WorldWideScience

Sample records for dentin surfaces treated

  1. The effects of current dentinal adhesives on the dentinal surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, R P; Spencer, P; Eick, J D

    1994-12-01

    The effects of the dentinal surface treatments from six currently available commercial dentinal adhesives are presented. The adhesives are All-Bond 2, etched and unetched, Syntac, Prisma Universal Bond 3, Scotchbond Multipurpose, Tenure Solution, and Adhesive By Choice. Unerupted third molar human teeth were sectioned and treated with the appropriate adhesive according to the manufacturer's directions. After the teeth were treated, they were processed for observation by scanning electron microscopy. Scanning-electron microscopic photomicrographs were made of each step in the process to show the effects of the constituents, including the adhesives, on the dentinal surface. For All-Bond 2, unetched, the smear layer was not removed before the primer and the adhesive were applied. The primer for Prisma Universal Bond 3 altered the smear layer by reacting with it but did not produce a large demineralized zone in the dentin. All the other adhesives did remove the smear layer before the tooth was treated with the primer and adhesive.

  2. Bond strength of resin cement to dentin and to surface-treated posts of titanium alloy, glass fiber, and zirconia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahafi, Alireza; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Asmussen, Erik;

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the effect of surface treatments on bond strength of two resin cements (ParaPost Cement and Panavia F) to posts of titanium alloy (ParaPost XH), glass fiber (ParaPost Fiber White), and zirconia (Cerapost), and to dentin. MATERIALS AND METHODS: After embedding, planar surface...

  3. A novel bioactive glass-ceramic for treating dentin hypersensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Tirapelli

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Dentin hypersensitivity (DH is a painful response to stimulus applied to the open dentinal tubules of a vital tooth. It's a common oral condition, however, without an ideal treatment available yet. This work evaluated in vitro the effect of micron-sized particles from a novel bioactive glass-ceramic (Biosilicate in occluding open dentinal tubules. A dentin disc model was employed to observe comparatively, using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, dentinal tubule occlusion by different products and deposition of hydroxyl carbonate apatite (HCA on dentin surface by Biosilicate, after a single application: G1 - Dentifrice with potassium nitrate and fluoride; G2 - Two-step calcium phosphate precipitation treatment; G3 - Water-free gel containing Biosilicate particles (1%; G4 - Biosilicate particles mixed with distilled water in a 1:10 ratio; all of them after 1, 12 and 24 hours of immersion in artificial saliva. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR was performed to detect HCA formation on dentin discs filled with Biosilicate after 2 minutes, 30 minutes and 12 hours of immersion in artificial saliva. SEM showed a layer of HCA formed on dentin surface after 24 hours by G4. G1, G2 and G3 promoted not total occlusion of open dentinal tubules after 24 hours. FTIR showed HCA precipitation on the dentin surface induced by Biosilicate after 30 minutes. The micron-sized particles from the bioactive glass-ceramic thus were able to induce HCA deposition in open dentinal tubules in vitro. This finding suggests that Biosilicate may provide a new option for treating DH.

  4. A Mechanistic study of Plasma Treatment Effects on Demineralized Dentin Surfaces for Improved Adhesive/Dentin Interface Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaoqing; Chen, Meng; Wang, Yong; Yu, Qingsong

    2014-01-01

    Our previous work has shown that non-thermal plasma treatment of demineralized dentin significantly (p<0.05) improved adhesive/dentin bonding strength for dental composite restoration as compared with the untreated controls. This study is to achieve mechanistic understanding of the plasma treatment effects on dentin surface through investigating the plasma treated dentin surfaces and their interaction with adhesive monomer, 2-Hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). The plasma treated dentin surfaces from human third molars were evaluated by water contact angle measurements and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that plasma-treated dentin surface with subsequent HEMA immersion (Plasma/HEMA Treated) had much lower water contact angle compared with only plasma-treated (Plasma Treated) or only HEMA immersed (HEMA Treated) dentin surfaces. With prolong water droplet deposition time, water droplets spread out completely on the Plasma/HEMA Treated dentin surfaces. SEM images of Plasma/HEMA Treated dentin surfaces verified that dentin tubules were opened-up and filled with HEMA monomers. Extracted type I collagen fibrils, which was used as simulation of the exposed dentinal collagen fibrils after acid etching step, were plasma treated and analyzed with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectra. FT-IR spectra of the Plasma/HEMA Treated collage fibrils showed broadened amide I peak at 1660 cm−1 and amide II at 1550 cm−1, which indicate secondary structure changes of the collagen fibrils. CD spectra indicated that 67.4% collagen helix structures were denatured after plasma treatment. These experimental results demonstrate that non-thermal argon plasma treatment was very effective in loosing collagen structure and enhancing adhesive monomer penetration, which are beneficial to thicker hybrid layer and longer resin tag formation, and consequently enhance adhesive/dentin interface bonding. PMID:25267936

  5. Adhesion to bovine dentin--surface characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruse, N D; Smith, D C

    1991-06-01

    X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) were used to characterize the dentin surface, to determine the effects of different pre-conditioning procedures on the elemental composition of the dentin surface, and to investigate the interaction between dentin and a dentin bonding agent (ScotchBond) by studying the changes in the elemental composition of dentin as a result of the interaction. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterize sample surface morphology, which was then correlated with surface elemental composition. The results showed that: (a) the elemental composition of the smear layer was similar to that of the underlying dentin; (b) cleaning with hydrogen-peroxide did not produce any modification in the elemental composition of the dentin surface; and (c) acid-etching led to an almost complete demineralization of the dentin, leaving behind an organic-rich surface. The results suggest that bonding systems that use acid-etching as a pre-conditioning procedure should be based on agents able to interact with the organic components of dentin, since bonding agents that rely on a chelation-to-calcium reaction are unlikely to be successful. The investigation of the interaction between the bonding agent and dentin led to a postulated adhesive-bonding reaction mechanism and suggested a partially cohesive failure in the bonding agent during fracturing of a dentin-bonding-agent-bonded assembly.

  6. Plasma treatment of dentin surfaces for improving self-etching adhesive/dentin interface bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaoqing; Li, Hao; Chen, Meng; Wang, Yong; Yu, Qingsong

    2015-06-01

    This study is to evaluate plasma treatment effects on dentin surfaces for improving self-etching adhesive and dentin interface bonding. Extracted unerupted human third molars were used after crown removal to expose dentin. One half of each dentin surface was treated with atmospheric non-thermal argon plasmas, while another half was untreated and used as the same tooth control. Self-etching adhesive and universal resin composite was applied to the dentin surfaces as directed. After restoration, the adhesive-dentin bonding strength was evaluated by micro-tensile bonding strength (μTBS) test. Bonding strength data was analyzed using histograms and Welch's t-test based on unequal variances. μTBS test results showed that, with plasma treatment, the average μTBS value increased to 69.7±11.5 MPa as compared with the 57.1±17.5 MPa obtained from the untreated controls. After 2 months immersion of the restored teeth in 37 °C phosphate buffered saline (PBS), the adhesive-dentin bonding strengths of the plasma-treated specimens slightly decreased from 69.7±11.5 MPa to 63.9±14.4 MPa, while the strengths of the untreated specimens reduced from 57.1±17.5 MPa to 48.9±14.6 MPa. Water contact angle measurement and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination verified that plasma treatment followed by water rewetting could partially open dentin tubules, which could enhance adhesive penetration to form thicker hybrid layer and longer resin tags and consequently improve the adhesive/dentin interface quality.

  7. Plasma treatment of dentin surfaces for improving self-etching adhesive/dentin interface bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaoqing; Li, Hao; Chen, Meng; Wang, Yong; Yu, Qingsong

    2015-01-01

    This study is to evaluate plasma treatment effects on dentin surfaces for improving self-etching adhesive and dentin interface bonding. Extracted unerupted human third molars were used after crown removal to expose dentin. One half of each dentin surface was treated with atmospheric non-thermal argon plasmas, while another half was untreated and used as the same tooth control. Self-etching adhesive and universal resin composite was applied to the dentin surfaces as directed. After restoration, the adhesive-dentin bonding strength was evaluated by micro-tensile bonding strength (μTBS) test. Bonding strength data was analyzed using histograms and Welch’s t-test based on unequal variances. μTBS test results showed that, with plasma treatment, the average μTBS value increased to 69.7±11.5 MPa as compared with the 57.1±17.5 MPa obtained from the untreated controls. After 2 months immersion of the restored teeth in 37 °C phosphate buffered saline (PBS), the adhesive-dentin bonding strengths of the plasma-treated specimens slightly decreased from 69.7±11.5 MPa to 63.9±14.4 MPa, while the strengths of the untreated specimens reduced from 57.1±17.5 MPa to 48.9±14.6 MPa. Water contact angle measurement and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination verified that plasma treatment followed by water rewetting could partially open dentin tubules, which could enhance adhesive penetration to form thicker hybrid layer and longer resin tags and consequently improve the adhesive/dentin interface quality. PMID:26273561

  8. Efficacy of a desensitizing toothpaste containing arginine and calcium carbonate on dentin surface pore structure and dentin morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Li, YueHeng; Chen, Jiao; Zhou, Zhi; Morrison, Boyce M; Panagakos, Fotinos S

    2012-08-01

    To investigate the laboratory changes in dentin tubule occlusion morphology during short term use of desensitizing products as evaluated by electron microscopy and an image analysis. Freshly extracted human third molar teeth were collected at random and 40 dentin discs were prepared. These dentin samples were then divided in to four groups (n=10). The test treatment consisted of undiluted Colgate Sensitive Pro-Relief Toothpaste containing 8.0% arginine and calcium carbonate that was applied on the dentin surface under a brushing cycle of 200 strokes, 2 times/day, for 10 days and then soaked in the filtrated human saliva. The two other test products were a commercial toothpaste, Sensodyne Original, containing 10% strontium chloride and a professional re-mineralizing treatment paste (GC Tooth Mousse). The negative control group was soaked in human saliva that had been sterilized by filtration. The occluding ability of the dentin tubules, using the dentin disc model, was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The degree of occlusion of the dentin tubules was quantified using an image analyzer and the results were analyzed by ANOVA and a Tukey's test. All test products created a smear layer on the dentin surface that significantly reduced the diameter of dentin tubules after treatment. Compared to the dentin tubule area on disks treated with the negative control (72.02 +/- 7.23 microm2), disks treated with Colgate Sensitive Pro-Relief, Sensodyne Original, and GC Mousse had dentin tubule areas of 2.10 +/- 0.42 microm2, 10.11 +/- 2.83 microm2, and 30.40 +/- 4.04 microm2 respectively. These differences were statistically significant.

  9. The dentinal surface: its influence on dentinal adhesion. Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eick, J D; Cobb, C M; Chappell, R P; Spencer, P; Robinson, S J

    1991-12-01

    Three categories of dentinal adhesive are proposed: category I includes adhesives with shear bond strength values between 5 and 7 MPa; category II includes dentinal adhesives with shear bond strengths between 8 and 14 MPa; and category III includes adhesives with shear bond strength values up to 20 MPa. In part I of this article, photomicrographs of the dentinal smear layer and three category I first-generation dentin-adhesive interfaces are presented. The photomicrographs show that the wetting and penetration of the first-generation dentinal adhesives were not adequate to produce high shear bond strengths. When the category I adhesives were tested for shear bond strength, failures occurred at the interface or in the resin adhesive. Future articles will explain wetting and adhesive performance of category II and III adhesives.

  10. Dentin surface treatment using a non-thermal argon plasma brush for interfacial bonding improvement in composite restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritts, Andy Charles; Li, Hao; Yu, Qingsong; Xu, Changqi; Yao, Xiaomei; Hong, Liang; Wang, Yong

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the treatment effects of non-thermal atmospheric gas plasmas on dentin surfaces for composite restoration. Extracted unerupted human third molars were used by removing the crowns and etching the exposed dentin surfaces with 35% phosphoric acid gel. The dentin surfaces were treated by using a non-thermal atmospheric argon plasma brush for various durations. The molecular changes of the dentin surfaces were analyzed using FTIR/ATR and an increase in carbonyl groups on dentin surfaces was detected with plasma treated dentin. Adper Single Bond Plus adhesive and Filtek Z250 dental composite were applied as directed. To evaluate the dentin/composite interfacial bonding, the teeth thus prepared were sectioned into micro-bars as the specimens for tensile test. Student Newman Keuls tests showed that the bonding strength of the composite restoration to peripheral dentin was significantly increased (by 64%) after 30 s plasma treatment. However, the bonding strength to plasma treated inner dentin did not show any improvement. It was found that plasma treatment of peripheral dentin surface up to 100 s gave an increase in interfacial bonding strength, while a prolong plasma treatment of dentin surfaces, e.g., 5 min treatments, showed a decrease in interfacial bonding strength. PMID:20831586

  11. Penetration Potential of a Silver Diamine Fluoride Solution on Dentin Surfaces. An Ex Vivo Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willershausen, Ines; Schulte, Daniel; Azaripour, Adriano; Weyer, Veronica; Briseño, Benjamin; Willershausen, Brita

    2015-01-01

    Occurrence of open dentinal tubules as a cause of dental hypersensitivity is a very common pnenomenon in patients. The aim of this in vitro study was to assess the effect of a silver diamine fluoride solution (Ag(NH3)2 F) on human dentin samples. A total of five fully retained wisdom teeth were selected for this study. The crowns of the teeth were separated from the roots and the occlusal enamel surface was removed. All dentin samples were treated for 60 seconds with phosphoric acid (36%) and rinsed thoroughly to remove the smear layer. Then the desensitizing agent (Riva Star, SDI; 38% Ag(NH3)2 F) was placed according to the manufacturer's instruction. Three dentin samples were prepared for element analysis using an electron beam microprobe analyzer (JEOL JXA 8900RL). The Ag concentrations in the dentin samples were measured in depths ranging from 5 to 40 μm. The other two dentin samples were vertically fractured and accordingly prepared for visualization with SEM (Zeiss DSM). The application of the desensitizing agent on the dentin areas demonstrated an increased Ag concentration (JEOL JXA 8900RL). On the dentin surface an Ag concentration of 1.7 weight % (? 0.7) was measured, but at a depth of 20 μm only 0.3 weight % (± 0.1) were detected. In depths greater than 40 μm the Ag concentration was below the detection limit. The SEM results showed that deposits could be found in a covering on the dentin layer and in the dentinal tubules to a depth of 20 μm. In this ex vivo study, the effect of silver diamine fluoride on dentin surfaces could be demonstrated. The desensitizing agent formed a film on the dentin surface and in some dentinal tubules deposits were detected. These findings can explain a certain desensitizing effect, but a direct translation to in vivo conditions can only be done with caution.

  12. Effect of laser irradiation on the fluoride uptake of silver diamine fluoride treated dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, May L; Ito, Leticia; Zhang, C F; Lo, Edward C M; Chu, C H

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the fluoride uptake of dentine treated with a 38 % silver diamine fluoride (SDF) solution and laser irradiation at sub-ablative energy levels. Fifteen human dentine slices were prepared and divided into four samples each. Four types of laser were chosen: CO2 (10,600 nm), Er:YAG (2,940 nm), Nd:YAG (1,064 nm) and Diode (810 nm). First, the four samples from 12 of the dentine slices were treated with SDF, and then irradiated by one of the four types of laser at three different settings. One sample was untreated and acted as a control. The setting that rendered the highest fluoride uptake was selected. Second, the remaining dentine slices were treated with SDF and irradiated by the four lasers with the selected settings. Fluoride uptake was assessed using Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry at the dentine surface and up to 20 μm below the surface. The selected settings were CO2 irradiation at 1.0 W for 1 s, Er:YAG irradiation at 0.5 W for 20 s, Nd:YAG irradiation at 2.0 W for 1 s and diode irradiation at 3.0 W for 3 s. The fluoride content (weight %) at the dentine surface following CO2, Er:YAG, Nd:YAG and diode irradiation was 6.91 ± 3.15, 4.09 ± 1.19, 3.35 ± 2.29 and 1.73 ± 1.04, respectively. CO2 and Er:YAG irradiation resulted in higher fluoride uptake than Nd:YAG and diode irradiation at all levels (p fluoride uptake in the SDF-treated dentine than Nd:YAG laser and diode laser irradiation.

  13. Comparative evaluation of microshear bond strength of the caries-affected dentinal surface treated with conventional method and chemomechanical method (papain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chittem, Jyothi; Sajjan, Girija S; Varma, Kanumuri Madhu

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing interest in chemomechanical excavation (papain) in permanent molar teeth. There are several studies dealing with primary molar teeth. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of conventional method and Carie-care (chemomechanical method) on the microshear bond strength (μSBS) and the type of failure of an adhesive system to caries-affected dentin of permanent molar teeth. Twenty permanent molar teeth with carious lesions extending into the dentin were selected. Through the center of the carious lesion, teeth were sectioned mesiodistally and divided into two groups based on the method of caries excavation (conventional and chemomechanical method). The time required for the completion of excavation procedure was noted. Samples were again divided into two subgroups in each according to the method of restoration (Ketac N100 and Filtek Z350 composite). The bonded interface was subjected to μSBS testing in a universal testing machine. Fractured surfaces were examined under a stereomicroscope, and representative specimens were examined under scanning electron microscope for the type of failure. It was achieved with unpaired t-test and Kruskal-Wallis H-test at 5% level of significance. The μSBS values of Carie-care groups were similar to that of the conventional method. The μSBSs of resin composite were significantly (P chemomechanical agent can be used safely as a method for caries removal when employing conventional adhesive systems.

  14. Cytotoxicity evaluation of dentin contacting materials with dentin barrier test device using erbium-doped yttrium, aluminum, and garnet laser-treated dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ülker, H E; Ülker, M; Botsalı, M S; Dündar, A; Acar, H

    2014-09-01

    The effect of dentin contacting materials on three-dimensional cultures of pulp-derived cells was evaluated in a dentin barrier test device using erbium-doped yttrium, aluminum, and garnet (Er:YAG) laser-treated dentin. The test materials (iBond(®), G-Bond™, and Vitrebond™) were applied on laser-treated or untreated dentin discs. After 24 h of exposure with perfusion of the test chamber, cell survival was evaluated by enzyme activity and related to a nontoxic control material. The mean values of control tissues were set to represent 100% viability. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U test. Vitrebond was the most toxic material for both laser-treated and untreated dentin. On untreated dentin, G-bond was cytotoxic to the pulp-derived cells (p 0.05). However, G-Bond and iBond were not cytotoxic when they were applied to Er:YAG laser-treated dentin (p > 0.05). Er:YAG laser treatment of dentin may protect the pulp cells from toxic substances of dentin contacting restorative materials; however, this effect is material related. Taking into consideration the limitations of this in vitro study, the Er:YAG laser treatment of dentin before restoration might be an option for decreasing the cytotoxic effects of the dental materials. Further research is required for clinical applications. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Tensile bond strength of hydroxyethyl methacrylate dentin bonding agent on dentin surface at various drying techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Ismiyatin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are several dentin surface drying techniques to provide a perfect resin penetration on dentin. There are two techniques which will be compared in this study. The first technique was by rubbing dentin surface gently using cotton pellet twice, this technique is called blot dry technique. The second technique is by air blowing dentin surface for one second and continued by rubbing dentin surface gently using moist cotton. Purpose: This experiment was aimed to examine the best dentin surface drying techniques after 37% phosphoric acid etching to obtain the optimum tensile bond strength between hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA and dentin surface. Method: Bovine teeth was prepared flat to obtain the dentin surface and than was etched using 37% phosphoric acid for 15 seconds. After etching the dentin was cleaned using 20 cc plain water and dried with blot dry techniques (group I, or dried with air blow for one second (group II, or dried with air blow for one second, and continued with rubbing gently using moist cotton pellet (group III, and without any drying as control group (group IV. After these drying, the dentin surfaces were applied with resin dentin bonding agent and put into plunger facing the composite mould. The antagonist plunger was filled with composite resin. After 24 hours, therefore bond strength was measured using Autograph. Result: Data obtained was analyzed using One-Way ANOVA with 95% confidence level and continued with LSD test on p≤0.05. The result showed that the highest tensile bond strength was on group I, while the lowest on group IV. Group II and IV, III and IV, II and III did not show signigicant difference (p>0.05. Conclusion: Dentin surface drying techniques through gentle rubbing using cotton pellet twice (blot dry technique gave the greatest tensile bond strength.Latar belakang masalah: Tehnik pengeringan permukaan dentin agar resin dapat penetrasi dengan sempurna adalah dengan cara pengusapan secara

  16. Long-term Adhesion Study of Self-etching Systems to Plasma-treated Dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Ronaldo; Teixeira, Hellen; Ayres, Ana Paula Almeida; Machado, Lucas S; Coelho, Paulo G; Thompson, Van P; Giannini, Marcelo

    2015-06-01

    To determine the influence of atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) treatment on the microtensile dentin bond strength of two self-etching adhesive systems after one year of water storage as well as observe the contact angle changes of dentin treated with plasma and the micromorphology of resin/dentin interfaces using SEM. For contact angle measurements, 6 human molars were sectioned to remove the occlusal enamel surface, embedded in PMMA resin, and ground to expose a flat dentin surface. Teeth were divided into two groups: 1) argon APP treatment for 30 s, and 2) blown air (control). For the microtensile test, 28 human third molars were used and prepared similarly to contact angle measurements. Teeth were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 7) according to two self-etching adhesives and APP treatment (with/without). After making the composite resin buildup, teeth were sectioned perpendicular to the bonded interface to obtain beam specimens. The specimens were tested after 24 h and one year of water storage until failure. Bond strength data were analyzed by three-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test (α = 0.05%). Three beam specimens per group that were not used in the bond strength test were prepared for interfacial SEM analysis. APP application decreased the contact angle, but increased the bond strength only for one adhesive tested. SEM evaluation found signs of degradation within interfacial structures following 1-year aging in water. APP increased the dentin surface energy, but the effects of APP and 1-year water storage on dentin bond strength were product dependent. APP increased the dentin surface energy. It also increased the bond strength for Scotchbond Universal, but storage for one year negated the positive effect of APP treatment.

  17. Relationship between degree of polymerization of resin composite and bond strength to Gluma-treated dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagawa, T; Finger, W J

    1994-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship between shear bond strength (SBS) to dentin and degree of polymerization of resin adjacent to the coupling interface. A hybrid-type resin composite was polymerized on Gluma-treated dentin at thicknesses of 1, 2, 3 and 5 mm, respectively, with seven different light activation times (LAT) from 3 through 180 seconds. SBS of the specimens was determined 10 minutes after the end of light activation. The degree of polymerization of resin close to the dentin interface was determined by Wallace Indentation Depth (WID) of specimens polymerized under the same conditions as the SBS samples, however, separated from the dentin surface by a thin glass plate. Consistent relationships were found for SBS vs. LAT and WID vs. LAT by regression analyses (y = A+B/x). There was a strong linear correlation between SBS and WID (r = -0.93), indicating that the early bond strength to Gluma-treated dentin is a function of mechanical characteristics of resin close to the bonding interface.

  18. Replica of human dentin treated with different desensitizing agents: a methodological SEM study in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Jose Carlos

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a preliminary study to determine a methodological sequence in vitro which may allow the reproduction of dentin for SEM analysis, after the use of different desensitizing agents. Dentin discs obtained from extracted human third molars were etched with 6% citric acid, an artificial smear layer was created and the surface dentin discs were divided into four quadrants. Quadrants 2, 3 and 4 of each disc were conditioned with 6% citric acid. The desensitizing agents (Oxa-Gel®, Gluma Desensitizer and an experimental agent were applied to quadrants 3 and 4. To evaluate the acid resistance of the treatment, quadrant 4 was etched again with 6% citric acid. An impression was then taken with Aquasil ULV. After a setting period of 6 min, each disc was removed from the impression and stored in a moist-free environment for 24 h at 37ºC. After that time, a low-viscosity epoxy resin (Araltec GY 1109 BR was poured into the impression and cured for 24 h. All specimens were metal-coated for SEM analysis. Comparison of the photomicrographs of dentin discs with their respective impressions and resin replicas showed that this technique can reproduce the characteristics of the dentin surface treated with desensitizing agents.

  19. Ultrastructural investigation of root canal dentine surface after application of active ultrasonic method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitić Aleksandar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION The basic work principle of all ultrasonic techniques is the piezoelectric effect of producing high frequency ultrasounds of small length, which are transmitted over the endodontic extensions or canal instruments into the root canal. When in contact with the tissue, ultrasonic vibrations are converted into mechanical oscillations. Ultrasonic waves and the obtained oscillations along with the synergic effect of irrigation bring about the elimination of smear layer from the root canal walls. OBJECTIVE The aim of the study was to ultrastucturally examine the effect of smear layer removal from the walls of canals by the application of the active ultrasonic method without irrigation, that is by the application of ultrasound and irrigation using distilled water and 2.5% NaOCl. METHOD The investigation comprised 35 single-canal, extracted human teeth. After removal of the root canal content, experimental samples were divided into three groups. According to the procedure required, the first group was treated by ultrasound without irrigation; the second one by ultrasound with irrigation using distilled water; and the third group was treated by ultrasound and irrigation using 2.5% NaOCl solution. The control samples were treated by machine rotating instruments (Pro-File and were rinsed by distilled water. RESULTS The obtained results showed that the ultrasonic treatment of the root canal without irrigation did not remove the smear layer. The dentine canals are masked, and big dentine particles are scattered on the intertubular dentine. The ultrasonic treatment by using irrigation with distilled water provides cleaner dentine walls and open dentine tubules but with smaller particles on the intertubular dentine. The ultrasound treatment by using irrigation with 2.5% NaOCl solution provides a clean intertubular dentine surface without a smear layer and clearly open dentine tubules. CONCLUSION Instrumentation of the root canal by application of

  20. SEM Analysis of Residual Dentin Surface in Primary Teeth Using Different Chemomechanical Caries Removal Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Rachna; Patil, Sandya Devi S; Kush, Anil; Madhu, K

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to analyze the residual dentinal surfaces following caries removal using two chemomechanical methods (Papacarie Duo and Carie Care), by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Twenty extracted primary molars with active occlusal carious lesions were randomly assigned two groups depending on the CMCR agent used for the caries excavation - Group 1 - with Papacarie Duo and Group - 2 with Carie Care. After the caries excavation, the specimens were subjected to SEM analysis. Though both the agents showed the minimal smear layer with the patent dentinal tubules, Carie care showed patent dentinal tubules with a clearly exposed peritubular and intertubular collagen network. Carie Care treated surface exhibited better surface morphology of residual dentin.

  1. The influence of Carisolv on enamel and dentine surface topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennerberg, A; Sawase, T; Kultje, C

    1999-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the surface topography of healthy enamel and dentine before and after application of a new chemomechanical system for caries removal, Carisolv. The same surfaces were investigated with respect to the influence of phosphoric acid, plus carious dentine after removal with either Carisolv or burrs. One-hundred freshly extracted teeth were used. Surface topography was measured in two different ways in order to characterize the surfaces at different levels of resolution, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and a contact stylus profilometer. Somewhat conflicting data were obtained with the two measuring techniques. When surfaces were investigated over a small area (AFM), healthy enamel seemed unaffected by Carisolv, while healthy dentine became smoother. Etching enamel with phosphoric acid resulted in a rougher surface, while no effect was detected on etched healthy dentine. Caries removal using Carisolv resulted in a smoother surface compared with conventional caries removal. When the surfaces were monitored with the contact profilometer, no effect of Carisolv could be detected on healthy enamel or dentine. Phosphoric acid etching, in contrast, increased the surface roughness of both enamel and dentine. When compared with conventional caries removal technique, caries removal with Carisolv did increase the surface roughness.

  2. Micromorphology and adhesive performance of Er:YAG laser-treated dentin of primary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flury, Simon; Koch, Tamara; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Lussi, Adrian

    2012-05-01

    This study evaluated (1) the micromorphology by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and (2) the adhesive performance by microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of diamond bur-treated dentin compared to Er:YAG laser-treated dentin of human primary teeth. (1) For qualitative SEM evaluation, dentin of 18 second primary molars (n = 3/method) was treated with either diamond bur as a control (group 1a: 40 μm diamond bur only (clinical situation); group 1b: grinding + 40 μm diamond bur) or with Er:YAG laser (group 2a (clinical situation, manufacturer's settings): 200 mJ/25 Hz (5 W) + 100 mJ/35 Hz (3.5 W) laser only; group 2b (experimental setting "high"): grinding + 400 mJ/20 Hz (8 W); group 2c (manufacturer's setting "finishing"): grinding + 100 mJ/35 Hz (3.5 W); group 2d (experimental setting "low"): grinding + 50 mJ/35 Hz (1.75 W)). (2) For evaluation of adhesive performance, 64 second primary molars were divided into four groups and treated as described for group 1b and groups 2b/c/d (n = 16/method), and μTBS of Clearfil SE/Clearfil Majesty Esthetic to dentin was measured. The SEM micrographs were qualitatively analyzed. The μTBS values were compared with a Kruskal-Wallis test. The significance level was set at α = 0.05. SEM micrographs showed the typical micromorphologies with a smear layer for the diamond bur groups and open dentin tubules for all laser-treated groups. However, in group 2d, the laser beam had insufficiently irradiated the dentin area, rendering the underlying ground surface partly visible. There were no statistically significant differences between μTBS values of the four groups (p = 0.394). This suggests that Er:YAG laser treatment of dentin of primary molars provides bond strengths similar to those obtained following diamond bur treatment.

  3. Making human enamel and dentin surfaces superwetting for enhanced adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobyev, A. Y.; Guo, Chunlei

    2011-11-01

    Good wettability of enamel and dentin surfaces is an important factor in enhancing adhesion of restorative materials in dentistry. In this study, we developed a femtosecond laser surface texturing approach that makes both the enamel and dentine surfaces superwetting. In contrast to the traditional chemical etching that yields random surface structures, this approach produces engineered surface structures. The surface structure engineered and tested here is an array of parallel microgrooves that generates a strong capillary force. Due to the powerful capillary action, water is rapidly sucked into this engineered surface structure and spreads even on a vertical surface.

  4. Influence of bioactive materials used on the dentin surface whitened with carbamide peroxide 16%

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Burlamaqui Pinheiro

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the influence of bioactive materials on the dentin surface whitened. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Three bovine teeth were shaped into three dentin wafers. Each wafer was then sectioned, into six dentin slices. One slice from each tooth was distributed into one of 6 groups: 1.CG = control group (distilled water; 2.WT = whitening treatment; 3.WT + MI Paste Plus, applied once a day; 4.WT + Relief ACP30, applied once a day for 30 mintes; 5.WT + Relief ACP60, applied once a day for 60 minutes; 6.WT + Biosilicate®, applied once a week. All groups were treated over 14 days. RESULTS: CG presented all dentinal tubules occluded by smear layer; WT group was observed all dentinal tubules opened. In the groups 3, 4 and 6, tubules were occluded. Group 5, dentinal tubules were completely occluded by mineral deposits. CONCLUSION: The use of bioactive materials immediately after whitening treatment can reduce or even avoid the demineralization effect of whitening and avoid exposing dentinal tubules.

  5. Chemical treatment of the intra-canal dentin surface: a new approach to modify dentin hydrophobicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar GAITAN-FONSECA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study evaluated the hydrophobicity of dentin surfaces that were modified through chemical silanization with octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS. Material and Methods An in vitro experimental study was performed using 40 human permanent incisors that were divided into the following two groups: non-silanized and silanized. The specimens were pretreated and chemically modified with OTS. After the chemical modification, the dentin hydrophobicity was examined using a water contact angle measurement (WCA. The effectiveness of the modification of hydrophobicity was verified by the fluid permeability test (FPT. Results and Conclusions Statistically significant differences were found in the values of WCA and FPT between the two groups. After silanization, the hydrophobic intraradicular dentin surface exhibited in vitro properties that limit fluid penetration into the sealed root canal. This chemical treatment is a new approach for improving the sealing of the root canal system.

  6. EFFECT OF SURFACE CONDTIONINGON BOND STRENGTH TO ENAMEL AND DENTIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M MOUSAVINASAB

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Compoglass is a trade mark of dental compomers and because of its partially resinus structure, surface conditioning of dental surfaces is needed for a better bonding process. In this study, the effect of enamel and dentin conditioning procedure on shear bond strength (SBS of compoglass to tooth surfaces was studied. Methods. four groups each one including 11 sound premolars were chosen and their surfaces were prepared as following groups: group1, unconitioned dentin; group 2, dentin conditioning with phosphoric acid 35%; group 3, dentin conditioning with polyacrylic acid 20% group 4, unconditioning enamel; group 5, enamel conditioning with phosphoric acid 35%; and group 6, enamel conditioning with polyacrylic acid 20%. Compoglass was bonded to prepared surfaces and after fixation of the samples in acrylic molds, all samples were tested under shear force of instron testing machine at a rate of 1 mm/min speed. Results. The mean SBS obtained in these 6 groups were 6.207, 8.057, 10.146, 25.939 and 11.827 mpa. the mode of fracture also studied using a streomicroscope. Statistical analysis of the results showed that the maximum SBS obtained in group 5 and the lowest SBS about 6.207 mpa obtained in group 1. Despite increase in SBS group 2 and 3, there was no statistical differncies between group 1, 2 and 3. Discussion. Based on results of this study, conditioning of enamel and dentin surface due to improve SBS is recommeneded.

  7. Adhesion of composite luting cement to Er:YAG-laser-treated dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrieri, Teresa C D; de Freitas, Patricia M; Navarro, Ricardo S; Eduardo, Carlos de P; Mori, Matsuyoshi

    2007-09-01

    Although some studies claim to the increase of composite resin adhesion to Er:YAG-laser-treated dentin, there are still no reports on the adhesion of composite resin cements to the irradiated surface. This in vitro study evaluated the tensile bond strength (TBS) of a composite resin cement to dentin treated with the Er:YAG laser. Sixty human dentin samples were divided into four groups (n = 15): G1 (Control)-no treatment; G2-Er:YAG laser 60 mJ, 2 Hz, with water cooling, non-contact (19 J/cm(2)); G3-Er:YAG laser 60 mJ, 10 Hz, 50/10 fiber, contact, without water cooling (40 J/cm(2)); G4-Er:YAG laser 60 mJ, 10 Hz, 50/10 fiber, contact, with water cooling (40 J/cm(2)). After the surface treatment, each sample was submitted to bonding procedures. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey tests revealed no statistical significant difference on TBS values for groups G1 (13.73 +/- 3.05 MPa), G2 (12.60 +/- 2.09 MPa) and G4 (11.17 +/- 4.04 MPa). G4 was not statistically different from G3 (8.64 +/- 2.06 MPa). Er:YAG laser irradiation with different settings can constitute an alternative tool to the use of composite resin-luting cements.

  8. Imaging natural and artificial demineralization on dentin surfaces with polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manesh, Saman K; Darling, Cynthia L; Fried, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the potential of polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) to measure non-destructively the severity of natural and artificial caries lesions in dentin and determine the efficacy of intervention with anti-caries agents. Although several studies have demonstrated the utility of PS-OCT to image caries lesions in enamel and to quantify the lesion severity, only a few studies have focused on lesions in dentin. In this study images of natural root caries lesions on extracted human teeth were acquired with PS-OCT. In addition artificial lesions were produced in dentin after 12 days of exposure to a demineralization solution at a pH of 5.0. Before exposure, three incisions were made on the sample surfaces using Er:YAG laser irradiation and selected areas were treated with topical fluoride. PS-OCT images were acquired using a high power (45-mw) 1310-nm superluminescent diode with a bandwidth of 35-nm. PS-OCT was able to measure demineralization in dentin to a depth of ~ 1 mm. Polarized light microscopy and microradiography were used to measure lesion severity on histological thin sections for comparison. PS-OCT successfully measured the inhibition of demineralization by topical fluoride. Er:YAG laser irradiation did not significantly increase or decrease the rate of dentin demineralization.

  9. Dentin Morphology of Root Canal Surface: A Quantitative Evaluation Based on a Scanning Electronic Microscopy Study

    OpenAIRE

    Giuseppe Lo Giudice; Giuseppina Cutroneo; Antonio Centofanti; Alessandro Artemisia; Ennio Bramanti; Angela Militi; Giuseppina Rizzo; Angelo Favaloro; Alessia Irrera; Roberto Lo Giudice; Marco Cicciù

    2015-01-01

    Dentin is a vital, hydrated composite tissue with structural components and properties that vary in the different topographic portions of the teeth. These variations have a significant implication for biomechanical teeth properties and for the adhesive systems utilized in conservative dentistry. The aim of this study is to analyse the root canal dentin going from coronal to apical zone to find the ratio between the intertubular dentin area and the surface occupied by dentin tubules varies. Ob...

  10. Holmium:YAG laser in dentistry: photoconditioning of dentinal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Raleigh A.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    1994-09-01

    This in vitro study was undertaken to determine energy levels necessary to produce tubule closure and surface smoothing on dentinal surfaces of human teeth and their resultant temperature increases within the pulpal canals with the Holmium:YAG laser. An optimal working spot size and even absorption pattern were produced by defocusing the laser beam and evaluated by images produced on light exposed and developed photographic paper. The surface effects on dentin were examined by scanning electron microscopy. A thermocouple was positioned in the canals of fresh dissected dog jaws and attached to a recorder which produced a graph of the temperature changes. The in vitro research model for intrapulpal temperatures changes was verified by comparing premortem and postmortem temperature readings. The same protocol was used to evaluate temperature changes in fresh human extracted teeth. In vivo histological studies were conducted to evaluate the effects of HO:YAG laser energy on pulpal tissues. The results of these studies indicate the HO:YAG laser at a wavelength of 2.12 microns can be safely and effectively used for photoconditioning of the dentinal surfaces of teeth in clinical conditions.

  11. Modification of the dentin surface by using carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akasaka, Tsukasa; Nakata, Keiko; Uo, Motohiro; Watari, Fumio

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be used as biomedical materials because of their unique properties. CNTs effect nucleation of hydroxyapatite, because of which considerable interest has been generated regarding the use of CNTs in dentistry. However, there are only a few reports on the use of CNTs as dental materials. In this study, we investigated the changes induced in the surfaces of tooth slices by the application of a coating of CNTs by observing CNT-coated tooth slices both macroscopically as well as under a scanning electron microscope. Further, we investigated the effect of CNT coating on the tensile bond strength of dentin adhesives. CNTs adhered easily to the tooth surfaces when tooth slices were suspended in a CNT-dispersed solution. Interestingly, it was observed that CNTs selectively adhered to the surfaces of dentin and cementum, possibly by adhering to their exposed collagen fibers. In addition, the CNT coating did not affect the tensile bond strength of dentin adhesives. These results indicate that coating of the teeth with CNTs can be a possible application of CNTs as dental materials.

  12. The effects of oxalate treatment on the smear layer of ground surfaces of human dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashley, D H; Galloway, S E

    1985-01-01

    The layer was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and by measurement of hydraulic conductance before and after 2-min topical treatment with potassium chloride, neutral potassium oxalate, half-neutralized oxalic acid or both neutral and acidic oxalates. The treated smear layers were then re-evaluated microscopically and functionally both before and after acid challenge. The layers treated with KCl were not altered either microscopically or functionally and were susceptible to acid etching. Dentine surfaces treated with either oxalate solutions became less permeable and were acid-resistant.

  13. Femtosecond laser surface structuring technique for making human enamel and dentin surfaces superwetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobyev, A. Y.; Guo, Chunlei

    2013-12-01

    It is known that good wettability of enamel and dentin surfaces is a key factor in enhancing adhesion of restorative materials in dentistry. Here, we report on a femtosecond laser surface texturing approach that makes both the enamel and dentine surfaces superwetting. In contrast to the traditional chemical etching that yields random surface structures, this new approach produces engineered surface structures. The surface structure engineered and tested here is an array of femtosecond laser-produced parallel microgrooves that generates a strong capillary force. Due to the powerful capillary action, water is rapidly sucked into this engineered surface structure and spreads even on a vertical surface.

  14. Immediate dentin sealing of onlay preparations: thickness of pre-cured Dentin Bonding Agent and effect of surface cleaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavridakis, Minos M; Krejci, Ivo; Magne, Pascal

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated the thickness of Dentin Bonding Agent (DBA) used for "immediate dentin sealing" of onlay preparations prior to final impression making for indirect restorations. In addition, the amount of DBA that is removed when the adhesive surface is cleaned with polishing or air abrasion prior to final cementation was evaluated. For this purpose, a standardized onlay preparation was prepared in 12 extracted molars, and either OptiBond FL (Kerr) or Syntac Classic (Vivadent) was applied to half of the teeth and cured in the absence of oxygen (air blocking). Each tooth was bisected in a bucco-lingual direction into two sections, and the thickness of the DBA was measured under SEM on gold sputtered epoxy resin replicas at 11 positions. The DBA layer of each half tooth was treated with either air abrasion or polishing. The thickness of the DBAs was then re-measured on the replicas at the same positions. The results were statistically analyzed with non-parametric statistics (Mann-Whitney U test and Kruskal-Wallis test) at a confidence level of 95% (p=0.05). The film thickness of the DBA was not uniform across the adhesive interface (121.13 +/- 107.64 microm), and a great range of values was recorded (0 to 500 microm). Statistically significant differences (pOptiBond FL or Syntac Classic) and position (1 to 11) dependent. Syntac Classic presented a higher thickness of DBA (142.34 +/- 125.10 microm) than OptiBond FL (87.99 +/- 73.76 microm). The higher film thickness of both DBAs was at the deepest part of the isthmus (the most concave part of the preparation), while the lowest was at the line angles of the dentinal crest (the most convex part of the preparation). OptiBond FL presented a more uniform thickness around the dentinal crest of preparation; Syntac Classic pooled at the lower parts of the preparation. The amount of DBA that was removed with air abrasion or polishing was not uniform (11.94 +/- 16.46 microm), and a great range of values was recorded (0 to

  15. Dynamic contact angle and spreading rate measurements for the characterization of the effect of dentin surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wege, Hartmut Alexander; Aguilar, José Arturo; Rodríguez-Valverde, Miguel Angel; Toledano, Manuel; Osorio, Raquel; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, Miguel Angel

    2003-07-01

    A new methodology capable of providing reliable and reproducible contact angle (theta) data has been employed to study the effect of clinical treatments grinding, acid etching, and deproteinization on medial dentin tissue. It is based on the application of the ADSA-CD algorithm to the determination of low-rate dynamic contact angles, obtained from slowly growing drops, and on contact angle measurement, as well as spreading behavior analysis, during the relaxation of the system (water on treated dentin) after initial drop growth. The theta data obtained were substantially more reproducible than those obtained with classical methods. A net effect of the treatment on theta was found, increasing dentin wettability: theta (polished) >theta (etched) >theta (deproteinized). The spreading rates correlate with the angles and are adequate for the dentin surface characterization. ANOVA and SNK tests show that for advancing contact angles the means corresponding to all treatments are significantly different. In the relaxing phase, mean angle and spreading rates on polished dentin differ significantly from those on etched and deproteinized dentin, but the latter do not differ significantly from each other.

  16. Chemical and topographical analyses of dentine surfaces after Carisolv treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvidsson, Anna; Liedberg, Bo; Möller, Kenneth; Lyvén, Benny; Sellén, Annika; Wennerberg, Ann

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterise the surface chemistry of cavities after chemomechanical caries excavation, and also to measure the surface topography after caries removal with Carisolv or burs, followed by acid etching. Fourier transform (FT)-Raman spectroscopy was used to study the relative amounts of organic material and minerals of sound enamel, dentine, and cavities, after caries excavation. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) were used for detection of Carisolv substances (i.e. mainly sodium hypochlorite, amino acids, and the gelling agent carboxymethyl cellulose). In total, 19 carious and 11 sound extracted teeth were used for the chemical analyses. Topographic examination of 30 carious extracted teeth was performed with a contact profilometer. The relative amounts of organic material and minerals did not significantly differ between sound dentine and the cavities after caries removal with burs or Carisolv. The FTIR analyses indicated extremely small amounts of Carisolv substances at the cavity surface, but the LA-ICP-MS analyses did not confirm those findings. Furthermore, the topographical parameters did not significantly differ between etched cavities after caries removal using burs or Carisolv. The chemical and topographical analyses in the present study imply that any differences between the cavities after caries excavation with burs or with Carisolv are insignificant.

  17. Influence of light intensity on surface free energy and dentin bond strength of core build-up resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Y; Tsujimoto, A; Furuichi, T; Suzuki, T; Tsubota, K; Miyazaki, M; Platt, J A

    2015-01-01

    We examined the influence of light intensity on surface free energy characteristics and dentin bond strength of dual-cure direct core build-up resin systems. Two commercially available dual-cure direct core build-up resin systems, Clearfil DC Core Automix with Clearfil Bond SE One and UniFil Core EM with Self-Etching Bond, were studied. Bovine mandibular incisors were mounted in acrylic resin and the facial dentin surfaces were wet ground on 600-grit silicon carbide paper. Adhesives were applied to dentin surfaces and cured with light intensities of 0 (no irradiation), 200, 400, and 600 mW/cm(2). The surface free energy of the adhesives (five samples per group) was determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids placed on the cured adhesives. To determine the strength of the dentin bond, the core build-up resin pastes were condensed into the mold on the adhesive-treated dentin surfaces according to the methods described for the surface free energy measurement. The resin pastes were cured with the same light intensities as those used for the adhesives. Ten specimens per group were stored in water maintained at 37°C for 24 hours, after which they were shear tested at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/minute in a universal testing machine. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and a Tukey-Kramer test were performed, with the significance level set at 0.05. The surface free energies of the adhesive-treated dentin surfaces decreased with an increase in the light intensity of the curing unit. Two-way ANOVA revealed that the type of core build-up system and the light intensity significantly influence the bond strength, although there was no significant interaction between the two factors. The highest bond strengths were achieved when the resin pastes were cured with the strongest light intensity for all the core build-up systems. When polymerized with a light intensity of 200 mW/cm(2) or less, significantly lower bond strengths were observed. CONClUSIONS: The

  18. Influence of a prophylaxis paste on surface roughness of different composites, porcelain, enamel and dentin surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of a prophylaxis paste on surface roughness of different composites, enamel, dentin and porcelain surfaces. Methods: Three different composites (FiltekZ250/Group1, Filtek Supreme XT/Group2, Premise/Group3), enamel/Group4, dentin/Group5 and porcelain/Group6 samples were used in this study. All specimens were prepared flat by SiC discs and polished with a diamond polishing paste. The surface roughness measurements were determined with a profilometer after po...

  19. Dentin tubule occluding ability of dentin desensitizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Linlin; Okiji, Takashi

    2015-04-01

    To compare the dentin tubule-occluding ability of fluoroaluminocalciumsilicate-based (Nanoseal), calcium phosphate-based (Teethmate Desensitizer), resin-containing oxalate (MS Coat ONE) and diamine silver fluoride (Saforide) dentin desensitizers using artificially demineralized bovine dentin. Simulated hypersensitive dentin was created using cervical dentin sections derived from bovine incisors using phosphoric acid etching followed by polishing with a paste containing hydroxyapatite. The test desensitizers were applied in one, two, or three cycles, where each cycle involved desensitizer application, brushing, and immersion in artificial saliva (n= 5 each). The dentin surfaces were examined with scanning electron microscopy, and the dentin tubule occlusion rate was calculated. The elemental composition of the deposits was analyzed with electron probe microanalysis. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and the Tukey honestly significant different test. Marked deposit formation was observed on the specimens treated with Nanoseal or Teethmate Desensitizer, and tags were detected in the specimens' dentin tubules. These findings became more prominent as the number of application cycles increased. The major elemental components of the tags were Ca, F, and Al (Nanoseal) and Ca and P (Teethmate Desensitizer). The tubule occlusion rates of MS Coat ONE and Saforide were significantly lower than those of Nanoseal and Teethmate Desensitizer (P< 0.05).

  20. Transmission of Curing Light through Moist, Air-Dried, and EDTA Treated Dentine and Enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Uusitalo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study measured light transmission through enamel and dentin and the effect of exposed dentinal tubules to light propagation. Methods. Light attenuation through enamel and dentin layers of various thicknesses (1 mm, 2 mm, 3 mm, and 4 mm was measured using specimens that were (1 moist and (2 air-dried (n=5. Measurements were repeated after the specimens were treated with EDTA. Specimens were transilluminated with a light curing unit (maximum power output 1869 mW/cm2, and the mean irradiance power of transmitting light was measured. The transmission of light through teeth was studied using 10 extracted intact human incisors and premolars. Results. Transmitted light irradiance through 1 mm thick moist discs was 500 mW/cm2 for enamel and 398 mW/cm2 for dentin (p<0.05. The increase of the specimen thickness decreased light transmission in all groups (p<0.005, and moist specimens attenuated light less than air-dried specimens in all thicknesses (p<0.05. EDTA treatment increased light transmission from 398 mW/cm2 to 439 mW/cm2 (1 mm dentin specimen thickness (p<0.05. Light transmission through intact premolar was 6.2 mW/cm2 (average thickness 8.2 mm and through incisor was 37.6 mW/cm2 (average thickness 5.6 mm. Conclusion. Light transmission through enamel is greater than that through dentin, probably reflecting differences in refractive indices and extinction coefficients. Light transmission through enamel, dentin, and extracted teeth seemed to follow Beer-Lambert’s law.

  1. Differences in tensile adhesion strength between HEMA and nonHEMA-based dentin bonding applied on superficial and deep dentin surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eresha Melati Kusuma Wurdani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Improvement in dentistry shows some progresses, due to patients awareness on the importance of dental care. Cervical lesion is the most common phenomenon which oftenly found 46.36% in man and 38.13% in woman. Cervical lesions need composite restoration for treatment to stop the process of tissue damage. The process of adhesion of composite restoration material to the structure of the tooth is not easily separated and it needs optimal function in the oral cavity. Application of dentin bonding agents to attach the composite is needed. Selection of HEMA-based bonding material and Hema free-based bonding material which have a different solvent in their composition, as applied to the dentin superficial and deep dentin, affect the results of debonding test. Debonding test is done to measure the adhesion strength of a bonding material. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze differences in tensile bond strength of dentine bonding HEMA-based and HEMA-free based after application in superficial and deep dentine surfaces. Method: The tooth of the bovine was as samples. A superficial dentine sample was taken from 0.5-1 mm of dentino enamel junction and a deep dentine sample was taken from 0.5 mm culmination of pulp horn. Dentine surface area was equal to p x r2 = (3.14 x 22 = 12.56 mm2. Six samples of HEMA-based bonding was applied to the dentine superficial. Six samples of HEMAfree based bonding was applied to the superficial dentine. Six samples of HEMA-based bonding was applied to the deep dentine. Six samples of HEMA-free based bonding was applied to the deep dentine. Tensile strength was measured using an Autograph AG-10TE. Result: There were differences tensile bond strength of dentine bonding HEMA-based and HEMA-free based after the application on superficial (p=0.000 and deep dentine surfaces (p=0.000. Conclusion: There were differences tensile bond strength of dentine bonding HEMA-based and HEMA-free based after the

  2. Preservation of resin-dentin interfaces treated with benzalkonium chloride adhesive blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatini, Camila; Ortiz, Pilar A; Pashley, David H

    2015-04-01

    Reducing collagen degradation within hybrid layers may contribute to the preservation of adhesive interfaces. This study evaluated the stability of resin-dentin interfaces treated with benzalkonium chloride (BAC)-modified adhesive blends and assessed collagen degradation in dentin matrices treated with BAC. The etch-and-rinse adhesive, Adper Single Bond Plus, modified with 0.5% and 1.0% BAC, was evaluated for microtensile bond strength (μTBS) and nanoleakage (NL) after 24 h and 1 yr. Thirty completely demineralized dentin beams from human molars were dipped for 60 s in deionized water (DW; control), or in 0.5% or 1.0% BAC, and then incubated in simulated body fluid (SBF). Collagen degradation was assessed by quantification of the dry mass loss and the amount of hydroxyproline (HYP) released from hydrolyzed specimens after 1 or 4 wk. Although all groups demonstrated a significant increase in NL after 1 yr, adhesive modified with 0.5% BAC showed stable bond strength after 1 yr (9% decrease) relative to the control (44% decrease). Significantly less HYP release and dry mass loss were observed for both 0.5% and 1.0% BAC relative to the control. This in vitro study demonstrates that BAC contributes to the preservation of resin-dentin bonds for up to 1 yr by reducing collagen degradation.

  3. Sodium Thiosulfate for Recovery of Bond Strength to Dentin Treated with Sodium Hypochlorite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel Corrêa, Ana Carolina; Cecchin, Doglas; de Almeida, José Flávio Affonso; Gomes, Brenda Paula Figueiredo de Almeida; Zaia, Alexandre Augusto; Ferraz, Caio Cezar Randi

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of sodium thiosulfate (Na2S2O3) for restoring adhesion to pulp chamber dentin treated with sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and EDTA. Sixty-three crowns of bovine incisors were cut to expose the dentin pulp chamber. The specimens were polished and randomly distributed into 9 groups (n = 7) according to the following protocols used: 0.9% sodium chloride for 30 minutes (negative control), 5.25% NaOCl for 30 minutes, 17% EDTA for 3 minutes, and 5.25% NaOCl for 1 minute (positive control). The other groups, after treatments with NaOCl and EDTA, were immersed in 0.5% or 5% Na2S2O3 for 1, 5, and 10 minutes or just immersed in an inert solution for 10 minutes (0.9% sodium chloride). After drying the specimens, Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (3M ESPE, St Paul, MN) was applied to the pulp chamber dentin followed by Filtek Z250 composite (3M ESPE). Six rectangular slabs were obtained from each specimen, and the dentin/resin interface was tested by using a universal testing machine. The resulting data were submitted to 1-way analysis of variance and the Duncan test (P = .05). There was a significant decrease in bond strength regarding NaOCl and EDTA (P composite resin to NaOCl/EDTA-treated dentin, allowing adhesive restorations to be immediately applied after endodontic treatment. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of plasma treatment effects on improving adhesive/dentin bonding by using the same tooth controls and varying cross-sectional surface areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaoqing; Ritts, Andy Charles; Staller, Corey; Yu, Qingsong; Chen, Meng; Wang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate and verify the effectiveness of plasma treatment for improving adhesive/dentin interfacial bonding by performing micro-tensile bond strength (μTBS) test using the same-tooth controls and varying cross-sectional surface areas. Extracted unerupted human third molars were used by removing the crowns to expose the dentin surface. For each dentin surface, one half of it was treated with a non-thermal argon plasma brush, while another half was shielded with glass slide and used as untreated control. Adper Single Bond Plus adhesive and Filtek Z250 dental composite were then applied as directed. The teeth thus prepared were further cut into micro-bar specimens with cross-sectional size of 1×1 mm2, 1×2 mm2 and 1×3 mm2 for μTBS test. The test results showed that plasma treated specimens gave substantially stronger adhesive/dentin bonding than their corresponding same tooth controls. As compared with their untreated controls, plasma treatment gave statistically significant higher bonding strength for specimens having cross-sectional area of 1×1 mm2 and 1×2 mm2, with mean increases of 30.8% and 45.1%, respectively. Interface examination using optical and electron microscopy verified that plasma treatment improved the quality of the adhesive/dentin interface by reducing defects/voids and increasing the resin tag length in dentin tubules. PMID:23841788

  5. Evaluation of Chlorine Dioxide Irrigation Solution on the Microhardness and Surface Roughness of Root Canal Dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballal, Nidambur Vasudev; Khandewal, Deepika; Karthikeyan, Saravana; Somayaji, Krishnaraj; Foschi, Federico

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of chlorine dioxide and various other more common irrigation solutions on the microhardness and surface roughness of root canal dentin. Fifty human maxillary central incisors were sectioned longitudinally and treated for 1 minute with 5 ml of the following aqueous solutions (v/v%): Group 1: 13.8% chlorine dioxide, Group 2: 17% ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). Group 3: 7% maleic acid, Group 4: 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (5 ml/min), Group 5: Saline (control). Specimens were subjected to microhardness and surface roughness testing. Chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite reduced the microhardness more than other test agents. The highest surface roughness was produced with maleic acid. Chlorine dioxide should be used cautiously during chemomechanical preparation of the root canal system in order to prevent untoward damage to the teeth.

  6. Clinical efficacy of toothpaste containing potassium citrate in treating dentin hypersensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Ya Shen

    2009-12-01

    Conclusion: The prevalence of dentin hypersensitivity in this study was 38%. The use of desensitizing toothpaste containing potassium citrate with oral hygiene instruction can effectively reduce dentin hypersensitivity.

  7. Comparative study of dentine permeability after apicectomy and surface treatment with 9.6 microm TEA CO2 and Er:YAG laser irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouw-Soares, S; Stabholz, A; Lage-Marques, J L; Zezell, D M; Groth, E B; Eduardo, C P

    2004-04-01

    Failure of apicectomies is generally attributed to dentine surface permeability as well as to the lack of an adequate marginal sealing of the retrofilling material, which allows the percolation of microorganisms and their products from the root canal system to the periodontal region, thus compromising periapical healing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate dentine and the marginal permeability after apicectomy and surface treatment with 9.6 micro m TEA CO(2) or Er:YAG 2.94 micro m laser irradiation. Sixty-five single rooted human endodontically treated teeth were divided into five experimental groups: group I (control), apicectomy with high speed bur; group II, similar procedure to that of group I, followed by dentinal surface treatment with 9.6 micro m CO(2) laser; group III, similar procedure to group I followed by dentinal surface treatment with Er:YAG laser 2.94 micro m; group IV, apicectomy and surface treatment with CO(2) 9.6 micro m laser; and group V, apicectomy and surface treatment with Er:YAG laser 2.94 micro m. The analysis of methylene blue dye infiltration through the dentinal surface and the retrofilling material demonstrated that the samples from the groups that were irradiated with the lasers showed significantly lower infiltration indexes than the ones from the control group. These results were compatible with the structural morphological changes evidenced through SEM analysis. Samples from groups II and IV (9.6 micro m CO(2)) showed clean smooth surfaces, fusion, and recrystallized dentine distributed homogeneously throughout the irradiated area sealing the dentinal tubules. Samples from groups III and V (Er:YAG 2.94 micro m) also presented clean surfaces, without smear layer, but roughly compatible to the ablationed dentine and without evidence of dentinal tubules. Through the conditions of this study, the Er:YAG 2.94 micro m and the 9.6 micro m CO(2) laser used for root canal resection and dentine surface treatment showed a reduction of

  8. The effects of various irrigating solutions on intra-radicular dentinal surface: An SEM analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J V Karunakaran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The action of irrigant solutions on intra- radicular dentinal surface were evaluated in an in vitro setting using a scanning electron microscope (SEM and it was observed that sodium hypochlorite and MTAD produced the cleanest surface and that none of the irrigants were able to produce an ideal preparation of the dentinal surface when used individually. The primary objective of endodontic therapy is to achieve a clean, optimal environment in root canals to avoid unsuccessful treatment outcomes. The complexities of the root canal system necessitate the use of irrigating solutions which act on radicular dentin surface, modifying it. The action of irrigants can be beneficial, and yet at the same time, as they modify the surface structure of dentin, they can have an adverse impact on the properties of dentin. The present study was undertaken to assess the effect of various irrigants on the dentinal surface using an SEM. Materials and Methods: Forty-five roots were randomly divided into nine groups (n=5 and prepared by sectioning at the level of cemento-enamel junction (CEJ and 10 mm from the CEJ and split longitudinally. The dentin surface was prepared and the cemental surfaces were coated with double layer of varnish. The irrigants tested were normal saline, de-ionized water, 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA, 5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl, 5% NaOCl with ultrasonic agitation, 3% hydrogen peroxide, 2% chlorhexidine (CHX, MTAD, and MTAD with ultrasonic agitation. The prepared samples were placed in the irrigant solution for 3 min, subsequently dehydrated, sputter coated, and observed under SEM. The images were subsequently analyzed for dentinal surface changes. Results: 17% EDTA and MTAD produced the cleanest dentinal surface. Ultrasonic agitation enhanced the effect of irrigants. 5% NaOCl and 3% hydrogen peroxide were efficient at removal of organic debris, but were unable to remove the smear layer. De-ionized water, normal saline, and 2

  9. Dentin Morphology of Root Canal Surface: A Quantitative Evaluation Based on a Scanning Electronic Microscopy Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Giudice, Giuseppe; Cutroneo, Giuseppina; Centofanti, Antonio; Artemisia, Alessandro; Bramanti, Ennio; Militi, Angela; Rizzo, Giuseppina; Favaloro, Angelo; Irrera, Alessia; Lo Giudice, Roberto; Cicciù, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Dentin is a vital, hydrated composite tissue with structural components and properties that vary in the different topographic portions of the teeth. These variations have a significant implication for biomechanical teeth properties and for the adhesive systems utilized in conservative dentistry. The aim of this study is to analyse the root canal dentin going from coronal to apical zone to find the ratio between the intertubular dentin area and the surface occupied by dentin tubules varies. Observations were conducted on 30 healthy premolar teeth extracted for orthodontic reasons in patients aged between 10 and 14. A SEM analysis of the data obtained in different canal portions showed that, in the coronal zone, dentinal tubules had a greater diameter (4.32 μm) than the middle zone (3.74 μm) and the apical zone (1.73 μm). The average number of dentinal tubules (in an area of 1 mm2) was similar in coronal zone (46,798 ± 10,644) and apical zone (45,192 ± 10,888), while in the middle zone they were lower in number (30,940 ± 7,651). However, intertubular dentin area was bigger going from apical to coronal portion. The differences between the analysed areas must be considered for the choice of the adhesive system. PMID:26413504

  10. Dentin Morphology of Root Canal Surface: A Quantitative Evaluation Based on a Scanning Electronic Microscopy Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Lo Giudice

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dentin is a vital, hydrated composite tissue with structural components and properties that vary in the different topographic portions of the teeth. These variations have a significant implication for biomechanical teeth properties and for the adhesive systems utilized in conservative dentistry. The aim of this study is to analyse the root canal dentin going from coronal to apical zone to find the ratio between the intertubular dentin area and the surface occupied by dentin tubules varies. Observations were conducted on 30 healthy premolar teeth extracted for orthodontic reasons in patients aged between 10 and 14. A SEM analysis of the data obtained in different canal portions showed that, in the coronal zone, dentinal tubules had a greater diameter (4.32 μm than the middle zone (3.74 μm and the apical zone (1.73 μm. The average number of dentinal tubules (in an area of 1 mm2 was similar in coronal zone (46,798±10,644 and apical zone (45,192±10,888, while in the middle zone they were lower in number (30,940±7,651. However, intertubular dentin area was bigger going from apical to coronal portion. The differences between the analysed areas must be considered for the choice of the adhesive system.

  11. Microshear bond strength evaluation of surface pretreated zirconia ceramics bonded to dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Shenbagakuttalam; Ebenezar, Ambrose Vedamanickam Rajesh; Anand, Nirupa; Rajkumar, Kothandaraman; Mahalaxmi, Sekar; Srinivasan, Narasimhan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To comparatively assess the micro shear bond strength (MSBS) of dentin bonded surface pre-treated zirconia ceramics. Materials and Methods: Zirconia blocks were sectioned into 50 cubical blocks. The blocks were further categorized into five groups (n = 10 each). Group I: No treatment was performed on zirconia samples; Group II: The zirconia samples were sand-blasted; Group III: Group II + etched with 9.8% of hydrofluoric (HF) acid for 60 s; Group IV: The sandblasted zirconia samples were selectively infiltrated with low fusing porcelain; and Group V: Group IV + etched using 9.8% HF acid gel. The zirconia specimens were then bonded to dentin samples, and the samples were tested for MSBS evaluation using universal testing machine. Results: The MSBS of all the four experimental groups shows greater value than group I. Among the experimental groups, group V and group IV do not show any statistical significant difference, whereas the mean MSBS of groups IV and V were statistically greater than group III and group II. However, groups I, II, and III do not show any statistical significant difference in mean MSBS values between them. Conclusion: Selective infiltration etching of zirconia ceramics provides the highest bond strength with resin cement. PMID:26038654

  12. Clinical Efficacy of Fluoride Varnish and Low-Level Laser Radiation in Treating Dentin Hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Euler Maciel; Amorim, Fernanda Kyarelly de Oliveira; Nóbrega, Fernando José de Oliveira; Dantas, Poliana Medeiros Cunha; Vasconcelos, Rodrigo Gadelha; Queiroz, Lélia Maria Guedes

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of fluoride varnish (Fluorniz(r)) and irradiation with a gallium-arsenide-aluminum diode laser in the treatment of cervical dentin hypersensitivity. Cervical dentin hypersensitivity (CDH) is a painful condition that is highly prevalent in the world's adult population, with one in six patients presenting this symptom. Eighty-six teeth were divided into two groups: Group 1, teeth treated with Fluorniz; Group 2, teeth irradiated with a GaAlAs laser at a 4 J/cm2 dose. The two treatments were applied to the buccal cervical region in four sessions, at intervals of 72 to 96 h. The response of the patient to tactile and thermal-evaporative stimuli was rated on a visual analog scale. The results showed a reduction of hypersensitivity in response to tactile and thermal-evaporative stimulation at the end of treatment in both groups. In conclusion, short-term treatment with Fluorniz was found to be more effective than low-level laser radiation in reducing cervical dentin hypersensitivity.

  13. Er:YAG 激光与涡轮机处理乳牙牙本质表面对树脂剪切强度影响的对比研究%The comparative study on the Er:YAG laser and high speed handpiece treat primary dentin surface to the resin shear strength influence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许岩; 汪凤; 郑雪飞; 吴佩玲

    2014-01-01

    目的:评价 Er:YAG 激光和高速涡轮机2种方法处理乳牙牙本质表面形态学变化及其对复合树脂剪切强度的影响。方法选取因乳牙滞留拔除的无龋坏、无充填体、无裂纹的下颌乳前牙64颗,随机分为 Er:YAG激光组(A 组)和高速涡轮机(B 组),每组32个样本,分别用功率为2 W 的 Er:YAG 激光和高速涡轮机处理乳牙牙本质表面,各组随机抽出2个样本,使用电镜扫描观察乳牙牙本质表面形态。其余样本进行酸蚀并复合树脂充填后检测乳牙牙本质与复合树脂间剪切强度。结果扫描电镜观察 Er:YAG 激光处理的乳牙牙本质表面无玷污层,牙本质小管开放。A 组剪切强度数值为(11.45±3.8)MPa,B 组剪切强度为(8.97±4.03)MPa,A 组与 B 组比较差异有统计学意义(P <0.05)。结论Er:YAG 激光处理乳牙牙本质可去除玷污层;乳切牙牙本质表面使用Er:YAG 激光处理后树脂剪切强度优于涡轮机,该结果为 Er:YAG 激光应用于乳牙牙体预备提供了理论依据,并为临床选择何种方法预备乳牙牙体提供了参考依据。%Objective To investigate Er:YAG laser and high speed handpiece separately to treat primary teeth surface,observe its morphological changes,and evaluate the impact of this two methods treating pri-mary dentin on the shear strength of composite resin.Methods 64 mandibulars primary anterior teeth without carious,filling body,cracks because of primary teeth retain removing were selected,and divided into two groups randomly.Each group with 32 samples were treated primary teeth surface by using Er:YAG laser and high speed handpiece separately.Two samples from each group was randomly selected,and scanned with electronic microscope to observe primary teeth surface.The remaining samples were acid etched and filled with composite resin,and then evaluated the shear strength of primary teeth and compos

  14. The effects of oxalate-containing products on the exposed dentine surface: an SEM investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillam, D G; Mordan, N J; Sinodinou, A D; Tang, J Y; Knowles, J C; Gibson, I R

    2001-11-01

    In-office products containing oxalates have been claimed to be clinically effective in reducing dentine sensitivity, although there has been limited supporting clinical data. The rationale for their use appears to be based on their potential to act as occluding and/or nerve desensitizing agents. Four commercially available oxalate-containing products were applied to etched dentine discs and the extent of tubule occlusion was observed by scanning electron microscopy. Tenure Quick (aluminium oxalate), Sensodyne Sealant (ferric oxalate) and MS Coat (oxalic acid) covered the dentine surface and occluded the tubules. However, Butler Protect (potassium oxalate) did not cover the surface to any great extent but provided some occlusion. The presence of oxalates after application to glass slides and dentine discs was examined using thin film X-ray diffraction. From samples on glass, only potassium oxalate could be clearly identified (JCPDS 14-0845). No oxalate was detected on dentine discs in either thin film geometry or standard theta two theta mode. We have demonstrated that professionally applied in-office products containing oxalate are capable of covering the dentine surface and/or occluding the tubules to varying degrees. However, X-ray diffraction analysis was unable to confirm the oxalate profile for all products as described in the available commercial literature.

  15. A comparison between the occluding effects of the Nd:YAG laser and the desensitising agent sensodyne on permeation through exposed dentinal tubules of endodontically treated teeth: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Azzawi, Lehadh M; Dayem, Raad N

    2006-07-01

    Dentine hypersensitivity may occur due to loss of covering enamel and/or loss of cementum after gingival recession, resulting in exposure of cervical dentine and patency of dentinal tubules. The effect of thermally cooled pulsed neodymium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet (Nd:YAG) laser on the permeability and structural appearance of the root canal wall was investigated in vitro. The aim of this study was to compare the occluding effect of Nd:YAG laser with that of sensodyne on exposed dentine. Forty freshly extracted human maxillary anterior teeth were collected at random. Root canal obturations were performed using master apical file no. 60 k-type for obturated teeth. All teeth were stored in 100% humidity at 37 degrees C for 48h to allow time for the sealer to set. Dentine of 35 teeth was exposed by removing the cementum, and the remaining five teeth represented a negative control group. Specimens were examined using stereomicroscopy to show the surface topography of the dentine substrate before and after treatment with Nd:YAG laser or sensodyne. A double-blind technique was used when taking measurements of ink penetration (in mm) for each group. Teeth treated by Nd:YAG laser showed the least ink penetration, followed by teeth treated by sensodyne. The positive control group demonstrated complete ink penetration and the negative control group showed no ink penetration. Stereomicroscopic examination of specimens treated with Nd:YAG laser showed deposition on the dentinal surface, and specimens treated with sensodyne showed partial deposition. Untreated specimens were free of deposition and the tubules remained patent. There is no significant difference in the occluding effect of Nd:YAG laser and sensodyne toothpaste. Both treatments have a promising effect on the reduction of permeation through exposed dentinal tubules. However, the occluding effect of Nd:YAG laser occurs within seconds whereas that of sensodyne takes at least 3 weeks.

  16. Clinical and histological responses of human dental pulp to MTA and combined MTA/treated dentin matrix in partial pulpotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrvarzfar, Payman; Abbott, Paul V; Mashhadiabbas, Fatemeh; Vatanpour, Mehdi; Tour Savadkouhi, Sohrab

    2017-08-18

    The aim of this study was to compare the responses of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and combined MTA/treated dentin matrix (TDM) as direct pulp capping material. In this clinical trial study, 33 intact third molars in 11 healthy volunteers (three molars in each) were included. Partial pulpotomies were performed in a split mouth manner in two of the third molars in each patient randomly and the third tooth had used as TDM source. The coronal dentin was chopped to dentine chips and transformed to TDM using different concentrations of ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) solution. Pulps were directly capped by MTA alone or using a combination layering of MTA/TDM. Following 6-week clinical and radiological evaluations, each tooth was extracted and prepared for histological evaluation. There were no significant differences in the clinical and radiographic responses or in the quality of dentin bridges (P > 0.05). However, the dentin bridge was significantly thicker in MTA/TDM group than MTA group (P = 0.003). Using the combination of MTA/TDM as a pulp-dressing agent may form a thicker dentin bridge compared to MTA alone. © 2017 Australian Society of Endodontology Inc.

  17. Properties of human dentin surface after ArF excimer laser irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Tomohiro; Tonami, Ken-ichi; Araki, Kouji; Kurosaki, Norimasa

    2008-03-01

    Recently, improvement of the properties of dentin surface using dental lasers to increase bonding strength has been anticipated in the field of adhesive dentistry. The objective of this study was to investigate changes in the surface properties of human dentin after ArF excimer laser irradiation at different irradiation times, pulse repetition rates and energy densities. The SEM images of the irradiated surfaces were observed, and the contact angle and the roughness of the irradiated surface were measured. As a result, SEM demonstrated that the dentin surface became irregular following ArF excimer laser irradiation. When the energy density increased, the irregularity became more minute and dentinal tubules were more easily identified. By contrast, such changes were not observed when the irradiation time and pulse repetition rate were changed. Moreover, as energy densities increased, the contact angle tended to decrease and the surface roughness tended to increase. These results suggested that the area of the irradiated surface and wettability increased after irradiation with the ArF excimer laser. Consequently, irradiation with ArF excimer lasers could improve the surface properties and be potentially useful for adhesive dentistry.

  18. Quantitative Analysis of Defects at the Dentin-Post Space in Endodontically Treated Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariasevera Di Comite

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess frequency and extension of the defects affecting the dentin-post interface after using different combinations of irrigants and sealers. The experimental work was conducted on single-rooted teeth extracted for orthodontic reasons. The specimens were divided into different groups, according to irrigant and endodontic cement utilized, and endodontically instrumented. After fiberglass posts cementation, cross sections were obtained at apical, middle and coronal level of the root and submitted to quantitative analyses. Different types of defects were found: bubbles, bonding defects, polymerization defect, and cement residues. The percent extension of each defect and its frequency were related to the specific irrigant/sealer combination and to the root level. Detachments of the material from dentin were found only at apical and middle levels. Chlorhexidine digluconate seems to have more beneficial effects if compared to sodium hypochlorite: samples prepared with chlorhexidine digluconate showed a higher performance, with roots including null to few defects. In detail, samples treated with chlorhexidine digluconate and Pulp Canal Sealer showed the lowest frequency and the smallest dimension of defects.

  19. An In Vitro Comparison of the Bond Strength of Composite to Superficial and Deep Dentin, Treated With Er:YAG Laser Irradiation or Acid-Etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaghehmand, Homayoon; Nezhad Nasrollah, Fatemeh; Nokhbatolfoghahaei, Hanieh; Fekrazad, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to compare the micro-shear bond strength of composite resin on superficial and deep dentin after conditioning with phosphoric acid and Erbium-Doped Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (Er:YAG) laser. Methods: Thirty human molars were selected, roots were removed and crowns were bisected to provide a total of 60 half-crowns. Specimens were ground to expose superficial and deep dentin. Samples were assigned to six groups: (1) AS (acid etching of superficial dentin); (2) AD (acid etching of deep dentin); (3) LS (Er:YAG laser irradiation on superficial dentin); (4) LD (Er:YAG laser irradiation on deep dentin); (5) LAS (Er:YAG laser irradiation on superficial dentin followed by acid etching); (6) LAD (Er:YAG laser irradiation on deep dentin followed by acid etching) The adhesive protocol was performed. Samples were thermocycled and micro-shear bond strength was tested to failure. The data were submitted to statistical analysis with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey post hoc test. Results: The AS group, demonstrated the greatest amount of micro-shear bond strength. Statistical analysis showed a decrease in bond strength in laser-treated groups which was more significant for deep dentin. Conclusion: Preparation of dentin with laser did not improve bonding to superficial and deep dentin. PMID:28144437

  20. The Dentin Sialoprotein (DSP) Domain Regulates Dental Mesenchymal Cell Differentiation through a Novel Surface Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Chunyan; Yuan, Guohua; Luo, Daoshu; Zhang, Lu; Lin, Heng; Liu, Huan; Chen, Lei; Yang, Guobin; Chen, Shuo; Chen, Zhi

    2016-07-19

    Dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) is a dentin extracellular matrix protein that is processed into dentin sialoprotein (DSP), dentin glycoprotein (DGP) and dentin phosphoprotein (DPP). DSP is mainly expressed in odontoblasts. We hypothesized that DSP interacts with cell surface receptors and subsequently activates intracellular signaling. Using DSP as bait for screening a protein library, we demonstrate that DSP acts as a ligand and binds to integrin β6. The 36 amino acid residues of DSP are sufficient to bind to integrin β6. This peptide promoted cell attachment, migration, differentiation and mineralization of dental mesenchymal cells. In addition, DSP (aa183-219) stimulated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and P38 kinases. This activation was inhibited by an anti-integrin β6 antibody and siRNA. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this DSP fragment induces SMAD1/5/8 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation via ERK1/2 and P38 signaling. SMAD1/5/8 binds to SMAD binding elements (SBEs) in the DSPP gene promoter. SBE mutations result in a decrease in DSPP transcriptional activity. Endogenous DSPP expression was up-regulated by DSP (aa183-219) in dental mesenchymal cells. The data in the current study demonstrate for the first time that this DSP domain acts as a ligand in a RGD-independent manner and is involved in intracellular signaling via interacting with integrin β6. The DSP domain regulates DSPP expression and odontoblast homeostasis via a positive feedback loop.

  1. Effect of LASER Irradiation on the Shear Bond Strength of Zirconia Ceramic Surface to Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Shahabi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Reliable bonding between tooth substrate and zirconia-based ceramic restorations is always of great importance. The laser might be useful for treatment of ceramic surfaces. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of laser irradiation on the shear bond strength of zirconia ceramic surface to dentin. Materials and Methods: In this experimental in vitro study, 40 Cercon zirconia ceramic blocks were fabricated. The surface treatment was performed using sandblasting with 50-micrometer Al2O3, CO2 laser, or Nd:YAG laser in each test groups. After that, the specimens were cemented to human dentin with resin cement. The shear bond strength of ceramics to dentin was determined and failure mode of each specimen was analyzed by stereo-microscope and SEM investigations. The data were statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and Tukey multiple comparisons. The surface morphology of one specimen from each group was investigated under SEM. Results: The mean shear bond strength of zirconia ceramic to dentin was 7.79±3.03, 9.85±4.69, 14.92±4.48 MPa for CO2 irradiated, Nd:YAG irradiated, and sandblasted specimens, respectively. Significant differences were noted between CO2 (P=0.001 and Nd:YAG laser (P=0.017 irradiated specimens with sandblasted specimens. No significant differences were observed between two laser methods (P=0.47. The mode of bond failure was predominantly adhesive in test groups (CO2 irradiated specimens: 75%, Nd:YAG irradiated: 66.7%, and sandblasting: 41.7%. Conclusion: Under the limitations of the present study, surface treatment of zirconia ceramics using CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers was not able to produce adequate bond strength with dentin surfaces in comparison to sandblasting technique. Therefore, the use of lasers with the mentioned parameters may not be recommended for the surface treatment of Cercon ceramics.

  2. X-ray absorption fine structure analysis of the local environment of zinc in dentine treated with zinc compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatsuka, Tsutomu; Hirano, Junko; Matsumoto, Hitoshi; Honma, Tetsuo

    2005-04-01

    It has been reported that zinc oxide (ZnO) inhibits dentine demineralization. By using the X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) technique, our aims in this study were to provide information about the local environment of zinc atoms in dentine that had been treated with zinc compounds. We measured the Zn K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of dentine specimens treated with zinc chloride or ZnO. In XAFS analyses, the spectra of dentine specimens treated with ZnO (D-ZO) or with zinc chloride (D-ZC) were similar and obviously different from the reference ZnO spectrum. This suggests that most of the zinc atoms detected in D-ZO are not derived from particles of ZnO. The spectra of D-ZO and D-ZC were similar to the spectrum of the synthetic, zinc-containing hydroxyapatite, but were not similar to that of zinc in ZnCl2-treated collagen. The results of this study suggest that most of the zinc atoms detected were attached to hydroxyapatite and not to collagen.

  3. Role of surface tension and roughness on the wettability of Er:YAG laser irradiated dentin: In vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this “in vitro” study was to evaluate the role of surface tension and surface roughness in the wettability, considered essential for a good adhesion, comparing Er:YAG laser - to bur-prepared dentin.

  4. Modified Revascularization in Human Teeth Using an Intracanal Formation of Treated Dentin Matrix: A Report of Two Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrvarzfar, Payman; Abbott, Paul V; Akhavan, Hengameh; Savadkouhi, Sohrab Tour

    2017-01-01

    Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA)-treated dentin matrix (TDM) is an enriched source of bioactive molecules. Therefore, it was hypothesized that fabrication of autogenous TDM on root dentinal walls of necrotic immature permanent teeth may allow more predictable outcome of revascularization treatments. Two young patients with permanent nonvital immature teeth were chosen for revascularization treatment. After appropriate disinfection of root canal system, TDM was fabricated on root dentinal walls using different dilutions of EDTA. Then, bleeding was induced in canals and calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement was placed over the blood clots. In all follow-up periods, both cases were asymptomatic and radiographic findings have shown a continued root development. Revascularization is a valuable treatment for nonvital immature teeth, allows continuation of root development. Modification of root regeneration through a TDM protocol may seem more predictable treatment and improve maturogenesis than traditional therapy.

  5. SEM analysis of microstructure of adhesive interface between resin cement and dentin treated with self-etching primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirabayashi, Shigeru; Yoshida, Eiji; Hayakawa, Tohru

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the microstructure of the adhesive interface between resin cement and dentin treated with a self-etching primer by SEM in order to clarify the adhesive efficiencies of four self-etch type resin cement systems, Bistite II (BII), Linkmax (LM), Panavia F2.0 (PF), and ResiCem (RC) to dentin. The fluidity and inorganic filler content of these cements were also determined to examine their influences on the adhesion. A hybrid layer with 0.5-1.5 µm thickness and many resin tags could be confirmed clearly at the interface between BII cement and dentin, but was not observed distinctly for the other resin cements. It was suggested that the hybrid layer and resin tags might contribute to the high adhesive efficiency for BII. As the fluidity of cement had been adjusted to be suitable for luting in all cements, it did not significantly influence the adhesive efficiency of cement.

  6. Surface energy of bovine dentin and enamel by means of inverse gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okulus, Zuzanna; Strzemiecka, Beata; Czarnecka, Beata; Buchwald, Tomasz; Voelkel, Adam

    2015-04-01

    Adhesion between tooth tissues and dental fillings depends on the surface energy of both connected materials. Bond strength can be determined directly or indirectly as a work of adhesion on the basis of values of surface energy of these materials. Inverse gas chromatography (IGC) is one of the methods of surface energy examination. In this study the values of total surface energy components of wet and dry teeth fragments (enamel, crown dentin and root dentin) were determined with the use of inverse gas chromatography. Inverse gas chromatography has never been used for investigation of surface energy of natural tooth tissues. Different storage conditions were examined - wet and dry. Different values of surface energy are observed according to the type of tooth tissue (dentin or enamel), occurring place (crown or root) and storage conditions (dry or wet). The effect of tissue type and occurring place was the greatest, while storage conditions were of secondary importance. Surface energy depends on composition of tissue, its surface area and the presence of pores. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Shear Bond Strength of an Etch-and-rinse Adhesive to Er:YAG Laser- and/or Phosphoric Acid-treated Dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davari, Abdolrahim; Sadeghi, Mostafa; Bakhshi, Hamid

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims. Er:YAG laser irradiation has been claimed to improve the adhesive properties of dentin; therefore, it has been proposed as an alternative to acid etching. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the shear bond strength of an etch-and-rinse adhesive system to dentin surfaces following Er:YAG laser and/or phosphoric acid etching. Materials and methods. The roots of 75 sound maxillary premolars were sectioned below the CEJ and the crowns were embedded in auto-polymerizing acrylic resin with the buccal surfaces facing up. The buccal surfaces were ground using a diamond bur and polished until the dentin was exposed; the samples were randomly divided into five groups (n=15) according to the surface treatment: (1) acid etching; (2) laser etching; (3) laser etching followed by acid etching; (4) acid etching followed by laser etching and (5) no acid etching and no laser etching (control group). Composite resin rods (Point 4, Kerr Co) were bonded to treated dentin surfaces with an etch-and-rise adhesive system (Optibond FL, Kerr Co) and light-cured.After storage for two weeks at 37°C and 100% humidity and then thermocycling, bond strength was measured with a Zwick Universal Testing Machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data was analyzed using parametric and non-parametric tests (P<0.05). Results. Mean shear bond strength for acid etching (20.1±1.8 MPa) and acid+laser (15.6±3.5 MPa) groups were significantly higher than those for laser+acid (15.6±3.5 MPa), laser etching (14.1±3.4 MPa) and control (8.1±2.1 MPa) groups. However, there were no significant differences between acid etching and acid+laser groups, and between laser+acid and laser groups. Conclusion. When the cavity is prepared by bur, it is not necessary to etch the dentin surface by Er:YAG laser following acid etching and acid etching after laser etching. PMID:23875083

  8. Restorative approaches to treat dentin caries in preschool children: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duangthip, D; Jiang, M; Chu, C H; Lo, E C M

    2016-06-01

    Dental restorations have long been used for the management of early childhood caries, but there is a need to have an evidence based approach when selecting the most appropriate restorative intervention to treat dentin caries in preschool children. This systematic review aimed to assess the effectiveness of restorative treatments of dentin caries in primary teeth in preschool children. A systematic search of the main electronic databases (Pubmed, Cochrane Collaboration, EMBASE) was conducted to identify peer reviewed papers published in English in the years 1947-2014. Search keywords and MeSH headings were "dental caries", "primary dentition" and "dental restoration". The inclusion criteria were clinical studies conducted in children under 6 years old, and reported findings on the longevity or failure of restorations in primary teeth. Retrieved papers were read by two reviewers independently to assess suitability for inclusion, and the final decision was made by consensus. The quality of the included studies was assessed and data were extracted for analysis. The search identified 348 papers for screening. Among these, 218 papers did not satisfy the study inclusion criteria. Consequently, 130 full papers were retrieved and reviewed. Finally, 9 papers were included. Most of the trials were assessed as having high risk of bias. Five included studies that compared the success rates of restorations with different filling materials and liner materials. Two studies showed clinical advantages of using minimally invasive approaches in caries removal and cavity preparation. The other two trials showed low success rates of interim GI restorations done in a field setting, compared to the high caries arrest rates of silver diammine fluoride application. Within the limitation of this systematic review, there is insufficient evidence to make recommendations regarding which material and technique is the most appropriate for restorative treatment in young children. Minimally

  9. Influence of multi-wavelength laser irradiation of enamel and dentin surfaces on surface morphology and permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Nai-Yuan N.; Jew, Jamison; Simon, Jacob C.; Chan, Kenneth H.; Lee, Robert C.; Fried, William A.; Cho, Jinny; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    UV and IR lasers can be used to specifically target protein, water, and the mineral phase of dental hard tissues to produce varying changes in surface morphology. In this study, we irradiated enamel and dentin surfaces with various combinations of lasers operating at 0.355, 2.94, and 9.4 μm, exposed those surfaces to topical fluoride, and subsequently evaluated the influence of these changes on surface morphology and permeability. Digital microscopy and surface dehydration rate measurements were used to monitor changes in the samples overtime. The surface morphology and permeability (dehydration rate) varied markedly with the different laser treatments on enamel. On dentin, fluoride was most effective in reducing the permeability.

  10. Changes in the permeability and morphology of dentine surfaces after brushing with a Thai herbal toothpaste: A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajrabhaya, La-Ongthong; Korsuwannawong, Suwanna; Harnirattisai, Choltacha; Teinchai, Chayada

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate dentine permeability after brushing with Twin Lotus(®), Thai herbal toothpaste by comparing with Sensodyne Rapid Relief(®), a commercial desensitizing toothpaste, and also after artificial saliva (AS) immersion or citric acid challenge. Dentine discs from human mandibular third molars were divided into three groups (n = 20) and brushed with either experimental toothpaste or water (control) for 2 min with an automated toothbrush. Then, 10 discs were immersed in AS, and the other 10 discs were immersed in 6% citric acid to simulate the conditions of the oral environment. The dentine permeability of each specimen was measured before brushing and after each treatment using a fluid filtration system. Morphological changes in the dentine were observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Both toothpastes significantly reduced dentine permeability, and a crystalline precipitate was observed on the dentine surface under SEM observation. No significant difference was found between the two toothpaste groups with regard to dentine permeability after brushing and AS or acid immersion. The dentine permeability reduction caused by the two toothpastes did not differ after brushing or after AS or citric acid immersion.

  11. Shear bond strength of self-adhering flowable composite on dentin surface as a result of scrubbing pressure and duration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferry Jaya

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Self-adhering flowable composite is a combination of composite resin and adhesive material. Its application needs scrubbing process on the dentin surface, but sometimes it is difficult to determine the pressure and duration of scrubbing. Purpose: This study was aimed to analyze the effect of scrubbing pressure and duration on shear bond strength of self-adhering flowable composite to dentin surface Methods: Fifty four mandibulary third molar were cut to get the dentin surface and divided into nine groups (n = 6. Dentin surface was scrubbed with 1, 2, and 3 grams of scrubbing pressure, each for 15, 20, and 25 seconds respectively. surface was scrubbed with 1, 2, and 3 grams of scrubbing pressure, each for 15, 20, and 25 seconds respectively. Composite resin was applied incrementally and polymerized for 20 seconds. All specimens were immersed in saline solution at 37º C for 24 hours. Shear bond strength was tested for all specimens by using Universal Testing Machine (Shimadzu AG-5000E, Japan at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute and analyzed by ANOVA and Post Hoc Test Bonferonni. The interface between self-adhering flowable interface between self-adhering flowable composite and dentin was observed with a Scanning Electron Microscope (JEOL JSM 6510LA. Results: The highest shear bond strength was obtained by 3 grams scrubbing pressure for 25 seconds or equal to applying the brush applicator in 0º relative to dentin surface. Conclusion: Increasing the scrubbing pressure and duration will increase the shear bond strength of self adhering flowable composite resin to dentinal surface. The highest shear bond strength was obtained when the applicator in 0º relative to dentin surface. Latar belakang: Self-adhering flowable composite merupakan gabungan resin komposit dengan material adhesif yang dalam penggunaannya memerlukan teknik scrubbing pada permukaan dentin, namun sulit untuk menentukan besar tekanan yang tepat saat scrubbing. Tujuan

  12. Combination of aligned PLGA/Gelatin electrospun sheets, native dental pulp extracellular matrix and treated dentin matrix as substrates for tooth root regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Chen, Jinlong; Yang, Bo; Li, Lei; Luo, Xiangyou; Zhang, Xuexin; Feng, Lian; Jiang, Zongting; Yu, Mei; Guo, Weihua; Tian, Weidong

    2015-06-01

    In tissue engineering, scaffold materials provide effective structural support to promote the repair of damaged tissues or organs through simulating the extracellular matrix (ECM) microenvironments for stem cells. This study hypothesized that simulating the ECM microenvironments of periodontium and dental pulp/dentin complexes would contribute to the regeneration of tooth root. Here, aligned PLGA/Gelatin electrospun sheet (APES), treated dentin matrix (TDM) and native dental pulp extracellular matrix (DPEM) were fabricated and combined into APES/TDM and DPEM/TDM for periodontium and dental pulp regeneration, respectively. This study firstly examined the physicochemical properties and biocompatibilities of both APES and DPEM in vitro, and further investigated the degradation of APES and revascularization of DPEM in vivo. Then, the potency of APES/TDM and DPEM/TDM in odontogenic induction was evaluated via co-culture with dental stem cells. Finally, we verified the periodontium and dental pulp/dentin complex regeneration in the jaw of miniature swine. Results showed that APES possessed aligned fiber orientation which guided cell proliferation while DPEM preserved the intrinsic fiber structure and ECM proteins. Importantly, both APES/TDM and DPEM/TDM facilitated the odontogenic differentiation of dental stem cells in vitro. Seeded with stem cells, the sandwich composites (APES/TDM/DPEM) generated tooth root-like tissues after being transplanted in porcine jaws for 12 w. In dental pulp/dentin complex-like tissues, columnar odontoblasts-like layer arranged along the interface between newly-formed predentin matrix and dental pulp-like tissues in which blood vessels could be found; in periodontium complex-like tissues, cellular cementum and periodontal ligament (PDL)-like tissues were generated on the TDM surface. Thus, above results suggest that APES and DPEM exhibiting appropriate physicochemical properties and well biocompatibilities, in accompany with TDM, could

  13. Immunolocalization of dentin matrix protein-1 in human primary teeth treated with different pulp capping materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenço Neto, Natalino; Marques, Nádia C T; Fernandes, Ana Paula; Rodini, Camila O; Sakai, Vivien T; Abdo, Ruy Cesar C; Machado, Maria Aparecida A M; Santos, Carlos F; Oliveira, Thais M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the immunolocalization of dentin matrix protein (DMP)-1 in human primary teeth treated with different pulp capping materials. Twenty-five primary molars were divided into the following groups: formocresol (FC), calcium hydroxide (CH), mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), corticosteroid/antibiotic solution + CH (O + CH), and Portland cement (PC), and all received conventional pulpotomy treatment. The teeth at the regular exfoliation period were extracted for histological analysis and immunolocalization of DMP-1. Statistical analysis was performed using the χ(2) test (p < 0.05). Histological analysis revealed statistically significant differences in the comparison among the groups through the use of a score system regarding the presence of hard tissue barrier, odontoblastic layer, and internal resorption, but not regarding pulp calcification. Immunohistochemical analysis showed immunostaining for DMP-1 in groups CH, MTA, O + CH, and PC. Internal resorption was observed in the groups FC and CH. MTA and PC showed pulp repair without inflammation and with the presence of hard tissue barrier. DMP-1 immunostaining was higher for MTA and PC, confirming the reparative and bioinductive capacity of these materials.

  14. Effects of NaOCl or Combination of NaOCl and Various Acids on Dentin Surface Morphology: A SEM Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gökçe Kağan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate by SEM morphological changes of dentin surfaces under the use of 5% NaOCl before applying different acids for etching. In the study, dentin surfaces were prepared from the middle third of 20 non-carious human third molars. Samples were divided into 2 groups with 3 subgroups each. In the first group, no application was performed on dentin surfaces. In the second group, 5% NaOCl was applied for 60 seconds on the dentin surfaces then rinsed with distilled water for 5 seconds. In all of the subgroups, dentin surfaces were etched by different conditioning agents for 15 seconds then rinsed for 30 seconds. After surface applications, all of the specimens were placed in distilled water. Morphological changes of dentin surfaces were determined by SEM. The results were evaluated by the scoring system based on Brannström et al.

  15. Effects of Er:YAG and Nd:YAP laser irradiation on the surface roughness and free surface energy of enamel and dentin: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armengol, Valerie; Laboux, O; Weiss, P; Jean, A; Hamel, H

    2003-01-01

    Sixty-seven extracted molars were selected (134 samples). Dentin and enamel samples were prepared by buccal and lingual surface sectioning to expose a planar enamel or dentin surface. For the roughness study, 80 samples were randomly assigned to eight groups. Enamel and dentin surfaces were etched with a 37% phosphoric acid solution, irradiated with an Er:YAG laser or irradiated with a Nd:YAP laser. Samples were then observed in SEM using BSE. For the free-surface energy study, 54 samples received the same treatment as above. Two contact angle measurements were made on each surface using a goniometer. Data were analyzed by a non-parametric statistical test. Morphological changes on enamel and dentin were greater with acid-etch and Er:YAG laser than with Nd:YAP laser. Free surface energy was significantly greater with acid-etch or Er:YAG laser than with Nd:YAP laser (p < 0.001).

  16. Micromorphology and bond strength evaluation of adhesive interface of a self-adhering flowable composite resin-dentin: Effect of surface treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Saadat, Maryam

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluated the effect of dentin surface treatment on the micromorphology and shear bond strength (SBS) of a self-adhering flowable composite, Vertis Flow (VF). Flat dentin surfaces obtained from sixty extracted human molars were divided into six groups (n = 10) according to the following surface treatments: (G1) control, no treatment; (G2) self-etching adhesive, Optibond All-in-One; (G3) phosphoric acid etching for 15 s; (G4) polyacrylic acid for 10 s; (G5) EDTA for 60 s; and G6) sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) for 15 s. After restoration using VF, SBS was measured in MPa. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tamhane test (α = 0.05). Six additional specimens were prepared for scanning electron microscopy analysis. SBS was significantly affected by surface treatment (P < 0.001). SBS of six groups from the highest to the lowest were as follows: (G3) 13.5(A); (G5) 8.98(AB); (G2) 8.85(AB); (G4) 8.21(AB); (G1) 7.53(BC); and (G6) 4.49(C) (groups with the same superscript letter were statistically similar). Morphological analysis revealed numerous long resin tags at the adhesive interface for acid-etched group, with a few short resin tags for the control group and small gap formation for NaOCl-treated group. In conclusion, dentin surface treatments tested differently affected bonding performance of VF; only acid-etching effectively improved this.

  17. The hardness and chemical changes in demineralized primary dentin treated by fluoride and glass ionomer cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Fernandes DIAS

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluoride plays an important role in the control of dental caries. Aim To evaluate the chemical exchange between restoration of glass ionomer cement of high viscosity (GIC and primary dentin with application of sodium fluoride (NaF 2% through changes in hardness from uptake of calcium, phosphate and fluoride. Material and method Class I cavities were prepared in 40 sound primary molars, and the sample was divided into two groups (n=20 according to dentin condition: sound (1 and demineralized (2. Sub-groups (n=10 were formed to investigate the isolated action of the GIC or the association with NaF (F. This in vitro study examined the chemical exchange under two conditions, sound and demineralized dentin (pH cycling, to simulate the occurrence of mineral loss for the caries lesion. G1 and G2 received GIC restoration only; groups G1F and G2F received NaF before GIC restoration. The specimens were prepared for Knoop hardness test and micro-Raman spectroscopy. A two-way ANOVA test (α = 0.05 was used for statistical analysis. Micro-Raman data were qualitatively described. Result Increased hardness was observed in all the sites of direct contact with GIC in sound and demineralized dentin for all groups (p0.05. In the evaluation of micro-Raman, direct contact between GIC and dentin for sound and demineralized dentin resulted in increased peaks of phosphate. Conclusion The exchange between GIC and demineralized dentin may induce changes of mechanical properties of the substrate, and uptake of mineral ions (phosphate occurs without the influence of NaF.

  18. [Dentin adhesives. An update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandini, R; Novelli, C; Pierleoni, P

    1991-11-01

    Even if mechanical bonding to enamel utilizing the acid-etch technique has been very successful, adhesion to dentin is still a challenge to researchers and clinicians. Dentin is a vital tissue and differs in composition from enamel: acid-etching does not enhance the bond strength of composite resins to dentin and may elicit a severe pulpal response. For an effective bond to occur, a dentin bonding system has to be used. The first generation of methacrylate-based dentin adhesives was capable of chemical bonding to the inorganic phase of dentin. The chemical basis for this resin-dentin adhesive was the interaction between a phosphate group attached to the methacrylate and the calcium ions on the dentin surface. This system yielded rather low bond strengths which were clinically unsatisfying. The second generation of dentin adhesives became available to the profession recently. Each of these new bonding systems use similar chemical composition for the same purpose of bonding with physicochemical interaction to the hard tooth tissues. All these systems contain a mild acid dentin conditioner to remove the smear layer and an aqueous resin containing primer to improve monomer penetration into the hydrophilic dentin surface. The second generation dentin bonding systems are extremely sensitive to variations upon the completeness of instructions and how accurately these are followed by dental practitioners.

  19. Modification of the dentin surface by using carbon nanotubes.

    OpenAIRE

    Akasaka, Tsukasa; Nakata, Keiko; Uo, Motohiro; WATARI, Fumio

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be used as biomedical materials because of their unique properties. CNTs effect nucleation of hydroxyapatite, because of which considerable interest has been generated regarding the use of CNTs in dentistry. However, there are only a few reports on the use of CNTs as dental materials. In this study, we investigated the changes induced in the surfaces of tooth slices by the application of a coating of CNTs by observing CNT-coated tooth...

  20. Adhesion of composite to enamel and dentin surfaces irradiated by IR laser pulses of 0.5-35 micros duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staninec, Michal; Gardner, Andrew K; Le, Charles Q; Sarma, Anupama V; Fried, Daniel

    2006-10-01

    The characteristics of laser-treated tooth surfaces depend on the laser wavelength, pulse duration, spatial and temporal laser beam quality, incident fluence, surface roughness, and the presence of water during irradiation. Ablated surfaces are most commonly restored with adhesive dental materials and the characteristics of the ablated surfaces influence adhesion of restorative materials. Previous studies suggest that high bond strengths can be achieved using shorter laser pulses that minimize peripheral thermal damage. In this study, Er:YSGG, Er:YAG, and CO(2) lasers were used at irradiation intensities sufficient to simulate efficient clinical caries removal to uniformly irradiate bovine enamel and human dentin surfaces using a motion control system with a microprocessor-controlled water spray. The degree of spatial overlap of adjacent pulses was varied so as to investigate the influence of irradiation uniformity and surface roughness on the bond strength. Composite resin was bonded to the irradiated surfaces and shear bond tests were used to obtain bond strengths in MPa. The highest results were obtained using the Er:YAG pulses with pulse durations less than 35 mus without the necessity for postirradiation acid etching. Some of these groups were not significantly different from nonirradiated, acid-etch-only positive control groups.

  1. Effects of surface treatment on the microtensile bond strength of ceramic materials to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcellos, Walison A; Alvim, Hugo H; Saad, Jose R C; Susin, Alexandre H

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of distinct surface treatments on the micro-tensile bonding strength (microTBS) of different ceramic materials. The occlusal surfaces of eighteen human maxillary molars were flattened perpendicularly to the long axis and divided in groups based on surface treatment (sandblasting: s; hydrofluoric acid: a; tribochemical silica coating: t): DP-s, DP-a, DP-t, IE-s, IE-a, IE-t, IC-s, IC-a, IC-t) and ceramic materials (Duceran Plus: DP, IPS Empress 2: IE, In-Ceram Alumina, IC). Panavia F luting resins were used according to the manufacturers' instructions to bond ceramic materials to the exposed dentin specimens under a load of 7.5 N. After 3-day storage, microTBS was tested at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey's test. ANOVA results showed that the microTBS of DP and IC were significantly different. The microTBS of DP-a was significantly higher than those of DP-s and DP-t. The microTBS of IC-t was significantly higher than those of IC-s and IC-a. Ceramic materials with different chemical formulations and applications yielded significantly different bond strengths to human dentin and must receive distinct surface treatments accordingly.

  2. Growth Factor Liberation and DPSC Response Following Dentine Conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadaghiani, L; Gleeson, H B; Youde, S; Waddington, R J; Lynch, C D; Sloan, A J

    2016-10-01

    Liberation of the sequestrated bioactive molecules from dentine by the action of applied dental materials has been proposed as an important mechanism in inducing a dentinogenic response in teeth with viable pulps. Although adhesive restorations and dentine-bonding procedures are routinely practiced, clinical protocols to improve pulp protection and dentine regeneration are not currently driven by biological knowledge. This study investigated the effect of dentine (powder and slice) conditioning by etchants/conditioners relevant to adhesive restorative systems on growth factor solubilization and odontoblast-like cell differentiation of human dental pulp progenitor cells (DPSCs). The agents included ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA; 10%, pH 7.2), phosphoric acid (37%, pH EDTA, phosphoric acid, and citric acid from powdered dentine. The dentine matrix extracts were shown to be bioactive, capable of stimulating odontogenic/osteogenic differentiation as observed by gene expression and phenotypic changes in DPSCs cultured in monolayer on plastic. Polyacrylic acid failed to solubilize proteins from powdered dentine and was therefore considered ineffective in triggering a growth factor-mediated response in cells. The study went on to investigate the effect of conditioning dentine slices on growth factor liberation and DPSC behavior. Conditioning by EDTA, phosphoric acid, and citric acid exposed growth factors on dentine and triggered an upregulation in genes associated with mineralized differentiation, osteopontin, and alkaline phosphatase in DPSCs cultured on dentine. The cells demonstrated odontoblast-like appearances with elongated bodies and long extracellular processes extending on dentine surface. However, phosphoric acid-treated dentine appeared strikingly less populated with cells, suggesting a detrimental impact on cell attachment and growth when conditioning by this agent. These findings take crucial steps in informing clinical practice on dentine

  3. Dentin conditioning codetermines cell fate in regenerative endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galler, Kerstin M; D'Souza, Rena N; Federlin, Marianne; Cavender, Adriana C; Hartgerink, Jeffrey D; Hecker, Stephanie; Schmalz, Gottfried

    2011-11-01

    Recent successes in dental pulp engineering indicate that regenerative treatment strategies in endodontics are feasible. Clinically, revascularization procedures render completion of root formation in immature teeth. The generation of a pulp-like tissue after seeding of dental pulp stem cells into dentin discs or cylinders and transplantation in vivo is possible. In this experimental setup, which mimics the situation in the root canal, the pretreatment of dentin might influence cellular behavior at the cell-dentin interface. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate whether dentin conditioning can determine cell fate. Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) were seeded into a growth factor-laden peptide hydrogel, transferred into dentin cylinders, and transplanted subcutaneously into immunocompromised mice. Before cell seeding, dentin cylinders were either pretreated with sodium hypochloride (NaOCl) or conditioned with EDTA. The constructs were explanted after 6 weeks and subjected to histological and immunohistochemical analysis. In dentin treated with NaOCl, resorption lacunae were found at the cell-dentin interface created by multinucleated cells with clastic activity. After conditioning with EDTA, DPSCs adjacent to the dentin formed an intimate association with the surface, differentiated into odontoblasts-like cells that expressed dentin sialoprotein, and extended cellular processes into the dentinal tubules. A vascularized soft connective tissue similar to dental pulp was observed inside the dentin cylinder. Dentin conditioning considerably influences DPSC fate when seeded in close proximity to dentin. This information might be critical for optimized strategic planning for future regenerative endodontic treatment. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The effect of three different antioxidants on the dentinal tubular penetration of Resilon and Real Seal SE on sodium hypochlorite-treated root canal dentin: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Renjelina Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The effect of 10% ascorbic acid, 10% tannic acid, and 10% gallic acid on the dentinal tubular penetration of Resilon and Real Seal SE on sodium hypochlorite-treated root canal dentin was evaluated. Materials and Methods: Fifty human premolars were decoronated to attain 14-mm root length and divided into five groups of 10 teeth each. Biomechanical preparation was done with rotary instruments. Group I specimens were irrigated with saline and 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA. Specimens from groups II, III, IV, and V were irrigated with 5.25% sodium hypochlorite and 17% EDTA. Specimens from groups III, IV, and V underwent additional irrigation with antioxidants-10% ascorbic acid, 10% tannic acid, and 10% gallic acid, respectively. Following obturation with Resilon and Real Seal SE, scanning electron microscope (SEM analysis was done to note the maximum dentinal tubular penetration at the cervical, middle, and apical thirds of each specimen. The data were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, Post hoc and Dunnett′s test. Results: Maximum dentinal tubular penetration of Resilon and Real Seal SE was obtained following irrigation with 10% gallic acid. Conclusion: 10% gallic acid was superior among the antioxidant irrigants that enabled the increased dentinal tubular penetration of Resilon and Real Seal SE.

  5. Effect of surface treatments on the flexural properties and adhesion of glass fiber-reinforced composite post to self-adhesive luting agent and radicular dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnaghy, Amr M; Elsaka, Shaymaa E

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of different surface treatments on the flexural properties and adhesion of glass fiber post to self-adhesive luting agent and radicular dentin. Seventy-five single-rooted human teeth were prepared to receive a glass fiber post (Reblida). The posts were divided into five groups according to the surface treatment: Gr C (control; no treatment), Gr S (silanization for 60 s), Gr AP (airborne-particle abrasion), Gr HF (etching with 9 % hydrofluoric acid for 1 min), and Gr M10 (etching with CH2Cl2 for 10 min). Dual-cure self-adhesive luting agent (Rely X Unicem) was applied to each group for testing the adhesion using micropush-out test. Failure types were examined with stereomicroscope and surface morphology of the posts was characterized using a scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Flexural properties of posts were assessed using a three-point bending test. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test. Statistical significance was set at the 0.05 probability level. Groups treated with M10 showed significantly higher bond strength than those obtained with other surface treatments (P C > S > AP > HF. Most failure modes were adhesive type of failures between dentin and luting agent (48.2%). SEM analysis revealed that the fiber post surfaces were modified after surface treatments. The surface treatments did not compromise the flexural properties of fiber posts. Application of M10 to the fiber post surfaces enhanced the adhesion to self-adhesive luting agent and radicular dentin.

  6. Interactions of dentine desensitisers with human dentine: morphology and composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliades, George; Mantzourani, Maria; Labella, Roberto; Mutti, Bruna; Sharma, Deepak

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the effect of desensitising agents on human dentine morphology and composition. Randomly assigned human coronal-dentine specimens were subjected to: (a) no treatment (smear-layer control, n=4); (b) acid etching with 6% citric acid (demineralised control, n=4); (c) treatment with desensitising agents (12 cycles of 60 s treatment with 60 s between-treatment rinsing, n=6 per agent); and (d) exposure to acidic challenge (pH 5.0 for 90 s, n=6 per agent). The tested products were: Listerine® Advanced Defence Sensitive (LADS; 1.4% potassium oxalate) mouthrinse, Colgate® Sensitive Pro-Relief™ mouthrinse, and toothpaste slurries (paste/water 1:2 wt/wt ratio) of Colgate® Sensitive Pro-Relief™ paste, Crest® Sensitive paste and Sensodyne® Repair and Protect paste. All dentine surfaces were studied by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, Raman microscopy and high vacuum scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (HV-SEM/EDX). Desensitising slurry treatments occluded tubule orifices of acid-etched dentine, creating a randomly distributed surface pattern of particle aggregates. The greatest intratubular penetration of occluding particles was found in dentine treated with LADS. The atomic ratios of Ca/N and Ca/P, and the mineral/matrix ratios increased after toothpaste-slurry treatments compared with the acid-etched dentine. However, the acidic challenge removed most surface precipitates and further demineralised these substrates. Before the acidic challenge, the surface features were least affected in specimens treated with Sensodyne® Repair and Protect. After the acidic challenge, the sub-surface occlusion features were least affected in specimens treated with LADS. Although most tested products achieved occlusion of dentinal tubules and provided evidence of mineral deposits, the deposit formed by LADS demonstrated the greatest resistance to acidic challenge, which simulates intra

  7. Effect of dentin surface roughness on the shear bond strength of resin bonded restorations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koodaryan, Roodabeh; Poursoltan, Sajjad

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE This study aimed to investigate whether dentin surface preparation with diamond rotary instruments of different grit sizes affects the shear bond strength of resin-bonded restorations. MATERIALS AND METHODS The buccal enamel of 60 maxillary central incisors was removed with a low speed diamond saw and wet ground with silicon carbide papers. The polished surfaces of the teeth were prepared with four groups of rotary diamond burs with super-coarse (SC), coarse (C), medium (M), and fine (F) grit sizes. Following surface preparation, 60 restorations were casted with nickel-chromium alloy and bonded with Panavia cement. To assess the shear bond strength, the samples were mounted on a universal testing machine and an axial load was applied along the cement-restoration interface at the crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The acquired data was analyzed with one way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc test (α=.05). RESULTS The mean ± SD shear bond strengths (in MPa) of the study groups were 17.75 ± 1.41 for SC, 13.82 ± 1.13 for C, 10.40 ± 1.45 for M, and 7.13 ± 1.18 for F. Statistical analysis revealed the significant difference among the study groups such that the value for group SC was significantly higher than that for group F (P<.001). CONCLUSION Dentin surface roughness created by diamond burs of different grit sizes considerably influences the shear bond strength of resin bonded restorations. PMID:27350858

  8. SEM evaluation of demineralized dentin treated with professional-strength NaF topical pastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlinsey, Robert L; Mackey, Allen C; Schwandt, Craig S; Walker, Trenton J

    2011-12-01

    To qualitatively explore the effects of prescription-strength topical NaF pastes on patent tubules in a pH cycling model comprising remineralization and demineralization phases. 3 mm diameter dentin cores were extracted from bovine teeth, mounted in acrylic rods, ground and polished, and initially demineralized in 10 mL unstirred 50% citric acid (pH = 1.2) for 2 minutes to remove the smear layer and expose the dentin tubules. 72 acceptable specimens were then divided into six groups (12 per group) and subjected to a two-phase pH cycling study. The six pastes evaluated were as follows: fluoride-free Silly Strawberry, Clinpro 5000 and Clinpro Tooth Crème, MI Paste Plus, Sensodyne NUPRO 5000 and Topex Renew. First, the specimens were subjected to a remineralization regimen (Phase A), with each day comprising inverted immersion of specimens in three paste treatments (10 g paste: 20 mL distilled water) performed for 1 minute apiece with the immersion in artificial saliva (pH = 7.0) for 2 hours in between each treatment as well as overnight. After 7 days, the specimens were imaged using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). The remaining six specimens from each group were then cycled through a demineralization regimen (Phase B), with each day comprising inverted immersion of specimens in three rounds of a 1-minute treatment (10 g paste: 20 ml distilled water) followed immediately by a 3-minute static acid challenge (0.3% citric acid, pH = 3.8) with 2 hours in artificial saliva in between each round as well as overnight. After 3 days, the specimens were again imaged using FESEM. After the Phase A regimen (i.e. remineralization phase), treatment with Silly Strawberry (fluoride-free), Sensodyne NUPRO 5000 and Topex Renew yielded qualitatively similar tubule pore appearance, whereby deposits appeared to have formed around the tubule openings. Clinpro 5000, MI Paste Plus and Clinpro Tooth Crème appeared to occlude dentin tubules as shown by the relatively

  9. Application of a proanthocyanidin agent to improve the bond strength of root dentin treated with sodium hypochlorite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Sujatha Manimaran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The objective of this study was to analyze the application of PA agent that improves the bond strength of root dentin treated with NaOCl. Materials and Methods: Group 1: root canals were irrigated using 0.9% isotonic saline as an irrigant (negative control; Group 2: root canals were irrigated using 5.25% NaOCl (positive control; Group 3: root canals were irrigated with 5.25% NaOCl followed by 10% sodium ascorbate for 10 minutes; Group 4: root canals were irrigated with 5.25% NaOCl followed by 5% PA for 10 minutes. All the canals were then coated with self-etch dentin bonding agent, filled with resin cement, stored for one day in water, and then cross sectioned into three slabs of 2-mm thickness that were prepared and tested for microtensile bond strength. Results: The results demonstrated that 5.25% NaOCl caused significant reduction (P<0.05 in the bond strength, but this can be reversed by 5% PA significantly more than the 10% sodium ascorbate.

  10. Effect of different surface treatments on adhesion of In-Ceram Zirconia to enamel and dentin substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saker, Samah; Ibrahim, Fatma; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2013-08-01

    Resin bonding of In-Ceram Zirconia (ICZ) ceramics is still a challenge, especially for minimally invasive applications. This study evaluated the adhesion of ICZ to enamel and dentin after different surface treatments of the ceramic. ICZ ceramic specimens (diameter: 6 mm; thickness: 2 mm) (N = 100) were fabricated following the manufacturer's instructions and randomly assigned to 5 groups (n = 20), according to the surface treatment methods applied. The groups were as follows: group C: no treatment; group SB: sandblasting; group SCS-S: CoJet+silane; group SCS-P: CoJet+Alloy Primer; group GE-S: glaze+ hydrofluoric acid etching (9.6%) for 60 s+silane. Each group was randomly divided into two subgroups to be bonded to either enamel or dentin (n = 10 per group) using MDP-based resin cement (Panavia F2.0). All the specimens were subjected to thermocycling (5000x, 5°C-55°C). The specimens were mounted in a universal testing machine and tensile force was applied to the ceramic/cement interface until failure occurred (1 mm/min). After evaluating all the debonded specimens under SEM, the failure types were defined as either "adhesive" with no cement left on the ceramic surface (score 0) or "mixed" with less than 1/2 of the cement left adhered to the surface with no cohesive failure of the substrate (score 1). The data were statistically evaluated using 2-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α = 0.05). The highest tensile bond strength for the enamel surfaces was obtained in group GE-S (18.1 ± 2 MPa) and the lowest in group SB (7.1 ± 1.4 MPa). Regarding dentin, group CSC-P showed the highest (12 ± 1.3 MPa) and SB the lowest tensile bond strength (5.7 ± 0.4 MPa). Groups SB, CSC-S, CSC-P, and GE-S did not show significant differences between the different surface treatments on either enamel or dentin surfaces (p enamel and dentin substrates (p enamel substrates, exclusively adhesive failures from ICZ (score 0) were found, on dentin exclusively mixed failures were observed (score

  11. Dentinal surface-cutting efficiency using a high-speed diamond bur, ultrasound and laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, M.; Quinelato, A.; Youssef, F.; Pelino, J. E. Pelizon; Salvadori, M. C.; Mori, M.

    2008-04-01

    We compare an ultrasound bur with a conventional one and an Er:YAG laser for cavity preparations. Human molars were embedded in resin and sliced for this study. The surface abrasion was performed by a high-speed instrument and ultrasound. The cavity preparation was initially performed with a high-speed diamond bur. After this, a 2.94-μm laser with 400 mJ/pulse at 4 Hz, and a pulse width from 250-500 μs was applied to the tooth surface for 30 s in a sweeping motion. The samples were analyzed by SEM. The abrasion surface with a conventional bur showed structure removal with different grooves, a smear-layer presence, and occluded dentinal tubules. The abraded surface with the CVD bur suggested a removal process in layers. The laser-irradiated surface showed a rough aspect with opened tubules and the absence of a smear layer. The results of this study suggest that a high-speed diamond bur, ultrasound, and laser were able to perform cavity preparation. However, the CVD bur presented a higher surface quality.

  12. Dentin permeability: determinants of hydraulic conductance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeder, O W; Walton, R E; Livingston, M J; Pashley, D H

    1978-02-01

    A technique is described which permits measurements of the ease with which fluid permeates dentin. This value, the hydraulic conductance of dentin, increased as surface area increases and/or as dentin thickness decreases. It increased 32-fold when dentin was acid etched due to removal of surface debris occluding the tubules.

  13. Microtensile bond strength analysis of adhesive systems to Er:YAG and Er,Cr:YSGG laser-treated dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Thaysa Monteiro; Ramos-Oliveira, Thayanne Monteiro; Moretto, Simone Gonçalves; de Freitas, Patricia Moreira; Esteves-Oliveira, Marcella; de Paula Eduardo, Carlos

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of different surface treatments (control, diamond bur, erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser, and erbium, chromium:yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser) on sound dentin surface morphology and on microtensile bond strength (μTBS). Sixteen dentin fragments were randomly divided into four groups (n = 4), and different surface treatments were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Ninety-six third molars were randomly divided into eight groups (n = 12) according to type of surface treatment and adhesive system: G1 = Control + Clearfil SE Bond (SE); G2 = Control + Single Bond (SB); G3 = diamond bur (DB) + SE; G4 = DB + SB, G5 = Er:YAG laser (2.94 μm, 60 mJ, 2 Hz, 0.12 W, 19.3 J/cm(2)) + SE; G6 = Er:YAG + SB, G7 = Er,Cr:YSGG laser (2.78 μm, 50 mJ, 30 Hz, 1.5 W, 4.5 J/cm(2)) + SE; and G8 = Er,Cr:YSGG + SB. Composite blocks were bonded to the samples, and after 24-h storage in distilled/deionized water (37 °C), stick-shaped samples were obtained and submitted to μTBS test. Bond strength values (in megapascal) were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey tests (α = 0.05). G1 (54.69 ± 7.8 MPa) showed the highest mean, which was statistically significantly higher than all the other groups (p systems did not differ statistically from each other. Based on the irradiation parameters considered in this study, it can be concluded that Er:YAG and Er,Cr:YSGG irradiation presented lower values than the control group; however, their association with self-etching adhesive does not have a significantly negative effect on sound dentin (μTBS values of >20 MPa).

  14. Strain Distribution in Root Surface Dentin of Maxillary Central Incisors during Lateral Compaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Pilo

    Full Text Available To precisely quantify the circumferential strains created along the radicular dentin of maxillary incisors during a simulated clinical procedure of lateral compaction.Six miniature strain gauges were bonded on the roots of fourteen recently extracted maxillary central incisors that were subjected to root canal instrumentation. The strain gauges were bonded at three levels (apical, middle, and coronal and four aspects (buccal, lingual, mesial, and distal of the roots. Each tooth was embedded in a PVC cylinder containing polyvinyl-siloxane impression material. Root filling was then performed by simulating the clinical procedure of lateral compaction using nickel-titanium finger spreaders. The force applied to the spreader and the strains developing in the surface root dentin were continuously recorded at a frequency of 10 Hz.The highest strains that developed during lateral compaction were in the mesial and distal aspects at the apical level of the root. The magnitudes of the maximal mesial/distal strains at the apical as well as the mid-root levels were approximately 2.5-3 times higher than those at the buccal/lingual aspects (p = 0.041. The strains decreased significantly (p<0.04 from the apical through the mid-root levels to the coronal level, yielding gradients of 2.5- and 6-fold, respectively. The mesial and distal strains were consistently tensile and did not differ significantly; however, the buccal strains were generally 35-65% higher than the lingual strains (p = 0.078. Lateral compaction resulted in the gradual build-up of residual strains, resulting in generation of a 'stair-step' curve. These strains declined gradually and almost completely disappeared after 1000 sec.With proper mounting of several miniature strain gauges at various levels and aspects of the root, significant circumferential strains can be monitored under clinically relevant compaction forces. The residual strains at the end of lateral compaction are not stored in the

  15. A scanning electron microscopic study of different caries removal techniques on human dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, A Rüya; Ozgünaltay, Gül; Dayangaç, Berrin

    2002-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) evaluated the effect of different caries removal techniques on human dentin topography. Thirty-six extracted human carious mandibular molars were randomly assigned to six groups according to caries removal technique. Carious tissue was removed by hand excavation, bur excavation, air-abrasion, laser ablation, chemomechanical methods and sono-abrasion. The remaining dentin surfaces were replicated and gold-coated. The surfaces were examined using SEM and distinct differences in appearance were observed among specimens treated with different caries removal techniques. While hand-excavated, bur-excavated and air-abraded carious dentin surfaces were covered with a residual smear layer, sono-abrasion with patent dentinal tubules completely removed the smear layer. A few patent orifices of dentinal tubules were observed in dentin subjected to laser ablation and chemo-mechanical caries removal.

  16. Chemical characterization of the dentin/adhesive interface by Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, P; Byerley, T J; Eick, J D; Witt, J D

    1992-01-01

    Irreversible bonding of composite materials to tooth structure depends on chemical as well as mechanical adhesion. The proposed bonding mechanism for several commercial dental adhesives is chemical adhesion to the dentin surface. The purpose of this in vitro investigation was to characterize the chemical nature of the surface interaction between dentin and two commercial adhesives by use of Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy (FTIR/PAS). The occlusal thirds of the crowns of freshly extracted, non-carious, unerupted human molars were sectioned perpendicular to the long axis. Dentin disks, 6 mm x 2 mm, were prepared from these sectioned teeth. The exposed dentin surface was treated with either Scotchbond 2, a BIS-GMA resin, or Dentin-Adhesit, a polyurethane resin. All spectra were recorded from 4000 to 400 cm-1 by use of an Analect RFX-65 FTIR spectrometer equipped with an MTEC Photoacoustics Model 200 photoacoustic cell. An initial spectrum of the dentin surface was collected. This surface was primed according to manufacturer's instructions and spectra recorded of the primed surface plus one to three layers of adhesive. By comparison of these spectra, it was possible for us to record changes in the phosphate and amide I and II bands due to surface interactions between the adhesive and the dentin. Although early results do not indicate covalent bonding between the dentin and these adhesives, this technique presents several advantages for spectroscopic evaluation of the dentin/adhesive interface.

  17. SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC INVESTIGATION OF DENTINAL TUBULES IN MONKEY DENTIN SCANNING ELECTRON MICROSCOPIC INVESTIGATION OF DENTINAL TUBULES IN Cebus apella DENTIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Humberto Antoniazzi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available

    The aim of the study was to investigate the number and diameter of the Cebus apella dentinal tubules. The roots of the Cebus apella teeth were examined in specific tooth locations: the apical, middle and cervical dentin. The calculations were based on the scanning electron microscope photographs of the fractured surfaces. The results showed that the average number of dentinal tubules for each location was: 74,800 tubules/mm2 for apical root dentin, 90,000 tubules/mm2 for mid-root dentin, 91,600 tubules/mm2 for cervical root dentin. The average diameter was the following: apical root dentin, 4,30µm; mid-root dentin, 4,37µm; cervical root dentin,  5,23µm. These findings demonstrate that the Cebus apella teeth are a suitable substitute for human in endodontics studies. 

    KEY WORDS: Dentin, dentinal tubules, teeth.
    The aim of the study was to investigate the number and diameter of the Cebus apella dentinal tubules. The roots of the Cebus apella teeth were examined in specific tooth locations: the apical, middle and cervical dentin. The calculations were based on the scanning electron microscope photographs of the fractured surfaces. The results showed that the average number of dentinal tubules for each location was: 74,800 tubules/mm2 for apical root dentin, 90,000 tubules/mm2 for mid-root dentin, 91,600 tubules/mm2 for cervical root dentin. The average diameter was the following: apical root dentin, 4,30µm; mid-root dentin, 4,37µm; cervical root dentin,  5,23µm. These findings demonstrate that the Cebus apella teeth are a suitable substitute for human in endodontics studies. 

    KEY WORDS: Dentin, dentinal tubules, teeth.

  18. Dentin desensitizing agents: SEM and X-ray microanalysis assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, P; Vargas, M A; Denehy, G E; Boyer, D B

    1997-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of four proprietary dentin desensitizing agents on dentin tubular occlusion, chemical composition changes on the dentin surface, and the effect of saliva and toothbrushing on these agents. Fifty dentin discs, obtained from 50 freshly extracted human premolar and molar teeth were used in this study. These were divided into five groups of 10 discs each. Five discs from each group were treated with the desensitizing agents, viewed under the SEM and subjected to energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The other five discs were treated with the desensitizing agents, immersed in artificial saliva, subjected to simulated toothbrushing equivalent to 3 weeks of normal brushing and viewed under the SEM. The agents studied were Sensodyne Dentin Desensitizer, Therma-Trol Desensitizer Gel, Gluma Desensitizer and All-Bond DS. The Kruskal-Wallis test followed by the Wilcoxon signed-rank test showed that Sensodyne Dentin Desensitizer exhibited the greatest amount of tubular occlusion among the unbrushed samples, followed by Therma-Trol Desensitizer Gel, Gluma Desensitizer and All-Bond DS (P Sensodyne Dentin Desensitizer treated samples.

  19. Catechol-Functionalized Synthetic Polymer as a Dental Adhesive to Contaminated Dentin Surface for a Composite Restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Bae; González-Cabezas, Carlos; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Kuroda, Kenichi

    2015-08-10

    This study reports a synthetic polymer functionalized with catechol groups as dental adhesives. We hypothesize that a catechol-functionalized polymer functions as a dental adhesive for wet dentin surfaces, potentially eliminating the complications associated with saliva contamination. We prepared a random copolymer containing catechol and methoxyethyl groups in the side chains. The mechanical and adhesive properties of the polymer to dentin surface in the presence of water and salivary components were determined. It was found that the new polymer combined with an Fe(3+) additive improved bond strength of a commercial dental adhesive to artificial saliva contaminated dentin surface as compared to a control sample without the polymer. Histological analysis of the bonding structures showed no leakage pattern, probably due to the formation of Fe-catechol complexes, which reinforce the bonding structures. Cytotoxicity test showed that the polymers did not inhibit human gingival fibroblast cells proliferation. Results from this study suggest a potential to reduce failure of dental restorations due to saliva contamination using catechol-functionalized polymers as dental adhesives.

  20. Catechol-Functionalized Synthetic Polymer as a Dental Adhesive to Contaminated Dentin Surface for a Composite Restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This study reports a synthetic polymer functionalized with catechol groups as dental adhesives. We hypothesize that a catechol-functionalized polymer functions as a dental adhesive for wet dentin surfaces, potentially eliminating the complications associated with saliva contamination. We prepared a random copolymer containing catechol and methoxyethyl groups in the side chains. The mechanical and adhesive properties of the polymer to dentin surface in the presence of water and salivary components were determined. It was found that the new polymer combined with an Fe3+ additive improved bond strength of a commercial dental adhesive to artificial saliva contaminated dentin surface as compared to a control sample without the polymer. Histological analysis of the bonding structures showed no leakage pattern, probably due to the formation of Fe–catechol complexes, which reinforce the bonding structures. Cytotoxicity test showed that the polymers did not inhibit human gingival fibroblast cells proliferation. Results from this study suggest a potential to reduce failure of dental restorations due to saliva contamination using catechol-functionalized polymers as dental adhesives. PMID:26176305

  1. Adipose tissue-deprived stem cells acquire cementoblast features treated with dental follicle cell conditioned medium containing dentin non-collagenous proteins in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Xiujie; Nie, Xin; Zhang, Li [Department of Stomatology, Daping Hospital and Research Institute of Surgery, Third Military Medical University, 10 Daping Changjiang Branch Road, Yuzhong District, Chongqing 400042 (China); Liu, Luchuan, E-mail: liuluchuan1957@126.com [Department of Stomatology, Daping Hospital and Research Institute of Surgery, Third Military Medical University, 10 Daping Changjiang Branch Road, Yuzhong District, Chongqing 400042 (China); Deng, Manjing, E-mail: iradeng@163.com [Department of Stomatology, Daping Hospital and Research Institute of Surgery, Third Military Medical University, 10 Daping Changjiang Branch Road, Yuzhong District, Chongqing 400042 (China)

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} In this study we examine the effects of dental follicle cell conditioned medium (DFCCM) containing dentin non-collagenous proteins (dNCPs) on differentiation of ADSCs. {yields} We examined that ADSCs treated with dNCPs/DFCCM underwent morphological changes and significantly lost their proliferative capacity. {yields} dNCPs/DFCCM enhanced the mineralization behaviour and mineralization-related marker expression of ADSCs. {yields} ADSCs acquired cementoblast features in vitro with dNCPs/DFCCM treatment. -- Abstract: Adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs), which are easily harvested and show excellent pluripotency potential, have generated considerable interest in regenerative medicine. In this study, the differentiation of ADSCs was assessed after treatment with dental follicle cell conditioned medium (DFCCM) containing dentin non-collagenous proteins (dNCPs). ADSCs exhibited a fibroblast-like morphology and high proliferative capacity. However, after treatment with dNCPs/DFCCM, ADSCs changed from a fibroblast-like to cementoblast-like morphology and significantly lost their proliferative capacity. Alkaline phosphatase activity and in vitro mineralization behaviour of ADSCs were significantly enhanced. Mineralization-related markers including cementum attachment protein, bone sialoprotein, osteocalcin, osteopontin and osteonectin were detected at mRNA or protein levels, whereas dentin sialophosphoprotein and dentin sialoprotein were not detected, implying a cementoblast-like phenotype. These results demonstrate that ADSCs acquired cementoblast features in vitro with dNCPs/DFCCM treatment and could be a potential source of cementogenic cells for periodontal regeneration.

  2. Effect of phytic acid etchant on resin-dentin bonding: Monomer penetration and stability of dentin collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Kalyan; Hiraishi, Noriko; Nassar, Mohannad; Otsuki, Masayuki; Yiu, Cynthia K Y; Tagami, Junji

    2017-07-01

    Phytic acid (IP6) works well as an etchant in dentin bonding to remove the smear layer due to its acidity and chelating effect. This study compared the etching effect of IP6 with phosphoric acid (PA) and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) on resin-dentin bond strength, micromorphology of the etched dentin surface and nanoleakage formation along resin-dentin interfaces and compared the protecting effect against collagen degradation. Dentin disks and flat dentin surfaces were obtained from extracted human teeth. Specimens were etched with 35% PA (15s), 0.5M EDTA (30s) or 1% IP6 (30s). The surfaces and longitudinal sections of the etched dentin disks were observed using field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). An etch-and-rinse adhesive was used to create composite build up-specimens for microtensile bond strength (μTBS) testing and nanoleakage observation. To evaluate the effect on collagen degradation, demineralized bovine root dentin blocks were challenged with bacterial collagenase and then observed under light microscope. PA- and EDTA- treated groups showed significantly lower μTBS when compared to IP6-treated group. PA showed distinct nanoleakage and severe collagen degradation. Only slight nanoleakage was detected in IP6 group. IP6 showed better effect than EDTA in preventing collagen degradation induced by bacterial collagenase. IP6 effectively removed the smear layer and etched dentin, providing high bond strength values and causing minimal nanoleakage and slight collagen degradation. Copyright © 2016 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Selective removal of carious lesion with Er:YAG laser followed by dentin biomodification with chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curylofo-Zotti, Fabiana A; Tanta, Gabriela Solano; Zucoloto, Miriane Lucindo; Souza-Gabriel, Aline E; Corona, Silmara A M

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Er:YAG laser for selective removal of carious lesion, followed by biomodification with chitosan gel where the subsurface microhardness, chemical composition, and morphological changes of the residual caries-affected dentin were examined. Artificial dentinal lesions were created by pH-cycling method (14 days) in 104 bovine specimens (5 × 5 mm). Specimens were randomly divided according to the carious removal method: bur (low-speed handpiece) or Er:YAG laser (250 mJ/4 Hz). Specimens were treated with 35% phosphoric acid and were subdivided into two groups according to dentin biomodification: without chitosan (control) and 2.5% chitosan. Forty specimens were restored with an adhesive system and composite resin. Subsurface microhardness tests were performed in sound dentin, caries-affected dentin, residual caries-affected dentin, and after the restoration. The other 64 specimens were subjected to SEM-EDS atomic analysis. Data were statistically analyzed (p carious lesions with Er:YAG laser (p  0.05). SEM analysis showed morphological changes on residual caries-affected dentin (p > 0.05). The selective removal of carious dentin with Er:YAG laser increased microhardness of residual caries-affected dentin, changing its surface morphology and chemical composition. The biomodification with chitosan did not influence the structural and chemical composition of residual caries-affected dentin.

  4. Effect of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate pre-treatment on micro-tensile bond strength of resin composite to demineralized dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, J; Itota, T; Torii, Y; Nakabo, S; Yoshiyama, M

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) application on the micro-tensile bond strength of resin composite to demineralized dentin. Artificially demineralized lesions were formed on bovine dentin surfaces and treated with 10, 30, 50, 70 and 100 wt% HEMA aqueous solution. The surfaces were then applied and covered with SE Bond and AP-X according to the manufacturer's instruction. After immersion in 37 degrees C water for 24 h, bond strength were measured using a universal testing machine. Bond strengths to both demineralized dentin and normal dentin, without HEMA application, were also measured. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observation and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) analysis at the resin-dentin interface were also performed. The bond strength data were statistically compared with anova and Scheffe's test (P Bond strength to demineralized dentin treated with over 30 wt% HEMA aqueous solution were significantly higher than that to demineralized dentin without HEMA application, but significantly lower than that to normal dentin. SEM observation revealed that the hybrid layer and resin-tags thickened and lengthened with HEMA application. In CLSM, the diffusion of adhesive primer into demineralized dentin increased with HEMA application. These results indicated that HEMA application might increase the bond strength to demineralized dentin by the enhancement of resin monomer penetration of HEMA.

  5. Effect of desensitising toothpastes on dentinal tubule occlusion: a dentine permeability measurement and SEM in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhejun; Sa, Yue; Sauro, Salvatore; Chen, Hao; Xing, Wenzhong; Ma, Xiao; Jiang, Tao; Wang, Yining

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the in vitro effectiveness of a new bioglass-containing and two commercial desensitising toothpastes on dentinal tubule occlusion after citric acid challenge or artificial saliva (AS) immersion. One hundred dentin discs from human third molars were used. Specimens were randomly divided into five groups (n=20), Group 1: EDTA-treated dentin; Group 2: brushing with distilled water; Group 3: brushing with Novamin; Group 4: brushing with Sensodyne Freshmint; Group 5: brushing with Colgate Sensitive. In each group, samples were then equally split into two subgroups (n=10) to test two post-treatments: 6% citric acid challenge or 24h immersion in artificial saliva. Dentine permeability of each specimen was measured before and after each treatment using a hydrostatic device working at 20cm H(2)O pressure. Data were analysed by two-way repeated measures ANOVA to determine if there were any significant differences within or between groups. Dentine morphology and surface deposits were observed by SEM. All three desensitising toothpastes significantly reduced dentine permeability and created precipitates on the treated dentine surfaces. Moreover, the reductions in dentine permeability showed partial recovery after a citric acid and artificial saliva immersion. Sensodyne showed significant resistant to acid attack and Novamin exhibited the lowest permeability after artificial saliva immersion for 24h. The application of the three toothpastes resulted in effective dentinal tubule occlusion. However, the new bioglass-containing toothpaste (Novamin) represented excellent occlusion effects after brushing treatment and AS immersion, while Sensodyne demonstrated more reduction in permeability when citric acid challenged.

  6. Three-dimensional finite element analysis of the stress distribution in the endodontically treated maxillary central incisor by glass fiber post and dentin post

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarfaraz Memon

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The FEA results showed that the stress in the cervical area of the dentin was more for fiber post when compared to dentin post, and maximum displacement values were less for dentin post in comparison to fiber post.

  7. Fracture Forces of Dentin after Surface Treatment with High Speed Drill Compared to Er:YAG and Er,Cr:YSGG Laser Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzen, Rene; Kianimanesh, Nasrin; Marx, Rudolf; Ahmed, Asma; Gutknecht, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Dental tooth restorative procedures may weaken the structural integrity of the tooth, with the possibility of leading to fracture. In this study we present findings of coronal dentin strength after different techniques of surface modification. The fracture strength of dentin beams after superficial material removal with a fine diamond bur high speed drill hand piece, Er:YAG (2.94 μm, 8 J/cm(2)), and Er,Cr:YSGG (2.78 μm, 7.8 J/cm(2)) laser irradiation slightly above the ablation threshold was measured by a four-point bending apparatus. Untreated dentin beams served as a control. A total of 58 dentin beams were manufactured from sterilized human extracted molars using the coronal part of the available dentin. Mean values of fracture strength were calculated as 82.0 ± 27.3 MPa for the control group (n = 10), 104.5 ± 26.3 MPa for high speed drill treatment (n = 10), 96.1 ± 28.1 MPa for Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation (n = 20), and 89.1 ± 36.3 MPa for Er:YAG laser irradiation (n = 18). Independent Student's t-tests showed no significant difference between each two groups (p > 0.05). Within the parameter settings and the limits of the experimental setup used in this study, both lasers systems as well as the high speed drill do not significantly weaken coronal dentin after surface treatment.

  8. Shear bond strength of dentin and deproteinized enamel of AI mouse incisors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugach, M.K.; Ozer, F.; Mulmadgi, R.; Li, Y.; Suggs, C.; Wright, J.T.; Bartlett, J.D.; Gibson, C.W.; Lindemeyer, R.G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the adhesion through shear bond strength (SBS) testing of a resin composite bonded with a self-etching bonding system (SEB) to amelogenesis imperfecta (AI)-affected deproteinized mouse enamel or dentin; and to compare wild-type (WT), amelogenin null (AmelxKO) and matrix metalloproteinase-20 null (Mmp20KO) enamel and dentin phenotypes using microCT and nanoindentation. Methods Enamel incisor surfaces of WT, AmelxKO and Mmp20KO mice were treated with SEB with and without NaOCl and tested for SBS. Incisor dentin was also treated with SEB and tested for SBS. These surfaces were further examined by SEM. MicroCT and nanoindentation analyses were performed on mouse dentin and enamel. Data were analyzed for significance by ANOVA. Results Deproteinization did not improve SBS of SEB to these AI-affected enamel surfaces. SBS of AmelxKO teeth was similar in dentin and enamel; however, it was higher in Mmp20KO dentin. The nanohardness of knockout enamel was significantly lower than WT, while knockout dentin nanohardness was not different from WT. Conclusions Using animal AI models, it was demonstrated that enamel NaOCl deproteinization of hypoplastic and hypoplastic-hypomaturation enamel did not increase shear bond strength while removal of the defective enamel allowed optimal dentin bonding. PMID:25303500

  9. Shear bond strength of dentin and deproteinized enamel of amelogenesis imperfecta mouse incisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugach, Megan K; Ozer, Fusun; Mulmadgi, Raj; Li, Yong; Suggs, Cynthia; Wright, J Timothy; Bartlett, John D; Gibson, Carolyn W; Lindemeyer, Rochelle G

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to: (1) investigate adhesion through shear bond strength (SBS) testing of a resin composite bonded with a self-etching bonding system (SEB) to amelogenesis imperfecta (AI)-affected deproteinized mouse enamel or dentin; and (2) compare wild-type (WT), amelogenin null (AmelxKO), and matrix metalloproteinase-20 null (Mmp20KO) enamel and dentin phenotypes using micro-CT and nanoindentation. Enamel incisor surfaces of WT, AmelxKO, and Mmp20KO mice were treated with SEB with and without sodium hypochlorite and tested for SBS. Incisor dentin was also treated with SEB and tested for SBS. These surfaces were further examined by scanning electron miscroscopy. Micro-CT and nanoindentation analyses were performed on mouse dentin and enamel. Data were analyzed for significance by analysis of variance. Deproteinization did not improve SBS of SEB to these AI-affected enamel surfaces. SBS of AmelxKO teeth was similar in dentin and enamel; however, it was higher in Mmp20KO dentin. The nanohardness of knockout enamel was significantly lower than WT, while knockout dentin nanohardness was not different from WT. Using animal amelogenesis imperfecta models, enamel sodium hypochlorite deproteinization of hypoplastic and hypoplastic-hypomaturation enamel did not increase shear bond strength, while removal of the defective enamel allowed optimal dentin bonding.

  10. Ammonium hexafluorosilicate elicits calcium phosphate precipitation and shows continuous dentin tubule occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suge, Toshiyuki; Kawasaki, Akiko; Ishikawa, Kunio; Matsuo, Takashi; Ebisu, Shigeyuki

    2008-02-01

    Diamine silver fluoride [AgF: (NH(3))(2)AgF] has been used clinically in Japan, as it reduces dental caries and dentin hypersensitivity. However, AgF stains the teeth black due to silver precipitation. To overcome this drawback, the authors prepared ammonium hexafluorosilicate [SiF: (NH(4))(2)SiF(6)], which does not stain the teeth, and SiF occluded open dentin tubules completely with silica-calcium phosphate precipitate. The aim of this study was to evaluate the duration of dentin tubule occlusion after SiF treatment in a simulated oral environment. To simulate dentin tubules subject to dentin hypersensitivity, dentin disks were treated with EDTA for 2 min. The disks were treated with 0.476 mol/L SiF for 3 min, and then the disks were immersed in synthetic saliva, which was regularly replenished to maintain its ionic concentration, for up to 7 days. The occluding ability of the dentin tubules was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the hydraulic conductance was measured following Pashley's method at regular intervals. SEM photographs demonstrated that dentin tubules were occluded homogeneously and completely with the precipitate at 7 days after treatment with SiF. In addition, newly formed calcium phosphate precipitate was present at the dentin surface. The dentin permeability showed a consistently low value throughout the experimental period. The values immediately after SiF treatment and 7 days after immersion were 11.9+/-3.7% and 7.9+/-2.9%, respectively. Ammonium hexafluorosilicate is useful for the treatment of dentin hypersensitivity, since ammonium hexafluorosilicate induced calcium phosphate precipitation from the saliva; therefore, it has a continuous effect on dentin tubules occlusion under a simulated oral environment.

  11. The combination use of platelet-rich fibrin and treated dentin matrix for tooth root regeneration by cell homing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Baohui; Sheng, Lei; Chen, Gang; Guo, Shujuan; Xie, Li; Yang, Bo; Guo, Weihua; Tian, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous regeneration through cell homing provides an alternative approach for tissue regeneration, except cell transplantation, especially considering clinical translation. However, tooth root regeneration through cell homing remains a provocative approach in need of intensive study. Both platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) and treated dentin matrix (TDM) are warehouses of various growth factors, which can promote cell homing. We hypothesized that endogenous stem cells are able to sense biological cues from PRF membrane and TDM, and contribute to the regeneration of tooth root, including soft and hard periodontal tissues. Therefore, the biological effects of canine PRF and TDM on periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) were evaluated respectively in vitro. Beagle dogs were used as orthotopic transplantation model. It was found that PRF significantly recruited and stimulated the proliferation of PDLSCs and BMSCs in vitro. Together, PRF and TDM induced cell differentiation by upregulating the mineralization-related gene expression of bone sialoprotein (BSP) and osteopotin (OPN) after 7 days coculture. In vivo, transplantation of autologous PRF and allogeneic TDM into fresh tooth extraction socket achieved successful root regeneration 3 months postsurgery, characterized by the regeneration of cementum and periodontal ligament (PDL)-like tissues with orientated fibers, indicative of functional restoration. The results suggest that tooth root connected to the alveolar bone by cementum-PDL complex can be regenerated through the implantation of PRF and TDM in a tooth socket microenvironment, probably by homing of BMSCs and PDLSCs. Furthermore, bioactive cues and inductive microenvironment are key factors for endogenous regeneration. This approach provides a tangible pathway toward clinical translation.

  12. Molecular and morphological surface analysis: effect of filling pastes and cleaning agents on root dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    DAINEZI, Vanessa Benetello; IWAMOTO, Alexsandra Shizue; MARTIN, Airton Abrahão; SOARES, Luís Eduardo Silva; HOSOYA, Yumiko; PASCON, Fernanda Miori; PUPPIN-RONTANI, Regina Maria

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The quality of the dentin root is the most important factor for restoration resin sealing and drives the outcome of endodontic treatment. Objective This study evaluated the effect of different filling pastes and cleaning agents on the root dentin of primary teeth using Fourier-transformed Raman spectroscopy (FT-Raman), micro energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (µ-EDXRF) and scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis. Material and Methods Eighty roots of primary teeth were endodontically prepared and distributed into 4 groups and filled according to the following filling pastes: Control-no filling (CP), Calen®+zinc oxide (CZ), Calcipex II® (CII), Vitapex® (V). After seven days, filling paste groups were distributed to 4 subgroups according to cleaning agents (n=5): Control-no cleaning (C), Ethanol (E), Tergenform® (T), 35% Phosphoric acid (PA). Then, the roots were sectioned and the dentin root sections were internally evaluated by FT-Raman, µ-EDXRF and SEM. Data was submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey tests (α=0.05). Results Regarding filling pastes, there was no significant difference in organic content. CP provided the lowest calcium values and, calcium/phosphoric ratio (Ca/P), and the highest phosphoric values. For cleaning agents there was no difference in organic content when compared to the C; however, T showed significantly higher calcium and Ca/P than PA. All groups showed similar results for phosphorus. The dentin smear layer was present after use of the cleaning agents, except PA. Conclusion The filling pastes changed the inorganic content, however they did not change the organic content. Cleaning agents did not alter the inorganic and organic content. PA cleaned and opened dentin tubules. PMID:28198982

  13. Dentinal tubules driven wetting of dentin: Cassie-Baxter modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, S. M. M.; Alderete, L.; Farge, P.

    2009-10-01

    We investigate the wetting properties of dentin surfaces submitted to a phosphoric acid etching followed by an air drying procedure, as in clinical situations of adhesive dentistry. The surface topography of the etched surfaces was characterized by AFM, and the wetting properties of water on these rough and heterogeneous surfaces were studied, by contact angle measurements. We showed that the contact angle increases with the acid exposure time and consequently with both surface roughness and the organic-mineral ratio of the dentin components. From the whole results, obtained on dentin and also on synthesized hydroxyapatites samples, we inferred a water contact angle of ˜ 133° on the dentinal tubule. These experimental results may be described by the Cassie-Baxter approach, and it is suggested that small air pockets could be formed inside the dentinal tubules.

  14. Shear bond strength of two bonding systems on dentin surfaces prepared with Er:YAG laser; Resistencia de uniao ao cisalhamento de dois sistemas adesivos em superficies dentinarias preparadas com laser de Er:YAG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dall' Magro, Eduardo

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the shear bond strength of two bonding dentin systems, one 'one step' (Single Bond - 3M) and one 'self-etching' (Prompt-L-ESPE), when applied on dentin surfaces prepared with Er:YAG laser (2,94{mu}m) that underwent ar not, acid etched. Forty one human molars just extracted were selected and after the cut with diamond disc and included in acrylic resin, resulting in 81 specimens (hemi crowns). After, the specimens were divided in one group treated with sand paper and another two groups treated with Er:YAG laser with 200 mJ and 250 mJ of energy and 2 Hz of frequency. Next, the prepared surfaces received three treatments with following application: 1) acid + Single Bond + Z 250 resin, 2) prompt-L-Pop + Z 250 resin, and 3) acid without, Single Bond + Z 250 resin. The Z 250 resin was applied and photopolymerized in increments on a Teflon matrix that belonged to an apparatus called 'Assembly Apparatus' machine producing cylinders of 3,5 mm of diameter and 5 mm of height. After these specimens were submitted to thermo cycling during 1 minute the 55 deg C and during 1 minute with 5 deg C with a total of 500 cycles for specimen, and the measures of shear bond strength were abstained using EMIC model DL 2000 rehearsed machine, with speed of 0,5 mm/min, measuring the final rupture tension (Mpa). The results showed an statistic superiority of 5% of probability level in dentin flattened with sandpaper and with laser using 200 mJ of energy with aspect to the ones flattened with laser using 250 mJ of energy. It was observed that using 'Single Bond' bonding dentin system the marks were statistically superior at 5% of probability with reference to the use of the Prompt-L-Pop adhesive system. So, it was concluded that Er:YAG Laser with 200 mJ of energy produced similar dentin cavity prepare than sandpaper and Single Bond seemed the best bonding agent system between restorative material and dentin

  15. Morphological effects of MMPs inhibitors on the dentin bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, He; Li, Tianbo; Li, Xiuying; Zhang, Zhimin; Li, Penglian; Li, Zhenling

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been studied extensively, and MMP inhibitors have been used as dental pretreatment agents prior to dentin bonding because they reduce collagen fiber degradation and improve bonding strength. However, morphologic characteristics of the collagen network after etching and of the post-adhesive dentin hybrid layers (DHL) after MMP inhibitors pretreatment have not been evaluated. Thus, we investigated demineralized dentin pretreated with chlorhexidine (CHX) and minocycline (MI) in an etch- and -rinse adhesive system with field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and immuno-gold labeling markers to observe the collagen network and DHL. FESEM revealed after CHX and MI, a demineralized dentin surface and improved collagen network formation, reduced collagen degradation, and distinct gold-labeling signals. Applying adhesive after either MMP inhibitor created a better dentin interface as evidenced by immuno-gold staining, better adhesive penetration, and higher DHL quality. With microtensile bond strength tests (µTBS) we estimated bonding strength using µTBS data. Immediate µTBS was enhanced with MMP inhibitor application to the bonding surface, and the CHX group was significantly different than non-treated etched surfaces, but no significant change was detected in the MI group. Surface micromorphology of the fractured dentin resin restoration showed that the CHX group had a better resin and dentin tube combination. Both MMP inhibitors created uniform resin coverage. Thus, morphologic results and µTBS data suggest that CHX and MI can inhibit MMP activity, improve immediate bonding strength, and enhance dentin bonding stability with an etch- and -rinse adhesive system.

  16. Effect of a novel bioactive glass-ceramic on dentinal tubule occlusion: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Y; Liu, J; Li, X; Yin, W; He, T; Hu, D; Liao, Y; Yao, X; Wang, Y

    2015-03-01

    This in vitro study aimed to assess the ability and efficacy of HX-BGC, a novel bioactive glass-ceramic (SiO2-P2 O5-CaO-Na2 O-SrO), to reduce dentine tubule permeability. Dentine discs from human third molars were etched and randomly allocated into five groups: Group 1--distilled water; Group 2--Sensodyne Repair toothpaste (containing NovaMin®); Group 3--HX-BGC toothpaste (containing 7.5% HX-BGC); Group 4--control toothpaste (without HX-BGC); and Group 5--HX-BGC powder. Specimens were treated daily by brushing with an electric toothbrush for 20 seconds. Between daily treatments (7 days total), specimens were immersed in artificial saliva for 24 hours. Dentine permeability was measured at baseline, after the first treatment, after the first 24-hour immersion in artificial saliva and at the end of day 7. Dentine morphology and surface deposits were observed by scanning electron microscopy after one day and 7 days of treatment, respectively. Sensodyne Repair and bioactive glass-ceramic toothpaste significantly and immediately lowered dentine permeability. The HX-BGC powder group showed the highest reduction in dentine permeability after 7 days of treatment. The novel bioactive glass-ceramic material HX-BGC is effective in reducing dentine permeability by occluding open dentine tubules, indicating that HX-BGC may be a potential treatment for dentine hypersensitivity. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  17. Effect of two different chemomechanical caries removal agents on dentin microhardness: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamoorthi, Surendar; Nivedhitha, Malli Sureshbabu; Vanajassun, P Pranav

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of two different chemomechanical caries removal (CMCR) agents on dentin microhardness. In this study, the crown portion of ten carious-free and ten caries-affected teeth were selected. In carious-free samples, the teeth were decoronated at the level of cemento - enamel junction. Only the crown portion of the teeth was selected. Occlusal one-third of the crowns were cross-sectioned and discarded to expose the dentin, and it was divided into two groups, five teeth in each group. Then, they were further sectioned longitudinally through the centre. In one group, no agent was applied on one half and Carisolv was applied on other half. In another group, no agent was applied on one-half and Carie-Care was applied on the other half for 1 min. In carious samples, the crowns were sectioned through the centre of carious lesion. Carisolv was applied on one-half and Carie-Care was applied on the other half. After using CMCR agents, surface hardness of dentin was examined using Vickers hardness number (VHN). The data were analyzed using t-test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). There were no significant difference among normal dentin (62.91 ± 2.76), Carisolv-treated normal dentin (61.72 ± 2.89), and Carie-Care-treated normal dentin (61.90 ± 3.19). In carious samples, the results of Carisolv-treated dentin (58.57 ± 2.62) was not statistically significantly different from those of the Carie-Care-treated dentin (56.77 ± 4.41). In conclusion, neither of the CMCR methods caused a significant change in the microhardness of normal dentin and the treated carious dentin.

  18. Marginal adaptation of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) to root dentin surface with orthograde/retrograde application techniques: A microcomputed tomographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Fouzan, Khalid; Awadh, Mohammed; Badwelan, Moahmmed; Gamal, Abeer; Geevarghese, Amrita; Babhair, Samar; Al-Rejaie, Mansour; Al Hezaimi, Khalid; Rotstein, Ilan

    2015-01-01

    Achieving a good apical seal for root canals is known to be associated with good mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) adaptation to dentin. This study aims to compare the marginal adaptation of MTA with root dentin between orthograde and retrograde application techniques using microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) analysis. Fifty-two single-rooted human teeth were divided into four equal groups: (Group 1) Retrograde MTA (RMTA), (Group 2) Orthograde MTA (OMTA), (Group 3) Etched RMTA (ERMTA), and (Group 4) Etched OMTA (EOMTA). For Group 1, 3-mm retrograde cavities were prepared and filled with MTA. For Group 2, the apical 6 mm of the canals were filled with MTA and sealed with sealer cement and warm gutta-percha. In Groups 3 and 4, canals were treated the same as Groups 1 and 2, respectively, except that before placing the MTA, canals were irrigated with 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). After 48 hours, all the teeth were analyzed using a micro-CT scanner. Mean dentin-MTA contact and the mean length and width of each gap was analysed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Statistical significance was set at an α level of 5%. No significant difference in gap volumes was observed in the dentin-MTA adaptation in both orthograde and retrograde application techniques. However, significant difference in the gap volumes was observed between RMTA and ERMTA (P = 0.045). Etching significantly improved the MTA-Dentin adaptation (P MTA adaptation, instead with the use of 17% EDTA, a significant improvement could be achieved. Within the limitations of the present study, it concludes that MTA adaptation to dentin tooth structure is not significantly different between an orthograde and retrograde approach. However, the use of EDTA significantly improved the MTA-Dentin adaptation.

  19. Effectiveness of simplified dentin bonding systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, T; Itoh, K; Tani, C; Manabe, A; Yamashita, T; Hisamitsu, H; Wakumoto, S

    1998-03-01

    The effectiveness of newly developed commercial dentin bonding systems (SB, MB II and KB) was evaluated by measuring the contraction gap width of a resin composite restored into a cylindrical dentin cavity prepared in an extracted human molar and by measuring the tensile bond strength to the flat dentin surface. In addition, calcium loss during dentin conditioning was analyzed using electron microanalyses. An experimental dentin bonding system composed of EDTA conditioning, GM solution priming and a bonding agent containing 10-MDP was employed as a control in which it was presumed that contraction gap formation was prevented completely. However, gap formation was observed using the three commercial simplified dentin bonding systems. SEM observation showed that the gap was formed between the resin composite and the top surface of the dentin cavity wall indicating that the fracture occurred at the adhesive interface, but never inside the dentin nor inside the resin composite.

  20. Effect of an Er,Cr:YSGG laser on water perfusion in human dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adu-Arko, Ampong Y; Sidhu, Sharanbir K; McCabe, John F; Pashley, David H

    2010-10-01

    Changes in fluid perfusion through tubules may affect the sensitivity of exposed and restored dentine. The rate of perfusion is dependent on the structure and composition of dentine, particularly at the surface. This work analyzed the effect of treatment with an Erbium, Chromium-doped: Yttrium Scandium Gallium Garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser on dentine perfusion. Extracted molars were sectioned above the mid-coronal portion, and below the cemento-enamel junction, to create crown segments. The pulp was extirpated and the dentine treated with the Er,Cr:YSGG laser, a diamond bur or sandpaper. Each specimen was mounted, with the pulp chamber oriented upwards, on a petri-dish cover in order to permit a tube filled with water to be connected to the pulp. Movement of the water meniscus over 24 h provided a measurement of the volume of water that filtered across the dentine. The dishes contained water to provide a moist environment in the relevant specimens, or were left dry to provide dry conditions. Specimens were perfused for 24 h with water pressures ranging from 20 to 60 cm. The results (in μl mm(-2) d(-1) ) showed a significant difference in the perfusion rate between treatments. The difference between perfusion in wet and dry conditions was highly significant. Laser and bur treatment of dentine significantly affected perfusion, which was higher in the former than in the latter. Therefore, laser-treated dentine may be more sensitive than bur-cut dentine.

  1. Scanning transmission electron microscopy/energy-dispersive spectroscopy analysis of the dentin adhesive interface using a labeled 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eick, J D; Robinson, S J; Byerley, T J; Chappell, R P; Spencer, P; Chappelow, C C

    1995-06-01

    In an attempt to compare the morphology of the dentin adhesive interface and the wetting and penetration of the adhesive in relation to the dentin surface, we studied four dentin adhesive systems using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). 2-Hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA), a monomer common to many commercial dentin adhesive systems, was altered to produce a thiolated analogue (HETMA). Sulfur, traceable by EDS and STEM, was substituted for the oxygen atom in the backbone of the HEMA molecule. The resulting analogue, with solubility parameters and other wetting and physical properties very similar to those of HEMA, was applied to four sets of tooth specimens, each pre-treated with a different primer or etchant. Three separate pre-treatments--nitric acid, maleic acid, and citric acid/ferric chloride--created a demineralized zone approximately 1 to 3 microns thick at the dentin surface. The HETMA was found to permeate freely into this zone when either of the latter two pre-treatments was used. However, the band of dentin that was demineralized by the nitric acid pre-treatment appeared impermeable to the HETMA. The fourth pre-treatment, an alcohol-based solution including the phosphorus acid ester PENTA and HEMA, modified the smear layer of the tooth slightly and did not appear to demineralize the dentin. HETMA applied to the specimens pre-treated with PENTA and HEMA was clearly in intimate contact with the dentin or modified smear layer; however, it did not penetrate or diffuse into these areas. It did flow into the dentinal tubules, as was also evident with each of the other systems. It was concluded that the acid pre-treatment of the dentin greatly influenced the wetting behavior of the dentin adhesive and thus could substantially affect the resultant bond strength of the dentin adhesive systems.

  2. Microstructural characterization of laser sintered synthetic calcium phosphate-natural dentine interface for the restoration of enamel surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Animesh Jha

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Tooth sensitivity is a common occurrence and it is caused by acid induced erosion of enamel surface. In this investigation we report the results of calcium phosphate based minerals which are irradiated with lasers ex vivo for the analysis of photo activated densification of minerals. The photo-activation in these minerals may primarily arise from the absorption centres, namely OH- and rare-earth (RE3+ ion dopants (e.g. Er3+ ions incorporated during synthesis. The loss of hydroxyl group from mineral is characterized using the thermogravimetric technique. The microstructural changes under the conditions of continuous wave (CW and pulsed laser irradiation are reported together with the measured temperature rise. The preliminary data on surface hardness of occluded dentine with photo-activated calcium phosphate minerals are also reported, for aiming an eventual hardness value of 3300 MPa which is known for natural enamels.

  3. Effects of a ferric chloride primer on collagen-depleted dentin bonding between tri-n-butylborane initiated self-curing resin and dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeno, Kohyoh; Taira, Yohsuke; Ito, Shuichi; Atsuta, Mitsuru; Pashley, David H

    2007-11-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the micro-tensile bond strength between a carboxylic resin and dentin, when the dentin surface was modified with an experimental dentin primer. The three primers tested were ED primer II (ED), 0.3% ferric chloride aqueous solution (FE), and ED containing 0.3% ferric chloride (ED/FE). Three commercial dentin conditioners [40% phosphoric acid, 10% NaOCl, and 10% citric acid with 3% ferric chloride (10-3)] were also used. The coronal surfaces of extracted human molars were ground flat to dentin. The dentin surfaces were treated with phosphoric acid, NaOCl, or with one of the primers. The 10-3 was used without phosphoric acid or NaOCl as a control. A composite material rod was bonded to the dentin surface with 4-META/MMA-TBB resin. After 24-h immersion in 37 degrees C distilled water, 0.9 mm x 0.9 mm composite-dentin beams cut from the bonded specimens were stressed to failure in tension at 0.6 mm/min. The bond strengths were also evaluated after 5000 thermocycles. The bond strength of the group ED/FE was significantly higher than those of the 10-3, ED, and FE. After 5000 thermocycling, 10-3, ED and FE showed significant decrease in bond strength, although no significant decrease was seen for ED/FE. It was concluded that dentin surface treatment with phosphoric acid, NaOCl, and the ED/FE primer improved the bonding (p bond strengths in the control group fell 34% following 5000 thermocycles.

  4. Fracture Forces of Dentin after Surface Treatment with High Speed Drill Compared to Er:YAG and Er,Cr:YSGG Laser Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rene Franzen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental tooth restorative procedures may weaken the structural integrity of the tooth, with the possibility of leading to fracture. In this study we present findings of coronal dentin strength after different techniques of surface modification. The fracture strength of dentin beams after superficial material removal with a fine diamond bur high speed drill hand piece, Er:YAG (2.94 μm, 8 J/cm2, and Er,Cr:YSGG (2.78 μm, 7.8 J/cm2 laser irradiation slightly above the ablation threshold was measured by a four-point bending apparatus. Untreated dentin beams served as a control. A total of 58 dentin beams were manufactured from sterilized human extracted molars using the coronal part of the available dentin. Mean values of fracture strength were calculated as 82.0±27.3 MPa for the control group (n=10, 104.5±26.3 MPa for high speed drill treatment (n=10, 96.1±28.1 MPa for Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation (n=20, and 89.1±36.3 MPa for Er:YAG laser irradiation (n=18. Independent Student’s t-tests showed no significant difference between each two groups (p>0.05. Within the parameter settings and the limits of the experimental setup used in this study, both lasers systems as well as the high speed drill do not significantly weaken coronal dentin after surface treatment.

  5. The effect of stromelysin-1 (MMP-3) on non-collagenous extracellular matrix proteins of demineralized dentin and the adhesive properties of restorative resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukpessi, T; Menashi, S; Camoin, L; Tencate, J M; Goldberg, M; Chaussain-Miller, C

    2008-11-01

    Dentin non-collagenous matrix components (NCPs) are structural proteins involved in the formation, the architecture and the mineralization of the extracellular matrix (ECM). We investigated here how recombinant metalloproteinase stromelysin-1, also termed MMP-3, initiates the release of ECM molecules from artificially demineralized human dentin. Analysis of the supernatants by Western blotting reveals that MMP-3 extracts PGs (decorin, biglycan), and also a series of phosphorylated proteins: dentin sialoprotein (DSP), osteopontin (OPN), bone sialoprotein (BSP) and MEPE, but neither dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP1), another member of the SIBLING family, nor osteocalcin (OC), a non-phosphorylated matrix molecule. After treatment of dentin surfaces by MMP-3, scanning electron microscope (SEM) examination of resin replica shows an increased penetration of the resin into the dentin tubules when compared to surfaces only treated by demineralizing solutions. This preclinical investigation suggests that MMP-3 may be used to improve the adhesive properties of restorative materials.

  6. Topical application of lithium chloride on the pulp induces dentin regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuya Ishimoto

    Full Text Available We herein describe a novel procedure for dentin regeneration that mimics the biological processes of tooth development in nature. The canonical Wnt signaling pathway is an important regulator of the Dentin sialophosphoprotein (Dspp expression. Our approach mimics the biological processes underlying tooth development in nature and focuses on the activation of canonical Wnt signaling to trigger the natural process of dentinogenesis. The coronal portion of the dentin and the underlying pulp was removed from the first molars. We applied lithium chloride (LiCl, an activator of canonical Wnt signaling, on the amputated pulp surface to achieve transdifferentiation toward odontoblasts from the surrounding pulpal cells. MicroCT and microscopic analyses demonstrated that the topical application of LiCl induced dentin repair, including the formation of a complete dentin bridge. LiCl-induced dentin is a tubular dentin in which the pulp cells are not embedded within the matrix, as in primary dentin. In contrast, a dentin bridge was not induced in the control group treated with pulp capping with material carriers alone, although osteodentin without tubular formation was induced at a comparatively deeper position from the pulp exposure site. We also evaluated the influence of LiCl on differentiation toward odontoblasts in vitro. In the mDP odontoblast cell line, LiCl activated the mRNA expression of Dspp, Axin2 and Kallikrein 4 (Klk4 and downregulated the Osteopontin (Osp expression. These results provide a scientific basis for the biomimetic regeneration of dentin using LiCl as a new capping material to activate dentine regeneration.

  7. Topical Application of Lithium Chloride on the Pulp Induces Dentin Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimoto, Kazuya; Hayano, Satoru; Yanagita, Takeshi; Kurosaka, Hiroshi; Kawanabe, Noriaki; Itoh, Shinsuke; Ono, Mitsuaki; Kuboki, Takuo; Kamioka, Hiroshi; Yamashiro, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    We herein describe a novel procedure for dentin regeneration that mimics the biological processes of tooth development in nature. The canonical Wnt signaling pathway is an important regulator of the Dentin sialophosphoprotein (Dspp) expression. Our approach mimics the biological processes underlying tooth development in nature and focuses on the activation of canonical Wnt signaling to trigger the natural process of dentinogenesis. The coronal portion of the dentin and the underlying pulp was removed from the first molars. We applied lithium chloride (LiCl), an activator of canonical Wnt signaling, on the amputated pulp surface to achieve transdifferentiation toward odontoblasts from the surrounding pulpal cells. MicroCT and microscopic analyses demonstrated that the topical application of LiCl induced dentin repair, including the formation of a complete dentin bridge. LiCl-induced dentin is a tubular dentin in which the pulp cells are not embedded within the matrix, as in primary dentin. In contrast, a dentin bridge was not induced in the control group treated with pulp capping with material carriers alone, although osteodentin without tubular formation was induced at a comparatively deeper position from the pulp exposure site. We also evaluated the influence of LiCl on differentiation toward odontoblasts in vitro. In the mDP odontoblast cell line, LiCl activated the mRNA expression of Dspp, Axin2 and Kallikrein 4 (Klk4) and downregulated the Osteopontin (Osp) expression. These results provide a scientific basis for the biomimetic regeneration of dentin using LiCl as a new capping material to activate dentine regeneration. PMID:25812134

  8. Effect of collagen cross-linkers on the shear bond strength of a self-etch adhesive system to deep dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakhamuri Srinivasulu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the shear bond strength of composite resin to deep dentin, bonded using a self-etch adhesive, after treatment with two collagen cross-linkers at varying time intervals. Materials and Methods: Thirty extracted human incisors were sectioned longitudinally into equal mesial and distal halves ( n = 60. The proximal deep dentin was exposed and the specimens were divided based on the surface treatment of dentin prior to bonding as follows: Group I ( n = 12, control: No prior dentin surface treatment; group II ( n = 24: Dentin surface pretreated with 10% sodium ascorbate; and group III ( n = 24: Dentin surface pretreated with 6.5% proanthocyanidin. Groups II and III were further divided into two subgroups based on the pre-treatment time of five and 10 min. Shear bond strength of the specimens was tested using universal testing machine and the data were statistically analyzed. Results: Significantly higher shear bond strength to deep dentin was observed in teeth treated with 10% sodium ascorbate and 6.5% proanthocyanidin compared to control group. No significant difference was observed between 5 min and 10 min pre-treatment times. Conclusion: Dentin surface pre-treatment with both 10% sodium ascorbate and 6.5% proanthocyanidin resulted in significant improvement in bond strength of self-etch adhesive to deep dentin.

  9. Morphological/chemical imaging of demineralized dentin layer in its natural, wet state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Yao, Xiaomei

    2010-05-01

    Measuring the structure, composition or suitability for bonding of the acid-etched dentin substrate, especially in its hydrated state, has been a formidable problem. The purpose of this study was to determine the morphological and structural profiles of the dentin demineralized layer measured in its natural wet state using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and micro-Raman imaging. The occlusal 1/3 of the crown was removed from nine extracted, unerupted human third molars. Dentin surfaces were abraded with 600-grit SiC sandpaper under water to create smear layers. The prepared dentin surfaces were randomly selected for treatment with the self-etching agent (Adper Prompt L-Pop) or the total-etching agent 35% H(3)PO(4) gel (with/without agitation). Micro-Raman spectra and imaging were acquired at 1-1.5microm spatial resolution at positions perpendicular to the treated surfaces; since this technique is non-destructive, the same specimens were also imaged with ESEM. Specimens were kept wet throughout spectral acquisition and ESEM observations. ESEM could be used to reveal demineralized layers in acid-etched dentin, but the resolution was low and no collagen fibrils were disclosed. The detailed chemical maps/profiles of demineralized dentin layers under wet conditions could be obtained using Raman imaging. It was shown that the mineral existed in the superficial layer of all etched dentin covered with smear layers. The mineral was much easier to be removed underneath the superficial layer. The depth, degree, and profile of dentin demineralization were dependent on the types of acids (self-etching vs. total etching) and application procedures (with vs. without agitation). Most current adhesives are applied using wet bonding techniques in which the dentin is kept fully hydrated throughout the bonding. Our ability to fully characterize the hydrated, etched dentin substrates is very important for understanding bonding under in vivo conditions. 2010 Academy of

  10. Bonding stability of adhesive systems to eroded dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Janaina Barros; Bonini, Gabriela; Lenzi, Tathiane Larissa; Imparato, José Carlos Pettorossi; Raggio, Daniela Prócida

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the immediate and 6 months microshear bond strength (µSBS) of different adhesive systems to sound and eroded dentin. Sixty bovine incisors were embedded in acrylic resin and ground to obtain flat buccal dentin surfaces. Specimens were randomly allocated into two groups: sound dentin (immersion in artificial saliva) and eroded dentin (erosive challenge following a pH cycling model comprising 4 ×/day Sprite Light® drink for 10 days). Then, specimens were reassigned according to the adhesive system: etch-and-rinse adhesive (Adper Single Bond), two-step self-etch system (Clearfil SE Bond), or one-step self-etch adhesive (Adper Easy One). Polyethylene tubes with an internal diameter of 0.76 mm were placed over pre-treated dentin and filled with resin composite (Z250). Half of the specimens were evaluated by the µSBS test after 24 h, and the other half 6 months later, after water storage at 37 °C. Failure mode was evaluated using a stereomicroscope (400 ×). Data were analyzed by three-way repeated measures analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc tests (α = 0.05). After 6 months of water aging, marked reductions in µSBS values were observed, irrespective of the substrate. The µSBS values for eroded dentin were lower than those obtained for sound dentin. No difference in bonding effectiveness was observed among adhesive systems. For all groups, adhesive/mixed failure was observed. In conclusion, eroded dentin compromises the bonding quality of adhesive systems over time.

  11. Bonding stability of adhesive systems to eroded dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina Barros CRUZ

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This in vitro study evaluated the immediate and 6 months microshear bond strength (µSBS of different adhesive systems to sound and eroded dentin. Sixty bovine incisors were embedded in acrylic resin and ground to obtain flat buccal dentin surfaces. Specimens were randomly allocated into two groups: sound dentin (immersion in artificial saliva and eroded dentin (erosive challenge following a pH cycling model comprising 4 ×/day Sprite Light® drink for 10 days. Then, specimens were reassigned according to the adhesive system: etch-and-rinse adhesive (Adper Single Bond, two-step self-etch system (Clearfil SE Bond, or one-step self-etch adhesive (Adper Easy One. Polyethylene tubes with an internal diameter of 0.76 mm were placed over pre-treated dentin and filled with resin composite (Z250. Half of the specimens were evaluated by the µSBS test after 24 h, and the other half 6 months later, after water storage at 37°C. Failure mode was evaluated using a stereomicroscope (400×. Data were analyzed by three-way repeated measures analysis of variance and Tukey’s post hoc tests (α = 0.05. After 6 months of water aging, marked reductions in µSBS values were observed, irrespective of the substrate. The µSBS values for eroded dentin were lower than those obtained for sound dentin. No difference in bonding effectiveness was observed among adhesive systems. For all groups, adhesive/mixed failure was observed. In conclusion, eroded dentin compromises the bonding quality of adhesive systems over time.

  12. Mesenchymal dental pulp cells attenuate dentin resorption in homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y; Chen, M; He, L; Marão, H F; Sun, D M; Zhou, J; Kim, S G; Song, S; Wang, S L; Mao, J J

    2015-06-01

    Dentin in permanent teeth rarely undergoes resorption in development, homeostasis, or aging, in contrast to bone that undergoes periodic resorption/remodeling. The authors hypothesized that cells in the mesenchymal compartment of dental pulp attenuate osteoclastogenesis. Mononucleated and adherent cells from donor-matched rat dental pulp (dental pulp cells [DPCs]) and alveolar bone (alveolar bone cells [ABCs]) were isolated and separately cocultured with primary rat splenocytes. Primary splenocytes readily aggregated and formed osteoclast-like cells in chemically defined osteoclastogenesis medium with 20 ng/mL of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and 50 ng/mL of receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL). Strikingly, DPCs attenuated osteoclastogenesis when cocultured with primary splenocytes, whereas ABCs slightly but significantly promoted osteoclastogenesis. DPCs yielded ~20-fold lower RANKL expression but >2-fold higher osteoprotegerin (OPG) expression than donor-matched ABCs, yielding a RANKL/OPG ratio of 41:1 (ABCs:DPCs). Vitamin D3 significantly promoted RANKL expression in ABCs and OPG in DPCs. In vivo, rat maxillary incisors were atraumatically extracted (without any tooth fractures), followed by retrograde pulpectomy to remove DPCs and immediate replantation into the extraction sockets to allow repopulation of the surgically treated root canal with periodontal and alveolar bone-derived cells. After 8 wk, multiple dentin/root resorption lacunae were present in root dentin with robust RANKL and OPG expression. There were areas of dentin resoprtion alternating with areas of osteodentin formation in root dentin surface in the observed 8 wk. These findings suggest that DPCs of the mesenchymal compartment have an innate ability to attenuate osteoclastogenesis and that this innate ability may be responsible for the absence of dentin resorption in homeostasis. Mesenchymal attenuation of dentin resorption may have implications in internal

  13. Shear bond strength of partial coverage restorations to dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustín-Panadero, Rubén; Alonso-Pérez-Barquero, Jorge; Fons-Font, Antonio; Solá-Ruíz, María-Fernanda

    2015-01-01

    Background When partial coverage restorations (veneers, inlays, onlays…) must be cemented to dentin, bond strength may not reach the same predictable values as to enamel. The purpose of this study was: 1. To compare, with a shear bond test, the bond strength to dentin of a total-etch and a self-etching bonding agent. 2. To determine whether creating microretention improves the bond strength to dentin. Material and Methods Two bonding agents were assayed, Optibond FL® (Kerr), two-bottle adhesive requiring acid etching, and Clearfil SE Bond® (Kuraray), two-bottle self-etching adhesive. The vestibular, lingual, distal and mesial surfaces of ten molars (n=10) were ground to remove all enamel and 40 ceramic samples were cemented with Variolink II® (Ivoclar Vivadent). Half the molar surfaces were treated to create round microretention (pits) to determine whether these could influence bond strength to dentin. The 40 molar surfaces were divided into four groups (n=10): Optibond FL (O); Clearfil SE (C); Optibond FL + microretention (OM); Clearfil SE + micro retention (CM). A shear bond test was performed and the bond failures provoked examined under an optical microscope. Results O=35.27±8.02 MPa; C=36.23±11.23 MPa; OM=28.61±6.27 MPa; CM=27.01±7.57 MPa. No statistically significant differences were found between the adhesives. Optibond FL showed less statistical dispersion than Clearfil SE. The presence of microretentions reduced bond strength values regardless of the adhesive used. Conclusions 1. Clearfil SE self-etching adhesive and Optibond FL acid-etch showed adequate bond strengths and can be recommended for bonding ceramic restorations to dentin. 2. The creation of round microretention pits compromises these adhesives’ bond strength to dentin. Key words:Adhesion to dentin, bonding agent, Optibond FL, Clearfil SE, microretention, shear bond test. PMID:26330937

  14. Investigation of dentinal tubule occlusion using FIB-SEM milling and EDX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earl, J S; Ward, M B; Langford, R M

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the dentin tubule occluding effect of an 8% strontium acetate dentifrice (Sensodyne Rapid Relief) compared to patent dentin tubules using modern sample preparation, imaging, and analysis techniques. Etched dentin discs, either untreated or treated with the dentifrice, were analyzed by preparing cross-sections using focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) milling, and the strontium presence mapped using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Surface imaging showed the dentifrice had coated the treated sample. Sub-surface information gained by preparing longitudinal cross-sections of the treated samples showed the tubule openings to be plugged, and EDX mapping of the cross-section confirmed enhanced strontium levels within the tubules several microns below the treatment surface. The combination of modern sample preparation, imaging, and analysis techniques employed in this study has shown that the 8% strontium acetate dentifrice occludes dentin tubules. EDX analysis has shown the presence of strontium within the dentin tubules, with elemental maps illustrating how the strontium has been incorporated into the dentin.

  15. On modeling and nanoanalysis of caries-affected dentin surfaces restored with Zn-containing amalgam and in vitro oral function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledano, Manuel; Aguilera, Fátima S; Osorio, Estrella; López-López, Modesto T; Cabello, Inmaculada; Toledano-Osorio, Manuel; Osorio, Raquel

    2015-12-19

    The aim of this research was to assess the influence of mechanical loading on the ability of Zn-free versus Zn-containing amalgams to promote remineralization at the dentin interface. Sound and caries-affected dentin surfaces (CAD) were restored using Zn-free or Zn-containing dental amalgams. Midcoronal dentin surfaces were studied by (1) atomic force microscopy analysis (including plot and phase imaging, nanoindentation test [modulus of Young (Ei), nanoroughness measurements, and fibril diameter assessment], (2) Raman spectroscopy/cluster analysis, (3) x-ray diffraction, (4) field emission electron microscope and energy-dispersive analysis, for morphological, mechanical, and physicochemical characterization. Analyses were performed before amalgam placement and after amalgam removal, at 24 h and 3 weeks of load cycling. Zn-free and Zn-containing amalgams restorations promoted an increase in the modulus of Young of CAD surfaces, after 3 weeks of load cycling; at this time, Zn-containing amalgams attained higher Ei than Zn-free restorations. Zn-containing amalgams induced tubular occlusion after load cycling, in both sound and CAD. Zn free-amalgams promoted remineralization of both intertubular and peritubular dentin in CAD substrata. These minerals were identified as calcium-phosphate deposits and crystals as hydroxyl-apatite with augmented crystallographic maturity but with some components of lattice distortion. Crosslinking of collagen diminished and secondary structure of collagen increased in CAD substrate restored with Zn-containing amalgam after 3 weeks of load cycling, indicating an advanced preservation, molecular organization, and orientation of collagen fibrils after load cycling. Plot and phase images permitted to observe the topographical changes which were promoted by the mineral deposits; in general, the indexes related to higher remineralization gave rise to a decrease of nanoroughness and an augmentation of the bandwidth of the collagen fibrils. Zn

  16. Effect of 16% Carbamide Peroxide Bleaching Gel on Enamel and Dentin Surface Micromorphology and Roughness of Uremic Patients: An Atomic Force Microscopic Study

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the effect of 16% carbamide peroxide bleaching gel on surface micromorphology and roughness of enamel and root dentin of uremic patients receiving hemodialysis using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Methods: A total of 20 sound molars were collected from healthy individuals (n=10) and uremic patients (n=10). The roots were separated from their crowns at the cemento-enamel junction. Dental slabs (3 mm x 2 mm x 2 mm) were obtained from the buccal surface for enamel slab...

  17. Influence of multi-wavelength laser irradiation of enamel and dentin surfaces at 0.355, 2.94, and 9.4 μm on surface morphology, permeability, and acid resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Nai-Yuan N; Jew, Jamison M; Simon, Jacob C; Chen, Kenneth H; Lee, Robert C; Fried, William A; Cho, Jinny; Darling, Cynthia L; Fried, Daniel

    2017-07-12

    Ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) lasers can be used to specifically target protein, water, and mineral, respectively, in dental hard tissues to produce varying changes in surface morphology, permeability, reflectivity, and acid resistance. The purpose of this study was to explore the influence of laser irradiation and topical fluoride application on the surface morphology, permeability, reflectivity, and acid resistance of enamel and dentin to shed light on the mechanism of interaction and develop more effective treatments. Twelve bovine enamel surfaces and twelve bovine dentin surfaces were irradiated with various combinations of lasers operating at 0.355 (Freq.-tripled Nd:YAG (UV) laser), 2.94 (Er:YAG laser), and 9.4 μm (CO2 laser), and surfaces were exposed to an acidulated phosphate fluoride gel and an acid challenge. Changes in the surface morphology, acid resistance, and permeability were measured using digital microscopy, polarized light microscopy, near-IR reflectance, fluorescence, polarization sensitive-optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT), and surface dehydration rate measurements. Different laser treatments dramatically influenced the surface morphology and permeability of both enamel and dentin. CO2 laser irradiation melted tooth surfaces. Er:YAG and UV lasers, while not melting tooth surfaces, showed markedly different surface roughness. Er:YAG irradiation led to significantly rougher enamel and dentin surfaces and led to higher permeability. There were significant differences in acid resistance among the various treatment groups. Surface dehydration measurements showed significant changes in permeability after laser treatments, application of fluoride and after exposure to demineralization. CO2 laser irradiation was most effective in inhibiting demineralization on enamel while topical fluoride was most effective for dentin surfaces. Lasers Surg. Med. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. CHANGES IN VALUES MEASURED WITH A LASER FLUORESCENCE SYSTEM FOR ENAMEL AND DENTIN ETHCED FOR DIFFERNT TIME INTERVALS - pilot study.

    OpenAIRE

    Radostina Anastasova; Mirela Marinova-Takorova; Vladimir E. Panov

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the presented in vitro study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the laser fluorescent device DIAGNOdent in measuring changes in the level of mineralization of intact enamel surfaces etched for different time intervals and intact dentin etched for 30 sec. Material and methods: The study was performed on extracted human teeth. DIAGNOcam was used to measure the values of laser fluorescence of intact enamel and dentinal surfaces. Then the samples were treated with 37% H2...

  19. The effect of endodontic regeneration medicaments on mechanical properties of radicular dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassen, Ghaeth H.

    Endodontic regeneration treatment of necrotic immature teeth has gained popularity in recent years. The approach suggests a biological alternative to induce a continuous root development. In this project, three in vitro experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of three medicaments used in endodontic regeneration on mechanical properties and chemical structure of radicular dentin. In the first experiment, we investigated longitudinally the effect of medicaments on the indentation properties of the root canal surface of immature teeth using a novel BioDent reference point indenter. A significant difference in the majority of indentation parameters between all groups was found after one-week and one-month application of medicaments (p double antibiotic paste (DAP) > control > calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH)2]. The four-week exposure of dentin to TAP and DAP caused 43% and 31% increase in total indentation distance outcome, respectively. In the second experiment, we investigated longitudinally the effect of medicaments on the chemical structure of immature radicular dentin by measuring the phosphate/amide I ratios of dentin using Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. Phosphate/amide I ratios were significantly different between the four groups after one week, two weeks and four week application of medicaments (p untreated dentin > DAP-treated dentin > TAP-treated dentin. In the third experiment, we investigated longitudinally the effect of medicaments on root fracture resistance and microhardness of radicular dentin. For the microhardness, the two-way interaction between group and time was significant (pintegrity of the superficial radicular dentin and significantly affected the indentation properties of the root canal surface. Furthermore, the three month intracanal application of medicaments significantly reduced the fracture resistance of roots.

  20. Effect of phytic acid etchant on the structural stability of demineralized dentine and dentine bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Kalyan; Islam, Md Sofiqul; Nassar, Mohannad; Hiraishi, Noriko; Otsuki, Masayuki; Yiu, Cynthia K Y; Tagami, Junji

    2015-08-01

    This study examined the effect of phytic acid (IP6) in stabilizing the morphology of dentine collagen network and resin-dentine bonding. Dentine beams were fully demineralized with 10% phosphoric acid (PA) or 1% IP6 (pH 1.2). PA-demineralized beams were divided into three groups: (a) no further treatment (control), (b) treatment with 5% glutaraldehyde (GA) for 1 h and (c) treatment with 1% IP6 (pH 7) for 1 h. IP6-demineralized beams received no further treatment. The beams were then subjected to ultimate tensile strength (UTS) testing. Dentine micromorphology evaluation was performed using a field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). Dentine disks were etched with 35% PA for 15 s or 1% IP6 for 30s. PA-etched dentine disks were divided into three groups as (a), (b) and (c) as for UTS testing, but the treatment with GA or IP6 was done in 1min. For microtensile bond strength (µTBS) testing, flat dentine surfaces etched with PA or IP6 were blot-dried (wet dentine) or air-dried for 10s (dry dentine) and bonded with an etch-and-rinse adhesive followed by composite build-up. IP6-demineralized dentine showed significantly higher UTS, when compared to PA-demineralized dentine. GA and IP6 significantly improved UTS of PA-demineralized dentine. FE-SEM observation revealed that dentine collagen network was preserved by GA and IP6. No significant difference in µTBS was found between the wet and dry IP6-etched dentine groups. IP6 etching showed a structural stabilizing effect on demineralized dentine matrix and produced good resin-dentine bonding, regardless of dentine moistness or dryness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of the Morphological Characteristics of Laser-Irradiated Dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilaj, Bledar; Franz, Alexander; Degendorfer, Daniela; Moritz, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different energy settings of Er:YAG laser irradiation on dentin surface morphology with respect to the number of opened dentinal tubules. Background data: An ideally prepared dentin surface with opened dentinal tubules is a prerequisite for adhesive fixation. No study, however, has yet compared the numbers of opened dentinal tubules with regard to statistical differences. Methods: Conventional preparations using a bur with or without additional acid etching acted as control groups. Dentin specimens were prepared from human third molars and randomly divided into eight groups according to the energy settings of the laser (1, 1.5, 4, 6, 7.5, and 8 W) and two controls (bur and bur plus acid etching). After surface preparation, dentin surfaces were analyzed with a scanning electron microscope, and the number of opened dentinal tubules in a defined area was counted. Results: The control groups showed smooth surfaces with (bur plus acid etching) and without opened dentinal tubules (bur), whereas all laser-irradiated surfaces showed rough surfaces. Using the energy setting of 4 W resulted in significantly more opened dentinal tubules than the conventional preparation technique using the bur with additional acid etching. In contrast, the energy setting of 8 W showed significantly fewer opened dentinal tubules, and also exhibited signs of thermal damage. Conclusions: The Er:YAG laser with an energy setting of 4 W generates a dentin surface with opened dentinal tubules, a prerequisite for adhesive fixation. PMID:26389986

  2. Evaluation of Effects on the Adhesion of Various Root Canal Sealers after Er:YAG Laser and Irrigants Are Used on the Dentin Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkocak, Ismail; Sonat, Bade

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of various root canal sealers after various irrigation solutions and Er:YAG laser irradiation were used on root canal dentin. One hundred fifty freshly extracted human maxillary single-rooted teeth were used in this study. Teeth were sectioned transversally 4 mm below the cementoenamel junction. The root canal of each specimen was prepared using a tapered bur. Teeth were divided into 3 main groups by sealer (AH Plus Jet [Dentsply DeTrey, Konstanz, Germany], EndoSequence BC Sealer [Brasseler, Savannah, GA], and Real Seal [SybronEndo, Orange, CA]) and then divided into 5 subgroups by dentin treatment (distilled water, calcium hydroxide, sodium hypochlorite, EDTA, and Er:YAG laser). The specimens were placed immediately at 37°C and 100% humidity for 1 week. Then, the push-out test was applied. The maximum failure load was recorded in newtons and was used to calculate the push-out bond strength in MPa. Then, 3 random specimens from each group were examined under scanning electron microscopy. The resin root canal sealers had higher push-out bond strength than the bioceramic sealer, and the differences were statistically significant (P < .05) except in the sodium hypochlorite groups. The EDTA and Er:YAG laser applications removed the smear layer and increased the bond strength. The highest adhesion was observed in EDTA groups when each sealer was evaluated in itself. The bonding strength of root canal sealers is influenced by their properties and various dentin surface treatments. The scanning electron microscopic study showed that although the dentinal tubules were open, at the profile examination the sealers did not penetrate into the dentin canals in all specimens. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Dentin Topographic Features following Chemomechanical Caries Removal in Primary Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotb, R M; Elkateb, M A; Ahmed, A M; Kawana, K Y; El Meligy, O A

    Study the topographic features of dentin after caries removal with a chemomechanical agent (Papacarie) compared with the conventional drilling method. The sample included 7 exfoliated and extracted primary teeth with carious dentin lesions, not reaching the pulp. Each tooth was sectioned longitudinally through the center of the carious lesions into two halves. The teeth were then divided into two groups according to the method of caries removal. Following caries removal, dentin topography and the cut section were examined using the scanning electron microscope. Papacarie produced an irregular, porous, rough and globular dentin appearance. The dentin surfaces were generally free of smear layer, visible bacteria and the dentinal tubules were opened. The dentin cut surfaces showed patent dentinal tubules with open orifices. The drilling method created a smooth and amorphous surface with a continuous smear layer occluding the dentinal tubules. Numerous bacteria were also observed. The cut dentin surfaces showed patent dentinal tubules with their orifices plugged with smear layer. Papacarie produced a rough and porous surface with partial or complete removal of the smear layer and opened dentinal tubules, while the drill produced a smooth surface with uniform smear layer occluding the dentinal tubules.

  4. Enamel and dentin bond strength following gaseous ozone application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadenaro, Milena; Delise, Chiara; Antoniollo, Francesca; Navarra, Ottavia Chiara; Di Lenarda, Roberto; Breschi, Lorenzo

    2009-08-01

    To evaluate the effects of gaseous ozone application on enamel and dentin bond strength produced by two self-etching adhesive systems. The shear bond strength test was conducted to assess adhesion on enamel (protocol 1), while the microtensile bond strength test was performed on dentin (protocol 2). Protocol 1: 96 bovine incisors were randomly divided into 4 groups, and enamel surfaces were bonded in accordance with the following treatments: (1E) ozone + Clearfil Protect Bond; (2E) Clearfil Protect Bond (control); (3E) ozone + Xeno III; (4E) Xeno III (control). Ozone gas was applied for 80 s. Shear bond strength was measured with a universal testing machine. Protocol 2: 40 noncarious human molars were selected. Middle/deep dentin was exposed and bonded in accordance with the following treatments: (1D) ozone+Clearfil Protect Bond; (2D) Clearfil Protect Bond (control); (3D) ozone+Xeno III (4D) Xeno III (control). Four-mm-thick buildups were built on the adhesives, then specimens were sectioned in accordance with the nontrimming technique. Specimens were stressed until failure occurred, and failure modes were analyzed. Shear bond and microtensile bond strength data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test. No statistical differences were found between ozone treated specimens and controls, neither on enamel nor on dentin irrespective of the tested adhesive. Clearfil Protect Bond showed higher bond strength to enamel than Xeno III, irrespective of the ozone treatment (p enamel and dentin bond strength.

  5. Anti-proteolytic property and bonding durability of mussel adhesive protein-modified dentin adhesive interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Hui; Li, Quan-Li; Han, Min; Mei, May Lei; Chu, Chun Hung

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of mussel adhesive protein (MAP) on collagenase activity, dentin collagen degradation and microtensile dentin bond strength (μTBS). Three groups were designed: 1. experimental group: treated with MAP; 2. positive control: treated with GM6001 (collagenase-inhibitor); 3. negative control: treated with distilled water (DW). For collagenase activity, Clostridiopeptidase-A was added to each group (n=5), and collagenase activity was assessed by colorimetric assay. For dentin collagen degradation, thirty dentin slabs were allocated to the three above groups (n=10). Dentin collagen degradation was evaluated by measuring released hydroxyproline by colorimetric assay after being incubated in Clostridiopeptidase-A for 7 days. For microtensile bond strength, sixty human third molars with flat dentin surfaces were etched by phosphoric acid and then assigned to the three above groups (n=20). An etch-and-rinse adhesive system was applied to all three groups as stated in standard clinic protocol. The test of μTBS was performed before and after thermocycling and collagenase challenge. The collagenase activities (nmol/min/mg) in the group of MAP was significantly less inactive compared to the group of GM6001 and DW (MAP0.06), the value of μTBSs after thermocycling and collagenase challenge was significantly greater in the group of MAP and GM6001 compared to the group of DW (MAP, GM6000>DW, pcomposite restoration over time. Copyright © 2017 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Functional remineralization of carious dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugach, Megan Kardon

    A primary goal of dental tissue engineering is the biological reconstruction of tooth substrate destroyed by caries or other diseases affecting tooth mineralization. Traditionally, dentists treat caries by using invasive techniques to remove the diseased dental tissue and restore the lesion, ideally preventing further progression of decay. Success in strategies associated with remineralization of enamel and root caries have contributed to the less invasive prospect of remineralization of dentinal carious lesions. The central hypothesis of this dissertation is that carious dentin lesions can be remineralized if the lesions contain residual mineral. Caries Detector (CD) stained zones (pink, light pink, transparent and normal) of arrested carious dentin lesions were characterized according to microstructure by atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging, mineral content by digital transverse microradiography, and nanomechanical properties by AFM-based nanoindentation. CD-stained and unstained zones had significantly different microstructure, mineral content and nanomechanical properties. Furthermore, the most demineralized carious zone contained residual mineral. To obtain reproducible, standardized dentin caries lesions, we characterized the lesions from an artificial carious dentin lesion model using a 0.05M acetate demineralization buffer. The artificial caries-like lesions produced by the buffer had similar mineral content and nanomechanical properties in the stained and unstained zones as natural dentin lesions. Both natural and artificial lesions had significant correlations between mineral content and nanomechanical properties. Mineral crystallite size and shape was examined by small angle x-ray scattering. Both natural and artificial carious dentin had different mineral sizes than normal dentin. Collagen in natural and artificial carious dentin lesions was examined by trichrome stain, AFM high-resolution imaging, and UV resonance Raman spectroscopy, to determine if

  7. Multi-factoriality of dentine hypersensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Stojšin Ivana; Petrović Ljubomir; Stojanac Igor; Drobac Milan

    2008-01-01

    Introduction. Dentine hypersensitivity has been defined as a sharp, short pain arising from exposed dentin in response to stimuli typically thermal, evaporative tactile, osmoticor, chemical and which cannot be ascribed to any other form of dental defect or pathology. Prevalence. The most affected patients range in age from 20 to 40. The following teeth tend to be most sensitive: cuspids, premolars and incisors, location-concentrated on the facial surface. Morphological bases of dentine hypers...

  8. Efficacy of Gluma Desensitizer® on dentin hypersensitivity in periodontally treated patients Eficácia do Gluma Desensitizer® sobre hipersensibilidade dentinária em pacientes periodontalmente tratados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila de Azevedo de Assis

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this double-blind, controlled, split-mouth designed clinical trial was to assess the effect of a single application of Gluma Desensitizer® on alleviating dentin hypersensitivity. Twelve subjects entered the study and ten completed the protocol. Each subject had two teeth treated: one with Gluma Desensitizer® according to the manufacturer's instructions and one with water. The assessment of pain was performed with the VAS (Visual Analogue Scale, after tactile (probe, thermal (cold blast of water and thermal/evaporative (cold blast of air stimuli at baseline, immediately after treatment, after 1 week and after 4 weeks. The mean VAS values for the test and control teeth were compared by the paired t test (alpha = 0.05. Repeated measurements ANOVA was used to compare the different experimental times. The results showed that for test teeth, at baseline, mean VAS values were 1.76 (± 2.82, 7.10 (± 2.10 and 4.75 (± 2.65, and, after 4 weeks, the mean values were 1.70 (± 2.31, 5.50 (± 3.30 and 4.61 (± 3.14, respectively for probe, water and air stimuli. For the control teeth, at baseline, the mean VAS values were 1.86 (± 2.92, 6.61 (± 2.31 and 4.08 (± 2.91 and, after 4 weeks, 2.66 (± 3.07, 6.32 (± 2.94 e 4.76 (± 3.26.There were no statistically significant differences between test and control teeth at any time. No intra-group differences were demonstrated either. It was concluded that Gluma Desensitizer® had no effect on hypersensitive teeth from periodontally treated patients for a period up to 4 weeks.O objetivo deste estudo clínico duplo-cego, controlado, de boca-dividida foi avaliar o efeito de uma aplicação única do Gluma Desensitizer® no alívio da hipersensibilidade dentinária. Doze sujeitos participaram do estudo, sendo que destes dez completaram o estudo. Cada um dos participantes teve dois dentes tratados, um com o Gluma Desensitizer®, de acordo com as orientações do fabricante, e o outro com água. Para a

  9. Shear bond strength of two resin cements to human root dentin using three dentin bonding agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogos, C; Stavrianos, C; Kolokouris, I; Economides, N; Papadoyannis, I

    2007-01-01

    This study compared the bond strength of two resin cements to human root dentin when used with three bonding agents. The materials used were Rely X ARC and Perma Cem, two one-bottle bonding agents (Single Bond, Bond-1) and one self-etching bonding agent (Clearfil SE Bond). The dentin was obtained from single rooted human teeth, and the specimens were treated with either 15% EDTA or 37% phosphoric acid to remove the smear layer, except in groups where the self-etching bonding agent was used. The resin cements were placed on dentin surfaces with the use of bonding agents. Shear bond strength (SBS) was tested using a single plane shear test assembly. The dentin specimens were divided into 10 groups. Eight groups were pre-treated with EDTA or phosphoric acid to remove the smear layer, followed by a bonding agent (Bond-1 or Single Bond) and resin cement (Rely X or Perma Cem). In the two remaining groups, the smear layer was left intact, and the two resins cements were used in combination with the self-etching bonding agent (Clearfil SE Bond). No statistically significant differences were observed among the eight groups treated with one-bottle bonding agents. The mean bond strengths of the two groups treated with the self-etching bonding agent did not differ significantly from each other but were both significantly greater than the bond strengths of all the other groups. The results of this study also showed that EDTA can be used as an alternative to phosphoric acid in bonding procedures for resin cements. However, the bond strengths of resin cements, in combination with a self-etching bonding agent, were significantly greater than those of the same cements when used with one-bottle bonding agents.

  10. Microtensile bond strength and micromorphologic analysis of surface-treated resin nanoceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joon-Ho

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different surface treatment methods on the microtensile bond strength of resin cement to resin nanoceramic (RNC). MATERIALS AND METHODS RNC onlays (Lava Ultimate) (n=30) were treated using air abrasion with and without a universal adhesive, or HF etching followed by a universal adhesive with and without a silane coupling agent, or tribological silica coating with and without a universal adhesive, and divided into 6 groups. Onlays were luted with resin cement to dentin surfaces. A microtensile bond strength test was performed and evaluated by one-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD test (α=.05). A nanoscratch test, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used for micromorphologic analysis (α=.05). The roughness and elemental proportion were evaluated by Kruskal–Wallis test and Mann–Whitney U test. RESULTS Tribological silica coating showed the highest roughness, followed by air abrasion and HF etching. After HF etching, the RNC surface presented a decrease in oxygen, silicon, and zirconium ratio with increasing carbon ratio. Air abrasion with universal adhesive showed the highest bond strength followed by tribological silica coating with universal adhesive. HF etching with universal adhesive showed the lowest bond strength. CONCLUSION An improved understanding of the effect of surface treatment of RNC could enhance the durability of resin bonding when used for indirect restorations. When using RNC for restoration, effective and systemic surface roughening methods and an appropriate adhesive are required. PMID:27555896

  11. Influence of the direction of tubules on bond strength to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, M; Okuda, M; Nakajima, M; Pereira, P N; Sano, H; Tagami, J

    2001-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of the direction of dentinal tubules on resin-dentin tensile bond strength (mu TBS) using four commercially available bonding systems and observed the resin-dentin interfaces with an SEM. The dentin bonding systems used in this study were Clearfil Liner Bond II (LB, Kuraray), Imperva Fluoro Bond (FB, Shofu), Single Bond (SB, 3M) and One-Step (OS, BISCO). Thirty-six extracted caries-free human molars were used for micro tensile bond testing and eight additional teeth were used for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The teeth were divided into two groups according to the direction of the dentinal tubules at the resin-dentin interface: a perpendicular group, in which the occlusal enamel was removed perpendicular to the long axis of the tooth, and a parallel group, in which the mesial half of the tooth was removed parallel to the long axis of the tooth, and the coronal dentin surface was used for bonding. After the flat dentin surfaces were polished with #600 silicon carbide paper, each surface was treated with one of the four adhesive systems according to the manufacturer's recommendation, then covered with resin composite (Clearfil AP-X, Kuraray) to provide sufficient bulk for micro-tensile bond testing. After 24 hours in 37 degrees C water, the resin-bonded teeth were serially sliced perpendicular to the adhesive surface, the adhesive interface trimmed to a cross sectional area of 1 mm2 and subjected to tensile forces at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Statistical analysis of the tensile bond strengths were performed using two-way ANOVA and Fisher's PLSD test at 95% level of confidence. The tensile bond strength of the group with tubules parallel to the bonded interface was higher than that of tubules cut perpendicularly. This tendency reached statistical significance using SB and OS.

  12. A zinc chloride-doped adhesive facilitates sealing at the dentin interface: A confocal laser microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledano, Manuel; Osorio, Raquel; Osorio, Estrella; Cabello, Inmaculada; Toledano-Osorio, Manuel; Aguilera, Fátima S

    2017-10-01

    or SEB·Bd-Zn doping are preferred to treat caries-affected dentin surfaces. ZnO-doping encouraged for etch-and-rinse adhesives. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Laser controlled melting of pre-treated zirconia surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilbas, B.S., E-mail: bsyilbas@kfupm.edu.sa [ME Department, KFUPM, Dhahran 31261, (Saudi Arabia); Akhtar, S.S. [ME Department, KFUPM, Dhahran 31261, (Saudi Arabia); Karatas, C. [Engineering College, Hacettepe University, (Turkey)

    2011-05-15

    Laser treatment of pre-prepared zirconia surface is carried out. The pre-prepared surface, prior to laser treatment, consists of 50 {mu}m carbon film and 7% titanium carbide particles, which are imbedded in the carbon film. The microstructural and morphological changes in the laser treated surface layer are examined using optical and scanning electron microscopes, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The fracture toughness of the laser treated surface is measured and the residual stress formed at the surface vicinity is determined from the X-ray diffraction technique. It is found that the microhardness of the laser treated surface increased slightly due to the dense layer formed at the surface vicinity. However, the laser treatment process reduces the fracture toughness of the surface due to improved surface hardness and the residual stress formed in the surface vicinity.

  14. Effects of different surface treatments on bond strength of an indirect composite to bovine dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laiza Tatiana Poskus

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Sandblasting was a safe surface treatment for the indirect composite, increasing the BS values. Hydrofluoric acid applied after sandblasting damaged the BS values and should not be recommended while ethanol and H2O2, when applied after sandblasting, were effective in increasing BS values.

  15. [Effect of different irrigants on radicular dentin cleansing and resin tag formation after post space preparation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Cai-Yun; Gu, Xin-Hua

    2010-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of different root canal irrigants on smear layer removal and dentinal tubule opening of root canal surfaces after post space preparation. Thirty maxillary anteriors were endodontically treated. After post space preparation, the teeth were assigned to three groups with ten teeth each: group A, B, C. 3% H2O2, 15% ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid(EDTA), 15% EDTA and 3% NaClO were used as irrigant of group A, B, C. After post space irrigation, eight teeth of each group were examined under scanning electron microscope (SEM) for smear layer removal and dentinal tubule opening. The left two specimens were restored with fiber posts and prepared for evaluation of resin tag formation. The cleansing effectiveness of group A, B and C was respectively 3.89 +/- 0.36, 1.77 +/- 0.30, 1.25 +/- 0.21. The dentinal tubule opening of group A, B and C was respectively (2.53 +/- 0.19), (3 11 +/- 023) (3.83 +/- 0.52) microm. The cleansing effectiveness and dentinal tubule opening of root canal surfaces were significantly affected by different root canal irrigants (P irrigant groups, and group B showed excellent resin tag formation. Irrigation with 15% EDTA after post space preparation can excellently remove the smear layer and improve dentinal tubule opening, permitting well penetration of resin adhesive into the dentinal tubules and collagen fibrillar structure.

  16. Effect of glutaraldehyde and ferric sulfate on shear bond strength of adhesives to primary dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhakar A

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of alternative pulpotomy agents such as glutaraldehyde and ferric sulfate on the shear bond strength of self-etch adhesive systems to dentin of primary teeth. Materials and Methods: Eighty human primary molar teeth were sectioned in a mesiodistal direction and divided into experimental and control groups. Lingual dentin specimens in experimental groups were treated with glutaraldehyde and ferric sulfate. Buccal surfaces soaked in water served as control group. Each group was then divided into two groups based on the adhesive system used: Clearfil SE Bond and Adper Prompt L-Pop. A teflon mold was used to build the composite (Filtek Z-250 cylinders on the dentinal surface of all the specimens. Shear bond strength was tested for all the specimens with an Instron Universal Testing Machine. The failure mode analysis was performed with a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM. Results: The results revealed that glutaraldehyde and ferric sulfate significantly reduced the shear bond strength of the tested adhesive systems to primary dentin. Clearfil SE Bond showed much higher shear bond strength than Adper Prompt L Pop to primary dentin. SEM analysis revealed a predominant cohesive failure mode for both adhesive systems. Conclusion: This study revealed that the pulpotomy medicaments glutaraldehyde and ferric sulfate adversely affected the bonding of self-etch adhesive systems to primary dentin.

  17. Scanning electron microscopy and dentinal permeability analysis of smear layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prati, C; Mongiorgi, R; Pashley, D H; Riva di Sanseverino, L

    1991-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the surface morphology and the permeability of dentine after different acid treatments: polyacrylic acid, maleic acid, phosphoric acid and saline solution as control. Dentine permeability was expressed as hydraulic conductance. All the acid treatments removed the smear layer and increased the dentine permeability.

  18. Shear bond strength of Biodentine, ProRoot MTA, glass ionomer cement and composite resin on human dentine ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaup, Markus; Dammann, Christoph Heinrich; Schäfer, Edgar; Dammaschke, Till

    2015-04-19

    The aim of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of Biodentine, ProRoot MTA (MTA), glass ionomer cement (GIC) and composite resin (CR) on dentine. 120 extracted human third molars were embedded in cold-cured-resin and grinned down to the dentine. For each material 30 specimens were produced in standardised height and width and the materials were applied according to manufacturers´ instructions on the dentine samples. Only in the CR group a self-etching dentine-adhesive was used. In all other groups the dentine was not pre-treated. All specimens were stored at 37.5 °C and 100% humidity for 2d, 7d and 14d. With a testing device the shear bond strength was determined (separation of the specimens from the dentine surface). The statistical evaluation was performed using ANOVA and Tukey-test (p MTA the lowest values (p MTA and Biodentine increased significantly compared to the 2d investigation period (p MTA (p  0.05). After 7d Biodentine showed comparable shear bond values than GIC, whereas the shear bond values for MTA were significantly lower even after 14d. The adhesion of Biodentine to dentine surface seams to be superior compared to that of MTA.

  19. Comparative evaluation of microhardness of dentin treated with 4% titanium tetrafluoride and 1.23% acidic phosphate fluoride gel before and after exposure to acidic pH: An ex vivo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandanuru, Vivek; Madhusudhana, Koppolu; Ramachandruni, Vamsi Krishna; Vitta, Harish Madhav; Babu, Lenin

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to comparatively evaluate the effect of 4% titanium tetrafluoride (TiF4) and 1.23% acidic phosphate fluoride (APF) gel on the microhardness of human coronal dentin. Materials and Methods: Thirty noncarious extracted premolars were collected and sectioned buccolingually with the help of diamond disk. Exposing the sectioned surface, teeth were embedded in self-cure acrylic. Exposed coronal dentin was polished with abrasive papers starting with 220–5000 grit. Microhardness was evaluated by Vickers microhardness evaluator, at four different stages as follows - stage 1: Baseline values, Stage 2: Exposure of specimens to acidic environment at a pH 1 for 5 min, Stage 3: Application of 1.23% APF gel and 4% TiF4 (after dividing the specimens into two groups, i.e., Group A and B, respectively), and Stage 4: Followed by exposure of fluoridated specimens to acidic protocol as mentioned above. Results: Paired t-test was used to compare the readings between Groups A and B. Group B has shown greater resistance to decrease in microhardness of coronal dentin (P < 0.05) on exposure to acidic protocol. Conclusion: Due to acidic pH (1.5) of 4% TiF4, amount of increase in microhardness of dentin is <1.23% APF gel. 4% TiF4 was more effective in resisting demineralization than 1.23% APF gel. PMID:27994319

  20. Morfologia da dentina tratada com substâncias dessensibilizantes: avaliação através da microscopia eletrônica de varredura Morphology of dentin treated with desensitizing substances: scanning electron microscopy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margareth ODA

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available As constantes recidivas dos tratamentos preconizados para a hipersensibilidade dentinária são causa de estudos a respeito desta patologia. Neste trabalho, in vitro, nos propomos a avaliar, por meio de microscopia eletrônica de varredura, a possível formação de película impermeabilizadora quando da aplicação de substâncias dessensibilizantes, acompanhada de condicionamento ácido da dentina. Discos de dentina, foram utilizados onde foi preparado um esfregaço padronizado, realizado condicionamento ácido e aplicação das substâncias testadas, à base de glutaraldeído, oxalato e fluoretos. Para compor o grupo controle um corpo-de-prova foi mantido sem tratamento e outro apenas condicionado com ácido. Dos resultados morfológicos obtidos pode-se concluir que o condicionamento ácido prévio ao tratamento com substâncias à base de glutaraldeído e de oxalato não é capaz de formar uma película uniforme, impermeabilizante sobre a dentina. O uso de fluoretos forma uma camada sobre a dentina facilmente removível, não produzindo porém efeitos a longo prazo nestes tipos de tratamento.The constant recurrence of indicated treatments for dentine hypersensitivity has motivated many studies on the subject, in the search for good long-term clinical results. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate, by SEM, the formation of an impermeable film when desensitizing substances are applied after acid etching of the dentine surface. Dentine discs with a standardized smear layer were acid etched with 35% phosphoric acid and substances based on glutaraldehyde, oxalate and sodium fluoride were applied according to manufacturer’s instructions. Discs without treatment were used as the control group and only one of them was acid etched. Morphological results showed that acid etching of the dentine surface prior to the application of substances based on glutaraldehyde and oxalate are not able to form a uniform, impermeable film over dentine. On

  1. Effect of desensitizing treatments on bond strength of resin composites to dentin - an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Makkar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Hypersensitivity is a common clinical multietiological problem. Many desensitizing treatments are there to overcome hypersensitivity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different dentin-desensitizing treatments on the tensile bond strength of composite restoration. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four sound human molars were used. Enamel was wet abraded to expose flat dentin surfaces, polished with sandpaper. The specimens were then divided into three groups (n = 8 based on the type of dentin-desensitizing treatment given. The first group: G1 was the control group where no desensitizing agent was used. The second group: G2 was treated with desensitizing dentifrice containing a combination of potassium nitrate, triclosan, and sodium monoflorophosphate. The third group: G3 was treated with Er:YAG laser. Afterwards, the desensitized specimens were treated with one step self-etch adhesive according to manufacturer′s instructions and composite microcylinders were packed. The specimens were then examined for tensile bond strength using universal tensile machine (KMI TM . Results: Statistical analysis of the data obtained revealed the mean values for the tensile bond strengths were 10.2613 MPa, 5.9400 MPa and 6.3575 MPa for groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively. These values were statistically significantly different between groups pretreated with laser or dentifrice as compared to control group. Conclusions: Dentifrice and Laser pre-treated dentin has lower tensile bond strength with resin composites as compared to dentin that is untreated.

  2. Longitudinal Effect of Surface Treatments Modified by NaOCl-Induced Deproteinization and Nd:YAG Laser on Dentin Permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Stella Renata Machado Silva; Huhtala, Maria Filomena Rocha Lima; Gomes, Ana Paula Martins; Ye, Qiang; Spencer, Paulette; De Paiva Gonçalves, Sérgio Eduardo

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate dentin permeability after dentin hypersensitivity treatments: fluoride, adhesive system, and collagen deproteinization with and without Nd:YAG laser exposure, and after erosive and abrasive challenges. Dentin permeability was assessed by measuring dentinal fluid flow using a permeability device. Eighty bovine dentin specimens (6 mm diameter/1 mm thickness) had permeability measured in the presence of the smear layer and after removal of the smear layer by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). They were then divided into eight groups according to treatment (n = 10): Group C, control; Group L, Nd:YAG laser; Group F, fluoride; Group FL, fluoride plus Nd:YAG laser; Group A, adhesive; Group AL, adhesive plus Nd:YAG laser; Group D, 10% NaOCl plus adhesive; and group DL, NaOCl plus adhesive plus Nd:YAG laser. Nd:YAG laser was irradiated at 60 mJ/pulse/10 Hz/47.7 J/cm2/1 W and applied freehanded without contact for 60 sec. Permeability was measured 24 h after the treatments. The specimens were exposed to erosive and abrasive challenges for 5 days. Erosive challenge was done by immersion in Coca-Cola, four times a day/90 sec each. After the first and last erosive challenge of the day, the abrasive challenge was conducted by brushing the specimens (24,000 cycles/3.8 cm range/200 g weight), and permeability was measured again. Results were analyzed statistically using two factor ANOVA and Tukey tests (α = 0.05). With the exception of groups FL and A, all treatments reduced permeability. A significant reduction in permeability was seen when the treatments were combined with laser exposure. The association of adhesive and Nd:YAG laser led to the lowest rate of permeability after 24 h. NaOCl-induced deproteinization associated with Nd:YAG laser showed the lowest permeability rate after erosive/abrasive challenges. Dentin hypersensitivity treatments reduced dentin permeability when associated with Nd

  3. Etidronate from medicine to endodontics: effects of different irrigation regimes on root dentin roughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartari, Talita; Duarte Junior, Anivaldo Pereira; Silva Júnior, José Otávio Carrera; Klautau, Eliza Burlamaqui; Silva E Souza Junior, Mario Honorato; Silva E Souza Junior, Patrícia de Almeida Rodrigues

    2013-01-01

    An increase in dentin roughness, associated with surface composition, contributes to bacterial adherence in recontaminations. Surface roughness is also important for micromechanical interlocking of dental materials to dentin, and understanding the characteristics of the surface is essential to obtain the adhesion of root canal sealers that have different physico-chemical characteristics. To evaluate the effects of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), ethylenediaminetetraacetic (EDTA), etidronic (HEBP), and citric acid (CA) associated with different irrigation regimens on root dentin roughness. Forty-five root halves of anterior teeth were used. The root parts were sectioned in thirds, embedded in acrylic resin and polished to a standard surface roughness. Initially, the samples of each third were randomly assigned into 3 groups and treated as follows: G1 - saline solution (control); G2 - 5% NaOCl+18% HEBP mixed in equal parts; and G3 - 2.5% NaOCl. After initial measuments, the G3 samples were distributed into subgroups G4, G5 and G6, which were subjected to 17% EDTA, 10% CA and 9% HEBP, respectively. Following the new measuments, these groups received a final flush with 2.5% NaOCl, producing G7, G8 and G9. The dentin surface roughness (Ra) was determined before and after treatments using a profilometer. The Wilcoxon test (αirrigation regimens that used chelating agents altered the roughness of root dentin.

  4. Effect of various laser irradiations on the mineral content of dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilber, Erhan; Malkoc, Meral Arslan; Ozturk, A Nilgun; Ozturk, Firat

    2013-01-01

    THE AIM OF THIS STUDY WAS TO EVALUATE THE MINERAL CONTENT OF DENTIN IRRADIATION WITH ERBIUM: yttrium-aliminum-garnet (Er:YAG), Neodmiyum:yttrium-aliminum garnet (Nd:YAG) and potassium titanium phosphate (KTP) laser used for in the treatment of dentin hypersensitivity. Six extracted wisdom, unerupted molar teeth were used in this study. The enamel of the teeth was removed with a conventional bur under water cooling to expose the dentin surface. The teeth were mounted in a slow-speed, diamond-saw, sectioning machine. Two dentin slabs were obtained from each tooth and each slab was sectioned so that 4 slabs were made from each teeth. Then dentin slabs were randomly divided into four groups. Group A: Control Group, Group B: Er:YAG laser, Group C: Nd:YAG laser, Group D: KTP laser. The levels of Ca, K, Mg, Na,P and Ca/P mineral ratio in each dentin slab were measured by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Data were analysed by one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD tests. One sample from each group was prepared for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). There were no significant differences between the groups for Ca, K, Mg, Na,P and Ca/P mineral ratio (P>.05). SEM photographs indicated that there were melted areas around the exposed dentin tubules in groups treated with Er:YAG and KTP lasers. This study demonstrated that laser etching with the Er:YAG, Nd:YAG, KTP laser systems did not affect the compositional structure of the dentin surfaces.

  5. Bond strength of composite to dentin: effect of acid etching and laser irradiation through an uncured self-etch adhesive system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, F. L. A.; Carvalho, J. G.; Andrade, M. F.; Saad, J. R. C.; Hebling, J.; Lizarelli, R. F. Z.

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluated the effect on micro-tensile bond strength (µ-TBS) of laser irradiation of etched/unetched dentin through an uncured self-etching adhesive. Dentinal surfaces were treated with Clearfil SE Bond Adhesive (CSE) either according to the manufacturer’s instructions (CSE) or without applying the primer (CSE/NP). The dentin was irradiated through the uncured adhesive, using an Nd:YAG laser at 0.75 or 1 W power settings. The adhesive was cured, composite crowns were built up, and the teeth were sectioned into beams (0.49 mm2) to be stressed under tension. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey statistics (α = 5%). Dentin of the fractured specimens and the interfaces of untested beams were observed under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that non-etched irradiated surfaces presented higher µ-TBS than etched and irradiated surfaces (p 0.05). SEM showed solidification globules on the surfaces of the specimens. The interfaces were similar on irradiated and non-irradiated surfaces. Laser irradiation of dentin through the uncured adhesive did not lead to higher µ-TBS when compared to the suggested manufacturer’s technique. However, this treatment brought benefits when performed on unetched dentin, since bond strengths were higher when compared to etched dentin.

  6. Buccal Epithelium in treating Ocular Surface Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas KR

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Background - Ocular surface disorders due to limbal stem cell deficiency are an important cause of ocular morbidity and visual loss. Although autologous limbal stem cell transplants have helped in the management of unilateral disease, allografts in those with bilateral disease often fail due to immunological reasons. The use of autologous buccal epithelium cultivated on amniotic membrane has been described as a useful approach in the management of this condition. It is the purpose of this study to explore the feasibility of using a novel thermo-gelatin polymer (TGP as a substrate to culture these cells, and to characterize them using RNA extraction and RT-PCR. Methods - Oral cheek mucosal biopsies were obtained from 5 adult patients undergoing Modified Osteo-Odonto Keratoprosthesis surgery. The specimens were transported to the laboratory in transport medium. The cells were released using enzymatic digestion and seeded in both convention culture medium and TGP. The resulting cellular growth was characterized using RNA extraction and RT-PCR. Results - Cells could be cultured from 4 of the 5 specimens. In one specimen, contamination occurred and this was discarded. In the other specimens, the cheek epithelial cells could be cultured in both the conventional culture medium and TGP, with equal ease. RT-PCR revealed the presence of K3, a marker for epithelial cells, and GAPDH indicating the presence of some adipose tissue as well. Conclusions - It is possible to culture autologous cheek mucosal epithelial cells using TGP, a synthetic scaffold, without the need for other biological substrates. Since the specimens are obtained from the oral cavity, stringent asepsis is required. Further studies are required for histopathological characterization of the cultured cells and to create a model for delivery onto the ocular surface of eyes with bilateral surface disease due to limbal stem cell deficiency.

  7. Site specific properties of carious dentin matrices biomodified with collagen cross-linkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedran-Russo, Ana K.; Karol, Sachin; Pashley, David H.; Viana, Grace

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To assess in non-cavitated carious teeth the mechanical properties of dentin matrix by measuring its reduced modulus of elasticity and the effect of dentin biomodification strategies on three dentin matrix zones: caries-affected, apparently normal dentin below caries-affected zone and sound dentin far from carious site. Methods Nano-indentations were performed on dentin matrices of carious molars before and after surface modification using known cross-linking agents (glutaraldehyde, proanthocyanidins from grape seed extract and carbodiimide). Results Statistically significant differences were observed between dentin zones of demineralized dentin prior to surface biomodification (P< 0.05). Following surface modification, there were no statistically significant differences between dentin zones (P< 0.05). An average increase of 30-fold, 2-fold and 2.2-fold of the reduced modulus of elasticity was observed following treatments of the three dentin zones with proanthocyanidin, carbodiimide and glutaraldehyde, respectively. PMID:24479274

  8. Dentine microhardness after different methods for detection and removal of carious dentine tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollica, Fernanda Brandão; Rocha Gomes Torres, Carlos; Gonçalves, Sergio Eduardo de Paiva; Mancini, Maria Nadir Gasparoto

    2012-01-01

    There are several methods for identifying carious dentinal tissue aiming to avoid removal of healthy dentinal tissue. The purpose of this study was to test different methods for the detection of carious dentinal tissue regarding the amount of carious tissue removed and the remaining dentin microhardness after caries removal. The dentin surfaces of 20 bovine teeth were exposed and half of the surface was protected with nail polish. Cariogenic challenge was performed by immersion in a demineralizing solution for 14 days. After transverse cross-section of the crown, the specimens were divided into four groups (n=10), according to the method used to identify and remove the carious tissue: "Papacárie", Caries-detector dye, DIAGNOdent and Tactile method. After caries removal, the cross-sectional surface was included in acrylic resin and polished. In a microhardness tester, the removed dentin thickness and the Vickers microhardness of the following regions were evaluated: remaining dentin after caries removal and superficial and deep healthy dentin. ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05) were performed, except for DIAGNOdent, which did not detect the presence of caries. Results for removed dentin thickness were: "Papacárie" (424.7 ± 105.0; a), Caries-detector dye (370.5 ± 78.3; ab), Tactile method (322.8 ± 51.5; bc). Results for the remaining dentin microhardness were: "Papacárie" (42.2 ± 10.5; bc), Caries-detector dye (44.6 ± 11.8; abc), Tactile method (24.3 ± 9.0; d). DIAGNOdent did not detect the presence of carious tissue; Tactile method and "Papacárie" resulted in the least and the most dentinal thickness removal, respectively; Tactile method differed significantly from "Papacárie" and Caries-detector dye in terms of the remaining dentin microhardness, and Tactile method was the one which presented the lowest microhardness values.

  9. Er:YAG激光与氟化钠治疗牙本质过敏症的疗效观察%Observation on the Clinical Effect of Er: YAG Laser Irradiation and Sodium Fluoride in Treating Dentin Hypersensitivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶丽君; 邓蔓菁; 刘鲁川; 李向杰; 安建平; 董正谋

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To observe the clinical curative effect of dentine hypersensitivity being locally treated by Er: YAG laser irradiation and sodium fluoride. Methods: 85 patients with dentine hypersensitivity were collected and randomly divided into four groups : A (laser treatment) , B (sodium fluoride treatment), C (combination treatment of laser and sodium fluoride) and D (blank controll), following the VAS(visual analogue scale)score to analyze the clinical curative effect of different treatment on dentine hypersensitivity. Results: The VAS scores in observation period have a decreasing trend. Comparing A, B and C group with D group, there have statistical differences (Ptreat dentine hypersensitivity locally has significantly clinical curative effect.%目的:观察Er:YAG激光照射和氟化钠局部治疗牙本质过敏的临床疗效.方法:临床收集85名牙本质过敏的患者,随机分为A(激光治疗)、B(氟化钠治疗)、C(激光联合氟化钠治疗)和D(空白对照)4组,利用直观疼痛标尺法VAS(visual analogue scale)分析其疗效.结果:在观察期间实验组VAS评分均有降低的趋势,A、B、C和D组相比有统计学差异(P<0.05);C和A、B组相比有统计学差异(P<0.05).结论:Er:YAG激光照射联合氟化钠局部治疗牙本质过敏临床疗效显著.

  10. Evaluation of caries progression in dentin treated by fluoride-containing materials using an in-air micro-PIGE and micro-PIXE measurement system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, H., E-mail: yhiroko@dent.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Restorative Dentistry and Endodontology, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, 1-8 Yamada-Oka, Suita 565-0871 (Japan); Iwami, Y.; Yagi, K.; Hayashi, M. [Department of Restorative Dentistry and Endodontology, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, 1-8 Yamada-Oka, Suita 565-0871 (Japan); Komatsu, H.; Okuyama, K.; Matsuda, Y. [Graduate School of Dental Medicine, Hokkaido University, Kita 13, Nishi 7, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8586 (Japan); Yasuda, K. [The Wakasa Wan Energy Research Center, 64-52-1 Nagatani, Tsuruga 914-0192 (Japan)

    2015-04-01

    It is well-known that fluorine (F) is involved in the progression of caries. The evaluation of caries progression has conventionally been based on the change in mineral content using transverse microradiography (TMR). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the progression of dentinal caries by the change in calcium (Ca) content using Particle-Induced Gamma-ray Emission/Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIGE/PIXE) techniques at the Wakasa Wan Energy Research Center. We also assessed the relationship between caries progression rate and the concentration of F penetration into dentin from dental fluoride-containing materials (FCMs). Dentin sections of six extracted human teeth were prepared to obtain various amounts of F uptake using three types of FCMs. F and Ca distribution of specimens were obtained using PIGE/PIXE techniques. After evaluation, the specimens were immersed in 10 ml of demineralizing solution (pH 4.5) to simulate caries attack. To estimate caries progression rates, the same portions of the specimens were evaluated after caries attack treatment using PIGE/PIXE. A negative correlation between the F uptake in dentin and the rate of caries progression was observed. Therefore, caries progression in dentin was reduced by increasing the amount of F uptake from FCMs. This demonstrates that PIGE/PIXE techniques are valuable for estimating caries progression rates.

  11. Two pre-treatments for bonding to non-carious cervical root dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flury, Simon; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Lussi, Adrian

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the effect of airborne-particle abrasion or diamond bur preparation as pre-treatment steps of non-carious cervical root dentin regarding substance loss and bond strength. 45 dentin specimens-produced from crowns of extracted human incisors by grinding the labial surfaces with silicon carbide papers (control) were treated with one of three adhesive systems (Group 1A-C; A: OptiBond FL, B: Clearfil SE Bond, or C: Scotchbond Universal; n= 15/adhesive system). Another 135 dentin specimens (n = 15/group) produced from the labial, non-carious cervical root part of extracted human incisors were treated with one of the adhesive systems after either no pre-treatment (Group 2A-C), pre-treatment with airborne-particle abrasion (CoJet Prep and 50 µm aluminum oxide powder; Group 3A-C), or pre-treatment with diamond bur preparation (40 µm grit size; Group 4A-C). Substance loss caused by the pre-treatment was measured in Groups 3 and 4. After treatment with the adhesive systems, resin composite was applied and all specimens were stored (37°C, 100% humidity, 24 hours) until measurement of micro-shear bond strength (µSBS). Data were analyzed with a nonparametric ANOVA followed by Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon rank sum tests (level of significance: α = 0.05). Overall substance loss was significantly lower in Group 3 (median: 19 µm) than in Group 4 (median: 113 µm; P carious cervical root dentin regardless of any pre-treatment of the latter (both P = 0.661). For Scotchbond Universal, the µSBS to non-carious cervical root dentin without pre-treatment was significantly lower than to ground crown dentin and to non-carious cervical root dentin pre-treated with airborne-particle abrasion or diamond bur preparation (P ≤ 0.014).

  12. Environmental scanning electron microscopy of hydrated conditioned/etched dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wet, F A; van der Vyver, P J; Eick, J D; Dusevich, V M

    2000-11-01

    Various etchants/conditioners are used during dental treatment to affect or remove the smear layer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different treatments on moist dentine, using a field emission environmental scanning electron microscope (FE-ESEM). Twenty freshly extracted, human molar teeth were utilised. The roots and pulps were removed, and the crowns horizontally sectioned with a low speed diamond saw (Isomet) (with cooling in a saline solution) in order to expose superficial dentine. A smear layer was created on these surfaces by using 600 grit silicone carbide paper. Test surfaces were then treated in one of the following ways: 1. 37% phosphoric acid liquid 2. 37% phosphoric acid gel 3. NRC (non-rinse conditioner) without rinsing 4. NRC with rinsing. Shallow grooves were cut on the untreated sides, using a thin diamond bur. This enabled the samples to be split in half when pressure was applied in the grooves. Samples were maintained moist throughout specimen preparation. Samples were examined in the FE-ESEM (Philips XL 30) in such a way that the effect of the treatment could be viewed occlusally, as well as perpendicular to the treated interface. Phosphoric acid liquid and gel removed the smear layer, and demineralised the dentine for approximately 5-10 micrometers. NRC penetrated the smear layer and modified it to a lesser degree. However, washing of the NRC treated surface removed part of the smear layer, and opened up some dentinal tubules. Excellent resolution was possible with the FE-ESEM in both the wet and dry modes.

  13. An investigation of the effect of a desensitizing dentifrice on dentinal tubules in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topbaşi, B; Türkmen, C; Günday, M

    1998-03-01

    The effect of Sensodyne dentifrice, which contains strontium chloride hexahydrate, on the occlusion of dentinal tubules was studied in vivo and in vitro. Eight premolar teeth scheduled for extraction for orthodontic purposes were used. Four of the teeth were extracted before Sensodyne application (in vitro). The other four teeth were treated in vivo and then extracted. A patch of enamel was removed from all the teeth to expose the dentinal surfaces, and the smear layer over the exposed area was removed. In the in vivo test, the patients were instructed to brush their teeth for 1 minute, twice a day, for 2 weeks. The teeth were then extracted and kept in distilled water until examined by scanning electron microscope. The in vitro teeth were brushed in the same manner and kept in distilled water between brushings. Most of the in vitro dentinal tubules were found to be open, whereas most of the in vivo dentinal tubules were occluded.

  14. Material, Mechanical, and Tribological Characterization of Laser-Treated Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilbas, Bekir Sami; Kumar, Aditya; Bhushan, Bharat; Aleem, B. J. Abdul

    2014-10-01

    Laser treatment under nitrogen assisting gas environment of cobalt-nickel-chromium-tungsten-based superalloy and high-velocity oxygen-fuel thermal spray coating of nickel-chromium-based superalloy on carbon steel was carried out to improve mechanical and tribological properties. Superalloy surface was preprepared to include B4C particles at the surface prior to the laser treatment process. Material and morphological changes in the laser-treated samples were examined using scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Residual stresses present at the surface region of the laser-treated layer were determined from the XRD data. The microhardness of the laser-treated surface was measured by indentation tests. Fracture toughness of the coating surfaces before and after laser treatment were also measured using overload indentation tests. Macrowear and macrofriction characterization were carried out using pin-on-disk tests.

  15. Glass polyalkenoate bond strength to dentine after chemomechanical caries removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, F M; Lynch, E

    1994-10-01

    The bond strength of a glass polyalkenoate cement after chemomechanical caries removal of dentine with or without the use of a conditioning agent and the mode of bond failure using scanning electron microscopy was examined. Forty extracted carious human teeth were divided into four groups of ten. Conventional caries removal was carried out on two groups and chemomechanical caries removal on the other two groups. Surface conditioner was applied to the dentine in one conventionally treated and one chemomechanically treated group. Glass polyalkenoate cement was applied via a metal holder to the dentine. The samples were stored for 7 days in a moist environment at 37 degrees C. The samples were subjected to a shearing-type stress at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm min-1. The mean bond strength for each group, in MPa (standard deviation), was: conventional caries removal alone 1.32 (0.51), conventional caries removal and conditioner application 2.43 (0.47), chemomechanical caries removal alone 2.47 (0.99) and chemomechanical caries removal and conditioner application 2.76 (0.96). Mean bond strengths for both the chemomechanically treated groups and the conventionally treated group, coupled with the use of the conditioning agent, were significantly greater than for the conventionally treated groups alone at the 0.05 level. There was no significant difference between the chemomechanically treated groups or the group conventionally treated with conditioner application. SEM examination revealed a combination of cohesive and adhesive bond failure. Different morphologies between the conventionally and chemomechanically treated surfaces were also evident.

  16. ON THE STIFFNESS OF DEMINERALIZED DENTIN MATRICES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryou, Heonjune; Turco, Gianluca; Breschi, Lorenzo; Tay, Franklin R.; Pashley, David H.; Arola, Dwayne

    2015-01-01

    Resin bonding to dentin requires the use of self-etching primers or acid etching to decalcify the surface and expose a layer of collagen fibrils of the dentin matrix. Acid-etching reduces the stiffness of demineralized dentin from approximately 19 GPa to 1 MPa, requiring that it floats in water to prevent it from collapsing during bonding procedures. Several publications show that crosslinking agents like gluteraladehyde, carbodiimide or grape seed extract can stiffen collagen and improve resin-dentin bond strength. Objective The objective was to assess a new approach for evaluating the changes in stiffness of decalcified dentin by polar solvents and a collagen cross-linker. Methods Fully demineralized dentin beams and sections of etched coronal dentin were subjected to indentation loading using a cylindrical flat indenter in water, and after treatment with ethanol or ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC). The stiffness was measured as a function of strain and as a function of loading rate from 1 to 50 µm/sec. Results At a strain of 0.25% the elastic modulus of the fully demineralized dentin was approximately 0.20 MPa. It increased to over 0.90 MPa at strains of 1%. Exposure to ethanol caused an increase in elastic modulus of up to four times. Increasing the loading rate from 1 to 50 µm/sec caused an increase in the apparent modulus of up to three times in both water and ethanol. EDC treatment caused increases in the stiffness in fully demineralized samples and in acid-etched demineralized dentin surfaces in situ. Significance Changes in the mechanical behavior of demineralized collagen matrices can be measured effectively under hydration via indentation with cylindrical flat indenters. This approach can be used for quantifying the effects of bonding treatments on the properties of decalcified dentin after acid etching, as well as to follow the loss of stiffness over time due to enzymatic degradation. PMID:26747822

  17. Shear bond strength of composite resin to dentin after application of cavity disinfectants - SEM study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to evaluate the effect of different cavity disinfectants on dentin bond strengths of composite resin applied with two different adhesive systems. Materials and Methods: Two-hundred mandibular molars were sectioned parallel to the occlusal surface to expose dentin in the midcoronal one-third. The dentinal surfaces were polished with waterproof-polishing papers. The specimens were randomly divided into five groups of 40 teeth each as follows: group 1(control -- specimens were not treated with any cavity disinfectants. Groups 2--5 (experimental groups -- dentin surfaces were treated with the following cavity disinfectants, respectively; 2% chlorhexidine solution, 0.1% benzalkonium chloride-based disinfectant, 1% chlorhexidine gel, and an iodine potassium iodide/copper sulfate-based disinfectant. The specimens were then randomly divided into two subgroups including 20 teeth each to evaluate the effect of different bonding systems. Dentin bonding systems were applied to the dentin surfaces and the composite buildups were done. After the specimens were stored in an incubator for 24 hours, the shear bond strength was measured at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The specimens were then statistically analyzed. Statistical Analysis Used: One way analysis of variance and Tukey-HSD tests were used. Results: There was no significant difference between chlorhexidine gel and control groups regardless of the type of the bonding agent used (P>0.05. On the other hand, pretreatment with benzalkonium chloride-based, iodine potassium iodide/copper sulfate-based disinfectants or chlorhexidine solutions had a negative effect on the shear bond strength of self-etching bonding systems. Conclusions: The findings of this study suggest that when benzalkonium chloride-based, iodine potassium iodide/copper sulfate-based disinfectants or chlorhexidine solutions are used as a cavity disinfectant, an etch-and-rinse bonding system should be preferred.

  18. Occluding effect of dentifrices on dentinal tubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrais, César Augusto Galvão; Micheloni, Carolina Diniz; Giannini, Marcelo; Chan, Daniel C N

    2003-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the tubule occluding ability of three commercial available dentifrices (Sensodyne, Emoform and Sorriso) by Scanning Electron Microscopy. Fifty cervical areas from buccal and lingual surfaces of sound third human molars were used. Cervical enamel was wet abraded to expose flat dentin surfaces and further polished with diamond pastes. Specimens were randomly divided into five groups (n=10): G1-no brushing; G2-brushing without dentifrice; G3-brushing with Sensodyne; G4-brushing with Emoform; G5-brushing with Sorriso. Brushed specimens were treated for 4 min per day, for 7 days in a toothbrushing machine. Specimens were prepared and observed under SEM for calculation of the percentage of occluded tubules. In addition, slurries of toothpastes were analyzed by X-ray microanalysis. Data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey test (p<0.05). Means of occluded tubules in descending order were: G5-98.83+/-3.31% (a), G4-96.02+/-5.24% (a), G3-80.12+/-24.65% (a), G1-37.31+/-24.22% (b); G2-22.92+/-15.19% (b). The three tested dentifrices produced increased dentinal occlusion as compared to controls (p<0.05) but equivalent occlusion among each other. Calcium from calcium-carbonate abrasive was identified in all dentifrices. Results indicated that the use of all dentifrices occluded tubules more than no brushing and brushing without dentifrices groups. Thus, the tested dentifrices seem effective for desensitization by tubule occlusion.

  19. A novel approach to evaluate the effect of medicaments used in endodontic regeneration on root canal surface indentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassen, Ghaeth H; Chu, Tien-Min G; Gallant, Maxime A; Allen, Matthew R; Vail, Mychel M; Murray, Peter E; Platt, Jeffrey A

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the capability of a novel reference point indentation apparatus to test the indentation properties of root canal surface dentine treated with three intracanal medicaments used in endodontic regeneration. Immature human premolars were selected (n = 22). Four specimens were obtained from each root and randomly assigned to three treatment groups and a control group. Each specimen was exposed to one of the three treatment pastes (triple antibiotic (TAP), double antibiotic (DAP), or calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2)) or neutral deionized water (control) for 1 or 4 weeks. After each time interval, the indentation properties of the root canal dentine surfaces were measured using a BioDent reference point indenter. Two-way ANOVA and Fisher's protected least significant differences were used for statistical analyses. Significant differences in indentation parameters and estimated hardness between all groups at both time points were found. TAP-treated dentine had the highest significant indentation parameters, followed by DAP-treated dentine, untreated control dentine, and Ca(OH)2-treated dentine, respectively. Furthermore, TAP-treated dentine had the lowest significant estimated hardness, followed by DAP-treated dentine, untreated control dentine, and Ca(OH)2-treated dentine, respectively. BioDent reference point indenter was able to detect significant differences in indentation properties of root canal dentine treated with various medicaments. The use of a reference point indenter is a promising approach to characterize the indentation properties of root canal surfaces without any surface modification. This might provide an in vitro mechanical measurement that is more representative of the actual clinical situation.

  20. Comparison of shear bond strength of amalgam bonded to primary and permanent dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi, S; Bahman, S; Arghavan, A B; Fatemeh, M

    2008-06-01

    Amalgam's non-adhesive characteristics necessitate cavity preparations incorporating retentive features, which often require the removal of non-carious tooth structure. Use of adhesives beneath amalgam restorations, would be helpful to overcome this disadvantage. This study was undertaken to compare the mean shear bond strength of amalgam bonded to primary and permanent dentin, to evaluate the efficacy of amalgam adhesives in pediatric dentistry.27 primary and 28 permanent posterior teeth with intact buccal or lingual surfaces were grounded to expose dentin and wet-polished with 400-grit silicone carbide paper. Scotchbond Multi Purpose Plus adhesive system was applied to the dentin surfaces and light cured. Amalgam was condensed onto the treated dentin through a plastic mold.shear bond strength testing was done using an Instron Universal testing machine, at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min.The data were analyzed by independent samples t-test The difference among the two groups was not statistically significant (p>0.05) Bonded amalgam showed the same level of bond strength to primary and permanent dentin; so, application of amalgam bonding agents in pediatric dentistry can be recommended.

  1. Comparison of shear bond strength of amalgam bonded to primary and permanent dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi S

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Amalgam′s non-adhesive characteristics necessitate cavity preparations incorporating retentive features, which often require the removal of non-carious tooth structure. Use of adhesives beneath amalgam restorations, would be helpful to overcome this disadvantage. This study was undertaken to compare the mean shear bond strength of amalgam bonded to primary and permanent dentin, to evaluate the efficacy of amalgam adhesives in pediatric dentistry.27 primary and 28 permanent posterior teeth with intact buccal or lingual surfaces were grounded to expose dentin and wet-polished with 400-grit silicone carbide paper. Scotchbond Multi Purpose Plus adhesive system was applied to the dentin surfaces and light cured. Amalgam was condensed onto the treated dentin through a plastic mold.shear bond strength testing was done using an Instron Universal testing machine, at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min.The data were analyzed by independent samples t-test The difference among the two groups was not statistically significant (p>0.05 Bonded amalgam showed the same level of bond strength to primary and permanent dentin; so, application of amalgam bonding agents in pediatric dentistry can be recommended.

  2. Surface treated polypropylene (PP) fibres for reinforced concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López-Buendía, Angel M., E-mail: buendia@uv.es [AIDICO Technological Institute of Construction, Benjamin Franklin 17, 46380 Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Romero-Sánchez, María Dolores [AIDICO Technological Institute of Construction, Marble Technical Unit, Camí de Castella 4, 03660 Novelda. Alicante (Spain); Climent, Verónica [Lafarge Cementos, Polígono Sepes, Isaac Newton s/n, 46500 Sagunto, Valencia (Spain); Guillem, Celia [AIDICO Technological Institute of Construction, Marble Technical Unit, Camí de Castella 4, 03660 Novelda. Alicante (Spain)

    2013-12-15

    Surface treatments on a polypropylene (PP) fibre have contributed to the improvement of fibre/concrete adhesion in fibre-reinforced concrete. The treatments to the PP fibre were characterized by contact angle measurements, ATR-IR and XPS to analyse chemical alterations. The surface topography and fibre/concrete interaction were analysed by several microscopic techniques, namely optical petrographic, and scanning electron microscopy. Treatment modified the surface chemistry and topography of the fibre by introducing sodium moieties and created additional fibre surface roughness. Modifications in the fibre surface led to an increase in the adhesion properties between the treated fibres and concrete and an improvement in the mechanical properties of the fibre-reinforced concrete composite as compared to the concrete containing untreated PP fibres. Compatibility with the concrete and increased roughness and mineral surface was also improved by nucleated portlandite and ettringite mineral association anchored on the alkaline PP fibre surface, which is induced during treatment.

  3. Effects of CO2 laser energy on dentin permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashley, E L; Horner, J A; Liu, M; Kim, S; Pashley, D H

    1992-06-01

    The effect of a CO2 laser on the structure and permeability of smear layer-covered human dentin was evaluated in vitro. Three different energy levels were used (11, 113, and 566 J/cm2). The lowest exposure to the laser energy increased dentin permeability, measured as a hydraulic conductance, due to partial measured as a hydraulic conductance, due to partial loss of the superficial smear layer and smear plugs. The intermediate energy level also increased dentin permeability by crater formation, making the dentin thinner. The lack of uniform glazing of the surface of the crater, leaving its surface porous and in communication with the underlying dentinal tubules also contributed to the increase in dentin permeability seen with the intermediate laser energy. The highest laser energy produced complete glazing of the crater surfaces and sealed the dentinal tubules beneath the crater. However, it also completely removed the smear layer in a halo zone about 100-microns wide around each crater which increased the permeability of the pericrater dentin at the same time it decreased the permeability of the dentin within the crater. The combined use of scanning electron microscopy and permeability measurements provides important complementary information that is essential in evaluating the effects of lasers on dentin.

  4. Efficacy of stannous, fluoride and their their combination in dentin erosion prevention in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amnah Abdullah ALGARNI

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the protective effects of solutions containing stannous (Sn, fluoride (F and their combination in the prevention of dentin erosion. Forty bovine root dentin specimens (4’4’2 mm3 were prepared and randomly assigned to 4 groups (n = 10: SnCl2 (800 ppm/6.7 mM Sn, NaF (250 ppm/13 mM F, NaF/SnCl2 (800 ppm/6.7 mM Sn; 250 ppm/13 mM F, and deionized water (DIW as a negative control. An acquired pellicle was formed on dentin samples by incubation in clarified, pooled, stimulated human saliva for 24 hours. The specimens were subjected to 5 daily cycles, each consisting of 5 of min demineralization (0.3%/15.6 mM citric acid, pH 2.6, 6’/day and 60 min of re-mineralization in clarified human saliva. Thirty minutes after the 1st, 3rd and 5th demineralization episodes of each day, the specimens were treated with one of the test solutions for 2 min. Surface loss was measured via optical profilometry. Mixed-model ANOVA followed by Tukey’s test were used for the statistical analysis. Sn, F, and their combination significantly reduced the dentin surface loss by 23%, 36%, and 60% compared with DIW, respectively. All groups were significantly different (p < 0.05. The combination of Sn and F significantly reduced the amount of dentin surface loss compared with all other groups. The F group also significantly reduced surface loss compared with Sn and DIW, followed by the Sn group, which showed significantly greater protection compared with the DIW control. The daily use of a combined fluoride and stannous solution is promising for preventing dentin erosion.

  5. In vitro photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy in dentine contaminated by cariogenic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, M. A. S.; de-Paula, D. M.; Lima, J. P. M.; Borges, F. M. C.; Steiner-Oliveira, C.; Nobre-Dos-Santos, M.; Zanin, I. C. J.; Barros, E. B.; Rodrigues, L. K. A.

    2010-06-01

    The development of a method to ensure bacterial-free substrates without extensive cavity preparation would be highly useful to dentistry, since there is no currently available effective method for killing residual bacteria in dentinal tissue. This randomized in vitro study determined parameters for using toluidine blue O (TBO) with a light-emitting diode (LED) for dentine caries disinfection and monitored intrapulpal/periodontal temperatures during irradiation. Occlusal human dentine slabs were immersed in Streptococcus mutans culture for demineralization induction. Slabs were allocated to 10 groups ( n = 15), which were treated with 0.1 mg ml-1 TBO with 5 min of incubation time or 0.9% NaCl solution for 5, 10 or 15 min, and submitted or not to irradiation for 5, 10 or 15 min (47, 94, and 144 J/cm2). Before and after treatments, dentine samples were analyzed with regard to S. mutans counts. In whole teeth, temperature in pulp and periodontium was measured by thermocouples during irradiation. Kruskal-Wallis/Student-Newman-Keuls, and ANOVA/Tukey test were respectively utilized to compare log reductions and temperature rises between groups. Bacterial reduction was observed when dentine was exposed to both TBO and LED at all irradiation times, as well as to LED alone for 10 and 15 min. Temperature increases lower than 2°C were observed for either pulp or periodontium. Concluding, LED combined with TBO is a safe and effective approach for dentine caries disinfection. Nevertheless, additional studies should be conducted to determine the influence of the irradiation in S. mutans viability in dentinal surface/tubules.

  6. Bonding over Dentin Replacement Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meraji, Naghmeh; Camilleri, Josette

    2017-08-01

    Dentin replacement materials are necessary in large cavities to protect the pulp and reduce the bulk of filling material. These materials are layered with a composite resin restorative material. Microleakage caused by poor bonding of composite resin to underlying dentin replacement material will result in pulp damage. The aim of this study was to characterize the interface between dentin replacement materials and composite resin and to measure the shear bond strength after dynamic aging. Biodentine (Septodont, Saint Maur-des-Fosses, France), Theracal LC (Bisco, Schaumburg, IL), and Fuji IX (GC, Tokyo, Japan) were used as dentin replacement materials. They were then overlaid with a total-etch and bonding agent or a self-etch primer and composite resin or a glass ionomer cement. All combinations were thermocycled for 3000 cycles. The interface was characterized using scanning electron microscopy and elemental mapping. Furthermore, the shear bond strength was assessed. The Biodentine surface was modified by etching. The Theracal LC and Fuji IX microstructure was unchanged upon the application of acid etch. The Biodentine and glass ionomer interface showed an evident wide open space, and glass particles from the glass ionomer adhered to the Biodentine surface. Elemental migration was shown with aluminum, barium, fluorine, and ytterbium present in Biodentine from the overlying composite resin. Calcium was more stable. The bond strength between Theracal LC and composite using a total-etch technique followed by self-etch primer achieved the best bond strength values. Biodentine exhibited the weakest bond with complete failure of bonding shown after demolding and thermocycling. Dynamic aging is necessary to have clinically valid data. Bonding composite resin to water-based dentin replacement materials is still challenging, and further alternatives for restoration of teeth using such materials need to be developed. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists

  7. Bonding mechanism of three "one-bottle" systems to conditioned and unconditioned enamel and dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, M; Goracci, G; García-Godoy, F

    1997-10-01

    This in vivo study investigated the formation of hybrid layer, resin tags and adhesive lateral branches, by use of the latest generation of enamel-dentin bonding systems ("one-bottle" systems) on conditioned and unconditioned enamel and dentin. The dentin adhesives were tested on 24 flat dentin preparations made on facial surfaces of vital, periodontally compromised teeth. The experimental teeth were randomly divided in six groups of four samples each. Group 1: Prime & Bond 2.1 (conditioned dentin, CD); Group 2: Single Bond (CD); Group 3: Syntac Sprint (CD); Group 4: Prime & Bond 2.1 (unconditioned dentin, UD); Group 5: Single Bond (UD); Group 6: Syntac Sprint (UD). In the first three groups, the "one-bottle" systems were applied following the manufacturers' instructions, while in the other three groups the dentin and the enamel were not treated with phosphoric acid and the primer was applied directly on the prepared surfaces. On top of the primer-adhesive, a thin layer of resin was applied and light-cured for 20 seconds. The sample teeth were extracted immediately after the adhesive material was light-cured. All the samples were split-fractured along their long axis. Half of the samples were deproteinized and decalcified at the interface in order to visualize the hybrid layer and the other halves were completely dissolved in order to observe the morphology of resin tags by use of scanning electron microscopy. Groups 1-3: All the tested products showed the same micromechanical bonding mechanism to conditioned dentin with phosphoric acid: they formed hybrid layer, resin tags and adhesive lateral branches. In the samples of the first three groups, characteristic reverse cone-shaped tags with their corresponding adhesive lateral branches were evident. At the enamel site, traditional pattern of etch enamel was always observed. Groups 4-6: When the bonding systems were applied on unconditioned dentin, hybrid layer was not formed, resin tags were rarely noted and their

  8. Effects of non-thermal atmospheric pressure pulsed plasma on the adhesion and durability of resin composite to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Geum-Jun; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Chung, Sung-No; Chun, Bae-Hyeock; Kim, Chang-Keun; Seo, Deog-Gyu; Son, Ho-Hyun; Cho, Byeong-Hoon

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of low-power, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma (NT-APP) treatments, in pulsed and conventional modes, on the adhesion of resin composite to dentin and on the durability of the bond between resin composite and dentin. A pencil-type NT-APP jet was applied in pulsed and conventional modes to acid-etched dentin. The microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of resin composite to dentin was evaluated at 24 h and after thermocycling in one control group (no plasma) and in two experimental groups (pulsed plasma and conventional plasma groups) using the Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus Adhesive System. Data were analyzed using two-factor repeated-measures anova and Weibull statistics. Fractured surfaces and the bonded interfaces were evaluated using a field-emission scanning electron microscope. Although there were no significant differences between the plasma treatment groups, the plasma treatment improved the MTBS compared with the control group. After thermocycling, the MTBS did not decrease in the control or conventional plasma group but increased in the pulsed plasma group. Thermocycling increased the Weibull moduli of plasma-treated groups. In conclusion, plasma treatment using NT-APP improved the adhesion of resin composite to dentin. Using a pulsed energy source, the energy delivered to the dentin was effectively reduced without any reduction in bond strength or durability.

  9. Long-term bond strength of adhesive systems applied to etched and deproteinized dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninoshka Uceda-Gómez

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the early and 12-month bond strength of two adhesive systems (Single Bond-SB and One Step-OS applied to demineralized dentin (WH and demineralized/NaOCl-treated dentin (H. Twenty flat dentin surfaces were exposed, etched, rinsed and slightly dried. For the H groups, a solution of 10% NaOCl was applied for 60 s, rinsed (15 s and slightly dried. The adhesives were applied according to the manufacturer's instructions and composite resin crowns were incrementally constructed. After 24 h (water-37ºC, the specimens was sectioned in order to obtain resin-dentin sticks (0.8 mm². The specimens were tested in microtensile (0.5 mm/min immediately (IM or after 12 months of water storage (12M. The data (MPa were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey's test (a=0.05. Only the main factors adhesive and time were significant (p=0.004 and p=0.003, respectively. SB (42.3±9.1 showed higher bond strengths than OS (33.6±11.6. The mean bond strength for IM-group (42.5±8.7 was statistically superior to 12M (33.3±11.8. The use of 10% NaOCl, after acid etching, did not improve the immediate and the long-term resin-dentin bond strength.

  10. Construction and in vitro test of a new electrode for dentin resistance measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Steffen; Gente, Michael

    2013-10-01

    It is necessary to reduce the tooth substance before treating a tooth with a dental crown. The preparation often requires reduction of the dentin. This results in a dentin wound and a thinner substance over the pulp, increases the risk of inflammation, and could result in necrosis of the pulp. To give the dentist information about the amount of dentin over the pulp during preparation, the Prepometer was developed. The function of this device is based on the measurement of the electric resistance of the tooth substance. The measuring behavior of the first-generation Prepometer is characterized by smaller values of electric resistance before reaching full contact of the measuring head to the dentin surface and the actual value RT. This measuring behavior can mislead inexperienced therapists with inaccurate values that suggest thinner dentin than the reality. In this study, a new electrode based on the technology of active guard drive was constructed to overcome this issue. The results show that improvement in the measuring behavior of the new electrode could be achieved, eliminating the earlier disadvantage of the Prepometer.

  11. Utilization of surface-treated rubber particles from waste tires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, F.G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Systems Div.]|[Environmental Technologies Alternatives, Inc., Lima, OH (United States)

    1994-12-01

    During a 12-month program, the author successfully demonstrated commercial applications for surface-treated rubber particles in two major markets: footwear (shoe soles and components) and urethane-foam carpet underlay (padding). In these markets, he has clearly demonstrated the ease of using R-4080 and R-4030 surface-treated rubber particles in existing manufacturing plants and processes and have shown that the material meets or exceeds existing standards for performance, quality, and cost-effectiveness. To produce R-4080 and R-4030, vulcanized rubber, whole-tire material is finely ground to particles of nominal 80 and mesh size respectively. Surface treatment is achieved by reacting these rubber particles with chlorine gas. In this report, the author describes the actual test and evaluations of the participant companies, and identifies other potential end uses.

  12. A clinical perspective on dentin adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichmiller, F C

    1993-01-01

    The newer generation of dentin adhesives has changed the practice of restorative dentistry. Two features common to most of the bonding restorative materials are the ability to alter, through the use of acidic etching agents, the surface of the dentin and the ability to completely wet and re-infiltrate the altered dentin surface with a hydrophilic polymerizable monomer. The acidic etchants remove or break up the smear layer, partially demineralize and/or alter the mineral in the first few microns of the dentin surface, and expose the collagen fibril network. The hydrophilic adhesive monomers that contain both acidic and methacrylate groups on the same molecule are bifunctional in nature. These monomers are able to infiltrate the demineralized dentin due to their hydrophilic nature and polymerize to encapsulate the exposed collagen fibers. Available products can be divided into two broad categories: systems that contain a low concentration of adhesive monomer diluted in a volatile solvent and systems that use adhesive resins of moderate to high viscosity. Knowledge of the features and properties of dentin adhesives provides the needed rationale for the protocol of application and the proper choice of materials in restorative dentistry.

  13. Influence of Immediate Dentin Sealing on the Shear Bond Strength of Pressed Ceramic Luted to Dentin with Self-Etch Resin Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Dalby

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To examine the effect of immediate dentin sealing (IDS, with dentin bonding agents (DBAs applied to freshly cut dentin, on the shear bond strength of etched pressed ceramic luted to dentin with RelyX Unicem (RXU cement. Method. Eighty extracted noncarious third molars were ground flat to expose the occlusal dentin surfaces. The teeth were randomly allocated to five groups (A to E of sixteen teeth each. Groups A to D were allocated a dentin bonding agent (Optibond FL, One Coat Bond, Single Bond, or Go! that was applied to the dentin surface to mimic the clinical procedure of IDS. These specimen groups then had etched glass ceramic discs (Authentic luted to the sealed dentin surface using RXU. Group E (control had etched glass ceramic discs luted to the dentin surface (without a dentin bonding agent using RXU following the manufacturer’s instructions. All specimens were stored for one week in distilled water at room temperature and then shear stressed at a constant cross-head speed of 1 mm per minute until failure. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA followed by post hoc Tukey HSD method (0.05 in the SBS between the test groups (A–D or the control (group E. Conclusion. IDS using the dentin bonding agents tested does not statistically (>0.05 affect the shear bond strength of etched pressed ceramic luted to dentin with RXU when compared to the control.

  14. Stability of plasma treated superhydrophobic surfaces under different ambient conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Faze; Liu, Jiyu; Cui, Yao; Huang, Shuai; Song, Jinlong; Sun, Jing; Xu, Wenji; Liu, Xin

    2016-05-15

    Plasma hydrophilizing of superhydrophobic substrates has become an important area of research, for example, superhydrophobic-(super)hydrophilic patterned surfaces have significant practical applications such as lab-on-chip systems, cell adhesion, and control of liquid transport. However, the stability of plasma-induced hydrophilicity is always considered as a key issue since the wettability tends to revert back to the untreated state (i.e. aging behavior). This paper focuses on the stability of plasma treated superhydrophobic surface under different ambient conditions (e.g. temperature and relative humidity). Water contact angle measurement and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy are used to monitor the aging process. Results show that low temperature and low relative humidity are favorable to retard the aging process and that pre-storage at low temperature (-10°C) disables the treated surface to recover superhydrophobicity. When the aging is performed in water, a long-lasting hydropholicity is obtained. As the stability of plasma-induced hydrophilcity over a desired period of time is a very important issue, this work will contribute to the optimization of storage conditions of plasma treated superhydrophobic surfaces.

  15. Etidronate from Medicine to Endodontics: effects of different irrigation regimes on root dentin roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    TARTARI, Talita; DUARTE JUNIOR, Anivaldo Pereira; SILVA JÚNIOR, José Otávio Carrera; KLAUTAU, Eliza Burlamaqui; SILVA E SOUZA JUNIOR, Mario Honorato; SILVA E SOUZA, Patrícia de Almeida Rodrigues

    2013-01-01

    An increase in dentin roughness, associated with surface composition, contributes to bacterial adherence in recontaminations. Surface roughness is also important for micromechanical interlocking of dental materials to dentin, and understanding the characteristics of the surface is essential to obtain the adhesion of root canal sealers that have different physico-chemical characteristics. Objectives To evaluate the effects of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), ethylenediaminetetraacetic (EDTA), etidronic (HEBP), and citric acid (CA) associated with different irrigation regimens on root dentin roughness. Material and Methods Forty-five root halves of anterior teeth were used. The root parts were sectioned in thirds, embedded in acrylic resin and polished to a standard surface roughness. Initially, the samples of each third were randomly assigned into 3 groups and treated as follows: G1 - saline solution (control); G2 - 5% NaOCl+18% HEBP mixed in equal parts; and G3 - 2.5% NaOCl. After initial measuments, the G3 samples were distributed into subgroups G4, G5 and G6, which were subjected to 17% EDTA, 10% CA and 9% HEBP, respectively. Following the new measuments, these groups received a final flush with 2.5% NaOCl, producing G7, G8 and G9. The dentin surface roughness (Ra) was determined before and after treatments using a profilometer. The Wilcoxon test (α<0.05) was used to compare the values before and after treatments, and the Friedman test (α<0.05) to detect any differences among root thirds. Results (i) NaOCl did not affect the surface roughness; (ii) there was a significant increase in roughness after the use of chelating agents (P<0.01); and (iii) only the G3 group showed a difference in surface roughness between apical third and other thirds of the teeth (P<0.0043). Conclusion Only the irrigation regimens that used chelating agents altered the roughness of root dentin. PMID:24212986

  16. Etidronate from Medicine to Endodontics: effects of different irrigation regimes on root dentin roughness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talita Tartari

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available An increase in dentin roughness, associated with surface composition, contributes to bacterial adherence in recontaminations. Surface roughness is also important for micromechanical interlocking of dental materials to dentin, and understanding the characteristics of the surface is essential to obtain the adhesion of root canal sealers that have different physico-chemical characteristics. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effects of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl, ethylenediaminetetraacetic (EDTA, etidronic (HEBP, and citric acid (CA associated with different irrigation regimens on root dentin roughness. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty-five root halves of anterior teeth were used. The root parts were sectioned in thirds, embedded in acrylic resin and polished to a standard surface roughness. Initially, the samples of each third were randomly assigned into 3 groups and treated as follows: G1 - saline solution (control; G2 - 5% NaOCl+18% HEBP mixed in equal parts; and G3 - 2.5% NaOCl. After initial measuments, the G3 samples were distributed into subgroups G4, G5 and G6, which were subjected to 17% EDTA, 10% CA and 9% HEBP, respectively. Following the new measuments, these groups received a final flush with 2.5% NaOCl, producing G7, G8 and G9. The dentin surface roughness (Ra was determined before and after treatments using a profilometer. The Wilcoxon test (α<0.05 was used to compare the values before and after treatments, and the Friedman test (α<0.05 to detect any differences among root thirds. RESULTS: (i NaOCl did not affect the surface roughness; (ii there was a significant increase in roughness after the use of chelating agents (P<0.01; and (iii only the G3 group showed a difference in surface roughness between apical third and other thirds of the teeth (P<0.0043. CONCLUSION: Only the irrigation regimens that used chelating agents altered the roughness of root dentin.

  17. Effect of depth and tubule direction on ultimate tensile strength of human coronal dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Satoshi; Pereira, Patricia N R; Kawamoto, Chiharu; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Koshiro, Kenichi; Tagami, Junji; Carvalho, Ricardo M; Pashley, David H; Sano, Hidehiko

    2003-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of dentin depth and tubule direction on the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of human dentin. Dentin slabs of 0.5-mm thickness were trimmed either from the mesial and distal (for specimens with the tubules parallel to the tensile force; parallel group) or from the occlusal and pulpal surfaces (perpendicular group) to reduce the cross-sectional area of the superficial, middle, and deep regions to 0.25 mm2, and subjected to microtensile testing. From SEM photomicrographs of the fractured specimens of the parallel group, the tubule density was investigated. For both parallel and perpendicular groups, superficial dentin showed a significantly higher UTS than deep dentin. The tubule density of superficial dentin was significantly lower than that of middle and deep dentin. When performing the microtensile bond test to deep dentin, it is possible that cohesive failure of dentin can occur at relatively low tensile stresses.

  18. Tubular occlusion optimizes bonding of hydrophobic resins to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadek, F T; Pashley, D H; Ferrari, M; Tay, F R

    2007-06-01

    Although hydrophobic resins may be bonded to acid-etched dentin with an ethanol wet-bonding technique, the protocol is sensitive to moisture contamination when bonding is performed in deep dentin. This study tested the hypothesis that the use of oxalate or poly(glutamic) acid-modified, diluted ceramicrete (PADC) for dentinal tubule occlusion prevents fluid contamination and improves the bonding of an experimental hydrophobic adhesive to acid-etched, ethanol-dehydrated dentin. Mid-coronal and deep acid-etched moist dentin pre-treated with oxalate or PADC was dehydrated by ethanol wet-bonding and infiltrated with the experimental three-step etch-and-rinse hydrophobic adhesive under simulated pulpal pressure. Tensile bond strengths to deep dentin without pre-treatment were severely compromised. Conversely, oxalate and PADC pre-treatments reduced dentin permeability, prevented water contamination, and improved bond strengths. Minimal nanoleakage was identified within hybrid layers created in the oxalate- and PADC-pre-treated deep dentin. The use of tubular occluding agents optimized bonding of hydrophobic resins to dentin.

  19. Self-etching adhesives increase collagenolytic activity in radicular dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Franklin R; Pashley, David H; Loushine, Robert J; Weller, R Norman; Monticelli, Francesca; Osorio, Raquel

    2006-09-01

    Endogenous matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) release from crown dentin and their activation results in degradation of hybrid layers created by dentin adhesives. This study tested the hypothesis that instrumented intraradicular dentin possesses latent collagenolytic activity that is activated by mild self-etching adhesives. Root dentin shavings were produced from 50 cleaned and shaped, saline-irrigated root canals using Gates Glidden drills and rinsed with sodium azide to prevent bacterial growth. Dried dentin powder aliquots were treated with two clinically-relevant MMP inhibitors, 2% chlorhexidine for 10 minutes and 17% EDTA for 1 minute. Additional dentin powder was mixed with Clearfil Liner Bond 2V or Clearfil Tri-S Bond for 1 minute followed by extracting the adhesives with acetone. Dentin powder was also treated with 2% chlorhexidine for 10 minutes before or after adhesive application. Collagenolytic activities of the nine groups were assayed with a fluorometer in 96-well plates, by recording the changes in fluorescence before and after addition of fluorescein-labeled type I collagen. Epoxy resin-embedded powders were examined with TEM for the extent of demineralization. Instrumented, mineralized intraradicular dentin possessed low but detectable collagenolytic activity that was inhibited by chlorhexidine (p dentin powder and activated latent MMPs, with 14- to 15-fold increases in collagenolytic activities (p MMPs without denaturing these enzymes, and may adversely affect the longevity of bonded root canal fillings and posts.

  20. Effect of theobromine-containing toothpaste on dentin tubule occlusion in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaechi, Bennett T; Mathews, Sapna M; Mensinkai, Poornima K

    2015-01-01

    Dentin hypersensitivity (DH) is treated by either occlusion of dentin tubules or nerve desensitization. This in situ study compared dentin tubules occlusion by theobromine-containing dentifrices with (Theodent-classic-F®, TCF) and without (Theodent-classic®, TC) fluoride with 1,500 ppm fluoride toothpaste, Colgate®-Regular (Fluoride) and Novamin®-containing toothpaste, Sensodyne®-5000-Nupro (Novamin®). Each subject wore four intraoral appliances bearing dentin blocks while using one of four test dentifrices (n = 20/dentifrice) twice daily for 7 days. The four appliances were removed successively after 1, 2, 3, and 7 days. Treated blocks and their control (untreated) blocks were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Effects were compared statistically (ANOVA/Tukey's) based on percentage of surface area covered by deposited precipitate layer (%DPL) and percentage of fully open (%FOT), partially occluded (%POT), and completely occluded (%COT) tubules in each block calculated relative to the number of tubules in their control blocks. SEM observation indicated an increased %COT and %DPL over time. After 1 and 2 days, %COT was comparable with TC and TCF, and significantly (p < 0.05) higher compared with Novamin® and Fluoride. Following 3 and 7 days, %COT was comparable among TC, TCF, and Novamin®, but remained significantly lower in Fluoride. At any time, %DPL was significantly (p < 0.05) higher in TC, TCF, and Novamin® compared with Fluoride. Theobromine-containing toothpastes with and without fluoride have equal potential in occluding dentin tubules within a shorter time period than Novamin®-containing toothpaste; however, the three demonstrated equal potential after 1 week, but not the fluoride toothpaste. Theobromine-containing toothpaste promoted dentin tubule occlusion thus shows potential to relief DH.

  1. Iloprost induces tertiary dentin formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limjeerajarus, Chalida Nakalekha; Chanarattanubol, Thichaporn; Trongkij, Panruethai; Rujiwanichkul, Mirantee; Pavasant, Prasit

    2014-11-01

    Prostacyclin (PGI2), a member of the prostaglandin family, can promote angiogenesis and cell proliferation. In this study, the effect of the application of a PGI2 analog (iloprost) on dentin repair was examined in vitro and in vivo. Iloprost significantly stimulated the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and osteo-/odontogenic marker messenger RNA in human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) under osteoinductive conditions in vitro. In addition, iloprost enhanced HDPC alkaline phosphatase enzymatic activity and mineral deposition. An in vivo study was performed using a rat molar mechanical pulp exposure model. After 30 days, histologic analysis revealed that there was a dramatic tertiary dentin formation in the iloprost-treated group compared with the calcium hydroxide and the untreated control groups. Furthermore, vascular endothelial growth factor protein expression in dental pulp tissue was increased in the iloprost-treated group as determined by immunohistochemical staining. Taken together, the present study, for the first time, shows that iloprost induces the expression of osteo-/odontogenic markers in vitro and promotes angiogenic factor expression and enhances tertiary dentin formation in vivo. This implies the potential clinical usefulness of iloprost in vital pulp therapy. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Influence of different dentin depths on microtensile bond strength of two dentin adhesive systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Tie-li; Huang, Cui; Zheng, Zhi-xing

    2009-10-01

    To determine the microtensile bond strength of two adhesives systems to either superficial or deep dentin. The crowns extracted human premolars were transversally sectioned next to the occlusal DEJ to expose flat dentin surfaces. The surfaces were bonded with: (1)two-step, total-etch adhesive Prime&Bond NT (PB),(2)wo-step, self-etching adhesive FL-Bond (FB), according to manufacturers' directions. Composite build-ups were constructed incrementally. After storage for 24 hours in water at 37 degrees, the teeth were longitudinally sectioned in the "x" and "y" directions to obtain bonded sticks with a cross-sectional area of 0.81mm(2) with a slow-speed diamond saw. The remaining dentin thickness (RDT) was measured to assess the superficial dentin group (RDT> or =3mm) and the deep dentin group (RDT0.05). No cohesive failure was observed in either superficial or deep dentin. Most of the failure was adhesive failure. From this study, it can be concluded that different dentin depths can not influence the microtensile bond strengths of Prime&Bond NT and FL-Bond adhesive systems.

  3. How to bond to root canal dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nica, Luminita; Todea, Carmen; Furtos, Gabriel; Baldea, Bogdan

    2014-01-01

    Bonding to root canal dentin may be difficult due to various factors: the structural characteristic of the root canal dentin, which is different from that of the coronal dentin; the presence of the organic tissue of the dental pulp inside the root canal, which has to be removed during the cleaning-shaping of the root canal system; the smear-layer resulted after mechanical instrumentation, which may interfere with the adhesion of the filling materials; the type of the irrigants used in the cleaning protocol; the type of the sealer and core material used in the obturation of the endodontic space; the type of the materials used for the restoration of the endodontically treated teeth. The influence of the cleaning protocol, of the root canal filling material, of the type of the adhesive system used in the restoration of the treated teeth and of the region of the root canal, on the adhesion of several filling and restorative materials to root canal dentin was evaluated in the push-out bond strength test on 1-mm thick slices of endodontically treated human teeth. The results showed that all these factors have a statistically significant influence on the push-out bond strength. Formation of resin tags between radicular dentin and the investigated materials was observed in some of the samples at SEM analysis.

  4. Bonding glass-ionomer cements to chemomechanically-prepared dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes-Ledoux, P M; Weinberg, R; Grogono, A

    1989-05-01

    The aim of this investigation was to compare the shear bond strengths of two commercially available glass-ionomer cement base materials to remaining dentin: (1) after conventional caries removal and polyacrylic acid conditioning; (2) after chemomechanical caries removal (Caridex); and (3) after chemomechanical caries removal and polyacrylic acid conditioning. Ninety freshly extracted carious teeth were randomly assigned for caries removal with either the chemomechanical technique (N = 60), or with conventional mechanical drilling (N = 30). Caries removal was continued until the remaining dentin surfaces were judged sound. The remaining dentin in 30 of the teeth prepared with the chemomechanical technique, and in all of the teeth prepared with mechanical drilling, was treated with 10% aqueous polyacrylic acid for 10 seconds. Groups of 15 teeth were assigned for bonding with either Ketac-Bond or Shofu Glasionomer Base Cement. All bonded specimens were stored in a humidor at 37 degrees C for 24 hr. Shear bond strength was tested by means of a mechanical testing machine at a cross-head speed of 0.05 cm/min. Analysis of variance indicated no significant difference (p greater than 0.05) in the mean bond strength among the groups.

  5. Flame retardant polypropylene nanocomposites reinforced with surface treated carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guleria, Abhishant

    Polypropylene nanocomposites are prepared by reinforcing carbon nanotubes by ex-situ solution mixing method. Interfacial dispersion of carbon nanotubes in polypropylene have been improved by surface modification of CNTs and adding surfactants. Polypropylene nanocomposites fabrication was done after treating CNTs. Firstly, oxidation of CNTs followed by silanization for addition of functionalized groups on the surface of CNTs. Maleic anhydride grafted PPs were used as surfactants. Maleic anhydrides with two different molecular weights were LAMPP and HMAPP. Successful oxidation of CNTs by nitric acid and functionalized CNTs by 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane was confirmed by attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) with evidence of absorption peak at 1700 and 1100-1000 cm-1. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs revealed that the CNTs dispersion quality was improved by directly adding LMAPP/HMAPP into PP/CNTs system and the PP-CNTs adhesion was enhanced through both the CNTs surface treatment and the addition of surfactant. Thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) revealed an enhanced thermal stability in the PP/CNTs and PP/CNTs/MAPP. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) characterization demonstrated that the crystalline temperature, fusion heat and crystalline fraction of hosting PP were decreased with the introduction of CNTs and surface treated CNTs; however, melting temperature was only slightly changed. Melting rheological behaviors including complex viscosity, storage modulus, and loss modulus indicated significant changes in the PP/MAPP/CNTs system before and after functionalization of CNTs, and the mechanism were also discussed in details.

  6. Characterization of treated porcelain surfaces via dynamic contact angle analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoenix, R D; Shen, C

    1995-01-01

    Successful porcelain repair requires conditioning of porcelain surfaces. Conditioning is intended to facilitate wetting by repair materials and improve interfacial bonding. The objective of this investigation was to determine the effects of selected surface treatments upon the wettability of a representative feldspathic porcelain. Dynamic contact angle analysis and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the effects of such treatments. Standardized porcelain specimens were subjected to the following five treatment regimens: (1) control (no treatment); (2) airborne particle abrasion using 50 microns aluminum oxide; (3) etching with ammonium bifluoride gel; (4) etching with acidulated phosphate fluoride gel; and (5) etching with hydrofluoric acid gel. Following treatment, specimens were cleansed and dried. Advancing contact angles were quantified using dynamic contact angle analysis. Mean values and 95% confidence intervals were (in degrees): control, 63.8 +/- 2.7; ammonium bifluoride, 39.4 +/- 2.0; airborne particle abrading, 29.1 +/- 2.9; acidulated phosphate fluoride, 24.9 +/- 1.7; and hydrofluoric acid, 16.5 +/- 1.2. Significant differences were found between all treatment groups (P = .05). Subsequent scanning electron microscopy examination of treated surfaces indicated lesser contact angles were associated with surfaces displaying deeper and wider grooves. Apparently, the resultant increase in surface area produces increased wettability. It is inferred that an increase in surface area may correspond to enhanced resin-porcelain bonding.

  7. Current status of dentin adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinfelder, K F

    1998-12-01

    Undoubtedly, dentin bonding agents have undergone a major evolution during the last several years. The shear bond strength of composite resin to the surface of dentin is actually greater than the inherent strength of the dentin itself under well-controlled conditions. No longer must the clinician depend only upon the bonding to enamel as the sole bonding mechanism. Bonding to both types of dental structure permits even better reinforcement of the tooth itself. Perhaps even more important than the high level of bonding exhibited by the current dentin adhesives is their ability to seal the dentin. So effective is this sealing capability that it is now possible to protect the pulpal tissue from microbial invasion through the dentinal tubules. Further, by enclosing the odontoblastic processes and preventing fluid flow, the potential for postoperative sensitivity is diminished considerably. In fact, so evolutionary is the concept of bonding that the procedures associated with the restoration of teeth has changed dramatically. Undoubtedly, far greater improvements can be anticipated in the future.

  8. Multi-factoriality of dentine hypersensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojšin Ivana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Dentine hypersensitivity has been defined as a sharp, short pain arising from exposed dentin in response to stimuli typically thermal, evaporative tactile, osmoticor, chemical and which cannot be ascribed to any other form of dental defect or pathology. Prevalence. The most affected patients range in age from 20 to 40. The following teeth tend to be most sensitive: cuspids, premolars and incisors, location-concentrated on the facial surface. Morphological bases of dentine hypersensitivity Sensitive teeth have much greater numbers of open tubules per unit area and the average diameter of tubules is almost 2 times greater than tubules in nonsensitive teeth. Mechanisms of dentine hypersensitivity. The most widely accepted theory of how the pain occurs is Brannstroms theory. Etiology Dentine hypersensitivity represents a condition of presumable multifactorial pathology. Two processes are essential for its development: (1 dentin must be exposed through either genetic disturbance, enamel defect (lamellae, tufts and spindles, loss of enamel (erosion, abrasion, attrition, abfraction, gingival recession with rapid loss of cementum and (2 the dentin tubules must be open to both the oral cavity and the pulp. Diagnosis. Diagnostic protocol for this condition consisted of Medical, Dental Dietary, Oral Hygiene History and Intra-oral examinations with air indexing method. Differential Diagnosis: We must take into consideration a number of variables such as: dental caries, cracked tooth, restorative sensitivity, medication sensitivity, bleaching sensitivity and abscessed or non-vital tooth. Conclusion. Dentin hypersensitivity is a problem that bothes many patients. Many conditions share the symptoms of tooth sensitivity so differential diagnosis is essential for suitable treatment or preventive measures.

  9. Dentine microhardness after different methods for detection and removal of carious dentine tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    MOLLICA, Fernanda Brandão; TORRES, Carlos Rocha Gomes; GONÇALVES, Sergio Eduardo de Paiva; MANCINI, †Maria Nadir Gasparoto

    2012-01-01

    There are several methods for identifying carious dentinal tissue aiming to avoid removal of healthy dentinal tissue. Objectives The purpose of this study was to test different methods for the detection of carious dentinal tissue regarding the amount of carious tissue removed and the remaining dentin microhardness after caries removal. Material and methods The dentin surfaces of 20 bovine teeth were exposed and half of the surface was protected with nail polish. Cariogenic challenge was performed by immersion in a demineralizing solution for 14 days. After transverse cross-section of the crown, the specimens were divided into four groups (n=10), according to the method used to identify and remove the carious tissue: "Papacárie", Caries-detector dye, DIAGNOdent and Tactile method. After caries removal, the cross-sectional surface was included in acrylic resin and polished. In a microhardness tester, the removed dentin thickness and the Vickers microhardness of the following regions were evaluated: remaining dentin after caries removal and superficial and deep healthy dentin. Results ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05) were performed, except for DIAGNOdent, which did not detect the presence of caries. Results for removed dentin thickness were: "Papacárie" (424.7±105.0; a), Caries-detector dye (370.5±78.3; ab), Tactile method (322.8±51.5; bc). Results for the remaining dentin microhardness were: "Papacárie" (42.2±10.5; bc), Caries-detector dye (44.6±11.8; abc), Tactile method (24.3±9.0; d). Conclusions DIAGNOdent did not detect the presence of carious tissue; Tactile method and "Papacárie" resulted in the least and the most dentinal thickness removal, respectively; Tactile method differed significantly from "Papacárie" and Caries-detector dye in terms of the remaining dentin microhardness, and Tactile method was the one which presented the lowest microhardness values. PMID:23032207

  10. Dentine microhardness after different methods for detection and removal of carious dentine tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Brandão Mollica

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available There are several methods for identifying carious dentinal tissue aiming to avoid removal of healthy dentinal tissue. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to test different methods for the detection of carious dentinal tissue regarding the amount of carious tissue removed and the remaining dentin microhardness after caries removal. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The dentin surfaces of 20 bovine teeth were exposed and half of the surface was protected with nail polish. Cariogenic challenge was performed by immersion in a demineralizing solution for 14 days. After transverse cross-section of the crown, the specimens were divided into four groups (n=10, according to the method used to identify and remove the carious tissue: "Papacárie", Caries-detector dye, DIAGNOdent and Tactile method. After caries removal, the cross-sectional surface was included in acrylic resin and polished. In a microhardness tester, the removed dentin thickness and the Vickers microhardness of the following regions were evaluated: remaining dentin after caries removal and superficial and deep healthy dentin. RESULTS: ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05 were performed, except for DIAGNOdent, which did not detect the presence of caries. Results for removed dentin thickness were: "Papacárie" (424.7±105.0; a, Caries-detector dye (370.5±78.3; ab, Tactile method (322.8±51.5; bc. Results for the remaining dentin microhardness were: "Papacárie" (42.2±10.5; bc, Caries-detector dye (44.6±11.8; abc, Tactile method (24.3±9.0; d. CONCLUSIONS: DIAGNOdent did not detect the presence of carious tissue; Tactile method and "Papacárie" resulted in the least and the most dentinal thickness removal, respectively; Tactile method differed significantly from "Papacárie" and Caries-detector dye in terms of the remaining dentin microhardness, and Tactile method was the one which presented the lowest microhardness values.

  11. EFFECT OF FLUORIDE-CONTAINING DESENSITIZING AGENTS ON THE BOND STRENGTH OF RESIN-BASED CEMENTS TO DENTIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraç, Duygu; Külünk, Safak; Saraç, Y. Sinasi; Karakas, Özlem

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of desensitizing agents containing different amounts of fluoride on the shear bond strength of a dual polymerized resin cement and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) to dentin. Material and Methods: One hundred human molars were mounted in acrylic resin blocks and prepared until the dentin surface was exposed. The specimens were treated with one of four desensitizing agents: Bifluorid 12, Fluoridin, Thermoline and PrepEze. The remaining 20 specimens served as untreated controls. All groups were further divided into 2 subgroups in which a dual polymerized resin cement (Bifix QM) or a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (AVANTO) was used. The shear bond strength (MPa) was measured using a universal testing machine at a 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed. The data were analyzed statistically with a 2-way ANOVA, Tukey HSD test and regression analysis (α=0.05). The effect of the desensitizing agents on the dentin surface was examined by scanning electron microscopy. Results: The fluoride-containing desensitizing agents affected the bond strength of the resin-based cements to dentin (p<0.001). PrepEze showed the highest bond strength values in all groups (p<0.001). Conclusion: Regression analysis showed a reverse relation between bond strength values of resin cements to dentin and the amount of fluoride in the desensitizing agent (p<0.05). PMID:19936532

  12. Micro-tensile bond strength of self-etching primer adhesive systems to human coronal carious dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, J; Itota, T; Torii, Y; Nakabo, S; Yoshiyama, M

    2004-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the micro-tensile bond strengths of three self-etching primer adhesive systems to normal dentin (ND), caries-affected dentin (CAD) and caries-infected dentin (CID). Human extracted molars with caries were used, and flat dentin surfaces ground by 600-grit SiC paper were prepared. The surfaces were dyed using Caries-Detector solution, treated with Clearfil SE Bond, Mac-Bond II and UniFil Bond, and then covered with resin composites according to manufacturer's instructions. After immersion in 37 degrees C water for 24 h, the teeth were serially sectioned into multiple slices. Each slice was distinguished into ND, CAD and CID groups by the degree of staining, and the bond strength was measured in a universal testing machine. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) observation was also performed. For statistical analysis, anova and Scheffe's test were used (P bond strengths of the three adhesive systems to CAD and CID were significantly lower than those to ND. There was significant difference in the bond strength to ND between Clearfil SE Bond and UniFil Bond, but no significant differences to CAD and CID among the three adhesive systems. On SEM, the hybrid layers in CAD and CID showed more porous structures compared with ND. The results indicated that the bond strengths to CAD and CID were not affected by a variety of self-etching primer adhesive systems because of the porous hybrid layer formation in carious dentin.

  13. In vitro disinfection of dentinal tubules by various endodontics irrigants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, R; Eleazer, P D; Staat, R H

    1999-12-01

    Effectiveness of endodontic irrigants within dentinal tubules of human teeth was evaluated. Mid-sections of single-rooted teeth were prepared into dentin wedges. The pulpal sides of the sections were exposed to Micrococcus luteus or Bacillus megaterium that grew into the tubules. Irrigants used in the study included: 0.525% NaOCl, 0.12% chlorhexidine, RC Prep, 0.5% betadine iodine, and sterile H2O (as a control). Pulpal surfaces were exposed to an irrigant and then rinsed in sterile water. The samples were then cracked, exposing a fresh surface. Culture of the exposed dentin surfaces showed that selected irrigants reached to the far ends of the dentinal tubules in a concentration sufficient to kill 100% of the M. luteus. However B. megaterium was neither killed nor apparently inhibited by any irrigant. We conclude that endodontic irrigants permeate throughout dentinal tubules, but their effectiveness is dependent on the type of bacteria found within the tubules.

  14. Contraction stress in dentin adhesives bonded to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, M; de Gee, A J; Kaga, M; Feilzer, A J

    2006-08-01

    Adhesives cured under constrained conditions develop contraction stresses. We hypothesized that, with dentin as a bonding substrate, the stress would reach a maximum, followed by a continuous decline. Stress development was determined with a tensilometer for two total-etch systems and two systems with self-etching primers. The adhesives were placed in a thin layer between a glass plate and a flat dentin surface pretreated with phosphoric acid or self-etching primer. After an initial maximum shortly after light-curing, the stress decreased dramatically for the total-etch systems (70%) and, to a lesser extent, for the adhesives with self-etching primers (30%). The greater stress decrease for the total-etch systems was ascribed to water and/or solvents released into the adhesives from the fully opened dentinal tubules by the pulling/sucking action of the contraction stress. This happened less with the adhesives with self-etching primers, where the tubules remained mainly closed.

  15. Dentin sialoprotein and dentin phosphoprotein overexpression during amelogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paine, Michael L; Luo, Wen; Wang, Hong-Jun; Bringas, Pablo; Ngan, Amanda Y W; Miklus, Vetea G; Zhu, Dan-Hong; MacDougall, Mary; White, Shane N; Snead, Malcolm L

    2005-09-09

    The gene for dentin sialophosphoprotein produces a single protein that is post-translationally modified to generate two distinct extracellular proteins: dentin sialoprotein and dentin phosphoprotein. In teeth, dentin sialophosphoprotein is expressed primarily by odontoblast cells, but is also transiently expressed by presecretory ameloblasts. Because of this expression profile it appears that dentin sialophosphoprotein contributes to the early events of amelogenesis, and in particular to those events that result in the formation of the dentino-enamel junction and the adjacent "aprismatic" enamel. Using a transgenic animal approach we have extended dentin sialoprotein or dentin phosphoprotein expression throughout the developmental stages of amelogenesis. Overexpression of dentin sialoprotein results in an increased rate of enamel mineralization, however, the enamel morphology is not significantly altered. In wild-type animals, the inclusion of dentin sialoprotein in the forming aprismatic enamel may account for its increased hardness properties, when compared with bulk enamel. In contrast, the overexpression of dentin phosphoprotein creates "pitted" and "chalky" enamel of non-uniform thickness that is more prone to wear. Disruptions to the prismatic enamel structure are also a characteristic of the dentin phosphoprotein overexpressing animals. These data support the previous suggestion that dentin sialoprotein and dentin phosphoprotein have distinct functions related to tooth formation, and that the dentino-enamel junction should be viewed as a unique transition zone between enamel and the underlying dentin. These results support the notion that the dentin proteins expressed by presecretory ameloblasts contribute to the unique properties of the dentino-enamel junction.

  16. Effect of Green Tea Extract on the Treatment of Dentin Erosion: An in Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Mirkarimi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of green tea on dentin erosion.Materials and Methods: Twelve extracted sound human premolars were immersed in Coca Cola with a pH of 2.8 for 5 minutes. The surface microhardness was measured with a Knoop diamond under a load of 50gr/10s. The teeth were immersed in green tea (Camellia sinensis solution for one minute. The microhardness values were measured again and compared with pretreatment values by the Wilcoxon test. Three eroded teeth, which were treated with green tea, were evaluated under scanning electron microscope.Results: The mean ± SD of microhardness values before and after immersion in green tea were 46.5±2.79 and 54.5±4.4, respectively with statistically significant differences between the two measurements (P<0.01. In SEM evaluation there was an improvement in eroded dentin appearance and there were deposits on the dentin surface.Conclusion: Green tea (Camellia sinensis increased the microhardness of eroded dentin and improved the eroded texture.

  17. Primum non nocere - The effects of sodium hypochlorite on dentin as used in endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Li-Sha; Huang, Xue-Qing; Griffin, Brandon; Bergeron, Brian R; Pashley, David H; Niu, Li-Na; Tay, Franklin R

    2017-10-01

    The medical literature is replete with the maxim 'primum non nocere', cautioning health care providers to avoid doing any harm to human subjects in their delivery of medical care. Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) is a well-established irrigant for root canal treatment because of its antimicrobial and organic tissue remnant dissolution capability. However, little is known about the deleterious effect of this strong oxidizing agent on the integrity of human mineralized dentin. Iatrogenically-induced loss of dentin integrity may precipitate post-treatment root fracture and has potential medico-legal complications. In the present work, transmission electron microscopy provided evidence for collagen destruction in the surface/subsurface of dentin treated with high NaOCl concentrations and long contact times. Size exclusion chromatography showed that the hypochlorite anion, because of its small size, penetrated the water compartments of apatite-encapsulated collagen fibrils, degraded the collagen molecules and produced a 25-35µm thick, non-uniform "ghost mineral layer" with enlarged, coalesced dentinal tubules and their lateral branches. Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy identified increases in apatite/collagen ratio in NaOCl-treated dentin. The apatite-rich, collagen-sparse dentin matrix that remained after NaOCl treatment is more brittle, as shown by the reductions in flexural strength. Understanding the deleterious effects of NaOCl on mineralized dentin enables one to balance the risks and benefits in using high NaOCl concentrations for lengthy periods in root canal debridement. Delineating the mechanism responsible for such a phenomenon enables high molecular weight, polymeric antimicrobial and tissue dissolution irrigants to be designed that abides by the maxim of 'primum non nocere' in contemporary medical practices. The antimicrobial and tissue-dissolution capacities of NaOCl render it a well-accepted agent for root canal debridement. These highly desirable

  18. SURFACE REARRANGEMENTS OF OXYGEN PLASMA TREATED POLYSTYRENE: SURFACE DYNAMICS AND HUMIDITY EFFECT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junwei Li; Kyunghui Oh; Hyuk Yu

    2005-01-01

    The time evolution of oxygen plasma treated polystyrene (PS) surfaces was investigated upon storing them in the air under controlled humidity conditions. The methods of water contact angle, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to infer the surface properties and structure. Chemical groups containing oxygen were formed on the PS surface with the plasma treatment,demonstrated by water contact angle and XPS. The surface polarity decayed markedly on time, as assessed by steady increase in the water contact angle as a function of storage time, from zero to around 60°. The observed decay is interpreted as arising from surface rearrangement processes to burying polar groups away from the uppermost layer of the surfaces, which is in contact with air. On the other hand, XPS results show that the chemical composition in the first 3 nm surface layer is unaffected by the surface aging, and the depth profile of oxygen is essentially the same with time. A possible change of PS surface roughness was examined by AFM, and it showed that the increase of water contact angle during surface aging could not be attributed to surface roughness. Thus, it is concluded that surface aging is attributable to surface reorganization and the motion of oxygen containing groups is confined within the XPS probing depth. SFG spectroscopy, which is intrinsically interface-specific, was used to detect the chemical structure of PS surface at the molecular level after various aging times.The results are interpreted as follows. During the aging of the plasma treated PS surfaces, the oxygen containing groups undergo reorientation processes toward the polymer bulk and/or parallel to the surface, while the CH2 moiety stands up on the PS surface. Our results indicate that the surface configuration changes do not require large length scale segmental motions or migration of macromolecules. Motions that are

  19. Mineral content of the dentine remaining after chemomechanical caries removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, H K; Beeley, J A; Stevenson, A G

    1995-01-01

    Although the dentine remaining after chemomechanical caries removal appears sound by normal clinical criteria, no definitive evidence has yet been obtained to confirm that the dentine surface is in fact mineralised. The aim of this study was to use backscattered electron (BSE) imaging and electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA) to ascertain the level of mineralisation of the dentine remaining in cavities prepared by this technique. Carious dentine was removed from carious lesions by means of N-monochloro-DL-2-aminobutyric acid (NMAB) or NMAB containing 2 mol/l urea. Sections of teeth in which caries removal was complete by normal clinical criteria were examined by EPMA and BSE. Dentine adjacent to the pulp was found to be less mineralised than the surrounding dentine. Although the superficial layer of dentine remaining on the cavity floors frequently appeared to have a slightly reduced mineral content, the results clearly indicated that there was no significant difference between this dentine and the underlying sound dentine.

  20. Effect of Nanofiller Addition to an Experimental Dentin Adhesive on Microtensile Bond Strength to Human Dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SH. Kasraei

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the influence of adding nanofiller particles to a dentin bonding agent on resin-dentin bond strength.Materials and Methods: Fifty-four human intact premolar teeth were divided in to 6 groups of nine. The teeth were ground on occlusal surfaces and polished with 320 and then 600 grit silicon carbide papers. An experimental bonding system based on acetone/alcoholsolvent was provided with filler contents of 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5, 5.0, and 10.0 weight percent fumed silica nanofiller. After dentin surface etching, rinsing and blot drying, the experimentalbonding agents were applied to dentin surface. A composite resin was, then,bonded to the dentin on the bonding agent. The specimens were thermocycled for 500 cycles and sectioned in stick form. After two week of storage in distilled water, resin-dentin microtensile bond strength of the specimens was measured. Data were analyzed by one way ANOVA and DunnettT3 tests.Results: Bond strength to dentin was significantly affected by the filler level. Minimum and maximum resin-microtensile bond strength was in the experimental bonding agent with no filler (5.88 MPa and with filler level of 1.0 weight percent (15.15 MPa, respectively,and decreased with the increase of filler content down to 8.95 MPa for the filler level of 10.0 weight percent.Conclusion: Filler content seems to be one of the important factors influencing the bond strength of dental adhesives. Maximum dentin bond strength was obtained with 1% silanized nanofiller silica added to experimental adhesive system.

  1. Nanoleakage patterns of four dentin bonding systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H; Burrow, M F; Tyas, M J

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the nanoleakage patterns of four dentin bonding systems. The dentin bonding systems used in this study were: Single Bond, One Coat Bond, Prime & Bond NT/Non Rinse Conditioner (NRC), and PermaQuik. Flat occlusal dentin surfaces from extracted human molars were finished with wet 600-grit silicon carbide paper, and bonded with one of the dentin bonding systems. After 24 h storage at 37 degrees C in water, margins were finished with polishing discs and the surrounding tooth surfaces coated with nail varnish. The samples were immersed in a 50% (w/v) solution of silver nitrate for 24 h, and exposed to photodeveloping solution for 8 h. The samples were cut longitudinally, polished, and mounted on stubs, carbon coated and observed in a Field Emission-SEM using backscattered electron mode. Different nanoleakage patterns were observed with the different adhesive systems. However, accumulations of silver particles were often noted at the base of the hybrid layer for all materials. Single Bond and One Coat Bond demonstrated uptake of silver particles both within the hybrid layer and the adhesive resin. Prime & Bond NT/NRC showed silver staining throughout almost the entire thickness of the hybrid layer. The leakage pattern of PermaQuik revealed loose silver deposition within the hybrid layer. The composition of each adhesive system may play a role in forming the different leakage patterns. The current dentin bonding systems used in this study do not achieve perfect sealing at the restoration/dentin interface, which may influence the durability of the bond to dentin.

  2. Effects of Er:YAG laser on bond strength of self-etching adhesives to caries-affected dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyuturk, Alp Erdin; Ozmen, Bilal; Cortcu, Murat; Tokay, Ugur; Tosun, Gul; Erhan Sari, Mustafa

    2014-04-01

    The erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser may be effective the bond strength of adhesive systems on dentine surfaces, the chemical composition and aggressiveness of adhesive systems in clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of the Er:YAG laser system with the bonding ability of two different self-etching adhesives to caries-affected dentine in primary molars. Ninety mid-coronal flat dentine surfaces obtained from sound and caries-affected human primary dentine were treated with an Er:YAG laser or a bur. The prepared surfaces were restored with an adhesive system (Xeno V; Clearfil S³) and a compomer (Dyract Extra). The restored teeth were sectioned with a low-speed saw and 162 samples were obtained. The bond strength of the adhesive systems was tested using the micro-tensile test method. The data were statistically analyzed. A restored tooth in each group was processed for scanning electron microscopy evaluation. The values of the highest bond strength were obtained from the Clearfil S³-Er:YAG laser-sound dentine group in all groups. (24.57 ± 7.27 MPa) (P > 0.05). The values of the lowest bond strength were obtained from the Xeno V-Er:YAG laser-sound dentine group in all groups (11.01 ± 3.89 MPa). It was determined that the Clearfil S³ increased the bond strength on the surface applied with Er:YAG laser according to the Xeno V. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Effects of air-drying in vitro on human dentine permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashley, D H; Stewart, F P; Galloway, S E

    1984-01-01

    The effects of evaporation produced by air blasts of 0, 0.5, 2 or 5 min to dentine in vitro were evaluated by measuring dentine hydraulic conductance before and after each trial. When the tubules were filled with water, even prolonged evaporation had no effect on dentine permeability. Tubules filled with physiological salt solution produced a time-dependent decrease in dentine permeability. Tubules filled with 1.5 per cent albumin in water gave the largest reductions in dentine permeability. These effects were more marked in unetched as opposed to acid-etched dentine. The results suggest that part of the reduction in dentine sensitivity produced clinically by prolonged air blasts may be due to precipitation of organic and inorganic constituents of dentinal fluid at the surface.

  4. Superficial roughness on composite surface, composite enamel and composite dentin junctions after different finishing and polishing procedures. Part I: roughness after treatments with tungsten carbide vs diamond burs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Federico; Conti, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate different instruments for finishing composite restorations, as well as examining different surfaces and interfaces of the same restoration. The null hypothesis is represented by the fact that there are no significant differences on roughness of composite restorations finishing between tungsten carbide and diamond burs, furthermore the null hypothesis is that there are no significant differences on roughness between finishing on composite surfaces (C), compositeenamel (CE) and composite-dentin (CD) interfaces. The study was performed on 28 teeth, and class V cavities were prepared on the extracted teeth. Restorations were done in Filtek XTE nanofilled composite (3M Espe) in a standardized method, to then be finished. A comparison was made in the phase 1 between tungsten carbide burs (16 blades), diamond burs (46 μm), with a similar shape by the same manufacturer (Komet). Each surface received 5 bur applications. Consequently, an analysis with a profilometer was performed. Phase 2 involved further confrontation of ulterior finishing with ultrafine tungsten carbide burs (30 blades) and with extra and ultrafine diamond burs (25 and 8 μm) (the same shape as previously mentioned). A second analysis was then performed with a profilometer. All measurements were taken on C surfaces, CE and CD interfaces. Statistical analyses were carried out with c2 test (a = 0.05). The finishing procedures with fine grit or toothing burs gave a better smoothness with tungsten carbide burs compared to diamond burs. While with the ultrafine grit no significant differences were noted between tungsten carbide and diamond burs on the CE and CD interfaces, the diamond bur left less superficial roughness on the C surfaces. With regards to the superficial roughness of the different areas of restoration, it can be concluded that: minor roughness was detected on C surfaces, while the CD interface had the most superficial roughness, regardless of whether the

  5. Validation of a Cariogenic Biofilm Model to Evaluate the Effect of Fluoride on Enamel and Root Dentine Demineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Constanza E; Tenuta, Livia M A; Cury, Jaime A

    2016-01-01

    Due to gingival recession both enamel and root dentine are at risk of developing caries. Both tissues are exposed to a similar environment, however there is not a validated model to evaluate the effect of fluoride on these dental substrates simultaneously. Hence, this study aimed to validate a caries model to evaluate the effect of fluoride to prevent demineralization on enamel and root-dentine. Streptococcus mutans UA159 biofilms were formed on saliva-coated bovine enamel and root dentine slabs (n = 12 per group) mounted in the same well of culture plates. The biofilms were exposed 8×/day to 10% sucrose and treated 2×/day with fluoridated solutions containing 0, 150, 450, or 1,350 ppm F; thus, simulating the use of low to high fluoride concentration toothpastes. The pH values of the culture medium was monitored 2×/day as a biofilm acidogenicity indicator. After 96 h, biofilms were collected for fluoride concentration analysis. The percentage of surface hardness loss (%SHL) was calculated for slabs. The fluoride uptake by the enamel and dentine was also determined. The model showed a dose-response because the biofilm and fluoride uptake increased and %SHL decreased at increasing fluoride concentrations (p enamel. With the same fluoride concentration treatment, the percentage of reduction of demineralization was lower for dentine than for enamel. In conclusion, the model was validated in terms of a dose-response effect of fluoride on enamel and root dentine. Furthermore, the findings support the clinical data, suggesting that higher fluoride concentrations are necessary to control caries of root dentine than of enamel.

  6. Carabelli's trait revisited: an examination of mesiolingual features at the enamel-dentine junction and enamel surface of Pan and Homo sapiens upper molars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Alejandra; Skinner, Matthew M; Bailey, Shara E; Hublin, Jean-Jacques

    2012-10-01

    Carabelli's trait is a morphological feature that frequently occurs on the mesiolingual aspect of Homo sapiens upper molars. Similar structures also referred to as Carabelli's trait have been reported in apes and fossil hominins. However, the morphological development and homology of these mesiolingual structures among hominoids are poorly understood. In this study, we employ micro-computed tomography to image the enamel-dentine junction (EDJ) and outer enamel surface (OES) of Pan (n = 48) and H. sapiens (n = 52) upper molars. We investigate the developmental origin of mesiolingual features in these taxa and establish the relative contribution of the EDJ and enamel cap to feature expression. Results demonstrate that mesiolingual features of H. sapiens molars develop at the EDJ and are similarly expressed at the OES. Morphological variation at both surfaces in this taxon can satisfactorily be assessed using standards for Carabelli's trait developed by the Arizona State University Dental Anthropology System (ASUDAS). Relative to H. sapiens, Pan has an even greater degree of correspondence in feature expression between the EDJ and OES. Morphological manifestations in Pan molars are not necessarily limited to the protocone and are best characterized by a lingual cingulum that cannot be captured by the ASUDAS. Cusp-like structures, similar to those seen in marked Carabelli's trait expressions in H. sapiens, were not found in Pan. This study provides a foundation for further analyses on the evolutionary history of mesiolingual dental traits within the hominoid lineage. It also highlights the wealth of morphological data that can be obtained at the EDJ for understanding tooth development and for characterizing tooth crown variation in worn fossil teeth.

  7. Effect of Imidazolium-Based Silver Nanoparticles on Root Dentin Roughness in Comparison with Three Common Root Canal Irrigants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshad, Melika; Abbaszadegan, Abbas; Ghahramani, Yasamin; Jamshidzadeh, Akram

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a nanosilver-based irrigant on dentin roughness in comparison with three commonly used root canal irrigation solutions. Three common irrigants including 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) and also an imidazolium-based silver nanoparticle solution (ImSNP) (5.7×10 (-8) mol/L), were used. Distilled water was used as control. Roots of 25 human anterior teeth were sectioned longitudinally to obtain 50 dentin samples. Roughness values were evaluated by atomic force microscopy analysis on 5 groups (n=10) after each group was treated in one of the tested irrigant solutions for 10 min. Values were statistically analyzed by One-way analysis of variance, followed by a post hoc Tukey's test for pair-wise comparison. Dentin roughness significantly increased from 95.82 nm (control) to 136.02 nm, 187.07 nm, 142.29 nm and 150.92 nm with NaOCl, CHX, ImSNP and EDTA, respectively. CHX demonstrated a significantly higher roughness value compared to the other tested irrigants while no significant differences were seen in NaOCl, ImSNP and EDTA groups (P>0.242). ImSNP affected the physicochemical properties of dentin and raised its surface roughness; thus, this irrigant could impact bacterial and restorative material adhesion to root canal dentin walls.

  8. Effect of Imidazolium-Based Silver Nanoparticles on Root Dentin Roughness in Comparison with Three Common Root Canal Irrigants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshad, Melika; Abbaszadegan, Abbas; Ghahramani, Yasamin; Jamshidzadeh, Akram

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a nanosilver-based irrigant on dentin roughness in comparison with three commonly used root canal irrigation solutions. Methods and Materials: Three common irrigants including 5.25% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), 17% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) and also an imidazolium-based silver nanoparticle solution (ImSNP) (5.7×10 -8 mol/L), were used. Distilled water was used as control. Roots of 25 human anterior teeth were sectioned longitudinally to obtain 50 dentin samples. Roughness values were evaluated by atomic force microscopy analysis on 5 groups (n=10) after each group was treated in one of the tested irrigant solutions for 10 min. Values were statistically analyzed by One-way analysis of variance, followed by a post hoc Tukey’s test for pair-wise comparison. Results: Dentin roughness significantly increased from 95.82 nm (control) to 136.02 nm, 187.07 nm, 142.29 nm and 150.92 nm with NaOCl, CHX, ImSNP and EDTA, respectively. CHX demonstrated a significantly higher roughness value compared to the other tested irrigants while no significant differences were seen in NaOCl, ImSNP and EDTA groups (P>0.242). Conclusion: ImSNP affected the physicochemical properties of dentin and raised its surface roughness; thus, this irrigant could impact bacterial and restorative material adhesion to root canal dentin walls. PMID:28179931

  9. Observation of clinical effects of treating dentine hypersensitivity by bifluorid varnish%双氟涂料脱敏的临床疗效

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    文立亚; 侯义林; 许亦权; 唐晓云

    2001-01-01

    目的:评价双氟涂料(bifluorid varnish)对牙本质过敏症(dentine hypersensitivity)的脱敏疗效。方法:采用双氟涂料对牙本质过敏症患者进行脱敏治疗,分别于1个月、1年后观察其疗效并进行统计学分析。结果:1个月后两组疗效统计学分析相差不显著(P>0.05),而1年后两组疗效统计学分析相差显著(P<0.05)。结论:双氟涂料对牙本质过敏症具有较好的脱敏作用,值得临床推广应用。

  10. Desensitization therapy using laser, drug or their combination to treat dentine hypersentitivity: a review%激光联合药物脱敏的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭蓝; 陈新梅

    2012-01-01

    牙本质敏感是口腔临床上的常见病、多发病之一,其发病机制尚不清楚,而且,目前临床上仍没有理想的脱敏方法.激光联合药物脱敏克服了单一脱敏方法的不足,提高了脱敏效果,已成为近年来牙本质敏感治疗研究的焦点.本文对激光联合药物脱敏的研究进展作一综述.%Dentine hypersensitivity (DH) is one of the most common clinical oral diseases, yet its patho-genesis is not clear. There is no ideal clinical desensitization therapy at present . The combination of laser and drug o-vercame the drawbacks of single laser or drug therapy, and improved the desensitization effect. It has become the focus of the treatment of DH. In this article, the progress of desensitization therapies using laser, medicine and its combination is summarized.

  11. Carbodiimide inactivation of MMPs and effect on dentin bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoni, A; Apolonio, F M; Saboia, V P A; Santi, S; Angeloni, V; Checchi, V; Curci, R; Di Lenarda, R; Tay, F R; Pashley, D H; Breschi, L

    2014-03-01

    The use of protein cross-linking agents during bonding procedures has been recently proposed to improve bond durability. This study aimed to use zymography and in situ zymography techniques to evaluate the ability of 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) cross-linker to inhibit matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. The hypotheses tested were that: (1) bonding procedures increase dentin gelatinolytic activity and (2) EDC pre-treatment prevents this enzymatic activity. The zymographic assay was performed on protein extracts obtained from dentin powder treated with Optibond FL or Scotchbond 1XT with or without 0.3M EDC pre-treatment. For in situ zymography, adhesive/dentin interfaces were created with the same adhesives applied to acid-etched dentin slabs pre-treated or not with EDC conditioner. Zymograms revealed increased expression of dentin endogenous MMP-2 and -9 after adhesive application, while the use of EDC as a primer inactivated dentin gelatinases. Results of in situ zymograpy showed that hybrid layers of tested adhesives exhibited intense collagenolytic activity, while almost no fluorescence signal was detected when specimens were pre-treated with EDC. The correlative analysis used in this study demonstrated that EDC could contribute to inactivate endogenous dentin MMPs within the hybrid layer created by etch-and-rinse adhesives.

  12. Anti-proteolytic capacity and bonding durability of proanthocyanidin-biomodified demineralized dentin matrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui-Rui Liu; Ming Fang; Ling Zhang; Cheng-Fang Tang; Qi Dou; Ji-Hua Chen

    2014-01-01

    Our previous studies showed that biomodification of demineralized dentin collagen with proanthocyanidin (PA) for a clinically practical duration improves the mechanical properties of the dentin matrix and the immediate resin-dentin bond strength. The present study sought to evaluate the ability of PA biomodification to reduce collagenase-induced biodegradation of demineralized dentin matrix and dentin/adhesive interfaces in a clinically relevant manner. The effects of collagenolytic and gelatinolytic activity on PA-biomodified demineralized dentin matrix were analysed by hydroxyproline assay and gelatin zymography. Then, resin-/dentin-bonded specimens were prepared and challenged with bacterial collagenases. Dentin treated with 2%chlorhexidine and untreated dentin were used as a positive and negative control, respectively. Collagen biodegradation, the microtensile bond strengths of bonded specimens and the micromorphologies of the fractured interfaces were assessed. The results revealed that both collagenolytic and gelatinolytic activity on demineralized dentin were notably inhibited in the PA-biomodified groups, irrespective of PA concentration and biomodification duration. When challenged with exogenous collagenases, PA-biomodified bonded specimens exhibited significantly less biodegradation and maintained higher bond strengths than the untreated control. These results suggest that PA biomodification was effective at inhibiting proteolytic activity on demineralized dentin matrix and at stabilizing the adhesive/dentin interface against enzymatic degradation, is a new concept that has the potential to improve bonding durability.

  13. On the surface topography of ultrashort laser pulse treated steel surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Obona, J. Vincenc; Ocelik, V.; Skolski, J. Z. P.; Mitko, V. S.; Romer, G. R. B. E.; in't Veld, A. J. Huis; De Hosson, J. Th M.; Römer, G.R.B.E.; Huis in’t Veld, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    This paper concentrates on observations of the surface topography by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on alloyed and stainless steels samples treated by ultrashort laser pulses with duration of 210 fs and 6.7 ps. Globular-like and jet-like objects were found depending on the various levels of the

  14. Dentin bond strengths of simplified adhesives: effect of dentin depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Guilherme Carpena; Perdigão, Jorge; Lopes, Mariana de F; Vieira, Luiz Clovis Cardoso; Baratieri, Luiz Narciso; Monteiro, Sylvio

    2006-06-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of 3 simplified adhesive systems applied on shallow vs deep dentin. For superficial dentin, 30 human molars were sectioned with a diamond saw to expose dentin immediately below the dentoenamel junction. For deep dentin, 30 molars were sectioned 3 mm below the dentoenamel junction. The teeth were mounted, polished to 600-grit, and randomly assigned to 3 groups (n=10): Single Bonda and OptiBond Solo, total-etch adhesives, and Clearfil Liner Bond 2V, a self-etching primer adhesive. Adhesives were applied, the restorative material Filtek Z250 inserted in a No. 5 gelatin capsule, and light-cured. After 24 hours in water at 37 degrees C, shear bond strength was measured with an Instron at 5 mm/min. The data were analyzed with 2-way ANOVA and Duncan's post-hoc test. The results showed the following shear bond strengths (mean +/- SD in MPa): Single Bond/superficial dentin = 22.1 +/- 2.8; Single Bond/deep dentin = 14.2 +/- 7.0; OptiBond Solo/superficial dentin = 18.9 +/- 4.1; OptiBond Solo/deep dentin = 18.4 +/- 4.8; Clearfil Liner Bond 2V/superficial dentin = 21.0 +/- 7.4; Clearfil Liner Bond 2V/deep dentin = 17.6 +/- 5.9. There were no significant differences between mean shear bond strength for the factor "adhesive system" (P>.822). The Duncan's test showed that Single Bond resulted in higher shear bond strength on superficial dentin than on deep dentin. The mean shear bond strength for Clearfil Liner Bond 2V and OptiBond Solo were not influenced by dentin depth. When data were pooled for dentin depth, deep dentin resulted in statistically lower bond strengths than superficial dentin (Pcomposition of the dentin adhesive.

  15. Bonding of resin composite to caries-affected dentin after Carisolv(®) treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawaideh, Feda; Palamara, Joseph E A; Messer, Louise B

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of Carisolv(®) on resin composite adhesion on caries-affected dentin. Carious lesion specimens (N =46) were prepared from 45 extracted primary molars: Group 1 (N =23)-chemomechanical (Carisolv(®)) treatment; Group 2 (N =23)-rotary instrumentation; and Group 3 (N =23)-caries-free specimens from 20 noncarious primary molars. After caries removal (Groups 1 and 2) or washing and drying (Group 3), a resin composite rod (2-mm high, 0.975-mm diameter) was bonded vertically to dentin. Specimens were stressed at constant displacement (1.0 mm/minute) to failure; treated surfaces were examined under a scanning electron microscope. The mean (±SD) microshear bond strengths of resin composite to dentin were: Group 1=6.69 (±4.08) MPa; Group 2=10.31 (±5.47) MPa; and Group 3=7.16 (±6.64) MPa. The mean bond strength of resin composite of Group 2 significantly exceeded that of Groups 1 (P=.02) and 3 (P=.01); Groups 1 and 3 did not differ significantly. There was no significant association between failure mode and treatment type (P=.22) or mean bond strength (P=.44). Carisolv(®) removed the smear layer or limited its formation, producing demineralization incompletely infiltrated by resin composite. Chemomechanical treatment of caries-affected dentin of primary teeth did not adversely affect resin composite bonding.

  16. Assessment of the wetting behavior of three different root canal sealers on root canal dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muralidhar Tummala

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The objective of the present study was to evaluate and compare the wetting behavior of three different root canal sealers on the root canal dentin surface treated with irrigants and their combination. Materials and Methods: Decoronation and apical third resections of 27 extracted single-rooted human mandibular premolars were done. The roots were then split longitudinally into two halves, and randomly assigned into three treatment groups (n=18. The root dentin surfaces in Group1, Group 2 and Group 3 were treated with 17% ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA, 3% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl and combination of 17% EDTA and 3% NaOCl, respectively. Each group was subdivided into three subgroups of 6 specimens each, depending on the the sealer used, i.e. sub group A. zinc oxide (ZnOE, sub group B. AH plus, subgroup C. Guttaflow sealer, respectively. The contact angle was measured using First Ten Angstroms (FTA 200 dynamic contact angle analyzer. Results: The contact angle values for AH Plus sealer were significantly lower when compared to the other two sealer groups. Conclusion: The wettability of AH Plus sealer on the root surface dentin was found to be better than Gutta-Flow and ZnOE sealer.

  17. Effects of endodontic tri-antibiotic paste on bond strengths of dentin adhesives to coronal dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvin Mirzakoucheki

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of tri-antibiotic paste (TAP on microtensile bond strengths (MTBS of dental adhesives to dentin. Materials and Methods Sixty extracted molars had their occlusal surfaces flattened to expose dentin. They were divided into two groups, i.e., control group with no dentin treatment and experimental group with dentin treatment with TAP. After 10 days, specimens were bonded using self-etch (Filtek P90 adhesive or etch-and-rinse (Adper Single Bond Plus adhesives and restored with composite resin. Teeth were sectioned into beams, and the specimens were subjected to MTBS test. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests. Results There was a statistically significant interaction between dentin treatment and adhesive on MTBS to coronal dentin (p = 0.003. Despite a trend towards worse MTBS being noticed in the experimental groups, TAP application showed no significant effect on MTBS (p = 0.064. Conclusions The etch-and-rinse adhesive Adper Single Bond Plus presented higher mean bond strengths than the self-etch adhesive Filtek P90, irrespective of the group. The superior bond performance for Adper Single Bond when compared to Filtek P90 adhesive was confirmed by a fewer number of adhesive failures. The influence of TAP in bond strength is insignificant.

  18. Effect of endodontic procedures on root dentin permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, L; Anderson, R W; Pashley, D H

    1991-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitate the sequential effects of endodontic procedures on the permeability of human root dentin in vitro. Forty single-rooted teeth were used. Both the crown and the apical 2 mm of the root were removed. The hydraulic conductance of the root before and after various endodontic procedures was measured using a fluid filtration method. Measurements were also made of dentin thickness, intracanal diameter changes, and changes in intracanal surface area. The results showed that instrumentation by K files alone or in combination with Gates Glidden drills did not alter radicular dentin permeability when the cementum remained intact. After removing the cementum, the creation of a smear layer and smear plugs on the canal surface tended to offset the expected increase in dentin permeability created by increasing the intracanal surface area and decreasing root dentin thickness. EDTA treatment inside the instrumented canal to remove the smear layer did not increase permeability significantly. The use of K files followed by Gates Glidden drills tended to remove more cervical dentin, increased the intracanal surface area, and increased the hydraulic conductance of root dentin more than the use of K files alone.

  19. Stability of bonds made to superficial vs. deep dentin, before and after thermocycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Wang, Dan-yang; Fan, Jing; Li, Fang; Chen, Yu-jiang; Chen, Ji-hua

    2014-11-01

    Bonding stability of resinous adhesives to dentin is still problematic and may involve regional variations in dentin composition. This study is to evaluate the effect of dentin depth on the stability of resin-dentin bonds under thermocycling challenge. Dentin slabs with two flat surfaces parallel to the tooth axis were obtained from extracted human third molars. The slabs were randomized into eight groups according to the location of dentin [deep dentin (DD) or superficial dentin (SD)], the adhesive treatment (Single Bond 2 or Clearfil S(3) Bond), and the storage treatment (thermocycling for 5000 times vs. no). After the adhesive treatment and composite buildup on the dentin slabs, the micro-shear bond strength (μSBS) of each group was detected. The concentrations of cross-linked carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) were also evaluated using an immunoassay to detect the degree of collagen degradation in each group. Dentin depth, adhesive treatment and storage treatment all showed significant effects on both the μSBSs and the ICTP values (P0.05). Deep dentin showed significantly more bond degradation after thermocycling than did superficial dentin. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Resin diffusion through demineralized dentin matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARVALHO Ricardo M.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper has focused on the factors that may affect the permeability of adhesive resins into the demineralized dentin matrix during the development of the bonding process. The effects of surface moisture are discussed respectively to the adhesive systems, and the problems related to incomplete hybrid layer formation presented.

  1. Effect of self-etching primer vs phosphoric acid etchant on bonding to bur-prepared dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, M; Harada, N; Yamaguchi, S; Nakajima, M; Tagami, J

    2002-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of dentin conditioner on tensile bond strength to dentin prepared with different types of burs. A self-etching primer system, Mac-Bond II (MB, Tokuyama Dental) and a phosphoric acid etching system, Single Bond (SB, 3M) were used for conditioning. Twenty-four extracted intact human molars were ground flat to expose occlusal dentin. After the dentin surfaces were polished with #600 SiC paper, the teeth were randomly divided into a control group and three experimental groups according to the bur grits used: #600 SiC paper only as the control, fine cut steel bur (SB600), crosscut steel bur (SB703) and regular grit diamond bur (DB) mounted in a dental handpiece utilizing water cooling. The dentin surfaces were treated with one of two adhesive systems, then composite buildups were done with Clearfil AP-X (Kuraray Medical). After soaking the bond specimens for 24 hours in 37 degrees C water, multiple vertical serial sections (0.7 mm thick, 7-8 slices per one tooth) were made, trimmed to form an hour-glass shape with a 1.0 mm2 cross-section and tensile bond strengths were determined at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute. Statistical analysis was made using one and two-way ANOVA and Fisher's PLSD test (pbond strength (TBS) among the groups that received bur preparation, and there were no statistical differences among SB600, SB703 and the control. For SB, the TBS of SB703 was the highest, and there were no statistical differences among the other groups and the control. The influence of the method used to prepare dentin for micro-tensile bond strength testing was dependent on the adhesive system used.

  2. The effect of thermocycling on the adhesion of self-etching adhesives on dental enamel and dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Araby, Alaa Morsy; Talic, Yousef F

    2007-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness of one total-etch self-priming adhesive and two one-step self-etching adhesive systems on the adhesion of a resin composite to both dentin and enamel. The effect of thermocycling on the adhesion was also investigated. The null hypothesis tested was thermocycling would not affect bond strengths to enamel and dentin treated with self-etching adhesives or a total-etch adhesive. Two single-step self-etching adhesives [Xeno III (XE3) and Prompt L-Pop (PP)] and one two-step total-etch adhesive system (Prime & Bond NT) (P&B NT) were used in this study. Thirty caries-free unrestored human third molars were used to make specimens of enamel and dentin. Different adhesives were applied on enamel and dentin surfaces according to the manufacturer's instructions then hybrid composite restorative material was condensed on the surface using a mold. The bonded specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 masculineC for 24 hours before being tested. Half of the bonded specimens were tested for shear bond strength without thermocycling. The other half of the test specimens were thermocycled using a thermocycling apparatus in water baths held at 5 masculineC and 55 masculineC with a dwell time of one minute each for 10,000 cycles prior to shear testing. The mean shear bond strength before and after thermocycling was calculated, and the results were subjected to two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and repeated measure design to show the interaction between different materials and different times. The results showed shear bond strength on both enamel and dentin of the total-etch adhesive and the self-etching adhesives decreased after the specimens were subjected to thermocycling. The null hypothesis tested "thermocycling would not affect bond strengths treated with self-etching adhesives" was rejected. Furthermore, the study revealed the following: 1. The shear bond strength to both enamel and dentin of the total

  3. Evaluating EDTA as a substitute for phosphoric acid-etching of enamel and dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbery, Terence A; Kennedy, Matthew; Janus, Charles; Moon, Peter C

    2012-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are proteolytic enzymes released when dentin is acid-etched. The enzymes are capable of destroying unprotected collagen fibrils that are not encapsulated by the dentin adhesive. Chlorhexidine applied after etching inhibits the activation of released MMPs, whereas neutral ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) prevents the release of MMPs. The purpose of this study was to determine if conditioning enamel and dentin with EDTA can be a substitute for treating acid-etching enamel and dentin with chlorhexidine. A column of composite resin was bonded to enamel and dentin after conditioning. Shear bond strengths were evaluated after 48 hours and after accelerated aging for three hours in 12% sodium hypochlorite. Shear bond strengths ranged from 15.6 MP a for accelerated aged EDTA enamel specimens to 26.8 MPa for dentin conditioned with EDTA and tested after 48 hours. A three-way ANOVA and a Tukey HSD test found statistically significant differences among the eight groups and the three independent variables (P EDTA was successfully substituted for phosphoric acid-etched enamel and dentin treated with chlorhexidine. Interactions of conditioning agent and aging were significant for dentin but not for enamel. In an effort to reduce the detrimental effects of MMPs, conditioning enamel and dentin with EDTA is an alternative to treating acid-etched dentin and enamel with chlorhexidine.

  4. In vivo remineralization of dentin using an agarose hydrogel biomimetic mineralization system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Min; Li, Quan-Li; Cao, Ying; Fang, Hui; Xia, Rong; Zhang, Zhi-Hong

    2017-02-01

    A novel agarose hydrogel biomimetic mineralization system loaded with calcium and phosphate was used to remineralize dentin and induce the oriented densely parallel packed HA layer on defective dentin surface in vivo in a rabbit model. Firstly, the enamel of the labial surface of rabbits’ incisor was removed and the dentin was exposed to oral environment. Secondly, the hydrogel biomimetic mineralization system was applied to the exposed dentin surface by using a custom tray. Finally, the teeth were extracted and evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and nanoindentation test after a certain time of mineralization intervals. The regenerated tissue on the dentin surface was composed of highly organised HA crystals. Densely packed along the c axis, these newly precipitated HA crystals were perpendicular to the underlying dental surface with a tight bond. The demineralized dentin was remineralized and dentinal tubules were occluded by the grown HA crystals. The nanohardness and elastic modulus of the regenerated tissue were similar to natural dentin. The results indicated a potential clinical use for repairing dentin-exposed related diseases, such as erosion, wear, and dentin hypersensitivity.

  5. Effect of chemomechanical caries removal on bonding of resin-modified glass ionomer cement adhesives to caries-affected dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamama, Hhh; Yiu, Cky; Burrow, M F

    2015-06-01

    This study evaluated the effect of: (1) chemomechanical caries removal (CMCR); (2) dentine surface treatments and (3) dentine substrates on adhesion of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) adhesives. One hundred and twenty permanent molars exhibiting moderate cavitation on the occlusal surface into dentine were used. Seventy-five carious molars were used for bond strength testing; the remaining 45 for micromorphological evaluation of the bonded interface. Caries was excavated with NaOCl-based CMCR (Carisolv), enzyme-based CMCR (Papacarie), or conventional rotary caries removal methods. Dentine surface treatment was performed using 37% phosphoric acid, 25-30% PAA or 20% PAA + 3% AlCl3 . Three-way ANOVA revealed that all three factors 'caries removal methods', 'dentine surface treatments' and 'dentine substrates' did not significantly affect bond strength (p > 0.05). Scanning electron microscopy micrographs showed that the acid-base resistant layer was thicker in caries-affected dentine compared to sound dentine. NaOCl- and enzyme-based CMCR methods have no adverse effect on adhesion of RMGIC adhesives to sound and caries-affected dentine. Dentine surface treatment with 37% phosphoric acid for 5 s has no negative effect on bonding of RMGIC adhesives to dentine compared with using polyacrylic acid for 10 s. RMGIC adhesives bonded well to both sound and caries-affected dentine. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  6. Surface Properties of Cell-treated Polyethylene Terephthalate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Shi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The materials used in artificial joints undergo degradation through fatigue and corrosive wear in human body. The lifetime for well-designed artificial joints like hip joints is at most 12 years and a patient will usually have two total joint replacements during his/her lifetime. Tissue engineering, an alternative to total joint implantation, is the replacement of damaged tissue with the tissue that is designed and constructed to meet the needs of the individual patient. In this study, polyethylene terephthalate (PET in the form of overhead transparency films were investigated on their cell interactions and the tribological properties as an alternative tissue-engineering matrix. The base material of the transparency films is PET. Cell culture methods as well as atomic force microscope (AFM, contact angle goniometer, confocal microscope and universal tribotester were used to study the properties of the substrate materials and the interactions between the surface and the substrate materials. Results showed that cells grew on the substrate of the base materials of the PET. The tribological properties of the slides have been changed after being cell-treated.

  7. Effect of delayed light curing of a resin composite on marginal integrity in cylindrical dentine cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manabe, A; Debari, K; Itoh, K; Hisamitsu, H; Wakumoto, S

    1993-12-01

    The effect of delayed light curing of resin composite on marginal adaptation has been examined by measuring the wall-to-wall polymerization contraction gap when using a commercial resin composite together with experimental dentine bonding systems to restore cylindrical preparations in dentine. Morphological changes in dentine during dentine bonding procedures were observed using a scanning electron microscope. In a previous report, the contraction gap width for a resin composite increased when irradiation of the resin system was delayed, despite the use of a dentine bonding system considered to be 'contraction' gap free. Such deterioration in marginal adaptation was minimized by use of an experimental dentine primer, 40% erythritol methacrylate aqueous solution (EM), followed by the use of a commercial dual- or autocured dentine bonding agent. Under scanning electron microscopy, the dentine surface microstructure became unclear after EM priming, and a polymer film was detected after polymerization of the dual-cured dentine bonding agent. The hydrogelled primer and the formation of a polymer network on the dentine surface may prevent the flow of fluid from the pulp through the dentine tubules, and maintain marginal integrity if there is delay in light curing of light-activated resin composite systems.

  8. Comparison of removal torques between laser-treated and SLA-treated implant surfaces in rabbit tibiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Nam-Seok; Li, Lin-Jie; Cho, Sung-Am

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare removal torques and surface topography between laser treated and sandblasted, large-grit, acid-etched (SLA) treated implants. Laser-treated implants (experimental group) and SLA-treated implants (control group) 8 mm in length and 3.4 mm in diameter were inserted into both sides of the tibiae of 12 rabbits. Surface analysis was accomplished using a field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM; Hitachi S-4800; Japan) under ×25, ×150 and ×1,000 magnification. Surface components were analyzed using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Rabbits were sacrificed after a 6-week healing period. The removal torque was measured using the MGT-12 digital torque meter (Mark-10 Co., Copiague, NY, USA). In the experimental group, the surface analysis showed uniform porous structures under ×25, ×150 and ×1,000 magnification. Pore sizes in the experimental group were 20-40 mm and consisted of numerous small pores, whereas pore sizes in the control group were 0.5-2.0 mm. EDS analysis showed no significant difference between the two groups. The mean removal torque in the laser-treated and the SLA-treated implant groups were 79.4 Ncm (SD = 20.4; range 34.6-104.3 Ncm) and 52.7 Ncm (SD = 17.2; range 18.7-73.8 Ncm), respectively. The removal torque in the laser-treated surface implant group was significantly higher than that in the control group (P=.004). In this study, removal torque values were significantly higher for laser-treated surface implants than for SLA-treated surface implants.

  9. Effect of sodium ascorbate on dentin bond strength after treatment with oxidizing root canal irrigants†

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nihan Gönülol

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: Although 10% sodium ascorbate application for 10 minutes is an effective method to reverse the compromised bond strength of NaOCl- and H2O2-treated dentin, it might not have a sufficient effect when the dentin is treated with ozonated water.

  10. Effectiveness of immediate bonding of etch-and-rinse adhesives to simplified ethanol-saturated dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Afonso Guimarães

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the immediate bond strength of etch-and-rinse adhesives to demineralized dentin saturated with either water or absolute ethanol. The research hypothesis was that there would be no difference in bond strength to dentin between water or ethanol wet-bonding techniques. The medium dentin of 20 third molars was exposed (n = 5. The dentin surface was then acid-etched, left moist and randomly assigned to be saturated via either water wet-bonding (WBT or absolute ethanol wet-bonding (EBT. The specimens were then treated with one of the following etch-and-rinse adhesive systems: a 3-step, water-based system (Adper Scotchbond Multipurpose, or SBMP or a 2-step, ethanol/water-based system (Adper Single Bond 2, or SB. Resin composite build-ups were then incrementally constructed. After water storage for 24 h at 37°C, the tensile strength of the specimens was tested in a universal testing machine (0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (a = 5%. The failure modes were verified using a stereomicroscope (40'. For both adhesives, no significant difference in bond strength was observed between WBT and EBT (p > 0.05. The highest bond strength was observed for SB, regardless of the bonding technique (p < 0.05. No significant interaction between adhesives and bonding techniques was noticed (p = 0.597. There was a predominance of adhesive failures for all tested groups. The EBT and WBT displayed similar immediate bond strength means for both adhesives. The SB adhesive exhibited higher means for all conditions tested. Further investigations are needed to evaluate long-term bonding to dentin mediated by commercial etch-and-rinse adhesives using the EBT approach.

  11. Controllable surface morphology and properties via mist polymerization on a plasma-treated polymethyl methacrylate surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, S J; Wang, L; Xu, X J; Zhao, C H; Liu, X D

    2014-02-14

    Surface modification by grafting polymers on solid materials is an important strategy used to improve surface properties. This article reports that under appropriate conditions, very thin layers with desired morphologies may be constructed on a plasma-treated substrate by feeding a small quantity of a monomer with a mist stream carrying droplets produced from monomer solutions. We investigate the effects of process parameters that affect layer morphology, including exposure time to the mist stream, concentration of the monomer solution, and solvent selectivity. For a methyl methacrylate solution in ethanol, nanoparticles are uniformly grown with increasing monomer concentration or exposure time and finally form a porous layer at 3.65 mol L(-1) for 30 min. Decreasing solvent polarity not only affects surface morphology, but also increases hydrophobicity of the resulting surface. With 2,2,3,4,4,4-hexafluorobutyl methacrylate as the monomer, SEM and AFM micrographs indicated that mist polymerization results in numerous microspheres on the activated surface. These experimental results were interpreted by a mechanism in terms of an in situ polymerization accompanied by a phase transformation of the resulting polymer. Specifically, plasma treatment provides highly active cations and radicals to initiate very rapid polymerization, and the resulting polymers are consequently deposited from the liquid onto the surface under phase transition mechanisms.

  12. Influence of immediate dentin sealing on the shear bond strength of pressed ceramic luted to dentin with self-etch resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalby, Robert; Ellakwa, Ayman; Millar, Brian; Martin, F Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To examine the effect of immediate dentin sealing (IDS), with dentin bonding agents (DBAs) applied to freshly cut dentin, on the shear bond strength of etched pressed ceramic luted to dentin with RelyX Unicem (RXU) cement. Method. Eighty extracted noncarious third molars were ground flat to expose the occlusal dentin surfaces. The teeth were randomly allocated to five groups (A to E) of sixteen teeth each. Groups A to D were allocated a dentin bonding agent (Optibond FL, One Coat Bond, Single Bond, or Go!) that was applied to the dentin surface to mimic the clinical procedure of IDS. These specimen groups then had etched glass ceramic discs (Authentic) luted to the sealed dentin surface using RXU. Group E (control) had etched glass ceramic discs luted to the dentin surface (without a dentin bonding agent) using RXU following the manufacturer's instructions. All specimens were stored for one week in distilled water at room temperature and then shear stressed at a constant cross-head speed of 1 mm per minute until failure. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA followed by post hoc Tukey HSD method (P Optibond FL (Group A) and Go! (Group D). There was no statistical difference (P > 0.05) in the SBS between the test groups (A-D) or the control (group E). Conclusion. IDS using the dentin bonding agents tested does not statistically (P > 0.05) affect the shear bond strength of etched pressed ceramic luted to dentin with RXU when compared to the control.

  13. The effects of desensitizing agents on the hydraulic conductance of human dentin in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhill, J D; Pashley, D H

    1981-03-01

    The hydrodynamic theory of dentin sensitivity states that a stimulus applied at the orifice of exposed dentinal tubules causes movement of tubular fluid which stimulates nerve receptors. The fluid should obey principles of fluid movement through capillary tubes. Any decrease in the functional radius of the dentinal tubules should greatly reduce the rate of fluid flow, thus reducing dentinal sensitivity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of agents that have been used previously for clinical dentin desensitization to reduce the rate of fluid flow through dentin in vitro. Dentin discs prepared from extracted human third molars were treated with 50% citric acid to remove debris from tubular orifices. After placing the discs in a split chamber device, the rate at which buffer solution could filter across the dentin under 240 cm of water pressure was measured. The occlusal side of the disc was then treated with an agent thought to desensitize dentin to determine if it reduced fluid flow rate. Discs that had more than a 50% reduction in flow rate were examined by scanning electron microscopy to determine if those agents that decreased fluid flow also partially occluded tubular orifices. This in vitro model provided a useful quantitative method for screening a host of preparations that have been used in the past to decrease dentin sensitivity.

  14. Characterization of genipin-modified dentin collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Hiroko; Nagaoka, Hideaki; Walter, Ricardo; Boushell, Lee W; Miguez, Patricia A; Burton, Andrew; Ritter, André V; Yamauchi, Mitsuo

    2014-01-01

    Application of biomodification techniques to dentin can improve its biochemical and biomechanical properties. Several collagen cross-linking agents have been reported to strengthen the mechanical properties of dentin. However, the characteristics of collagen that has undergone agent-induced biomodification are not well understood. The objective of this study was to analyze the effects of a natural cross-linking agent, genipin (GE), on dentin discoloration, collagen stability, and changes in amino acid composition and lysyl oxidase mediated natural collagen cross-links. Dentin collagen obtained from extracted bovine teeth was treated with three different concentrations of GE (0.01%, 0.1%, and 0.5%) for several treatment times (0-24 h). Changes in biochemical properties of NaB(3)H4-reduced collagen were characterized by amino acid and cross-link analyses. The treatment of dentin collagen with GE resulted in a concentration- and time-dependent pigmentation and stability against bacterial collagenase. The lysyl oxidase-mediated trivalent mature cross-link, pyridinoline, showed no difference among all groups while the major divalent immature cross-link, dehydro-dihydroxylysinonorleucine/its ketoamine in collagen treated with 0.5% GE for 24 h, significantly decreased compared to control (P < 0.05). The newly formed GE-induced cross-links most likely involve lysine and hydroxylysine residues of collagen in a concentration-dependent manner. Some of these cross-links appear to be reducible and stabilized with NaB(3)H4.

  15. Characterization of Genipin-Modified Dentin Collagen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Nagaoka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Application of biomodification techniques to dentin can improve its biochemical and biomechanical properties. Several collagen cross-linking agents have been reported to strengthen the mechanical properties of dentin. However, the characteristics of collagen that has undergone agent-induced biomodification are not well understood. The objective of this study was to analyze the effects of a natural cross-linking agent, genipin (GE, on dentin discoloration, collagen stability, and changes in amino acid composition and lysyl oxidase mediated natural collagen cross-links. Dentin collagen obtained from extracted bovine teeth was treated with three different concentrations of GE (0.01%, 0.1%, and 0.5% for several treatment times (0–24 h. Changes in biochemical properties of NaB3H4-reduced collagen were characterized by amino acid and cross-link analyses. The treatment of dentin collagen with GE resulted in a concentration- and time-dependent pigmentation and stability against bacterial collagenase. The lysyl oxidase-mediated trivalent mature cross-link, pyridinoline, showed no difference among all groups while the major divalent immature cross-link, dehydro-dihydroxylysinonorleucine/its ketoamine in collagen treated with 0.5% GE for 24 h, significantly decreased compared to control (P< 0.05. The newly formed GE-induced cross-links most likely involve lysine and hydroxylysine residues of collagen in a concentration-dependent manner. Some of these cross-links appear to be reducible and stabilized with NaB3H4.

  16. [The properties of dentin and resinified dentin in the tensile test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J

    1989-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of resinifying therapy to the hard tissue of tooth by using measurement of the tensile strength. The fresh extracted maxillary anterior teeth having been cleaned and sterilized were divided into two groups. The control group was placed into 9% N-saline solution of 37 +/- 1 degrees C. The experimental group was treated with resinifying therapy. The tensile specimens were shaped by turning in a lathe until it satisfied the tensile test requirement of Mechanics of Materials except that they were hollow. A set of special split jig was made for this test. Instron Universal Testing Machine was used for measuring the load on the specimens. The loading speed was 0.05 mm/min. The straining meter was used to measure the tensile strain. The result revealed that tensile strength of resinifying dentin was little lower than that of unresinified dentin. The resinified dentin didn't increases stiffness or brittleness.

  17. Laser gas assisted treatment of steel 309: Corrosion and scratch resistance of treated surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toor, Ihsan-ul-Haq; Yilbas, B. S.; Ahmed, Junaid; Karatas, C.

    2017-10-01

    Laser gas assisted surface treatment of steel 309 is carried out and the characteristics of the resulting surface are analyzed using the analytical tools. Scanning electron and 3-D optical microscopes are used to assess the morphological and metallurgical changes in the laser treated layer. Energy spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction are carried out to determine the elemental composition and compounds formed on the laser treated surface. The friction coefficient of the laser treated surface is measured using the micro-tribometer and compared to that of the as received surface. The corrosion resistance of the laser treated and as received surfaces is measured incorporating the electrochemical tests. It is found that laser treatment results in a dense layer and formation of nitride compounds at the surface. This enhances the microhardness at the laser treated surface. The friction coefficient attains lower values at the laser treated surface than that corresponding to the as received surface. The corrosion rate of the surface reduces significantly after the laser treatment process, which can be attributed to the passive layer at the surface via formation of a dense layer and nitride compounds in the surface vicinity. In addition, the number of pit sites decreased for the laser treated surface than that of as received surface.

  18. Shear Bond Strength of Two Types of Glass Ionomer to Bleached Dentin: Effect of Delayed Bonding and Antioxidant Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omrani, Ladan Ranjbar; Sabouri, Parastoo; Abbasi, Mehdi; Ahmadi, Elham; Ghavam, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Studies have shown a reduction in bond strength of composites and glass ionomer to bleached enamel and dentin. Several methods have been proposed to reverse compromised bond strength. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of delayed bonding and application of antioxidant agent on the bond strength of reinforced self-cured (Fuji IX) and light-cured glass ionomers (Fuji II LC) to bleached dentin. Material: Eighty extracted third molars were randomly divided into 8 groups. Buccal dentin surfaces received different treatments: Two control groups: no treatment + bonding Fuji IX or Fuji II LC. Two immediate bonding groups: bleaching + bonding Fuji IX or Fuji II LC. Two delayed bonding groups: bleaching + 7 days delay + bonding Fuji IX or Fuji II LC. Two sodium ascorbate application groups: Bleaching + application of 10% sodium ascorbate + bonding Fuji IX or Fuji II LC. All samples were tested for shear bond strength. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to compare the mean and standard deviations among groups, followed by the Tukey’s test for significant interaction. Results: No statistically significant difference was detected in shear bond strength of Fuji IX to bleached or normal dentin. Although a significant reduction was found shear bond strength values of Fuji II LC to bleached dentin, no significant difference was observed between no bleaching group and those treated with 10% sodium ascorbate or 7 days of delay in bonding for both types of glass ionomer. Conclusion: Bleaching had no significant effect on shear bond strength of Fuji IX to dentin; this type of GI can be used immediately after bleaching. PMID:28217187

  19. CHANGES IN VALUES MEASURED WITH DIAGNOdent FOR ENAMEL AND DENTIN OF DECIDUOUS TEETH ETCHED FOR DIFFERENT TIME INTERVALS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir E. Panov

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dental caries continues to affect a large percentage of children and currently advises that if diagnosed at an early stage can be reversed with minimally invasive treatments. There a large number of methods for early diagnostics. Purpose: The aim of the presented in vitro study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the laser fluorescent device DIAGNOdent pen in measuring changes in the level of mineralization of intact deciduous teeth enamel surfaces etched for different intervals and of intact dentin etched for 30 seconds. Material and methods: The study was performed on extracted children teeth. DIAGNOdent was used to measure the values of laser fluorescence of intact enamel and dentinal surfaces. Samples were treated with 37% H2PO3 etched for 5 sec., 30 sec. and 60 sec. for enamel surfaces and 30 sec. for dentinal. Teeth were rinsed, dried and measured again with DIAGNOdent. Results: After etching the enamel surfaces for 5 sec., 30 sec. and 60 sec. an average increase of 1.55 (0.85-2.2 was detected. The detected average values of increase of laser fluorescence for the enamel were 0.85 for 5 sec. ethching; 1.6 for 30 sec. and 2.2 for 60 sec. The average increase in the dentine was 3.5. Conclusions: Based on the limitations of the conducted study it may be concluded that the changes in the degree of mineralization of deciduous tooth structures can be detected by DIAGNOdent. Enamel etching for 5 sec., 30 sec. and 60 sec. lead to a comparative degree of change in the laser fluorescence. The obtained values after 30 sec. of etching revealed almost a double increase compared to 5 sec. etching and 3-fold for those at the 60 sec. The measured changes after etching in the dentin were better expressed than those in the enamel.

  20. CHANGES IN VALUES MEASURED WITH A LASER FLUORESCENCE SYSTEM FOR ENAMEL AND DENTIN ETHCED FOR DIFFERNT TIME INTERVALS - pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radostina Anastasova

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of the presented in vitro study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the laser fluorescent device DIAGNOdent in measuring changes in the level of mineralization of intact enamel surfaces etched for different time intervals and intact dentin etched for 30 sec. Material and methods: The study was performed on extracted human teeth. DIAGNOcam was used to measure the values of laser fluorescence of intact enamel and dentinal surfaces. Then the samples were treated with 37% H2PO3 etchant for 5, 30 and 60 sec for enamel surfaces and 30 sec for dentinal. Teeth were rinsed, dried and measured again with DIAGNOdent. Statistical analysis was done using statistical software SPSS 16.0 (SPSS Inc.. Results: After etching the enamel surfaces for 5, 30 and 60 seconds an average increase of 0,5 (0.62-1.1 was detected. The detected average values of increase of laser fluorescence for the enamel were 0.5 for 5 sec. ethching, 0.62 for 30 sec and 1.1 for 60 sec. The average increase for dentine was 0.26. Conclusions: Based on the limitations of the conducted study it may be concluded that changes in the degree of mineralization of tooth structures can be detected by using DIAGNOdent. Enamel etching for 5 sec and 30 sec lead to a comparative degree of change in the laser fluorescence. The obtained values after 60 sec. of etching revealed an almost double increase. The measured changes in enamel after etching are better pronounced than that in dentin.

  1. In vitro study of caries detection through sound dentin using a laser fluorescence device, DIAGNOdent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwami, Yukiteru; Shimizu, Ayako; Yamamoto, Hiroko; Hayashi, Mikako; Takeshige, Fumio; Ebisu, Shigeyuki

    2003-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of proximal surface caries detection using a laser fluorescence device, DIAGNOdent, through the sound dentin surrounding the cavity wall after removal of occlusal caries. Extracted sound human molars were ground to prepare horizontal and vertical dentin plates 1.4 mm thick. Extracted carious human molars were reduced in thickness horizontally from the occlusal surfaces until exposure of the dentin caries. The dentin plate was placed on the carious tooth. Before and after gradual thinning of the dentin plate from approximately 1.4 mm to 0.2 mm thick, the dentin caries was measured 10 times through the plate by the laser fluorescence device with a cone-shaped tip or a broad tip. When the dentin plate was reduced to less than 0.3 mm thick (using a combination of a horizontal plate and cone-shaped tip) or 0.2 mm thick (using the other combinations), the values measured with the laser fluorescence device were significantly larger than the values before reducing the thickness of the dentin. Based on these results, the device offers potential use as one of the screening tests for proximal surface caries detection through sound dentin when the sound dentin between tip and caries is thin.

  2. The effect of anti-sensitivity dentifrices on brushing abrasion of eroded dentin in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Nathan; Mason, Stephen; Creeth, Jonathan; Hara, Anderson T; Parmar, Madhu; González-Cabezas, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the abrasive effects of three marketed anti-sensitivity, and one marketed regular dentifrice on dentin, using an erosion-abrasion in vitro model. Standardized human dentin specimens were prepared and exposed to cycles of erosion, remineralization, and tooth brushing, utilizing the four commercially available dentifrices. Dentin surface loss was then measured by optical profilometry after a total of nine complete cycles. The RDA and pH values of the dentifrices were also measured to assist in the interpretation of results. Profilometry showed significantly greater dentin surface loss for both Colgate Sensitive Fresh Stripe and Colgate Sensitive Multi Protection when compared with Sensodyne Total Protection or Crest Cavity Protection dentifrices. The abrasive level of dentifrices correlated positively (r-squared = 0.66; p < 0.05) with dentin surface loss. This study demonstrated that the abrasivity of dentifrices can have a significant effect on the wear of eroded dentin in vitro.

  3. Bone regeneration performance of surface-treated porous titanium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amin Yavari, Saber; Stok, Johan; Chai, Yoke Chin; Wauthle, Ruben; Thamasebi Birgani, Zeinab; Habibovic, Pamela; Mulier, Michiel; Schrooten, Jan; Weimans, Harrie; Zadpoor, Amir Abbas

    2014-01-01

    The large surface area of highly porous titanium structures produced by additive manufacturing can be modified using biofunctionalizing surface treatments to improve the bone regeneration performance of these otherwise bioinert biomaterials. In this longitudinal study, we applied and compared three

  4. Fractal characterization and wettability of ion treated silicon surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, R. P.; Kumar, Tanuj; Baranwal, V.; Vandana, Kumar, Manvendra; Priya, P. K.; Pandey, S. N.; Mittal, A. K.

    2017-02-01

    Fractal characterization of surface morphology can be useful as a tool for tailoring the wetting properties of solid surfaces. In this work, rippled surfaces of Si (100) are grown using 200 keV Ar+ ion beam irradiation at different ion doses. Relationship between fractal and wetting properties of these surfaces are explored. The height-height correlation function extracted from atomic force microscopic images, demonstrates an increase in roughness exponent with an increase in ion doses. A steep variation in contact angle values is found for low fractal dimensions. Roughness exponent and fractal dimensions are found correlated with the static water contact angle measurement. It is observed that after a crossover of the roughness exponent, the surface morphology has a rippled structure. Larger values of interface width indicate the larger ripples on the surface. The contact angle of water drops on such surfaces is observed to be lowest. Autocorrelation function is used for the measurement of ripple wavelength.

  5. Application of cerium chloride to improve the acid resistance of dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegehaupt, Florian J; Sener, Beatrice; Attin, Thomas; Schmidlin, Patrick R

    2010-06-01

    To investigate the effect of cerium chloride, cerium chloride/fluoride and fluoride application on calcium release during erosion of treated dentine. Forty dentine samples were prepared from human premolars and randomly assigned to four groups (1-4). Samples were treated twice a day for 5 days, 30s each, with the following solutions: group 1 placebo, group 2 fluoride (Elmex fluid), group 3 cerium chloride and group 4 combined fluoride and cerium chloride. For the determination of acid resistance, the samples were consecutively eroded six times for 5 min with lactic acid (pH 3.0) and the calcium release in the acid was determined. Furthermore, six additional samples per group were prepared and used for EDS analysis. SEM pictures of these samples of each group were also captured. Samples of group 1 presented the highest calcium release when compared with the samples of groups 2-4. The highest acid resistance was observed for group 2. Calcium release in group 3 was similar to that of group 4 for the first two erosive attacks, after which calcium release in group 4 was lower than that of group 3. Generally, the SEM pictures showed a surface coating for groups 2-4. No deposits were observed in group 1. Although fluoride showed the best protective effect, cerium chloride was also able to reduce the acid susceptibility of dentine significantly, which merits further investigation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of dentin location and long-term water storage on bonding effectiveness of dentin adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Munck, Jan; Mine, Atsushi; Vivan Cardoso, Marcio; De Almeida Neves, Aline; Van Landuyt, Kirsten L; Poitevin, André; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2011-01-01

    Dentin is a variable substrate with properties that change considerable in a single surface. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bonding effectiveness to these different dentin locations and evaluate these differences over time. After bonding procedures with five different adhesives, small micro-tensile bond strength (µTBS) beams were prepared and dichotomously divided in 'center' and 'periphery' dentin specimens. After 1 week, 3, 6 and 12 months of water storage the µTBS of specimens of each group was determined, enabling a paired study design. The bond strengths of both etch&rinse adhesives were insensitive to regional variability. For the two-step self-etch adhesives, a marked increase in bond strengths was observed with increasing amount of intertubular dentin. Regional variability did not affect the long-term bonding effectiveness for any of the adhesives tested. In conclusion, only for the mild self-etch adhesives, µTBS to 'periphery' dentin was higher than for the 'center' specimens.

  7. Association between Severity of Tooth Wear and Dentinal Hypersensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Ayer

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Tooth wear (attrition, abrasion, erosion, and abfraction is perceived globally as ever increasing problem. Several outcome of the tooth wear are hypersensitivity, esthetic problems, functional impairment, annoyance to the patient, and fracture of the tooth. Among these, the measurable and more commonly reported outcome is hypersensitivity to stimuli. Although dentin hypersensitivity is a common clinical condition and is generally reported by the patient after experiencing a sharp, short pain caused by one of the several different external stimuli, it is often inadequately understood. None of the scientific literature available till date attempted to establish the relationship between tooth wear and dentin hypersensitivity which could be a key factor in monitoring those patients.  The aim of the study was to estimate the association between severity of teeth wear and sensitivity in the patients with reported dentinal hypersensitivity.Materials & Methods: Fifty patients with dentin hypersensitivity were investigated for tooth wear. Tooth wear measured using exact tooth wear index and level of sensitivity to stimuli was recorded using a numerical rating scale. Results: Enamel wear at cervical region of teeth showed a positive correlation (p=.010, similarly, dentin wear at cervical region of teeth showed positive correlation and significant association (p<.001 with dentinal hypersensitivity.Conclusion: The observation supports a significant association between severities of tooth surface wear and dentinal hypersensitivity.

  8. Characterization of Dentine to Assess Bond Strength of Dental Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Liaqat

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to develop alternating dentine adhesion models that could help in the evaluation of a self-bonding dental composite. For this purpose dentine from human and ivory was characterized chemically and microscopically before and after acid etching using Raman and SEM. Mechanical properties of dentine were determined using 3 point bend test. Composite bonding to dentine, with and without use of acid pre-treatment and/or the adhesive, were assessed using a shear bond test. Furthermore, micro gap formation after restoration of 3 mm diameter cavities in dentine was assessed by SEM. Initial hydroxyapatite level in ivory was half that in human dentine. Surface hydroxyapatites decreased by approximately half with every 23 s of acid etch. The human dentine strength (56 MPa was approximately double that of ivory, while the modulus was almost comparable to that of ivory. With adhesive use, average shear bond strengths were 30 and 26 MPa with and without acid etching. With no adhesive, average bond strength was 6 MPa for conventional composites. This, however, increased to 14 MPa with a commercial flowable “self–bonding” composite or upon addition of low levels of an acidic monomer to the experimental composite. The acidic monomer additionally reduced micro-gap formation with the experimental composite. Improved bonding and mechanical properties should reduce composite failures due to recurrent caries or fracture respectively.

  9. Regeneration of dental pulp/dentine complex with a three-dimensional and scaffold-free stem-cell sheet-derived pellet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Sijia; Zhang, Hao; Huang, Fang; Wang, Weiqi; Ding, Yin; Li, Dechao; Jin, Yan

    2016-03-01

    Dental pulp/dentine complex regeneration is indispensable to the construction of biotissue-engineered tooth roots and represents a promising approach to therapy for irreversible pulpitis. We used a tissue-engineering method based on odontogenic stem cells to design a three-dimensional (3D) and scaffold-free stem-cell sheet-derived pellet (CSDP) with the necessary physical and biological properties. Stem cells were isolated and identified and stem cells from root apical papilla (SCAPs)-based CSDPs were then fabricated and examined. Compact cell aggregates containing a high proportion of extracellular matrix (ECM) components were observed, and the CSDP culture time was prolonged. The expression of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), dentine sialoprotein (DSPP), bone sialoprotein (BSP) and runt-related gene 2 (RUNX2) mRNA was higher in CSDPs than in cell sheets (CSs), indicating that CSDPs have greater odonto/osteogenic potential. To further investigate this hypothesis, CSDPs and CSs were inserted into human treated dentine matrix fragments (hTDMFs) and transplanted into the subcutaneous space in the backs of immunodeficient mice, where they were cultured in vivo for 6 weeks. The root space with CSDPs was filled entirely with a dental pulp-like tissue with well-established vascularity, and a continuous layer of dentine-like tissue was deposited onto the existing dentine. A layer of odontoblast-like cells was found to express DSPP, ALP and BSP, and human mitochondria lined the surface of the newly formed dentine-like tissue. These results clearly indicate that SCAP-CSDPs with a mount of endogenous ECM have a strong capacity to form a heterotopic dental pulp/dentine complex in empty root canals; this method can be used in the fabrication of bioengineered dental roots and also provides an alternative treatment approach for pulp disease. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Regional variability in the permeability of human dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashley, D H; Andringa, H J; Derkson, G D; Derkson, M E; Kalathoor, S R

    1987-01-01

    This was measured qualitatively by using dyes and quantitatively by hydraulic conductance in dentine discs and crown segments in vitro. Both types of preparation demonstrated large regional differences in permeability, with the highest values at the periphery and the lowest in the centre of the disc or crown. As dentine permeability may vary 3-10-fold across a few millimetres, investigators should use as large a surface area as possible to compensate for these regional differences.

  11. Evaluation of the tensile bond strength of an adhesive system self-etching in dentin irradiated with Er:YAG laser; Avaliacao da resistencia a tracao de um sistema adesivo self-etching em dentina irradiada com Er:YAG laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mello, Andrea Malluf Dabul de

    2000-07-01

    Since Buonocore (1955), several researchers have been seeking for the best adhesive system and treatment for the enamel and dentin surfaces. The use of the acid has been presented as one of the best techniques of dentin conditioning , because this promotes the removal of the 'smear layer and exhibition of dentinal structure, for a best penetration and micro- retention of the adhesive system. However, some conditioning methods have been appearing in the literature, for the substitution or interaction with the acid substances, as the laser. The objective of this work is to evaluate the tensile bond strength of the adhesive system self-etching' associated to a composed resin, in dentin surfaces conditioned with the Er:YAG laser. For this study, freshly extracted human teeth were used and in each one the dentinal surfaces , which were treated with three sandpapers of different granulations (120,400,600), to obtain a standard of the smear layer, before the irradiation of the laser and of the restoring procedure. After these procedures the specimens were storage in distilled water at 37 deg C for 24 hours. Soon after, they were submitted to the tensile strength test .After analyzing the results, we can concluded that the use of the Er:YAG laser can substitute the drill without the need of conditioning, when using the adhesive system 'self-etching' in the dentinal surfaces because there was a decline in the strength of adhesion in the groups conditioned with the laser. (author)

  12. Evaluation of the effects of fluoride-releasing varnish on dentin demineralization using optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotaku, Mayumi; Murayama, Ryosuke; Shimamura, Yutaka; Takahashi, Fuminori; Suzuki, Takayuki; Kurokawa, Hiroyasu; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    Effects of a fluoride-releasing varnish containing surface reaction-type prereacted glass ionomer (S-PRG) filler on dentin demineralization were examined using optical coherence tomography. Bovine incisors that were sliced and treated with undersaturated 0.1 M lactic acid buffer solution (DE group). A thin film of varnish-containing S-PRG filler was applied before demineralization (PRG group). Control was maintained in artificial saliva. Using optical coherence tomography of selected locations on the dentin surface, peak intensity (dB) and width (μm) at 1/e(2) were obtained and integrated values calculated. Although alterations in integrated values were different in each group, there was a slight but not significant increase in those for the control group and a slight but significant increase for the De group. For the PRG group, integrated values were doubled seven days after experiment initiation, followed by a significant increase. Fluoride-releasing varnish containing S-PRG fillers prevented dentin demineralization as detected by optical coherence tomography.

  13. Oxalate-containing phytocomplexes as dentine desensitisers: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauro, Salvatore; Gandolfi, Maria Giovanna; Prati, Carlo; Mongiorgi, Romano

    2006-08-01

    It is known that pulpal fluid movement through dentinal tubules causes dentinal hypersensitivity and that pain can be reduced by decreasing the fluid flow. The aim of this study was to evaluate dentinal permeability and morphology after a single exposure to experimental phytocomplex substances containing oxalates. The treatments tested were experimental pastes, gels and solutions of phytocomplexes (extracted from rhubarb, spinach and mint), an experimental paste containing 5% potassium oxalate, and two commercial toothpastes recommended for dentinal hypersensitivity (Elmex and Sensodyne). Dentine discs from human third molars were used in this study. Each sample was brushed for 3 min with each treatment in order to test reductions in dentinal permeability. Each treated sample was challenged with orthophosphoric acid for 90 s to determine changes in dentinal permeability and the sensitivity of treatments to acid challenge. Scanning electron microscopy was used to analyse the samples. This study found that spinach and rhubarb phytocomplex treatments reduced dentinal permeability by occluding dentinal tubules through formation of calcium oxalate crystals. These results indicate that phytocomplexes extracted from rhubarb and spinach, used in different formulations, should be effective for topical treatment of dentinal hypersensitivity.

  14. Nanolayering of phosphoric acid ester monomer on enamel and dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, Kumiko; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Hayakawa, Satoshi; Nagaoka, Noriyuki; Irie, Masao; Ogawa, Tatsuyuki; Van Landuyt, Kirsten L; Osaka, Akiyoshi; Suzuki, Kazuomi; Minagi, Shogo; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2011-08-01

    Following the "adhesion-decalcification" concept, specific functional monomers possess the capacity to primary chemically interact with hydroxyapatite (HAp). Such ionic bonding with synthetic HAp has been demonstrated for 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (10-MDP), manifest as self-assembled "nanolayering". In continuation of that basic research this study aimed to explore whether nanolayering also occurs on enamel and dentin when a 10-MDP primer is applied following a common clinical application protocol. Therefore, the interaction of an experimental 10-MDP primer and a control, commercially available, 10-MDP-based primer (Clearfil SE Bond primer (C-SE), Kuraray) with enamel and dentin was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), complemented with transmission electron microscopy interfacial ultrastructural data upon their reaction with enamel and dentin. In addition, XRD was used to study the effect of the concentration of 10-MDP on nanolayering on dentin. Finally, the stability of the nanolayers was determined by measuring the bond strength to enamel and dentin when a photoinitiator was added to the experimental primer or when interfacial polymerization depended solely on the photoinitiator supplied with the subsequently applied adhesive resin. XRD confirmed nanolayering on enamel and dentin, which was significantly greater on dentin than on enamel, and also when the surface was actively rubbed with the primer. Nanolayering was also proportional to the concentration of 10-MDP in the primer. Finally, the experimental primer needed the photoinitiator to obtain a tensile bond strength to dentin comparable with that of the control C-SE primer (which also contains a photoinitiator), but not when bonded to enamel. It is concluded that self-assembled nanolayering occurs on enamel and dentin, even when following a clinically used application protocol. The lower bonding effectiveness of mild self-etch adhesives to enamel should be ascribed in part to a lower

  15. The effect of dentine location and tubule orientation on the bond strengths between resin and dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phrukkanon, S; Burrow, M F; Tyas, M J

    1999-05-01

    This study determined the influence of dentine structure on the micro-tensile bond strengths between resin and dentine of two different dentine adhesive systems (Single Bond, 3M Dental Products, St Paul, MN; MF-102 (experimental self-etching primer), GC Corporation, Tokyo, Japan). The study was separated into two main parts: bond strength measurement and investigation of the bonding interface. Twenty-two human premolars were used for the bond strength measurement. Each tooth was cut vertically, separating the tooth into mesio-distal halves. One half of the tooth was used to bond to a surface perpendicular to the dentinal tubules and other half to bond to a surface parallel to the tubules. For each half, six locations of dentine were bonded. Each material was used in accordance to the manufacturer's directions. Cylindrical hourglass-shaped specimens of 1.2 mm diameter at the bonded interface were manufactured. The bonds were stressed in tension at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Mean bond strengths were compared using LSD, one-way ANOVA, and Student's t-test. The fractured surfaces were examined under a scanning electron microscope, and the frequency of fracture modes was compared using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. For the investigation of the bonded interface, four teeth were prepared by the same procedure used for the bond test specimens. The bonded interfaces were observed after an acid-base treatment or fracturing across the bonded interface, prior to investigation with a field-emission scanning electron microscope. For Single Bond, the bond strengths for mid-root dentine were significantly lower than for other locations (p 0.05). MF-102 bonded well to all locations of dentine while Single Bond showed a porous zone at the base of the hybrid layer. The bonds were not influenced by tubule orientation. The results indicate that the bond for Single Bond may be affected by its ability to penetrate demineralised dentine in different locations of a tooth

  16. Dentin hypersensitivity: from diagnosis to a breakthrough therapy for everyday sensitivity relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Diane

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the current knowledge of diagnosis, epidemiology, etiology, and clinical management of dentin hypersensitivity. It summarizes technical approaches to relieve sensitivity in professional and home-use products, with emphasis on the clinical evidence for the efficacy of desensitizing toothpaste, and introduces a new innovative dentifrice technology containing 8% arginine, calcium carbonate, and 1450 ppm fluoride. Dentin hypersensitivity is characterized by short, sharp pain arising from exposed dentin in response to external stimuli which cannot be ascribed to any other form of dental defect or disease. The hydrodynamic theory proposes that pain-producing stimuli cause a change in dentin fluid flow that activates intra-dental nerve fibers, via a mechanoreceptor response, to cause pain. To be hypersensitive, dentin must be exposed and dentin tubules must be open to external stimuli and patent at the pulp. Gingival recession is the primary cause of dentin exposure, and a major predisposing factor for dentin hypersensitivity. Dentin hypersensitivity is a prevalent condition. It has been reported to afflict 15-20% of the adult population, typically 20 to 50-year-olds, with peak incidence between 30 and 39 years. Some studies have reported higher prevalence levels of up to 57%. The incidence of dentin hypersensitivity is expected to rise with changing diets, and as caries and periodontal disease prevention result in improved oral health status, and retention and functionality of the dentition. Treatments to relieve dentin hypersensitivity are based on interruption of the neural response to pain stimuli or occlusion of open tubules to block the hydrodynamic mechanism. Effective and robust dentin occlusion offers the greatest prospect for instant and lasting relief of dentin hypersensitivity. In particular, materials which can coat exposed dentin surfaces, in addition to plugging and sealing open dentin tubules, offer the intriguing

  17. Surface composition of Pt-Pd alloys treated in hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, A.; Paál, Z.; Szász, A.; Kojnok, J.; Fabian, D. J.

    1989-11-01

    Pd enrichment is observed in Pd-Pt alloy sheets when heated in He and in H 2. The surface composition was monitored by soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (SXES) and by work function measurements. A regular solution model is used to calculate the expected composition of the surface atomic layers, with and without adsorbed hydrogen, and the calculated and measured values for Pd-enrichment are compared. The possible effect of subsurface adsorbed hydrogen is discussed.

  18. Effect of multi-step and single- step dentin bonding agents on the bond strength of composite to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maleknejad F

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Composite resin restorative materials, that nowadays are used as tooth-colour materials, have both benefits and weaknesses. One of these weaknesses is the contraction resulted from resin polymerization which influences on the composite dentin bond strength and it has been tried to be eliminated by different bonding systems. The aim of this in-vitro study was to compare the dentin bond strength of two dentine adhesive systems: multi-step Scoth Bond Multipurpose (SBMP and single- step Excite, by two composites of Ideal Makoo and Tetric. One hundred sixty (160 sound human molars were selected. At first they were debrided and mounted with acrylic resin in molds. The enamel of the buccal surface was eliminated by diamond burs. To provide a flat dentin surface, it was removed about lmm. Then, based on the type of dentin adhesive, they were divided into two groups of 30 teeth and were applied on the exposed dentine surface according to the manufacturer's instructions. Then, each group was divided into two subgroups of 15, based on the type of composite resin. Cylinders of the desired composite resin, attached to the dentin surface, were used for 80 seconds. The samples were stored in 100% humidity (37°c for 24 hours. The bond strengths was measured by a cross head blade with the speed of 2mm/min. Variance analysis and Duncan test, with 95% confidence level, showed that statistically, two factors of adhesive and composite, interact on each other, in bond strength. There was no significant difference in bond strength, between two composites with similar adhesives, however, comparing two different adhesives with the same composite, showed that the bond strength of Tetric with Excite (28.39 was more than that of SBMP (17.98 Mpa. Finally, it was recognized that among four experimental groups, there was only a significant difference in bond strengths, between Tetric-Excite with Tetric- SBMP. This study shows that dentin bond strength is influenced by

  19. Effects of a Dicalcium and Tetracalcium Phosphate-Based Desensitizer on In Vitro Dentin Permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jianfeng; Chiba, Ayaka; Scheffel, Debora L S; Hebling, Josimeri; Agee, Kelli; Niu, Li-Na; Tay, Franklin R; Pashley, David H

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effectiveness of a dicalcium and tetracalcium phosphate-based desensitizer in reducing dentin permeability in vitro. Dentin fluid flow was measured before and after treatment of dentin with patent dentinal tubules using 1 or 3 applications of the dicalcium and tetracalcium phosphate containing agent TeethmateTM (TM) and comparing the results with two sodium fluoride varnishes VellaTM (VLA) and VanishTM (VAN), after storage in artificial saliva for 24 h, 48 h and 7 days. Significant differences were observed among the 4 methods employed for reducing dentin permeability (p < 0.001) and the 3 post-treatment times (p < 0.001). VLA and VAN never achieved 50% permeability reductions consistently in any of the 3 time periods. Only the calcium phosphate-based desensitizer applied for 3 times consistently reduced dentin permeability by 50% after 24 h. When applied once, the permeability reduction of TM increased progressively over the 3 time periods. After 7 days, only one and three applications of the calcium phosphate-based desensitizer consistently reduced dentin permeability by more than 50%. Permeability reductions corresponded well with scanning electron microscopy examination of dentinal tubule orifice occlusion in dentin specimens treated with the agents. Overall, the dicalcium and tetracalcium phosphate-based desensitizer is effective in reducing dentin permeability via a tubule occlusion mechanism. The ability of the agent to reduce dentin permeability renders it to be potentially useful as a clinical dentin desensitizing agent, which has to be confirmed in future clinical studies. By contrast, the two sodium fluoride varnishes are not effective in dentin permeability reduction and should be considered as topical fluoride delivering agents rather than tubular orifice-blocking agents.

  20. Combining Bioactive Multifunctional Dental Composite with PAMAM for Root Dentin Remineralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimeng Xiao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The objectives of this study were to: (1 develop a bioactive multifunctional composite (BMC via nanoparticles of amorphous calcium phosphate (NACP, 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC, dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate (DMAHDM and nanoparticles of silver (NAg; and (2 investigate the effects of combined BMC + poly (amido amine (PAMAM on remineralization of demineralized root dentin in a cyclic artificial saliva/lactic acid environment for the first time. Methods. Root dentin specimens were prepared and demineralized with 37% phosphoric acid for 15 s. Four groups were prepared: (1 root dentin control; (2 root dentin with BMC; (3 root dentin with PAMAM; (4 root dentin with BMC + PAMAM. Specimens were treated with a cyclic artificial saliva/lactic acid regimen for 21 days. Calcium (Ca and phosphate (P ion concentrations and acid neutralization were determined. The remineralized root dentin specimens were examined via hardness testing and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Results. Mechanical properties of BMC were similar to commercial control composites (p = 0.913. BMC had excellent Ca and P ion release and acid-neutralization capability. BMC or PAMAM alone each achieved slight mineral regeneration in demineralized root dentin. The combined BMC + PAMAM induced the greatest root dentin remineralization, and increased the hardness of pre-demineralized root dentin to match that of healthy root dentin (p = 0.521. Significance. The excellent root dentin remineralization effects of BMC + PAMAM were demonstrated for the first time. BMC + PAMAM induced effective and complete root dentin remineralization in an acid challenge environment. The novel BMC + PAMAM method is promising for Class V and other restorations to remineralize and protect tooth structures.

  1. Effects of a Dicalcium and Tetracalcium Phosphate-Based Desensitizer on In Vitro Dentin Permeability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfeng Zhou

    Full Text Available The present study evaluated the effectiveness of a dicalcium and tetracalcium phosphate-based desensitizer in reducing dentin permeability in vitro. Dentin fluid flow was measured before and after treatment of dentin with patent dentinal tubules using 1 or 3 applications of the dicalcium and tetracalcium phosphate containing agent TeethmateTM (TM and comparing the results with two sodium fluoride varnishes VellaTM (VLA and VanishTM (VAN, after storage in artificial saliva for 24 h, 48 h and 7 days. Significant differences were observed among the 4 methods employed for reducing dentin permeability (p < 0.001 and the 3 post-treatment times (p < 0.001. VLA and VAN never achieved 50% permeability reductions consistently in any of the 3 time periods. Only the calcium phosphate-based desensitizer applied for 3 times consistently reduced dentin permeability by 50% after 24 h. When applied once, the permeability reduction of TM increased progressively over the 3 time periods. After 7 days, only one and three applications of the calcium phosphate-based desensitizer consistently reduced dentin permeability by more than 50%. Permeability reductions corresponded well with scanning electron microscopy examination of dentinal tubule orifice occlusion in dentin specimens treated with the agents. Overall, the dicalcium and tetracalcium phosphate-based desensitizer is effective in reducing dentin permeability via a tubule occlusion mechanism. The ability of the agent to reduce dentin permeability renders it to be potentially useful as a clinical dentin desensitizing agent, which has to be confirmed in future clinical studies. By contrast, the two sodium fluoride varnishes are not effective in dentin permeability reduction and should be considered as topical fluoride delivering agents rather than tubular orifice-blocking agents.

  2. Comparative evaluation of shear bond strength of two self-etching adhesives (sixth and seventh generation on dentin of primary and permanent teeth: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaseen S

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was undertaken to compare and evaluate shear bond strength of two self-etching adhesives (sixth and seventh generation on dentin of primary and permanent teeth. Materials and Methods: Flat dentin surface of 64 human anterior teeth (32 primary and 32 permanent divided into four groups of 16 each. Groups A and C were treated with Contax (sixth generation, while groups B and D were treated with Clearfil S3 (seventh generation. A teflon mold was used to build the composite (Filtek Z-350 cylinders on the dentinal surface of all the specimens. Shear bond strength was tested for all the specimens with an Instron Universal Testing Machine. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA for multiple group comparison, followed by student′s unpaired ′t′ test for group-wise comparison. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in shear bond strength among the study groups except that primary teeth bonded with Contax exhibited significantly lesser shear bond strength than permanent teeth bonded with Clearfil S3. Conclusion: This study revealed that Clearfil S3 could be of greater advantage in pediatric dentistry than Contax because of its fewer steps and better shear bond strength in dentin of both primary and permanent teeth.

  3. Dentinal fluid dynamics in human teeth, in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciucchi, B; Bouillaguet, S; Holz, J; Pashley, D

    1995-04-01

    Cavities were prepared in human premolars scheduled for extraction for orthodontic reasons. The smear layer was removed from the dentin surface by acid etching, and the cavity was sealed using a hollow chamber. The chamber was filled with sterile saline solution and connected via tubing to a hydraulic circuit featuring an adjustable pressure reservoir and a device that measures fluid movement across dentin. In the absence of any exogenous pressure, all cavities exhibited an outward fluid flow rate of 0.36 microliters min-1 cm-2. As exogenous pressure was applied to the cavity, the outward flow slowed. The exogenous pressure that stopped outward fluid flow was taken to be equal to normal pulpal tissue pressure. The mean value was 14.1 cm H2O in five teeth. This simple method permits measurement of dentinal fluid flux, the hydraulic conductance of dentin, and estimates pulpal tissue pressure.

  4. Effects of dentin depth and cavity configuration on bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, T; Sano, H; Burrow, M F; Tagami, J; Pashley, D H

    1999-04-01

    During polymerization of resin composites, shrinkage stresses compete with resin-dentin bonds in a manner that can cause failure of the bond, depending upon the configuration of the cavity, its depth, and the restorative technique. The hypothesis tested in this study was that the effect of cavity configuration (C) and remaining dentin thickness (RDT) influence resin bond strength to the dentin of Class I cavity floors. The occlusal enamel was ground to expose a flat superficial dentin surface as a control (superficial dentin, C-factor = 1) in human extracted third molars. Cavities 3 mm long x 4 mm wide were prepared to a depth 2 mm below the ground dentin surfaces (deep dentin within cavity floor, C-factor = 3). To assess the relationship between C-factor and RDT, we removed the walls of cavities, making a deep flat surface for bonding (deep dentin, C-factor = 1). The teeth were restored with either Clearfil Liner Bond II (LB II), One-Step (OS), or Super-Bond D Liner (DL), followed by Clearfil Photo Posterior resin composite. After 24 hrs' storage in water, the teeth were sectioned vertically into 3 or 4 slabs (0.7 mm thick) and trimmed for the micro-tensile bond test so that we could determine the strength of the resin bonds to the pulpal floor. All groups gave high bond strengths to superficial dentin, but OS and DL gave significantly lower bond strengths to flat deep dentin when the C-factor was 1. When the C-factor was increased to 3 by the creation of a three-dimensional cavity preparation, the bond strengths of all materials fell (range, 21 to 35%), but the difference was significant (p bond strengths tended to exhibit cohesive failures within the hybrid layer, while specimens exhibiting low bond strengths showed failures at the top of the hybrid layer. Some adhesives do not bond well to deep dentin, making them more susceptible to polymerization shrinkage stress that develops in cavities with high C-factors.

  5. Resin-infiltrated-dentine--a FE-ESEM microscopy investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eick, J D; Dusevich, V M; de Wet, F A; van der Vyver, P J

    2004-09-01

    The formation of a hybrid layer is essential for bonding of dental composites to dentine. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of various etchants/conditioners and dentine bonding systems on dentine surfaces utilising a Field Emission Environmental SEM (FE-ESEM). Twenty one, freshly extracted human molar teeth were utilised. Dentine without resin application was initially observed both wet and dried in the following conditions: (1) fractured surface, (2) smear layer, and (3) smear layer removed with 37% phosphoric acid. Resin infiltration into dentine was then studied after applying Scotchbond 1, Optibond Solo, Prime & Bond NT, or Prompt L-Pop systems. Scotchbond 1, Optibond Solo, and Prime & Bond NT resins penetrated the dentine tubules and created hybrid layers; although, in some cases Prime & Bond NT only created a partially filled hybrid layer. No polymerised resin or hybrid layer was observed for Prompt L-Pop. The FE-ESEM permitted observation of specimens at near in-vivo wet conditions.

  6. Effects of different lasers on organic/inorganic ratio of radicular dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, F C; Roperto, R; Akkus, A; Akkus, O; Souza-Gabriel, A E; Sousa-Neto, M D

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the chemical stability of endodontic-treated root dentin after different laser irradiations through Raman spectroscopy. Fifty maxillary canines were selected and prepared with K3 system. Roots were randomly distributed into five groups (n = 10) according to the surface treatment: GI (water), GII (NaOCl + EDTA), GIII (NaOCl + EDTA + 980 nm Diode laser), GIV (NaOCl + EDTA+ 1064 nm Nd: YAG laser) and GV (NaOCl + EDTA+ 2780 nm Er,Cr: YSGG laser). Lasers were applied for 20 s. Samples were bisected, and the organic and inorganic content of dentin was analyzed by Raman spectroscopy. Data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey tests (p laser had a reduced collagen content (GV-290.7 ± 41.7) compared with the water-treated roots (GI-328.3 ± 63.5) and those treated with NaOCl + EDTA (GII-333.9 ± 55.8). Roots irradiated with Er,Cr: YSGG laser also showed a higher inorganic/organic ratio (GV-9.5 ± 1.1) than roots treated with water (GI-7.7 ± 1.5), NaOCl + EDTA (GII-8.0 ± 1.4) and diode laser (GIII-8.2 ± 1.6). Both organic and inorganic contents increased from cervical to apical thirds in all groups. None of the surface treatments were able to promote changes in the inorganic content of the root dentin; treatment with NaOCl + EDTA combined with Er,Cr: YSGG altered collagen.

  7. Immediate and delayed micro-tensile bond strength of different luting resin cements to different regional dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Abdelraheem Mohamed; Hamouda, Ibrahim Mohamed; Ghazy, Mohamed Hamed; Abo-Madina, Manal Mohamed

    2013-03-01

    We sought to evaluate immediate and delayed micro-tensile bond strength of Panavia F2.0 and Multilink Sprint resin cement to superficial, deep and cervical dentin. Thirty-six freshly extracted non-carious human molars were sectioned in the mesiodistal direction to expose three different dentin regions including superficial dentin (1 mm below the dentine-enamel junction), deep dentin (1 mm above the highest pulp horn) and cervical dentin (0.5 mm above the cemento-enamel junction and 0.5 mm below the dentine-enamel junction). Resin cements were applied on dentin surfaces and composite blocks were luted under constant seating pressure. Each group was divided into three subgroups according to time intervals. Specimens were sectioned to obtain sticks of 1 mm(2) in diameter and subjected to microtensile bond strength testing at a cross head speed of 1 mm/min. Both resin cements showed higher micro-tensile bond strength to superficial dentin than that to deep or cervical dentin (P Micro-tensile bond strengths of Panavia F2.0 were higher than those of Multilink Sprint at different dentin regions (P micro-tensile bond strengths were higher than those of delayed micro-tensile bond strengths for both resin cements (P micro-tensile bond strengths to different dentin regions.

  8. Mapping physicochemical surface modifications of flame-treated polypropylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Farris

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to investigate how the surface morphology of polypropylene (PP is influenced by the surface activation mediated by a flame obtained using a mixture of air and propane under fuel-lean (equivalence ratio φ = 0.98 conditions. Morphological changes observed on flamed samples with smooth (S, medium (M, and high (H degree of surface roughness were attributed to the combined effect of a chemical mechanism (agglomeration and ordering of partially oxidized intermediate-molecular-weight material with a physical mechanism (flattening of the original roughness by the flame’s high temperature. After two treatments, the different behavior of the samples in terms of wettability was totally reset, which made an impressive surface energy of ~43 mJ•m–2 possible, which is typical of more hydrophilic polymers (e.g., polyethylene terephthalate – PET. In particular, the polar component was increased from 1.21, 0.08, and 0.32 mJ•m–2 (untreated samples to 10.95, 11.20, and 11.17 mJ•m–2 for the flamed samples S, M, and H, respectively, an increase attributed to the insertion of polar functional groups (hydroxyl and carbonyl on the C–C backbone, as demonstrated by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results.

  9. Surface roughness and morphologic changes of zirconia: Effect of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    surfaces for Cercon (45.15 Ra) and Aadva Zr (51.67 Ra) ceramics. .... cement to dentin and to surface‑treated posts of titanium alloy, glass fiber, and zirconia. J Adhes ... Subasi MG, Inan O. Evaluation of the topographical surface changes and.

  10. Bond durability of contemporary adhesive systems to pulp chamber dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayar, Muhammet Kerim

    2015-12-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate long-term bond strengths of dentin adhesive systems, which include one-step self-etch adhesive systems (Optibond All-in-one, Kerr; Adper Prompt L-POP, 3 M ESPE), a three-step etch-and-rinse adhesive (Optibond FL, Kerr) and two-step self-etch adhesive (AdheSE Bond, Ivoclar), applied to pulp chamber dentin surfaces after 12-month water storage by using microtensile bond strength (µTBS) test. Materials and methods: Dentin adhesive systems were applied to unprepared pulp chamber dentin surfaces according to manufacturer's directions, respectively (n = 5). After applying adhesive systems, composite buildups were done incrementally. Bond strengths to pulp chamber dentin surfaces were determined using µTBS test after water storage for 24 h and 12 month. Kruskal-Wallis analysis and Mann-Whitney U-test for pairwise comparisons were used to determine statistical differences in µTBS between the groups at a significance level of 5%. Results: There were no significant differences in µTBS between storage periods for tested adhesives regardless adhesive class. Conclusion: Bond durability of tested adhesive systems, including one-bottle self-etch adhesives with pulp chamber dentin surfaces, may be considered stable after 12-month water storage. Therefore, one-step self-etch, also called "user-friendly" adhesives may perform and traditional three-step etch-and-rinse adhesives in the long-term when used for bonding to pulp chamber dentin surfaces.

  11. Bond strength of resin modified glass ionomer cement to primary dentin after cutting with different bur types and dentin conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca Di Nicoló

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of different bur types and acid etching protocols on the shear bond strength (SBS of a resin modified glass ionomer cement (RM-GIC to primary dentin. Forty-eight clinically sound human primary molars were selected and randomly assigned to four groups (n=12. In G1, the lingual surface of the teeth was cut with a carbide bur until a 2.0-mm-diameter dentin area was exposed, followed by the application of RM-GIC (Vitremer - 3M/ESPE prepared according to the manufacturer's instructions. The specimens of G2, received the same treatment of G1, however the dentin was conditioned with phosphoric acid. In groups G3 and G4 the same procedures of G1 and G2 were conducted respectively, nevertheless dentin cutting was made with a diamond bur. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37ºC for 24h, and then tested in a universal testing machine. SBS. data were submitted to 2-way ANOVA (= 5% and indicated that SBS values of RM-GIC bonded to primary dentin cut with different burs were not statistically different, but the specimens that were conditioned with phosphoric acid presented SBS values significantly higher that those without conditioning. To observe micromorphologic characteristics of the effects of dentin surface cut by diamond or carbide rotary instruments and conditioners treatment, some specimens were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Smear layer was present in all specimens regardless of the type of rotary instrument used for dentin cutting, and specimens etched with phosphoric acid presented more effective removal of smear layer. It was concluded that SBS of a RM-GIC to primary dentin was affected by the acid conditioning but the bur type had no influence.

  12. Effect of postponed polishing on marginal adaptation of resin used with dentin-bonding agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, E K; Asmussen, E

    1988-06-01

    Dentin cavities, prepared in extracted human teeth, were treated with two different dentin-bonding agents and filled with a light-activated microfilled resin. The maximum width of the contraction gap (MG) and the extent of the gap (GP) were then measured, using a light microscope, approximately 0.1 mm below the original free surface of the filling. The contraction gap was measured 30 s, 10 min or 60 min, and remeasured 65 min, after stop of irradiation. A positive correlation was found between the two variables, MG and GP. The product of MG and GP was chosen as basis for the statistical analyses. This "marginal index" was significantly reduced when polishing of the marginal area was postponed for 10 min with one of the dentin-bonding agents and for 60 min with the other. Even though the improvement in marginal adaptation was statistically significant, this improvement was considered clinically irrelevant. It is concluded that polishing of the marginal area should not be done before the hygroscopic expansion of the resin restoration has closed the contraction gap.

  13. Adhesion of different resin cements to enamel and dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumova, Ella A; Ernst, Saskia; Schaper, Katharina; Arnold, Wolfgang H; Piwowarczyk, Andree

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the shear bond strength (SBS) of five different resin cements to human enamel and dentin under different storage conditions. Five resin cements and their dedicated systems were tested. Teeth were embedded, ground flat to expose enamel or dentin and polished with sandpaper. Adhesive systems were applied according to the manufacturers'instructions. V2A steel cylinders with were silicated, coated, and cemented onto the teeth. Specimens were stored at three different conditions and subsequently thermocycled. SBS was measured. Significant differences were observed between the tested resin cements depending on the tooth surface. Different storage conditions influenced the bond strength, independent of the tooth surface, in all test cements. The bond strength of all experimental materials to enamel is higher than that to dentin surfaces. Furthermore, the adhesiveness decreases after wetness (hydro-) and hydrothermal stress, regardless of the tooth surface.

  14. Surface chemical composition analysis of heat-treated bamboo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fan-dan; Yu, Yang-lun; Zhang, Ya-mei; Yu, Wen-ji; Gao, Jian-min

    2016-05-01

    In this study, the effect of heat treatment on the chemical composition of bamboo slivers was studied. The chemical properties of the samples were examined by chemical analysis. Results showed a decrease in the contents of holocellulose and α-cellulose, as well as an increase in the contents of lignin and extractives. Changes in the chemical structure of bamboo components were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). FTIR spectroscopy results indicated that hemicellulose contents decrease, whereas lignin contents increase after heat treatment. Ester formation linked to lignin decreased the hygroscopicity of the bamboo samples and consequently improved their dimensional stability and durability. XPS spectroscopy results showed that hemicelluloses and celluloses are relatively more sensitive to the heating process than lignin. As a consequence, hemicellulose and cellulose contents decreased, whereas lignin contents increased during heat treatment. The results obtained in this study provide useful information for the future utilization of heat-treated bamboo.

  15. Surface functionalization of HF-treated silicon nanowires

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ming-Wang Shao; Hong Wang; Yan Fu; Jun Hua; Dorothy-Duo-Duo Ma

    2009-05-01

    Versatile methods were employed to investigate the chemical reactivity of hydrogenterminated surface of silicon nanowires. The experimental results showed that coupling reaction took place when silicon nanowires reacted with 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl acrylate, and reductive deposition reaction occurred in the presence of inorganic salt such as HgCl2, and also co-reduction reaction took place in a solution containing both AuCl3 and PdCl2. The possible reaction mechanisms were studied and this study would be expected to favour the homogeneity, selectivity, reproducibility, and stability of SiNW devices or sensors.

  16. Evaluation of Five Different Desensitizers: A Comparative Dentin Permeability and SEM Investigation In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Nasibe Aycan; Ertas, Ertan; Orucoğlu, Hasan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and durability of five different dentin desensitizers (Gluma Desensitizer Powergel, Bifluorid 12, Gluma Self Etch Bond, D/Sense Crystal, Nupro Sensodyne Prophylaxis Paste with Novamin) on tubule occlusion and dentin permeability reduction in vitro. The quantitative changes in permeability of 100 dentin discs were measured after desensitizer treatments and following post-treatments of 6% citric acid challenge for 1 min or immersion in artificial saliva for 24 hours under hydrostatic pressure generated by a computerised fluid filtration meter. Qualitative SEM analyses were also carried out. Dentin permeability decreased after desensitizer application in all groups. Nevertheless, only the difference between 'Gluma Self Etch Bond' and 'Nupro Sensodyne Prophylaxis Paste with Novamin' groups was significantly different (p0.05). Of all the artificial saliva-subgroups, only the difference between 'D/Sense Crystal' and 'Bifluorid 12' was significantly different (p<0.05). In SEM analysis, morphological changes were detected on the dentin surface and within the tubules following desensitizer treatments and post-treatments. All the desensitizers significantly reduced dentin permeability by changing the morphology of the dentin surface and/or dentinal tubules. Following post-treatments, there was some reduction in the efficacy of the desensitizers which was represented by the reduction in permeability values. SEM analysis revealed some physical changes in the dentin structure which can partly give an explanation to the reduced efficacy of tested desensitizers.

  17. Development of an in situ methodology for the clinical evaluation of dentine hypersensitivity occlusion ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claydon, N C A; Addy, M; MacDonald, E L; West, N X; Maggio, B; Barlow, A; Parkinson, C; Butler, A

    2009-01-01

    The aim of these clinical studies was to evaluate an in situ dentine tubule occlusion model, and to determine the occluding effect from novel occluding agents on patent dentine tubules compared to a positive control (8% strontium acetate--Sensodyne Mint) and negative control (a non-occluding agent) after four days of brushing treatment. These two in situ clinical studies were of single-center, randomized, crossover, single-blind design. Healthy participants wore two lower intra-oral appliances retaining four dentine samples for four treatment days for each period of the study. Samples were power-brushed each day with the test product. Assessment utilized surface topological analysis with a replica-based methodology under scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Both clinical trials demonstrated that the positive control (8% strontium acetate) occluded dentine tubules significantly better (p = 0.0007; p < 0.0009) than the negative controls in the two studies, respectively. The experimental occluding agents demonstrated varying degrees of success for occluding effect compared to the controls. The methodology clearly demonstrates that this in situ clinical model can robustly and reproducibly detect the dentine tubular occlusive effects of positive and negative controls in the treatment of dentine hypersensitivity brushed on the dentine surface. Using this methodology, new occlusion agents for the relief of dentine hypersensitivity can be assessed for occlusive effects on dentine.

  18. Surface Treated Natural Fibres as Filler in Biocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzova, I.; Stevulova, N.; Singovszka, E.; Terpakova, E.

    2015-11-01

    Biocomposites based on natural fibres as organic filler have been studied for several years because traditional building materials such as concrete are increasingly being replaced by advanced composite materials. Natural fibres are a potential replacement of glass fibres in composite materials. Inherent advantages such as low density, biodegradability and comparable specific mechanical properties make natural fibres an attractive option. However, limitations such as poor thermal stability, moisture absorption and poor compatibility with matrix are challenges that need to be resolved. The primary objective of this research was to study the effect of surface treatment on properties of hemp hurds like a natural lignocellulosic material and composites made thereof. Industrial hemp fibre is the one of the most suitable fibres for use in composite materials because of its good specific properties, as well as it being biologically degradable and CO2 neutral. Improving interfacial bonding between fibres and matrix is an important factor in using hemp fibres as reinforcement in composites. In order to improve interfacial bonding, modifications can be made to the hemp fibres to remove non- cellulosic compounds, separate hemp fibres from their bundles, and modify the fibre surface. This paper contains the comparison of FTIR spectra caused by combination of physical and chemical treatment of hemp material with unmodified sample. Modification of hemp hurds was carried out by NaOH solution and by ultrasonic treatment (deionized water and NaOH solution were used as the cleaning mediums).

  19. Methods for Biomimetic Remineralization of Human Dentine: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Ying Cao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to review the laboratory methods on biomimetic remineralization of demineralized human dentine. A systematic search of the publications in the PubMed, TRIP, and Web of Science databases was performed. Titles and abstracts of initially identified publications were screened. Clinical trials, reviews, non-English articles, resin-dentine interface studies, hybrid layer studies, hybrid scaffolds studies, and irrelevant studies were excluded. The remaining papers were retrieved with full texts. Manual screening was conducted on the bibliographies of remaining papers to identify relevant articles. A total of 716 studies were found, and 690 were excluded after initial screening. Two articles were identified from the bibliographies of the remaining papers. After retrieving the full text, 23 were included in this systematic review. Sixteen studies used analogues to mimic the functions of non-collagenous proteins in biomineralization of dentine, and four studies used bioactive materials to induce apatite formation on demineralized dentine surface. One study used zinc as a bioactive element, one study used polydopamine, and another study constructed an agarose hydrogel system for biomimetic mineralization of dentine. Many studies reported success in biomimetic mineralization of dentine, including the use of non-collagenous protein analogues, bioactive materials, or elements and agarose hydrogel system.

  20. Identification of collagen encapsulation at the dentin/adhesive interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Paulette; Wang, Yong; Katz, J Lawrence

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the dentin/adhesive interfacial characteristics of three current commercial adhesives with different relative hydrophilic/hydrophobic composition, using a nondestructive staining technique. Dentin surfaces of 18 unerupted human third molars were randomly selected for treatment with one of three commercial dentin bonding agents according to manufacturers' instructions for the "wet" bonding technique. The adhesives were ranked based on hydrophilic/hydrophobic component ratios (ie, ability to dissolve in water), highest to lowest, as follows: Uno (Pulpdent) > Prime&Bond NT (PBNT, Dentsply Caulk) > Single Bond (SB, 3M ESPE). Dentin/adhesive (d/a) interface sections were stained with Goldner's trichrome, a classical bone stain, and examined using light microscopy. The extent and degree to which the adhesive encapsulates the demineralized dentin matrix is reflected in the color differences in the stained sections. The depth of demineralization appeared comparable among these bonding systems, but adhesive infiltration varied from highest to lowest as follows: Uno > PBNT > SB. The differential staining technique provided a clear representation of the depth of dentin demineralization and extent/degree of adhesive encapsulation of the exposed collagen at the d/a interface. This technique provides a mechanism for readily identifying vulnerable sites at the d/a interface. The composition of the one-bottle adhesive systems has a substantial effect on the interfacial structure of the d/a bond.

  1. Methods for biomimetic remineralization of human dentine: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chris Ying; Mei, May Lei; Li, Quan-Li; Lo, Edward Chin Man; Chu, Chun Hung

    2015-03-02

    This study aimed to review the laboratory methods on biomimetic remineralization of demineralized human dentine. A systematic search of the publications in the PubMed, TRIP, and Web of Science databases was performed. Titles and abstracts of initially identified publications were screened. Clinical trials, reviews, non-English articles, resin-dentine interface studies, hybrid layer studies, hybrid scaffolds studies, and irrelevant studies were excluded. The remaining papers were retrieved with full texts. Manual screening was conducted on the bibliographies of remaining papers to identify relevant articles. A total of 716 studies were found, and 690 were excluded after initial screening. Two articles were identified from the bibliographies of the remaining papers. After retrieving the full text, 23 were included in this systematic review. Sixteen studies used analogues to mimic the functions of non-collagenous proteins in biomineralization of dentine, and four studies used bioactive materials to induce apatite formation on demineralized dentine surface. One study used zinc as a bioactive element, one study used polydopamine, and another study constructed an agarose hydrogel system for biomimetic mineralization of dentine. Many studies reported success in biomimetic mineralization of dentine, including the use of non-collagenous protein analogues, bioactive materials, or elements and agarose hydrogel system.

  2. In vitro evaluation of influence of salivary contamination on the dentin bond strength of one-bottle adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nujella B.P Suryakumari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To evaluate the effect of salivary contamination on the bond strength of one-bottle adhesive systems - (the V generation at various stages during the bonding procedure and to investigate the effect of the contaminant removing treatments on the recovery of bond strengths. Materials and Methods: In this study the V generation one-bottle system - (Adper Single Bond was tested. Fifty caries-free human molars with flat dentin surfaces were randomly divided into five groups of ten teeth each: Group I had 15 second etching with 35% Ortho Phosphoric acid, 15 second rinse and blot dried (Uncontaminated; Group II contaminated and blot dried; Group III contaminated and completely dried; Group IV contaminated, washed, blot dried; Group V contaminated, retched washed, and blot dried. The bonding agent was applied and resin composite (Z-100 3M ESPE was bonded to the treated surfaces using the Teflon mold. The specimens in each group were then subjected to shear bond strength testing in an Instron Universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm / minute and the data were subjected to one way ANOVA for comparison among the groups (P<0.05. Results: There was a significant difference between the group that was dried with strong oil-free air after contamination (Group III and the other groups. When the etched surface was contaminated by saliva, there was no statistical difference between the just blot dry, wash, or the re-etching groups (Groups II, IV, V if the dentin surface was kept wet before priming. When the etched dentin surface was dried (Group III the shear bond strength decreased considerably. Conclusion: The bond strengths to the tooth structure of the recent dentin bonding agents are less sensitive to common forms of contamination than assumed. Re-etching without additional mechanical preparation is sufficient to provide or achieve the expected bond strength.

  3. Surface chemical composition analysis of heat-treated bamboo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Fan-dan, E-mail: fandan_meng@163.com [MOE Key Laboratory of Wooden Material Science and Application, Beijing Forestry University, 35 Qinghua East Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Yu, Yang-lun, E-mail: yuyanglun@caf.ac.cn [Research Institute of Wood Industry, Chinese Academy of Forestry, No 1 Dongxiaofu, Haidian District, Beijing 100091 (China); Zhang, Ya-mei, E-mail: zhangyamei@caf.ac.cn [Research Institute of Wood Industry, Chinese Academy of Forestry, No 1 Dongxiaofu, Haidian District, Beijing 100091 (China); Yu, Wen-ji, E-mail: yuwenji@caf.ac.cn [Research Institute of Wood Industry, Chinese Academy of Forestry, No 1 Dongxiaofu, Haidian District, Beijing 100091 (China); Gao, Jian-min, E-mail: gaojm@bjfu.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Wooden Material Science and Application, Beijing Forestry University, 35 Qinghua East Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Investigate the detailed chemical components contents change of bamboo due to heating. • Chemical analysis of bamboo main components during heating. • Identify the connection between the oxygen to carbon atomic ratio changes and chemical degradation. - Abstract: In this study, the effect of heat treatment on the chemical composition of bamboo slivers was studied. The chemical properties of the samples were examined by chemical analysis. Results showed a decrease in the contents of holocellulose and α-cellulose, as well as an increase in the contents of lignin and extractives. Changes in the chemical structure of bamboo components were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). FTIR spectroscopy results indicated that hemicellulose contents decrease, whereas lignin contents increase after heat treatment. Ester formation linked to lignin decreased the hygroscopicity of the bamboo samples and consequently improved their dimensional stability and durability. XPS spectroscopy results showed that hemicelluloses and celluloses are relatively more sensitive to the heating process than lignin. As a consequence, hemicellulose and cellulose contents decreased, whereas lignin contents increased during heat treatment. The results obtained in this study provide useful information for the future utilization of heat-treated bamboo.

  4. A comparative microleakage evaluation of three different base materials in Class I cavity in deciduous molars in sandwich technique using dye penetration and dentin surface interface by scanning electron microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babita Niranjan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A major objective in restorative dentistry is the control of marginal leakage, which may occur because of dimensional changes or lack of adaptation of restorative material to the cavity preparation. Numerous techniques have been advocated to overcome polymerization shrinkage in composite restorations. Aim and Objectives: This study investigated microleakage of three different bases under composite resin in sandwich technique using dye penetration and dentin surface interface using scanning electron microscope (SEM. Materials and Methods: Sixty extracted deciduous molars were stored in distilled water and Class I cavities with a width of about one-fourth of intercuspal distance and a depth of 0.5-1 mm below the dentino-enamel junction was prepared without bevels. In Group 1 - glass ionomer cement (GIC; Group 2 - mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA; Group 3 - Biodentine™ was placed as a base under composite. Teeth were longitudinally sectioned in two halves, through the centers of the restoration, immersed in 2% methylene blue and microleakage was evaluated under stereomicroscope and surface interface between base and dentin was evaluated under SEM. Results:Under the condition of in vitro study, less microleakage and less internal gaps were seen in Biodentine™ (0.00 ± 0.00 and 4.00 ± 1.59 group than MTA (0.00 ± 0.00 and 6.08 ± 1.82 and GIC (25.25 ± 6.57 and 14.73 ± 3.72, respectively and showed very strong positive correlation between microleakage and internal gaps. Conclusion: Biodentine™ exhibits superior marginal sealing ability as well as marginal adaptation under composite resin as compared to MTA and GIC.

  5. The resistance of surfaces treated with oils and waxes to the action of dry heat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaić Milan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface treatment of wood can be done with different coatings, and the choice of the appropriate system of processing depends on several factors, such as technological, aesthetic, economic and ecological. Raising awareness of the need to preserve the living and working environment has had a crucial impact on the increase in the use of natural materials for surface treatment of wood - oil and wax. The application of oils and waxes allows surface treated wood to keep the natural look, while protecting it from different influences, which can cause degradation and deterioration of the final product. The paper presents the results of testing the resistance of beech surface (Fagus silvatica L. processed with linseed oil and beeswax to the action of dry heat. In order to compare the quality of surface treated with oil and/or wax, beech wood treated with 2K-polyurethane coating is taken as a reference of surface treatment of wood. Surfaces treated with beeswax are less resistant to dry heat than those treated with linseed oil, and both showed significantly less resistance than surface treated with 2K-polyurethane coating.

  6. Effect of ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid, MTAD TM , and HEBP as a final rinse on the microhardness of root dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukura Kulasekaran Dineshkumar

    2012-01-01

    Aims: This study evaluated the effect of 17% EDTA, MTAD, and 18% HEBP solutions on the microhardness of human root canal dentin using the Vickers microhardness test. Materials and Methods: Forty human single-rooted teeth were decoronated at the cementoenamel junction and sectioned longitudinally into buccal and lingual segments. Eighty specimens were divided into four groups (n=20. Group I was treated with distilled water (control, groups II, III, and IV were treated with 1.3% NaOCl as a working solution for 20 minutes followed by 17% EDTA, MTAD, and 18% HEBP respectively. The surface hardness of the root dentin was determined in each specimen with a Vicker′s hardness tester. The values were statistically analyzed using the one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey multiple comparison tests. Results: There was a statistical significant difference among all the groups (one-way ANOVA; P<0.001. Among the experimental groups, HEBP showed the highest dentin microhardness (53.74 MPa, P<0.001. Least microhardness was found with MTAD (42.85 MPa, P<0.001. Conclusions: HEBP as a final rinse appears to be a promising irrigation protocol with less impact on the mineral content of root dentin.

  7. Inhibition of dentin demineralization by fluoride in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Cate, J M; Damen, J J; Buijs, M J

    1998-01-01

    Compared with the knowledge accumulated on enamel-fluoride interactions, relatively little data is available regarding fluoride effects on dentin. This applies to both laboratory and clinical studies into the efficacy of fluoride schemes for the prevention of root surface caries. This study aimed to determine the effects of fluoride and pH on the demineralization of dentin, such as to provide information necessary to develop preventive programmes. Bovine dentin blocks were subjected to undersaturated calcium- and phosphate-containing solutions in the pH range 4.0-6.0 with fluoride added at concentrations between 0.5 and 10 ppm. Non-fluoride solutions served as controls. Mineral loss was assessed chemically and by transversal microradiography. Comparisons were made with similar studies on enamel demineralization. The results showed that demineralization of dentin depends on both pH and fluoride concentration in the demineralizing solution. Inhibition of demineralization that could be relevant from a clinical point of view was found at fluoride values 5-10 times the corresponding values for enamel. Also rapid depletion of fluoride from the solutions was observed, indicating the high uptake capacity of dentin for fluoride. Lesion depth depended on pH of the solution while the fluoride levels were associated with the surface layer, both in mineral content and depth. For dentin we propose a demineralization mechanism where acid penetrates rapidly into the tissue, presumably through the tubules, after which the released calcium and phosphate is partly trapped by the inward diffusing fluoride. This leads to the formation of a surface layer, which may even be hypermineralized compared to sound dentin.

  8. Effect of adhesive system and application strategy on reduction of dentin permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Oliveira Carvalho

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effect of adhesive systems and application strategies on dentin hydraulic conductance (HC. The buccal enamel was removed from bovine incisors to simulate laminate cavity preparations. After removing the roots and the coronal pulp, the buccal dentin was treated with EDTA solution (0.5 M for 5 minutes, rinsed, ultrasonicated for 12 minutes and connected to a permeability device. HC of the specimens was measured at 10 psi (n = 5. Permeability was measured before and after bonding procedures using G-Bond (GB, Clearfil Tri-S Bond (CTS, Hybrid Coat (HY, Bond Force (BF, Adper Easy Bond (AEB Silorane (SI, Clearfil SE Bond (CSE and Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SMP adhesives systems, which were applied following three strategies: 1 according to the manufacturers' instructions; 2 two coats of all-in-one self-etching adhesives (GB, CTS, HY, BF, AEB or priming step plus two coats of bonding resin for the other systems (SI, CSE and SMP; and 3 a thin layer of a flowable composite applied over one coat of all-in-one self-etching adhesives or primed surface for SI, CSE and SMP adhesives. No significant difference was observed among the application modes concerning their ability to reduce HC. None of the adhesives showed complete sealing (100% of the bovine tooth dentin. SI exhibited lower HC than SMP, however, they were not significantly different from the other systems. The results suggest that all systems tested result in an HC reduction of more than 90%. The wet bonding technique seemed to be more sensitive for dentin sealing.

  9. Influence of dentin pretreatment with titanium tetrafluoride and self-etching adhesive systems on microtensile bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridi, Enrico Coser; Amaral, Flávia Lucisano Botelho; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes; Turssi, Cecília Pedroso; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of dentin pretreatment with 2.5% titanium tetrafluoride (TiF4) on microtensile bond strength (microTBS) of one- or two-step self-etching adhesive systems. 24 human sound third molars were used. A flat dentin surface of each tooth was exposed. After planing, teeth were divided into groups so that dentin would be left untreated or treated with a 2.5% TiF4 solution for 1 minute. Specimens were then subdivided into two groups to receive one of the following adhesive systems: one-step self-etching Adper Easy One (ADP) or two-step self-etching adhesive Clearfil SE Bond (CLEAR). A block of composite measuring 5.0 mm high and 5.0 mm wide was made incrementally on the tooth. Specimens were taken to a metallographic cutter to fabricate sticks with a bond area of approximately 1 mm2. After 24 hours, specimens were submitted to microTBS testing and the failure mode was recorded by examining specimens under stereomicroscopy. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) photomicrographs were obtained of the tooth/restoration interface. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test demonstrated that pretreatment of dentin with a TiF4 solution did not affect the microTBS values of either of the adhesive systems (P = 0.675). CLEAR provided higher bond strength than ADP, regardless of whether dentin was or was not pretreated with the TiF4 solution. Failure mode showed mostly adhesive failures in all groups, except when only ADP was used, causing mostly cohesive fractures in resin.

  10. The Effect of Laser Irradiation on Shear Bond Strength of GI to Dentin After CPP-ACP Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moezizadeh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Dentin sensitivity is one of the most important problems in dentistry. Enamel loss due to root exposure is serious issue and common exposure is one of the reasons for dentin hypersensitivity. There are different methods for solving this problem. One of the most conservative and least expensive methods is use of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP paste. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate shear bond strength of GIC to dentin, with or without laser, CPP-ACP paste and polyacrylic acid treatments. Materials and Methods Fifty sound human third molars were bisected in a mesiodistal direction using a diamond disk. Using 400, 600 and 800 grit silicon carbide paper, dentin surfaces were exposed. The teeth were divided into five groups. In groups A, B, D and H, CPP-ACP (GC tooth mousse Itabashi-Ku, Tokyo, Japan was applied for one hour the first day and repeated at the same time of day for a total of five days. In groups B, C, D and E, the specimens were subjected to laser for 10 seconds using Er, Cr: YSGG laser. In groups B, C, H and G, specimens were treated with 10% polyacrylic acid for 20 seconds. A plastic tube containing GI was positioned over the tooth. Samples were loaded in shear bond using a Universal Testing Machine (Zwick/Roell, Germany, at a 0.5 mm/minute crosshead speed. Results Despite the failing of groups A and D, group analysis showed that there were no significant differences between the groups. The predominant type of fracture in all groups was adhesive. Conclusions Application of CPP-ACP, without preconditioning with polyacrylic acid, can decrease shear bond strength. Laser irradiation has no effect on shear bond strength of GIC to dentin in this condition.

  11. Chlorhexidine preserves dentin bond in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrilho, M R O; Carvalho, R M; de Goes, M F; di Hipólito, V; Geraldeli, S; Tay, F R; Pashley, D H; Tjäderhane, L

    2007-01-01

    Loss of hybrid layer integrity compromises resin-dentin bond stability. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) may be partially responsible for hybrid layer degradation. Since chlorhexidine inhibits MMPs, we hypothesized that chlorhexidine would decelerate the loss of resin-dentin bonds. Class I preparations in extracted third molars were sectioned into two halves. One half was customarily restored (etch-and-rinse adhesive/resin composite), and the other was treated with 2% chlorhexidine after being acid-etched before restoration. Specimens were stored in artificial saliva with/without protease inhibitors. Microtensile bond strengths and failure mode distribution under SEM were analyzed immediately after specimens' preparation and 6 months later. With chlorhexidine, significantly better preservation of bond strength was observed after 6 months; protease inhibitors in the storage medium had no effect. Failure analysis showed significantly less failure in the hybrid layer with chlorhexidine, compared with controls after 6 months. In conclusion, this in vitro study suggests that chlorhexidine might be useful for the preservation of dentin bond strength.

  12. CLOSING OF DENTINAL TUBULES BY GLUTARDIALDEHYDE TREATMENT, A SCANNING ELECTRON-MICROSCOPY STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DIJKMAN, GEHM; JONGEBLOED, WL; DEVRIES, J; OGAARD, B; ARENDS, J

    1994-01-01

    The properties of dentin are strongly influenced by the so-called smear layer. This layer is always present on the dentin surface after cutting, drilling, sawing, etc. The smear layer can be removed by various chemical treatments, such as those of acid etching or ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDT

  13. Shear bond strengths of three glass ionomer cements to enamel and dentine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalho, T.S.; van Amerongen, W.E.; de Gee, A.; Bönecker, M.; Sampaio, F.C.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The shear bond strength of three glass ionomer cements (GIC) to enamel and dentine was evaluated. Study Design: Sound permanent human molars (n=12) were grinded perpendicular to their axial axes, exposing smooth, flat enamel and dentine surfaces. The teeth were embedded in resin and

  14. Shear bond strengths of three glass ionomer cements to enamel and dentine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalho, T.S.; van Amerongen, W.E.; de Gee, A.; Bönecker, M.; Sampaio, F.C.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The shear bond strength of three glass ionomer cements (GIC) to enamel and dentine was evaluated. Study Design: Sound permanent human molars (n=12) were grinded perpendicular to their axial axes, exposing smooth, flat enamel and dentine surfaces. The teeth were embedded in resin and cond

  15. Effect of denture base-resin with prereacted glass-ionomer filler on dentin demineralization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Mukai; K. Kamijo; F. Fujino; T. Teranaka; J.M. ten Cate

    2009-01-01

    The demineralization of dentin was studied when placed adjacent to one of four experimental denture base-resins. These experimental resins contained polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and 0, 5, 10, 20 or 30 wt% surface reaction-type prereacted glass-ionomer (S-PRG) filler, respectively. A dentin thin-sec

  16. Shear bond strengths of three glass ionomer cements to enamel and dentine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvalho, T.S.; van Amerongen, W.E.; de Gee, A.; Bönecker, M.; Sampaio, F.C.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The shear bond strength of three glass ionomer cements (GIC) to enamel and dentine was evaluated. Study Design: Sound permanent human molars (n=12) were grinded perpendicular to their axial axes, exposing smooth, flat enamel and dentine surfaces. The teeth were embedded in resin and cond

  17. A COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF BOND - STRENGTH BETWEEN NORMAL DENTIN AND CARIES AFFECTED DENTIN: AN INVITRO STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The concept of adhesive dentistry has taken leaps forward and has resulted in a concept of more conservation of tooth structure which in turn enhance the life of teeth. The bonding agent forms a hybrid layer with dentin and its other side co - polymerize with the matrix p hase of dental composite, producing strong micro - mechanical bonding. AIMS AND OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the bond strength of adhesive agent to normal dentin and caries affected dentin and also to compare the bond strength between different bonding agents. METHOD: 20 mandibular molar were collected, washed and stored in normal saline. Each tooth was cut longitudinally. Healthy tooth structure of each half of the tooth represents the control group and the carious portion of the same tooth represents as experi mental group. Thus, 80 samples were prepared. The groups were then further subdivided into 4 sub - groups of 4 different bonding agents. The dentin surface of all the sub groups were etched by 37% of phosphoric acid gel for 10 - 15 secs and respective bonding agent were used and cured for 20 secs. Cylindrical composite resin was prepared using a plastic module of internal diameter of 3mm and length 5mm. Statistical analysis was done using mean standard deviation (S.D, student ‘t’ test and level of significance ‘P’. RESULTS: For both the control and experimental group, 3M single bond has showed the strongest bond strength followed by Prime and Bond NT, Excite and PQ1.

  18. The effects of dentin bonding agents on micro-tensile dentin bond strengths of self-adhesive resin cements and RMGIC%粘接处理剂对自粘接树脂水门汀和RMGIC的牙本质粘接强度的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宣桂红; 傅柏平

    2012-01-01

    目的:实验评价牙本质粘接处理剂对自粘接树脂水门汀和树脂加强型玻璃离子水门汀(RMGIC)的牙本质微拉伸粘接强度的影响.方法:选用离体人无龋第三恒磨牙24颗,用低速切片机垂直于牙体长轴方向将磨牙冠(牙合)中1/3交界线处切开待用.实验组牙本质表面涂布牙本质粘接处理剂,对照组不涂粘接处理剂.后将试样分别用自粘接树脂水门汀(Unicem,3M ESPE;seT PP,SDI)或树脂加强型玻璃离子水门汀(Fuji CEM,GC)原位对位粘接.水浴中储存24h后,用低速切片机把样本切割成约1mm×1mm×8mm条状,随后进行微拉伸测试.用扫描电镜观察粘接界面形貌.结果:无论是否使用粘接处理剂,Unicem的牙本质粘接强度显著高于seT PP 和Fuji CEM(P <0.01).与对照组相比,实验组的粘接强度显著提高(P <0.05).结论:粘接处理剂表面处理增强自粘接树脂水门汀及树脂加强型玻璃离子水门汀的牙本质粘接强度.%Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of dentin bonding agents on the micro-tensile dentin bond strengths (mTBS) of self-adhesive resin cements and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC). Methods: Twenty-four non-carious humane third molars were used for the study. The crowns were cut into two with a low-speed saw (Isomet) along the line between occlusal one third and middle one third of crowns, perpendicularly to tooth long axis in order to expose the dentin surfaces of both sectioned sides. The sectioned dentin surfaces were treated with or without dentin primer (control). Subsequently, the sectioned dentin surfaces were glued together in situ either with one of two resin cements (Unicem, 3M ESPE; seT PP, SDI) or with RMGIC (Fuji CEM; GC). After 24h water storage, all specimens were sectioned into beams about 1 × 1 × 8mm consistently with the axis of the teeth, followed by μTBS tests with micro-tensile tester. The micro-morphologies of the debonded cement-dentin

  19. EDTA conditioning of dentine promotes adhesion, migration and differentiation of dental pulp stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galler, K M; Widbiller, M; Buchalla, W; Eidt, A; Hiller, K-A; Hoffer, P C; Schmalz, G

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of dentine conditioning on migration, adhesion and differentiation of dental pulp stem cells. Dentine discs prepared from extracted human molars were pre-treated with EDTA (10%), NaOCl (5.25%) or H2 O. Migration of dental pulp stem cells towards pre-treated dentine after 24 and 48 h was assessed in a modified Boyden chamber assay. Cell adhesion was evaluated indirectly by measuring cell viability. Expression of mineralization-associated genes (COL1A1, ALP, BSP, DSPP, RUNX2) in cells cultured on pre-treated dentine for 7 days was determined by RT-qPCR. Nonparametric statistical analysis was performed for cell migration and cell viability data to compare different groups and time-points (Mann-Whitney U-test, α = 0.05). Treatment of dentine with H2 O or EDTA allowed for cell attachment, which was prohibited by NaOCl with statistical significance (P = 0.000). Furthermore, EDTA conditioning induced cell migration towards dentine. The expression of mineralization-associated genes was increased in dental pulp cells cultured on dentine after EDTA conditioning compared to H2 O-pre-treated dentine discs. EDTA conditioning of dentine promoted the adhesion, migration and differentiation of dental pulp stem cells towards or onto dentine. A pre-treatment with EDTA as the final step of an irrigation protocol for regenerative endodontic procedures has the potential to act favourably on new tissue formation within the root canal. © 2015 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Comparison of shear bond strength of self-adhering flowable composite with different flowable composites to dentin

    OpenAIRE

    Merve Erkmen Almaz; Aylin Akbay Oba; Işıl Şaroğlu Sönmez; Deniz Sönmez

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to measure and compare the shear bond strength of a self-adhering flowable resin composite with different flowable composites to dentin. Materials and Methods: A total of 48 extracted teeth were divided randomly into four groups, and dentin surfaces were exposed. Following materials were applied to dentin surfaces; Group I: VF (self-adhering flowable composite), Group II: CSE Bond (two-step self-etch adhesive) + CMF (conventional flowable composite), Gro...

  1. Surface energy of preservative-treated southern yellow pine (Pinus spp.) by contact angle measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Jinzhen; Pascal D.Kamdem

    2007-01-01

    In this study,the contact angles of four different reference liquids (including distilled water,diiodomethane,formadide and glycerol) formed on the surfaces of wood,treated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA) and two other emerging copper-based water-borne systems (commercial names:NW and NS) were measured with sessile drop method.Based on the contact angle data,the surface energy was obtained from the acid-base approach.The total surface energy consisted of Lifshiz-van der Waals parameter and acid-base parameter.Results showed that the NW and CCA treatments made the wood surface more hydrophobic while the NS treatment had the reverse effect on the wood surface mainly owing to the increased penetration of earlywood.By using three liquids,diiodomethane,formamide and distilled water,the total surface energy obtained for untreated earlywood,untreated latewood, CCA-treated earlywood,CCA-treated latewood,NW-treated earlywood,NW-treated latewood,NS-treated earlywood and NS-treated latewood were 43.1,44.5,43.4,45.1,49.4,40.6,46.0 and 40.9 mJ/m2,respectively.The surface energy of CCA-treated wood was almost the same as untreated wood.After NW and NS treatments,the surface energy of both earlywood and latewood changed a little.However,the change was not so obvious as to draw any further conclusion concerning the influence of NW and NS treatments on the surface energy of wood.

  2. Cryopreserved dentin matrix as a scaffold material for dentin-pulp tissue regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Liang; Xie, Li; Yang, Bo; Yu, Mei; Jiang, Zongting; Feng, Lian; Guo, Weihua; Tian, Weidong

    2014-06-01

    Cryopreservation has been identified as an efficient approach to preserve tissue engineered products for a long term. Our prior studies have suggested that the treated dentin matrix (TDM) could be an ideal bioactive scaffold for dental tissue regeneration. In this study, we hypothesize that the cryopreservation could effectively maintain the survival and viability of dentinogenesis-related proteins of TDM and the cryopreserved dentin matrix (CDM) would provide the suitable biological scaffold and inductive microenvironment for the regeneration of dentin-pulp like tissue. CDM-3 and CDM-6 were prepared by cryopreserving TDM in liquid nitrogen (-196 °C) with cryoprotectant for 3 months and 6 months, respectively. Various biological characteristics of CDM, including mechanical properties, cell proliferation, and odontogenesis ability, were investigated. To further evaluate the inductive capacity of CDM, human dental follicle cells were encapsulated within CDM, and implanted the scaffold into a mouse model for 8 weeks, and the grafts were harvested and assessed histologically. The CDM showed superior mechanical properties than TDM. Compared to TDM, CDM can release more dentinogenesis-related proteins due to the larger pore diameter. Cell proliferation with the addition of CDM extract liquid was similar to that of TDM in the first five days. Human dental follicle cells, under the effect of CDM extract liquid, highly expressed bone sialoprotein, collagen-1, alkaline phosphatase, indicating that CDM, regarded as the inductive microenvironment, plays an important role in odontogenesis. Most importantly, in vivo, CDM could induce dental follicle cells to regenerate new dentin-pulp like tissues, such as dentinal tubules, predentin, collagen fibers, nerves, and blood vessels which were positive for dentin sialophosphoprotein, dental matrix protein-1, Tubulin, and collagen-1. In conclusion, CDM is an ideal biological scaffold material for human dentin-pulp like tissue

  3. Proanthocyanidins-Loaded Nanoparticles Enhance Dentin Degradation Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawzy, A S; Priyadarshini, B M; Selvan, S T; Lu, T B; Neo, J

    2017-07-01

    Previous studies reported that grapeseed extract (GSE), which is rich in proanthocyanidins (PAs), improves the biodegradation resistance of demineralized dentin. This study aimed to investigate the effect of a new GSE delivery strategy to demineralized dentin through loading into biodegradable polymer poly-[lactic-co-glycolic acid] (PLGA) nanoparticles on the biodegradation resistance in terms of structural stability and surface/bulk mechanical and biochemical properties with storage time in collagenase-containing solutions. GSE-loaded nanoparticles were synthetized by nanoprecipitation at PLGA/GSE (w/w) ratios of 100:75, 100:50, and 100:25 and characterized for their morphological/structural features, physicochemical characteristics, and drug loading, entrapment, and release. Nanoparticle suspensions in distilled water (12.5% w/v) were applied (1 min) to demineralized dentin specimens by simulating pulpal pressure. The nanoparticle delivery was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the GSE release from the delivered nanoparticles was further characterized. The variations in surface and bulk mechanical properties were characterized in terms of reduced elastic-modulus, hardness, nanoindentation testing, and apparent elastic-modulus with a storage time up to 3 mo. Hydroxyproline release with exposure to collagenase up to 7 d was estimated. An etch-and-rinse dentin adhesive was applied to investigate the morphology of the resin-dentin interface after nanoparticle delivery. Treatment with the GSE-loaded nanoparticles enhanced the collagen fibril structural resistance, reflected from the TEM investigation, and improved the biomechanical and biochemical stability of demineralized dentin. Nanoparticles having PLGA/GSE of 100:75 (w/w) showed the highest cumulative GSE release and were associated with the best improvement in biodegradation resistance. TEM/SEM showed the ability of the nanoparticles to infiltrate

  4. Digital moiré interferometric analysis on the effect of nanoparticle conditioning on the mechanical deformation in dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fang Chi; Kishen, Anil

    2016-02-01

    Dentin is a biological composite that forms the major bulk of tooth structure. Understanding the biomechanical response of dentin structure to forces is essential to restore the loss of mechanical integrity associated with dentin loss during disease or treatment procedures. Moiré interferometry is an optical interferometry based method, which allows wholefield, real-time analysis of dental structures with high-sensitivity. The aim of this study was to investigate the deformation gradients in dentin during function and subsequent to surface conditioning with bioactive biopolymeric nanoparticle. Slab shaped dentin specimens were prepared and a customized loading jig was used to compressively load the specimens from 10 N to 50 N. Specific regions of interest was chosen on the dentin specimens for strain analysis. The digital moiré interferometry experiments showed a distinct deformation pattern in dentin in the direction perpendicular to the dentinal tubules, which increased with increase in dentin loss. The dentin conditioned with nanoparticles did not display marked increase in strain gradients with loads. The current photomechanical experiment highlighted the impact of nanoparticle treatment to improve the mechanical integrity of dentin.

  5. Characterization of film surface treated with ECR plasma by Doppler broadening

    CERN Document Server

    Nishijima, S; Hirata, K; Kobayashi, Y; Honda, Y; Tagawa, S

    2000-01-01

    Doppler broadened positron annihilation measurements were carried out using the positron beam technique on plasma treated polyethylene films as a function of incident positron energy. In addition, surface properties of the treated films also have been measured using other conventional techniques such as FT-IR, SEM and AFM. The surface tension of the films was also determined using sessile drop method. The S-parameter is seen to decrease on the surface upon plasma treatment that introduces polar groups such as hydroxyl and carbonyl on the surface. The results are discussed.

  6. Dentine sealing provided by smear layer/smear plugs vs. adhesive resins/resin tags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrilho, Marcela R; Tay, Franklin R; Sword, Jeremy; Donnelly, Adam M; Agee, Kelli A; Nishitani, Yoshihiro; Sadek, Fernanda T; Carvalho, Ricardo M; Pashley, David H

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of five experimental resins, which ranged from hydrophobic to hydrophilic blends, to seal acid-etched dentine saturated with water or ethanol. The experimental resins (R1, R2, R3, R4, and R5) were evaluated as neat bonding agents (100% resin) or as solutions solvated with absolute ethanol (70% resin/30% ethanol). Fluid conductance was measured at 20 cm H(2)O hydrostatic pressure after sound dentine surfaces were: (i) covered with a smear layer; (ii) acid-etched; or (iii) bonded with neat or solvated resins, which were applied to acid-etched dentine saturated with water or ethanol. In general, the fluid conductance of resin-bonded dentine was significantly higher than that of smear layer-covered dentine. However, when the most hydrophobic neat resins (R1 and R2) were applied to acid-etched dentine saturated with ethanol, the fluid conductance was as low as that produced by smear layers. The fluid conductance of resin-bonded dentine saturated with ethanol was significantly lower than for resin bonded to water-saturated dentine, except for resin R4. Application of more hydrophobic resins may provide better sealing of acid-etched dentine if the substrate is saturated with ethanol instead of with water.

  7. Composite resin bond strength to caries-affected dentin contaminated with 3 different hemostatic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Hosseini-Shirazi, Moeen; Farahbod, Foroozan; Keshani, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Bonding of composite resins to sound and caries-affected dentin in cervical areas may necessitate the use of hemostatic agents to control sulcular fluid and hemorrhage. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the bond strengths of a self-etching adhesive system to sound and caries-affected dentin after the use of 3 different hemostatic agents. Composite resin cylinders were bonded to 48 caries-affected and 48 sound dentin surfaces in 8 groups. Groups 1-4 utilized caries-affected dentin: group 1, uncontaminated control; 2, ViscoStat; 3, ViscoStat Clear; and 4, trichloroacetic acid (TCA). Groups 5-8 utilized sound dentin: group 5, uncontaminated control; 6, ViscoStat; 7, ViscoStat Clear; and 8, TCA. The hemostatic agents were applied for 2 minutes and rinsed. After 500 rounds of thermocycling, shear bond strength tests were carried out. Data were analyzed with 1- and 2-way analyses of variance, t test, and post hoc Tukey tests at a significance level of P composite resin to caries-affected dentin was significantly reduced compared to that with sound dentin. Among the studied hemostatic agents, ViscoStat resulted in a greater decrease in dentin bond strength. Contamination of both sound and caries-affected dentin with hemostatic agents decreased composite resin bond strength. Of the 3 hemostatic agents used, ViscoStat Clear appeared to have the least detrimental effect on bond strength.

  8. Analysis of the dentin-resin interface by use of laser Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, M; Onose, H; Moore, B K

    2002-12-01

    Adhesion of resin-bonding agents to dentin is currently believed to result from impregnation of adhesive resin into superficially demineralized dentin. The purpose of this study was to investigate the chemical composition of the resin-impregnated dentin (hybrid) layer using a micro-Raman spectroscopy. Resin composites were bonded to bovine dentin with the two-step bonding systems, and specimens were sectioned parallel to dentinal tubules. These surfaces were then polished down to 1 microm diamond pastes. Raman spectra were successively recorded along a line perpendicular to the dentin-adhesive interface by steps of 0.2 microm on a computer controlled X-Y stage. The relative amounts of hydroxyapatite (960 cm(-1), P-O), adhesive resin (640 cm(-1), aromatic ring), and organic substrate (1450 cm(-1), C-H) in the dentin-adhesive bonding area were calculated. From the Raman spectroscopy results, the hybrid layer represents a gradual transition in the relative amount of adhesive from the resin side to dentin side. Evidence of poor saturation of the adhesive resin in the demineralized dentin with the one-bottle adhesive system was detected. From the results of this study, inhomogeneity of the hybrid layer composition was detected, and the degree of resin impregnation was found to be different between the bonding systems tested.

  9. Evaluation of the shear bond strength of nanocomposite on carious and sound deciduous dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Seema; Nandlal, B

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of conventional composites with nanocomposites in carious and sound deciduous dentin with the use of self-etching adhesive. Human primary molars were ground to obtain flat dentin surfaces and divided into two groups: Carious dentin and sound dentin group. The carious teeth specimens were prepared by removing infected dentin and area with affected dentin was used for bonding composite. Teeth with carious and sound dentin were subdivided in two groups (n = 15) based on the type of the composite into conventional composite group and nanocomposite group. The composite was bonded to the teeth with self-etching adhesive. All the bonded specimens were stored in distilled water for 24 hours at 37°C before shear bond testing. Independent t-test and analysis of variance were applied to the results. The results indicated that the nanocomposite offered significantly higher bond strength compared to conventional composite. In addition presence of affected dentin significantly reduced the bond strength of both the composite types. How to cite this article: Deshmukh S, Nandlal B. Evaluation of the Shear Bond Strength of Nanocomposite on Carious and Sound Deciduous Dentin. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012;5(1): 25-28.

  10. Atomic force microscopy of surface topography of nitrogen plasma treated steel

    CERN Document Server

    Mahboubi, F

    2002-01-01

    Nitriding of steels, using plasma environments has been practiced for many years. A lot of efforts have been put on developing new methods, such as plasma immersion ion implantation (Pl sup 3) and radio frequency (RF) plasma nitriding, for mass transfer of nitrogen into the surface of the work piece. This article presents the results obtained from an in depth investigation of the surface morphology of the treated samples, carried out using an atomic force microscope. Samples from a microalloyed steel, were treated by both methods for 5 hours at different temperatures ranging from 350 to 550 sup d eg sup C in 75% N sub 2 -25% H sub 2 atmosphere. It has been found that the surface of the samples treated by PI sup 3 technique, although having more favorable properties, were rougher than the surfaces treated by RF plasma nitriding.

  11. Caries-resistant bonding layer in dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Niu, Li-Na; Hu, Lin; Jiao, Kai; Chang, Gang; Shen, Li-Juan; Tay, Franklin R; Chen, Ji-Hua

    2016-09-07

    The present study examined the mechanism for caries resistance and the pulp responses in vital teeth following the use of the augmented-pressure adhesive displacement technique. Dentin adhesives were applied to the surface of sound dentin disks in 4 experimental groups: non-antibacterial adhesive and gentle adhesive displacement (N-G), non-antibacterial adhesive and augmented-pressure adhesive displacement (N-H), antibacterial adhesive and gentle adhesive displacement (A-G), antibacterial adhesive and augmented-pressure adhesive displacement (A-H). The depth of demineralization induced by biological or chemical demineralization models was measured using confocal laser scanning microscopy and analyzed with two-way ANOVA. Pulp responses of vital dog's teeth to the augmented-pressure adhesive displacement technique were evaluated using light microscopy. Depth of demineralization was significantly affected by "adhesive type" and "intensity of adhesive displacement" for biological demineralization. For chemical demineralization, only "intensity of adhesive displacement" showed significant influence on lesion depth. Pulp response of 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 MPa groups showed only moderate disorganization of the odontoblast layer at 24 hours that completely re-organized after 3 weeks. Augmented-pressure adhesive displacement improves the caries resistance property of bonded dentin and does not cause irreversible pulpal damage to vital teeth when the air pressure employed is equal or smaller than 0.3 MPa.

  12. Cigarette smoke affects bonding to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida e Silva, Junio S; de Araujo, Edson Medeiro; Araujo, Elito

    2010-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the microtensile bond strength (muTBS) of composite resin bonded to dentin that had been contaminated by cigarette smoke. Ten extracted unerupted human third molars were used: Six molars were prepared for muTBS testing, while the other four molars were assigned to pre- and post-etching scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) analysis. The 20 specimens obtained from the 10 coronal portions were distributed into two experimental groups so that each tooth served as its own control. Group 1 underwent a daily toothbrushing simulation and exposure to a smoking simulation chamber, while Group 2 received only a daily simulated toothbrushing. Student's t-test demonstrated that Group 1 samples demonstrated significantly lower bond strength (49.58 MPa) than Group 2 samples (58.48 MPa). Pre and postetching SEM analysis revealed the presence of contaminants on the dentinal surfaces of the Group 1 specimens. It was concluded that contamination by cigarette smoke decreases the bond strength between dentin and composite resin.

  13. Influence of handpiece maintenance sprays on resin bonding to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toyotarou Sugawara

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Toyotarou Sugawara1, Atsushi Kameyama2, Akiko Haruyama3, Takumi Oishi4, Nobuyuki Kukidome2, Yasuaki Takase2, Masatake Tsunoda21Undergraduate Student, Tokyo Dental College, Chiba, Japan; 2Division of General Dentistry, Tokyo Dental College Chiba Hospital, Chiba, Japan; 3Department of Dental Materials Science, Tokyo Dental College, Chiba, Japan; 4Department of Dentistry and Oral Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, JapanObjective: To investigate the influence of maintenance spray on resin bonding to dentin.Materials and methods: The crown of extracted, caries-free human molars was transversally sectioned with a model trimmer to prepare the dentin surfaces from mid-coronal sound dentin, and then uniformly abraded with #600 silicon carbide paper. The dentin surfaces were randomly divided into three groups: oil-free spray group where maintenance cleaner for air bearing handpieces was sprayed onto the dentin surface for 1 s and rinsed with water spray for 30 s; oil-containing spray group where maintenance cleaner for micro motor handpieces was sprayed onto the dentin surface for 1 s and rinsed with water spray for 30 s; and control group where the surface was rinsed with water spray for 30 s and then air-dried. These surfaces were then bonded with Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray Medical, and resin composite (Clearfil AP-X, Kuraray Medical build-up crowns were incrementally constructed on the bonded surfaces. After storage for 24 h in 37°C water, the bonded teeth were sectioned into hour-glass shaped slices (0.7-mm thick perpendicular to the bonded surfaces. The specimens were then subjected to microtensile bond strength (μTBS testing at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and the Tukey-Kramer test.Results: Maintenance spray-contaminated specimens (oil-free and oil-containing spray groups showed significantly lower μTBS than control specimens (P < 0.05. However, there was no significant difference between

  14. Effect of dentin biomodifiers on the immediate and long-term bond strengths of a simplified etch and rinse adhesive to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payal Singh

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This in vitro study evaluated the effect of dentin biomodifiers on the immediate and long-term bond strengths of a simplified etch and rinse adhesive to dentin. Materials and Methods Flat coronal dentin surfaces were prepared in 120 extracted human molars. Teeth were randomly divided into 5 groups (n = 24 according to 5 different surface pre-treatments: No pre-treatment (control; 1M carbodiimide (EDC; 0.1% epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG; 2% minocycline (MI; 10% sodium ascorbate (SA. After surface pre-treatment, adhesive (Adper Single Bond 2 [SB], 3M ESPE was applied. Composite was applied into transparent plastic tubes (2.5 mm in diameter, which was placed over the bonded dentin surface. From each group, 10 samples were subjected to shear bond strength (SBS evaluation at 24 hours (immediate and remaining 10 samples were tested after 6 months (delayed. Additionally, 4 samples per group were subjected to scanning electron microscopic analysis for observation of resin-dentin interface. The data were statistically analysed with Shaperio‑Wilk W test, 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, and post hoc Tukey's test. Results At 24 hours, SBS of all surface pre-treatment groups were comparable with the control group, with significant differences found between EDC and SA groups only (p = 0.009. After 6 months storage, EDC, EGCG, and MI pre-treatments preserved the resin-dentin bond strength with no significant fall. Conclusions Dentin pre-treatment with all the dentin biomodifiers except SA resulted in significant preservation of resin-dentin bond over 6 months storage period, without negatively affecting the immediate bond strength of the etch and rinse adhesive tested.

  15. Surface characteristics, corrosion and bioactivity of chemically treated biomedical grade NiTi alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chembath, Manju; Balaraju, J N; Sujata, M

    2015-11-01

    The surface of NiTi alloy was chemically modified using acidified ferric chloride solution and the characteristics of the alloy surface were studied from the view point of application as a bioimplant. Chemically treated NiTi was also subjected to post treatments by annealing at 400°C and passivation in nitric acid. The surface of NiTi alloy after chemical treatment developed a nanogrid structure with a combination of one dimensional channel and two dimensional network-like patterns. From SEM studies, it was found that the undulations formed after chemical treatment remained unaffected after annealing, while after passivation process the undulated surface was filled with oxides of titanium. XPS analysis revealed that the surface of passivated sample was enriched with oxides of titanium, predominantly TiO2. The influence of post treatment on the corrosion resistance of chemically treated NiTi alloy was monitored using Potentiodynamic Polarization and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) in Phosphate Buffered Saline (PBS) solution. In the chemically treated condition, NiTi alloy exhibited poor corrosion resistance due to the instability of the surface. On the other hand, the breakdown potential (0.8V) obtained was highest for the passivated samples compared to other surface treated samples. During anodic polarization, chemically treated samples displayed dissolution phenomenon which was predominantly activation controlled. But after annealing and passivation processes, the behavior of anodic polarization was typical of a diffusion controlled process which confirmed the enhanced passivity of the post treated surfaces. The total resistance, including the porous and barrier layer, was in the range of mega ohms for passivated surfaces, which could be attributed to the decrease in surface nickel content and formation of compact titanium oxide. The passivated sample displayed good bioactivity in terms of hydroxyapatite growth, noticed after 14days immersion in

  16. Temperature changes across CO2-lased dentin during multiple exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakariasen, Kenneth L.; Barron, Joseph R.; Boran, Thomas L.

    1990-06-01

    The literature increasingly indicates that lasers will have a multitude of applications for dental hard tissue procedures, e.g. preventive therapy, caries removal, laser etching and endodontic therapy. However, it is critical that such laser therapies avoid the production of heat levels which will be damaging to the surrounding vital tissues, such as the dental pulp and periodontal tissues. Our preliminary research on temperature changes across C02 lased dentin indicated that for single preventive therapeutic exposures (1.2 W., 0. 1 sec., 1.0 mm focal spot) the mean temperature rise across 350 j.tm of dentin was 0.57 0C while across 1000 .tm of dentin the mean rise was only 0.18 °C. Further research utilizing multiple preventive therapeutic exposures (1.2 W., 0. 1 sec., 1.0 mm focal spot, 3 x 1.0 sec. intervals) showed mean temperature elevations of 1.56 0C across 350 m of dentin and 0.66 O across 1000 xm of dentin. While these temperature elevations, which would be associated with preventive therapy, are very low and would be biologically acceptable, it must be noted that exposures of higher intensities are required to fuse enamel and porcelain, or remove decay. This current research investigates temperature elevations which occuT during C02 lasing utilizing the following exposure parameters: 8.0 W., 1.0 mm focal spot, 0.1 sec. exposures, 2 or 4 exposures per site pulsed 1.0 sec. apart. Three dentin thicknesses were utilized, i.e. 1000 jim, 1500 p.tm and 2000 .tm. Four sections of each thickness were utilized with four exposure sites per specimen (2 with 2 exposures, 2 with 4 exposures). All dentin sections were prepared from non-carious third molars using a hard tissue microtome. A thermistor was placed on the dentin surface opposite each lased site and temperature changes were recorded for approximately 50 sec. following lasing. Mean temperature elevations ranged from a high of 3.07 C for the 1000 xm section utilizing four exposures to a low of 0.37 0C for the

  17. Effect of dentine conditioning on adhesion of resin-modified glass ionomer adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamama, H H; Burrow, M F; Yiu, C

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the use of phosphoric acid as a surface treatment compared to traditional conditioning agents to dentine bonded with resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGIC) adhesives. Forty human molars were utilized in microtensile bond strength testing, while another 16 were used for evaluation of the bonded interface with scanning electron microscopy. Three RMGIC adhesives were evaluated: Fuji Bond LC (GC Corp); Riva Bond LC (SDI Ltd); and Ketac N100 (3M-ESPE). Surface treatments were 37% phosphoric acid (5 s) or 25-30% polyacrylic acid (PAA) (10 s), or the manufacturer's method - Fuji Bond LC: Cavity Conditioner (20% PAA + 3% AlCl3 10 s) or Ketac N100 primer: Ketac Nano priming agent (15 s). Teeth were finished with 600-grit SiC paper, surfaces treated and bonded with RMGIC adhesive and stored in distilled water for 24 h then subjected to microtensile bond strength testing. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed adhesion was affected by the 'type of RMGIC adhesive' and 'method of dentine surface treatment' (p adhesives a brief etch with phosphoric acid does not adversely effect short-term bond strengths, but is no better than traditional conditioning with PAA. © 2014 Australian Dental Association.

  18. Effect of self-etching adhesives on dentin permeability in a fluid flow model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grégoire, Geneviève; Guignes, Philippe; Millas, Arlette

    2005-01-01

    Numerous self-etching bonding systems exist, with composition differing from one product to another. It is important for the clinician to know if they are all equally effective, and whether they provide an effective seal between dentin and restorative materials. This study was designed to measure the hydraulic conductance of physiologic saline across dentin after application of various self-etching bonding systems or of a 1-bottle adhesive system preceded by a phosphoric acid etch. One hundred extracted noncarious human third molars from patients 18-25 years old were used for this study. Dentin disks were cut from crown segments parallel to the occlusal surface at the top of the pulp cavity. The 100 disks, each 1 mm thick, were divided into 10 groups (n=10 per group), each of which was treated with 1 of 9 self-etching systems-AdheSE, Adper Prompt L-Pop, Clearfil SE Bond, Etch & Prime 3.0, Prime & Bond NRC Nt, One-Up Bond F, optiBond solo Plus Self Etch, Prompt L-Pop, or Xeno III-or a control bonding system (Prime & Bond NT) preceded by a phosphoric acid etch. Hydraulic conductance, the volume of fluid transported across a known area of surface (0.28 cm2) per unit time under a unit pressure gradient (200 cm H2O), was analyzed for the adhesive systems using a fluid flow apparatus (Flodec). First, both sides of each specimen were etched with 36% phosphoric acid for 30 seconds, and the hydraulic conductance was measured every 30 seconds for 15 minutes. The initial set of measurements served as the reference value for each specimen. The measurements were repeated when a smear layer had been formed and, finally, after 1 of the 10 bonding systems had been applied. The data were analyzed using a 1-way ANOVA and Duncan's multiple range test (alpha=.05). The control 1-bottle adhesive used with a phosphoric acid pre-etch did not provide the largest reduction in penetration (42.3%). The greatest mean reduction (68.9%, PAdheSE, 58.2%; Etch & Prime 3.0, 56.8%; Adper Prompt L

  19. Shear bond strengths and microleakage of four types of dentin adhesive materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateyah, Nasrien Z; Elhejazi, Ahmed A

    2004-02-15

    The aim of this investigation was to compare the microleakage of composite resin (Z-100) and shear bond strength to bovine dentin using different types of adhesive systems (Scotch Bond Multi-Purpose, All-Bond 2, One-Step, and Perma Quick) to compare and correlate microleakage to shear bond strength. For the microleakage aspect of the study, 20 class V were prepared (bovine incisors) with 90-degree cavosurface margins and were located at the cemento-enamel junction using a template. Each dentin bonding system was applied to five cavities following the manufacturer's instructions and restored with Z-100 composite resin. After 24 hours of storage in distilled water at 37 degrees C, the teeth were immersed in 2% basic fuchsin dye. All teeth were sectioned in a mesiodistal direction using a diamond saw, and each section was then inspected under a stereomacroscope. For the shear bond strength aspect of the study, 20 bovine incisors were centrally horizontally mounted in Teflon mold with cold cure acrylic resin. Flat labial dentin surfaces were prepared using different grit silicon carbide abrasive wheels. Five specimens were used for each of the bonding agent systems. Each specimen was bonded with restorative composite resin (Z-100) and applied to the treated dentinal surface through a split Teflon mold. All specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. The bonds were stressed using shear forces at a crosshead speed of 0.5mm/min using an Instron Universal testing machine. Findings indicate none of the systems tested in this study were free from microleakage. Scotch bond multi-purpose achieved the best seal, with One-Step being second best, while All-Bond 2 and Perma Quick had the poorest seal. However, there were significant differences among the shear bond strengths of the four bonding systems tested. Scotch Bond Multi-Purpose has a higher bond strength to composite resin when compared to the other dentin adhesives. The study also concluded

  20. Effect of chlorhexidine application on the bond strength of resin core to axial dentin in endodontic cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yun-Hee; Shin, Dong-Hoon

    2012-11-01

    This study evaluated the influence of chlorhexidine (CHX) on the microtensile bonds strength (µTBS) of resin core with two adhesive systems to dentin in endodontic cavities. Flat dentinal surfaces in 40 molar endodontic cavities were treated with self-etch adhesive system, Contax (DMG) and total-etch adhesive system, Adper Single Bond 2 (3M ESPE) after the following surface treatments: (1) Priming only (Contax), (2) CHX for 15 sec + rinsing + priming (Contax), (3) Etching with priming (Adper Single Bond 2), (4) Etching + CHX for 15 sec + rinsing + priming (Adper Single Bond 2). Resin composite build-ups were made with LuxaCore (DMG) using a bulk method and polymerized for 40 sec. For each condition, half of specimens were submitted to µTBS after 24 hr storage and half of them were submitted to thermocycling of 10,000 cycles between 5℃ and 55℃ before testing. The data were analyzed using ANOVA and independent t-test at a significance level of 95%. CHX pre-treatment did not affect the bond strength of specimens tested at the immediate testing period, regardless of dentin surface treatments. However, after 10,000 thermocycling, all groups showed reduced bond strength. The amount of reduction was greater in groups without CHX treatments than groups with CHX treatment. These characteristics were the same in both self-etch adhesive system and total-etch adhesive system. 2% CHX application for 15 sec proved to alleviate the decrease of bond strength of dentin bonding systems. No significant difference was shown in µTBS between total-etching system and self-etching system.

  1. Removal effects of the Nd:YAG laser and Carisolv on carious dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Y; Hossain, M; Kawanaka, T; Kinoshita, J; Matsumoto, K

    2000-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the removal effect of the Nd:YAG laser irradiation and Carisolv on carious dentin. Many previous studies have reported several simple and alternative techniques, such as lasers and chemicals, for caries removal. Carisolv was applied on the surface of 20 extracted human anterior and molar teeth for 1 min and then the Nd:YAG laser was irradiated with a continuous water spray for another 1 min. The energy densities were varied from 2 to 6W with a repetition rate of 20 pps. As caries removal progressed, the cavity was carefully assessed by DIAGNOdent. Each lesion was photographed before and after treatment, and the treated cavity was observed microscopically using a stereoscope and with scanning electron microscope (SEM). Thermal change at the time of laser irradiation was measured by thermovision. Our results revealed that application of Carisolv followed by Nd:YAG laser irradiation at 4-6W pulse energy effectively removed dentin caries. The total procedure was usually repeated once or twice for complete caries removal. From the SEM study, it was found that the cavity surface treated with the laser revealed various patterns of microirregularity, often accompanied by microfissure propagation. There was also no smear layer. It was revealed that Nd:YAG laser and Carisolv could provide an alternative technique for caries removal instead of the conventional mechanical drilling and cutting.

  2. Investigation of Biodentine as dentine replacement material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, Josette

    2013-07-01

    Biodentine was compared to glass ionomer and resin modified cements in an "open sandwich" restoration. Fuji IX, Vitrebond and Biodentine were characterised using various techniques. The effect of etching with 35% phosphoric acid was investigated by assessment of surface topography, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, surface micro-hardness and micro-leakage using tagged carboxylated-modified fluorescent microspheres and tracing the presence of these particles with a confocal microscope. Acid etching resulted in erosion of the material surface with exposure of the glass particles in the glass ionomer-based materials. Biodentine exhibited a reduction in the chlorine peak and the calcium-silicon ratio. There was no difference in the micro-hardness in etched and un-etched materials. The FT-IR plots did not show any chemical changes caused by etching for all the materials investigated. Both Vitrebond and Fuji IX exhibited no leakage at the dentine to material interface while Biodentine exhibited leakage both when it was etched and also when the surface was left unprepared. The sandwich technique was effective and prevented micro-leakage with glass ionomer-based materials but micro-leakage occurred with Biodentine. Biodentine demonstrated both structural and chemical changes when etched with 37% phosphoric acid. Biodentine exhibited a lower calcium to silicon ratio and a reduction in the chloride peak height when etched. When used as a dentine replacement material in the sandwich technique overlayed with composite, significant leakage occurred at the dentine to material interface. On the other hand materials based on glass ionomer cement were etched successfully and no chemical and physical changes or micro-leakage were detected when the materials were used as bases under composite restorations. The micro-hardness of all the materials was unaffected by etching. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Experimental Investigation and Analysis of Mercerized and Citric Acid Surface Treated Bamboo Fiber Reinforced Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Jyotiraman; Baxi, R. N., Dr.

    2017-08-01

    Mercerization or NaOH fiber surface treatment is one of the most popular surface treatment processes to make the natural fibers such as bamboo fibers compatible for use as reinforcing material in composites. But NaOH being a chemical is hazardous and polluting to the nature. This paper explores the possibility of use of naturally derived citric acid for bamboo fiber surface treatment and its comparison with NaOH treated Bamboo Fiber Composites. Untreated, 2.5 wt% NaOH treated and 5 wt% citric acid treated Bamboo Fiber Composites with 5 wt% fiber content were developed by Hand Lay process. Bamboo mats made of bamboo slivers were used as reinforcing material. Mechanical and physical characterization was done to compare the effects of NaOH and citric acid bamboo fiber surface treatment on mechanical and physical properties of Bamboo Fiber Composite. The experiment data reveals that the tensile and flexural strength was found to be highest for citric acid and NaOH treated Bamboo Fiber Composite respectively. Water absorption tendency was found more than the NaOH treated Bamboo Fiber Composites. SEM micrographs used to analyze the morphology of fracture surface of tensile test specimens confirm improvement in fiber-matrix interface bonding due to surface treatment of bamboo fibers.

  4. Effect of chitosan/riboflavin modification on resin/dentin interface: spectroscopic and microscopic investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daood, Umer; Iqbal, Kulsum; Nitisusanta, Lorraine I; Fawzy, Amr S

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the morphological and chemical changes of demineralized dentin collagen-matrix and resin/dentin interface associated with chitosan/riboflavin modification. Dentin disc specimens were prepared from sound molars, acid-etched with 35% phosphoric acid and modified with either 0.1% riboflavin or chitosan/riboflavin (Ch/RF ratios 1:4 or 1:1) and photo-activated by UVA. Morphological and chemical changes associated with surface modification were characterized by SEM and micro-Raman spectroscopy. Dentin surfaces of sound molars were exposed, acid-etched, and modified as described before. Etch-and-rinse dentin adhesive was applied, light-cured, and layered with resin-restorative composite. The resin infiltration and resin/dentin interface were characterized by micro-Raman spectroscopy and SEM. An open-intact collagen network-structure, formation of uniform hybrid-layer and higher resin infiltration were found with 0.1%RF and Ch/RF 1:4 modifications. Raman analysis revealed chemical changes and shifts in Amide bands with the modification of dentin collagen-matrix. The use of riboflavin and chitosan/riboflavin formulations to modify dentin-collagen matrix, with the defined ratios, stabilizes the collagen fibrillar network and enhances resin infiltration and hybrid layer formation. These preliminary results are encouraging for subsequent consideration of chitosan/riboflavin modification in adhesive dentistry.

  5. Experiment and simulation of resistance of nanoporous dentin biomaterial to CO₂ laser irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H Y; Lin, S L; Chung, C K; Chuang, S F

    2011-12-01

    The resistance of nanoporous dentin biomaterial to CO₂ laser irradiation was investigated by experiment and simulation for potential tooth hypersensitivity treatment. The controlled parameters including laser power of 0.03-0.150 W, scanning speeds of 11.4-34.2 mm/s and focus/defocus modes were used for studying interaction between laser energy and dentin of human tooth. Most of the dentin specimens were etched after CO₂ laser irradiation with the power larger than 0.12 W at a scanning speed of 11.4 mm/s. Compared with the simulation results of temperature distribution, the maximum temperature at laser powers from 0.12 to 0.15 W is increased from 1961 to 2245°C, which exceeded the melting point (1570°C) of dentin's main content hydroxyapatite (HA). Increasing scanning speed can reduce the linear density of laser output energy for just locally melting porous microstructure of dentin surface without etching. Varying focus mode can also improve the damage of nanoporous dentin microstructure. At parameters of 0.150 W power and 34.2 mm/s scanning speed under defocus operation, laser treatment was successfully performed on the nano-HA coated dentin with well-molten sealing on tubules of porous microstructure at a simulate surface temperature of about 574°C, which was the potential for dentin hypersensitivity cure application.

  6. Effect of Er:YAG laser on dentin bonding durability under simulated pulpal pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakry, Ahmed Samir; Nakajima, Masatoshi; Otsuki, Masayuki; Tagami, Junji

    2009-10-01

    To evaluate the effects of Er:YAG laser ablation on the microtensile bond strength and the nanoleakage of Er:YAG-lased dentin bonded to a self-etching adhesive system with and without pulpal pressure. Twenty flat dentin surfaces were obtained from extracted molars. Ten specimens were irradiated by Er:YAG laser, other specimens (control group) were ground using #600 SiC paper. Direct communication to the pulp chamber was created by cutting at a level approximately 1 mm below the cementoenamel junction and parallel to the occlusal surface. The experimental groups were exposed to a simulated pulpal pressure of 15 cm H2O. Each specimen was restored using an adhesive and a photocured composite. The specimens were then sectioned vertically to obtain dentin/adhesive slabs. Ninety-six slabs were prepared for microtensile bond testing. Sixty-four slabs were immersed in ammoniacal silver nitrate tracer solution for 18 h, then rinsed thoroughly, and immersed in photodeveloping solution for 6 h prior to their examination by FE-SEM. The method of dentin preparation and the pulpal pressure storage condition significantly affected the microTBS, while the storage duration did not (p < 0.05). The nanoleakage patterns observed in the dentin/bond interface differed depending on whether the dentin was conventionally prepared or ablated by Er:YAG laser. Er:YAG laser ablation to dentin adversely affected the microTBS and the sealing ability of SE Bond bonded to dentin under simulated pulpal condition.

  7. Carious dentine removal: current approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germana Coeli de Farias Sales

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Dentistry is renewed day after day through the results of qualified researches. The approach as regards carious dentin removal is goingthrough questioning and innovation. The scope of this study was to perform a literature review in the sense of elucidating questions pertaining to the problem of whether or not it is necessary to completely remove carious dentin, and the possibility of performing restoration in a single session, in addition to a discussion about which type of material should be applied in this type of substrate. After analyzing the referenced articles, it was concluded that the stepwise treatment controls caries progression; there is a trend in the literature to partially remove the carious dentin in deep lesions and perform definitive restoration; Calcium hydroxide cement is a classical liner in these situations, while glass ionomer cement and resinous materials are other possibilities of materials that can be in close contact with the remaining dentin.

  8. Surface analysis, hydrogen adsorption and electrochemical performance of alkali-reduce treated hydrogen storage alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈卫祥; 徐铸德; 涂江平; 李海洋; 陈石; 袁俊; 鲍世宁

    2002-01-01

    The hydrogen storage alloy powders (MlNi4.0Co0.6Al0.4, Ml=rich-La mischmetal) were treated in a hot 6mol/L KOH+0.02mol/L KBH4 solution, the surface compositions and chemical states of the treated and untreated alloys were analyzed by XPS and EDX, the hydrogen adsorption on the surface of these alloys was evaluated by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS), the effects of the surface treatment on the electrochemical performances of the alloy electrodes were investigated. The results show that the hydrogen adsorption is greatly strengthened by the surface modification, and hence leads to marked improvement in the electrocatalytic activity, the treated alloy exhibits higher exchange current density and lower apparent activation energy for the hydrogen electrode reaction than the untreated alloy.

  9. [Effect of a nano hydroxyapatite desensitizing paste application on dentin bond strength of three self-etch adhesive systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, D D; Liu, S Y; Yang, H Y; Gan, J; Huang, C

    2017-05-09

    Objective: To evaluate a nano-hydroxyapatite (nano-HA) desensitizing paste application on the bond strength of three self-etch adhesives. Methods: Three dentin specimens of about 1 mm thick were cut from two teeth. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to evaluate the dentin surfaces without treatment, after citric acid treatment and after nano-HA treatment. Thirty-six intact third molars extracted for surgical reasons were cut to remove the occlusal enamel with isomet, and then were etched with 1% citric acid for 20 s to simulate the sensitive dentin and divided into two groups randomly using a table of random numbers (n=18): the control group (no treatment) and the HA treated group (with nano-HA paste treatment). Each group was divided into three subgroups randomly using a table of random numbers (n=6). Subgroup A, B and C was bonded with G-Bond, Clearfil S(3) Bond and FL-Bond Ⅱ according to the manufacture's instruction separately. At 24 h after bonding procedure, and after water storage for 6 months, microtensile bond strength of the specimens was tested and the failure mode was analyzed. Results: SEM obeservation showed that citric acid could open the dentin tubules to set up the sensitive dentin model, and the nano-HA could occlude the dentin tubules effectively. For subgroup A, bonding strength of specimens treated with nano-HA ([41.14±8.91] MPa) was significantly high than that of the control group ([34.27±6.16] MPa) at 24 h after bonding procedure (P0.05). For subgroup B, specimens with nano-HA application showed lower bonding strength ([30.87±6.41] MPa) than that of the control group ([36.73±5.82] MPa) at 24 h after bonding procedure (P0.05). Failure mode analysis showed that more than half of the samples in all groups were adhesive failure. Conclusions: Nano-HA treatment decreased the bond strength of subgroup B, while had no adverse effect on subgroup A and subgroup C.

  10. Clinical, mineral and ultrastructural changes in carious dentin of primary molars after restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibinski, Ana Claudia Rodrigues; Wambier, Letícia; Reis, Alessandra; Wambier, Denise Stadler

    2016-06-01

    Partial caries removal has been shown to be an effective method to treat deep carious lesions in deciduous teeth. Nevertheless, the possibility of keeping infected dentin in the cavity still requires additional investigation. The objective of this research was to describe changes in primary infected dentin after restoration with glass ionomer cement. Dentin from 45 primary molars with deep and active carious lesions was evaluated using clinical and laboratory criteria, before and 60 days after restoration. The clinical analysis evaluated dentin colour (CO), dentin consistency (COS) and laser fluorescence (LF). The laboratory procedures assessed bacterial contamination and mineral content (MC), and evaluated the dentin ultrastructure and collagen content. Data on CO, COS, LF and colony forming units were analysed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test; MC, bacterial counts and collagen evaluations were evaluated using the Student's t-test. After 60 days, lower values of LF were observed, together with a lower bacterial count, and a higher COS was found, with an increase in calcium, phosphorus and collagen contents. Differences were not detected for CO or for fluorine content. Baseline samples showed enlarged tubules with bacterial invasion; 60-day samples showed better organised tissue, with a more compact intertubular dentin and narrower tubules. It is concluded that appropriate cavity sealing can promote beneficial changes in deep carious lesions of primary teeth, even in the presence of infected dentin. © 2016 FDI World Dental Federation.

  11. Degradation in the Fatigue Strength of Dentin by Cutting, Etching and Adhesive Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H.-H.; Majd, H.; Orrego, S.; Majd, B.; Romberg, E.; Mutluay, M.M.; Arola, D.

    2014-01-01

    The processes involved in placing resin composite restorations may degrade the fatigue strength of dentin and increase the likelihood of fractures in restored teeth. Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the relative changes in strength and fatigue behavior of dentin caused by bur preparation, etching and resin bonding procedures using a 3-step system. Methods Specimens of dentin were prepared from the crowns of unrestored 3rd molars and subjected to either quasi-static or cyclic flexural loading to failure. Four treated groups were prepared including dentin beams subjected to a burr treatment only with a conventional straight-sided bur, or etching treatment only. An additional treated group received both bur and etching treatments, and the last was treated by bur treatment and etching, followed by application of a commercial resin adhesive. The control group consisted of “as sectioned” dentin specimens. Results Under quasi-static loading to failure there was no significant difference between the strength of the control group and treated groups. Dentin beams receiving only etching or bur cutting treatments exhibited fatigue strengths that were significantly lower (p≤0.0001) than the control; there was no significant difference in the fatigue resistance of these two groups. Similarly, the dentin receiving bur and etching treatments exhibited significantly lower (p≤0.0001) fatigue strength than that of the control, regardless of whether an adhesive was applied. Significance The individual steps involved in the placement of bonded resin composite restorations significantly decrease the fatigue strength of dentin, and application of a bonding agent does not increase the fatigue strength of dentin. PMID:24985539

  12. Characterization and Streptococcus mutans adhesion on air polishing dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Kazuhiro; Oda, Hirotake; Inatomi, Michitomo; Sato, Soh

    2014-07-01

    Air polishing is known as an effective and time saving tooth cleaning method. However, this method increased surface roughness and bacterial adhesion on dentin surface. The aim of this study was to characterize and examine Streptococcus mutans adhesion on dentin surface after air polishing as compared to the conventional method. The dentin blocks (4 × 4 × 1 mm) were polished by a rubber cup with polishing material (Polishing) and air-polished by 25 μm glycine (G25), 65 μm glycine (G65), and 65 μm sodium bicarbonate (NHC65) microparticles. Surface roughness (Ra) was measured by a laser electron microscope. The amount of adhered S. mutans was quantified using a resazurin reduction assay (alamarBlue(®)). The Ra of G25 and G65 was significantly (p Polishing. However, there was no significant difference in S. mutans adhesion among Polishing, G25, and G65, while NHC65 showed significantly (p polishing using glycine microparticles conditioned S. mutans adhesion on dentin surface in a similar fashion than the conventional method, and less than air polishing using sodium bicarbonate microparticles.

  13. Effect of propolis gel on the in vitro reduction of dentin permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Helena de Carvalho Sales-Peres

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the capacity of potassium oxalate, fluoride gel and two kinds of propolis gel to reduce the hydraulic conductance of dentin, in vitro. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The methodology used for the measurement of hydraulic conductance of dentin in the present study was based on a model proposed in literature. Thirty-six 1-mm-thick dentin discs, obtained from extracted human third molars were divided into 4 groups (n=9. The groups corresponded to the following experimental materials: GI-10% propolis gel, pH 4.1; GII-30% propolis gel; GIII-3% potassium oxalate gel, pH 4,1; and GIV-1.23% fluoride gel, pH 4.1, applied to the dentin under the following surface conditions: after 37% phosphoric acid and before 6% citric acid application. The occluding capacity of the dentin tubules was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM at ×500, ×1,000 and ×2,000 magnifications. Data were analyzed statistically by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test at 5% significance level. RESULTS: Groups I, II, III, IV did not differ significantly from the others in any conditions by reducing in hydraulic conductance. The active agents reduced dentin permeability; however they produced the smallest reduction in hydraulic conductance when compared to the presence of smear layer (P<0.05. The effectiveness in reducing dentin permeability did not differ significantly from 10% or 30% propolis gels. SEM micrographs revealed that dentin tubules were partially occluded after treatment with propolis. CONCLUSIONS: Under the conditions of this study, the application of 10% and 30% propolis gels did not seem to reduce the hydraulic conductance of dentin in vitro, but it showed capacity of partially obliterating the dentin tubules. Propolis is used in the treatment of different oral problems without causing significant great collateral effects, and can be a good option in the treatment of patients with dentin sensitivity.

  14. Machining human dentin by abrasive water jet drilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohorst, Philipp; Tegtmeyer, Sven; Biskup, Christian; Bach, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Stiesch, Meike

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this experimental in-vitro study was to investigate the machining of human dentin using an abrasive water jet and to evaluate the influence of different abrasives and water pressures on the removal rate. Seventy-two human teeth had been collected after extraction and randomly divided into six homogeneous groups (n=12). The teeth were processed in the area of root dentin with an industrial water jet device. Different abrasives (saccharose, sorbitol, xylitol) and water pressures (15 or 25 MPa) were used in each group. Dimensions of dentin removal were analysed using a stripe projection microscope and both drilling depth as well as volume of abrasion were recorded. Morphological analyses of the dentin cavities were performed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Both drilling depth and volume of abrasion were significantly influenced by the abrasive and the water pressure. Depending on these parameters, the drilling depth averaged between 142 and 378 μm; the volume of abrasion averaged between 0.07 and 0.15 mm3. Microscopic images revealed that all cavities are spherical and with clearly defined margins. Slight differences between the abrasives were found with respect to the microroughness of the surface of the cavities. The results indicate that abrasive water jet machining is a promising technique for processing human dentin.

  15. Nanostructure evaluation of healthy and fluorotic dentin by atomic force microscopy before and after phosphoric acid etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala-Alonso, Veronica; Aguilera-Flores, Rafael; Patiño-Marin, Nuria; Martinez-Castañon, Gabriel A; Anusavice, Kenneth J; Loyola-Rodriguez, Juan Pablo

    2011-01-01

    The aim was to characterize by atomic force microscopy (AFM) the nanostructure of human dentin surfaces affected by dental fluorosis (DF) before and after phosphoric acid etching. This study included 240 human dentin samples classified according to the severity of DF, which were divided into four groups using the Thylstrup-Fejerskov Index (TFI). Samples were analyzed by AFM before and after acid etching for 15, 30, and 60 s. The roughness (R(a)) for healthy dentin, and dentin with mild, moderate, and severe fluorosis were 440 nm, 442 nm, 445 nm, and 449 nm, respectively. After 15, 30, and 60 s of acid etching, all healthy and fluorotic dentin samples increased in roughness (p<0.05). The diameter of dentinal tubule orifices (D(t)) in healthy human dentin increased after acid etching for 60 s. We conclude that effective etching times are 15 s for healthy and mild dentin fluorosis, 30-s for moderately fluorosed dentin, and 45-60 s for severe fluorotic dentin.

  16. The effects of restorative composite resins on the cytotoxicity of dentine bonding agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyunghwan; Son, Kyung Mi; Kwon, Ji Hyun; Lim, Bum-Soon; Yang, Hyeong-Cheol

    2013-01-01

    During restoration of damaged teeth in dental clinics, dentin bonding agents are usually overlaid with restorative resin composites. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of restorative resin composites on cytotoxicity of dentin bonding agents. Dentin bonding agents were placed on glass discs, pre-cured and uncured resin composite discs. Bonding agents on the glass discs and composite resins discs were light cured and used for agar overlay cytotoxicity testing. Dentin bonding agents on composite resin discs exhibited far less cytotoxicity than that on glass discs. The polymerization of resin composite increased the surface hardness and decreased the cytotoxicity of bonding agents. In conclusion, composite resins in dental restorations are expected to enhance the polymerization of dentin bonding agents and reduce the elution of resin monomers, resulting in the decrease of cytotoxicity.

  17. Apparent Surface Free Energy of Polymer/Paper Composite Material Treated by Air Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Terpiłowski

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface plasma treatment consists in changes of surface properties without changing internal properties. In this paper composite polymer/paper material is used for production of packaging in cosmetic industry. There are problems with bonding this material at the time of packaging production due to its properties. Composite surface was treated by air plasma for 1, 10, 20, and 30 s. The advancing and receding contact angles of water, formamide, and diiodomethane were measured using both treated and untreated samples. Apparent surface free energy was estimated using the hysteresis (CAH and Van Oss, Good, Chaudhury approaches (LWAB. Surface roughness was investigated using optical profilometry and identification of after plasma treatment emerging chemical groups was made by means of the XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy technique. After plasma treatment the values of contact angles decreased which is particularly evident for polar liquids. Apparent surface free energy increased compared to that of untreated samples. Changes of energy value are due to the electron-donor parameter of energy. This parameter increases as a result of adding polar groups at the time of surface plasma activation. Changes of surface properties are combination of increase of polar chemical functional groups, increase on the surface, and surface roughness increase.

  18. Effect of Smear Layers Created by Different Burs on Durability of Self-Etching Adhesive Bond to Dentin of Primary Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rirattanapong, P; Senawongse, P; Harnirattisal, C; Wunsiw, W

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a smear layer generated by a high-speed diamond or carbide bur on the durability of microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of a self-etching adhesive to primary dentin. Flat occlusal dentin surfaces of 105 human primary molars were exposed using 600 grit silicon carbide paper before being divided into 2 groups for further grinding with either a highspeed diamond or carbide bur. Ten prepared dentin surfaces treated by each bur were evaluated for the characteristics of the smear layer using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Seventy-five specimens from each bur-prepared group were applied with a 2-step self-etching adhesive (Clearfil SE Bond(®)) then built up with a resin composite. Each bonded specimen was sectioned into a 1-mm thick slab and trimmed to a dumbbell shape with a cross-sectional area of approximately 1 mm(2). All slabs were divided into 3 groups (n=25) according to 3 storage times of 24 hrs, 3 months, and 6 months, in distilled water at 37°C. After storage, the μTBS was determined using a universal testing machine. All fracture specimens were prepared for observation of failure modes. Ten bonded specimens of each bur group were prepared for observation of the resin-dentin interface using an SEM. Smear-layer thickness, μTBS, and failure mode distributions were statistically analyzed. The high speed carbide bur created a significantly thinner smear layer than the diamond bur (p composite to primary dentin.

  19. A technical report on repair of amalgam-dentin complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, M; Salihoğlu-Yener, E

    2011-01-01

    This clinical report describes a repair protocol for cusp fracture of a failed amalgam-dentin complex. A maxillary right first premolar with an amalgam restoration presented a buccal cusp fracture. Chairside repair has been undertaken by conditioning the existing amalgam restoration with silica coating (30 μm CoJet®-Sand), phosphoric acid etching the beveled enamel surface, priming dentin, and application of a bonding agent on both enamel and dentin. Thereafter, the amalgam was silanized (ESPE®-Sil), and opaque resin was applied and polymerized to mask the amalgam. The fractured buccal cusp was modeled using resin composite (Clearfil Photo Posterior) and photo-polymerized. Finally, the amalgam was refinished and refurbished and the composite was finished and polished.

  20. Amalgam buildups: shear strength and dentin sealing properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashley, E L; Comer, R W; Parry, E E; Pashley, D H

    1991-01-01

    The retentive strength and sealing properties of amalgam buildups were compared in vitro in three groups of specimens. All teeth were prepared with flat, nonretentive surfaces. In the first group, the amalgam buildups were retained by four self-threading Minim pins. In the second group, retention was provided by a circumferential slot prepared in the dentin just inside the DEJ. The third group utilized an adhesive resin for retention. Dentin permeability was measured as a hydraulic conductance before and after placement of the amalgam buildups and before and after thermocycling. All methods of retention sealed dentin very well even in the absence of cavity varnish. The 90 degree retentive strength was: pins, 10.3 +/- 0.9 MPa; slots, 4.1 +/- 0.5 MPa; resin, 3.1 +/- 0.8 MPa (mean +/- SEM).

  1. Interaction morphology and bond strength of nanofilled simplified-step adhesives to acid etched dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Hipólito, Vinicius; Reis, André Figueiredo; Mitra, Sumita B.; de Goes, Mario Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of nanofillers incorporated into adhesives on the microtensile bond strength (μ-TBS) and interfacial micromorphology to dentin. Methods: The occlusal enamel of 5 human molars was removed and each tooth sectioned into four quarters. The exposed dentin was treated with one of the following adhesives: Adper Single Bond (SB-unfilled), OptiBond Solo Plus (OS-barium aluminoborosilicate, 400nm Ø), Prime & Bond NT (NT-colloidal silica, 7–40 nm Ø) and Adper Single Bond 2 (SB2-colloidal silica, 5nm Ø). Cylinders of resin-based composite were constructed on the adhesive layers. After 24-hour storage, the restored tooth-quadrants were sectioned to obtain stick-shaped specimens (0.8 mm2, cross-sectional area) and submitted to μ-TBS at a cross-speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (alpha = .05). Twenty-eight additional teeth were used for interfacial micro-morphologic analysis by SEM (16-teeth) and TEM (12-teeth). The dentin surfaces of 32 discs were treated with the adhesives (8 discs for adhesive) and laminated to form disc-pairs using a flowable resin composite for SEM/EDS analysis. For TEM, 90nm-thick nondemineralized unstained sections were processed. Results: SB2 showed significant higher bond strength than SB, OS and NT. The SEM/EDS and TEM analysis revealed nanofillers infiltrated within the interfibrillar spaces of the SB2-hybrid layer. Fillers were concentrated around patent tubular orifices and in the adhesive layer for OS and NT. Conclusion: The presence of nanofillers within the interfibrillar spaces of the SB2-hybrid layer suggests its importance in the improvement of the μ-TBS. PMID:23077413

  2. Correlative transmission electron microscopy examination of nondemineralized and demineralized resin-dentin interfaces formed by two dentin adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Meerbeek, B; Conn, L J; Duke, E S; Eick, J D; Robinson, S J; Guerrero, D

    1996-03-01

    The resin-dentin interface formed by two dentin adhesives, Optibond (OPTI, Kerr) and Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SBMP, 3M), was ultramorphologically examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Ultrastructural information from nondemineralized and demineralized sections was correlated. It was hypothesized that the different chemical formulations of the two adhesives would result in a different morphological appearance of the hybrid layer. Ultrastructural TEM examination proved that each of the two dentin adhesive systems was able to establish a micromechanical bond between dentin and resin with the formation of a hybrid layer. However, the interfacial hybridization process that took place to produce this resin-dentin bond appeared to be specifically related to the chemical composition and application modes of both systems. OPTI consistently presented with a hybrid layer with a relatively uniform ultrastructure, electron density, and acid resistance. These three parameters were found to be more variable for the hybrid layer formed by SBMP. Characteristic of SBMP was the identification of an amorphous phase deposited at the outer surface of the hybrid layer. Although both adhesive systems investigated follow a total-etch concept, their specific chemical formulations result in different interfacial ultrastructures that are probably related to different underlying bonding mechanisms. The clinical significance of these morphological findings, however, is still unknown.

  3. Eroded dentin does not jeopardize the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina Barros Cruz

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This in vitro study evaluated the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials to sound and eroded dentin. Thirty-six bovine incisors were embedded in acrylic resin and ground to obtain flat buccal dentin surfaces. Specimens were randomly allocated in 2 groups: sound dentin (immersion in artificial saliva and eroded dentin (pH cycling model - 3× / cola drink for 7 days. Specimens were then reassigned according to restorative material: glass ionomer cement (KetacTM Molar Easy Mix, resin-modified glass ionomer cement (VitremerTM or adhesive system with resin composite (Adper Single Bond 2 + Filtek Z250. Polyethylene tubes with an internal diameter of 0.76 mm were placed over the dentin and filled with the material. The microshear bond test was performed after 24 h of water storage at 37ºC. The failure mode was evaluated using a stereomicroscope (400×. Bond strength data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests (α = 0.05. Eroded dentin showed bond strength values similar to those for sound dentin for all materials. The adhesive system showed the highest bond strength values, regardless of the substrate (p < 0.0001. For all groups, the adhesive/mixed failure prevailed. In conclusion, adhesive materials may be used in eroded dentin without jeopardizing the bonding quality. It is preferable to use an etch-and-rinse adhesive system because it shows the highest bond strength values compared with the glass ionomer cements tested.

  4. Eroded dentin does not jeopardize the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Janaina Barros; Lenzi, Tathiane Larissa; Tedesco, Tamara Kerber; Guglielmi, Camila de Almeida Brandão; Raggio, Daniela Prócida

    2012-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials to sound and eroded dentin. Thirty-six bovine incisors were embedded in acrylic resin and ground to obtain flat buccal dentin surfaces. Specimens were randomly allocated in 2 groups: sound dentin (immersion in artificial saliva) and eroded dentin (pH cycling model - 3× / cola drink for 7 days). Specimens were then reassigned according to restorative material: glass ionomer cement (KetacTM Molar Easy Mix), resin-modified glass ionomer cement (VitremerTM) or adhesive system with resin composite (Adper Single Bond 2 + Filtek Z250). Polyethylene tubes with an internal diameter of 0.76 mm were placed over the dentin and filled with the material. The microshear bond test was performed after 24 h of water storage at 37ºC. The failure mode was evaluated using a stereomicroscope (400×). Bond strength data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests (α = 0.05). Eroded dentin showed bond strength values similar to those for sound dentin for all materials. The adhesive system showed the highest bond strength values, regardless of the substrate (p < 0.0001). For all groups, the adhesive/mixed failure prevailed. In conclusion, adhesive materials may be used in eroded dentin without jeopardizing the bonding quality. It is preferable to use an etch-and-rinse adhesive system because it shows the highest bond strength values compared with the glass ionomer cements tested.

  5. Long-term nano-mechanical properties of biomodified dentin-resin interface components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Paulo Henrique; Karol, Sachin; Bedran-Russo, Ana Karina

    2011-06-03

    Failures of dental composite restorative procedures are largely attributed to the degradation of dentin-resin interface components. Biomodification of dentin using bioactive agents may improve the quality and durability of the dentin-resin bonds. The aim of this study was to nanomechanically assess the reduced modulus of elasticity (Er) and nano-hardness (H) of major components of the dentin-resin interface (hybrid layer, adhesive layer and underlying dentin) biomodified by collagen cross-linkers at 24h, 3 and 6 months following restorative procedure. Demineralized dentin surfaces were biomodified with 5% glutaraldehyde (GD) or 6.5% grape seed extract (GSE) prior to placement of adhesive systems and composite resin. Nano-measurements of the interface components in a fluid cell showed that both agents increased the Er and H of underlying dentin after 3 and 6 months when compared to a control. The mechanical properties of the adhesive and hybrid layers decreased over time. Biomodification of the dentin-resin interface structures using GD and GSE can increase the mechanical properties of the interface over time and may contribute to the long-term quality of adhesive restorations.

  6. Papain-based gel for biochemical caries removal: influence on microtensile bond strength to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Piva

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the influence of a papain-based gel (Papacárie for chemo-mechanical caries removal on bond strength to dentin. Human molars were assigned to the following groups: Group 1: sound teeth were flattened to expose dentin; Group 2: after flattening of surfaces, the papain-based gel was applied on the sound dentin; Group 3: overlying enamel from carious teeth was removed and mechanical excavation of dentin was conducted; Group 4: chemo-mechanical excavation of carious dentin was conducted using the papain-based gel. The Prime&Bond NT or Clearfil SE Bond adhesive systems were used for restorative procedures. A microtensile bond strength test was performed, and the modes of failure were determined under SEM. The data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p < 0.05. No significant differences were observed between the sound dentin groups. For both excavation methods, Clearfil presented a significantly higher bond strength than Prime&Bond NT. Also, for Clearfil, the mechanically excavated samples disclosed a significantly higher bond strength than the chemo-mechanically ones. For Prime&Bond NT, no significant differences were detected between the excavation methods. Predominance of mixed failures for the sound substrate and of adhesive failures for the carious dentin one was detected. The bond strength to carious dentin of the self-etching system was negatively affected by chemo-mechanical excavation using the papain-based gel.

  7. Evaluation of Stability of Surface-Treated Mini-Implants in Diabetic Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam-Hee Oh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of surface treatment of mini-implants in diabetes-induced rabbits by comparing osseointegration around mini-implants. Methods. Twelve New Zealand white rabbits were divided into two groups (alloxan-induced diabetic group and control group. A total of 48 mini-implants were placed after four weeks of diabetic induction. 24 mini-implants were surface-treated with SLA (sandblasted with large grit, and acid etched and the remaining 24 mini-implants had smooth surfaces. Four weeks after placement, 32 mini-implants were removed from 4 control and 4 diabetic rabbits. Insertion and removal torques were measured. The remaining 16 mini-implants from the two groups were histomorphometrically analyzed. Results. Maximum insertion torque showed no difference between diabetic and control groups, but total insertion energy was higher in control group. In surface-treated mini-implants, maximum removal torque was higher in both diabetic and control groups. Bone-implant contact (BIC was increased in the control group when compared to the diabetic group. Surface-treated group had higher BIC than smooth surface group in both control and diabetic groups. However, there was no significantly statistical difference. Conclusions. Type 1 diabetes mellitus and surface treatment method of mini-implant affected primary stability of mini-implants. In addition, the use of orthodontic mini-implants in a diabetic patient is likely to show results similar to the healthy patient.

  8. Effect of whitening and desensitizing dentifrices on composite surfaces treated with surface sealants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Paulo Henrique; Brogin, Fabiana Ferres; Catelan, Anderson; Suzuki, Thaís Yumi Umeda; Guedes, Ana Paula Albuquerque; Pavan, Sabrina; Assunção, Wirley Gonçalves; Briso, André Luiz Fraga

    2013-05-01

    This study evaluated the effect of different dentifrices on the microhardness and surface roughness of composite surfaces covered by surface sealants. Samples of Filtek P60 were made and divided into groups, in accordance with surface treatments: G1 - Fortify; G2 - Fortify Plus; G3 - control (none). For Knoop microhardness evaluation, the specimens were placed in a microdurometer, under a load of 50 g for 15 sec. The analyses of surface roughness were carried out individually in a profilometer. The specimens were submitted to toothbrushing using dentifrices: Colgate Maximum Protection Anti-caries, Colgate Whitening or Sensodyne, diluted in distilled water (1:3) for 30 000 cycles. The results showed that the control group (G3) presented the highest microhardness values. The control group presented, before toothbrushing, the lowest surface roughness values, and after toothbrushing there were no differences among the experimental groups. The maintenance of the lowest values of microhardness demonstrated the effectiveness of these sealant materials to support the abrasive wear. © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. The inhibition effect of non-protein thiols on dentinal matrix metalloproteinase activity and HEMA cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, Mohannad; Hiraishi, Noriko; Shimokawa, Hitoyata; Tamura, Yukihiko; Otsuki, Masayuki; Kasugai, Shohei; Ohya, Keiichi; Tagami, Junji

    2014-03-01

    Phosphoric acid (PA) etching used in etch-and-rinse adhesives is known to activate host-derived dentinal matrix-metalloproteinases (MMPs) and increase dentinal permeability. These two phenomena will result, respectively; in degradation of dentine-adhesive bond and leaching of some monomers especially 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) into the pulp that would negatively affect the viability of pulpal cells. This study is the first to investigate the inhibitory effect of non-protein thiols (NPSH); namely reduced glutathione (GSH) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on dentinal MMPs and compare their effects on HEMA cytotoxicity. Dentine powder was prepared from human teeth, demineralized with 1% PA and then treated with 2% GSH, 2% NAC or 2% chlorhexidine (CHX). Zymographic analysis of extracted proteins was performed. To evaluate the effect of GSH, NAC and CHX on HEMA cytotoxicity, solutions of these compounds were prepared with or without HEMA and rat pulpal cells were treated with the tested solutions for (6 and 24h). Cells viability was measured by means of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Cytotoxicity data were analysed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc tests (pcytotoxicity inhibition. NPSH were effective to inhibit dentinal MMPs and HEMA cytotoxicity. The tested properties of NPSH provide promising clinical use of these agents which would enhance dentine-bond durability and decrease post-operative sensitivity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Superficial roughness on composite surface, composite-enamel and composite-dentin junctions after different finishing and polishing procedures. Part II: roughness with diamond finishing and differences between enamel composite vs body composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Federico; Conti, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    The following study asks three principle questions relative to composite finishing and composite polishing: 1) Will the superficial roughness of different restoration surfaces have different values, utilizing the same polishing system (multistep), after finishing with the tungsten carbide or diamond bur? 2) Under the same conditions of finishing and polishing sequences, will the composite surfaces (C), the composite-enamel (CE) and composite-dentin (CD) interfaces show different roughness values? 3) Will the surface roughness of composites of different translucency in the various phases of finishing and polishing, and on different interfaces, have different results? The null hypothesis is represented by the fact that there are no significant differences on roughness of composite restorations when polishing, after finishing with tungsten carbide or diamond burs. Furthermore, the null hypothesis is that there are no significant differences on roughness between polishing on composite surface, composite-enamel and composite-dentin interfaces, and finally there are no differences on roughness after finishing and polishing of two composite with different translucency. For the study, 56 class V cavities were prepared on extracted teeth. Restorations were done in nanofilled composite Filtek XTE (3M Espe) in a standard fashion, and then finished and polished. The 28 buccal cavities were restored on the surface with composite enamel and the 28 palatals with composite body. Finishing was done with fine toothing burs in tungsten carbide (16 blades) or fine grit diamond burs (46 μm), and made by the same manufacturer (Komet). The second phase of finishing was done with burs (with the same form as already mentioned) ultrafine toothing tungsten carbide (30 blades) or with extra and ultrafine grit diamond (25 and 8 μm). The polishing phase for both of the earlier sequences was done with the application of three rubber tips with decreasing abrasiveness and an application with a

  11. Bond strength of adhesives to dentin contaminated with smoker's saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzon, Lilliam M; Oguri, Makoto; O'Keefe, Kathy; Dusevish, Vladimir; Spencer, Paulette; Powers, John M; Marshall, Grayson W

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of contamination with smoker's and non-smoker's saliva on the bond strength of resin composite to superficial dentin using different adhesive systems. The interfacial structure between the resin and dentin was evaluated for each treatment using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Freshly extracted human molars were ground with 600-grit SiC paper to expose the superficial dentin. Adhesives [One-Up-Bond-F-Plus (OUFP) and Adper-Prompt-L-Pop (APLP)] and resin composite (TPHSpectrum) were bonded to the dentin (n = 8/group, 180 total specimens) under five surface conditions: control (adhesive applied following manufacturers' instructions); saliva, then 5-s air dry, then adhesive; adhesive, saliva, 5-s air dry; adhesive, saliva, 5-s water rinse, 5-s air dry (ASW group); and adhesive, saliva, 5-s water rinse, 5-s air dry, reapply adhesive (ASWA group). After storage in water at 37 degrees C for 24 h, the specimens were debonded under tension at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. ESEM photomicrographs of the dentin/adhesive interfaces were taken. Mean bond strength ranged from 8.1 to 24.1 MPa. Fisher's protected least significant difference (P = 0.05) intervals for critical adhesive, saliva, and surface condition differences were 1.3, 1.3, and 2.1 MPa, respectively. There were no significant differences in bond strength to dentin between contamination by smoker's and nonsmoker's saliva, but bond strengths were significantly different between adhesive systems, with OUFP twice as strong as APLP under almost all conditions. After adhesive application and contamination with either smoker's or nonsmoker's saliva followed by washing and reapplication of the adhesive (ASWA group), the bond strength of both adhesive systems was the same as that of the control group.

  12. Oxygen plasma-treated thermoresponsive polymer surfaces for cell sheet engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Kazunori; Fujita, Hideaki; Nagamori, Eiji

    2010-06-01

    Although cell sheet tissue engineering is a potent and promising method for tissue engineering, an increase of mechanical strength of a cell sheet is needed for easy manipulation of it during transplantation or 3D tissue fabrication. Previously, we developed a cell sheet-polymer film complex that had enough mechanical strength that can be manipulated even by tweezers (Fujita et al., 2009. Biotechnol Bioeng 103(2): 370-377). We confirmed the polymer film involving a temperature sensitive polymer and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins could be removed by lowering temperature after transplantation, and its potential use in regenerative medicine was demonstrated. However, the use of ECM proteins conflicted with high stability in long-term storage and low cost. In the present study, to overcome these drawbacks, we employed the oxygen plasma treatment instead of using the ECM proteins. A cast and dried film of thermoresponsive poly-N-isopropylacrylamide (PNIPAAm) was fabricated and treated with high-intensity oxygen plasma. The cells became possible to adhere to the oxygen plasma-treated PNIPAAm surface, whereas could not to the inherent surface of bulk PNIPAAm without treatment. Characterizations of the treated surface revealed the surface had high stability. The surface roughness, wettability, and composition were changed, depending on the plasma intensity. Interestingly, although bulk PNIPAAm layer had thermoresponsiveness and dissolved below lower critical solution temperature (LCST), it was found that the oxygen plasma-treated PNIPAAm surface lost its thermoresponsiveness and remained insoluble in water below LCST as a thin layer. Skeletal muscle C2C12 cells could be cultured on the oxygen plasma-treated PNIPAAm surface, a skeletal muscle cell sheet with the insoluble thin layer could be released in the medium, and thus the possibility of use of the cell sheet for transplantation was demonstrated.

  13. Dentin wear after simulated toothbrushing with water, a liquid dentifrice or a standard toothpaste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Youngjune; Ihm, Jung-joon; Baik, Su-jin; Yoo, Kyung-jin; Jang, Da-hyun; Roh, Byoung-duck; Seo, Deog-gyu

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the influence of dentifrices with and without abrasives on the wear and surface topography of human dentin following simulated toothbrushing in vitro. 24 dentin specimens were prepared and randomly allocated to a liquid dentifrice (Garglin Gum-Guard), conventional dentifrice (333 Clinic Total Care), and control (distilled water) groups. Specimens were subjected to simulated toothbrushing of 50,000 repeated strokes under a 150 g-load. The dentin surface was profiled in each specimen using a profilometer before and after toothbrushing. The mean surface roughness (Ra) of the specimens was calculated and compared by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test (α = 0.05). The dentin surfaces were further examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The Ra values were similar between the liquid dentifrice and control groups (P > 0.05), and was significantly higher in the conventional dentifrice group (P dentifrice and liquid dentifrice groups, but were not observed in the control group.

  14. Surface analysis of 316 stainless steel treated with cold atmospheric plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David F.; Kellar, Ewen J. C.; Jesson, David A.; Watts, John F.

    2017-05-01

    The surface of 316 stainless steel has been modified using cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) to increase the surface free energy (by cleaning the and chemically activating the surface)IN preparation for subsequent processes such as painting, coating or adhesive bonding. The analyses carried out, on CAP treated 316 stainless steel surfaces, includes X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), imaging XPS (iXPS), and surface free energy (SFE) analysis using contact angle measurements. The CAP treatment is shown to increase the SFE of as-received 316 stainless steel from ∼39 mJ m-1 to >72 mJ m-1 after a short exposure to the plasma torch. This was found to correlate to a reduction in adventitious carbon, as determined by XPS analysis of the surface. The reduction from ∼90 at% to ∼30% and ∼39 at%, after being plasma treated for 5 min and 15 s respectively, shows that the process is relatively quick at changing the surface. It is suggested that the mechanism that causes the increase in surface free energy is chain scission of the hydrocarbon contamination triggered by free electrons in the plasma plume followed by chemical functionalisation of the metal oxide surface and some of the remaining carbon contamination layer.

  15. Can 1% chlorhexidine diacetate and ethanol stabilize resin-dentin bonds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manso, Adriana Pigozzo; Grande, Rosa Helena Miranda; Bedran-Russo, Ana Karina; Reis, Alessandra; Loguercio, Alessandro D.; Pashley, David Henry; Carvalho, Ricardo Marins

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine the effects of the combined use of chlorhexidine and ethanol on the durability of resin-dentin bonds. Methods Forty-eight flat dentin surfaces were etched (32% phosphoric acid), rinsed (15 s) and kept wet until bonding procedures. Dentin surfaces were blot-dried with absorbent paper and re-wetted with water (Water, control), 1% chlorhexidine diacetate in water (CHD/Water), 100% ethanol (Ethanol), or 1% chlorhexidine diacetate in ethanol (CHD/Ethanol) solutions for 30 s. They were then bonded with All Bond 3 (AB3, Bisco) or Excite (EX, Ivoclar-Vivadent) using a smooth, continuous rubbing application (10 s), followed by 15 s gentle air stream to evaporate solvents. The adhesives were light-cured (20 s) and resin composite build-ups constructed for the microtensile method. Bonded beams were obtained and tested after 24-hours, 6-months and 15-months of water storage at 37°C. Storage water was changed every month. Effects of treatment and testing periods were analyzed (ANOVA, Holm-Sidak, p<0.05) for each adhesive. Results There were no interactions between factors for both etch-and-rinse adhesives. AB3 was significantly affected only by storage (p = 0.003). Excite was significantly affected only by treatments (p = 0.048). AB3 treated either with ethanol or CHD/ethanol resulted in reduced bond strengths after 15 months. The use of CHD/ethanol resulted in higher bond strengths values for Excite. Conclusions Combined use of ethanol/1% chlorhexidine diacetate did not stabilize bond strengths after 15 months. PMID:24815823

  16. Grafting Silane onto Silicate Glass Surface Treated by DBD in Air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Chunsheng; WANG Dezhen; WANG Younian

    2008-01-01

    Dielectric barrier discharge plasma in air was used to modify glass surface to induce the graft of silane onto the treated surface to increase the possibility of biomolecule immobilization.The plasma treated glass had been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM),Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy,X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and surface water contact angle measurement.The validity of grafting silane onto glass surface was approved by the analysis of water contact angle measurement,SEM and XPS.The grafted silane content was measured by visible absorption spectroscopy using acid Orange-7.It is shown that the grafting density of silane for glass samples increases significantly after plasma treatment.

  17. Effects of different desensitizing treatments on root dentin permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raydsa Raíssa Moura ROSA

    Full Text Available Abstract The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of diode laser and a desensitizing dentifrice on dentin permeability. Fifty-two root dentin fragments were obtained (5 × 5mm and treated with 24% EDTA gel. The samples were divided into 4 groups (n = 13: G1, control (no treatment; G2, diode laser (λ = 908 nm, 1.5 W, continuous mode, 20s; G3, application of abrasive dentifrice for 1 minute (Elmex Sensitive Professional (International Gaba; and G4, application of abrasive dentifrice for 1 minute followed by irradiation with diode laser. Ten samples per group were immersed in 2% methylene blue solution for 4h. The specimens were washed, longitudinally sectioned, observed under optical microscopy, photographed and assessed based on the degree of dye leakage. The remaining samples were observed under scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The leakage data were subjected to ANOVA test, followed by Tukey’s t-test (α = 5%. Groups 2, 3 and 4 showed less dye penetration than the control group (p < 0.05, but were similar among each other. SEM images showed that dentinal tubules were open in G1, and fused and occluded in G2. Group 3 showed dentinal tubules that were occluded by the metal ions from the toothpaste. G4 presented similar characteristics to G3, and the presence of fused dentin. The diode laser and the dentifrice were effective in reducing dentinal permeability, and the combination of the two treatments did not show better results than either one used alone.

  18. Evaluation of the micro-shear bond strength of four adhesive systems to dentin with and without adhesive area limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Yuan; Lin, Hong; Zheng, Gang; Zhang, Xuehui; Niu, Guangliang; Du, Qiao

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bonding ability of four representative dentin-adhesive systems by applying the micro-shear bond strength (μ-SBS) test method and to evaluate the influence of adhesive area limitation on the bond strength. Two different adhesive application methods were used in the μ-SBS test (with and without adhesives area limitation), and four representative adhesive systems were used in this study. Each dentin surface was treated with one of the four representative adhesive systems, and with twenty samples per group (n=20), each of the four groups underwent a μ-SBS test. The results showed that the bond strength was significantly influenced by the adhesive application method (padhesive type (padhesive systems, 3-E&R has a much better bond quality compared to the other adhesive systems. Furthermore, the micro-shear bond strength test method of restricting the area of both the adhesive and the resin is more reliable for evaluating the bonding property of adhesives to dentin, and it is also adequate for comparing the different adhesives systems.

  19. Human and Bovine Dentin Composition and Its Hybridization Mechanism Assessed by FT-Raman Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    L. E. S. Soares; A. D. F. Campos; Martin, A. A.

    2013-01-01

    FT-Raman spectroscopy was used to study the human and bovine dentin and their interactions with adhesive systems. Ten human (H) molars and ten bovine (B) teeth were prepared exposing the dentin and then each specimen was divided into two parts. The resulted forty dentin segments were treated either with the total-etch one bottle adhesive (Prime & Bond 2.1, PB) or with the single-step self-etching adhesive (Xeno III, X) and divided into four groups: HPB (control), HX, BPB, and BX. Each group w...

  20. Effect of intracanal medicaments used in endodontic regeneration procedures on microhardness and chemical structure of dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghaeth Hamdon Yassen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This study was performed to investigate the effects of different intracanal medicaments on chemical structure and microhardness of dentin. Materials and Methods Fifty human dentin discs were obtained from intact third molars and randomly assigned into two control groups and three treatment groups. The first control group received no treatment. The second control group (no medicament group was irrigated with sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl, stored in humid environment for four weeks and then irrigated with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA. The three treatment groups were irrigated with NaOCl, treated for four weeks with either 1 g/mL triple antibiotic paste (TAP, 1 mg/mL methylcellulose-based triple antibiotic paste (DTAP, or calcium hydroxide [Ca(OH2] and finally irrigated with EDTA. After treatment, one half of each dentin disc was subjected to Vickers microhardness (n = 10 per group and the other half was used to evaluate the chemical structure (phosphate/amide I ratio of treated dentin utilizing attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (n = 5 per group. One-way ANOVA followed by Fisher's least significant difference were used for statistical analyses. Results Dentin discs treated with different intracanal medicaments and those treated with NaOCl + EDTA showed significant reduction in microhardness (p < 0.0001 and phosphate/amide I ratio (p < 0.05 compared to no treatment control dentin. Furthermore, dentin discs treated with TAP had significantly lower microhardness (p < 0.0001 and phosphate/amide I ratio (p < 0.0001 compared to all other groups. Conclusions The use of DTAP or Ca(OH2 medicaments during endodontic regeneration may cause significantly less microhardness reduction and superficial demineralization of dentin compared to the use of TAP.

  1. Investigation on surface structure of potassium permanganate/nitric acid treated poly(tetrafluoroethylene)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Congli; Liu, Shuling; Gong, Tianlong; Gu, Aiqun; Yu, Zili, E-mail: ziliyu@scu.edu.cn

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • A new transformation (conversion) mechanism of PTFE surface from a hydrophobicity to a hydrophilicity was proposed through the treatment of KMnO{sub 4}/HNO{sub 3}. • Chemical reactions or defluorination of PTFE described in the reported paper was testified to be a misconceived conclusion by the combination of several testing measurements (IR, XPS, XRD and so on) in our present work. • Deposition of manganese oxide and/or manganese hydroxide on PTFE surface contributed to the hydrophilic property of the modified PTFE with KMnO{sub 4}/HNO{sub 3} treated. • The deposition thickness on the modified PTFE surface was about 5 μm, which was significantly helpful in enhancing the adhesive strength of PTFE with other materials. - Abstract: In the previous articles concerning the treatment of poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) with potassium permanganate/nitric acid mixture, the conversion of a hydrophobic to a hydrophilic surface was partially assigned to the defluorination of PTFE and then the introduction of carbonyl and hydroxyl groups into the defluorinated sites. In the present work, PTFE sheets were treated with potassium permanganate/nitric acid, and the surfaces before and after treatment were comparatively characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The surface sediments of the treated PTFE were also determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). The results indicate that the conversion of the hydrophobicity to the hydrophilicity on the modified PTFE surface is mainly due to the deposition of hydrophilic manganese oxides which covered the fluorocarbon surface, and no detectable chemical reactions of PTFE occur in the treating process.

  2. The Role of Host-derived Dentinal Matrix Metalloproteinases in Reducing Dentin Bonding of Resin Adhesives

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Shan-chuan; Kern, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Dentin matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of host-derived proteolytic enzymes trapped within mineralized dentin matrix, which have the ability to hydrolyze the organic matrix of demineralized dentin. After bonding with resins to dentin there are usually some exposed collagen fibrils at the bottom of the hybrid layer owing to imperfect resin impregnation of the demineralized dentin matrix. Exposed collagen fibrils might be affected by MMPs inducing hydrolytic degradation, which migh...

  3. Surface XPS-investigations of tobacco leaves treated with low-temperature plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The tobacco leaves were treated with low-temperature plasma in Ar, N2, O2, and air atmospheres at different powers (60-130 W). The surface-elemental components, their relative contents, and the functional groups of the surface components of the tobacco leaves were determined using XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy). The experimental results showed that the percentage of the elements C, N, and O had changed considerably and a large number of polar functional groups containing oxygen atoms were incorporated into the components on the tobacco surfaces.The measurements of the surface contact angle showed that the surface contact angle of the modified tobacco leaves was 0 degree, whereas it was 110 degrees before the plasma treatment. These results indicate that the wettability of the modified tobacco leaves improved dramatically. This work may be significant for future researches on the surface modification of the tobacco leaves.

  4. The relationship between the color of carious dentin stained with a caries detector dye and bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwami, Yukiteru; Shimizu, Ayako; Narimatsu, Masahiro; Kinomoto, Yoshifumi; Ebisu, Shigeyuki

    2005-01-01

    This in vitro study aimed to design a method for the objective evaluation of carious dentin using numerical values. This study also investigated the relationship between the color of carious dentin stained with a caries detector dye using this objective method and the rate of bacterial detection as detected by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In 15 molars with occlusal dentin caries and three extracted sound molars, dentin was removed in multiple steps with 300 microm removed each step. Before and after every removal, images of a color-matching sticker and carious surfaces stained with a caries detector dye were acquired simultaneously using a CCD camera and dentinal tissue samples were removed with a round bur. Next, corrected L*, a* and b* values of the carious surfaces (CIE 1976 L*a*b* color system) were calculated from the color changes of the stickers in the images. In addition, bacterial DNA in the dentinal tissue was detected by PCR. From evaluations of the receiver operating characteristic curves for the L*, a* and b* values, the L* value was determined to be a more useful parameter than a* or b* for detecting bacterial infection using the caries detector dye. The bacterial detection rates of carious dentin decreased as the L* values of carious dentin stained with the dye increased. When the L* values were more than 60, the dentin had no bacterial infection. This study clarified the relationship between the colors of lesions stained with a caries detector dye and the rates of bacterial detection.

  5. Cardiopulmonary bypass circuit treated with surface-modifying additives : A clinical evaluation of blood compatibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gu, YJ; Boonstra, PW; Rijnsburger, AA; Haan, J; van Oeveren, W

    Background. The cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) circuit induces blood activation and a systemic inflammatory response in cardiac surgical patients. The CPB circuit treated with surface-modifying additive (SMA) has been found to reduce blood activation by in vitro and ex vivo experiments. This study

  6. Structural analysis of heat-treated birch (Betule papyrifera) surface during artificial weathering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Xianai [Universite du Quebec a Chicoutimi, 555, boul. de l' Universite, Chicoutimi, Quebec, G7H 2B1 (Canada); Kocaefe, Duygu, E-mail: dkocaefe@uqac.ca [Universite du Quebec a Chicoutimi, 555, boul. de l' Universite, Chicoutimi, Quebec, G7H 2B1 (Canada); Kocaefe, Yasar [Universite du Quebec a Chicoutimi, 555, boul. de l' Universite, Chicoutimi, Quebec, G7H 2B1 (Canada); Boluk, Yaman [University of Alberta, 3-142 Markin/CNRL Natural Resources Engineering Facility, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2W2 (Canada); Krause, Cornelia [Universite du Quebec a Chicoutimi, 555, boul. de l' Universite, Chicoutimi, Quebec, G7H 2B1 (Canada)

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Investigate detailed structural changes of heat-treated wood due to weathering. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identify connection between physical structural changes and chemical degradation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Study effect of heat treatment conditions on weathering degradation process. - Abstract: Effect of artificial weathering on the surface structural changes of birch (Betule papyrifera) wood, heat-treated to different temperatures, was studied using the fluorescence microscopy and the scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Changes in the chemical structure of wood components were analyzed by FTIR in order to understand the mechanism of degradation taking place due to heat treatment and artificial weathering. The results are compared with those of the untreated (kiln-dried) birch. The SEM analysis results show that the effect of weathering on the cell wall of the untreated birch surface is more than that of heat-treated samples. The FTIR spectroscopy results indicate that lignin is the most sensitive component of heat-treated birch to the weathering degradation process. Elimination of the amorphous and highly crystallised cellulose is observed for both heat-treated and untreated wood during weathering. It is also observed that heat treatment increases the lignin and crystallised cellulose contents, which to some extent protects heat-treated birch against degradation due to weathering.

  7. Effects of ammonium hexafluorosilicate concentration on dentin tubule occlusion and composition of the precipitate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suge, Toshiyuki; Kawasaki, Akiko; Ishikawa, Kunio; Matsuo, Takashi; Ebisu, Shigeyuki

    2010-01-01

    Ammonium hexafluorosilicate [SiF: (NH(4))(2)SiF(6)] was prepared in order to overcome the tooth discoloration caused by diamine silver fluoride [AgF: (NH(3))(2)AgF] application. We employed a single concentration of SiF solution in our previous study; therefore, it is still unclear how the concentration of SiF solution affects the occlusion of dentin tubules and composition of the precipitate. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of changing the concentration of SiF on its clinical use as a dentin hypersensitivity treatment. To simulate dentin tubules subject to dentin hypersensitivity, dentin disks were treated with EDTA for 2 min. Then, the disks were treated with several concentrations of SiF solution (from 100 to 19,400 ppm) for 3 min. The occlusion of dentin tubules was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the composition of the precipitate formed in the tubules after SiF treatment was assessed using energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXA). SEM photographs demonstrated that dentin tubules after treatment with SiF were occluded homogeneously and fully regardless of the concentration of SiF solution. The Ca/P molar ratio of the precipitate formed in dentin tubules after SiF treatment was increased with the concentration of SiF solution. It was concluded that the capacity to occlude dentin tubules was the same regardless of the concentration of SiF solution. However, the composition of the precipitate formed in the tubules was dependent on the concentration of SiF solution.

  8. Quantitative microleakage of some dentinal bonding restorative systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, T; Retief, D H

    1993-03-01

    The quantitative microleakage of class V cementum (dentin) cavities restored with six dentinal bonding restorative systems was determined in vitro. Ninety extracted human permanent first and second mandibular and maxillary premolars were used in this study. Class V preparations were made in cementum (dentin) at the root facial surfaces. The preparations were restored with 1) a dentin bonding system containing 2% HEMA and BisGMA and a light-cured microfilled composite; 2) the same materials only substituting META/MMA base and TBB catalyst monomers for the BisGMA sealer; 3) a dentin bonding system containing 35% HEMA with META/MMA base and TBB catalyst, and a light-cured hybrid composite; 5) the same dentin bonding system only substituting the 35% glycerylmethacrylate for the 35% HEMA and using the microfilled composite; and 6) the previously described system with a substitution of 0.5 mol EDTA for the 10% citric acid -3% FeCl3. Fifteen teeth were restored with each procedure. The restorations were finished with 12-bladed carbide burs 15 min after placement, the teeth were stored in saline at 37 degrees C for 24 h, finished with Sof-Lex discs and then thermocycled in 2% methylene blue solution 500 times between 50 degrees C and 8 degrees C with a dwell time of 15 s. Quantitative microleakage was determined by a spectrophotometric dye-recovery method and expressed in microgram/dye/restoration. The data were analyzed by ANOVA, Student-Newman-Keuls and Kruskal-Wallis tests. The quantitative microleakage of the teeth restored with the adhesive systems containing 35% glyceryl methacrylate was significantly reduced. The bonding mechanism of glyceryl methacrylate is not known.

  9. Nanoleakage of cervical restorations of four dentin bonding systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H; Burrow, M F; Tyas, M J

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the degree of nanoleakage of restorations placed in cervical preparations with dentin bonding systems. The dentin bonding systems used were Single Bond, One Coat Bond, Prime & Bond NT/NRC, and PermaQuik. Ten saucer-shaped cervical preparations were bonded with one of the dentin bonding systems and restored with Silux Plus resin composite in each group. After 24 hours storage in 37 degrees C water, restorations were finished and the surrounding tooth surfaces were coated with nail varnish. The samples were immersed in 50% w/v solution of silver nitrate for 24 hours, and exposed to photodeveloping solution for 8 hours. The samples were cut longitudinally through the center, polished, carbon coated and observed in a Field Emission SEM using backscattered electron mode. The degree of silver penetration along the preparation wall was observed and calculated as a percentage of the total preparation wall length. Results were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and LSD tests. PermaQuik demonstrated the lowest leakage score and the least silver deposition within the hybrid layer, while Prime & Bond NT/NRC showed the greatest leakage scores and the most silver deposition within the hybrid layer. Different nanoleakage patterns were observed for the different adhesive systems. First, the composition of each adhesive system may play a role in the different leakage patterns. Second, the current dentin bonding systems used in this study did not achieve perfect sealing at the restoration-dentin interface. This may influence the durability of the bond to dentin.

  10. Fibroblastic response and surface characterization of O(2)-plasma-treated thermoplastic polyetherurethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlicht, Henning; Haugen, Håvard J; Sabetrasekh, Roya; Wintermantel, Erich

    2010-04-01

    Injection-molded samples of thermoplastic polyetherurethane (TPU) were treated with low-temperature oxygen plasma for different processing times in order to enhance cellular attachment for a gastric implant. Its effects were investigated by contact angle measurement, surface topography, cytotoxicity and cell colonization tests. No significant changes were found in the surface roughness of plasma treatment with plasma treatment time of less than 5 min. Longer treatment showed significantly higher surface roughness. It seems that there was a link between the changes in contact angle and enhanced cell growth on the treated surface, although only for the range up to plasma treatment times of 3 min. Prolonged treatment times did not cause any major changes in the water contact angle, but strongly improved the number of growing cells on the surface. Plasma treatment for 3-7 min led to a twofold increase in the number of cells compared to untreated samples and did not significantly alter the WST-1 nor worsened the lactate dehydrogenase activity compared to the control. Thus, it appears that O(2) plasma treatment is a suitable surface modification method for a gastric implant made of TPU in order to improve surface cell attachment where 3-7 min is the recommended treatment time.

  11. Surface composition XPS analysis of a plasma treated polystyrene: Evolution over long storage periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba, Ousmane M; Marmey, Pascal; Anselme, Karine; Duncan, Anthony C; Ponche, Arnaud

    2016-09-01

    A polystyrene surface (PS) was initially treated by cold nitrogen and oxygen plasma in order to incorporate in particular amine and hydroxyl functions, respectively. The evolution of the chemical nature of the surface was further monitored over a long time period (580 days) by chemical assay, XPS and contact angle measurements. Surface density quantification of primary amine groups was performed using three chemical amine assays: 4-nitrobenzaldehyde (4-NBZ), Sulfo succinimidyl 6-[3'(2 pyridyldithio)-pionamido] hexanoate (Sulfo-LC-SPDP) and iminothiolane (ITL). The results showed amine densities were in the range of 2 per square nanometer (comparable to the results described in the literature) after 5min of nitrogen plasma treatment. Over the time period investigated, chemical assays, XPS and contact angles suggest a drastic significant evolution of the chemical nature of the surface within the first two weeks. Beyond that time period and up to almost two years, nitrogen plasma modified substrates exhibits a slow and continuous oxidation whereas oxygen plasma modifed polystyrene surface is chemically stable after two weeks of storage. The latter appeared to "ease of" showing relatively mild changes within the one year period. Our results suggest that it may be preferable to wait for a chemical "stabilization" period of two weeks before subsequent covalent immobilization of proteins onto the surface. The originality of this work resides in the study of the plasma treated surface chemistry evolution over long periods of storage time (580 days) considerably exceeding those described in the literature.

  12. Evaluation of inactivation of intracanal antiseptics by dentin, demineralized dentin, dentin matrix and mineral component of dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razmi H

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Many studies have shown that microorganisms are the main cause of pulpal diseases and the main purpose of root canal therapy is their elimination from the root canal system. Antiseptic agents are used to reduce bacteria but their antibacterial activities differ from in vivo to in vitro studies and might be inactivated by dentin and its components in root canal space. This study was designed to investigate the effect of dentin on antibacterial activity of different antimicrobial agents. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, two antibacterial agents (sodium hypochlorite and chlorhexidine with different concentrations were used in four experimental groups: Group 1: dentin, Group 2: demineralized dentin with EDTA, Group 3: dentin matrix and Group 4: dentin mineral component. The species used in this study was Entrococcus faecalis. Different concentration of agents were added to mixture of each experimental group and bacteria. At the baseline and after one and 24 hours, samples were collected and cultured. After incubation period, colonies were counted. Data were analyzed by Tukey test with p<0.05 as the limit of significance. Results: 2% and 0.2% chlorhexidine, and 5% sodium hypochlorite solutions at the three studied times eliminated Entrococcus faecalis completely. 1% sodium hypochlorite eliminated all bacteria in 1h and 24 hs. Statistical analysis showed significant differences between experimental and control groups (P<0.05. Sodium 1% hypochlorite at time 0, could reduce bacteria significantly (P<0.05 but didn’t eliminate them completely. Conclusion: Inactivation of intracanal antiseptics was not observed in this study. As elimination of bacteria occurred, application of these antibacterial agents are recommended in endodontic treatment. Further investigations on other antibacterial agents, other concentrations and shorter time intervals are recommended.

  13. Laser restoring the glass surface treated with acid-based paint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strusevich, Anastasia V.; Poltaev, Yuriy A.; Sinev, Dmitrii A.

    2013-11-01

    The modern city facilities are often being attacked by graffiti artists, and increasingly vandals leave "tags" using paints, which compound based on acids, hydrofluoric or acetic commonly. These paints not only ink the surface, but also increase the surface roughness, and such impact can not be corrected by conventional cleaning. Thus, it was requested to develop technology that would not only clean the surface, but also to restore its structure by smoothing out irregularities and roughness formed after exposure in acid. In this work we investigated the effect of restoring the surface of the glass, spoiled by acid-based paint and then treated with CO2-laser. During the experiments, it was found that it is real to create the single-step laser surface restoring technology.

  14. Evaluation of microshear bond strength and nanoleakage of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives to dentin pretreated with silver diamine fluoride/potassium iodide: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Karthik; Sampath, Vidhya; Sujatha, V; Mahalaxmi, S

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to comparatively evaluate the microshear bond strength (MSBS) of etch-and-rinse and self-etch (ER and SE) bonding systems to dentin pretreated with silver diamine fluoride/potassium iodide (SDF/KI) and nanoleakage at the resin-dentin interface using transmission electron microscope (TEM). Seventy-two dentin slabs of 3 mm thickness were prepared from extracted human permanent third molars and divided into four groups (n = 18) based on the dentin surface treatment as follows: (1) ER adhesive bonding without dentin pretreatment; (2) SDF/KI pretreatment of dentin followed by ER adhesive bonding; (3) SE adhesive bonding without dentin pretreatment; and (4) SDF/KI pretreatment of dentin followed by SE adhesive bonding. Resin composite was built on the dentin slabs to a height of 4 mm incrementally, and dentin-composite beams of approximately 1 mm 2 cross-sectional area were prepared. The beams were subjected to MSBS analysis, and the fractured surface was observed under scanning electron microscope to determine the mode of failure. The resin-dentin interface was examined under TEM for evaluation of nanoleakage. One-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc multiple comparison tests. Pretreatment of dentin with SDF/KI increased the MSBS of ER and SE adhesives, though not statistically significant, except between Groups 2 and 3. In all the groups, the predominant mode of failure was adhesive followed by cohesive in resin, mixed and cohesive in dentin. TEM examination of resin-dentin interface showed that pretreatment with 38% SDF/KI reduced nanoleakage regardless of the type of bonding system used. Pretreatment of dentin with SDF/KI minimized nanoleakage at the resin-dentin interface without adversely affecting the bond strength of resin composite to dentin.

  15. Effect of endodontic irrigation and dressing procedures on the shear bond strength of composite to coronal dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar E. Abo-Hamar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the effects of three sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl-endodontic irrigation procedures used alone or in combinations with two intermediate dressing materials on bond strengths of two adhesive composite systems to coronal dentin. Surfaces were treated with NaOCl or NaOCl–Glyde-File-Prep (H2O2 and EDTA with or without chlorhexidine (CHX as a final rinse. Intermediate dressing materials of calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH2 and sodium perborate (SP were combined with surface treatments. Surface treatment groups (n = 10/group included (1 distilled water (control, (2 5.25% NaOCl (30 min, (3 NaOCl/Glyde (30 min, (4 NaOCl/Glyde (30 min + CHX (2 min, (5 NaOCl/Glyde (30 min + Ca(OH2 (5 days + CHX (2 min, and (6 NaOCl/Glyde (30 min + SP (9 days + CHX (2 min. For each surface treatment group, dentin shear bond strengths of two different composite systems (Excite/Tetric Flow Chroma, [EX/TFC], and Clearfil Protect Bond/Protect Liner F [PB/PLF] were evaluated. Median shear bond strengths (EX/TFC, PB/PLF for each surface treatment group in MPa were (1 21, 18; (2 26, 18; (3 21, 17; (4 22, 16; (5 17, 11; and (6 14, 11, respectively. NaOCl significantly increased the bond strength of EX/TFC (p  0.05, whereas it significantly decreased PB/PLF (p < 0.05. Ca(OH2 and SP significantly decreased the bond strengths of both adhesive systems (p < 0.05. Adhesion to coronal dentin is dependent upon the irrigation regimen and the type of adhesive.

  16. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy of resin-dentin interface morphology of seven dentin adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanumiharja, M; Burrow, M F; Tyas, M J; Carpenter, J

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the resin-dentin interface morphology of 7 resin-based dentin adhesive systems (Solid Bond, EBS-Multi, PermaQuik, One Coat Bond, Gluma One Bond, Prime & Bond NT/NRC, and Clearfil Liner Bond 2V). Fourteen dentin disks 1.0 mm thick were obtained from superficial occlusal dentin of extracted human third molars, and finished with wet 600-grit silicon carbide paper. Two dentin disks were bonded using each of the adhesives above according to the manufacturers' instructions, and a thin layer of flowable resin composite was applied. The specimens were kept in tap water for 24 h at 37 degrees C, and then assigned to one of two observational techniques: a fracture technique and an acid-base technique. Fracture technique: shallow grooves were cut, fixed in 10% buffered formalin, and dehydrated in an ascending ethanol series up to 100%, critical-point dried, and fractured along the prepared grooves. Acid-base technique: the specimens were embedded in epoxy resin, sectioned through the center, polished with diamond paste down to 0.25-micron particle size, and treated with 10% orthophosphoric acid for 10 s and 5% sodium hypochlorite for 5 min. All the specimens were mounted on aluminum stubs, gold sputter coated, and observed using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). All the dentin adhesive systems showed hybrid layer formation, but the thickness varied depending on the bonding system used. The self-etching priming systems (Prime & Bond NT/NRC and Clearfil Liner Bond 2V) showed the thinnest hybrid layer at 1 to 2 microns, whereas the "single-bottle" system (Gluma One Bond) exhibited the thickest hybrid layer at 8 to 16 microns. The ultramorphological structures of dentin bonding systems are determined by the composition of each system. Characterization of the interface of the adhesive system using the fracture technique provides additional information regarding the pattern of resin infiltration in some dentin bonding

  17. Repair of dentin defects from DSPP knockout mice by PILP mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurrohman, H.; Saeki, K.; Carneiro, K.; Chien, Y.C.; Djomehri, S.; Ho, S.P.; Qin, C.; Marshall, S.J.; Gower, L.B.; Marshall, G.W.; Habelitz, S.

    2016-01-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta type II (DGI-II) lacks intrafibrillar mineral with severe compromise of dentin mechanical properties. A Dspp knockout (Dspp−/−) mouse, with a phenotype similar to that of human DGI-II, was used to determine if poly-L-aspartic acid [poly(ASP)] in the “polymer-induced liquid-precursor” (PILP) system can restore its mechanical properties. Dentin from six-week old Dspp−/− and wild-type mice was treated with CaP solution containing poly(ASP) for up to 14 days. Elastic modulus and hardness before and after treatment were correlated with mineralization from Micro x-ray computed tomography (Micro-XCT). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM)/Selected area electron diffraction (SAED) were used to compare matrix mineralization and crystallography. Mechanical properties of the Dspp−/− dentin were significantly less than wild-type dentin and recovered significantly (P < 0.05) after PILP-treatment, reaching values comparable to wild-type dentin. Micro-XCT showed mineral recovery similar to wild-type dentin after PILP-treatment. TEM/SAED showed repair of patchy mineralization and complete mineralization of defective dentin. This approach may lead to new strategies for hard tissue repair. PMID:27239097

  18. Dental Pulp and Dentin Tissue Engineering and Regeneration – Advancement and Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, George T.-J.

    2012-01-01

    Hard tissue is difficult to repair especially dental structures. Tooth enamel is incapable of self-repairing whereas dentin and cememtum can regenerate with limited capacity. Enamel and dentin are commonly under the attack by caries. Extensive forms of caries destroy enamel and dentin and can lead to dental pulp infection. Entire pulp amputation followed by the pulp space disinfection and filled with an artificial rubber-like material is employed to treat the infection --commonly known as root canal or endodontic therapy. Regeneration of dentin relies on having vital pulps; however, regeneration of pulp tissue has been difficult as the tissue is encased in dentin without collateral blood supply except from the root apical end. With the advent of modern tissue engineering concept and the discovery of dental stem cells, regeneration of pulp and dentin has been tested. This article will review the recent endeavor on pulp and dentin tissue engineering and regeneration. The prospective outcome of the current advancement and challenge in this line of research will be discussed. PMID:21196351

  19. Structural analysis of heat-treated birch (Betule papyrifera) surface during artificial weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xianai; Kocaefe, Duygu; Kocaefe, Yasar; Boluk, Yaman; Krause, Cornélia

    2013-01-01

    Effect of artificial weathering on the surface structural changes of birch (Betule papyrifera) wood, heat-treated to different temperatures, was studied using the fluorescence microscopy and the scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Changes in the chemical structure of wood components were analyzed by FTIR in order to understand the mechanism of degradation taking place due to heat treatment and artificial weathering. The results are compared with those of the untreated (kiln-dried) birch. The SEM analysis results show that the effect of weathering on the cell wall of the untreated birch surface is more than that of heat-treated samples. The FTIR spectroscopy results indicate that lignin is the most sensitive component of heat-treated birch to the weathering degradation process. Elimination of the amorphous and highly crystallised cellulose is observed for both heat-treated and untreated wood during weathering. It is also observed that heat treatment increases the lignin and crystallised cellulose contents, which to some extent protects heat-treated birch against degradation due to weathering.

  20. Effect of dentinal tubules and resin-based endodontic sealers on fracture properties of root dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jainaen, Angsana; Palamara, Joseph E A; Messer, Harold H

    2009-10-01

    To investigate the role of dentinal tubules in the fracture properties of human root dentin and whether resin-filled dentinal tubules can enhance fracture resistance. Crack propagation in human root dentin was investigated in 200 microm thick longitudinal samples and examined by light and scanning electron microscopy. 30 maxillary premolar teeth were prepared for work of fracture (Wf) test at different tubule orientations, one perpendicular and two parallel to dentinal tubules. Another 40 single canal premolars were randomly divided into four groups of 10 each: intact dentin, prepared but unobturated canal, canal obturated with epoxy rein (AH Plus/gutta percha), or with UDMA resin sealer (Resilon/RealSeal. The samples were prepared for Wf test parallel to dentinal tubules. Wf was compared under ANOVA with statistical significance set at pcanal preparation nor obturation using epoxy- or UDMA-based resins as sealer cements substantially influenced fracture properties of root dentin, despite extensive infiltration of dentinal tubules by both sealer cements.

  1. COHESIVE STRENGTH OF DENTIN RESISTÊNCIA COESIVA DA DENTINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Fernando DEMARCO

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available The bond strength of dentin adhesives to dentin has increased after each generation. Although dentin substratum is part of the bonding process, little importance has been given to measure dentin cohesive strength. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cohesive strength of dentin in human canines. Seventeen non carious canines were selected. All of them had been extracted for more than one year. The teeth were ground until dentin square samples with approximately 2 X 2 mm were obtained. They were embedded in acrylic resin and subjected to shear stress, in a Wolpert Machine, at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The mean cohesive strength of dentin in shear mode was 33.95 (+-9.72 MPa. The fracture surfaces were observed under a X40 magnification. A finite element analysis was performed to observe the stress distribution as related to the shear test. The failure pattern was compatible with the shear test and also with the stress distribution in the finite element analysisA resistência de união dos adesivos dentinários tem sido aumentada com o desenvolvimento de cada nova geração. Pouca importância tem sido dada à resistência coesiva da dentina. A proposta deste estudo foi avaliar a resistência coesiva da dentina. Dezessete caninos humanos hígidos, os quais tinham sido extraídos há mais de um ano, foram usados. Os dentes foram desgastados até a obtenção de corpos-de-prova em dentina, de formato quadrangular, com tamanho aproximado de 2 X 2 mm. Os dentes foram incluídos em resina acrílica e, então, submetidos ao teste de cisalhamento em uma máquina de ensaios universais Wolpert, com uma velocidade de 0,5 mm/min. A resistência coesiva média da dentina no teste de cisalhamento foi de 33,95 (+- 9,72 MPa. O tipo de fratura foi analisado com um aumento de 40X. Foi realizada uma análise com elemento finito, para observar a distribuição do estresse relacionada com o teste de cisalhamento. O padrão de fratura encontrado foi compat

  2. Effect of desensitizers on the bond strength of a self-etching adhesive system to caries-affected dentin on the gingival wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengun, Abdulkadir; Koyuturk, Alp Erdin; Sener, Yagmur; Ozer, Fusun

    2005-01-01

    A self-etching dentin adhesive was evaluated for its ability to bond to caries-affected and sound dentin after applying three desensitizers to the gingival walls. Sixty extracted human molars, with approximal dentin caries, were cut horizontally on the long axis of the tooth through caries-affected gingival walls. Carious dentin was removed with SiC paper by means of a caries detector to expose caries-affected dentin. The molars were randomly assigned to four groups: control and three experimental groups-Micro Prime, Glauma Desentizer and Cervitec. Desensitizers were applied to the dentinal surfaces according to manufacturers' instructions. A resin composite was bonded to both the caries-affected and sound dentin of each tooth using a bonding system and plastic rings. The restoration was debonded by shear bond strength. The application of Micro Prime and Gluma Desensitizer to caries-affected dentin did not show any effect on bond strength testing. However, Cervitec caused a decrease in bond strength to caries-affected dentin. The effect of desensitizers on the bond strength of the self-etch bonding agent to caries-affected dentin changed according to the chemical composition of the materials. Desensitizer application on sound dentin is recommended with self-etch bonding systems.

  3. How erosive drinks and enzyme inhibitors impact bond strength to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Moreira MACHADO

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Concern has been raised about the bonding of restorative procedures to an erosive lesion, given the change in organic and inorganic composition and structure of this substrate. This in vitro study evaluated the effect of erosive drinks and an enzyme inhibitor (2% chlorhexidine digluconate – 2% CHX on bond strength to dentin. Sixty sound human third molars were selected, and the occlusal enamel was flattened, exposing the dentin surface. The specimens were randomly divided into three groups: AS-Artificial saliva (control group, RC- Regular Cola and ZC- Zero Cola. Twenty specimens were immersed in their respective solution for 1 minute, 3 times a day, over the course of 5 days. After acid etching and before bonding with Adper Single Bond 2, half of the samples of each group (n = 10 were treated with 2% CHX, whereas the other half (n = 10 were not, forming the control group (CONV. All the specimens were restored with Filtek Z250 composite resin filled in Tygon tubes (0.48 mm2, yielding six microcylinders for microshear bond strength testing. Three composite resin microcylinders of each specimen were tested after 1 month, and the remaining microcylinders were tested after 6 months. Failure modes were determined using a stereomicroscope (40x. The data were statistically analyzed by three-way ANOVA and Tukey tests (α = 0.05. Overall bonding was reduced after 6 months, regardless of treatment. The 2% CHX enhanced bond strength after 1 month only in the ZC group, and did not enhance bonding performance to demineralized dentin by erosive protocol after 6 months in any group.

  4. Microindentation hardness and calcium/phosphorus ratio of dentin following excavation of dental caries lesions with different techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katirci, Gunseli; Ermis, R Banu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the microindentation hardness and chemical composition of residual dentin left at the cavity bottom following removal of carious dentin using the Carisolv chemomechanical and Er:YAG laser caries excavation methods in comparison with the conventional tungsten-carbide bur excavation. Sixty-nine extracted permanent teeth with occlusal dentin caries were assigned into three groups according to caries removal technique. Carious dentin excavation was guided by tactile method and a caries-staining dye. In stereomicroscope images (100×) of the samples, the presence or absence of residual caries was defined. The Knoop hardness value of the cavity floor was determined and atomic analysis of treated cavities was performed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The Knoop hardness value of residual dentin left at the cavity bottom was lower (One-way ANOVA, Dunnett-C, p carious dentin was higher after Carisolv excavation than those obtained after conventional and laser excavations (Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U, p  0.05). The results indicated that Er:YAG laser was more comparable to conventional bur excavation than chemomechanical method in the efficacy of caries removal with regard to microindentation hardness of remaining dentin and both Carisolv gel and Er:YAG laser did not alter chemical composition of residual dentin in the treated cavities.

  5. Thermal Stability of Surface Layer Microstructures of Commercially Pure Titanium Treated by High Energy Shot Peening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yu-juan; CHEN Chun-huan; REN Rui-ming

    2004-01-01

    Commercially pure titanium was treated by high energy shot peening, and annealed at a series of temperatures. The surface layers are characterized by means of scan electronic microscope, X-Ray diffraction, transmission electronic microscope and micro-hardness testing machine. The results showed that microhardness of surface layers decreases with anneal temperature, the tendency of microhardness is similar to unannealed one, in other words, the more close to the surface, the more rapidly the hardness decreases, after reaches the depth of 50 μm, the decrease becomes steadily. But the sub-surface microhardness decreased suddenly over 500 ℃, From 550 ℃ to 650 ℃, the microhardness of surface layers almost unchanged.Observing by TEM and SEM, the grain sizes of pure titanium surface layers have increased below 500 ℃; Deformation twins begin disappearing obviously at 550 ℃; The nano-scaled grains within about 10 micrometers from surface existed even at 550℃.Surface nanocrystallization is well known as one of important methods to improve surface properties. The thermal stability of nanocrystalline microstructures was related to their preparation and application. The commercial pure Ti thermal stability of nanocrystalline and deformed microstructures induced by high-energy-shot-peening (HESP) technique was investigated. The nanostructured surface and deformed sub-surface layers of specimens were prepared through HESP treatment. The thermal stability was characterized through XRD analyses of surface layers, SEM and TEM microstructure observation and microhardness measurement of specimens annealed in different temperature in the air after HESP treatments. The results showed that after HESP treatment, the microhardness of surface layers increased with treatment time, especially in the rang of about 40 micrometers from the surface, the microhardness increase was obvious. The surface microhardness decreased gradually with annealing temperature, but the sub-surface

  6. Nanoscopic dynamic mechanical analysis of resin-infiltrated dentine, under in vitro chewing and bruxism events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledano, Manuel; Osorio, Estrella; Cabello, Inmaculada; Aguilera, Fátima S; López-López, Modesto T; Toledano-Osorio, Manuel; Osorio, Raquel

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the induced changes in mechanical behavior and bonding capability of resin-infiltrated dentine interfaces, after application of mechanical stimuli. Dentine surfaces were subjected to partial demineralization through 37% phosphoric acid etching followed by the application of an etch-and-rinse dentine adhesive, Single Bond (3M/ESPE). Bonded interfaces were stored in simulated body fluid during 24h, and then tested or submitted to the mechanical loading challenge. Different loading waveforms were applied: No cycling (I), 24h cycled in sine (II) or square (III) waves, sustained loading held for 24h (IV) or sustained loading held for 72h (V). Microtensile bond strength (MTBS) was assessed for the different groups. Debonded dentine surfaces were studied by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). At the resin-dentine interface, both the hybrid layer (HL) and the bottom of the hybrid layer (BHL), and both peritubular and intertubular were evaluated using a nanoindenter in scanning mode. The load and displacement responses were used to perform the nano-Dynamic Mechanical analysis and to estimate the complex and storage modulus. Dye assisted Confocal Microscopy Evaluation was used to assess sealing ability. Load cycling increased the percentage of adhesive failures in all groups. Specimens load cycled in held 24h attained the highest complex and storage moduli at HL and BHL. The storage modulus was maximum in specimens load cycled in held 24h at peritubular dentine, and the lowest values were attained at intertubular dentine. The storage modulus increased in all mechanical tests, at peritubular dentine. An absence of micropermeability and nanoleakage after loading in sine and square waveforms were encountered. Porosity of the resin-dentine interface was observed when specimens were load cycled in held 72h. Areas of combined sealing and permeability were discovered at the interface of specimens load cycled in held 24h. Crack

  7. The effects of Pain-Free Desensitizer on dentine permeability and tubule occlusion over time, in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y; Agee, K; Pashley, D H; Pashley, E L

    1998-11-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the efficacy of a new resin emulsion (Pain-Free Desensitizer) treatment for dentine hypersensitivity, for its ability to decrease dentine permeability. Crown segments were prepared from extracted, unerupted human 3rd molars by horizontal sectioning to remove occlusal enamel and the roots. The specimens were allocated in one of two groups: In group 1, the dentine surface was acid-etched to simulate the patent tubules of hypersensitive dentine. In group 2, the mineralized dentine surface was polished free of smear layer using a hydroxyapatite paste and ultrasonication. The hydraulic conductance of each specimen was then measured to obtain a pretreatment of control value. After a single treatment with resin desensitizer, the permeability was remeasured at 5 min, 1 day, 1 week and 1 month. Between measurements, the specimens were stored in buffer solution to simulate the solubilizing effects of saliva. Parallel specimens were followed by SEM examination. The results showed that a single treatment with resin desensitizer produced large, immediate, reductions in dentine permeability in both acid-etched and mineralized surfaces. In the acid-etched (group 1) specimens, the permeability returned to control values within 7 days, while the permeability of the group 2 specimens remained low even after 30 days of soaking. This simple treatment for occluding dentinal tubules may provide sufficient temporary reduction in dentine permeability to permit the development of natural desensitization.

  8. The permeability of dentine from bovine incisors in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagami, J; Tao, L; Pashley, D H; Horner, J A

    1989-01-01

    The permeability of coronal dentine was investigated by measuring the hydraulic conductance of dentine discs. Reductions in dentine thickness from the enamel side of disc resulted in a greater increase in permeability than reductions from the pulpal side. Scanning electron microscopy revealed fewer dentinal tubules with smaller diameters in superficial dentine than in deep dentine. The permeability of coronal incisor bovine dentine is six to eight times less than that of unerupted coronal human third molar dentine but similar to that of human root dentine.

  9. Dentin-cement Interfacial Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmeh, A.R.; Chong, E.Z.; Richard, G.; Festy, F.; Watson, T.F.

    2012-01-01

    The interfacial properties of a new calcium-silicate-based coronal restorative material (Biodentine™) and a glass-ionomer cement (GIC) with dentin have been studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), micro-Raman spectroscopy, and two-photon auto-fluorescence and second-harmonic-generation (SHG) imaging. Results indicate the formation of tag-like structures alongside an interfacial layer called the “mineral infiltration zone”, where the alkaline caustic effect of the calcium silicate cement’s hydration products degrades the collagenous component of the interfacial dentin. This degradation leads to the formation of a porous structure which facilitates the permeation of high concentrations of Ca2+, OH-, and CO32- ions, leading to increased mineralization in this region. Comparison of the dentin-restorative interfaces shows that there is a dentin-mineral infiltration with the Biodentine, whereas polyacrylic and tartaric acids and their salts characterize the penetration of the GIC. A new type of interfacial interaction, “the mineral infiltration zone”, is suggested for these calcium-silicate-based cements. PMID:22436906

  10. Dentinal candidiasis in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damm, D D; Neville, B W; Geissler, R H; White, D K; Drummond, J F; Ferretti, G A

    1988-01-01

    Two examples of an unusual presentation of oropharyngeal candidiasis in cancer patients are offered. The light and scanning electron microscopic appearances of candidiasis involving the dentin of teeth are described. The potential significance of recognition of this form of candidiasis in cancer patients is discussed.

  11. Tensile Properties of Surface-Treated Glass Fiber Reinforced PTFE Composite with Rare Earth Elements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛玉君; 程先华

    2003-01-01

    The optimum amount of rare earth elements (RE) for treating glass fiber surface and its effect on the tensile properties of glass fiber reinforced polytetrafluoroethylene (GF/PTFE) composites were investigated. The tensile properties of GF/PTFE composites with different surface treatment conditions were measured. The fracture surface morphologies were observed and analyzed by SEM. The results indicate that rare earth elements can effectively promote the interfacial adhesion between the glass fiber and PTFE, owing to the effects of rare earth elements on the compatibility. The tensile properties of GF/PTFE composites can be improved considerably when the content of RE in surface modifier is 0.2%~0.4%, and the optimum performance of GF/PTFE composites is obtained at 0.3%RE content.

  12. CO2 laser improves 45S5 bioglass interaction with dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakry, A S; Takahashi, H; Otsuki, M; Sadr, A; Yamashita, K; Tagami, J

    2011-02-01

    Bioglass 45S5 is a bioactive glass that can create a layer of calcium-phosphate crystals on mineralized hard tissues. In this study, 45S5 bioglass was mixed with phosphoric acid and irradiated with CO(2) laser and examined as a possible aid in the treatment of dentin hypersensitivity. The dentinal surface modified by the aforementioned technique was chemically and micro-morphologically examined with a field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) equipped with an energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscope (EDS), and the crystalline structures of the examined dentinal surfaces were examined by x-ray diffraction (XRD). Moreover, the mechanical properties of the newly formed layer were examined by nanoindentation. The results showed that 45S5 bioglass could occlude the dentinal tubule orifices with calcium-phosphate crystals. The application of CO(2) laser potentially improved the mechanical organization of these crystals.

  13. Bond strength comparison of amalgam repair protocols using resin composite in situations with and without dentin exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Schoonbeek, Geert; Gökçe, Bülent; Cömlekoglu, Erhan; Dündar, Mine

    2010-01-01

    The replacement of defective amalgam restorations leads to loss of tooth material and weakens the tooth, creating an increased risk of cusp fracture. The repair of such defects is a minimal intervention technique. The current study compared the repair bond strengths of a resin composite to amalgam and an amalgam-dentin complex after various surface conditioning methods. The specimens (N = 50) consisted of sound human canines with cylindrical preparations (diameter: 2.3 mm, depth: 3 mm) with amalgam-dentin complex (N = 30, n = 10/per group) and two groups with amalgam only (N = 20, n = 10/per group). The teeth were embedded in auto-polymerized polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). The preparations were filled with non-Gamma 2 amalgam. The enamel was removed to expose dentin. The specimens with the amalgam-dentin complex were randomly assigned to one of the following conditioning methods: Group 1: Silicacoating amalgam, etching dentin, silane application on amalgam, primer/bonding on dentin, opaquer on amalgam, resin composite on both; Group 2: Etching dentin, silicacoating amalgam, silane application on amalgam, primer/bonding on dentin, opaquer on amalgam, resin composite on both and Group 3: Etching dentin, primer/bonding on dentin, opaquer, resin composite. The specimens with only amalgam were assigned to one of the following conditioning methods: Group 4: Silicacoating, silane application, opaquer, resin composite and Group 5: Opaquer, resin composite. For the two control groups, where no dentin was involved (Groups 4 and 5), bonding was achieved only on amalgam and Group 5 had no conditioning. The specimens were kept in water at 37 degrees C for five weeks before bond strength (MPa +/- SD) testing (Universal Testing Machine). After debonding, the failure types were analyzed. The results were significantly affected by the surface conditioning method (ANOVA). Only dentin conditioning (Group 3) showed the highest bond strength (39.9 +/- 14). The unconditioned control

  14. An in situ study investigating dentine tubule occlusion of dentifrices following acid challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olley, Ryan C; Pilecki, Peter; Hughes, Nathan; Jeffery, Peter; Austin, Rupert S; Moazzez, Rebecca; Bartlett, David

    2012-07-01

    To investigate the dentine occlusion and acid resistance of dentifrices developed to treat dentine hypersensitivity. This was a single centre, single blind, randomised, split mouth, four treatments, two period crossover, in situ study in healthy subjects. Subjects wore buccal intra-oral appliances each fitted with four dentine samples over four consecutive days with one study product applied per appliance; 8% strontium acetate in silica base, 1040 ppm sodium fluoride (Sensodyne(®) Rapid Relief), 8% arginine, calcium carbonate, 1450 ppm sodium monofluorophosphate (Colgate Sensitive Pro-Relief(®)), 1450 ppm sodium fluoride (control paste) and water. On days 3 and 4, two agitated grapefruit juice challenges (ex vivo) occurred for 1 min. At the end of each treatment day 1 dentine sample was removed from each appliance for scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The extent of tubule occlusion was measured using an examiner-based visual scoring index (three trained examiners). In total, 28 subjects ((12 males and 16 females with a mean age of 34.7 years (SD 8.41 years)) completed the study. On day 2, both test dentifrices demonstrated significantly better dentine tubule occlusion than water (p < 0.0001) and control paste (8% strontium p = 0.0003 and 8% arginine p = 0.0019). After 3 and 4 days of twice daily brushing with acid challenges on days 3 and 4 the strontium-based dentifrice demonstrated significantly better dentine occlusion than all other treatments (p < 0.0001). Strontium acetate and arginine-based dentifrice result in statistically significant dentine tubular occlusion compared to controls, but the arginine-based dentifrice is more susceptible to acid challenge. Erosive beverages are an important aetiology in DH by exposing dentine tubules. Their consumption has increased significantly over the past decade in the UK. This 4-day in situ study investigated the properties of commercially available dentifrices designed to occlude dentine tubules and their

  15. Time-related surface modification of denture base acrylic resin treated by atmospheric pressure cold plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Kun; Pan, Hong; Li, Yinglong; Wang, Guomin; Zhang, Jue; Pan, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The changes of denture base acrylic resin surface properties under cold plasma and the relationships with time were investigated. Cold plasma treated the specimens for 30 s, 60 s, 90 s, and 120 s, respectively. Water contact angles were measured immediately after the treatment, 48 h, 15 days and 30 days later. Surface roughness was measured with 3-D laser scanning microscope. Candida albicans adherence was evaluated by CFU counting. Chemical composition was monitored by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. Water contact angle reduced after treated for 30 s. No changes were observed with time prolonged, except the durability. There were no differences in roughness among all groups. However, treatment groups showed significantly lower C. albicans adherence. XPS demonstrated a decrease in C/O, and this reduction was affected by treatment time. Cold plasma was an effective means of increasing hydrophilicity of acrylic resin and reducing C. albicans adherence without affecting physical properties.

  16. Electrochemical analysis of the UV treated bactericidal Ti6Al4V surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacha-Olivenza, Miguel A. [Networking Research Center on Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Extremadura, Av. Elvas s/n, 06071 Badajoz (Spain); Gallardo-Moreno, Amparo M., E-mail: amparogm@unex.es [Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Extremadura, Av. Elvas s/n, 06071 Badajoz (Spain); Networking Research Center on Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); Vadillo-Rodríguez, Virginia; González-Martín, M. Luisa [Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Extremadura, Av. Elvas s/n, 06071 Badajoz (Spain); Networking Research Center on Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); Pérez-Giraldo, Ciro [Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Extremadura, Av. Elvas s/n, 06071 Badajoz (Spain); Networking Research Center on Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine (CIBER-BBN) (Spain); Galván, Juan C. [National Centre for Metallurgical Research (CENIM-CSIC), Av. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040-Madrid (Spain)

    2013-04-01

    This research investigates in detail the bactericidal effect exhibited by the surface of the biomaterial Ti6Al4V after being subjected to UV-C light. It has been recently hypothesized that small surface currents, occurring as a consequence of the electron–hole pair recombination taking place after the excitation process, are behind the bactericidal properties displayed by this UV-treated material. To corroborate this hypothesis we have used different electrochemical techniques, such as electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), potentiodynamic polarization plots and Mott–Schottky plots. EIS and Mott–Schottky plots have shown that UV-C treatment causes an initial increase on the surface electrical conduction of this material. In addition, EIS and polarization plots demonstrated that higher corrosion currents occur at the UV treated than at the non-irradiated samples. Despite this increase in the corrosion currents, EIS has also shown that such currents are not likely to affect the good stability of this material oxide film since the irradiated samples completely recovered the control values after being stored in dark conditions for a period not longer than 24 h. These results agree with the already-published in vitro transitory behavior of the bactericidal effect, which was shown to be present at initial times after the biomaterial implantation, a crucial moment to avoid a large number of biomaterial associated infections. Highlights: ► Bactericidal response of UV-treated Ti6Al4V is explained through electrochemistry. ► There is an increase in the superficial electrical conduction after UV-treatment. ► Higher corrosion currents for UV-treated against non-UV-treated samples are shown. ► EIS shows the recuperation on irradiated samples in agreement with microbial tests.

  17. Chemical surface modification of calcium carbonate particles with stearic acid using different treating methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhi; Daly, Michael; Clémence, Lopez; Geever, Luke M.; Major, Ian; Higginbotham, Clement L.; Devine, Declan M.

    2016-08-01

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) is often treated with stearic acid (SA) to decrease its polarity. However, the method of application of the SA treatments has a strong influence on CaCO3 thermoplastic composite's interfacial structure and distribution. Several of papers describe the promising effects of SA surface treatment, but few compare the treatment process and its effect on the properties of the final thermoplastic composite. In the current study, we assessed a new SA treatment method, namely, complex treatment for polymer composite fabrication with HDPE. Subsequently, a comparative study was performed between the "complex" process and the other existing methods. The composites were assessed using different experiments included scanning electron microscopy (SEM), void content, density, wettability, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and tensile tests. It was observed that the "complex" surface treatment yielded composites with a significantly lower voids content and higher density compared to other surface treatments. This indicates that after the "complex" treatment process, the CaCO3 particles and HDPE matrix are more tightly packed than other methods. DSC and wettability results suggest that the "wet" and "complex" treated CaCO3 composites had a significantly higher heat of fusion and moisture resistance compared to the "dry" treated CaCO3 composites. Furthermore, "wet" and "complex" treated CaCO3 composites have a significantly higher tensile strength than the composites containing untreated and "dry" treated CaCO3. This is mainly because the "wet" and "complex" treatment processes have increased adsorption density of stearate, which enhances the interfacial interaction between matrix and filler. These results confirm that the chemical adsorption of the surfactant ions at the solid-liquid interface is higher than at other interface. From this study, it was concluded that the utilization of the "complex" method minimised the negative effects of void

  18. [Characterization of Wood Surface Treated with Electroless Copper Plating by Near Infrared Spectroscopy Technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jing; Zhang, Mao-mao; Zhao, Guang-jie; Yang, Zhong

    2015-05-01

    Wood electromagnetic shielding material, which was made by treating wood with electroless plating, not only keep the superior characteristics of wood, but also improve the conductivity, thermal conductivity and electromagnetic shielding properties of wood. The emergence of this material opens the way to the value-added exploitation of wood and widens the processing and application field for the electromagnetic shielding material. In order to explore the feasibility of using NIR technology to investigate the properties of wood electromagnetic shielding material, this study analysis the samples before and after copper plated process by the NIR spectroscopy coupled with principal component analysis (PCA). The results showed that (1) there exist significant differences between samples before and after copper plated process both on the spectral shape and absorption, and the great differences can also be seen in the samples with different treat time, especially for the samples with 5 min treat time; (2) after PCA analysis, six clusters from the samples before and after copper plated process were separately distributed in the score plot, and the properties of untreated wood and sensitized wood were similar, and the properties of samples for 25 and 40 min treat time were also similar in order that these samples were close to each other, all of which might suggest that the NIR spectroscopy reflected major feature information about material treatment; (3) After comparing the PCA performance between NIR and visible spectral region, it could be found that the classification performance of samples before and after copper plated process based on the NIR region were better than that based on the visible region, and the information of color on the surface of samples were preferably reflected in the visible region, which could indicate that there are more information about samples' surface characters using the visible spectroscopy coupled with NIR spectroscopy and it is feasible to

  19. Nerve-targeted desensitizing toothpastes occlude dentin tubules and induce mineral precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhejun; Jiang, Tao; Sauro, Salvatore; Wang, Yining; Xing, Wenzhong; Liang, Shanshan; Sa, Yue; Zhang, Chengfei; Shen, Ya; Haapasalo, Markus

    2012-02-01

    To examine the laboratory dentin tubules occlusion and mineral precipitation capability of two potassium salts-containing desensitizing toothpastes. 40 dentin disks were obtained and divided into four groups, including artificial saliva (AS), distilled water (DW), Sensodyne Freshmint (SF) and Colgate Sensitive (CS). Dentin permeability measurement was performed after EDTA etching, initial brush, 3-day brush, 7-day brush and citric acid challenge, respectively. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) was used to monitor the variation of mineral content before and after treatments. The ultra-morphology of dentin surface was examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to evaluate tubule occlusion. The two potassium salts-containing desensitizing toothpastes significantly reduced dentin permeability to less than 40% after 7-day treatment (P<0.05). The ATR-FTIR analysis showed increase of the intensity of the phosphate peak after a 7-day brushing period using both of the tested toothpastes. However, the dentin permeability significantly increased and the intensity of phosphate peak decreased after acid etching for all groups. The SEM examination revealed partially occluded dentin tubules after toothpaste treatments, but after the acid challenge the tubules were opened again.

  20. Comparative assessment of hardening of demineralized dentin under lining materials using an ultramicroindentation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidlin, Patrick R; Zehnder, Matthias; Imfeld, Thomas; Swain, Michael V

    2007-10-01

    The aim of the current in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of three lining materials with a reported mineralizing capacity on hardness and elasticity of demineralized dentin. Four standardized microcavities were prepared in exposed dentin surfaces of 16 extracted human molars each. Dentin was demineralized in 0.5M EDTA for 2 h. One microcavity was left empty. The others were filled with a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC), a bioactive glass S53P4 suspension, and a prototype Ca-PO(4) cement. Teeth were then immersed in deionized water or simulated oral fluid. After 3 weeks, hardness and composite elastic modulus of the dentin subjacent to the microcavities were assessed under wet conditions using the ultramicroindentation system (UMIS). After immersion in deionized water, there was no significant improvement of the mechanical properties of dentin irrespective of the material applied beforehand, indicating a lack of direct material effects. Exposure to simulated oral fluid resulted in significantly (p < 0.05) higher hardness and composite elastic modulus values of the dentin subjacent to empty microcavities and counterparts lined with bioactive glass compared to corresponding dentin under the RMGIC. UMIS profiles showed little variance.

  1. Shear bond strengths of three glass ionomer cements to enamel and dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Thiago-Saads; van Amerongen, Willem-Evert; de Gee, Anton; Bönecker, Marcelo; Sampaio, Fábio-Correia

    2011-05-01

    The shear bond strength of three glass ionomer cements (GIC) to enamel and dentine was evaluated. Sound permanent human molars (n=12) were grinded perpendicular to their axial axes, exposing smooth, flat enamel and dentine surfaces. The teeth were embedded in resin and conditioned with polyacrylic acid (25%; 10s). Twenty four specimens of each GIC: Fuji IX (FJ-GC), Ketac Molar Easymix (KM-3M ESPE) and Maxxion (MX-FGM) were prepared according to the Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) (12 enamel and 12 dentine), in a bonding area of 4.91 mm² and immersed in water (37°C, 24h). The shear bond strength was tested in a universal testing machine. Non-parametric statistical tests (Friedman and post-hoc Wilcoxon Signed Ranks) were carried out (p=0.05). The mean (±sd) of shear bond strength (MPa), on enamel and dentine, were: KM (6.4±1.4 and 7.6±1.5), FJ (5.9±1.5 and 6.0±1.9) and MX (4.2±1.5 and 4.9±1.5), respectively. There was a statistically significant difference between the GICs in both groups: enamel (p=0.004) and dentine (p=0.002). The lowest shear bond value for enamel was with MX and the highest for dentine was KM (padhesion to both enamel and dentine, followed by FJ and MX.

  2. Dentin bond strength and degree of conversion evaluation of experimental self-etch adhesive systems

    OpenAIRE

    Yazdi, Fatemeh Maleknejad; Moosavi, Horieh; Atai, Mohammad; Zeynali, Mahsa

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different concentrations of 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (10-MDP) monomer in one-step self-etch experimental adhesives on dentinal microshear bond strength (µSBS), their degree of conversion and bonded micro structure. Material and Methods Composite resin cylinders (Clearfil AP-X) were bonded on human sound molar dentinal surfaces by using five experimental one-step self-etching adhesives (1-SEAs) containing 0% ...

  3. Kekuatan Geser Semen Ionomer Kaca pada Dentin Gigi Sulung setelah Aplikasi Kondisioner dengan Durasi Berbeda

    OpenAIRE

    Suzanna Sungkar; Margaretha Suharsini; Hendrarlin Soenawan

    2015-01-01

    The bond strength between glass ionomer and tooth structure can be improved with application of conditioner on enamel or dentin surface to remove the smear layer. The bond strength can be measured with shear bond strength testing. This study aimed to determine the difference of shear bond strength of glass ionomer cement to primary teeth dentine after conditioner application for 10", 20" and 30". Twenty seven primary mandibular incisors were randomly divided into 3 groups that were subjected ...

  4. Microstructure and wettability of root canal dentine and root canal filling materials after different chemical irrigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonijevic, Djordje; Milovanovic, Petar [Laboratory for Anthropology, Institute for Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Brajkovic, Denis [Department of Dentistry, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Kragujevac, Kragujevac (Serbia); Ilic, Dragan [Department of Restorative Medicine, School of Dental Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Hahn, Michael; Amling, Michael [Department of Osteology and Biomechanics (IOBM), University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Lottestr. 55A, 22529 Hamburg (Germany); Rakocevic, Zlatko [Laboratory for Atomic Physics, Institute for Nuclear Science “Vinca”, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Djuric, Marija [Laboratory for Anthropology, Institute for Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Busse, Björn, E-mail: b.busse@uke.uni-hamburg.de [Department of Osteology and Biomechanics (IOBM), University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Lottestr. 55A, 22529 Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Different irrigation solutions and disinfectants were used for treatment of root canal dentine and gutta-percha points. • Materials surface characteristics were assessed using quantitative backscattered electron imaging, reference point indentation, and contact angle analyzer. • The most significant differences in mineralization, indentation, and adhesive outcomes were observed after ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid treatment. • Irrigation solutions confer to superior sealing ability of endodontic filling materials. • Micromechanical characteristics of dentine after irrigation are considerable reduced. - Abstract: The objective of this study was to determine the effects of various irrigation solutions on root canal dentine and gutta-percha surface properties. In addition, the effects of disinfectant chemicals on the wettability and surface morphological properties of the filling materials were evaluated. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), citric acid, and ozone were employed as irrigation solutions for dentine and gutta-percha treatment. Thereafter, the samples’ microstructure, degree of mineralization, and mechanical properties were assessed by means of quantitative backscattered electron imaging (qBEI) and reference point indentation (RPI). A contact angle analyzer was used to measure adhesion on the tested materials. Here, EDTA had the most significant affect on both the mechanical properties and the adhesive behavior of dentine. Citric acid did not affect dentine wettability, whereas the indentation properties and the mineralization were reduced. Similar effects were observed when ozone was used. The dentinal tubules were significantly widened in citric acid compared to the ozone group. EDTA causes considerable micromechanical surface alteration of dentine and gutta-percha, but represents the best option in clinical cases where a high adhesiveness of the filling materials is desired.

  5. Adhesion of adhesive resin cements to dental zirconia ceramic and human dentin

    OpenAIRE

    YANG Bin

    2008-01-01

    In this work, the long-term bond strengths of adhesive resin cements to zirconia ceramic and human dentin were evaluated, and resin-ceramic and resin-dentin bonding mechanisms were investigated. In chapter 3, the influence of surface pre-treatment on the bonding durability of three resin cements (Super-Bond C&B resin cement : SB, Clearfil™ Esthetic cement: CEC, Chemiace II: CH) to zirconia ceramic was studied. Most importantly, the influence of chemical reactions of functional monomers in...

  6. Dentin bonding--state of the art 1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdigão, J; Lopes, M

    1999-12-01

    The adhesion of restorative materials to the hard components of tooth structure has been a goal pursued by many researchers ever since Buonocore established the foundation for adhesive and preventive dentistry. Based on the industrial use of phosphoric acid to obtain better adhesion of paints and resin coatings to metal surfaces, Buonocore proposed that phosphoric acid could be used to transform the surface of enamel to "render it more receptive to adhesion." Subsequent research indicated that the formation of taglike resin prolongations into the enamel microporosities was the leading bonding mechanism of resin to phosphoric acid-etched enamel. The enamel bonding agents of the 1960s and 1970s progressively evolved into complex multibottle or universal adhesives in the early 1990s, which were designed to bond to enamel, dentin, composite, amalgam, porcelain, and non-precious metal. Although bonding to enamel has been a dependable technique, bonding to dentin still represents an overwhelming task because dentin is a naturally wet organic tissue penetrated by a tubular maze containing the odontoblastic process, which communicates with the pulp. This intrinsic moisture may actually benefit the chemistry of the newest adhesive systems, which must be applied on moist dentin to be effective. In fact, the collapse of the collagen that occurs on air-drying may prevent the adhesive monomers from penetrating the network of nano-channels formed by the dissolution of hydroxyapatite crystals between collagen fibrils. In view of the complexity of the mechanisms associated with these mechanisms, the objective of this review article is to summarize the most recent concepts in dentin bonding.

  7. Influence of fluoride- or triclosan-based desensitizing agents on adhesion of resin cements to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dündar, Mine; Cal, Ebru; Gökçe, Bülent; Türkün, Murat; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2010-10-01

    Effect of desensitizers on the bond strength of resin cements to dentin was evaluated. Intact premolars (N = 90) were embedded in polymethyl methacrylate; dentin surfaces were exposed, and they were randomly divided into two main groups of cements (Duolink (D), Variolink II (V); n = 45 per group) and then into three desensitizer subgroups (n = 15 per subgroup). Teeth in controls (C) were treated according to cements' adhesion protocols; the other two groups received either fluoride- [Aqua-Prep F (F)] or triclosan-based [Seal&Protect (T)] desensitizers. Ceramic disks (Empress 2) were adhered; specimens were thermocycled (×5,000 cycles, 5-55 ± 1°C, dwell time 30 s) and subjected to shear bond strength test (MPa ± SD) in a universal testing machine (crosshead speed 1 mm/min). Failure types were classified using scanning electron microscope. For V, application of both desensitizers (29.6 ± 7.8 and 22.8 ± 2.8 for F and T, respectively) did not present significantly different results than that of the VC (21.2 ± 2.3; p > 0.05, one-way ANOVA). In D, F (20.6 ± 2.4) showed significantly higher results (p types.

  8. The effect of glutathione on 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate cytotoxicity and on resin-dentine bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, M; Hiraishi, N; Islam, M S; Tamura, Y; Otsuki, M; Kasugai, S; Ohya, K; Tagami, J; Tay, F R

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the influence of reduced glutathione (GSH) application on 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) cytotoxicity on rat pulpal cells and evaluate the effect of etched-dentine treatment with GSH on the immediate microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of etch-and-rinse adhesive. The cytotoxicity of 10 mmol L(-1) HEMA, 10 mmol L(-1) HEMA + 1 mmol L(-1) GSH, 10 mmol L(-1) HEMA + 5 mmol L(-1) GSH and 10 mmol L(-1) HEMA + 10 mmol L(-1) GSH was compared (6 h and 24 h). Cells viability was measured by means of 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, followed by morphological observation of cells. Etched-dentine surfaces were rinsed and treated with one of the following solutions: 2% GSH, 5% GSH or 10% GSH, bonded with Adper Single Bond Plus (3M, ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) and restored with resin composite. The control group received no GSH treatment. After 1 day of water-storage at 37 °C, the specimens were subjected to μTBS testing. Cytotoxicity and μTBS data were analysed by one-way anova and Tukey post hoc tests (P cytotoxicity. GSH had neither positive nor negative influence on μTBS. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Triclosan-loaded poly(amido amine) dendrimer for simultaneous treatment and remineralization of human dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan; Yang, Jiaojiao; Lin, Zaifu; Li, Jiyao; Liang, Kunneng; Yuan, He; Li, Sheyu; Li, Jianshu

    2014-03-01

    In order to treat dental caries of damaged dentine, triclosan-loaded carboxyl-terminated poly(amido amine) dendrimer (PAMAM-COOH) is prepared and characterized. While being incubated in artificial saliva, triclosan-loaded PAMAM-COOH formulation can induce in situ remineralization of hydroxyapatite (HA) on etched dentine, and the regenerated HA has a similar crystal structure with natural dentine. It can also release the encapsulated triclosan for a long period. The interesting drug release profiles are controlled by both dendrimer encapsulation capability and the mineralization degree, which are ideal to obtain multifunctional properties of long-term release of anti-bacterial drug for local treatment during the remineralization process. The triclosan-loaded G4-COOH provides a general strategy to cure dental caries and repair damaged dentine at the same time, which forms a potential restorative material for dental repair.

  10. Morphological evaluation of cavity preparation surface after duraphat and Er:YAG laser treatment by scanning electronic microscopy; Avaliacao das alteracoes morfologicas da superficie do preparo cavitario apos condicionamento com verniz fluoretado a 2,26 % e laser de Er:YAG atraves de microscopia eletronica de varredura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Luciane Borelli

    2002-07-01

    The treatment of dental surface using different lasers to prevent dental caries has been studied for several on last years. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the morphological changes on dentin surface from pulpal wall of cavity preparations performed by high-speed drill, treated with 2,26% fluoride varnish (Duraphat) and Er:YAG laser, and then submitted after receiving or not to EDTA 15% treatment. Twenty Class V cavities were performed on ten humans molars. The specimens were randomly divided in to 4 groups: group 1- treatment with Duraphat followed by Er:YAG laser irradiation (120 mJ/ 4 Hz); group 2: Er:YAG laser irradiation, same parameters, followed by Duraphat treatment; group 3- same group 1 followed by immersion in EDTA (5 min); group 4 - same as group 2 followed by immersion in EDTA (5 min). The specimens were processed for SEM analysis. The micrographs showed that Duraphat treatment promoted morphological changes on dentin, closing dentinal tubules; the specimens treated by Duraphat and Er:YAG laser and immersed in EDTA (group 3) showed homogeneous surface, closed and protected dentinal tubules, maintenance of the fluoride varnish on the dentin surface and around the dentinal tubules, showing feasible and efficiency of these therapies the feasibility.(author)

  11. The effect of laser-treated titanium surface on human gingival fibroblast behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltriukienė, D; Sabaliauskas, V; Balčiūnas, E; Melninkaitis, A; Liutkevičius, E; Bukelskienė, V; Rutkūnas, V

    2014-03-01

    Surface modification, as a means of enhancing soft tissue integration in titanium would have significant advantages including less marginal bone resorption, predictable esthetic outcome, improved soft tissue stability, and seal against bacterial leakage. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of laser-roughened titanium surfaces on human gingival fibroblast (HGF) viability, proliferation, and adhesion. Titanium discs were ablated with impulse laser in four different patterns. Polished and sand-blasted titanium discs were used as control groups. Specimen surface properties were determined using optical profilometry and scanning electron microscopy. HGF behavior on modified surfaces was analyzed using cell adhesion, viability, proliferation, and ELISA assays. Results suggested that modified Ti surfaces did not affect the viability of HGFs and improved adhesion was measured in laser treatment groups after 24 h. However, proliferation study showed that the adsorbance of fibroblast cells after 72 h cultured on polished titanium was higher and comparable with that of control cells. As for focal adhesion kinase (FAK), cells grown on laser modified surfaces had higher expression of FAK as compared with polished titanium. In conclusion, tested laser-treated surfaces seem to favor HGF adhesion. There were no significant differences between different laser treatment groups. Copyright © 2013 Society of Plastics Engineers.

  12. Guided tissue remineralisation of partially demineralised human dentine.