WorldWideScience

Sample records for dentistry corporate author

  1. Corporate dentistry in 2032?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Michael

    2012-07-01

    During the last 20 years, there has been considerable growth in the number of dental practices owned by corporate bodies. At present, well over 800 practices are owned by such bodies and they employ over 3000 dentists. This paper describes the factors that have led to this growth and explores the advantages and disadvantages of 'corporate' dentistry for patients, dentists, and the dental team. It then considers how and why dental practice may change over the next 20 years and concludes that by 2032 the small one-dentist practice may well be in the past. It is likely that smaller practices will have to work in some form of association if they are to survive. Although their current model is unstable, corporates are likely to adapt to a changing environment. By 2032, in some cases, dentistry may well be taken out of its conventional setting, into supermarkets or a school environment.

  2. Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    The specialty of Dental Surgery has progressed from the "blood and acrylic" of the early seventies. Dentistry has undergone a quantum leap over the past twenty-five years, with improvements in both technique and technology, bringing us the sophisticated procedures used in today's practice.

  3. Authority and Democracy in Corporate Governance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. van Oosterhout (Hans)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractAlthough McMahon offers a potentially valuable extension of Joseph Raz's conceptualization of authority by distinguishing three different kinds of authority, this paper argues, first, that his account of the conditions and considerations that would justify managerial authority is problem

  4. Authority and Democracy in Corporate Governance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. van Oosterhout (Hans)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractAlthough McMahon offers a potentially valuable extension of Joseph Raz's conceptualization of authority by distinguishing three different kinds of authority, this paper argues, first, that his account of the conditions and considerations that would justify managerial authority is

  5. 77 FR 45715 - Application of Key Lime Air Corporation for Commuter Authority

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    ...] Application of Key Lime Air Corporation for Commuter Authority AGENCY: Department of Transportation. ACTION... Lime Air Corporation fit, willing, and able, and awarding it a Commuter Air Carrier...

  6. 78 FR 21344 - Grant of Authority for Subzone Status, Hemlock Semiconductor Corporation, (Polysilicon), Hemlock...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-10

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Grant of Authority for Subzone Status, Hemlock Semiconductor Corporation... Semiconductor Corporation, located in Hemlock, Michigan (FTZ Docket 61-2011, filed 10-5-2011); Whereas, notice... Semiconductor Corporation, located in Hemlock, Michigan (Subzone 140C), as described in the application...

  7. 76 FR 771 - Grant of Authority for Subzone Status; Dow Corning Corporation (Silicones); Carrollton...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-06

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Grant of Authority for Subzone Status; Dow Corning Corporation (Silicones... warehousing facilities of Dow Corning Corporation, located in Carrollton, Elizabethtown and Shepherdsville... to the manufacturing of silicones at the facilities of Dow Corning Corporation, located in...

  8. Is the Current Way of Constructing Corporate Authority Records Still Useful?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Jin

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Catalogers have been establishing corporate body name headings (and other entities in their original language in the official form, as they appear most frequently on the title pages of publications for print publications, for many years. A random sample of corporate headings from the Library of Congress Name Authority File created during 1998–2002 was searched on the Web via Google to find corporate Web pages. The purpose of this research is to begin to answer the question: Does the current way of constructing corporate authority records still help users find resources by and about corporate bodies in the online public access catalog in this Web-oriented environment?

  9. 78 FR 54449 - Subzone 8I, Authorization of Production Activity, Whirlpool Corporation (Washing Machines); Clyde...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-04

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Subzone 8I, Authorization of Production Activity, Whirlpool Corporation (Washing Machines); Clyde and Green Springs, Ohio On May 1, 2013, Whirlpool Corporation (Whirlpool) submitted a notification of proposed production activity to the Foreign-Trade Zones (FTZ) Board for its facility...

  10. 77 FR 48150 - Carolina Gas Transmission Corporation; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-13

    ... Grover Compressor Station. Carolina Gas states that it would convert the three standby compressor units... Energy Regulatory Commission Carolina Gas Transmission Corporation; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization Take notice that on July 25, Carolina Gas Transmission Corporation (Carolina Gas), 601 Old Taylor...

  11. 78 FR 59649 - Subzone 26G, Authorization of Production Activity, Roper Corporation, (Kitchen Ranges), Lafayette...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Subzone 26G, Authorization of Production Activity, Roper Corporation, (Kitchen Ranges), Lafayette, Georgia On May 21, 2013, Roper Corporation submitted a notification of...

  12. 77 FR 6057 - Approval for Manufacturing Authority, Foreign-Trade Zone 22, Baxter Healthcare Corporation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-07

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Approval for Manufacturing Authority, Foreign-Trade Zone 22, Baxter Healthcare Corporation, (Pharmaceutical and Biological Intravenous Product Manufacturing), Chicago, IL Pursuant to its... District, grantee of Foreign-Trade Zone 22, has requested manufacturing authority on behalf of...

  13. 77 FR 70139 - Foreign-Trade Zone 8-Toledo, OH; Authorization of Production Activity; Whirlpool Corporation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 8--Toledo, OH; Authorization of Production Activity; Whirlpool Corporation (Washing Machines); Clyde and Green Springs, OH On July 20, 2012 the...

  14. 29 CFR 453.20 - Corporate sureties holding grants of authority from the Secretary of the Treasury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Corporate sureties holding grants of authority from the... REQUIREMENTS OF THE LABOR-MANAGEMENT REPORTING AND DISCLOSURE ACT OF 1959 Qualified Agents, Brokers, and Surety Companies for the Placing of Bonds § 453.20 Corporate sureties holding grants of authority from...

  15. 78 FR 21100 - Grant of Authority for Subzone Status; Dow Corning Corporation (Silicon-Based Products); Midland, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-09

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Grant of Authority for Subzone Status; Dow Corning Corporation (Silicon-Based... subzone with certain manufacturing authority at the silicon- based products manufacturing facility of Dow... facility of Dow Corning Corporation, located in Midland, Michigan (Subzone 140B), as described in...

  16. Cosmetic Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you have stained, broken or uneven teeth, cosmetic dentistry can help. Cosmetic dentistry is different from orthodontic treatment, which can straighten your teeth with braces or other devices. Cosmetic dental procedures include Bleaching to make teeth whiter ...

  17. 75 FR 52927 - Foreign-Trade Zone 29; Application for Subzone Authority; Dow Corning Corporation; Extension of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-30

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 29; Application for Subzone Authority; Dow Corning Corporation; Extension of Rebuttal Period Based on a request from Dow Corning Corporation (Dow Corning), the rebuttal period on the preliminary recommendation for the application for ] subzone status at the...

  18. 75 FR 72801 - Reissuance of the Subzone Grant of Authority for Subzone 70M, General Motors Corporation, Lansing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Reissuance of the Subzone Grant of Authority for Subzone 70M, General Motors Corporation, Lansing, MI Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade Zones Act of June 18, 1934, as amended (19 U.S.C. 81a-81u), the Foreign-Trad...

  19. 76 FR 80886 - Approval for Manufacturing Authority; Foreign-Trade Zone 26; Makita Corporation of America; (Hand...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-27

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Approval for Manufacturing Authority; Foreign-Trade Zone 26; Makita Corporation... Manufacturing); Buford, GA Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade Zones Act of June 18, 1934, as..., Georgia Foreign-Trade Zone, Inc., grantee of Foreign-Trade Zone 26, has requested manufacturing...

  20. 17 CFR 200.30-1 - Delegation of authority to Director of Division of Corporation Finance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Director of Division of Corporation Finance. 200.30-1 Section 200.30-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges... Division of Corporation Finance. Pursuant to the provisions of Pub. L., No. 87-592, 76 Stat. 394 (15 U.S.C... otherwise, the following functions to the Director of the Division of Corporation Finance, to be...

  1. 75 FR 44760 - Foreign-Trade Zone 29; Application for Subzone Authority; Dow Corning Corporation; Extension of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-29

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 29; Application for Subzone Authority; Dow Corning... the preliminary recommendation for the application for subzone status at the Dow Corning Corporation (Dow Corning) facilities in Carrollton, Elizabethtown and Shepherdsville, Kentucky (75 FR 31763,...

  2. Corporate Governance in the Debate on CSR and Ethics: Sensemaking of Social Issues in Management by Authorities and CEOs

    OpenAIRE

    Y. FASSIN; A. VAN ROSSEM; 1958-

    2010-01-01

    Research Question/Issue: The aim of the present exploratory cognitive study is to uncover how opinion leaders, i.e. CEOs and other authorities in the domain of social issues in management, understand and differentiate the various concepts pertaining to corporate governance, CSR and business ethics. The present study with the Repertory Grid Technique (RGT) extends the sensemaking analysis, to the whole spectrum of social issues in management. For this research 41 RGT interviews were conducted ...

  3. ETHICAL CHALLENGES IN AESTHETIC DENTISTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius NEAGU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aesthetic dentistry is a branch of dentistry which aims primarily at improving patient’s physical appearance and, to a lesser extent, the functionality of teeth. This field raises particular ethical dilemmas and requires a careful evaluation of patient’s needs and wishes versus his/her clinical best interests. In this article, the authors discuss the main ethical challenges in the field of aesthetic dentistry in the light of the four “classical” principles of bioethics: autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence and justice. The authors conclude that the principles of medical ethics should be at the very foundation of the field of aesthetic dentistry, for establishing a patient-physician relationship which could lead to optimum clinical outcomes, while respecting the wishes of the patient and promoting his/her best interests.

  4. Transnational Private Authority in Education Policy in Jordan and South Africa: The Case of Microsoft Corporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanji, Zahra

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore Microsoft Corporation as a new international actor shaping educational reforms and practices. This study examines how the implementation of Microsoft's global Partners in Learning (PiL) program varied and was mediated by national politics and national institutional practices in two different contexts,…

  5. Minimally Invasive Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to your desktop! more... What Is Minimally Invasive Dentistry? Article Chapters What Is Minimally Invasive Dentistry? Minimally ... techniques. Reviewed: January 2012 Related Articles: Minimally Invasive Dentistry Minimally Invasive Veneers Dramatically Change Smiles What Patients ...

  6. Radiation incidents in dentistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovelock, D.J. [Dental Hospital and School, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom). Dept. of Radiology

    1996-12-31

    Most dental practitioners act as their own radiographer and radiologist, unlike their medical colleagues. Virtually all dental surgeons have a dental X-ray machine for intraoral radiography available to them and 40% of dental practices have equipment for dental panoramic tomography. Because of the low energy of X-ray equipment used in dentistry, radiation incidents tend to be less serious than those associated with other aspects of patient care. Details of 47 known incidents are given. The advent of the 1985 and 1988 Ionising Radiation Regulations has made dental surgeons more aware of the hazards of radiation. These regulations, and general health and safety legislation, have led to a few dental surgeons facing legal action. Because of the publicity associated with these court cases, it is expected that there will be a decrease in radiation incidents arising from the practice of dentistry. (author).

  7. 76 FR 81475 - Foreign-Trade Zones 140 and 78 Applications for Subzone Authority Dow Corning Corporation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-28

    ... Corporation, Hemlock Semiconductor Corporation and Hemlock Semiconductor, L.L.C.; Notice of Public Hearing and... Semiconductor Corporation facility in Hemlock, Michigan (76 FR 63282, 10/12/2011) and the Hemlock...

  8. Tissue engineering in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Neel, Ensanya Ali; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Salih, Vehid M; Kim, Hae-Won; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2014-08-01

    of this review is to inform practitioners with the most updated information on tissue engineering and its potential applications in dentistry. The authors used "PUBMED" to find relevant literature written in English and published from the beginning of tissue engineering until today. A combination of keywords was used as the search terms e.g., "tissue engineering", "approaches", "strategies" "dentistry", "dental stem cells", "dentino-pulp complex", "guided tissue regeneration", "whole tooth", "TMJ", "condyle", "salivary glands", and "oral mucosa". Abstracts and full text articles were used to identify causes of craniofacial tissue loss, different approaches for craniofacial reconstructions, how the tissue engineering emerges, different strategies of tissue engineering, biomaterials employed for this purpose, the major attempts to engineer different dental structures, finally challenges and future of tissue engineering in dentistry. Only those articles that dealt with the tissue engineering in dentistry were selected. There have been a recent surge in guided tissue engineering methods to manage periodontal diseases beyond the traditional approaches. However, the predictable reconstruction of the innate organisation and function of whole teeth as well as their periodontal structures remains challenging. Despite some limited progress and minor successes, there remain distinct and important challenges in the development of reproducible and clinically safe approaches for oral tissue repair and regeneration. Clearly, there is a convincing body of evidence which confirms the need for this type of treatment, and public health data worldwide indicates a more than adequate patient resource. The future of these therapies involving more biological approaches and the use of dental tissue stem cells is promising and advancing. Also there may be a significant interest of their application and wider potential to treat disorders beyond the craniofacial region. Considering the

  9. 76 FR 19747 - Grant of Authority for Subzone Status; Grundfos Pumps Manufacturing Corporation (Multi-Stage...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-08

    ... (Multi-Stage Centrifugal Pumps); Allentown, PA Pursuant to its authority under the Foreign-Trade Zones... to the Board for authority to establish a special-purpose subzone at the multi-stage centrifugal pump... status for activity related to the manufacturing of multi-stage centrifugal pumps at the Grundfos...

  10. Violation regulation of financial services authority (FSA, financial performance, and corporate social responsibility disclosure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Habib Muhammad Shahib

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available So far, there has been a bureaucracy reform and implementation of new regulations for good governance capital markets. However, policy violations are still frequent. For example, cases of violation of financial regulations leading to fraudulent financial reporting occurred in several companies listed on the Indonesia Stock Exchange. This study aims to examine the empirical facts related to the legitimacy theory with-in the scope of violation of financial regulation, financial performance and social responsibility disclosure of non-financial companies in Indonesia Stock Exchange. The data were obtained from the Indonesia Stock Exchange. There were 24 non-financial violator-companies of financial regulation chosen as the sample. These data, in relation to the research hypotheses, were analyzed by using a path analysis test. The result showed there were no significant effect of the violations of financial regulations on financial performance and the level of corporate social responsibility disclosure. Therefore, this study confirms legitimacy theory in different forms.

  11. 78 FR 23472 - Amendments to Existing Validated End-User Authorizations: CSMC Technologies Corporation in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-19

    ... include commodities, software, and technology, except those controlled for missile technology or crime... information against the VEU authorization criteria. Given the nature of the review, and in light of...

  12. The Corporate Authority of Governing Boards of Colleges and Universities at the Turn of the Century: A Review of Statutes and Court Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duryea, E. D.

    The American system of higher education governance is examined by exploring the corporate authority of governing boards at the turn of the century, from the 1880s to World War I, to establish a baseline from which to evaluate changes in this authority resulting from the changing role of federal and state governments in higher education since World…

  13. 76 FR 76934 - Foreign-Trade Zones 140 and 78; Applications for Subzone Authority; Dow Corning Corporation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-09

    ... Corporation, Hemlock Semiconductor Corporation and Hemlock Semiconductor, L.L.C.; Extension of Comment Periods... in Midland, Michigan (76 FR 63282- 63283, October 12, 2011), at the Hemlock Semiconductor Corporation facility in Hemlock, Michigan (76 FR 63282, October 12, 2011) and at the Hemlock Semiconductor,...

  14. 77 FR 21082 - Foreign-Trade Zones 140 and 78, Applications for Subzone Authority Dow Corning Corporation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-09

    ... Corporation, Hemlock Semiconductor Corporation, and Hemlock Semiconductor, L.L.C.; Reopening of Rebuttal... facility in Midland, Michigan (76 FR 63282- 63283, 10/12/2011), at the Hemlock Semiconductor Corporation facility in Hemlock, Michigan (76 FR 63282, 10/12/2011) and at the Hemlock Semiconductor, L.L.C....

  15. 77 FR 30500 - Foreign-Trade Zones 140 and 78, Applications for Subzone Authority, Dow Corning Corporation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    ... Corporation, Hemlock Semiconductor Corporation, and Hemlock Semiconductor, L.L.C.; Reopening of Comment... facility in Midland, Michigan (76 FR 63282- 63283, 10/12/2011), at the Hemlock Semiconductor Corporation facility in Hemlock, Michigan (76 FR 63282, 10/12/2011) and at the Hemlock Semiconductor, L.L.C....

  16. Re-Packaging FPIC: Contesting the Shape of Corporate Responsability,Sate Authority, and Indigenous Governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Szablowski

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I propose to examine how rival global governmentalprojects are asserted and contested by decentralized networks thatlink actors operating at different scales. I argue that Tsing’s notionof «travelling packages» provides a useful way of conceptualizingthe means by which elements of these projects are diffused, translated,taken up, and adapted into different localities around theworld. I explore these dynamics in relation to the contestation of agovernance model based on the principle that the free, prior andinformed consent (FPIC of an indigenous people is required toauthorize actions that may affect upon indigenous territory or indigenousrights. Through the assertion of different versions of FPIC,networked actors are contesting the nature and shape of corporatesocial responsibility, the authority of the state, and the significanceof indigenous governance. I propose to explore the implicationsof different packaging strategies on the contestation between rivalgovernance models and on their propensity for uptake in local sites.

  17. BOOK APPRAISAL: HISTORY OF DENTISTRY IN NIGERIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, O S

    2016-06-01

    The book appraised in this edition of Chronicles of Medical History, History of Dentistry in Nigeria, is a product of many years of painstaking research. The Author, Professor Eyitope Ogunbodede, has put together an excellent book that is a great work of art. Dentistry is one of the first specialties in medicine with a very long history; evidence of periodontal disease has been traced back to at least 100, 000 years in human remains. However, the book by Professor Ogunbodede is the first comprehensive record of the History of dentistry in Nigeria. It is a must-read for every medical professional practicing in Nigeria and a worthy addition to every library.

  18. New technologies in dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanin, Fatima A. A.; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Pecora, Jesus D.

    1999-05-01

    The technology in dentistry has been developed significantly lately, increasing the technological level of new materials, methods and equipment have been developed. Undoubtedly the CO2 laser has contributed to this evolution particular to the treatment of the infected dentin. CO2 laser can sterilize and promote increase 6 to 8 times of dentin resistance, through the transformation the hydroxyapatite in calcium-phosphato-hydroxyapatite. We can reassure our patients about the use of pulsed CO2 laser due to better preservation of dental structure and its benefits permitting advanced esthetic treatments. The CEREC system, registers a tri-dimensional image of the preparation through a scan system, and sends it to the computer and the operator will edit the restorations so the equipment will finish porcelain restoration. The authors used a new laser 650 nm for caries detection and the other low lever laser (670 nm and 730 nm) considered an auxiliary method to prevent and treat the hypersensitivity in dentin.

  19. Color: Implications in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sikri Vimal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The success of restorative dentistry is determined on the basis of functional and esthetic results. To achieve esthetics, four basic determinants are required in sequence; viz., position, contour, texture and color. The knowledge of the concept of color is essential for achieving good esthetics. This review compiles the various aspects of color, its measurements and shade matching in dentistry.

  20. Laser in operative dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Yasini

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available Today laser has a lot of usage in medicine and dentistry. In the field of dentistry, laser is used in soft tissue surgery, sterilization of canals (in root canal therapy and in restorative dentistry laser is used for cavity preparation, caries removal, sealing the grooves (in preventive dentistry, etching enamel and dentin, composite polymerization and removal of tooth sensitivity. The use of Co2 lasers and Nd: YAG for cavity preparation, due to creating high heat causes darkness and cracks around the region of laser radiation. Also due to high temperature of these lasers, pulp damage is inevitable. So today, by using the Excimer laser especially the argon floride type with a wavelength of 193 nm, the problem of heat stress have been solved, but the use of lasers in dentistry, especially for cavity preparation needs more researches and evaluations.

  1. Minimum intervention dentistry: periodontics and implant dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darby, I B; Ngo, L

    2013-06-01

    This article will look at the role of minimum intervention dentistry in the management of periodontal disease. It will discuss the role of appropriate assessment, treatment and risk factors/indicators. In addition, the role of the patient and early intervention in the continuing care of dental implants will be discussed as well as the management of peri-implant disease.

  2. From corporate governance to hospital governance. Authority, transparency and accountability of Belgian non-profit hospitals' board and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eeckloo, Kristof; Van Herck, Gustaaf; Van Hulle, Cynthia; Vleugels, Arthur

    2004-04-01

    As a result of multiple developments in health care and health care policy, hospital administrators, policy makers and researchers are increasingly challenged to reflect on the meaning of good hospital governance and how they can implement it in the hospital organisations. The question arises whether and to what extent governance models that have been developed within the corporate world can be valuable for these reflections. Due to the unique societal position of hospitals--which involves a large diversity of stakeholders--the claim for autonomy of various highly professional groups and the lack of clear business objectives, principles of corporate governance cannot be translated into the hospital sector without specific adjustments. However, irrespective of these contextual differences, corporate governance can provide for a comprehensive 'frame of reference', to which the hospital sector will have to give its own interpretation. A multidisciplinary research unit of the university of Leuven has taken the initiative to develop a governance model for Belgian hospitals. As part of the preliminary research work a survey has been performed among 82 hospitals of the Flemish Community on their governance structure, the composition of the governance entities, the partition of competencies and the relationship between management and medical staff.

  3. Ethical advertising in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graskemper, Joseph P

    2009-01-01

    Advertising in dentistry has steadily increased since the 1970s to become a leading choice of many dentists to promote their practices. The manner in which advertising progresses within the profession affects all dentists and how patients perceive dentistry as a profession. This paper presents ethical concepts that should be followed when dentists are pursuing practice promotion through advertising. It also raises questions that, hopefully, will increase attention and discussion on dental advertising. The paper concludes that ethical advertising is easily achieved by promoting patient education while not placing the dentist's self-interests ahead of the patient's. With this approach, dentistry may continue to be one of the most trusted professions.

  4. Ozone Therapy in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Sudarshan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available With the advancements in the field of dentistry, new treatment protocols are budding day by day to combat human ailments in a much natural better and simpler way. One such advancement is the application of ozone in dentistry. Ozone is a natural element protects us from ultraviolet rays. It has several properties including analgesics, immunostimulant and antimicrobial properties. In Dentistry its uses are abundance from gingival diseases, infection control, temporomandibular disorders, radiation and chemotherapy induced mucositis, lichen planus etc. Researchers believe that this therapy is in state of equilibrium with benefit and drawback. This review throws light on the history, properties, methods of administration, uses in the field of medicine and dentistry, toxicity, contraindications of ozone. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(1.000: 45-54

  5. Magnets in prosthetic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, M A; Walmsley, A D; Harris, I R

    2001-08-01

    Magnetic retention is a popular method of attaching removable prostheses to either retained roots or osseointegrated implants. This review chronicles the development of magnets in dentistry and summarizes future research in their use. The literature was researched by using the Science Citation Index and Compendex Web from 1981 to 2000. Articles published before 1981 were hand researched from citations in other publications. Articles that discussed the use of magnets in relation to prosthetic dentistry were selected.

  6. LASER USED IN PEDIATRIC DENTISTRY : A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avanindra

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In 1960 , Theodore Harold Maiman , an American of Hughes Aircraft corporation , observed the stimulated emission in the visible portion of the spectrum by using an excited synthetic ruby rod , and generated the first “LASER” beam an acronym for “Light Amplification by Stimulated Emis sion of Radiation”. 1 The acceptance of lasers as viable alternatives to traditional methods in medicine was one of the events that created an explosion of interest in the last decade in the role of lasers in dentistry. 2 Dentistry has entered the 1990s an e ra of high technology . W e are fortunate to have at our disposal many technological innovations to enhance treatment , including intraoral video cameras , computer imaging , and air abrasive units. However no instruments are more representative of the term high - tech than the laser. 3

  7. Brexit and dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, E; Stagnell, S; Shah, S

    2016-05-27

    On 23 June 2016, eligible UK voters will be asked to decide whether to vote in the EU referendum. The EU impacts on our daily lives in more ways than many people realise. Dentistry is affected by EU legislation. Examples include the movement of dental professionals, the import of dental equipment and materials, as well as health and safety legislation. Many more EU dentists and DCPs come to the UK to work than vice versa. These numbers have increased markedly since 2004. The result of the vote may affect how dentistry operates in the UK in future years. In addition, a vote to stay would not necessarily prevent change. There are attempts underway to increase the ease by which professionals can work in other member states, especially on a temporary basis. This too is likely affect dentistry at some point. Workforce planners and policy makers should factor in the impact of the EU in future dental policy.

  8. Lasers in aesthetic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Timothy C; Pang, Peter K

    2004-10-01

    This article focuses on lasers and aesthetic dentistry and their unique parallel in history from their early development to their present day usage and application. The demand for aesthetic dentistry has had a major impact not only on treatment planning but also on the choice of materials, techniques, and equipment. It is this demand that has married the use of lasers with aesthetic dentistry. A short literature review on the five basic laser types precedes the basic premise of smile design and its critical importance in attaining the desirable aesthetic end result. A short review on biologic width and biologic zone reinforces their importance when manipulating gingival tissue. Four case reports highlight the use of diode, erbium, and carbon dioxide lasers. The end results show the power of proper treatment planning and the use of a smile design guide when using these instruments and confirm a conservative, aesthetic treatment without compromising the health and function of the patients.

  9. Nanomaterials in preventive dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannig, Matthias; Hannig, Christian

    2010-08-01

    The prevention of tooth decay and the treatment of lesions and cavities are ongoing challenges in dentistry. In recent years, biomimetic approaches have been used to develop nanomaterials for inclusion in a variety of oral health-care products. Examples include liquids and pastes that contain nano-apatites for biofilm management at the tooth surface, and products that contain nanomaterials for the remineralization of early submicrometre-sized enamel lesions. However, the treatment of larger visible cavities with nanomaterials is still at the research stage. Here, we review progress in the development of nanomaterials for different applications in preventive dentistry and research, including clinical trials.

  10. Polyamides in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shekhar Bhatia

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Thermoplastic resins have been used in dentistry for over 50 years. Since that time their applications have continued to grow, and the interest in nylon based materials have increased. With the development of new properties, there are certain to be additional new applications for thermoplastic resins in the future, to help patients with damaged or missing teeth. The dentists have to meet growing demands for prosthetic rehabilitation due to population aging and higher requirements on the quality of life. Herein in this article we will be discussing in detail properties of nylon based materials and their various implications in dentistry

  11. Publicity in dentistry: assessment of the ethical aspects involved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artênio José Isper Garbin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To verify whether the professionals who make use of advertising in Dentistry by means of billboards respect the ethical aspects determined by the Federal Council of Dentistry Resolution No 71, 2006. Methods: This was an observational study in which 178 billboards of dental clinics in the municipality of São Paulo were assessed. Results: Among the billboards analyzed, 91.4% belonged to private persons and 9.6% to corporate bodies. With regard to the ethical aspects related to the advertisement, only 44.9% of the billboards presented all the mandatory items in accordance with the Federal Council of Dentistry. The item found the least number of times in the advertisements was the registration number in the Regional Council of Dentistry (34.8%. Among the items allowed by the Federal Council of Dentistry, the telephone number (65.2% was the most commonly found. Among the ethical infractions, 1.7% of the billboards advertised the terms of payment. Conclusion: Professionals are not following the ethical precepts established by the Code of Ethics in Dentistry, and awareness of these professionals needs to be aroused, so that information about their services is communicated and divulged in an ethical manner.

  12. Plasma in dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Cha, Seunghee; Park, Young-Seok

    2014-01-01

    This review describes the contemporary aspects of plasma application in dentistry. Previous studies on plasma applications were classified into two categories, surface treatment and direct applications, and were reviewed, respectively according to the approach. The current review discussed modification of dental implant surface, enhancing of adhesive qualities, enhancing of polymerization, surface coating and plasma cleaning under the topics of surface treatment. Microbicidal activities, deco...

  13. Restorative dentistry for children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donly, Kevin J

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses contemporary pediatric restorative dentistry. Indications and contraindications for the choice of different restorative materials in different clinical situations, including the risk assessment of the patient, are presented. The specific use of glass ionomer cement or resin-modified glass ionomer cement, resin-based composite, and stainless steel crowns is discussed so that preparation design and restoration placement is understood.

  14. Invisalign and aesthetic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Invisalign has been an integral part of dental practices for many years. Besides improving crowding and spacing in teeth, it is an excellent adjunct for many different aesthetic procedures. One such case is illustrated in this article, where the combination of Invisalign and minimally invasive dentistry allowed for a stellar outcome, and one very happy dental patient.

  15. Aloe vera in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujatha, G; Kumar, G Senthil; Muruganandan, J; Prasad, T Srinivasa

    2014-10-01

    Aloe vera is a medicinal plant which has been used for thousands of years. The health benefits of aloe vera is well known and the dental uses of this plant is multiple. Interest is gathering among researchers regarding the use of this plant. Studies have proved the antiseptic, anti inflammatory, antiviral and antifungal properties of aloe vera and the use of this plant is proved beneficial. This plant is proved to be non allergic and very good in building up the immune system. Aloe vera is gaining popularity in dentistry as it is completely natural and there is no side effects being reported with its use. This paper gives an overview of the uses of this miracle plant and its uses in dentistry.

  16. Color vision and dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, W; Schuman, N

    1992-05-01

    Color vision is a critical component of restorative and esthetic dentistry, but dentists, as a group, do not have their color vision tested at any time during their careers. A study was undertaken to ascertain the color-vision status of practicing dental personnel at the University of Tennessee, College of Dentistry. One hundred fifty individuals, 75 men and 75 women, were screened. The results corroborated the existing medical data for the general population. It was found that 9.3% of the men and none of the women exhibited color-vision defect. Since most dentists are male, this study demonstrates an area of potential weakness for some practitioners. Once a color-vision problem is found, it is simple to remedy by employing a team approach to shade matching or mechanical means of matching shades (by the practitioner). No ethnic or racial distinctions were detected, although these have been reported in other studies.

  17. Corporate Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waddock, Sandra; Rasche, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    We define and discuss the concept of corporate responsibility. We suggest that corporate responsibility has some unique characteristics, which makes it different from earlier conceptions of corporate social responsibility. Our discussion further shows commonalities and differences between corporate...... responsibility and related concepts, such as corporate citizenship and business ethics. We also outline some ways in which corporations have implemented corporate responsibility in practice....

  18. Nanorobots: Future in dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Shetty, Neetha J.; Swati, P.; David, K.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the phenomenon of nanotechnology as it might apply to dentistry as a new field called nanodentistry. Treatment possibilities might include the application of nanotechnology to local anesthesia, dentition renaturalization, the permanent cure for hypersensitivity, complete orthodontic realignment in a single visit, covalently bonded diamondized enamel, and continuous oral health maintenance using mechanical dentifrobots. Dental nanorobots could be construc...

  19. Integral Rehabilitation in Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Lamas Lara, César; Cirujano Dentista, Docente del Área de Operatoria Dental y Endodoncia de la Facultad de OdontoIogía de la UNMSM.; Paz Fernández, Juan José; Paredes Coz, Gerson; Cirujano Dentista, Especialista en Rehabilitación Oral, Docente del Área de Rehabilitación Oral de la Facultad de Odontología de la UNMSM.; Angulo de la Vega, Giselle; Cirujano Dentista, Estudios de Especialidad de Rehabilitación Oral de la Facultad de Odontología de la UNMSM.; Cardoso Hernández, Sully; Estudiante de internado de la Facultad de Odontología de la UNMSM.

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays is fundamental the interrelationship of the diverse specialities of dentistry for the resolution of the treatments realized in the patients who come to the odontologic consultation, since the vision slanted of some area can deprive to offer a better possibility of treatment. Working with specialists in different areas carries to orientating adequately the treatments and to optimizing results. In the present article the integral rehabilitation of a patient is detailed by the participa...

  20. Nanocharacterization in Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Shivani Sharma; Cross, Sarah E.; Carlin Hsueh; Ruseen P. Wali; Stieg, Adam Z.; James K Gimzewski

    2010-01-01

    About 80% of US adults have some form of dental disease. There are a variety of new dental products available, ranging from implants to oral hygiene products that rely on nanoscale properties. Here, the application of AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) and optical interferometry to a range of dentistry issues, including characterization of dental enamel, oral bacteria, biofilms and the role of surface proteins in biochemical and nanomechanical properties of bacterial adhesins, is reviewed. We also...

  1. Prevention of Prosthetic Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eremin O.V.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Prevention in prosthetic dentistry is not just a regular oral hygiene and the prevention of caries in the early stages of its development. The initial goal of orthopedic and dental should be the ability to convey to the patient's sense of pros-thetics that proteziruya one saved more. An example is included prosthetic dental arch defects with bridges or single artificial crowns on implants that will prevent movement of teeth and the continuity of the dentition

  2. Piezosurgery in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhruvakumar Deepa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Piezosurgery (piezoelectric bone surgery is a technique of bone surgery which is gaining popularity in the field of dentistry in the recent years. This device is being used in osteotomies, periodontology and implantology, and oral surgical procedures. Piezoelectric ultrasonic vibrations are utilized to perform precise and safe osteotomies. This article discusses the equipment, biological effects on bone, and advantages and disadvantages of this technology.

  3. Minimally legally invasive dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, R

    2014-12-01

    One disadvantage of the rapid advances in modern dentistry is that treatment options have never been more varied or confusing. Compounded by a more educated population greatly assisted by online information in an increasingly litigious society, a major concern in recent times is increased litigation against health practitioners. The manner in which courts handle disputes is ambiguous and what is considered fair or just may not be reflected in the judicial process. Although legal decisions in Australia follow a doctrine of precedent, the law is not static and is often reflected by community sentiment. In medical litigation, this has seen the rejection of the Bolam principle with a preference towards greater patient rights. Recent court decisions may change the practice of dentistry and it is important that the clinician is not caught unaware. The aim of this article is to discuss legal issues that are pertinent to the practice of modern dentistry through an analysis of legal cases that have shaped health law. Through these discussions, the importance of continuing professional development, professional association and informed consent will be realized as a means to limit the legal complications of dental practice.

  4. Minimal intervention dentistry - a new frontier in clinical dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mm, Jingarwar; Nk, Bajwa; A, Pathak

    2014-07-01

    Minimally invasive procedures are the new paradigm in health care. Everything from heart bypasses to gall bladder, surgeries are being performed with these dynamic new techniques. Dentistry is joining this exciting revolution as well. Minimally invasive dentistry adopts a philosophy that integrates prevention, remineralisation and minimal intervention for the placement and replacement of restorations. Minimally invasive dentistry reaches the treatment objective using the least invasive surgical approach, with the removal of the minimal amount of healthy tissues. This paper reviews in brief the concept of minimal intervention in dentistry.

  5. Direct reimbursement. The future for organized dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, D P

    2001-10-01

    Direct reimbursement, or DR, has been a popular topic in organized dentistry for much of the last decade, and the concept is beginning to be more widely known. This article explores the underpinnings of and future for DR. TYPES OF LITERATURE REVIEWED: This article is based on an online review of the dental, medical and business literature. The author explores the advantages of DR for patients, employers and dentists. He also presents purported disadvantages of DR, and refutes them. Organized dentistry's marketing efforts and the importance of third-party administrators also are examined. During the next several years, DR has the potential to become the vehicle of choice for financing much of the dental care provided in the United States. Dentists need to become more aware of what DR is and what it can offer the public. They then will be better able to promote DR, which is a significantly better payment system for dental care than any other available today.

  6. Lasers In Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanth. S

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The uses of Lasers in dentistry have revolutionized several areas of treatment in the last three & a half decades of the 20th century. Initially it was used for ablating the hard tissues for acid etch treatment. Later Lasers were used for cutting, coagulation & cauterization of the soft tissues. It is also been used for the diagnosis of carious lesions& to test pulp vitality with Doppler. There are more than 40 uses for Laser. Initially Lasers were very expensive, but now they have become much cheaper. Portable models are available which have increased its versatility. Lasers will be the main weapon in the armamentarium of the dental surgeons.

  7. Interior design for dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unthank, M; True, G

    1999-11-01

    In the increasingly complex, competitive and stressful field of dentistry, effectively designed dental offices can offer significant benefits. Esthetic, functional and life-cycle cost issues to be considered when developing your interior design scheme include color, finishes, lighting, furnishings, art and accessories. An appropriately designed dental office serves as a valuable marketing tool for your practice, as well as a safe and enjoyable work environment. Qualified interior design professionals can help you make design decisions that can yield optimum results within your budget.

  8. Corporate Support of Education: Some Strings Attached

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malott, Robert H.

    1978-01-01

    Corporate self-interest should guide corporate giving. Managers of publicly held corporations have the right, the capability, and the obligation to establish a philosophical screen to use in determining how shareholders' money is to be donated. (Author/MLF)

  9. Corporate Support of Education: Some Strings Attached

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malott, Robert H.

    1978-01-01

    Corporate self-interest should guide corporate giving. Managers of publicly held corporations have the right, the capability, and the obligation to establish a philosophical screen to use in determining how shareholders' money is to be donated. (Author/MLF)

  10. Reframing in dentistry: Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivakumar Nuvvula

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The successful practice of dentistry involves a good combination of technical skills and soft skills. Soft skills or communication skills are not taught extensively in dental schools and it can be challenging to learn and at times in treating dental patients. Guiding the child′s behavior in the dental operatory is one of the preliminary steps to be taken by the pediatric dentist and one who can successfully modify the behavior can definitely pave the way for a life time comprehensive oral care. This article is an attempt to revisit a simple behavior guidance technique, reframing and explain the possible psychological perspectives behind it for better use in the clinical practice.

  11. [Ergonomic movement in dentistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos-Huizer, J J A; Bolderman, F W

    2014-02-01

    'Ergonomic movement in dentistry' is a recently developed ergonomic programme for dental healthcare professionals which is intended to prevent work-related complaints and assist in recovering from them. The programme is recommended by disability insurers in cases of specific physical complaints, limitations or disability, as a consequence of which a dental healthcare professional is unable to carry out his or her work. In a four-day training programme, in one's own workplace, skills are taught in the areas of work organization, work attitude and movement. These skills are directly applied in the treatment ofpatients and, if necessary, further improved. In this way, one advances step by step to an ergonomic way of working. Evaluations have shown that the programme is advantageous for the attitude toward work, the workplace and the work organization as well as the reduction of disability.

  12. Biological therapy and dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radfar, Lida; Ahmadabadi, Roshanak E; Masood, Farah; Scofield, R Hal

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, a new class of drugs has revolutionized the treatment of autoimmune, allergic, infectious and many more diseases. These drugs are classified into three groups, cytokines, monoclonal antibodies and fusion proteins. Biological drugs have less side effects compared to conventional drugs, and may target special damaged cells, but not all the cells. There may be side effects such as infection, hypersensitivity, hematological disorders, cancer, hepatotoxicity and neurological disorders, but there is not enough evidence or long term studies of the mechanism of action and side effects of these drugs. Patients on biological therapy may need some special consideration in dentistry. This paper is a review regarding the classification, mechanism of action and side effects of these drugs, and dental consideration for patients on biological therapy. PMID:26372436

  13. Nanocharacterization in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shivani; Cross, Sarah E; Hsueh, Carlin; Wali, Ruseen P; Stieg, Adam Z; Gimzewski, James K

    2010-06-17

    About 80% of US adults have some form of dental disease. There are a variety of new dental products available, ranging from implants to oral hygiene products that rely on nanoscale properties. Here, the application of AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) and optical interferometry to a range of dentistry issues, including characterization of dental enamel, oral bacteria, biofilms and the role of surface proteins in biochemical and nanomechanical properties of bacterial adhesins, is reviewed. We also include studies of new products blocking dentine tubules to alleviate hypersensitivity; antimicrobial effects of mouthwash and characterizing nanoparticle coated dental implants. An outlook on future "nanodentistry" developments such as saliva exosomes based diagnostics, designing biocompatible, antimicrobial dental implants and personalized dental healthcare is presented.

  14. Nanocharacterization in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivani Sharma

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available About 80% of US adults have some form of dental disease. There are a variety of new dental products available, ranging from implants to oral hygiene products that rely on nanoscale properties. Here, the application of AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy and optical interferometry to a range of dentistry issues, including characterization of dental enamel, oral bacteria, biofilms and the role of surface proteins in biochemical and nanomechanical properties of bacterial adhesins, is reviewed. We also include studies of new products blocking dentine tubules to alleviate hypersensitivity; antimicrobial effects of mouthwash and characterizing nanoparticle coated dental implants. An outlook on future “nanodentistry” developments such as saliva exosomes based diagnostics, designing biocompatible, antimicrobial dental implants and personalized dental healthcare is presented.

  15. Nanorobots: Future in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Neetha J; Swati, P; David, K

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the phenomenon of nanotechnology as it might apply to dentistry as a new field called nanodentistry. Treatment possibilities might include the application of nanotechnology to local anesthesia, dentition renaturalization, the permanent cure for hypersensitivity, complete orthodontic realignment in a single visit, covalently bonded diamondized enamel, and continuous oral health maintenance using mechanical dentifrobots. Dental nanorobots could be constructed to destroy caries-causing bacteria or to repair tooth blemishes where decay has set in, by using a computer to direct these tiny workers in their tasks. Dental nanorobots might be programed to use specific motility mechanisms to crawl or swim through human tissue with navigational precision, to acquire energy, to sense and manipulate their surroundings, to achieve safe cytopenetration, and to use any of a multitude of techniques to monitor, interrupt, or alter nerve-impulse traffic in individual nerve cells in real time.

  16. Silver nanoparticles in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noronha, Victor T; Paula, Amauri J; Durán, Gabriela; Galembeck, Andre; Cogo-Müller, Karina; Franz-Montan, Michelle; Durán, Nelson

    2017-10-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been extensively studied for their antimicrobial properties, which provide an extensive applicability in dentistry. Because of this increasing interest in AgNPs, the objective of this paper was to review their use in nanocomposites; implant coatings; pre-formulation with antimicrobial activity against cariogenic pathogens, periodontal biofilm, fungal pathogens and endodontic bacteria; and other applications such as treatment of oral cancer and local anesthesia. Recent achievements in the study of the mechanism of action and the most important toxicological aspects are also presented. Systematic searches were carried out in Web of Science (ISI), Google, PubMed, SciFinder and EspaceNet databases with the keywords "silver nano* or AgNP*" and "dentist* or dental* or odontol*". A total of 155 peer-reviewed articles were reviewed. Most of them were published in the period of 2012-2017, demonstrating that this topic currently represents an important trend in dentistry research. In vitro studies reveal the excellent antimicrobial activity of AgNPs when associated with dental materials such as nanocomposites, acrylic resins, resin co-monomers, adhesives, intracanal medication, and implant coatings. Moreover, AgNPs were demonstrated to be interesting tools in the treatment of oral cancers due to their antitumor properties. The literature indicates that AgNPs are a promising system with important features such as antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and antitumor activity, and a potential carrier in sustained drug delivery. However, there are some aspects of the mechanisms of action of AgNPs, and some important toxicological aspects arising from the use of this system that must be completely elucidated. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Building Corporate Reputation through Corporate Governance = Krepitev ugleda korporacij skozi njihovo vodenje

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cedomir Ljubojevic

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The authors of the article deal with mutual relations of corporate governance and corporate reputation. The aim of this paper is to show that corporate governance design is in the function of better corporate reputation and to test the perceived relation between corporate governance and corporate reputation. The research expect to show: the necessity for integration of corporate strategy into business strategy (this issue will be even more present in the future and to prove the opinion of consumers and corporations who claim that corporate governance is a necessity for corporate reputation development.

  18. Corporate Branding and Corporate Reputation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karmark, Esben

    2013-01-01

    Corporate branding has been seen as developing in “waves”. This chapter explores the links between corporate branding and corporate reputation as they emerge in the context of three waves of corporate branding. It highlights the way in which the two constructs have related to each other through o...... for corporate brands and corporate communication.......Corporate branding has been seen as developing in “waves”. This chapter explores the links between corporate branding and corporate reputation as they emerge in the context of three waves of corporate branding. It highlights the way in which the two constructs have related to each other through...... organizational culture and identity, and how, although characterized by parallel developments, new ideas and models from a “third” wave of corporate branding challenge prevailing assumptions of corporate reputation particularly in terms of the assumptions that reputations emerge from authentic and transparent...

  19. Evidence-based dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David W

    2010-01-01

    Both panegyric and criticism of evidence-based dentistry tend to be clumsy because the concept is poorly defined. This analysis identifies several contributions to the profession that have been made under the EBD banner. Although the concept of clinicians integrating clinical epidemiology, the wisdom of their practices, and patients' values is powerful, its implementation has been distorted by a too heavy emphasis of computerized searches for research findings that meet the standards of academics. Although EBD advocates enjoy sharing anecdotal accounts of mistakes others have made, faulting others is not proof that one's own position is correct. There is no systematic, high-quality evidence that EBD is effective. The metaphor of a three-legged stool (evidence, experience, values, and integration) is used as an organizing principle. "Best evidence" has become a preoccupation among EBD enthusiasts. That overlong but thinly developed leg of the stool is critiqued from the perspectives of the criteria for evidence, the difference between internal and external validity, the relationship between evidence and decision making, the ambiguous meaning of "best," and the role of reasonable doubt. The strongest leg of the stool is clinical experience. Although bias exists in all observations (including searches for evidence), there are simple procedures that can be employed in practice to increase useful and objective evidence there, and there are dangers in delegating policy regarding allowable treatments to external groups. Patient and practitioner values are the shortest leg of the stool. As they are so little recognized, their integration in EBD is problematic and ethical tensions exist where paternalism privileges science over patient's self-determined best interests. Four potential approaches to integration are suggested, recognizing that there is virtually no literature on how the "seat" of the three-legged stool works or should work. It is likely that most dentists

  20. Should dentists become 'oral physicians'? No, dentistry must remain dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assael, Leon A

    2004-04-01

    Dentistry is not an allied health profession. It is not a paramedical profession. It is time that dentistry be recognized as the profession that offers patients some of the most complex surgery performed on the human body--namely, restorative dentistry and rehabilitation of the masticatory system. Dentistry is the only anatomically focused health care profession that is university-based and for which primary care responsibility is maintained by the profession. An inferiority complex about what it means to be a dentist has served only to confuse the public and bring us further from our goal of improving the health of all our patients. This inferiority complex is driven by the public and the medical profession, neither of which understands how dentistry fits into overall health care. It is essential that every academic health center have oral health education as an integrated part of health care education for dentists, physicians, nurses, allied dental personel, physical therapists, psychologists and all who receive university-based health care education. In this way, all the health professions and the public will see dentistry and oral health as essential to patients' overall health. The idea of emulating those who do not have the strength of basic-science education, practice complexity, surgical skills or community status by seizing a new title will not elevate the profession for the future. The public knows what a dentist is. It is our task to inform the public about the capabilities of dentists and the value of oral health and our profession. We can accomplish this best by assuring that our profession's name, "dentistry," is understood to represent one of the world's most accomplished surgical endeavors, one that is thoroughly integrated into the fabric of health care. Thus, good oral health will be thoroughly integrated into what it means to be healthy.

  1. Herbs in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, Jamile B; Azimi, Somayyeh; Rafieian, Nasrin; Zanjani, Hosein Akhavan

    2011-12-01

    Herbs have been used for centuries to prevent and control disease. Herbal extracts are effective because they interact with specific chemical receptors within the body and are in a pharmacodynamic sense, drugs themselves. By using herbal medicines, patients have averted the many side effects that generally come with traditional medicines, but this does not mean that side effects do not occur. Only knowledgeable practitioners can prescribe the right herb and its proper dosage. Herbal medicines had been considered in every culture, however, pharmaceutical companies overturned this type of thinking. Now, pharmaceuticals are called traditional and herbs are libeled as the 'alternative'. The biggest challenge and problem is lack of information about the effect of herbs in oral tissues, mechanism of effect, and side effects. Several popular conventional drugs on the market are derived from herbs. These include aspirin (from white willow bark), digitalis (from foxglove), and sudafed (modelled after a component in the plant ephedra). Herbal products can vary in their potency. Therefore, care must be taken in selecting herbs, even so, herbal medicines have dramatically fewer side effects and are safer to use than conventional medications. The herbs described in this article are Bloodroot, Caraway, Chamomile, Echinacea, Myrrh, Peppermint, Rosemary, Sage, Thyme, Aloe Vera, Propolis, and a summary of other herbs that are useful in dentistry. Herbs may be good alternatives to current treatments for oral health problems but it is clear that we need more research.

  2. Ultrasonics in Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, A. D.

    Ultrasonic instruments have been used in dentistry since the 1950's. Initially they were used to cut teeth but very quickly they became established as an ultrasonic scaler which was used to remove deposits from the hard tissues of the tooth. This enabled the soft tissues around the tooth to return to health. The ultrasonic vibrations are generated in a thin metal probe and it is the working tip that is the active component of the instrument. Scanning laser vibrometry has shown that there is much variability in their movement which is related to the shape and cross sectional shape of the probe. The working instrument will also generate cavitation and microstreaming in the associated cooling water. This can be mapped out along the length of the instrument indicating which are the active areas. Ultrasonics has also found use for cleaning often inaccessible or different surfaces including root canal treatment and dental titanium implants. The use of ultrasonics to cut bone during different surgical techniques shows considerable promise. More research is indicated to determine how to maximize the efficiency of such instruments so that they are more clinically effective.

  3. Piezosurgery in implant dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stübinger S

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Stefan Stübinger,1 Andres Stricker,2 Britt-Isabelle Berg3,4 1Hightech Research Center of Cranio-maxillofacial Surgery, University of Basel, Allschwil, Switzerland; 2Private Practice, Konstanz, Germany; 3Department of Cranio-maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland; 4Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Piezosurgery, or the use of piezoelectric devices, is being applied increasingly in oral and maxillofacial surgery. The main advantages of this technique are precise and selective cuttings, the avoidance of thermal damage, and the preservation of soft-tissue structures. Through the application of piezoelectric surgery, implant-site preparation, bone grafting, sinus-floor elevation, edentulous ridge splitting or the lateralization of the inferior alveolar nerve are very technically feasible. This clinical overview gives a short summary of the current literature and outlines the advantages and disadvantages of piezoelectric bone surgery in implant dentistry. Overall, piezoelectric surgery is superior to other methods that utilize mechanical instruments. Handling of delicate or compromised hard- and soft-tissue conditions can be performed with less risk for the patient. With respect to current and future innovative surgical concepts, piezoelectric surgery offers a wide range of new possibilities to perform customized and minimally invasive osteotomies. Keywords: implantology, piezoelectric device, piezosurgery, maxillary sinus elevation, bone grafting, osteotomy, edentulous ridge splitting

  4. Is dentistry at risk? A case for interprofessional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, Rebecca S; O'Donnell, Jean A; Barry, J Mark; Galli, Dominique M; Hakim, Foroud F; Holyfield, Lavern J; Robbins, Miriam R

    2008-11-01

    The goal of interprofessional education (IPE) is to bring various professional groups together in the educational environment to promote collaborative practice and improve the health care of patients. Interest in IPE has been sparked by several factors in the health care system, including the increased awareness of oral-systemic connections, an aging population, the shift of the burden of illness from acute to chronic care, and lack of access to basic oral care. Increasingly, since the publication of the U.S. surgeon general's report in 2000, the dialogue surrounding IPE in dentistry has escalated. But how has dentistry changed regarding IPE since the report was released? This position paper argues that little has changed in the way dental students are taught and prepared to participate in IPE. The authors contend that academic dentistry and organized dentistry must take the lead in initiating and demanding IPE if dental students are to be prepared to work in the health care environment of the twenty-first century. Included are reasons why IPE is necessary and why dentistry must lead the conversation and participate in the solution to the oral health care crisis. It explores existing models and alternate approaches to IPE, barriers to implementation, and proposed strategies for academic institutions.

  5. What is minimally invasive dentistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericson, Dan

    2004-01-01

    Minimally Invasive Dentistry is the application of "a systematic respect for the original tissue." This implies that the dental profession recognizes that an artifact is of less biological value than the original healthy tissue. Minimally invasive dentistry is a concept that can embrace all aspects of the profession. The common delineator is tissue preservation, preferably by preventing disease from occurring and intercepting its progress, but also removing and replacing with as little tissue loss as possible. It does not suggest that we make small fillings to restore incipient lesions or surgically remove impacted third molars without symptoms as routine procedures. The introduction of predictable adhesive technologies has led to a giant leap in interest in minimally invasive dentistry. The concept bridges the traditional gap between prevention and surgical procedures, which is just what dentistry needs today. The evidence-base for survival of restorations clearly indicates that restoring teeth is a temporary palliative measure that is doomed to fail if the disease that caused the condition is not addressed properly. Today, the means, motives and opportunities for minimally invasive dentistry are at hand, but incentives are definitely lacking. Patients and third parties seem to be convinced that the only things that count are replacements. Namely, they are prepared to pay for a filling but not for a procedure that can help avoid having one.

  6. Corporate Law and Corporate Governance

    OpenAIRE

    Roberta Romano

    1998-01-01

    We have seen a revival in interest in corporate law and corporate governance since the 1980s, as researchers applied the tools of the new institutional economics and modern corporate finance to analyze the new transactions emerging in the 1980s takeover wave. This article focuses on three mechanisms of corporate governance to illustrate the analytical usefulness of transaction cost economics for corporate law. They are the board of directors; relational investing, a form of block ownership in...

  7. Cosmetic Dentistry - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Cosmetic Dentistry URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... W XYZ List of All Topics All Cosmetic Dentistry - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  8. What's new in paediatric dentistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, M. C.

    2016-03-01

    Since the early 80's, the use of laser has been introduced in the daily dental practice and the technological development has also provided over time to optimize its use. Various types of lasers with different wavelengths have been developed for use in a handy, easy and ergonomic manner. In daily paediatric dentistry, laser could be a very useful medical device which can completely replace the traditional high hand-piece and bur to realize a "micro-invasive" dentistry and a "clean" surgery, without bleeding and sutures. According to the international literature and in the light of recent researches, this work could give an overview on assisted laser therapy in paediatric dentistry, highlighting advantages and disadvantages of this new technology and pointing out the high compliance of the young patient.

  9. Developing patient safety in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemberton, M N

    2014-10-01

    Patient safety has always been important and is a source of public concern. Recent high profile scandals and subsequent reports, such as the Francis report into the failings at Mid Staffordshire, have raised those concerns even higher. Mortality and significant morbidity associated with the practice of medicine has led to many strategies to help improve patient safety, however, with its lack of associated mortality and lower associated morbidity, dentistry has been slower at systematically considering how patient safety can be improved. Recently, several organisations, researchers and clinicians have discussed the need for a patient safety culture in dentistry. Strategies are available to help improve patient safety in healthcare and deserve further consideration in dentistry.

  10. 3D printing in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery.

  11. Treatment regimens in preventive and restorative dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusavice, K J

    1995-06-01

    Due in part to a lack of appropriate training and the incentive of adequate compensation, preventive dentistry in the United States has focused on prophylaxis and fluoride application. Dentistry must shift its attention to developing standardized protocols for "preservative dentistry"--diagnosing caries, assessing and monitoring caries risk, arresting active caries and remineralizing non-cavitated lesions. This article addresses shortcomings in preventive dentistry and proposes a plan for treatment standardization that can ensure optimum treatment and, ideally, lead to adequate compensation.

  12. Geriatric Dentistry in the Predoctoral Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshman, Jack; And Others

    1985-01-01

    A survey of U.S. dental schools to determine the status of geriatric dentistry in the curriculum is discussed. Evidence of growing commitment is shown by deans who plan to give geriatric dentistry increasing priority in the future and by the fact that all schools now teach geriatric dentistry in some way. (MLW)

  13. [The elementary discussion on digital implant dentistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Y C

    2016-04-09

    It is a digital age today. Exposed to all kinds of digital products in many fields. Certainly, implant dentistry is not exception. Digitalization could improve the outcomes and could decrease the complications of implant dentistry. This paper introduces the concepts, definitions, advantages, disadvantages, limitations and errors of digital implant dentistry.

  14. Using technology to market cosmetic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seltzer, S M

    1997-01-01

    The presentation of proposed dental treatment has been hampered by the absence of visual communication technologies. New high tech dentistry-related tools permit efficient production of case presentations for cosmetic dentistry and restorative dentistry. This review describes how to create computer-based case presentations using Microsoft PowerPoint (Microsoft Corp., Redmond, WA) and visual treatment proposals using Microsoft Word for Windows.

  15. Corporate Awakening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LaFrance, Julie; Lehmann, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Predominantly since the 1992 Rio Summit, corporations have been increasingly pursuing partnerships with public institutions including governments, international organisations and NGOs that aim to contribute to sustainable development activities. Partnerships have become more common as corporation...... public-private partnerships. These theoretical perspectives are used to gain a deeper understanding of the corporate drivers that motivated TOTAL S.A. to approach UNESCO for cooperation on community development programs in Myanmar.......Predominantly since the 1992 Rio Summit, corporations have been increasingly pursuing partnerships with public institutions including governments, international organisations and NGOs that aim to contribute to sustainable development activities. Partnerships have become more common as corporations...... react to mounting pressure from corporate stakeholders, civil society and government on the responsible nature of their business practices. The corporate awakening towards a broader role of business in society and the trend of corporations embracing partnerships has led many to question the driving...

  16. Rand Corporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Toggle Search Site-wide Search Search RAND RAND Corporation Provides Objective Research Services and Public Policy Analysis ... on Twitter Share on LinkedIn About The RAND Corporation is a research organization that develops solutions to ...

  17. China Petrochemical Corporation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    China Petrochemical Corporation (Sinopec Group) is a super-large petroleum and petrochemical enterprise group, established in July 1998 on the basis of the former China Petrochemical Corporation. Sinopec Group is a state-owned company solely invested by the state, function ing as a state-authorized investment organization in which the state holds the controlling share. Headquartered in Beijing, Sinopec Group has a registered capital of 182 billion yuan. The board chairman of Sinopec Group is its legal representative.

  18. The Corporations Act 2001

    OpenAIRE

    Bostock, Tom

    2002-01-01

    The author outlines reforms made in Australia in the area of company law with an analysis of the Corporations Act 2001, which along with the Australian Securities and Investments Commission Act 2001 comprises Corporations legislation in Australia. Article by Tom Bostock (a partner in the law firm Mallesons Stephen Jaques, Melbourne, Australia). Published in Amicus Curiae - Journal of the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies and its Society for Advanced Legal Studies. The Journal is produced by...

  19. Dentistry and Dental Hygiene Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

    A reference guide to laws, rules, and regulations that govern dentistry and dental hygiene practice in New York State is presented. In addition to identifying licensing requirements/procedures for dentists and dental hygienists, general provisions of Title VIII of the Education Law are covered, along with state management, professional misconduct,…

  20. Curriculum Guidelines on Forensic Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1990

    1990-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' guidelines for curriculum design explain the scope of forensic dentistry and interrelationships with other fields, give an overview of the curriculum, and outline suggested primary educational goals, prerequisites, core content, specific behavioral objectives, sequencing, faculty and facility…

  1. Dentistry and Dental Hygiene Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

    The handbook contains laws, rules, and regulations of the New York State Education Department that govern dentistry and dental hygiene practice in the state. It describes licensure requirements and includes complete application forms and instructions for obtaining license and first registration as a dentist and dental hygienist. Applicants are…

  2. Corporate Governance

    OpenAIRE

    International Finance Corporation; UN Global Compact

    2017-01-01

    Corporate citizenship - a commitment to ethical behavior in business strategy, operations, and culture - has been on the periphery of corporate governance and board leadership, linked mainly to corporate reputation. However, in today’s globalized and interconnected world, investors, creditors, and other stakeholders have come to recognize that environmental, social, and governance responsi...

  3. Corporate attributes and corporate accruals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Md Shamimul Hasan; Normah Omar; Rashidah Abdul Rahman; Syed Zabid Hossain

    2016-01-01

    ... (discretionary accruals) in Bangladesh. The behaviour of corporate accruals is explained by corporate attributes such as asset size, turnover, earnings per share, number of shareholders, year of listing, international link of audit firm...

  4. [Ergonomy--dentistry--biomechanics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catović, E; Kraljević, K; Satović, A

    1990-01-01

    In this paper the authors present with scientifically--critically looking, ergonomicas--in interdisciplinary group of applied sciences, show the outstanding possibilities of complete analysis and improvement of "man--machine--environment system". With a scientific approach and use of the latest principles of modern ergonomics, the term of dental ergonomics is introduced in dental medicine. It particularly refers to the creation of different models of dental equipment, instruments and working areas, as well as to the investigation of the harmful factors and the effects of working environment on the dentist's health, especially, on the locomotor system which is mostly affected within the "dentist/patient/--equipment--environment system". In conclusion the authors pointed to the fact that there are still so many uninvestigated questions and problems related to dental ergonomics.

  5. Corporate Lingo: A New Meaning (Language Watching).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haymes, Richard D.

    1995-01-01

    Notes that the words and phrases that make up corporate lingo usually have meaning on two levels: management level and worker level, with huge gaps between them. Offers the author's "redefinitions" of a number of corporate terms. (SR)

  6. Biomaterials in Relation to Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Sanjukta; Chana, Simran

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries remains a challenge in the improvement of oral health. It is the most common and widespread biofilm-dependent oral disease, resulting in the destruction of tooth structure by the acidic attack from cariogenic bacteria. The tooth is a heavily mineralised tissue, and both enamel and dentine can undergo demineralisation due to trauma or dietary conditions. The adult population worldwide affected by dental caries is enormous and despite significant advances in caries prevention and tooth restoration, treatments continue to pose a substantial burden to healthcare. Biomaterials play a vital role in the restoration of the diseased or damaged tooth structure and, despite providing reasonable outcomes, there are some concerns with clinical performance. Amalgam, the silver grey biomaterial that has been widely used as a restorative material in dentistry, is currently in throes of being phased out, especially with the Minimata convention and treaty being signed by a number of countries (January 2013; http://mercuryconvention.org/Convention/) that aims to control the anthropogenic release of mercury in the environment, which naturally impacts the use of amalgam, where mercury is a component. Thus, the development of alternative restoratives and restoration methods that are inexpensive, can be used under different climatic conditions, withstand storage and allow easy handling, the main prerequisites of dental biomaterials, is important. The potential for using biologically engineered tissue and consequent research to replace damaged tissues has also seen a quantum leap in the last decade. Ongoing research in regenerative treatments in dentistry includes alveolar ridge augmentation, bone tissue engineering and periodontal ligament replacement, and a future aim is bioengineering of the whole tooth. Research towards developing bioengineered teeth is well underway and identification of adult stem cell sources to make this a viable treatment is advancing; however, this

  7. The Institutions of Corporate Governance

    OpenAIRE

    Roe, Mark J.

    2004-01-01

    In this review piece, I outline the institutions of corporate governance decision-making in the large public firm in the wealthy West. By corporate governance, I mean the relationships at the top of the firm - the board of directors, the senior managers, and the stockholders. By institutions I mean those repeated mechanisms that allocate authority among the three and that affect, modulate, and control the decisions made at the top of the firm. Core corporate governance institutions respon...

  8. Potent Inhalational Anesthetics for Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satuito, Mary; Tom, James

    2016-01-01

    Nitrous oxide and the volatile inhalational anesthetics have defined anxiety and pain control in both dentistry and medicine for over a century. From curious experimentation to spectacular public demonstrations, the initial work of 2 dentists, Horace Wells and William T. G. Morton, persists to this day in modern surgery and anesthesia. This article reviews the history, similarities, differences, and clinical applications of the most popular inhalational agents used in contemporary dental surgical settings.

  9. Nutrition intervention in general dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sintes, J L

    1990-12-01

    This article presents a nutrition program in general dentistry following an oral health nutrition care process, and provides a guideline for identifying patients at risk of developing marginal malnutrition as a result of oral health procedures. The program highlights the importance of assessing nutritional status by segregating high-risk patients from low-risk patients. A case report demonstrates the therapeutic dietary management of a patient whose jaws were immobilized as a result of trauma.

  10. Corporate Awakening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LaFrance, Julie; Lehmann, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Predominantly since the 1992 Rio Summit, corporations have been increasingly pursuing partnerships with public institutions including governments, international organisations and NGOs that aim to contribute to sustainable development activities. Both the business community and public organisations...... are recognizing the potential benefits of public-private partnerships for furthering the Millennium Development Goals while having a positive impact on business. Partnerships have become more common as corporations react to mounting pressure from corporate stakeholders, civil society and government...... on the responsible nature of their business practices. The accountability of corporations has moved beyond the traditional obligations of addressing shareholder demands and today, corporations must be accountable to society and all stakeholders affected by global development. The corporate awakening towards...

  11. Corporate Foundations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlin, Heidi; Thusgaard Pedersen, Janni

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to explore the potential of Danish corporate foundations as boundary organizations facilitating relationships between their founding companies and non-governmental organizations (NGOs). Hitherto, research has been silent about the role of corporate foundations in relation to cross......-sector partnerships. The results of this paper are based on interviews, participant observations, and organizational documents from a 19-month empirical study of a Danish corporate foundation. Findings suggest that corporate foundations have potential to act as boundary organizations and facilitate collaborative...... action between business and NGOs through convening, translation, collaboration, and mediation. Our study provides valuable insights into the tri-part relationship of company foundation NGO by discussing the implications of corporate foundations taking an active role in the realm of corporate social...

  12. Corporate Taxation and Corporate Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köthenbürger, Marko; Stimmelmayr, Michael

    2009-01-01

    interests between shareholders and managers. We set up an agency model and analyze the crucial issue in corporate taxation of whether the normal return on investment should be exempted from taxation. The findings suggest that the divergence of interests may be intensified and welfare reduced...... if the corporate tax system exempts the normal return on investment from taxation. The optimal system may well use the full return on investment as a tax base. Hence, tax systems such as an Allowance for Corporate Equity (ACE) or a Cash-flow tax do not have the familiar efficiency-enhancing effects in the presence......The effects of corporate taxation on firm behavior have been extensively discussed in the neoclassical model of firm behavior which abstracts from agency problems. As emphasized by the corporate governance literature, corporate investment behavior is however crucially influenced by diverging...

  13. Corporate Taxation and Corporate Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köthenbürger, Marko; Stimmelmayr, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The effects of corporate taxation on firm behavior have been extensively discussed in the neoclassical model of firm behavior which abstracts from agency problems. As emphasized by the corporate governance literature, corporate investment behavior is however crucially influenced by diverging...... interests between shareholders and managers. We set up an agency model and analyze the crucial issue in corporate taxation of whether the normal return on investment should be exempted from taxation. The findings suggest that the divergence of interests may be intensified and welfare reduced...... if the corporate tax system exempts the normal return on investment from taxation. The optimal system may well use the full return on investment as a tax base. Hence, tax systems such as an Allowance for Corporate Equity (ACE) or a Cash-flow tax do not have the familiar efficiency-enhancing effects in the presence...

  14. The concept of minimally invasive dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ericson, Dan

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews Minimally Invasive Dentistry (MID) from a day-to-day dentistry perspective, focusing mostly on cariology and restorative dentistry, even though it embraces many aspects of dentistry. The concept of MID supports a systematic respect for the original tissue, including diagnosis, risk assessment, preventive treatment, and minimal tissue removal upon restoration. The motivation for MID emerges from the fact that fillings are not permanent and that the main reasons for failure are secondary caries and filling fracture. To address these flaws, there is a need for economical re-routing so that practices can survive on maintaining dental health and not only by operative procedures.

  15. Of Corporate Bondage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgeway, James

    1975-01-01

    "While it is entirely possible that the university will continue to function as an essential arm of the giant agribusiness and energy corporations, there are, nevertheless, a wealth of opportunities for it to direct its energies to more useful purposes." The author traces universities' past involvement noting alternatives in energy and agriculture…

  16. Corporate Stakeholding and Globalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauesen, Linne Marie

    2016-01-01

    Most corporations consider their stakeholders to be those, who can be defined in a relatively narrow periphery. Customers, workers, investors, authorities, neighbours, suppliers and various interest groups, for instance NGOs. However, during the last decades, phenomena such as the financial crisis...

  17. Corporate strategies: organizational structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, R C; Oestreicher, V

    1988-06-01

    In previous installments of this series, the authors outlined factors that influence corporation information system strategies. The factor that appears to be most significant is centralization vs. decentralization. This article presents examples of organizational structures, roles and responsibilities for either approach.

  18. Corporate communication and impression management - New perspectives why companies engage in corporate social reporting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooghiemstra, R

    2000-01-01

    This paper addresses the theoretical framework on corporate social reporting. Although that corporate social reporting has been analysed from different perspectives, legitmacy theory currently is the dominating perspective. Authors employing this framework suggest that social and environmental discl

  19. Corporate communication and impression management - New perspectives why companies engage in corporate social reporting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooghiemstra, R

    2000-01-01

    This paper addresses the theoretical framework on corporate social reporting. Although that corporate social reporting has been analysed from different perspectives, legitmacy theory currently is the dominating perspective. Authors employing this framework suggest that social and environmental discl

  20. Corporate Language and Corporate Talk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zølner, Mette

    2013-01-01

    the geographical borders by the medium of common corporate values for knowledge management, collection of data and analysis in these studies inspired by approach of ground theory and presents a usefulness of distinguishing between corporate language and talks to enable the headquarters learning. Also it concludes...

  1. Dental traumatology: an orphan in pediatric dentistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva; Daugaard-Jensen, Jette

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic dental injuries are very frequent during childhood and adolescence. In fact, 2 out of 3 children have suffered a traumatic dental injury before adulthood. This fact links dental traumatology to pediatric dentistry. Unfortunately, this is not reflected by active participation by pediatric dentists in acute treatment, follow-up, and research. To examine the status of pediatric dentistry in relation to dental trauma, a publication analysis was undertaken in 1980, 1990, 2000, and 2007 about trauma articles published in 4 pediatric journals: journal of Dentistry for Children, Pediatric Dentistry, The journal of Pedodontics, and the International journal of Pediatric Dentistry. This study shows an average publication rate of trauma articles of approximately 3 percent of all articles published and with no improvement in later decennia. If only clinical studies are considered (leaving out case reports), the publication rate is less than 1 percent--completely out of proportion to the size of the problem dental trauma impose in children.

  2. Dental traumatology: an orphan in pediatric dentistry?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva; Daugaard-Jensen, Jette

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic dental injuries are very frequent during childhood and adolescence. In fact, 2 out of 3 children have suffered a traumatic dental injury before adulthood. This fact links dental traumatology to pediatric dentistry. Unfortunately, this is not reflected by active participation by pediatric...... dentists in acute treatment, follow-up, and research. To examine the status of pediatric dentistry in relation to dental trauma, a publication analysis was undertaken in 1980, 1990, 2000, and 2007 about trauma articles published in 4 pediatric journals: journal of Dentistry for Children, Pediatric...... Dentistry, The journal of Pedodontics, and the International journal of Pediatric Dentistry. This study shows an average publication rate of trauma articles of approximately 3 percent of all articles published and with no improvement in later decennia. If only clinical studies are considered (leaving out...

  3. Dental traumatology: an orphan in pediatric dentistry?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva; Daugaard-Jensen, Jette

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic dental injuries are very frequent during childhood and adolescence. In fact, 2 out of 3 children have suffered a traumatic dental injury before adulthood. This fact links dental traumatology to pediatric dentistry. Unfortunately, this is not reflected by active participation by pediatric...... dentists in acute treatment, follow-up, and research. To examine the status of pediatric dentistry in relation to dental trauma, a publication analysis was undertaken in 1980, 1990, 2000, and 2007 about trauma articles published in 4 pediatric journals: journal of Dentistry for Children, Pediatric...... Dentistry, The journal of Pedodontics, and the International journal of Pediatric Dentistry. This study shows an average publication rate of trauma articles of approximately 3 percent of all articles published and with no improvement in later decennia. If only clinical studies are considered (leaving out...

  4. Implant marketing: cost effective implant dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohrle, P S; Levin, R P

    1996-01-01

    The application of the KAL-Technique to the field of implant dentistry allows both patients and dental practices to benefit. It is an exciting advance that decreases frustration and stress in providing implant procedures and lowers overall costs. Professionals using the KAL-Technique report significant predictability in achieving passive framework fit. They are also lowering overall cost of implant cases, which increases the number of patients who can accept implant treatment. It has been well established that the more individuals in a practice that receive implants, the more referrals a practice will gain. This is because implant patients find tremendous advances in the quality of life, and do not hesitate to tell others who can take advantage of this opportunity. Implant dentistry is one of the fastest growing fields in dentistry today. While some other areas of dentistry begin to decline in volume and need, implant dentistry provides the opportunity to keep practices strong and to insure long-term success.

  5. Regenerative Perspective in Modern Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihnea Ioan Nicolescu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This review aims to trace the contour lines of regenerative dentistry, to offer an introductory overview on this emerging field to both dental students and practitioners. The crystallized depiction of the concept is a translational approach, connecting dental academics to scientific research and clinical utility. Therefore, this review begins by presenting the general features of regenerative medicine, and then gradually introduces the specific aspects of major dental subdomains, highlighting the progress achieved during the last years by scientific research and, in some cases, which has already been translated into clinical results. The distinct characteristics of stem cells and their microenvironment, together with their diversity in the oral cavity, are put into the context of research and clinical use. Examples of regenerative studies regarding endodontic and periodontal compartments, as well as hard (alveolar bone and soft (salivary glands related tissues, are presented to make the reader further acquainted with the topic. Instead of providing a conclusion, we will emphasize the importance for all dental community members, from young students to experienced dentists, of an early awareness rising regarding biomedical research progress in general and regenerative dentistry in particular.

  6. Corporate entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Karina

    2005-01-01

    Corporate entreprenørskab kan blive svaret på, hvordan Danmark fremmer en mere videnintensiv produktion. Begrebet er blevet anvendt til at forklare forskellige organisatoriske fænomener alt fra strategi over ledelse i al almindelighed til innovation, hvilket har medført en mangfoldighed af begreber...... og perspektiver, som har skabt stor uklarhed omkring corporate entreprenørskab. Med henblik på at skabe fundamentet for et fælles fodslag redegøres der i denne artikel for corporate entreprenørskabsbegrebet ud fra forskellige perspektiver. Der gives i artiklen endvidere et overblik ved hjælp af en...... model, der indeholder intraprenørskab og exoprenørskab, samt fire organisatoriske perspektiver: corporate venturing, interne ressourcer, internationalisering og eksterne netværk....

  7. Corporate Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2004-01-01

    Appeals to corporate responsibility often simply take for granted that businesses have ethical responsibilities that go beyond just respecting the law. This paper addresses arguments to the effect that businesses have no such responsibilities. The interesting claim is not that businesses have no ethical responsibility at all but that their primal responsibility is to increase their profits. The extent to which there is reason to take such arguments seriously delineates the limits of corporate...

  8. Examining corporate governance and corporate tax management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Surya Mulyadi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Taxation play an essential role both in a country and in a corporation. For a country it is one of the primary income source, while for the corporation taxes will reduce corporate net income. To minimize the tax payment, corporation conduct a corporate tax management. According to some of previous research, there is a correlation between corporate governance and corporate tax management. While there are many corporate governance proxies could be used in corporate governance research, in this research we are focusing on three: number of board, number of independent board and board compensation. We measure corporate tax management by using effective tax rate (GAAP ETR and current ETR are used in this research. By using several other control variables, we run the regression and conduct the statistical analysis to examine the correlation between corporate governance and corporate tax management. Our result show that corporate governance have a significant correlation to corporate tax management.

  9. Peculiarities of Corporate Governance Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Vladimirovna Prokhorova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This work is devoted to the study of the quality and identification of priorities of institutional investors in corporate governance in Russia. The authors conclude that the main task of the corporate governance system is to create favorable conditions for broad attraction of foreign investments in Russian companies and to increase the role of shareholders in strategic management. At present, the companies from developed countries achieve higher economic performance through the introduction of modern methods of corporate governance. The adoption of the new Code of Corporate Governance in the Russian Federation in 2014 will create an opportunity to improve the efficiency of Russian companies and to conduct their activities in accordance with international standards through the introduction of modern corporate governance practices, including ensuring transparency of activities for investors. At the same time, despite significant improvements in corporate governance practices of Russian companies, the level of its quality in comparison with foreign countries remains low. The article highlights both positive and negative trends in the Russian practice of corporate governance. One of the effective corporate governance methods is to ensure feedback between Russian companies and institutional investors. The article presents the results of a survey of opinions of investors that allow to identify the main factors of corporate governance that motivate them to take investment decisions on the Russian market.

  10. THE SOUND OF CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DUMITRASCU LUMINITA MIHAELA

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper explores the corporate governance and corporate social responsibility in music industry, by reviewing the literature and investigating the aspects in the context of a sample made by top companies in this domain. The paper spotlighting the mutual connections between corporate governance and corporate social responsibility. The research methodology used consists in investigate the corporate governance codes. It’s about a qualitative interpretive research methodology that was adopted. The findings suggest the intercorelation of corporate governance with corporate social responsibility. The main contribution of the author consists in the fact that the added value of this paper and the original contribution leads in the intercorelation of these two aspects of corporate governance and corporate social responsibility, the findings beeing interesting, implying that recent preoccupation with corporate governance in music industry is starting to be equable by some attention to social responsibility aspects, with growing appreciation of their interdependencies. Previous literature has researched corporate governance and corporate social responsibility independently. Due to this fact, this paper is considering them jointly. The paper is important for both practical and theoretical aspects: for managers and also can serve as the basis for future research on this topic. The current paper is realized in the doctoral program entitled “PhD in Economics at the Standards of European Knowledge- DoEsEc”, scientific coordinator Prof. PhD Niculae Feleaga, Institution: The Academy of Economic Studies Bucharest, Faculty of Accounting and Management Informatic System, Department of International Accounting, period of research 2009-2012.

  11. Ayurveda in Dentistry: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Roopali; Ingle, Navin Anand; Kaur, Navpreet; Yadav, Pramod; Ingle, Ekta; Charania, Zohara

    2015-08-01

    Ayurvedic medicine was considered to be world's oldest medical system, which was originated in India dating back over thousands of years. There was a long history regarding plants for the improvement of dental health and oral hygiene. To study various plants and their products as effective medicines in the treatment of various ailments since ancient times. Data were performed in PubMed Central and Cochrane library using MeSH Terms - Dentistry, Herbal Medicine, Periodontitis. A total of 142 relevant articles were found in 2013 and 2014 followed by case reports. Various studies have mentioned the uses of herbs, which are found to be statistically significant in treatment and management of oral diseases. Current researches showed that herbal extracts are effective because of the interaction with specific chemical receptors within the body. Nowadays, there has been a sudden increase in the use of herbal extracts or plant products as an alternative approach to modern day medicines.

  12. Role of Triphala in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shobha Prakash

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ayurveda is considered as the "science of life," because the ancient Indian system of health care focused views of man and his illness. India has an age-old heritage of traditional herbal medicine. Conventional drugs usually provide effective antibiotic therapy for bacterial infections, but there is an increasing problem of antibiotic resistance and a continuing need for new solutions. Hence, now herbal drugs are being preferred to synthetic antibiotics. ′Triphala′ is a well-known powdered preparation in the Indian system of medicine (ISM. It consists of equal parts of the Emblica officinalis, Terminalia chebula, and Terminalia belerica. Currently, Triphala is being extensively researched for its various therapeutic effects including its anti-caries, antioxidant, anti-collagenase, and anti-microbial activities. The present review will focus on the comprehensive appraisal of Triphala and its several applications in dentistry.

  13. Decision analysis in restorative dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anusavice, K J

    1992-12-01

    Standardization of clinical decisions in restorative dentistry should be based on the tenets of the Hippocratic Oath. Although there is wide variability in preventive and operative treatment decisions, some of these decisions may lead along parallel courses to similar, clinically ethical outcomes. However, what parameters must be considered in judging the relative magnitude of positive and negative outcomes? This paper proposes several decision-making strategies for selecting optimum treatment plans for preventive and restorative situations. The caries-risk level of patients must first be identified in a systematic way and then it must be coupled with treatment options that are consistent with the potential future caries increment. A decision-tree approach and/or the treatment-index concept can then be applied to specific clinical conditions and preventive-restorative options to derive an "expected value" for each possible outcome.

  14. Corporate Governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragoș-Mihail Daghie

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to analyze and understand the recently introduced form of managementof a company limited by shares. The Law no. 441/2006, which fundamentally amended Company Law,created this form of controlling the company, the corporate governance, but the legislation does not explicitlydefine what it wants to achieve through this instrument. This topic is recent in research as the theme ofgerman-roman commercial law systems (in French corporate governance system was introduced in 1966 andin Romania in 2006 but in terms of Anglo-Saxon law, the topic has been addressed years since 1776 (AdamSmith: The Wealth of Nations The concept of corporate governance would like, as a result, to establish somerules that companies must comply in order to achieve effective governance, transparent and beneficial forboth shareholders and for the minority. Corporate governance is a key element with an aim at improvingefficiency and economic growth in full accordance with the increase of investors’ confidence. Corporategovernance assumes a series of relationship between the company management, leadership, shareholders andthe other people concerned. Also corporate governance provides for that structure by means of which thecompany’s targets are set out and the means to achieve them and also the manner how to monitor such.

  15. CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Alexandru SITARU

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The work is aimed to examine the issues “corporate governance” involves, with the goal set to clarify the meanings of such notion, and to provide an overall image of the positive effects arising implementing the corporate governance principles. The first section includes a series of definitions for the purpose of explaining and outlining the concept of “corporate governance”, subsequently giving a definition that appears adequate to us, from the legal standpoint pre eminently. The second section has for purpose to state the corporate governance Principles, and briefly examine the same. Its purpose also includes concretely illustrating the efficient operation methods for a “corporation”, as well as the main dilemmas, and the existing solutions for the same within the internal structure of a joint stock company to adopt, and subject itself to, such principles. Finally, the last section of the work underlines the corporate governance importance, and states the goals to be attained for purposes of securing effective, balanced, and not in the last place profitable management.

  16. Lasers and radiofrequency devices in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, James; Weiss, Adam; Stern, Avichai

    2011-07-01

    Advances in technology are changing the ways that patients experience dental treatment. Technology helps to decrease treatment time and makes the treatment more comfortable for the patient. One technological advance is the use of lasers in dentistry. Lasers are providing more efficient, more comfortable, and more predictable outcomes for patients. Lasers are used in all aspects of dentistry, including operative, periodontal, endodontic, orthodontic, and oral and maxillofacial surgery. Lasers are used for soft and hard tissue procedures in the treatment of pathologic conditions and for esthetic procedures. This article discusses how lasers work and their application in the various specialties within dentistry. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Nanomaterials for Tissue Engineering In Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chieruzzi, Manila; Pagano, Stefano; Moretti, Silvia; Pinna, Roberto; Milia, Egle; Torre, Luigi; Eramo, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The tissue engineering (TE) of dental oral tissue is facing significant changes in clinical treatments in dentistry. TE is based on a stem cell, signaling molecule, and scaffold triad that must be known and calibrated with attention to specific sectors in dentistry. This review article shows a summary of micro- and nanomorphological characteristics of dental tissues, of stem cells available in the oral region, of signaling molecules usable in TE, and of scaffolds available to guide partial or total reconstruction of hard, soft, periodontal, and bone tissues. Some scaffoldless techniques used in TE are also presented. Then actual and future roles of nanotechnologies about TE in dentistry are presented.

  18. Advances of Proteomic Sciences in Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurshid, Zohaib; Zohaib, Sana; Najeeb, Shariq; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail; Rehman, Rabia; Rehman, Ihtesham Ur

    2016-05-13

    Applications of proteomics tools revolutionized various biomedical disciplines such as genetics, molecular biology, medicine, and dentistry. The aim of this review is to highlight the major milestones in proteomics in dentistry during the last fifteen years. Human oral cavity contains hard and soft tissues and various biofluids including saliva and crevicular fluid. Proteomics has brought revolution in dentistry by helping in the early diagnosis of various diseases identified by the detection of numerous biomarkers present in the oral fluids. This paper covers the role of proteomics tools for the analysis of oral tissues. In addition, dental materials proteomics and their future directions are discussed.

  19. Advances of Proteomic Sciences in Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurshid, Zohaib; Zohaib, Sana; Najeeb, Shariq; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail; Rehman, Rabia; Rehman, Ihtesham Ur

    2016-01-01

    Applications of proteomics tools revolutionized various biomedical disciplines such as genetics, molecular biology, medicine, and dentistry. The aim of this review is to highlight the major milestones in proteomics in dentistry during the last fifteen years. Human oral cavity contains hard and soft tissues and various biofluids including saliva and crevicular fluid. Proteomics has brought revolution in dentistry by helping in the early diagnosis of various diseases identified by the detection of numerous biomarkers present in the oral fluids. This paper covers the role of proteomics tools for the analysis of oral tissues. In addition, dental materials proteomics and their future directions are discussed. PMID:27187379

  20. 19 CFR 141.37 - Additional requirements for nonresident corporations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... corporations. 141.37 Section 141.37 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Additional requirements for nonresident corporations. If a nonresident corporation has not qualified to... authority of the grantor designated to execute the power of attorney on behalf of the corporation....

  1. A survey of retracted articles in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Túlio Eduardo; Gonçalves, Andréia Souza; Leles, Cláudio Rodrigues; Batista, Aline Carvalho; Costa, Luciane Rezende

    2017-07-06

    Publication retraction is a mechanism to preserve the scientific literature against publications that contain seriously flawed or erroneous data, redundant publication, plagiarism, unethical research, and other features that compromise the integrity of science. An increase in the occurrence of retractions in recent years has been reported. Nevertheless, there is scarce information on this topic concerning publications in dentistry and related specialties. Thus, this study aimed to investigate retracted papers published in dental journals. Data collection included an exploratory search in PubMed and a specific search in SCImago Journal Rank indexed journals, complemented by the cases reported on the Retraction Watch website and in PubMed. All 167 dental journals included in SCImago were searched for identification of retracted articles up to March 2016. The selected retracted articles and their corresponding retraction notices were recorded and assessed for classification according to the reason for retraction and other additional information. Forty of the 167 journals scrutinised at SCImago (23.9%) had at least one retracted article, and four additional journals were identified from the Retraction Watch website. A total of 72 retracted found were retracted for the reasons: redundant publication (20.8%), plagiarism (18.1%), misconduct (13.8%), overlap (13.6%) and honest error (9.7%). Higher number of retractions were reported in those journals with cites/doc retractions were mostly due to the authors' malpractice and were more frequently related to journals with less impact.

  2. Corporate Venturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vintergaard, Christian

    From the perspective of Austrian economics, this paper develops a conceptual understanding ofhow corporate venture managers recognize and discover opportunities in a network environment.In an effort to create a better understanding of who is involved in process, this paper reports onthe development...... path of an entrepreneurial opportunity of the Danish corporate venture capitalist,Danfoss A/S. This paper distinguishes itself from previous research done on entrepreneurialopportunities by creating a holistic and conceptual framework, which broadens and expands theperception of the market participants...... involved in recognition and discovery. Consequently thepaper offers insight to a diversified group of actors who mix and match technological and marketcapabilities in a constant process of recognition and discovery.Key words: Corporate venturing, entrepreneurship, discovery, networks, opportunities,recognition....

  3. Corporate Entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Astrid Heidemann

    Corporate entrepreneurship is often highlighted as being more relevant than ever, as a viable means for existing organizations to pursue creative new solutions to the complex challenges facing firms today. This includes continuously exploring and exploiting previously unexploited opportunities, a...... entrepreneurship and innovation, and identifying management practices supportive of these particular innovation processes.......Corporate entrepreneurship is often highlighted as being more relevant than ever, as a viable means for existing organizations to pursue creative new solutions to the complex challenges facing firms today. This includes continuously exploring and exploiting previously unexploited opportunities......, and thereby moving the organization to a new state of being. In spite of a general consensus on a strong interlinkage between the concepts of innovation and corporate entrepreneurship, the nature of this linkage is rarely addressed directly. This has made further research in the two areas problematic, mainly...

  4. The State of the Corporation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hein Jessen, Mathias

    and the corporation, seeing that the state is itself a corporate entity, albeit one which has achieved a privileged position in our political understanding as the repository of sovereignty and the sole legitimate claimant to political authority and allegiance. The state has throughout history governed social life......Today it has become commonplace to claim the demise of the power of the democratic nation-state due to globalization, neoliberal policies and the increasing power of transnational entities (UN, EU, IMF, WTO, World Bank) and multinational corporations. This view, however, prevalent in both public...... discourse and political debates, rests on a misguided conception of the state and on a sharp demarcation between the state and the corporation. This demarcation – between state and corporation and the political and the economic – is fundamental to the functioning of state power and to the existing political...

  5. Corporate responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karsten Klint

    2007-01-01

    Is it legitimate for a business to concentrate on profits under respect for the law and ethical custom? On the one hand, there seems to be good reasons for claiming that a corporation has a duty to act for the benefit of all its stakeholders. On the other hand, this seems to dissolve the notion...... to this paradox as Goodpaster, namely that a corporation is the instrument of the shareholders only, but that shareholders still have an obligation to act ethically responsibly. To this, I add discussion of Friedman's claim that this responsibility consists in increasing profits. I show that most of his arguments...

  6. Local anesthetics: dentistry's most important drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamed, S F

    1994-12-01

    One hundred and fifty years ago, Horace Wells opened the door to local anesthetics. Since then, many advances have been made in pain control. The development of dentistry's most important drugs is highlighted here.

  7. Adhesive dentistry: 2013 and into the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleman, David S; Deliperi, Simone

    2013-10-01

    With the recent founding of the International Academy for Adhesive Dentistry (IAAD), scientific research, commercially available products, and clinically proven protocols will be brought together with the dental profession.

  8. Ultrasound: A Revenant Therapeutic Modality in Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    An ultrasound (US) gives a visible image of the organs that are present inside the body. In medicine it serves for diagnosing and also its therapeutic benefits are well established for bone healing, osteointegration and soft tissue healing. In dentistry it is widely used for diagnostic purposes. When it was discovered it was introduced for therapeutic purposes, but due to lack of clinical studies its use as therapy was remittent in dentistry. The aim of the present paper was to establish the ...

  9. The advantages of minimally invasive dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Gordon J

    2005-11-01

    Minimally invasive dentistry, in cases in which it is appropriate, is a concept that preserves dentitions and supporting structures. In this column, I have discussed several examples of minimally invasive dental techniques. This type of dentistry is gratifying for dentists and appreciated by patients. If more dentists would practice it, the dental profession could enhance the public's perception of its honesty and increase its professionalism as well.

  10. Pathways of fear and anxiety in dentistry: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Ava Elizabeth; Carter, Geoff; Boschen, Mark; AlShwaimi, Emad; George, Roy

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article was to analyze the theories underpinning dental fear, anxiety and phobias. To be included, articles must have been published between the years of 1949 and 2013 concerning fears and phobias within dentistry and/or psychiatry. Of 200 articles originally under review, 140 were included and reviewed by the authors.Five specific pathways relating to dental fear and anxiety were identified; Cognitive Conditioning, Informative, Visual Vicarious, Verbal Threat, and Parental. Eight currently accepted management techniques across all dental disciplines for dental fear and anxiety were identified. Further research is required to identify clinical diagnosis and treatment for fears originating from different pathways. PMID:25405187

  11. Corporate Governance and Corporate Creditworthiness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dror Parnes

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We examine the relation between corporate governance and bankruptcy risk as an underlying force affecting a bond’s yield. The level of corporate governance is captured by the G-index, along with the explicit groups of governance provisions. We estimate bankruptcy risk by Z-score, by cash-flow-score, by O-score, through Merton structural model default probabilities, and by S&P credit ratings. After addressing endogeneity and while controlling for firm-specific factors, based on the four objective methodologies we find that corporate governance is inversely related to bankruptcy risk. Yet, rating agencies take a mixed approach towards this association likely because of the conflicting impact of different governance provisions.

  12. Auditors' Experience with Corporate Psychopaths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov Jeppesen, Kim; Leder, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyse auditors’ experience with corporate psychopaths in their client management. Design/methodology/approach: The research was conducted as a survey among Danish state-authorized auditors, to which 179 auditors responded, representing 9% of the total...... actually exist and are a phenomenon worthy of research attention in areas such as accounting, auditing, internal control, fraud investigation, performance management and human resource management. Practical implications: As auditors are likely to come across corporate psychopaths from time to time...... auditors’ experience with corporate psychopaths. It adds value by confirming the relevance of the topic for practice and research....

  13. Tax Management and Corporate Governance

    OpenAIRE

    Přidal, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Recent accounting scandals and current global financial crisis have brought new demands on the whole corporate world. The call for better corporate governance is strengthening in all business areas including tax. Tax non -- compliance brings substantial risks for both tax payers and tax revenue authorities. The way how companies manage their tax risks can significantly influence their overall financial performance and reputation. The paper deals with issues of tax non -- compliance as a lack ...

  14. Dentistry proteomics: from laboratory development to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Taia M B; Lima, Stella M F; Petriz, Bernardo A; Silva, Osmar N; Freire, Mirna S; Franco, Octávio L

    2013-12-01

    Despite all the dental information acquired over centuries and the importance of proteome research, the cross-link between these two areas only emerged around mid-nineties. Proteomic tools can help dentistry in the identification of risk factors, early diagnosis, prevention, and systematic control that will promote the evolution of treatment in all dentistry specialties. This review mainly focuses on the evolution of dentistry in different specialties based on proteomic research and how these tools can improve knowledge in dentistry. The subjects covered are an overview of proteomics in dentistry, specific information on different fields in dentistry (dental structure, restorative dentistry, endodontics, periodontics, oral pathology, oral surgery, and orthodontics) and future directions. There are many new proteomic technologies that have never been used in dentistry studies and some dentistry areas that have never been explored by proteomic tools. It is expected that a greater integration of these areas will help to understand what is still unknown in oral health and disease.

  15. Intranasal sedatives in pediatric dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSarheed, Maha A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To identify the intranasal (IN) sedatives used to achieve conscious sedation during dental procedures amongst children. Methods: A literature review was conducted by identifying relevant studies through searches on Medline. Search included IN of midazolam, ketamine, sufentanil, dexmedetomidine, clonidine, haloperidol and loranzepam. Studies included were conducted amongst individuals below 18 years, published in English, and were not restricted by year. Exclusion criteria were articles that did not focus on pediatric dentistry. Results: Twenty studies were included. The most commonly used sedatives were midazolam, followed by ketamine and sufentanil. Onset of action for IN midazolam was 5-15 minutes (min), however, IN ketamine was faster (mean 5.74 min), while both IN sufentanil (mean 20 min) and IN dexmedetomidine (mean 25 min) were slow in comparison. Midazolam was effective for modifying behavior in mild to moderately anxious children, however, for more invasive or prolonged procedures, stronger sedatives, such as IN ketamine, IN sufentanil were recommended. In addition, ketamine fared better in overall success rate (89%) when compared with IN midazolam (69%). Intranasal dexmedetomidine was only used as pre-medication amongst children. While its’ onset of action is longer when compared with IN midazolam, it produced deeper sedation at the time of separation from the parent and at the time of anesthesia induction. Conclusion: Intranasal midazolam, ketamine and sufentanil are effective and safe for conscious sedation, while intranasal midazolam, dexmedetomidine and sufentanil have proven to be effective premedications. PMID:27570849

  16. [Importance of psychology in dentistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñaranda, P

    1990-01-01

    In this paper, the venezuelan dentists express their necessities of knowing certain aspects of psychology that could be useful in the relations with their patients. In the investigation a 16 item questionnaire was elaborated, taking 5 areas in consideration: a. Psychological management of the dental patient. b. Psychological consequences of the dental disease. c. Dental disease psychogenesis. d. Patient first contact behavior. e. Aspects of work organization. 100 dentists and 100 dental students of the last 2 years were inquired, in order to compare these two populations at the XXXth Congress of the venezuelan dentists. The two proportion coefficient test was used with: P less than or equal to 0.01. As a result 4 groups of items had a significant difference: a. Patient dissertation. b. Children with problematic behavior. c. Anxious patients; and d. Professional fees. Quantitatively 16 items were recognized as items in with Psychology could be useful to be applied in dentistry. The article concludes with 6 recommendations underlining the important role of the dental psychology in the dental school as well as in private practice.

  17. Intranasal sedatives in pediatric dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSarheed, Maha A

    2016-09-01

    To identify the intranasal (IN) sedatives used to achieve conscious sedation during dental procedures amongst children. A literature review was conducted by identifying relevant studies through searches on Medline. Search included IN of midazolam, ketamine, sufentanil, dexmedetomidine, clonidine, haloperidol, and loranzepam. Studies included were conducted amongst individuals below 18 years, published in English, and were not restricted by year. Exclusion criteria were articles that did not focus on pediatric dentistry.  Twenty studies were included. The most commonly used sedatives were midazolam, followed by ketamine and sufentanil. Onset of action for IN midazolam was 5-15 minutes (min), however, IN ketamine was faster (mean 5.74 min), while both IN sufentanil (mean 20 min) and IN dexmedetomidine (mean 25 min) were slow in comparison. Midazolam was effective for modifying behavior in mild to moderately anxious children, however, for more invasive or prolonged procedures, stronger sedatives, such as IN ketamine, IN sufentanil were recommended. In addition, ketamine fared better in overall success rate (89%) when compared with IN midazolam (69%). Intranasal dexmedetomidine was only used as pre-medication amongst children. While its' onset of action is longer when compared with IN midazolam, it produced deeper sedation at the time of separation from the parent and at the time of anesthesia induction. Intranasal midazolam, ketamine, and sufentanil are effective and safe for conscious sedation, while intranasal midazolam, dexmedetomidine, and sufentanil have proven to be effective premedications.

  18. Significance of biofilms in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wróblewska, Marta; Strużycka, Izabela; Mierzwińska-Nastalska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    In the past decades significant scientific progress has taken place in the knowledge about biofilms. They constitute multilayer conglomerates of bacteria and fungi, surrounded by carbohydrates which they produce, as well as substances derived from saliva and gingival fluid. Modern techniques showed significant diversity of the biofilm environment and a system of microbial communication (quorum sensing), enhancing their survival. At present it is believed that the majority of infections, particularly chronic with exacerbations, are a result of biofilm formation, particularly in the presence of biomaterials. It should be emphasised that penetration of antibiotics and other antimicrobial agents into deeper layers of a biofilm is poor, causing therapeutic problems and necessitating sometimes removal of the implant or prosthesis. Biofilms play an increasing role in dentistry as a result of more and more broad use in dental practice of plastic and implantable materials. Biofilms are produced on the surfaces of teeth as dental plaque, in the para-nasal sinuses, on prostheses, dental implants, as well as in waterlines of a dental unit, constituting a particular risk for severely immunocompromised patients. New methods of therapy and prevention of infections linked to biofilms are under development.

  19. [Specialties in dentistry. 4. Post-academic specialization in geriatric dentistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaub, R.M.; Baat, C. de

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, a specialization in geriatric dentistry has been established and along with it an educational programme. A specialist in geriatric dentistry is a dentist general practitioner with special knowledge and skills for delivering oral care to frail elderly people. The educational programm

  20. [Dentistry students' reasons for choosing dentistry as a career in Damascus University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashlah, A M

    2012-05-01

    This cross-sectional questionnaire survey assessed the motives for choosing dentist as a profession among dentistry students at Damascus University, Syrian Arab Republic. A total of 408 undergraduate students (233 males and 175 females) aged 18-23 years were selected randomly from students in the second, third and fourth years of dentistry study. They completed a questionnaire that enquired about their reasons for studying dentistry as well as their sociodemographic characteristics. The number of admissions in females had increased over the 3 years. Most parents of the students were university-educated. The main motivation for choosing dentistry was as a means to achieve personal goals, including getting a good job abroad, having financial independence, and attaining a good reputation. There were significant differences between the sexes with regard to the reasons for choosing dentistry.

  1. [Brazilian bibliographical output on public oral health in public health and dentistry journals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celeste, Roger Keller; Warmling, Cristine Maria

    2014-06-01

    The scope of this paper is to describe characteristics of the scientific output in the area of public oral health in journals on public health and dentistry nationwide. The Scopus database of abstracts and quotations was used and eight journals in public health, as well as ten in dentistry, dating from 1947 to 2011 were selected. A research strategy using key words regarding oral health in public health and key words about public health in dentistry was used to locate articles. The themes selected were based on the frequency of key words. Of the total number of articles, 4.7% (n = 642) were found in oral health journals and 6.8% (n = 245) in public health journals. Among the authors who published most, only 12% published in both fields. There was a percentile growth of public oral health publications in dentistry journals, though not in public health journals. In dentistry, only studies indexed as being on the topic of epidemiology showed an increase. In the area of public health, planning was predominant in all the phases studied. Research to evaluate the impact of research and postgraduate policies in scientific production is required.

  2. Nanodrug delivery systems in dentistry: a review on current status and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renugalakshmi, Apathsakayan; Vinothkumar, Thilla Sekar; Kandaswamy, Deivanayagam

    2011-09-01

    The present review provides an insight into various potential areas of dentistry that are being invaded by nanotechnology based drugs and drug delivery systems. Current treatments for diseases of dental and oral structures rely on the use of classical pharmacological agents which, in some cases are limited by low efficacy and lack of selectivity to target cells. However, various nanostructures in drug delivery and their challenges in the field of dentistry have not been reviewed so far in the literature. The different treatment opportunities of importance include caries control restorations, tooth remineralisation, management of dentinal hypersensitivity, dental caries vaccine, management of oral biofilm, root canal disinfection, local anaesthesia and periodontal infection. The authors have also identified few dental applications demanding extensive research to emerge as a promising therapeutic strategy. We conclude by claiming that dentistry should follow the trend of probing matter at nanoscale to achieve a predictable treatment outcome.

  3. Sports dentistry: a perspective for the future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Vinícius Soares

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Sports Dentistry (SD acts in the prevention, maintenance and treatment of oral and facial injuries, as well as the collection and dissemination of information on dental trauma, beyond stimulus to research. Establishes as a duty for the dentist detect problems related to the athlete’s stomatognathic system. This essay is based on the provided data from the literature related to SD, including definition, practice areas and research fields. To discuss the data, six areas were categorized: shares in sports dentistry; oral health of athlete; sports-related dental implications; dental-facial trauma; face shields; and mouthguards. The analyzed data show that the SD is still an underexplored field of action by dentists, but it is expanding, despite not being recognized specialty by the Federal Council of Dentistry, but the Brazilian Academy of Sports Dentistry has been created with a mission to show the real importance of Dentistry in sport. The dentist should be part of the group of professionals associated with the athlete to perform periodic checks in order to ensure oral health which may contribute to athletes´performance. When impact occurs, however, it would be possible reduce the severity of the impact related to injuries, by using helmets, masks, goggles, face shields and mouthguard. Additionally, it is imperative that dentists, sports coaching, athletes, and professional who work with athletes be aware of the benefits of incorporating SD as an important academic and professional subject.

  4. Measuring instruments of corporate reputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damir Grgić

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this paper is focused on the instruments for the measurement of corporate reputation. Recent research of the elements which influence the success of a company shows a growing interest in intangible values. Corporate reputation itself has been identified as one of the key intangible assets which create the company’s added value. Understanding of the importance of corporate reputation has been determined as a significant component of the company’s competitiveness, that is, of its competitive edge. Reputation is a normal part of our life and an integral part of our society. Our interest in the honesty and integrity of others is firmly established in all cultures and nowadays the focus of this interest is switching increasingly on companies. Corporate reputation can be acquired by means of strong, well-developed strategies, which are crucial for the opinion of stakeholders regarding future stability and competitive sustainability of the company. On the other hand, it should be emphasized that in order to manage it, corporate reputation has to be measured first. However, although the concept of corporate reputation is universally accepted and its significance has been recognized especially in the last two decades, the process of its measurement is still at an early stage and there is no universally accepted instrument for its measurement. Therefore, the author of this paper gives an overview of the instruments used for the measurement of corporate reputation which have gained a foothold through former practical usage.

  5. A new corporate governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Bucur

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The issue of corporate governance has become increasingly important as globalisation has begun to accelerate and the economic and financial turmoil have intensified. Post-crisis context has imposed the need to expand the prospects for analysis over governance and companies, as well as the need to identify new ways of administration and resource management. From this perspective, the author aims to highlight the conditions, factors and events that have generated profound changes within the business environment, while the analysis is focusing on contemporary changes in the systems of corporate governance and economic mutations, especially in terms of the companies. The establishment of new governance rules is demanding a theoretical approach based on new methodological requirements which are needed to reform theoretical foundations and to promote creative and effective shapes and governance systems.

  6. Monitoring managers through corporate compliance programs

    OpenAIRE

    Angelucci, C.; Han, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Compliance programs entail monitoring of employees' behavior with the claimed objective of fighting corporate crime. (Competition) Authorities promote such intra-firm monitoring. In a three-tier hierarchy model, authority-shareholder-manager, we study the impact of monitoring through a compliance program on contracting within the firm and the authority's optimal sanctions and leniency policy. We find that compliance programs are beneficial in the fight against corporate crime if and only if t...

  7. Features of the content of corporate contracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Petrovna Gladneva

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective to study the legal nature to reveal the peculiarities of the subject and other essential terms of corporate contracts as a technique and means of legal regulation of corporate relations. Methods general and specific methods of cognition dialectical formal logic analysis synthesis modeling structural and systemicfunctional methods as well as comparative legal logical legal historical legal grammatical methods and systemic interpretation. Results it is concluded that the object of corporate contracts includes terms about the features of implementation of corporate rights for shares and share in capital assets conditions order of the implementation of corporate rights and approval of other actions related to company management activity reorganization and liquidation the passive duty of corporate organizations to refrain from committing any action authority arising from the nature of corporate agreements as well as the active responsibilities associated with the certain implementation of corporate rights certified by stocks shares rights to stocks shares. In addition to the subject the content of corporate contractsincludes other essential necessary conditions stipulated by the corporate legislation norms and the agreement of the participants of economic entity. Scientific novelty for the first time taking into account modern achievements of civilistic jurisprudence and practice the authors investigate the relationship between the concepts of a civil contract and corporate contract give the definition of corporate contract show the specificity of the subject and other material terms of corporate contracts. Practical significance the findings can be taken into account in the further research of corporate law issues as subbranch of civil law used in law making and enforcement activities in the educational process as a teaching material in civil law. nbsp

  8. Corporate Social Entrepreneurship in India

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrawal, Anirudh; Sahasranamam, Sreevas

    2016-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to analyze how corporations create social and economic value through corporate social entrepreneurial activities. Design/methodology/approach – This paper employs a multiple case study approach. The selected cases cover companies that have a clear corporate...... social enterprise model in operation and address different prevailing social problems. Findings – This study reveals that corporate social entrepreneurship (CSE) is driven by the environmental dynamics, organizational antecedents, and organizational outcomes. In addition, the authors found that CSE...... institutional and socio-economical context. Practical implications – The developed model is useful for companies operating in complex environments in developing markets as it provides recommendations on how to strengthen social and public legitimacy and earn returns on their business investments. Moreover...

  9. Corporate Social Entrepreneurship in India

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrawal, Anirudh; Sahasranamam, Sreevas

    2016-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to analyze how corporations create social and economic value through corporate social entrepreneurial activities. Design/methodology/approach – This paper employs a multiple case study approach. The selected cases cover companies that have a clear corporate...... social enterprise model in operation and address different prevailing social problems. Findings – This study reveals that corporate social entrepreneurship (CSE) is driven by the environmental dynamics, organizational antecedents, and organizational outcomes. In addition, the authors found that CSE......, the developed model helps companies operating in antagonistic environments with prevailing social problems to position themselves favorably. Social implications – The study attempts to legitimize the practice of CSE by highlighting the positive financial, social, and political outcomes. Originality...

  10. Didactic Community Dentistry Curricula in U.S. Dental Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Marsha A.

    1987-01-01

    A national survey of predoctoral community dentistry faculty members provided ratings of importance for 32 community dentistry topics and information on clock hours of didactic instruction in each topic. (MSE)

  11. Recent advances in imaging technologies in dentistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naseem; Shah; Nikhil; Bansal; Ajay; Logani

    2014-01-01

    Dentistry has witnessed tremendous advances in all its branches over the past three decades. With these advances, the need for more precise diagnostic tools,specially imaging methods, have become mandatory.From the simple intra-oral periapical X-rays, advanced imaging techniques like computed tomography, cone beam computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound have also found place in modern dentistry. Changing from analogue to digital radiography has not only made the process simpler and faster but also made image storage, manipulation(brightness/contrast, image cropping, etc.) and retrieval easier. The three-dimensional imaging has made the complex cranio-facial structures more accessible for examination and early and accurate diagnosis of deep seated lesions. This paper is to review current advances in imaging technology and their uses in different disciplines of dentistry.

  12. Plasma rich in growth factors in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Glavina

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF has wider use in many fields of dentistry due to its endogenous biocompatible regenerative potential i.e., their potential to stimulate and accelerate tissue healing and bone regeneration. Aims This review shows the increasing use of PRGF technology in various fields of dentistry. Methods In the last nine years PubMed has been searched in order to find out published articles upon PRGF in dentistry and 36 papers have been included. Results PRGF technology has many advantages with positive clinical and biological outcomes in tissue healing and bone regeneration. Conclusion In order to determine the most effective therapeutic value for patients, further research is required.

  13. Evidence-based equine dentistry: preventive medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmalt, James L

    2007-08-01

    Dental problems are some of the most common reasons for a horse to be presented to an equine veterinarian. Despite the importance of anecdotal evidence as a starting point, the science of equine dentistry (especially prophylactic dentistry) has remained poorly supported by evidence-based approaches to diagnosis and treatment. In the 21st century, veterinarians have an ethical responsibility to promote and use the results of evidence-based research and not propagate statements attesting to the purported benefits of intervention without supporting research. Consider also that society is becoming more litigious and therefore is basing treatment plans and advice on published research, which protects the profession from legal challenges concerning our professional conduct. This article reviews the current published evidence concerning the role of equine dentistry in feed digestibility and performance.

  14. Advances in Nanotechnology for Restorative Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohaib Khurshid

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Rationalizing has become a new trend in the world of science and technology. Nanotechnology has ascended to become one of the most favorable technologies, and one which will change the application of materials in different fields. The quality of dental biomaterials has been improved by the emergence of nanotechnology. This technology manufactures materials with much better properties or by improving the properties of existing materials. The science of nanotechnology has become the most popular area of research, currently covering a broad range of applications in dentistry. This review describes the basic concept of nanomaterials, recent innovations in nanomaterials and their applications in restorative dentistry. Advances in nanotechnologies are paving the future of dentistry, and there are a plenty of hopes placed on nanomaterials in terms of improving the health care of dental patients.

  15. Corporate Fictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunæs, Dorthe; Søndergaard, D. M.

    2006-01-01

    The article describes a particular strategy of communication called a social science fiction. The strategy was taken up following an empirical research project on gender and management, in order to communicate results to the company's managers and Human Resource Staff. The research results showed...... fiction was the kind of narrative therapy, which aims to reconfigure the problem in focus by a process of externalisation that allows a reconstruction and retelling of the issue. The article describes how three cultural mechanisms in the company were condensed into three imaginary figures: Mr. Corporate...

  16. Corporate Foresight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohrbeck, René; Gemünden, Hans Georg

    2011-01-01

    Although in the last three decades much knowledge has been produced on how best to conduct foresight exercises, but little is known on how foresight should be integrated with the innovation effort of a company. Drawing on empirical evidence from 19 case studies and 107 interviews, we identify three...... roles that corporate foresight should play to maximize the innovation capacity of a firm: (1) the strategist role, which explores new business fields; (2) the initiator role, which increases the number of innovation concepts and ideas; and (3) the opponent role, which challenges innovation projects...

  17. Corporate Entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Astrid Heidemann

    2006-01-01

    The recognition of the importance of entrepreneurial dynamics in corporate context is increasingly acknowledged in both entrepreneurship and strategic management literature, as firms today face a reality in which frame-breaking innovation is an important element of survival. From this understanding......, the concept of Strategic Entrepreneurship (SE) has arisen, arguing a logic of focusing on the intersections between the two fields. This paper sets out to explore the SE construct empirically. Through seven case studies evolving around radical technological innovations, evidence is found of the importance...

  18. Going Corporate

    CERN Document Server

    Kadre, Shailendra

    2011-01-01

    Going Corporate: A Geek's Guide shows technology workers how to gain the understanding and skills necessary for becoming an effective, promotable manager or sought-after consultant or freelancer. Technology professionals typically dive deeply into small pieces of technology - like lines of code or the design of a circuit. As a result, they may have trouble seeing the bigger picture and how their work supports an organization's goals. But ignoring or dismissing the business or operational aspects of projects and products can lead to career stagnation. In fact, understanding the larger business

  19. Corporate Fictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunæs, Dorthe; Søndergaard, D. M.

    2006-01-01

    The article describes a particular strategy of communication called a social science fiction. The strategy was taken up following an empirical research project on gender and management, in order to communicate results to the company's managers and Human Resource Staff. The research results showed...... fiction was the kind of narrative therapy, which aims to reconfigure the problem in focus by a process of externalisation that allows a reconstruction and retelling of the issue. The article describes how three cultural mechanisms in the company were condensed into three imaginary figures: Mr. Corporate...

  20. Corporate Foresight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohrbeck, René; Gemünden, Hans Georg

    2011-01-01

    Although in the last three decades much knowledge has been produced on how best to conduct foresight exercises, but little is known on how foresight should be integrated with the innovation effort of a company. Drawing on empirical evidence from 19 case studies and 107 interviews, we identify three...... roles that corporate foresight should play to maximize the innovation capacity of a firm: (1) the strategist role, which explores new business fields; (2) the initiator role, which increases the number of innovation concepts and ideas; and (3) the opponent role, which challenges innovation projects...

  1. Nanotechnology in dentistry: prevention, diagnosis, and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abou Neel EA

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Ensanya Ali Abou Neel,1–3 Laurent Bozec,3 Roman A Perez,4,5 Hae-Won Kim,4–6 Jonathan C Knowles3,5 1Division of Biomaterials, Operative Dentistry Department, Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 2Biomaterials Department, Faculty of Dentistry, Tanta University, Tanta, Egypt; 3UCL Eastman Dental Institute, Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, London, UK; 4Institute of Tissue Regenerative Engineering (ITREN, 5Department of Nanobiomedical Science and BK21 Plus NBM Global Research Center for Regenerative Medicine, 6Department of Biomaterials Science, College of Dentistry, Dankook University, Cheonan, Republic of Korea Abstract: Nanotechnology has rapidly expanded into all areas of science; it offers significant alternative ways to solve scientific and medical questions and problems. In dentistry, nanotechnology has been exploited in the development of restorative materials with some significant success. This review discusses nanointerfaces that could compromise the longevity of dental restorations, and how nanotechnolgy has been employed to modify them for providing long-term successful restorations. It also focuses on some challenging areas in dentistry, eg, oral biofilm and cancers, and how nanotechnology overcomes these challenges. The recent advances in nanodentistry and innovations in oral health-related diagnostic, preventive, and therapeutic methods required to maintain and obtain perfect oral health, have been discussed. The recent advances in nanotechnology could hold promise in bringing a paradigm shift in dental field. Although there are numerous complex therapies being developed to treat many diseases, their clinical use requires careful consideration of the expense of synthesis and implementation. Keywords: nanotechnology, nanointerfaces, biofilm-related oral diseases, tissue engineering, drug delivery, toxicity

  2. Changing the education paradigm in pediatric dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Gomez, Francisco J

    2014-10-01

    Traditional curricula of pediatric dental residency programs have overemphasized restorative dentistry while failing to give adequate attention to early diagnosis, preventive disease management, risk assessment, cultural competency, advocacy, community partnerships and interprofessional education. The University of California, Los Angeles, Community Health and Advocacy Training Program in Pediatric Dentistry emphasizes these lesser-taught areas, integrating them within a structured education in classical restorative techniques and Commission on Dental Accreditation-approved standards, providing a diverse curriculum and preparing residents for practice in increasingly diverse communities.

  3. Use of DNA technology in forensic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Ricardo Henrique Alves; Sales-Peres, Arsenio; de Oliveira, Rogério Nogueira; de Oliveira, Fernando Toledo; Sales-Peres, Sílvia Helena de Carvalho

    2007-06-01

    The established importance of Forensic Dentistry for human identification, mainly when there is little remaining material to perform such identification (e.g., in fires, explosions, decomposing bodies or skeletonized bodies), has led dentists working with forensic investigation to become more familiar with the new molecular biology techniques. The currently available DNA tests have high reliability and are accepted as legal proofs in courts. This article presents a literature review referring to the main studies on Forensic Dentistry that involve the use of DNA for human identification, and makes an overview of the evolution of this technology in the last years, highlighting the importance of molecular biology in forensic sciences.

  4. A multidisciplinary approach to esthetic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear, Frank M; Kokich, Vincent G

    2007-04-01

    Today's dentist does not just repair teeth to make them better for chewing. Increasingly, his or her work involves esthetics. With patients demanding more attractive teeth, dentists now must become more familiar with the formerly independent disciplines of orthodontics, periodontics, restorative dentistry, and maxillofacial surgery. This article provides a systematic method of evaluating dentofacial esthetics in a logical, interdisciplinary manner. In today's interdisciplinary dental world, treatment planning must begin with well-defined esthetic objectives. By beginning with esthetics, and taking into consideration the impact on function, structure, and biology, the clinician will be able to use the various disciplines in dentistry to deliver the highest level of dental care to each patient.

  5. Bioeconomy analysis in Aesthetic Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreea Dana Tudose

    2015-12-01

    technical report of treatment ( labor - price, average duration, satisfaction, relative to direct restoration techniques versus indirect techniques . In conclusion, SWOT analysis can be successfully applied to a better targeting of treatments, applying a plan lines for management in dental treatment units. None of direct techniques can not fit the bioeconomy principles (saves time, money, dental tissue in the short term. All maneuvers efficient in terms of functional aesthetics dentistry win at time saving and lost tooth structure chapter to the cost issue. In the long run costs can be amortized, especially since the restoration increases predictability.

  6. Iranian Corporations and Corporate Social Responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Chapardar

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Comparative studies have demonstrated that the themes for corporate social responsibility (CSR initiatives are different among nations and geographic regions based on their cultural, political, legal, social, and economic contexts. In this research, which was conducted on 56 corporations from IMI100 (100 Iranian companies with highest annual sales, ranked by Industrial Management Institute or IMI, CSR themes in priority have been identified. Data collected from a semistructured questionnaire and some complementary interviews were analyzed against the results of a reference study over 100 companies from developed countries. The resulted themes, some of which may have several subthemes, were developed in three economic, environmental, and social categories. Beside these qualitative findings, two indices are constructed for indicating the “importance” of and “contribution” to each theme. The results and discussions are supposed to help business leaders, international companies inside Iran, governmental authorities, and researchers to improve CSR discussions and practices in the country where CSR undergoes a less structured platform.

  7. The role of coaching in the business of dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, T C

    2007-09-08

    Coaching is a subject dentistry appears to have let slip by, yet as this article outlines, it has so much to offer in many different aspects of dentistry, but particularly in fulfilling the Standards for dental professionals determined by the General Dental Council (GDC). Evidence suggests that coaching has produced tremendous benefits to business, and dentistry is a business.

  8. Employment of the Disabled in Large Corporations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabby, Rami

    1983-01-01

    Large corporations are in a unique position to employ the disabled, but they sometimes lack the motivation to do so. The author discusses elements of a corporate policy for the disabled, ways of formulating and disseminating it, assignment of responsibility, changes in management attitudes, and the special case of the multinational company.…

  9. Employment of the Disabled in Large Corporations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabby, Rami

    1983-01-01

    Large corporations are in a unique position to employ the disabled, but they sometimes lack the motivation to do so. The author discusses elements of a corporate policy for the disabled, ways of formulating and disseminating it, assignment of responsibility, changes in management attitudes, and the special case of the multinational company.…

  10. Ethical and legal implications of marketing in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Renato Paranhos

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: The aim of this study was to discuss the ethical and legal use of marketing in dentistry by the professionals. Marketing itself is very important for solving the problems of competitiveness of daily private practice, but in several times its application methods may raise concern due to the current regulations. Literature review: The marketing concepts have been frequently reported, and this literature review shows that the methods of marketing in Dentistry are very varied. Conclusion: At the end of this study, most authors agreed that internal marketing is the most effective due to low cost. Besides that, it should be accepted as an obligation for the dentist’s professional success. Consequently, the dentist becomes responsible for the effectiveness and evaluation of the marketing program of the office, and may be helped by the auxiliary personnel. The professional is exposed to unnecessary risks regarding to the professional responsibility concerning to the law in services delivery advertising. Although there are no specific laws, the current legislation must be respected.

  11. Corporate ethic policy

    OpenAIRE

    Хадарцева, Лариса; Кайтмазов, Владимир

    2014-01-01

    The article deals with the general concept of business ethics, a corporate code of ethics and corporate social responsibility. Corporations take pains to promote sustainability through codes of ethics and their efforts are positively received by consumers.

  12. Latex allergy in dentistry: clinical cases report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raggio, D.P.; Camargo, L.B.; Naspitz, G.M.C.C.; Politano, G.T.; Bonifacio, C.C.; Mendes, F.M.; Kierstman, F.

    2010-01-01

    Generally natural rubber latex (NRL) allergy is detected after some exposition to the material. As NRL is commonly found in different materials used daily in dental clinic, the allergy can be manifested in the pediatric dentistry clinic. The first clinical manifestation can be smooth but also severe

  13. Dentistry and Dental Hygiene Handbook. 1988 Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

    The laws, rules and regulations of the New York State Education Department governing dentistry and dental hygiene practice in the state are presented. In addition, the requirements and procedures for obtaining licensure and first registration as a dentist and dental hygienist in New York are discussed. The following chapters are provided: (1)…

  14. Computerized implant-dentistry: Advances toward automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Minkle; Anand, Vishal; Salaria, Sanjeev Kumar; Jain, Nikil; Gupta, Shilpi

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in the field of implantology such as three-dimensional imaging, implant-planning software, computer-aided-design/computer-aided-manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology, computer-guided, and navigated implant surgery have led to the computerization of implant-dentistry. This three-dimensional computer-generated implant-planning and surgery has not only enabled accurate preoperative evaluation of the anatomic limitations but has also facilitated preoperative planning of implant positions along with virtual implant placement and subsequently transferring the virtual treatment plans onto the surgical phase via static (guided) or dynamic (navigated) systems aided by CAD/CAM technology. Computerized-implant-dentistry being highly predictable and minimally invasive in nature has also allowed implant placement in patients with medical comorbidities (e.g. radiation therapy, blood dyscrasias), in patients with complex problems following a significant alteration of the bony anatomy as a result of benign or malignant pathology of the jaws or trauma and in patients with other physical and emotional problems. With significant achievements accomplished in the field of computerized implant-dentistry, attempts are now been made toward complete automation of implant-dentistry. PMID:25810585

  15. Evidence-Based Dentistry: What's New?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ballini, S. Capodiferro, M. Toia, S. Cantore, G. Favia, G. De Frenza, F.R. Grassi

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of evidence for every branch of medicine in teaching in order to orient the practitioners among the great amount of most actual scientific information's, and to support clinical decisions, is well established in health care, including dentistry. The practice of evidence-based medicine is a process of lifelong, self-directed, problem-based learning which leads to the need for clinically important information about diagnosis, prognosis, therapy and other clinical and health care issues. Nowadays the practice of dentistry is becoming more complex and challenging because of the continually changing in dental materials and equipments, an increasingly litigious society, an increase in the emphasis of continuing professional development, the information explosion and the consumer movement associated with advances on the Internet. The need for reliable information and the electronic revolution have come together to allow the “paradigm shift” towards evidence-based health care. Recent years have seen an increase in the importance of evidence-based dentistry, aiming to reduce to the maximum the gap between clinical research and real world dental practice. Aim of evidence-based practice is the systematic literature review, which synthesizes the best evidences and provides the basis for clinical practice guidelines. These practice guidelines give a brief review of what evidence-based dentistry is and how to use it.

  16. Nanotechnology in dentistry: Current achievements and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramandeep Singh Gambhir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology offers advances particularly in each and every field of human activity such as electronics, industry, telecommunications, environmental science, etc., The field of nanotechnology has got remarkable potential that can bring considerable improvements to the human health, enhanced use of natural resources, and reduced environmental pollution. Since 1990s, nanotechnology has been exploited for potential medical and dental applications. Nanotechnology holds promise for advanced diagnostics, targeted drug delivery, and biosensors. Dentistry is undergoing yet another change to benefit mankind, this time by transforming itself to the nanodentistry. A variety of nanostructures such as nanorobots, nanospheres, nanofibers, nanorods, etc., have been studied for various applications in dentistry and medicine. Preventive dentistry has also utilized nanodentistry to develop the nanomaterials for inclusion in a variety of oral health-care products. However, due to insufficient evidence on potential hazards on human health and environment, nanotechnology has become a controversial issue. It is documented that nanomaterials can enter the human body through several routes and can pose a threat to human health by interacting with the DNA. The present article focuses on the current status and the future implications of nanotechnology in dentistry.

  17. Developing an Undergraduate Hospital Dentistry Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, G. B.; Swanson, A. E.

    1991-01-01

    The process used by the University of British Columbia to establish and improve an undergraduate hospital dentistry program is chronicled. The program's initial structure and objectives, use of student input for program improvement, and the success of the approach in developing an effective program are discussed. (MSE)

  18. Patient autonomy in evidence-based dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritwik, Priyanshi

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based dentistry is the judicious integration of scientific information relating to the patient's oral health and medical condition with the dentist's clinical expertise and the patient's own treatment needs and preferences. In this triad of factors, we (the dentists) are least likely to be formally trained in recognizing our patient's preferences. Do we understand what shapes these preferences?

  19. Biological and hardware complications in implant dentistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wismeijer, D.; Buser, D.; Chen, S.

    2015-01-01

    The ITI Treatment Guide series, a unique compendium of evidence-based treatment methods in implant dentistry in daily practice, written by renowned clinicians, provides a comprehensive overview of various therapeutic options. Using an illustrated step-by-step approach, the ITI Treatment Guide shows

  20. Computerized implant-dentistry: Advances toward automation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minkle Gulati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Advancements in the field of implantology such as three-dimensional imaging, implant-planning software, computer-aided-design/computer-aided-manufacturing (CAD/CAM technology, computer-guided, and navigated implant surgery have led to the computerization of implant-dentistry. This three-dimensional computer-generated implant-planning and surgery has not only enabled accurate preoperative evaluation of the anatomic limitations but has also facilitated preoperative planning of implant positions along with virtual implant placement and subsequently transferring the virtual treatment plans onto the surgical phase via static (guided or dynamic (navigated systems aided by CAD/CAM technology. Computerized-implant-dentistry being highly predictable and minimally invasive in nature has also allowed implant placement in patients with medical comorbidities (e.g. radiation therapy, blood dyscrasias, in patients with complex problems following a significant alteration of the bony anatomy as a result of benign or malignant pathology of the jaws or trauma and in patients with other physical and emotional problems. With significant achievements accomplished in the field of computerized implant-dentistry, attempts are now been made toward complete automation of implant-dentistry.

  1. Latex allergy in dentistry: clinical cases report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raggio, D.P.; Camargo, L.B.; Naspitz, G.M.C.C.; Politano, G.T.; Bonifacio, C.C.; Mendes, F.M.; Kierstman, F.

    2010-01-01

    Generally natural rubber latex (NRL) allergy is detected after some exposition to the material. As NRL is commonly found in different materials used daily in dental clinic, the allergy can be manifested in the pediatric dentistry clinic. The first clinical manifestation can be smooth but also

  2. Evidence-based dentistry: what's new?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballini, A; Capodiferro, S; Toia, M; Cantore, S; Favia, G; De Frenza, G; Grassi, F R

    2007-06-06

    The importance of evidence for every branch of medicine in teaching in order to orient the practitioners among the great amount of most actual scientific information's, and to support clinical decisions, is well established in health care, including dentistry. The practice of evidence-based medicine is a process of lifelong, self-directed, problem-based learning which leads to the need for clinically important information about diagnosis, prognosis, therapy and other clinical and health care issues. Nowadays the practice of dentistry is becoming more complex and challenging because of the continually changing in dental materials and equipments, an increasingly litigious society, an increase in the emphasis of continuing professional development, the information explosion and the consumer movement associated with advances on the Internet. The need for reliable information and the electronic revolution have come together to allow the "paradigm shift" towards evidence-based health care. Recent years have seen an increase in the importance of evidence-based dentistry, aiming to reduce to the maximum the gap between clinical research and real world dental practice. Aim of evidence-based practice is the systematic literature review, which synthesizes the best evidences and provides the basis for clinical practice guidelines. These practice guidelines give a brief review of what evidence-based dentistry is and how to use it.

  3. Water Stewardship and Corporate Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter JONES

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to provide an exploratory review of the extent to which some of the world’s leading companies are publicly addressing water stewardship as part of their corporate sustainability strategies. The paper begins with an outline of the growing importance of corporate sustainability and water stewardship. The paper draws its empirical material from the most recent information on sustainability posted on the top twelve ‘Consumer Superbrands’ corporate websites. The findings reveal that a majority of the selected companies address a number of elements concerning water stewardship as part of their more general approach to corporate sustainability. However corporate commitments to water stewardship can be interpreted as being driven as much by business imperatives as by any concerns for environmental sustainability or a desire to maintain the viability and integrity of natural ecosystems. More critically the authors suggest that the selected companies’ commitments to water stewardship are framed within existing business models focused on technological improvements in eco-efficiency and continuing economic growth. The paper provides an accessible review of the water stewardship issues being pursued by some of the world’s leading companies and as such it will interest academics, students, political commentators and business managers interested in water stewardship and corporate sustainability.

  4. Managing Corporate Reputation Through Corporate Branding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Majken; Hatch, Mary Jo; Adams, Nick

    2012-01-01

    This article, which concentrates on symbolic management by explaining the role of corporate branding in managing corporate reputation, using Novo Nordisk as a case study, presents three perspectives on corporate branding: the marketing perspective, the organisational perspective and the co......-creation perspective. The three perspectives reviewed show the possibility of developing a multidisciplinary conceptualisation of corporate branding. They all offer insights important to managing organisations as corporate brands in a multi-stakeholder context and thus to the likelihood that corporate branding...... is a way to influence corporate reputation. The Novo Nordisk management believes the data indicate that corporate branding influenced reputation more than the other way around. Formal brand management practices may work considerably better when they complement rather than try to control existing forces...

  5. Managing Corporate Reputation Through Corporate Branding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Majken; Hatch, Mary Jo; Adams, Nick

    2012-01-01

    -creation perspective. The three perspectives reviewed show the possibility of developing a multidisciplinary conceptualisation of corporate branding. They all offer insights important to managing organisations as corporate brands in a multi-stakeholder context and thus to the likelihood that corporate branding......This article, which concentrates on symbolic management by explaining the role of corporate branding in managing corporate reputation, using Novo Nordisk as a case study, presents three perspectives on corporate branding: the marketing perspective, the organisational perspective and the co...... is a way to influence corporate reputation. The Novo Nordisk management believes the data indicate that corporate branding influenced reputation more than the other way around. Formal brand management practices may work considerably better when they complement rather than try to control existing forces...

  6. Corporate Social Communication and Corporate Social Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Ziggers, Gerrit Willem

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide firms in the food and agricultural sector a model that enables them to assess their corporate social initiatives in conjunction with their stakeholders. Building on the concepts of corporate social responsibility (CSR), corporate social performance (CSP) and the relational view the paper argues that firms can improve the results of their corporate social initiatives by setting up a dialogue with their stakeholders and to relate this to their internal or...

  7. Corporate Support of Education: No Strings Attached

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabot, Louis W.

    1978-01-01

    Nothing is better calculated to drive a wedge between the corporate community and our universities than efforts on the part of business to dictate to a community of scholars how it shall fulfill its mission. (Author)

  8. Corporate Support of Education: No Strings Attached

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabot, Louis W.

    1978-01-01

    Nothing is better calculated to drive a wedge between the corporate community and our universities than efforts on the part of business to dictate to a community of scholars how it shall fulfill its mission. (Author)

  9. Delegated Contracting and Corporate Hierarchies

    OpenAIRE

    Choe, Chongwoo; Park, In-Uck

    2004-01-01

    In a typical corporate hierarchy, the manager is delegated the authority to make decisions that set directions for the organization, employ subordinates and contract with external suppliers. This paper explains when such delegation of authority can be optimal, using a model of a firm with three parties: the principal, the manager and the worker. In centralization with two two-tier hierarchies, the principal designs contracts for both agents. In delegation with a three-tier hierarchy, the prin...

  10. Place of Value Management in a System of Corporate Management and Its Financial Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Igorevich Zavorotniy

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The author proves great urgency of applying of value approach in a strategic business man-agement. All factors of corporate value are presented. Also there is different classifications of factors of corporate value which were developed by other scientists. The place of value strategy in strategic business management is researched.The author proves that certain types of corporate value depend on main goals of corporate administration. He classifies some types of corporate value and financial indicators which correspond to them. Author defines financial methods of corporate value management and researches the influence of applying of each of them on corporate value.

  11. Corporate Control in Global Agrifood System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melnikov Aleksandr Borisovich

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The current state of global agrifood system is characterized by the increase in large enterprises concentration at each of food chain stages. One of the key factors providing the corporate control of multinational corporation is represented by the achievement of vertical and horizontal integration at each step of production, processing and sale of agrifood production. At this, the vertical and horizontal corporate integration is considered as the factor providing development and stability of control over the multinational corporations in agrifood sector. The classification of primary activities of agroindustrial multinational corporations including the leading multinational corporations is presented. The food chain of the largest multinational corporations is analysed on the basis of the following criteria – gene material, seeds, chemical fertilizers, trade and processing of raw agricultural material, processing industry, supermarkets. The analysis of consequences of agrocorporations concentration is also carried out on the example of seed farming branch and retail trade enterprises. The authors give recommendations on the adaptation to the consequences of multinational corporations expansion. Within these corporations it is necessary for the governments of host countries to improve the state legislation in the field of effective regulation of oligopolistic bodies; to make corporations responsible for any violations of the labor legislation; to provide conditions for competition at the food market and to control the merges and absorptions at the different stages of food chain.

  12. Factor analysis of processes of corporate culture formation at industrial enterprises of Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Illiashenko Sergii

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Authors have analyzed and synthesized the features of formation and development of the corporate culture at industrial enterprises of Ukraine and on this basis developed recommendations for application in the management of strategic development. During the research authors used the following general scientific methods: at research of patterns of interaction national culture, corporate culture and the culture of the individual authors used logical generalization method; for determining factors influencing corporate culture formation with the level of occurrence authors used factor analysis; for trend analysis of the corporate culture development at appropriate levels authors used comparative method. Results of the analysis showed that macro- and microfactors are external and mezofaktors (adaptability of business and corporate governance, corporate ethics, corporate social responsibility and personnel policies, corporate finance are internal for an enterprise. Authors have identified areas for each of the factors, itemized obstacles to the establishment and development of corporate culture at Ukrainian industrial enterprises and proposed recommendations for these processes management.

  13. Sovereign Wealth Funds – the New Challenge for Corporate Governance

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The article discusses Sovereign Wealth Funds with reference do the process of corporate governance. In the first part the paper presents the rise, growth and current investment activity of those funds. In the second section the author consider reasons for implementation of corporate governance best practices. The last part of the paper compares Santiago Principles with OECD principles of corporate governance.

  14. Sovereign Wealth Funds – the New Challenge for Corporate Governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariusz Urban

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses Sovereign Wealth Funds with reference do the process of corporate governance. In the first part the paper presents the rise, growth and current investment activity of those funds. In the second section the author consider reasons for implementation of corporate governance best practices. The last part of the paper compares Santiago Principles with OECD principles of corporate governance.

  15. 12 CFR 560.121 - Investment in State housing corporations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Investment in State housing corporations. 560... Investment in State housing corporations. (a) Any savings association to the extent it has legal authority to... state housing corporation; provided, that such obligations or loans are secured directly, or...

  16. Corporate Governance: A Keynote Speech

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    In the article, the author gives an overview of the many different aspects of corporate governance to discuss at a conference in Budapest in May 1997 arranged by Société Universitaire Européenne de Recherches Financières (SUERF). Among the subjects dealt with are the relationsship between...... cases of privatization in Western Europe. Almost everywhere, the role of institutional shareholders is increasing. The internationalization proces implies that also the role of the governance systems changes the incentives for corporate managers to demonstrate good financial performance, and there seems...

  17. Enhancing interoperability in the GFZ ISDC ontology by embedding SKOS transformed NASA's GCMD keywords for describing and connecting entities and VIAF authority data for referencing personal and corporate names

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritschel, B.; Neher, G.

    2011-12-01

    ISDC ontology integrated GCMD's controlled science and services keywords. In order to benefit from the hierarchical structure of GCDM's keywords, NASA's original files have been transformed into appropriate multi-language capable SKOS ontologies and afterwards integrated into the ISDC ontology. Now, existing information retrieval use cases can be extended using the SKOS vocabulary, such as e.g. broader, narrower or prefLabel. The problem of the global identification of persons and institutions within the ISDC ontology could be solved by the integration of authority data. From viaf.org provided URIs for personal and corporate names have been integrated as steady pillars into the ISDC ontology. Now persons and institutions can be unambiguously identified and further relations to publications or other information in the Web can be established. The successful educational and research activities combining geoscientists and information scientists will be extended into the areas of Open linked data and re-use of existing ontologies and controlled vocabularies.

  18. Use of additive dentistry decreases risk by minimizing reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, K Michael

    2012-05-01

    This case required enhancement of esthetics and reduction of long-term risk of pathologic tooth wear and decay, as well as minimizing erosion caused by innate and environmental influences. The author weighed patient expectations, diet, treatment of teeth, and age to create a treatment plan that would conserve tooth structure while accomplishing the goals of the case. The patient's dentition was restored utilizing intact enamel, adhesive dentistry, and etchable ceramic materials that require less than 1 mm of occlusal reduction without a significant loss of strength. In this case, opening the vertical dimension of occlusion--which was done to increase the height of both the maxillary and mandibular arches, in keeping with the patient's esthetic desires--eliminated the need to remove excessive amounts of healthy tooth structure and facilitated treatment of the occlusal dysfunction.

  19. Еnterprise’s corporate management improvement on the base of corporate culture development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.O. Biliak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The author reveals extremely important role of corporate culture and uniqueness of the corporate culture system. It is established that the corporate management is characterized above all, by the economic activity and corporate culture practice. The securement of the balance in the process of interaction between organization and its environment plays one of the key roles in any management system. The author determines the influence of corporate culture on the business activity of the enterprise, when personnel predicts the situation development according to which they build models and evaluate their behavior. While realizing them in their activity employees strengthen certain trends and create in such a way appropriate situations. The search of ways of development and changing corporate culture as the base of corporate management improvement is conducted with the use of the strategic approach. The creation of a corporate culture that supports the development strategy of the enterprise, is an essential component of effective business and management, because the culture shapes a socio-psychological climate and corporate spirit which contributes to the operational execution of tasks and achievement of certain goals. Accordingly to the mentioned above, the set of measures of enterprise’s corporate culture development securement is proposed.

  20. Preparing students to practice evidence-based dentistry: a mixed methods conceptual framework for curriculum enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palcanis, Kent G; Geiger, Brian F; O'Neal, Marcia R; Ivankova, Nataliya V; Evans, Retta R; Kennedy, Lasonja B; Carera, Karen W

    2012-12-01

    This article describes a mixed methods conceptual framework for evidence-based dentistry to enhance the curriculum at the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Dentistry. A focus of recent curriculum reform has been to prepare students to integrate evidence-based dentistry into clinical practice. The authors developed a framework consisting of four conceptual phases to introduce curriculum innovation: 1) exploration of the phenomenon; 2) development of two new instruments; 3) data collection, analysis, outcomes, and evaluation; and 4) application to curricular reform. Eight sequential procedural steps (literature review; focus group discussions; development of themes; survey design; internal review; data collection, analysis, and evaluation; development of recommendations with external review; and implementation of recommendations for curricular enhancement) guided the curricular enhancement. Faculty members supported the concept of teaching evidence-based dentistry to facilitate major curriculum reform, and course directors incorporated evidence-based teaching to prepare scientist-practitioners who meet dental performance standards. The new curriculum implemented following completion of the study is in its third year. Much of its structure is based on evidence-based teaching methodologies, and approximately one-third of the content consists of small groups researching clinical problems with applied science and discussing the findings. The framework described in this article proved useful to guide revision of predoctoral clinical education at one dental school and may be useful in other settings.

  1. 31 CFR 210.4 - Authorizations and revocations of authorizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Authorizations and revocations of authorizations. 210.4 Section 210.4 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance... corporate action, or the appointment of a receiver, conservator, or liquidator for the RDFI. In any such...

  2. The Corporate Secretary

    OpenAIRE

    International Finance Corporation

    2016-01-01

    This Handbook offers a concise and practical description of how corporate secretaries might carry out their role to improve governance in their organizations. It can also serve as a guidance tool for both International Finance Corporation (IFC) clients and advisory staff to clarify the potentially expansive duties of corporate secretaries and to help them assist corporate secretaries in un...

  3. Information and Corporate Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Miriam A.

    1984-01-01

    This paper defines "corporate culture" (set of values and beliefs shared by people working in an organization which represents employees' collective judgments about future) and discusses importance of corporate culture, nature of corporate cultures in business and academia, and role of information in shaping present and future corporate cultures.…

  4. Realizing Corporate Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Girschik, Verena

    This doctoral dissertation aims to understand how companies realize corporate responsibility - both how they perform corporate responsibility in particular local contexts and how they negotiate understandings of what corporate responsibility means. It builds on an inductive case study of the Danish...... in this dissertation unfold distinct yet interdependent processes of positioning and framing that constitute new ways of performing and understanding corporate responsibility....

  5. Rapid prototyping: An innovative technique in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakeba Quadri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Emergence of advanced digital technology has opened up new perspectives for design and production in the field of dentistry. Rapid prototyping (RP is a technique to quickly and automatically construct a three-dimensional (3D model of a part or product using 3D printers or stereolithography machines. RP has various dental applications, such as fabrication of implant surgical guides, zirconia prosthesis and molds for metal castings, maxillofacial prosthesis and frameworks for fixed and removable partial dentures, wax patterns for the dental prosthesis and complete denture. Rapid prototyping presents fascinating opportunities, but the process is difficult as it demands a high level of artistic skill, which means that the dental technicians should be able to work with the models obtained after impression to form a mirror image and achieve good esthetics. This review aims to focus on various RP methods and its application in dentistry.

  6. Dentistry students' perceptions of learning management systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handal, B; Groenlund, C; Gerzina, T

    2010-02-01

    This paper reports an exploratory survey study about students' perceptions of learning management systems (LMS) at the Faculty of Dentistry, University of Sydney. Two hundred and fifty-four students enrolled in the Bachelor of Dentistry and the Bachelor of Oral Health programmes participated in an online survey aimed at exploring their beliefs and attitudes as well as their preferences for eLearning tools. Results indicated a strong preference of students for using LMSs as resource repositories rather than for higher-order learning activities such as online discussion forums. This finding holds importance for consideration of the development of the educational resources modalities that support development of essential graduate attributes such as information literacy and collaborative learning.

  7. [iPS cells in dentistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egusa, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of the induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell technology, which enables us to produce pluripotent stem cells by introducing a few genetic factors, commands considerable attention in the field of dentistry. These iPS cells may be of particular importance for developing innovative technologies to regenerate missing jaw bones and lost teeth, and there are expectations that several types of tissue stem cells and mucosal cells in the oral area can be used as an ideal iPS cell source. We previously reported that the gingiva, which is often resected during general dental treatments and treated as biomedical waste, is a promising source of iPS cells. In this review, the current trends in iPS cell research in dentistry are outlined, and future aspects of potential applications of the iPS cell technologies to dental treatments will be discussed.

  8. Nanotechnology in dentistry: prevention, diagnosis, and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Neel, Ensanya Ali; Bozec, Laurent; Perez, Roman A; Kim, Hae-Won; Knowles, Jonathan C

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology has rapidly expanded into all areas of science; it offers significant alternative ways to solve scientific and medical questions and problems. In dentistry, nanotechnology has been exploited in the development of restorative materials with some significant success. This review discusses nanointerfaces that could compromise the longevity of dental restorations, and how nanotechnolgy has been employed to modify them for providing long-term successful restorations. It also focuses on some challenging areas in dentistry, eg, oral biofilm and cancers, and how nanotechnology overcomes these challenges. The recent advances in nanodentistry and innovations in oral health-related diagnostic, preventive, and therapeutic methods required to maintain and obtain perfect oral health, have been discussed. The recent advances in nanotechnology could hold promise in bringing a paradigm shift in dental field. Although there are numerous complex therapies being developed to treat many diseases, their clinical use requires careful consideration of the expense of synthesis and implementation.

  9. Dentistry and medicine, then and now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formicola, Allan J

    2002-01-01

    Two factors have, at times, pushed dentistry and medicine together and pulled them apart. The factor acting to create a symbiosis is the common biomedical or scientific foundation for these fields. The factor causing independence deals with socio-cultural matters impacting on the professions and the public. These two factors will be examined at three points in time when the relationship between the two professions was significantly important for the welfare of the public: the 1920s and '30s, the 1960s and '70s, and our own time. Contemporary major discussion about the alignment of dental education, scientific advances, and societal needs point to a need for a new look at how dentistry and medicine relate to one another.

  10. Evidence-based dentistry: a clinician's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Janet; Spackman, Sue; Chiappelli, Francesco; Prolo, Paolo; Stevenson, Richard

    2006-07-01

    Evidence-based dentistry is a discipline that provides best, explicit-based evidence to dentists and their patients in shared decision-making. Currently, dentists are being trained and directed to adopt the role of translational researchers in developing evidence-based dental practices. Practically, evidence-based dentistry is not usable in its current mode for the provision of labor-intensive services that characterize current dental practice. The purpose of this article is to introduce a model of evidence-based dental practice. This model conceptualizes a team approach in explaining problems and solutions to change current dental practice. These changes constitute an evidence-based dental practice that involves the electronic chart, centralized database, knowledge management software, and personnel in optimizing effective oral health care to dental patients.

  11. Composite resin in medicine and dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Pamela S; Sullivan, Jennifer; Haubenreich, James E; Osborne, Paul B

    2005-01-01

    Composite resin has been used for nearly 50 years as a restorative material in dentistry. Use of this material has recently increased as a result of consumer demands for esthetic restorations, coupled with the public's concern with mercury-containing dental amalgam. Composite is now used in over 95% of all anterior teeth direct restorations and in 50% of all posterior teeth direct restorations. Carbon fiber reinforced composites have been developed for use as dental implants. In medicine, fiber-reinforced composites have been used in orthopedics as implants, osseous screws, and bearing surfaces. In addition, hydroxyapatite composite resin has become a promising alternative to acrylic cement in stabilizing fractures and cancellous screw fixation in elderly and osteoporotic patients. The use of composite resin in dentistry and medicine will be the focus of this review, with particular attention paid to its physical properties, chemical composition, clinical applications, and biocompatibility.

  12. Patent law in dentistry: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Nadeem A Bijle

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dentistry in recent years has developed interest in the field of intellectual property rights (IPR and Patents due to extensive research in the fraternity and existing competition. There have been various patent applications and grants in the field of dentistry abroad due to better understanding of IPR but India still has very few patent grants and applications on the subject matter. This review article in particular deals with the understanding of IPR and Patents as a whole, especially for dental professionals involved in research and development. Hence, this would also act as an asset for dental researchers to explore and expand their scope of activities, with special privileges empowered for their work.

  13. Periosteum: A Highly Underrated Tool in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Mahajan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The ultimate goal of any dental treatment is the regeneration of lost tissues and alveolar bone. Under the appropriate culture conditions, periosteal cells secrete extracellular matrix and form a membranous structure. The periosteum can be easily harvested from the patient's own oral cavity, where the resulting donor site wound is invisible. Owing to the above reasons, the periosteum offers a rich cell source for bone tissue engineering; hence, the regenerative potential of periosteum is immense. Although the use of periosteum as a regenerative tool has been extensive in general medical field, the regenerative potential of periosteum is highly underestimated in dentistry; therefore, the present paper reviews the current literature related to the regenerative potential of periosteum and gives an insight to the future use of periosteum in dentistry.

  14. Application of Calcium Phosphate Materials in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jabr S. Al-Sanabani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium phosphate materials are similar to bone in composition and in having bioactive and osteoconductive properties. Calcium phosphate materials in different forms, as cements, composites, and coatings, are used in many medical and dental applications. This paper reviews the applications of these materials in dentistry. It presents a brief history, dental applications, and methods for improving their mechanical properties. Notable research is highlighted regarding (1 application of calcium phosphate into various fields in dentistry; (2 improving mechanical properties of calcium phosphate; (3 biomimetic process and functionally graded materials. This paper deals with most common types of the calcium phosphate materials such as hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate which are currently used in dental and medical fields.

  15. The changing face of dentistry: nanotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanaparthy R

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Rosaiah Kanaparthy1, Aruna Kanaparthy2 1Department of Periodontics, 2Conservative Dentistry, Peoples Dental Academy, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India Abstract: The human body comprises molecules; hence, the availability of molecular nanotechnology will permit dramatic progress to address medical problems and will use molecular knowledge to maintain and improve human health at the molecular scale. Nanomedicine could develop devices that are able to work inside the human body in order to identify the early presence of a disease, and to identify and quantify toxic molecules and tumor cells, for example. Nanodentistry will make possible the maintenance of comprehensive oral health by employing nanomaterials, including tissue engineering and, ultimately, dental nanorobots. This review is an attempt to highlight the possible applications of nanotechnology and the use of nanomaterials in dentistry. Keywords: nanotechnology, molecule, nanomedicine, nanodentistry, nanorobots

  16. Nanotechnology in dentistry: Present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Archana; Bhardwaj, Abhishek; Misuriya, Abhinav; Maroli, Sohani; Manjula, S; Singh, Arvind Kumar

    2014-02-01

    Nanotechnology is the manipulation of matter on the molecular and atomic levels. It has the potential to bring enormous changes into the fields of medicine and dentistry. A day may soon come when nanodentistry will succeed in maintaining near-perfect oral health through the aid of nanorobotics, nanomaterials and biotechnology. However, as with all developments, it may also pose a risk for misuse. Time, economical and technical resources, and human needs will determine the direction this revolutionizing development may take. This article reviews the current status and the potential clinical applications of nanotechnology, nanaomedicine and nanodentistry. How to cite the article: Bhardwaj A, Bhardwaj A, Misuriya A, Maroli S, Manjula S, Singh AK. Nanotechnology in dentistry: Present and future. J Int Oral Health 2013;6(1):121-6.

  17. Position paper on digital communication in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David W

    2012-01-01

    Digital communication offers advantages and challenges to dental practice. As dentistry becomes comfortable with this technology, it is essential that commercial and other values not be accepted on a par with professional ones and that the traditional dentist-patient relationship not be compromised by inserting third parties that introduce nonprofessional standards. The Officers and Regents of the American College of Dentist have prepared this background and position paper as a guide to the ethical use of digital communication in dental practice.

  18. Application and development of ultrasonics in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Liang; Chang, Hao-Hueng; Chiang, Yu-Chih; Lin, Chun-Pin

    2013-11-01

    Since the 1950s, dentistry's ultrasonic instruments have developed rapidly. Because of better visualization, operative convenience, and precise cutting ability, ultrasonic instruments are widely and efficiently applied in the dental field. This article describes the development and improvement of ultrasonic instruments in several dental fields. Although some issues still need clarification, the results of previous studies indicate that ultrasonic instruments have a high potential to become convenient and efficient dental tools and deserve further development.

  19. Use of DNA technology in forensic dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardo Henrique Alves da Silva; Arsenio Sales-Peres; Rogério Nogueira de Oliveira; Fernando Toledo de Oliveira; Sílvia Helena de Carvalho Sales-Peres

    2007-01-01

    The established importance of Forensic Dentistry for human identification, mainly when there is little remaining material to perform such identification (e.g., in fires, explosions, decomposing bodies or skeletonized bodies), has led dentists working with forensic investigation to become more familiar with the new molecular biology techniques. The currently available DNA tests have high reliability and are accepted as legal proofs in courts. This article presents a literature review referring...

  20. Laser in dentistry: Biostimulation and surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzè, Franco; Palmieri, Beniamino; Scalise, Lorenzo; Rottigni, Valentina

    2012-09-01

    Laser therapy has achieved an important rule in cosmetic dentistry especially in the treatment of several complications such as leukoplakia, oral lichen planus, glossitis, oral mucositis, labial herpes virus, stomatitis, frenulum and oral hemangioma. In our study we enrolled 40 patients affected by these diseases to treat them with a new infrared dental laser demonstrating that it is extremely safe and effective in pain and postoperative discomforts reduction.

  1. [Dental restoration materials in pediatric dentistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, C L

    1997-02-01

    Restorative materials in pediatric dentistry have to fulfill special requirements. They should be easy to handle and applicable in a not always dry mouth. They should potentially be adhesive in order to avoid too much mechanical preparation. They do not have to be extremely wear resistant as the dwell time of the restorations is relatively short. Glass-ionomer cements and in particular the resin modified types possess properties which make them almost ideal for the required purpose.

  2. Minimally invasive dentistry: a review and update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brostek, Andrew M; Bochenek, Andrew J; Walsh, Laurence J

    2006-06-01

    The term "Minimal Invasive (MI) Dentistry" can best be defined as the management of caries with a biological approach, rather than with a traditional (surgical) operative dentistry approach. Where operative dentistry is required, this is now carried out in the most conservative manner with minimal destruction of tooth structure. This new approach to caries management changes the emphasis from diagnosing carious lesions as cavities (and a repeating cycle of restorations), to one of diagnosing the oral ecological imbalance and effecting biological changes in the biofilm. The goal of MI is to stop the disease process and then to restore lost tooth structure and function, maximizing the healing potential of the tooth. The thought process which underpins this new minimal invasive approach can be organized into three main categories: (1) Recognize, which means identify patient caries risk, (2) Remineralize, which means prevent caries and reverse non-cavitated caries, and (3) Repair, which means control caries activity, maximize healing and repair the damage. The disease of dental caries is not just demineralization, but a process of repeated demineralization cycles caused by an imbalance in the ecological and chemical equilibrium of the biofilm /tooth interface (the ecological plaque hypothesis). Dietary and lifestyle patterns, especially carbohydrate frequency, water intake and smoking, play an important role in changing the biofilm ecology and pathogenicity. Tools for chairside assessment of saliva and plaque, allow risk to be assessed and patient compliance monitored. The remineralizing properties of saliva can be enhanced using materials which release biologically available calcium, phosphate and fluoride ions (CPP-ACP and CPP-ACFP). Use of biocides can also alter the pathogenic properties of plaque. Use of these MI treatment protocols, can repair early lesions and improve patient understanding and compliance. This review article introduces some of the key concepts

  3. Palaeontology: early Neolithic tradition of dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppa, A; Bondioli, L; Cucina, A; Frayer, D W; Jarrige, C; Jarrige, J-F; Quivron, G; Rossi, M; Vidale, M; Macchiarelli, R

    2006-04-01

    Prehistoric evidence for the drilling of human teeth in vivo has so far been limited to isolated cases from less than six millennia ago. Here we describe eleven drilled molar crowns from nine adults discovered in a Neolithic graveyard in Pakistan that dates from 7,500-9,000 years ago. These findings provide evidence for a long tradition of a type of proto-dentistry in an early farming culture.

  4. APPLICATION OF NANOBIOMATERIALS IN RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Maya Lyapina; Mariana Cekova; Maria Dencheva; Assya Krasteva; Mariela Yaneva-Deliverska; Jordan Deliverski; Angelina Kisselova

    2016-01-01

    Nanodentistry is defined as the science and technology of diagnosing, treating and preventing oral and dental diseases, relieving pain, preserving and improving dental health using nanostructured material. Varieties of new dental products are available that rely on nanoscale properties, ranging from implants to oral hygiene products. Nanodentistry encourages the concept of minimally invasive dentistry, creating a more dentist friendly atmosphere. However, patient awareness and education is im...

  5. Advances in local anesthesia in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogle, Orrett E; Mahjoubi, Ghazal

    2011-07-01

    Local pain management is the most critical aspect of patient care in dentistry. The improvements in agents and techniques for local anesthesia are probably the most significant advances that have occurred in dental science. This article provides an update on the most recently introduced local anesthetic agents along with new technologies used to deliver local anesthetics. Safety devices are also discussed, along with an innovative method for reducing the annoying numbness of the lip and tongue following local anesthesia.

  6. Evidence-Based Dentistry: What's New?

    OpenAIRE

    A. Ballini, S. Capodiferro, M. Toia, S. Cantore, G. Favia, G. De Frenza, F.R. Grassi

    2007-01-01

    The importance of evidence for every branch of medicine in teaching in order to orient the practitioners among the great amount of most actual scientific information's, and to support clinical decisions, is well established in health care, including dentistry. The practice of evidence-based medicine is a process of lifelong, self-directed, problem-based learning which leads to the need for clinically important information about diagnosis, prognosis, therapy and other clinical and health care ...

  7. Laser and radiosurgery in veterinary dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellows, Jan

    2013-05-01

    Lasers and radiosurgery frequently used in human dentistry are rapidly entering veterinary dental use. The carbon dioxide, diode, and low-level therapy lasers have features including hemostasis control, access to difficult to reach areas, and decreased pain, that make them useful for oral surgery. Periodontal pocket surgery, gingivectomy, gingivoplasty, gingival hyperplasia, operculectomy, tongue surgery, oropharyngeal inflammation therapy, oral mass surgery, crown, and frenectomy laser surgeries are described, including images.

  8. Stem cell-based approaches in dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Mitsiadis, T A; Orsini, G.; Jimenez-Rojo, L

    2015-01-01

    Repair of dental pulp and periodontal lesions remains a major clinical challenge. Classical dental treatments require the use of specialised tissue-adapted materials with still questionable efficacy and durability. Stem cell-based therapeutic approaches could offer an attractive alternative in dentistry since they can promise physiologically improved structural and functional outcomes. These therapies necessitate a sufficient number of specific stem cell populations for implantation. Dental m...

  9. Digital photoelastic analysis applied to implant dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, K.; Hariprasad, M. P.; Bhuvanewari, S.

    2016-12-01

    Development of improved designs of implant systems in dentistry have necessitated the study of stress fields in the implant regions of the mandible/maxilla for better understanding of the biomechanics involved. Photoelasticity has been used for various studies related to dental implants in view of whole field visualization of maximum shear stress in the form of isochromatic contours. The potential of digital photoelasticity has not been fully exploited in the field of implant dentistry. In this paper, the fringe field in the vicinity of the connected implants (All-On-Four® concept) is analyzed using recent advances in digital photoelasticity. Initially, a novel 3-D photoelastic model making procedure, to closely mimic all the anatomical features of the human mandible is proposed. By choosing appropriate orientation of the model with respect to the light path, the essential region of interest were sought to be analysed while keeping the model under live loading conditions. Need for a sophisticated software module to carefully identify the model domain has been brought out. For data extraction, five-step method is used and isochromatics are evaluated by twelve fringe photoelasticity. In addition to the isochromatic fringe field, whole field isoclinic data is also obtained for the first time in implant dentistry, which could throw important information in improving the structural stability of the implant systems. Analysis is carried out for the implant in the molar as well as the incisor region. In addition, the interaction effects of loaded molar implant on the incisor area are also studied.

  10. Rapid Prototyping and its Application in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. V. Madhav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical implants and biological models have three main characteristics: low volume, complex shape, and can be customized. These characteristics suit very well with Rapid Prototyping (RP and Rapid Manufacturing (RM processes. RP/RM processes are fabricated part layer- by-layer until complete shape finished from 3D model. Biocompatible materials, such as Titanium and Titanium alloy, Zirconium, Cobalt Chromium, PEEK, etc, are used for fabrication process. Reverse Engineering (RE technology greatly affects RP/RM processes. RE is used to capture or scan image of the limb, cranium, tooth, and other biological objects. Three common methods to get the image are 3D laser scanning, Computer Tomography (CT, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI. Main RP/RM techniques used in Dentistry are Stereotype Lithography Apparatus (SLA, Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM, Selective Laser Sintering (SLS, and ink jet printing. This article reviews the changing scenario of technology in dentistry with special emphasis on Rapid Prototyping and its various applications in Dentistry.

  11. YouTube, dentistry, and dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knösel, Michael; Jung, Klaus; Bleckmann, Annalen

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to systematically assess the informational value, intention, source, and bias of videos related to dentistry available on the video-sharing Internet platform YouTube. YouTube (www.youtube.com) was searched for videos related to dentistry, using the system-generated sorts "by relevance" and "most viewed" and two categories (All and Education). Each of the first thirty results was rated by two assessors filling out a questionnaire for each (total: 120). The data were subjected to statistical analysis using Cohen's kappa, Pearson's correlation coefficient tau, Mann-Whitney U-tests, and a nonparametric three-way ANOVA, including an analysis of the interaction between the sorting and category effect, with an α-level of 5 percent. The scan produced 279,000 results in the category All and 5,050 in the category Education. The analysis revealed a wide variety of information about dentistry available on YouTube. The purpose of these videos includes entertainment, advertising, and education. The videos classified under Education have a higher degree of usefulness and informational value for laypersons, dental students, and dental professionals than those found in a broader search category. YouTube and similar social media websites offer new educational possibilities that are currently both underdeveloped and underestimated in terms of their potential value. Dentists and dental educators should also recognize the importance of these websites in shaping public opinion about their profession.

  12. Corporate Social Responsibility: Consumer Behavior, Corporate Strategy, and Public Policy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kreng, Victor B; Huang, May-Yao

    2011-01-01

    ... as "the consumers' impression of the corporation itself, corporate product marketing, and the services provided by the corporation". Corporate image is thus the consumers' subjective overall assessment of the corporation. Some marketing experts believe that the role corporations play in the wider society will help build their corporate image. ...

  13. Retrospective on community dentistry and public health at the University of Southern California (1966-1976), Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dummett, C O

    1998-05-01

    The authorization of departments of community dentistry and public health in the nation's dental schools is a relatively recent innovation in dental education. Such a department was established at the University of Southern California School of Dentistry in 1966, as part of the School of Medicine's effort to share responsibility in providing both access and availability of health services in inner-city Los Angeles, California. Dentistry was included in the protocol submitted to the US Office of Economic Opportunity to build a neighborhood health center in Watts, operated under the joint jurisdiction of the medical and dental schools. The dental division of the health center was designated a satellite of the community dentistry department. The department envisioned future changes during the revolutionary 1960s when all aspects of the nation were experiencing upheaval as traditional concepts were challenged by new attitudes. The nation's leaders in government and education as well as in the health professions were stimulated by scientific and technologic discoveries. Dentistry had come of age, having gained the respect of other health-care disciplines. It was a time of expanded exploration of means toward a healthier populace and a more sensitive ethical provider of health care. In one decade, the USC community dentistry department accomplished a major shift in attitude about the specialty from one of pervasive opposition and antipathy to that of acceptance and even enthusiasm. The department became competitive with similar units nationwide in educating dental students and practitioners to fulfill their responsibilities at the highest level of proficiency and to be true to the trust bestowed on them by the public. In pursuit of these goals, the department reflected credit on dentistry and the University of Southern California.

  14. Plasma in dentistry: a review of basic concepts and applications in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Hoon; Lee, Mi-Ae; Han, Geum-Jun; Cho, Byeong-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Plasma-related technologies are essential in modern industries. Recently, plasma has attracted increased attention in the biomedical field. This paper provides a basic knowledge of plasma and a narrative review of plasma applications in dentistry. To review plasma applications in dentistry, an electronic search in PubMed, SCOPUS and Google scholar up to December 2012 was done. This was followed by extensive hand searching using reference lists from relevant articles. There have been attempts to apply plasma technology in various fields of dentistry including surface modifications of dental implants, adhesion, caries treatment, endodontic treatment and tooth bleaching. Although many studies were in early stages, the potential value of plasma for dental applications has been demonstrated. To enlarge the scope of plasma applications and put relevant research to practical use, interdisciplinary research with participation of dental professionals is required.

  15. [The rise and development of general dentistry in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongchen

    2016-02-01

    General dentistry is an important part of the dental medicine and general dentists and general dentistry form the basis of clinical dental medicine. China's general dentistry has a long history, which started as an independent specialist in the 1990s. At present, the Chinese general dental medicine has received more and more attention as an independent profession. General dental medical model has been rapidly developed in the general hospital department of dentistry, private practice and community dentistry institutions, dental specialist hospitals and so on. In this paper, we will review the rise and development of China's general dentistry, and report its theoretical characteristics, institutional framework, academic progress, member development report, and look forward to its development in the future.

  16. Corporate governance and government owned corporations in Queensland

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    MCDONOUGH, Darryl D

    1998-01-01

    ...) - principles of corporate governance applicable to government owned corporations - history of corporatisation - objectives and features of the Government Owned Corporations Act 1993 - categorisation...

  17. Clinical Challenges on Adhesive Dentistry on its 60th Anniversary

    OpenAIRE

    Sartori MS, PhD, Neimar

    2015-01-01

    Adhesive dentistry allowed restoring lost tooth structures using Minimally Invasive direct or indirect bonded restorations. Adhesive systems and bonding techniques have been constantly evolving since the introduction of Sevriton Cavity Seal, in 1940 by Oskar Hagger. As we celebrate the 60th anniversary of adhesive dentistry in 2015 the future of the Minimally Invasive Adhesive Dentistry is more promising than ever. A better understanding of long-term resin-dentin bonds interaction is guiding ...

  18. A new dimension to conservative dentistry: Air abrasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hegde Vivek

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Air abrasion dentistry has evolved over a period of time from a new concept of an alternative means of cavity preparation to an essential means of providing a truly conservative preparation for preservation of a maximal sound tooth structure. The development of bonded restorations in combination with air abrasion dentistry provides a truly minimal intervention dentistry. This article reviews the development of air abrasion, its clinical uses, and the essential accessories required for its use.

  19. A new dimension to conservative dentistry: Air abrasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Vivek S; Khatavkar, Roheet A

    2010-01-01

    Air abrasion dentistry has evolved over a period of time from a new concept of an alternative means of cavity preparation to an essential means of providing a truly conservative preparation for preservation of a maximal sound tooth structure. The development of bonded restorations in combination with air abrasion dentistry provides a truly minimal intervention dentistry. This article reviews the development of air abrasion, its clinical uses, and the essential accessories required for its use.

  20. Research in dentistry: Question, search and studies design.

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro Aravena

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based dentistry (EBD) concept has caused great impact and interest in the field of dentistry. For its development is important to use research protocols and study designs according to the research problem. The aim of this review is to present basic aspects for the start of a quantitative research in dentistry.It presents the topics necessary to transform a research problem to a question with clinical approach. Then, concepts about finding relevant scientific articles in the electroni...

  1. Corporate Bonds in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tell, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Corporate financing is the choice between capital generated by the corporation and capital from external investors. However, since the financial crisis shook the markets in 2007–2008, financing opportunities through the classical means of financing have decreased. As a result, corporations have...... to think in alternative ways such as issuing corporate bonds. A market for corporate bonds exists in countries such as Norway, Germany, France, the United Kingdom and the United States, while Denmark is still behind in this trend. Some large Danish corporations have instead used foreign corporate bonds...... markets. However, NASDAQ OMX has introduced the First North Bond Market in December 2012 and new regulatory framework came into place in 2014, which may contribute to a Danish based corporate bond market. The purpose of this article is to present the regulatory changes in Denmark in relation to corporate...

  2. Corporate social responsibility and hospitals: US theory, Japanese experiences, and lessons for other countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Toshiro; Ellen, Moriah; Brown, Adalsteinn

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the role that corporate social responsibility can play in advancing hospital management. Corporate social responsibility is the integration of social and environmental concerns within business operations. The authors discuss how corporate social responsibility can help hospitals and provide suggestions to hospitals in deciding which corporate social responsibility initiatives to pursue.

  3. Continued medication use in dentistry: the importance of dental records

    OpenAIRE

    de Medeiros, Glaucia Helena Faraco; Brüning, Vanessa

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Appoint the main chronic diseases and the most frequent medications used by the patients by the graduation students of Dentistry between 2012 and 2014/A,through patients’dentistry records.Material and Methods: Two studies were performed: one retrospective in patients’ dentistry records, attended at the Clinical School of Dentistry and a cross-sectional study with the students enrolled between the 6th and 9th semester in 2014/B. After the record, the data were inserted on an Excel® spread...

  4. A Study of the Science Production in Dentistry Using Web of Science Database (2000-2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serati Shirazi M.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Science production in medical fields such as dentistry is of great significance. Science production can be appropriately directed through recognition of the most effective investigations, the most active institutions and countries in science production domain and also determining the status of specialists. Purpose: The aim of this survey was to study the rate of dental science production indexed in the Web of Science (WOS database by Iranian and other countries' specialists.Materials and Method: Using Web of Science, science production in dentistry in 2000-2009 was estimated; revealing 5005 records for scientists around the world and 32 for Iranian specialists. Then, analyses were done using HistCite software.Results: The findings showed that the growth rate of scientific production in dentistry was 64.53% in 2000-2009. USA was in the first rank among other countries; British Dental Journal, Sao Paolo University, and Kokich Vare were the top journal, institution and author, respectively.Data related to Iran showed that Tehran and Shiraz Universities were the first and second top institutions, each with 6 articles. M.H.Fathi with 44 TGCS was the most prolific author in WOS and H.R.Pakshir with 4 TLCS was the most highly published author in WOS in this collection. Conclusion: The findings showed that USA and UK were the first and second top countries in this regard. Iran had only 0.63% of the scientific production of dentistry in the Web of Science database, which is considered low in spite of the importance of this field.

  5. Preventive Dentistry Conference - Public Health Aspects of Preventive Dentistry, 3-4 March 1983, Fort Sam Houston, Texas,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-04-01

    pockets in excess of 4-5 mm. e. Prosthetics: 1. Soldiers that require complete dentures or remo- vable partial dentures to properly masticate food. 2...Shulman ARMY COMMUNITY DENTISTRY - PROGRAM PLANNING .. ............... 7-1 Lieutenant Colonel John E. King HISTORY OF PREVENTIVE DENTISTRY IN THE ARMY... History of Preventive COL Barnes Dentistry in the Army 0900 ACO - Program Evaluation LTC King 1000 BREAK 1015 Dental Readiness Program Ms. Bowen at

  6. Corporate Culture and Public Relations

    OpenAIRE

    Korolko, Valentyn; Nekrasova, Oksana

    2009-01-01

    Analyzing American publications dealing with the concept of excellent public relations, the authors trace the development of organizational culture and its connection with societal culture, as well as an alyze theoretical and methodological issues of corporate culture and its impact on public relations in an organization. Special attention is paid to some ways in which professional PR departments can be come the source of progressive counter cultures inside the organization capable of changin...

  7. Knowledge of drug prescription in dentistry students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guzmán-Álvarez R

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available R Guzmán-Álvarezv,1 M Medeiros,2,3 LI Reyes Lagunes,4 AE Campos-Sepúlveda11Pharmacology Department, UNAM School of Medicine and Dentistry, Mexico City, 2Pharmacology Clinical Seminar, UNAM School of Medicine, Mexico City, 3Medical Sciences Department, Mexico Federico Gómez Children's Hospital, Mexico City, 4Measuring and Evaluation Unit, UNAM School of Psychology, Mexico City, MexicoBackground: Students in schools of dentistry attend to patients with illnesses, and often prescribe medication. Because students are still learning, they are influenced by a variety of factors: the different teaching approaches of the professors at the clinics and in the pharmacology course, fellow students, and even the information provided by the pharmaceutical industry.Objectives: The aim of this pilot study was to assess the prescription knowledge and common mistakes in fourth-year students at the School of Dentistry at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México.Methods: In March 2010, a survey was conducted among 66 fourth-year students at the School of Dentistry, applying a previously validated questionnaire consisting of six open-ended questions The following factors were assessed: the most frequent illness requiring dental prescription; the most prescribed nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and antibiotics; the most frequent errors; sources of information used for prescribing drugs; and whether the students knew and followed the World Health Organization Guide to Good Prescribing.Results: The most frequent response for each question was considered the most significant. The most common reason for prescribing medication was infection (n = 37, 56%, followed by pain (n = 24, 38%; the most used painkillers were ibuprofen and acetaminophen at equal levels (n = 25, 37.8%, followed by ketorolac (n = 7, 10.6%, naproxen (n = 6, 9.1%, diclofenac (n = 2, 3%, and aspirin (n = 1, 1.5%; the most widely prescribed antibiotics were amoxicillin (n = 52, 78

  8. [Five star dentistry - IV Congress of European Federation for the Advancement of Anesthesia in Dentistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovich, S A; Anisimova, E N; Zavodilenko, L A

    2015-01-01

    The Russian delegation of the European Federation for the Advancement of Anesthesia in Dentistry (EFAAD) participated in IV Congress of EFAAD where were considered such problems of dental and anxiolysis in patients with severe concomitant diseases and training dentists improvements on such problems as anesthesia, sedation, prophylaxis and emergency management inpatients with accompanying diseases.

  9. National Museum of Dentistry exhibition: the future is now! African Americans in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dummett, Clifton O

    2003-09-01

    Inspired by recently published NDA II: The Story of America's Second National Dental Association and sponsored jointly by the National Dental Association Foundation and the Colgate-Palmolive Company, an historical exhibit on dentistry in the African-American community was one of the celebrations for the Golden Anniversary of the American Academy of the History of Dentistry. This exhibit premiered on Sept. 27, 2002 in the National Museum of Dentistry located on the medical/dental campus of the University of Maryland in Baltimore. The Museum recently became an affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution. Contents of the exhibit were photographs, charts, artifacts, memorabilia, etc. These materials presented an overview of African-American activities in dental education, research, patient care, general practice, dental specialities, military service, and public health. Also included were inter-racial relationships, socioeconomic developments, and participation in civil rights endeavors that played a major role in changing out-dated accepted customs. The exhibit's purpose was to celebrate dentistry's ministrations as a health professional among African Americans in particular and the nation at large over the past two centuries. Respect for and progress of black dentists paralleled that of black physicians who were instrumental in including dentist and pharmacists as equal members in the National Medical Association since the latter's inception in 1895.

  10. ISI Bibliometric profile of Universidad de Concepción School of Dentistry, 1989-2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Moraga

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To characterize personal, institutional or national scientific production is a need to understand and improve the generation of knowledge. The aim of this study is to describe the bibliometric profile of ISI publications related of Universidad de Concepción School of Dentistry during 1989-2012 timespan.Matherial and methods: Bibliometric study. A search on Web of Knowledge of Thomson Reuters for Science Citation Index Expanded database was perfomed, about the scientific productivity of Universidad de Concepción School of Dentistry during 1989-2012 period. The analyzed variables were the number of publications, cites, magazines on which they were published, authors, institutions and coauthor countries.Results: Thirty nine articles were identified. These articles were cited in 266 opportunities (6,82 cites per article and h-index of 10. In relation with journals, stands out Oral Surgery Oral Medicine Oral Pathology Oral Radiology and Endodontology (21.9%, Journal of Oral Pathology Medicine (12.2%, and International Journal of Morphology (7.3%. More productive authors were Rojas (13, Martínez (11 y Brethauer (9. 48,72% of publications was concentrated in last five-years and 69.23% in last ten-years.Conclusions: Universidad de Concepción School of Dentistry scientific production is poor, being observed an increase during the last 5 years.

  11. Fostering Corporate Entrepreneurship

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ). The choice of using a strategy for corporate entrepreneurship as a primary means of .... Corporate venturing is a means of planning for organizational ambiguity in .... Multidiscipline teamwork approach, Long time horizon, Volunteer program.

  12. Corporate Consumer Contact API

    Data.gov (United States)

    General Services Administration — The data in the Corporate Consumer Contact API is based on the content you can find in the Corporate Consumer Contact listing in the Consumer Action Handbook (PDF)....

  13. Fortune 500 Corporate Headquarters

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Large Corporate Headquarters in the United States This database is composed of 'an annual list of the 500 largest industrial corporations in the U.S., published by...

  14. Role of the Occupational Physician in Corporate Management of Health Risks: An Important Aspect of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugita, Minoru; Miyakawa, Michiko

    2016-01-01

    understand the merit of occupational physicians working with the management to decrease health risks. However, an occupational physician is an important member of the corporation, so he/she must be involved in the management of health risks not only within the corporation itself, but also outside the corporation from the viewpoint of CSR. Effective management of health risks due to corporate activities should be widely discussed among occupational physicians, business entrepreneurs and managers of the division in charge of corporate health risk management as well as stakeholders. The authors propose expanding the role of occupational physicians to actively manage health risks not only inside but also outside the corporations.

  15. Professionalism: challenges for dentistry in the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozar, D T

    2012-11-01

    While countries varies significantly in the financing of dental care, they are much more alike in the delivery of dentistry. Dental care is principally provided in dental offices and clinics that are independent business entities whose business leaders are most often the dentists themselves. However society expects from dentists a level of professionalism (i.e. habitually acting ethically, both in terms of competence and conduct) in contrast to the methods and motivations of the marketplace. This is why the single most important challenge of dental professional ethics continues to be giving proper priority to patients' well being and building ethically correct decision-making relationships with patients while, at the same time, trying to maintain a successful business operation. If we look into dentistry's future, the centrality of this aspect of professional ethics is not likely to change, although the ways in which dentists might violate this trust will probably multiple as funding mechanisms become increasingly complex. It is important that dentists reflect with fresh eyes on their ethical commitments. One challenge is the increased availability of oral health information to the public and the fact that so many people are uncritical of the accuracy of information in the media and on the web. A second is the increase in the amount of health care advertising in many societies. A third is the growth of aesthetic dentistry that differs from standard oral health care in important and ethically significant ways. The fourth is insurance that frequently complicates the explanation of a patient's treatment alternatives and often brings a third party into the treatment decision relationship. The ethical challenges of each of these factors will be considered and ultimately tying it to the central theme of dental professionalism.

  16. Women dentists: Changing the face of dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jammula Surya Prasanna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It was only toward the close of the last century that women emancipated themselves from their former small territory of usefulness in a strictly domestic life, and pushing forward, proved themselves often the business equal to men and sometimes their superior. If was long before this progression, when a women in business or professional ranks was almost a curiosity. When women first entered the profession, they faced many obstacles. Mentors or faculty in the dental organizations majority were male restraining women by all means. In the beginning, men were resentful because they feel women are inferior. It took a long time for women to become a consistent presence in dental schools. In the beginning, dental schools used to admit one or two women each year, later the number increased slowly. Olden day′s women used to relieve not even the tooth ache but also used to relieve others fret also. But histories of dentistry were not acknowledged the talent of women whatsoever. The efforts and achievements of women punch the clock in the future dentistry. The current scenario has totally changed now. Nearly, half of all dental students′ are women and 25% of them are practicing dentists. Only 3% women dentists were there before the 1970s. [1] Women struggled to obtain a degree, to establish practices, and are respected as professionals. Some women choose this rewarding occupation as career followed by their family members. The population tally of chosen work upbringing has changed over time. This paper reports in a delineative way of the amelioration, staggering presence, and intendment of dentistry practicing by worldwide women.

  17. Implementation of corporate governance principles in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramona Iulia Țarțavulea (Dieaconescu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to conduct a study regarding the manner in which corporate governance principles are applied in Romania, in both public and private sector. In the first part of the paper, the corporate governance principles are presented as they are defined in Romania, in comparison with the main international sources of interest in the domain (OECD corporate governance principles, UE legal framework. The corporate governance (CG principles refer to issues regarding board composition, transparency of scope, objectives and policies; they define the relations between directors and managers, shareholders and stakeholders. The research methodology is based on both fundamental research and empirical study on the implementation of corporate governance principles in companies from Romania. The main instrument of research is a corporate governance index, calculated based on a framework proposed by the author. The corporate governance principles are transposed in criteria that compose the framework for the CG index. The results of the study consist of scores for each CG principles and calculation of CG index for seven companies selected from the public and private sector in Romania. The results are analyzed and discussed in order to formulate general and particular recommendations. The main conclusion of this study is that that a legal framework in the area of corporate governance regulation is needed in Romania. I consider that the main CG principles should be enforced by developing a mandatory legal framework.

  18. Monitoring managers through corporate compliance programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Angelucci, C.; Han, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Compliance programs entail monitoring of employees' behavior with the claimed objective of fighting corporate crime. (Competition) Authorities promote such intra-firm monitoring. In a three-tier hierarchy model, authority-shareholder-manager, we study the impact of monitoring through a compliance pr

  19. Monitoring managers through corporate compliance programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Angelucci; M.A. Han

    2010-01-01

    Compliance programs entail monitoring of employees’ behavior with the claimed objective of fighting corporate crime. (Competition) Authorities promote such intra-firm monitoring. In a three-tier hierarchy model, authority-shareholder-manager, we study the impact of monitoring on contracting within t

  20. Measuring Success and ROI in Corporate Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Kent; Mattox, John R., II

    2010-01-01

    When measuring outcomes in corporate training, the authors recommend that it is essential to introduce a comprehensive plan, especially when resources are limited and the company needs are vast. The authors hone in on five critical components for shaping a measurement plan to determine the success and ROI of training. The plan's components should…

  1. 75 FR 67029 - Amendment to Existing Validated End-User Authorization in the People's Republic of China...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    ...'s Republic of China: Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corporation AGENCY: Bureau of... Semiconductor Manufacturing International Corporation (SMIC) facilities that are authorized to receive certain.... Specifically, BIS removes Cension Semiconductor Manufacturing Corporation (Cension) from SMIC's list...

  2. The Property of Portland Cement and its Employment in Dentistry: Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Vinícius Holanda BARBOSA

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the present study was to investigate the performance of the Portland cement when used as material in the dentistry. Methods: It was accomplished a bibliographical research using scientific goods published in national and international literature, which intended to evaluate the physical properties, chemical and biological behavior, as well as the antimicrobial activity of this product. In the selected article, the authors used methods of investigation in vitro and in vivo for study comparing the cement with materials consecrated in dentistry. Conclusion: In agreement with the consulted bibliography it was possible to ensure the similarity in the chemical composition between the Portland cement and the MTA, in the effectiveness of the sealing ability of the roads areas between the root canal and the periodontal tissue, satisfactory antimicrobial action, and demonstrate favorable biological properties, stimulating the deposition of the cement and inducing the reparative pulpar answer.

  3. Lasers: The Magic Wand in Esthetic Dentistry!!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shajahan, P A; Kumar, P Ranjith; Hariprasad, A; Mathew, Jyothis; Shaji, A P; Ahammed, M Fazeel

    2015-01-01

    In this era of fast developing technologies and innovative ideas, the need for faster treatment has become a necessity. Treatment with lasers that is much less time-consuming and painless is accepted and appreciated by the patient. Use of Lasers is not new; they have been in use for decades since their development by Maiman in 1960. Lasers have travelled a long way from ruby lasers to erbium lasers and are being fondly used in every aspect of dental treatment. This article aims at elaborate the use and applications of lasers in the field of esthetic dentistry. PMID:26124614

  4. ON PSYCHOLOGICAL DISTRESS AND FEAR OF DENTISTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena IORGA

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety and fear are normal reactions in humans when situations are evaluating as being painful. In medical dentistry, anxiety and fear characterize in fact o problematic patient with special reactions during dental interventions and avoidance behavior, both behaviors having a great impact on patient’s dental health. The paper presents some aspects on the psychological profile of odontophobics, causes and consequences of dental fear on patient’s dental health, and some considerations on psychological interventions meant at reducing anxiety and fear during dental treatment.

  5. Forensic dentistry in a terrorist world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, R Thomas

    2005-04-01

    While body identification by dental means has not changed substantially since 9/11, or even since the bombing of the Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City in 1995, the conditions and potential risks of a bioterrorism action to the dental personnel is new. The purpose of this article is to review general forensic dentistry disaster responses and to address the impact a bioterrorism action might have on primary, secondary and tertiary dental responders. It will also examine the triage role that dental offices might play in the event of such a disaster.

  6. Applications of ozone therapy in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiva Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ozone is an allotropic form of oxygen, which is effectively used in the treatment of different diseases for more than 100 years. In the present era of increasing antibiotic resistance, ozone therapy is an alternative medical treatment that rationales to increase the amount of oxygen to the body through institution of ozone into the body. Owing to its beneficial biological properties including antimicrobial and immune-stimulating effects, ozone therapy has opened new vistas in treatment modalities of dental pathologies for patients of all ages. The objective of this article is to review the literature available on applications of ozone in dentistry.

  7. Current Concepts in Restorative Implant Dentistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Prof.Marchack

    2009-01-01

    Patients today are incteasingly aware of dental implants.and their expectations are for esthetically and functionally pleasingimplant restorations that mimic natural teeth.This presentation will give both the experienced and novice practitioner a better understand-ing of how restorative implant dentistry has evolved.Treatment planning and restorative options for single implants.multiple implants andfully edentulons arches will be discussed,and the use of modern materials and CADCAM technology in fabricating the most contemporaryfixed implant supported prostheses will be demonstrated.

  8. Resin composites in minimally invasive dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    The concept of minimally invasive dentistry will provide favorable conditions for the use of composite resin. However, a number of factors must be considered when placing composite resins in conservatively prepared cavities, including: aspects on the adaptation of the composite resin to the cavity walls; the use of adhesives; and techniques for obtaining adequate proximal contacts. The clinician must also adopt an equally conservative approach when treating failed restorations. The quality of the composite resin restoration will not only be affected by the outline form of the preparation but also by the clinician's technique and understanding of the materials.

  9. Conscious Sedation: Emerging Trends in Pediatric Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attri, Joginder Pal; Sharan, Radhe; Makkar, Vega; Gupta, Kewal Krishan; Khetarpal, Ranjana; Kataria, Amar Parkash

    2017-01-01

    Dental fear and anxiety is a common problem in pediatric patients. There is considerable variation in techniques used to manage them. Various sedation techniques using many different anesthetic agents have gained considerable popularity over the past few years. Children are not little adults; they differ physically, psychologically, and emotionally. The purpose of this review is to survey recent trends and concerning issues in the rapidly changing field of pediatric sedation. We will study the topic from the perspective of an anesthesiologist. It will also provide information to practitioners on the practice of conscious sedation in dentistry and will also outline the route of administration, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of various drugs used.

  10. The changing face of dentistry: nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaparthy, Rosaiah; Kanaparthy, Aruna

    2011-01-01

    The human body comprises molecules; hence, the availability of molecular nanotechnology will permit dramatic progress to address medical problems and will use molecular knowledge to maintain and improve human health at the molecular scale. Nanomedicine could develop devices that are able to work inside the human body in order to identify the early presence of a disease, and to identify and quantify toxic molecules and tumor cells, for example. Nanodentistry will make possible the maintenance of comprehensive oral health by employing nanomaterials, including tissue engineering and, ultimately, dental nanorobots. This review is an attempt to highlight the possible applications of nanotechnology and the use of nanomaterials in dentistry.

  11. Corporate Business Diplomacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    This article illustrates the interdisciplinary nature of the field of corporate business diplomacy using examples from academic disciplines, such as economics and political science, which can contribute to the understanding of corporate business diplomacy. Examples also show that corporate business...... diplomacy can complement business theories such as stakeholder theory and agency theory. Examples from practice show that in a broad sense, corporate business diplomacy is concerned with managing external stakeholders, while in a narrow sense, it is concerned with managing internal stakeholders...

  12. CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY: OPTIONAL OR REGULATORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIHAELA IRINA IONESCU

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Given the collateral activity developed and the economic background of the present author I took the approach of a topic that includes aspects from both fields, namely “Corporate Social responsibility- optional or regulatory”. Through the paper I will try to summarize the pros and cons of regulation, mandatory of corporate social responsibility and to review, present the ways in which countries with advanced economies in European Union and the EU itself have addressed this issue.

  13. 25 CFR 227.6 - Corporations and corporate information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Corporations and corporate information. 227.6 Section 227... § 227.6 Corporations and corporate information. (a) If the applicant for a lease is a corporation, it... the lands are located, evidence showing compliance with the corporation laws thereof. Statements...

  14. 25 CFR 213.14 - Corporations and corporate information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Corporations and corporate information. 213.14 Section... Corporations and corporate information. If the applicant for a lease is a corporation, it shall file evidence..., evidence showing compliance with the corporation laws thereof. Statements of changes in officers...

  15. Corporate communications impact on corporate image and corporate competitiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Valentina Pirić

    2008-01-01

    The subject of this paper is an analysis of the impact of corporate communications and of the intensity of their application on a company’s image management, and an emphasis of the role that a company’s image plays as one of the fundamental sources of its competitiveness in contemporary market conditions. Through review and analysis of theoretical contributions, the paper shows how corporate communications integrate management, organization and the marketing communication dimension at the lev...

  16. Evolution of Corporate Essence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomcenco, Alex

    2016-01-01

    , it offers a legal framework where public benefit is more important than profits. As a corporate entity, Public Benefit Corporation already exists in numerous jurisdictions and those jurisdictions that do not yet facilitate creation of this corporate form should most definitely consider it....

  17. Reinventing Corporate Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Elizabeth L.; Trujillo, Nick

    1987-01-01

    Urges a "re-inventing" of corporate communications in today's organizations, and provides information about how corporations can change in new and positive ways during the current "information age." Discusses specific public relations and organizational communication concepts essential for a comprehensive understanding of corporate communications…

  18. Entrepreneurial Knowledge and Aspirations of Dentistry Students in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brijlal, Pradeep; Brijlal, Priscilla

    2013-01-01

    An investigation of the intentions and knowledge of entrepreneurship of final-year university dentistry students is reported, with particular regard to the factors of gender and race. A questionnaire survey was used with final-year dentistry students, over two years, at the University of the Western Cape in South Africa. The findings show that…

  19. 12 CFR 995.4 - Book-entry procedure for Financing Corporation obligations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Book-entry procedure for Financing Corporation... FINANCING CORPORATION OPERATIONS § 995.4 Book-entry procedure for Financing Corporation obligations. (a) Authority. Any Federal Reserve Bank shall have authority to apply book-entry procedure to...

  20. Bioactive Glasses in Dentistry: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbasi Z

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive glasses are silicate-based and can form a strong chemical bond with the tissues. These biomaterials are highly biocompatible and can form a hydroxyapatite layer when implanted in the body or soaked in the simulated body fluid. Due to several disadvantages, conventional glass processing method including melting of glass components, is replaced by sol-gel method with a large number of benefits such as low processing temperature, higher purity and homogeneity and therefore better control of bioactivity. Bioactive glasses have a wide range of applications, particularly in dentistry. These glasses can be used as particulates or monolithic shapes and porous or dense constructs in different applications such as remineralization or hypersensitivity treatment. Some properties of bioactive glasses such as antibacterial properties can be promoted by adding different elements into the glass. Bioactive glasses can also be used to modify different biocompatible materials that need to be bioactive. This study reviews the significant developments of bioactive glasses in clinical application, especially dentistry. Furthermore, we will discuss the field of bioactive glasses from beginning to the current developments, which includes processing methods, applications, and properties of these glasses.

  1. Probiotics and its Applications in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vagish Kumar L S

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics are living bacteria that can benefit our health. They may reduce the overgrowth of pathogens and are used in the form of food and food supplements. Probiotics which is being commonly used for the management of intestinal tract problems has recently been used to promote oral health. The concept of administering beneficial bacteria with a view to replace harmful microbes by useful ones is revived by probiotic concept. In oral cavity probiotics form a biofilm that is protective against oral diseases. Probiotics can compete for adhesion sites as well as for nutrients and growth factors with cariogenic, halithogenic, fungal and periodontal pathogens thereby inhibiting their growth. Thus they may be useful in preventing and treating various oral diseases. Probiotics with gene therapy are capable of yielding amazing success in intercepting and treating diseases. A literature search in Pub-Med, Google scholar, EBSCO HOST, SciELO, ScienceDirect database was done for English articles, using the following search terms: and ldquo;probiotics and rdquo; , and ldquo;oral health and rdquo;, and ldquo;dentistry and rdquo;; no restrictions were used for publication dates. The aim of article is to provide an insight about probiotics and their applications in dentistry. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2014; 23(4.000: 703-723

  2. Clinical aplications of ozone in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haroldo José Mendes

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The ozone is an allotropic form of oxygen whose unique properties offer a wide application to biological systems and clinical treatments. Although discovered in the year 1840, its clinical use is current, finding applicability in various specialties in the dentistry pratice. This article aims to review the clinical applications of ozone in various dental specialties. The compound provides a high purifying capacity, responsible for microbicides actions (bacteria, fungi and viruses, through oxidation mechanisms not yet elucidated, makes it an alternative against the diseases. In dentistry practice, the ozone can be employed in process of sterilization of instruments and purification system of irrigation to dental unit, serving as a good strategy in the control and prevention of cross-infection in the dental environment. However, the administration of ozone at low concentration by systemic way induces tissue proliferation and neovascularization, and thus inducing a healing, a characteristic that makes it attractive from the clinical, as it allows both the elimination of bacteria such as the repair of anatomical structures. It has limited use in treating endodontic infections and tooth decay. The ozone can be used in the treatment of various oral diseases, reducing the clinical course of disease, achieving superior results in comparison to conventional therapies. Despite the literature showing positive results with the use of ozone in cariology, surgery, periodontics and endodontics, there is need for further studies with standardized methodologies to reach a definitive conclusion about its applicability

  3. Neuromuscular dentistry: Occlusal diseases and posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohd Toseef; Verma, Sanjeev Kumar; Maheshwari, Sandhya; Zahid, Syed Naved; Chaudhary, Prabhat K

    2013-01-01

    Neuromuscular dentistry has been a controversial topic in the field of dentistry and still remains debatable. The issue of good occlusion and sound health has been repeatedly discussed. Sometimes we get complains of sensitive teeth and sometimes of tired facial muscles on getting up in the morning. Owing to the intimate relation of masticatory apparatus with the cranium and cervico-scapular muscular system, the disorders in any system, draw attention from concerned clinicians involved in management, to develop an integrated treatment protocol for the suffering patients. There may be patients reporting to the dental clinics after an occlusal restoration or extraction, having pain in or around the temporomandibular joint, headache or neck pain. Although their esthetic demands must not be undermined during the course of treatment plan, whenever dental treatment of any sort is planned, occlusion/bite should be given prime importance. Very few dentist are able to diagnose the occlusal disease and of those who diagnose many people resort to aggressive treatment modalities. This paper aims to report the signs of occlusal disease, and discuss their association with TMDs and posture.

  4. Biosmart materials: breaking new ground in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badami, Vijetha; Ahuja, Bharat

    2014-01-01

    By definition and general agreement, smart materials are materials that have properties which may be altered in a controlled fashion by stimuli, such as stress, temperature, moisture, pH, and electric or magnetic fields. There are numerous types of smart materials, some of which are already common. Examples include piezoelectric materials, which produce a voltage when stress is applied or vice versa, shape memory alloys or shape memory polymers which are thermoresponsive, and pH sensitive polymers which swell or shrink as a response to change in pH. Thus, smart materials respond to stimuli by altering one or more of their properties. Smart behaviour occurs when a material can sense some stimulus from its environment and react to it in a useful, reliable, reproducible, and usually reversible manner. These properties have a beneficial application in various fields including dentistry. Shape memory alloys, zirconia, and smartseal are examples of materials exhibiting a smart behavior in dentistry. There is a strong trend in material science to develop and apply these intelligent materials. These materials would potentially allow new and groundbreaking dental therapies with a significantly enhanced clinical outcome of treatments.

  5. Epigenetics: a new frontier in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, S D; Hughes, T E; Adler, C J; Brook, A H; Townsend, G C

    2014-06-01

    In 2007, only four years after the completion of the Human Genome Project, the journal Science announced that epigenetics was the 'breakthrough of the year'. Time magazine placed it second in the top 10 discoveries of 2009. While our genetic code (i.e. our DNA) contains all of the information to produce the elements we require to function, our epigenetic code determines when and where genes in the genetic code are expressed. Without the epigenetic code, the genetic code is like an orchestra without a conductor. Although there is now a substantial amount of published research on epigenetics in medicine and biology, epigenetics in dental research is in its infancy. However, epigenetics promises to become increasingly relevant to dentistry because of the role it plays in gene expression during development and subsequently potentially influencing oral disease susceptibility. This paper provides a review of the field of epigenetics aimed specifically at oral health professionals. It defines epigenetics, addresses the underlying concepts and provides details about specific epigenetic molecular mechanisms. Further, we discuss some of the key areas where epigenetics is implicated, and review the literature on epigenetics research in dentistry, including its relevance to clinical disciplines. This review considers some implications of epigenetics for the future of dental practice, including a 'personalized medicine' approach to the management of common oral diseases.

  6. Biosmart Materials: Breaking New Ground in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijetha Badami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available By definition and general agreement, smart materials are materials that have properties which may be altered in a controlled fashion by stimuli, such as stress, temperature, moisture, pH, and electric or magnetic fields. There are numerous types of smart materials, some of which are already common. Examples include piezoelectric materials, which produce a voltage when stress is applied or vice versa, shape memory alloys or shape memory polymers which are thermoresponsive, and pH sensitive polymers which swell or shrink as a response to change in pH. Thus, smart materials respond to stimuli by altering one or more of their properties. Smart behaviour occurs when a material can sense some stimulus from its environment and react to it in a useful, reliable, reproducible, and usually reversible manner. These properties have a beneficial application in various fields including dentistry. Shape memory alloys, zirconia, and smartseal are examples of materials exhibiting a smart behavior in dentistry. There is a strong trend in material science to develop and apply these intelligent materials. These materials would potentially allow new and groundbreaking dental therapies with a significantly enhanced clinical outcome of treatments.

  7. Nano Era Of Dentistry-An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maman, Paramjot; Nagpal, Manju; Gilhotra, Ritu Mehra; Aggarwal, Geeta

    2017-08-25

    Management of the health of oral tissues is a prime requirement in dentistry. The prevention of tooth decay and the treatment of lesions and cavities are ongoing challenges. The limitations in dental materials, medications, instruments, procedures put off the accomplishment of this goal. Rationalization of science and technology has made possible to work out these limitations. Nanotechnology which is the outcome of this rationalization has become one of the most favored technologies in medical and dental application. The substantial contribution of nano dental materials is the identification of oral health related problems by better diagnosis and management of dental disorders by bionanomaterials. Application of nanodentistry holds promise for comprehensive dental care by utilizing nanomaterials ans ultimately by nanorobots. This review discusses the rationale of nanodentistry, nanocarriers researched in treatment of different dental diseases, the latest innovations in nanomaterials in various disciplines of dentistry; patent literature and related marketed products. Advances in nanotechnology have placed plenty of hopes in terms of improving the oral health care of dental patients. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Lasers in Dentistry: Is It Really Safe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Mortazavi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lasers are used in various disciplines in dentistry such as restorative dentistry, endodontics, periodontics, pedodontics, and oral and maxillofacial surgery. Despite many advantages of dental lasers, this method might have some adverse effects. The aim of this review article is to debate about the impacts of lasers on orodental tissues. Methods: An electronic search was accomplished using specialized databases such as Google Scholar, PubMed, PubMed Central, Science Direct, and Scopus to find relevant studies by using keywords such as “laser”, “dentistry”, “adverse effect”, and “side effect”. Results: Several adverse effects of laser were identified such as impacts on dental pulp, effects on tooth surface, subcutaneous and submucosal effects, histopathological changes, and infection transmission due to laser smoke. During dental procedures, necrosis of the pulp, periodontal ligament and odontoblasts, cemental lysis, bone resorption, hypo/hyperpigmentation, burns, itching, and scarring might occur. In addition, laser can weaken the dentin by inducing surface cracks. Restorative procedures by laser might increase microleakage and decrease shear bond strength, as well as microhardness of tooth walls. Meanwhile, laser surgery might cause emphysema after abscess incision and drainage, frenectomy, flap elevation, and gingivoplasty. Conclusion: Practitioners should be very cautious in treatment planning and case selection during laser-based therapeutic procedures.

  9. Geriatric Dentistry and the Alzheimer Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Coelho GOIATO

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The world population is getting old, mainly in countries in development like Brazil. So, the number of pathologies, which appears in the elderly, will happen in a higher frequency. Among these diseases, we can point Alzheimer, an irreversible dementia, that has been related to age, cerebral vascular disease, stroke, immunological defects and to genetic factors (Down Syndrome. It is known that with the progression of dementia, patients present difficulties of oral hygiene caused by decrease of motor and cognitive functions of Alzheimer's bearers. These patients demand specific strategies for a dental treatment without bigger difficulties. Objective: the aim of this paper was to review the articles about the relationship of geriatric dentistry and Alzheimer disease focusing and the characteristics of the patients with this kind of dementia and the cares to them. For this purpose, a peer-reviewed literature was completed using Medline database for the period from 1972 to 2006, including alzheimer disease and dentistry, and BBO for the period from 1987 to 2004, with geriatric keyword. Conclusion: The available data indicate that individuals with Alzheimer disease have more oral health problems than individuals without dementia.

  10. Antecedents and benefits of corporate citizenship : an investigation of French businesses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maignan, [No Value; Ferrell, OC

    2001-01-01

    The authors first propose a conceptualization and operationalization of corporate citizenship. Then, they present an empirical study conducted among French businesses aimed at: (1) understanding whether an organization's culture affects its likelihood of engaging in corporate citizenship and (2) whe

  11. Antecedents and benefits of corporate citizenship : an investigation of French businesses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maignan, [No Value; Ferrell, OC

    2001-01-01

    The authors first propose a conceptualization and operationalization of corporate citizenship. Then, they present an empirical study conducted among French businesses aimed at: (1) understanding whether an organization's culture affects its likelihood of engaging in corporate citizenship and (2) whe

  12. From a School Board Member: The Case Against Corporal Punishment in the Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonin, Tobyann

    1977-01-01

    No matter what kind of classroom we choose, we have to remember that discipline must not be used interchangeably with corporal punishment. Constructive discipline is a positive means of managing a classroom; corporal punishment is an exceedingly negative one. (Author)

  13. 75 FR 78238 - Access to Confidential Business Information by Science Applications International Corporation and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-15

    ... AGENCY Access to Confidential Business Information by Science Applications International Corporation and...: EPA has authorized its contractor, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) of San Diego... determined to be Confidential Business Information (CBI). DATES: Access to the confidential data...

  14. Effects of corporate governance on corporate reputation

    OpenAIRE

    López González, Eva

    2015-01-01

    One of the most critical strategic and enduring assets that a corporation may possess is good reputation. The positive impact of corporate reputation on firm performance has been analyzed and documented for ages. Intangible assets like reputation are increasing their importance in companies as sources of sustainable advantages. Organizations used to look for tangible assets as the drivers of these advantages, but nowadays intangible ones are getting much more weight in this sense. This is wh...

  15. CORPORATE GOVERNANCE RELATION WITH CORPORATE SUSTAINABILITY

    OpenAIRE

    ISSAM MF SALTAJI

    2013-01-01

    Sustainability is targeted in this article to be integrated with corporate governance presenting its importance in business world not as obligation, but as a tool be adopted. Economic challenges push companies to think twice before making decisions. Corporate governance is a success key for companies through improving performance and gain mistrust of investors serving business sustainability. Objectives direction has been changed from concentrating on shareholders’ benefits to maintain sustai...

  16. CORPORATE GOVERNANCE RELATION WITH CORPORATE SUSTAINABILITY

    OpenAIRE

    ISSAM MF SALTAJI

    2013-01-01

    Sustainability is targeted in this article to be integrated with corporate governance presenting its importance in business world not as obligation, but as a tool be adopted. Economic challenges push companies to think twice before making decisions. Corporate governance is a success key for companies through improving performance and gain mistrust of investors serving business sustainability. Objectives direction has been changed from concentrating on shareholders’ benefits to maintain sustai...

  17. The path to corporate responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadek, Simon

    2004-12-01

    Nike's tagline,"Just do it," is an inspirational call to action for the millions who wear the company's athletic gear. But in terms of corporate responsibility, Nike didn't always follow its own advice. In the 1990s, protesters railed against sweatshop conditions at some of its overseas suppliers and made Nike the global poster child for corporate ethical fecklessness. The intense pressure that activists exerted on the athletic apparel giant forced it to take a long, hard look at corporate responsibility--sooner than it might have otherwise. In this article, Simon Zadek, CEO of the UK-based institute AccountAbility, describes the bumpy route Nike has traveled to get to a better ethical place, one that cultivates and champions responsible business practices. Organizations learn in unique ways, Zadek contends, but they inevitably pass through five stages of corporate responsibility, from defensive ("It's not our fault") to compliance ("We'll do only what we have to") to managerial ("It's the business") to strategic ("It gives us a competitive edge") and, finally, to civil ("We need to make sure everybody does it"). He details Nike's arduous trek through these stages-from the company's initial defensive stance, when accusations about working conditions arose, all the way to its engagement today in the international debate about business's role in society and in public policy. As he outlines this evolution, Zadek offers valuable insights to executives grappling with the challenge of managing responsible business practices. Beyond just getting their own houses in order, the author argues, companies need to stay abreast of the public's evolving ideas about corporate roles and responsibilities. Organizations that do both will engage in what he calls"civil learning".

  18. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry and the specialty of pediatric dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Largent, Beverly A

    2009-01-01

    Founded in 1947, the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) is a not-for-profit membership association representing the specialty of pediatric dentistry. The AAPD's 7,500 members are primary oral health care providers who offer comprehensive specialty treatment for millions of infants, children, adolescents, and individuals with special healthcare needs. The AAPD also represents general dentists who treat a significant number of children in their practices. As advocates for children's oral health, the AAPD develops and promotes evidence-based policies and guidelines, fosters research, contributes to scholarly work concerning pediatric oral health, and educates healthcare providers, policymakers, and the public on ways to improve children's oral health. The academy's philanthropic arm, Healthy Smiles, Healthy Children: The Foundation of the AAPD, advances the AAPD mission through the support and promotion of education, research, service, and policy development.

  19. Perspectives of Residents of Mashhad School of Dentistry about the Curriculum of Residency Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Sarabadani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study was carried out to analyze the viewpoint of the residents of school of dentistry about the curriculum presented in the residency program to students of Mashhad School of Dentistry. Methods: To evaluate the perspectives of residents of dental school about the curriculum and regulations of residency program, a questionnaire was designed whose validity and reliability were confirmed by the authorities of School of Dentistry and test-retest reliability, respectively. The questionnaire was distributed among 100 residents and 80 of them completed the questionnaires. The data were analyzed by SPSS software (version 11.5. Results: A total of 43% of residents were informed of the curriculum (e.g. academic leave, transfer, removal of semester, etc.. As for the ability to write research proposal, 42.7% of residents were reported to have a favorable status, i.e. they were able to write more than 80% of their proposal. From among the residents, 30.4% had specialized English language certificate. Most of them (77% were satisfied with the professional staff, faculty members, of the faculty. Many students liked to participate in the teaching method courses of the residency program. Conclusion: Residents maintained that the curriculum in such domains as educational and research issues and special capabilities had some weak points. Thus, appropriate strategies are recommended to be applied to revise the curriculum using the residents’ views on these programs.

  20. Creating an evidence-based dentistry culture at Baylor College of Dentistry: the winds of change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, Robert J; Dechow, Paul C; Abdellatif, Hoda; Jones, Daniel L; McCann, Ann L; Schneiderman, Emet D; D'Souza, Rena

    2011-03-01

    In the early years of the new millennium, the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research of the National Institutes of Health began funding Oral Health Research Education Grants using the R25 mechanism to promote the application of basic and clinical research findings to clinical training and to encourage students to pursue careers in oral health research. This report describes the impact of an R25 grant awarded to the Texas A&M Health Science Center's Baylor College of Dentistry (BCD) on its curriculum and faculty development efforts. At BCD, the R25 grant supports a multipronged initiative that employs clinical research as a vehicle for acquainting both students and faculty with the tools of evidence-based dentistry (EBD). New coursework and experiences in all four years of the curriculum plus a variety of faculty development offerings are being used to achieve this goal. Progress on these fronts is reflected in a nascent EBD culture characterized by increasing participation and buy-in by students and faculty. The production of a new generation of dental graduates equipped with the EBD skill set as well as a growing nucleus of faculty members who can model the importance of evidence-based practice is of paramount importance for the future of dentistry.

  1. The evidence-based dentistry initiative at Baylor College of Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Daniel L; Hinton, Robert J; Dechow, Paul C; Abdellatif, Hoda; McCann, Ann L; Schneiderman, Emet D; D'Souza, Rena

    2011-02-01

    This report describes the impact of an R25 Oral Health Research Education Grant awarded to the Texas A&M Health Science Center-Baylor College of Dentistry (BCD) to promote the application of basic and clinical research findings to clinical training and encourage students to pursue careers in oral health research. At Baylor, the R25 grant supports a multi-pronged initiative that employs clinical research as a vehicle for acquainting both students and faculty with the tools of evidence-based dentistry (EBD). New coursework and experiences in all 4 years of the curriculum plus a variety of faculty development offerings are being used to achieve this goal. Progress on these fronts is reflected in a nascent "EBD culture" characterized by increasing participation and buy-in by students and faculty. The production of a new generation of dental graduates equipped with the EBD skill set as well as a growing nucleus of faculty who can model the importance of evidence-based practice is of paramount importance for the future of dentistry.

  2. Thermography: A New Diagnostic Tool in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarbani Deb Sikdar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The various biochemical processes in the human body generate heat, which must be dissipated. Skin is the major route for heat dissipation using blood as the heat exchange fluid. Skin temperature is an indicator of aberrations in metabolism, hemodynamis or in neuronal thermoregulatory processes. Since most of the heat dissipation of skin is by infrared black body emission skin temperature should be measured without contact, by monitoring the emitted infrared radiation. This has been the basis of telethermography Thermography is being used to detect various pathological conditions in the medical field. There are also various orofacial conditions in which thermography can be used. This paper deals with the history of thermography and its various uses in dentistry.

  3. Piezoelectric surgery in implant dentistry: clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Masako Ferreira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Pizosurgery has therapeutic characteristics in osteotomies, such as extremely precise, selective and millimetric cuts and a clear operating field. Piezoelectricity uses ultrasonic frequencies, which cause the points specially designed for osteotomy to vibrate. The points of the instrument oscillate, allowing effective osteotomy with minimal or no injury to the adjacent soft tissues, membranes and nerve tissues. This article presents the various applications of piezoelectricity in oral implant surgery such as: removal of autogenous bone; bone window during elevation of the sinus membrane and removal of fractured implants. The cavitational effect caused by the vibration of the point and the spray of physiological solution, provided a field free of bleeding and easy to visualize. The study showed that the piezoelectric surgery is a new surgical procedurethat presents advantages for bone cutting in many situations in implant dentistry, with great advantages in comparison with conventional instrumentation. Operating time is longer when compared with that of conventional cutters.

  4. APPLICATION OF NANOBIOMATERIALS IN RESTORATIVE DENTISTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Lyapina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanodentistry is defined as the science and technology of diagnosing, treating and preventing oral and dental diseases, relieving pain, preserving and improving dental health using nanostructured material. Varieties of new dental products are available that rely on nanoscale properties, ranging from implants to oral hygiene products. Nanodentistry encourages the concept of minimally invasive dentistry, creating a more dentist friendly atmosphere. However, patient awareness and education is important to make them understand the developments in the field and the options available in the treatment. Following the progress of nanotechnology, current dental research is exploring designs for restorative systems. During the last decades, an increasing variety of dental restorative materials were developed. The paper reviews the most innovative nanocomposites, their structure, antibacterial and remineralizing capabilities, economical and ethical aspects and safety issues.

  5. Nanotechnology in dentistry: reduction to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ure, David; Harris, Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    The speed at which advances are being made in science has catapulted nanotechnology from its theoretical foundations straight into the real world. There are now many examples of commercially available products demonstrating that, in given situations, the technology really does work and that its scope for further application is wide. Healthcare, along with society as a whole, is facing a major revolution in the wake of ongoing technological developments in the field of nanotechnology. Dentistry as an individual healthcare discipline is not exempt, having already been targeted directly with novel 'nano-materials' at the same time as indirectly enjoying the benefits of nano-related advances in the electronics industry through the ongoing computerization of the modern practice. This article examines current practical applications of nanotechnology alongside proposed applications in the future and aims to demonstrate that, as well as a good deal of science fiction, there is some tangible science fact emerging from this novel multi-disciplinary science.

  6. Ozone applications in dentistry: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junaid Ahmed

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Ozone therapy has been successfully used in the medical field for treatment of various diseases, for more than 100 years. Researches have shown the efficacy of both gaseous and dissolved ozone in eradicating a wide range of bacteria, bacterial spores and viruses. Ozone could also help in healing wounds, treatment of radiation-induced mucositis and osteoradionecrosis by increasing the blood supply and through modulation of inflammatory mediators. Despite of these advantages, therapeutic ozone’s application in dentistry is limited because of its possible side effects on upper respiratory system. Dental practitioners need to know the proper usage of modern pharmaceutical methods like ozone, that can provide better patient care and considerably cut down the time and cost of treatment. [J Exp Integr Med 2013; 3(3.000: 171-176

  7. Nanotechnology applications in medicine and dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Jyoti

    2011-05-01

    Nanotechnology, or nanoscience, refers to the research and development of an applied science at the atomic, molecular, or macromolecular levels (i.e. molecular engineering, manufacturing). The prefix "nano" is defined as a unit of measurement in which the characteristic dimension is one billionth of a unit. Although the nanoscale is small in size, its potential is vast. As nanotechnology expands in other fields, clinicians, scientists, and manufacturers are working to discover the uses and advances in biomedical sciences. Applications of nanotechnology in medical and dental fields have only approached the horizon with opportunities and possibilities for the future that can only be limited by our imagination. This paper provides an early glimpse of nanotechnology applications in medicine and dentistry to illustrate their potentially far-reaching impacts on clinical practice. It also narrates the safety issues concerning nanotechnology applications.

  8. Gene Therapy and its applications in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Lakhanpal Manisha

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This era of advanced technology is marked by progress in identifying and understanding the molecular and cellular cause of a disease. With the conventional methods of treatment failing to render satisfactory results, gene therapy is not only being used for the cure of inherited diseases but also the acquired ones. The broad spectrum of gene therapy includes its application in the treatment of oral cancer and precancerous conditions and lesions, treatment of salivary gland diseases, bone repair, autoimmune diseases, DNA vaccination, etc. The aim of this article is to throw light on the history, methodology, applications and future of gene therapy as it would change the nature and face of dentistry in the coming years.

  9. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scully, C; Greenspan, J S

    2006-09-01

    HIV transmission in the health-care setting is of concern. To assess the current position in dentistry, we have reviewed the evidence to November 1, 2005. Transmission is evidently rare in the industrialized nations and can be significantly reduced or prevented by the use of standard infection control measures, appropriate clinical and instrument-handling procedures, and the use of safety equipment and safety needles. We hope that breaches in standard infection control will become vanishingly small. When occupational exposure to HIV is suspected, the application of post-exposure protocols for investigating the incident and protecting those involved from possible HIV infection further reduces the likelihood of HIV disease, and also stress and anxiety.

  10. Corporal and capital punishment of juveniles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, H C

    1990-01-01

    There is a previously unobserved connection between corporal punishment of public school children and capital punishment of juveniles. Both are barometers of acceptable levels of violent punishment and their elimination is a hallmark of a maturing and decent society. Within a majority of the eighteen states where school authorities most frequently strike children are housed 25 of the nation's 28 juvenile death row inmates. On average, the homicide rates of these jurisdictions are two and a half times greater than those that have abolished both state-sanctioned corporal and capital punishment or limit death sentences to those age eighteen and older at the time of their crime(s). Most of the eighteen state abolitions of corporal punishment occurred in the 1980's. The US Supreme Court has ruled both corporal and capital punishment of juveniles constitutional. Additional state legislative abolition of both is anticipated in the 1990s.

  11. [The fight over dentistry 1919-1924].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindblom, C

    1997-01-01

    In the history of many professions there are periods of more or less pronounced borderline fights against other professions and/or charlatans. This article is about such an example from the profession of dentistry in Sweden. From the middle of the second decade of this century, there was an increasing discrepancy between the need for dental care and the too low number of dentists. Furthermore: the majority of the Swedish people could not afford dental care at all. In the public debate the concept "dental misery" was created. In 1919 a famous Swedish paediatric professor, Isak Jundell, presented a debate article in "Allmänna Svenska Läkartidningen" (Journal of the Swedish Medical Association), with a proposal for building up a corps of dental assistants with shorter training than dentists, but still with competence for tooth cleaning, extraction and some operative dentistry. The aim of the proposal was to give people easier available and cheaper dental care. The dental profession had been questioned and threatened and the reaction from the advocates of the dentists was immediate and intense. Now followed an almost five year long struggle, with the Swedish Dental Association on one side and parts of the medical profession, dental technicians, even some dentists and a number of politicians on the other. The controversy ended up in the Swedish Parliament in 1924 where many members in both the chambers had signed motions concerning authorisation of dental technicians. The dentists won the fight thanks to the resolution in the Parliament not to authorise the technicians. But still more important, from a social political point of view, was a statement from the Parliament with a commission to the Government to analyse the prerequisites for building up a Public Dental Health Service organisation in Sweden. After a series of committees this was finally a reality fourteen years later, in 1938, when the Parliament in a resolution initiated "folktandvården".

  12. Status and Functions of Regional Power Grid Corporations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Wei

    2007-01-01

    @@ In line with power institutional reform and formation of the state power grid, status and roles of regional power grid corporations experienced several variations and are now being incessantly marginalized and weakened. The reform of turning regional grid corporations into regional headquarters of State Grid Corporation may be a better choice beneficial to group operation, intensive development and precise management. This article can be regarded as the author's personal opinion.

  13. Elimination of corporal punishment of children's a human right

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevanović Ivana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors indicate the necessity of explicit legal prohibition of all corporal punishment of children that represent a violation of the right of the child to respect his/her physical integrity and human dignity. The paper emphasizes why all corporal punishment of children should be prohibited and points out the progress made at the legislative level to the elimination of all corporal punishment of children in some member states of the Council of Europe and the Republic of Serbia.

  14. Current applications of nanotechnology in dentistry: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavikatti, Shaeesta Khaleelahmed; Bhardwaj, Smiti; Prabhuji, M L V

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing demand for advances in diagnosis and treatment modalities, nanotechnology is being considered as a groundbreaking and viable research subject. This technology, which deals with matter in nanodimensions, has widened our views of poorly understood health issues and provided novel means of diagnosis and treatment. Researchers in the field of dentistry have explored the potential of nanoparticles in existing therapeutic modalities with moderate success. The key implementations in the field of dentistry include local drug delivery agents, restorative materials, bone graft materials, and implant surface modifications. This review provides detailed insights about current developments in the field of dentistry, and discusses potential future uses of nanotechnology.

  15. Surveillance of viral contamination of invasive medical instruments in dentistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Lin-fu; ZHU Hai-hong; LIN Jun; HU Min-jun; CHEN Feng; CHEN Zhi

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the viral contamination of invasive medical instruments in dentistry and to provide health administrative institutions with surveillance data. Methods: Sterilized samples were randomly collected from the department of dentistry to detect HBV-DNA, HCV-RNA, HIV-RNA and HBsAg. Results: Of the invasive medical instruments that were sterilized with 2% glutaraldehyde, one of the samples was positive for HBV-DNA, and another sample was positive for HBsAg.Conclusion: Though massive virus contamination of invasive medical instruments in dentistry has been reduced to a low level, the occurrence of contamination still remains.

  16. CORPORATE GOVERNANCE IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciprian Apostol

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the research was focused on measuring the performance level of corporate governance in Romania. This is carried out by evaluating the importance level given to the principles of corporate governance in the Romanian economy, while the practices of transparency and dissemination of companies’ information in the selected sample were monitored. To achieve the objectives of the study, we need to examine the Corporate Governance Code of the Bucharest Stock Exchange. Sample companies were selected and their information from the “Comply or Explain” Statements was analyzed.The research method is a non-participating observation—based on the information from the “Comply or Explain” Statement to determine whether companies are applying corporate governance and transparency elements. The research results highlight the progress of Romanian companies in the process of exercising to the principles of corporate governance, becoming internationally recognized, and integrating into the Corporate Governance Code of the Bucharest Stock Exchange.

  17. The Corporate Marketing Department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritter, Thomas; Eggert, Andreas; Münkhoff, Eva

    it can best add value to the firm. Based on a qualitative study among B2B companies, we develop a conceptual framework highlighting the various parental roles through which corporate marketing can contribute to overall firm and business unit performance. In addition, we identify five gaps that restrain......Corporate marketing has been downsized or eliminated in many firms. At the same time, firms that still own a corporate marketing department struggle with organizing and positioning their commercial front‐end. The question arises whether firms need a corporate marketing department, and if so, how...... successful outcomes of corporate marketing activities. In sum, our framework provides important insights on how to successfully organize corporate marketing activities....

  18. 25 CFR 226.8 - Corporation and corporate information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Corporation and corporate information. 226.8 Section 226... RESERVATION LANDS FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Leasing Procedure, Rental and Royalty § 226.8 Corporation and corporate information. (a) If the applicant for a lease is a corporation, it shall file evidence...

  19. Radioprotection in dentistry: Analysis of the Dentistry Faculties of the Rio de Janeiro State not referring at personnel and installations; Radioprotecao em Odontologia: analise das faculdades de Odontologia do Estado do Rio de Janeiro no tocante a pessoal e instalacoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padilha F, L.G. [PEN-COPPE/UFRJ Fund. Tecnica Educacional Souza Marques. Av. Mirandela 786 c/15 26520-460, Nilopolis, RJ, (Brazil); Borges, J.C.; Raymundo Junior, R.; Koch, H.A

    1998-12-31

    The objective was to show the necessity and the importance of the training and formation of the dentist in radioprotection according to the recent proposal for technical regulations `Radiological protection directrixes in Medical and Dentistry radiodiagnostic` of the Secretaria do Vigilancia Sanitaria of Ministerio da Saude (SVSMS). This regulation establishes basic standards to radioprotection in the medical and dentistry areas, including principles, limits, obligations and basic controls for the man and environment protection, versus possible improper effects caused by the use of ionizing radiation sources. An analysis of the discipline programs of the Dentistry Schools of Rio de Janeiro state indicates that they show a little or none preoccupation by the radiological protection, which was confirmed through a survey applied toward responsible professors by department or radiology service to the dentistry Schools. This work suggests the creation or adaptation of the existing disciplines introducing radioprotection and images quality in radiodiagnostic, to improve, complement and to make uniform the formation of future dentists optimizing the solution of the identified problems. (Author)

  20. Corporate governance in Malaysia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    SINGAM, Kamini

    2003-01-01

    ... governance in Malaysia - the ownership structure, composition and operation of Malaysian companies in Malaysia - the nature of shareholder control and protection made available in the Malaysian corporate...

  1. Policy entrepreneurship in the reform of pediatric dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstein, Burton L; Maas, William R

    2017-06-30

    In a recently published IJHPR article, Cohen and Horev ask whether an individual who holds rightful governmental power is able to effectively "challenge the equilibrium" in ways that might "clash with the goals" of an influential group". This question is raised within the context of a shift in governmental policy that imposed the potential for cost management by HMOs acting as financial intermediaries for pediatric dental care in an effort to provide Israeli children better access to affordable dental care. The influential group referred to consists of Israel's private dentists and the individual seeking to challenge the equilibrium was an Israeli Minister of Health whom the authors consider to be a policy entrepreneur.The Israeli health care system is similar to that of the United States in that private benefit plans and self-pay financing dominate in dental care. This is in contrast to the substantial role of government in the financing and regulation of medical care in both countries (with Israel having universal coverage financed by government and the US having government financing the care of the elderly and the poor as well as providing subsidies through the tax system for the care of most other Americans).Efforts to expand governmental involvement in dental care in both countries have either been opposed by organized dentistry or have suffered from ineffective advocacy for increased public investment in dental care.In the U.S., philanthropic foundations have acted as or have supported health policy entrepreneurs. The recent movement to introduce the dental therapist, a type of allied dental professional trained to provide a narrow set of commonly-needed procedures, to the U.S. is discussed as an example of a successful challenge to the equilibrium by groups supported by these foundations. This is a somewhat different, and complementary, model of policy entrepreneurship from the individual policy entrepreneur highlighted in the Cohen-Horev paper.The political

  2. Corporate Governance Country Assessment : Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2012-01-01

    This report assesses Ghana s corporate governance policy framework. It highlights recent improvements in corporate governance regulation, makes policy recommendations, and provides investors with a benchmark against which to measure corporate governance in Ghana. It is an update of the 2005 Corporate Governance ROSC. Good corporate governance enhances investor trust, helps to protects mino...

  3. Current state of sedation/analgesia care in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitch, Jason; Macpherson, Avril

    2007-08-01

    Dentistry treatment is one of the most anxiety-inducing events in people's lives. The development of pain and anxiety-control techniques has always been very closely aligned to the development of dentistry. The purpose of this review is to summarize the recent literature in this field. The literature in the last 12 months falls into four main categories: dental anxiety and its influence on patient care, dental sedation for children, sedation with benzodiazepines for dentistry, and intravenous propofol sedation for dentistry. Considerable progress is being made with a number of innovative techniques. Oral midazolam for children and patient-controlled propofol show very promising results. More research is needed before propofol can be recommended for use without anaesthetic staff. The recently published systematic review of sedation in children outlines gaps in the literature and contains recommendations for future work.

  4. Overall pattern of publication in Journal of Conservative Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmani, Umesh Kumar; Devi, T. Premlata; Sh. Priyadarshini; Jadhav, Ganesh; Dharmani, Charan Kamal Kaur; Singh, Bishnupati; Kumar, Vinay

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Journal of Conservative Dentistry (JCD) has been online since 2008. Materials and Methods: This paper reviews the publication in this journal over a 5-year period (2011–2015). It assesses the types of articles published, coverage of various types of subjects of endodontics, and conservative dentistry in the journal and explores the authorship patterns in the publication and citation of the journal over this period. Results and Conclusion: JCD has delivered broad-based, balanced coverage of endodontics and conservative dentistry between 2011 and 2015, with contributions from all over India, as well as abroad. Although a maximum number of articles were from India, the publications from other countries are also on an increase. Thus, the widespread coverage of this journal suggests that JCD has begun to represent the global face of the Indian Association of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics. PMID:27656069

  5. Antibacterial activity in adhesive dentistry: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Memarpour, Mahtab

    2012-01-01

    This literature review summarizes the published research regarding the antibacterial agents used in adhesive dentistry. This article provides information about the clinical applications, beneficial effects, and possible disadvantages of antibacterials when used in various bonding situations.

  6. Factors affecting anxiety-fear of surgical procedures in dentistry ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors affecting anxiety-fear of surgical procedures in dentistry. ... the questions concerning previous dental experience, education level, and previous ... structure and gender are the significantly effective factors on dental anxiety and fear.

  7. A short account of forensic dentistry in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaud, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    The earliest records and more recent cases where forensic dentistry has been used to identify bodies in France are described. The establishment of the French Society of Forensic Odontology is detailed.

  8. Why be an evidence-based dentistry champion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, Jan E; Bonetti, Debbie

    2009-09-01

    Evidence-based dentistry champions are committed to improving the quality, effectiveness, and appropriateness of dental care through the application of evidence-based principles and tools. They share knowledge and skills to promote evidence-based dentistry (EBD) in practice, guiding colleagues, patients and policy makers in the application of critical thinking skills and evidence-based decision-making. Being an evidence-based champion requires furthering an understanding of the full process and the challenges of evidence based dentistry, including the development of an evidence base, evidence synthesis and summary, the creation of best practice guidelines, as well as evidence implementation. Efforts to improve the quality, effectiveness, and appropriateness of dental care need to occur at, and be coordinated across, multiple levels of dentistry, including the patient, clinician, team, organization, and policy.

  9. EVALUATION OF DISTANCE EDUCATION IN DENTISTRY GRADUATION COURSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helbert Eustáquio Cardoso da Silva

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The curricula of Dentistry are in the process of modernization , to suit the labor market geared to the needs of the population . The changes seek a teaching method that is conducive to student elfmanagement of their knowledge through a transdisciplinary vision. Objective: To examine about the training of teachers responsible for the disciplines of dentistry , as well as new possibilities of knowledge transmission . In this context, the distance is shown as an alternative to the continuing education of future dentists , covering new technologies and new methods of teaching adults. Methods: Through a literature review , we discuss about the goals of the national curriculum guidelines and the training of teachers of courses in dentistry and also surveys are presented in distance education in healthcare. Results: The study shows successful application of distance learning for adult learners courses in Dentistry .

  10. Research in dentistry: Question, search and studies design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Aravena

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Evidence-based dentistry (EBD concept has caused great impact and interest in the field of dentistry. For its development is important to use research protocols and study designs according to the research problem. The aim of this review is to present basic aspects for the start of a quantitative research in dentistry.It presents the topics necessary to transform a research problem to a question with clinical approach. Then, concepts about finding relevant scientific articles in the electronic databases available on the Internet. It also presents observational and experimental research designs, their classification and topics for your choice. These elements represents simple and clear recommendations for research in dentistry.

  11. Demand in pediatric dentistry for sedation and general anesthesia by dentist anesthesiologists: a survey of directors of dentist anesthesiologist and pediatric dentistry residencies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hicks, C Gray; Jones, James E; Saxen, Mark A; Maupome, Gerardo; Sanders, Brian J; Walker, Laquia A; Weddell, James A; Tomlin, Angela

    2012-01-01

    This study describes what training programs in pediatric dentistry and dental anesthesiology are doing to meet future needs for deep sedation/general anesthesia services required for pediatric dentistry...

  12. Corporate Investments in Education during an Economic Downturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Kirstin; Contardo, Jeanne; Eckert, Leila Morsy

    2010-01-01

    Corporate philanthropies can provide much-needed support to K-12 and postsecondary education efforts. This article analyzes whether select multi-billion dollar corporate philanthropies continue such support and adhere to best-funding practices during an economic downtown. Drawing on interview and document review data, the authors examine the…

  13. Corporate Governance: Can Universities Learn from the Private Sector?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henze, Raphaela

    2010-01-01

    Corporate governance has several objectives: growth, transparency, leadership, social responsibility and trust, as well as the protection of shareholders and company assets. It also plays a key role in determining a company's control environment. In this article, the author takes a closer look at corporate governance in the private sector,…

  14. A Survey of Parental Opinions on Corporal Punishment in Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Patrick C.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    In a survey of 129 parents of military dependents, 51% supported the use of corporal punishment in schools and 37% disagreed. Analysis of the responses displayed a relationship between parental attitudes on the use of corporal punishment and opinion of the positive effects of physical punishment on children's behavior. (Author/CL)

  15. Probability of Corporal Punishment: Lack of Resources and Vulnerable Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seunghee

    2011-01-01

    The author examined corporal punishment practices in the United States based on data from 362 public school principals where corporal punishment is available. Results from multiple regression analyses show that schools with multiple student violence prevention programs and teacher training programs had fewer possibilities of use corporal…

  16. Corporate Governance: Can Universities Learn from the Private Sector?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henze, Raphaela

    2010-01-01

    Corporate governance has several objectives: growth, transparency, leadership, social responsibility and trust, as well as the protection of shareholders and company assets. It also plays a key role in determining a company's control environment. In this article, the author takes a closer look at corporate governance in the private sector,…

  17. Corporate Investments in Education during an Economic Downturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Kirstin; Contardo, Jeanne; Eckert, Leila Morsy

    2010-01-01

    Corporate philanthropies can provide much-needed support to K-12 and postsecondary education efforts. This article analyzes whether select multi-billion dollar corporate philanthropies continue such support and adhere to best-funding practices during an economic downtown. Drawing on interview and document review data, the authors examine the…

  18. Types of Lasers and Their Applications in Pediatric Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Nazemisalman, Bahareh; Farsadeghi, Mahya; Sokhansanj, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Laser technology has been recently introduced into the dental field with the idea to replace drilling. Having a less painful first dental experience by the use of modern instruments like laser can be an efficient preventive and therapeutic strategy in pediatric dentistry. Pedodontists need to learn the new less invasive technologies and adopt them in their routine practice. This study aimed to review the available types of lasers and their applications in pediatric dentistry. An electronic se...

  19. Different clinical applications of bondable reinforcement ribbond in pediatric dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuloglu, Nuray; Bayrak, Sule; Tunc, Emine Sen

    2009-10-01

    Ribbond is a bondable, biocompatible, esthetic, translucent and easy-to-use reinforced ribbon. By virtue of its wide spectrum of intended properties, it enjoys various applications in clinical dentistry. This case report demonstrates usage of Ribbond as a space maintainer, a fixed partial denture with a natural tooth pontic, an endodontic post and cores and a splint material in children. Ribbond can be used as an alternative to conventional treatment in pediatric dentistry.

  20. Ozone- A Biological Therapy in Dentistry- Reality or Myth?????

    OpenAIRE

    Saraswathi V Naik; K, Rajeshwari; Kohli, Shivani; Zohabhasan, Sayyad; Bhatia, Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    The usage of ozone in dentistry has been proposed because of its antimicrobial, disinfectant, biocompatibility and healing properties. In the last decade a number of therapeutic protocols with ozone have been developed to address common dental infections associated with periodontal disease, RCT and caries. Despite these advantages, therapeutic ozone’s application in dentistry is limited because of its possible side effects. Hence, dental practitioners need to know the proper usage of ozone th...

  1. Nanostructural analysis of the adhesive interface in dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Frassetto, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is the stability of the adhesive interface in dentistry. Success in adhesive dentistry means long lasting restorations. However, there is substantial evidence that this ideal objective is not achieved. Current research in this field aims at increasing the resin-dentin bond durability. This doctoral research examines the fundamental processes responsible for the aging mechanisms involved in the degradation of resin-bonded interfaces, as well as some potential approac...

  2. Use of Polyethylene Fiber (Ribbond in Pediatric Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eda Arat Maden

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Polyethylene fiber (Ribbond is a bondable, biocompatible, esthetic, translucent material. By virtue of its wide spectrum of intended properties, it enjoys various applications in clinical dentistry. Different clinical applications of Ribbond include space maintainers, fixed partial dentures with a natural tooth pontic, endodontic posts and cores and splint materials in children. Ribbond can be used as an alternative to conventional treatment in pediatric dentistry. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2012; 1(2.000: 110-115

  3. Different Clinical Applications of Bondable Reinforcement Ribbond in Pediatric Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuloglu, Nuray; Bayrak, Sule; Tunc, Emine Sen

    2009-01-01

    Ribbond is a bondable, biocompatible, esthetic, translucent and easy-to-use reinforced ribbon. By virtue of its wide spectrum of intended properties, it enjoys various applications in clinical dentistry. This case report demonstrates usage of Ribbond as a space maintainer, a fixed partial denture with a natural tooth pontic, an endodontic post and cores and a splint material in children. Ribbond can be used as an alternative to conventional treatment in pediatric dentistry. PMID:19826607

  4. Ethical and legal implications of marketing in Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Luiz Renato Paranhos; Eduardo de Novaes Benedicto; Mário Marques Fernandes; Fábio Roberto de Souza Viotto; Eduardo Daruge Júnior

    2011-01-01

    Introduction and objective: The aim of this study was to discuss the ethical and legal use of marketing in dentistry by the professionals. Marketing itself is very important for solving the problems of competitiveness of daily private practice, but in several times its application methods may raise concern due to the current regulations. Literature review: The marketing concepts have been frequently reported, and this literature review shows that the methods of marketing in Dentistry are v...

  5. Profile of special needs patients at a pediatric dentistry clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Sílvio Augusto Fernandes de Menezes; Helder Henrique Costa Pinheiro; Luciana Teixeira Passos; Camila de Almeida Smith; Tatiany Oliveira de Alencar Menezes

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the characteristics of special needs patients assisted at the Clinic of Pediatric Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Federal University of Pará. Methods: A descriptive observational study conducted from March 2007 to December 2009, assessing 137 records of which were extracted the following data: gender, age, origin, current and past medical history, type of special needs and major oral diseases. We applied descriptive statistics, one-dimensional frequency table and prepare...

  6. Misogyny in Health Professions? An Analysis of the Dalhousie Dentistry Scandal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hunter, Kelly

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This commentary offers an explanation for how and why the Dalhousie Dentistry scandal could occur in a society and time where traditional gender roles are seemingly being eradicated. We use Foucault’s modes of objectification, applied to an analysis of the use of “manhood acts” and in relation to the hidden curriculum, to argue that when women threaten the authority of men in health professions, men may subconsciously look for ways to re-exert an unequal and gendered subject-object binary.

  7. Dentistry in Korea during the Japanese Occupation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHIN Jae-Eu

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The Japanese introduction of dentistry into Korea was for treating the Japanese residing in Korea Noda-Oji was the first Japanese dentist for Japanese people in Korea in 1893. and Narajaki doyoyo, an invited dentist was posted in the Korean headquarter of Japanese army in september, 1905. The imperialist Japan licensed the dental technicians(yipchisa without limit and controled them generously so they could practice dentistry freely. This measure was contrary to that in Japan. (In Japan no new dental technician was licensed. Komori, a dental technician opened his laboratory at Chungmuro in 1902. The dental technician had outnumerbered by 1920. In 1907, the first Korean dental technician Sung-Ryong Choi practiced dentistry in Jongno. The imperialist Japan made the regulation for dental technicians to set a limit to the advertisement and medical practice of dental technicians. The first Korean dentist Suk-Tae Ham was registered No. 1 in the dentist license. The Kyungsung dental school was established by Nagira Dasoni for the purpose of educating some korean people that contributed to Japanese colonization. It made progress with the help of Japan. it was given the approval of the establishment of the professional school in January the 25th, 1929. it was intended to produce Korean dentists in the first place but became the school for Japanese students later on. The association of Chosun dentist, which had been founded by Narajaki doyoyo, was managed by Japanese dentists in favor of the colonial ruling. The Hansung Association of Dentists established in 1925 was the organization made by the necessity of the association for Koreans only. the Japanese forcefully annexed the Association of Hansung Dentists (Koreans only to the Association of Kyungsung Dentists to avoid collective actions of Korean dentists in the name of 'Naesunilche'--'Japan and Korea are one'. Their invading intention was shown in the event of 'decayed tooth preventive day'. Japanese

  8. Practice of preventive dentistry for nursing staff in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Valeria Jimenez-Baez

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Determine the domain of preventive dentistry in nursing personnel assigned to a primary care unit. Methods: Prospective descriptive study, questionnaire validation, and prevalence study. In the first stage, the questionnaire for the practice of preventive dentistry (CPEP, for the term in Spanish was validated; consistency and reliability were measured by Cronbach's alpha, Pearson's correlation, factor analysis with intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC. In the second stage, the domain in preventive dental nurses was explored. Results: The overall internal consistency of CPEP is α= 0.66, ICC= 0.64, CI95%: 0.29-0.87 (p >0.01. Twenty-one subjects in the study, average age 43, 81.0% female, average seniority of 12.5 were included. A total of 71.5% showed weak domain, 28.5% regular domain, and there was no questionnaire with good domain result. The older the subjects were, the smaller the domain; female nurses showed greater mastery of preventive dentistry (29%, CI95%: 0.1-15.1 than male nurses. Public health nurses showed greater mastery with respect to other categories (50%, CI95%: 0.56-2.8. Conclusions: The CDEP has enough consistency to explore the domain of preventive dentistry in health-care staff. The domain of preventive dentistry in primary care nursing is poor, required to strengthen to provide education in preventive dentistry to the insured population. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE

  9. Exploring leadership in the context of dentistry in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willcocks, Stephen George

    2016-05-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore selective leadership approaches in the context of dentistry in the UK. Design/methodology/approach This is a conceptual paper utilising published sources from relevant literature about leadership theory and practice and the policy background to dentistry in the UK. Findings This paper suggests that there is merit in identifying and applying an eclectic mix of leadership theory to the case of dentistry. It offers insight into individual aspects of the leadership role for dentists and applies this to the dental context. It also contrasts these individual approaches with shared leadership and suggests this may also be relevant to dentistry. It highlights the fact that leadership will be of growing concern for dentistry in the light of recent policy changes. Research limitations/implications This paper points out that there are developmental implications depending on the particular approach taken. It argues that leadership development will become increasingly important in dentistry in the UK. Originality/value This paper addresses a topic that has so far received limited attention in the literature.

  10. Understanding Corporate Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cluff, Gary A.

    1988-01-01

    Considers concept of corporate culture and discusses several values which can be considered when assessing corporate culture, and the "compatibility scales" used to measure them. Included are discussions of employee attitudes, work atmosphere, internal communications, management style, employment opportunity, stability, business ethics, corporate…

  11. Corporate Bankruptcy Tourists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Couwenberg, Oscar; Lubben, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Foreign corporations facing financial distress have a choice: resructure in their home jurisdiction or file for bankruptcy in the United States. And some number of foreign corporations do file bankruptcy petitions in the United States. But besides the occasional anecdotal account, how frequently thi

  12. Efficiency in Corporate Takeovers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Dai (Yun)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstractCorporate takeover is a very important economic activity that generates profound consequences on many classes of market participants. The great financing needs and transaction costs directly change the wealth of both shareholders and creditors. The corporate restructuring induced by

  13. Corporate Media Governance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempen, Petrus Cornelis

    2011-01-01

    The media can make or break a reputation. This being said, it seems to be essential for companies, governments and institutions to pay specific attention to corporate media management in their daily operations. However, this thesis shows that they often neglect to pay adequate attention to corporate

  14. Corporate Bankruptcy Tourists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Couwenberg, Oscar; Lubben, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Foreign corporations facing financial distress have a choice: resructure in their home jurisdiction or file for bankruptcy in the United States. And some number of foreign corporations do file bankruptcy petitions in the United States. But besides the occasional anecdotal account, how frequently

  15. Corporate Media Governance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempen, Petrus Cornelis

    2011-01-01

    The media can make or break a reputation. This being said, it seems to be essential for companies, governments and institutions to pay specific attention to corporate media management in their daily operations. However, this thesis shows that they often neglect to pay adequate attention to corporate

  16. Corporate Crime and Restitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Charles F.

    1985-01-01

    Articulates need, nature, and form of a restitutionary approach to corporate crime. Considers small, in-prison production-oriented programs; residential in-community programs, and nonresidential in-community programs for individual offenders; also considers lump sum and continuous payments for corporations to make restitution. (NRB)

  17. Reinventing Corporate Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Elizabeth L.; Trujillo, Nick

    1987-01-01

    Urges a "re-inventing" of corporate communications in today's organizations, and provides information about how corporations can change in new and positive ways during the current "information age." Discusses specific public relations and organizational communication concepts essential for a comprehensive understanding of…

  18. Corporation as climate ambassador

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trapp, Leila

    2012-01-01

    At a time when corporations are addressing increasingly complex, global corporate social responsibility (CSR) issues, this study examines and evaluates the strategies used in Vattenfall’s challenging and innovative CSR campaign which aimed at establishing the energy company as a credible climate...

  19. The CSR-Quality Trade-Off: When can Corporate Social Responsibility and Corporate Ability Compensate Each Other?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.A.J.M. Berens (Guido); C.B.M. van Riel (Cees); J. van Rekom (Johan)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThis paper investigates under what conditions a good corporate social responsibility (CSR) can compensate for a relatively poor corporate ability (CA) (quality), and vice versa. The authors conducted an experiment among business administration students, in which information about a finan

  20. Institutional conditions of corporate citizenship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurissen, R.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    Exploring the concept of citizenship from the history of political philosophy provides suggestions about what corporate citizenship could mean. The metaphor of corporate citizenship suggests an institutional approach to corporate social responsibility. Citizenship is a social role, characterized by

  1. Institutional conditions of corporate citizenship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeurissen, R.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    Exploring the concept of citizenship from the history of political philosophy provides suggestions about what corporate citizenship could mean. The metaphor of corporate citizenship suggests an institutional approach to corporate social responsibility. Citizenship is a social role, characterized by

  2. CORPORATE GOVERNANCE TERHADAP KINERJA PERUSAHAAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman Darwis

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The research aimed to provide empirical evidence that corporate governance implementation,managerial ownership, institutional ownership, board of executive, and independent executiveaffected corporate performance. Population of the research was companies listed at IndonesianStock Exchange (ISX between 2006 – 2008; sampling method used was purposive sampling as well asmultiple regression analysis. The result showed the implementation of GCG affected corporate performance.This meant that if the listed companies at BEI and have been surveyed by IICG implement agood corporate governance, the performance would increase. The higher corporate governance wasmeasured by corporate governance index perception, the higher corporate obedience and result ina good corporate performance. Institutional ownership affected corporate performance. The greaterinstitutional share ownership, the better corporate performance. The result showed that controlfunction from the ownership did determine improving corporate performance. Managerial ownership,board of commissioner, and commissioner independent did not affect corporate.

  3. Corporate Language Policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanden, Guro Refsum

    This paper offers a review of literature dealing with language policies in general and corporate language policies in particular. Based on a discussion of various definitions of these concepts within two research traditions, i.e. sociolinguistics and international management, a three......-level definition of corporate language policies is presented, emphasising that a corporate language policy is a context-specific policy about language use. The three-level definition is based on the argument that in order to acquire a complete understanding of what corporate language policies involve, one needs...... to consider three progressive questions; 1) what is a policy? 2) what is a language policy?, and ultimately, 3) what is a corporate language policy?...

  4. Corporate Language Policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanden, Guro Refsum

    2015-01-01

    This paper offers a review of literature dealing with language policies in general and corporate language policies in particular. Based on a discussion of various definitions of these concepts within two research traditions, i.e. sociolinguistics and international management, a three......-level definition of corporate language policies is presented, emphasising that a corporate language policy is a context-specific policy about language use. The three-level definition is based on the argument that in order to acquire a complete understanding of what corporate language policies involve, one needs...... to consider three progressive questions; 1) what is a policy? 2) what is a language policy?, and ultimately, 3) what is a corporate language policy?...

  5. THEORIES OF CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin Nicolae BORLEA

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study attempts to provide a theoretical framework for the corporate governance debate. The review of various corporate governance theories enhances the major objective of corporate governance which is maximizing the value for shareholders by ensuring good social and environment performances. The theories of corporate governance are rooted in agency theory with the theory of moral hazard’s implications, further developing within stewardship theory and stakeholder theory and evolving at resource dependence theory, transaction cost theory and political theory. Later, to these theories was added ethics theory, information asymmetry theory or the theory of efficient markets. These theories are defined based on the causes and effects of variables such as: the configuration of the board of directors, audit committee, independence of managers, the role of top management and their social relations beyond the legal regulatory framework. Effective corporate governance requires applying a combination

  6. Corporate Social Responsibility and the Millennials

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlone, Teresa; Spain, Judith Winters; McGlone, Vernon

    2011-01-01

    The incorporation of corporate social responsibility (CSR) into an organization's strategic plan may impact the company's ability to attract and keep members of the Millennial generation as employees. The authors examined the CSR attitudes of college students and the correlation of these attitudes with willingness to work for companies that…

  7. Corporate Social Responsibility and the Millennials

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlone, Teresa; Spain, Judith Winters; McGlone, Vernon

    2011-01-01

    The incorporation of corporate social responsibility (CSR) into an organization's strategic plan may impact the company's ability to attract and keep members of the Millennial generation as employees. The authors examined the CSR attitudes of college students and the correlation of these attitudes with willingness to work for companies that…

  8. The Image Gently in Dentistry campaign: Promotion of responsible use of maxillofacial radiology in dentistry for children

    OpenAIRE

    White, SC; Scarfe, WC; Schulze, RKW; Lurie, AG; Douglass, JM; Farman, AG; Law, CS; Levin, MD; Sauer, RA; Valachovic, RW; Zeller, GG; Goske, MJ

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 Published by Elsevier Inc. The Image Gently in Dentistry campaign to be launched in September 2014 is a specific initiative of the Alliance for Radiation Safety in Pediatric Imaging, supported by organized dentistry and dental education as well as many dental specialty organizations. The objective of the campaign is to change practice by increasing awareness of the opportunities to improve radiation protection when imaging children in dental practices. Six practical steps are provided ...

  9. HDACi: cellular effects, opportunities for restorative dentistry.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duncan, H F

    2011-12-01

    Acetylation of histone and non-histone proteins alters gene expression and induces a host of cellular effects. The acetylation process is homeostatically balanced by two groups of cellular enzymes, histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs). HAT activity relaxes the structure of the human chromatin, rendering it transcriptionally active, thereby increasing gene expression. In contrast, HDAC activity leads to gene silencing. The enzymatic balance can be \\'tipped\\' by histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), leading to an accumulation of acetylated proteins, which subsequently modify cellular processes including stem cell differentiation, cell cycle, apoptosis, gene expression, and angiogenesis. There is a variety of natural and synthetic HDACi available, and their pleiotropic effects have contributed to diverse clinical applications, not only in cancer but also in non-cancer areas, such as chronic inflammatory disease, bone engineering, and neurodegenerative disease. Indeed, it appears that HDACi-modulated effects may differ between \\'normal\\' and transformed cells, particularly with regard to reactive oxygen species accumulation, apoptosis, proliferation, and cell cycle arrest. The potential beneficial effects of HDACi for health, resulting from their ability to regulate global gene expression by epigenetic modification of DNA-associated proteins, also offer potential for application within restorative dentistry, where they may promote dental tissue regeneration following pulpal damage.

  10. The role of dentists in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, D W

    2001-12-01

    The extent to which dentists influence the outcomes of dental care, compared to the effects of dental technology or patient variation, has not been well studied. A review of the literature on the personality and value structures of dentists and dental students reveals general trends involving preferences of concrete, utilitarian, unambiguous, and conventional situations that are classified and judged in terms of their potential for dentists' power and control and for relationships of helping others but avoiding mutual dependency. These findings are summarized in a hypothesis that dentists seek situations where they can exercise control and establish paternalistic relationships with others. The evidence about career satisfaction of dentists is difficult to interpret. Between 20 percent and 50 percent of dentists report that they would not choose to enter the profession again if given a chance. Yet the number leaving the profession voluntarily is less than the number of career changers in the general population by a factor of about 1 to 15. Career satisfaction of practitioners can be partially predicted from an understanding of dentists' personality and values. Factors such as uncooperative patients, incompetent staff, and government and insurance intrusions are major dissatisfiers; they threaten dentists' core need for control. Factors such as quality of work, which is under the control of dentists, are major satisfiers. The personalities and values of dentists and the expression of these in professional norms may function to limit our understanding of dentistry. Based on this analysis, eight predictions are offered about the profession.

  11. Digital X-ray Imaging in Dentistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Kyung [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, College of Dentistry, Dankook University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-08-15

    In dentistry, Radio Visio Graphy was introduced as a first electronic dental x-ray imaging modality in 1989. Thereafter, many types of direct digital radiographic systems have been produced in the last decade. They are based either on charge-coupled device (CCD) or on storage phosphor technology. In addition, new types of digital radiographic system using amorphous selenium, image intensifier etc. are under development. Advantages of digital radiographic system are elimination of chemical processing, reduction in radiation dose, image processing, computer storage, electronic transfer of images and so on. Image processing includes image enhancement, image reconstruction, digital subtraction, etc. Especially digital subtraction and reconstruction can be applied in many aspects of clinical practice and research. Electronic transfer of images enables filmless dental hospital and teleradiology/teledentistry system. Since the first image management and communications system (IMACS) for dentomaxillofacial radiology was reported in 1992, IMACS in dental hospital has been increasing. Meanwhile, researches about computer-assisted diagnosis, such as structural analysis of bone trabecular patterns of mandible, feature extraction, automated identification of normal landmarks on cephalometric radiograph and automated image analysis for caries or periodontitis, have been performed actively in the last decade. Further developments in digital radiographic imaging modalities, image transmission system, imaging processing and automated analysis software will change the traditional clinical dental practice in the 21st century.

  12. Occupational contact allergic dermatitis in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikov Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Dental professionals may be at increased risk of developing occupational allergic diseases specially to methacrylates that can permeate protective disposable gloves. Case report. We presented a case of occupational allergic contact dermatitis in a 28-year-old dental technician. The patient had complained of itching and cracking of fingers for 6 months. The dermatitis improved over weekends. Skin erythema and scaling were present with primarily involvement of the fingertips. Patch testing with dental series gave positive vesicular reaction to methyl methacrylate. Follow-up after 6 months of allergen avoidance showed a complete regression of dermatitis. Conclusion. Methacrylates serve as bases for acrylic resins which are used in prosthetics. Methyl methacrylate as a small molecular acrylate can permeate thin protective disposable gloves. Using adequate personal protective equipment, like nitrile rubber gloves, is the most important preventive measure in this occupation. Health practitioners should recognize possible occupational hazards in dentistry and implement appropriate preventive measures to protect health of workers.

  13. Growing quackery in dentistry: An indian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukhvinder Singh Oberoi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental disease restricts activities in school, work, and home and often significantly diminishes the quality of life for many children and adults, especially those who have low income or are uninsured. Though the overall dentist population ratio in India is 1:10,000, at present in rural India, one dentist is serving 2.5 lakhs of people. Only 15-20% of people in India are able to get dental services through national schemes, and 80-85% are spending money from their pockets, providing an ideal breeding ground for quackery into dental practice in India. Dental quacks cater to the lower-middle and lower socioeconomic classes that cannot afford qualified dental practitioners. A large number of people visiting these quacks seek care only when in pain, have a restricted budget, and are not very quality conscious. Dentistry has come a long way in the last one and a half century; today it is ranked as one of the most respected professions. It is incumbent upon dentists everywhere to protect this hard-earned reputation by weeding out quacks from among them. The government should urge fresh graduates to practice in rural areas and provide more incentives to them. Public health dentists should take the initiative of adopting more community-oriented oral health programs to increase the awareness among rural populations.

  14. Non-invasive diagnostic methods in dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todea, Carmen

    2016-03-01

    The paper, will present the most important non-invasive methods for diagnostic, in different fields of dentistry. Moreover, the laser-based methods will be emphasis. In orthodontics, 3D laser scanners are increasingly being used to establish database for normative population and cross-sectional growth changes but also to asses clinical outcomes in orthognatic surgical and non-surgical treatments. In prevention the main methods for diagnostic of demineralization and caries detection in early stages are represented by laser fluorescence - Quantitative Light Florescence (QLF); DiagnoDent-system-655nm; FOTI-Fiberoptic transillumination; DIFOTI-Digital Imaging Fiberoptic transillumination; and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). In odontology, Laser Doppler Flowmetry (LDF) is a noninvasive real time method used for determining the tooth vitality by monitoring the pulp microcirculation in traumatized teeth, fractured teeth, and teeth undergoing different conservative treatments. In periodontology, recently study shows the ability of LDF to evaluate the health of gingival tissue in periodontal tissue diseases but also after different periodontal treatments.

  15. Prosthodontics an "arsenal" in forensic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathala, Lakshmana Rao; Rachuri, Narendra Kumar; Rayapati, Srinivas Rao; Kondaka, Sudheer

    2016-01-01

    After major disasters such as earthquakes, fires, floods, tsunami, bomb blasts or terrorist attacks, accurate, and early identification of the dead and injured becomes an utmost importance. Restorations, cariesteeth, missingteeth and/or prostheses are most useful aids for the dental identification. At times, only identifiable remains are a victim's partial or complete dentures. The central principle of dental identification is that postmortem dental remains can be compared with antemortem dental records which include, studycasts, radiographs, etc., to confirm the identity of the victims. Marking/labeling dentures have been considered an important aid in forensic dentistry. Other than finger printing, when compared with all the methods, the marking/labeling of dentures is an accurate and rapid method to identify the unknown victims. There are no standardized methods to follow, but dental practitioners needs to maintain some dental records of their patients. This may include documentation of the "marking of dentures." The preparedness is the key to success in mass disaster identification. The aim of this review article is to discuss the methods of denture identification, advantages of denture labeling for the rapid identification during major disasters/accidents and the importance of maintaining the patient records.

  16. An overview of monolithic zirconia in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Malkondu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Zirconia restorations have been used successfully for years in dentistry owing to their biocompatibility and good mechanical properties. Because of their lack of translucency, zirconia cores are generally veneered with porcelain, which makes restorations weaker due to failure of the adhesion between the two materials. In recent years, all-ceramic zirconia restorations have been introduced in the dental sector with the intent to solve this problem. Besides the elimination of chipping, the reduced occlusal space requirement seems to be a clear advantage of monolithic zirconia restorations. However, scientific evidence is needed to recommend this relatively new application for clinical use. This mini-review discusses the current scientific literature on monolithic zirconia restorations. The results of in vitro studies suggested that monolithic zirconia may be the best choice for posterior fixed partial dentures in the presence of high occlusal loads and minimal occlusal restoration space. The results should be supported with much more in vitro and particularly in vivo studies to obtain a final conclusion.

  17. Management of pregnant patient in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurien, Sophia; Kattimani, Vivekanand S; Sriram, Roopa Rani; Sriram, Sanjay Krishna; Rao V K, Prabhakara; Bhupathi, Anitha; Bodduru, Rupa Rani; N Patil, Namrata

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this article is to update general dentists and maxillofacial surgeons in the perioperative management of the pregnant patient. Pregnancy results in physiologic changes in almost all organ systems in the body mediated mainly by hormones; which influences the treatment schedule. Understanding these normal changes is essential for providing quality care for pregnant women. The general principles that apply in this situation are discussed, followed by the relevant physiologic changes and their treatment implications, the risks of various medications to the mother and fetus, the management of concomitant medical problems in the pregnant patient, appropriate timing of oral and maxillofacial surgery during pregnancy, and management of emergencies during pregnancy. Information about the compatibility, complications, and excretion of the common drugs during pregnancy is provided. Guidelines for the management of a pregnant patient in the dental office are summarized. How to cite this article: Kurien S, Kattimani V S, Sriram R, Sriram S K, Prabhakar Rao V K, Bhupathi A, Bodduru R, Patil N N. Management of Pregnant Patient in Dentistry. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(1):88-97.

  18. Minimally invasive dentistry and the dental enterprise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossomando, Edward F

    2007-03-01

    Improvements in understanding the process of remineralization have resulted in a reappraisal of repair of damaged tooth structure and call into question the principles of cavity preparation of GV Black and his principle of "extension for prevention." From this reappraisal has emerged the idea of minimally invasive dentistry (MID). The goal of MID is to remove as little of the sound tooth structure during the restoration phase as possible. This goal is in our reach in part because of availability of products that promote mineralization and of dental excavation instruments, like the dental laser, that can be managed to remove only damaged tooth structure. It is critical that the leaders of the dental enterprise endorse MID. Delay could allow new products to move from the dental profession to other health care providers. For example, a caries vaccine will soon enter the market place. Will dentists expand the scope of their practices to include the application of this vaccine, or will they ignore this new product and allow the new technology to enter the scope of practice of other health providers?

  19. [Equine dentistry: Survey on Swiss horse owners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiesser, E; Geyer, H; Kummer, M; Jackson, M

    2017-08-01

    The interest in equine dentistry has significantly increased in the last 15 years. On the part of the veterinarians as well as of the horse owners there is a strong attention to the topic. The aim of the questionnaire was to investigate amongst horse owners what their level of information and preferences about dental treatment are and how they are implemented. The questionnaire was translated into the three national languages and included 20 questions about level and sources of information, frequency of treatments and the horse owner's stance over sedation of the animals. With a return rate of 45% (1'466 of 3'250 sent questionnaires) significant conclusions could be drawn. Horse owners showed a strong demand for clarification regarding tooth problems, the causes, consequences and methods of treatment. More than half of the owners considered themselves not well informed. The treating person was in 66.7% a veterinarian with a special education. Horse owners indicated that information circulated most frequently by word of mouth recommendations and they explicitly wished information from professional and reliable sources. The questionnaire provided a clear result about current equine dental treatments. We suggest that they should be performed by veterinarians only with a special education.

  20. Ceramics in Restorative and Prosthetic DENTISTRY1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, J. Robert

    1997-08-01

    This review is intended to provide the ceramic engineer with information about the history and current use of ceramics in dentistry, contemporary research topics, and potential research agenda. Background material includes intra-oral design considerations, descriptions of ceramic dental components, and the origin, composition, and microstructure of current dental ceramics. Attention is paid to efforts involving net-shape processing, machining as a forming method, and the analysis of clinical failure. A rationale is presented for the further development of all-ceramic restorative systems. Current research topics receiving attention include microstructure/processing/property relationships, clinical failure mechanisms and in vitro testing, wear damage and wear testing, surface treatments, and microstructural modifications. The status of the field is critically reviewed with an eye toward future work. Significant improvements seem possible in the clinical use of ceramics based on engineering solutions derived from the study of clinically failed restorations, on the incorporation of higher levels of "biomimicry" in new systems, and on the synergistic developments in dental cements and adhesive dentin bonding.

  1. Biocompatibility of polymethylmethacrylate resins used in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Rupali; Singh, Raghuwar D; Sharma, Vinod P; Siddhartha, Ramashanker; Chand, Pooran; Kumar, Rakesh

    2012-07-01

    Biocompatibility or tissue compatibility describes the ability of a material to perform with an appropriate host response when applied as intended. Poly-methylmethacrylate (PMMA) based resins are most widely used resins in dentistry, especially in fabrication of dentures and orthodontic appliances. They are considered cytotoxic on account of leaching of various potential toxic substances, most common being residual monomer. Various in vitro and in vivo experiments and cell based studies conducted on acrylic based resins or their leached components have shown them to have cytotoxic effects. They can cause mucosal irritation and tissue sensitization. These studies are not only important to evaluate the long term clinical effect of these materials, but also help in further development of alternate resins. This article reviews information from scientific full articles, reviews, or abstracts published in dental literature, associated with biocompatibility of PMMA resins and it is leached out components. Published materials were searched in dental literature using general and specialist databases, like the PubMED database.

  2. Corporate Governance, between Classicism and Modernism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Vasile

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Corporate governance represents a complex concept, being an assembly of mechanisms used to set order into company leaders’ decisions. The rules of corporate governance are the ones keeping the score between the economic entity’s leaders and the third parties who invest their resources in the business. The corporate governance issue did not appear by hazard, but it resulted from the necessity to reconcile many business interests within a company (sometimes contradictory issues, especially the ones between the shareholders and the business leaders. The Anglo-Saxon view, in which the business power is given to the Equity items, is traditionally opposing the European (continental vision, where focus is being made on the Stakeholders’ interests. Within a world dominated by globalization issues, and where the financial markets evolve on an exponential curve, the two above mentioned corporate governance models ought to interact one with another in a constructive manner. Even if the corporate governance concept has developed recently, mainly during the last 25 years, its origins are rooted way back into the world history. Corporate governance is organically linked to the capitalist society and economy. After the 11 September attacks, many of the contemporary authors had the tendency to declare this date as the beginning of the XXIst century. If the ‘Twin Towers’ had hosted companies like: Tyco, Enron, Xerox, Wordcom and many other Stock Exchange-quoted businesses, it is likely that the financial crisis from 2000-2002 would have been differently perceived, and corporate governance had developed slightly different evolutionary mechanisms. A scientific article, based on the comparison between the classical and modern corporate governance experiences, would therefore suit the Romanian business environment.

  3. Corporate Governance, between Classicism and Modernism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niculae Feleaga

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Corporate governance represents a complex concept, being an assembly of mechanisms used to set order into company leaders’ decisions. The rules of corporate governance are the ones keeping the score between the economic entity’s leaders and the third parties who invest their resources in the business. The corporate governance issue did not appear by hazard, but it resulted from the necessity to reconcile many business interests within a company (sometimes contradictory issues, especially the ones between the shareholders and the business leaders. The Anglo-Saxon view, in which the business power is given to the Equity items, is traditionally opposing the European (continental vision, where focus is being made on the Stakeholders’ interests. Within a world dominated by globalization issues, and where the financial markets evolve on an exponential curve, the two above mentioned corporate governance models ought to interact one with another in a constructive manner. Even if the corporate governance concept has developed recently, mainly during the last 25 years, its origins are rooted way back into the world history. Corporate governance is organically linked to the capitalist society and economy. After the 11 September attacks, many of the contemporary authors had the tendency to declare this date as the beginning of the XXIst century. If the ‘Twin Towers’ had hosted companies like: Tyco, Enron, Xerox, Wordcom and many other Stock Exchange-quoted businesses, it is likely that the financial crisis from 2000-2002 would have been differently perceived, and corporate governance had developed slightly different evolutionary mechanisms. A scientific article, based on the comparison between the classical and modern corporate governance experiences, would therefore suit the Romanian business environment.

  4. INFORMATION GATHERING, DELEGATED CONTRACTING AND CORPORATE HIERARCHIES

    OpenAIRE

    Chongwoo Choe; In-Uck Park

    2008-01-01

    In a typical corporate hierarchy, the manager is delegated the authority to make strategic decisions, and to contract with other employees. We study when such delegation can be optimal. In centralization, the owner retains the authority, which fails to motivate the manager to acquire valuable information, leading to suboptimal decisions and inefficient incentive provision to the worker. Beneficial delegation should necessarily motivate the manager to acquire information, which is possible onl...

  5. Systematic Review and Quality Appraisal of Economic Evaluation Publications in Dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonmukayakul, U; Calache, H; Clark, R; Wasiak, J; Faggion, C M

    2015-10-01

    Economic evaluation (EE) studies have been undertaken in dentistry since the late 20th century because economic data provide additional information to policy makers to develop guidelines and set future direction for oral health services. The objectives of this study were to assess the methodological quality of EEs in oral health. Electronic searching of Ovid MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, and the NHS Economic Evaluation Database from 1975 to 2013 were undertaken to identify publications that include costs and outcomes in dentistry. Relevant reference lists were also searched for additional studies. Studies were retrieved and reviewed independently for inclusion by 3 authors. Furthermore, to appraise the EE methods, 1 author applied the Drummond 10-item (13-criteria) checklist tool to each study. Of the 114 publications identified, 79 studies were considered full EE and 35 partial. Twenty-eight studies (30%) were published between the years 2011 and 2013. Sixty-four (53%) studies focused on dental caries prevention or treatment. Median appraisal scores calculated for full and partial EE studies were 11 and 9 out of 13, respectively. Quality assessment scores showed that the quality of partial EE studies published after 2000 significantly improved (P = 0.02) compared to those published before 2000. Significant quality improvement was not found in full EE studies. Common methodological limitations were identified: absence of sensitivity analysis, discounting, and insufficient information on how costs and outcomes were measured and valued. EE studies in dentistry increased over the last 40 y in both quantity and quality, but a number of publications failed to satisfy some components of standard EE research methods, such as sensitivity analysis and discounting.

  6. Transnational Corporations in Education: Filling the Governance Gap through New Social Norms and Market Multilateralism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanji, Zahra

    2008-01-01

    This paper explores the rising presence of transnational corporations (TNCs) in education and their mobilisation of global corporate social discourses to legitimise their private authority in education. The rising presence of TNCs is explored in the paper in two parts. First, through a taxonomy of global corporate social engagement (GCSE)…

  7. 77 FR 10506 - Access to Confidential Business Information by Syracuse Research Corporation, Inc., and Its...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ... AGENCY Access to Confidential Business Information by Syracuse Research Corporation, Inc., and Its...: Notice. SUMMARY: EPA has authorized its contractor, Syracuse Research Corporation (SRC), Inc., of North Syracuse, NY, and its identified subcontractor BeakerTree Corporation to access information which has...

  8. Transnational Corporations in Education: Filling the Governance Gap through New Social Norms and Market Multilateralism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanji, Zahra

    2008-01-01

    This paper explores the rising presence of transnational corporations (TNCs) in education and their mobilisation of global corporate social discourses to legitimise their private authority in education. The rising presence of TNCs is explored in the paper in two parts. First, through a taxonomy of global corporate social engagement (GCSE)…

  9. The end of corporate imperialism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prahalad, C K; Lieberthal, Kenneth

    2003-08-01

    As they search for growth, multinational corporations will have no choice but to compete in the big emerging markets of China, India, Indonesia, and Brazil. But while it is still common to question how such corporations will change life in those markets, Western executives would be smart to turn the question around and ask how multinationals themselves will be transformed by these markets. To be successful, MNCs will have to rethink every element of their business models, the authors assert in this seminal HBR article from 1998. During the first wave of market entry in the 1980s, multinationals operated with what might be termed an imperialist mind-set, assuming that the emerging markets would merely be new markets for their old products. But this mind-set limited their success: What is truly big and emerging in countries like China and India is a new consumer base comprising hundreds of millions of people. To tap into this huge opportunity, MNCs need to ask themselves five basic questions: Who is in the emerging middle class in these countries? How do the distribution networks operate? What mix of local and global leadership do you need to foster business opportunities? Should you adopt a consistent strategy for all of your business units within one country? Should you take on local partners? The transformation that multinational corporations must undergo is not cosmetic--simply developing greater sensitivity to local cultures will not do the trick, the authors say. To compete in the big emerging markets, multinationals must reconfigure their resources, rethink their cost structures, redesign their product development processes, and challenge their assumptions about who their top-level managers should be.

  10. New insight in pediatric dentistry: preventive dentistry in allergy management protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seno Pradopo

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available ; "> The relationship between oral health and systemic diseases had been abundantly studied, however, mostly were related to adultsuch as cerebrovascular disease, cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus etc. Nevertheless, it was still uncommon that oral healthalso related to allergic disease. The field of pediatric dentistry is mostly related to preventive dentistry (i.e. prophylactic procedures,preventive orthodontic etc., but rarely related to preventive medicine such allergy prevention in children. Allergic diseases develop outof a close interaction between genetic predisposition and environmental triggers, and progress continuously since infancy regarding tothe allergic march. Concerning to the partially developed immunity in children, children are more susceptible to infection and allergicdiseases than adults. Unfortunately, infection and allergic diseases are interrelated; infection impaired allergy and vice versa. Poororal health is closely related to infection; however, improving oral health is not included in allergy management protocol. In order toanticipate the future, dentist or especially pediatric dentist should be able to review about basic children immunity and oral mucosalimmunity. Additionally, it is essential to explain to the parents and medical practitioners who are not familiar to this new paradigm.The objective of this study is to review articles related to children’s oral health and allergic symptoms. Regarding to the successfuloral management of allergic symptoms, the propensity that improving oral health could be included in children’s allergy managementprotocol is likely.

  11. Corporate Blogging For Dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Karr, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Establish a successful corporate blog to reach your customers. Corporate blogs require careful planning and attention to legal and corporate policies in order for them to be productive and effective. This fun, friendly, and practical guide walks you through using blogging as a first line of communication to customers and explains how to protect your company and employees through privacy, disclosure, and moderation policies. Blogging guru Douglas Karr demonstrates how blogs are an ideal way to offer a conversational and approachable relationship with customers. You'll discover how to prepare, e

  12. Strategic corporate sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grewatsch, Sylvia; Rohrbeck, René; Madsen, Henning

    This paper aims to advance the understanding of the circumstances under which corporate sustainability (CS) pays off. On the basis of a review of 129 major papers from both the sustainability and general management literature, we discuss the development of the research field. In addition we discuss...... antecedents and outcomes. To overcome this limitation we propose an integrated typology which may facilitate more research on the link between corporate sustainability performance (CSP) and corporate financial performance (CFP). Our expectation is that the strategy type might play a moderating or mediating...

  13. Corporate Social Behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Peter; Rahbek Pedersen, Esben

    2003-01-01

    , human rights and environmental protection. Without a common point of reference in national regulation, managers in multinational enterprises now have to develop their own codes of corporate social behaviour. This has created a growing market for private standards within the field of environmental...... management systems, social accountability, corporate citizenship, occupational health and safety and so forth. However, both the idea of government regulation and the literature acclaiming corporate self-regulation should be met with some scepticism. This paper offers a short assessment of the potentials...

  14. Strategic corporate sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grewatsch, Sylvia; Rohrbeck, René; Madsen, Henning

    This paper aims to advance the understanding of the circumstances under which corporate sustainability (CS) pays off. On the basis of a review of 129 major papers from both the sustainability and general management literature, we discuss the development of the research field. In addition we discuss...... antecedents and outcomes. To overcome this limitation we propose an integrated typology which may facilitate more research on the link between corporate sustainability performance (CSP) and corporate financial performance (CFP). Our expectation is that the strategy type might play a moderating or mediating...

  15. CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY – CORPORATE BRANDING RELATIONSHIP: AN EMPIRICAL COMPARATIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bistra VASSILEVA

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Current academic research on the relationship of firms’ CSR activities with corporate branding typically focuses on consumers’ and shareholders’ viewpoints. This research aims to shed light on how organisational members in firms perceive to be the impact of CSR activities upon their corporate brand strategy. Using a survey administered to companies in the U.K. and Bulgaria, the author investigate, firstly, organisational members’ perceptions of the impact of different CSR-related activities upon corporate branding and, secondly, their beliefs about what customers and shareholders think are the impacts of CSR-related activities upon brand image and brand identity. The findings indicated that while organisational members rated quality products, customer service and corporate governance highly as key components of CSR activity, they were much more ambivalent about their companies'commitment to broader actions which involve the 'community' and 'society'. This paper concludes by discussing the implications of the findings for future 'CSR education' among companies.

  16. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home > Advanced Search > Author Details ... Intra‑Operative Airway Management in Patients with Maxillofacial Trauma having Reduction and ... Clinical Parameters and Challenges of Managing Cervicofacial Necrotizing Fasciitis in a ...

  17. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home > Advanced Search > Author Details. Log in or ... Difficult airway management in a patient with giant malignant goitre scheduled for thyroidectomy - case report ... Airway Management Dilemma in a Patient with Maxillofacial Injury

  18. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home > Advanced Search > Author Details ... Sequencing for Batch Production in a Group Flowline Machine Shop ... Sampling Plans for Monitoring Quality Control Process at a Plastic Manufacturing Firm in Nigeria: A Case Study

  19. 78 FR 52982 - Experian, Experian US Headquarters: Corporate Departments (Finance, HRMD, Contracts, Corporate...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-27

    ... Employment and Training Administration Experian, Experian US Headquarters: Corporate Departments (Finance...), Experian, Experian US Headquarters: Corporate Departments (finance, HRMD, Contracts, Corporate Marketing...: Corporate Departments (finance, HRMD, Contracts, Corporate Marketing, Global Corporate Systems, Legal...

  20. Corporate liquidity and firm value: evidence from China’s listed firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Jinmin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The value of liquidity is a promising area for research. This paper analyzes the correlation be-tween corporate liquidity and firm value by using evidence from China’s listed firms. This paper also investigates the relation among corporate liquidity, R&D and firm size. The authors find that firm’s sufficient liquidity can increase its market value. However, corporate liquidity has insignificant effect on firm’s R&D. What’s more, the authors further find that corporate liquidity also has diseconomies of scale. Excess corporate liquidity may ad-versely affect market value of large firms.

  1. Corporate Social Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance

    2007-01-01

    Understanding Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) as having explicit policies and implicit norms situated in cultural systems highlights the connections between institutional and cultural structures of nation states and business' commitment to CSR as reflected in the strategies used to communic...

  2. Corporate Social Responsibility

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Suhaimi Ishak; Mohamad Naimi Mohamad Nor

    2017-01-01

    .... In Malaysia, based on the Malaysian Code on Corporate Governance (MCCG), (2007; 2012) clearly stated the role and responsibility of the board of directors toward the risk management activities...

  3. The corporate security professional

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Karen Lund

    2013-01-01

    In our age of globalization and complex threat environments, every business is called upon to manage security. This tendency is reflected in the fact that a wide range of businesses increasingly think about security in broad terms and strive to translate national security concerns into corporate...... speech. This article argues that the profession of the security manager has become central for understanding how the relationship between national and corporate security is currently negotiated. The national security background of most private sector security managers makes the corporate security...... professional inside the company a powerful hybrid agent. By zooming in on the profession and the practice of national security inside companies, the article raises questions about where to draw the line between corporate security and national security along with the political consequences of the constitution...

  4. Measuring Corporate Sustainability Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugen Nicolăescu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to examine and evaluate the evolving character of sustainability management in corporations, the significance of environmental protection and sustainability, and barriers to carrying out an incorporated and strategic firm-wide advance of social responsibility. In the present paper, we focus on the contribution of sustainability undertakings towards enhancing corporate performance, the financial involvements of sustainability position and operation, and the chief function of values in corporate policy. Our paper contributes to the literature by supplying proof of elements that lead to the triumph of business patterns for sustainable development, processes through which stakeholders are affecting corporate sustainability conduct, and the link between economic growth and the environment.

  5. Corporate Social Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance

    2007-01-01

    Understanding Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) as having explicit policies and implicit norms situated in cultural systems highlights the connections between institutional and cultural structures of nation states and business' commitment to CSR as reflected in the strategies used...

  6. AIDS: today's vital challenge to dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, E O

    1985-01-01

    This article suggests precautions that should be taken if dentists are to treat acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients. Dentists are considered to be at higher risk of contracting AIDS than physicians. AIDS patients often present at dental offices seeking treatment for the oral symptoms sometimes associated with the virus. Identification of patients who may have AIDS is a critical factor in establishing treatment and protective guidelines; however, such identification is hindered by the prolonged incubation period. It is suggested that questions identifying symptoms of AIDS should be added to the Medical-Dental History Form (a sample form is included with the article). If responses to this form raise suspicion that a patient might have AIDS, the patient should be referred to his physician before an oral examination is scheduled. There is good evidence that AIDS patients can be safely treated in the dental office if the following precaustions are observed: 1) faithful use of an updated medical-dental history form with the follow-up measures suggested, 2) limitation to an absolute minimum of any dental operations; and 3) control of splashback. It is reasonable to assume that liquids that come from the mouth contain blood, infected fluids, saliva, sputum, and mucus that can act as carriers for the AIDS virus if they become droplets and/or aerosols and are transmitted to others through the mucuous membranes of the mouth or eyes. The use of face masks, washed-field dentistry, the rubber dam, protective eyeglasses, rubber gloves, disposable needles, autocleavable instruments, and disposable cap and gown is advocated to protect dentists from the AIDS virus.

  7. The application of air abrasion in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandinić Zoran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main objectives of contemporary dentistry is to preserve healthy tooth structure by applying techniques of noninvasive treatment. Air abrasion is a minimally invasive nonmechanical technique of tooth preparation that uses kinetic energy to remove carious tooth structure. A powerful narrow stream of moving aluminum-oxide particles hit the tooth surface and they abrade it without heat, vibration or noise. Variables that affect speed of cutting include air pressure, particle size, powder flow, tip’s size, angle and distance from the tooth. It has been proposed that air abrasion can be used to diagnose early occlusal-surface lesions and treat them with minimal tooth preparation using magnifier. Reported advantages of air abrasion include reduced noise, vibration and sensitivity. Air abrasion cavity preparations have more rounded internal contours than those prepared with straight burs. This may increase the longevity of placed restorations because it reduces the incidence of fractures and a consequence of decreased internal stresses. However, air abrasion cannot be used for all patients, i.e. in cases involving severe dust allergy, asthma, chronic obstructive lung disease, recent extraction or other oral surgery, open wounds, advanced periodontal disease, recent placement of orthodontic appliances and oral abrasions, or subgingival caries removal. Many of these conditions increase the risk of air embolism in the oral soft tissues. Dust control is a challenge, and it necessitates the use of rubber dam, high-volume evacuation, protective masks and safety eyewear for both the patient and the therapist. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 46009

  8. Chemical of darkness (Melatonin: A ray of glow to dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayakumar Ambaldhage

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin (MLT is a neuroendocrine hormone secreted mainly by the pineal gland. Recent studies have shown that it is also synthesized in various other parts of the body including salivary glands. The most significant effects of MLT are because of its potent antioxidant, antiageing, immunomodulatory, shielding and antineoplastic properties. Because of these effects, it might be used therapeutically in dentistry for the potentially malignant disorders, lesions of mechanical, bacterial, fungal or viral origin. It stimulates synthesis of collagen fibers and bone formation, and can be used in postsurgical wounds caused by tooth extractions, periodontal therapies, and dental implants. Thus, it is important for the dental clinicians to be familiar with the possible therapeutic uses of MLT in dentistry. The aim of the present article is to review related articles in the literature that have focused on MLT and its applications in dentistry and to provide a quick sketch of applications of MLT in dentistry for dental clinicians. Our review concludes that the research to date certainly offers valid applications of MLT in dentistry. Meanwhile, practical strategies with the highest success rates are needed for further interventions.

  9. Straightforward Case of Dental Implant in General Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aji P. Tjikman

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dental implant has become a fast developing and dynamic field in dental practice. It is acknowledged as a predictable treatment modality with high clinical success rates. Conventional fixed prostheses are no longer considered to be the first choice of treatment for replacing a missing tooth. Despite the increasing number of patients requesting dental implant treatments, there are only some clinicians who are offering implant therapy in their daily practice. The International team for Implantology described a straightforward case as a simple case such as implant placements in adquate soft and hard tissue conditions and single-tooth restorations in a non-aesthetic zone. A review of the current literature discussed the implementation of implant dentistry in universities worldwide into their curriculum for both undergraduate and postgraduate programs in general dentistry. The European consensus in implant dentistry education concluded that it is desirable to include the surgical technique for implant placement for straightforward cases into the dental curriculum. The levels and limitations to which the various aspects of implant dentistry and related skills are taught to be determined by the academic community. This review aimed at promoting awareness amongst dental practitioners and institutions in Indonesia of the shifting treatment paradigm in the maangement of a missing tooth. Hence clinicians will be able to include implant dentistry in the treatment planning of their patients and also undertake a significant part in the execution of such treatments.

  10. Corporate Governance and Shareholder Litigation

    OpenAIRE

    Kalchev, Georgi

    2009-01-01

    The probability for shareholder litigation is studied and how corporate governance characteristics and other factors explain it. Shareholder litigation results from failure of corporate governance. Thus a better quality of corporate governance is hypothesized to decrease the litigation probability. Corporate governance index is constructed based on principal components. It is found to be a significant predictor of shareholder litigation.

  11. Corporate risk management : an overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterhof, Casper M.

    2001-01-01

    Corporate risk management and hedging are important activities within financial as well as non-financial corporations. Under the assumptions of Modigliani and Miller [1958], corporate risk management is a redundant activity. However, the existence of market imperfections can explain the corporate us

  12. Corporate Governance Country Assessment : Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2005-01-01

    This report assesses Brazil's corporate governance policy framework. It highlights recent improvements in corporate governance regulation, makes policy recommendations, and provides investors with a benchmark against which to measure corporate governance in Brazil. It is an update of the 2005 corporate governance Report on the Observance of Standards and Codes (ROSC). Brazil's experience o...

  13. Tax planning in corporation

    OpenAIRE

    Nevodnicheva, Yulia

    2010-01-01

    This thesis "Tax planning in corporation" puts brain to legal entity income tax and it is looking for possible solutions in tax planning in corporation. The first part deals with the tax theory, the other part is the theory of tax planning, comparison of tax regimes and tax policy and tax revenue by optimizing both internationally and in the local aspect. The last part discusses options for optimizing tax

  14. Corporate Risk Disclosure and Corporate Governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaouthar Lajili

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available To date, research which integrates corporate governance and risk management has been limited. Yet, risk exposure and management are increasingly becoming the core function of modern business enterprises in various sectors and industries domestically and globally. Risk identification and management are crucial in any business strategy design and implementation. From the investors’ point of view, knowledge of the risk profile, risk appetite and risk management are key elements in making sound portfolio investment decisions. This paper examines the relationships between corporate governance mechanisms and risk disclosure behavior using a sample of Canadian publicly-traded companies (TSX 230. Results show that Canadian public companies are more likely to disclose risk management information over and above the mandatory risk disclosures, if they are larger in size and if their boards of directors have more independent members. Minority voting control ownership structures appear to negatively impact risk disclosure and CEO incentive compensation shows mixed results. The paper concludes that more research is needed to further assess the impact of various governance mechanisms on corporate risk management and disclosure behavior.

  15. Innovation activity of corporations in emerging economies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soboleva Ekaterina N.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers macro parameters of corporation innovation activity in the BRICS countries. The authors determine transnational corporation behavior strategies in the context of creating and transferring new knowledge, where developed countries (the USA, European countries and Japan play an important role and take a leading position in this process. Companies from emerging economies focus on using and adopting innovations. The reason for this is that knowledge “is coded” specifically, consequently the participants of its exchange have to be in similar intellectual space. Nevertheless, the market-leading corporations from the BRICS countries join the world chains of innovation creation, building their networks to satisfy their branches needs concerning technological decisions and personnel training

  16. Use of images for human identification in forensic dentistry; A utilizacao de imagens na identificacao humana em odontologia legal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Suzana Papile Maciel; Lopes-Junior, Cesar [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Bauru, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia], e-mail: sumaciel@uol.com.br; Silva, Ricardo Henrique Alves da [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia; Peres, Arsenio Sales [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Bauru, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia. Dept. de Saude Coletiva

    2009-03-15

    The present systematic review article is aimed at describing radiological methods utilized for human identification in forensic dentistry. For this purpose, a literature review was undertaken, and out of 45 papers, 19 were selected in accordance with inclusion criteria. Several radiological techniques can be used to assist in both individual and general identification, including determination of gender, ethnic group and, mainly, age. The analysis of ante-mortem and post-mortem radiographic and tomographic images has become an essential tool for human identification in forensic dentistry, particularly with the refinement of techniques resulting from developments in the field of the radiology itself as well as the incorporation of information technology resources to the technique. It can be concluded that, based on an appropriate knowledge on the available methods, forensic dentists can choose the best method to achieve a successful identification with a careful application of the technique and accurate interpretation of data. (author)

  17. Author Guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    Istadi Istadi

    2011-01-01

    AUTHOR GUIDELINES Indian Journal of Community Health (IJCH) accepts only online submission of manuscript(s) by using Open Journal software (OJS) at http://www.iapsmupuk.org/journal/index.php/IJCH/login Online SubmissionsAlready have a Username/Password for Indian Journal of Community Health (IJCH)? GO TO LOGINNeed a Username/Password?GO TO REGISTRATIONNote: Registration and login are required to submit items online and to track the status of current submissions.Author GuidelinesIJCH strictly ...

  18. 78 FR 26053 - Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-03

    ... Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a) (2) of the Federal... Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry (ACTPCMD). Dates and Times: May 20, 2013...

  19. 78 FR 48440 - Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ... Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry (ACTPCMD). Date and Time: August 29, 2013,...

  20. Black triangle dilemma and its management in esthetic dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vijendra P; Uppoor, Ashita S; Nayak, Dilip G; Shah, Dipen

    2013-05-01

    In recent years, clinician and dentist's esthetic demand in dentistry have increased rapidly, driven by an enhanced awareness of beauty and esthetics. The ultimate goal in modern restorative dentistry is to achieve "white" and "pink" esthetics in esthetically important zones. "White esthetics" is the natural dentition or the restoration of dental hard tissues with suitable materials. "Pink esthetics" refers to the surrounding soft-tissues, which includes the interdental papilla and gingiva that can enhance or diminish the esthetic result. Reconstruction of the lost interdental papilla is one of the most challenging and least predictable problems. Restoration and maintenance of these tissues with adequate surgical and prosthetic techniques are a real challenge in modern esthetic dentistry. Treatment of marginal tissue recession, excessive gingival display, deficient ridges, ridge collapse, and esthetic defects around teeth and implants are some of the esthetic problems associated with the interdental papilla that have to be corrected in todays scenario which has been discussed in this review.

  1. Identification of special competences for Master degree in dentistry: draft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulbashna Ya.A.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the problem of identifying specific com­petencies of Master in dentistry. The results of the analysis of domestic and foreign scientific literature, legal documents regulating the implementation of competence-based approach in higher medical education is presented, international experience in the modernization of higher education, including medical, on the basis of changes in the educational paradigm on competence approach is studied. In the process of identifying set of special competences of Master of dentistry, the main ideas of the existing professional Standards in Dentistry were used. A worked out set of special competences reflects peculiarities of the profession in accordance with the algorithm, aimed to help dental patient in a vicious circle from disease prevention to rehabilitation after diseases, the latter includes legal, methodical, social and managerial aspects of the professional activities of a dentist.

  2. Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) in dentistry- A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasat, Vikrant; Gupta, Aditi; Ladda, Ruchi; Kathariya, Mitesh; Saluja, Harish; Farooqui, Anjum-Ara

    2014-12-01

    Transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS) is a non-pharmacological method which is widely used by medical and paramedical professionals for the management of acute and chronic pain in a variety of conditions. Similarly, it can be utilized for the management of pain during various dental procedures as well as pain due to various conditions affecting maxillofacial region. This review aims to provide an insight into clinical research evidence available for the analgesic and non analgesic uses of TENS in pediatric as well as adult patients related to the field of dentistry. Also, an attempt is made to briefly discuss history of therapeutic electricity, mechanism of action of TENS, components of TENs equipment, types, techniques of administration, advantages and contradictions of TENS. With this we hope to raise awareness among dental fraternity regarding its dental applications thereby increasing its use in dentistry. Key words:Dentistry, pain, TENS.

  3. A clinician's perspective on evidence-based dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Edward M

    2010-01-01

    Evidence-based dentistry seems to be more popular with researchers and those in policy positions than with clinicians. A private practitioner looks at the difference between the promise of evidence-based dentistry, which urges a blend of science, clinical judgment, and patient preferences, and the actuality of the rhetoric of rigorous and formulaic clinical trials. The same dichotomy exists in medicine, where the concept originated. Without subscribing to the formality of evidence-based dentistry, practitioners can place a valid scientific foundation under their practices by avoiding unproven assumptions, carefully monitoring outcomes, using measures that are clinically relevant, relating both positive and negative outcomes to possible explanations, and cautiously introducing new techniques. The standards for publishing clinical research seem to favor adherence to methodological rules over useful of outcomes.

  4. Evidence-based dentistry: fundamentals for the dentist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Janet; Chiappelli, Francesco; Spackman, Sue; Prolo, Paolo; Stevenson, Richard

    2006-06-01

    This article explains the fundamentals of evidence-based dentistry for the dentist. Evidence-based dentistry is a discipline whose primary participant is the translational researcher. Recent developments have emphasized the importance of this discipline (clinical and translational research) for improving health care. The process of evidence-based dentistry is the reciprocation of new and existing evidence between dentists and quantitative and qualitative researchers, facilitated by the translational researcher. The product of this reciprocation is the clinical practice guideline, or best evidence, that provides the patient options in choosing treatments or services. These options are quantified and qualified by decision, utility, and cost data. Using shared decision-making, the dentist and patient arrive at a mutual understanding of which option best meets an acceptable and preferred treatment course that is cost effective. This option becomes the clinical decision.

  5. Techniques to administer oral, inhalational, and IV sedation in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Krystyna Harbuz

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Sedation in dentistry is a controversial topic given the variety of opinions regarding its safe practice. Aims This article evaluates the various techniques used to administer sedation in dentistry and specific methods practiced to form a recommendation for clinicians. Methods An extensive literature search was performed using PubMed, Medline, Google Scholar, Google, and local library resources. Results Most of the literature revealed a consensus that light sedation on low-risk American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA groups, that is ASA I, and possibly II, is the safest method for sedation in a dental outpatient setting. Conclusion Formal training is essential to achieve the safe practice of sedation in dentistry or medicine. The appropriate setting for sedation should be determined as there is an increased risk outside the hospital setting. Patients should be adequately assessed and medication titrated appropriately, based on individual requirements.

  6. Nanotechnology in Dentistry: Clinical Applications, Benefits, and Hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashirekha, Govind; Jena, Amit; Mohapatra, Satyajit

    2017-05-01

    Nanotechnology is emerging as an interdisciplinary field that is undergoing rapid development and has brought about enormous changes in medicine and dentistry. Nanomaterial-based design is able to mimic some of the mechanical and structural properties of native tissue and can promote biointegration. Nanotechnology has various applications in dentistry, including dentition renaturalization, therapy for dentin hypersensitivity, complete orthodontic realignment in a single visit, covalently bonding diamondized enamel, enhancing properties of root canal sealers, and continuous oral health maintenance using mechanical dentifrobots. A range of synthetic nanoparticles such as hydroxyapatite, bioglass, titanium, zirconia, and silver nanoparticles are proposed for dental restoration. This review focuses on the developments in the field of nanomaterials in dentistry in the form of tissue regeneration materials, implantable devices, nanocomposites, endodontic sealers etc. and issues of patient safety.

  7. The use of bay leaf (Eugenia polyantha Wight in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Sumono

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bay leaf or Eugenia polyantha Wight is a species that has several chemical properties. Bay leaf consists of tanine, flavonoid, essensial oil, including citric acid and eugenol. However, only few reports were published about the use of bay leaf in dentistry. Purpose: The aim of this article is to describe the chemical properties of Eugenia polyantha Wight that are widely used in dentistry. Reviews: The chemical properties of Eugenia polyantha Wight have analgesic, antibacterial, and anti-inflammatory effect, so they can be used as an alternative dental therapy. These properties can be used as a basic of therapy or as a basic ingredients of treatment. Conclusion: Eugenia polyantha Wight has some useful pharmacologic activities that are useful in dentistry. We suggest this article can be used as a basic knowledge for dental researchers.

  8. Public dentistry, which direction? The Italian anomaly and its new perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Reali

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Italian National Health Service (INHS provides hospital, district and preventive cares in many medical areas but dental cares are a small part of all treatments provided. It is estimated that it only answers a 5% of need. In Italy dental treatments are predominantly provided by private practitioners: it means little access equity to cares. Nowadays, just 1,5% of the INHS expense is aimed at public dentistry because most of dental cares are believed “not urgent”. Why oral diseases are not considered so invalidating to have relief in INHS? They should get the same attention of the other pathologies because they worsen the quality of life in term of physical and psychological health. Need of public dentistry performances has recently increased, as confirmed by larger and larger waiting lists: it has revealed the growing dental need of the weakest part of the Italian society that, because of economic, social, cultural reasons, can hardly afford private cares (private practitioners are now facing a crisis, too. Dentists’ ethical code is not essentially different from physicians’ one even if most of the oral pathology is not worrying about patients’ life. “Bioethics in Dentistry” (2005, an issue by the National Bioethics Committee says: “public dentistry is actually absent in helping the weak part of the society. Just consider that in Italy oral cares are not included in Essential Care Levels (ECL and they are not provided by Local Health Authorities whereas requirements to State exams include minimum tooth number and good oral health, because of the high importance of oral wellness.

  9. Rubber dam use during routine operative dentistry procedures: findings from the dental PBRN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Gregg H; Litaker, Mark S; Pihlstrom, Daniel J; Amundson, Craig W; Gordan, Valeria V

    2013-04-01

    Rubber dam use during operative dentistry procedures has been quantified based on questionnaires completed by dentists. However, based on the knowledge of the authors of the current study, there are no reports based on use during actual clinical procedures other than in dental materials studies and none based on routine care. The objectives of the current study were to: 1) quantify how commonly the rubber dam is used during operative dentistry procedures; 2) test the hypothesis that certain dentist, restoration and patient-level factors are associated with its use. A total of 229 dentist practitioner-investigators in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) participated. DPBRN comprises 5 regions: Alabama/Mississippi, Florida/Georgia, Minnesota, Permanente Dental Associates; and Scandinavia. Practitioner-investigators collected data on 9,890 consecutive restorations done in previously unrestored tooth surfaces from 5,810 patients. Most dentists (63%) did not use a rubber dam for any restoration in this study. A rubber dam was used for only 12% of restorations, 83% of which were used in 1 DPBRN region. With regions accounted for, no other dentist characteristics were significant. A multi-level multiple logistic regression of rubber dam use was done with restoration and patient-level variables modeled simultaneously. In this multi-variable context, these restoration-level characteristics were statistically significant: tooth-arch type, restoration classification and reason for placing the restoration. These patient-level characteristics were statistically significant: ethnicity, dental insurance, and age. These results, obtained fromactual clinical procedures rather than questionnaires, document a low prevalence of usage of the rubber dam during operative dentistry procedures. Usage varied with certain dentist, restoration, and patient level characteristics.

  10. Rubber dam use during routine operative dentistry procedures: findings from the Dental PBRN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Gregg H; Litaker, Mark S; Pihlstrom, Daniel J; Amundson, Craig W; Gordan, Valeria V

    2010-01-01

    Rubber dam use during operative dentistry procedures has been quantified based on questionnaires completed by dentists. However, based on the knowledge of the authors of the current study, there are no reports based on use during actual clinical procedures other than in dental materials studies and none based on routine care. The objectives of the current study were to: 1) quantify how commonly the rubber dam is used during operative dentistry procedures; 2) test the hypothesis that certain dentist, restoration and patient-level factors are associated with its use. A total of 229 dentist practitioner-investigators in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) participated. DPBRN comprises five regions of the USA: Alabama/Mississippi, Florida/Georgia, Minnesota, Permanente Dental Associates and Scandinavia. Practitioner-investigators collected data on 9,890 consecutive restorations done in previously unrestored tooth surfaces from 5,810 patients. Most dentists (63%) did not use a rubber dam for any restoration in this study. A rubber dam was used for only 12% of restorations, 83% of which were used in one DPBRN region. With regions accounted for, no other dentist characteristics were significant. A multi-level multiple logistic regression of rubber dam use was done with restoration and patient-level variables modeled simultaneously. In this multi-variable context, these restoration-level characteristics were statistically significant: tooth-arch type, restoration classification and reason for placing the restoration. These patient-level characteristics were statistically significant: ethnicity, dental insurance and age. These results, obtained from actual clinical procedures rather than questionnaires, document a low prevalence of usage of the rubber dam during operative dentistry procedures. Usage varied with certain dentist, restoration and patient-level characteristics.

  11. Green dentistry: the art and science of sustainable practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulimani, P

    2017-06-23

    Dentistry is highly energy and resource intensive with significant environmental impact. Factors inherent in the profession such as enormous electricity demands of electronic dental equipment, voluminous water requirements, environmental effects of biomaterials (before, during and after clinical use), the use of radiation and the generation of hazardous waste involving mercury, lead etc have contributed towards this. With rising temperatures across the world due to global warming, efforts are being made worldwide to mitigate the effects of environmental damage by resorting to sustainability concepts and green solutions in a myriad of ways. In such a scenario, a professional obligation and social responsibility of dentists makes it imperative to transform the practice of dentistry from a hazardous to a sustainable one, by adopting environmental-friendly measures or 'green dentistry'. The NHS in the UK has been proactive in implementing sustainability in healthcare by setting targets, developing guidance papers, initiating steering groups to develop measures and implementing actions through its Sustainable Development Unit (SDU). Such sustainable frameworks, specific to dentistry, are not yet available and even the scientific literature is devoid of studies in this field although anecdotal narratives abound. Hence this paper attempts to present a comprehensive evaluation of the existing healthcare sustainability principles, for their parallel application in the field of dentistry and lays out a blueprint for integrating the two main underlying principles of sustainability - resource use efficiency and eliminating or minimising pollution - in the day-to-day practice. The article also highlights the importance of social values, community care, engaging stakeholders, economic benefits, developing policy and providing leadership in converting the concept of green dentistry into a practised reality.

  12. Corporate imagination and expeditionary marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, G; Prahalad, C K

    1991-01-01

    In the 1980s, competitive success came mostly from achieving cost and quality advantages over rivals in existing markets. In the 1990s, it will come from building and dominating fundamentally new markets. Core competencies are one prerequisite for creating new markets. Corporate imagination and expeditionary marketing are the keys that unlock them. McKinsey Award winners Gary Hamel and C.K. Prahalad argue that corporate imagination quickens when companies escape the tyranny of their served markets. (Motorola, for example, sees itself as a leader in wireless communications, not just as a maker of beepers and mobile phones). Think about needs and functionalities instead of marketing's more conventional customer-product grid. Overturn traditional price/performance assumptions. (Fidelity Investments unlocked a vast new market by packaging sophisticated investment vehicles for middle-income investors.) And lead customers rather than simply follow them. Creating new markets is a risky business, however--a lot like shooting arrows into the mist. Imaginative companies minimize the risk not by being fast followers but through the process the authors call expeditionary marketing: low-cost, fast-paced market incursions designed to bring the target quickly into view. Toshiba introduced laptop computers to the market at such a blistering pace that it could explore every conceivable niche--and afford an occasional failure without compromising its credibility with customers. To stimulate corporate imagination, top management needs to redefine failure and develop new time- and risk-adjusted yardsticks for managerial performance. Managers must be encouraged to stretch their company's opportunity horizon well beyond the boundaries of its current businesses.

  13. Local anesthetics: dentistry's most important drugs, clinical update 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamed, Stanley F

    2006-12-01

    Local anesthetics are the safest most effective drugs in medicine for the control and management of pain. They also represent the most important drugs in dentistry. Today, dentistry has a spectrum of local anesthetics that permit pain control to be tailored to the specific needs of the patient: short-, intermediate-, and long-acting drugs. Bupivacaine has become a standard part of the armamentarium for postsurgical pain control while articaine has become the second-most used local anesthetic in the United States since its introduction in 2000. Despite an increase in anecdotal reports of paresthesia since articaine's introduction there is yet, no supporting scientific evidence.

  14. Biologic width and its importance in periodontal and restorative dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babitha Nugala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An adequate understanding of the relationship between periodontal tissues and restorative dentistry is paramount to ensure adequate form, function, esthetics and comfort of the dentition. While most clinicians are aware of this important relationship, uncertainty remains regarding specific concepts such as biologic width, its maintenance and applications of crown lengthening in cases of biologic width violation. Relevant publications regarding biologic width, its violation and management were identified up to August 2011 using manual and electronic database search in Medline, Embase, Directory of Open Access Journals and Google Scholar. This review discusses the concept of biologic width around tooth and its relationship to periodontal health and restorative dentistry.

  15. Ozone- A Biological Therapy in Dentistry- Reality or Myth?????

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Saraswathi V; K, Rajeshwari; Kohli, Shivani; Zohabhasan, Sayyad; Bhatia, Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    The usage of ozone in dentistry has been proposed because of its antimicrobial, disinfectant, biocompatibility and healing properties. In the last decade a number of therapeutic protocols with ozone have been developed to address common dental infections associated with periodontal disease, RCT and caries. Despite these advantages, therapeutic ozone's application in dentistry is limited because of its possible side effects. Hence, dental practitioners need to know the proper usage of ozone therapy that can provide better patient care and considerably cut down the time and cost of the treatment.

  16. The use of information and communication technology (ICT) in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, N J

    2013-02-01

    As the use of information and communication technology (ICT) becomes more widespread in dentistry the risk of breaching electronic commerce laws and patient confidentiality increases. It is necessary to be aware of the responsibilities internet usage entails, especially within a dental practice where the protection of patient information is of the utmost importance. More should be done to outline the various precautions that should be taken to ensure ICT security within the professional domain, as it would appear dentistry has been neglected with regard to receiving the proper ICT education, training and support systems.

  17. The use of CAD/CAM in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidowitz, Gary; Kotick, Philip G

    2011-07-01

    Computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM) have become an increasingly popular part of dentistry over the past 25 years. The technology, which is used in both the dental laboratory and the dental office, can be applied to inlays, onlays, veneers, crowns, fixed partial dentures, implant abutments, and even full-mouth reconstruction. This article discusses the history of CAD/CAM in dentistry and gives an overview of how it works. It also provides information on the advantages and disadvantages, describes the main products available, discusses how to incorporate the new technology into your practice, and addresses future applications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Stem cells: A potential regenerative future in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumit Narang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the field of dentistry has embossed its presence by taking major leaps in research and further bringing it into practice. The most valuable ongoing research in regenerative dentistry is the study on stem cells. It was instituted that stem cells grow rapidly and have the potential to form specialized dentin, bone, and neuronal cells. These neuronal cells can be used for dental therapies and can provide better treatment options for patients. The stem cells based therapies could help in new advances in treating damaged teeth, inducing bone regeneration and treating neural injury as well.

  19. The role of virtual articulator in prosthetic and restorative dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koralakunte, Pavankumar Ravi; Aljanakh, Mohammad

    2014-07-01

    Virtual reality is a computer based technology linked with the future of dentistry and dental practice. The virtual articulator is one such application in prosthetic and restorative dentistry based on virtual reality that will significantly reduce the limitations of the mechanical articulator, and by simulation of real patient data, allow analyses with regard to static and dynamic occlusion as well as to jaw relation. It is the purpose of this article to present the concepts and strategies for a future replacement of the mechanical articulator by a virtual one. Also, a brief note on virtual reality haptic system has been highlighted along with newly developed touch enabled virtual articulator.

  20. Nonsurgical facelifts via cosmetic dentistry: fact or fiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, J K

    1997-01-01

    The role that cosmetic dentistry can play in improving one's overall facial esthetics has become increasingly more meaningful to patients, dentists, and physicians as elective cosmetic procedures continue to gain momentum and acceptance in today's Western culture. By incorporating fundamental principals of proper smile design into a total esthetic facial enhancement treatment plan, dramatic improvements may be realized. As cosmetic dentists, maxillofacial surgeons, and orthodontists continue to make successful strides with their physician counterparts, they must continue to emphasize the key role that the smile commands. Although a review of current literature discloses few references to the specific topic of facial enhancements through cosmetic dentistry, it is nonetheless a topic for further discussion.

  1. Icons of dentistry: Dr Leon Eisenbud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranin, A Norman

    2006-01-01

    Dentistry has a long, often well documented history. Evidence of tooth pullings has been discovered in crude carvings on the walls of caves that are over 10,000 years old. The ancient Egyptians, the Athenians, and the early inhabitants of Rome required oral health care; in addition to tooth extractions, they underwent tumor removal, tamponade for hemorrhage, reduction of jaw fractures with gold wire ligatures, cautery using white hot platinum loops, and an additional variety of remedies and nostrums. Pain relief was offered, with courses of treatment as varied as postural change, alteration of ambient temperature, and vegetable and organic medicines in poultices or via oral and rectal routes. Through the centuries, great surgeons and physicians introduced various methods of treatment: Hippocrates codified ethical standards; Maimonides established pragmatic rules for physicians; LeFort categorized facial fractures; Pasteur clarified the need for sterilization; Semmelweis standardized antiseptic conditions in the operating theater; Morton and Wells discovered safer methods of analgesia; Freud explored the theraupeutic uses of narcotics; Roentgen championed X-ray imaging; Curie pioneered the use of chemotherapy; and Barton and Nightingale were models of empathy and patient care. In more recent times, we have profited from the genius of Watson and Crick (DNA); Fleming (penicillin); Venable and Stuck (Chrome-cobalt--molybdenum alloy); Gershkoff and Goldberg (the subperiosteal implant); Chercheve, Branemark, Linkow, Misch, Tatum, and Niznick (innovative root forms, titanium and its alloys, and sinus floor grafting). The 20th century has brought to us phenomenal imaging, breathtaking intrauterine fetal surgery, wildly promising stem cell research, and astonishing CADCAM techniques. We've had great teachers and clinicians who have introduced us to new forms of therapy and advanced methods, including the role of the hemidesmasomes, the essential elements of bone grafting

  2. Defining and Assessing Knowledge and Skill Outcomes in Undergraduate Pediatric Dentistry Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanes, Carole M.

    1990-01-01

    Methods of assessing the general goals for the Pediatric Dentistry Department at the Medical College of Georgia School of Dentistry are discussed. Goals are: (1) to prepare dentists to provide comprehensive dental care for the pediatric patient; (2) to create positive attitudes toward pediatric dentistry; (3) to encourage students to seek to…

  3. 76 FR 30951 - Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-27

    ... Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry (ACTPCMD). Date and Time: June 13, 2011, 1 p.m... Secretary, Division of Medicine and Dentistry, Bureau of Health Professions, Health Resources and...

  4. 77 FR 42513 - Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-19

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York... of Dentistry has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian... the human remains may contact the New York University College of Dentistry. Disposition of the...

  5. 77 FR 42507 - Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-19

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York... of Dentistry has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian... the human remains may contact the New York University College of Dentistry. Disposition of the...

  6. 77 FR 64116 - Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-18

    ... Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry (ACTPCMD). Date and Time: November 1, 2012, 10... Jerilyn K. Glass, M.D., Ph.D., Division of Medicine and Dentistry, Bureau of Health Professions,...

  7. 75 FR 36110 - Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-24

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York... Dentistry, New York, NY. The human remains were removed from Broward and Levy Counties, FL, and an unknown... assessment of the human remains was made by the New York University College of Dentistry professional...

  8. 75 FR 14446 - Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-25

    ... Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... Committee on Training in Primary CareMedicine and Dentistry (ACTPCMD). Date and Time: April 22, 2010, 8 a.m... of Health Professions, Division of Medicine and Dentistry. In the plenary session, the...

  9. 77 FR 9664 - Funds for Leadership Training in Pediatric Dentistry's Current Grantees; One-Year Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-17

    ... Dentistry's Current Grantees; One-Year Extension AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA... Pediatric Dentistry's (T17) Current Grantees. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration... Pediatric Dentistry awards to Columbia University, The Regents of the University of California and...

  10. 76 FR 64952 - Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-19

    ... Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... Committee on Training in Primary Care, Medicine and Dentistry . Dates and Times: November 7, 2011, 8:30 a.m.... Purpose: The Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry (``Advisory...

  11. 75 FR 64318 - Advisory Committee on Training in Primary Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-19

    ... Care Medicine and Dentistry; Notice of Meeting In accordance with section 10(a)(2) of the Federal... Committee on Training in Primary Care, Medicine and Dentistry (ACTPCMD). Date and Time: November 15, 2010, 8... Secretary, Division of Medicine and Dentistry, Bureau of Health Professions, Health Resources and...

  12. 75 FR 33327 - Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York... Dentistry, New York, NY. The human remains were removed from the Allred Bluff and Salts Bluff Rockshelters... assessment of the human remains was made by the New York University College of Dentistry professional...

  13. 77 FR 42508 - Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-19

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York... of Dentistry has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation with the appropriate Indian... the human remains may contact the New York University College of Dentistry. Repatriation of the...

  14. 75 FR 33329 - Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York... Dentistry, New York, NY. The human remains were removed from Lovelock Cave, Churchill County, NV. This... remains was made by the New York University College of Dentistry professional staff in consultation...

  15. 75 FR 52021 - Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-24

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: New York University College of Dentistry, New York... of an inventory of human remains in the possession of the New York University College of Dentistry... made by New York University College of Dentistry professional staff in consultation...

  16. APL: a corporate strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, J; Nyatanga, L; Ringer, C; Greaves, J

    1992-06-01

    This paper is based on, and summarises, papers read at the second annual international conference of Nurse Education Tomorrow held at the University of Durham (UK) September 1991. To this end this paper will offer: Some Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL) definition and process as reflected in the literature available. A distinction will be made between APL and Accreditation of Prior Experiential Learning (APEL) although the procedures and processes for assessing them will be shown to be the same. A brief outline of corporate strategy, as it applies to APL, will be given to form the basis for logical demonstration of how Derbyshire Institute of Health and Community Studies has employed such a corporate strategy. Insights developed and gained from APL research currently being undertaken through the college of nursing and midwifery will be used to inform the development and nature of corporate strategy. A flowchart of the operationalisation of the corporate strategy is offered as an integrative summary of how all the APL ideas have had a positive cumulative effect. The paper finishes by highlighting the possible strengths and limitations of APL corporate strategy.

  17. Methodical support of assessment of enterprise corporate culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. Ovcharenko

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article. The article summarizes the existing theoretical approaches to the assessment of corporate culture of enterprise and defined the benefits and shortcomings of existing assessment methods.The results of the analysis. In particular, the present methods of such complex phenomena as organization's culture are conventionally divided into three groups: holistic scholar is deeply immersed in the culture of the organization and acts as communication observer; metaphorical the researcher uses language samples of documents, reports that there are stories and conversations that help to identify the fingerprints of culture, quantitative the researcher evaluates many points of view for evaluating the attributes of organization's culture.The authors concluded that it is important to develop methodology based on empirical evidence obtained as a result of a combination of both quantitative and holistic techniques for a comprehensive assessment of corporate culture. It will maximize the assessment of corporate culture. Thorough analysis of existing scientific research and theoretical developments of the mentioned problems the authors revealed the absence of adequate methodological approaches to quantify the level of corporate culture in the company.When calculating the integral indicator of corporate culture LCC Level of corporate culture, the authors performed a mathematical formalization assessment of corporate culture, the algorithm of calculation which includes seven stages.Hierarchical three-level structure of corporate culture was developed for assessing the corporate culture of the company. The limits of each criterion were determined. For identifying the relationship of each qualitative assessment of the value of the i-th parameter with the appropriate level of corporate culture (low, medium, high, high authors used the method of analysis T.Saaty. Formula for calculating the integral index, defined by the range and quality level of

  18. The need for leadership and vision in dentistry. A personal view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Vernon P

    2008-07-01

    This paper considers how dentistry has developed in the United Kingdom (UK) over the last 60 years and concludes that dentists have failed to be proactive and to shape the systems for the delivery of an optimal level of care to the population. It suggests that there is a need for far better leadership and for dentists, as individuals and as a profession, to rediscover the sense of vision that they once had and to shape their destinies, rather than accepting the current situation. The author goes on to explain how this might be done. Since the inception of the National Health Service (NHS), the dental profession in the UK has, to a large extent, been dominated by the politics of the NHS, by changing fee structures and contracts, by reports from the Review Body on Doctors' and Dentists' Remuneration (DDRB), and by strategies adopted by successive governments, especially during the last two decades. These strategies have resulted in cohorts of disillusioned dental practitioners reducing their commitment to, or opting out of, NHS contracts and committing themselves, to a greater or lesser extent, to private practice. It is now over three years since, for the first time, the proportion of dentistry provided under private contact in the UK, as measured by gross fees, exceeded that provided under NHS contract. The profession has shown a remarkable lack of imagination in organising itself to provide the best kind of care for patients. Instead of being proactive and visionary, it has allowed itself to become a political football. This has led to the progressive deskilling of many practitioners, and a manifest failure to secure the long-term oral health of patients. This paper considers how the situation could be improved and looks at four aspects, which are: 1. 21st century dentistry: state of the art versus reality? The contrast between what is clinically possible and what the profession currently delivers. 2. What are we here for? The need for a new vision for dentistry

  19. AUTHOR GUIDELINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chief Editor

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available AUTHOR GUIDELINESIndian Journal of Community Health (IJCH accepts only online submission of manuscript(s by using Open Journal software (OJS at http://www.iapsmupuk.org/journal/index.php/IJCH/loginOnline SubmissionsAlready have a Username/Password for Indian Journal of Community Health (IJCH? GO TO LOGINNeed a Username/Password?GO TO REGISTRATIONNote: Registration and login are required to submit items online and to track the status of current submissions.Author GuidelinesIJCH strictly adheres on the recommendations for the Conduct, Reporting, Editing and Publication of Scholarly Work in Medical Journals as per the standard universal guidelines given by International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE - Recommendations for Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts. Authors are requested to visit http://www.icmje.org/index.html before making online submission of their manuscript(s.SectionsEditorial:On issues of current public health needAbout 1000 – 1200 wordsReferences: 5 – 10 (PubMed - Citation preferredInvited Commentary:Brief, provocative, opinionated communicationsOn issues of current public health needMain Text: 750-1000 words excluding referencesReferences: 5 – 10 (PubMed - Citation preferredOriginal Article:Articles from Original ResearchStructured abstract: 250 wordsMain Text: 2500 - 3000 words, IMRD formatKey Words: 5 - 8References: 20 – 25 (PubMed - Citation preferredTables / Figures: 3 – 4*Certificate of clearance from respective Institutional Ethical Committee (IECReview Article:On subject of public health relevanceAbstract: 250 wordsMain Text: 2500 - 3000 wordsKey Words: 3 - 4References: 20 – 25 (PubMed - Citation preferredTables / Figures: 3 – 4Short Communication / Article:Short report of a research project / outbreakMain Text : 1000 – 1200 wordsReferences: 10 – 15 (PubMed - Citation preferredTable / Figure: 01*Certificate of clearance from respective Institutional Ethical Committee (IECReport from the field

  20. Re-Attitude of Biochemistry Laboratory Course Contents in Medical, Dentistry and Para-Medical Faculties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durdi Qujeq

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Regarding to development of basic science and new methods in biochemistry in recent years, practical biochemistry contents should be optimized (1. Therefore, re-attitude biochemistry course contents in medical schools has paralleled worldwide trends a moved from current status is needed (2, 3. As reported by investi-gators many medical schools around the world have reformed their medical curriculum in recent years (2. Many authors are convinced that students learn more effectively if the knowledge and skills they acquire are inserted and contextualized in relevant real-life, problem based situations (3. Previous studies demonstrated that biochemistry course content is now incorporated into the clinical beneficial, therefore the evolution of students in many countries has occurred (4. In this respect, the purpose of the current study was to evaluate biochemistry laboratory course contents in medical, dentistry and Para-medicine faculties from view points of the students. This descriptive study was per-formed in years 2010-2013. Questionnaire contained items about appropriateness of biochemistry laboratory contents for students. The first section of questionnaire determines the effectiveness of bioche¬mistry laboratory contents and the factors influence on it. The second section indicates the application of biochemistry laboratory contents, and the third parts of questi¬onnaire demonstrate the laboratory time spent of biochemistry laboratory course contents. For this purpose three faculties were selected. First, Faculty of Medicine (50 medical students, second Faculty of Dentistry (50 dentistry students and third Faculty of Para-medicine (50 laboratory science students were selected. At least 50 students were selected from each faculty and they received a questionnaire. All students were randomly selected to receive a standard questionnaire designed to evaluate their opinions about biochemistry laboratory course contents. The students were asked

  1. Corporate governance and liquidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farooq, Omar; Derrabi, Mohamed; Naciri, Monir

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of corporate governance mechanisms on liquidity in the MENA region, i.e. Morocco, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Jordan, Kuwait, and Bahrain. Using turnover as a proxy for liquidity, we document significant difference in liquidity between the pre......- and the post-crisis periods in the MENA region. In addition, our results show that bulk of this reduction in turnover can be explained due to weaknesses of corporate governance mechanisms. For example, that dividend payout ratio and choice of auditors – proxies for agency problems – can explain the entire...... difference in liquidity between the two periods. Furthermore, our results indicate that more than 50% of this difference between the two periods can be explained by operational and informational complexity of a firm – proxy for transparency. We argue that poor corporate governance mechanisms increase...

  2. Corporate governance and liquidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farooq, Omar; Derrabi, Mohamed; Naciri, Monir

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of corporate governance mechanisms on liquidity in the MENA region, i.e. Morocco, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Jordan, Kuwait, and Bahrain. Using turnover as a proxy for liquidity, we document significant difference in liquidity between the pre......- and the post-crisis periods in the MENA region. In addition, our results show that bulk of this reduction in turnover can be explained due to weaknesses of corporate governance mechanisms. For example, that dividend payout ratio and choice of auditors – proxies for agency problems – can explain the entire...... difference in liquidity between the two periods. Furthermore, our results indicate that more than 50% of this difference between the two periods can be explained by operational and informational complexity of a firm – proxy for transparency. We argue that poor corporate governance mechanisms increase...

  3. INTERNAL CONTROLS IN ENSURING GOOD CORPORATE GOVERNANCE IN FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KOSMAS NJANIKE

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper assessed factors that influence the internal controls in ensuring good corporate governance in financial institutions in developing economies with special reference to Zimbabwe. The research paper assessed how lack of internal controls affected good corporate governance and aimed to bring out elements of good corporate governance. It emerged that failure to effectively implement internal controls contributed significantly to poor corporate governance. The study discovered that internal control system overrides and the issue of “fact cat” directors also contributed to poor corporate governance. The study recommended that there is need for the board of directors to guarantee an organizational structure that clearly defines management responsibilities, authority and reporting relationships. There is also need to ensure that delegated responsibilities are effectively carried out to ensure compliance with internal controls of the financial institution concerned.

  4. Jaarboek corporate governance 2011-2012

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lückerath – Rovers, M.; Bier, B.; Kaptein, M.; Paape, L.

    2011-01-01

    In dit eerste Jaarboek Corporate Governance worden uiteenlopende aspecten van Corporate Governance nader besproken door toonaangevende schrijvers uit verschillende disciplines. Inclusief actuele corporate governance code.

  5. Jaarboek corporate governance 2011-2012

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lückerath – Rovers, M.; Bier, B.; Kaptein, M.; Paape, L.

    2011-01-01

    In dit eerste Jaarboek Corporate Governance worden uiteenlopende aspecten van Corporate Governance nader besproken door toonaangevende schrijvers uit verschillende disciplines. Inclusief actuele corporate governance code.

  6. Student learning outcomes associated with video vs. paper cases in a public health dentistry course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Donald L; Pickrell, Jacqueline E; Riedy, Christine A

    2014-01-01

    Educational technologies such as video cases can improve health professions student learning outcomes, but few studies in dentistry have evaluated video-based technologies. The goal of this study was to compare outcomes associated with video and paper cases used in an introductory public health dentistry course. This was a retrospective cohort study with a historical control group. Based on dual coding theory, the authors tested the hypotheses that dental students who received a video case (n=37) would report better affective, cognitive, and overall learning outcomes than students who received a paper case (n=75). One-way ANOVA was used to test the hypotheses across ten cognitive, two affective, and one general assessment measures (α=0.05). Students in the video group reported a significantly higher overall mean effectiveness score than students in the paper group (4.2 and 3.3, respectively; pimpact their future role as dentists) and affective (e.g., empathizing with vulnerable individuals, appreciating how health disparities impact real people) goals. Compared to paper cases, video cases significantly improved cognitive, affective, and overall learning outcomes for dental students.

  7. Incorporating Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainability into a Business Course: A Shared Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persons, Obeua

    2012-01-01

    The author discusses how corporate social responsibility (CSR) and sustainability were incorporated into a business course by using 4 assignments, a project with a CSR question, 7 ethics cases, and 17 ethics scenarios tied to a corporate code of ethics. The author also discusses student evaluation of CSR learning experience, strengths and…

  8. Incorporating Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainability into a Business Course: A Shared Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persons, Obeua

    2012-01-01

    The author discusses how corporate social responsibility (CSR) and sustainability were incorporated into a business course by using 4 assignments, a project with a CSR question, 7 ethics cases, and 17 ethics scenarios tied to a corporate code of ethics. The author also discusses student evaluation of CSR learning experience, strengths and…

  9. 75 FR 57912 - Application To Export Electric Energy; Rainbow Energy Marketing Corporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-23

    ... Application To Export Electric Energy; Rainbow Energy Marketing Corporation AGENCY: Office of Electricity... Corporation (Rainbow) has applied for authority to transmit electric energy from the United States to Mexico... received an application from Rainbow for authority to transmit electric energy from the United States...

  10. 77 FR 20375 - Application to Export Electric Energy; Rainbow Energy Marketing Corporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-04

    ... Application to Export Electric Energy; Rainbow Energy Marketing Corporation AGENCY: Office of Electricity... Corporation (Rainbow) has applied to renew its authority to transmit electric energy from the United States to... Department of Energy (DOE) issued Order No. EA-296 authorizing Rainbow to transmit electric energy from...

  11. Corporate Social Responsibility of Multinational Oil Corporations to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Corporate Social Responsibility of Multinational Oil Corporations to Host ... adopting partnership strategies as a means of contributing to community development, ... community development partnership (CDPs) initiatives' undertaken by Exxon ...

  12. Author Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chief Editor

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available AUTHOR GUIDELINES Indian Journal of Community Health (IJCH accepts only online submission of manuscript(s by using Open Journal software (OJS at http://www.iapsmupuk.org/journal/index.php/IJCH/login Online SubmissionsAlready have a Username/Password for Indian Journal of Community Health (IJCH? GO TO LOGINNeed a Username/Password?GO TO REGISTRATIONNote: Registration and login are required to submit items online and to track the status of current submissions.Author GuidelinesIJCH strictly adheres on the recommendations for the Conduct, Reporting, Editing and Publication of Scholarly Work in Medical Journals as per the standard universal guidelines given by International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE - Recommendations for Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts. Authors are requested to visit http://www.icmje.org/index.html before making online submission of their manuscript(s. http://www.icmje.org/recommendations/browse/manuscript-preparation/preparing-for-submission.html Preparing for SubmissionGeneral PrinciplesReporting GuidelinesManuscript SectionsTitle PageAbstractIntroductionMethodsResultsDiscussionReferencesTablesIllustrations (FiguresUnits of MeasurementAbbreviations and Symbols 1. General PrinciplesThe text of articles reporting original research is usually divided into Introduction, Methods, Results, and Discussion sections. This so-called “IMRAD” structure is not an arbitrary publication format but a reflection of the process of scientific discovery. Articles often need subheadings within these sections to further organize their content. Other types of articles, such as meta-analyses, may require different formats, while case reports, narrative reviews, and editorials may have less structured or unstructured formats.Electronic formats have created opportunities for adding details or sections, layering information, cross-linking, or extracting portions of articles in electronic versions. Supplementary electronic

  13. 76 FR 67790 - National Express Acquisition Corporation-Control-Petermann Partners, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-02

    .... AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board. ACTION: Notice Tentatively Approving and Authorizing Finance... NEC corporate family, an organization with experience in passenger transportation; and (2) the...: 1. The proposed finance transaction is approved and authorized, subject to the filing of opposing...

  14. Corporate Cost of Occupational Accidents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rikhardsson, Pall M.; Impgaard, M.

    2004-01-01

    method could be used in all of the companies without revisions. The evaluation of accident cost showed that 2/3 of the costs of occupational accidents are visible in the Danish corporate accounting systems reviewed while 1/3 is hidden from management view. The highest cost of occupational accidents......The systematic accident cost analysis (SACA) project was carried out during 2001 by The Aarhus School of Business and PricewaterhouseCoopers Denmark with financial support from The Danish National Working Environment Authority. Its focused on developing and testing a method for evaluating...... occupational costs of companies for use by occupational health and safety professionals. The method was tested in nine Danish companies within three different industry sectors and the costs of 27 selected occupational accidents in these companies were calculated. One of the main conclusions is that the SACA...

  15. Anxiety, fainting and gagging in dentistry: Separate or overlapping constructs?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtem, C.M.H.H. van

    2016-01-01

    This thesis aimed to increase the knowledge about severe forms of anxiety, gagging and fainting in dentistry and to investigate whether these phenomena are overlapping or separate constructs. In Chapter 2 a literature review of twin studies showed that the estimated heritability of specific phobias

  16. Educational Outcomes: Their Impact on Graduate Pediatric Dentistry Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adair, Steven M.

    1990-01-01

    Six outcomes of professional competence that can be applied to postdoctoral pediatric dentistry training are: conceptual, contextual, technical, interpersonal communications, integrative, and adaptive competence. Questionnaire-type surveys are probably the best means of assessing the contextual, interpersonal, and adaptive competencies of…

  17. Er:YAG and adhesion in conservative dentistry : clinical overview

    OpenAIRE

    Fornaini, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    The notion of utilizing laser technology in conservative dentistry was proposed in 1990 by Hibst and Keller, who introduced the possibility of using an Er:YAG laser as alternative to conventional instruments such as the turbine and micro-motor. In subsequent years a continuing effort has been made by clinicians, researchers and commercial companies to improve the technology.

  18. An ancient herb aloevera in dentistry: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indavara Eregowda Neena

    2015-01-01

    A. vera has been used in dentistry for its wound-healing effects, gingivitis, plaque control, and curing oral mucosal lesions. A. vera may also reduce the pain and duration of oral ulcers while speeding healing. The dentists should use A. vera at a level high enough to maximize its therapeutic benefit.

  19. Specialisation and specialist education in prosthetic dentistry in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Owall, B.; Welfare, R.; Garefis, P.; Hedzelek, W.; Hobkirk, J.; Isidor, F.; Jerolimov, V.; Jokstad, A.; Kalk, W.; Kronstrom, M.; van der Kuij, P.; Mericske-Stern, R.; Naert, I.; Narhi, T.; Nilner, K.; Polyzois, G.; Setz, J.; User, A.; Zonnenberg, A.

    2006-01-01

    This presentation reports on the results of a meeting of prosthodontists from selected European countries. The aim of the meeting was to analyse and promote specialisation and specialist education in Prosthetic Dentistry in Europe. Representatives for Europe were selected from the European Prosthodo

  20. SCDA task force on a special care dentistry residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Jeffery; Vishwanat, Lakshmi; Perry, Maureen; Messura, Judith; Dee, Kristin

    2016-07-01

    The Special Care Dentistry Association (SCDA) has acted on a proposal regarding the status of training in the care of patients with special needs. Two phases of action were undertaken. Phase 1: (a) examination of the literature on existing training and curricula in the care of patients with special needs and (b) a survey of existing postdoctoral programs in special needs. Phase 2: establish a group of experts who: (a) submitted to the Commission on Dental Accreditation a request to approve a postdoctoral general dentistry residency program in Special Care Dentistry and (b) created suggested accreditation standards for such postdoctoral programs. This article describes efforts by the SCDA to evaluate: The status of existing training of dental students in the care of patients with special needs. The number and characteristics of postdoctoral general dentistry programs offering formal training in the care of patients with special needs. Whether additional training in the care of patients with special needs is needed for dental students and -dentists. Possible actions by SCDA to impact the numbers of dentists trained each year in the care of patients with -special needs.