily available outside of basic sciences laboratories. Evaluation and usage statistics indicate that researchers, regardless of departmental affiliation or position, require support to access molecular biology and genetics resources. Centralizing such services in the library is a natural synergy of interests and enhances the provision of traditional library resources. Successful implementation of a library-based bioinformatics program requires both subject-specific and library and information technology expertise.

  13. A library-based bioinformatics services program*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarfitz, Stuart; Ketchell, Debra S.

    2000-01-01

    Support for molecular biology researchers has been limited to traditional library resources and services in most academic health sciences libraries. The University of Washington Health Sciences Libraries have been providing specialized services to this user community since 1995. The library recruited a Ph.D. biologist to assess the molecular biological information needs of researchers and design strategies to enhance library resources and services. A survey of laboratory research groups identified areas of greatest need and led to the development of a three-pronged program: consultation, education, and resource development. Outcomes of this program include bioinformatics consultation services, library-based and graduate level courses, networking of sequence analysis tools, and a biological research Web site. Bioinformatics clients are drawn from diverse departments and include clinical researchers in need of tools that are not readily available outside of basic sciences laboratories. Evaluation and usage statistics indicate that researchers, regardless of departmental affiliation or position, require support to access molecular biology and genetics resources. Centralizing such services in the library is a natural synergy of interests and enhances the provision of traditional library resources. Successful implementation of a library-based bioinformatics program requires both subject-specific and library and information technology expertise. PMID:10658962

  14. Awareness, knowledge and practice of evidence-based dentistry amongst dentists in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haron, I M; Sabti, M Y; Omar, R

    2012-02-01

    This study assessed the awareness, knowledge and practice of evidence-based dentistry (EBD) amongst dentists working in the public sector in Kuwait. Of the 150 randomly selected dentists from all five health districts in Kuwait who had originally been approached, 120 participated by completing a pre-tested, self-administered questionnaire (80% response rate). Whereas 60.9% of the group stated that they practice EBD most of the time, fewer (40.8%) had a reasonable understanding of EBD based upon tested knowledge scores of EBD-related topics. Clinical decisions appeared to be mostly based on the clinician's own judgment (73.3%) rather than on evidence-based sources such as PubMed (28.3%) or the Cochrane Library (6.7%). A number of within-group differences were noted, with women (Pevidence-based sources to remove some of the possible barriers to implementation of EBD.

  15. Addressing Library Anxiety (LA) in student nurses: a study in an NHS Foundation Trust Hospital library and information service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Still, Madeleine

    2015-12-01

    Library anxiety is a concept which has been recognised in academic library circles since the early 1990s. It can result in students actively avoiding the library for the duration of their studies. Madeleine Still is Trust Librarian at North Tees & Hartlepool NHS Foundation Trust and while studying for an MSc, recognised that some student nurses were exhibiting signs of library anxiety. She decided to make it the focus of her MSc dissertation, and this article discusses her research project as well as highlighting the measures she has taken to address the issues she uncovered. Madeleine graduated in July 2013 with an MSc in Information & Library Studies from Robert Gordon University.

  16. The Image Gently in Dentistry campaign: Promotion of responsible use of maxillofacial radiology in dentistry for children

    OpenAIRE

    White, SC; Scarfe, WC; Schulze, RKW; Lurie, AG; Douglass, JM; Farman, AG; Law, CS; Levin, MD; Sauer, RA; Valachovic, RW; Zeller, GG; Goske, MJ

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 Published by Elsevier Inc. The Image Gently in Dentistry campaign to be launched in September 2014 is a specific initiative of the Alliance for Radiation Safety in Pediatric Imaging, supported by organized dentistry and dental education as well as many dental specialty organizations. The objective of the campaign is to change practice by increasing awareness of the opportunities to improve radiation protection when imaging children in dental practices. Six practical steps are provided ...

  17. Choices after Graduation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    正From the above table,we can see that the students of this university have three main choices after graduation.Of these choices,the students who have found a job only take up 50%.In contrast,students who pursue further study by taking the postgraduate entrance exam or going abroad have increased greatly than before, with the total percentage of 47%.Indeed,this phenomenon is also quite common in other universities. The following factors can account for the choices of graduates.Above all,with the enrollment extension of universities,college graduates are facing the severe em-

  18. Academic Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Library Journal, 1970

    1970-01-01

    Building data is given for the following academic libraries: (1) Rosary College, River Forest, Illinois; (2) Abilene Christian College, Abilene, Texas; (3) University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California. (MF)

  19. Guide to Sources: Colleges & Universities, Graduate Programs, Transfer Information, Financial Aid. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Bryan

    This library guide lists some of the more useful sources of information about colleges and universities that are available in the Fogler Library at the University of Maine. The 99 items cited are listed in four categories: (1) colleges and universities, including general, graduate, and foreign programs; (2) preparation for admission exams; (3)…

  20. Assessing the Value of Embedded Librarians in an Online Graduate Educational Technology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Mary; Kumar, Swapna; Ochoa, Marilyn

    2010-01-01

    The increase in online programs has been accompanied by the need for library instruction and support for online students. Students enrolled in off-campus programs have to be able to successfully access and use digital library resources to complete course requirements. An embedded librarian project in an online graduate educational technology…

  1. HDACi: cellular effects, opportunities for restorative dentistry.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duncan, H F

    2011-12-01

    Acetylation of histone and non-histone proteins alters gene expression and induces a host of cellular effects. The acetylation process is homeostatically balanced by two groups of cellular enzymes, histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs). HAT activity relaxes the structure of the human chromatin, rendering it transcriptionally active, thereby increasing gene expression. In contrast, HDAC activity leads to gene silencing. The enzymatic balance can be \\'tipped\\' by histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), leading to an accumulation of acetylated proteins, which subsequently modify cellular processes including stem cell differentiation, cell cycle, apoptosis, gene expression, and angiogenesis. There is a variety of natural and synthetic HDACi available, and their pleiotropic effects have contributed to diverse clinical applications, not only in cancer but also in non-cancer areas, such as chronic inflammatory disease, bone engineering, and neurodegenerative disease. Indeed, it appears that HDACi-modulated effects may differ between \\'normal\\' and transformed cells, particularly with regard to reactive oxygen species accumulation, apoptosis, proliferation, and cell cycle arrest. The potential beneficial effects of HDACi for health, resulting from their ability to regulate global gene expression by epigenetic modification of DNA-associated proteins, also offer potential for application within restorative dentistry, where they may promote dental tissue regeneration following pulpal damage.

  2. The role of dentists in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, D W

    2001-12-01

    The extent to which dentists influence the outcomes of dental care, compared to the effects of dental technology or patient variation, has not been well studied. A review of the literature on the personality and value structures of dentists and dental students reveals general trends involving preferences of concrete, utilitarian, unambiguous, and conventional situations that are classified and judged in terms of their potential for dentists' power and control and for relationships of helping others but avoiding mutual dependency. These findings are summarized in a hypothesis that dentists seek situations where they can exercise control and establish paternalistic relationships with others. The evidence about career satisfaction of dentists is difficult to interpret. Between 20 percent and 50 percent of dentists report that they would not choose to enter the profession again if given a chance. Yet the number leaving the profession voluntarily is less than the number of career changers in the general population by a factor of about 1 to 15. Career satisfaction of practitioners can be partially predicted from an understanding of dentists' personality and values. Factors such as uncooperative patients, incompetent staff, and government and insurance intrusions are major dissatisfiers; they threaten dentists' core need for control. Factors such as quality of work, which is under the control of dentists, are major satisfiers. The personalities and values of dentists and the expression of these in professional norms may function to limit our understanding of dentistry. Based on this analysis, eight predictions are offered about the profession.

  3. Digital X-ray Imaging in Dentistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Kyung [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Dankook University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-08-15

    In dentistry, Radio Visio Graphy was introduced as a first electronic dental x-ray imaging modality in 1989. Thereafter, many types of direct digital radiographic systems have been produced in the last decade. They are based either on charge-coupled device (CCD) or on storage phosphor technology. In addition, new types of digital radiographic system using amorphous selenium, image intensifier etc. are under development. Advantages of digital radiographic system are elimination of chemical processing, reduction in radiation dose, image processing, computer storage, electronic transfer of images and so on. Image processing includes image enhancement, image reconstruction, digital subtraction, etc. Especially digital subtraction and reconstruction can be applied in many aspects of clinical practice and research. Electronic transfer of images enables filmless dental hospital and teleradiology/teledentistry system. Since the first image management and communications system (IMACS) for dentomaxillofacial radiology was reported in 1992, IMACS in dental hospital has been increasing. Meanwhile, researches about computer-assisted diagnosis, such as structural analysis of bone trabecular patterns of mandible, feature extraction, automated identification of normal landmarks on cephalometric radiograph and automated image analysis for caries or periodontitis, have been performed actively in the last decade. Further developments in digital radiographic imaging modalities, image transmission system, imaging processing and automated analysis software will change the traditional clinical dental practice in the 21st century.

  4. Occupational contact allergic dermatitis in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikov Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Dental professionals may be at increased risk of developing occupational allergic diseases specially to methacrylates that can permeate protective disposable gloves. Case report. We presented a case of occupational allergic contact dermatitis in a 28-year-old dental technician. The patient had complained of itching and cracking of fingers for 6 months. The dermatitis improved over weekends. Skin erythema and scaling were present with primarily involvement of the fingertips. Patch testing with dental series gave positive vesicular reaction to methyl methacrylate. Follow-up after 6 months of allergen avoidance showed a complete regression of dermatitis. Conclusion. Methacrylates serve as bases for acrylic resins which are used in prosthetics. Methyl methacrylate as a small molecular acrylate can permeate thin protective disposable gloves. Using adequate personal protective equipment, like nitrile rubber gloves, is the most important preventive measure in this occupation. Health practitioners should recognize possible occupational hazards in dentistry and implement appropriate preventive measures to protect health of workers.

  5. Non-invasive diagnostic methods in dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todea, Carmen

    2016-03-01

    The paper, will present the most important non-invasive methods for diagnostic, in different fields of dentistry. Moreover, the laser-based methods will be emphasis. In orthodontics, 3D laser scanners are increasingly being used to establish database for normative population and cross-sectional growth changes but also to asses clinical outcomes in orthognatic surgical and non-surgical treatments. In prevention the main methods for diagnostic of demineralization and caries detection in early stages are represented by laser fluorescence - Quantitative Light Florescence (QLF); DiagnoDent-system-655nm; FOTI-Fiberoptic transillumination; DIFOTI-Digital Imaging Fiberoptic transillumination; and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). In odontology, Laser Doppler Flowmetry (LDF) is a noninvasive real time method used for determining the tooth vitality by monitoring the pulp microcirculation in traumatized teeth, fractured teeth, and teeth undergoing different conservative treatments. In periodontology, recently study shows the ability of LDF to evaluate the health of gingival tissue in periodontal tissue diseases but also after different periodontal treatments.

  6. Prosthodontics an "arsenal" in forensic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathala, Lakshmana Rao; Rachuri, Narendra Kumar; Rayapati, Srinivas Rao; Kondaka, Sudheer

    2016-01-01

    After major disasters such as earthquakes, fires, floods, tsunami, bomb blasts or terrorist attacks, accurate, and early identification of the dead and injured becomes an utmost importance. Restorations, cariesteeth, missingteeth and/or prostheses are most useful aids for the dental identification. At times, only identifiable remains are a victim's partial or complete dentures. The central principle of dental identification is that postmortem dental remains can be compared with antemortem dental records which include, studycasts, radiographs, etc., to confirm the identity of the victims. Marking/labeling dentures have been considered an important aid in forensic dentistry. Other than finger printing, when compared with all the methods, the marking/labeling of dentures is an accurate and rapid method to identify the unknown victims. There are no standardized methods to follow, but dental practitioners needs to maintain some dental records of their patients. This may include documentation of the "marking of dentures." The preparedness is the key to success in mass disaster identification. The aim of this review article is to discuss the methods of denture identification, advantages of denture labeling for the rapid identification during major disasters/accidents and the importance of maintaining the patient records.

  7. An overview of monolithic zirconia in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Malkondu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Zirconia restorations have been used successfully for years in dentistry owing to their biocompatibility and good mechanical properties. Because of their lack of translucency, zirconia cores are generally veneered with porcelain, which makes restorations weaker due to failure of the adhesion between the two materials. In recent years, all-ceramic zirconia restorations have been introduced in the dental sector with the intent to solve this problem. Besides the elimination of chipping, the reduced occlusal space requirement seems to be a clear advantage of monolithic zirconia restorations. However, scientific evidence is needed to recommend this relatively new application for clinical use. This mini-review discusses the current scientific literature on monolithic zirconia restorations. The results of in vitro studies suggested that monolithic zirconia may be the best choice for posterior fixed partial dentures in the presence of high occlusal loads and minimal occlusal restoration space. The results should be supported with much more in vitro and particularly in vivo studies to obtain a final conclusion.

  8. Management of pregnant patient in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurien, Sophia; Kattimani, Vivekanand S; Sriram, Roopa Rani; Sriram, Sanjay Krishna; Rao V K, Prabhakara; Bhupathi, Anitha; Bodduru, Rupa Rani; N Patil, Namrata

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to update general dentists and maxillofacial surgeons in the perioperative management of the pregnant patient. Pregnancy results in physiologic changes in almost all organ systems in the body mediated mainly by hormones; which influences the treatment schedule. Understanding these normal changes is essential for providing quality care for pregnant women. The general principles that apply in this situation are discussed, followed by the relevant physiologic changes and their treatment implications, the risks of various medications to the mother and fetus, the management of concomitant medical problems in the pregnant patient, appropriate timing of oral and maxillofacial surgery during pregnancy, and management of emergencies during pregnancy. Information about the compatibility, complications, and excretion of the common drugs during pregnancy is provided. Guidelines for the management of a pregnant patient in the dental office are summarized. How to cite this article: Kurien S, Kattimani V S, Sriram R, Sriram S K, Prabhakar Rao V K, Bhupathi A, Bodduru R, Patil N N. Management of Pregnant Patient in Dentistry. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(1):88-97.

  9. Minimally invasive dentistry and the dental enterprise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossomando, Edward F

    2007-03-01

    Improvements in understanding the process of remineralization have resulted in a reappraisal of repair of damaged tooth structure and call into question the principles of cavity preparation of GV Black and his principle of "extension for prevention." From this reappraisal has emerged the idea of minimally invasive dentistry (MID). The goal of MID is to remove as little of the sound tooth structure during the restoration phase as possible. This goal is in our reach in part because of availability of products that promote mineralization and of dental excavation instruments, like the dental laser, that can be managed to remove only damaged tooth structure. It is critical that the leaders of the dental enterprise endorse MID. Delay could allow new products to move from the dental profession to other health care providers. For example, a caries vaccine will soon enter the market place. Will dentists expand the scope of their practices to include the application of this vaccine, or will they ignore this new product and allow the new technology to enter the scope of practice of other health providers?

  10. [Equine dentistry: Survey on Swiss horse owners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiesser, E; Geyer, H; Kummer, M; Jackson, M

    2017-08-01

    The interest in equine dentistry has significantly increased in the last 15 years. On the part of the veterinarians as well as of the horse owners there is a strong attention to the topic. The aim of the questionnaire was to investigate amongst horse owners what their level of information and preferences about dental treatment are and how they are implemented. The questionnaire was translated into the three national languages and included 20 questions about level and sources of information, frequency of treatments and the horse owner's stance over sedation of the animals. With a return rate of 45% (1'466 of 3'250 sent questionnaires) significant conclusions could be drawn. Horse owners showed a strong demand for clarification regarding tooth problems, the causes, consequences and methods of treatment. More than half of the owners considered themselves not well informed. The treating person was in 66.7% a veterinarian with a special education. Horse owners indicated that information circulated most frequently by word of mouth recommendations and they explicitly wished information from professional and reliable sources. The questionnaire provided a clear result about current equine dental treatments. We suggest that they should be performed by veterinarians only with a special education.

  11. Ceramics in Restorative and Prosthetic DENTISTRY1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, J. Robert

    1997-08-01

    This review is intended to provide the ceramic engineer with information about the history and current use of ceramics in dentistry, contemporary research topics, and potential research agenda. Background material includes intra-oral design considerations, descriptions of ceramic dental components, and the origin, composition, and microstructure of current dental ceramics. Attention is paid to efforts involving net-shape processing, machining as a forming method, and the analysis of clinical failure. A rationale is presented for the further development of all-ceramic restorative systems. Current research topics receiving attention include microstructure/processing/property relationships, clinical failure mechanisms and in vitro testing, wear damage and wear testing, surface treatments, and microstructural modifications. The status of the field is critically reviewed with an eye toward future work. Significant improvements seem possible in the clinical use of ceramics based on engineering solutions derived from the study of clinically failed restorations, on the incorporation of higher levels of "biomimicry" in new systems, and on the synergistic developments in dental cements and adhesive dentin bonding.

  12. Biocompatibility of polymethylmethacrylate resins used in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Rupali; Singh, Raghuwar D; Sharma, Vinod P; Siddhartha, Ramashanker; Chand, Pooran; Kumar, Rakesh

    2012-07-01

    Biocompatibility or tissue compatibility describes the ability of a material to perform with an appropriate host response when applied as intended. Poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA) based resins are most widely used resins in dentistry, especially in fabrication of dentures and orthodontic appliances. They are considered cytotoxic on account of leaching of various potential toxic substances, most common being residual monomer. Various in vitro and in vivo experiments and cell based studies conducted on acrylic based resins or their leached components have shown them to have cytotoxic effects. They can cause mucosal irritation and tissue sensitization. These studies are not only important to evaluate the long term clinical effect of these materials, but also help in further development of alternate resins. This article reviews information from scientific full articles, reviews, or abstracts published in dental literature, associated with biocompatibility of PMMA resins and it is leached out components. Published materials were searched in dental literature using general and specialist databases, like the PubMED database.

  13. A survey of retracted articles in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Túlio Eduardo; Gonçalves, Andréia Souza; Leles, Cláudio Rodrigues; Batista, Aline Carvalho; Costa, Luciane Rezende

    2017-07-06

    Publication retraction is a mechanism to preserve the scientific literature against publications that contain seriously flawed or erroneous data, redundant publication, plagiarism, unethical research, and other features that compromise the integrity of science. An increase in the occurrence of retractions in recent years has been reported. Nevertheless, there is scarce information on this topic concerning publications in dentistry and related specialties. Thus, this study aimed to investigate retracted papers published in dental journals. Data collection included an exploratory search in PubMed and a specific search in SCImago Journal Rank indexed journals, complemented by the cases reported on the Retraction Watch website and in PubMed. All 167 dental journals included in SCImago were searched for identification of retracted articles up to March 2016. The selected retracted articles and their corresponding retraction notices were recorded and assessed for classification according to the reason for retraction and other additional information. Forty of the 167 journals scrutinised at SCImago (23.9%) had at least one retracted article, and four additional journals were identified from the Retraction Watch website. A total of 72 retracted found were retracted for the reasons: redundant publication (20.8%), plagiarism (18.1%), misconduct (13.8%), overlap (13.6%) and honest error (9.7%). Higher number of retractions were reported in those journals with cites/doc retractions were mostly due to the authors' malpractice and were more frequently related to journals with less impact.

  14. Meet Your Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Karen L.

    1989-01-01

    Presents five vocational graduates who have become successful entrepreneurs. Their businesses include an ice cream parlor, an investment service, a dog grooming business, microcomputer program manufacturing, and high-fashion clothing and cosmetics for problem skin. (JOW)

  15. New insight in pediatric dentistry: preventive dentistry in allergy management protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seno Pradopo

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available ; "> The relationship between oral health and systemic diseases had been abundantly studied, however, mostly were related to adultsuch as cerebrovascular disease, cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus etc. Nevertheless, it was still uncommon that oral healthalso related to allergic disease. The field of pediatric dentistry is mostly related to preventive dentistry (i.e. prophylactic procedures,preventive orthodontic etc., but rarely related to preventive medicine such allergy prevention in children. Allergic diseases develop outof a close interaction between genetic predisposition and environmental triggers, and progress continuously since infancy regarding tothe allergic march. Concerning to the partially developed immunity in children, children are more susceptible to infection and allergicdiseases than adults. Unfortunately, infection and allergic diseases are interrelated; infection impaired allergy and vice versa. Poororal health is closely related to infection; however, improving oral health is not included in allergy management protocol. In order toanticipate the future, dentist or especially pediatric dentist should be able to review about basic children immunity and oral mucosalimmunity. Additionally, it is essential to explain to the parents and medical practitioners who are not familiar to this new paradigm.The objective of this study is to review articles related to children’s oral health and allergic symptoms. Regarding to the successfuloral management of allergic symptoms, the propensity that improving oral health could be included in children’s allergy managementprotocol is likely.

  16. AIDS: today's vital challenge to dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, E O

    1985-01-01

    This article suggests precautions that should be taken if dentists are to treat acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients. Dentists are considered to be at higher risk of contracting AIDS than physicians. AIDS patients often present at dental offices seeking treatment for the oral symptoms sometimes associated with the virus. Identification of patients who may have AIDS is a critical factor in establishing treatment and protective guidelines; however, such identification is hindered by the prolonged incubation period. It is suggested that questions identifying symptoms of AIDS should be added to the Medical-Dental History Form (a sample form is included with the article). If responses to this form raise suspicion that a patient might have AIDS, the patient should be referred to his physician before an oral examination is scheduled. There is good evidence that AIDS patients can be safely treated in the dental office if the following precaustions are observed: 1) faithful use of an updated medical-dental history form with the follow-up measures suggested, 2) limitation to an absolute minimum of any dental operations; and 3) control of splashback. It is reasonable to assume that liquids that come from the mouth contain blood, infected fluids, saliva, sputum, and mucus that can act as carriers for the AIDS virus if they become droplets and/or aerosols and are transmitted to others through the mucuous membranes of the mouth or eyes. The use of face masks, washed-field dentistry, the rubber dam, protective eyeglasses, rubber gloves, disposable needles, autocleavable instruments, and disposable cap and gown is advocated to protect dentists from the AIDS virus.

  17. The application of air abrasion in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandinić Zoran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main objectives of contemporary dentistry is to preserve healthy tooth structure by applying techniques of noninvasive treatment. Air abrasion is a minimally invasive nonmechanical technique of tooth preparation that uses kinetic energy to remove carious tooth structure. A powerful narrow stream of moving aluminum-oxide particles hit the tooth surface and they abrade it without heat, vibration or noise. Variables that affect speed of cutting include air pressure, particle size, powder flow, tip’s size, angle and distance from the tooth. It has been proposed that air abrasion can be used to diagnose early occlusal-surface lesions and treat them with minimal tooth preparation using magnifier. Reported advantages of air abrasion include reduced noise, vibration and sensitivity. Air abrasion cavity preparations have more rounded internal contours than those prepared with straight burs. This may increase the longevity of placed restorations because it reduces the incidence of fractures and a consequence of decreased internal stresses. However, air abrasion cannot be used for all patients, i.e. in cases involving severe dust allergy, asthma, chronic obstructive lung disease, recent extraction or other oral surgery, open wounds, advanced periodontal disease, recent placement of orthodontic appliances and oral abrasions, or subgingival caries removal. Many of these conditions increase the risk of air embolism in the oral soft tissues. Dust control is a challenge, and it necessitates the use of rubber dam, high-volume evacuation, protective masks and safety eyewear for both the patient and the therapist. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 46009

  18. Dentistry – a professional contained career in healthcare. A qualitative study of Vocational Dental Practitioners' professional expectations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eaton Kenneth A

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New graduates in the UK presently spend one year in training as Vocational Dental Practitioners (VDPs in preparation for primary dental care. There is a growing recognition that the emerging workforce has very different professional expectations to those of earlier generations, with implications for the profession, patients and the performance of health systems. The objectives of this study were to investigate why VDPs' in England and Wales perceive they chose dentistry as a professional career; how they perceive their vision has changed and the implications for their professional career plans, both short- and longterm. Methods Purposive sampling of schemes was undertaken to include urban, rural and metropolitan schemes, schemes in areas with and without dental schools and geographic coverage across England and Wales. All VDPs in these schemes were initiated to participate in this qualitative study using focus groups. A topic guide was utilised to standardise data collection. Informants' views were recorded on tape and in field notes. Data were transcribed and analysed using Framework Methodology. Results A total of 99 VDPs participated in the 10 focus groups. Their choice of dentistry as a professional career was motivated by multiple categories of influence: 'academic', 'healthcare', 'lifestyle', the influence of 'family', 'friends', 'careers advice' and 'work experience'. Consideration of the features of the 'professional job' appears to have been key to their choice of dentistry and the 'active rejection of medicine' as an alternative career. Entry into the profession was proving a challenging process for some but not all VDPs. Informants perceived that their vision had been moderated as a result of 'personal student debt', 'national workforce initiatives', 'limitations on clinical practice' and the 'cost of additional training'. Short term goals focused around 'recovery from the past' and 'preparation for the future

  19. Is dentistry at risk? A case for interprofessional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, Rebecca S; O'Donnell, Jean A; Barry, J Mark; Galli, Dominique M; Hakim, Foroud F; Holyfield, Lavern J; Robbins, Miriam R

    2008-11-01

    The goal of interprofessional education (IPE) is to bring various professional groups together in the educational environment to promote collaborative practice and improve the health care of patients. Interest in IPE has been sparked by several factors in the health care system, including the increased awareness of oral-systemic connections, an aging population, the shift of the burden of illness from acute to chronic care, and lack of access to basic oral care. Increasingly, since the publication of the U.S. surgeon general's report in 2000, the dialogue surrounding IPE in dentistry has escalated. But how has dentistry changed regarding IPE since the report was released? This position paper argues that little has changed in the way dental students are taught and prepared to participate in IPE. The authors contend that academic dentistry and organized dentistry must take the lead in initiating and demanding IPE if dental students are to be prepared to work in the health care environment of the twenty-first century. Included are reasons why IPE is necessary and why dentistry must lead the conversation and participate in the solution to the oral health care crisis. It explores existing models and alternate approaches to IPE, barriers to implementation, and proposed strategies for academic institutions.

  20. Chemical of darkness (Melatonin: A ray of glow to dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayakumar Ambaldhage

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin (MLT is a neuroendocrine hormone secreted mainly by the pineal gland. Recent studies have shown that it is also synthesized in various other parts of the body including salivary glands. The most significant effects of MLT are because of its potent antioxidant, antiageing, immunomodulatory, shielding and antineoplastic properties. Because of these effects, it might be used therapeutically in dentistry for the potentially malignant disorders, lesions of mechanical, bacterial, fungal or viral origin. It stimulates synthesis of collagen fibers and bone formation, and can be used in postsurgical wounds caused by tooth extractions, periodontal therapies, and dental implants. Thus, it is important for the dental clinicians to be familiar with the possible therapeutic uses of MLT in dentistry. The aim of the present article is to review related articles in the literature that have focused on MLT and its applications in dentistry and to provide a quick sketch of applications of MLT in dentistry for dental clinicians. Our review concludes that the research to date certainly offers valid applications of MLT in dentistry. Meanwhile, practical strategies with the highest success rates are needed for further interventions.

  1. Straightforward Case of Dental Implant in General Dentistry

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    Aji P. Tjikman

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dental implant has become a fast developing and dynamic field in dental practice. It is acknowledged as a predictable treatment modality with high clinical success rates. Conventional fixed prostheses are no longer considered to be the first choice of treatment for replacing a missing tooth. Despite the increasing number of patients requesting dental implant treatments, there are only some clinicians who are offering implant therapy in their daily practice. The International team for Implantology described a straightforward case as a simple case such as implant placements in adquate soft and hard tissue conditions and single-tooth restorations in a non-aesthetic zone. A review of the current literature discussed the implementation of implant dentistry in universities worldwide into their curriculum for both undergraduate and postgraduate programs in general dentistry. The European consensus in implant dentistry education concluded that it is desirable to include the surgical technique for implant placement for straightforward cases into the dental curriculum. The levels and limitations to which the various aspects of implant dentistry and related skills are taught to be determined by the academic community. This review aimed at promoting awareness amongst dental practitioners and institutions in Indonesia of the shifting treatment paradigm in the maangement of a missing tooth. Hence clinicians will be able to include implant dentistry in the treatment planning of their patients and also undertake a significant part in the execution of such treatments.

  2. America's Star Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Ray; Lance, Keith Curry

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal"'s new national rating of public libraries, the "LJ" Index of Public Library Service, identifies 256 "star" libraries. It rates 7,115 public libraries. The top libraries in each group get five, four, or three Michelin guide-like stars. All included libraries, stars or not, can use their scores to learn from their peers and improve…

  3. America's Star Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Ray; Lance, Keith Curry

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal"'s new national rating of public libraries, the "LJ" Index of Public Library Service, identifies 256 "star" libraries. It rates 7,115 public libraries. The top libraries in each group get five, four, or three Michelin guide-like stars. All included libraries, stars or not, can use their scores to learn from their peers and improve…

  4. COMBINATORIAL LIBRARIES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1997-01-01

    The invention provides a method for the production of a combinatorial library of compound of general formula (I) using solid phase methodologies. The cleavage of the array of immobilised compounds of the phthalimido type from the solid support matrix is accomplished by using an array of dinucleop......The invention provides a method for the production of a combinatorial library of compound of general formula (I) using solid phase methodologies. The cleavage of the array of immobilised compounds of the phthalimido type from the solid support matrix is accomplished by using an array...... of dinucleophiles, e.g. hydrazines (hydrazinolysis) or N-hydroxylamines, whereby a combinatorial dimension is introduced in the cleavage step. The invention also provides a compound library....

  5. 78 FR 26053 - Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-03

    ... Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a) (2) of the Federal... Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry (ACTPCMD). Dates and Times: May 20, 2013...

  6. 78 FR 48440 - Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ... Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry (ACTPCMD). Date and Time: August 29, 2013,...

  7. Black triangle dilemma and its management in esthetic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vijendra P; Uppoor, Ashita S; Nayak, Dilip G; Shah, Dipen

    2013-05-01

    In recent years, clinician and dentist's esthetic demand in dentistry have increased rapidly, driven by an enhanced awareness of beauty and esthetics. The ultimate goal in modern restorative dentistry is to achieve "white" and "pink" esthetics in esthetically important zones. "White esthetics" is the natural dentition or the restoration of dental hard tissues with suitable materials. "Pink esthetics" refers to the surrounding soft-tissues, which includes the interdental papilla and gingiva that can enhance or diminish the esthetic result. Reconstruction of the lost interdental papilla is one of the most challenging and least predictable problems. Restoration and maintenance of these tissues with adequate surgical and prosthetic techniques are a real challenge in modern esthetic dentistry. Treatment of marginal tissue recession, excessive gingival display, deficient ridges, ridge collapse, and esthetic defects around teeth and implants are some of the esthetic problems associated with the interdental papilla that have to be corrected in todays scenario which has been discussed in this review.

  8. Identification of special competences for Master degree in dentistry: draft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulbashna Ya.A.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the problem of identifying specific com­petencies of Master in dentistry. The results of the analysis of domestic and foreign scientific literature, legal documents regulating the implementation of competence-based approach in higher medical education is presented, international experience in the modernization of higher education, including medical, on the basis of changes in the educational paradigm on competence approach is studied. In the process of identifying set of special competences of Master of dentistry, the main ideas of the existing professional Standards in Dentistry were used. A worked out set of special competences reflects peculiarities of the profession in accordance with the algorithm, aimed to help dental patient in a vicious circle from disease prevention to rehabilitation after diseases, the latter includes legal, methodical, social and managerial aspects of the professional activities of a dentist.

  9. Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) in dentistry- A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasat, Vikrant; Gupta, Aditi; Ladda, Ruchi; Kathariya, Mitesh; Saluja, Harish; Farooqui, Anjum-Ara

    2014-12-01

    Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) is a non-pharmacological method which is widely used by medical and paramedical professionals for the management of acute and chronic pain in a variety of conditions. Similarly, it can be utilized for the management of pain during various dental procedures as well as pain due to various conditions affecting maxillofacial region. This review aims to provide an insight into clinical research evidence available for the analgesic and non analgesic uses of TENS in pediatric as well as adult patients related to the field of dentistry. Also, an attempt is made to briefly discuss history of therapeutic electricity, mechanism of action of TENS, components of TENs equipment, types, techniques of administration, advantages and contradictions of TENS. With this we hope to raise awareness among dental fraternity regarding its dental applications thereby increasing its use in dentistry. Key words:Dentistry, pain, TENS.

  10. A clinician's perspective on evidence-based dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Edward M

    2010-01-01

    Evidence-based dentistry seems to be more popular with researchers and those in policy positions than with clinicians. A private practitioner looks at the difference between the promise of evidence-based dentistry, which urges a blend of science, clinical judgment, and patient preferences, and the actuality of the rhetoric of rigorous and formulaic clinical trials. The same dichotomy exists in medicine, where the concept originated. Without subscribing to the formality of evidence-based dentistry, practitioners can place a valid scientific foundation under their practices by avoiding unproven assumptions, carefully monitoring outcomes, using measures that are clinically relevant, relating both positive and negative outcomes to possible explanations, and cautiously introducing new techniques. The standards for publishing clinical research seem to favor adherence to methodological rules over useful of outcomes.

  11. Evidence-based dentistry: fundamentals for the dentist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Janet; Chiappelli, Francesco; Spackman, Sue; Prolo, Paolo; Stevenson, Richard

    2006-06-01

    This article explains the fundamentals of evidence-based dentistry for the dentist. Evidence-based dentistry is a discipline whose primary participant is the translational researcher. Recent developments have emphasized the importance of this discipline (clinical and translational research) for improving health care. The process of evidence-based dentistry is the reciprocation of new and existing evidence between dentists and quantitative and qualitative researchers, facilitated by the translational researcher. The product of this reciprocation is the clinical practice guideline, or best evidence, that provides the patient options in choosing treatments or services. These options are quantified and qualified by decision, utility, and cost data. Using shared decision-making, the dentist and patient arrive at a mutual understanding of which option best meets an acceptable and preferred treatment course that is cost effective. This option becomes the clinical decision.

  12. Nanotechnology in Dentistry: Clinical Applications, Benefits, and Hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashirekha, Govind; Jena, Amit; Mohapatra, Satyajit

    2017-05-01

    Nanotechnology is emerging as an interdisciplinary field that is undergoing rapid development and has brought about enormous changes in medicine and dentistry. Nanomaterial-based design is able to mimic some of the mechanical and structural properties of native tissue and can promote biointegration. Nanotechnology has various applications in dentistry, including dentition renaturalization, therapy for dentin hypersensitivity, complete orthodontic realignment in a single visit, covalently bonding diamondized enamel, enhancing properties of root canal sealers, and continuous oral health maintenance using mechanical dentifrobots. A range of synthetic nanoparticles such as hydroxyapatite, bioglass, titanium, zirconia, and silver nanoparticles are proposed for dental restoration. This review focuses on the developments in the field of nanomaterials in dentistry in the form of tissue regeneration materials, implantable devices, nanocomposites, endodontic sealers etc. and issues of patient safety.

  13. The use of bay leaf (Eugenia polyantha Wight in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Sumono

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bay leaf or Eugenia polyantha Wight is a species that has several chemical properties. Bay leaf consists of tanine, flavonoid, essensial oil, including citric acid and eugenol. However, only few reports were published about the use of bay leaf in dentistry. Purpose: The aim of this article is to describe the chemical properties of Eugenia polyantha Wight that are widely used in dentistry. Reviews: The chemical properties of Eugenia polyantha Wight have analgesic, antibacterial, and anti-inflammatory effect, so they can be used as an alternative dental therapy. These properties can be used as a basic of therapy or as a basic ingredients of treatment. Conclusion: Eugenia polyantha Wight has some useful pharmacologic activities that are useful in dentistry. We suggest this article can be used as a basic knowledge for dental researchers.

  14. Green dentistry: the art and science of sustainable practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulimani, P

    2017-06-23

    Dentistry is highly energy and resource intensive with significant environmental impact. Factors inherent in the profession such as enormous electricity demands of electronic dental equipment, voluminous water requirements, environmental effects of biomaterials (before, during and after clinical use), the use of radiation and the generation of hazardous waste involving mercury, lead etc have contributed towards this. With rising temperatures across the world due to global warming, efforts are being made worldwide to mitigate the effects of environmental damage by resorting to sustainability concepts and green solutions in a myriad of ways. In such a scenario, a professional obligation and social responsibility of dentists makes it imperative to transform the practice of dentistry from a hazardous to a sustainable one, by adopting environmental-friendly measures or 'green dentistry'. The NHS in the UK has been proactive in implementing sustainability in healthcare by setting targets, developing guidance papers, initiating steering groups to develop measures and implementing actions through its Sustainable Development Unit (SDU). Such sustainable frameworks, specific to dentistry, are not yet available and even the scientific literature is devoid of studies in this field although anecdotal narratives abound. Hence this paper attempts to present a comprehensive evaluation of the existing healthcare sustainability principles, for their parallel application in the field of dentistry and lays out a blueprint for integrating the two main underlying principles of sustainability - resource use efficiency and eliminating or minimising pollution - in the day-to-day practice. The article also highlights the importance of social values, community care, engaging stakeholders, economic benefits, developing policy and providing leadership in converting the concept of green dentistry into a practised reality.

  15. Library rooms or Library halls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Serrai

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Library Halls, understood as Renaissance and Baroque architectural creations, along with the furnishings and decorations, accomplish a cognitive task and serve to transmit knowledge. The design of these spaces based on the idea that they should reflect the merits and content of the collections housed within them, in order to prepare the mind of the reader to respect and admire the volumes. In accordance with this principle, in the fifteenth century library rooms had a basilican shape, with two or three naves, like churches, reflecting thus the spiritual value of the books contained there. Next to that inspiring function, library rooms had also the task of representing the entire logical and conceptual universe of human knowledge in a figurative way, including for this purpose also the and Kunst- und Wunderkammern, namely the collections of natural, artficial objects, and works of art. The importance of library rooms and their function was understood already in the early decades of the seventeenth century, as underlined in the treatise, Musei sive Bibliothecae tam privatae quam publicae Extructio, Instructio, Cura, Usus, written by the Jesuit Claude Clément and published in 1635. Almost the entire volume is dedicated to the decoration and ornamentation of the Saloni, and the function of the library is identified exclusively with the preservation and decoration of the collection, neglecting more specifically bibliographic aspects or those connected to library science. The architectural structure of the Saloni was destined to change in relation to two factors, namely the form of books, and the sources of light. As a consequence, from the end of the sixteenth century – or perhaps even before if one considers the fragments of the Library of Urbino belonging to Federico da Montefeltro – shelves and cabinets have been placed no longer in the center of the room, but were set against the walls. This new disposition of the furniture, surmounted by

  16. Libraries in the early 21st century, v.2 an international perspective

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Following the pattern of the first volume, the second volume of Libraries in the early 21st century: An international perspective extends the range of countries covered. Each chapter covers a different country and describes the modern history, development of libraries and library technology. The careful selection of countries achieves good representation of professional library work on all continents.This two-volume work represents an excellent contribution to international librarianship and allows comparative studies both at graduate and professional level.

  17. Local anesthetics: dentistry's most important drugs, clinical update 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamed, Stanley F

    2006-12-01

    Local anesthetics are the safest most effective drugs in medicine for the control and management of pain. They also represent the most important drugs in dentistry. Today, dentistry has a spectrum of local anesthetics that permit pain control to be tailored to the specific needs of the patient: short-, intermediate-, and long-acting drugs. Bupivacaine has become a standard part of the armamentarium for postsurgical pain control while articaine has become the second-most used local anesthetic in the United States since its introduction in 2000. Despite an increase in anecdotal reports of paresthesia since articaine's introduction there is yet, no supporting scientific evidence.

  18. Biologic width and its importance in periodontal and restorative dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babitha Nugala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An adequate understanding of the relationship between periodontal tissues and restorative dentistry is paramount to ensure adequate form, function, esthetics and comfort of the dentition. While most clinicians are aware of this important relationship, uncertainty remains regarding specific concepts such as biologic width, its maintenance and applications of crown lengthening in cases of biologic width violation. Relevant publications regarding biologic width, its violation and management were identified up to August 2011 using manual and electronic database search in Medline, Embase, Directory of Open Access Journals and Google Scholar. This review discusses the concept of biologic width around tooth and its relationship to periodontal health and restorative dentistry.

  19. Ozone- A Biological Therapy in Dentistry- Reality or Myth?????

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Saraswathi V; K, Rajeshwari; Kohli, Shivani; Zohabhasan, Sayyad; Bhatia, Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    The usage of ozone in dentistry has been proposed because of its antimicrobial, disinfectant, biocompatibility and healing properties. In the last decade a number of therapeutic protocols with ozone have been developed to address common dental infections associated with periodontal disease, RCT and caries. Despite these advantages, therapeutic ozone's application in dentistry is limited because of its possible side effects. Hence, dental practitioners need to know the proper usage of ozone therapy that can provide better patient care and considerably cut down the time and cost of the treatment.

  20. The use of information and communication technology (ICT) in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, N J

    2013-02-01

    As the use of information and communication technology (ICT) becomes more widespread in dentistry the risk of breaching electronic commerce laws and patient confidentiality increases. It is necessary to be aware of the responsibilities internet usage entails, especially within a dental practice where the protection of patient information is of the utmost importance. More should be done to outline the various precautions that should be taken to ensure ICT security within the professional domain, as it would appear dentistry has been neglected with regard to receiving the proper ICT education, training and support systems.

  1. The use of CAD/CAM in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidowitz, Gary; Kotick, Philip G

    2011-07-01

    Computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) have become an increasingly popular part of dentistry over the past 25 years. The technology, which is used in both the dental laboratory and the dental office, can be applied to inlays, onlays, veneers, crowns, fixed partial dentures, implant abutments, and even full-mouth reconstruction. This article discusses the history of CAD/CAM in dentistry and gives an overview of how it works. It also provides information on the advantages and disadvantages, describes the main products available, discusses how to incorporate the new technology into your practice, and addresses future applications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Stem cells: A potential regenerative future in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Narang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the field of dentistry has embossed its presence by taking major leaps in research and further bringing it into practice. The most valuable ongoing research in regenerative dentistry is the study on stem cells. It was instituted that stem cells grow rapidly and have the potential to form specialized dentin, bone, and neuronal cells. These neuronal cells can be used for dental therapies and can provide better treatment options for patients. The stem cells based therapies could help in new advances in treating damaged teeth, inducing bone regeneration and treating neural injury as well.

  3. The role of virtual articulator in prosthetic and restorative dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koralakunte, Pavankumar Ravi; Aljanakh, Mohammad

    2014-07-01

    Virtual reality is a computer based technology linked with the future of dentistry and dental practice. The virtual articulator is one such application in prosthetic and restorative dentistry based on virtual reality that will significantly reduce the limitations of the mechanical articulator, and by simulation of real patient data, allow analyses with regard to static and dynamic occlusion as well as to jaw relation. It is the purpose of this article to present the concepts and strategies for a future replacement of the mechanical articulator by a virtual one. Also, a brief note on virtual reality haptic system has been highlighted along with newly developed touch enabled virtual articulator.

  4. Nonsurgical facelifts via cosmetic dentistry: fact or fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, J K

    1997-01-01

    The role that cosmetic dentistry can play in improving one's overall facial esthetics has become increasingly more meaningful to patients, dentists, and physicians as elective cosmetic procedures continue to gain momentum and acceptance in today's Western culture. By incorporating fundamental principals of proper smile design into a total esthetic facial enhancement treatment plan, dramatic improvements may be realized. As cosmetic dentists, maxillofacial surgeons, and orthodontists continue to make successful strides with their physician counterparts, they must continue to emphasize the key role that the smile commands. Although a review of current literature discloses few references to the specific topic of facial enhancements through cosmetic dentistry, it is nonetheless a topic for further discussion.

  5. Icons of dentistry: Dr Leon Eisenbud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranin, A Norman

    2006-01-01

    Dentistry has a long, often well documented history. Evidence of tooth pullings has been discovered in crude carvings on the walls of caves that are over 10,000 years old. The ancient Egyptians, the Athenians, and the early inhabitants of Rome required oral health care; in addition to tooth extractions, they underwent tumor removal, tamponade for hemorrhage, reduction of jaw fractures with gold wire ligatures, cautery using white hot platinum loops, and an additional variety of remedies and nostrums. Pain relief was offered, with courses of treatment as varied as postural change, alteration of ambient temperature, and vegetable and organic medicines in poultices or via oral and rectal routes. Through the centuries, great surgeons and physicians introduced various methods of treatment: Hippocrates codified ethical standards; Maimonides established pragmatic rules for physicians; LeFort categorized facial fractures; Pasteur clarified the need for sterilization; Semmelweis standardized antiseptic conditions in the operating theater; Morton and Wells discovered safer methods of analgesia; Freud explored the theraupeutic uses of narcotics; Roentgen championed X-ray imaging; Curie pioneered the use of chemotherapy; and Barton and Nightingale were models of empathy and patient care. In more recent times, we have profited from the genius of Watson and Crick (DNA); Fleming (penicillin); Venable and Stuck (Chrome-cobalt--molybdenum alloy); Gershkoff and Goldberg (the subperiosteal implant); Chercheve, Branemark, Linkow, Misch, Tatum, and Niznick (innovative root forms, titanium and its alloys, and sinus floor grafting). The 20th century has brought to us phenomenal imaging, breathtaking intrauterine fetal surgery, wildly promising stem cell research, and astonishing CADCAM techniques. We've had great teachers and clinicians who have introduced us to new forms of therapy and advanced methods, including the role of the hemidesmasomes, the essential elements of bone grafting

  6. Designing post-graduate Master's degree programs: the advanced training program in Dental Functional Analysis and Therapy as one example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratzmann, Anja; Ruge, Sebastian; Ostendorf, Kristin; Kordaß, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The decision to consolidate European higher education was reached by the Bologna Conference. Based on the Anglo-American system, a two-cycle degree program (Bachelor and Master) has been introduced. Subjects culminating in a state examination, such as Medicine and Dentistry, were excluded from this reform. Since the state examination is already comparable in its caliber to a Master’s degree in Medicine or Dentistry, only advanced Master’s degree programs with post-graduate specializations come into consideration for these subjects. In the field of dentistry numerous post-graduate study programs are increasingly coming into existence. Many different models and approaches are being pursued. Method: Since the 2004-2005 winter semester, the University of Greifswald has offered the Master’s degree program in Dental Functional Analysis and Therapy. Two and a half years in duration, this program is structured to allow program participation while working and targets licensed dentists who wish to attain certified skills for the future in state-of-the-art functional analysis and therapy. Aim: The design of this post-graduate program and the initial results of the evaluation by alumni are presented here. Conclusion: Our experiences show that the conceptual idea of an advanced Master’s program has proved successful. The program covers a specialty which leads to increased confidence in handling challenging patient cases. The sharing of experiences among colleagues was evaluated as being especially important. PMID:24872853

  7. Methods to increase underrepresented minority student enrollment and retention at the University of Louisville school of dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCants, Jennifer B

    2011-12-01

    The 2000 U.S. census reported that the population is 12.3 percent African American and 12.5 percent Hispanic; however, less than 4 percent of dentists are African American and 2 percent are Hispanic. To address this disparity, increasing the diversity of dental students is mandatory. The purpose of this article is to describe how the University of Louisville School of Dentistry (ULSD) has approached enrolling and retaining underrepresented minority students. ULSD has increased its pool of underrepresented minority applicants through three major methods: partnerships and collaborations, mentoring, and restructuring administration. Data from ULSD's admissions, institutional research, and planning along with annual enrollment surveys from the American Dental Education Association were used to determine the percentage of African American and Hispanic students entering (1993-2006) and graduating (1997-2010). From 1993 to 2010, African American enrollment increased from 3 to 9.6 percent of the entering class, and the graduation rate of African American students increased from 1.7 to 8.5 percent. Hispanic student enrollment also increased (1.6 percent in 1993 to 2.4 percent in 2006), but Hispanic student graduation rates decreased (3.5 percent in 1996 to 0 percent in 2010).

  8. Perioperative post graduate education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapnoullas, J

    1997-04-01

    This article describes post-graduate perioperative education in Australia at the Australian Catholic University and St. Vincent's Public Hospital: The Graduate Certificate in Perioperative Practice. The Australian Catholic University operates from eight campuses along the east coast of Australia. There are approximately 9000 students along with 1000 staff. The University consists of major faculties that all have clear relevance to the workplace-namely Arts and Sciences, Education and Health Sciences. Qualifications are offered at Certificate of Doctoral level studies in the areas of business, education, ethics, human movement, management, information systems, music, nursing, religion, social work and theology.

  9. Defining and Assessing Knowledge and Skill Outcomes in Undergraduate Pediatric Dentistry Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanes, Carole M.

    1990-01-01

    Methods of assessing the general goals for the Pediatric Dentistry Department at the Medical College of Georgia School of Dentistry are discussed. Goals are: (1) to prepare dentists to provide comprehensive dental care for the pediatric patient; (2) to create positive attitudes toward pediatric dentistry; (3) to encourage students to seek to…

  10. 76 FR 30951 - Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-27

    ... Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry (ACTPCMD). Date and Time: June 13, 2011, 1 p.m... Secretary, Division of Medicine and Dentistry, Bureau of Health Professions, Health Resources and...

  11. 77 FR 42513 - Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-19

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York... of Dentistry has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian... the human remains may contact the New York University College of Dentistry. Disposition of the...

  12. 77 FR 42507 - Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-19

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York... of Dentistry has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian... the human remains may contact the New York University College of Dentistry. Disposition of the...

  13. 77 FR 64116 - Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-18

    ... Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry (ACTPCMD). Date and Time: November 1, 2012, 10... Jerilyn K. Glass, M.D., Ph.D., Division of Medicine and Dentistry, Bureau of Health Professions,...

  14. 75 FR 36110 - Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-24

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York... Dentistry, New York, NY. The human remains were removed from Broward and Levy Counties, FL, and an unknown... assessment of the human remains was made by the New York University College of Dentistry professional...

  15. 75 FR 14446 - Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-25

    ... Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... Committee on Training in Primary CareMedicine and Dentistry (ACTPCMD). Date and Time: April 22, 2010, 8 a.m... of Health Professions, Division of Medicine and Dentistry. In the plenary session, the...

  16. 77 FR 9664 - Funds for Leadership Training in Pediatric Dentistry's Current Grantees; One-Year Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-17

    ... Dentistry's Current Grantees; One-Year Extension AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA... Pediatric Dentistry's (T17) Current Grantees. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration... Pediatric Dentistry awards to Columbia University, The Regents of the University of California and...

  17. 76 FR 64952 - Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-19

    ... Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... Committee on Training in Primary Care, Medicine and Dentistry . Dates and Times: November 7, 2011, 8:30 a.m.... Purpose: The Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry (``Advisory...

  18. 75 FR 64318 - Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-19

    ... Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... Committee on Training in Primary Care, Medicine and Dentistry (ACTPCMD). Date and Time: November 15, 2010, 8... Secretary, Division of Medicine and Dentistry, Bureau of Health Professions, Health Resources and...

  19. 75 FR 33327 - Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York... Dentistry, New York, NY. The human remains were removed from the Allred Bluff and Salts Bluff Rockshelters... assessment of the human remains was made by the New York University College of Dentistry professional...

  20. 77 FR 42508 - Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-19

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York... of Dentistry has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian... the human remains may contact the New York University College of Dentistry. Repatriation of the...

  1. 75 FR 33329 - Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York... Dentistry, New York, NY. The human remains were removed from Lovelock Cave, Churchill County, NV. This... remains was made by the New York University College of Dentistry professional staff in consultation...

  2. 75 FR 52021 - Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-24

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York... of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the New York University College of Dentistry... made by New York University College of Dentistry professional staff in consultation...

  3. Logit Analysis of Graduate Student Retention and Graduation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Mary Diederich; Markewich, Theodore S.

    Logit analysis coupled with the BMDP4F computer program (Brown, 1983) was used to derive an appropriate model for the study of student retention and graduation. The model was then applied to graduate student retention and graduation data from the University of Maryland, College Park (UMCP). Logit analysis is a method of determining what effects…

  4. The Graduates 1976.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gell, Robert L.; Armstrong, David F.

    A followup survey to determine the present circumstances of 1976 graduates and their attitudes toward their educational experiences resulted in the following findings: (1) almost equal numbers were employed as were in school; (2) of those in school, the majority were enrolled at the University of Maryland; (3) of those employed, most were earning…

  5. Graduate Education's Trying Times

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    As more and more people in China attend graduate schools, experts are raising questions about the quality of the education students receive, and some view the outlook as relatively bleak unless major changes are made. At the National Association for the Study of Higher Education's 2005 annual meeting in November at Shanghai Jiao Tong University (Xuhui campus), a task force led by Yang Jie,

  6. Library news

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Library

    2010-01-01

    The CERN Library has been providing electronic access to the "Techniques de l'Ingénieur" database for the past 8 months. As a reminder, this is a multidisciplinary database of over 4000 technical and scientific articles in French, covering a broad range of topics such as mechanical engineering, safety, electronics and the environment. In a few simple steps, you can create your own account, select the types of documents you are interested in and configure your settings so as to receive alerts when articles in your field of activity are published. You can now access this resource from outside CERN using the "remote access to electronic resources" service. Further information is available here. Direct access to the database. Remote access to electronic resources. If you have any questions or comments, don't hesitate to contact us at: library.desk@cern.ch.

  7. Anxiety, fainting and gagging in dentistry: Separate or overlapping constructs?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtem, C.M.H.H. van

    2016-01-01

    This thesis aimed to increase the knowledge about severe forms of anxiety, gagging and fainting in dentistry and to investigate whether these phenomena are overlapping or separate constructs. In Chapter 2 a literature review of twin studies showed that the estimated heritability of specific phobias

  8. Er:YAG and adhesion in conservative dentistry : clinical overview

    OpenAIRE

    Fornaini, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    The notion of utilizing laser technology in conservative dentistry was proposed in 1990 by Hibst and Keller, who introduced the possibility of using an Er:YAG laser as alternative to conventional instruments such as the turbine and micro-motor. In subsequent years a continuing effort has been made by clinicians, researchers and commercial companies to improve the technology.

  9. An ancient herb aloevera in dentistry: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indavara Eregowda Neena

    2015-01-01

    A. vera has been used in dentistry for its wound-healing effects, gingivitis, plaque control, and curing oral mucosal lesions. A. vera may also reduce the pain and duration of oral ulcers while speeding healing. The dentists should use A. vera at a level high enough to maximize its therapeutic benefit.

  10. Specialisation and specialist education in prosthetic dentistry in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Owall, B.; Welfare, R.; Garefis, P.; Hedzelek, W.; Hobkirk, J.; Isidor, F.; Jerolimov, V.; Jokstad, A.; Kalk, W.; Kronstrom, M.; van der Kuij, P.; Mericske-Stern, R.; Naert, I.; Narhi, T.; Nilner, K.; Polyzois, G.; Setz, J.; User, A.; Zonnenberg, A.

    2006-01-01

    This presentation reports on the results of a meeting of prosthodontists from selected European countries. The aim of the meeting was to analyse and promote specialisation and specialist education in Prosthetic Dentistry in Europe. Representatives for Europe were selected from the European Prosthodo

  11. SCDA task force on a special care dentistry residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Jeffery; Vishwanat, Lakshmi; Perry, Maureen; Messura, Judith; Dee, Kristin

    2016-07-01

    The Special Care Dentistry Association (SCDA) has acted on a proposal regarding the status of training in the care of patients with special needs. Two phases of action were undertaken. Phase 1: (a) examination of the literature on existing training and curricula in the care of patients with special needs and (b) a survey of existing postdoctoral programs in special needs. Phase 2: establish a group of experts who: (a) submitted to the Commission on Dental Accreditation a request to approve a postdoctoral general dentistry residency program in Special Care Dentistry and (b) created suggested accreditation standards for such postdoctoral programs. This article describes efforts by the SCDA to evaluate: The status of existing training of dental students in the care of patients with special needs. The number and characteristics of postdoctoral general dentistry programs offering formal training in the care of patients with special needs. Whether additional training in the care of patients with special needs is needed for dental students and -dentists. Possible actions by SCDA to impact the numbers of dentists trained each year in the care of patients with -special needs.

  12. Advanced functional polymers for regenerative and therapeutic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, W-F; Oka, K; Jung, H-S

    2015-07-01

    Use of ceramics and polymers continues to dominate clinical procedures in modern dentistry. Polymers have provided the basis for adhesives, tissue void fillers, and artificial replacements for whole teeth. They have been remarkably effective in the clinic at restoration of major dental functions after damage or loss of teeth. With the rapid development of polymer science, dental materials science has significantly lagged behind in harnessing these advanced polymer products. What they offer is new and unique properties superior to traditional polymers and crucially a range of properties that more closely match natural biomaterials. Therefore, we should pursue more vigorously the benefits of advanced polymers in dentistry. In this review, we highlight how the latest generation of advanced polymers will enhance the application of materials in the dental clinic using numerous promising examples. Polymers have a broad range of applications in modern dentistry. Some major applications are to construct frameworks that mimic the precise structure of tissues, to restore tooth organ function, and to deliver bioactive agents to influence cell behavior from the inside. The future of polymers in dentistry must include all these new enhancements to increase biological and clinical effectiveness beyond what can be achieved with traditional biomaterials.

  13. Critical Issues for Dentistry: PGD Program Directors Respond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchison, Kathryn A.; Cheffetz, Susan E.

    2002-01-01

    Surveyed directors of programs in postgraduate education in general dentistry (PGD) about critical issues facing their programs. Identified 12 themes: lack of postdoctoral applicants; student quality; professionalism and attitudes; number of postdoctoral positions; lack of funding; quality of facilities; special patient care; program curriculum;…

  14. Military and VA General Dentistry Training: A National Resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchison, Kathryn A.; Bachand, William; Buchanan, C. Richard; Lefever, Karen H.; Lin, Sylvia; Engelhardt, Rita

    2002-01-01

    Compared the program characteristics of the postgraduate general dentistry (PGD) training programs sponsored by the military and the Veterans Health Administration (VA). Gathered information on program infrastructure and emphasis, resident preparation prior to entering the program, and patients served and types of services provided. Programs…

  15. Stem cells in dentistry--part I: stem cell sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egusa, Hiroshi; Sonoyama, Wataru; Nishimura, Masahiro; Atsuta, Ikiru; Akiyama, Kentaro

    2012-07-01

    Stem cells can self-renew and produce different cell types, thus providing new strategies to regenerate missing tissues and treat diseases. In the field of dentistry, adult mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) have been identified in several oral and maxillofacial tissues, which suggests that the oral tissues are a rich source of stem cells, and oral stem and mucosal cells are expected to provide an ideal source for genetically reprogrammed cells such as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Furthermore, oral tissues are expected to be not only a source but also a therapeutic target for stem cells, as stem cell and tissue engineering therapies in dentistry continue to attract increasing clinical interest. Part I of this review outlines various types of intra- and extra-oral tissue-derived stem cells with regard to clinical availability and applications in dentistry. Additionally, appropriate sources of stem cells for regenerative dentistry are discussed with regard to differentiation capacity, accessibility and possible immunomodulatory properties.

  16. An introduction to standard setting methods in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puryer, J; O'Sullivan, D

    2015-10-09

    The aim of this paper is to give readers an overview of contemporary standard setting methods used within dental education, and to provide a better understanding of the subject. We hope that it will be of benefit not just to those in academic dentistry, but all practitioners involved with both undergraduate and postgraduate assessment.

  17. Forensic dentistry in human identification: A review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ata-Ali, Javier; Ata-Ali, Fadi

    2014-04-01

    An update is provided of the literature on the role of odontology in human identification, based on a PubMed-Medline search of the last 5 years and using the terms: "forensic dentistry" (n = 464 articles), "forensic odontology" (n = 141 articles) and "forensic dentistry identification" (n = 169 articles). Apart from these initial 774 articles, others considered to be important and which were generated by a manual search and cited as references in review articles were also included. Forensic dentistry requires interdisciplinary knowledge, since the data obtained from the oral cavity can contribute to identify an individual or provide information needed in a legal process. Furthermore, the data obtained from the oral cavity can narrow the search range of an individual and play a key role in the victim identification process following mass disasters or catastrophes. This literature search covering the last 5 years describes the novelties referred to buccodental studies in comparative identification, buccodental evaluation in reconstructive identification, human bites as a method for identifying the aggressor, and the role of DNA in dental identification. The oral cavity is a rich and noninvasive source of DNA, and can be used to solve problems of a social, economic or legal nature. Key words:Forensic identification, DNA, forensic dentistry, rugoscopy, cheiloscopy, saliva.

  18. Healthcare-associated viral and bacterial infections in dentistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laheij, A.M.G.A.; Kistler, J.O.; Belibasakis, G.N.; Valimaa, H.; de Soet, J.J.

    2012-01-01

    Infection prevention in dentistry is an important topic that has gained more interest in recent years and guidelines for the prevention of cross-transmission are common practice in many countries. However, little is known about the real risks of cross-transmission, specifically in the dental healthc

  19. Striving for excellence with evidence-based dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillette, Jane

    2009-09-01

    With an explosion of published dental research, experienced dental practitioners may desire to update their clinical knowledge. Evidence-based dentistry provides a unique opportunity for dental practitioners to strive for excellence of scientific knowledge through evidence-finding processes that are not only simple, but have a significant potential to improve patient health care outcomes.

  20. Digital dentistry: promise, reality and the role of software standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benalouane, A.; Bakker, Q.; Wismeijer, D.; Genuchten, M.

    2011-01-01

    Up until now, dentistry was mostly carried out in the "analogue" world: X-rays were examined on film, patient information was recorded on paper, impressions were poured in plaster to create models, models were waxed and physical dental articulators were used. Today, certain steps of the process can

  1. Material choice for restorative dentistry: inlays, onlays, crowns, and bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Bruce W

    2006-01-01

    New materials--specifically the new CAD/CAM zirconia-based systems--are available now for restorative dentistry. When esthetics are not a factor, gold remains the standard, particularly for intracoronal restorations and full posterior coverage. Tooth-colored crowns made with zirconia are new and offer great promise for the future, although more long-term in vivo studies are necessary.

  2. A Distance Learning Program in Advanced General Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Timothy A.; Raybould, Ted P.; Hardison, J. David

    1998-01-01

    Describes a University of Kentucky program in advanced general dentistry offered by compressed video and computer in remote areas of the state. Topics discussed include program development, the technology, instructional design principles used, student recruitment, program evaluation, student evaluation, faculty evaluation, laboratory exercises,…

  3. An Introduction to Silanes and Their Clinical Applications in Dentistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matinlinna, Jukka P.; Lassila, Lippo V. J.; Özcan, Mutlu; Yli-Urpo, Antti; Pekka K. Vallittu, [No Value

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: This overview presents a description of organofunctional trialkoxysilane coupling agents (silanes), their chemistry, properties, use, and some of the main clinical experiences in dentistry. Materials and Methods: The main emphasis was on major dental journals that have been reviewed from 19

  4. An Introduction to Silanes and Their Clinical Applications in Dentistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matinlinna, J.P.; Lassila, L.V.J.; Ozcan, M.; Yli-Urpo, A.; Vallittu, P.K.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: This overview presents a description of organofunctional trialkoxysilane coupling agents (silanes), their chemistry, properties, use, and some of the main clinical experiences in dentistry. Materials and Methods: The main emphasis was on major dental journals that have been reviewed from 19

  5. Workforce diversity in dentistry - current status and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Raul I; Blue Spruce, George; Sinkford, Jeanne C; Lopez, Michael J; Sullivan, Louis W

    2017-03-01

    The racial and ethnic diversity of the US oral health care workforce remains insufficient to meet the needs of an increasingly diverse population and to address persistent health disparities. The findings from a recent national survey of underrepresented minority dentists are reviewed and recommendations are made for enhancing diversity in the dental profession. © 2017 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  6. Implant Dentistry in General Practice. Part 1: Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Ken

    2016-06-01

    This paper, the first of two, provides an introduction to implant dentistry for the general dental practitioner. CPD/Clinical Relevance: Implant placement and restoration is becoming more common place in general dental practice to the point where it may already be considered a routine treatment option.

  7. Library Benchmarking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiji Suwarno

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The term benchmarking has been encountered in the implementation of total quality (TQM or in Indonesian termed holistic quality management because benchmarking is a tool to look for ideas or learn from the library. Benchmarking is a processof measuring and comparing for continuous business process of systematic and continuous measurement, the process of measuring and comparing for continuous business process of an organization to get information that can help these organization improve their performance efforts.

  8. Demand in Pediatric Dentistry for Sedation and General Anesthesia by Dentist Anesthesiologists: A Survey of Directors of Dentist Anesthesiologist and Pediatric Dentistry Residencies

    OpenAIRE

    Hicks, C. Gray; Jones, James E.; Saxen, Mark A.; Maupome,Gerardo; Sanders, Brian J.; Walker, LaQuia A.; James A. Weddell; Tomlin, Angela

    2012-01-01

    This study describes what training programs in pediatric dentistry and dental anesthesiology are doing to meet future needs for deep sedation/general anesthesia services required for pediatric dentistry. Residency directors from 10 dental anesthesiology training programs in North America and 79 directors from pediatric dentistry training programs in North America were asked to answer an 18-item and 22-item online survey, respectively, through an online survey tool. The response rate for the 1...

  9. Pulsed lasers in dentistry: sense or nonsense?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koort, Hans J.; Frentzen, Matthias

    1991-05-01

    The great interest in the field of laser applications in dentistry provokes the question, if all these new techniques may really fulfill advantages, which are expected after initial in-vitro studies. Whereas laser surgery of soft oral tissues has been developed to a standard method, laser treatment of dental hard tissues and the bone are attended with many unsolved problems. Different laser types, especially pulsed lasers in a wide spectrum of wavelengths have been proofed for dental use. Today neither the excimer lasers, emitting in the far uv-range from 193 to 351 nm, nor the mid-infrared lasers like Nd:YAG (1,064 μm), Ho:YAG (2,1 μm) and Er:YAG (2,96 μm) or the C02-laser (10,6 μm) show mechanism of interaction more carefully and faster than a preparation of teeth with diamond drillers. The laser type with the most precise and considerate treatment effects in the moment is the short pulsed (15 ns) ArF-excimer laser with a wavelength of 193 nm. However this laser type has not yet the effectivity of mechanical instruments and it needs a mirror system to deliver the radiation. Histological results point out, that this laser shows no significant pathological alterations in the adjacent tissues. Another interesting excimer laser, filled with XeCI and emitting at a wavelength of 308 nm has the advantage to be good to deliver through quartz fibers. A little more thermal influence is to be seen according to the longer wavelength. Yet the energy density, necessary to cut dental hard tissues will not be reached with the laser systems available now. Both the pulsed Er:YAG- (2,94 μm, pulse duration 250 s) and the Ho:YAG -laser (2,1 μm, pulse duration 250 μs) have an effective coupling of the laser energy to hydrogeneous tissues, but they do not work sufficient on healthy enamel and dentine. The influence to adjacent healthy tissue is not tolerable, especially in regard of the thermal damage dentine and pulp tissues. Moreover, like the 193 nm ArF-excimer laser

  10. Electives in Graduate Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Santosh; Zayapragassarazan, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Modern curricula have both compulsory portions and electives or portions chosen by students. Electives have been a part of graduate and postgraduate general higher education. Electives are included in various standards for graduate medical education and are also included in proposed Medical Council of India Regulations on Graduate Medical…

  11. A systematic appraisal of the Evidence-Based Dentistry Journal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Nikisha; Marshman, Zoe

    2016-09-01

    BackgroundThis systematic appraisal was conducted to determine if the Evidence-Based Dentistry Journal (EBDJ) acts as a reliable and contemporary source of knowledge for practitioners across all disciplines within dentistry.ObjectivesThe main objectives were to determine i) the year the articles were published and included in the EBDJ; ii) if the articles published covered all fields equally within dentistry; iii) the type of study design of the articles reported in the journal and; iv) the level of expertise of the writers of the commentaries.MethodsThis study used a systematic approach to assess the articles included in the journal. Data were extracted on the difference in the year the article was originally published and the year the article was included in the EBDJ, the number of articles in each dental discipline, the type of study designs included in the journal and the expertise of the commentators of each article. The information provided by the journal was validated by accessing the original articles through electronic databases.ResultsThe appraisal considered the 582 articles that met the inclusion criteria. Overall, 45.3% of the articles were included in the EBDJ in the same year and 44.8% of the articles were included a year after they were originally published. The number of articles varied across disciplines within dentistry: 23.7% from dental public health, 18.4% from periodontology and 11.8% from orthodontics, with only 4.6% from prosthodontics, 1% from oral pathology and 0.5% from dental materials. Most of the articles were systematic reviews and randomised controlled trials at 72% and 22.3% respectively. The writers of the commentaries were mostly academics and hospital consultants (71.2% and 13.6% commentators).ConclusionsOn the whole, it can be concluded that the journal acts as a reliable and contemporary source of knowledge/evidence for dentists, however, not all specialities within dentistry had equal coverage.

  12. Methodological Quality of Consensus Guidelines in Implant Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faggion, Clovis Mariano; Apaza, Karol; Ariza-Fritas, Tania; Málaga, Lilian; Giannakopoulos, Nikolaos Nikitas; Alarcón, Marco Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Background Consensus guidelines are useful to improve clinical decision making. Therefore, the methodological evaluation of these guidelines is of paramount importance. Low quality information may guide to inadequate or harmful clinical decisions. Objective To evaluate the methodological quality of consensus guidelines published in implant dentistry using a validated methodological instrument. Methods The six implant dentistry journals with impact factors were scrutinised for consensus guidelines related to implant dentistry. Two assessors independently selected consensus guidelines, and four assessors independently evaluated their methodological quality using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research & Evaluation (AGREE) II instrument. Disagreements in the selection and evaluation of guidelines were resolved by consensus. First, the consensus guidelines were analysed alone. Then, systematic reviews conducted to support the guidelines were included in the analysis. Non-parametric statistics for dependent variables (Wilcoxon signed rank test) was used to compare both groups. Results Of 258 initially retrieved articles, 27 consensus guidelines were selected. Median scores in four domains (applicability, rigour of development, stakeholder involvement, and editorial independence), expressed as percentages of maximum possible domain scores, were below 50% (median, 26%, 30.70%, 41.70%, and 41.70%, respectively). The consensus guidelines and consensus guidelines + systematic reviews data sets could be compared for 19 guidelines, and the results showed significant improvements in all domain scores (p < 0.05). Conclusions Methodological improvement of consensus guidelines published in major implant dentistry journals is needed. The findings of the present study may help researchers to better develop consensus guidelines in implant dentistry, which will improve the quality and trust of information needed to make proper clinical decisions. PMID:28107405

  13. Dormitory libraries: libraries in dormitories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Pavletič

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Dormitory libries are not justly treated in Slovenia. They have a double purpose: to develop student literacy, especially reading, critical and creative competence and, moreover, to provide students with opportunities for learning and active spending of free-time. This is made possible by means of a good collection of expertly arranged library material, which is regulary updated and presented to its users, both students and tutors alike. A questionnaire has helped us to find out that libraries in secondary school dormitories carry out their work rather successfully, especially from the viewpoint of poor facilities. The major problems are, nevertheless, the appropriate qualifications of those who fill the posts of librarian and low financial resources. Therefore, such activities should be thoroughly analysed and reconsidered in terms of possible effective solutions, if we want to at least maintain them, let alone develop them.

  14. Libraries for users services in academic libraries

    CERN Document Server

    Alvite, Luisa

    2010-01-01

    This book reviews the quality and evolution of academic library services. It revises service trends offered by academic libraries and the challenge of enhancing traditional ones such as: catalogues, repositories and digital collections, learning resources centres, virtual reference services, information literacy and 2.0 tools.studies the role of the university library in the new educational environment of higher educationrethinks libraries in academic contextredefines roles for academic libraries

  15. Discover Dentistry: encouraging wider participation in dentistry using a massive open online course (MOOC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, C W; Towers, A C; Jinks, P V; Symington, A

    2015-07-24

    This paper describes how a relatively new style of online learning, a massive open online course (MOOC), may be used to raise aspirations and widen participation in dental professions. A MOOC was designed and run with the aim of engaging prospective students of dental professions in learning and discussion. Over 4,200 learners signed up, and 450 students fully completed this first run of the course. The course attracted a significantly younger demographic than is typical for MOOCs, and nearly a third who responded to the pre-course survey reported they were doing the course specifically as preparation for a dental degree. The approach also provided a platform for public engagement on the subject of dentistry with participants, both dental professionals and members of the public, contributing to discussion around the learning materials from around the world, providing a unique, internationalised perspective of oral healthcare for learners. This study shows that there is genuine potential for MOOCs to involve people from disadvantaged backgrounds in higher education by offering free, accessible, enjoyable and engaging educational experiences. The data gives us cautious optimism that these courses can play a significant role within a platform of other WP interventions.

  16. Using ACRL Standards to Assess the Information Literacy of Graduate Students in an Education Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Jo Catalano

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective - This study investigates the information literacy of graduate education students, including those in doctoral cohorts. The Association for Research and College Libraries Information Literacy Standards were used a baseline for measurement.Methods - A survey was sent to all graduate students in the School of Education; it asked a combination of questions measuring students’ perceptions of their information literacy skills and testing their knowledge of information literacy.Results – A total of 172 surveys were returned. The results indicated that while there is a heavy reliance on internet sources, many students were able to determine which sources were reliable and which were not. After attending information instruction sessions, students were more familiar with library services and more inclined to use them.Conclusion - It was determined that a one credit course or multiple sessions of library instruction would better serve graduate students completing capstone projects.

  17. Survey of foreign graduate students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Peter M.

    In the 1983 American Institute of Physics (AIP) Graduate Student Survey, the issue of foreign versus national students in U.S. graduate programs was explored. In the past decade, the number of entering graduate students from foreign nations in American universities has risen from about 600 to about 1100, an increase from 23% in 1973 to 40% in 1983 of all entering physics graduate students in the United States. There are more than 10,000 graduate students in physics in the United StatesThe benefits, or lack thereof, of having foreign graduate students raises a number of philosophical points. Like all students, foreign students learn from academic programs; but at high competitive levels, they contribute as well. The essence of growth in any academic program is described by the creativity supplied by ever incoming students. In an academically competitive system the question of foreign students displacing U.S. students in graduate programs has no definition. On the other hand, what about the graduate job market after graduation? Some would point to the return of foreign graduates to their homeland as an example of U.S. education efforts not benefitting U.S. society, at least directly. Others worry about foreign graduates flooding the U.S. job market.

  18. Factors influencing dental students' specialty choice: a survey of ten graduating classes at one institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jane H; Kinnunen, Taru H; Zarchy, Marisa; Da Silva, John D; Chang, Brian Myung W; Wright, Robert F

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to survey ten graduating classes at Harvard School of Dental Medicine regarding students' specialty choice and factors influencing that choice. Students were surveyed once in 2008 (for the Classes of 2007-11) and again in 2013 (for the Classes of 2012-16). A prior article reported results regarding students' interest in and experiences with prosthodontics; this article presents results regarding their interest in all dental specialties and factors influencing those interests. Of a total 176 students in the Classes of 2012-16, 143 responded to the survey, for a response rate of 81%, compared to a 95% response rate (167 of total 176 students) for the Classes of 2007-11. The results showed that orthodontics was the most popular specialty choice, followed by oral and maxillofacial surgery. From the 2008 to the 2013 survey groups, there was an increase in the percentages of students planning to pursue oral and maxillofacial surgery, pediatric dentistry, and postdoctoral general dentistry. The educational debt these students expected to accrue by graduation also increased. The largest percentage of students chose "enjoyment of providing the specialty service" as the factor most influencing their specialty choice. "Prior dental school experience" and "faculty influence" were greater influences for students pursuing specialties than those pursuing postdoctoral general dentistry. Increased interest in particular disciplines may be driven by high debt burdens students face upon graduation. Factors related to mentoring especially influenced students pursuing specialties, demonstrating the importance of student experiences outside direct patient care for exposure to the work of specialists beyond the scope of predoctoral training. This finding suggests that dental schools should increase mentoring efforts to help students make career decisions based not on financial burden but rather on personal interest in the specialty, which is likely to have a

  19. 25-year analysis of a dental undergraduate research training program (BSc Dent) at the University of Manitoba Faculty of Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, J E; de Vries, J; Iacopino, A M

    2008-12-01

    Research in the context of the dental school has traditionally been focused on institutional/faculty accomplishments and generating new knowledge to benefit the profession. Only recently have significant efforts been made to expand the overall research programming into the formal dental curriculum, to provide students with a baseline exposure to the research and critical thinking processes, encourage evidence-based decision-making, and stimulate interest in academic/research careers. Various approaches to curriculum reform and the establishment of multiple levels of student research opportunities are now part of the educational fabric of many dental schools worldwide. Many of the preliminary reports regarding the success and vitality of these programs have used outcomes measures and metrics that emphasize cultural changes within institutions, student research productivity, and student career preferences after graduation. However, there have not been any reports from long-standing programs (a minimum of 25 years of cumulative data) that describe dental school graduates who have had the benefit of research/training experiences during their dental education. The University of Manitoba Faculty of Dentistry initiated a BSc Dent program in 1980 that awarded a formal degree for significant research experiences taking place within the laboratories of the Faculty-based researchers and has continued to develop and expand this program. The success of the program has been demonstrated by the continued and increasing demands for entry, the academic achievements of the graduates, and the numbers of graduates who have completed advanced education/training programs or returned to the Faculty as instructors. Analysis of our long-term data validates many recent hypotheses and short-term observations regarding the benefits of dental student research programs. This information may be useful in the design and implementation of dental student research programs at other dental schools.

  20. A survey of referral patterns to a paediatric dentistry unit over a 2-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, A J; Nunn, J H; Welbury, R R

    1994-12-01

    Following the changes in October 1990 in the payment system for children's dental treatment within the General Dental Service in the UK there has been widespread concern that repercussions would be felt in other branches of dentistry. The aim of this survey was to investigate the referral of children for specialist care to the Department of Child Dental Health in Newcastle upon Tyne after the changes in 1990, so that consultant clinics and the provision of advice and treatment could be targeted more effectively. Information was obtained from the patients' referral letters and from their hospital records between March 1991 and March 1993. There were 513 referrals (excluding those for orthodontic treatment, extractions under general anaesthesia and acute emergencies), the number more than doubling during the 2-year survey period. 83% of these patients lived within 15 miles of the hospital. 84% of these referrals were from general dental practitioners, and the greater proportion were from those who graduated within the previous 4 years. The most common reason for referral involved behaviour problems. Changes in the payment system that occurred in 1990 may have been a contributory factor in explaining these findings.

  1. Graduate Quantum Mechanics Reform

    CERN Document Server

    Carr, L D

    2008-01-01

    We address four main areas in which graduate quantum mechanics education in the U.S. can be improved: course content; textbook; teaching methods; and assessment tools. We report on a three year longitudinal study at the Colorado School of Mines using innovations in all four of these areas. In particular, we have modified the content of the course to reflect progress in the field in the last 50 years, use modern textbooks that include such content, incorporate a variety of teaching techniques based on physics education research, and used a variety of assessment tools to study the effectiveness of these reforms. We present a new assessment tool, the Graduate Quantum Mechanics Conceptual Survey, and further testing of a previously developed assessment tool, the Quantum Mechanics Conceptual Survey (QMCS). We find that graduate students respond well to research-based techniques that have previously been tested mainly in introductory courses, and that they learn a great deal of the new content introduced in each ve...

  2. Perception of Dental Public Health Competency among recent graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunkar, Ridhima B.; Basavarajappa, Puttaswamy; Raheel, Syed A.; Kujan, Omar B.

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: This study aimed to assess how competent the recent dental graduates perceive themselves to be in Dental Public Health. Materials and Methods: A 21-item structured, close-ended questionnaire study was carried out at the KLEVK Institute of Dental Sciences, Belgaum, India. Students assessed their competencies using a three-point ordinal scale. One hundred and thirty-three students were asked to rate their proficiency on a 21-item matrix of the dental public health program. The responses were grouped using the Likert-type scale. Frequencies descriptive data were generated, and statistical analysis of examined variables was carried out using the Chi-square test. Mann–Whitney test was conducted to identify the correlation between variables. Results: The overall mean score was 22.61 ± 10.94, highlighting confidence of the graduates in managing the oral health problems at the community level. Females showed higher competencies in functions related “to develop activities to motivate the community development,” “to motivate health and oral health through health education,” and “to motivate health and oral health through the creation of healthy settings.” While males reported greater competency for the function “to adjust the dental practice to situations of restrictions that limits it.” Conclusion: Recent dental graduates at the Institute perceived themselves competent in managing oral and dental health problems at the public level. Additional countrywide evidence regarding teaching and learning of public health dentistry is essential to compare the current experiences of dental graduates and ultimately enhance patient care. PMID:27652246

  3. Managing patients taking edoxaban in dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curto, Daniel; Sanchez, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Background Anticoagulation therapy is used in several conditions to prevent or treat thromboembolism. A new group of oral anticoagulants with clear advantages over classic dicoumarin oral anticoagulants (warfarin and acenocoumarol) has been developed in recent years. The Food and Drug Administration has approved edoxaban, dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban. Their advantages include: predictable pharmacokinetics, drug interactions and limited food, rapid onset of action and short half-life. However, they lack a specific reversal agent. Material and Methods This paper examines the available evidence regarding rivaroxaban and sets out proposals for clinical guidance of dental practitioners treating these patients in primary dental care. A literature search was conducted through July 2016 for publications in PubMed and Cochrane Library using the keywords “edoxaban”, “dabigatran”, “rivaroxaban”, “apixaban”, “new oral anticoagulants”, “novel oral anticoagulants”, “bleeding” and “dental treatment” with the “and” boolean operator in the last 10 years. Results The number of patients taking edoxaban is increasing. There is no need for regular coagulation monitoring of patients on edoxaban therapy. For patients requiring minor oral surgery procedures, interruption of edoxaban is not generally necessary. Management of patients on anticoagulation therapy requires that dentists can accurately assess the patient prior to dental treatments. Conclusions Their increased use means that oral care clinicians should have a sound understanding of the mechanism of action, pharmacology, reversal strategies and management of bleeding in patients taking edoxaban. There is a need for further clinical studies in order to establish more evidence-based guidelines for dental patients requiring edoxaban. Key words:Edoxaban, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, novel oral anticoagulants, bleeding. PMID:28210454

  4. Nepalese dental hygiene and dental students' career choice motivation and plans after graduation: a descriptive cross-sectional comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knevel, Ron J M; Gussy, Mark G; Farmer, Jane; Karimi, Leila

    2015-12-11

    This is the first study of its kind to provide data regarding the self-reported career choice motivation and intentions after graduation of dental and dental hygiene students in Nepal. The findings of this study can be used to inform future oral health workforce planning in Nepal. A cross-sectional survey of dentistry and dental hygiene students attending a large accredited dental college in Kathmandu, Nepal. Quantitative data were analysed using IBM® SPSS® 22. The respondents were given the opportunity to provide clarifying comments to some of the questions. Two hundred questionnaires were distributed, and 171 students completed the anonymous survey (response rate 86 %). Working in health care and serving the community were the most important initial motives for career choice, with significantly more dentistry students selecting their degree course because of the possibility to work flexible working hours (p interest in going abroad (p = .011) following graduation. Only 10 % of all students plan to live or work in rural areas after study. Most common preferred locations to live after graduation are urban (33 %) or abroad (38 %). Data suggest a preference to combine working in a hospital with working in their own practice (44 %) while interest in solely working in their own practice is low (unemployment or envision better chances abroad. Most of the students in this study expressed a preference to live in an urban area after graduation. Findings indicate that strong measures are required to incentivise students to consider rural work.

  5. Marketing the Virtual Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Jody Condit

    2009-01-01

    Far more people are familiar with their local public or college library facility than their library's website and online resources. In fact, according to a recent survey, 96% of Americans said they had visited a library in person, but less than one-third have visited their online library. Since everyone agrees that online library resources are…

  6. Perceptions of business skill development by graduates of the University of Michigan Dental School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Michael; Wiesen, Robert; Arnold, Sara; Taichman, Russell S; Taichman, Linda Susan

    2011-04-01

    Many graduating dentists leave dental school feeling that they are not prepared to start and run a dental practice. The aim of this pilot study was to explore the knowledge and perceptions dental graduates have in the area of practice management. A twenty-item survey was mailed in the fall of 2008 to nearly half of the University of Michigan dental school alumni who had graduated between the years of 1997 and 2007. Respondents were asked about their demographics, practice characteristics, and perceptions of knowledge/experience regarding practice management skills at the present time as well as at graduation. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. The majority of respondents were general practitioners (84 percent) aged thirty to thirty-nine practicing between six and ten years with practice incomes reported to be greater than $300,000 per year (79 percent). Most dentists reported being either an owner or co-owner of the practice (57 percent), and 33 percent reported being an associate in the practice. Upon graduation, 7 percent of the respondents felt that they had a strong knowledge of accounting or human resource issues; this perception increased to 47 percent at the present time. Similarly, less than 6 percent of respondents felt they understood issues pertaining to dental insurance upon graduation; this perception increased to 68 percent after having spent time in the workforce. In contrast to the large increase in knowledge/experience in business aspects of dentistry that had accrued since graduation, most alumni reported only a 7 percent increase in their knowledge of the legal aspects of dental practice. Results from this study indicate that interventions are needed to increase graduating dentists' knowledge of practice management and close the gap between their knowledge and its application in real life. The majority of alumni believed there is a need to improve the curriculum focused on these aspects of dental practice.

  7. Azadirachta indica: A herbal panacea in dentistry – An update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi, T.; Krishnan, Vidya; Rajendran, R; Madhusudhanan, N.

    2015-01-01

    Azadirachta indica commonly known as Neem, is an evergreen tree. Since time immemorial it has been used by Indian people for treatment of various diseases due to its medicinal properties. It possesses anti-bacterial, anti-cariogenic, anti-helminthic, anti-diabetic, anti-oxidant, astringent, anti-viral, cytotoxic, and anti-inflammatory activity. Nimbidin, Azadirachtin and nimbinin are active compounds present in Neem which are responsible for antibacterial activity. Neem bark is used as an active ingredient in a number of toothpastes and toothpowders. Neem bark has anti-bacterial properties, it is quite useful in dentistry for curing gingival problems and maintaining oral health in a natural way. Neem twigs are used as oral deodorant, toothache reliever and for cleaning of teeth. The objective of this article is to focus on the various aspects of Azadirachta indica in dentistry in order to provide a tool for future research. PMID:26009692

  8. Dentistry 4. X-ray diagnostics; Zahnheilkunde 4. Roentgendiagnostik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-07-01

    DIN pocketbook 267/4 gives an overview of the normative requirements of the new X-Ray and Radiation Protection Ordinance, which has been in effect since 1 November 2011. This DIN pocketbook is intended for anyone charged with professional responsibility for the use of ionizing radiation in dentistry, operators and users of x-ray devices, radiation protection officers, accredited experts, manufacturers as well as for anyone with an interest in radiation protection or optimal radiological diagnostics. It contains standards relating to the following areas: acceptance and constancy testing; devices for evaluating findings (monitors, film viewing devices), films, printers; archiving, designating, labelling. Adherence to the standards makes it possible to avoid distractive artefacts in x-ray images and optimise the quality of x-ray diagnostics in dentistry.

  9. Today prospects for tissue engineering therapeutic approach in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossù, Maurizio; Pacifici, Andrea; Carbone, Daniele; Tenore, Gianluca; Ierardo, Gaetano; Pacifici, Luciano; Polimeni, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    In dental practice there is an increasing need for predictable therapeutic protocols able to regenerate tissues that, due to inflammatory or traumatic events, may suffer from loss of their function. One of the topics arising major interest in the research applied to regenerative medicine is represented by tissue engineering and, in particular, by stem cells. The study of stem cells in dentistry over the years has shown an exponential increase in literature. Adult mesenchymal stem cells have recently been isolated and characterized from tooth-related tissues and they might represent, in the near future, a new gold standard in the regeneration of all oral tissues. The aim of our review is to provide an overview on the topic reporting the current knowledge for each class of dental stem cells and to identify their potential clinical applications as therapeutic tool in various branches of dentistry.

  10. Can we learn, teach and practise dentistry anywhere, anytime?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatoon, B; Hill, K B; Walmsley, A D

    2013-10-01

    Dentistry-related applications for mobile phones are becoming a popular way of accessing information for students, practitioners and patients. The aim of this article is to review the use of mobile technology, such as 'apps', within dentistry. Over time, there has been a change from desktop learning (D-learning) to mobile learning (M-learning) and this has only been possible with the aid of electronic media and the growth of the Internet. In spite of the increase in mobile applications, there is a need for any information to have a strong underlying evidence base. Several good examples of dental applications which take full advantage of this electronic medium are available. However, developers of mobile applications should provide good quality, peer-reviewed evidence to validate their material.

  11. Can Dentistry Have Two Contracts with the Public?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, David A

    2015-01-01

    The social contract is an implicit agreement between parts of society and society as a whole. Since the Middle Ages, the learned professions, recently including dentistry, have had a covenantal relationship with the public based on trust, exchanging monopoly privileges for benefiting the public good. Unlike commercial trade in commodities, professional relationships are grounded in ensuring an adequate level of oral health to all. A second contract is emerging where dentists relate to society as business operators, exchanging commodity services for a price. Recent actions by the Federal Trade Commission and the U.S. Supreme Court make it unlikely that dentistry will be able to enjoy only selected aspects of each contract while avoiding obligations that it finds unfavorable.

  12. Finite-element modeling and analysis in nanomedicine and dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Andy H; Conway, Richard C; Ben-Nissan, Besim

    2014-08-01

    This article aims to provide a brief background to the current applications of finite-element analysis (FEA) in nanomedicine and dentistry. FEA was introduced in orthopedic biomechanics in the 1970s in order to assess the stresses and deformation in human bones during functional loadings and in the design and analysis of implants. Since then, it has been applied with great frequency in orthopedics and dentistry in order to analyze issues such as implant design, bone remodeling and fracture healing, the mechanical properties of biomedical coatings on implants and the interactions at the bone-implant interface. More recently, FEA has been used in nanomedicine to study the mechanics of a single cell and to gain fundamental insights into how the particulate nature of blood influences nanoparticle delivery.

  13. "Practical skills" – Positioning of the GMA committee for dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheutzel, Petra

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The GMA committee for dentistry of the German Society for Medical Education (GMA considers its’ main purpose the representation and interconnection of all aspects of dentistry with and within the GMA. Teaching and assessing practical skills during training is traditionally of great importance in dental education. This is also reflected in the National Competence Based Catalogue of Learning Objectives for Dental Education (NKLZ. Practical skills are not comprised in a separate chapter as they are in the National Competence Based Catalogue of Learning Objectives for Medical Education (NKLM, but are considered in all sections of the NKLZ for the purpose of interdisciplinary patient- or disease-specific application, targeting the educational level of acting competency. The implementation of the associated joined interdisciplinary integrated educational concept has undoubtedly been a challenge for dental curriculum development against the backdrop of German Dental Licensure Act dating back to 1955.

  14. NUTRITIONAL ASPECTS OF FOUR COMMON SPICES USED IN DENTISTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjan Katyal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spices are used for aroma, flavor, colour and preservation of foodstuff. Spices may be derived from many parts of the plant viz bark, buds, flowers, fruits, leaves, rhizomes, roots, seeds and the entire plant. Spices are frequently desiccated, dehydrated, processed or distilled to prepare extracts such as essential oils from the raw spice material. These processing techniques may hamper the nutritional aspect of these spices. Moreover, the pharmacological activity of these spices is also altered by these processing methods. Better nutritional prospect of any natural product helps in proper growth of gums in case of dentistry. The current review tries to focus on the nutritional aspects of four common spices used in dentistry.

  15. Gene therapy in dentistry: tool of genetic engineering. Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Khushboo; Singh, Saurabh; Garg, Kavita Nitish

    2015-03-01

    Advances in biotechnology have brought gene therapy to the forefront of medical research. The concept of transferring genes to tissues for clinical applications has been discussed nearly half a century, but the ability to manipulate genetic material via recombinant DNA technology has brought this goal to reality. The feasibility of gene transfer was first demonstrated using tumour viruses. This led to development of viral and nonviral methods for the genetic modification of somatic cells. Applications of gene therapy to dental and oral problems illustrate the potential impact of this technology on dentistry. Preclinical trial results regarding the same have been very promising. In this review we will discuss methods, vectors involved, clinical implication in dentistry and scientific issues associated with gene therapy.

  16. Evidence-based dentistry resources for dental practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarbecz, Mark

    2008-01-01

    The American Dental Association has taken an active role in support of an evidence-based approach to the practice of dentistry. This concept integrates clinically relevant scientific evidence into a clinician's decision-making process, along with the patient's oral and medical history, the dentist's own expertise and the patient's treatment needs and preferences. The purpose of this article is to assist dentists in locating and retrieving quality research reports and research evidence which can be integrated into the clinical decision making process. The research methodologies which constitute the foundation of evidence-based dentistry are described. The advantages and disadvantages associated with literature that summarizes research, such as the literature review, the systematic review and meta-analysis are described. Evidence-based resources for dentists are described, such as journals specializing in an evidence-based approach, online resources such as PubMed and the Cochrane Collaboration.

  17. Mortality incidence in outpatient anesthesia for dentistry in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkansah, P J; Haas, D A; Saso, M A

    1997-06-01

    Studies determining anesthesia mortality rates in dentistry have been published, yet a similar investigation has never been conducted in Canada. Therefore the objective of this study was to determine the incidence of mortality when general anesthesia or deep sedation was administered by qualified dentists in the province of Ontario. Mortality data were obtained from the years 1973 to 1995 inclusive. The number of general anesthetics and deep sedations administered annually by qualified in dental offices was calculated by surveying all oral and maxillofacial surgeons and dental anesthetists in Ontario in 1990 and 1995. The results provided an estimate of 2,830,000 cases from 1973 to 1995 inclusive. Over this time period there were four deaths associated with cases in which either an oral and maxillofacial surgeon or dental anesthetist administered the general anesthetic or deep sedation, yielding a mortality rate of 1.4 per 1,000,000. This mortality incidence is similar to rates already published for outpatient dentistry.

  18. Education, regulation, representation and remuneration in dentistry - who does what?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabiat-Pour, S; Pepper, T; Fisher, N L

    2011-05-14

    Dentistry in the United Kingdom demands a wide range of supportive and regulative bodies, the roles of which are intertwined, overlapping and changeable. The interaction between these bodies is not always clear, and often the present-day role of the body is far removed from its original purpose. Consequently, the system can appear daunting and opaque. Even so, a thorough understanding of this topic is requisite for those considering applying for higher specialist training, and pertinent for practitioners with an interest in the dental political arena. We hope this paper goes some way towards unravelling the tangle of boards, committees, associations, societies and councils that commonly influence dentistry, and provides a starting point for those interested in increasing their knowledge of the profession at the strategic level.

  19. Ocular complications associated with local anesthesia administration in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boynes, Sean G; Echeverria, Zydnia; Abdulwahab, Mohammad

    2010-10-01

    The most widely used method for controlling pain during dental procedures is the intraoral administration of local anesthetics in close proximity to a specific nerve or fiber to obtund nerve conduction. The most commonly anesthetized nerves in dentistry are branches or nerve trunks associated with the maxillary and mandibular divisions of the trigeminal nerve (cranial nerve V). However, other nerves may be inadvertently affected by intraoral local anesthesia injections, resulting in anesthetic complications of structures far from the oral cavity. Practitioners should be aware of potential ocular complications following intraoral injections in dentistry. These complications include oculomotor paralysis and vision loss. The knowledge of these conditions and their potential cause should alert the dentist to the importance of appropriate injection techniques and an understanding of management protocol.

  20. Visual pedagogy in dentistry for children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäckman, B; Pilebro, C

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to present and evaluate a model based on visual pedagogy for the introduction of dentistry to preschool children with autism. The model is based on the knowledge that it is easier for these children to communicate via pictures than via words. A book has been produced with distinct color-prints describing every step when visiting the dentist. The project has been designed in cooperation with the multi-professional team involved with the children. A total of sixteen children with autism participated in the project. Evaluation was done after 1.5 years. The ability of the children to cooperate is compared with that of sixteen children with autism of the same ages who were not treated with this method. The capacity of the children in the project to cooperate during dental treatment is superior to that of the control-children. Visual pedagogy is a way of introducing dentistry to children with autism.

  1. Minimal intervention concept: a new paradigm for operative dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalli, Mehmet; Çolak, Hakan; Mustafa Hamidi, M

    2012-08-01

    The current treatment philosophy is to prevent and detect dental disease at the earliest stage in order to avoid invasive treatment. With the current understanding of the nature of dental disease and its process, the treatment philosophy is now changing to a more conservative approach and the concept of minimal intervention is gaining popularity in modern dentistry throughout the world. It is now established that demineralized but non-cavitated enamel and dentine can be healed and traditional surgical approach of drilling and filling may no longer be necessary as this only treats the symptoms of the disease and not the cause. However, when surgical intervention is indicated, the least invasive techniques such as preventive resin restoration and minimal cavity preparation are utilized. The aim of this article is to give dental professionals an overview of the concepts of minimal intervention dentistry and recent innovations in dental technology in both the diagnosis and treatment of dental caries.

  2. Does photodynamic therapy enhance standard antibacterial therapy in dentistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Fawad; Romanos, Georgios E

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether or not photodynamic therapy enhanced standard antibacterial therapy in dentistry. Photodynamic therapy when used as an adjunct to conventional periodontal therapy kills more bacteria than when conventional periodontal therapy is used alone. To address the focused question, "Does photodynamic therapy enhance killing of oral bacteria?" PubMed/MEDLINE(®) and Google Scholar databases were explored. Original human and experimental studies and studies using photodynamic therapy for killing oral bacteria were included. Letters to the Editor, historic reviews, and unpublished data were excluded. Photodynamic therapy significantly reduces periodontopathogenic bacteria including Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Prevotella intermedia, and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Photodynamic therapy kills cariogenic bacteria (such as Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sanguis), bacteria associated with infected root canals, and those associated with periimplantitis. Photodynamic therapy, when used as an adjunct to conventional oral disinfection protocols, enhances standard antibacterial therapy in dentistry.

  3. [Communication and dental practice. Practica in social dentistry and information].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorter, R C; den Dekker, J; Schut, H; Eijkman, M A

    1994-09-01

    An overview is presented of several undergraduate courses given by the Department of Social Dentistry and Dental Health Education (ACTA). A short description of the contents of courses in communication skills, treatment of anxious patients and practice management is given together with the results of a student-evaluation. Students consider these courses useful and relevant for future dental practice. This is especially true in case the direct relevance for clinical practice is clear.

  4. Unconventional dentistry: Part III. Legal and regulatory issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, B H

    2000-10-01

    This is the third in a series of 5 articles providing a contemporary overview and introduction to unconventional dentistry (UD) and its correlation to unconventional medicine (UM). UD presents issues of dental quackery, fraud and malpractice, and it also engenders professional concerns about public protection and professional risks. Case reports illustrate numerous issues. The reader is encouraged to evaluate the cases for problems related to malpractice, fraud, ethics, behaviours and professionalism. A discussion of ethical issues is beyond the scope of this paper.

  5. Aminophylline Fails to Reverse Conscious Sedation with Midazolam in Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigo, Chandra R.; Rosenquist, Jan B.

    1986-01-01

    A double blind, randomized crossover study investigated whether aminophylline reverses the conscious sedation with midazolam in dentistry to result in quicker clinical recovery than when midazolam is used alone. Twenty-five patients between 17-30 years of age (ASA Grade 1) were sedated with midazolam for bilateral third molar extractions, one side being operated on one visit. Aminophylline or normal saline was given at the end of the surgical procedure on one visit and the alternative during ...

  6. The application of CAD / CAM technology in Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susic, I.; Travar, M.; Susic, M.

    2017-05-01

    Information and communication technologies have found their application in the healthcare sector, including the frameworks of modern dentistry. CAD / CAM application in dentistry is the process by which is attained finished dental restoration through fine milling process of ready ceramic blocks. CAD / CAM is an acronym of english words Computer-Aided-Design (CAD) / Computer-Aided-Manufacture (CAM), respectively dental computer aided design and computer aided manufacture of inlays, onlays, crowns and bridges. CAD / CAM technology essentially allows you to create a two-dimensional and three-dimensional models and their materialization by numerical controlled machines. In order to operate more efficiently, reduce costs, increase user/patient satisfaction and ultimately achieve profits, many dental offices in the world have their attention focused on implementation of modern IT solutions in everyday practice. In addition to the specialized clinic management software, inventory control, etc., or hardware such as the use of lasers in cosmetic dentistry or intraoral scanning, recently the importance is given to the application of CAD / CAM technology in the field of prosthetic. After the removal of pathologically altered tooth structure, it is necessary to achieve restoration that will be most similar to the anatomy of a natural tooth. Applying CAD / CAM technology on applicable ceramic blocks it can be obtained very quick, but also very accurate restoration, in the forms of inlays, onlays, bridges and crowns. The paper presents the advantages of using this technology as well as satisfaction of the patients and dentists by using systems as: Cercon, Celay, Cerec, Lava, Everest, which represent imperative of modern dentistry in creating fixed dental restorations.

  7. Putting the practice into evidence-based dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulter, Ian D

    2007-01-01

    Whenever a new field emerges in health care, a period is experienced in which the field tries to define itself. This is the position evidence-based dental practice finds itself in at the moment. In this paper, it is argued that, for dentistry to enter into the brave new world of evidence-based practice, it will require some rethinking of the research enterprise in the profession.

  8. Minimally invasive dentistry: paradigm shifts in preparation design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeSage, Brian P

    2009-01-01

    While the concept of minimally invasive dentistry has long been considered a rational, viable approach to restorative care, preparation design, material science, and long-term evidentiary support have only recently begun to provide the foundation necessary to support such treatment in the everyday practice. This article reviews the fundamental paradigm shift evidenced in contemporary prosthodontics as required to facilitate the emerging interest in delivering conservative restorative alternatives.

  9. Eco-friendly dentistry: Need of future. An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savy Arora

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In today's world, it is very necessary to understand the importance of being eco-friendly in every facet of our lives. The color “green” has healing power and denotes renewal, growth, and hope. “Eco-friendly dentistry” attempts to reduce the detrimental impact of dental practices on the environment and promote environmental awareness and sustainability to patients. This paper attempts to cover all possible aspects of making a dental practice eco-friendly, both in a dental perspective as well as a general perspective. While establishing an eco-friendly dental workplace, the dentist needs to assess his choices in planning the infrastructure and purchasing of equipment and dental materials. Eco-friendly dentistry is a newly evolving practice of dentistry, which encompasses a simultaneous devotion to sustainability, prevention, precaution, and a minimally invasive patient-centric, as well as global-centric treatment. There are two main avenues for implementing eco-friendly dentistry: (1 appropriate policy development and implementation and (2 dentists taking responsibility/ownership in the absence of policies and regulations. Although in some cases, it may take a little extra effort or money; dentists throughout the world are doing their best to reduce the environmental impact of the dental practice. Although the commitment of one small dental office cannot save the planet, certainly, the collective efforts of many small offices as well as large dental hospitals/colleges can ensure that dentists, at least, will not be responsible for destroying it. This article discusses various factors that can be incorporated into dental practice that can help make dentistry eco-friendly.

  10. Doing qualitative research in dentistry and dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, S; Brown, G

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to assist dental researchers to develop their expertise in qualitative research. It sketches the key characteristics of qualitative research; summarises theoretical perspectives; outlines the core skills of qualitative data collection and the procedures which underlie three methods of qualitative research: interviewing, focus groups and concept maps. The paper offers some guidance on writing qualitative research and provides examples of qualitative research drawn from dentistry and dental education.

  11. Midazolam: Review of a Versatile Agent for Use in Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    Midazolam is a relatively new benzodiazepine that is widely used in both medicine and dentistry. Its multiplicity of uses makes it unique among the benzodiazepines, and its water solubility and lack of active metabolites give it distinct advantages over diazepam. This paper reviews the clinical pharmacology of midazolam, provides comparison with diazepam and presents current information regarding its indications, limitations, advantages, disadvantages, methods of administration and precaution...

  12. Cost differentials of dental outpatient care across clinical dentistry branches

    OpenAIRE

    Jovana Rančić; Nemanja Rančić; Nemanja Majstorović; Vladimir Biočanin; Marko Milosavljević; Mihajlo Jakovljević

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dental care presents affordability issues in Central & Eastern European transitional economies due to lack of insurance coverage in most countries of the region and almost complete out-of-pocket payments by citizens.Objective: Real world estimates on cost differentials across clinical dentistry branches, ICD-10 diagnostic groups and groups of dental services.Methods: Prospective case-series cost analysis was conducted from the patient perspective. A six months time horizon was...

  13. Analyses of Mentoring Expectations, Activities, and Support in Canadian Academic Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Marni R.; Marshall, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Mentoring expectations, activities, and support in Canadian college and university libraries were investigated by surveying 332 recent MLIS graduates, practicing academic librarians, and library administrators. Findings indicate that the presence of a mentoring program will help attract new librarians, retain them, and aid in restructuring efforts…

  14. The Teaching of Reference in American Library Schools. Historical Paper 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheney, Frances Neel

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the author proposes to present a superficial view of what is being taught in the 32 American Library Association accredited graduate library schools. She briefly discusses and answers the following three questions: (1) Who is teaching reference?; (2) What is being taught?; and (3) How is it being taught? [For the commentary on…

  15. Disturbingly Weak: The Current State of Financial Management Education in Library and Information Science Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Robert H.; Kaufman, Paula T.; Atkinson, Amy L.

    2015-01-01

    Financial management skills are necessary for responsible library management. In light of the profession's current emphasis on financial literacy, the authors posed four questions: (1) to what extent are library and information science schools providing courses in financial management for their graduates; (2) what is the quality and quantity of…

  16. Learning to Provide 3D Virtual Reference: A Library Science Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Megan; Purpur, Geraldine; Abbott, Lisa T.

    2009-01-01

    In spring semester 2009, two of the authors taught LIB 5020--Information Sources & Services to graduate library science students at Appalachian State University. The course covers information seeking patterns and provides an overview of reference services. The course is also designed to examine and evaluate library reference materials and…

  17. Disturbingly Weak: The Current State of Financial Management Education in Library and Information Science Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Robert H.; Kaufman, Paula T.; Atkinson, Amy L.

    2015-01-01

    Financial management skills are necessary for responsible library management. In light of the profession's current emphasis on financial literacy, the authors posed four questions: (1) to what extent are library and information science schools providing courses in financial management for their graduates; (2) what is the quality and quantity of…

  18. The Teaching of Reference in American Library Schools. Historical Paper 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheney, Frances Neel

    2015-01-01

    In this article, the author proposes to present a superficial view of what is being taught in the 32 American Library Association accredited graduate library schools. She briefly discusses and answers the following three questions: (1) Who is teaching reference?; (2) What is being taught?; and (3) How is it being taught? [For the commentary on…

  19. Assessing the Impact of Gender and Race on Earnings in the Library Science Labor Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeper, Darren; Smith, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    Using data from the 2003 National Survey of College Graduates, this paper examines earnings in the library science labor market and assesses the impact of gender on the income attainment process. We use this cross-sectional dataset to determine if there are significant income differences between male and female library science professionals. The…

  20. Social Media in Academic Libraries: Engaging in 140 Characters or Less

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    The Future Voices in Public Services column is a forum for students in graduate library and information science programs to discuss key issues they see in academic library public services, to envision what they feel librarians in public service have to offer to academia, to tell of their visions for the profession, or to tell of research that is…

  1. Learning to Provide 3D Virtual Reference: A Library Science Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Megan; Purpur, Geraldine; Abbott, Lisa T.

    2009-01-01

    In spring semester 2009, two of the authors taught LIB 5020--Information Sources & Services to graduate library science students at Appalachian State University. The course covers information seeking patterns and provides an overview of reference services. The course is also designed to examine and evaluate library reference materials and other…

  2. Accessibility, Collaboration, and Staffing: Revamping the Model for Academic Library Video Collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGeary, Bryan James

    2015-01-01

    This column contains information on how students in graduate library and information science programs participate in a forum to discuss key issues they see in academic library public services, to envision what they feel librarians in public service have to offer to academia, to state their visions for the profession, or to tell of research that is…

  3. Agricultural Libraries and Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Keith W., Ed.; Pisa, Maria G., Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Eleven articles address issues relating to agricultural libraries and information, including background on agricultural libraries and information, trend management, document delivery, reference services, user needs and library services, collection development, technologies for international information management, information sources,…

  4. Italian library associations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ksenija Petaros-Kmetec

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In Italy, five library associations of national significance function at present. There are special associations of ecclesiastic libraries, prison libraries, architecture libraries and libraries with artistic material. The role of the general national association, covering all types of libraries including documentation centres, is played by the Italian Library Association. It strive for the development of a contemporary Italian library system comparable to international standards, monitors library legislation, promotes education for librarians and keeps the librarians and the broader public informed about the importance of libraries and librarianship for society. The activity and efforts of the association are reflected through their website offering much information and links to similar sites. ILA presents and realises its activities for both, the librarians and the public users. A great deal of actions promoting libraries and the Library Association might be interesting for Slovenia and perhaps transferred to our environment.

  5. Brazilian scientific production on herbal medicines used in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.D. Castro

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to critically analyze the scientific production published in specialized Brazilian journals concerning the use of medicinal plants in dentistry. A literature review was carried out using an indirect documentation technique by means of a bibliographical study. Four examiners performed independent searches in Brazilian journals of medicinal plants indexed in the database SciELO (Brazilian Journal of Pharmacognosy; Brazilian Journal of Medicinal Plants; Brazilian Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences; and Acta Botanica Brasilica using the descriptors "herbal medicine/phytotherapy" or "medicinal plants" and "dentistry ". The articles published from 2002 to 2012 addressing the use of medicinal plants in dentistry were included and analyzed. The searches based on the descriptors and reading of abstracts, resulted in 155 articles. Of these, 44 were read in full and a total of 16 publications met the eligibility criteria and were selected. Laboratory studies predominated (10 and were limited to the evaluation of antimicrobial properties by means of tests for determining inhibitory, fungicidal and bactericidal concentrations. Three literature reviews and only one clinical trial with no blinding and randomization were found. It is highlighted the need for better methodological designs in the researches and greater production of clinical or in vivo studies.

  6. Open Access: Concepts, findings, and recommendations for stakeholders in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Fang; Shen, Cenyu; Walsh, Tanya; Glenny, Anne-Marie; Worthington, Helen

    2017-09-01

    Open Access (OA) to the scientific literature, a recent revolution in scientific communication, is now required by an increasing number of funders and institutions. The aims of this narrative review are to raise awareness of OA-related concepts and recent research findings among stakeholders in dentistry and to help them make better use of OA and relevant resources. Published journal articles and relevant online materials. OA-related definitions and research findings, the approaches to OA, as well as its motivating factors, benefits, 'citation advantage', and mandate policies are introduced. Moreover, the phenomenon of predatory publishing and the status quo of OA in dentistry are discussed. Recommendations are made for stakeholders to avoid and address the hazards of predatory publishing, and for dental researchers to make their work OA in an appropriate manner. Knowledge about concepts on OA, associated resources and research findings are important for researchers and other users of dental research to make full, appropriate use of OA, and help reduce the avoidable waste caused by inaccessible research. We need more studies into the use and development of OA in dentistry. In addition, joint efforts are required to eliminate the threat of predatory publishing to the dental profession. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Black triangle dilemma and its management in esthetic dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijendra P Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, clinician and dentist′s esthetic demand in dentistry have increased rapidly, driven by an enhanced awareness of beauty and esthetics. The ultimate goal in modern restorative dentistry is to achieve "white" and "pink" esthetics in esthetically important zones. "White esthetics" is the natural dentition or the restoration of dental hard tissues with suitable materials. "Pink esthetics" refers to the surrounding soft-tissues, which includes the interdental papilla and gingiva that can enhance or diminish the esthetic result. Reconstruction of the lost interdental papilla is one of the most challenging and least predictable problems. Restoration and maintenance of these tissues with adequate surgical and prosthetic techniques are a real challenge in modern esthetic dentistry. Treatment of marginal tissue recession, excessive gingival display, deficient ridges, ridge collapse, and esthetic defects around teeth and implants are some of the esthetic problems associated with the interdental papilla that have to be corrected in todays scenario which has been discussed in this review.

  8. Enduring symbols of dentistry: international metaphors of dental science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearn, J

    2008-12-13

    Dentists' contributions to science and society extend beyond the practice of clinical dentistry and preventive oral health. Such service encompasses contributions to biology specifically and more generally to societal good works for which dentists are particularly esteemed. The profession of dentistry promotes the history and heritage of its craft and those who practise it. Enduring symbols of dentistry take many forms. These include metonymic emblems such as those of Cadmus and Saint Apollonia and the portrayal of effigies of twentieth century dentists on eponymous medals. Other enduring symbols are to be found in the names of streets and towns (eg Normanville in Australia) which commemorate dentists; and in the worldwide scientific names of plants and animal species which perpetuate singular contributions of dentists to biological science. Such include the scientific names of grasses (Deyeuxia rodwayi) after the Tasmanian dentist, Dr Leonard Rodway (1853-1936); seaweeds (Jeannerettia sp.) after a seaweed of the Pacific and Southern Oceans, after Dr Henry Jeannerett (1802-1886); gastropods (Typhina yatesi) after Dr Lorenzo Yates (1837-1909); copepods (eg Mimocalanus heronae) named to commemorate the life and works of Gayle Ann Heron (b.1923), a dental hygienist of the University of Washington, USA; and crabs (eg Cancer bellianus) named to commemorate the life and works of the leading British dentist of his day, Thomas Bell (1792-1880). This paper explores this theme of the creation and promotion of enduring symbols of dental science - enshrined in the civic, numismatic and taxonomic record.

  9. EUROPEAN AND INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS ON MEDICAL DEVICES FOR DENTISTRY.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan Deliversky

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Standards are produced for many different products and services, and may be created for company, national, regional or global application. In Europe there are three different categories of standard: International standard – a standard adopted by an international standardization organization; European standard – a standard adopted by a European standardization body; National standard – a standard adopted by a national standardization body and made available to the public. Harmonized standards play a special role in the EU. A harmonised standard is a European standard elaborated on the basis of a request from the European Commission to a recognised European Standards Organisation to develop a European standard that provides solutions for compliance with a legal provision. Most standards for dental materials have been harmonized through a so-called cumulative standard (EN 1641:2009 - Dentistry - Medical devices for dentistry - Materials. This European Standard specifies general requirements for materials used in the practice of dentistry for the restoration of the form and function of the dentition and which are medical devices. A multiplicity of laws, standards, and recommendations regulate the marketing of medical devices. The medical doctor and the dentist should be informed about the European and international standards concerning medical devices and use only those for which appropriate information is available. The manufacturer/importer is responsible for its products and is potentially liable for damages.

  10. Minimally Invasive Dentistry--concepts and techniques in cariology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericson, Dan; Kidd, Edwina; McComb, Dorothy; Mjör, Ivar; Noack, Michael J

    2003-01-01

    The concept 'Minimally Invasive Dentistry' can be defined as maximal preservation of healthy dental structures. Within cariology, this concept includes the use of all available information and techniques ranging from accurate diagnosis of caries, caries risk assessment and prevention, to technical procedures in repairing restorations. Dentists are currently spending more than half their time replacing old restorations. The main reasons for restoration failures are secondary caries and fractures, factors that are generally not addressed in the technical process of replacing a restoration. Prevailing concepts on minimally invasive dentistry seem to be 'product or technique-motivated', challenging one technique or product with another, rather than focusing on a general concept. New knowledge of caries progression rates has also led to substantial modification of restorative intervention thresholds and further handling of the disease. New diagnostic tools for caries lesion detection, caries risk assessment and focused preventive treatments have decreased the need for early restorative interventions. In parallel to this, new techniques for cutting teeth and removing decay have evolved. This paper focuses on describing minimally invasive dentistry in cariology from a conceptual perspective, relating to clinical caries diagnosis, restorative intervention thresholds and operative procedures, with special reference to survival of tunnel and slot restorations and to repair vs. replacement of defective restorations.

  11. Stem cells in dentistry--Part II: Clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egusa, Hiroshi; Sonoyama, Wataru; Nishimura, Masahiro; Atsuta, Ikiru; Akiyama, Kentaro

    2012-10-01

    New technologies that facilitate solid alveolar ridge augmentation are receiving considerable attention in the field of prosthodontics because of the growing requirement for esthetic and functional reconstruction by dental implant treatments. Recently, several studies have demonstrated potential advantages for stem-cell-based therapies in regenerative treatments. Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) are now an excellent candidate for tissue replacement therapies, and tissue engineering approaches and chair-side cellular grafting approaches using autologous MSCs represent the clinical state of the art for stem-cell-based alveolar bone regeneration. Basic studies have revealed that crosstalk between implanted donor cells and recipient immune cells plays a key role in determining clinical success that may involve the recently observed immunomodulatory properties of MSCs. Part II of this review first overviews progress in regenerative dentistry to consider the implications of the stem cell technology in dentistry and then highlights cutting-edge stem-cell-based alveolar bone regenerative therapies. Factors that affect stem-cell-based bone regeneration as related to the local immune response are then discussed. Additionally, pre-clinical stem cell studies for the regeneration of teeth and other oral organs as well as possible applications of MSC-based immunotherapy in dentistry are outlined. Finally, the marketing of stem cell technology in dental stem cell banks with a view toward future regenerative therapies is introduced. Copyright © 2012 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Appropriate and inappropriate referrals to a unit of conservative dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, F J; Goodall, C A; Hayes, F

    1999-10-01

    Inappropriate referrals to secondary care are an unnecessary cost, notwithstanding the effect on waiting lists. It is essential therefore that only those patients whose referrals are appropriate are actually referred for secondary care. This project aimed to determine whether referrals to a unit of conservative dentistry are appropriate. The records of 120 consecutive new patient referrals who had been examined by one consultant in the unit of conservative dentistry at Glasgow Dental Hospital and School were obtained. A pro forma was designed on which synopses of the relevant clinical findings were written. These synopses were examined by four general dental practitioners (GDPs). A referral was considered appropriate if three or four of the GDPs considered it to be so, a referral was considered inappropriate if three or four of the GDPs concurred. Of the 120 cases examined, a majority of the GDP assessors agreed that 54 warranted referral, with 23 of these being referrals for toothwear. Agreement was not reached in 35 cases, while 31 referrals were considered inappropriate. Of the 31 cases which were considered inappropriate, 27 were thought to be within the scope of general practitioners. In conclusion, the results suggest that around one quarter of referrals to a unit of conservative dentistry are inappropriate. It would appear that a number of GDPs are unable or unwilling to treat a variety of simple conditions in practice and it may be that the development of referral guidelines is necessary to ensure that only those patients who merit a specialist opinion are referred for this service.

  13. Computer-Based Technologies in Dentistry: Types and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajaa Mahdi Musawi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available During dental education, dental students learn how to examine patients, make diagnosis, plan treatment and perform dental procedures perfectly and efficiently. However, progresses in computer-based technologies including virtual reality (VR simulators, augmented reality (AR and computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM systems have resulted in new modalities for instruction and practice of dentistry. Virtual reality dental simulators enable repeated, objective and assessable practice in various controlled situations. Superimposition of three-dimensional (3D virtual images on actual images in AR allows surgeons to simultaneously visualize the surgical site and superimpose informative 3D images of invisible regions on the surgical site to serve as a guide. The use of CAD/CAM systems for designing and manufacturing of dental appliances and prostheses has been well established.This article reviews computer-based technologies, their application in dentistry and their potentials and limitations in promoting dental education, training and practice. Practitioners will be able to choose from a broader spectrum of options in their field of practice by becoming familiar with new modalities of training and practice.Keywords: Virtual Reality Exposure Therapy; Immersion; Computer-Aided Design; Dentistry; Education

  14. Universal adhesives: the next evolution in adhesive dentistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Every so often a new material, technique, or technological breakthrough spurs a paradigm shift in the way dentistry is practiced. The development and evolution of reliable enamel and dentin bonding agents is one such example. Indeed, the so-called "cosmetic revolution" in dentistry blossomed in large part due to dramatic advances in adhesive technology. It is the ability to bond various materials in a reasonably predictable fashion to both enamel and dentin substrates that enables dentists to routinely place porcelain veneers, direct and indirect composites, and a plethora of other restorative and esthetic materials. In fact, the longevity and predictability of many (if not most) current restorative procedures is wholly predicated on the dentist's ability to bond various materials to tooth tissues. Adhesive systems have progressed from the largely ineffective systems of the 1970s and early 1980s to the relatively successful total- and self-etching systems of today. The latest players in the adhesive marketplace are the so-called "universal adhesives." In theory, these systems have the potential to significantly simplify and expedite adhesive protocols and may indeed represent the next evolution in adhesive dentistry. But what defines a universal system, and are all these new systems truly "universal" and everything they are claimed to be? This article will examine the origin, chemistry, strengths, weaknesses, and clinical relevance of this new genre of dental adhesives.

  15. Graduate Education in a Small Business Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bering, E. A., III; Longmier, B.; Giambusso, M.

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports on the issues that confront a professor when supervising graduate students and postdocs whose research work is done on site at a small business. The advantages include relative freedom from having to write proposals; the excitement of working on topics that have clear, direct uses; more extensive engineering support than many students get; and hands on day to day mentoring from the rest of the team. Students get direct instruction in technology transfer and small business processes. The disadvantages include isolation from the rest of the students in your Department and campus life, physical isolation from resources such as the seminar program, library, health center, and other student services. In addition, students who need "introduction to research" practicum instruction in electronics and computer skills will not do well. Finally, care must be taken to avoid including proprietary data in the core argument of the work.

  16. Graduate Mathematical Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kelly, James J

    2006-01-01

    This up-to-date textbook on mathematical methods of physics is designed for a one-semester graduate or two-semester advanced undergraduate course. The formal methods are supplemented by applications that use MATHEMATICA to perform both symbolic and numerical calculations. The book is written by a physicist lecturer who knows the difficulties involved in applying mathematics to real problems. As many as 40 exercises are included at the end of each chapter. A student CD includes a basic introduction to MATHEMATICA, notebook files for each chapter, and solutions to selected exercises. Free soluti

  17. Otoplasty: A graduated approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, H M

    1999-01-01

    Numerous otoplastic techniques have been described for the correction of protruding ears. Technique selection in otoplasty should be done only after careful analysis of the abnormal anatomy responsible for the protruding ear deformity. A graduated surgical approach is presented which is designed to address all contributing factors to the presenting auricular deformity. The approach starts with the more conservative cartilage-sparing suturing techniques, then proceeds to incorporate other more aggressive cartilage weakening maneuvers. Applying this approach resulted in better long-term results with less postoperative lateralization than that encountered on using the cartilage-sparing techniques alone.

  18. INTRODUCTION: GRADUATE STUDENT SCHOLARSHIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laverne Jacobs

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Windsor Yearbook of Access to Justice is proud to publish issue 32 (1. This issue features a special section highlighting the scholarship of graduate students. While it is always a pleasure to read promising work by newer scholars in the fields of law and social justice, we are certain that this collection of articles represents some of the finest and thought-provoking scholarship stemming from current graduate students in law. The articles stem from a graduate student essay contest that WYAJ held in 2013 and for which we received many submissions. The collection of selected papers offers a view of legal and interdisciplinary research examining issues that are topically diverse but which are all of deep, long-term importance to the world of access to justice. A reader of the special section on Graduate Student Scholarship will find explorations of access to justice from the perspectives of equality rights, discretion, adjudication and methods of legal service delivery, to name a few. A prize was offered to two papers judged to be of exceptional quality. I am very pleased to announce that the winners of those two prizes are Andrew Pilliar, for his article “Exploring a Law Firm Business Model to Improve Access to Justice” and Blair A. Major, for his contribution, “Religion and Law in R v NS: Finding Space to Re-think the Balancing Analysis”. The Editorial Board thanks all those who submitted papers to the contest and to this final special issue of the Windsor Yearbook of Access to Justice. Another notable feature of this issue is the introduction of a section called Research Notes. The Yearbook will periodically publish peer-reviewed research notes that present the findings of empirical (quantitative, qualitative or mixed method research studies. This section aims to contribute to the growing and important body of empirical scholarship within the realm of access to justice socio-legal research. We hope that you enjoy

  19. Novice Academic Librarians Provide Insight into Choosing Their Careers, Graduate School Education, and First Years on the Job. A Review of: Sare, L., Bales, S., & Neville, B. (2012). New academic librarians and their perceptions of the profession. portal: Libraries and the Academy, 12(2), 179-203. doi: 10.1353/pla.2012.0017

    OpenAIRE

    Carol D. Howe

    2012-01-01

    Objective – To study the ways in which noviceacademic librarians’ perceptions oflibrarianship develop from the time theydecide to attend library school through theirfirst 6 to 24 months of library work.Design – Grounded theory method utilizingtwo qualitative research techniques: one-onone,face-to-face interviews and documentanalysis.Setting – The libraries of three Texasuniversities, three Texas four-year colleges,and one Texas community college.Subjects – 12 professional academic librariansw...

  20. The benefits of evidence-based dentistry for the private dental office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillette, Jane; Matthews, Joseph D; Frantsve-Hawley, Julie; Weyant, Robert J

    2009-01-01

    Dentistry over the last 100 years has been characterized by improved approaches to education and practice. Parallel to trends in the field of medicine as a whole, dentistry is moving toward evidence-based practices. The goal of evidence-based dentistry is the assurance, through reference to high-quality evidence, that care provided is optimal for the patient and that treatment options are presented in a manner that allows for fully informed consent. As we transition toward broad-based use of evidence-based dentistry approaches in clinical practice, many dental offices will benefit from a better understanding of how evidence-based dentistry can improve patient outcomes. This article lists the likely benefits evidence-based dentistry can provide to patients, staff, and dentists when routinely adopted in daily practice.