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Sample records for dentate gyrus dg

  1. The dentate gyrus: fundamental neuroanatomical organization (dentate gyrus for dummies).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, David G; Scharfman, Helen E; Lavenex, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    The dentate gyrus is a simple cortical region that is an integral portion of the larger functional brain system called the hippocampal formation. In this review, the fundamental neuroanatomical organization of the dentate gyrus is described, including principal cell types and their connectivity, and a summary of the major extrinsic inputs of the dentate gyrus is provided. Together, this information provides essential information that can serve as an introduction to the dentate gyrus--a "dentate gyrus for dummies."

  2. The dentate gyrus: fundamental neuroanatomical organization (dentate gyrus for dummies)

    OpenAIRE

    Amaral, David G.; Scharfman, Helen E.; Lavenex, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    The dentate gyrus is a simple cortical region that is an integral portion of the larger functional brain system called the hippocampal formation. In this review, the fundamental neuroanatomical organization of the dentate gyrus is described, including principal cell types and their connectivity, and a summary of the major extrinsic inputs of the dentate gyrus is provided. Together, this information provides essential information that can serve as an introduction to the dentate gyrus — a “dent...

  3. Strong evidence for pattern separation in human dentate gyrus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berron, David; Schütze, Hartmut; Maass, Anne; Cardenas-Blanco, Arturo; Kuijf, Hugo J.; Kumaran, Dharshan; Düzel, Emrah

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampus is proposed to be critical in distinguishing between similar experiences by performing pattern separation computations that create orthogonalized representations for related episodes. Previous neuroimaging studies have provided indirect evidence that the dentate gyrus (DG) and CA3 hi

  4. Evolution of the mammalian dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hevner, Robert F

    2016-02-15

    The dentate gyrus (DG), a part of the hippocampal formation, has important functions in learning, memory, and adult neurogenesis. Compared with homologous areas in sauropsids (birds and reptiles), the mammalian DG is larger and exhibits qualitatively different phenotypes: 1) folded (C- or V-shaped) granule neuron layer, concave toward the hilus and delimited by a hippocampal fissure; 2) nonperiventricular adult neurogenesis; and 3) prolonged ontogeny, involving extensive abventricular (basal) migration and proliferation of neural stem and progenitor cells (NSPCs). Although gaps remain, available data indicate that these DG traits are present in all orders of mammals, including monotremes and marsupials. The exception is Cetacea (whales, dolphins, and porpoises), in which DG size, convolution, and adult neurogenesis have undergone evolutionary regression. Parsimony suggests that increased growth and convolution of the DG arose in stem mammals concurrently with nonperiventricular adult hippocampal neurogenesis and basal migration of NSPCs during development. These traits could all result from an evolutionary change that enhanced radial migration of NSPCs out of the periventricular zones, possibly by epithelial-mesenchymal transition, to colonize and maintain nonperiventricular proliferative niches. In turn, increased NSPC migration and clonal expansion might be a consequence of growth in the cortical hem (medial patterning center), which produces morphogens such as Wnt3a, generates Cajal-Retzius neurons, and is regulated by Lhx2. Finally, correlations between DG convolution and neocortical gyrification (or capacity for gyrification) suggest that enhanced abventricular migration and proliferation of NSPCs played a transformative role in growth and folding of neocortex as well as archicortex.

  5. Extended Interneuronal Network of the Dentate Gyrus

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    Gergely G. Szabo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Local interneurons control principal cells within individual brain areas, but anecdotal observations indicate that interneuronal axons sometimes extend beyond strict anatomical boundaries. Here, we use the case of the dentate gyrus (DG to show that boundary-crossing interneurons with cell bodies in CA3 and CA1 constitute a numerically significant and diverse population that relays patterns of activity generated within the CA regions back to granule cells. These results reveal the existence of a sophisticated retrograde GABAergic circuit that fundamentally extends the canonical interneuronal network.

  6. Adult Neurogenesis in the Mammalian Hippocampus: Why the Dentate Gyrus?

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    Drew, Liam J.; Fusi, Stefano; Hen, René

    2013-01-01

    In the adult mammalian brain, newly generated neurons are continuously incorporated into two networks: interneurons born in the subventricular zone migrate to the olfactory bulb, whereas the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus integrates locally born principal neurons. That the rest of the mammalian brain loses significant neurogenic capacity…

  7. Adult Neurogenesis in the Mammalian Hippocampus: Why the Dentate Gyrus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Liam J.; Fusi, Stefano; Hen, René

    2013-01-01

    In the adult mammalian brain, newly generated neurons are continuously incorporated into two networks: interneurons born in the subventricular zone migrate to the olfactory bulb, whereas the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus integrates locally born principal neurons. That the rest of the mammalian brain loses significant neurogenic capacity…

  8. Sex Steroids and the Dentate Gyrus

    OpenAIRE

    Hajszan, Tibor; Milner, Teresa A.; Leranth, Csaba

    2007-01-01

    In the late 1980s, the finding that the dentate gyrus contains more granule cells in the male than in the female of certain mouse strains provided the first indication that the dentate gyrus is a significant target for the effects of sex steroids during development. Gonadal hormones also play a crucial role in shaping the function and morphology of the adult brain. Besides reproduction-related processes, sex steroids participate in higher brain operations such as cognition and mood, in which ...

  9. Adult neurogenesis modifies excitability of the dentate gyrus.

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    Ikrar, Taruna; Guo, Nannan; He, Kaiwen; Besnard, Antoine; Levinson, Sally; Hill, Alexis; Lee, Hey-Kyoung; Hen, Rene; Xu, Xiangmin; Sahay, Amar

    2013-01-01

    Adult-born dentate granule neurons contribute to memory encoding functions of the dentate gyrus (DG) such as pattern separation. However, local circuit-mechanisms by which adult-born neurons partake in this process are poorly understood. Computational, neuroanatomical and electrophysiological studies suggest that sparseness of activation in the granule cell layer (GCL) is conducive for pattern separation. A sparse coding scheme is thought to facilitate the distribution of similar entorhinal inputs across the GCL to decorrelate overlapping representations and minimize interference. Here we used fast voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) imaging combined with laser photostimulation and electrical stimulation to examine how selectively increasing adult DG neurogenesis influences local circuit activity and excitability. We show that DG of mice with more adult-born neurons exhibits decreased strength of neuronal activation and more restricted excitation spread in GCL while maintaining effective output to CA3c. Conversely, blockade of adult hippocampal neurogenesis changed excitability of the DG in the opposite direction. Analysis of GABAergic inhibition onto mature dentate granule neurons in the DG of mice with more adult-born neurons shows a modest readjustment of perisomatic inhibitory synaptic gain without changes in overall inhibitory tone, presynaptic properties or GABAergic innervation pattern. Retroviral labeling of connectivity in mice with more adult-born neurons showed increased number of excitatory synaptic contacts of adult-born neurons onto hilar interneurons. Together, these studies demonstrate that adult hippocampal neurogenesis modifies excitability of mature dentate granule neurons and that this non-cell autonomous effect may be mediated by local circuit mechanisms such as excitatory drive onto hilar interneurons. Modulation of DG excitability by adult-born dentate granule neurons may enhance sparse coding in the GCL to influence pattern separation.

  10. Adult neurogenesis modifies excitability of the dentate gyrus

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    Taruna eIkrar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Adult-born dentate granule neurons contribute to memory encoding functions of the dentate gyrus (DG such as pattern separation. However, local circuit-mechanisms by which adult-born neurons partake in this process are poorly understood. Computational, neuroanatomical and electrophysiological studies suggest that sparseness of activation in the granule cell layer (GCL is conducive for pattern separation. A sparse coding scheme is thought to facilitate the distribution of similar entorhinal inputs across the GCL to decorrelate overlapping representations and minimize interference. Here we used fast voltage-sensitive dye (VSD imaging combined with laser photostimulation and electrical stimulation to examine how selectively increasing adult DG neurogenesis influences local circuit activity and excitability. We show that DG of mice with more adult-born neurons exhibits decreased strength of neuronal activation and more restricted excitation spread in GCL while maintaining effective output to CA3c. Conversely, blockade of adult hippocampal neurogenesis changed excitability of the DG in the opposite direction. Analysis of GABAergic inhibition onto mature dentate granule neurons in the DG of mice with more adult-born neurons shows a modest readjustment of perisomatic inhibitory synaptic gain without changes in overall inhibitory tone, presynaptic properties or GABAergic innervation pattern. Retroviral labeling of connectivity in mice with more adult-born neurons showed increased number of excitatory synaptic contacts of adult-born neurons onto hilar interneurons. Together, these studies demonstrate that adult hippocampal neurogenesis modifies excitability of mature dentate granule neurons and that this non-cell autonomous effect may be mediated by local circuit mechanisms such as excitatory drive onto hilar interneurons. Modulation of DG excitability by adult-born dentate granule neurons may enhance sparse coding in the GCL to influence pattern

  11. The neural cell adhesion molecule-derived peptide FGL facilitates long-term plasticity in the dentate gyrus in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dallérac, Glenn; Zerwas, Meike; Novikova, Tatiana

    2011-01-01

    and maintenance of synaptic plasticity in the dentate gyrus (DG) in vivo. For this, we first assessed the effect of the FGL peptide on synaptic functions at perforant path-dentate gyrus synapses in the anesthetized rat. FGL, or its control inactive peptide, was injected locally 60 min before applying high...

  12. Transmitter systems in the primate dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, D G; Campbell, M J

    1986-01-01

    While the dentate gyrus is clearly the simplest of the cortical fields that constitute the hippocampal formation, it nonetheless occupies a pivotal position in the flow of information through this region. Though it has been the subject of anatomical study for over a century and its major connections have been known for almost as long, the use of newly developed histochemical and immunohistochemical techniques have demonstrated many new facets of its intrinsic connectivity and afferent innervation. These techniques have established that it is innervated by cholinergic, noradrenergic, serotonergic and dopaminergic fibers. More recent studies have shown that fibers and cell bodies of the dentate gyrus are immunoreactive for variety of neuroactive substances including the excitatory amino acids glutamate and aspartate, the inhibitory transmitter GABA, as well as peptides of many types including the opioid peptides, enkephalin and dynorphin, several forms of somatostatin, neuropeptide Y, cholycystokinin, vasoactive intestinal peptide and substance P. In this review, we will briefly summarize the distribution of each of these putative transmitter systems within the dentate gyrus. The perspective emerges that the plethora of newly identified and chemically specific fiber systems enriches the classical understanding of the organization of this relatively simple cortical structure. Since there is thus far no evidence for the exclusion from the dentate gyrus of any class of transmitter bearing fiber or neuron found in the neocortex, it can be viewed as a relatively simple model system for studying the interactions of specific transmitter systems in a laminated, cortical structure.

  13. Microglia engulf viable newborn cells in the epileptic dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Cong; Koyama, Ryuta; Ikegaya, Yuji

    2016-09-01

    Microglia, which are the brain's resident immune cells, engulf dead neural progenitor cells during adult neurogenesis in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG). The number of newborn cells in the SGZ increases significantly after status epilepticus (SE), but whether and how microglia regulate the number of newborn cells after SE remain unclear. Here, we show that microglia rapidly eliminate newborn cells after SE by primary phagocytosis, a process by which viable cells are engulfed, thereby regulating the number of newborn cells that are incorporated into the DG. The number of newborn cells in the DG was increased at 5 days after SE in the adult mouse brain but rapidly decreased to the control levels within a week. During this period, microglia in the DG were highly active and engulfed newborn cells. We found that the majority of engulfed newborn cells were caspase-negative viable cells. Finally, inactivation of microglia with minocycline maintained the increase in the number of newborn cells after SE. Furthermore, minocycline treatment after SE induced the emergence of hilar ectopic granule cells. Thus, our findings suggest that microglia may contribute to homeostasis of the dentate neurogenic niche by eliminating excess newborn cells after SE via primary phagocytosis. GLIA 2016;64:1508-1517.

  14. Functional circuits of new neurons in the dentate gyrus

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    Carmen eVivar

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The hippocampus is crucial for memory formation. New neurons are added throughout life to the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG, a brain area considered important for differential storage of similar experiences and contexts. To better understand the functional contribution of adult neurogenesis to pattern separation processes, we recently used a novel synapse specific trans-neuronal tracing approach to identify the (sub cortical inputs to new dentate granule cells. It was observed that newly born neurons receive sequential innervation from structures important for memory function. Initially, septal-hippocampal cells provide input to new neurons, followed after about one month by perirhinal and lateral entorhinal cortex. These cortical areas are deemed relevant to encoding of novel environmental information and may enable pattern separation. Here, we review the developmental time-course and proposed functional relevance of new neurons, within the context of their unique neural circuitry.  

  15. Epithelial cells supply Sonic Hedgehog to the perinatal dentate gyrus via transport by platelets.

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    Choe, Youngshik; Huynh, Trung; Pleasure, Samuel J

    2015-10-12

    Dentate neural stem cells produce neurons throughout life in mammals. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is critical for maintenance of these cells; however, the perinatal source of Shh is enigmatic. In the present study, we examined the role of Shh expressed by hair follicles (HFs) that expand perinatally in temporal concordance with the proliferation of Shh-responding dentate stem cells. Specific inhibition of Shh from HFs or from epithelial sources in general hindered development of Shh-responding dentate stem cells. We also found that the blood-brain barrier (BBB) of the perinatal dentate gyrus (DG) is leaky with stem cells in the dentate exposed to blood-born factors. In attempting to identify how Shh might be transported in blood, we found that platelets contain epithelial Shh, provide Shh to the perinatal DG and that inhibition of platelet generation reduced hedgehog-responsive dentate stem cells.

  16. Corruption of the dentate gyrus by "dominant" granule cells: Implications for dentate gyrus function in health and disease.

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    Scharfman, Helen E; Myers, Catherine E

    2016-03-01

    The dentate gyrus (DG) and area CA3 of the hippocampus are highly organized lamellar structures which have been implicated in specific cognitive functions such as pattern separation and pattern completion. Here we describe how the anatomical organization and physiology of the DG and CA3 are consistent with structures that perform pattern separation and completion. We then raise a new idea related to the complex circuitry of the DG and CA3 where CA3 pyramidal cell 'backprojections' play a potentially important role in the sparse firing of granule cells (GCs), considered important in pattern separation. We also propose that GC axons, the mossy fibers, already known for their highly specialized structure, have a dynamic function that imparts variance--'mossy fiber variance'--which is important to pattern separation and completion. Computational modeling is used to show that when a subset of GCs become 'dominant,' one consequence is loss of variance in the activity of mossy fiber axons and a reduction in pattern separation and completion in the model. Empirical data are then provided using an example of 'dominant' GCs--subsets of GCs that develop abnormally and have increased excitability. Notably, these abnormal GCs have been identified in animal models of disease where DG-dependent behaviors are impaired. Together these data provide insight into pattern separation and completion, and suggest that behavioral impairment could arise from dominance of a subset of GCs in the DG-CA3 network.

  17. Effect of dentate gyrus disruption on remembering what happened where

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    Min W Jung

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Our previous studies using Bax knockout (Bax-KO mice, in which newly generated granule cells continue to accumulate, disrupting neural circuitry specifically in the dentate gyrus (DG, suggest the involvement of the DG in binding the internally-generated spatial map with sensory information on external landmarks (spatial map-object association in forming a distinct spatial context for each environment. In order to test whether the DG is also involved in binding the internal spatial map with sensory information on external events (spatial map-event association, we tested the behavior of Bax-KO mice in a delayed-non-match-to-place task. Performance of Bax-KO mice was indistinguishable from that of wild-type mice as long as there was no interruption during the delay period (tested up to 5 min, suggesting that on-line maintenance of working memory is intact in Bax-KO mice. However, Bax-KO mice showed profound performance deficits when they were removed from the maze during the delay period (interruption condition with a sufficiently long (65 s delay, suggesting that episodic memory was impaired in Bax-KO mice. Together with previous findings, these results suggest the role of the DG in binding spatial information derived from dead reckoning and nonspatial information, such as external objects and events, in the process of encoding episodic memory.

  18. Dentate Gyrus Is Necessary for Disambiguating Similar Object-Place Representations

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    Lee, Inah; Solivan, Frances

    2010-01-01

    Objects are often remembered with their locations, which is an important aspect of event memory. Despite the well-known involvement of the hippocampus in event memory, detailed intrahippocampal mechanisms are poorly understood. In particular, no experimental evidence has been provided in support of the role of the dentate gyrus (DG) in…

  19. Role of Dentate Gyrus in Aligning Internal Spatial Map to External Landmark

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    Lee, Jong Won; Kim, Woon Ryoung; Sun, Woong; Jung, Min Whan

    2009-01-01

    Humans and animals form internal representations of external space based on their own body movement (dead reckoning) as well as external landmarks. It is poorly understood, however, how different types of information are integrated to form a unified representation of external space. To examine the role of dentate gyrus (DG) in this process, we…

  20. Dentate Gyrus Is Necessary for Disambiguating Similar Object-Place Representations

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    Lee, Inah; Solivan, Frances

    2010-01-01

    Objects are often remembered with their locations, which is an important aspect of event memory. Despite the well-known involvement of the hippocampus in event memory, detailed intrahippocampal mechanisms are poorly understood. In particular, no experimental evidence has been provided in support of the role of the dentate gyrus (DG) in…

  1. The transcriptional response to chronic stress and glucocorticoid receptor blockade in the hippocampal dentate gyrus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Datson, Nicole A.; Speksnijder, Niels; Mayer, Joseph L.; Steenbergen, Peter J.; Korobko, Oksana; Goeman, Jelle; de Kloet, E. Ronald; Joels, Marian; Lucassen, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    The dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus plays a crucial role in learning and memory. This subregion is unique in its ability to generate new neurons throughout life and integrate these new neurons into the hippocampal circuitry. Neurogenesis has further been implicated in hippocampal plasticity an

  2. The transcriptional response to chronic stress and glucocorticoid receptor blockade in the hippocampal dentate gyrus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Datson, N.A.; Speksnijder, N.; Mayer, J.L.; Steenbergen, P.J.; Korobko, O.; Goeman, J.; de Kloet, E.R.; Joëls, M.; Lucassen, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    The dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus plays a crucial role in learning and memory. This subregion is unique in its ability to generate new neurons throughout life and integrate these new neurons into the hippocampal circuitry. Neurogenesis has further been implicated in hippocampal plasticity an

  3. D1/D5 Receptors and Histone Deacetylation Mediate the Gateway Effect of LTP in Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan-You; Lavine, Amir; Kandel, Denise B.; Yin, Deqi; Colnaghi, Luca; Drisaldi, Bettina; Kandel, Eric R.

    2014-01-01

    The dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus is critical for spatial memory and is also thought to be involved in the formation of drug-related associative memory. Here, we attempt to test an aspect of the Gateway Hypothesis, by studying the effect of consecutive exposure to nicotine and cocaine on long-term synaptic potentiation (LTP) in the DG. We…

  4. D1/D5 Receptors and Histone Deacetylation Mediate the Gateway Effect of LTP in Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus

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    Huang, Yan-You; Lavine, Amir; Kandel, Denise B.; Yin, Deqi; Colnaghi, Luca; Drisaldi, Bettina; Kandel, Eric R.

    2014-01-01

    The dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus is critical for spatial memory and is also thought to be involved in the formation of drug-related associative memory. Here, we attempt to test an aspect of the Gateway Hypothesis, by studying the effect of consecutive exposure to nicotine and cocaine on long-term synaptic potentiation (LTP) in the DG. We…

  5. Neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus: carrying the message or dictating the tone

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    Piatti, Verónica C.; Ewell, Laura A.; Leutgeb, Jill K.

    2013-01-01

    The dentate gyrus (DG) is a region in the mammalian brain critical for memory encoding with a neuronal architecture and function that deviates considerably from other cortical areas. One of the major differences of the DG compared to other brain regions is the finding that the dentate gyrus generates new principal neurons that are continuously integrated into a fully functional neural circuit throughout life. Another distinguishing characteristic of the dentate network is that the majority of principal neurons are held under strong inhibition and rarely fire action potentials. These two findings raise the question why a predominantly silent network would need to continually incorporate more functional units. The sparse nature of the neural code in the DG is thought to be fundamental to dentate network function, yet the relationship between neurogenesis and low activity levels in the network remains largely unknown. Clues to the functional role of new neurons come from inquiries at the cellular as well as the behavioral level. Few studies have bridged the gap between these levels of inquiry by considering the role of young neurons within the complex dentate network during distinct stages of memory processing. We will review and discuss from a network perspective, the functional role of immature neurons and how their unique cellular properties can modulate the dentate network in memory guided behaviors. PMID:23576950

  6. Status Epilepticus Induced Spontaneous Dentate Gyrus Spikes: In Vivo Current Source Density Analysis.

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    Flynn, Sean P; Barriere, Sylvain; Barrier, Sylvain; Scott, Rod C; Lenck-Santini, Pierre-Pascal; Holmes, Gregory L

    2015-01-01

    The dentate gyrus is considered to function as an inhibitory gate limiting excitatory input to the hippocampus. Following status epilepticus (SE), this gating function is reduced and granule cells become hyper-excitable. Dentate spikes (DS) are large amplitude potentials observed in the dentate gyrus (DG) of normal animals. DS are associated with membrane depolarization of granule cells, increased activity of hilar interneurons and suppression of CA3 and CA1 pyramidal cell firing. Therefore, DS could act as an anti-excitatory mechanism. Because of the altered gating function of the dentate gyrus following SE, we sought to investigate how DS are affected following pilocarpine-induced SE. Two weeks following lithium-pilocarpine SE induction, hippocampal EEG was recorded in male Sprague-Dawley rats with 16-channel silicon probes under urethane anesthesia. Probes were placed dorso-ventrally to encompass either CA1-CA3 or CA1-DG layers. Large amplitude spikes were detected from EEG recordings and subject to current source density analysis. Probe placement was verified histologically to evaluate the anatomical localization of current sinks and the origin of DS. In 9 of 11 pilocarpine-treated animals and two controls, DS were confirmed with large current sinks in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. DS frequency was significantly increased in pilocarpine-treated animals compared to controls. Additionally, in pilocarpine-treated animals, DS displayed current sinks in the outer, middle and/or inner molecular layers. However, there was no difference in the frequency of events when comparing between layers. This suggests that following SE, DS can be generated by input from medial and lateral entorhinal cortex, or within the dentate gyrus. DS were associated with an increase in multiunit activity in the granule cell layer, but no change in CA1. These results suggest that following SE there is an increase in DS activity, potentially arising from hyperexcitability along the

  7. Status Epilepticus Induced Spontaneous Dentate Gyrus Spikes: In Vivo Current Source Density Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean P Flynn

    Full Text Available The dentate gyrus is considered to function as an inhibitory gate limiting excitatory input to the hippocampus. Following status epilepticus (SE, this gating function is reduced and granule cells become hyper-excitable. Dentate spikes (DS are large amplitude potentials observed in the dentate gyrus (DG of normal animals. DS are associated with membrane depolarization of granule cells, increased activity of hilar interneurons and suppression of CA3 and CA1 pyramidal cell firing. Therefore, DS could act as an anti-excitatory mechanism. Because of the altered gating function of the dentate gyrus following SE, we sought to investigate how DS are affected following pilocarpine-induced SE. Two weeks following lithium-pilocarpine SE induction, hippocampal EEG was recorded in male Sprague-Dawley rats with 16-channel silicon probes under urethane anesthesia. Probes were placed dorso-ventrally to encompass either CA1-CA3 or CA1-DG layers. Large amplitude spikes were detected from EEG recordings and subject to current source density analysis. Probe placement was verified histologically to evaluate the anatomical localization of current sinks and the origin of DS. In 9 of 11 pilocarpine-treated animals and two controls, DS were confirmed with large current sinks in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. DS frequency was significantly increased in pilocarpine-treated animals compared to controls. Additionally, in pilocarpine-treated animals, DS displayed current sinks in the outer, middle and/or inner molecular layers. However, there was no difference in the frequency of events when comparing between layers. This suggests that following SE, DS can be generated by input from medial and lateral entorhinal cortex, or within the dentate gyrus. DS were associated with an increase in multiunit activity in the granule cell layer, but no change in CA1. These results suggest that following SE there is an increase in DS activity, potentially arising from

  8. Distinct gamma oscillations in the distal dendritic fields of the dentate gyrus and the CA1 area of mouse hippocampus.

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    Lasztóczi, Bálint; Klausberger, Thomas

    2017-04-08

    The molecular layer of the dentate gyrus and the anatomically adjacent stratum lacunosum-moleculare of CA1 area, represent afferent areas at distinct levels of the hippocampal trisynaptic loop. Afferents to the dentate gyrus and CA1 area originate from different cell populations, including projection cells in entorhinal cortex layers two and three, respectively. To determine the organization of oscillatory activities along these terminal fields, we recorded local field potentials from multiple sites in the dentate gyrus and CA1 area of the awake mice, and localized gamma frequency (30-150 Hz) oscillations in different layers by means of current source density analysis. During theta oscillations, we observed different temporal and spectral organization of gamma oscillations in the dendritic layers of the dentate gyrus and CA1 area, with a sharp transition across the hippocampal fissure. In CA1 stratum lacunosum-moleculare, transient mid-frequency gamma oscillations (CA1-gammaM; 80 Hz) occurred on theta cycle peaks, while in the dentate gyrus, fast (DG-gammaF; 110 Hz), and slow (DG-gammaS; 40 Hz) gamma oscillations preferentially occurred on troughs of theta waves. Units in dentate gyrus, in contrast to units in CA1 pyramidal layer, phase-coupled to DG-gammaF, which was largely independent from CA1 fast gamma oscillations (CA1-gammaF) of similar frequency and timing. Spike timing of units recorded in either CA1 area or dentate gyrus were modulated by CA1-gammaM. Our experiments disclosed a set of gamma oscillations that differentially regulate neuronal activity in the dentate gyrus and CA1 area, and may allow flexible segregation and integration of information across different levels of hippocampal circuitry.

  9. Separation or binding? Role of the dentate gyrus in hippocampal mnemonic processing.

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    Lee, Jong Won; Jung, Min Whan

    2017-02-04

    As a major component of the hippocampal trisynaptic circuit, the dentate gyrus (DG) relays inputs from the entorhinal cortex to the CA3 subregion. Although the anatomy of the DG is well characterized, its contribution to hippocampal mnemonic processing is still unclear. A currently popular theory proposes that the primary function of the DG is to orthogonalize incoming input patterns into non-overlapping patterns (pattern separation). We critically review the available data and conclude that the theoretical support and empirical evidence for this theory are not strong. We then review an alternative theory that posits a role for the DG in binding together different types of incoming sensory information. We conclude that 'binding' better captures the contribution of the DG to memory encoding than 'pattern separation'.

  10. Monosynaptic inputs to new neurons in the dentate gyrus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vivar, Carmen; Potter, Michelle C; Choi, Jiwon; Lee, Ji-Young; Stringer, Thomas P; Callaway, Edward M; Gage, Fred H; Suh, Hoonkyo; van Praag, Henriette

    2012-01-01

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is considered important for cognition. The integration of newborn dentate gyrus granule cells into the existing network is regulated by afferent neuronal activity of unspecified origin...

  11. A Computational Model of Pattern Separation Efficiency in the Dentate Gyrus with Implications in Schizophrenia

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    Faramarz eFaghihi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Information processing in the hippocampus begins by transferring spiking activity of the Entorhinal Cortex (EC into the Dentate Gyrus (DG. Activity pattern in the EC is separated by the DG such that it plays an important role in hippocampal functions including memory. The structural and physiological parameters of these neural networks enable the hippocampus to be efficient in encoding a large number of inputs that animals receive and process in their life time. The neural encoding capacity of the DG depends on its single neurons encoding and pattern separation efficiency. In this study, encoding by the DG is modelled such that single neurons and pattern separation efficiency are measured using simulations of different parameter values. For this purpose, a probabilistic model of single neurons efficiency is presented to study the role of structural and physiological parameters. Known neurons number of the EC and the DG is used to construct a neural network by electrophysiological features of neuron in the DG. Separated inputs as activated neurons in the EC with different firing probabilities are presented into the DG. For different connectivity rates between the EC and DG, pattern separation efficiency of the DG is measured. The results show that in the absence of feedback inhibition on the DG neurons, the DG demonstrates low separation efficiency and high firing frequency. Feedback inhibition can increase separation efficiency while resulting in very low single neuron’s encoding efficiency in the DG and very low firing frequency of neurons in the DG (sparse spiking. This work presents a mechanistic explanation for experimental observations in the hippocampus, in combination with theoretical measures. Moreover, the model predicts a critical role for impaired inhibitory neurons in schizophrenia where deficiency in pattern separation of the DG has been observed.

  12. Local and Long-Range Circuit Connections to Hilar Mossy Cells in the Dentate Gyrus

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    Sun, Yanjun; Grieco, Steven F.; Holmes, Todd C.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Hilar mossy cells are the prominent glutamatergic cell type in the dentate hilus of the dentate gyrus (DG); they have been proposed to have critical roles in the DG network. To better understand how mossy cells contribute to DG function, we have applied new viral genetic and functional circuit mapping approaches to quantitatively map and compare local and long-range circuit connections of mossy cells and dentate granule cells in the mouse. The great majority of inputs to mossy cells consist of two parallel inputs from within the DG: an excitatory input pathway from dentate granule cells and an inhibitory input pathway from local DG inhibitory neurons. Mossy cells also receive a moderate degree of excitatory and inhibitory CA3 input from proximal CA3 subfields. Long range inputs to mossy cells are numerically sparse, and they are only identified readily from the medial septum and the septofimbrial nucleus. In comparison, dentate granule cells receive most of their inputs from the entorhinal cortex. The granule cells receive significant synaptic inputs from the hilus and the medial septum, and they also receive direct inputs from both distal and proximal CA3 subfields, which has been underdescribed in the existing literature. Our slice-based physiological mapping studies further supported the identified circuit connections of mossy cells and granule cells. Together, our data suggest that hilar mossy cells are major local circuit integrators and they exert modulation of the activity of dentate granule cells as well as the CA3 region through “back-projection” pathways. PMID:28451637

  13. The role of the dorsal dentate gyrus in object and object-context recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dees, Richard L; Kesner, Raymond P

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of the dorsal dentate gyrus (dDG) in object recognition memory using a black box and object-context recognition memory using a clear box with available cues that define a spatial context. Based on a 10 min retention interval between the study phase and the test phase, the results indicated that dDG lesioned rats are impaired when compared to controls in the object-context recognition test in the clear box. However, there were no reliable differences between the dDG lesioned rats and the control group for the object recognition test in the black box. Even though the dDG lesioned rats were more active in object exploration, the habituation gradients did not differ. These results suggest that the dentate gyrus lesioned rats are clearly impaired when there is an important contribution of context. Furthermore, based on a 24 h retention interval in the black box the dDG lesioned rats were impaired compared to controls.

  14. Role of the dentate gyrus in mediating object-spatial configuration recognition.

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    Kesner, Raymond P; Taylor, James O; Hoge, Jennifer; Andy, Ford

    2015-02-01

    In the present study the effects of dorsal dentate gyrus (dDG) lesions in rats were tested on recognition memory tasks based on the interaction between objects, features of objects, and spatial features. The results indicated that the rats with dDG lesions did not differ from controls in recognition for a change within object feature configuration and object recognition tasks. In contrast, there was a deficit for the dDG lesioned rats relative to controls in recognition for a change within object-spatial feature configuration, complex object-place feature configuration and spatial recognition tasks. It is suggested that the dDG subregion of the hippocampus supports object-place and complex object-place feature information via a conjunctive encoding process.

  15. The CA3 "backprojection" to the dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharfman, Helen E

    2007-01-01

    The hippocampus is typically described in the context of the trisynaptic circuit, a pathway that relays information from the perforant path to the dentate gyrus, dentate to area CA3, and CA3 to area CA1. Associated with this concept is the assumption that most hippocampal information processing occurs along the trisynaptic circuit. However, the entorhinal cortex may not be the only major extrinsic input to consider, and the trisynaptic circuit may not be the only way information is processed in hippocampus. Area CA3 receives input from a variety of sources, and may be as much of an "entry point" to hippocampus as the dentate gyrus. The axon of CA3 pyramidal cells targets diverse cell types, and has commissural projections, which together make it able to send information to much more of the hippocampus than granule cells. Therefore, CA3 pyramidal cells seem better designed to spread information through hippocampus than the granule cells. From this perspective, CA3 may be a point of entry that receives information which needs to be "broadcasted," whereas the dentate gyrus may be a point of entry that receives information with more selective needs for hippocampal processing. One aspect of the argument that CA3 pyramidal cells have a widespread projection is based on a part of its axonal arbor that has received relatively little attention, the collaterals that project in the opposite direction to the trisynaptic circuit, "back" to the dentate gyrus. The evidence for this "backprojection" to the dentate gyrus is strong, particularly in area CA3c, the region closest to the dentate gyrus, and in temporal hippocampus. The influence on granule cells is indirect, through hilar mossy cells and GABAergic neurons of the dentate gyrus, and appears to include direct projections in the case of CA3c pyramidal cells of ventral hippocampus. Physiological studies suggest that normally area CA3 does not have a robust excitatory influence on granule cells, but serves instead to inhibit

  16. The enigmatic mossy cell of the dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharfman, Helen E

    2016-09-01

    Mossy cells comprise a large fraction of the cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, suggesting that their function in this region is important. They are vulnerable to ischaemia, traumatic brain injury and seizures, and their loss could contribute to dentate gyrus dysfunction in such conditions. Mossy cell function has been unclear because these cells innervate both glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons within the dentate gyrus, contributing to a complex circuitry. It has also been difficult to directly and selectively manipulate mossy cells to study their function. In light of the new data generated using methods to preferentially eliminate or activate mossy cells in mice, it is timely to ask whether mossy cells have become any less enigmatic than they were in the past.

  17. DNA Methyltransferase 1 Is Indispensable for Development of the Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Hirofumi; Murao, Naoya; Kimura, Ayaka; Matsuda, Taito; Namihira, Masakazu; Nakashima, Kinichi

    2016-06-01

    Development of the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) in the mammalian brain is achieved through multiple processes during late embryonic and postnatal stages, with each developmental step being strictly governed by extracellular cues and intracellular mechanisms. Here, we show that the maintenance DNA methyltransferase 1 (Dnmt1) is critical for development of the DG in the mouse. Deletion of Dnmt1 in neural stem cells (NSCs) at the beginning of DG development led to a smaller size of the granule cell layer in the DG. NSCs lacking Dnmt1 failed to establish proper radial processes or to migrate into the subgranular zone, resulting in aberrant neuronal production in the molecular layer of the DG and a reduction of integrated neurons in the granule cell layer. Interestingly, prenatal deletion of Dnmt1 in NSCs affected not only the developmental progression of the DG but also the properties of NSCs maintained into adulthood: Dnmt1-deficient NSCs displayed impaired neurogenic ability and proliferation. We also found that Dnmt1 deficiency in NSCs decreased the expression of Reelin signaling components in the developing DG and increased that of the cell cycle inhibitors p21 and p57 in the adult DG. Together, these findings led us to propose that Dnmt1 functions as a key regulator to ensure the proper development of the DG, as well as the proper status of NSCs maintained into adulthood, by modulating extracellular signaling and intracellular mechanisms. Here, we provide evidence that Dnmt1 is required for the proper development of the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG). Deletion of Dnmt1 in neural stem cells (NSCs) at an early stage of DG development impaired the ability of NSCs to establish secondary radial glial scaffolds and to migrate into the subgranular zone of the DG, leading to aberrant neuronal production in the molecular layer, increased cell death, and decreased granule neuron production. Prenatal deletion of Dnmt1 in NSCs also induced defects in the proliferation and

  18. Slow gamma rhythms in CA3 are entrained by slow gamma activity in the dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Yi-Tse; Zheng, Chenguang; Colgin, Laura Lee

    2016-12-01

    In hippocampal area CA1, slow (∼25-55 Hz) and fast (∼60-100 Hz) gamma rhythms are coupled with different CA1 afferents. CA1 slow gamma is coupled to inputs from CA3, and CA1 fast gamma is coupled to inputs from the medial entorhinal cortex (Colgin LL, Denninger T, Fyhn M, Hafting T, Bonnevie T, Jensen O, Moser MB, Moser EI. Nature 462: 353-357, 2009). CA3 gives rise to highly divergent associational projections, and it is possible that reverberating activity in these connections generates slow gamma rhythms in the hippocampus. However, hippocampal gamma is maximal upstream of CA3, in the dentate gyrus (DG) region (Bragin A, Jando G, Nadasdy Z, Hetke J, Wise K, Buzsaki G. J Neurosci 15: 47-60, 1995). Thus it is possible that slow gamma in CA3 is driven by inputs from DG, yet few studies have examined slow and fast gamma rhythms in DG recordings. Here we investigated slow and fast gamma rhythms in paired recordings from DG and CA3 in freely moving rats to determine whether slow and fast gamma rhythms in CA3 are entrained by DG. We found that slow gamma rhythms, as opposed to fast gamma rhythms, were particularly prominent in DG. We investigated directional causal influences between DG and CA3 by Granger causality analysis and found that DG slow gamma influences CA3 slow gamma. Moreover, DG place cell spikes were strongly phase-locked to CA3 slow gamma rhythms, suggesting that DG excitatory projections to CA3 may underlie this directional influence. These results indicate that slow gamma rhythms do not originate in CA3 but rather slow gamma activity upstream in DG entrains slow gamma rhythms in CA3. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Fluoxetine and the dentate gyrus: memory, recovery of function, and electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Julian R; Wu, Ying; Epp, Jonathon R; Sutherland, Robert J

    2007-09-01

    Chronic fluoxetine increases neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG). In view of the widespread clinical use of fluoxetine and the well-established role of the DG in memory, surprisingly few studies have examined the effects of fluoxetine on memory and hippocampal electrophysiology. Additionally, few studies have evaluated the potential for fluoxetine to promote recovery of function after DG damage. Therefore, we studied the effects of long-term administration of fluoxetine on both spatial-reference memory and working memory, recovery of function after intrahippocampal colchicine infusions, which can destroy 50-70% of DG granule cells, and electrophysiological responses in the DG to perforant path stimulation in freely moving rats. Chronic fluoxetine did not affect matching-to-place or reference-memory performance in intact rats in the Morris water-maze task. Surprisingly, in rats with DG damage, recovery of function on both tasks was adversely affected by chronic fluoxetine. Finally, unlike an earlier study that reported fluoxetine-induced increases in hippocampal population spike amplitudes and excitatory postsynaptic potential slopes in urethane-anesthetized rats, electrophysiological measures in DG of freely moving rats were not affected by chronic fluoxetine treatment.

  20. Impaired neurogenesis of the dentate gyrus is associated with pattern separation deficits: A computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, Faramarz; Moustafa, Ahmed A

    2016-09-01

    The separation of input patterns received from the entorhinal cortex (EC) by the dentate gyrus (DG) is a well-known critical step of information processing in the hippocampus. Although the role of interneurons in separation pattern efficiency of the DG has been theoretically known, the balance of neurogenesis of excitatory neurons and interneurons as well as its potential role in information processing in the DG is not fully understood. In this work, we study separation efficiency of the DG for different rates of neurogenesis of interneurons and excitatory neurons using a novel computational model in which we assume an increase in the synaptic efficacy between excitatory neurons and interneurons and then its decay over time. Information processing in the EC and DG was simulated as information flow in a two layer feed-forward neural network. The neurogenesis rate was modeled as the percentage of new born neurons added to the neuronal population in each time bin. The results show an important role of an optimal neurogenesis rate of interneurons and excitatory neurons in the DG in efficient separation of inputs from the EC in pattern separation tasks. The model predicts that any deviation of the optimal values of neurogenesis rates leads to different decreased levels of the separation deficits of the DG which influences its function to encode memory.

  1. Retrieval of morphine-associated context induces cFos in dentate gyrus neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Phillip D; Raghavan, Ramya K; Yun, Sanghee; Latchney, Sarah E; McGovern, Mary-Katherin; García, Emily F; Birnbaum, Shari G; Eisch, Amelia J

    2015-04-01

    Addiction has been proposed to emerge from associations between the drug and the reward-associated contexts. This associative learning has a cellular correlate, as there are more cFos+ neurons in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) after psychostimulant conditioned place preference (CPP) versus saline controls. However, it is unknown whether morphine CPP leads to a similar DG activation, or whether DG activation is due to locomotion, handling, pharmacological effects, or-as data from contextual fear learning suggests-exposure to the drug-associated context. To explore this, we employed an unbiased, counterbalanced, and shortened CPP design that led to place preference and more DG cFos+ cells. Next, mice underwent morphine CPP but were then sequestered into the morphine-paired (conditioned stimulus+ [CS+]) or saline-paired (CS-) context on test day. Morphine-paired mice sequestered to CS+ had ∼30% more DG cFos+ cells than saline-paired mice. Furthermore, Bregma analysis revealed morphine-paired mice had more cFos+ cells in CS+ compared to CS- controls. Notably, there was no significant difference in DG cFos+ cell number after handling alone or after receiving morphine in home cage. Thus, retrieval of morphine-associated context is accompanied by activation of hippocampal DG granule cell neurons.

  2. Establishment of an in vivo electroporation method into postnatal newborn neurons in the dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hidenori; Morishita, Rika; Iwamoto, Ikuko; Nagata, Koh-ichi

    2014-12-01

    Electroporation-mediated gene transfer has been developed for the analysis of mammalian brain development in vivo. Indeed, in utero electroporation method is widely used for the investigation of the mouse embryonic cortical development while in vivo electroporation using neonatal mouse brain is employed for the analysis of the rostral migratory stream (RMS) and postnatal olfactory neurogenesis. In the present study, we established a stable gene-transfer method to dentate gyrus (DG) neurons by carefully determining the in vivo electroporation conditions, such as position and direction of electrode, voltage for electric pulses, and interval between electroporation and sample preparation. Consequently, GFP-positive cells in DG were observed to extend branched dendrites and long axons into the molecular layer and the hilus, respectively, 21 days after electrporation. They were morphologically identified as dentate granule neurons with many protrusions on dendrites, and some of them had wide head and thin neck that resembled matured mushroom spines. Expression of GFP in dentate neurons sustained for at least 9 months after electroporation under our experimental conditions. Taken together, the method developed here could be a powerful new tool for the analysis of the postnatal DG development.

  3. Increases in Doublecortin Immunoreactivity in the Dentate Gyrus following Extinction of Heroin-Seeking Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan P. Hicks

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult-generated neurons in the dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampus play a role in various forms of learning and memory. However, adult born neurons in the DG, while still at an immature stage, exhibit unique electrophysiological properties and are also functionally implicated in learning and memory processes. We investigated the effects of extinction of drug-seeking behavior on the formation of immature neurons in the DG as assessed by quantification of doublecortin (DCX immunoreactivity. Rats were allowed to self-administer heroin (0.03 mg/kg/infusion for 12 days and then subjected either to 10 days of extinction training or forced abstinence. We also examined extinction responding patterns following heroin self-administration in glial fibrillary acidic protein thymidine kinase (GFAP-tk transgenic mice, which have been previously demonstrated to show reduced formation of immature and mature neurons in the DG following treatment with ganciclovir (GCV. We found that extinction training increased DCX immunoreactivity in the dorsal DG as compared with animals undergoing forced abstinence, and that GCV-treated GFAP-tk mice displayed impaired extinction learning as compared to saline-treated mice. Our results suggest that extinction of drug-seeking behavior increases the formation of immature neurons in the DG and that these neurons may play a functional role in extinction learning.

  4. Increases in doublecortin immunoreactivity in the dentate gyrus following extinction of heroin-seeking behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Megan P; Wischerath, Kelly C; Lacrosse, Amber L; Olive, M Foster

    2012-01-01

    Adult-generated neurons in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus play a role in various forms of learning and memory. However, adult born neurons in the DG, while still at an immature stage, exhibit unique electrophysiological properties and are also functionally implicated in learning and memory processes. We investigated the effects of extinction of drug-seeking behavior on the formation of immature neurons in the DG as assessed by quantification of doublecortin (DCX) immunoreactivity. Rats were allowed to self-administer heroin (0.03 mg/kg/infusion) for 12 days and then subjected either to 10 days of extinction training or forced abstinence. We also examined extinction responding patterns following heroin self-administration in glial fibrillary acidic protein thymidine kinase (GFAP-tk) transgenic mice, which have been previously demonstrated to show reduced formation of immature and mature neurons in the DG following treatment with ganciclovir (GCV). We found that extinction training increased DCX immunoreactivity in the dorsal DG as compared with animals undergoing forced abstinence, and that GCV-treated GFAP-tk mice displayed impaired extinction learning as compared to saline-treated mice. Our results suggest that extinction of drug-seeking behavior increases the formation of immature neurons in the DG and that these neurons may play a functional role in extinction learning.

  5. Transmembrane protein 108 is required for glutamatergic transmission in dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Hui-Feng; Sun, Xiang-Dong; Bates, Ryan; Xiong, Lei; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Fang; Li, Lei; Zhang, Hong-Sheng; Wang, Shun-Qi; Xiong, Ming-Tao; Patel, Mihir; Stranahan, Alexis M; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Li, Bao-Ming; Mei, Lin

    2017-01-31

    Neurotransmission in dentate gyrus (DG) is critical for spatial coding, learning memory, and emotion processing. Although DG dysfunction is implicated in psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, underlying pathological mechanisms remain unclear. Here we report that transmembrane protein 108 (Tmem108), a novel schizophrenia susceptibility gene, is highly enriched in DG granule neurons and its expression increased at the postnatal period critical for DG development. Tmem108 is specifically expressed in the nervous system and enriched in the postsynaptic density fraction. Tmem108-deficient neurons form fewer and smaller spines, suggesting that Tmem108 is required for spine formation and maturation. In agreement, excitatory postsynaptic currents of DG granule neurons were decreased in Tmem108 mutant mice, indicating a hypofunction of glutamatergic activity. Further cell biological studies indicate that Tmem108 is necessary for surface expression of AMPA receptors. Tmem108-deficient mice display compromised sensorimotor gating and cognitive function. Together, these observations indicate that Tmem108 plays a critical role in regulating spine development and excitatory transmission in DG granule neurons. When Tmem108 is mutated, mice displayed excitatory/inhibitory imbalance and behavioral deficits relevant to schizophrenia, revealing potential pathophysiological mechanisms of schizophrenia.

  6. Alpha-CaMKII deficiency causes immature dentate gyrus, a novel candidate endophenotype of psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamasaki Nobuyuki

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Elucidating the neural and genetic factors underlying psychiatric illness is hampered by current methods of clinical diagnosis. The identification and investigation of clinical endophenotypes may be one solution, but represents a considerable challenge in human subjects. Here we report that mice heterozygous for a null mutation of the alpha-isoform of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (alpha-CaMKII+/- have profoundly dysregulated behaviours and impaired neuronal development in the dentate gyrus (DG. The behavioral abnormalities include a severe working memory deficit and an exaggerated infradian rhythm, which are similar to symptoms seen in schizophrenia, bipolar mood disorder and other psychiatric disorders. Transcriptome analysis of the hippocampus of these mutants revealed that the expression levels of more than 2000 genes were significantly changed. Strikingly, among the 20 most downregulated genes, 5 had highly selective expression in the DG. Whereas BrdU incorporated cells in the mutant mouse DG was increased by more than 50 percent, the number of mature neurons in the DG was dramatically decreased. Morphological and physiological features of the DG neurons in the mutants were strikingly similar to those of immature DG neurons in normal rodents. Moreover, c-Fos expression in the DG after electric footshock was almost completely and selectively abolished in the mutants. Statistical clustering of human post-mortem brains using 10 genes differentially-expressed in the mutant mice were used to classify individuals into two clusters, one of which contained 16 of 18 schizophrenic patients. Nearly half of the differentially-expressed probes in the schizophrenia-enriched cluster encoded genes that are involved in neurogenesis or in neuronal migration/maturation, including calbindin, a marker for mature DG neurons. Based on these results, we propose that an "immature DG" in adulthood might induce alterations in behavior and

  7. Adult neurogenesis in the intact and epileptic dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parent, Jack M

    2007-01-01

    Neurogenesis persists throughout life in the adult mammalian dentate gyrus. Adult-born dentate granule cells integrate into existing hippocampal circuitry and may provide network plasticity necessary for certain forms of hippocampus-dependent learning and memory. Neural stem cells and neurogenesis in the adult dentate gyrus are regulated by a variety of environmental, physiological, and molecular factors. These include aging, stress, exercise, neurovascular components of the stem cell niche, growth factors, neurotransmitters, and hormones. Seizure activity also influences dentate granule cell neurogenesis. Production of adult-born neurons increases in rodent models of temporal lobe epilepsy, and both newborn and pre-existing granule neurons contribute to aberrant axonal reorganization in the epileptic hippocampus. Prolonged seizures also disrupt the migration of dentate granule cell progenitors and lead to hilar-ectopic granule cells. The ectopic granule neurons appear to integrate abnormally and contribute to network hyperexcitability. Similar findings of granule cell layer dispersion and ectopic granule neurons in human TLE suggest that aberrant neurogenesis contributes to epileptogenesis or learning and memory disturbances in this epilepsy syndrome.

  8. Apoptosis and autophagy control cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus following hippocampal lesion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ju Zhou; Wei Peng; Qi Zhu; Shan Gong; Lidong Shan; Tadashi Hisamitsu; Shiyu Guo; Xinghong Jiang

    2010-01-01

    Brain injuries often result in the promotion of cell proliferation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus(DG),but the number of newborn cells declines with time.However,the cause of this decline remains poorly understood.Elucidation of the fate of these newborn cells will further the understanding of the pathological process and treatment of brain injury.In the present study,the number of newborn cells was quantitatively analyzed using an unbiased stereological method following hippocampal lesion by kainic acid,in combination with detection of apoptosis and autophagy.Results revealed that hippocampal lesion resulted in a significantly increased number of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine(BrdU)-positive cells in the DG,which subsequently decreased with time.BrdU/cleaved caspase-3 double-labeled cells were detected in the granular cell layer and hilus of DG.However,expressions of LC3-11,Beclin 1,and p53 were upregulated,and pro-caspase-3 and Bcl-2 were downregulated.Results indicated that hippocampal lesion in adult rats resulted in significant cell proliferation in the DG,which subsequently reduced with time.In addition,results suggested that apoptosis and autophagic processes could regulate cell proliferation in the DG following hippocampal lesion.

  9. Neuromodulation of the Feedforward Dentate Gyrus-CA3 Microcircuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Luke Y.; Bacon, Travis J.; Tigaret, Cezar M.; Mellor, Jack R.

    2016-01-01

    The feedforward dentate gyrus-CA3 microcircuit in the hippocampus is thought to activate ensembles of CA3 pyramidal cells and interneurons to encode and retrieve episodic memories. The creation of these CA3 ensembles depends on neuromodulatory input and synaptic plasticity within this microcircuit. Here we review the mechanisms by which the neuromodulators aceylcholine, noradrenaline, dopamine, and serotonin reconfigure this microcircuit and thereby infer the net effect of these modulators on the processes of episodic memory encoding and retrieval. PMID:27799909

  10. Neuromodulation of the feedforward dentate gyrus-CA3 microcircuit

    OpenAIRE

    Luke Yuri Prince; Travis J Bacon; Tigaret, Cezar M.; Mellor, Jack R.

    2016-01-01

    The feedforward dentate gyrus-CA3 microcircuit in the hippocampus is thought to activate ensembles of CA3 pyramidal cells and interneurons to encode and retrieve episodic memories. The creation of these CA3 ensembles depends on neuromodulatory input and synaptic plasticity within this microcircuit. Here we review the mechanisms by which the neuromodulators aceylcholine, noradrenaline, dopamine, and serotonin reconfigure this microcircuit and thereby infer the net effect of these modulators on...

  11. Neuromodulation of the Feedforward Dentate Gyrus-CA3 Microcircuit

    OpenAIRE

    Prince, Luke; Travis J Bacon; Tigaret, Cezar; Mellor, Jack

    2016-01-01

    The feedforward dentate gyrus-CA3 microcircuit in the hippocampus is thought to activate ensembles of CA3 pyramidal cells and interneurons to encode and retrieve episodic memories. The creation of these CA3 ensembles depends on neuromodulatory input and synaptic plasticity within this microcircuit. Here we review the mechanisms by which the neuromodulators aceylcholine, noradrenaline, dopamine, and serotonin reconfigure this microcircuit and thereby infer the net effect of these modulators on...

  12. Neuromodulation of the Feedforward Dentate Gyrus-CA3 Microcircuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Luke Y; Bacon, Travis J; Tigaret, Cezar M; Mellor, Jack R

    2016-01-01

    The feedforward dentate gyrus-CA3 microcircuit in the hippocampus is thought to activate ensembles of CA3 pyramidal cells and interneurons to encode and retrieve episodic memories. The creation of these CA3 ensembles depends on neuromodulatory input and synaptic plasticity within this microcircuit. Here we review the mechanisms by which the neuromodulators aceylcholine, noradrenaline, dopamine, and serotonin reconfigure this microcircuit and thereby infer the net effect of these modulators on the processes of episodic memory encoding and retrieval.

  13. Characterization of physiological phenotypes of dentate gyrus synapses of PDZ1/2 domain-deficient PSD-95-knockin mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagura, Hitoshi; Doi, Tomoko; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2016-03-01

    The hippocampal formation is involved in several important brain functions of animals, such as memory formation and pattern separation, and the synapses in the dentate gyrus (DG) play critical roles as the first step in the hippocampal circuit. Previous studies have reported that mice with genetic modifications of the PDZ1/2 domains of postsynaptic density (PSD)-95 exhibit altered synaptic properties in the DG and impaired hippocampus-dependent behaviors. Based on the involvement of the DG in the regulation of behaviors, these data suggest that the abnormal behavior of these knockin (KI) mice is due partly to altered DG function. Precise understanding of the phenotypes of these mutant mice requires characterization of the synaptic properties of the DG, and here we provide detailed studies of DG synapses. We have demonstrated global changes in the PSD membrane-associated guanylate kinase expression pattern in the DG of mutant mice, and DG synapses in these mice exhibited increased long-term potentiation under a wide range of stimulus intensities, although the N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor dependence of the long-term potentiation was unchanged. Furthermore, our data also indicate increased silent synapses in the DG of the KI mice. These findings suggest that abnormal protein expression and physiological properties disrupt the function of DG neurons in these KI mice.

  14. Neural stem cell- and neurogenesis-related gene expression profiles in the young and aged dentate gyrus

    OpenAIRE

    Shetty, Geetha A.; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Shetty, Ashok K.

    2013-01-01

    Hippocampal neurogenesis, important for memory and mood function, wanes greatly in old age. Studies in rat models have implied that this decrease is not due to loss of neural stem cells (NSCs) in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus (DG) but rather due to an increased quiescence of NSCs. Additional studies have suggested that changes in the microenvironment, particularly declines in the concentrations of neurotrophic factors, underlie this change. In this study, we compared the expressio...

  15. Amygdala kindling alters protein kinase C activity in dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S J; Desai, M A; Klann, E; Winder, D G; Sweatt, J D; Conn, P J

    1992-11-01

    Kindling is a use-dependent form of synaptic plasticity and a widely used model of epilepsy. Although kindling has been widely studied, the molecular mechanisms underlying induction of this phenomenon are not well understood. We determined the effect of amygdala kindling on protein kinase C (PKC) activity in various regions of rat brain. Kindling stimulation markedly elevated basal (Ca(2+)-independent) and Ca(2+)-stimulated phosphorylation of an endogenous PKC substrate (which we have termed P17) in homogenates of dentate gyrus, assayed 2 h after kindling stimulation. The increase in P17 phosphorylation appeared to be due at least in part to persistent PKC activation, as basal PKC activity assayed in vitro using an exogenous peptide substrate was increased in kindled dentate gyrus 2 h after the last kindling stimulation. A similar increase in basal PKC activity was observed in dentate gyrus 2 h after the first kindling stimulation. These results document a kindling-associated persistent PKC activation and suggest that the increased activity of PKC could play a role in the induction of the kindling effect.

  16. Hilar mossy cells of the dentate gyrus: a historical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen E Scharfman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The circuitry of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus is unique compared to other hippocampal subfields because there are two glutamatergic principal cells instead of one: granule cells, which are the vast majority of the cells in the dentate gyrus, and the so-called ‘mossy cells.’ The distinctive appearance of mossy cells, the extensive divergence of their axons, and their vulnerability to excitotoxicity relative to granule cells has led to a great deal of interest in mossy cells. Nevertheless, there is no consensus about the normal functions of mossy cells and the implications of their vulnerability. There even seems to be some ambiguity about exactly what mossy cells are. Here we review initial studies of mossy cells, characteristics that define them, and suggest a practical definition to allow investigators to distinguish mossy cells from other hilar neurons even if all morphological and physiological information is unavailable due to technical limitations of their experiments. In addition, hypotheses are discussed about the role of mossy cells in the dentate gyrus network, reasons for their vulnerability and their implications for disease.

  17. Disrupting nNOS-PSD-95 coupling in the hippocampal dentate gyrus promotes extinction memory retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Han, Zhou; Cao, Bo; Cai, Cheng-Yun; Lin, Yu-Hui; Li, Fei; Wu, Hai-Ying; Chang, Lei; Luo, Chun-Xia; Zhu, Dong-Ya

    2017-09-06

    Granule cells in the dentate gyrus regenerate constantly in adult hippocampus and then integrate into neural circuits in the hippocampus thereby providing the neural basis for learning and memory. Promoting the neurogenesis in the hippocampus facilitates learning and memory such as spatial learning, object identification, and extinction learning. The interaction between neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) is reported to negatively regulate neurogenesis in brain, so we hypothesized that disrupting this interaction might facilitate the neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG) and thus enhance the extinction memory retrieval of fear learning. We found that uncoupling the nNOS-PSD-95 complex in remote contextual fear condition promoted both neuronal proliferation and survival in the DG, contributing to an enhanced retrieval of the extinction memory. Moreover, the nNOS-PSD-95 uncoupling-induced neurogenesis may be mediated by the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) as the phosphorylation level of ERK1/2 was increased after uncoupling. These findings suggest that the nNOS-PSD-95 complex may serve as a novel target for the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of lead exposure on dendrite and spine development in hippocampal dentate gyrus areas of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Fan; Ge, Meng-Meng; Chen, Wei-Heng

    2016-03-01

    Lead exposure has been implicated in the impairment of synaptic plasticity in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) areas of rats. However, whether the degradation of physiological properties is based on the morphological alteration of granule neurons in DG areas remains elusive. Here, we examined the dendritic branch extension and spine formation of granule neurons after lead exposure during development in rats. Dendritic morphology was studied using Golgi-Cox stain method, which was followed by Sholl analysis at postnatal days 14 and 21. Our results indicated that, for both ages, lead exposure significantly decreased the total dendritic length and spine density of granule neurons in the DG of the rat hippocampus. Further branch order analysis revealed that the decrease of dendritic length was observed only at the second branch order. Moreover, there were obvious deficits in the proportion and size of mushroom-type spines. These deficits in spine formation and maturity were accompanied by a decrease in Arc/Arg3.1 expression. Our present findings are the first to show that developmental lead exposure disturbs branch and spine formation in hippocampal DG areas. Arc/Arg3.1 may have a critical role in the disruption of neuronal morphology and synaptic plasticity in lead-exposed rats. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Early immature neuronal death initiates cerebral ischemia-induced neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus.

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    Kim, D H; Lee, H E; Kwon, K J; Park, S J; Heo, H; Lee, Y; Choi, J W; Shin, C Y; Ryu, J H

    2015-01-22

    Throughout adulthood, neurons are continuously replaced by new cells in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus, and this neurogenesis is increased by various neuronal injuries including ischemic stroke and seizure. While several mechanisms of this injury-induced neurogenesis have been elucidated, the initiation factor remains unclear. Here, we investigated which signal(s) trigger(s) ischemia-induced cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the hippocampal DG region. We found that early apoptotic cell death of the immature neurons occurred in the DG region following transient forebrain ischemia/reperfusion in mice. Moreover, early immature neuronal death in the DG initiated transient forebrain ischemia/reperfusion-induced neurogenesis through glycogen synthase kinase-3β/β-catenin signaling, which was mediated by microglia-derived insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). Additionally, we observed that the blockade of immature neuronal cell death, early microglial activation, or IGF-1 signaling attenuated ischemia-induced neurogenesis. These results suggest that early immature neuronal cell death initiates ischemia-induced neurogenesis through microglial IGF-1 in mice.

  20. Kindling induces transient fast inhibition in the dentate gyrus--CA3 projection.

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    Gutiérrez, R; Heinemann, U

    2001-04-01

    The granule cells of the dentate gyrus (DG) send a strong glutamatergic projection, the mossy fibre tract, toward the hippocampal CA3 field, where it excites pyramidal cells and neighbouring inhibitory interneurons. Despite their excitatory nature, granule cells contain small amounts of GAD (glutamate decarboxylase), the main synthetic enzyme for the inhibitory transmitter GABA. Chronic temporal lobe epilepsy results in transient upregulation of GAD and GABA in granule cells, giving rise to the speculation that following overexcitation, mossy fibres exert an inhibitory effect by release of GABA. We therefore stimulated the DG and recorded synaptic potentials from CA3 pyramidal cells in brain slices from kindled and control rats. In both preparations, DG stimulation caused excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP)/inhibitory postsynaptic potential (IPSP) sequences. These potentials could be completely blocked by glutamate receptor antagonists in control rats, while in the kindled rats, a bicuculline-sensitive fast IPSP remained, with an onset latency similar to that of the control EPSP. Interestingly, this IPSP disappeared 1 month after the last seizure. When synaptic responses were evoked by high-frequency stimulation, EPSPs in normal rats readily summate to evoke action potentials. In slices from kindled rats, a summation of IPSPs overrides that of the EPSPs and reduces the probability of evoking action potentials. Our data show for the first time that kindling induces functionally relevant activity-dependent expression of fast inhibition onto pyramidal cells, coming from the DG, that can limit CA3 excitation in a frequency-dependent manner.

  1. Altered expression of the cell cycle regulatory protein cyclin D1 in the rat dentate gyrus after adrenalectomy-induced granular cell lass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postigo, JA; Van der Werf, YD; Korf, J; Krugers, HJ

    1998-01-01

    The loss of dentate gyrus (DG) granular cells after removal of the rat adrenal glands (ADX) is mediated by a process that is apoptotic in nature. The present study was initiated to compare changes in the immunocytochemical distribution of the cell-cycle regulatory protein cyclin D1, which has been

  2. Enhanced nonsynaptic epileptiform activity in the dentate gyrus after kainate-induced status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, G S; Santos, L E C; Rodrigues, A M; Scorza, C A; Scorza, F A; Cavalheiro, E A; de Almeida, A-C G

    2015-09-10

    Understanding the mechanisms that influence brain excitability and synchronization provides hope that epileptic seizures can be controlled. In this scenario, non-synaptic mechanisms have a critical role in seizure activity. The contribution of ion transporters to the regulation of seizure-like activity has not been extensively studied. Here, we examined how non-synaptic epileptiform activity (NEA) in the CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG) regions of the hippocampal formation were affected by kainic acid (KA) administration. NEA enhancement in the DG and suppression in area CA1 were associated with increased NKCC1 expression in neurons and severe neuronal loss accompanied by marked glial proliferation, respectively. Twenty-four hours after KA, the DG exhibited intense microglial activation that was associated with reduced cell density in the infra-pyramidal lamina; however, cellular density recovered 7 days after KA. Intense Ki67 immunoreactivity was observed in the subgranular proliferative zone of the DG, which indicates new neuron incorporation into the granule layer. In addition, bumetanide, a selective inhibitor of neuronal Cl(-) uptake mediated by NKCC1, was used to confirm that the NKCC1 increase effectively contributed to NEA changes in the DG. Furthermore, 7 days after KA, prominent NKCC1 staining was identified in the axon initial segments of granule cells, at the exact site where action potentials are preferentially initiated, which endowed these neurons with increased excitability. Taken together, our data suggest a key role of NKCC1 in NEA in the DG. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Methamphetamine decreases dentate gyrus stem cell self-renewal and shifts the differentiation towards neuronal fate

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    Sofia Baptista

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine (METH is a highly addictive psychostimulant drug of abuse that negatively interferes with neurogenesis. In fact, we have previously shown that METH triggers stem/progenitor cell death and decreases neuronal differentiation in the dentate gyrus (DG. Still, little is known regarding its effect on DG stem cell properties. Herein, we investigate the impact of METH on mice DG stem/progenitor cell self-renewal functions. METH (10 nM decreased DG stem cell self-renewal, while 1 nM delayed cell cycle in the G0/G1-to-S phase transition and increased the number of quiescent cells (G0 phase, which correlated with a decrease in cyclin E, pEGFR and pERK1/2 protein levels. Importantly, both drug concentrations (1 or 10 nM did not induce cell death. In accordance with the impairment of self-renewal capacity, METH (10 nM decreased Sox2+/Sox2+ while increased Sox2−/Sox2− pairs of daughter cells. This effect relied on N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA signaling, which was prevented by the NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801 (10 μM. Moreover, METH (10 nM increased doublecortin (DCX protein levels consistent with neuronal differentiation. In conclusion, METH alters DG stem cell properties by delaying cell cycle and decreasing self-renewal capacities, mechanisms that may contribute to DG neurogenesis impairment followed by cognitive deficits verified in METH consumers.

  4. Neuromodulation of the feedforward dentate gyrus-CA3 microcircuit

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    Luke Yuri Prince

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The feedforward dentate gyrus-CA3 microcircuit in the hippocampus is thought to activate ensembles of CA3 pyramidal cells and interneurons to encode and retrieve episodic memories. The creation of these CA3 ensembles depends on neuromodulatory input and synaptic plasticity within this microcircuit. Here we review the mechanisms by which the neuromodulators aceylcholine, noradrenaline, dopamine, and serotonin reconfigure this microcircuit and thereby infer the net effect of these modulators on the processes of episodic memory encoding and retrieval.

  5. Intracellular Zn(2+) signaling in the dentate gyrus is required for object recognition memory.

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    Takeda, Atsushi; Tamano, Haruna; Ogawa, Taisuke; Takada, Shunsuke; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Fujii, Hiroaki; Ando, Masaki

    2014-11-01

    The role of perforant pathway-dentate granule cell synapses in cognitive behavior was examined focusing on synaptic Zn(2+) signaling in the dentate gyrus. Object recognition memory was transiently impaired when extracellular Zn(2+) levels were decreased by injection of clioquinol and N,N,N',N'-tetrakis-(2-pyridylmethyl) ethylendediamine. To pursue the effect of the loss and/or blockade of Zn(2+) signaling in dentate granule cells, ZnAF-2DA (100 pmol, 0.1 mM/1 µl), an intracellular Zn(2+) chelator, was locally injected into the dentate molecular layer of rats. ZnAF-2DA injection, which was estimated to chelate intracellular Zn(2+) signaling only in the dentate gyrus, affected object recognition memory 1 h after training without affecting intracellular Ca(2+) signaling in the dentate molecular layer. In vivo dentate gyrus long-term potentiation (LTP) was affected under the local perfusion of the recording region (the dentate granule cell layer) with 0.1 mM ZnAF-2DA, but not with 1-10 mM CaEDTA, an extracellular Zn(2+) chelator, suggesting that the blockade of intracellular Zn(2+) signaling in dentate granule cells affects dentate gyrus LTP. The present study demonstrates that intracellular Zn(2+) signaling in the dentate gyrus is required for object recognition memory, probably via dentate gyrus LTP expression.

  6. Running Exercise Reduces Myelinated Fiber Loss in the Dentate Gyrus of the Hippocampus in APP/PS1 Transgenic Mice.

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    Chao, Fenglei; Zhang, Lei; Luo, Yanmin; Xiao, Qian; Lv, Fulin; He, Qi; Zhou, Chunni; Zhang, Yi; Jiang, Lin; Jiang, Rong; Gu, Hengwei; Tang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of running exercise on myelinated fibers in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus during Alzheimer's disease (AD), 6-month-old male APP/PS1 transgenic mice were randomly assigned to control or running groups. The running group mice were subjected to a running protocol for four months. The behaviors of the mice from both group mice were then assessed using the Morris water maze, and the total volume of the DG and the related quantitative parameters with characteristics of the myelinated nerve fiber and the myelin sheath in the DG were investigated using unbiased stereological techniques and electron microscopy. Learning and spatial memory performances were both significantly increased in the running group compared with the control group. There was no significant difference in the gratio of the myelinated axons between the two groups. However, the DG volume, the myelinated fiber length and volume in the DG, and the myelin sheath volume and thickness in the DG were all significantly increased in the running group mice compared with the control group mice. These results indicated that running exercise was able to prevent DG atrophy and delay the progression of the myelinated fiber loss and the demyelination of the myelin sheaths in the DG in an AD mouse model, which may underlie the running-induced improvement in learning and spatial memory. Taken together, these results demonstrated that running exercise could delay the progression of AD.

  7. Dentate Gyrus Contributes to Retrieval as well as Encoding: Evidence from Context Fear Conditioning, Recall, and Extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Brian E; Lacagnina, Anthony F; Ayoub, Adam; Shue, Francis; Zemelman, Boris V; Krasne, Franklin B; Drew, Michael R

    2017-06-28

    Dentate gyrus (DG) is widely thought to provide a teaching signal that enables hippocampal encoding of memories, but its role during retrieval is poorly understood. Some data and models suggest that DG plays no role in retrieval; others encourage the opposite conclusion. To resolve this controversy, we evaluated the effects of optogenetic inhibition of dorsal DG during context fear conditioning, recall, generalization, and extinction in male mice. We found that (1) inhibition during training impaired context fear acquisition; (2) inhibition during recall did not impair fear expression in the training context, unless mice had to distinguish between similar feared and neutral contexts; (3) inhibition increased generalization of fear to an unfamiliar context that was similar to a feared one and impaired fear expression in the conditioned context when it was similar to a neutral one; and (4) inhibition impaired fear extinction. These effects, as well as several seemingly contradictory published findings, could be reproduced by BACON (Bayesian Context Fear Algorithm), a physiologically realistic hippocampal model positing that acquisition and retrieval both involve coordinated activity in DG and CA3. Our findings thus suggest that DG contributes to retrieval and extinction, as well as to the initial establishment of context fear.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Despite abundant evidence that the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) plays a critical role in memory, it remains unclear whether the role of DG relates to memory acquisition or retrieval. Using contextual fear conditioning and optogenetic inhibition, we show that DG contributes to both of these processes. Using computational simulations, we identify specific mechanisms through which the suppression of DG affects memory performance. Finally, we show that DG contributes to fear extinction learning, a process in which learned fear is attenuated through exposures to a fearful context in the absence of threat. Our data resolve a

  8. Neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the rat hippocampus enhanced by tickling stimulation with positive emotion.

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    Yamamuro, Takuya; Senzaki, Kouji; Iwamoto, Satomi; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Hayashi, Takashi; Hori, Miyo; Sakamoto, Shigeko; Murakami, Kazuo; Shiga, Takashi; Urayama, Osamu

    2010-12-01

    Hippocampal neurogenesis is influenced by many factors. In this study, we examined the effect of tactile stimulation (tickling), which induced positive emotion, on neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus. Four week-old rats were tickled for 5 min/day on 5 consecutive days and received 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) administration for 4 days from the second tickling day. Then they were allowed to survive for 18 h or 3 weeks after the end of BrdU treatment. Neurogenesis in the DG was compared between the tickled and untickled rats by using immunohistochemistry with anti-BrdU antibody. The result showed that the number of BrdU- and NeuN (neural cell marker)-double positive neurons on 18h as well as 3 weeks of the survival periods was significantly increased in the tickled group as compared with the untickled group. The expression of mRNA of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus of the tickled rats was not altered when compared with the control rats. In conclusion, tickling stimulation which induces positive emotion may affect the generation and survival of new neurons of the DG through the BDNF-independent pathway.

  9. Transcriptional effects of glucocorticoid receptors in the dentate gyrus increase anxiety-related behaviors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadège Sarrazin

    Full Text Available The Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR is a transcription factor ubiquitously expressed in the brain. Activation of brain GRs by high levels of glucocorticoid (GC hormones modifies a large variety of physiological and pathological-related behaviors. Unfortunately the specific cellular targets of GR-mediated behavioral effects of GC are still largely unknown. To address this issue, we generated a mutated form of the GR called DeltaGR. DeltaGR is a constitutively transcriptionally active form of the GR that is localized in the nuclei and activates transcription without binding to glucocorticoids. Using the tetracycline-regulated system (Tet-OFF, we developed an inducible transgenic approach that allows the expression of the DeltaGR in specific brain areas. We focused our study on a mouse line that expressed DeltaGR almost selectively in the glutamatergic neurons of the dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampus. This restricted expression of the DeltaGR increased anxiety-related behaviors without affecting other behaviors that could indirectly influence performance in anxiety-related tests. This behavioral phenotype was also associated with an up-regulation of the MAPK signaling pathway and Egr-1 protein in the DG. These findings identify glutamatergic neurons in the DG as one of the cellular substrate of stress-related pathologies.

  10. Mossy fiber synaptic transmission: communication from the dentate gyrus to area CA3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, David B; Gutiérrez, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    Communication between the dentate gyrus (DG) and area CA3 of the hippocampus proper is transmitted via axons of granule cells--the mossy fiber (MF) pathway. In this review we discuss and compare the properties of transmitter release from the MFs onto pyramidal neurons and interneurons. An examination of the anatomical connectivity from DG to CA3 reveals a surprising interplay between excitation and inhibition for this circuit. In this respect it is particularly relevant that the major targets of the MFs are interneurons and that the consequence of MF input into CA3 may be inhibitory or excitatory, conditionally dependent on the frequency of input and modulatory regulation. This is further complicated by the properties of transmitter release from the MFs where a large number of co-localized transmitters, including GABAergic inhibitory transmitter release, and the effects of presynaptic modulation finely tune transmitter release. A picture emerges that extends beyond the hypothesis that the MFs are simply "detonators" of CA3 pyramidal neurons; the properties of synaptic information flow from the DG have more subtle and complex influences on the CA3 network.

  11. Cyclosporin A enhances neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Andrew; Morshead, Cindi M

    2016-01-01

    Neural precursor cells (NPCs) in the adult mammalian brain demonstrate potential in applications of neural repair in the CNS. Recent work has shown that cyclosporin A (CsA), a commonly used immunosuppressive drug, expands the size of the NPC pool in the subventricular region by promoting cell survival. We asked if CsA had similar effects on NPCs in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus, leading to increased neurogenesis. We used the in vitro and in vivo assays to examine CsA's effect on the size of the NPC pool and the proliferation and differentiation profile of cells within the DG. We found that CsA increases the numbers of NPCs and enriches for neurogenic NPCs in vitro. Similarly, in vivo systemic administration of CsA for 7 days increases the size of the NPC pool in the DG observed through increases in numbers of proliferating cells and newborn neurons. Consistent with CsA's pro-survival effects, we have shown that CsA enhances the survival of newborn cells that normally undergo cell death over the time of infusion. Together these findings support the hypothesis that CsA administration promotes neurogenesis and may have implications for neural repair. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Locus Coeruleus Stimulation Facilitates Long-Term Depression in the Dentate Gyrus That Requires Activation of β-Adrenergic Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Niels; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity comprises a cellular mechanism through which the hippocampus most likely enables memory formation. Neuromodulation, related to arousal, is a key aspect in information storage. The activation of locus coeruleus (LC) neurons by novel experience leads to noradrenaline release in the hippocampus at the level of the dentate gyrus (DG). We explored whether synaptic plasticity in the DG is influenced by activation of the LC via electrical stimulation. Coupling of test-pulses that evoked stable basal synaptic transmission in the DG with stimulation of the LC induced β-adrenoreceptor-dependent long-term depression (LTD) at perforant path–DG synapses in adult rats. Furthermore, persistent LTD (>24 h) induced by perforant path stimulation also required activation of β-adrenergic receptors: Whereas a β-adrenergic receptor antagonist (propranolol) prevented, an agonist (isoproterenol) strengthened the persistence of LTD for over 24 h. These findings support the hypothesis that persistent LTD in the DG is modulated by β-adrenergic receptors. Furthermore, LC activation potently facilitates DG LTD. This suggests in turn that synaptic plasticity in the DG is tightly regulated by activity in the noradrenergic system. This may reflect the role of the LC in selecting salient information for subsequent synaptic processing in the hippocampus. PMID:24464942

  13. a-Band Oscillations in Intracellular Membrane Potentials of Dentate Gyrus Neurons in Awake Rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ross W.; Strowbridge, Ben W.

    2014-01-01

    The hippocampus and dentate gyrus play critical roles in processing declarative memories and spatial information. Dentate granule cells, the first relay in the trisynaptic circuit through the hippocampus, exhibit low spontaneous firing rates even during locomotion. Using intracellular recordings from dentate neurons in awake mice operating a…

  14. a-Band Oscillations in Intracellular Membrane Potentials of Dentate Gyrus Neurons in Awake Rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ross W.; Strowbridge, Ben W.

    2014-01-01

    The hippocampus and dentate gyrus play critical roles in processing declarative memories and spatial information. Dentate granule cells, the first relay in the trisynaptic circuit through the hippocampus, exhibit low spontaneous firing rates even during locomotion. Using intracellular recordings from dentate neurons in awake mice operating a…

  15. Tonic Inhibitory Control of Dentate Gyrus Granule Cells by α5-Containing GABAA Receptors Reduces Memory Interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engin, Elif; Zarnowska, Ewa D; Benke, Dietmar; Tsvetkov, Evgeny; Sigal, Maksim; Keist, Ruth; Bolshakov, Vadim Y; Pearce, Robert A; Rudolph, Uwe

    2015-10-07

    interference management or processes that can lead to interference-related memory problems has high theoretical and translational importance. This study provides empirical evidence that tonic inhibition in the dentate gyrus (DG), which maintains sparseness of neuronal activation in the DG, is essential for management of interference. The specificity of findings to tonic, but not faster, more transient types of neuronal inhibition and to the DG, but not the neighboring brain areas, is presented through control experiments. Thus, the findings link interference management to a specific mechanism, proposed previously by computational models. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/3513699-15$15.00/0.

  16. Ketamine Affects the Neurogenesis of the Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus in 7-Day-Old Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, He; Liu, Cun-Ming; Sun, Jie; Hao, Ting; Xu, Chun-Mei; Wang, Dan; Wu, Yu-Qing

    2016-08-01

    Ketamine has been reported to cause neonatal neurotoxicity via a neuronal apoptosis mechanism; however, no in vivo research has reported whether ketamine could affect postnatal neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG). A growing number of experiments suggest that postnatal hippocampal neurogenesis is the foundation of maintaining normal hippocampus function into adulthood. Therefore, this study investigated the effect of ketamine on hippocampal neurogenesis. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups: the control group (equal volume of normal saline), and the ketamine-anesthesia group (40 mg/kg ketamine in four injections at 1 h intervals). The S-phase marker 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was administered after ketamine exposure to postnatal day 7 (PND-7) rats, and the neurogenesis in the hippocampal DG was assessed using single- or double-immunofluorescence staining. The expression of GFAP in the hippocampal DG was measured by western blot analysis. Spatial reference memory was tested by Morris water maze at 2 months after PND-7 rats exposed to ketamine treatment. The present results showed that neonatal ketamine exposure significantly inhibited neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation, decreased astrocytic differentiation, and markedly enhanced neuronal differentiation. The disruptive effect of ketamine on the proliferation and differentiation of NSCs lasted at least 1 week and disappeared by 2 weeks after ketamine exposure. Moreover, the migration of newborn neurons in the granule cell layer and the growth of astrocytes in the hippocampal DG were inhibited by ketamine on PND-37 and PND-44. Finally, ketamine caused a deficit in hippocampal-dependent spatial reference memory tasks at 2 months old. Our results suggested that ketamine may interfere with hippocampal neurogenesis and long-term neurocognitive function in PND-7 rats. These findings may provide a new perspective to explain the adult neurocognitive dysfunction induced by neonatal

  17. DREADD in parvalbumin interneurons of the dentate gyrus modulates anxiety, social interaction and memory extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, D; Chen, L; Deng, D; Jiang, D; Dong, F; McSweeney, C; Zhou, Y; Liu, L; Chen, G; Wu, Y; Mao, Y

    2016-01-01

    Parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons in the hippocampus play a critical role in animal memory, such as spatial working memory. However, how PV-positive interneurons in the subregions of the hippocampus affect animal behaviors remains poorly defined. Here, we achieved specific and reversible activation of PV-positive interneurons using designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs (DREADD) technology. Inducible DREADD expression was demonstrated in vitro in cultured neurons, in which co-transfection of the hM3D-Gq-mCherry vector with a Cre plasmid resulted in a cellular response to hM3Dq ligand clozapine-N-oxide (CNO) stimulation. In addition, the dentate gyrus (DG) of PV-Cre mice received bilateral injection of control lentivirus or lentivirus expressing double floxed hM3D-Gq-mCherry. Selective activation of PV-positive interneurons in the DG did not affect locomotor activity or depression-related behavior in mice. Interestingly, stimulation of PV-positive interneurons induced an anxiolytic effect. Activation of PVpositive interneurons appears to impair social interaction to novelty, but has no effect on social motivation. However, this defect is likely due to the anxiolytic effect as the exploratory behavior of mice expressing hM3DGq is significantly increased. Mice expressing hM3D-Gq did not affect novel object recognition. Activation of PV-positive interneurons in the DG maintains intact cued and contextual fear memory but facilitates fear extinction. Collectively, our results demonstrated that proper control of PV interneurons activity in the DG is critical for regulation of the anxiety, social interaction and fear extinction. These results improve our fundamental understanding of the physiological role of PV-positive interneurons in the hippocampus.

  18. DREADD in Parvalbumin Interneurons of the Dentate Gyrus Modulates Anxiety, Social Interaction and Memory Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, D.; Chen, L.; Deng, D.; Jiang, D.; Dong, F.; McSweeney, C.; Zhou, Y.; Liu, L.; Chen, G.; Wu, Y.; Mao, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons in the hippocampus play a critical role in animal memory, such as spatial working memory. However, how PV-positive interneurons in the subregions of the hippocampus affect animal behaviors remains poorly defined. Here, we achieved specific and reversible activation of PV-positive interneurons using designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs (DREADD) technology. Inducible DREADD expression was demonstrated in vitro in cultured neurons, in which co-transfection of the hM3D-Gq-mCherry vector with a Cre plasmid resulted in a cellular response to hM3Dq ligand clozapine-N-oxide (CNO) stimulation. In addition, the dentate gyrus (DG) of PV-Cre mice received bilateral injection of control lentivirus or lentivirus expressing double floxed hM3D-Gq-mCherry. Selective activation of PV-positive interneurons in the DG did not affect locomotor activity or depression-related behavior in mice. Interestingly, stimulation of PV-positive interneurons induced an anxiolytic effect. Activation of PV-positive interneurons appears to impair social interaction to novelty, but has no effect on social motivation. However, this defect is likely due to the anxiolytic effect as the exploratory behavior of mice expressing hM3D-Gq is significantly increased. Mice expressing hM3D-Gq did not affect novel object recognition. Activation of PV-positive interneurons in the DG maintains intact cued and contextual fear memory but facilitates fear extinction. Collectively, our results demonstrated that proper control of PV interneurons activity in the DG is critical for regulation of the anxiety, social interaction and fear extinction. These results improve our fundamental understanding of the physiological role of PV-positive interneurons in the hippocampus. PMID:26733123

  19. Sparse and Specific Coding during Information Transmission between Co-cultured Dentate Gyrus and CA3 Hippocampal Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, Daniele; Thiagarajan, Srikanth; DeMarse, Thomas B; Wheeler, Bruce C; Brewer, Gregory J

    2017-01-01

    To better understand encoding and decoding of stimulus information in two specific hippocampal sub-regions, we isolated and co-cultured rat primary dentate gyrus (DG) and CA3 neurons within a two-chamber device with axonal connectivity via micro-tunnels. We tested the hypothesis that, in these engineered networks, decoding performance of stimulus site information would be more accurate when stimuli and information flow occur in anatomically correct feed-forward DG to CA3 vs. CA3 back to DG. In particular, we characterized the neural code of these sub-regions by measuring sparseness and uniqueness of the responses evoked by specific paired-pulse stimuli. We used the evoked responses in CA3 to decode the stimulation sites in DG (and vice-versa) by means of learning algorithms for classification (support vector machine, SVM). The device was placed over an 8 × 8 grid of extracellular electrodes (micro-electrode array, MEA) in order to provide a platform for monitoring development, self-organization, and improved access to stimulation and recording at multiple sites. The micro-tunnels were designed with dimensions 3 × 10 × 400 μm allowing axonal growth but not migration of cell bodies and long enough to exclude traversal by dendrites. Paired-pulse stimulation (inter-pulse interval 50 ms) was applied at 22 different sites and repeated 25 times in each chamber for each sub-region to evoke time-locked activity. DG-DG and CA3-CA3 networks were used as controls. Stimulation in DG drove signals through the axons in the tunnels to activate a relatively small set of specific electrodes in CA3 (sparse code). CA3-CA3 and DG-DG controls were less sparse in coding than CA3 in DG-CA3 networks. Using all target electrodes with the three highest spike rates (14%), the evoked responses in CA3 specified each stimulation site in DG with optimum uniqueness of 64%. Finally, by SVM learning, these evoked responses in CA3 correctly decoded the stimulation sites in DG for 43% of the

  20. Sparse and Specific Coding during Information Transmission between Co-cultured Dentate Gyrus and CA3 Hippocampal Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, Daniele; Thiagarajan, Srikanth; DeMarse, Thomas B.; Wheeler, Bruce C.; Brewer, Gregory J.

    2017-01-01

    To better understand encoding and decoding of stimulus information in two specific hippocampal sub-regions, we isolated and co-cultured rat primary dentate gyrus (DG) and CA3 neurons within a two-chamber device with axonal connectivity via micro-tunnels. We tested the hypothesis that, in these engineered networks, decoding performance of stimulus site information would be more accurate when stimuli and information flow occur in anatomically correct feed-forward DG to CA3 vs. CA3 back to DG. In particular, we characterized the neural code of these sub-regions by measuring sparseness and uniqueness of the responses evoked by specific paired-pulse stimuli. We used the evoked responses in CA3 to decode the stimulation sites in DG (and vice-versa) by means of learning algorithms for classification (support vector machine, SVM). The device was placed over an 8 × 8 grid of extracellular electrodes (micro-electrode array, MEA) in order to provide a platform for monitoring development, self-organization, and improved access to stimulation and recording at multiple sites. The micro-tunnels were designed with dimensions 3 × 10 × 400 μm allowing axonal growth but not migration of cell bodies and long enough to exclude traversal by dendrites. Paired-pulse stimulation (inter-pulse interval 50 ms) was applied at 22 different sites and repeated 25 times in each chamber for each sub-region to evoke time-locked activity. DG-DG and CA3-CA3 networks were used as controls. Stimulation in DG drove signals through the axons in the tunnels to activate a relatively small set of specific electrodes in CA3 (sparse code). CA3-CA3 and DG-DG controls were less sparse in coding than CA3 in DG-CA3 networks. Using all target electrodes with the three highest spike rates (14%), the evoked responses in CA3 specified each stimulation site in DG with optimum uniqueness of 64%. Finally, by SVM learning, these evoked responses in CA3 correctly decoded the stimulation sites in DG for 43% of the

  1. Potential implications of a monosynaptic pathway from mossy cells to adult-born granule cells of the dentate gyrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharfman, Helen E.; Bernstein, Hannah L.

    2015-01-01

    The dentate gyrus (DG) is important to many aspects of hippocampal function, but there are many aspects of the DG that are incompletely understood. One example is the role of mossy cells (MCs), a major DG cell type that is glutamatergic and innervates the primary output cells of the DG, the granule cells (GCs). MCs innervate the GCs as well as local circuit neurons that make GABAergic synapses on GCs, so the net effect of MCs on GCs – and therefore the output of the DG – is unclear. Here we first review fundamental information about MCs and the current hypotheses for their role in the normal DG and in diseases that involve the DG. Then we review previously published data which suggest that MCs are a source of input to a subset of GCs that are born in adulthood (adult-born GCs). In addition, we discuss the evidence that adult-born GCs may support the normal inhibitory ‘gate’ functions of the DG, where the GCs are a filter or gate for information from the entorhinal cortical input to area CA3. The implications are then discussed in the context of seizures and temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). In TLE, it has been suggested that the DG inhibitory gate is weak or broken and MC loss leads to insufficient activation of inhibitory neurons, causing hyperexcitability. That idea was called the “dormant basket cell hypothesis.” Recent data suggest that loss of normal adult-born GCs may also cause disinhibition, and seizure susceptibility. Therefore, we propose a reconsideration of the dormant basket cell hypothesis with an intervening adult-born GC between the MC and basket cell and call this hypothesis the “dormant immature granule cell hypothesis.” PMID:26347618

  2. Potential implications of a monosynaptic pathway from mossy cells to adult-born granule cells of the dentate gyrus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen eScharfman

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The dentate gyrus (DG is important to many aspects of hippocampal function, but there are many aspects of the DG that are incompletely understood. One example is the role of mossy cells (MCs, a major DG cell type that is glutamatergic and innervates the primary output cells of the DG, the granule cells (GCs. MCs innervate the GCs as well as local circuit neurons that make GABAergic synapses on GCs, so the net effect of MCs on GCs - and therefore the output of the DG - is unclear.Here we first review fundamental information about MCs and the current hypotheses for their role in the normal DG and in diseases that involve the DG. Then we review previously published data which suggest that MCs are a source of input to a subset of GCs that are born in adulthood (adult-born GCs. In addition, we discuss the evidence that adult-born GCs may support the normal inhibitory 'gate' functions of the DG, where the GCs are a filter or gate for information from the entorhinal cortical input to area CA3. The implications are then discussed in the context of seizures and temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. In TLE, it has been suggested that the DG inhibitory gate is weak or broken and MC loss leads to insufficient activation of inhibitory neurons, causing hyperexcitability. That idea was called the dormant basket cell hypothesis. Recent data suggest that loss of normal adult-born GCs may also cause disinhibition, and seizure susceptibility. Therefore, we propose a reconsideration of the dormant basket cell hypothesis with an intervening adult-born GC between the MC and basket cell and call this hypothesis the dormant immature granule cell hypothesis.

  3. Induction of galanin after chronic sertraline treatment in mouse ventral dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Misa; Makino, Yuya; Hashimoto, Tomio; Sugiyama, Azusa; Oka, Jun-Ichiro; Inagaki, Masatoshi; Yamada, Mitsuhiko; Saitoh, Akiyoshi

    2013-06-21

    A number of studies implicate neuroplasticity in the therapeutic mechanisms of antidepressants, specifically neuroplasticity in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation. The dorsal hippocampal region in rodents is preferentially involved in spatial learning and memory, while the ventral hippocampal region plays a more important role in stress, emotion, and affective behaviors. These findings led us to investigate behavioral changes and gene expression changes in the ventral and dorsal dentate gyrus differentially after chronic treatment in mice with the antidepressant sertraline. Four-week treatment with sertraline significantly decreased immobility in the modified forced swim test, a behavioral test for assessing antidepressant-like effects in rodents. In the novelty-suppressed feeding test, performance of which is affected by functional changes in the dentate gyrus, sertraline treatment significantly decreased latency to feed. Next, we examined the expression of several neuroplasticity-related genes (those for Notch receptors, basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors and related factors, SoxC transcription factors, and glial-related genes) by real-time RT-PCR in the ventral and dorsal dentate gyrus of mice after the sertraline treatment. The gene encoding the neuropeptide galanin was significantly induced in only ventral dentate gyrus, not in dorsal dentate gyrus. These results suggest that sertraline-related galanin induction in ventral dentate gyrus may play an important role in therapeutic mechanisms for depression. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Usp9x-deficiency disrupts the morphological development of the postnatal hippocampal dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Sabrina; Premarathne, Susitha; Harvey, Tracey J; Iyer, Swati; Dixon, Chantelle; Alexander, Suzanne; Burne, Thomas H J; Wood, Stephen A; Piper, Michael

    2016-05-16

    Within the adult mammalian brain, neurogenesis persists within two main discrete locations, the subventricular zone lining the lateral ventricles, and the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Neurogenesis within the adult dentate gyrus contributes to learning and memory, and deficiencies in neurogenesis have been linked to cognitive decline. Neural stem cells within the adult dentate gyrus reside within the subgranular zone (SGZ), and proteins intrinsic to stem cells, and factors within the niche microenvironment, are critical determinants for development and maintenance of this structure. Our understanding of the repertoire of these factors, however, remains limited. The deubiquitylating enzyme USP9X has recently emerged as a mediator of neural stem cell identity. Furthermore, mice lacking Usp9x exhibit a striking reduction in the overall size of the adult dentate gyrus. Here we reveal that the development of the postnatal SGZ is abnormal in mice lacking Usp9x. Usp9x conditional knockout mice exhibit a smaller hippocampus and shortened dentate gyrus blades from as early as P7. Moreover, the analysis of cellular populations within the dentate gyrus revealed reduced stem cell, neuroblast and neuronal numbers and abnormal neuroblast morphology. Collectively, these findings highlight the critical role played by USP9X in the normal morphological development of the postnatal dentate gyrus.

  5. Persistent discharges in dentate gyrus perisoma-inhibiting interneurons require hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgueta, Claudio; Köhler, Johannes; Bartos, Marlene

    2015-03-11

    Parvalbumin (PV)-expressing perisoma-inhibiting interneurons (PIIs) of the dentate gyrus integrate rapidly correlated synaptic inputs and generate short-duration action potentials that propagate along the axon to their output synapses, supporting fast inhibitory signaling onto their target cells. Here we show that PV-PIIs in rat and mouse dentate gyrus (DG) integrate their intrinsic activity over time and can turn into a persistent firing mode characterized by the ability to generate long-lasting trains of action potentials at ∼50 Hz in the absence of additional inputs. Persistent firing emerges in the axons remote from the axon initial segment and markedly depends on hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel (HCNC) activation. Persistent firing properties are modulated by intracellular Ca(2+) levels and somatic membrane potential. Detailed computational single-cell PIIs models reveal that HCNC-mediated conductances can contribute to persistent firing during conditions of a shift in their voltage activation curve to more depolarized potentials. Paired recordings from PIIs and their target granule cells show that persistent firing supports strong inhibitory output signaling. Thus, persistent firing may emerge during conditions of intense activation of the network, thereby providing silencing to the circuitry and the maintenance of sparse activity in the dentate gyrus. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/354131-09$15.00/0.

  6. Bilateral Dentate Gyrus Structural Alterations in a Cat Associated With Hippocampal Sclerosis and Intraventricular Meningioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klang, A; Thaller, D; Schmidt, P; Kovacs, G G; Halasz, P; Pakozdy, A

    2015-11-01

    A 13-year-old cat had a history of seizures for 3 years that resembled temporal lobe epilepsy. Histologic examination of the brain revealed bilateral hippocampal alterations, including hypergyration and broadening of the dentate gyrus associated with hippocampal sclerosis and an intraventricular meningioma near the hippocampal region. The findings in the dentate gyrus were interpreted as a congenital malformation; however, it could not be ruled out that the alterations were induced by the seizures. Similar changes of the dentate gyrus have not been previously described in cats. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Neuropeptide Y promotes neurogenesis and protection against methamphetamine-induced toxicity in mouse dentate gyrus-derived neurosphere cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, Sofia; Bento, Ana Rita; Gonçalves, Joana; Bernardino, Liliana; Summavielle, Teresa; Lobo, Andrea; Fontes-Ribeiro, Carlos; Malva, João O; Agasse, Fabienne; Silva, Ana P

    2012-06-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a psychostimulant drug of abuse that causes severe brain damage. However, the mechanisms responsible for these effects are poorly understood, particularly regarding the impact of METH on hippocampal neurogenesis. Moreover, neuropeptide Y (NPY) is known to be neuroprotective under several pathological conditions. Here, we investigated the effect of METH on dentate gyrus (DG) neurogenesis, regarding cell death, proliferation and differentiation, as well as the role of NPY by itself and against METH-induced toxicity. DG-derived neurosphere cultures were used to evaluate the effect of METH or NPY on cell death, proliferation or neuronal differentiation. Moreover, the role of NPY and its receptors (Y(1), Y(2) and Y(5)) was investigated under conditions of METH-induced DG cell death. METH-induced cell death by both apoptosis and necrosis at concentrations above 10 nM, without affecting cell proliferation. Furthermore, at a non-toxic concentration (1 nM), METH decreased neuronal differentiation. NPY's protective effect was mainly due to the reduction of glutamate release, and it also increased DG cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation via Y(1) receptors. In addition, while the activation of Y(1) or Y(2) receptors was able to prevent METH-induced cell death, the Y(1) subtype alone was responsible for blocking the decrease in neuronal differentiation induced by the drug. Taken together, METH negatively affects DG cell viability and neurogenesis, and NPY is revealed to be a promising protective tool against the deleterious effects of METH on hippocampal neurogenesis.

  8. GDNF facilitates differentiation of the adult dentate gyrus-derived neural precursor cells into astrocytes via STAT3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boku, Shuken, E-mail: shuboku@med.hokudai.ac.jp [Department of Psychiatry, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Nakagawa, Shin [Department of Psychiatry, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Takamura, Naoki [Pharmaceutical Laboratories, Dainippon Sumitomo Pharma Co. Ltd., Osaka (Japan); Kato, Akiko [Department of Psychiatry, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Takebayashi, Minoru [Department of Psychiatry, National Hospital Organization Kure Medical Center, Kure (Japan); Hisaoka-Nakashima, Kazue [Department of Pharmacology, Hiroshima University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima (Japan); Omiya, Yuki; Inoue, Takeshi; Kusumi, Ichiro [Department of Psychiatry, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)

    2013-05-17

    Highlights: •GDNF has no effect on ADP proliferation and apoptosis. •GDNF increases ADP differentiation into astrocyte. •A specific inhibitor of STAT3 decreases the astrogliogenic effect of GDNF. •STAT3 knockdown by lentiviral shRNA vector also decreases the astrogliogenic effect of GDNF. •GDNF increases the phosphorylation of STAT3. -- Abstract: While the pro-neurogenic actions of antidepressants in the adult hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) are thought to be one of the mechanisms through which antidepressants exert their therapeutic actions, antidepressants do not increase proliferation of neural precursor cells derived from the adult DG. Because previous studies showed that antidepressants increase the expression and secretion of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in C6 glioma cells derived from rat astrocytes and GDNF increases neurogenesis in adult DG in vivo, we investigated the effects of GDNF on the proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis of cultured neural precursor cells derived from the adult DG. Data showed that GDNF facilitated the differentiation of neural precursor cells into astrocytes but had no effect on their proliferation or apoptosis. Moreover, GDNF increased the phosphorylation of STAT3, and both a specific inhibitor of STAT3 and lentiviral shRNA for STAT3 decreased their differentiation into astrocytes. Taken together, our findings suggest that GDNF facilitates astrogliogenesis from neural precursor cells in adult DG through activating STAT3 and that this action might indirectly affect neurogenesis.

  9. Caffeine prevents sleep loss-induced deficits in long-term potentiation and related signaling molecules in the dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhaider, Ibrahim A; Aleisa, Abdulaziz M; Tran, Trinh T; Alkadhi, Karim A

    2010-04-01

    We have previously reported that caffeine prevented sleep deprivation-induced impairment of long-term potentiation (LTP) of area CA1 as well as hippocampus-dependent learning and memory performance in the radial arm water maze. In this report we examined the impact of long-term (4-week) caffeine consumption (0.3 g/L in drinking water) on synaptic plasticity (Alhaider et al., 2010) deficit in the dentate gyrus (DG) area of acutely sleep-deprived rats. The sleep deprivation and caffeine/sleep deprivation groups were sleep-deprived for 24 h by using the columns-in-water technique. We tested the effect of caffeine and/or sleep deprivation on LTP and measured the basal levels as well as stimulated levels of LTP-related molecules in the DG. The results showed that chronic caffeine administration prevented the impairment of early-phase LTP (E-LTP) in the DG of sleep-deprived rats. Additionally, chronic caffeine treatment prevented the sleep deprivation-associated decreases in the basal levels of the phosphorylated calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (P-CaMKII) and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) as well as in the stimulated levels of P-CaMKII in the DG area. The results suggest that chronic use of caffeine prevented anomalous changes in the basal levels of P-CaMKII and BDNF associated with sleep deprivation and as a result contributes to the revival of LTP in the DG region.

  10. Dentate gyrus network dysfunctions precede the symptomatic phase in a genetic mouse model of seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana eToader

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal circuit disturbances that lead to hyperexcitability in the cortico-hippocampal network are one of the landmarks of temporal lobe epilepsy. The dentate gyrus (DG network plays an important role in regulating the excitability of the entire hippocampus by filtering and integrating information received via the perforant path. Here, we investigated possible epileptogenic abnormalities in the function of the DG neuronal network in the Synapsin II (Syn II knockout mouse (Syn II-/-, a genetic mouse model of epilepsy. Syn II is a presynaptic protein whose deletion in mice reproducibly leads to generalized seizures starting at the age of two months. We made use of a high-resolution microelectrode array (4096 electrodes and patch-clamp recordings, and found that in acute hippocampal slices of young pre-symptomatic (3-6 weeks-old Syn II-/- mice excitatory synaptic output of the mossy fibers is reduced. Moreover, we showed that the main excitatory neurons present in the polymorphic layer of the DG, hilar mossy cells, display a reduced excitability. We also provide evidence of a predominantly inhibitory regulatory output from mossy cells to granule cells, through feed-forward inhibition, and show that the excitatory-inhibitory ratio is increased in both pre-symptomatic and symptomatic Syn II-/- mice. These results support the key role of the hilar mossy neurons in maintaining the normal excitability of the hippocampal network and show that the late epileptic phenotype of the Syn II-/- mice is preceded by neuronal circuitry dysfunctions. Our data provide new insights into the mechanisms of epileptogenesis in the Syn II-/- mice and open the possibility for early diagnosis and therapeutic interventions.

  11. Ablation of Hippocampal Neurogenesis Impairs Contextual Fear Conditioning and Synaptic Plasticity in the Dentate Gyrus

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Michael D. Saxe; Fortunato Battaglia; Jing-Wen Wang; Gael Malleret; Denis J. David; James E. Monckton; A. Denise R. Garcia; Michael V. Sofroniew; Eric R. Kandel; Luca Santarelli; René Hen; Michael R. Drew

    2006-01-01

    .... In the present study, we used two independent methods to ablate hippocampal neurogenesis and found that each procedure caused a limited behavioral deficit and a loss of synaptic plasticity within the dentate gyrus...

  12. Computational models of dentate gyrus with epilepsy-induced morphological alterations in granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejada, Julian; Roque, Antonio C

    2014-09-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy provokes a number of different morphological alterations in granule cells of the hippocampus dentate gyrus. These alterations may be associated with the hyperactivity and hypersynchrony found in the epileptic dentate gyrus, and their study requires the use of different kinds of approaches including computational modeling. Conductance-based models of both normal and epilepsy-induced morphologically altered granule cells have been used in the construction of network models of dentate gyrus to study the effects of these alterations on epilepsy. Here, we review these models and discuss their contributions to the understanding of the association between alterations in neuronal morphology and epilepsy in the dentate gyrus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Environmental Enrichment Increases Progenitor Cell Survival in the Dentate Gyrus following Lateral Fluid Percussion Injury

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Neurons in the hilus of the dentate gyrus are lost following a lateral fluid percussion injury. Environmental enrichment is known to increase neurogenesis in the dentate in intact rats, suggesting that it might also do so following fluid percussion injury, and potentially provide replacements for lost neurons. We report that 1 hour of daily environmental enrichment for 3 weeks increased the number of progenitor cells in the dentate following fluid percussion injury, but only on the ipsilesion...

  14. Temporal changes in prosaposin expression in the rat dentate gyrus after birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Midori; Nabeka, Hiroaki; Shimokawa, Tetsuya; Miyawaki, Kyojy; Doihara, Takuya; Saito, Shouichiro; Kobayashi, Naoto; Matsuda, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    Neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus occurs constitutively throughout postnatal life. Adult neurogenesis includes a multistep process that ends with the formation of a postmitotic and functionally integrated new neuron. During adult neurogenesis, various markers are expressed, including GFAP, nestin, Pax6, polysialic acid-neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM), neuronal nuclei (NeuN), doublecortin, TUC-4, Tuj-1, and calretinin. Prosaposin is the precursor of saposins A-D; it is found in various organs and can be excreted. Strong prosaposin expression has been demonstrated in the developing brain including the hippocampus, and its neurotrophic activity has been proposed. This study investigated changes in prosaposin in the dentate gyrus of young and adult rats using double immunohistochemistry with antibodies to prosaposin, PSA-NCAM, and NeuN. Prosaposin immunoreactivity was intense in the dentate gyrus at postnatal day 3 (P3) and P7, but decreased gradually after P14. In the dentate gyrus at P28, immature PSA-NCAM-positive neurons localized exclusively in the subgranular zone were prosaposin-negative, whereas mature Neu-N-positive neurons were positive for prosaposin. Furthermore, these prosaposin-negative immature neurons were saposin B-positive, suggesting that the neurons take up and degrade prosaposin. In situ hybridization assays showed that prosaposin in the adult dentate gyrus is dominantly the Pro+9 type, a secreted type of prosaposin. These results imply that prosaposin secreted from mature neurons stimulates proliferation and maturation of immature neurons in the dentate gyrus.

  15. Functional dissociation of adult-born neurons along the dorsoventral axis of the dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Melody V; Hen, René

    2014-07-01

    Adult-born granule cells in the mammalian dentate gyrus have long been implicated in hippocampal dependent spatial learning and behavioral effects of chronic antidepressant treatment. Although recent anatomical and functional evidence indicates a dissociation of the dorsal and ventral regions of the hippocampus, it is not known if adult neurogenesis within each region specifically contributes to distinct functions or whether adult-born cells along the entire dorsoventral axis are required for these behaviors. We examined the role of distinct subpopulations of adult-born hippocampal granule cells in learning- and anxiety-related behaviors using low-dose focal x-irradiation directed specifically to the dorsal or ventral dentate gyrus. Our findings indicate a functional dissociation between adult-born neurons along the longitudinal axis of the dentate gyrus wherein new neurons in the dorsal dentate gyrus are required for timely acquisition of contextual discrimination while immature neurons in the ventral dentate gyrus are necessary for anxiolytic/antidepressant-related effects of fluoxetine. Interestingly, when contexts are presented with altered temporal cues, or fluoxetine is administered alongside chronic glucocorticoid treatment, this dissociation is abrogated such that adult-born neurons across the entire dorsoventral extent of the dentate gyrus appear to contribute to these behaviors. Our results suggest that individual subpopulations of adult-born hippocampal neurons may be sufficient to mediate distinct behaviors in certain conditions, but are required to act in concert in more challenging situations. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Temporal changes in prosaposin expression in the rat dentate gyrus after birth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Midori Morishita

    Full Text Available Neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus occurs constitutively throughout postnatal life. Adult neurogenesis includes a multistep process that ends with the formation of a postmitotic and functionally integrated new neuron. During adult neurogenesis, various markers are expressed, including GFAP, nestin, Pax6, polysialic acid-neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM, neuronal nuclei (NeuN, doublecortin, TUC-4, Tuj-1, and calretinin. Prosaposin is the precursor of saposins A-D; it is found in various organs and can be excreted. Strong prosaposin expression has been demonstrated in the developing brain including the hippocampus, and its neurotrophic activity has been proposed. This study investigated changes in prosaposin in the dentate gyrus of young and adult rats using double immunohistochemistry with antibodies to prosaposin, PSA-NCAM, and NeuN. Prosaposin immunoreactivity was intense in the dentate gyrus at postnatal day 3 (P3 and P7, but decreased gradually after P14. In the dentate gyrus at P28, immature PSA-NCAM-positive neurons localized exclusively in the subgranular zone were prosaposin-negative, whereas mature Neu-N-positive neurons were positive for prosaposin. Furthermore, these prosaposin-negative immature neurons were saposin B-positive, suggesting that the neurons take up and degrade prosaposin. In situ hybridization assays showed that prosaposin in the adult dentate gyrus is dominantly the Pro+9 type, a secreted type of prosaposin. These results imply that prosaposin secreted from mature neurons stimulates proliferation and maturation of immature neurons in the dentate gyrus.

  17. Hippocampus and dentate gyrus of the Cebus monkey: architectonic and stereological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerreiro-Diniz, Cristovam; de Melo Paz, Roberta Bentes; Hamad, Mayra Hermínia Simões; Filho, Carlos Santos; Martins, Adriano Augusto Vilhena; Neves, Heitor Bastos; de Souza Cunha, Elane Domenica; Alves, Gisele Cristina; de Sousa, Lia Amaral; Dias, Ivanira Amaral; Trévia, Nonata; de Sousa, Aline Andrade; Passos, Aline; Lins, Nara; Torres Neto, João Bento; da Costa Vasconcelos, Pedro Fernando; Picanço-Diniz, Cristovam Wanderley

    2010-10-01

    Behavioral, electrophysiological, and anatomical assays of non-human primates have provided substantial evidence that the hippocampus and dentate gyrus are essential for memory consolidation. However, a single anatomical and stereological investigation of these regions has been done in New World primates to complement those assays. The aim of the present study was to describe the cyto-, myelo-, and histochemical architecture of the hippocampus and dentate gyrus, and to use the optical fractionator method to estimate the number of neurons in the hippocampal pyramidal and granular neurons in the dentate gyrus of the Cebus monkey. NeuN immunolabeling, lectin histochemical staining with Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA), enzyme-histochemical detection of NADPH-diaphorase activity and Gallyas silver staining were used to define the layers and limits of the hippocampal fields and dentate gyrus. A comparative analysis of capuchin (Cebus apella) and Rhesus (Macaca mulatta) monkeys revealed similar structural organization of these regions but significant differences in the regional distribution of neurons. C. apella were found to have 1.3 times fewer pyramidal and 3.5 times fewer granular neurons than M. mulatta. Taken together the architectonic and stereological data of the present study suggest that hippocampal and dentate gyrus neural networks in the C. apella and M. mulatta may contribute to hippocampal-dentate gyrus-dependent tasks in different proportions.

  18. Early natural stimulation through environmental enrichment accelerates neuronal development in the mouse dentate gyrus.

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    Na Liu

    Full Text Available The dentate gyrus is the primary afferent into the hippocampal formation, with important functions in learning and memory. Granule cells, the principle neuronal type in the dentate gyrus, are mostly formed postnatally, in a process that continues into adulthood. External stimuli, including environmental enrichment, voluntary exercise and learning, have been shown to significantly accelerate the generation and maturation of dentate granule cells in adult rodents. Whether, and to what extent, such environmental stimuli regulate the development and maturation of dentate granule cells during early postnatal development is largely unknown. Furthermore, whether natural stimuli affect the synaptic properties of granule cells had been investigated neither in newborn neurons of the adult nor during early development. To examine the effect of natural sensory stimulation on the dentate gyrus, we reared newborn mice in an enriched environment (EE. Using immunohistochemistry, we showed that dentate granule cells from EE-reared mice exhibited earlier morphological maturation, manifested as faster peaking of doublecortin expression and elevated expression of mature neuronal markers (including NeuN, calbindin and MAP2 at the end of the second postnatal week. Also at the end of the second postnatal week, we found increased density of dendritic spines across the entire dentate gyrus, together with elevated levels of postsynaptic scaffold (post-synaptic density 95 and receptor proteins (GluR2 and GABA(ARγ2 of excitatory and inhibitory synapses. Furthermore, dentate granule cells of P14 EE-reared mice had lower input resistances and increased glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic inputs. Together, our results demonstrate that EE-rearing promotes morphological and electrophysiological maturation of dentate granule cells, underscoring the importance of natural environmental stimulation on development of the dentate gyrus.

  19. Melatonin maintains calcium-binding calretinin-positive neurons in the dentate gyrus during aging of Balb/C mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Rodríguez, Gerardo; Gómez-Sánchez, Ariadna; Ortíz-López, Leonardo

    2014-12-01

    Melatonin, the main product synthesized by the pineal gland, modulates several brain functions through different mechanisms, some of them involving the activation or participation of calcium binding intracellular proteins, such as the alpha calcium dependent protein kinase C and calmodulin. Another calcium-binding protein is calretinin, which exerts an essential role for adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Melatonin favors calretinin-positive neurons in the dentate gyrus (DG) of young mice but hippocampal neurogenesis and plasma levels of melatonin decrease during aging. Thus, in this study, we analyzed the impact of exogenous supplementation with melatonin in calretinin-neurons and their distribution along the dorsal-ventral DG in the hippocampus at three different time points (1, 3, or 6 months) after daily treatment with melatonin (8 mg/kg) in male Balb/C mice. We found an increase in the number of calretinin-positive neurons in the DG after treatment (>66%). Although a significant decline in the number of calretinin-neurons was found in both treated (~60.46-69.56%) and untreated mice (~68.81-70.34%) with respect to the youngest mice analyzed, melatonin still maintained higher number of cells in the DG. Also, the distribution of calretinin-neurons along the dorsal-ventral DG significantly showed more cells in the ventral-DG of mice treated with melatonin. Together, the data suggest that melatonin also acts on calretinin in the DG, supporting it as a molecule connecting calcium signaling and neuronal development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Different patterns of amygdala priming differentially affect dentate gyrus plasticity and corticosterone, but not CA1 plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose-Marie eVouimba

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Stress-induced activation of the amygdala is involved in the modulation of memory processes in the hippocampus. However, stress effects on amygdala and memory remain complex. The activation of the basolateral amygdala (BLA was found to modulate plasticity in other brain areas, including the hippocampus. We previously demonstrated a differential effect of BLA priming on LTP in the CA1 and the dentate gyrus (DG. While BLA priming suppressed long term potentiation (LTP in CA1, it was found to enhance it in the DG. However, since the amygdala itself is amenable to experience-induced plasticity it is thus conceivable that when activity within the amygdala is modified this will have impact on the way the amygdala modulates activity and plasticity in other brain areas. In the current study we examined the effects of different patterns of BLA activation on the modulation of LTP in the DG and CA1, as well as on serum corticosterone (CORT. In CA1, BLA priming impaired LTP induction as was reported before. In contrast, in the DG, varying BLA stimulation intensity and frequency resulted in differential effects on LTP, ranging from no effect to strong impairment or enhancement. Varying BLA stimulation patterns resulted in also differential alterations in Serum CORT, leading to higher CORT levels being positively correlated with LTP magnitude in DG but not in CA1.The results support the notion of a differential role for the DG in aspects of memory, and add to this view the possibility that DG-associated aspects of memory will be enhanced under more emotional or stressful conditions. It is interesting to think of BLA patterns of activation and the differential levels of circulating CORT as two arms of the emotional and stress response that attempt to synchronize brain activity to best meet the challenge. It is foreseeable to think of abnormal such synchronization under extreme conditions, which would lead to the development of maladaptive behavior.

  1. Dentate Gyrus Development Requires ERK Activity to Maintain Progenitor Population and MAPK Pathway Feedback Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vithayathil, Joseph; Pucilowska, Joanna; Goodnough, L Henry; Atit, Radhika P; Landreth, Gary E

    2015-04-29

    The ERK/MAPK pathway is an important developmental signaling pathway. Mutations in upstream elements of this pathway result in neuro-cardio-facial cutaneous (NCFC) syndromes, which are typified by impaired neurocognitive abilities that are reliant upon hippocampal function. The role of ERK signaling during hippocampal development has not been examined and may provide critical insight into the cause of hippocampal dysfunction in NCFC syndromes. In this study, we have generated ERK1 and conditional ERK2 compound knock-out mice to determine the role of ERK signaling during development of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. We found that loss of both ERK1 and ERK2 resulted in 60% fewer granule cells and near complete absence of neural progenitor pools in the postnatal dentate gyrus. Loss of ERK1/2 impaired maintenance of neural progenitors as they migrate from the dentate ventricular zone to the dentate gyrus proper, resulting in premature depletion of neural progenitor cells beginning at E16.5, which prevented generation of granule cells later in development. Finally, loss of ERK2 alone does not impair development of the dentate gyrus as animals expressing only ERK1 developed a normal hippocampus. These findings establish that ERK signaling regulates maintenance of progenitor cells required for development of the dentate gyrus. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/356836-13$15.00/0.

  2. Normal and epilepsy-associated pathologic function of the dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengler, C G; Coulter, D A

    2016-01-01

    The dentate gyrus plays critical roles both in cognitive processing, and in regulation of the induction and propagation of pathological activity. The cellular and circuit mechanisms underlying these diverse functions overlap extensively. At the cellular level, the intrinsic properties of dentate granule cells combine to endow these neurons with a fundamental reluctance to activate, one of their hallmark traits. At the circuit level, the dentate gyrus constitutes one of the more heavily inhibited regions of the brain, with strong, fast feedforward and feedback GABAergic inhibition dominating responses to afferent activation. In pathologic states such as epilepsy, a number of alterations within the dentate gyrus combine to compromise the regulatory properties of this circuit, culminating in a collapse of its normal function. This epilepsy-associated transformation in the fundamental properties of this critical regulatory hippocampal circuit may contribute both to seizure propensity, and cognitive and emotional comorbidities characteristic of this disease state. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Loss of Ensemble Segregation in Dentate Gyrus, but Not in Somatosensory Cortex, during Contextual Fear Memory Generalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Yokoyama

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The details of contextual or episodic memories are lost and generalized with the passage of time. Proper generalization may underlie the formation and assimilation of semantic memories and enable animals to adapt to ever-changing environments, whereas overgeneralization of fear memory evokes maladaptive fear responses to harmless stimuli, which is a symptom of anxiety disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. To understand the neural basis of fear memory generalization, we investigated the patterns of neuronal ensemble reactivation during memory retrieval when contextual fear memory expression is generalized using transgenic mice that allowed us to visualize specific neuronal ensembles activated during memory encoding and retrieval. We found preferential reactivations of neuronal ensembles in the primary somatosensory cortex, when mice were returned to the conditioned context to retrieve their memory 1 day after conditioning. In the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG, exclusively separated ensemble reactivation was observed when mice were exposed to a novel context. These results suggest that the DG as well as the somatosensory cortex were likely to distinguish the two different contexts at the ensemble activity level when memory is not generalized at the behavioral level. However, 9 days after conditioning when animals exhibited generalized fear, the unique reactivation pattern in the DG, but not in the somatosensory cortex, was lost. Our results suggest that the alternations in the ensemble representation within the DG, or in upstream structures that link the sensory cortex to the hippocampus, may underlie generalized contextual fear memory expression.

  4. The chronic administration of cerebrolysin induces plastic changes in the prefrontal cortex and dentate gyrus in aged mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez, Ismael; González, Deniss Janeth; Mena, Raúl; Flores, Gonzalo

    2011-11-01

    Cerebrolysin (Cbl) is a mixture of neuropeptides with effects similar to the endogenous neurotrophic factors and is considered one of the best drugs used in the treatment of dementias such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). In brains with AD, morphological changes in the dendrites of pyramidal neurons of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus have been reported. These changes are reflected particularly in the decrement of both the dendritic tree and spine density. Here we evaluated the effect of this drug on the dendrites of pyramidal neurons of the PFC and CA1 dorsal hippocampus and granule cells from the dentate gyrus (DG) and medium spiny neurons of the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) of aged mice. Cbl (5 ml kg(-1) , i.p.) was administered daily for 60 days to 6-month-old mice. Dendritic morphology was studied by the Golgi-Cox stain procedure followed by Sholl analysis at 8 months ages. In all Cbl-treated mice a significant increase in dendritic spine density and dendritic length in pyramidal neurons of the PFC and granule cells of the DG was observed. Interestingly, the enhancement in dendritic length was close to the soma in pyramidal neurons of the PFC whereas in granule neurons of the DG the increase in dendritic length was further from the soma. Our results suggest that Cbl induces plastic modifications of dendritic morphology in the PFC and DG. These changes may explain the therapeutic effect seen in AD patients treated with Cbl.

  5. Neural stem cell- and neurogenesis-related gene expression profiles in the young and aged dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Geetha A; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Shetty, Ashok K

    2013-12-01

    Hippocampal neurogenesis, important for memory and mood function, wanes greatly in old age. Studies in rat models have implied that this decrease is not due to loss of neural stem cells (NSCs) in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus (DG) but rather due to an increased quiescence of NSCs. Additional studies have suggested that changes in the microenvironment, particularly declines in the concentrations of neurotrophic factors, underlie this change. In this study, we compared the expression of 84 genes that are important for NSC proliferation and neurogenesis between the DG of young (4 months old) and aged (24 months old) Fischer 344 rats, using a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction array. Interestingly, the expression of a vast majority of genes that have been reported previously to positively or negatively regulate NSC proliferation was unaltered with aging. Furthermore, most genes important for cell cycle arrest, regulation of cell differentiation, growth factors and cytokine levels, synaptic functions, apoptosis, cell adhesion and cell signaling, and regulation of transcription displayed stable expression in the DG with aging. The exceptions included increased expression of genes important for NSC proliferation and neurogenesis (Stat3 and Shh), DNA damage response and NF-kappaB signaling (Cdk5rap3), neuromodulation (Adora1), and decreased expression of a gene important for neuronal differentiation (HeyL). Thus, age-related decrease in hippocampal neurogenesis is not associated with a decline in the expression of selected genes important for NSC proliferation and neurogenesis in the DG.

  6. Chronically dysregulated NOTCH1 interactome in the dentate gyrus after traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhakka, Noora; Bot, Anna Maria; Vuokila, Niina; Debski, Konrad Jozef; Lukasiuk, Katarzyna; Pitkänen, Asla

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can result in several dentate gyrus-regulated disabilities. Almost nothing is known about the chronic molecular changes after TBI, and their potential as treatment targets. We hypothesized that chronic transcriptional alterations after TBI are under microRNA (miRNA) control. Expression of miRNAs and their targets in the dentate gyrus was analyzed using microarrays at 3 months after experimental TBI. Of 305 miRNAs present on the miRNA-array, 12 were downregulated (pdentate gyrus pathology-related morbidities. PMID:28273100

  7. Quantitative analysis of postnatal neurogenesis and neuron number in the macaque monkey dentate gyrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabès, Adeline; Lavenex, Pamela Banta; Amaral, David G.; Lavenex, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    The dentate gyrus is one of only two regions of the mammalian brain where substantial neurogenesis occurs postnatally. However, detailed quantitative information about the postnatal structural maturation of the primate dentate gyrus is meager. We performed design-based, stereological studies of neuron number and size, and volume of the dentate gyrus layers in rhesus macaque monkeys (Macaca mulatta) of different postnatal ages. We found that about 40% of the total number of granule cells observed in mature 5–10-year-old macaque monkeys are added to the granule cell layer postnatally; 25% of these neurons are added within the first three postnatal months. Accordingly, cell proliferation and neurogenesis within the dentate gyrus peak within the first three months after birth and remain at an intermediate level between three months and at least one year of age. Although granule cell bodies undergo their largest increase in size during the first year of life, cell size and the volume of the three layers of the dentate gyrus (i.e., the molecular, granule cell and polymorphic layers) continue to increase beyond one year of age. Moreover, the different layers of the dentate gyrus exhibit distinct volumetric changes during postnatal development. Finally, we observe significant levels of cell proliferation, neurogenesis and cell death in the context of an overall stable number of granule cells in mature 5–10-year-old monkeys. These data identify an extended developmental period during which neurogenesis might be modulated to significantly impact the structure and function of the dentate gyrus in adulthood. PMID:20074220

  8. Breaches of the pial basement membrane are associated with defective dentate gyrus development in mouse models of congenital muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Yu, Miao; Feng, Gang; Hu, Huaiyu; Li, Xiaofeng

    2011-11-07

    A subset of congenital muscular dystrophies (CMDs) has central nervous system manifestations. There are good mouse models for these CMDs that include POMGnT1 knockout, POMT2 knockout and Large(myd) mice with all exhibiting defects in dentate gyrus. It is not known how the abnormal dentate gyrus is formed during the development. In this study, we conducted a detailed morphological examination of the dentate gyrus in adult and newborn POMGnT1 knockout, POMT2 knockout, and Large(myd) mice by immunofluorescence staining and electron microscopic analyses. We observed that the pial basement membrane overlying the dentate gyrus was disrupted and there was ectopia of granule cell precursors through the breached pial basement membrane. Besides these, the knockout dentate gyrus exhibited reactive gliosis in these mouse models. Thus, breaches in the pial basement membrane are associated with defective dentate gyrus development in mouse models of congenital muscular dystrophies.

  9. NMDA receptor antagonist prevents cell death in the hippocampal dentate gyrus induced by hyponatremia accompanying adrenal insufficiency in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumida, Hisakazu; Takagi, Hiroshi; Fujisawa, Haruki; Iwata, Naoko; Nakashima, Kohtaro; Takeuchi, Seiji; Iwama, Shintaro; Namba, Takashi; Komatu, Yukio; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Oiso, Yutaka; Arima, Hiroshi; Sugimura, Yoshihisa

    2017-01-01

    Selective apoptosis of granule cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) of rats with bilateral adrenalectomy (ADX) and in patients who died of adrenal insufficiency has been reported. Although adrenal insufficiency is a common disease and is usually associated with hyponatremia, its effect on the central nervous system and in apoptosis in the hippocampus remain to be elucidated. Using rat models to represent clinical hyponatremia accompanying adrenal insufficiency, we show that reduced serum [Na(+)] was associated with selective apoptosis in the DG. Nine days after ADX, apoptotic cells were observed in the DG of rats whose serum [Na(+)] was <125mEq/L (moderate hyponatremia), but rarely in those whose serum [Na(+)] was ≥125mEq/L or in normonatremic rats. Although all hyponatremic ADX rats survived following treatment with corticosterone and saline started 7days after ADX when apoptosis had not yet occurred, selective apoptosis on day 9 was not prevented in moderately hyponatremic rats. Interestingly, treatment with memantine, a noncompetitive NMDAR antagonist, prevented the selective apoptosis in the DG in moderately hyponatremic, ADX rats, and improved electrophysiological dysfunction, including impaired basal synaptic transmission and long-term potentiation at the entorhinal cortex-DG synapses. These results demonstrated that in adrenal insufficient rats, hyponatremia was associated with apoptosis in the DG, and that memantine prevented the apoptosis and improved cell function. Our data imply the importance of assessing the possibility of neurological impairments after treatment with CORT in patients with moderate or severe hyponatremia accompanying adrenal insufficiency and that memantine may represent a beneficial therapeutic strategy to prevent neurological impairments in such patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. HIPP neurons in the dentate gyrus mediate the cholinergic modulation of background context memory salience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Syed Ahsan; Albrecht, Anne; Çalışkan, Gürsel; Müller, Bettina; Demiray, Yunus Emre; Ludewig, Susann; Meis, Susanne; Faber, Nicolai; Hartig, Roland; Schraven, Burkhart; Lessmann, Volkmar; Schwegler, Herbert; Stork, Oliver

    2017-08-04

    Cholinergic neuromodulation in the hippocampus controls the salience of background context memory acquired in the presence of elemental stimuli predicting an aversive reinforcement. With pharmacogenetic inhibition we here demonstrate that hilar perforant path-associated (HIPP) cells of the dentate gyrus mediate the devaluation of background context memory during Pavlovian fear conditioning. The salience adjustment is sensitive to reduction of hilar neuropeptide Y (NPY) expression via dominant negative CREB expression in HIPP cells and to acute blockage of NPY-Y1 receptors in the dentate gyrus during conditioning. We show that NPY transmission and HIPP cell activity contribute to inhibitory effects of acetylcholine in the dentate gyrus and that M1 muscarinic receptors mediate the cholinergic activation of HIPP cells as well as their control of background context salience. Our data provide evidence for a peptidergic local circuit in the dentate gyrus that mediates the cholinergic encoding of background context salience during fear memory acquisition.Intra-hippocampal circuits are essential for associating a background context with behaviorally salient stimuli and involve cholinergic modulation at SST(+) interneurons. Here the authors show that the salience of the background context memory is modulated through muscarinic activation of NPY(+) hilar perforant path associated interneurons and NPY signaling in the dentate gyrus.

  11. Origin, Maturation and Astroglial Transformation of Secondary Radial Glial Cells in the Developing Dentate Gyrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunne, Bianka; Zhao, Shanting; Derouiche, Amin; Herz, Joachim; May, Petra; Frotscher, Michael; Bock, Hans H.

    2010-01-01

    The dentate gyrus is a brain region where neurons are continuously born throughout life. In the adult, the role of its radial glia in neurogenesis has attracted much attention over the past years, however, little is known about the generation and differentiation of glial cells and their relationship to radial glia during the ontogenetic development of this brain structure. Here, we combine immunohistochemical phenotyping using antibodies against glial marker proteins with BrdU birthdating to characterize the development of the secondary radial glial scaffold in the dentate gyrus and its potential to differentiate into astrocytes. We demonstrate that the expression of BLBP, GLAST and GFAP characterizes immature differentiating cells confined to an astrocytic fate in the early postnatal dentate gyrus. Based on our studies we propose a model where immature astrocytes migrate radially through the granule cell layer to adopt their final positions in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. Time-lapse imaging of acute hippocampal slices from hGFAP-eGFP transgenic mice provide direct evidence for such a migration mode of differentiating astroglial cells in the developing dentate gyrus. PMID:20549747

  12. Automated measurement of hippocampal subfields in PTSD: Evidence for smaller dentate gyrus volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Jasmeet P; Hayes, Scott; Miller, Danielle R; Lafleche, Ginette; Logue, Mark W; Verfaellie, Mieke

    2017-09-09

    Smaller hippocampal volume has been consistently observed as a biomarker of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, less is known about individual volumes of the subfields composing the hippocampus such as the dentate gyrus and cornu ammonis (CA) fields 1-4 in PTSD. The aim of the present study was to examine the hypothesis that volume of the dentate gyrus, a region putatively involved in distinctive encoding of similar events, is smaller in individuals with PTSD versus trauma-exposed controls. Ninety-seven recent war veterans underwent structural imaging on a 3T scanner and were assessed for PTSD using the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale. The hippocampal subfield automated segmentation program available through FreeSurfer was used to segment the CA4/dentate gyrus, CA1, CA2/3, presubiculum, and subiculum of the hippocampus. Results showed that CA4/dentate gyrus subfield volume was significantly smaller in veterans with PTSD and scaled inversely with PTSD symptom severity. These results support the view that dentate gyrus abnormalities are associated with symptoms of PTSD, although additional evidence is necessary to determine whether these abnormalities underlie fear generalization and other memory alterations in PTSD. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Novel Control by the CA3 Region of the Hippocampus on Neurogenesis in the Dentate Gyrus of the Adult Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Jian Xin Liu; Pinnock, Scarlett B.; Joe Herbert

    2011-01-01

    The dentate gyrus is a site of continued neurogenesis in the adult brain. The CA3 region of the hippocampus is the major projection area from the dentate gyrus. CA3 sends reciprocal projections back to the dentate gyrus. Does this imply that CA3 exerts some control over neurogenesis? We studied the effects of lesions of CA3 on neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus, and on the ability of fluoxetine to stimulate mitotic activity in the progenitor cells. Unilateral ibotenic-acid generated lesions we...

  14. Impaired adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of a triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José J Rodríguez

    Full Text Available It has become generally accepted that new neurones are added and integrated mainly in two areas of the mammalian CNS, the subventricular zone and the subgranular zone (SGZ of the dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampus, which is of central importance in learning and memory. The newly generated cells display neuronal morphology, are able to generate action potentials and receive functional synaptic inputs, i.e. their properties are similar to those found in mature neurones. Alzheimer's disease (AD is the primary and widespread cause of dementia and is an age-related, progressive and irreversible neurodegenerative disease that deteriorates cognitive functions. Here, we have used male and female triple transgenic mice (3xTg-AD harbouring three mutant genes (beta-amyloid precursor protein, presenilin-1 and tau and their respective non-transgenic (non-Tg controls at 2, 3, 4, 6, 9 and 12 months of age to establish the link between AD and neurogenesis. Using immunohistochemistry we determined the area density of proliferating cells within the SGZ of the DG, measured by the presence of phosphorylated Histone H3 (HH3, and their possible co-localisation with GFAP to exclude a glial phenotype. Less than 1% of the HH3 labeled cells co-localised with GFAP. Both non-Tg and 3xTg-AD showed an age-dependent decrease in neurogenesis. However, male 3xTg-AD mice demonstrated a further reduction in the production of new neurones from 9 months of age (73% decrease and a complete depletion at 12 months, when compared to controls. In addition, female 3xTg-AD mice showed an earlier but equivalent decrease in neurogenesis at 4 months (reduction of 63% with an almost inexistent rate at 12 months (88% decrease compared to controls. This reduction in neurogenesis was directly associated with the presence of beta-amyloid plaques and an increase in the number of beta-amyloid containing neurones in the hippocampus; which in the case of 3xgTg females was directly correlated. These

  15. Prenatal alcohol exposure affects progenitor cell numbers in olfactory bulbs and dentate gyrus of vervet monkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burke, Mark W; Inyatkin, Alexey; Ptito, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    cells in the rostral migratory pathway, while production and migration of postnatal neurons into the dentate gyrus may be more complex. The relatively small size of the olfactory bulb, compared to the hippocampus, potentially makes this structure ideal for a rapid analysis. This study used the St. Kitts...... vervet monkey (Chlorocebus sabeus) to (1) investigate the normal developmental sequence of post-natal proliferation in the olfactory bulb and dentate gyrus and (2) determine the effects of naturalistic prenatal ethanol exposure on proliferation at three different ages (neonate, five months and two years......). Using design-based stereology, we found an age-related decrease of actively proliferating cells in the olfactory bulb and dentate gyrus for both control and FAE groups. Furthermore, at the neonatal time point, the FAE group had fewer actively proliferating cells as compared to the control group...

  16. Tooth loss inhibits neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of adult mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shaochen Su; Tao Qi; Baoli Su; Huibin Gu; Jianlin Wang; Lan Yang

    2014-01-01

    Tooth loss has been shown to affect learning and memory in mice and increases the risk of Alz-heimer’s disease. The dentate gyrus is strongly associated with cognitive function. This study hypothesized that tooth loss affects neurons in the dentate gyrus. Adult male mice were random-ly assigned to either the tooth loss group or normal control group. In the tooth loss group, the left maxillary and mandibular molars were extracted. Normal control mice did not receive any intervention. Immunolfuorescence staining revealed that the density and absorbance of double-cortin-and neuronal nuclear antigen-positive cells were lower in the tooth loss group than in the normal control group. These data suggest that tooth loss may inhibit neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of adult mice.

  17. Toward a full-scale computational model of the rat dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Calvin J; Bezaire, Marianne; Soltesz, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in parallel computing, including the creation of the parallel version of the NEURON simulation environment, have allowed for a previously unattainable level of complexity and detail in neural network models. Previously, we published a functional NEURON model of the rat dentate gyrus with over 50,000 biophysically realistic, multicompartmental neurons, but network simulations could only utilize a single processor. By converting the model to take advantage of parallel NEURON, we are now able to utilize greater computational resources and are able to simulate the full-scale dentate gyrus, containing over a million neurons. This has eliminated the previous necessity for scaling adjustments and allowed for a more direct comparison to experimental techniques and results. The translation to parallel computing has provided a superlinear speedup of computation time and dramatically increased the overall computer memory available to the model. The incorporation of additional computational resources has allowed for more detail and elements to be included in the model, bringing the model closer to a more complete and accurate representation of the biological dentate gyrus. As an example of a major step toward an increasingly accurate representation of the biological dentate gyrus, we discuss the incorporation of realistic granule cell dendrites into the model. Our previous model contained simplified, two-dimensional dendritic morphologies that were identical for neurons of the same class. Using the software tools L-Neuron and L-Measure, we are able to introduce cell-to-cell variability by generating detailed, three-dimensional granule cell morphologies that are based on biological reconstructions. Through these and other improvements, we aim to construct a more complete full-scale model of the rat dentate gyrus, to provide a better tool to delineate the functional role of cell types within the dentate gyrus and their pathological changes observed in epilepsy.

  18. Effect of Aggregated β-Amyloid (1-42 on Synaptic Plasticity of Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus Granule Cells in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirin Babri

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a common neurodegenerative disorder in elderly people with an impairment of cognitive decline and memory loss. β-amyloid (Aβ as a potent neurotoxic peptide has a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of AD. This disease begins with impairment in synaptic functions before developing into later neuro­degeneration and neuronal loss. The aim of this study was to evaluate the synaptic plasticity and electrophysiological function of granule cells in hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG after intracerebroventricular (i.c.v. administration of aggregated Aβ (1-42 peptide in vivo. Methods: Animals were divided to control and Aβ (1-42 groups. Long-term potentia­tion (LTP in perforant path-DG synapses was assessed in order to investigate the effect of aggregated Aβ (1-42 on synaptic plasticity. Field excitatory post-synaptic potential (fEPSP slope and population spike (PS amplitude were measured. Results: Administration of Aβ (1-42 significantly decreased fEPSP slope and PS amplitude in Aβ (1-42 group comparing with the control group and had no effect on baseline activity of neurons. Conclusion: The present study indicates that administration of aggregated form of Aβ (1-42 into the lateral ventricle effectively inhibits LTP in granular cells of the DG in hippocampus in vivo.

  19. Naringenin ameliorates kainic acid-induced morphological alterations in the dentate gyrus in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jungha; Jeong, Kyoung Hoon; Shin, Won-Ho; Bae, Young-Seuk; Jung, Un Ju; Kim, Sang Ryong

    2016-10-19

    Granule cell dispersion (GCD) in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus is a morphological alteration characteristic of temporal lobe epilepsy. Recently, we reported that treatment with naringin, a flavonoid found in grapefruit and citrus fruits, reduced spontaneous recurrent seizures by inhibiting kainic acid (KA)-induced GCD and neuronal cell death in mouse hippocampus, suggesting that naringin might have beneficial effects for preventing epileptic events in the adult brain. However, it is still unclear whether the beneficial effects of naringin treatment are mediated by the metabolism of naringin into naringenin in the KA-treated hippocampus. To investigate this possibility, we evaluated whether intraperitoneal injections of naringenin could mimic naringin-induced effects against GCD caused by intrahippocampal KA injections in mice. Our results showed that treatment with naringenin delayed the onset of KA-induced seizures and attenuated KA-induced GCD by inhibiting activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 in both neurons and reactive astrocytes in the DG. In addition, its administration attenuated the production of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) from microglial activation in the DG following KA treatment. These results suggest that naringenin may be an active metabolite of naringin and help prevent the progression of epileptic insults in the hippocampus in vivo; therefore, naringenin may be a beneficial metabolite of naringin for the treatment of epilepsy.

  20. Retrograde monosynaptic tracing reveals the temporal evolution of inputs onto new neurons in the adult dentate gyrus and olfactory bulb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Aditi; Bergami, Matteo; Ghanem, Alexander; Conzelmann, Karl-Klaus; Lepier, Alexandra; Götz, Magdalena; Berninger, Benedikt

    2013-01-01

    Identifying the connectome of adult-generated neurons is essential for understanding how the preexisting circuitry is refined by neurogenesis. Changes in the pattern of connectivity are likely to control the differentiation process of newly generated neurons and exert an important influence on their unique capacity to contribute to information processing. Using a monosynaptic rabies virus-based tracing technique, we studied the evolving presynaptic connectivity of adult-generated neurons in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus and olfactory bulb (OB) during the first weeks of their life. In both neurogenic zones, adult-generated neurons first receive local connections from multiple types of GABAergic interneurons before long-range projections become established, such as those originating from cortical areas. Interestingly, despite fundamental similarities in the overall pattern of evolution of presynaptic connectivity, there were notable differences with regard to the development of cortical projections: although DG granule neuron input originating from the entorhinal cortex could be traced starting only from 3 to 5 wk on, newly generated neurons in the OB received input from the anterior olfactory nucleus and piriform cortex already by the second week. This early glutamatergic input onto newly generated interneurons in the OB was matched in time by the equally early innervations of DG granule neurons by glutamatergic mossy cells. The development of connectivity revealed by our study may suggest common principles for incorporating newly generated neurons into a preexisting circuit. PMID:23487772

  1. Tricyclic antidepressant amitriptyline indirectly increases the proliferation of adult dentate gyrus-derived neural precursors: an involvement of astrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuken Boku

    Full Text Available Antidepressants increase the proliferation of neural precursors in adult dentate gyrus (DG, which is considered to be involved in the therapeutic action of antidepressants. However, the mechanism underlying it remains unclear. By using cultured adult rat DG-derived neural precursors (ADP, we have already shown that antidepressants have no direct effects on ADP. Therefore, antidepressants may increase the proliferation of neural precursors in adult DG via unknown indirect mechanism. We have also shown that amitriptyline (AMI, a tricyclic antidepressant, induces the expressions of GDNF, BDNF, FGF2 and VEGF, common neurogenic factors, in primary cultured astrocytes (PCA. These suggest that AMI-induced factors in astrocytes may increase the proliferation of neural precursors in adult DG. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of AMI-induced factors and conditioned medium (CM from PCA treated with AMI on ADP proliferation. The effects of CM and factors on ADP proliferation were examined with BrdU immunocytochemistry. AMI had no effect on ADP proliferation, but AMI-treated CM increased it. The receptors of GDNF, BDNF and FGF2, but not VEGF, were expressed in ADP. FGF2 significantly increased ADP proliferation, but not BDNF and GDNF. In addition, both of a specific inhibitor of FGF receptors and anti-FGF2 antibody significantly counteracted the increasing effect of CM on ADP proliferation. In addition, FGF2 in brain is mainly derived from astrocytes that are key components of the neurogenic niches in adult DG. These suggest that AMI may increase ADP proliferation indirectly via PCA and that FGF2 may a potential candidate to mediate such an indirect effect of AMI on ADP proliferation via astrocytes.

  2. Role of corticosteroid hormones in the dentate gyrus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joëls, M.

    2007-01-01

    Dentate granule cells are enriched with receptors for the stress hormone corticosterone, i.e., the high-affinity mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), which is already extensively occupied with low levels of the hormone, and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), which is particularly activated after stress.

  3. In Vivo Targeting of Adult Neural Stem Cells in the Dentate Gyrus by a Split-Cre Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Beckervordersandforth

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe the labeling of adult neural stem cells (aNSCs in the mouse and human dentate gyrus (DG by the combinatorial expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP and Prominin1, as revealed by immunohistochemistry. Split-Cre-based genetic fate mapping of these double-positive cells in the adult murine DG reveals their NSC identity, as they are self-renewing and contribute to neurogenesis over several months. Their progeny reacts to stimuli such as voluntary exercise with increased neurogenesis. Prominin1+/GFAP+ cells also exist in the adult human DG, the only region in the human brain for which adult neurogenesis has been consistently reported. Our data, together with previous evidence of such double-positive NSCs in the developing murine brain and in neurogenic regions of vertebrates with widespread neurogenesis, suggest that Prominin1- and GFAP-expressing cells are NSCs in a wide range of species in development and adulthood.

  4. Interleukin-1β increases neuronal death in the hippocampal dentate gyrus associated with status epilepticus in the developing rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincón-López, C; Tlapa-Pale, A; Medel-Matus, J-S; Martínez-Quiroz, J; Rodríguez-Landa, J F; López-Meraz, M-L

    2016-06-10

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) increases necrotic neuronal cell death in the CA1 area after induced status epilepticus (SE) in developing rats. However, it remains uncertain whether IL-1β has a similar effect on the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG). In this study, we analysed the effects of IL-1β on 14-day-old Wistar rats experiencing DG neuronal death induced by SE. SE was induced with lithium-pilocarpine. Six hours after SE onset, a group of pups was injected with IL-1β (at 0, 0.3, 3, 30, or 300ng/μL) in the right ventricle; another group was injected with IL-1β receptor (IL-1R1) antagonist (IL-1Ra, at 30ng/μL) of IL-1RI antagonist (IL-1Ra) alone, and additional group with 30ng/μL of IL-1Ra plus 3ng/μL of IL-1β. Twenty-four hours after SE onset, neuronal cell death in the dentate gyrus of the dorsal hippocampus was assessed using haematoxylin-eosin staining. Dead cells showed eosinophilic cytoplasm and condensed and fragmented nuclei. We observed an increased number of eosinophilic cells in the hippocampal DG ipsilateral to the site of injection of 3ng/μL and 300ng/μL of IL-1β in comparison with the vehicle group. A similar effect was observed in the hippocampal DG contralateral to the site of injection of 3ng/μL of IL-1β. Administration of both of IL-1β and IL-1Ra failed to prevent an increase in the number of eosinophilic cells. Our data suggest that IL-1β increases apoptotic neuronal cell death caused by SE in the hippocampal GD, which is a mechanism independent of IL-1RI activation. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Dentate Gyrus Local Circuit is Implicated in Learning Under Stress--a Role for Neurofascin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitman, Femke M P; Lucas, Morgan; Trinks, Sabine; Grosse-Ophoff, Laura; Kriebel, Martin; Volkmer, Hansjürgen; Richter-Levin, Gal

    2016-03-01

    The inhibitory synapses at the axon initial segment (AIS) of dentate gyrus granular cells are almost exclusively innervated by the axo-axonic chandelier interneurons. However, the role of chandelier neurons in local circuitry is poorly understood and controversially discussed. The cell adhesion molecule neurofascin is specifically expressed at the AIS. It is crucially required for the stabilization of axo-axonic synapses. Knockdown of neurofascin is therefore a convenient tool to interfere with chandelier input at the AIS of granular neurons of the dentate gyrus. In the current study, feedback and feedforward inhibition of granule cells was measured in the dentate gyrus after knockdown of neurofascin and concomitant reduction of axo-axonic input. Results show increased feedback inhibition as a result of neurofascin knockdown, while feedforward inhibition remained unaffected. This suggests that chandelier neurons are predominantly involved in feedback inhibition. Neurofascin knockdown rats also exhibited impaired learning under stress in the two-way shuttle avoidance task. Remarkably, this learning impairment was not accompanied by differences in electrophysiological measurements of dentate gyrus LTP. This indicates that the local circuit may be involved in (certain types) of learning.

  6. Antisense to the glucocorticoid receptor in hippocampal dentate gyrus reduces immobility in forced swim test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, S.M.; de Kloet, E.R.; Buwalda, B; Bouman, S.D.; Bohus, B

    1996-01-01

    Immobility time of rats in the forced swim test was reduced after bilateral infusion of an 18-mer antisense phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotide targeted to the glucocorticoid receptor mRNA into the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Vehicle-, sense- and scrambled sequence-treated animals spent

  7. Structural plasticity in the dentate gyrus- revisiting a classic injury model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perederiy, Julia V; Westbrook, Gary L

    2013-01-01

    The adult brain is in a continuous state of remodeling. This is nowhere more true than in the dentate gyrus, where competing forces such as neurodegeneration and neurogenesis dynamically modify neuronal connectivity, and can occur simultaneously. This plasticity of the adult nervous system is particularly important in the context of traumatic brain injury or deafferentation. In this review, we summarize a classic injury model, lesioning of the perforant path, which removes the main extrahippocampal input to the dentate gyrus. Early studies revealed that in response to deafferentation, axons of remaining fiber systems and dendrites of mature granule cells undergo lamina-specific changes, providing one of the first examples of structural plasticity in the adult brain. Given the increasing role of adult-generated new neurons in the function of the dentate gyrus, we also compare the response of newborn and mature granule cells following lesioning of the perforant path. These studies provide insights not only to plasticity in the dentate gyrus, but also to the response of neural circuits to brain injury.

  8. Selective dentate gyrus disruption causes memory impairment at the early stage of experimental multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planche, Vincent; Panatier, Aude; Hiba, Bassem; Ducourneau, Eva-Gunnel; Raffard, Gerard; Dubourdieu, Nadège; Maitre, Marlène; Lesté-Lasserre, Thierry; Brochet, Bruno; Dousset, Vincent; Desmedt, Aline; Oliet, Stéphane H; Tourdias, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    Memory impairment is an early and disabling manifestation of multiple sclerosis whose anatomical and biological substrates are still poorly understood. We thus investigated whether memory impairment encountered at the early stage of the disease could be explained by a differential vulnerability of particular hippocampal subfields. By using experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a mouse model of multiple sclerosis, we identified that early memory impairment was associated with selective alteration of the dentate gyrus as pinpointed in vivo with diffusion-tensor-imaging (DTI). Neuromorphometric analyses and electrophysiological recordings confirmed dendritic degeneration, alteration in glutamatergic synaptic transmission and impaired long-term synaptic potentiation selectively in the dentate gyrus, but not in CA1, together with a more severe pattern of microglial activation in this subfield. Systemic injections of the microglial inhibitor minocycline prevented DTI, morphological, electrophysiological and behavioral impairments in EAE-mice. Furthermore, daily infusions of minocycline specifically within the dentate gyrus were sufficient to prevent memory impairment in EAE-mice while infusions of minocycline within CA1 were inefficient. We conclude that early memory impairment in EAE is due to a selective disruption of the dentate gyrus associated with microglia activation. These results open new pathophysiological, imaging, and therapeutic perspectives for memory impairment in multiple sclerosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Developmental profiling of postnatal dentate gyrus progenitors provides evidence for dynamic cell-autonomous regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilley, Jennifer A.; Yang, Cui-Ping; Kernie, Steven G.

    2009-01-01

    The dentate gyrus of the hippocampus is one of the most prominent regions in the postnatal mammalian brain where neurogenesis continues throughout life. There is tremendous speculation regarding the potential implications of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, though it remains unclear to what extent this ability becomes attenuated during normal aging, and what genetic changes in the progenitor population ensue over time. Using defined elements of the nestin promoter, we developed a transgenic mouse that reliably labels neural stem and early progenitors with green fluorescent protein (GFP). Using a combination of immunohistochemical and flow cytometry techniques, we characterized the progenitor cells within the dentate gyrus and created a developmental profile from postnatal day 7 (P7) until 6 months of age. In addition, we demonstrate that the proliferative potential of these progenitors is controlled at least in part by cell-autonomous cues. Finally, in order to identify what may underlie these differences, we performed stem cell-specific microarrays on GFP-expressing sorted cells from isolated P7 and postnatal day 28 (P28) dentate gyrus. We identified several differentially expressed genes that may underlie the functional differences that we observe in neurosphere assays from sorted cells and differentiation assays at these different ages. These data suggest that neural progenitors from the dentate gyrus are differentially regulated by cell-autonomous factors that change over time. PMID:20014381

  10. Effects of NOS inhibitor on dentate gyrus neurogenesis after diffuse brain injury in the adult rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SunLi-Sha; XuJiang-ping

    2004-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of selective nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors on dentate gyrus neurogenesis after diffuse brain injury (DBI) in the adult rat brain. Methods Adult male SD rats were subjected to diffuse brain injury (DBI) model. By using systemic bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to label dividing cells, we compared the proliferation rate of

  11. Two distinct subpopulations of nestin-positive cells in adult mouse dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Satoshi; Kato, Fusao; Tozuka, Yusuke; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Miyamoto, Yusei; Hisatsune, Tatsuhiro

    2003-10-15

    Neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the adult mammalian hippocampus has been proven in a series of studies, but the differentiation process toward newborn neurons is still unclear. In addition to the immunohistochemical study, electrophysiological membrane recordings of precursor cells could provide an alternative view to address this differentiation process. In this study, we performed green fluorescent protein (GFP)-guided selective recordings of nestin-positive progenitor cells in adult dentate gyrus by means of nestin-promoter GFP transgenic mice, because nestin is a typical marker for precursor cells in the adult dentate gyrus. The patch-clamp recordings clearly demonstrated the presence of two distinct subpopulations (type I and type II) of nestin-positive cells. Type I cells had a lower input resistance value of 77.1 M(Omega) (geometric mean), and their radial processes were stained with anti-glial fibrillary acidic protein antibody. On the other hand, type II nestin-positive cells had a higher input resistance value of 2110 MOmega and expressed voltage-dependent sodium current. In most cases, type II cells were stained with anti-polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule. Taken together with a bromodeoxyuridine pulse-chase analysis, our results may reflect a rapid and dynamic cell conversion of nestin-positive progenitor, from type I to type II, at an early stage of adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus.

  12. Antisense to the glucocorticoid receptor in hippocampal dentate gyrus reduces immobility in forced swim test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, S.M.; de Kloet, E.R.; Buwalda, B; Bouman, S.D.; Bohus, B

    1996-01-01

    Immobility time of rats in the forced swim test was reduced after bilateral infusion of an 18-mer antisense phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotide targeted to the glucocorticoid receptor mRNA into the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Vehicle-, sense- and scrambled sequence-treated animals spent sign

  13. The similarity of astrocytes number in dentate gyrus and CA3 subfield of rats hippocampus.

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    Jahanshahi, Mehrdad; Sadeghi, Y; Hosseini, A; Naghdi, N

    2007-01-01

    The dentate gyrus is a part of hippocampal formation that it contains granule cells, which project to the pyramidal cells and interneurons of the CA3 subfield of the hippocampus. Astrocytes play a more active role in neuronal activity, including regulating ion flux currents, energy production, neurotransmitter release and synaptogenesis. Astrocytes are the only cells in the brain that contain the energy molecule glycogen. The close relationship between dentate gyrus and CA3 area can cause the similarity of the number of astrocytes in these areas. In this study 5 male albino wistar rats were used. Rats were housed in large plastic cage in animal house and were maintained under standard conditions, after histological processing, The 7 microm slides of the brains were stained with PTAH staining for showing the astrocytes. This staining is specialized for astrocytes. We showed that the number of astrocytes in different (ant., mid., post) parts of dentate gyrus and CA3 of hippocampus is the same. For example, the anterior parts of two area have the most number of astrocytes and the middle parts of two area have the least number of astrocytes. We concluded that dentate gyrus and CA3 area of hippocampus have the same group of astrocytes.

  14. Hilar somatostatin interneuron loss reduces dentate gyrus inhibition in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Gabrielle; Balgooyen, Laura; Mattis, Joanna; Deisseroth, Karl; Buckmaster, Paul S

    2016-06-01

    In patients with temporal lobe epilepsy, seizures usually start in the hippocampus, and dentate granule cells are hyperexcitable. Somatostatin interneurons are a major subpopulation of inhibitory neurons in the dentate gyrus, and many are lost in patients and animal models. However, surviving somatostatin interneurons sprout axon collaterals and form new synapses, so the net effect on granule cell inhibition remains unclear. The present study uses optogenetics to activate hilar somatostatin interneurons and measure the inhibitory effect on dentate gyrus perforant path-evoked local field potential responses in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy. In controls, light activation of hilar somatostatin interneurons inhibited evoked responses up to 40%. Epileptic pilocarpine-treated mice exhibited loss of hilar somatostatin interneurons and less light-induced inhibition of evoked responses. These findings suggest that severe epilepsy-related loss of hilar somatostatin interneurons can overwhelm the surviving interneurons' capacity to compensate by sprouting axon collaterals. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  15. Spatial Representations of Granule Cells and Mossy Cells of the Dentate Gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    GoodSmith, Douglas; Chen, Xiaojing; Wang, Cheng; Kim, Sang Hoon; Song, Hongjun; Burgalossi, Andrea; Christian, Kimberly M; Knierim, James J

    2017-02-08

    Granule cells in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus are thought to be essential to memory function by decorrelating overlapping input patterns (pattern separation). A second excitatory cell type in the dentate gyrus, the mossy cell, forms an intricate circuit with granule cells, CA3c pyramidal cells, and local interneurons, but the influence of mossy cells on dentate function is often overlooked. Multiple tetrode recordings, supported by juxtacellular recording techniques, showed that granule cells fired very sparsely, whereas mossy cells in the hilus fired promiscuously in multiple locations and in multiple environments. The activity patterns of these cell types thus represent different environments through distinct computational mechanisms: sparse coding in granule cells and changes in firing field locations in mossy cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Experience-Dependent Regulation of Dentate Gyrus Excitability by Adult-Born Granule Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun Hye; Burghardt, Nesha S; Dvorak, Dino; Hen, René; Fenton, André A

    2015-08-19

    Behavioral studies have established a role for adult-born dentate granule cells in discriminating between similar memories. However, it is unclear how these cells mediate memory discrimination. Excitability is enhanced in maturing adult-born neurons, spurring the hypothesis that the activity of these cells "directly" encodes and stores memories. An alternative hypothesis posits that maturing neurons "indirectly" contribute to memory encoding by regulating excitation-inhibition balance. We evaluated these alternatives by using dentate-sensitive active place avoidance tasks to assess experience-dependent changes in dentate field potentials in the presence and absence of neurogenesis. Before training, X-ray ablation of adult neurogenesis-reduced dentate responses to perforant-path stimulation and shifted EPSP-spike coupling leftward. These differences were unchanged after place avoidance training with the shock zone in the initial location, which both groups learned to avoid equally well. In contrast, sham-treated mice decreased dentate responses and shifted EPSP-spike coupling leftward after the shock zone was relocated, whereas X-irradiated mice failed to show these changes in dentate function and were impaired on this test of memory discrimination. During place avoidance, excitation-inhibition coupled neural synchrony in dentate local field potentials was reduced in X-irradiated mice, especially in the θ band. The difference was most prominent during conflict learning, which is impaired in the X-irradiated mice. These findings indicate that maturing adult-born neurons regulate both functional network plasticity in response to memory discrimination and dentate excitation-inhibition coordination. The most parsimonious interpretation of these results is that adult neurogenesis indirectly regulates hippocampal information processing. Adult-born neurons in the hippocampal dentate gyrus are important for flexibly using memories, but the mechanism is controversial. Using

  17. A comparative study of the dentate gyrus in hippocampal sclerosis in epilepsy and dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandopadhyay, R; Liu, J Y W; Sisodiya, S M; Thom, M

    2014-02-01

    Hippocampal sclerosis (HS) is long-recognized in association with epilepsy (HSE ) and more recently in the context of cognitive decline or dementia in the elderly (HSD ), in some cases as a component of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and fronto-temporal lobe dementia (FTLD). There is an increased risk of seizures in AD and spontaneous epileptiform discharges in the dentate gyrus of transgenic AD models; epilepsy can be associated with an age-accelerated increase in AD-type pathology and cognitive decline. The convergence between these disease processes could be related to hippocampal pathology. HSE typically shows re-organization of both excitatory and inhibitory neuronal networks in the dentate gyrus, and is considered to be relevant to hippocampal excitability. We sought to compare the pathology of HSE and HSD , focusing on re-organization in the dentate gyrus. In nine post mortem cases with HSE and bilateral damage, 18 HSD and 11 controls we carried out immunostaining for mossy fibres (dynorphin), and interneuronal networks (NPY, calbindin and calretinin) on sections from the mid-hippocampal body. Fibre sprouting (FS) or loss of expression in the dentate gyrus was semi-quantitatively graded from grade 0 (normal) to grade 3 (marked alteration). Significantly more re-organization was seen with all four markers in the HSE than HSD group (P dentate gyrus is more typical of HSE . Subtle alterations in HSD may be a result of increased hippocampal excitability, including unrecognized seizure activity. An unexpected finding was the identification of NPY-positive Hirano bodies in HSD but not HSE , which may be a consequence of the relative vulnerabilities of interneurons in these conditions. © 2013 The Authors. Neuropathology and Applied Neurobiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Neuropathological Society.

  18. Evaluation of Spirulina Supplementation on Intermittent Binge Ethanol - Induced Neurotoxicity in Dentate Gyrus of Rats

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    M A Asari

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Spirulina is a widely used nutritional supplement which is rich in antioxidants and proteins.  Studies have shown that intermittent binge-like ethanol consumption during adolescent period caused neuronal damage in specific parts of the brain, including the dentate gyrus. It has been suggested that antioxidant therapy may provide some level of protection against neurotoxicity of ethanol at cellular level. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the preventive effects of spirulina supplementation on ethanol-induced neurotoxicity in the dentate gyrus of adolescent rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were given ethanol (10 g/kg/day, intermittent binge model, or spirulina platensis (1000 mg/kg/day or both from postnatal day 30 for two weeks duration. The cerebral hemispheres were processed for routine histological staining and immunohistochemistry with anti-GFAP antibody.  Ethanol-treated group showed significant deficit in the numbers of granule cells and hilar neurons of the dentate gyrus when compared to the control group. Spirulina supplementation failed to provide protection against ethanol-induced neuronal loss. Spirulina supplementation also failed to alter increased expression of GFAP immunoreactivity induced by ethanol exposure. In conclusion, these findings indicate that spirulina supplementation is not effective in reducing the ethanol-induced neurotoxicity in the dentate gyrus of adolescent rats. Industrial Relevance. Spirulina is one of the widely used nutritional supplements particularly in Asian population. Being a strong antioxidant, spirulina has been shown to have many therapeutic effects in human. However, the question of whether spirulina supplementation is able to mitigate the effect of ethanol neurotoxicity is largely unknown. Therefore, the study was undertaken to investigate the possibility that spirulina supplementation is able to provide some protection against ethanol-induced neurotoxicity in a rat model

  19. Ketogenic diets cause opposing changes in synaptic morphology in CA1 hippocampus and dentate gyrus of late-adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balietti, Marta; Giorgetti, Belinda; Fattoretti, Patrizia; Grossi, Yessica; Di Stefano, Giuseppina; Casoli, Tiziana; Platano, Daniela; Solazzi, Moreno; Orlando, Fiorenza; Aicardi, Giorgio; Bertoni-Freddari, Carlo

    2008-06-01

    Ketogenic diets (KDs) have beneficial effects on several diseases, such as epilepsy, mitochondriopathies, cancer, and neurodegeneration. However, little is known about their effects on aging individuals. In the present study, late-adult (19-month-old) rats were fed for 8 weeks with two medium chain triglycerides (MCT)-KDs, and the following morphologic parameters reflecting synaptic plasticity were evaluated in stratum moleculare of hippocampal CA1 region (SM CA1) and outer molecular layer of hippocampal dentate gyrus (OML DG): average area (S), numeric density (Nv(s)), and surface density (Sv) of synapses, and average volume (V), numeric density (Nv(m)), and volume density (Vv) of synaptic mitochondria. In SM CA1, MCT-KDs induced the early appearance of the morphologic patterns typical of old animals (higher S and V, and lower Nv(s) and Nv(m)). On the contrary, in OML DG, Sv and Vv of MCT-KDs-fed rats were higher (as a result of higher Nv(s) and Nv(m)) versus controls; these modifications are known to improve synaptic function and metabolic supply. The opposite effects of MCT-KDs might reflect the different susceptibility to aging processes: OML DG is less vulnerable than SM CA1, and the reactivation of ketone bodies uptake and catabolism might occur more efficiently in this region, allowing the exploitation of their peculiar metabolic properties. Present findings provide the first evidence that MCT-KDs may cause opposite morphologic modifications, being potentially harmful for SM CA1 and potentially advantageous for OML DG. This implies risks but also promising potentialities for their therapeutic use during aging.

  20. Aging- and injury-related differential apoptotic response in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in rats following brain trauma

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    Dong eSun

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The elderly are among the most vulnerable to traumatic brain injury (TBI with poor functional outcomes and impaired cognitive recovery. Of the pathological changes that occur following TBI, apoptosis is an important contributor to the secondary insults and subsequent morbidity associated with TBI. The current study investigated age-related differences in the apoptotic response to injury, which may represent a mechanistic underpinning of the heightened vulnerability of the aged brain to TBI. This study compared the degree of TBI-induced apoptotic response and changes of several apoptosis-related proteins in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG of juvenile and aged animals following injury. Juvenile (p28 and aged rats (24 months were subjected to a moderate fluid percussive injury or sham injury and sacrificed at 2 days post-injury. One group of rats in both ages was sacrificed and brain sections were processed for TUNEL and immunofluorescent labeling to assess the level of apoptosis and to identify cell types which undergo apoptosis. Another group of animals was subjected to proteomic analysis, whereby proteins from the ipsilateral DG were extracted and subjected to 2D-gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry analysis. Histological studies revealed age- and injury-related differences in the number of TUNEL-labeled cells in the DG. In sham animals, juveniles displayed a higher number of TUNEL+ apoptotic cells located primarily in the subgranular zone of the DG as compared to the aged brain. These apoptotic cells expressed the early neuronal marker PSA-NCAM, suggestive of newly generated immature neurons. In contrast, aged rats had a significantly higher number of TUNEL+ cells following TBI than injured juveniles, which were NeuN-positive mature neurons located predominantly in the granule cell layer. Fluorescent triple labeling revealed that microglial cells were closely associated to the apoptotic cells. In concert with these cellular changes

  1. Preventing effect of L-type calcium channel blockade on electrophysiological alterations in dentate gyrus granule cells induced by entorhinal amyloid pathology.

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    Hamid Gholami Pourbadie

    Full Text Available The entorhinal cortex (EC is one of the earliest affected brain regions in Alzheimer's disease (AD. EC-amyloid pathology induces synaptic failure in the dentate gyrus (DG with resultant behavioral impairment, but there is little known about its impact on neuronal properties in the DG. It is believed that calcium dyshomeostasis plays a pivotal role in the etiology of AD. Here, the effect of the EC amyloid pathogenesis on cellular properties of DG granule cells and also possible neuroprotective role of L-type calcium channel blockers (CCBs, nimodipine and isradipine, were investigated. The amyloid beta (Aβ 1-42 was injected bilaterally into the EC of male rats and one week later, electrophysiological properties of DG granule cells were assessed. Voltage clamp recording revealed appearance of giant sIPSC in combination with a decrease in sEPSC frequency which was partially reversed by CCBs in granule cells from Aβ treated rats. EC amyloid pathogenesis induced a significant reduction of input resistance (Rin accompanied by a profound decreased excitability in the DG granule cells. However, daily administration of CCBs, isradipine or nimodipine (i.c.v. for 6 days, almost preserved the normal excitability against Aβ. In conclusion, lower tendency to fire AP along with reduced Rin suggest that DG granule cells might undergo an alteration in the membrane ion channel activities which finally lead to the behavioral deficits observed in animal models and patients with early-stage Alzheimer's disease.

  2. Regional differences in GABAergic modulation for TEA-induced synaptic plasticity in rat hippocampal CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Etsuko; Okada, Takashi

    2007-10-01

    Tetraethylammonium (TEA), a K(+)-channel blocker, reportedly induces long-term potentiation (LTP) of hippocampal CA1 synaptic responses, but at CA3 and the dentate gyrus (DG), the characteristics of TEA-induced plasticity and modulation by inhibitory interneurons remain unclear. This study recorded field EPSPs from CA1, CA3 and DG to examine the involvement of GABAergic modulation in TEA-induced synaptic plasticity for each region. In Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses and associational fiber (AF)-CA3 synapses, bath application of TEA-induced LTP in the presence and absence of picrotoxin (PTX), a GABA(A) receptor blocker, whereas TEA-induced LTP at mossy fiber (MF)-CA3 synapses was detected only in the absence of GABA(A) receptor blockers. MF-CA3 LTP showed sensitivity to Ni(2+), but not to nifedipine. In DG, synaptic plasticity was modulated by GABAergic inputs, but characteristics differed between the afferent lateral perforant path (LPP) and medial perforant path (MPP). LPP-DG synapses showed TEA-induced LTP during PTX application, whereas at MPP-DG synapses, TEA-induced long-term depression (LTD) was seen in the absence of PTX. This series of results demonstrates that TEA-induced DG and CA3 plasticity displays afferent specificity and is exposed to GABAergic modulation in an opposite manner.

  3. Organization of multisynaptic inputs to the dorsal and ventral dentate gyrus: retrograde trans-synaptic tracing with rabies virus vector in the rat.

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    Shinya Ohara

    Full Text Available Behavioral, anatomical, and gene expression studies have shown functional dissociations between the dorsal and ventral hippocampus with regard to their involvement in spatial cognition, emotion, and stress. In this study we examined the difference of the multisynaptic inputs to the dorsal and ventral dentate gyrus (DG in the rat by using retrograde trans-synaptic tracing of recombinant rabies virus vectors. Three days after the vectors were injected into the dorsal or ventral DG, monosynaptic neuronal labeling was present in the entorhinal cortex, medial septum, diagonal band, and supramammillary nucleus, each of which is known to project to the DG directly. As in previous tracing studies, topographical patterns related to the dorsal and ventral DG were seen in these regions. Five days after infection, more of the neurons in these regions were labeled and labeled neurons were also seen in cortical and subcortical regions, including the piriform and medial prefrontal cortices, the endopiriform nucleus, the claustrum, the cortical amygdala, the medial raphe nucleus, the medial habenular nucleus, the interpeduncular nucleus, and the lateral septum. As in the monosynaptically labeled regions, a topographical distribution of labeled neurons was evident in most of these disynaptically labeled regions. These data indicate that the cortical and subcortical inputs to the dorsal and ventral DG are conveyed through parallel disynaptic pathways. This second-order input difference in the dorsal and ventral DG is likely to contribute to the functional differentiation of the hippocampus along the dorsoventral axis.

  4. Orexin A-mediated AKT signaling in the dentate gyrus contributes to the acquisition, expression and reinstatement of morphine-induced conditioned place preference.

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    Guo, Sui-Jun; Cui, Yu; Huang, Zhen-Zhen; Liu, Huan; Zhang, Xue-Qin; Jiang, Jin-Xiang; Xin, Wen-Jun

    2016-05-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG), a critical brain region contributing to learning and memory, is involved in the addiction and relapse to abused drugs. Emerging studies also suggest the role of orexin signaling in the rewarding behavior induced by repeated exposure to opiates. In the present study, we investigated the dynamic adaptation of orexin signaling in the DG and its functional significance in the acquisition, expression, maintenance of and relapse to rewarding behavior induced by morphine. Repeated place conditioning with morphine significantly increased the orexin A content released from the lateral hypothalamic area projecting neurons into the DG. Local infusions of orexin A into the DG sensitized the acquisition of and relapse to the conditioned place preference induced by morphine. The application of the orexin receptor type 1 (OXR1) antagonist SB334867 significantly abolished the acquisition, expression and maintenance of the conditioned place preference induced by repeated exposure to morphine. Furthermore, the significant increase of the phosphorylation of AKT in the DG was associated with preference for the morphine-paired chamber in rats, which was reversed by the local administration of an OXR1 antagonist. Thus, these findings suggested that the dynamic upregulation of orexin A signaling, via the AKT pathway in the DG, may promote the acquisition and maintenance of opioid-induced craving behaviors and may increase sensitivity to the rewarding effect of subsequent opioids.

  5. Effects of amitriptyline and fluoxetine on synaptic plasticity in the dentate gyrus of hippocampal formation in rats

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    Ghasem Zarei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several studies have been shown that antidepressant drugs have contradictory effects on cognitive processes. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of amitriptyline and fluoxetine on synaptic plasticity in the dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampal formation in rat. Materials and Methods: Experimental groups were the control, the fluoxetine, and amitriptyline. The rats were treated for 21 days and then, paired pulse facilitation/inhibition (PPF/I and long-term potentiation (LTP in perforant path-DG synapses were assessed (by 400 Hz tetanization. Field excitatory post-synaptic potential (fEPSP slope and population spike (PS amplitude were measured. Results: The results of PPF/I showed that PS amplitude ratios were increased in 10-70 ms inter-stimulus intervals in the amitriptyline group compared to the control group. In the fluoxetine group, EPSP slope ratios were decreased in intervals 30, 40, and 50 ms inter-stimulus intervals compared to the control group. The PS-LTP was significantly lower in the fluoxetine and the amitriptyline groups with respect to the control group. Conclusion: The results showed that fluoxetine and amitriptyline affect synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus and these effects is probably due to the impact on the number of active neurons.

  6. Naringin attenuates granule cell dispersion in the dentate gyrus in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hannah; Jeong, Kyoung Hoon; Kim, Sang Ryong

    2016-07-01

    Morphological abnormalities of the dentate gyrus (DG) are an important phenotype in the hippocampus of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. We recently reported that naringin, a bioflavonoid in grapefruit and citrus fruits, exerts beneficial effects in the kainic acid (KA) mouse model of epilepsy. We found that naringin treatment reduced seizure activities and decreased autophagic stress and neuroinflammation in the hippocampus following in vivo lesion with KA. However, it remains unclear whether naringin may also attenuate seizure-induced morphological changes in the DG, collectively known as granule cell dispersion (GCD). To clarify whether naringin treatment reduces GCD, we evaluated the effects of intraperitoneal injection of naringin on GCD and activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), an important regulator of GCD, following intrahippocampal injection of KA. Our results showed that naringin treatment significantly reduced KA-induced GCD and mTORC1 activation, which was confirmed by assessing the phosphorylated form of the mTORC1 substrate, 4E-BP1, in the hippocampus. These results suggest that naringin treatment may help prevent epilepsy-induced hippocampal injury by inhibiting mTORC1 activation and thereby reducing GCD in the hippocampus in vivo.

  7. Decreased Myelinated Fibers in the Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus of the Tg2576 Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Yang, Shu; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Lin; Chao, Feng-Lei; Luo, Yan-min; Xiao, Qian; Gu, Heng-Wei; Jiang, Rong; Tang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the most common cause of dementia in the elderly, is characterized by deficits in cognition and memory. Although amyloid-β (Aβ) accumulation is known to be the earliest pathological event that triggers subsequent neurodegeneration, how Aβ accumulation causes behavioral deficits remains incompletely understood. In this study, using the Morris water maze test, ELISA and stereological methods, we examined spatial learning and memory performance, the soluble Aβ concentration and the myelination of fibers in the hippocampus of 4-, 6-, 8- and 10-month-old Tg2576 AD model mice. Our results showed that spatial learning and memory performance was significantly impaired in the Tg2576 mice compared to the wild type (WT) controls and that the myelinated fiber length in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) was markedly decreased from 0.33 ± 0.03 km in the WT controls to 0.17 ± 0.02 km in the Tg2576 mice at 10 months of age. However, the concentrations of soluble Aβ40 and Aβ42 were significantly increased as early as 4-6 months of age. The decreased myelinated fiber length in the DG may contribute to the spatial learning and memory deficits of Tg2576 mice. Therefore, we suggest that the significant accumulation of soluble Aβ may serve as a preclinical biomarker for AD diagnosis and that protecting myelinated fibers may represent a novel strategy for delaying the progression of early-stage AD. PMID:26971933

  8. Fmr1 knockout mice show reduced anxiety and alterations in neurogenesis that are specific to the ventral dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eadie, B D; Zhang, W N; Boehme, F; Gil-Mohapel, J; Kainer, L; Simpson, J M; Christie, B R

    2009-11-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by the selective loss of the expression of the Fmr1 gene. Key symptoms in FXS include intellectual impairment and abnormal anxiety-related behaviors. Fmr1 knockout (KO) mice exhibited reduced anxiety on two behavioral tests as well as a blunted corticosterone response to acute stress. Spatial learning and memory was not impaired when tested with both the classic Morris water and Plus-shaped mazes. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis has been associated with spatial learning and memory and emotions such as anxiety and depression. The process of neurogenesis appears abnormal in young adult Fmr1 KO mice, with significantly fewer bromodeoxyuridine-positive cells surviving for at least 4 weeks in the ventral subregion of the dentate gyrus (DG), a hippocampal subregion more closely associated with emotion than the dorsal DG. Within this smaller pool of surviving cells, we observed a concomitant increase in the proportion of surviving cells that acquire a neuronal phenotype. We did not observe a clear difference in cell proliferation using both endogenous and exogenous markers. This work indicates that loss of Fmr1 expression can alter anxiety-related behaviors in mice as well as produce region-specific alterations in hippocampal adult neurogenesis.

  9. Fatty acid synthase as a factor required for exercise-induced cognitive enhancement and dentate gyrus cellular proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chorna, Nataliya E; Santos-Soto, Iván J; Carballeira, Nestor M; Morales, Joan L; de la Nuez, Janneliz; Cátala-Valentin, Alma; Chornyy, Anatoliy P; Vázquez-Montes, Adrinel; De Ortiz, Sandra Peña

    2013-01-01

    Voluntary running is a robust inducer of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Given that fatty acid synthase (FASN), the key enzyme for de novo fatty acid biosynthesis, is critically involved in proliferation of embryonic and adult neural stem cells, we hypothesized that FASN could mediate both exercise-induced cell proliferation in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the dentate gyrus (DG) and enhancement of spatial learning and memory. In 20 week-old male mice, voluntary running-induced hippocampal-specific upregulation of FASN was accompanied also by hippocampal-specific accumulation of palmitate and stearate saturated fatty acids. In experiments addressing the functional role of FASN in our experimental model, chronic intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) microinfusions of C75, an irreversible FASN inhibitor, and significantly impaired exercise-mediated improvements in spatial learning and memory in the Barnes maze. Unlike the vehicle-injected mice, the C75 group adopted a non-spatial serial escape strategy and displayed delayed escape latencies during acquisition and memory tests. Furthermore, pharmacologic blockade of FASN function with C75 resulted in a significant reduction, compared to vehicle treated controls, of the number of proliferative cells in the DG of running mice as measured by immunoreactive to Ki-67 in the SGZ. Taken together, our data suggest that FASN plays an important role in exercise-mediated cognitive enhancement, which might be associated to its role in modulating exercise-induced stimulation of neurogenesis.

  10. Fatty acid synthase as a factor required for exercise-induced cognitive enhancement and dentate gyrus cellular proliferation.

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    Nataliya E Chorna

    Full Text Available Voluntary running is a robust inducer of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Given that fatty acid synthase (FASN, the key enzyme for de novo fatty acid biosynthesis, is critically involved in proliferation of embryonic and adult neural stem cells, we hypothesized that FASN could mediate both exercise-induced cell proliferation in the subgranular zone (SGZ of the dentate gyrus (DG and enhancement of spatial learning and memory. In 20 week-old male mice, voluntary running-induced hippocampal-specific upregulation of FASN was accompanied also by hippocampal-specific accumulation of palmitate and stearate saturated fatty acids. In experiments addressing the functional role of FASN in our experimental model, chronic intracerebroventricular (i.c.v. microinfusions of C75, an irreversible FASN inhibitor, and significantly impaired exercise-mediated improvements in spatial learning and memory in the Barnes maze. Unlike the vehicle-injected mice, the C75 group adopted a non-spatial serial escape strategy and displayed delayed escape latencies during acquisition and memory tests. Furthermore, pharmacologic blockade of FASN function with C75 resulted in a significant reduction, compared to vehicle treated controls, of the number of proliferative cells in the DG of running mice as measured by immunoreactive to Ki-67 in the SGZ. Taken together, our data suggest that FASN plays an important role in exercise-mediated cognitive enhancement, which might be associated to its role in modulating exercise-induced stimulation of neurogenesis.

  11. An extrahippocampal projection from the dentate gyrus to the olfactory tubercle

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    Künzle Heinz

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The dentate gyrus is well known for its mossy fiber projection to the hippocampal field 3 (CA3 and its extensive associational and commissural connections. The dentate gyrus, on the other hand, has only few projections to the CA1 and the subiculum, and none have clearly been shown to extrahippocampal target regions. Results Using anterograde and retrograde tracer techniques in the Madagascan lesser hedgehog tenrec (Afrosoricidae, Afrotheria it was shown in this study that the dentate hilar region gave rise to a faint, but distinct, bilateral projection to the most rostromedial portion of the olfactory tubercle, particularly its molecular layer. Unlike the CA1 and the subiculum the dentate gyrus did not project to the accumbens nucleus. A control injection into the medial septum-diagonal band complex also retrogradely labeled cells in the dentate hilus, but these neurons were found immediately adjacent to the heavily labeled CA3, while the tracer injections into the rostromedial tubercle did not reveal any labeling in CA3. Conclusion The dentate hilar neurons projecting to the olfactory tubercle cannot be considered displaced cells of CA3 but represent true dentato-tubercular projection neurons. This projection supplements the subiculo-tubercular projection. Both terminal fields overlap among one another as well as with the fiber terminations arising in the anteromedial frontal cortex. The rostromedial olfactory tubercle might represent a distinct ventral striatal target area worth investigating in studies of the parallel processing of cortico-limbic information in tenrec as well as in cat and monkey.

  12. Novel control by the CA3 region of the hippocampus on neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the adult rat.

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    Jian Xin Liu

    Full Text Available The dentate gyrus is a site of continued neurogenesis in the adult brain. The CA3 region of the hippocampus is the major projection area from the dentate gyrus. CA3 sends reciprocal projections back to the dentate gyrus. Does this imply that CA3 exerts some control over neurogenesis? We studied the effects of lesions of CA3 on neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus, and on the ability of fluoxetine to stimulate mitotic activity in the progenitor cells. Unilateral ibotenic-acid generated lesions were made in CA3. Four days later there was no change on the number of either BrdU or Ki67-positive progenitor cells in the dentate gyrus. However, after 15 or 28 days, there was a marked reduction in surviving BrdU-labelled cells on the lesioned side (but no change in Ki-67+ cells. pCREB or Wnt3a did not co-localise with Ki-67 but with NeuN, a marker of mature neurons. Lesions had no effect on the basal expression of either pCREB or Wnt3a. Subcutaneous fluoxetine (10 mg/kg/day for 14 days increased the number of Ki67+ cells as expected on the control (non-lesioned side but not on that with a CA3 lesion. Nevertheless, the expected increase in BDNF, pCREB and Wnt3a still occurred on the lesioned side following fluoxetine treatment. Fluoxetine has been reported to decrease the number of "mature" calbindin-positive cells in the dentate gyrus; we found this still occurred on the side of a CA3 lesion. We then showed that the expression GAP-43 was reduced in the dentate gyrus on the lesioned side, confirming the existence of a synaptic connection between CA3 and the dentate gyrus. These results show that CA3 has a hitherto unsuspected role in regulating neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the adult rat.

  13. Proteasome alteration and delayed neuronal death in hippocampal CA1 and dentate gyrus regions following transient cerebral ischemia

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    Pengfei Ge; Tianfei Luo; Jizhou Zhang; Haifeng Wang; Wenchen Li; Yongxin Luan; Feng Ling; Yi'nan Luo

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Proteasome dysfunction has been reported to induce abnormal protein aggregation and cell death.OBJECTIVE:To investigate the effect of proteasome changes on delayed neuronal death in CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG) regions of the rat hippocampus following transient cerebral ischemia.DESIGN,TIME AND SETTING:A randomized,controlled animal experiment.The study was performed at the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology,Norman Bethune Medical College of Jilin University,from September 2006 to May 2008.MATERIALS:Rabbit anti-19S S10B polyclonal antibody was purchased from Bioreagents,USA;propidium iodide and fluorescently-labeled goat anti-rabbit IgG were purchased from Jackson Immunoresearch,USA;hematoxylin and eosin staining solution was purchased from Sigma,USA;LSM 510 confocal microscope was purchased from Zeiss,Germany.METHODS:A total of 40 healthy Wistar rats,male,4 months old,were randomly divided into sham surgery group (n=8) and model group (n=32).Ischemic models were established in the model group by transient clamping of the bilateral carotid arteries and decreased blood pressure.After 20 minutes of global ischemia,the clamp was removed to allow blood flow for 30 minutes,4,24,and 72 hours,respectively,with 8 rats at each time point.The bilateral carotid arteries were not ligated in the sham surgery group.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:Neuronal death in the CA1 and DG regions was observed by hematoxylin-eosin staining.Proteasome expression in CA1 and DG region neurons was detected by immunohistochemistry.RESULTS:Hematoxylin-eosin staining showed neuronal death in the CA1 region alone at 72 hours of reperfusion following ischemia.In comparison to the sham surgery group,a significant decrease in proteasome expression was observed,by immunohistochemistry,in the CA1 and DG regions in the model group,following 30 minutes,4,24,and 72 hours of reperfusion (P<0.01).After 72 hours of reperfusion following ischemia,proteasome expression had almost completely

  14. Blockade of intracellular Zn2+ signaling in the dentate gyrus erases recognition memory via impairment of maintained LTP.

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    Tamano, Haruna; Minamino, Tatsuya; Fujii, Hiroaki; Takada, Shunsuke; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Ando, Masaki; Takeda, Atsushi

    2015-08-01

    There is no evidence on the precise role of synaptic Zn2+ signaling on the retention and recall of recognition memory. On the basis of the findings that intracellular Zn2+ signaling in the dentate gyrus is required for object recognition, short-term memory, the present study deals with the effect of spatiotemporally blocking Zn2+ signaling in the dentate gyrus after LTP induction and learning. Three-day-maintained LTP was impaired 1 day after injection of clioquinol into the dentate gyrus, which transiently reduced intracellular Zn2+ signaling in the dentate gyrus. The irreversible impairment was rescued not only by co-injection of ZnCl2 , which ameliorated the loss of Zn2+ signaling, but also by pre-injection of Jasplakinolide, a stabilizer of F-actin, prior to clioquinol injection. Simultaneously, 3-day-old space recognition memory was impaired 1 day after injection of clioquinol into the dentate gyrus, but not by pre-injection of Jasplakinolide. Jasplakinolide also rescued both impairments of 3-day-maintained LTP and 3-day-old memory after injection of ZnAF-2DA into the dentate gyrus, which blocked intracellular Zn2+ signaling in the dentate gyrus. The present paper indicates that the blockade and/or loss of intracellular Zn2+ signaling in the dentate gyrus coincidently impair maintained LTP and recognition memory. The mechanism maintaining LTP via intracellular Zn2+ signaling in dentate granule cells, which may be involved in the formation of F-actin, may retain space recognition memory. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Gas1 is present in germinal niches of developing dentate gyrus and cortex.

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    Estudillo, E; Zavala, P; Pérez-Sánchez, G; Ayala-Sarmiento, A E; Segovia, J

    2016-05-01

    Gas1 is a pleiotropic protein that inhibits cell growth when overexpressed in tumors but during development, it acts as a co-receptor for sonic hedgehog to promote the proliferation and survival of various growing organs and systems. This protein has been extensively studied during development in the cerebellum. However, in other structures of the central nervous system, information concerning Gas1 is limited to in situ hybridization studies. We investigate the pattern of Gas1 expression during various developmental stages of the cortex and dentate gyrus of the mouse brain. The levels of Gas1 decrease in the developing brain and the protein is mainly found in progenitor cells during the development of the cortex and dentate gyrus.

  16. Effect of Fluoxetine on Neurogenesis in Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus after Global Transient Cerebral Ischemia in Rats.

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    Khodanovich, M Yu; Kisel', A A; Chernysheva, G A; Smol'yakova, V I; Savchenko, R R; Plotnikov, M B

    2016-07-01

    Changes in cerebral neurogenesis provoked by ischemia and the effect of fluoxetine on this process were studied using a three-vessel occlusion model of global transient cerebral ischemia. The global transient cerebral ischemia was modeled on male Wistar rats by transient occlusion of three major vessels originating from the aortic arch and supplying the brain (brachiocephalic trunk, left subclavian artery, and left common carotid artery). The cells expressing doublecortin (DCX, a marker of young neurons) were counted in the hippocampal dentate gyrus on day 31 after ischemia modeling. It was found that ischemia inhibited neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus in comparison with sham-operated controls (p<0.05), while fluoxetine (20 mg/kg/day) injected over 10 days after surgery restored neurogenesis to the control level (p<0.001).

  17. Running increases cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the adult mouse dentate gyrus.

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    van Praag, H; Kempermann, G; Gage, F H

    1999-03-01

    Exposure to an enriched environment increases neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of adult rodents. Environmental enrichment, however, typically consists of many components, such as expanded learning opportunities, increased social interaction, more physical activity and larger housing. We attempted to separate components by assigning adult mice to various conditions: water-maze learning (learner), swim-time-yoked control (swimmer), voluntary wheel running (runner), and enriched (enriched) and standard housing (control) groups. Neither maze training nor yoked swimming had any effect on bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive cell number. However, running doubled the number of surviving newborn cells, in amounts similar to enrichment conditions. Our findings demonstrate that voluntary exercise is sufficient for enhanced neurogenesis in the adult mouse dentate gyrus.

  18. Suspension of mitotic activity in dentate gyrus of the hibernating ground squirrel.

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    Popov, Victor I; Kraev, Igor V; Ignat'ev, Dmitri A; Stewart, Michael G

    2011-01-01

    Neurogenesis occurs in the adult mammalian hippocampus, a region of the brain important for learning and memory. Hibernation in Siberian ground squirrels provides a natural model to study mitosis as the rapid fall in body temperature in 24 h (from 35-36°C to +4-6°C) permits accumulation of mitotic cells at different stages of the cell cycle. Histological methods used to study adult neurogenesis are limited largely to fixed tissue, and the mitotic state elucidated depends on the specific phase of mitosis at the time of day. However, using an immunohistochemical study of doublecortin (DCX) and BrdU-labelled neurons, we demonstrate that the dentate gyrus of the ground squirrel hippocampus contains a population of immature cells which appear to possess mitotic activity. Our data suggest that doublecortin-labelled immature cells exist in a mitotic state and may represent a renewable pool for generation of new neurons within the dentate gyrus.

  19. VTA Projection Neurons Releasing GABA and Glutamate in the Dentate Gyrus

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    2016-01-01

    Abstract Both dopamine and nondopamine neurons from the ventral tegmental area (VTA) project to a variety of brain regions. Here we examine nondopaminergic neurons in the mouse VTA that send long-range projections to the hippocampus. Using a combination of retrograde tracers, optogenetic tools, and electrophysiological recordings, we show that VTA GABAergic axons make synaptic contacts in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus, where we can elicit small postsynaptic currents. Surprisingly, the currents displayed a partial sensitivity to both bicuculline and NBQX, suggesting that these mesohippocampal neurons corelease both GABA and glutamate. Finally, we show that this projection is functional in vivo and its stimulation reduces granule cell-firing rates under anesthesia. Altogether, the present results describe a novel connection between GABA and glutamate coreleasing of cells of the VTA and the dentate gyrus. This connection could be relevant for a variety of functions, including reward-related memory and neurogenesis. PMID:27648470

  20. LTP at Hilar Mossy Cell-Dentate Granule Cell Synapses Modulates Dentate Gyrus Output by Increasing Excitation/Inhibition Balance.

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    Hashimotodani, Yuki; Nasrallah, Kaoutsar; Jensen, Kyle R; Chávez, Andrés E; Carrera, Daniel; Castillo, Pablo E

    2017-08-16

    Excitatory hilar mossy cells (MCs) in the dentate gyrus receive inputs from dentate granule cells (GCs) and project back to GCs locally, contralaterally, and along the longitudinal axis of the hippocampus, thereby establishing an associative positive-feedback loop and connecting functionally diverse hippocampal areas. MCs also synapse with GABAergic interneurons that mediate feed-forward inhibition onto GCs. Surprisingly, although these circuits have been implicated in both memory formation (e.g., pattern separation) and temporal lobe epilepsy, little is known about activity-dependent plasticity of their synaptic connections. Here, we report that MC-GC synapses undergo a presynaptic, NMDA-receptor-independent form of long-term potentiation (LTP) that requires postsynaptic brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)/TrkB and presynaptic cyclic AMP (cAMP)/PKA signaling. This LTP is input specific and selectively expressed at MC-GC synapses, but not at the disynaptic inhibitory loop. By increasing the excitation/inhibition balance, MC-GC LTP enhances GC output at the associative MC-GC recurrent circuit and may contribute to dentate-dependent forms of learning and epilepsy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Decrease of high voltage Ca(2+) currents in the dentate gyrus granule cells by entorhinal amyloidopathy is reversed by calcium channel blockade.

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    Pourbadie, Hamid Gholami; Naderi, Nima; Delavar, Hadi Mirzapour; Hosseinzadeh, Mahshid; Mehranfard, Nasrin; Khodagholi, Fariba; Janahmadi, Mahyar; Motamedi, Fereshteh

    2017-01-05

    In the Alzheimer's disease (AD), entorhinal-hippocampal circuit is one of the earliest affected networks. There are some evidences indicating abnormal neuronal excitability and impaired synaptic plasticity in the dentate gyrus (DG) of AD animal model. However, the underlying mechanism leading to DG dysfunction particularly in the early phase of AD is not known. Since calcium dyshomeostasis has a critical role in the etiology of AD, it is possible that this phenomenon precedes electrophysiological alteration in the DG. Here, the effect of the amyloid pathogenesis in the entorhinal cortex (EC) on high activated Ca(2+) currents in the DG granule cells was investigated. One week after bilaterally injection of amyloid beta (Aβ) 1-42 into the EC, Ca(2+) currents in the DG granule cells were assessed by whole cell patch clamp. Voltage clamp recording showed the amplitude of high voltage calcium currents in the DG granule cells was decreased following EC amyloidopathy. However, the Ca(2+) current decay was slower than control. Double-pulse recording revealed that Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation of calcium current (CDI) was more pronounced in the EC-Aβ group compared to the control group. However, chronic treatment by calcium channel blocker (CCBs), isradipine or nimodipine, reverse the Ca(2+) currents toward the control level. On the other hand, there was no significant difference in the calbindin level in the DG of different groups. In conclusion, our results suggest that Aβ in the EC independent of calbindin level triggers a decreased Ca(2+) currents along with increased CDI in the DG granule cells which may lead to further electrophysiological alterations in these cells, and treatment by CCBs could preserve normal calcium current and may ultimately normal function against the Aβ toxicity. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. The role of the dentate gyrus, CA3a,b, and CA3c for detecting spatial and environmental novelty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsaker, Michael R; Rosenberg, Jenna S; Kesner, Raymond P

    2008-01-01

    It has been suggested that the dentate gyrus (DG) and CA3 cooperate to efficiently process spatial information. The DG has been proposed to be important for fine spatial discrimination, and the CA3 has been proposed to mediate larger scale spatial information processing. To evaluate the roles of the DG and CA3a,b for spatial processing, we developed a task that measures responses to either overall environmental novelty or a response to more subtle changes within the environment. Animals with lesions to the DG showed impaired novelty detection for both environment as well as smaller changes in the environment, whereas animals with lesions to CA3a,b showed no such deficits. A closer look at the lesions suggested that the CA3 lesions included only CA3a and CA3b, but spared CA3c. To test the role of the spared CA3c region, animals with selective lesions to CA3c that spared CA3a,b were run on the same task and showed an intermediate pattern of deficits. These results suggest that the DG is critical for spatial information processing. These data also suggest that CA3 is a heterogeneous structure, with CA3c lesioned animals showing greater spatial processing deficits than CA3a,b lesioned animals. These findings extend our knowledge of hippocampal function and need to be accounted for in future computational models.

  3. Learning deficits and suppression of the cell proliferation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of offspring are attenuated by maternal chewing during prenatal stress.

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    Onishi, Mika; Iinuma, Mitsuo; Tamura, Yasuo; Kubo, Kin-Ya

    2014-02-07

    Prenatal stress in dams induces learning deficits and suppresses neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) of offspring via increasing corticosterone levels in the dam. Chewing under stressful conditions prevents stress-induced behavioral impairments and morphologic changes. Here, we examined whether chewing during prenatal stress prevents the stress-induced learning deficits and the suppression of cell proliferation in the hippocampal DG in adult offspring. Pregnant mice were exposed to restraint stress beginning on day 12 of pregnancy and continuing until delivery. Half of the dams were given a wooden stick to chew on during restraint. The pups were raised to adulthood, and learning ability and cell proliferation in the hippocampal DG were assessed. In dams, chewing during prenatal stress attenuated the stress-induced increase in plasma corticosterone levels. In the adult offspring, prenatal stress impaired learning and decreased cell proliferation in the DG, whereas maternal chewing during prenatal stress significantly attenuated the prenatal stress-induced learning deficits and decreased cell proliferation in the DG in their offspring. These findings suggest that maternal chewing during prenatal stress is an effective stress-coping method for the dam to prevent learning deficits and suppression of cell proliferation in offspring.

  4. GSK-3β Overexpression Alters the Dendritic Spines of Developmentally Generated Granule Neurons in the Mouse Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus

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    Pallas-Bazarra, Noemí; Kastanauskaite, Asta; Avila, Jesús; DeFelipe, Javier; Llorens-Martín, María

    2017-01-01

    The dentate gyrus (DG) plays a crucial role in hippocampal-related memory. The most abundant cellular type in the DG, namely granule neurons, are developmentally generated around postnatal day P6 in mice. Moreover, a unique feature of the DG is the occurrence of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, a process that gives rise to newborn granule neurons throughout life. Adult-born and developmentally generated granule neurons share some maturational aspects but differ in others, such as in their positioning within the granule cell layer. Adult hippocampal neurogenesis encompasses a series of plastic changes that modify the function of the hippocampal trisynaptic network. In this regard, it is known that glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) regulates both synaptic plasticity and memory. By using a transgenic mouse overexpressing GSK-3β in hippocampal neurons, we previously demonstrated that the overexpression of this kinase has deleterious effects on the maturation of newborn granule neurons. In the present study, we addressed the effects of GSK-3β overexpression on the morphology and number of dendritic spines of developmentally generated granule neurons. To this end, we performed intracellular injections of Lucifer Yellow in developmentally generated granule neurons of wild-type and GSK-3β-overexpressing mice and analyzed the number and morphologies of dendritic spines (namely, stubby, thin and mushroom). GSK-3β overexpression led to a general reduction in the number of dendritic spines. In addition, it caused a slight reduction in the percentage, head diameter and length of thin spines, whereas the head diameter of mushroom spines was increased. PMID:28344548

  5. Different susceptibility to neurodegeneration of dorsal and ventral hippocampal dentate gyrus: a study with transgenic mice overexpressing GSK3β.

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    Almudena Fuster-Matanzo

    Full Text Available Dorsal hippocampal regions are involved in memory and learning processes, while ventral areas are related to emotional and anxiety processes. Hippocampal dependent memory and behaviour alterations do not always come out in neurodegenerative diseases at the same time. In this study we have tested the hypothesis that dorsal and ventral dentate gyrus (DG regions respond in a different manner to increased glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β levels in GSK3β transgenic mice, a genetic model of neurodegeneration. Reactive astrocytosis indicate tissue stress in dorsal DG, while ventral area does not show that marker. These changes occurred with a significant reduction of total cell number and with a significantly higher level of cell death in dorsal area than in ventral one as measured by fractin-positive cells. Biochemistry analysis showed higher levels of phosphorylated GSK3β in those residues that inactivate the enzyme in hippocampal ventral areas compared with dorsal area suggesting that the observed susceptibility is in part due to different GSK3 regulation. Previous studies carried out with this animal model had demonstrated impairment in Morris Water Maze and Object recognition tests point out to dorsal hippocampal atrophy. Here, we show that two tests used to evaluate emotional status, the light-dark box and the novelty suppressed feeding test, suggest that GSK3β mice do not show any anxiety-related disorder. Thus, our results demonstrate that in vivo overexpression of GSK3β results in dorsal but not ventral hippocampal DG neurodegeneration and suggest that both areas do not behave in a similar manner in neurodegenerative processes.

  6. Functional alpha7 nicotinic receptors are expressed on immature granule cells of the postnatal dentate gyrus.

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    John, Danielle; Shelukhina, Irina; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Deuchars, Jim; Henderson, Zaineb

    2015-03-19

    Neurogenesis occurs throughout life in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus, and postnatal-born granule cells migrate into the granule cell layer and extend axons to their target areas. The α7*nicotinic receptor has been implicated in neuronal maturation during development of the brain and is abundant in interneurons of the hippocampal formation of the adult brain. Signalling through these same receptors is believed also to promote maturation and integration of adult-born granule cells in the hippocampal formation. We therefore aimed to determine whether functional α7*nicotinic receptors are expressed in developing granule cells of the postnatal dentate gyrus. For these experiments we used 2-3 week-old Wistar rats, and 2-9 week old transgenic mice in which GABAergic interneurons were marked by expression of green fluorescent protein. Immunohistochemistry indicated the presence of α7*nicotinic receptor subunits around granule cells close around the subgranular zone which correlated with the distribution of developmental markers for immature granule cells. Whole-cell patch clamp recording showed that a proportion of granule cells responded to puffed ACh in the presence of atropine, and that these cells possessed electrophysiological properties found in immature granule cells. The nicotinic responses were potentiated by an allosteric α7*nicotinic receptor modulator, which were blocked by a specific α7*nicotinic receptor antagonist and were not affected by ionotropic glutamate or GABA receptor antagonists. These results suggest the presence of functional somato-dendritic α7*nicotinic receptors on immature granule cells of the postnatal dentate gyrus, consistent with studies implicating α7*nicotinic receptors in dendritic maturation of dentate gyrus neurons in adult brain. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The Human Dentate Gyrus Plays a Necessary Role in Discriminating New Memories.

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    Baker, Stevenson; Vieweg, Paula; Gao, Fuqiang; Gilboa, Asaf; Wolbers, Thomas; Black, Sandra E; Rosenbaum, R Shayna

    2016-10-10

    Our day-to-day experiences are often similar to one another, occurring in the same place at the same time of day, with common people and objects, and with a shared purpose. Humans have an episodic memory to represent unique, personal events that are rich in detail [1]. For this to occur, at least two basic neural mechanisms are required: one to orthogonalize or "separate" overlapping input patterns at encoding and another to reinstate or "complete" memories from partial cues at retrieval [2-6]. To what extent do these purported "pattern separation" and "pattern completion" mechanisms rely on distinct subfields of the hippocampus [6]? Computational models [4-6] and lesion and genetic studies in rodents [7-12] largely point to the dentate gyrus as responsible for pattern separation and the CA3 and CA1 subfields for pattern completion (but see [13-16]). In high-resolution fMRI studies of humans, behavioral discrimination and completion tasks designed to approximate pattern separation and pattern completion, respectively, elicit the predicted pattern of activity in the dentate gyrus and CA3/CA1 [17-21]. Likewise, impaired behavioral discrimination has been demonstrated in individuals with hippocampal lesions [22, 23], but the lesions most likely encompass other subfields. Examination of these processes in individuals with selective lesions to hippocampal subfields is needed to infer causation [19]. Here, we report the rare case of BL, a 54-year-old man with bilateral ischemic lesions to the hippocampus [24] primarily affecting the dentate gyrus. Studying BL provides the unique opportunity to directly evaluate theories of hippocampal function that assign the dentate gyrus a specific role in discriminating old from new memories. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Moderate traumatic brain injury causes acute dendritic and synaptic degeneration in the hippocampal dentate gyrus.

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    Xiang Gao

    Full Text Available Hippocampal injury-associated learning and memory deficits are frequent hallmarks of brain trauma and are the most enduring and devastating consequences following traumatic brain injury (TBI. Several reports, including our recent paper, showed that TBI brought on by a moderate level of controlled cortical impact (CCI induces immature newborn neuron death in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. In contrast, the majority of mature neurons are spared. Less research has been focused on these spared neurons, which may also be injured or compromised by TBI. Here we examined the dendrite morphologies, dendritic spines, and synaptic structures using a genetic approach in combination with immunohistochemistry and Golgi staining. We found that although most of the mature granular neurons were spared following TBI at a moderate level of impact, they exhibited dramatic dendritic beading and fragmentation, decreased number of dendritic branches, and a lower density of dendritic spines, particularly the mushroom-shaped mature spines. Further studies showed that the density of synapses in the molecular layer of the hippocampal dentate gyrus was significantly reduced. The electrophysiological activity of neurons was impaired as well. These results indicate that TBI not only induces cell death in immature granular neurons, it also causes significant dendritic and synaptic degeneration in pathohistology. TBI also impairs the function of the spared mature granular neurons in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. These observations point to a potential anatomic substrate to explain, in part, the development of posttraumatic memory deficits. They also indicate that dendritic damage in the hippocampal dentate gyrus may serve as a therapeutic target following TBI.

  9. Maternal forced swimming reduces cell proliferation in the postnatal dentate gyrus of mouse offspring

    OpenAIRE

    Wasinski, Frederick; Estrela, Gabriel R.; Arakaki, Aline M.; Bader, Michael; Alenina, Natalia; Klempin, Friederike; Ronaldo C Araújo

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise positively affects the metabolism and induces proliferation of precursor cells in the adult brain. Maternal exercise likewise provokes adaptations early in the offspring. Using a high-intensity swimming protocol that comprises forced swim training before and during pregnancy, we determined the effect of maternal swimming on the mouse offspring's neurogenesis. Our data demonstrate decreased proliferation in sublayers of the postnatal dentate gyrus in offspring of swimming mot...

  10. Beneficial in vivo effect of aripiprazole on neuronal regeneration following neuronal loss in the dentate gyrus: evaluation using a mouse model of trimethyltin-induced neuronal loss/self-repair in the dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneyama, Masanori; Hasebe, Shigeru; Kawamoto, Noriko; Shiba, Tatsuo; Yamaguchi, Taro; Kikuta, Maho; Shuto, Makoto; Ogita, Kiyokazu

    2014-01-01

    Aripiprazole is used clinically as an atypical antipsychotic. We evaluated the effect of in vivo treatment with aripiprazole on the proliferation and differentiation of neural stem/progenitor cells in a mouse model, trimethyltin-induced neuronal loss/self-repair in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (referred as "impaired animals") [Ogita et al., J Neurosci Res. 82, 609 - 621 (2005)]. In the impaired animals, an increased number of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive cells was seen in the dentate gyrus at the initial time window of the self-repair stage. At the same time window, a single treatment with aripiprazole significantly increased the number of cells positive for both BrdU and nestin in the dentate gyrus of the impaired animals. Chronic treatment with aripiprazole promoted the proliferation/survival and neuronal differentiation of the cells newly-generated following the neuronal loss in the dentate gyrus of the impaired animals. The chronic treatment with aripiprazole improved depression-like behavior seen in the impaired animals. Taken together, our data suggest that aripiprazole had a beneficial effect on neuronal regeneration following neuronal loss in the dentate gyrus through indirectly promoted proliferation/survival and neuronal differentiation of neural stem/progenitor cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus.

  11. Innervation from the entorhinal cortex to the dentate gyrus and the vulnerability to Zn(2).

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    Takeda, Atsushi; Tamano, Hanuna

    2016-12-01

    Hippocampal Zn(2+) homeostasis is critical for cognitive activity and hippocampus-dependent memory. Extracellular Zn(2+) signaling is linked to extracellular glutamate signaling and leads to intracellular Zn(2+) signaling, which is involved in cognitive activity. On the other hand, excess intracellular Zn(2+) signaling that is induced by excess glutamate signaling is involved in cognitive decline. In the hippocampal formation, the dentate gyrus is the most vulnerable to aging and is thought to contribute to age-related cognitive decline. The layer II of the entorhinal cortex is the most vulnerable to neuronal death in Alzheimer's disease. The perforant pathway provides input from the layer II to the dentate gyrus and is one of the earliest affected pathways in Alzheimer's disease. Medial perforant pathway-dentate granule cell synapses are vulnerable to either excess intracellular Zn(2+) or β-amyloid (Aβ)-bound zinc, which induce transient cognitive decline via attenuation of medial perforant pathway LTP. However, it is unknown whether the vulnerability to excess intracellular Zn(2+) is involved in region-specific vulnerability to aging and Alzheimer's disease. To discover a strategy to prevent short-term cognitive decline in normal aging process and the pre-dementia stage of Alzheimer's disease, the present paper deals with vulnerability of medial perforant pathway-dentate granule cell synapses to intracellular Zn(2+) dyshomeostasis and its possible involvement in differential vulnerability to aging and Alzheimer's disease in the hippocampal formation.

  12. ApoE is required for maintenance of the dentate gyrus neural progenitor pool

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    Yang, Cui-Ping; Gilley, Jennifer A.; Zhang, Gui; Kernie, Steven G.

    2011-01-01

    Many genes regulating adult neurogenesis have been identified and are known to play similar roles during early neuronal development. We recently identified apolipoprotein E (ApoE) as a gene the expression of which is essentially absent in early brain progenitors but becomes markedly upregulated in adult dentate gyrus stem/progenitor cells. Here, we demonstrate that ApoE deficiency impairs adult dentate gyrus development by affecting the neural progenitor pool over time. We utilized ApoE-deficient mice crossed to a nestin-GFP reporter to demonstrate that dentate gyrus progenitor cells proliferate more rapidly at early ages, which is subsequently accompanied by an overall decrease in neural progenitor cell number at later time points. This appears to be secondary to over-proliferation early in life and ultimate depletion of the Type 1 nestin- and GFAP-expressing neural stem cells. We also rescue the proliferation phenotype with an ApoE-expressing retrovirus, demonstrating that ApoE works directly in this regard. These data provide novel insight into late hippocampal development and suggest a possible role for ApoE in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21880781

  13. Increased stathmin1 expression in the dentate gyrus of mice causes abnormal axonal arborizations.

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    Kohei Yamada

    Full Text Available Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP is involved in multiple brain functions. To clarify the cause of abnormal behavior in PACAP deficient-mice, we attempted the identification of genes whose expression was altered in the dentate gyrus of PACAP-deficient mice using the differential display method. Expression of stathmin1 was up-regulated in the dentate gyrus at both the mRNA and protein levels. PACAP stimulation inhibited stathmin1 expression in PC12 cells, while increased stathmin1expression in neurons of the subgranular zone and in primary cultured hippocampal neurons induced abnormal arborization of axons. We also investigated the pathways involved in PACAP deficiency. Ascl1 binds to E10 box of the stathmin1 promoter and increases stathmin1 expression. Inhibitory bHLH proteins (Hes1 and Id3 were rapidly up-regulated by PACAP stimulation, and Hes1 could suppress Ascl1 expression and Id3 could inhibit Ascl1 signaling. We also detected an increase of stathmin1 expression in the brains of schizophrenic patients. These results suggest that up-regulation of stathmin1 in the dentate gyrus, secondary to PACAP deficiency, may create abnormal neuronal circuits that cause abnormal behavior.

  14. Molecular and functional characterization of GAD67-expressing, newborn granule cells in mouse dentate gyrus

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    Cabezas, Carolina; Irinopoulou, Theano; Cauli, Bruno; Poncer, Jean Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Dentate gyrus granule cells (GCs) have been suggested to synthesize both GABA and glutamate immediately after birth and under pathological conditions in the adult. Expression of the GABA synthesizing enzyme GAD67 by GCs during the first few weeks of postnatal development may then allow for transient GABA synthesis and synaptic release from these cells. Here, using the GAD67-EGFP transgenic strain G42, we explored the phenotype of GAD67-expressing GCs in the mouse dentate gyrus. We report a transient, GAD67-driven EGFP expression in differentiating GCs throughout ontogenesis. EGFP expression correlates with the expression of GAD and molecular markers of GABA release and uptake in 2–4 weeks post-mitotic GCs. These rather immature cells are able to fire action potentials (APs) and are synaptically integrated in the hippocampal network. Yet they show physiological properties that differentiate them from mature GCs. Finally, GAD67-expressing GCs express a specific complement of GABAA receptor subunits as well as distinctive features of synaptic and tonic GABA signaling. Our results reveal that GAD67 expression in dentate gyrus GCs is a transient marker of late differentiation that persists throughout life and the G42 strain may be used to visualize newborn GCs at a specific, well-defined differentiation stage. PMID:23565079

  15. Neuronal injury and cytogenesis after simple febrile seizures in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of juvenile rat.

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    Nazem, Amir; Jafarian, Amir Hossein; Sadraie, Seyed Homayoon; Gorji, Ali; Kheradmand, Hamed; Radmard, Mahla; Haghir, Hossein

    2012-11-01

    Although simple febrile seizures are frequently described as harmless, there is evidence which suggests that hippocampal damage may occur after simple febrile seizures. This study aimed to investigate possible neuronal damages as well as alterations in cytogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus following simple febrile seizures. Simple febrile seizure was modeled by hyperthermia-induced seizures in 22-day-old male rats. The brains were removed 2 or 15 days after hyperthermia in all rats with (n=20) and without (n=10) occurrence of seizures as well as in control animals (n=10). The sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin to estimate the surface numerical density of dark neurons. Ki-67 immunohistochemistry was performed to evaluate changes of cytogenesis following simple febrile seizures. Hyperthermia induced behavioral seizure activities in 67 % of the rats. The numerical densities of dark neurons as well as the mean Ki-67 index (the fraction of Ki-67-positive cells) were significantly increased in dentate gyrus after induction of seizures by hyperthermia compared to both controls and rats without seizure after hyperthermia. Both the seizure duration and intensity were correlated significantly with numerical densities of dark neurons (but not with Ki-67 index). The data indicate that simple febrile seizures can cause neuronal damages and enhancement of cytogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, which were still visible for at least 2 weeks. These findings also suggest the correlation of febrile seizure intensity and duration with neuronal damage.

  16. Enhanced Synaptic Connectivity in the Dentate Gyrus during Epileptiform Activity: Network Simulation

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    França, Keite Lira de Almeida; Guimarães de Almeida, Antônio-Carlos; Infantosi, Antonio Fernando Catelli; Duarte, Mario Antônio; da Silveira, Gilcélio Amaral; Scorza, Fulvio Alexandre; Arida, Ricardo Mario; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Rodrigues, Antônio Márcio

    2013-01-01

    Structural rearrangement of the dentate gyrus has been described as the underlying cause of many types of epilepsies, particularly temporal lobe epilepsy. It is said to occur when aberrant connections are established in the damaged hippocampus, as described in human epilepsy and experimental models. Computer modelling of the dentate gyrus circuitry and the corresponding structural changes has been used to understand how abnormal mossy fibre sprouting can subserve seizure generation observed in experimental models when epileptogenesis is induced by status epilepticus. The model follows the McCulloch-Pitts formalism including the representation of the nonsynaptic mechanisms. The neuronal network comprised granule cells, mossy cells, and interneurons. The compensation theory and the Hebbian and anti-Hebbian rules were used to describe the structural rearrangement including the effects of the nonsynaptic mechanisms on the neuronal activity. The simulations were based on neuroanatomic data and on the connectivity pattern between the cells represented. The results suggest that there is a joint action of the compensation theory and Hebbian rules during the inflammatory process that accompanies the status epilepticus. The structural rearrangement simulated for the dentate gyrus circuitry promotes speculation about the formation of the abnormal mossy fiber sprouting and its role in epileptic seizures. PMID:23431287

  17. Enhanced Synaptic Connectivity in the Dentate Gyrus during Epileptiform Activity: Network Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keite Lira de Almeida França

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural rearrangement of the dentate gyrus has been described as the underlying cause of many types of epilepsies, particularly temporal lobe epilepsy. It is said to occur when aberrant connections are established in the damaged hippocampus, as described in human epilepsy and experimental models. Computer modelling of the dentate gyrus circuitry and the corresponding structural changes has been used to understand how abnormal mossy fibre sprouting can subserve seizure generation observed in experimental models when epileptogenesis is induced by status epilepticus. The model follows the McCulloch-Pitts formalism including the representation of the nonsynaptic mechanisms. The neuronal network comprised granule cells, mossy cells, and interneurons. The compensation theory and the Hebbian and anti-Hebbian rules were used to describe the structural rearrangement including the effects of the nonsynaptic mechanisms on the neuronal activity. The simulations were based on neuroanatomic data and on the connectivity pattern between the cells represented. The results suggest that there is a joint action of the compensation theory and Hebbian rules during the inflammatory process that accompanies the status epilepticus. The structural rearrangement simulated for the dentate gyrus circuitry promotes speculation about the formation of the abnormal mossy fiber sprouting and its role in epileptic seizures.

  18. Weakened Intracellular Zn(2+)-Buffering in the Aged Dentate Gyrus and Its Involvement in Erasure of Maintained LTP.

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    Takeda, Atsushi; Tamano, Haruna; Murakami, Taku; Nakada, Hiroyuki; Minamino, Tatsuya; Koike, Yuta

    2017-05-25

    Memory is lost by the increased influx of extracellular Zn(2+) into neurons. It is possible that intracellular Zn(2+) dynamics is modified even at non-zincergic medial perforant pathway-dentate granule cell synapses along with aging and that vulnerability to the modification is linked to age-related cognitive decline. To examine these possibilities, vulnerability of long-term potentiation (LTP) maintenance, which underlies memory retention, to modification of synaptic Zn(2+) dynamics was compared between young and aged rats. The influx of extracellular Zn(2+) into dentate granule cells was increased in aged rats after injection of high K(+) into the dentate gyrus, but not in young rats. This increase impaired maintained LTP in aged rats. However, the impairment was rescued by co-injection of CaEDTA, an extracellular Zn(2+) chelator, or CNQX, an AMPA receptor antagonist, which suppressed the Zn(2+) influx. Maintained LTP was also impaired in aged rats after injection of ZnAF-2DA into the dentate gyrus that chelates intracellular Zn(2+), but not in young rats. Interestingly, the capacity of chelating intracellular Zn(2+) with intracellular ZnAF-2 was almost lost in the aged dentate gyrus 2 h after injection of ZnAF-2DA into the dentate gyrus, suggesting that intracellular Zn(2+)-buffering is weakened in the aged dentate gyrus, compared to the young dentate gyrus. In the dentate gyrus of aged rats, maintained LTP is more vulnerable to modification of intracellular Zn(2+) dynamics than in young rats, probably due to weakened intracellular Zn(2+)-buffering.

  19. Postnatal changes in glucose transporter 3 expression in the dentate gyrus of the C57BL/6 mouse model.

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    Jung, Hyo Young; Yim, Hee Sun; Yoo, Dae Young; Kim, Jong Whi; Chung, Jin Young; Seong, Je Kyung; Yoon, Yeo Sung; Kim, Dae Won; Hwang, In Koo

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we observed the ontogenetic changes in glucose transporter 3 (GLUT3) immunoreactivity, a major neuronal GLUT, in the dentate gyrus of mouse brains at various ages: postnatal day (P) 1, 7, 14, 28, and 56. At P1, cresyl violet staining showed abundant neurons in the dentate gyrus, whereas the granule cell layer was ill-defined. At P7, the granule cell layer was observed, and cresyl violet-positive cells were dispersed throughout the polymorphic layer. At P14, the granule cell layer was well-defined, and cresyl violet positive cells were detected abundantly in the polymorphic layer. At P28 and P56, cresyl violet-positive cells were observed in the granule cell layer, as well as in the polymorphic layer. At P1, GLUT3 immunoreactivity was detected in the dentate gyrus. At P7, GLUT3 immunoreactive cells were scattered in the polymorphic and molecular layer. However, at P14, GLUT3 immunoreactivity was observed in the polymorphic layer as well as subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus. At P28, GLUT3 immunoreactivity was detected in the polymorphic layer of the dentate gyrus. At P56, GLUT3 immunoreactivity was observed predominantly in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus. GLUT3 immunoreactive cells were mainly colocalized with doublecortin, which is a marker for differentiated neuroblasts, in the polymorphic layer and subgranular zone of dentate gyrus at P14 and P56. These results suggest that the expression of GLUT3 is closely associated with postnatal development of the dentate gyrus and adult neurogenesis.

  20. Degeneration and regeneration of GABAergic interneurons in the dentate gyrus of adult mice in experimental models of epilepsy.

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    Wei, Dong; Yang, Fang; Wang, Ying; Yang, Feng; Wu, Chen; Wu, Sheng-Xi; Jiang, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence showed that GABAergic interneurons play an important role in the generation of seizures by regulating excitatory/inhibitory balance in the hippocampus; however, there is a continuous debate regarding the alteration in the number of hippocampal GABAergic interneurons during epileptogenesis. Here, we investigated the degeneration and regeneration of GABAergic interneurons in the dentate gyrus during epileptogenesis using glutamic acid decarboxylase-green fluorescence protein (GAD67-GFP) knock-in mice. Pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced chronic kindling model and lithium-pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE) model were used in this study. We found a progressive loss of GABAergic interneurons in the dentate gyrus during post-SE epileptogenesis rather than PTZ kindling. Both types of epileptogenic insults significantly promoted the proliferation of neural progenitor cells in the dentate gyrus; however, compared to 80% neuronal differentiation ratio in the control group, there was a remarkable decrease in PTZ kindling and pilocarpine models, that is 58% and 29%, respectively. Double/triple immunofluorescence labeling revealed no newborn neurons colabeled with GFP in both intact and epileptic dentate gyrus. In addition, valproate (a first-line antiepileptic drug) treatment prevented the loss of GABAergic interneurons but still failed to induce the regeneration of GAD67-positive interneurons in the dentate gyrus during post-SE epileptogenesis. These results indicate that degeneration of GABAergic interneurons may depend on the type of epileptogenic insult and that no newborn GABAergic interneurons occur in the adult dentate gyrus during epileptogenesis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Long-term potentiation in hilar circuitry modulates gating by the dentate gyrus.

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    Wright, Brandon J; Jackson, Meyer B

    2014-07-16

    The dentate gyrus serves as a gateway to the hippocampus, filtering and processing sensory inputs as an animal explores its environment. The hilus occupies a strategic position within the dentate gyrus from which it can play a pivotal role in these functions. Inputs from dentate granule cells converge on the hilus, and excitatory hilar mossy cells redistribute these signals back to granule cells to transform a pattern of cortical input into a new pattern of output to the hippocampal CA3 region. Using voltage-sensitive dye to image electrical activity in rat hippocampal slices, we explored how long-term potentiation (LTP) of different excitatory synapses modifies the flow of information. Theta burst stimulation of the perforant path potentiated responses throughout the molecular layer, but left responses in the CA3 region unchanged. By contrast, theta burst stimulation of the granule cell layer potentiated responses throughout the molecular layer, as well as in the CA3 region. Theta burst stimulation of the granule cell layer potentiated CA3 responses not only to granule cell layer stimulation but also to perforant path stimulation. Potentiation of responses in the CA3 region reflected NMDA receptor-dependent LTP of upstream synapses between granule cells and mossy cells, with no detectable contribution from NMDA receptor-independent LTP of local CA3 mossy fiber synapses. Potentiation of transmission to the CA3 region required LTP in both granule cell→mossy cell and mossy cell→granule cell synapses. This bidirectional plasticity enables hilar circuitry to regulate the flow of information through the dentate gyrus and on to the hippocampus. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/349743-11$15.00/0.

  2. The Effects of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome on the Dentate Gyrus and Learning and Memory in Children.

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    Cha, Jiook; Zea-Hernandez, Johanna A; Sin, Sanghun; Graw-Panzer, Katharina; Shifteh, Keivan; Isasi, Carmen R; Wagshul, Mark E; Moran, Eileen E; Posner, Jonathan; Zimmerman, Molly E; Arens, Raanan

    2017-04-19

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with intermittent hypoxia and sleep loss. In children, impairments of cognitive function are important manifestations, but the underlying pathology is unknown. We hypothesized that OSAS would affect the dentate gyrus, a hippocampal subdivision essential to neurogenesis and cognition, and that this impact would further affect cognitive function in children. In children with OSAS (n = 11) and control subjects (n = 12; age and sex matched), we performed diffusion tensor imaging and structural MRI, polysomnography, and neuropsychological assessments. We found that OSAS was associated with decreased mean diffusivity of the left dentate gyrus (p = 0.002; false discovery rate corrected; adjusting for sex, age, and body mass index), showing a large effect size (partial η(2) = 0.491), but not with any other structural measures across the brain. Decreased dentate gyrus mean diffusivity correlated with a higher apnea hypopnea index (Spearman's r = -0.50, p = 0.008) and a greater arousal index (r = -0.44, p = 0.017). OSAS did not significantly affect neuropsychological measures (p values >0.5); however, a lower verbal learning score correlated with lower dentate gyrus mean diffusivity (r = 0.54, p = 0.004). Path analysis demonstrated that dentate gyrus mean diffusivity mediates the impact of OSAS on verbal learning capacity. Finally, the diagnostic accuracy of a regression model based on dentate gyrus mean diffusivity reached 85.8% (cross validated). This study demonstrates a likely pathway of effects of OSAS on neurocognitive function in children, as well as potential utility of the dentate gyrus mean diffusivity as an early marker of brain pathology in children with OSAS.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In this study we investigate the relationships between dentate gyrus structure, hippocampus-dependent cognition, and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). We demonstrate lower mean diffusivity of the dentate gyrus in children

  3. Offer and demand: proliferation and survival of neurons in the dentate gyrus.

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    Lehmann, Konrad; Butz, Markus; Teuchert-Noodt, Gertraud

    2005-06-01

    The proliferation and survival of new cells in the dentate gyrus of mammals is a complex process that is subject to numerous influences, presenting a confusing picture. We suggest regarding these processes on the level of small networks, which can be simulated in silico and which illustrate in a nutshell the influences that proliferating cells exert on plasticity and the conditions they require for survival. Beyond the insights gained by this consideration, we review the available literature on factors that regulate cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus in vivo. It turns out that the rate of cell proliferation and excitatory afferents via the perforant path interactively determine cell survival, such that the best network stability is achieved when either of the two is increased whereas concurrent activation of the two factors lowers cell survival rates. Consequently, the mitotic activity is regulated by systemic parameters in compliance with the hippocampal network's requirements. The resulting neurogenesis, in contrast, depends on local factors, i.e. the activity flow within the network. In the process of cell differentiation and survival, each cell's spectrum of afferent and efferent connections decides whether it will integrate into the network or undergo apoptosis, and it is the current neuronal activity which determines the synaptic spectrum. We believe that this framework will help explain the biology of dentate cell proliferation and provide a basis for future research hypotheses.

  4. Caffeine treatment prevents rapid eye movement sleep deprivation-induced impairment of late-phase long-term potentiation in the dentate gyrus.

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    Alhaider, Ibrahim A; Alkadhi, Karim A

    2015-11-01

    The CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG) are physically and functionally closely related areas of the hippocampus, but they differ in various respects, including their reactions to different insults. The purpose of this study was to determine the protective effects of chronic caffeine treatment on late-phase long-term potentiation (L-LTP) and its signalling cascade in the DG area of the hippocampus of rapid eye movement sleep-deprived rats. Rats were chronically treated with caffeine (300 mg/L drinking water) for 4 weeks, after which they were sleep-deprived for 24 h. L-LTP was induced in in anaesthetized rats, and extracellular field potentials from the DG area were recorded in vivo. The levels of L-LTP-related signalling proteins were assessed by western blot analysis. Sleep deprivation markedly reduced L-LTP magnitude, and basal levels of total cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), phosphorylated CREB (P-CREB), and calcium/calmodulin kinase IV (CaMKIV). Chronic caffeine treatment prevented the reductions in the basal levels of P-CREB, total CREB and CaMKIV in sleep-deprived rats. Furthermore, caffeine prevented post-L-LTP sleep deprivation-induced downregulation of P-CREB and brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the DG. The current findings show that caffeine treatment prevents acute sleep deprivation-induced deficits in brain function.

  5. Previous history of chronic stress changes the transcriptional response to glucocorticoid challenge in the dentate gyrus region of the male rat hippocampus.

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    Datson, Nicole A; van den Oever, Jessica M E; Korobko, Oksana B; Magarinos, Ana Maria; de Kloet, E Ronald; McEwen, Bruce S

    2013-09-01

    Chronic stress is a risk factor for several neuropsychiatric diseases, such as depression and psychosis. In response to stress glucocorticoids (GCs) are secreted that bind to mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptors, ligand-activated transcription factors that regulate the transcription of gene networks in the brain necessary for coping with stress, recovery, and adaptation. Chronic stress particularly affects the dentate gyrus (DG) subregion of the hippocampus, causing several functional and morphological changes with consequences for learning and memory, which are likely adaptive but at the same time make DG neurons more vulnerable to subsequent challenges. The aim of this study was to investigate the transcriptional response of DG neurons to a GC challenge in male rats previously exposed to chronic restraint stress (CRS). An intriguing finding of the current study was that having a history of CRS had profound consequences for the subsequent response to acute GC challenge, differentially affecting the expression of several hundreds of genes in the DG compared with challenged nonstressed control animals. This enduring effect of previous stress exposure suggests that epigenetic processes may be involved. In line with this, CRS indeed affected the expression of several genes involved in chromatin structure and epigenetic processes, including Asf1, Ash1l, Hist1h3f, and Tp63. The data presented here indicate that CRS alters the transcriptional response to a subsequent GC injection. We propose that this altered transcriptional potential forms part of the molecular mechanism underlying the enhanced vulnerability for stress-related disorders like depression caused by chronic stress.

  6. Effects of exercise on neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus and ability of learning and memory after hippocampus lesion in adult rats

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    Lin CHEN; Shan GONG; Li-Dong SHAN; Wei-Ping XU; Yue-Jin ZHANG; Shi-Yu GUO; Tadashi Hisamitsu; Qi-Zhang YIN; Xing-Hong JIANG

    2006-01-01

    Objective To explore the effects of exercise on dentate gyrus (DG) neurogenesis and the ability of learning and memory in hippocampus-lesioned adult rats. Methods Hippocampus lesion was produced by intrahippocampal microinjection of kainic acid (KA). Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was used to label dividing cells. Y maze test was used to evaluate the ability of learning and memory. Exercise was conducted in the form of forced running in a motor-driven running wheel. The speed of wheel revolution was regulated at 3 kinds of intensity: lightly running, moderately running, or heavily running. Results Hippocampus lesion could increase the number of BrdU-labeled DG cells, moderately running after lesion could further enhance the number of BrdU-labeled cells and decrease the error number (EN) in Y maze test,while neither lightly running, nor heavily running had such effects. There was a negative correlation between the number of DG BrdU-labeled cells and the EN in the Y maze test after running. Conclusion Moderate exercise could enhance the DG neurogenesis and ameliorate the ability of learning and memory in hippocampus-lesioned rats.

  7. Characteristic of Extracellular Zn(2+) Influx in the Middle-Aged Dentate Gyrus and Its Involvement in Attenuation of LTP.

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    Takeda, Atsushi; Koike, Yuta; Osaw, Misa; Tamano, Haruna

    2017-03-13

    An increased influx of extracellular Zn(2+) into neurons is a cause of cognitive decline. The influx of extracellular Zn(2+) into dentate granule cells was compared between young and middle-aged rats because of vulnerability of the dentate gyrus to aging. The influx of extracellular Zn(2+) into dentate granule cells was increased in middle-aged rats after injection of AMPA and high K(+) into the dentate gyrus, but not in young rats. Simultaneously, high K(+)-induced attenuation of LTP was observed in middle-aged rats, but not in young rats. The attenuation was rescued by co-injection of CaEDTA, an extracellular Zn(2+) chelator. Intracellular Zn(2+) in dentate granule cells was also increased in middle-aged slices with high K(+), in which the increase in extracellular Zn(2+) was the same as young slices with high K(+), suggesting that ability of extracellular Zn(2+) influx into dentate granule cells is greater in middle-aged rats. Furthermore, extracellular zinc concentration in the hippocampus was increased age-dependently. The present study suggests that the influx of extracellular Zn(2+) into dentate granule cells is more readily increased in middle-aged rats and that its increase is a cause of age-related attenuation of LTP in the dentate gyrus.

  8. Effect of maternal morphine sulfate exposure on neuronal plasticity of dentate gyrus in Balb/c mice offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golalipour, M J; Ghafari, S; Kafshgiri, S Kaboli; Moghadam, M H Latifi; Moharri, A R

    2013-03-15

    This study carried out to evaluate the effects of maternal morphine exposure during gestational and lactation period on the neuronal cells of dentate gyrus in 18 and 32 days Balb/c mice offspring. In this experimental study 10 female mice were randomly allocated into cases and controls. In experimental group, animals were received morphine sulfate 10 mg/kg/body weight intraperitoneally during 7 days before mating, gestational period (GD0-21), 18 and 32 days after delivery. The control animals were received an equivalent volume normal saline. Cerebrum of six infant for each group were removed and stained with cresyl violet and monoclonal anti-neuronal nuclei (NeuN) antibody. Quantitative computer-assisted morphometric study was done on dentate gyrus of hippocampus. In the P18 mice, the numbers of granular cells in dentate gyrus medial blade and dentate gyrus lateral blade significantly reduced from 171.45 +/- 4.2 and 174.51 +/- 3.1 cells in control group to 153.32 +/- 2.8 and 151.23 +/- 3.2 cells in 10000 microm2 area of granular layer in treated group (p dentate gyrus significantly decreased from 155.31 +/- 4.1 and 153.77 +/- 3.4 in control group to 138.33 +/- 4.5 and 135.13 +/- 4.3 in treated group, respectively (p dentate gyrus significantly reduced in treated mice in compared to controls in P18 and P32 mice (p dentate gyrus in 18 and 32 days old infant mice.

  9. Zinc chelation reduces traumatic brain injury-induced neurogenesis in the subgranular zone of the hippocampal dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bo Young; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Hyun Jung; Lee, Bo Eun; Kim, In Yeol; Sohn, Min; Suh, Sang Won

    2014-10-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that traumatic brain injury (TBI) increases hippocampal neurogenesis in the rodent brain. However, the mechanisms underlying increased neurogenesis after TBI remain unknown. Continuous neurogenesis occurs in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) in the adult brain. The mechanism that maintains active neurogenesis in the hippocampal area is not known. A high level of vesicular zinc is localized in the presynaptic terminals of the SGZ (mossy fiber). The mossy fiber of dentate granular cells contains high levels of chelatable zinc in their terminal vesicles, which can be released into the extracellular space during neuronal activity. Previously, our lab presented findings indicating that a possible correlation may exist between synaptic zinc localization and high rates of neurogenesis in this area after hypoglycemia or epilepsy. Using a weight drop animal model to mimic human TBI, we tested our hypothesis that zinc plays a key role in modulating hippocampal neurogenesis after TBI. Thus, we injected a zinc chelator, clioquinol (CQ, 30mg/kg), into the intraperitoneal space to reduce brain zinc availability twice per day for 1 week. Neuronal death was evaluated with Fluoro Jade-B and NeuN staining to determine whether CQ has neuroprotective effects after TBI. The number of degenerating neurons (FJB (+)) and live neurons (NeuN (+)) was similar in vehicle and in CQ-treated rats at 1 week after TBI. Neurogenesis was evaluated using BrdU, Ki67 and doublecortin (DCX) immunostaining 1 week after TBI. The number of BrdU, Ki67 and DCX positive cell was increased after TBI. However, the number of BrdU, Ki67 and DCX positive cells was significantly decreased by CQ treatment. The present study shows that zinc chelation did not prevent neurodegeneration but did reduce TBI-induced progenitor cell proliferation and neurogenesis. Therefore, this study suggests that zinc has an essential role for modulating hippocampal

  10. Caffeine and modafinil promote adult neuronal cell proliferation during 48 h of total sleep deprivation in rat dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Surajit; Kauser, Hina; Ray, Koushik; Kishore, Krishna; Kumar, Sanjeev; Panjwani, Usha

    2013-10-01

    It has been established that sleep deprivation (SD) reduces the proliferation of neuronal precursors in the adult hippocampus. It has also been reported that psychostimulant drugs modulate adult neurogenesis. We examined the modulatory role of two psychostimulant drugs modafinil and caffeine on adult neuronal cell proliferation (NCP) during 48 h of total SD. A novel automated cage shaking stimulus was used to induce SD based on animal activity. 5-Bromo-2″-deoxyuridine (BrdU; 50mg/kg/day i.p.) was injected at the onset of the light phase for two days. Rats were successfully sleep deprived for 85-94% of total time. Stereological analysis showed that both caffeine and modafinil treatments during SD improved the number of BrdU positive cells as compared to the SD group. Caffeine treatment during SD, significantly increased early proliferative and post-mitotic stages of doublecortin (DCX) positive cells while modafinil treatment during SD, increased intermediate and post-mitotic stages of DCX positive cells compared to SD+Vehicle group. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) expression on BrdU positive cells as well as in the dentate gyrus (DG) region was decreased significantly after sleep deprivation. Both caffeine and modafinil significantly improved BDNF expression in the DG region. Modafinil, but not caffeine, significantly decreased hippocampal adenosine level during SD in comparison to the SD+Vehicle group. It may be concluded that caffeine or modafinil treatment during 48 h of SD prevents the SD induced decline in neuronal proliferation and differentiation. Caffeine and modafinil induced alterations of NCP during SD may involve modulation of BDNF and adenosine levels.

  11. Differential synaptic integration of interneurons in the outer and inner molecular layers of the developing dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chittajallu, Ramesh; Kunze, Albrecht; Mangin, Jean-Marie; Gallo, Vittorio

    2007-08-01

    The dentate gyrus (DG) undergoes continued reorganization and lamination during early postnatal development. Interneurons with anatomically identified synaptic contacts migrate from the outer to the inner regions of the molecular layer (ML) of the DG. By using the 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNP)-enhanced green fluorescent protein transgenic mouse, we were able to target and physiologically characterize Dlx2(+) developing ML interneurons. We investigated whether synapses on migrating ML interneurons were functional and defined properties of synaptic inputs onto interneurons that were located in the outer ML (OML) or inner ML (IML). Consistent with ongoing maturation, IML interneurons displayed lower input resistances and more hyperpolarized resting membrane potentials than OML interneurons. Both OML and IML interneurons received a direct excitatory monosynaptic input from the entorhinal cortex via the perforant paths, but this input was differentially sensitive to activation of presynaptic group II and III metabotropic glutamate receptors. Furthermore, only IML interneurons also received significant synaptic input from the CA3/hilar region, especially under conditions of experimentally induced disinhibition. These changes are attributed to a significant reorganization of dendritic fields. GABA(A) receptor-mediated innervation of OML and IML interneurons also displayed significant differences in miniature IPSC amplitude, frequency, and decay kinetics. Finally, cell-attached recordings indicated that GABA(A) receptor activation was depolarizing in OML interneurons but predominantly shunting in IML interneurons. Our data provide evidence that developing ML interneurons receive functional glutamatergic and GABAergic inputs and undergo significant changes in synaptic integration during migration from the OML to the IML.

  12. Dynamic Expression Patterns of Progenitor and Neuron Layer Markers in the Developing Human Dentate Gyrus and Fimbria.

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    Cipriani, Sara; Journiac, Nathalie; Nardelli, Jeannette; Verney, Catherine; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Guimiot, Fabien; Gressens, Pierre; Adle-Biassette, Homa

    2017-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that orchestrate the development of the human dentate gyrus are not known. In this study, we characterized the formation of human dentate and fimbrial progenitors and postmitotic neurons from 9 gestational weeks (GW9) to GW25. PAX6+ progenitor cells remained proliferative until GW16 in the dentate ventricular zone. By GW11, the secondary dentate matrix had developed in the intermediate zone, surrounding the dentate anlage and streaming toward the subpial layer. This secondary matrix contained proliferating PAX6+ and/or TBR2+ progenitors. In parallel, SOX2+ and PAX6+ fimbrial cells were detected approaching the dentate anlage, representing a possible source of extra-dentate progenitors. By GW16, when the granule cell layer could be delineated, a hilar matrix containing PAX6+ and some TBR2+ progenitors had become identifiable. By GW25, when the 2 limbs of the granule cell layer had formed, the secondary dentate matrix was reduced to a pool of progenitors at the fimbrio-dentate junction. Although human dentate development recapitulates key steps previously described in rodents, differences seemed to emerge in neuron layer markers expression. Further studies are necessary to better elucidate their role in dentate formation and connectivity. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Age-related impairment of long-term depression in area CA1 and dentate gyrus of rat hippocampus following developmental lead exposure in vitro.

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    Sui, L; Ge, S Y; Ruan, D Y; Chen, J T; Xu, Y Z; Wang, M

    2000-01-01

    Chronic developmental lead exposure is known to be associated with cognitive dysfunction in children. Impairment of the induction of long-term depression (LTD) has been reported in area CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG) of rat hippocampus following chronic lead exposure. The present study was carried out to investigate age-related alterations of LTD in area CA1 and DG of rat hippocampus following developmental lead exposure in vitro. Neonatal Wistar rats were exposed to lead from parturition to weaning via milk of dams drinking 0.2% lead acetate solution. Field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) were recorded in hippocampal slices at various postnatal ages: postnatal day (PND) 17-23, 27-33, and 57-63. Following low-frequency stimulation (LFS, 900 pulses/1 Hz), the average magnitude of LTD is age related. In the controls, LTD magnitude in area CA1 decreased with age, whereas in DG it increased with age. In the lead-exposed groups, the magnitude of LTD declined during development in both area CA1 and DG. The differences of LTD magnitude between the control and lead-exposed rats were 27.26 +/- 9.15% (PND 17-23), 21.59 +/- 12.93% (PND 27-33), and 16.96 +/- 9.33% (PND 57-63) in area CA1, and were 6.95 +/- 9.26%, 17.60 +/- 3.91%, and 33.63 +/- 10.47% in DG, respectively. These results demonstrated that the lead-induced impairment of LTD magnitude was an age-related decline in area CA1 and an age-related increase in area DG of rat hippocampus. Published by Elsevier Science Inc.

  14. Stimulation of the Sigma-1 Receptor by DHEA Enhances Synaptic Efficacy and Neurogenesis in the Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus of Olfactory Bulbectomized Mice

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    Moriguchi, Shigeki; Shinoda, Yasuharu; Yamamoto, Yui; Sasaki, Yuzuru; Miyajima, Kosuke; Tagashira, Hideaki; Fukunaga, Kohji

    2013-01-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is the most abundant neurosteroid synthesized de novo in the central nervous system. We previously reported that stimulation of the sigma-1 receptor by DHEA improves cognitive function by activating calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), protein kinase C and extracellular signal-regulated kinase in the hippocampus in olfactory bulbectomized (OBX) mice. Here, we asked whether DHEA enhances neurogenesis in the subgranular zone of the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) and improves depressive-like behaviors observed in OBX mice. Chronic treatment with DHEA at 30 or 60 mg/kg p.o. for 14 days significantly improved hippocampal LTP impaired in OBX mice concomitant with increased CaMKII autophosphorylation and GluR1 (Ser-831) phosphorylation in the DG. Chronic DHEA treatment also ameliorated depressive-like behaviors in OBX mice, as assessed by tail suspension and forced swim tests, while a single DHEA treatment had no affect. DHEA treatment also significantly increased the number of BrdU-positive neurons in the subgranular zone of the DG of OBX mice, an increase inhibited by treatment with NE-100, a sigma-1 receptor antagonist. DHEA treatment also significantly increased phosphorylation of Akt (Ser-473), Akt (Ser-308) and ERK in the DG. Furthermore, GSK-3β (Ser-9) phosphorylation increased in the DG of OBX mice possibly accounting for increased neurogenesis through Akt activation. Finally, we confirmed that DHEA treatment of OBX mice increases the number of BrdU-positive neurons co-expressing β-catenin, a downstream GSK-3βtarget. Overall, we conclude that sigma-1 receptor stimulation by DHEA ameliorates OBX-induced depressive-like behaviors by increasing neurogenesis in the DG through activation of the Akt/GSK-3β/β-catenin pathway. PMID:23593332

  15. Stimulation of the sigma-1 receptor by DHEA enhances synaptic efficacy and neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of olfactory bulbectomized mice.

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    Shigeki Moriguchi

    Full Text Available Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA is the most abundant neurosteroid synthesized de novo in the central nervous system. We previously reported that stimulation of the sigma-1 receptor by DHEA improves cognitive function by activating calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII, protein kinase C and extracellular signal-regulated kinase in the hippocampus in olfactory bulbectomized (OBX mice. Here, we asked whether DHEA enhances neurogenesis in the subgranular zone of the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG and improves depressive-like behaviors observed in OBX mice. Chronic treatment with DHEA at 30 or 60 mg/kg p.o. for 14 days significantly improved hippocampal LTP impaired in OBX mice concomitant with increased CaMKII autophosphorylation and GluR1 (Ser-831 phosphorylation in the DG. Chronic DHEA treatment also ameliorated depressive-like behaviors in OBX mice, as assessed by tail suspension and forced swim tests, while a single DHEA treatment had no affect. DHEA treatment also significantly increased the number of BrdU-positive neurons in the subgranular zone of the DG of OBX mice, an increase inhibited by treatment with NE-100, a sigma-1 receptor antagonist. DHEA treatment also significantly increased phosphorylation of Akt (Ser-473, Akt (Ser-308 and ERK in the DG. Furthermore, GSK-3β (Ser-9 phosphorylation increased in the DG of OBX mice possibly accounting for increased neurogenesis through Akt activation. Finally, we confirmed that DHEA treatment of OBX mice increases the number of BrdU-positive neurons co-expressing β-catenin, a downstream GSK-3βtarget. Overall, we conclude that sigma-1 receptor stimulation by DHEA ameliorates OBX-induced depressive-like behaviors by increasing neurogenesis in the DG through activation of the Akt/GSK-3β/β-catenin pathway.

  16. Role of hippocampal dentate gyrus neurons in the protective effects of heat shock factor 1 on working memory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Peng; Xiongzhao Zhu; Ming Cheng; Xiangyi Chen; Shuqiao Yao

    2011-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that heat shock factor 1 exerts endogenous protective effects on working memory under conditions of chronic psychological stress. However, the precise underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. This study examined the protective factors affecting working memory in heat shock transcription factor 1 gene knockout mice. The results indicated that the number of correct T maze alternations decreased following mild chronic psychological stress in knockout mice. This change was accompanied by a decrease in neurogenesis and an increase in neuronal apoptosis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. The number of correct T maze alternations was positively correlated with neurogenesis in hippocampal dentate gyrus, and negatively correlated with neuronal apoptosis. In wild type mice, no significant difference was detected in the number of correct T maze alternations or neuronal apoptosis in hippocampal dentate gyrus. These results indicate that the heat shock factor 1 gene has an endogenous protective role in working memory during mild chronic psychological stress associated with dentate gyrus neuronal apoptosis.Moreover, dentate gyrus neurogenesis appears to participate in the protective mechanism.

  17. Pyridoxine enhances cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation by upregulating the GABAergic system in the mouse dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Dae Young; Kim, Woosuk; Kim, Dae Won; Yoo, Ki-Yeon; Chung, Jin Young; Youn, Hwa Young; Yoon, Yeo Sung; Choi, Soo Young; Won, Moo-Ho; Hwang, In Koo

    2011-05-01

    We investigated the effects of pyridoxine (vitamin B(6)) on cell death, cell proliferation, neuroblast differentiation, and the GABAergic system in the mouse dentate gyrus. We administered pyridoxine (350 mg/kg intraperitoneally) to 8 week old mice twice a day for 14 days and sacrificed them at 10 weeks of age. Pyridoxine treatment did not induce neuronal death or activate microglia in the dentate gyrus, while glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive cells were significantly increased in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus. The increase in GFAP-positive cells was confirmed to be due to proliferating cells based on double immunofluorescence staining. GFAP-positive cells, which were also labeled with Ki67, a marker for cell proliferation, and doublecortin, a marker for neuroblast differentiation, were significantly increased in the pyridoxine-treated group compared to those in the vehicle-treated group. Pyridoxine treatment also increased the protein levels of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 67, an enzyme for GABA synthesis, and pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PNP) oxidase, an enzyme for pyridoxal phosphate synthesis, in the dentate gyrus. These results suggest that pyridoxine treatment distinctly increases cell proliferation, neuroblast differentiation, and upregulated the GABAergic system, as revealed by the increases of GAD67 and PNP oxidase in the mouse dentate gyrus.

  18. Environmental impoverishment and aging alter object recognition, spatial learning, and dentate gyrus astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Daniel G; Foro, César A R; Rego, Carla M D; Gloria, David A; de Oliveira, Fabio R R; Paes, Juliana M P; de Sousa, Aline A; Tokuhashi, Tatyana P; Trindade, Lucas S; Turiel, Maíra C P; Vasconcelos, Erick G R; Torres, João B; Cunnigham, Colm; Perry, Victor H; Vasconcelos, Pedro F da Costa; Diniz, Cristovam W P

    2010-08-01

    Environmental and age-related effects on learning and memory were analysed and compared with changes observed in astrocyte laminar distribution in the dentate gyrus. Aged (20 months) and young (6 months) adult female albino Swiss mice were housed from weaning either in impoverished conditions or in enriched conditions, and tested for episodic-like and water maze spatial memories. After these behavioral tests, brain hippocampal sections were immunolabeled for glial fibrillary acid protein to identify astrocytes. The effects of environmental enrichment on episodic-like memory were not dependent on age, and may protect water maze spatial learning and memory from declines induced by aging or impoverished environment. In the dentate gyrus, the number of astrocytes increased with both aging and enriched environment in the molecular layer, increased only with aging in the polymorphic layer, and was unchanged in the granular layer. We suggest that long-term experience-induced glial plasticity by enriched environment may represent at least part of the circuitry groundwork for improvements in behavioral performance in the aged mice brain.

  19. Suspension of Mitotic Activity in Dentate Gyrus of the Hibernating Ground Squirrel

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    Victor I. Popov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurogenesis occurs in the adult mammalian hippocampus, a region of the brain important for learning and memory. Hibernation in Siberian ground squirrels provides a natural model to study mitosis as the rapid fall in body temperature in 24 h (from 35-36°C to +4–6°C permits accumulation of mitotic cells at different stages of the cell cycle. Histological methods used to study adult neurogenesis are limited largely to fixed tissue, and the mitotic state elucidated depends on the specific phase of mitosis at the time of day. However, using an immunohistochemical study of doublecortin (DCX and BrdU-labelled neurons, we demonstrate that the dentate gyrus of the ground squirrel hippocampus contains a population of immature cells which appear to possess mitotic activity. Our data suggest that doublecortin-labelled immature cells exist in a mitotic state and may represent a renewable pool for generation of new neurons within the dentate gyrus.

  20. The Lysine Acetyltransferase Activator Brpf1 Governs Dentate Gyrus Development through Neural Stem Cells and Progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Linya; Yan, Kezhi; Zhou, Jinfeng; Zhao, Hong; Bertos, Nicholas R.; Park, Morag; Wang, Edwin; Yang, Xiang-Jiao

    2015-01-01

    Lysine acetylation has recently emerged as an important post-translational modification in diverse organisms, but relatively little is known about its roles in mammalian development and stem cells. Bromodomain- and PHD finger-containing protein 1 (BRPF1) is a multidomain histone binder and a master activator of three lysine acetyltransferases, MOZ, MORF and HBO1, which are also known as KAT6A, KAT6B and KAT7, respectively. While the MOZ and MORF genes are rearranged in leukemia, the MORF gene is also mutated in prostate and other cancers and in four genetic disorders with intellectual disability. Here we show that forebrain-specific inactivation of the mouse Brpf1 gene causes hypoplasia in the dentate gyrus, including underdevelopment of the suprapyramidal blade and complete loss of the infrapyramidal blade. We trace the developmental origin to compromised Sox2+ neural stem cells and Tbr2+ intermediate neuronal progenitors. We further demonstrate that Brpf1 loss deregulates neuronal migration, cell cycle progression and transcriptional control, thereby causing abnormal morphogenesis of the hippocampus. These results link histone binding and acetylation control to hippocampus development and identify an important epigenetic regulator for patterning the dentate gyrus, a brain structure critical for learning, memory and adult neurogenesis. PMID:25757017

  1. Postischemic Anhedonia Associated with Neurodegenerative Changes in the Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus of Rats

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    Jiro Kasahara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Poststroke depression is one of the major symptoms observed in the chronic stage of brain stroke such as cerebral ischemia. Its pathophysiological mechanisms, however, are not well understood. Using the transient right middle cerebral artery occlusion- (MCAO-, 90 min operated rats as an ischemia model in this study, we first observed that aggravation of anhedonia spontaneously occurred especially after 20 weeks of MCAO, and it was prevented by chronic antidepressants treatment (imipramine or fluvoxamine. The anhedonia specifically associated with loss of the granular neurons in the ipsilateral side of hippocampal dentate gyrus and was also prevented by an antidepressant imipramine. Immunohistochemical analysis showed increased apoptosis inside the granular cell layer prior to and associated with the neuronal loss, and imipramine seemed to recover the survival signal rather than suppressing the death signal to prevent neurons from apoptosis. Proliferation and development of the neural stem cells were increased transiently in the subgranular zone of both ipsi- and contralateral hippocampus within one week after MCAO and then decreased and almost ceased after 6 weeks of MCAO, while chronic imipramine treatment prevented them partially. Overall, our study suggests new insights for the mechanistic correlation between poststroke depression and the delayed neurodegenerative changes in the hippocampal dentate gyrus with effective use of antidepressants on them.

  2. The effect of Jujuboside A on the evoked field potentials of granule cells in dentate gyrus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    封洲燕; 郑筱祥

    2002-01-01

    Jujuboside A (JuA) is a main component of Jujubogenin extracted from the seeds of Ziziphus. The authors have not seen any report on JuA's direct effect on the neurons of the central nervous system. This study aimed to assess the effect of JuA on paired-pulse responses of dentate gyrus granule cells in urethane-anaesthetized rats, used intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) JuA to mimic in vitro bath conditions in vivo. Paired-pulse stimuli with 80ms interpulse interval were used to stimulate the perforant pathway. Evoked responses were recorded in the dentate gyrus cell layer after i.c.v. administration of 0.9% normal saline or JuA. In the first responses, the slopes of excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP1) and the amplitudes of population spike (PS1) decreased significantly after administration of JuA while the PS1 latencies increased significantly. In the second responses, the EPSP2 slopes and PS2 latencies were changed similarly to those of the first ones, but PS2 amplitudes increased. The results showed that JuA may have some inhibitory effect on the granule cell excitability mediated by presynaptic mechanism but may have little effect on the excitability mediated by postsynaptic mechanism since the second evoked N-methyl-D-aspartic mediating paired-pulse facilitation is a postsynaptic mechanism.

  3. The lysine acetyltransferase activator Brpf1 governs dentate gyrus development through neural stem cells and progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Linya; Yan, Kezhi; Zou, Jinfeng; Zhou, Jinfeng; Zhao, Hong; Bertos, Nicholas R; Park, Morag; Wang, Edwin; Yang, Xiang-Jiao

    2015-03-01

    Lysine acetylation has recently emerged as an important post-translational modification in diverse organisms, but relatively little is known about its roles in mammalian development and stem cells. Bromodomain- and PHD finger-containing protein 1 (BRPF1) is a multidomain histone binder and a master activator of three lysine acetyltransferases, MOZ, MORF and HBO1, which are also known as KAT6A, KAT6B and KAT7, respectively. While the MOZ and MORF genes are rearranged in leukemia, the MORF gene is also mutated in prostate and other cancers and in four genetic disorders with intellectual disability. Here we show that forebrain-specific inactivation of the mouse Brpf1 gene causes hypoplasia in the dentate gyrus, including underdevelopment of the suprapyramidal blade and complete loss of the infrapyramidal blade. We trace the developmental origin to compromised Sox2+ neural stem cells and Tbr2+ intermediate neuronal progenitors. We further demonstrate that Brpf1 loss deregulates neuronal migration, cell cycle progression and transcriptional control, thereby causing abnormal morphogenesis of the hippocampus. These results link histone binding and acetylation control to hippocampus development and identify an important epigenetic regulator for patterning the dentate gyrus, a brain structure critical for learning, memory and adult neurogenesis.

  4. The lysine acetyltransferase activator Brpf1 governs dentate gyrus development through neural stem cells and progenitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linya You

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Lysine acetylation has recently emerged as an important post-translational modification in diverse organisms, but relatively little is known about its roles in mammalian development and stem cells. Bromodomain- and PHD finger-containing protein 1 (BRPF1 is a multidomain histone binder and a master activator of three lysine acetyltransferases, MOZ, MORF and HBO1, which are also known as KAT6A, KAT6B and KAT7, respectively. While the MOZ and MORF genes are rearranged in leukemia, the MORF gene is also mutated in prostate and other cancers and in four genetic disorders with intellectual disability. Here we show that forebrain-specific inactivation of the mouse Brpf1 gene causes hypoplasia in the dentate gyrus, including underdevelopment of the suprapyramidal blade and complete loss of the infrapyramidal blade. We trace the developmental origin to compromised Sox2+ neural stem cells and Tbr2+ intermediate neuronal progenitors. We further demonstrate that Brpf1 loss deregulates neuronal migration, cell cycle progression and transcriptional control, thereby causing abnormal morphogenesis of the hippocampus. These results link histone binding and acetylation control to hippocampus development and identify an important epigenetic regulator for patterning the dentate gyrus, a brain structure critical for learning, memory and adult neurogenesis.

  5. A protocol for isolation and enriched monolayer cultivation of neural precursor cells from mouse dentate gyrus

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    Harish eBabu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In vitro assays are valuable tools to study the characteristics of adult neural precursor cells under controlled conditions with a defined set of parameters. We here present a detailed protocol based on our previous original publication (Babu et al., Enriched monolayer precursor cell cultures from micro-dissected adult mouse dentate gyrus yield functional granule cell-like neurons, PLoS One 2007, 2:e388 to isolate neural precursor cells from the hippocampus of adult mice and maintain and propagate them as adherent monolayer cultures. The strategy is based on the use of Percoll density gradient centrifugation to enrich precursor cells from the micro-dissected dentate gyrus. Based on the expression of Nestin and Sox2, a culture-purity of more than 98% can be achieved. The cultures are expanded under serum-free conditions in Neurobasal A medium with addition of the mitogens EGF and FGF2 as well as the supplements Glutamax-1 and B27. Under differentiation conditions, the precursor cells reliably generate approximately 30% neurons with appropriate morphological, molecular and electrophysiological characteristics that might reflect granule cell properties as their in vivo counterpart. We also highlight potential modifications to the protocol.

  6. BACE1 Deficiency Causes Abnormal Neuronal Clustering in the Dentate Gyrus

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    Hailong Hou

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACE1 is validated as Alzheimer's β-secretase and a therapeutic target for Alzheimer's disease. In examining BACE1-null mice, we discovered that BACE1 deficiency develops abnormal clusters of immature neurons, forming doublecortin-positive neuroblasts, in the developing dentate gyrus, mainly in the subpial zone (SPZ. Such clusters were rarely observed in wild-type SPZ and not reported in other mouse models. To understand their origins and fates, we examined how neuroblasts in BACE1-null SPZ mature and migrate during early postnatal development. We show that such neuroblasts are destined to form Prox1-positive granule cells in the dentate granule cell layer, and mainly mature to form excitatory neurons, but not inhibitory neurons. Mechanistically, higher levels of reelin potentially contribute to abnormal neurogenesis and timely migration in BACE1-null SPZ. Altogether, we demonstrate that BACE1 is a critical regulator in forming the dentate granule cell layer through timely maturation and migration of SPZ neuroblasts.

  7. Chronic pregabalin treatment decreases excitability of dentate gyrus and accelerates maturation of adult-born granule cells.

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    Lempel, Augusto Abel; Coll, Lucia; Schinder, Alejandro F; Uchitel, Osvaldo Daniel; Piriz, Joaquin

    2017-01-01

    Pregabalin (PGB) is extensively prescribed to treat neurological and neuropsychiatrical conditions such as neuropathic pain, anxiety disorders, and epilepsy. Although PGB is known to bind selectively to the α2δ subunit of voltage-gated calcium channels, there is little understanding about how it exerts its therapeutic effects. In this article, we analyzed the effects of an in vivo chronic treatment with PGB over the physiology of dentate gyrus granule cells (DGGCs) using ex vivo electrophysiological and morphological analysis in adult mice. We found that PGB decreases neuronal excitability of DGGCs. In addition, PGB accelerates maturation of adult-born DGGCs, an effect that would modify dentate gyrus plasticity. Together, these findings suggest that PGB reduces activity in the dentate gyrus and modulates overall network plasticity, which might contribute to its therapeutic effects. Cover Image for this issue: doi: 10.1111/jnc.13783. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  8. Age-related changes in dentate gyrus cell numbers, neurogenesis, and associations with cognitive impairments in the rhesus monkey

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    Laura Benjamin Ngwenya

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The generation of new neurons in the adult mammalian brain is well established for the hippocampal dentate gyrus. However, the role of neurogenesis in hippocampal function and cognition, how it changes in aging, and the mechanisms underlying this are yet to be elucidated in the monkey brain. To address this, we investigated adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of 42 rhesus monkeys (39 cognitively tested ranging in age from young adult to the elderly. We report here that there is an age-related decline in proliferation and a delayed development of adult neuronal phenotype. Additionally, we show that many of the new neurons survive throughout the lifetime of the animal and may contribute to a modest increase in total neuron number in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus over the adult life span. Lastly, we find that measures of decreased adult neurogenesis are only modestly predictive of age-related cognitive impairment.

  9. SUBFIELD AND LAYER-SPECIFIC DEPLETION IN CALBINDIN-D28K, CALRETININ AND PARVALBUMIN IMMUNOREACTIVITY IN THE DENTATE GYRUS OF APP/PS1 TRANSGENIC MICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovi, Miroljub; Caballero-Bleda, María; Kadish, Inga; van Groen, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The depletion of neuronal calcium binding proteins deprives neurons of the capacity to buffer high levels of intracellular Ca2+ and this leaves them vulnerable to pathological processes, such as those present in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression of the calcium binding proteins, calbindin-D28K, calretinin and parvalbumin in the dentate gyrus (DG) of APP/PS1 transgenic mice and their non-Tg littermates, as well as the relation with the deposition of human Aβ. We measured the expression of these three proteins at seven different rostro-caudal levels, and in the molecular, granular and polymorphic layers of the DG. We found that, except in the most caudal part of the DG, there is a substantial loss of calbindin-D28K immunoreactivity in all three layers of the DG in APP/PS1 mice compared to the non-Tg mice. Significant loss of calretinin immunoreactivity is present in most of the polymorphic layer of the DG of APP/PS1 mice compared to the non-Tg mice, as well as in the rostral and intermediate part of the inner molecular layer. Compared to the non-Tg mice parvalbumin immunoreactivity is significantly reduced throughout the whole polymorphic layer as well as in the rostral and intermediate part of the granular layer of DG in APP/PS1 mice. The relatively preservation of calbindin immunoreactivity in the caudal part of molecular and granular layers as well as calretinin immunoreactivity in the caudal part of polymorphic layer of the DG is likely related to the lower Aβ expression in those parts of DG. The present data suggest an involvement of calcium-dependent pathways in the pathogenesis of AD and indicate that there exists a subfield and layer-specific decrease in immunoreactivity which is related to the type of calcium-binding protein in APP/PS1 mice. Moreover, it seems that APP expression affects more the calbindin expression then parvalbumin and calretinin expression in the DG of APP/PS1 transgenic mice. PMID

  10. Long-term observation of neuronal degeneration and microgliosis in the gerbil dentate gyrus after transient cerebral ischemia.

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    Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Shin, Bich Na; Park, Joon Ha; Kim, In Hye; Cho, Jeong Hwi; Chen, BaiHui; Lee, Tae-Kyeong; Tae, Hyun-Jin; Lee, Jae-Chul; Cho, Jun Hwi; Kang, Il Jun; Kim, Young-Myeong; Lee, Yun Lyul; Won, Moo-Ho; Seo, Jeong Yeol

    2016-04-15

    Ischemic insults in the central nervous system evoke activation of microglia. In this study, we investigated long-term changes of neuronal damage and microglial activation in the gerbil dentate gyrus for 60 days after transient cerebral ischemia using immunohistochemistry and western blot. Neuronal damage or death was hardly found in the dentate gyrus after transient ischemia using cresyl violet staining and NeuN immunohistochemistry; however, neuronal degeneration was detected in the polymorphic layer of the dentate gyrus using Fluoro-Jade (F-J) B staining. F-J B-positive cells were significantly increased after ischemia-reperfusion (I-R) and peaked at 3 days post-ischemia, thereafter, F-J B-positive cells were decreased in a time-dependent manner and shown until 30 days post-ischemia; no F-J B-positive cells were observed 60 days after I-R. On the other hand, Iba-1-immunoreactive microglia were hypertrophied after I-R, and numbers of Iba-1-immunoreactive microglia were significantly increased along with the neuronal degeneration and highest 7 days after I-R, thereafter, numbers of Iba-1-immunoreactive microglia were decreased with time, although microglia activation lasted up to 60 days after I-R. In addition, Iba-1 protein level in the dentate gyrus after I-R was changed like immunohistochemical change. Our results, in brief, indicate that transient ischemia-induced neuronal degeneration in the dentate gyrus is maintained for about 30 days after I-R and that microglial activation lasts up to, at least, 60 days after I-R in the gerbil dentate gyrus after transient cerebral ischemia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. MDMA Increases Excitability in the Dentate Gyrus: Role of 5HT2A Receptor Induced PGE2 Signaling

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    Collins, Stuart A.; Huff, Courtney; Chiaia, Nicolas; Gudelsky, Gary A.; Yamamoto, Bryan K.

    2015-01-01

    MDMA is a widely abused psychostimulant which causes release of serotonin in various forebrain regions. Recently, we reported that MDMA increases extracellular glutamate concentrations in the dentate gyrus, via activation of 5HT2A receptors. We examined the role of prostaglandin signaling in mediating the effects of 5HT2A receptor activation on the increases in extracellular glutamate and the subsequent long-term loss of parvalbumin interneurons in the dentate gyrus caused by MDMA. Administration of MDMA into the dentate gyrus of rats increased PGE2 concentrations which was prevented by coadministration of MDL100907, a 5HT2A receptor antagonist. MDMA-induced increases in extracellular glutamate were inhibited by local administration of SC-51089, an inhibitor of the EP1 prostaglandin receptor. Systemic administration of SC-51089 during injections of MDMA prevented the decreases in parvalbumin interneurons observed 10 days later. The loss of parvalbumin immunoreactivity after MDMA exposure coincided with a decrease in paired-pulse inhibition and afterdischarge threshold in the dentate gyrus. These changes were prevented by inhibition of EP1 and 5HT2A receptors during MDMA. Additional experiments revealed an increased susceptibility to kainic acid-induced seizures in MDMA treated rats which could be prevented with SC51089 treatments during MDMA exposure. Overall, these findings suggest that 5HT2A receptors mediate MDMA-induced PGE2 signaling and subsequent increases in glutamate. This signaling mediates parvalbumin cell losses as well as physiologic changes in the dentate gyrus, suggesting that the lack of the inhibition provided by these neurons increases the excitability within the dentate gyrus of MDMA treated rats. PMID:26670377

  12. Repetitive noxious neonatal stimuli increases dentate gyrus cell proliferation and hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malheiros, J M; Lima, M; Avanzi, R D T; Gomes da Silva, S; Suchecki, D; Guinsburg, R; Covolan, L

    2014-04-01

    Neonatal noxious stimulation has been proposed to model pain triggered by diagnostic/therapeutic invasive procedures in premature infants. Previous studies have shown that hippocampal neurogenesis rate and the behavioral repertoire of adult rats may be altered by neonatal noxious stimuli. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether noxious stimulation during neonatal period alters the nociceptive response and dentate gyrus neurogenesis when compared to rats subjected to a single noxious stimulus in late infancy. Plasma corticosterone and hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels were measured. Neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus was evaluated in adolescent rats (postnatal day 40; P40) exposed twice to intra-plantar injections of Complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) on P1 and P21 (group P1P21) or P8 and P21 (P8P21) or exposed once on P21 (pubertal). On P21, one subset of animals received 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and was euthanized on P40 for identification of proliferating cells in the dentate gyrus. Another subset was sampled for thermal response or plasma corticosterone measurement and hippocampal BDNF levels. Proliferative cell rate in dentate gyrus was the highest in all re-exposed groups (P dentate granule cells in the hippocampus may have a role in the long-term behavioral responses to neonatal nociceptive stimulation. Noxious stimulation in the neonatal period results in sex-dependent neurogenic response. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Beta/gamma oscillatory activity in the CA3 hippocampal area is depressed by aberrant GABAergic transmission from the dentate gyrus after seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treviño, Mario; Vivar, Carmen; Gutiérrez, Rafael

    2007-01-03

    Oscillatory activity in the CA3 region is thought to be involved in the encoding and retrieval of information. These oscillations originate from the recurrent excitation between pyramidal cells that are entrained by the synchronous rhythmic inhibition of local interneurons. We show here that, after seizures, the dentate gyrus (DG) tonically inhibits beta/gamma (20-24 Hz) field oscillations in the CA3 area through GABA-mediated signaling. These oscillations originate in the interneuron network because they are maintained in the presence of ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists, and they can be blocked by GABA(A) receptor antagonists or by perfusion of a calcium-free extracellular medium. Inhibition of this oscillatory activity requires intact DG-to-CA3 connections, and it is suppressed by the activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR). The influence of mGluR activation was reflected in the spontaneous subthreshold membrane oscillations of CA3 interneurons after one seizure but could also be observed in pyramidal cells after several seizures. Coincident stimulation of the DG at and beta/gamma frequencies produced a frequency-dependent excitation of interneurons and the inhibition of pyramidal cells. Indeed, these effects were maximal at the frequency that matched the mGluR-sensitive spontaneous field oscillations, suggesting a resonance phenomenon. Our results shed light on the mechanisms that may underlie the deficits in memory and cognition observed after epileptic seizures.

  14. Differential effects of strain, circadian cycle, and stimulation pattern on LTP and concurrent LTD in the dentate gyrus of freely moving rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, Jared B; Abraham, Wickliffe C; Harris, Kristen M

    2012-06-01

    Because long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) are thought to be involved in learning and memory, it is important to delineate factors that modulate their induction and persistence, especially as studied in freely moving animals. Here, we investigated the effects of rat strain, circadian cycle, and high-frequency stimulation (HFS) pattern on LTP and concurrently induced LTD in the dentate gyrus (DG). Comparison of two commonly used rat strains revealed that medial perforant path field EPSP-population spike (E-S) coupling and LTP were greater in Long-Evans than Sprague-Dawley rats. Circadian cycle experiments conducted in Long-Evans rats revealed greater E-S coupling and enhanced LTP during the dark phase. Interestingly, concurrent LTD in the lateral perforant path did not significantly differ across strains or circadian cycle. Testing HFS protocols during the dark phase revealed that theta burst stimulation (100 Hz bursts at 5 Hz intervals) was ineffective in eliciting either LTP or concurrent LTD in DG, whereas 400 Hz bursts delivered at theta (5 Hz) or delta (1 Hz) frequencies produced substantial LTP and concurrent LTD. Thus, these natural and experimental factors regulate granule cell excitability, and differentially affect LTP and concurrent LTD in the DG of freely moving rats. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The parvalbumin-positive interneurons in the mouse dentate gyrus express GABAA receptor subunits α1, β2, and δ along their extrasynaptic cell membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milenkovic, I; Vasiljevic, M; Maurer, D; Höger, H; Klausberger, T; Sieghart, W

    2013-12-19

    Neuronal circuitries in the hippocampus are involved in navigation and memory and are controlled by major networks of GABAergic interneurons. Parvalbumin (PV)-expressing interneurons in the dentate gyrus (DG) are identified as fast-spiking cells, playing a crucial role in network oscillation and synchrony. The inhibitory modulation of these interneurons is thought to be mediated mainly through GABAA receptors, the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the brain. Here we show that all PV-positive interneurons in the granular/subgranular layer (GL/SGL) of the mouse DG express high levels of the GABAA receptor δ subunit. PV-containing interneurons in the hilus and the molecular layer, however, express the δ subunit to a lower extent. Only 8% of the somatostatin-containing interneurons express the δ subunit, whereas calbindin- or calretinin-containing interneurons in the DG seem not to express the GABAA receptor δ subunit at all. Hence, these cells receive a GABAergic control different from that of PV-containing interneurons in the GL/SGL. Experiments investigating a possible co-expression of GABAA receptor α1, α2, α3, α4, α5, β1, β2, β3, or γ2 subunits with PV and δ subunits indicated that α1 and β2 subunits are co-expressed with δ subunits along the extrasynaptic membranes of PV-interneurons. These results suggest a robust tonic GABAergic control of PV-containing interneurons in the GL/SGL of the DG via δ subunit-containing receptors. Our data are important for better understanding of the neuronal circuitries in the DG and the role of specific cell types under pathological conditions.

  16. Functional properties of granule cells with hilar basal dendrites in the epileptic dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Tony; Beck, Heinz

    2017-01-01

    The maturation of adult-born granule cells and their functional integration into the network is thought to play a key role in the proper functioning of the dentate gyrus. In temporal lobe epilepsy, adult-born granule cells in the dentate gyrus develop abnormally and possess a hilar basal dendrite (HBD). Although morphological studies have shown that these HBDs have synapses, little is known about the functional properties of these HBDs or the intrinsic and network properties of the granule cells that possess these aberrant dendrites. We performed patch-clamp recordings of granule cells within the granule cell layer "normotopic" from sham-control and status epilepticus (SE) animals. Normotopic granule cells from SE animals possessed an HBD (SE(+) HBD(+) cells) or not (SE(+) HBD(-) cells). Apical and basal dendrites were stimulated using multiphoton uncaging of glutamate. Two-photon Ca(2+) imaging was used to measure Ca(2+) transients associated with back-propagating action potentials (bAPs). Near-synchronous synaptic input integrated linearly in apical dendrites from sham-control animals and was not significantly different in apical dendrites of SE(+) HBD(-) cells. The majority of HBDs integrated input linearly, similar to apical dendrites. However, 2 of 11 HBDs were capable of supralinear integration mediated by a dendritic spike. Furthermore, the bAP-evoked Ca(2+) transients were relatively well maintained along HBDs, compared with apical dendrites. This further suggests an enhanced electrogenesis in HBDs. In addition, the output of granule cells from epileptic tissue was enhanced, with both SE(+) HBD(-) and SE(+) HBD(+) cells displaying increased high-frequency (>100 Hz) burst-firing. Finally, both SE(+) HBD(-) and SE(+) HBD(+) cells received recurrent excitatory input that was capable of generating APs, especially in the absence of feedback inhibition. Taken together, these data suggest that the enhanced excitability of HBDs combined with the altered intrinsic

  17. In vivo electrophysiological investigations into the role of histamine in the dentate gyrus of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manahan-Vaughan, D; Reymann, K G; Brown, R E

    1998-06-01

    Drugs acting at the three known classes of histamine receptors were injected intracerebroventricularly into the rat. The effects of these drugs upon synaptic potentials recorded from the dentate gyrus of the freely-moving rat were determined. Population spikes and field excitatory postsynaptic potentials were recorded from the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus following stimulation of the perforant path. Drugs, dissolved in 0.9% NaCl were applied into the lateral cerebral ventricle in a volume of 5 microl over a period of 6 min. The histamine H1 receptor antagonist mepyramine (0.4 or 0.8 microg) had no significant effect on population spikes or field excitatory postsynaptic potentials. In contrast the H2 receptor antagonist cimetidine (3.25, 6.5 or 13 microg) showed a biphasic effect. At the lower doses (3.25 or 6.5 microg) a small (15%) depression of the field excitatory postsynaptic potentials and population spikes was observed beginning about 1 h following the infusion. At the highest dose tested (13 microg) a marked increase of the population spike was observed beginning immediately following the infusion and lasting for 90 min. Application of the H3 receptor agonist R-alpha-methylhistamine (0.2 microg) depressed the field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (15% at 4 h post-injection) and even more strongly the population spike (50%). Surprisingly, at higher doses (0.4 and 0.8 microg) no effect was seen. The H3 receptor antagonist thioperamide (0.41 and 0.82 microg) did not cause an increase in synaptic potentials but rather at the highest dose a small depression occurred at later time points (2-4 h following the infusion). At the lower dose (0.41 microg) thioperamide blocked the effect of R-alpha-methylhistamine (0.2 microg). These results show that the histaminergic system modulates information flow through the dentate gyrus in a complex manner involving both histamine H2 and H1 receptors.

  18. Maternal forced swimming reduces cell proliferation in the postnatal dentate gyrus of mouse offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick Wasinski

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Physical exercise positively affects the metabolism and induces proliferation of precursor cells in the adult brain. Maternal exercise likewise provokes adaptations early in the offspring. Using a high-intensity swimming protocol that comprises forced swim training before and during pregnancy, we determined the effect of maternal swimming on the mouse offspring’s neurogenesis. Our data demonstrate decreased proliferation in sublayers of the postnatal dentate gyrus in offspring of swimming mother at postnatal day (P8 accompanied with decreased survival of newly generated cells 4 weeks later. The reduction in cell numbers was predominantly seen in the hilus and molecular layer. At P35, the reduced amount of cells was also reflected by a decrease in the population of newly generated immature and mature neurons of the granule cell layer. Our data suggest that forced maternal swimming at high-intensity has a negative effect on the neurogenic niche development in postnatal offspring.

  19. Maternal Forced Swimming Reduces Cell Proliferation in the Postnatal Dentate Gyrus of Mouse Offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasinski, Frederick; Estrela, Gabriel R; Arakaki, Aline M; Bader, Michael; Alenina, Natalia; Klempin, Friederike; Araújo, Ronaldo C

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise positively affects the metabolism and induces proliferation of precursor cells in the adult brain. Maternal exercise likewise provokes adaptations early in the offspring. Using a high-intensity swimming protocol that comprises forced swim training before and during pregnancy, we determined the effect of maternal swimming on the mouse offspring's neurogenesis. Our data demonstrate decreased proliferation in sublayers of the postnatal dentate gyrus in offspring of swimming mother at postnatal day (P) 8 accompanied with decreased survival of newly generated cells 4 weeks later. The reduction in cell numbers was predominantly seen in the hilus and molecular layer. At P35, the reduced amount of cells was also reflected by a decrease in the population of newly generated immature and mature neurons of the granule cell layer. Our data suggest that forced maternal swimming at high-intensity has a negative effect on the neurogenic niche development in postnatal offspring.

  20. Neural injury alters proliferation and integration of adult-generated neurons in the dentate gyrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perederiy, Julia V.; Luikart, Bryan W.; Washburn, Eric K.; Schnell, Eric; Westbrook, Gary L.

    2013-01-01

    Neural plasticity following brain injury illustrates the potential for regeneration in the central nervous system. Lesioning of the perforant path, which innervates the outer 2/3rds of the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus, was one of the first models to demonstrate structural plasticity of mature granule cells (Parnavelas, 1974; Caceres and Steward, 1983; Diekmann et al., 1996). The dentate gyrus also harbors a continuously proliferating population of neuronal precursors that can integrate into functional circuits and show enhanced short-term plasticity (Schmidt-Hieber et al., 2004; Abrous et al., 2005). To examine the response of adult-generated granule cells to unilateral complete transection of the perforant path in vivo, we tracked these cells using transgenic POMC-EGFP mice or by retroviral expression of GFP. Lesioning triggered a marked proliferation of newborn neurons. Subsequently, the dendrites of newborn neurons showed reduced complexity within the denervated zone, but dendritic spines still formed in the absence of glutamatergic nerve terminals. Electron micrographs confirmed the lack of intact presynaptic terminals apposing spines on mature cells and on newborn neurons. Newborn neurons, but not mature granule cells, had a higher density of dendritic spines in the inner molecular layer post-lesion, accompanied by an increase in miniature EPSC amplitudes and rise times. Our results indicate that injury causes an increase in newborn neurons and lamina-specific synaptic reorganization, indicative of enhanced plasticity. The presence of de novo dendritic spines in the denervated zone suggests that the post-lesion environment provides the necessary signals for spine formation. PMID:23486947

  1. Dentate Gyrus-Specific Knockdown of Adult Neurogenesis Impairs Spatial and Object Recognition Memory in Adult Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessberger, Sebastian; Clark, Robert E.; Broadbent, Nicola J.; Clemenson, Gregory D., Jr.; Consiglio, Antonella; Lie, D. Chichung; Squire, Larry R.; Gage, Fred H.

    2009-01-01

    New granule cells are born throughout life in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation. Given the fundamental role of the hippocampus in processes underlying certain forms of learning and memory, it has been speculated that newborn granule cells contribute to cognition. However, previous strategies aiming to causally link newborn neurons…

  2. Regrowing the Adult Brain: NF-κB Controls Functional Circuit Formation and Tissue Homeostasis in the Dentate Gyrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imielski, Yvonne; Schwamborn, Jens C.; Lüningschrör, Patrick; Heimann, Peter; Holzberg, Magdalena; Werner, Hendrikje; Leske, Oliver; Püschel, Andreas W.; Memet, Sylvie; Heumann, Rolf; Israel, Alain; Kaltschmidt, Christian; Kaltschmidt, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive decline during aging is correlated with a continuous loss of cells within the brain and especially within the hippocampus, which could be regenerated by adult neurogenesis. Here we show that genetic ablation of NF-κB resulted in severe defects in the neurogenic region (dentate gyrus) of the hippocampus. Despite increased stem cell proliferation, axogenesis, synaptogenesis and neuroprotection were hampered, leading to disruption of the mossy fiber pathway and to atrophy of the dentate gyrus during aging. Here, NF-κB controls the transcription of FOXO1 and PKA, regulating axogenesis. Structural defects culminated in behavioral impairments in pattern separation. Re-activation of NF-κB resulted in integration of newborn neurons, finally to regeneration of the dentate gyrus, accompanied by a complete recovery of structural and behavioral defects. These data identify NF-κB as a crucial regulator of dentate gyrus tissue homeostasis suggesting NF-κB to be a therapeutic target for treating cognitive and mood disorders. PMID:22312433

  3. The GABAA Antagonist DPP-4-PIOL Selectively Antagonises Tonic over Phasic GABAergic Currents in Dentate Gyrus Granule Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boddum, Kim; Frølund, Bente; Kristiansen, Uffe

    2014-01-01

    that phasic and tonic GABAA receptor currents can be selectively inhibited by the antagonists SR 95531 and the 4-PIOL derivative, 4-(3,3-diphenylpropyl)-5-(4-piperidyl)-3-isoxazolol hydrobromide (DPP-4-PIOL), respectively. In dentate gyrus granule cells, SR 95531 was found approximately 4 times as potent...

  4. Roles of afadin in the formation of the cellular architecture of the mouse hippocampus and dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Muneaki; Maruo, Tomohiko; Kaito, Aika; Wang, Shujie; Yamamoto, Hideaki; Fujiwara, Takeshi; Mizoguchi, Akira; Mandai, Kenji; Takai, Yoshimi

    2017-03-01

    The hippocampal formation with tightly packed neurons, mainly at the dentate gyrus, CA3, CA2, and CA1 regions, constitutes a one-way neural circuit, which is associated with learning and memory. We previously showed that the cell adhesion molecules nectins and its binding protein afadin play roles in the formation of the mossy fiber synapses which are formed between the mossy fibers of the dentate gyrus granule cells and the dendrites of the CA3 pyramidal cells. We showed here that in the afadin-deficient hippocampal formation, the dentate gyrus granules cells and the CA3, CA2, and CA1 pyramidal cells were abnormally located; the mossy fiber trajectory was abnormally elongated; the CA3 pyramidal cells were abnormally differentiated; and the densities of the presynaptic boutons on the mossy fibers and the apical dendrites of the CA3 pyramidal cells were decreased. These results indicate that afadin plays roles not only in the formation of the mossy fiber synapses but also in the formation of the cellular architecture of the hippocampus and the dentate gyrus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Ethanol extract ofOenanthe javanica increases cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the adolescent rat dentate gyrus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bai Hui Chen; Jae Chul Lee; Eun Joo Bae; Yun Lyul Lee; Jong Dai Kim; Moo-Ho Won; Il Jun Kang; Joon Ha Park; Jeong Hwi Cho; In Hye Kim; Bich Na Shin; Ji Hyeon Ahn; Seok Joon Hwang; Bing Chun Yan; Hyun Jin Tae

    2015-01-01

    Oenanthe javanica is an aquatic perennial herb that belongs to theOenanthe genus in Apiaceae family, and it displays well-known medicinal properties such as protective effects against glu-tamate-induced neurotoxicity. However, few studies regarding effects ofOenanthe javanica on neurogenesis in the brain have been reported. In this study, we examined the effects of a normal diet and a diet containing ethanol extract ofOenanthe javanica on cell proliferation and neu-roblast differentiation in the subgranular zone of the hippocampal dentate gyrus of adolescent rats using Ki-67 (an endogenous marker for cell proliferation) and doublecortin (a marker for neuroblast). Our results showed thatOenanthe javanica extract signiifcantly increased the number of Ki-67-immunoreactive cells and doublecortin-immunoreactive neuroblasts in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in the adolescent rats. In addition, the immunoreactivity of brain-derived neurotrophic factor was signiifcantly increased in the dentate gyrus of theOe-nanthe javanica extract-treated group compared with the control group. However, we did not ifnd that vascular endothelial growth factor expression was increased in theOenanthe javanica extract-treated group compared with the control group. These results indicate thatOenanthe javanica extract improves cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation by increasing brain-de-rived neurotrophic factor immunoreactivity in the rat dentate gyrus.

  6. Dentate Gyrus-Specific Knockdown of Adult Neurogenesis Impairs Spatial and Object Recognition Memory in Adult Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessberger, Sebastian; Clark, Robert E.; Broadbent, Nicola J.; Clemenson, Gregory D., Jr.; Consiglio, Antonella; Lie, D. Chichung; Squire, Larry R.; Gage, Fred H.

    2009-01-01

    New granule cells are born throughout life in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation. Given the fundamental role of the hippocampus in processes underlying certain forms of learning and memory, it has been speculated that newborn granule cells contribute to cognition. However, previous strategies aiming to causally link newborn neurons…

  7. Ethanol extract of Oenanthe javanica increases cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the adolescent rat dentate gyrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai Hui Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oenanthe javanica is an aquatic perennial herb that belongs to the Oenanthe genus in Apiaceae family, and it displays well-known medicinal properties such as protective effects against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity. However, few studies regarding effects of Oenanthe javanica on neurogenesis in the brain have been reported. In this study, we examined the effects of a normal diet and a diet containing ethanol extract of Oenanthe javanica on cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the subgranular zone of the hippocampal dentate gyrus of adolescent rats using Ki-67 (an endogenous marker for cell proliferation and doublecortin (a marker for neuroblast. Our results showed that Oenanthe javanica extract significantly increased the number of Ki-67-immunoreactive cells and doublecortin-immunoreactive neuroblasts in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in the adolescent rats. In addition, the immunoreactivity of brain-derived neurotrophic factor was significantly increased in the dentate gyrus of the Oenanthe javanica extract-treated group compared with the control group. However, we did not find that vascular endothelial growth factor expression was increased in the Oenanthe javanica extract-treated group compared with the control group. These results indicate that Oenanthe javanica extract improves cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation by increasing brain-derived neurotrophic factor immunoreactivity in the rat dentate gyrus.

  8. Expression of tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase in mature granule cells of the adult mouse dentate gyrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohira, Koji

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract New granule cells are continuously generated in the dentate gyrus of the adult hippocampus. During granule cell maturation, the mechanisms that differentiate new cells not only describe the degree of cell differentiation, but also crucially regulate the progression of cell differentiation. Here, we describe a gene, tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO, whose expression distinguishes stem cells from more differentiated cells among the granule cells of the adult mouse dentate gyrus. The use of markers for proliferation, neural progenitors, and immature and mature granule cells indicated that TDO was expressed in mature cells and in some immature cells. In mice heterozygous for the alpha-isoform of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, in which dentate gyrus granule cells fail to mature normally, TDO immunoreactivity was substantially downregulated in the dentate gyrus granule cells. Moreover, a 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine labeling experiment revealed that new neurons began to express TDO between 2 and 4 wk after the neurons were generated, when the axons and dendrites of the granule cells developed and synaptogenesis occurred. These findings indicate that TDO might be required at a late-stage of granule cell development, such as during axonal and dendritic growth, synaptogenesis and its maturation.

  9. Regrowing the adult brain: NF-κB controls functional circuit formation and tissue homeostasis in the dentate gyrus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Imielski

    Full Text Available Cognitive decline during aging is correlated with a continuous loss of cells within the brain and especially within the hippocampus, which could be regenerated by adult neurogenesis. Here we show that genetic ablation of NF-κB resulted in severe defects in the neurogenic region (dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. Despite increased stem cell proliferation, axogenesis, synaptogenesis and neuroprotection were hampered, leading to disruption of the mossy fiber pathway and to atrophy of the dentate gyrus during aging. Here, NF-κB controls the transcription of FOXO1 and PKA, regulating axogenesis. Structural defects culminated in behavioral impairments in pattern separation. Re-activation of NF-κB resulted in integration of newborn neurons, finally to regeneration of the dentate gyrus, accompanied by a complete recovery of structural and behavioral defects. These data identify NF-κB as a crucial regulator of dentate gyrus tissue homeostasis suggesting NF-κB to be a therapeutic target for treating cognitive and mood disorders.

  10. Morphological alterations in newly born dentate gyrus granule cells that emerge after status epilepticus contribute to make them less excitable.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián Tejada

    Full Text Available Computer simulations of external current stimulations of dentate gyrus granule cells of rats with Status Epilepticus induced by pilocarpine and control rats were used to evaluate whether morphological differences alone between these cells have an impact on their electrophysiological behavior. The cell models were constructed using morphological information from tridimensional reconstructions with Neurolucida software. To evaluate the effect of morphology differences alone, ion channel conductances, densities and distributions over the dendritic trees of dentate gyrus granule cells were the same for all models. External simulated currents were injected in randomly chosen dendrites belonging to one of three different areas of dentate gyrus granule cell molecular layer: inner molecular layer, medial molecular layer and outer molecular layer. Somatic membrane potentials were recorded to determine firing frequencies and inter-spike intervals. The results show that morphologically altered granule cells from pilocarpine-induced epileptic rats are less excitable than control cells, especially when they are stimulated in the inner molecular layer, which is the target area for mossy fibers that sprout after pilocarpine-induced cell degeneration. This suggests that morphological alterations may act as a protective mechanism to allow dentate gyrus granule cells to cope with the increase of stimulation caused by mossy fiber sprouting.

  11. Effect of chronic stress and mifepristone treatment on voltage-dependent Ca2+ currents in rat hippocampal dentate gyrus.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gemert, N.G.; Joëls, M.

    2006-01-01

    Chronic unpredictable stress affects many properties in rat brain. In the dentate gyrus, among other things, increased mRNA expression of the Ca2+ channel alpha1C subunit has been found after 21 days of unpredictable stress in combination with acute corticosterone application (100 nM). In the presen

  12. Status epilepticus increases mature granule cells in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhaoliang Liang; Fei Gao; Fajun Wang; Xiaochen Wang; Xinyu Song; Kejing Liu; Ren-Zhi Zhan

    2013-01-01

    Enhanced neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus following seizure activity, especially status epilepticus, is associated with ectopic residence and aberrant integration of newborn granule cells. Hilar ectopic granule cells may be detrimental to the stability of dentate circuitry by means of their electrophysiological properties and synaptic connectivity. We hypothesized that status epilepticus also increases ectopic granule cells in the molecular layer. Status epilepticus was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by intraperitoneal injection of pilocarpine. Immunostaining showed that many doublecortin-positive cells were present in the molecular layer and the hilus 7 days after the induction of status epilepticus. At least 10 weeks after status epilepticus, the estimated number of cells positive for both prospero homeobox protein 1 and neuron-specific nuclear protein in the hilus was significantly increased. A similar trend was also found in the molecular layer. These findings indicate that status epilepticus can increase the numbers of mature and ectopic newborn granule cells in the molecular layer.

  13. Kindling-associated SV2A expression in hilar GABAergic interneurons of the mouse dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Yukihiro; Okumura, Takahiro; Terada, Ryo; Ishihara, Shizuka; Serikawa, Tadao; Sasa, Masashi

    2012-02-29

    Immunohistochemical studies were performed to analyze the expressional changes in hippocampal synaptic vesicle protein 2A (SV2A) following pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) kindling. Repeated treatments of mice with sub-convulsive PTZ (40 mg/kg, i.p.) for 15 days progressively enhanced seizure susceptibility and induced clonic convulsions in most animals examined. Topographical analysis of hippocampal SV2A-immunoreactivity revealed that SV2A was densely expressed in the hilar region of the dentate gyrus, stratum lucidum of the CA3 field and around the periphery of CA3 pyramidal neurons. PTZ kindling region-specifically increased SV2A expression in the dentate hilus without affecting that in the stratum lucidum or the pyramidal cell layer of the CA3 field. Confocal laser microscopic analysis using PTZ-kindled mice illustrated that most SV2A was co-expressed with glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 in the cell bodies and dendrites of hilar interneurons. However, SV2A-immunoreactivity was negligibly observed in the hilar glutamatergic nerve terminals (mossy fibers) probed with the anti-vesicular glutamate transporter 1 antibody. The present study suggests that SV2A specifically regulates hilar GABAergic neurotransmission in the kindled hippocampus probably as a compensatory or prophylactic mechanism against kindling epileptogenesis.

  14. Reduced tonic inhibition in the dentate gyrus contributes to chronic stress-induced impairments in learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Vallent; MacKenzie, Georgina; Hooper, Andrew; Maguire, Jamie

    2016-10-01

    It is well established that stress impacts the underlying processes of learning and memory. The effects of stress on memory are thought to involve, at least in part, effects on the hippocampus, which is particularly vulnerable to stress. Chronic stress induces hippocampal alterations, including but not limited to dendritic atrophy and decreased neurogenesis, which are thought to contribute to chronic stress-induced hippocampal dysfunction and deficits in learning and memory. Changes in synaptic transmission, including changes in GABAergic inhibition, have been documented following chronic stress. Recently, our laboratory demonstrated shifts in EGABA in CA1 pyramidal neurons following chronic stress, compromising GABAergic transmission and increasing excitability of these neurons. Interestingly, here we demonstrate that these alterations are unique to CA1 pyramidal neurons, since we do not observe shifts in EGABA following chronic stress in dentate gyrus granule cells. Following chronic stress, there is a decrease in the expression of the GABAA receptor (GABAA R) δ subunit and tonic GABAergic inhibition in dentate gyrus granule cells, whereas there is an increase in the phasic component of GABAergic inhibition, evident by an increase in the peak amplitude of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs). Given the numerous changes observed in the hippocampus following stress, it is difficult to pinpoint the pertinent contributing pathophysiological factors. Here we directly assess the impact of a reduction in tonic GABAergic inhibition of dentate gyrus granule cells on learning and memory using a mouse model with a decrease in GABAA R δ subunit expression specifically in dentate gyrus granule cells (Gabrd/Pomc mice). Reduced GABAA R δ subunit expression and function in dentate gyrus granule cells is sufficient to induce deficits in learning and memory. Collectively, these findings suggest that the reduction in GABAA R δ subunit-mediated tonic inhibition

  15. Notch1 deficiency in postnatal neural progenitor cells in the dentate gyrus leads to emotional and cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shufang; Shi, Tianyao; Qiu, Jiangxia; Yang, Haihong; Wu, Yan; Zhou, Wenxia; Wang, Wei; Wu, Haitao

    2017-10-01

    It is well known that Notch1 signaling plays a crucial role in embryonic neural development and adult neurogenesis. The latest evidence shows that Notch1 also plays a critical role in synaptic plasticity in mature hippocampal neurons. So far, deeper insights into the function of Notch1 signaling during the different steps of adult neurogenesis are still lacking, and the mechanisms by which Notch1 dysfunction is associated with brain disorders are also poorly understood. In the current study, we found that Notch1 was highly expressed in the adult-born immature neurons in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Using a genetic approach to selectively ablate Notch1 signaling in late immature precursors in the postnatal hippocampus by cross-breeding doublecortin (DCX)(+) neuron-specific proopiomelanocortin (POMC)-α Cre mice with floxed Notch1 mice, we demonstrated a previously unreported pivotal role of Notch1 signaling in survival and function of adult newborn neurons in the dentate gyrus. Moreover, behavioral and functional studies demonstrated that POMC-Notch1(-/-) mutant mice showed anxiety and depressive-like behavior with impaired synaptic transmission properties in the dentate gyrus. Finally, our mechanistic study showed significantly compromised phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) in Notch1 mutants, suggesting that the dysfunction of Notch1 mutants is associated with the disrupted pCREB signaling in postnatally generated immature neurons in the dentate gyrus.-Feng, S., Shi, T., Qiu, J., Yang, H., Wu, Y., Zhou, W., Wang, W., Wu, H. Notch1 deficiency in postnatal neural progenitor cells in the dentate gyrus leads to emotional and cognitive impairment. © FASEB.

  16. Effects of Melissa officinalis L. (lemon balm) extract on neurogenesis associated with serum corticosterone and GABA in the mouse dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Dae Young; Choi, Jung Hoon; Kim, Woosuk; Yoo, Ki-Yeon; Lee, Choong Hyun; Yoon, Yeo Sung; Won, Moo-Ho; Hwang, In Koo

    2011-02-01

    Lemon balm, leaves of Melissa officinalis L., has been used for anti-anxiety and spasmolytics. We observed the extract of Melissa officinalis L. (MOE) on cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) of middle-aged mice (12 months of age) using Ki67 and doublecortin (DCX), respectively. We also observed changes in corticosterone, GAD67 and GABA-transaminase (GABA-T) to check their possible mechanisms related to neurogenesis. We administered 50 or 200 mg/kg MOE to the animals once a day for 3 weeks. For labeling of newly generated cells, we also administered 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) twice a day for 3 days from the day of the first MOE treatment. Administration of 50 or 200 mg/kg MOE dose-dependently increased Ki67 positive nuclei to 244.1 and 763.9% of the vehicle-treated group, respectively. In addition, 50 or 200 mg/kg MOE significantly increased DCX positive neuroblasts with well-developed (tertiary) dendrites. Furthermore, MOE administration significantly increased BrdU/calbindin D-28 k double labeled cells (integrated neurons into granule cells in the DG) to 245.2% of the vehicle-treated group. On the other hand, administration of MOE reduced corticosterone levels in serum and decreased GABA-T levels in the DG homogenates. These results suggest that MOE increases cell proliferation, neuroblast differentiation and integration into granule cells by decreasing serum corticosterone levels as well as by increasing GABA levels in the mouse DG.

  17. Prenatal nicotine and maternal deprivation stress de-regulate the development of CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus neurons in hippocampus of infant rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Wang

    Full Text Available Adverse experiences by the developing fetus and in early childhood are associated with profound effects on learning, emotional behavior, and cognition as a whole. In this study we investigated the effects of prenatal nicotine exposure (NIC, postnatal maternal deprivation (MD or the combination of the two (NIC+MD to determine if hippocampal neuron development is modulated by exposure to drugs of abuse and/or stress. Growth of rat offspring exposed to MD alone or NIC+MD was repressed until after weaning. In CA1 but not CA3 of postnatal day 14 (P14 pups, MD increased pyramidal neurons, however, in dentate gyrus (DG, decreased granule neurons. NIC had no effect on neuron number in CA1, CA3 or DG. Unexpectedly, NIC plus MD combined caused a synergistic increase in the number of CA1 or CA3 neurons. Neuron density in CA regions was unaffected by treatment, but in the DG, granule neurons had a looser packing density after NIC, MD or NIC+MD exposure. When septotemporal axes were analyzed, the synergism of stress and drug exposure in CA1 and CA3 was associated with rostral, whereas MD effects were predominantly associated with caudal neurons. TUNEL labeling suggests no active apoptosis at P14, and doublecortin positive neurons and mossy fibers were diminished in NIC+MD relative to controls. The laterality of the effect of nicotine and/or maternal deprivation in right versus left hippocampus was also analyzed and found to be insiginificant. We report for the first time that early life stressors such as postnatal MD and prenatal NIC exposure, when combined, may exhibit synergistic consequences for CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neuron development, and a potential antagonistic influence on developing DG neurons. These results suggest that early stressors may modulate neurogenesis, apoptosis, or maturation of glutamatergic neurons in the hippocampus in a region-specific manner during critical periods of neurodevelopment.

  18. Moderate Treadmill Exercise Protects Synaptic Plasticity of the Dentate Gyrus and Related Signaling Cascade in a Rat Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, An T; Zagaar, Munder A; Alkadhi, Karim A

    2015-12-01

    The dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus is known to be more resistant to the effects of various external factors than other hippocampal areas. This study investigated the neuroprotective effects of moderate treadmill exercise on early-phase long-term potentiation (E-LTP) and its molecular signaling pathways in the DG of amyloid β rat model of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). Animals were preconditioned to run on treadmill for 4 weeks and concurrently received ICV infusion of Aβ₁₋₄₂ peptides (250 pmol/day) during the third and fourth weeks of exercise training. We utilized in vivo electrophysiological recordings to assess the effect of exercise and/or AD pathology on basal synaptic transmission and E-LTP magnitude of the perforant pathway synapses in urethane-anesthetized rats. Immunoblotting analysis was used to quantify changes in the levels of learning and memory-related key signaling molecules. The AD-impaired basal synaptic transmission and suppression of E-LTP in the DG were prevented by prior moderate treadmill exercise. In addition, exercise normalized the basal levels of memory and E-LTP-related signaling molecules including Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), calcineurin (PP2B), and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Exercise also prevented the reduction of phosphorylated CaMKII and aberrant increase of PP2B seen after E-LTP induction in amyloid-infused rats. Our data suggests that by restoring the balance of kinase-phosphatase, 4 weeks of moderate treadmill exercise prevents DG synaptic deficits and deleterious alterations in signaling pathways associated with AD.

  19. Differences in paired-pulse inhibition and facilitation in the dentate gyrus and CA3 field between dorsal and ventral rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pofantis, Hermes; Georgopoulos, Panagiotis; Petrides, Theodoros; Papatheodoropoulos, Costas

    2015-05-22

    We studied the processes of inhibition and facilitation in the dentate gyrus (DG) and the CA3 field by examining the effects of paired-pulse stimulation on the evoked population spike (PS) in dorsal (DH) and ventral (VH) hippocampal slices from the adult rat. The antidromic-orthodromic (A-O) and the orthodromic-orthodromic (O-O) paired-pulse stimulation protocols were used at varying inter-pulse intervals (IPI). In the DG, the A-O stimulation produced an early depression of PS lasting 30-40ms which was significantly stronger in the VH compared with DH. The O-O stimulation produced a biphasic pattern of effects, in both dorsal and ventral DG, consisting of an early depression of PS followed by facilitation at relatively longer intervals. In the DH but not the VH the phase of facilitation was followed by a late depression of PS (>200ms). In the CA3 field both A-O and O-O stimulation had a biphasic effect consisting of an early phase of strong depression of similar strength in DH and VH. The depression was followed by a phase of facilitation which was more pronounced with O-O stimulation. The facilitation observed with the O-O stimulation was much stronger in DH than VH and in DH only it was significantly reduced by the antagonist of GABAB receptors CGP52432. Furthermore, the facilitation was insensitive to changes in [Ca(2+)]o in both hippocampal poles. These findings suggest that the dorsal compared with ventral DG is more amenable to fast-frequency input but filters out slow-frequency inputs more reliably while the gating and amplification of the excitatory input in the CA3 circuitry is more prominent in DH than in VH.

  20. Prolonged protein deprivation differentially affects calretinin- and parvalbumin-containing interneurons in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipólito-Reis, José; Pereira, Pedro Alberto; Andrade, José Paulo; Cardoso, Armando

    2013-10-25

    Protein deprivation is a detrimental nutritional state that induces several deleterious changes in the rat hippocampal formation. In this study, we compared the effects of protein deprivation in the number of parvalbumin (PV)-immunoreactive and calretinin (CR)-immunoreactive interneurons of the dentate gyrus, which are involved in the control of calcium homeostasis and fine tuning of the hippocampal circuits. Two month-old rats were randomly assigned to control and low-protein diet groups. The rats of the latter group were fed with a low-protein diet (8% casein) for 6 months. All animals were perfused at 8 months of age. The number of neurons expressing CR in the molecular layer and in the hilus of dentate gyrus was reduced in protein-deprived rats. Conversely, protein deprivation increased the number of PV-containing interneurons in the dentate granule cell layer and hilus. These results support the view that protein deprivation may disturb calcium homeostasis, leading to neuronal death including GABAergic interneurons expressing CR. In the other hand, the up-regulation of PV cells may reflect a protective mechanism to counteract the calcium overload and protect the remaining neurons of the dentate gyrus.

  1. Global state measures of the dentate gyrus gene expression system predict antidepressant-sensitive behaviors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin A Samuels

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs such as fluoxetine are the most common form of medication treatment for major depression. However, approximately 50% of depressed patients fail to achieve an effective treatment response. Understanding how gene expression systems respond to treatments may be critical for understanding antidepressant resistance. METHODS: We take a novel approach to this problem by demonstrating that the gene expression system of the dentate gyrus responds to fluoxetine (FLX, a commonly used antidepressant medication, in a stereotyped-manner involving changes in the expression levels of thousands of genes. The aggregate behavior of this large-scale systemic response was quantified with principal components analysis (PCA yielding a single quantitative measure of the global gene expression system state. RESULTS: Quantitative measures of system state were highly correlated with variability in levels of antidepressant-sensitive behaviors in a mouse model of depression treated with fluoxetine. Analysis of dorsal and ventral dentate samples in the same mice indicated that system state co-varied across these regions despite their reported functional differences. Aggregate measures of gene expression system state were very robust and remained unchanged when different microarray data processing algorithms were used and even when completely different sets of gene expression levels were used for their calculation. CONCLUSIONS: System state measures provide a robust method to quantify and relate global gene expression system state variability to behavior and treatment. State variability also suggests that the diversity of reported changes in gene expression levels in response to treatments such as fluoxetine may represent different perspectives on unified but noisy global gene expression system state level responses. Studying regulation of gene expression systems at the state level may be useful in guiding new

  2. Prolonged induction of c-fos in neuropeptide Y- and somatostatin-immunoreactive neurons of the rat dentate gyrus after electroconvulsive stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woldbye, D P; Greisen, M H; Bolwig, T G

    1996-01-01

    Induction of c-fos mRNA and Fos was studied in the hilus and granular layer of the dentate gyrus at various times up to 24 h after single electroconvulsive stimulation (ECS) using in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry. In both areas of the dentate gyrus, a prominent induction of c-fos m....... The Fos-immunoreactive NPY or SS neurons only amounted to about 50% of the total hilar population of NPY or SS neurons. The present observations suggest that a subpopulation of hilar NPY and SS neurons may be central to the actions of electroconvulsive seizures in the dentate gyrus....

  3. beta-Estradiol induces synaptogenesis in the hippocampus by enhancing brain-derived neurotrophic factor release from dentate gyrus granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kaoru; Akaishi, Tatsuhiro; Matsuki, Norio; Ohno, Yasuo; Nakazawa, Ken

    2007-05-30

    We investigated the effect of beta-estradiol (E2) on synaptogenesis in the hippocampus using organotypic hippocampal slice cultures and subregional hippocampal neuron cultures. E2 increased the expression of PSD95, a postsynaptic marker, specifically in stratum lucidum of Cornu Ammonis 3 (CA3SL) in cultured hippocampal slices. E2 also increased the spine density at the proximal site of CA3 apical dendrites in CA3SL and PSD95 was clustered on these spine heads. The effects of E2 on the expression of PSD95 and the spine density disappeared when the dentate gyrus (DG) had been excised at 1 day in vitro (DIV). FM1-43 analysis of subregional hippocampal neuron cultures which were comprised of Ammon's horn neurons, DG neurons, or a mixture of these neurons, revealed that E2 increased the number of presynaptic sites in the cultures that contained DG neurons. K252a, a potent inhibitor of the high affinity receptor of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and function-blocking antibody to BDNF (BDNFAB) completely inhibited the effects of E2 in hippocampal slice cultures and subregional neuron cultures, whereas ICI182,780 (ICI), a strong antagonist of nuclear estrogen receptors (nERs), did not. Expression of BDNF in DG neurons was markedly higher than that in Ammon's horn neurons and E2 did not affect these expression levels. E2 significantly increased the BDNF release from DG neurons. KT5720, a specific inhibitor of 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), and Rp-adenosine 3', 5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate triethylammonium salt (Rp-cAMP), a non-hydrolyzable diastereoisomer and a potent inhibitor of PKA, completely suppressed the E2-induced increase in BDNF release, whereas ICI and U0126, a potent inhibitor of MAP kinase kinase (MEK), did not. These results suggest that E2 induces synaptogenesis between mossy fibers and CA3 neurons by enhancing BDNF release from DG granule cells in a nER-independent and PKA-dependent manner.

  4. Developmental hypothyroidism abolishes bilateral differences in sonic hedgehog gene control in the rat hippocampal dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Takeshi; Wang, Liyun; Kimura, Masayuki; Abe, Hajime; Mizukami, Sayaka; Yoshida, Toshinori; Shibutani, Makoto

    2015-03-01

    Both developmental and adult-stage hypothyroidism disrupt rat hippocampal neurogenesis. We previously showed that exposing mouse offspring to manganese permanently disrupts hippocampal neurogenesis and abolishes the asymmetric distribution of cells expressing Mid1, a molecule regulated by sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling. The present study examined the involvement of Shh signaling on the disruption of hippocampal neurogenesis in rats with hypothyroidism. Pregnant rats were treated with methimazole (MMI) at 0 or 200 ppm in the drinking water from gestation day 10-21 days after delivery (developmental hypothyroidism). Adult male rats were treated with MMI in the same manner from postnatal day (PND) 46 to PND 77 (adult-stage hypothyroidism). Developmental hypothyroidism reduced the number of Mid1(+) cells within the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus of offspring on PND 21, and consequently abolished the normal asymmetric predominance of Mid1(+) cells on the right side through the adult stage. In control animals, Shh was expressed in a subpopulation of hilar neurons, showing asymmetric distribution with left side predominance on PND 21; however, this asymmetry did not continue through the adult stage. Developmental hypothyroidism increased Shh(+) neurons bilaterally and abolished the asymmetric distribution pattern on PND 21. Adult hypothyroidism also disrupted the asymmetric distribution of Mid1(+) cells but did not affect the distribution of Shh(+) hilar neurons. The results suggest that the hippocampal neurogenesis disruption seen in hypothyroidism involves changes in asymmetric Shh(+) neuron distribution in developmental hypothyroidism and altered Mid1 expression in both developmental and adult-stage hypothyroidism.

  5. Ongoing neurogenesis in the adult dentate gyrus mediates behavioral responses to ambiguous threat cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Lucas R; Schoenfeld, Timothy J; Karlsson, Rose-Marie; Bannerman, David M; Cameron, Heather A

    2017-04-01

    Fear learning is highly adaptive if utilized in appropriate situations but can lead to generalized anxiety if applied too widely. A role of predictive cues in inhibiting fear generalization has been suggested by stress and fear learning studies, but the effects of partially predictive cues (ambiguous cues) and the neuronal populations responsible for linking the predictive ability of cues and generalization of fear responses are unknown. Here, we show that inhibition of adult neurogenesis in the mouse dentate gyrus decreases hippocampal network activation and reduces defensive behavior to ambiguous threat cues but has neither of these effects if the same negative experience is reliably predicted. Additionally, we find that this ambiguity related to negative events determines their effect on fear generalization, that is, how the events affect future behavior under novel conditions. Both new neurons and glucocorticoid hormones are required for the enhancement of fear generalization following an unpredictably cued threat. Thus, adult neurogenesis plays a central role in the adaptive changes resulting from experience involving unpredictable or ambiguous threat cues, optimizing behavior in novel and uncertain situations.

  6. The effect of Jujuboside A on the evoked field potentials of Granule cells in dentate gyrus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    封洲燕; 郑筱祥

    2002-01-01

    Jujuboside A( JuA) is a main component of Jujubogenin extracted from the seeds of Ziziphus.The authors have not seen report on JuA's direct effect on the neruons of the central nervous system.This study aimed to assess the effect of JuA on paried-pulse responses of dentate gyrus granule cells in urethaneanasesthetized rats,used intracerebroventricular(i.c.v.) JuA to mimic in vitro tath conditions in vivo.Pariedpulse stimuli with 80ms interpulse interval were used to stimulate the perforant pathway.Evoked responses first responses,the slopoes of excitatory postsynaptic potential(EPSP1) and the amplitudes of population spike (PS1) decreased significantly after administration of JuA while the PS1 latencies increased significantly.In the second responses.the EPSP2 slops and PS2 latencies were changed similarly to those of the first ones.but PS2 amplitudes increased.The results showed that JuA may have some inhibitory effect on the granule cell excitability mediated by presynaptic mechanism but may have little effect on the excitability mediated by postsynaptic mechanism since the second evoked N-methyl-D-aspartic mediating paired-pulse facilitation is a postsynaptic mechanism.

  7. Electroacupuncture promotes neural stem cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus of rats following stroke via upregulation of Notch1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Junhong; Sui, Minghong; Lü, Xiao; Jin, Dongmei; Zhuang, Zhiqiang; Yan, Tiebin

    2015-11-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) are important in rehabilitation following stroke. Electroacupuncture (EA) treatment has been observed to promote the recovery of neurological functions subsequent to stroke, however, the effects of EA on the proliferation and differentiation of NSCs and its potential mechanisms remain to be elucidated. In the present study, rats, in which a stroke was induced through middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), were treated with EA or control manipulation for 21 days. The modified Neurological Severity score and Morris water maze tests were used to assess the neurological functions of the rats. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)/glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) or BrdU/neuronal marker (NeuN) double immunofluorescence staining were used to examine the proliferation and differentiation of the NSCs. Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT‑qPCR) and western blot analyses were performed to detect the expression levels of Notch1 and Hes1 in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus of rats following MCAO. The results demonstrated that EA treatment significantly improved the neurological functional recovery of rats following stroke. A significant increase was observed in the number of BrdU+/GAFP+ and BrdU+/NeuN+ cells in the DG area in the EA‑treated rats compared with that of the control group. RT‑qPCR analysis revealed that EA treatment significantly increased the expression levels of Notch1 and Hes1, which may account for the enhanced proliferation and differentiation of NSCs. In conclusion, to the best of our knowledge, the present study was the first to demonstrate that EA treatment promoted NSC proliferation and neurogenesis in the DG area through the upregulation of Notch signaling following a stroke; therefore, EA may be a useful novel therapeutic strategy in future stroke treatment.

  8. A Transient Upregulation of Glutamine Synthetase in the Dentate Gyrus Is Involved in Epileptogenesis Induced by Amygdala Kindling in the Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Kai; Xu, Zheng-Hao; Feng, Bo; Yu, Jie; Fang, Qi; Wang, Shuang; Wu, Deng-Chang; Zhang, Jian-Min; Chen, Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Reduction of glutamine synthetase (GS) function is closely related to established epilepsy, but little is known regarding its role in epileptogenesis. The present study aimed to elucidate the functional changes of GS in the brain and its involvement in epileptogenesis using the amygdala kindling model of epilepsy induced by daily electrical stimulation of basolateral amygdala in rats. Both expression and activity of GS in the ipsilateral dentate gyrus (DG) were upregulated when kindled seizures progressed to stage 4. A single dose of L-methionine sulfoximine (MSO, in 2 µl), a selective GS inhibitor, was administered into the ipsilateral DG on the third day following the first stage 3 seizure (just before GS was upregulated). It was found that low doses of MSO (5 or 10 µg) significantly and dose-dependently reduced the severity of and susceptibility to evoked seizures, whereas MSO at a high dose (20 µg) aggravated kindled seizures. In animals that seizure acquisition had been successfully suppressed with 10 µg MSO, GS upregulation reoccurred when seizures re-progressed to stage 4 and re-administration of 10 µg MSO consistently reduced the seizures. GLN at a dose of 1.5 µg abolished the alleviative effect of 10 µg MSO and deleterious effect of 20 µg MSO on kindled seizures. Moreover, appropriate artificial microRNA interference (1 and 1.5×106 TU/2 µl) of GS expression in the ipsilateral DG also inhibited seizure progression. In addition, a transient increase of GS expression and activity in the cortex was also observed during epileptogenesis evoked by pentylenetetrazole kindling. These results strongly suggest that a transient and region-specific upregulation of GS function occurs when epilepsy develops into a certain stage and eventually promotes the process of epileptogenesis. Inhibition of GS to an adequate degree and at an appropriate timing may be a potential therapeutic approach to interrupting epileptogenesis. PMID:23825580

  9. Effects of the angiotensin-(1-7) receptor Mas on cell proliferation and on the population of doublecortin positive cells within the dentate gyrus and the piriform cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, M; Walther, T; von Bohlen Und Halbach, O

    2014-02-01

    Aside from the well-known biologically active angiotensin II, other biologically active angiotensins have been discovered, including angiotensin IV and angiotensin-(1-7). Some years ago, we and others discovered that the Mas proto-oncogene encodes a G protein-coupled receptor being essential for angiotensin-(1-7) signaling. Mas is not only expressed in the periphery but also within the brain, e.g. in the dentate gyrus (DG) and the piriform cortex (PC). Since the DG is capable of adult neurogenesis, we examined the impact of a deletion of Mas upon adult neurogenesis. Deletion of Mas did not alter cell proliferation in the adult DG (as monitored with phosphohistone H3) and did not alter cell death (as monitored with activated Caspase 3). However, Mas deficiency resulted in an increase in the number of doublecortin (DCX) positive cells, indicating that lack of Mas increases the number of this cell population. Concerning the PC, it is discussed whether adult neurogenesis occurs under physiological conditions in this area. We could demonstrate that Mas deficiency has an impact on cell division and on the population of DCX-positive cells within the PC. Since Mas is not expressed before birth within the brain, our data may suggest that adult hippocampal neurogenesis and neurogenesis occurring during prenatal development share several common mechanisms, but are, at least in part, differentially regulated. Moreover, since deficiency for Mas increases the numbers of DCX-positive young neurons, blockage of Mas might be beneficial in stimulating neurogenesis in adults. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  10. A Transient Upregulation of Glutamine Synthetase in the Dentate Gyrus Is Involved in Epileptogenesis Induced by Amygdala Kindling in the Rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Liu Sun

    Full Text Available Reduction of glutamine synthetase (GS function is closely related to established epilepsy, but little is known regarding its role in epileptogenesis. The present study aimed to elucidate the functional changes of GS in the brain and its involvement in epileptogenesis using the amygdala kindling model of epilepsy induced by daily electrical stimulation of basolateral amygdala in rats. Both expression and activity of GS in the ipsilateral dentate gyrus (DG were upregulated when kindled seizures progressed to stage 4. A single dose of L-methionine sulfoximine (MSO, in 2 µl, a selective GS inhibitor, was administered into the ipsilateral DG on the third day following the first stage 3 seizure (just before GS was upregulated. It was found that low doses of MSO (5 or 10 µg significantly and dose-dependently reduced the severity of and susceptibility to evoked seizures, whereas MSO at a high dose (20 µg aggravated kindled seizures. In animals that seizure acquisition had been successfully suppressed with 10 µg MSO, GS upregulation reoccurred when seizures re-progressed to stage 4 and re-administration of 10 µg MSO consistently reduced the seizures. GLN at a dose of 1.5 µg abolished the alleviative effect of 10 µg MSO and deleterious effect of 20 µg MSO on kindled seizures. Moreover, appropriate artificial microRNA interference (1 and 1.5×10(6 TU/2 µl of GS expression in the ipsilateral DG also inhibited seizure progression. In addition, a transient increase of GS expression and activity in the cortex was also observed during epileptogenesis evoked by pentylenetetrazole kindling. These results strongly suggest that a transient and region-specific upregulation of GS function occurs when epilepsy develops into a certain stage and eventually promotes the process of epileptogenesis. Inhibition of GS to an adequate degree and at an appropriate timing may be a potential therapeutic approach to interrupting epileptogenesis.

  11. A Million-Plus Neuron Model of the Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus: Critical Role for Topography in Determining Spatiotemporal Network Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Phillip J; Yu, Gene J; Song, Dong; Berger, Theodore W

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a million-plus granule cell compartmental model of the rat hippocampal dentate gyrus, including excitatory, perforant path input from the entorhinal cortex, and feedforward and feedback inhibitory input from dentate interneurons. The model includes experimentally determined morphological and biophysical properties of granule cells, together with glutamatergic AMPA-like EPSP and GABAergic GABAA-like IPSP synaptic excitatory and inhibitory inputs, respectively. Each granule cell was composed of approximately 200 compartments having passive and active conductances distributed throughout the somatic and dendritic regions. Modeling excitatory input from the entorhinal cortex was guided by axonal transport studies documenting the topographical organization of projections from subregions of the medial and lateral entorhinal cortex, plus other important details of the distribution of glutamatergic inputs to the dentate gyrus. Information contained within previously published maps of this major hippocampal afferent were systematically converted to scales that allowed the topographical distribution and relative synaptic densities of perforant path inputs to be quantitatively estimated for inclusion in the current model. Results showed that when medial and lateral entorhinal cortical neurons maintained Poisson random firing, dentate granule cells expressed, throughout the million-cell network, a robust nonrandom pattern of spiking best described as a spatiotemporal "clustering." To identify the network property or properties responsible for generating such firing "clusters," we progressively eliminated from the model key mechanisms, such as feedforward and feedback inhibition, intrinsic membrane properties underlying rhythmic burst firing, and/or topographical organization of entorhinal afferents. Findings conclusively identified topographical organization of inputs as the key element responsible for generating a spatiotemporal distribution of clustered

  12. Lithium promotes neuronal repair and ameliorates depression-like behavior following trimethyltin-induced neuronal loss in the dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneyama, Masanori; Shiba, Tatsuo; Hasebe, Shigeru; Umeda, Kasumi; Yamaguchi, Taro; Ogita, Kiyokazu

    2014-01-01

    Lithium, a mood stabilizer, is known to ameliorate the stress-induced decrease in hippocampal neurogenesis seen in animal models of stress-related disorders. However, it is unclear whether lithium has beneficial effect on neuronal repair following neuronal damage in neuronal degenerative diseases. Here, we evaluated the effect of in vivo treatment with lithium on the hippocampal neuronal repair in a mouse model of trimethyltin (TMT)-induced neuronal loss/self-repair in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (such mice referred to as "impaired animals") [Ogita et al. (2005) J Neurosci Res 82: 609-621]. The impaired animals had a dramatically increased number of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-incorporating cells in their dentate gyrus at the initial time window (days 3 to 5 post-TMT treatment) of the self-repair stage. A single treatment with lithium produced no significant change in the number of BrdU-incorporating cells in the dentate granule cell layer and subgranular zone on day 3 post-TMT treatment. On day 5 post-TMT treatment, however, BrdU-incorporating cells were significantly increased in number by lithium treatment for 3 days. Most interestingly, chronic treatment (15 days) with lithium increased the number of BrdU-incorporating cells positive for NeuN or doublecortin in the dentate granule cell layer of the impaired animals, but not in that of naïve animals. The results of a forced swimming test revealed that the chronic treatment with lithium improved the depression-like behavior seen in the impaired animals. Taken together, our data suggest that lithium had a beneficial effect on neuronal repair following neuronal loss in the dentate gyrus through promoted proliferation and survival/neuronal differentiation of neural stem/progenitor cells in the subgranular zone.

  13. Beneficial effect of cilostazol-mediated neuronal repair following trimethyltin-induced neuronal loss in the dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneyama, Masanori; Tanaka, Masayuki; Hasebe, Shigeru; Yamaguchi, Taro; Shiba, Tatsuo; Ogita, Kiyokazu

    2015-01-01

    Cilostazol acts as an antiplatelet agent and has other pleiotropic effects based on phosphodiesterase-3-dependent mechanisms. We evaluated whether cilostazol would have a beneficial effect on neuronal repair following hippocampal neuronal damage by using a mouse model of trimethyltin (TMT)-induced neuronal loss/self-repair in the hippocampal dentate gyrus [Ogita et al. (2005) J Neurosci Res 82:609-621]; these mice will hereafter be referred to as impaired animals. A single treatment with cilostazol (10 mg/kg, i.p.) produced no significant change in the number of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-incorporating cells in the dentate granule cell layer (GCL) or subgranular zone on day 3 after TMT treatment. However, chronic treatment with cilostazol on days 3-15 posttreatment resulted in an increase in the number of BrdU-incorporating cells in the dentate GCL of the impaired animals, and these cells were positive for neuronal nuclear antigen or doublecortin. Cilostazol was effective in elevating the level of phosphorylated cyclic adrenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (pCREB) in the dentate gyrus of impaired animals. The results of a forced swimming test revealed that the chronic treatment with cilostazol improved the depression-like behavior seen in the impaired animals. In the cultures of hippocampal neural stem/progenitor cells, exposure to cilostazol produced not only enhancement of proliferation activity but also elevation of pCREB levels. Taken together, our data suggest that cilostazol has a beneficial effect on neuronal repair following neuronal loss in the dentate gyrus through promotion of proliferation and/or neuronal differentiation of neural progenitor cells in the subgranular zone. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. A million-plus neuron model of the hippocampal dentate gyrus: Dependency of spatio-temporal network dynamics on topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Phillip J; Yu, Gene J; Song, Dong; Berger, Theodore W

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a million-plus granule cell compartmental model of the rat hippocampal dentate gyrus, including excitatory, perforant path input from the entorhinal cortex, and feedforward and feedback inhibitory input from dentate interneurons. The model includes experimentally determined morphological and biophysical properties of granule cells, together with glutamatergic AMPA-like EPSP and GABAergic GABAA-like IPSP synaptic excitatory and inhibitory inputs, respectively. Each granule cell was composed of approximately 200 compartments having passive and active conductances distributed throughout the somatic and dendritic regions. Modeling excitatory input from the entorhinal cortex was guided by axonal transport studies documenting the topographical organization of projections from subregions of the medial and lateral entorhinal cortex, plus other important details of the distribution of glutamatergic inputs to the dentate gyrus. Results showed that when medial and lateral entorhinal cortical neurons maintained Poisson random firing, dentate granule cells expressed, throughout the million-cell network, a robust, non-random pattern of spiking best described as spatiotemporal "clustering". To identify the network property or properties responsible for generating such firing "clusters", we progressively eliminated from the model key mechanisms such as feedforward and feedback inhibition, intrinsic membrane properties underlying rhythmic burst firing, and/or topographical organization of entorhinal afferents. Findings conclusively identified topographical organization of inputs as the key element responsible for generating a spatio-temporal distribution of clustered firing. These results uncover a functional organization of perforant path afferents to the dentate gyrus not previously recognized: topography-dependent clusters of granule cell activity as "functional units" that organize the processing of entorhinal signals.

  15. Lithium promotes neuronal repair and ameliorates depression-like behavior following trimethyltin-induced neuronal loss in the dentate gyrus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Yoneyama

    Full Text Available Lithium, a mood stabilizer, is known to ameliorate the stress-induced decrease in hippocampal neurogenesis seen in animal models of stress-related disorders. However, it is unclear whether lithium has beneficial effect on neuronal repair following neuronal damage in neuronal degenerative diseases. Here, we evaluated the effect of in vivo treatment with lithium on the hippocampal neuronal repair in a mouse model of trimethyltin (TMT-induced neuronal loss/self-repair in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (such mice referred to as "impaired animals" [Ogita et al. (2005 J Neurosci Res 82: 609-621]. The impaired animals had a dramatically increased number of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU-incorporating cells in their dentate gyrus at the initial time window (days 3 to 5 post-TMT treatment of the self-repair stage. A single treatment with lithium produced no significant change in the number of BrdU-incorporating cells in the dentate granule cell layer and subgranular zone on day 3 post-TMT treatment. On day 5 post-TMT treatment, however, BrdU-incorporating cells were significantly increased in number by lithium treatment for 3 days. Most interestingly, chronic treatment (15 days with lithium increased the number of BrdU-incorporating cells positive for NeuN or doublecortin in the dentate granule cell layer of the impaired animals, but not in that of naïve animals. The results of a forced swimming test revealed that the chronic treatment with lithium improved the depression-like behavior seen in the impaired animals. Taken together, our data suggest that lithium had a beneficial effect on neuronal repair following neuronal loss in the dentate gyrus through promoted proliferation and survival/neuronal differentiation of neural stem/progenitor cells in the subgranular zone.

  16. Btg1 is Required to Maintain the Pool of Stem and Progenitor Cells of the Dentate Gyrus and Subventricular Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farioli-Vecchioli, Stefano; Micheli, Laura; Saraulli, Daniele; Ceccarelli, Manuela; Cannas, Sara; Scardigli, Raffaella; Leonardi, Luca; Cinà, Irene; Costanzi, Marco; Ciotti, Maria Teresa; Moreira, Pedro; Rouault, Jean-Pierre; Cestari, Vincenzo; Tirone, Felice

    2012-01-01

    Btg1 belongs to a family of cell cycle inhibitory genes. We observed that Btg1 is highly expressed in adult neurogenic niches, i.e., the dentate gyrus and subventricular zone (SVZ). Thus, we generated Btg1 knockout mice to analyze the role of Btg1 in the process of generation of adult new neurons. Ablation of Btg1 causes a transient increase of the proliferating dentate gyrus stem and progenitor cells at post-natal day 7; however, at 2 months of age the number of these proliferating cells, as well as of mature neurons, greatly decreases compared to wild-type controls. Remarkably, adult dentate gyrus stem and progenitor cells of Btg1-null mice exit the cell cycle after completing the S phase, express p53 and p21 at high levels and undergo apoptosis within 5 days. In the SVZ of adult (two-month-old) Btg1-null mice we observed an equivalent decrease, associated to apoptosis, of stem cells, neuroblasts, and neurons; furthermore, neurospheres derived from SVZ stem cells showed an age-dependent decrease of the self-renewal and expansion capacity. We conclude that ablation of Btg1 reduces the pool of dividing adult stem and progenitor cells in the dentate gyrus and SVZ by decreasing their proliferative capacity and inducing apoptosis, probably reflecting impairment of the control of the cell cycle transition from G1 to S phase. As a result, the ability of Btg1-null mice to discriminate among overlapping contextual memories was affected. Btg1 appears, therefore, to be required for maintaining adult stem and progenitor cells quiescence and self-renewal. PMID:22969701

  17. Novel microRNA revealed by systematic analysis of the microRNA transcriptome in dentate gyrus granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Brigid; Williams, Joanna M

    2016-09-06

    Post-transcriptional control of gene expression by microRNAs provides an important regulatory system within neurons, allowing co-ordinate and fine-tuned expression of plasticity-related proteins. Indeed, specific microRNAs have been shown to be regulated by synaptic activity in the dentate gyrus, and contribute to the regulated gene expression that underlies the persistence of long-term potentiation (LTP), a model of memory. To fully explore the contribution of microRNAs in synaptic plasticity, it is important to characterize the complete microRNA transcriptome in regions such as the dentate gyrus. Accordingly we used deep sequencing and miRDeep* analysis to search for novel microRNAs expressed in the dentate gyrus granule cell layer. Drawing on combined sequencing and bioinformatics analyses, including hairpin stability and patterns of precursor microRNA processing, we identified nine putative novel microRNAs. We did not find evidence of differential expression of any of these putative microRNAs following LTP at perforant path-granule cell synapses in awake rats (5h post-tetanus; p>0.05). Focusing on novel_miR-1, the most abundant novel miRNA, we showed that this sequence could be amplified from RNA extracted from dentate gyrus granule cells by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Further, by computationally predicting mRNA targets of this microRNA, we found that this novel microRNA likely contributes to the regulation of proteins that function at synapses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. GABAergic transmission facilitates ictogenesis and synchrony between CA3, hilus, and dentate gyrus in slices from epileptic rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafurov, Boris

    2013-01-01

    The impact of regional hippocampal interactions and GABAergic transmission on ictogenesis remain unclear. Cortico-hippocampal slices from pilocarpine-treated epileptic rats were compared with controls to investigate associations between seizurelike events (SLE), GABAergic transmission, and neuronal synchrony within and between cortico-hippocampal regions. Multielectrode array recordings revealed more prevalent hippocampal SLE in epileptic tissue when excitatory transmission was enhanced and GABAergic transmission was intact [removal of Mg2+ (0Mg)] than when GABAergic transmission was blocked [removal of Mg2+ + bicuculline methiodide (0Mg+BMI)]. When activity within individual regions was analyzed, spectral and temporal slow oscillation/SLE correlations and cross-correlations were highest within the hilus of epileptic tissue during SLE but were similar in 0Mg and 0Mg+BMI. GABAergic facilitation of spectral “slow” oscillation and ripple correlations was most prominent within CA3 of epileptic tissue during SLE. When activity between regions was analyzed, slow oscillation and ripple coherence was highest between the hilus and dentate gyrus as well as between the hilus and CA3 of epileptic tissue during SLE and was significantly higher in 0Mg than 0Mg+BMI. High 0Mg-induced SLE cross-correlations between the hilus and dentate gyrus as well as between the hilus and CA3 were reduced or abolished in 0Mg+BMI. SLE cross-correlation lag measurements provided evidence for a monosynaptic connection from the hilus to the dentate gyrus during SLE. Findings implicate the hilus as an oscillation generator, whose impact on other cortico-hippocampal regions is mediated by GABAergic transmission. Data also suggest that GABAA receptor-mediated transmission facilitates back-propagation from CA3/hilus to the dentate gyrus and that this back-propagation augments SLE in epileptic hippocampus. PMID:23615549

  19. Functional Analysis of Neurovascular Adaptations to Exercise in the Dentate Gyrus of Young Adult Mice Associated With Cognitive Gain

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Peter J.; Brzezinska, Weronika J.; Puchalski, Emily K.; Krone, David A.; Rhodes, Justin S.

    2009-01-01

    The discovery that aerobic exercise increases adult hippocampal neurogenesis and can enhance cognitive performance holds promise as a model for regenerative medicine. This study adds two new pieces of information to the rapidly growing field. First, we tested whether exercise increases vascular density in the granular layer of the dentate gyrus, whole hippocampus, and striatum in C57BL/6J mice known to display procognitive effects of exercise. Second, we determined the extent to which new neu...

  20. BDNF Depresses Excitability of Parvalbumin-Positive Interneurons through an M-Like Current in Rat Dentate Gyrus

    OpenAIRE

    Jose Luis Nieto-Gonzalez; Kimmo Jensen

    2013-01-01

    In addition to their classical roles in neuronal growth, survival and differentiation, neurotrophins are also rapid regulators of excitability, synaptic transmission and activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. We have recently shown that mature BDNF (Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor), but not proBDNF, modulates the excitability of interneurons in dentate gyrus within minutes. Here, we used brain slice patch-clamp recordings to study the mechanisms through which BDNF modulates the firing of i...

  1. BTG1 is required to maintain the pool of stem and progenitor cells of dentate gyrus and subventricular zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano eFarioli-Vecchioli

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Btg1 belongs to a family of cell cycle inhibitory genes. We observed that Btg1 is highly expressed in adult neurogenic niches, i.e., the dentate gyrus and subventricular zone (SVZ. Thus, we generated Btg1 knockout mice to analyze the role of Btg1 in the process of generation of adult new neurons.Ablation of Btg1 causes a transient increase of the proliferating dentate gyrus stem and progenitor cells at post-natal day 7; however, at two months of age the number of these proliferating cells, as well as of mature neurons, greatly decreases compared to wild-type controls. Remarkably, adult dentate gyrus stem and progenitor cells of Btg1-null mice exit cell cycle after completing the S phase, highly express p53 and p21, and within 5 days undergo apoptosis. In SVZ we observed an equivalent decrease, associated to apoptosis, of Btg1-null stem cells, neuroblasts and neurons; furthermore, neurospheres derived from SVZ stem cells showed an age-dependent decrease of the self-renewal and expansion capacity.We conclude that the ablation of Btg1 reduces the pool of dividing adult stem and progenitor cells in dentate gyrus and SVZ by decreasing their proliferative capacity and inducing apoptosis, likely reflecting the impairment of the control of the cell cycle transition from G1 to S phase. As a result, the ability of Btg1-null mice to discriminate among overlapping contextual memories was affected. Thus, Btg1 appears to be required for maintaining adult stem and progenitor cells quiescence and self-renewal.

  2. Functional Analysis of Neurovascular Adaptations to Exercise in the Dentate Gyrus of Young Adult Mice Associated With Cognitive Gain

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, Peter J.; Brzezinska, Weronika J.; Puchalski, Emily K.; Krone, David A.; Rhodes, Justin S.

    2009-01-01

    The discovery that aerobic exercise increases adult hippocampal neurogenesis and can enhance cognitive performance holds promise as a model for regenerative medicine. This study adds two new pieces of information to the rapidly growing field. First, we tested whether exercise increases vascular density in the granular layer of the dentate gyrus, whole hippocampus, and striatum in C57BL/6J mice known to display procognitive effects of exercise. Second, we determined the extent to which new neu...

  3. Dentate gyrus expression of nestin-immunoreactivity in patients with drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy and hippocampal sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessio, L; Konopka, H; Escobar, E; Acuña, A; Oddo, S; Solís, P; Seoane, E; Kochen, S

    2015-04-01

    Granule cells pathology in dentate gyrus, have received considerable attention in terms of understanding the pathophysiology of temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis. The aim of this study was to determine the nestin (an intermediate filament protein expressed by newly formed cells), immunoreactivity (IR) in granular cells layers of hippocampal tissue extirpated during epilepsy surgical procedure, in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. Hippocampal sections of 16 patients with hippocampal sclerosis and drug-resistant temporal lobe epilepsy were processed using immunoperoxidase with antibody to nestin. Archival material from 8 normal post-mortem hippocampus, were simultaneously processed. Reactive area for nestin-IR, the total number of positive nestin cells per field (20×), and the MGV (mean gray value) was determined by computerized image analysis (ImageJ), and compared between groups. Student's t test was used for statistical analysis. Nestin-IR cells were found in granule cells layers of both controls and patients. Larger reactive somas (p dentate gyrus may reflect changes in dentate gyrus neuroplasticity associated to chronic temporal epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis. Further studies are required to determine the clinical implications on memory an emotional alterations such as depression. Copyright © 2015 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Enhanced stability of hippocampal place representation caused by reduced magnesium block of NMDA receptors in the dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yuichiro; Nabeshima, Yoko; Kobayashi, Katsunori; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Tanda, Koichi; Takao, Keizo; Suzuki, Hidenori; Esumi, Eisaku; Noguchi, Shigeru; Matsuda, Yukiko; Sasaoka, Toshikuni; Noda, Tetsuo; Miyazaki, Jun-ichi; Mishina, Masayoshi; Funabiki, Kazuo; Nabeshima, Yo-ichi

    2014-06-04

    Voltage-dependent block of the NMDA receptor by Mg2+ is thought to be central to the unique involvement of this receptor in higher brain functions. However, the in vivo role of the Mg2+ block in the mammalian brain has not yet been investigated, because brain-wide loss of the Mg2+ block causes perinatal lethality. In this study, we used a brain-region specific knock-in mouse expressing an NMDA receptor that is defective for the Mg2+ block in order to test its role in neural information processing. We devised a method to induce a single amino acid substitution (N595Q) in the GluN2A subunit of the NMDA receptor, specifically in the hippocampal dentate gyrus in mice. This mutation reduced the Mg2+ block at the medial perforant path-granule cell synapse and facilitated synaptic potentiation induced by high-frequency stimulation. The mutants had more stable hippocampal place fields in the CA1 than the controls did, and place representation showed lower sensitivity to visual differences. In addition, behavioral tests revealed that the mutants had a spatial working memory deficit. These results suggest that the Mg2+ block in the dentate gyrus regulates hippocampal spatial information processing by attenuating activity-dependent synaptic potentiation in the dentate gyrus.

  5. Hippocampal CA3-dentate gyrus volume uniquely linked to improvement in associative memory from childhood to adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugherty, Ana M; Flinn, Robert; Ofen, Noa

    2017-06-01

    Associative memory develops into adulthood and critically depends on the hippocampus. The hippocampus is a complex structure composed of subfields that are functionally-distinct, and anterior-posterior divisions along the length of the hippocampal horizontal axis that may also differ by cognitive correlates. Although each of these aspects has been considered independently, here we evaluate their relative contributions as correlates of age-related improvement in memory. Volumes of hippocampal subfields (subiculum, CA1-2, CA3-dentate gyrus) and anterior-posterior divisions (hippocampal head, body, tail) were manually segmented from high-resolution images in a sample of healthy participants (age 8-25 years). Adults had smaller CA3-dentate gyrus volume as compared to children, which accounted for 67% of the indirect effect of age predicting better associative memory via hippocampal volumes. Whereas hippocampal body volume demonstrated non-linear age differences, larger hippocampal body volume was weakly related to better associative memory only when accounting for the mutual correlation with subfields measured within that region. Thus, typical development of associative memory was largely explained by age-related differences in CA3-dentate gyrus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Adiponectin Exerts Neurotrophic Effects on Dendritic Arborization, Spinogenesis, and Neurogenesis of the Dentate Gyrus of Male Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Di; Wang, Xuezhen; Lu, Xin-Yun

    2016-07-01

    The hippocampus, a brain region critical for learning, memory and emotional processing, maintains its capacity to undergo structural plasticity throughout life. Hippocampal structural plasticity can be modulated by a number of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. This study investigated the effects of adiponectin, an adipocyte-derived hormone, on dendritic growth, arborization, and spinogenesis in mature granule neurons of the hippocampal dentate gyrus generated during embryonic (early-born) or early postnatal (late-born) stages. We found that adiponectin deficiency reduced dendritic length, branching and spine density of granule neurons. The reduction was more evident in early-born granule neurons than in late-born granule neurons. Intracerebroventricular infusion of adiponectin for 1 week increased of dendritic spines and arbor complexity in late-born granule neurons. Moreover, adiponectin deficiency decreased the production of adult-born new granule neurons through suppressing neural progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation, whereas intracerebroventricular adiponectin infusion increased the proliferation of neural progenitor cells in adult dentate gyrus. These results suggest that adiponectin plays an important role in dendritic spine remodeling and neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus.

  7. Analyzing dendritic growth in a population of immature neurons in the adult dentate gyrus using laminar quantification of disjointed dendrites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shira eRosenzweig

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, new granule neurons are continuously produced throughout adult life. A prerequisite for the successful synaptic integration of these neurons is the sprouting and extension of dendrites into the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. Thus, studies aimed at investigating the developmental stages of adult neurogenesis often use dendritic growth as an important indicator of neuronal health and maturity. Based on the known topography of the dentate gyrus, characterized by distinct laminar arrangement of granule neurons and their extensions, we have developed a new method for analysis of dendritic growth in immature adult-born granule neurons. The method is comprised of laminar quantification of cell bodies, primary, secondary and tertiary dendrites separately and independently from each other. In contrast to most existing methods, laminar quantification of dendrites does not require the use of exogenous markers and does not involve arbitrary selection of individual neurons. The new method relies on immonuhistochemical detection of endogenous markers such as doublecortin to perform a comprehensive analysis of a sub-population of immature neurons. Disjointed, orphan dendrites that often appear in the thin histological sections are taken into account. Using several experimental groups of rats and mice, we demonstrate here the suitable techniques for quantifying neurons and dendrites, and explain how the ratios between the quantified values can be used in a comparative analysis to indicate variations in dendritic growth and complexity.

  8. Low-dose sevoflurane promotes hippocampal neurogenesis and facilitates the development of dentate gyrus-dependent learning in neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chong; Shen, Feng-Yan; Zhao, Xuan; Zhou, Tao; Xu, Dao-Jie; Wang, Zhi-Ru; Wang, Ying-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Huge body of evidences demonstrated that volatile anesthetics affect the hippocampal neurogenesis and neurocognitive functions, and most of them showed impairment at anesthetic dose. Here, we investigated the effect of low dose (1.8%) sevoflurane on hippocampal neurogenesis and dentate gyrus-dependent learning. Neonatal rats at postnatal day 4 to 6 (P4-6) were treated with 1.8% sevoflurane for 6 hours. Neurogenesis was quantified by bromodeoxyuridine labeling and electrophysiology recording. Four and seven weeks after treatment, the Morris water maze and contextual-fear discrimination learning tests were performed to determine the influence on spatial learning and pattern separation. A 6-hour treatment with 1.8% sevoflurane promoted hippocampal neurogenesis and increased the survival of newborn cells and the proportion of immature granular cells in the dentate gyrus of neonatal rats. Sevoflurane-treated rats performed better during the training days of the Morris water maze test and in contextual-fear discrimination learning test. These results suggest that a subanesthetic dose of sevoflurane promotes hippocampal neurogenesis in neonatal rats and facilitates their performance in dentate gyrus-dependent learning tasks.

  9. Effect of chronic stress on short and long-term plasticity in dentate gyrus; study of recovery and adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radahmadi, M; Hosseini, N; Nasimi, A

    2014-11-07

    Stress dramatically affects synaptic plasticity of the hippocampus, disrupts paired-pulse facilitation and impairs long-term potentiation (LTP). This study was performed to find the effects of chronic restraint stress and recovery period on excitability, paired-pulse response, LTP and to find probable adaptation to very long stress in the dentate gyrus. Thirty-eight male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups of Control, Rest-Stress (21 days stress), Stress-Rest (recovery) and Stress-Stress (42 days stress: adaptation). Chronic restraint stress was applied 6-h/day. Input-output functions, paired-pulse responses and LTP were recorded from the dentate gyrus while stimulating the perforant pathway. We found that chronic stress attenuated the responsiveness, paired-pulse response and LTP in the dentate gyrus. A 21-day recovery period, after the stress, improved all the three responses toward normal, indicating reversibility of these stress-related hippocampal changes. There was no significant adaptation to very long stress, probably due to severity of stress. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. NMDA-dependent mechanisms only affect the BOLD response in the rat dentate gyrus by modifying local signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiede, Regina; Krautwald, Karla; Fincke, Anja; Angenstein, Frank

    2012-01-01

    The role of N-methyl--aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated mechanisms in the formation of a blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) response was studied using electrical stimulation of the right perforant pathway. Stimulation of this fiber bundle triggered BOLD responses in the right hippocampal formation and in the left entorhinal cortex. The perforant pathway projects to and activates the dentate gyrus monosynaptically, activation in the contralateral entorhinal cortex is multisynaptic and requires forwarding and processing of signals. Application of the NMDA receptor antagonist MK801 during stimulation had no effect on BOLD responses in the right dentate gyrus, but reduced the BOLD responses in the left entorhinal cortex. In contrast, application of MK801 before the first stimulation train reduced the BOLD response in both regions. Electrophysiological recordings revealed that the initial stimulation trains changed the local processing of the incoming signals in the dentate gyrus. This altered electrophysiological response was not further changed by a subsequent application of MK801, which is in agreement with an unchanged BOLD response. When MK801 was present during the first stimulation train, a dissimilar electrophysiological response pattern was observed and corresponds to an altered BOLD response, indicating that NMDA-dependent mechanisms indirectly affect the BOLD response, mainly via modifying local signal processing and subsequent propagation. PMID:22167232

  11. Effects of butternut squash extract on dentate gyrus cell proliferation and spatial learning in male adult rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohsen Marzban; Sara Soleimani Asl; Hassan Fallah Huseini; Mahdi Tondar; Samira Choopani; Mehdi Mehdizadeh

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies reported that some plants, including butternut squash, exert positive effects on the brain. However, few studies have examined the effects of butternut squash on learning, memory, and neurogenesis. This study studied the effects of butternut squash extract on spatial learning and cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus of healthy male rats. Thirty-five male Wistar rats were intrap-eritoneally injected with 0, 50, 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg butternut squash extract once daily for 2 months. After the last administration, rat's spatial memory was studied using the Morris water maze. Finally, rats were sacrificed and hippocampal sections were prepared for light microscopy and bromodeoxyuridine immunohistochemistry studies. The results revealed that escape latency and swim distance decreased in all treatment groups compared with the control rats, and that the number of bromodeoxyuridine-positive cells in the dentate gyrus was significantly increased in the treatment groups compared with the controls. These findings suggest that butternut squash extract improves the learning and memory abilities of male rats, and increases the proliferation of dentate gyrus cells.

  12. Estradiol and soy extract increase the production of new cells in the dentate gyrus of old rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Martin, Margarita; Salazar, Veronica; Castillo, Carmen; Ariznavarreta, Carmen; Azcoitia, Iñigo; Garcia-Segura, Luis M; Tresguerres, Jesus A F

    2005-05-01

    In young rodents, estradiol increases cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. However, it is unknown if the old brain retains this response to estradiol. Here we assessed the generation of new cells in the dentate gyrus of old rats after administration of estradiol or a soy extract, since soy is used as an alternative to hormonal replacement therapy in postmenopausal women. In a first experiment, 12-month-old animals were ovariectomized and studied at 14, 18 or 22 months of age. The production of new cells, assessed by the incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), was similar in 14- and 18-month-old rats. However, there was a significant reduction in the number of BrdU-immunoreactive cells at 22 months of age. In a second experiment, 22-month-old ovariectomized animals were treated for 10 weeks with a weekly s.c. injection of 150 microg estradiol valerianate or with 60 mg/kg per day soy extract added to the drinking water. Both treatments increased significantly the production of new cells in the dentate gyrus. These findings indicate that the brains of old rats retain the ability to increase the production of new cells in response to estradiol and soy extracts.

  13. Stereotactic injection of cerebrospinal fluid from anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis into rat dentate gyrus impairs NMDA receptor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Würdemann, Till; Kersten, Maxi; Tokay, Tursonjan; Guli, Xiati; Kober, Maria; Rohde, Marco; Porath, Katrin; Sellmann, Tina; Bien, Christian G; Köhling, Rüdiger; Kirschstein, Timo

    2016-02-15

    Autoimmune encephalitis is increasingly recognized in patients with otherwise unexplained encephalopathy with epilepsy. Among these, patients with anti-N-methyl D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis present epileptic seizures, memory deficits, and psychiatric symptoms. However, the functional consequences of such autoantibodies are poorly understood. In order to investigate the pathophysiology of this disease, we stereotactically injected either cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from three anti-NMDAR encephalitis patients or commercially available anti-NMDAR1 into the dentate gyrus of adult female rats. Control animals were injected with either CSF obtained from three epilepsy patients (ganglioglioma, posttraumatic epilepsy, focal cortical dysplasia) lacking anti-NMDAR or saline. Intracellular recordings from dentate gyrus granule cells showed a significant reduction of the NMDAR-evoked excitatory postsynaptic potentials (NMDAR-EPSPs) in animals treated with anti-NMDAR. As a consequence of this, action potential firing in these cells by NMDAR-EPSPs was significantly impaired. Long-term potentiation in the dentate gyrus was also significantly reduced in rats injected with anti-NMDAR as compared to control animals. This was accompanied by a significantly impaired learning performance in the Morris water maze hidden platform task when the animals had been injected with anti-NMDAR antibody-containing CSF. Our findings suggest that anti-NMDAR lead to reduced NMDAR function in vivo which could contribute to the memory impairment found in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis.

  14. In vivo and in vitro treatment with edaravone promotes proliferation of neural progenitor cells generated following neuronal loss in the mouse dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuta, Maho; Shiba, Tatsuo; Yoneyama, Masanori; Kawada, Koichi; Yamaguchi, Taro; Hinoi, Eiichi; Yoneda, Yukio; Ogita, Kiyokazu

    2013-01-01

    Edaravone is clinically used in Japan for treatment of patients with acute cerebral infarction. To clarify the effect of edaravone on neurogenesis in the hippocampus following neuronal injury in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, we investigated the effect of in vitro and in vivo treatment with edaravone on the proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells prepared from the mouse dentate gyrus damaged by trimethyltin (TMT). Histological assessment revealed the presence of large number of nestin(+) cells in the dentate gyrus on days 3 - 5 post-TMT treatment. We prepared cells from the dentate gyrus of naïve, TMT-treated mice or TMT/edaravone-treated mice. The cells obtained from the dentate gyrus of TMT-treated animals were capable of BrdU incorporation and neurosphere formation when cultured in the presence of growth factors. The TMT-treated group had a larger number of nestin(+) cells and nestin(+)GFAP(+) cells than the naïve one. Under the culture condition used, sustained exposure of the cells from the damaged dentate gyrus to edaravone at 10(-11) and 10(-8) M promoted the proliferation of nestin(+) cells. The systemic in vivo treatment with edaravone for 2 days produced a significant increase in the number of nestin(+) cells among the cells prepared from the dentate gyrus on day 4 post-TMT treatment, and as well as one in the number of neurospheres formed from these cells in the culture. Taken together, our data indicated that edaravone had the ability to promote the proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells generated following neuronal damage in the dentate gyrus.

  15. Differentiation and Functional Incorporation of Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived GABAergic Interneurons in the Dentate Gyrus of Mice with Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Maisano, Xu; Litvina, Elizabeth; Tagliatela, Stephanie; Aaron, Gloster B.; Grabel, Laura B.; Naegele, Janice R

    2012-01-01

    Cell therapies for neurological disorders require an extensive knowledge of disease-associated neuropathology and procedures for generating neurons for transplantation. In many patients with severe acquired temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), the dentate gyrus exhibits sclerosis and GABAergic interneuron degeneration. Mounting evidence suggests that therapeutic benefits can be obtained by transplanting fetal GABAergic progenitors into the dentate gyrus in rodents with TLE, but the scarcity of human...

  16. Dentate gyrus supports slope recognition memory, shades of grey-context pattern separation and recognition memory, and CA3 supports pattern completion for object memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesner, Raymond P; Kirk, Ryan A; Yu, Zhenghui; Polansky, Caitlin; Musso, Nick D

    2016-03-01

    In order to examine the role of the dorsal dentate gyrus (dDG) in slope (vertical space) recognition and possible pattern separation, various slope (vertical space) degrees were used in a novel exploratory paradigm to measure novelty detection for changes in slope (vertical space) recognition memory and slope memory pattern separation in Experiment 1. The results of the experiment indicate that control rats displayed a slope recognition memory function with a pattern separation process for slope memory that is dependent upon the magnitude of change in slope between study and test phases. In contrast, the dDG lesioned rats displayed an impairment in slope recognition memory, though because there was no significant interaction between the two groups and slope memory, a reliable pattern separation impairment for slope could not be firmly established in the DG lesioned rats. In Experiment 2, in order to determine whether, the dDG plays a role in shades of grey spatial context recognition and possible pattern separation, shades of grey were used in a novel exploratory paradigm to measure novelty detection for changes in the shades of grey context environment. The results of the experiment indicate that control rats displayed a shades of grey-context pattern separation effect across levels of separation of context (shades of grey). In contrast, the DG lesioned rats displayed a significant interaction between the two groups and levels of shades of grey suggesting impairment in a pattern separation function for levels of shades of grey. In Experiment 3 in order to determine whether the dorsal CA3 (dCA3) plays a role in object pattern completion, a new task requiring less training and using a choice that was based on choosing the correct set of objects on a two-choice discrimination task was used. The results indicated that control rats displayed a pattern completion function based on the availability of one, two, three or four cues. In contrast, the dCA3 lesioned rats

  17. Exercise improves cognitive responses to psychological stress through enhancement of epigenetic mechanisms and gene expression in the dentate gyrus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Collins

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We have shown previously that exercise benefits stress resistance and stress coping capabilities. Furthermore, we reported recently that epigenetic changes related to gene transcription are involved in memory formation of stressful events. In view of the enhanced coping capabilities in exercised subjects we investigated epigenetic, gene expression and behavioral changes in 4-weeks voluntarily exercised rats. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Exercised and control rats coped differently when exposed to a novel environment. Whereas the control rats explored the new cage for the complete 30-min period, exercised animals only did so during the first 15 min after which they returned to sleeping or resting behavior. Both groups of animals showed similar behavioral responses in the initial forced swim session. When re-tested 24 h later however the exercised rats showed significantly more immobility behavior and less struggling and swimming. If rats were killed at 2 h after novelty or the initial swim test, i.e. at the peak of histone H3 phospho-acetylation and c-Fos induction, then the exercised rats showed a significantly higher number of dentate granule neurons expressing the histone modifications and immediate-early gene induction. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Thus, irrespective of the behavioral response in the novel cage or initial forced swim session, the impact of the event at the dentate gyrus level was greater in exercised rats than in control animals. Furthermore, in view of our concept that the neuronal response in the dentate gyrus after forced swimming is involved in memory formation of the stressful event, the observations in exercised rats of enhanced neuronal responses as well as higher immobility responses in the re-test are consistent with the reportedly improved cognitive performance in these animals. Thus, improved stress coping in exercised subjects seems to involve enhanced cognitive capabilities possibly resulting from

  18. Dynamics of cell proliferation in the adult dentate gyrus of two inbred strains of mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, N. L.; Nowakowski, R. S.

    2002-01-01

    The output potential of proliferating populations in either the developing or the adult nervous system is critically dependent on the length of the cell cycle (T(c)) and the size of the proliferating population. We developed a new approach for analyzing the cell cycle, the 'Saturate and Survive Method' (SSM), that also reveals the dynamic behaviors in the proliferative population and estimates of the size of the proliferating population. We used this method to analyze the proliferating population of the adult dentate gyrus in 60 day old mice of two inbred strains, C57BL/6J and BALB/cByJ. The results show that the number of cells labeled by exposure to BUdR changes dramatically with time as a function of the number of proliferating cells in the population, the length of the S-phase, cell division, the length of the cell cycle, dilution of the S-phase label, and cell death. The major difference between C57BL/6J and BALB/cByJ mice is the size of the proliferating population, which differs by a factor of two; the lengths of the cell cycle and the S-phase and the probability that a newly produced cell will die within the first 10 days do not differ in these two strains. This indicates that genetic regulation of the size of the proliferating population is independent of the genetic regulation of cell death among those newly produced cells. The dynamic changes in the number of labeled cells as revealed by the SSM protocol also indicate that neither single nor repeated daily injections of BUdR accurately measure 'proliferation.'.

  19. Late maturation of adult-born neurons in the temporal dentate gyrus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason S Snyder

    Full Text Available Hippocampal function varies along its septotemporal axis, with the septal (dorsal pole more frequently involved in spatial learning and memory and the temporal (ventral pole playing a greater role in emotional behaviors. One feature that varies across these subregions is adult neurogenesis. New neurons are more numerous in the septal hippocampus but are more active in the temporal hippocampus during water maze training. However, many other aspects of adult neurogenesis remain unexplored in the context of septal versus temporal subregions. In addition, the dentate gyrus contains another functionally important anatomical division along the transverse axis, with the suprapyramidal blade showing greater experience-related activity than the infrapyramidal blade. Here we ask whether new neurons differ in their rates of survival and maturation along the septotemporal and transverse axes. We found that neurogenesis is initially higher in the infrapyramidal than suprapyramidal blade, but these cells are less likely to survive, resulting in similar densities of neurons in the two blades by four weeks. Across the septotemporal axis, neurogenesis was higher in septal than temporal pole, while the survival rate of new neurons did not differ. Maturation was assessed by immunostaining for the neuronal marker, NeuN, which increases in expression level with maturation, and for the immediate-early gene, Arc, which suggests a neuron is capable of undergoing activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. Maturation occurred approximately 1-2 weeks earlier in the septal pole than in the temporal pole. This suggests that septal neurons may contribute to function sooner; however, the prolonged maturation of new temporal neurons may endow them with a longer window of plasticity during which their functions could be distinct from those of the mature granule cell population. These data point to subregional differences in new neuron maturation and suggest that changes in

  20. Entorhinal theta-frequency input to the dentate gyrus trisynaptically evokes hippocampal CA1 LTP

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    Jens eStepan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available There exists substantial evidence that some forms of explicit learning in mammals require long-term potentiation (LTP at hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses. While CA1 LTP has been well characterized at the monosynaptic level, it still remains unclear how the afferent systems to the hippocampus can initiate formation of this neuroplastic phenomenon. Using voltage-sensitive dye imaging in a mouse brain slice preparation, we show that evoked entorhinal cortical (EC theta-frequency input to the dentate gyrus highly effectively generates waves of neuronal activity which propagate through the entire trisynaptic circuit of the hippocampus (‘HTC-Waves’. This flow of activity, which we also demonstrate in vivo, critically depends on frequency facilitation of mossy fiber to CA3 synaptic transmission. The HTC-Waves are rapidly boosted by the cognitive enhancer caffeine (5 µM and the stress hormone corticosterone (100 nM. They precisely follow the rhythm of the EC input, involve high-frequency firing (>100 Hz of CA3 pyramidal neurons, and induce NMDA receptor-dependent CA1 LTP within a few seconds. Our study provides the first experimental evidence that synchronous theta-rhythmical spiking of EC stellate cells, as occurring during EC theta oscillations, has the capacity to drive induction of CA1 LTP via the hippocampal trisynaptic pathway. Moreover, we present data pointing to a basic filter mechanism of the hippocampus regarding EC inputs and describe a methodology to reveal alterations in the ‘input-output relationship’ of the hippocampal trisynaptic circuit.

  1. Effect of electroacupuncture on synaptic transmission in dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in cerebral ischemic injured rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haibo Yu; Zhuoxin Yang; Ling Wang; Min Pi; Jiawei Zhang

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Some studies suggest that the long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic transmission may be the basis for the neural synaptic plasticity of hippocampus, but can be evoked by various factors including electroacupuncture.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effect of electroacupuncture on the activities of basic synaptic transmission in dentate gyrus of hippocampus and the changes of high frequency stimulation (HFS) induced activity of synaptic transmission in cerebral ischemic injured rats.DESIGN: A randomized control trial.SETTING: Shenzhen Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine affiliated to Guangzhou University of Traditional Chinese Medicine.MATERIALS: Sixty healthy male Wistar rats, weighing 150-250 g, were provided by the Experimental Animal Center of Guangzhou University of Traditional Chinese Medicine. The experiment began after adaptation of environment for 1 week under standard experimental environment. The main experimental instruments included the programming electrical acupuncture apparatus (PCEA, product of the Institute of Acupuncture and Meridians, Anhui College of Traditional Chinese Medicine) and multichannel physiologic recorder (RM-86, Nihon Konden).METHODS: The experiment was carried out in Guangzhou University of Traditional Chinese Medicine between July 2003 and July 2004. ① Embedding of brain electrodes: In reference of the Pellegrino's rat brain atlas, the bipolar electrode stimulator was embedded into the perforant path (PP) anterior to the entorhinal area with location coordinates of AP 7.5 mm, L 4.2 mm and H 3.0 mm, that is, 7.5 mm posterior to the anterior fontanelle, 4.2 mm laterally on the right side and 3.0 mm under the subcortex. The subcortex recorder electrode coordinates are AP 3.8 mm, L 2.5 mm and H 3.5 mm, located in the granular cell layer of the unilateral dentate gyrus (DG) of hippocampus, at the site of which an opening with the diameter of 1.5 mm was drilled for the purpose of embedding of the stimulating and recording

  2. Bone morphogenic protein signaling is a major determinant of dentate development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Youngshik; Kozlova, Anastasiia; Graf, Daniel; Pleasure, Samuel J.

    2013-01-01

    To understand life-long neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG), characterizing dentate neural stem cells and the signals controlling their development are crucial. In the present study, we show that bone morphogenic protein (Bmp) signaling is a critical regulator of embryonic dentate development, required for initiating neurogenesis in embryonic DG progenitors and required for the establishment of dentate neural stem cells postnatally. We tested the hypothesis that Bmp signaling regulates dentate development in part by controlling the expression of Lef1, a Wnt responsive transcription factor expressed in dentate stem cells and absolutely required for dentate granule cell production. Bmp activation through the Acvr1 receptor induced Lef1 expression and neurogenesis in the embryonic DG. Ectopic expression of Bmp7 in the embryonic midline increased DG neurogenesis and inhibition of local Bmp signaling decreased embryonic DG neurogenesis. Mice with selective loss of Bmp expression due to defective meningeal development or with selective conditional deletion of meningeal Bmp7 also have dentate developmental defects. Conditional deletion of Acvr1 or Smad4 (a downstream target nuclear effector of Bmp signaling) in DG neural stem cells resulted in defects in the postnatal subgranular zone (SGZ) and reduced neurogenesis. These results suggest that Acvr1 mediated meningeal Bmp signaling regulates Lef1 expression in the dentate, regulating embryonic DG neurogenesis, DG neural stem cell niche formation and maintenance. PMID:23595735

  3. Vanillin and 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol promotes cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the dentate gyrus of mice via the increase of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and tropomyosin-related kinase B.

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    Cho, Jeong-Hwi; Park, Joon Ha; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Jae-Chul; Hwang, In Koo; Park, Seung Min; Ahn, Ji Yun; Kim, Dong Won; Cho, Jun Hwi; Kim, Jong-Dai; Kim, Young-Myeong; Won, Moo-Ho; Kang, Il-Jun

    2016-04-01

    4-Hydroxy‑3-methoxybenzaldehyde (vanillin) and 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohol (4-HBA) are well‑known phenolic compounds, which possess various therapeutic properties and are widely found in a variety of plants. In the present study, the effects of vanillin and 4‑HBA were first investigated on cell proliferation, as well as neuronal differentiation and integration of granule cells in the dentate gyrus (DG) of adolescent mice using Ki‑67, doublecortin (DCX) immunohistochemistry and 5‑bromo‑2'‑deoxyuridine (BrdU)/feminizing Locus on X 3 (NeuN) double immunofluorescence. In both the vanillin and 4‑HBA groups, the number of Ki‑67+ cells, DCX+ neuroblasts and BrdU+/NeuN+ neurons were significantly increased in the subgranular zone of the DG, as compared with the vehicle group. In addition, the levels of brain‑derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tropomyosin‑related kinase B (TrkB), a BDNF receptor, were significantly increased in the DG in the vanillin and 4‑HBA groups compared with the vehicle group. These results indicated that vanillin and 4‑HBA enhanced cell proliferation, neuroblast differentiation and integration of granule cells in the DG of adolescent mice . These neurogenic effects of vanillin and 4‑HBA may be closely associated with increases in BDNF and TrkB.

  4. Deletion of the Mouse Homolog of CACNA1C Disrupts Discrete Forms of Hippocampal-Dependent Memory and Neurogenesis within the Dentate Gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temme, Stephanie J; Bell, Ryan Z; Fisher, Grace L; Murphy, Geoffrey G

    2016-01-01

    L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (LVGCCs) have been implicated in various forms of learning, memory, and synaptic plasticity. Within the hippocampus, the LVGCC subtype, CaV1.2 is prominently expressed throughout the dentate gyrus. Despite the apparent high levels of CaV1.2 expression in the dentate gyrus, the role of CaV1.2 in hippocampal- and dentate gyrus-associated forms of learning remain unknown. To address this question, we examined alternate forms of hippocampal-dependent associative and spatial memory in mice lacking the mouse ortholog of CACNA1C (Cacna1c), which encodes CaV1.2, with dentate gyrus function implicated in difficult forms of each task. We found that while the deletion of CaV1.2 did not impair the acquisition of fear of a conditioned context, mice lacking CaV1.2 exhibited deficits in the ability to discriminate between two contexts, one in which the mice were conditioned and one in which they were not. Similarly, CaV1.2 knock-out mice exhibited normal acquisition and recall of the location of the hidden platform in a standard Morris water maze, but were unable to form a memory of the platform location when the task was made more difficult by restricting the number of available spatial cues. Within the dentate gyrus, pan-neuronal deletion of CaV1.2 resulted in decreased cell proliferation and the numbers of doublecortin-positive adult-born neurons, implicating CaV1.2 in adult neurogenesis. These results suggest that CaV1.2 is important for dentate gyrus-associated tasks and may mediate these forms of learning via a role in adult neurogenesis and cell proliferation within the dentate gyrus.

  5. Dentate gyrus-cornu ammonis (CA) 4 volume is decreased and associated with depressive episodes and lipid peroxidation in bipolar II disorder: Longitudinal and cross-sectional analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvsåshagen, Torbjørn; Zuzarte, Pedro; Westlye, Lars T; Bøen, Erlend; Josefsen, Dag; Boye, Birgitte; Hol, Per K; Malt, Ulrik F; Young, L Trevor; Andreazza, Ana C

    2016-12-01

    Reduced dentate gyrus volume and increased oxidative stress have emerged as potential pathophysiological mechanisms in bipolar disorder. However, the relationship between dentate gyrus volume and peripheral oxidative stress markers remains unknown. Here, we examined dentate gyrus-cornu ammonis (CA) 4 volume longitudinally in patients with bipolar II disorder (BD-II) and healthy controls and investigated whether BD-II is associated with elevated peripheral levels of oxidative stress. We acquired high-resolution structural 3T-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images and quantified hippocampal subfield volumes using an automated segmentation algorithm in individuals with BD-II (n=29) and controls (n=33). The participants were scanned twice, at study inclusion and on average 2.4 years later. In addition, we measured peripheral levels of two lipid peroxidation markers (4-hydroxy-2-nonenal [4-HNE] and lipid hydroperoxides [LPH]). First, we demonstrated that the automated hippocampal subfield segmentation technique employed in this work reliably measured dentate gyrus-CA4 volume. Second, we found a decreased left dentate gyrus-CA4 volume in patients and that a larger number of depressive episodes between T1 and T2 predicted greater volume decline. Finally, we showed that 4-HNE was elevated in BD-II and that 4-HNE was negatively associated with left and right dentate gyrus-CA4 volumes in patients. These results are consistent with a role for the dentate gyrus in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder and suggest that depressive episodes and elevated oxidative stress might contribute to hippocampal volume decreases. In addition, these findings provide further support for the hypothesis that peripheral lipid peroxidation markers may reflect brain alterations in bipolar disorders. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Deletion of the Mouse Homolog of CACNA1C Disrupts Discrete Forms of Hippocampal-Dependent Memory and Neurogenesis within the Dentate Gyrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Ryan Z.; Fisher, Grace L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (LVGCCs) have been implicated in various forms of learning, memory, and synaptic plasticity. Within the hippocampus, the LVGCC subtype, CaV1.2 is prominently expressed throughout the dentate gyrus. Despite the apparent high levels of CaV1.2 expression in the dentate gyrus, the role of CaV1.2 in hippocampal- and dentate gyrus-associated forms of learning remain unknown. To address this question, we examined alternate forms of hippocampal-dependent associative and spatial memory in mice lacking the mouse ortholog of CACNA1C (Cacna1c), which encodes CaV1.2, with dentate gyrus function implicated in difficult forms of each task. We found that while the deletion of CaV1.2 did not impair the acquisition of fear of a conditioned context, mice lacking CaV1.2 exhibited deficits in the ability to discriminate between two contexts, one in which the mice were conditioned and one in which they were not. Similarly, CaV1.2 knock-out mice exhibited normal acquisition and recall of the location of the hidden platform in a standard Morris water maze, but were unable to form a memory of the platform location when the task was made more difficult by restricting the number of available spatial cues. Within the dentate gyrus, pan-neuronal deletion of CaV1.2 resulted in decreased cell proliferation and the numbers of doublecortin-positive adult-born neurons, implicating CaV1.2 in adult neurogenesis. These results suggest that CaV1.2 is important for dentate gyrus-associated tasks and may mediate these forms of learning via a role in adult neurogenesis and cell proliferation within the dentate gyrus. PMID:27957527

  7. Gene expression profiling of the hippocampal dentate gyrus in an adult toxicity study captures a variety of neurodevelopmental dysfunctions in rat models of hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraki, Ayako; Saito, Fumiyo; Akane, Hirotoshi; Akahori, Yumi; Imatanaka, Nobuya; Itahashi, Megu; Yoshida, Toshinori; Shibutani, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    We previously found that developmental hypothyroidism changed the expression of genes in the rat hippocampal dentate gyrus, a brain region where adult neurogenesis is known to occur. In the present study, we performed brain region-specific global gene expression profiling in an adult rat hypothyroidism model to see if it reflected the developmental neurotoxicity we saw in the developmental hypothyroidism model. Starting when male rats were 5 weeks old, we administered 6-propyl-2-thiouracil at a doses of 0, 0.1 and 10 mg kg(-1) body weight by gavage for 28 days. We selected four brain regions to represent both cerebral and cerebellar tissues: hippocampal dentate gyrus, cerebral cortex, corpus callosum and cerebellar vermis. We observed significant alterations in the expression of genes related to neural development (Eph family genes and Robo3) in the cerebral cortex and hippocampal dentate gyrus and in the expression of genes related to myelination (Plp1 and Mbp) in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. We observed only minor changes in the expression of these genes in the corpus callosum and cerebellar vermis. We used real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction to confirm Chrdl1, Hes5, Mbp, Plp1, Slit1, Robo3 and the Eph family transcript expression changes. The most significant changes in gene expression were found in the dentate gyrus. Considering that the gene expression profile of the adult dentate gyrus closely related to neurogenesis, 28-day toxicity studies looking at gene expression changes in adult hippocampal dentate gyrus may also detect possible developmental neurotoxic effects.

  8. Immunohistochemical analysis of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) toxicity on the developmental dentate gyrus and hippocampal fimbria in fetal mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yoshihiro; Hirano, Tetsushi; Omotehara, Takuya; Hashimoto, Rie; Umemura, Yuria; Yuasa, Hideto; Masuda, Natsumi; Kubota, Naoto; Minami, Kiichi; Yanai, Shogo; Ishihara-Sugano, Mitsuko; Mantani, Youhei; Yokoyama, Toshifumi; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Hoshi, Nobuhiko

    2015-11-01

    Dioxins are widespread persistent environmental contaminants with adverse impacts on humans and experimental animals. Behavioral and cognitive functions are impaired by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) exposure. TCDD exerts its toxicity via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand-activated transcription factor. The hippocampus, which plays important roles in episodic memory and spatial function, is considered vulnerable to TCDD-induced neurotoxicity, because it contains the AhR. We herein investigated the effects of TCDD toxicity on hippocampal development in embryonic mice. TCDD was administered to dams at 8.5 days postcoitum with a single dose of 20, 200, 2,000 and 5,000 ng/kg body weight (groups T20, T200, T2000 and T5000, respectively), and the brains were dissected from their pups at embryonic day 18.5. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) immunoreactivities in the dentate gyrus (DG) were reduced in the T5000 group. Granular GFAP immunoreactivity was observed in the hippocampal fimbria, and the number of immunoreactive fimbria was significantly decreased in the T5000 group. The number of Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA)-positive cells was decreased in all TCDD-exposed groups and significantly reduced in the T20, T200 and T5000 groups. Together, these results demonstrate that maternal TCDD exposure has adverse impacts on neural stem cells (NSCs), neural precursor cells (NPCs) and granular cells in the DG and disrupts the NSC maintenance and timing of differentiation in the hippocampal fimbria, which in turn interrupt neuronal development in future generations of mice.

  9. Consolidation of remote fear memories involves Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone (CRH) receptor type 1-mediated enhancement of AMPA receptor GluR1 signaling in the dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoeringer, Christoph K; Henes, Kathrin; Eder, Matthias; Dahlhoff, Maik; Wurst, Wolfgang; Holsboer, Florian; Deussing, Jan M; Moosmang, Sven; Wotjak, Carsten T

    2012-02-01

    Persistent dreadful memories and hyperarousal constitute prominent psychopathological features of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Here, we used a contextual fear conditioning paradigm to demonstrate that conditional genetic deletion of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) receptor 1 within the limbic forebrain in mice significantly reduced remote, but not recent, associative and non-associative fear memories. Per os treatment with the selective CRHR1 antagonist DMP696 (3 mg/kg) attenuated consolidation of remote fear memories, without affecting their expression and retention. This could be achieved, if DMP696 was administered for 1 week starting as late as 24 h after foot shock. Furthermore, by combining electrophysiological recordings and western blot analyses, we demonstrate a delayed-onset and long-lasting increase in AMPA receptor (AMPAR) GluR1-mediated signaling in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the dorsal hippocampus 1 month after foot shock. These changes were absent from CRHR1-deficient mice and after DMP696 treatment. Inactivation of hippocampal GluR1-containing AMPARs by antisense oligonucleotides or philantotoxin 433 confirmed the behavioral relevance of AMPA-type glutamatergic neurotransmission in maintaining the high levels of remote fear in shocked mice with intact CRHR1 signaling. We conclude that limbic CRHR1 receptors enhance the consolidation of remote fear memories in the first week after foot shock by increasing the expression of Ca(2+)-permeable GluR1-containing AMPARs in the DG. These findings suggest both receptors as rational targets for the prevention and therapy, respectively, of psychopathology associated with exaggerated fear memories, such as PTSD.

  10. Different patterns of morphological changes in the hippocampus and dentate gyrus accompany the differential expression of disability following nerve injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalman, Eszter; Keay, Kevin A

    2014-01-01

    Physical and psychological trauma which results in mood disorders and the disruption of complex behaviours is associated with reductions in hippocampal volume. Clinical evaluation of neuropathic pain reveals mood and behavioural change in a significant number of patients. A rat model of neuropathic injury results in complex behavioural changes in a subpopulation (∼30%) of injured rats; these changes are co-morbid with a range of other ‘disabilities’. The specific objective of this study was to determine in rats the morphology of the hippocampus and dentate gyrus in individuals with and without complex behavioural disruptions following a constriction injury of the sciatic nerve, and to determine whether rats that develop disabilities following nerve injury have a reduced hippocampal volume compared with injured rats with no disabilities. The social behaviours of nerve-injured rats were evaluated before and after nerve injury. The morphology of the hippocampus of rats with and without behavioural disruptions was compared in serial histological sections. Single-housing and repeated social-interaction testing had no effect on the morphology of either the hippocampus or the dentate gyrus. Rats with transient or ongoing disability identified by behavioural disruption following sciatic nerve injury, show bilateral reductions in hippocampal volume, and lateralised reduction in the dentate gyrus (left side). Disabled rats display a combination of behavioural and physiological changes, which resemble many of the criteria used clinically to diagnose mood disorders. They also show reductions in the volume of the hippocampus similar to people with clinically diagnosed mood disorders. The sciatic nerve injury model reveals a similarity to the human neuropathic pain presentation presenting an anatomically specific focus for the investigation of the neural mechanisms underpinning the co-morbidity of chronic pain and mood disorder. PMID:25269883

  11. Prolonged protein deprivation, but not food restriction, affects parvalbumin-containing interneurons in the dentate gyrus of adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Armando; Castro, João Paulo; Pereira, Pedro Alberto; Andrade, José Paulo

    2013-07-19

    Several studies have demonstrated the vulnerability of the hippocampal formation to malnutrition. In this study, we compared the effects of food restriction and protein malnutrition in the total number of neurons of the dentate gyrus and in the number of parvalbumin-immunoreactive (PV-IR) interneurons, which are related to the control of calcium homeostasis and fine tuning of the hippocampal circuits. Two month-old rats were randomly assigned to control, food-restricted and low-protein diet groups. After 6 months, 10 rats from the low-protein diet group were selected at random and fed with a normal protein diet for 2 months. The total number of granule and hilar cells was reduced in protein-deprived rats and the nutritional reestablishment with a normal protein diet did not recover neuron numbers. Protein deprivation increased the number of PV-IR interneurons in the granule cell layer and hilus, but their number returned to values similar to controls after nutritional rehabilitation. Food restriction did not affect the total number of neurons or the density of PV-IR interneurons in the dentate gyrus. These results support the view that protein deprivation may disturb calcium homeostasis, leading to neuronal death. The up-regulation of PV-IR cells may reflect a protective mechanism to counteract the calcium overload and protect the remaining neurons of the dentate gyrus. This imbalance in cell-ratio favoring GABAergic interneurons may justify some learning and memory impairments described in protein-deprived animals. This contrast between the results of food restriction and protein deprivation should be further analyzed in future studies.

  12. Chronic Fluoxetine Induces the Enlargement of Perforant Path-Granule Cell Synapses in the Mouse Dentate Gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitahara, Yosuke; Ohta, Keisuke; Hasuo, Hiroshi; Shuto, Takahide; Kuroiwa, Mahomi; Sotogaku, Naoki; Togo, Akinobu; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro; Nishi, Akinori

    2016-01-01

    A selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor is the most commonly prescribed antidepressant for the treatment of major depression. However, the mechanisms underlying the actions of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are not fully understood. In the dentate gyrus, chronic fluoxetine treatment induces increased excitability of mature granule cells (GCs) as well as neurogenesis. The major input to the dentate gyrus is the perforant path axons (boutons) from the entorhinal cortex (layer II). Through voltage-sensitive dye imaging, we found that the excitatory neurotransmission of the perforant path synapse onto the GCs in the middle molecular layer of the mouse dentate gyrus (perforant path-GC synapse) is enhanced after chronic fluoxetine treatment (15 mg/kg/day, 14 days). Therefore, we further examined whether chronic fluoxetine treatment affects the morphology of the perforant path-GC synapse, using FIB/SEM (focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy). A three-dimensional reconstruction of dendritic spines revealed the appearance of extremely large-sized spines after chronic fluoxetine treatment. The large-sized spines had a postsynaptic density with a large volume. However, chronic fluoxetine treatment did not affect spine density. The presynaptic boutons that were in contact with the large-sized spines were large in volume, and the volumes of the mitochondria and synaptic vesicles inside the boutons were correlated with the size of the boutons. Thus, the large-sized perforant path-GC synapse induced by chronic fluoxetine treatment contains synaptic components that correlate with the synapse size and that may be involved in enhanced glutamatergic neurotransmission.

  13. Regulation of the ERK pathway in the dentate gyrus by in vivo dopamine D1 receptor stimulation requires glutamatergic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangarossa, Giuseppe; Valjent, Emmanuel

    2012-11-01

    Acute systemic administration of the dopamine D1/D5 receptors (D1Rs) agonist, SKF81297, activates the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERK) pathway selectively in the granule cells of the dentate gyrus. In this study, we examined the mechanisms involved in this regulation and investigated the molecular components that could promote ERK-dependent transcription and translation. SKF81297 induced phosphorylation of ERK and histone H3 required intact glutamatergic transmission. Blockade of glutamate release achieved by the mGluR2/3 agonist, LY354740 or the selective adenosine A1R agonist, CCPA as well as neurotoxic lesions of lateral entorhinal cortex reduced the ability of SKF81297 to induce ERK activation in the dentate gyrus. This activation required the combined stimulation of NR2B-containing NMDARs, mGluR1 and mGluR5. SKF81297 evoked phosphorylation of the ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) selectively at the Ser235/236 site while the Ser240/244 site remains unchanged. The SKF81297 induced increased phosphorylation of rpS6 was dependent on PKC and ERK/p90RSK activation. Surprisingly, administration of D1Rs agonist suppressed mTORC1/p70S6K pathway suggesting an mTOR-independent regulation of rpS6 phosphorylation. Taken together, our results show that intact glutamatergic transmission plays a major role in the regulation of ERK-dependent phosphorylation of histone H3 and rpS6 observed in the mouse dentate gyrus after systemic administration of SKF81297.

  14. A Computational Model Of Episodic Memory Encoding In Dentate Gyrus Hippocampus Sub Region As Pattern Separator Using ART Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhakar Tripathi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a computational model of encoding and separation of episodic events via Dentate Gyrus sub region of hippocampus. The proposed model is implemented using adaptive resonance theory (ART neural network. The model incorporates the proposed method encoding of episodes in binary patterns. The proposed model is capable of achieving high level of pattern encoding and separation. The separation achieved for different episodes and events shown by the results are very good depending upon the vigilance parameter of the model. Vigilance parameter is assumed to be correlated to attention attribute while perceiving an episode of an event.

  15. MDMA-induced loss of parvalbumin interneurons within the dentate gyrus is mediated by 5HT2A and NMDA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Stuart A; Gudelsky, Gary A; Yamamoto, Bryan K

    2015-08-15

    MDMA is a widely abused psychostimulant which causes a rapid and robust release of the monoaminergic neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin. Recently, it was shown that MDMA increases extracellular glutamate concentrations in the dorsal hippocampus, which is dependent on serotonin release and 5HT2A/2C receptor activation. The increased extracellular glutamate concentration coincides with a loss of parvalbumin-immunoreactive (PV-IR) interneurons of the dentate gyrus region. Given the known susceptibility of PV interneurons to excitotoxicity, we examined whether MDMA-induced increases in extracellular glutamate in the dentate gyrus are necessary for the loss of PV cells in rats. Extracellular glutamate concentrations increased in the dentate gyrus during systemic and local administration of MDMA. Administration of the NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801, during systemic injections of MDMA, prevented the loss of PV-IR interneurons seen 10 days after MDMA exposure. Local administration of MDL100907, a selective 5HT2A receptor antagonist, prevented the increases in glutamate caused by reverse dialysis of MDMA directly into the dentate gyrus and prevented the reduction of PV-IR. These findings provide evidence that MDMA causes decreases in PV within the dentate gyrus through a 5HT2A receptor-mediated increase in glutamate and subsequent NMDA receptor activation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A septo-temporal molecular gradient of sfrp3 in the dentate gyrus differentially regulates quiescent adult hippocampal neural stem cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiaqi; Bonaguidi, Michael A; Jun, Heechul; Guo, Junjie U; Sun, Gerald J; Will, Brett; Yang, Zhengang; Jang, Mi-Hyeon; Song, Hongjun; Ming, Guo-li; Christian, Kimberly M

    2015-09-04

    A converging body of evidence indicates that levels of adult hippocampal neurogenesis vary along the septo-temporal axis of the dentate gyrus, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this regional heterogeneity are not known. We previously identified a niche mechanism regulating proliferation and neuronal development in the adult mouse dentate gyrus resulting from the activity-regulated expression of secreted frizzled-related protein 3 (sfrp3) by mature neurons, which suppresses activation of radial glia-like neural stem cells (RGLs) through inhibition of Wingless/INT (WNT) protein signaling. Here, we show that activation rates within the quiescent RGL population decrease gradually along the septo-temporal axis in the adult mouse dentate gyrus, as defined by MCM2 expression in RGLs. Using in situ hybridization and quantitative real-time PCR, we identified an inverse septal-to-temporal increase in the expression of sfrp3 that emerges during postnatal development. Elimination of sfrp3 and its molecular gradient leads to increased RGL activation, preferentially in the temporal region of the adult dentate gyrus. Our study identifies a niche mechanism that contributes to the graded distribution of neurogenesis in the adult dentate gyrus and has important implications for understanding functional differences associated with adult hippocampal neurogenesis along the septo-temporal axis.

  17. Chronic psychosocial stress impairs early LTP but not late LTP in the dentate gyrus of at-risk rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkadhi, Karim A; Tran, Trinh T

    2014-11-07

    The CA1 and dentate gyrus regions of the hippocampus are physically and functionally closely related but they react differently to insults. This study examined the effect of chronic psychosocial stress on the dentate gyrus of an at-risk (preclinical) rat model of Alzheimer's disease (subAβ rats). Chronic psychosocial stress was produced using a rat intruder model. The at-risk rat model of Alzheimer's disease was created by osmotic pump infusion of sub-pathological dose of Aβ (160 pmol Aβ1-42/day i.c.v) for 14 days. Electrophysiological methods were used to evoke and record early and late phase LTP in the dentate gyrus of anesthetized rats, and immunoblotting was used to measure levels of memory-related signaling molecules in the same region. Electrophysiological and molecular tests in the dentate gyrus showed that subAβ rats or stressed rats were not different from control rats. However, when the subAβ rats were chronically stressed, the combined treatments severely suppressed early phase LTP without affecting the late phase LTP of dentate gyrus. Additionally, in the chronically stressed subAβ rats the expected elevation of levels of phosphorylated CaMKII did not materialize after expression of early phase LTP suggesting impaired phosphorylation, which may explain the severely blocked early phase LTP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Long-term administration of scopolamine interferes with nerve cell proliferation, differentiation and migration in adult mouse hippocampal dentate gyrus, but it does not induce cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Bing Chun; Park, Joon Ha; Chen, Bai Hui; Cho, Jeong-Hwi; Kim, In Hye; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Jae-Chul; Hwang, In Koo; Cho, Jun Hwi; Lee, Yun Lyul; Kang, Il-Jun; Won, Moo-Ho

    2014-10-01

    Long-term administration of scopolamine, a muscarinic receptor antagonist, can inhibit the survival of newly generated cells, but its effect on the proliferation, differentiation and migration of nerve cells in the adult mouse hippocampal dentate gyrus remain poorly understood. In this study, we used immunohistochemistry and western blot methods to weekly detect the biological behaviors of nerve cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of adult mice that received intraperitoneal administration of scopolamine for 4 weeks. Expression of neuronal nuclear antigen (NeuN; a neuronal marker) and Fluoro-Jade B (a marker for the localization of neuronal degeneration) was also detected. After scopolamine treatment, mouse hippocampal neurons did not die, and Ki-67 (a marker for proliferating cells)-immunoreactive cells were reduced in number and reached the lowest level at 4 weeks. Doublecortin (DCX; a marker for newly generated neurons)-immunoreactive cells were gradually shortened in length and reduced in number with time. After scopolamine treatment for 4 weeks, nearly all of the 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled newly generated cells were located in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus, but they did not migrate into the granule cell layer. Few mature BrdU/NeuN double-labeled cells were seen in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus. These findings suggest that long-term administration of scopolamine interferes with the proliferation, differentiation and migration of nerve cells in the adult mouse hippocampal dentate gyrus, but it does not induce cell death.

  19. Effects of Scutellaria baicalensis on neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and on spatial memory of adult rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun-Hwa Lee; Byung-II Min; Byung-soo Ahn; Bong-soo Lim; Seong-Kyu Kim; Sam-Ki Kim; Dae-II Lee; Sung-Rae Cho; Deok-Gon Kim; Jae-Bok Han

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the effects of ethanol extracted Scutellaria baicalensis (EESB) on spatial memory function and neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were orally administered 50, 100, or 200 mg/kg of EESB for 6 successive days. The radial-arm maze test showed that 200 mg/kg of EESB improved the spatial memory of adult rats. Confocal microscopy results showed that 100 mg/kg of EESB increased the number of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)- and neuron-specific nuclear protein-positive cells in the granular cell layer, and that 100 and 200 mg/kg of EESB increased the number of BrdU-/neuron-specific nuclear protein-positive cells in the sub-granular zone. 200 mg/kg of EESB increased the number of BrdU-/glial fibrillary acid protein-positive cells in the subgranular zone. These findings indicate that EESB can effectively promote neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and improve spatial memory function.

  20. Properties of doublecortin-(DCX)-expressing cells in the piriform cortex compared to the neurogenic dentate gyrus of adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klempin, Friederike; Kronenberg, Golo; Cheung, Giselle; Kettenmann, Helmut; Kempermann, Gerd

    2011-01-01

    The piriform cortex receives input from the olfactory bulb and (via the entorhinal cortex) sends efferents to the hippocampus, thereby connecting the two canonical neurogenic regions of the adult rodent brain. Doublecortin (DCX) is a cytoskeleton-associated protein that is expressed transiently in the course of adult neurogenesis. Interestingly, the adult piriform cortex, which is usually considered non-neurogenic (even though some reports exist that state otherwise), also contains an abundant population of DCX-positive cells. We asked how similar these cells would be to DCX-positive cells in the course of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Using BAC-generated transgenic mice that express GFP under the DCX promoter, we studied DCX-expression and electrophysiological properties of DCX-positive cells in the mouse piriform cortex in comparison with the dentate gyrus. While one class of cells in the piriform cortex indeed showed features similar to newly generated immature granule neurons, the majority of DCX cells in the piriform cortex was mature and revealed large Na+ currents and multiple action potentials. Furthermore, when proliferative activity was assessed, we found that all DCX-expressing cells in the piriform cortex were strictly postmitotic, suggesting that no DCX-positive "neuroblasts" exist here as they do in the dentate gyrus. We conclude that DCX in the piriform cortex marks a unique population of postmitotic neurons with a subpopulation that retains immature characteristics associated with synaptic plasticity. DCX is thus, per se, no marker of neurogenesis but might be associated more broadly with plasticity.

  1. Effect of low-frequency stimulation on kindling induced changes in rat dentate gyrus: an ultrastructural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohani, Razieh; Piryaei, Abbas; Jahanshahi, Ali; Sadeghi, Yousef; Mirnajafi-Zadeh, Javad

    2014-03-01

    It has been shown that low-frequency stimulation (LFS) can induce anticonvulsant effects. In this study, the effect of different LFS frequencies on kindling induced behavioral and ultrastructural changes was investigated. For induction of kindled seizures in rats, stimulating and recording electrodes were implanted in perforant path and dentate gyrus, respectively. Animals were stimulated in a rapid kindling manner. Different groups of animals received LFS at different frequencies (0.5, 1 and 5 Hz) following kindling stimulations and their effects on kindling rate were determined using behavioral and ultrastructural studies. Kindling stimulations were applied for 7 days. Then, the animals were sacrificed and their dentate gyrus was sampled for ultrastructural studies under electron microscopy. All three used LFS frequencies (0.5, 1 and 5 Hz) had a significant inhibitory effect on kindling rate and decreased afterdischarge duration and the number of stimulations to achieve stage 4 and 5 seizures significantly. In addition, application of LFS prevented the increase in the post-synaptic density and induction of concave synaptic vesicles following kindling. There was no significant change between anticonvulsant effects of LFS at different frequencies. Obtained results show that LFS application can prevent the neuronal hyperexcitability by preventing the ultrastructural changes during kindling and this may be one of the mechanisms of LFS anticonvulsant effects.

  2. Exposure to forced swim stress alters local circuit activity and plasticity in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarom, Orli; Maroun, Mouna; Richter-Levin, Gal

    2008-01-01

    Studies have shown that, depending on its severity and context, stress can affect neural plasticity. Most related studies focused on synaptic plasticity and long-term potentiation (LTP) of principle cells. However, evidence suggests that following high-frequency stimulation, which induces LTP in principal cells, modifications also take place at the level of complex interactions with interneurons within the dentate gyrus, that is, at the local circuit level. So far, the possible effects of stress on local circuit activity and plasticity were not studied. Therefore, we set out to examine the possible alterations in local circuit activity and plasticity following exposure to stress. Local circuit activity and plasticity were measured by using frequency dependant inhibition (FDI) and commissural modulation protocols following exposure to a 15 minute-forced swim trial. Exposure to stress did not alter FDI. The application of theta-burst stimulation (TBS) reduced FDI in both control and stressed rats, but this type of plasticity was greater in stressed rats. Commissural-induced inhibition was significantly higher in stressed rats both before and after applying theta-burst stimulation. These findings indicate that the exposure to acute stress affects aspects of local circuit activity and plasticity in the dentate gyrus. It is possible that these alterations underlie some of the behavioral consequences of the stress experience.

  3. Exposure to Forced Swim Stress Alters Local Circuit Activity and Plasticity in the Dentate Gyrus of the Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orli Yarom

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that, depending on its severity and context, stress can affect neural plasticity. Most related studies focused on synaptic plasticity and long-term potentiation (LTP of principle cells. However, evidence suggests that following high-frequency stimulation, which induces LTP in principal cells, modifications also take place at the level of complex interactions with interneurons within the dentate gyrus, that is, at the local circuit level. So far, the possible effects of stress on local circuit activity and plasticity were not studied. Therefore, we set out to examine the possible alterations in local circuit activity and plasticity following exposure to stress. Local circuit activity and plasticity were measured by using frequency dependant inhibition (FDI and commissural modulation protocols following exposure to a 15 minute-forced swim trial. Exposure to stress did not alter FDI. The application of theta-burst stimulation (TBS reduced FDI in both control and stressed rats, but this type of plasticity was greater in stressed rats. Commissural-induced inhibition was significantly higher in stressed rats both before and after applying theta-burst stimulation. These findings indicate that the exposure to acute stress affects aspects of local circuit activity and plasticity in the dentate gyrus. It is possible that these alterations underlie some of the behavioral consequences of the stress experience.

  4. Melatonin restores normal Bax and Bcl-2 protein expression in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in pinealectomized rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shengchang Zhang; Shuang Zhao; Lu Bai; Mingming Guan; Jielin Mo; Ling Lan

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we sought to elucidate the effects of melatonin on learning and memory as well as apoptosis and expression of the Bax or Bcl-2 proteins in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in pinealectomized rats. Using the Morris water maze and the olfactory memory tests, we found that the average escape latency in pinealectomized rats was clearly increased compared with sham-operated rats. Moreover, the average escape latency in the melatonin-treated and pinealectomized rats was longer than that in the sham-operated rats and shorter than that in the pinealectomized and untreated rats. Immunohistochemistry and terminal-deoxynucleoitidyl transferase mediated nick end labeling (TUNEL) showed that there were fewer Bax immunoreactive cells and TUNEL-positive (apoptotic) cells but more Bcl-2 immunoreactive cells in the melatonin-treated rats compared with the pinealectomized rats. The sham-operated rats showed numbers of these cells similar to the melatonin-treated rats. These experimental findings demonstrate that melatonin treatment may reduce abnormal apoptosis by promoting gene expression of Bax and suppressing gene expression of Bcl-2 in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in pinealectomized rats. These effects appear to result in the inhibition of cellular apoptosis and the improvement of spatial learning and memory in pinealectomized rats.

  5. Differential expression of cytoskeletal proteins in the dendrites of parvalbumin-positive interneurons versus granule cells in the adult rat dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haas Ratzliff, A; Soltesz, I

    2000-01-01

    Parvalbumin-positive interneurons and granule cells of the dentate gyrus exhibit characteristic differences in morphological, cytochemical, physiological, and pathophysiological properties. Several of these defining features, including dendritic morphology, spine density, and sensitivity to insults, are likely to be influenced by the neuronal cytoskeleton. The data in this paper demonstrate striking differences in the expression levels of all three neurofilament triplet proteins, as well as alpha-internexin and beta-tubulin III, between the parvalbumin-positive interneurons and dentate granule cells. Therefore, the molecular composition of intermediate filaments and microtubules in the dendritic domain of parvalbumin-positive dentate interneurons is distinct from the cytoskeleton of neighboring granule cells, indicating the existence of highly cell type-specific cytoskeletal architecture within the dentate gyrus.

  6. Activation of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 Impairs the Dendritic Arborization of Newborn Neurons in the Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus through the AMPK and Akt Signaling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujing Tian

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurite growth is an important process for the adult hippocampal neurogenesis which is regulated by a specific range of the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4 is a calcium-permeable channel and activation of it causes an increase in [Ca2+]i. We recently reported that TRPV4 activation promotes the proliferation of stem cells in the adult hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG. The present study aimed to examine the effect of TRPV4 activation on the dendrite morphology of newborn neurons in the adult hippocampal DG. Here, we report that intracerebroventricular injection of the TRPV4 agonist GSK1016790A for 5 days (GSK1016790A-injected mice reduced the number of doublecortin immunopositive (DCX+ cells and DCX+ fibers in the hippocampal DG, showing the impaired dendritic arborization of newborn neurons. The phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (p-AMPK protein level increased from 30 min to 2 h, and then decreased from 1 to 5 days after GSK1016790A injection. The phosphorylated protein kinase B (p-Akt protein level decreased from 30 min to 5 days after GSK1016790A injection; this decrease was markedly attenuated by the AMPK antagonist compound C (CC, but not by the AMPK agonist AICAR. Moreover, the phosphorylated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR and p70 ribosomal S6 kinase (p70S6k protein levels were decreased by GSK1016790A; these changes were sensitive to 740 Y-P and CC. The phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β at Y216 was increased by GSK1016790A, and this change was accompanied by increased phosphorylation of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2 and collapsin response mediator protein-2 (CRMP-2. These changes were markedly blocked by 740 Y-P and CC. Finally, GSK1016790A-induced decrease of DCX+ cells and DCX+ fibers was markedly attenuated by 740 Y-P and CC, but was unaffected by AICAR. We conclude that TRPV4 activation impairs the dendritic arborization of newborn

  7. The multi-herbal formula Chong-Myung-Tang improves spatial memory and increases cell genesis in the dentate gyrus of aged mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Zhang, Mingwei; Zhang, Ruifen; Lee, Mira; Wang, Zhen; Hou, Jingang; Sung, Chang-Keun

    2014-01-01

    Chong-Myung-Tang (CMT) is a multi-herbal formula that has been used to improve memory. However, the potential mechanism remains unknown. The present study investigated the effects of CMT (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg) on spatial memory of aged mice. The behavioral training tests indicated that 200 mg/kg CMT treatment can significantly improve spatial memory of aged mice in the Morris water maze. Moreover, cell survival was examined by injecting bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) on the first three days. The result showed that 200 mg/kg CMT treatment significantly increased cell survival in the dentate gyrus. Cell proliferation was determined by injecting BrdU 2 h before the mice were killed. The result suggested that CMT treatments had no influence on cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus. Thus, an increase in cell survival in the dentate gyrus stimulated by CMT may be involved in the effect of CMT on spatial memory improvement.

  8. Late Effect of Developmental Exposure to 3,3'-Iminodipropionitrile on Neurogenesis in the Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus of Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa-Baba, Yasuko; Tanaka, Takeshi; Watanabe, Yousuke; Wang, Liyun; Itahashi, Megu; Yoshida, Toshinori; Shibutani, Makoto

    2017-02-06

    The effects of developmental exposure to 3,3'-iminodipropionitrile (IDPN), a neurotoxicant that causes proximal axonopathy, on mouse hippocampal neurogenesis was examined. Pregnant mice were exposed to IDPN at 0, 600, or 1200 ppm in their drinking water from gestational day 6 to postnatal day (PND) 21. On PND 21, male offspring showed increased postmitotic neuron-specific NeuN-immunoreactive((+)) granule cell numbers in the dentate subgranular zone (SGZ) and granule cell layer (GCL) and decreased glutamate receptor gene Grin2d levels in the dentate gyrus at 1200 ppm. On PND 77, decreased numbers were observed for TBR2(+) progenitor cells in the SGZ at ≥600 ppm and GFAP(+) stem cells, DCX(+) progenitor cells and immature granule cells, NeuN(+) immature and mature granule cells, PCNA(+) proliferating cells in the SGZ and/or GCL, and immunoreactive cells for ARC or FOS, immediate-early gene products related to neuronal and synaptic plasticity, in the GCL at 1200 ppm. Additionally, at 1200 ppm of IDPN, downregulation of Kit, the gene encoding the stem cell factor (SCF) receptor, and upregulation of Kitl, encoding SCF, were observed in the dentate gyrus. Therefore, maternal IDPN exposure in mice affects neurogenesis involving glutamatergic signals at the end of developmental exposure, with late effects suppressing SGZ cell proliferation, reducing the broad range of granule cell lineage population, which may be responsible for SCF receptor downregulation. The upregulated SCF was likely a feedback response to the decreased receptor level. These results suggest that reduced SCF signaling may cause suppressed neuronal and synaptic plasticity.

  9. Growth hormone and melatonin prevent age-related alteration in apoptosis processes in the dentate gyrus of male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kireev, R A; Vara, E; Tresguerres, J A F

    2013-08-01

    It has been suggested that the age-related decrease in the number of neurons in the hippocampus that leads to alterations in brain function, may be associated with an increase in apoptosis due to the reduced secretion of growth hormone (GH) and/or melatonin in old animals. In order to investigate this possibility, male Wistar rats of 22 months of age were divided into three groups. One group remained untreated and acted as the control group. The second was treated with growth hormone (hGH) for 10 weeks (2 mg/kg/d sc) and the third was subjected to melatonin treatment (1 mg/kg/d) in the drinking water for the same time. A group of 2-months-old male rats was used as young controls. All rats were killed by decapitation at more than 24 month of age and dentate gyri of the hippocampi were collected. Aging in the dentate gyrus was associated with an increase in apoptosis promoting markers (Bax, Bad and AIF) and with the reduction of some anti-apoptotic ones (XIAP, NIAP, Mcl-1). Expressions of sirtuin 1 and 2 (SIRT1 and 2) as well as levels of HSP 70 were decreased in the dentate gyrus of old rats. GH treatment was able to reduce the pro/anti-apoptotic ratio to levels observed in young animals and also to increase SIRT2. Melatonin reduced also expression of pro-apoptotic genes and proteins (Bax, Bad and AIF), and increased levels of myeloid cell leukemia-1 proteins and SIRT1. Both treatments were able to reduce apoptosis and to enhance survival markers in this part of the hippocampus.

  10. Expression of the AMPA Receptor Subunits GluR1 and GluR2 is Associated with Granule Cell Maturation in the Dentate Gyrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagihara, Hideo; Ohira, Koji; Toyama, Keiko; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    The dentate gyrus produces new granule neurons throughout adulthood in mammals from rodents to humans. During granule cell maturation, defined markers are expressed in a highly regulated sequential process, which is necessary for directed neuronal differentiation. In the present study, we show that α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methy-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA) receptor subunits GluR1 and GluR2 are expressed in differentiated granule cells, but not in stem cells, in neonatal, and adult dentate gyrus. Using markers for neural progenitors, immature and mature granule cells, we found that GluR1 and GluR2 were expressed mainly in mature cells and in some immature cells. A time-course analysis of 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine staining revealed that granule cells express GluR1 around 3 weeks after being generated. In mice heterozygous for the alpha-isoform of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, a putative animal model of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder in which dentate gyrus granule cells fail to mature normally, GluR1 and GluR2 immunoreactivities were substantially downregulated in the dentate gyrus granule cells. In the granule cells of mutant mice, the expression of both presynaptic and postsynaptic markers was decreased, suggesting that GluR1 and GluR2 are also associated with synaptic maturation. Moreover, GluR1 and GluR2 were also expressed in mature granule cells of the neonatal dentate gyrus. Taken together, these findings indicate that GluR1 and GluR2 expression closely correlates with the neuronal maturation state, and that GluR1 and GluR2 are useful markers for mature granule cells in the dentate gyrus. PMID:21927594

  11. 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine increases excitability in the dentate gyrus: role of 5HT2A receptor-induced PGE2 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Stuart A; Huff, Courtney; Chiaia, Nicolas; Gudelsky, Gary A; Yamamoto, Bryan K

    2016-03-01

    3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) is a widely abused psychostimulant, which causes release of serotonin in various forebrain regions. Recently, we reported that MDMA increases extracellular glutamate concentrations in the dentate gyrus, via activation of 5HT2A receptors. We examined the role of prostaglandin signaling in mediating the effects of 5HT2A receptor activation on the increases in extracellular glutamate and the subsequent long-term loss of parvalbumin interneurons in the dentate gyrus caused by MDMA. Administration of MDMA into the dentate gyrus of rats increased PGE2 concentrations which was prevented by coadministration of MDL100907, a 5HT2A receptor antagonist. MDMA-induced increases in extracellular glutamate were inhibited by local administration of SC-51089, an inhibitor of the EP1 prostaglandin receptor. Systemic administration of SC-51089 during injections of MDMA prevented the decreases in parvalbumin interneurons observed 10 days later. The loss of parvalbumin immunoreactivity after MDMA exposure coincided with a decrease in paired-pulse inhibition and afterdischarge threshold in the dentate gyrus. These changes were prevented by inhibition of EP1 and 5HT2A receptors during MDMA. Additional experiments revealed an increased susceptibility to kainic acid-induced seizures in MDMA-treated rats, which could be prevented with SC51089 treatments during MDMA exposure. Overall, these findings suggest that 5HT2A receptors mediate MDMA-induced PGE2 signaling and subsequent increases in glutamate. This signaling mediates parvalbumin cell losses as well as physiologic changes in the dentate gyrus, suggesting that the lack of the inhibition provided by these neurons increases the excitability within the dentate gyrus of MDMA-treated rats. We hypothesized that the widely abused psychostimulant MDMA causes a loss of parvalbumin (PV) cells and increases excitability in the dentate gyrus. MDMA increases serotonin (5HT) release and activates 5HT2A

  12. The contrasting effects of dendrotoxins and other potassium channel blockers in the CA1 and dentate gyrus regions of rat hippocampal slices

    OpenAIRE

    Southan, A P; Owen, D G

    1997-01-01

    The effects of potassium channel blocking compounds on synaptic transmission in the CA1 and dentate gyrus regions of the rat hippocampus were examined by means of simultaneous field potential recording techniques in brain slices.4-Aminopyridine (4-AP) enhanced the excitatory postsynaptic potential (e.p.s.p.) and induced multiple population spike responses in both regions. EC50 values were 6.7 μM in the CA1 (n=5) and 161.7 μM (n=5) in the dentate gyrus.Tetraethylammonium (TEA) increased the am...

  13. Expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase and identification of GABAergic cells in the ischemic rat dentate gyrus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Georg Johannes; Dogonowski, Anne-Marie; Finsen, Bente

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the glutamic acid dexcarboxylase (GAD) mRNA and protein isoforms as markers for ischemic loss of GABAergic neurons in the dentate hilus. Stereological counts of these neurons were performed in rats surviving 8 days after 10 min of transient forebrain ischemia, and in control...

  14. Expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase and identification of GABAergic cells in the ischemic rat dentate gyrus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Georg Johannes; Dogonowski, Anne-Marie; Finsen, Bente

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the glutamic acid dexarboxylase (GAD) mRNA and protein isoforms as markers for ischemic loss of GABAergic neurons in the dentate hilus. Stereological counts of these neurons were performed in rats surviving 8 days after 10 min of transient forebrain ischemia, and in control...

  15. Expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase and identification of GABAergic cells in the ischemic rat dentate gyrus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Georg Johannes; Dogonowski, Anne-Marie; Finsen, Bente;

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the glutamic acid dexarboxylase (GAD) mRNA and protein isoforms as markers for ischemic loss of GABAergic neurons in the dentate hilus. Stereological counts of these neurons were performed in rats surviving 8 days after 10 min of transient forebrain ischemia, and in control...

  16. A STEREOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF THE EFFECT OF EARLY POSTNATAL ETHANOL EXPOSURE ON NEURONAL NUMBERS IN RAT DENTATE GYRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takanori Miki

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Maternal ethanol ingestion during pregnancy can cause fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS in their offspring. Among the symptoms of FAS, damage to the central nervous system has emerged as one of the most serious problems. We have previously shown that a relatively high dose of ethanol exposure during early postnatal life can cause alterations in spatial learning ability. This ability is controlled, at least in part, by the hippocampal formation. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether exposure of rat pups to ethanol during early postnatal life had effects on the total number of the dentate gyrus neurons. Wistar rats were exposed to a relatively high daily dose of ethanol between postnatal days 10 to 15. Ethanol exposure was achieved by placing rat pups in a chamber containing ethanol vapour for 3 hours a day. The blood ethanol concentration was found to be about 430 mg/dL at the end of the exposure period. Groups of ethanol treated (ET, separation controls (SC and mother reared controls (MRC were anaesthetised and killed at 16-days-of-age by perfusion with phosphate-buffered 2.5% glutaraldehyde. The Cavalieri principle was used to determine the volume of subdivisions of the dentate gyrus, and the physical disector method was used to estimate the numerical densities of neurons within each subdivision. The total number of neurons was calculated by multiplying estimates of the numerical density with the volume. There was, on average, about 421,000 granule cells in all three treatment groups. In the hilus region, ET rats had about 27,000 neuronal cells. This value was significantly smaller than the average of 38,000 such neurons estimated to be present in both MRC and SC animals. It is concluded that neurons in the hilus region of the dentate gyrus may be particularly vulnerable to the effects of a high dose of ethanol exposure during PND 10-15. It is likely that this deficit was due to neuronal death induced by some mechanisms related to

  17. Functional analysis of neurovascular adaptations to exercise in the dentate gyrus of young adult mice associated with cognitive gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Peter J; Brzezinska, Weronika J; Puchalski, Emily K; Krone, David A; Rhodes, Justin S

    2009-10-01

    The discovery that aerobic exercise increases adult hippocampal neurogenesis and can enhance cognitive performance holds promise as a model for regenerative medicine. This study adds two new pieces of information to the rapidly growing field. First, we tested whether exercise increases vascular density in the granular layer of the dentate gyrus, whole hippocampus, and striatum in C57BL/6J mice known to display procognitive effects of exercise. Second, we determined the extent to which new neurons from exercise participate in the acute neuronal response to high levels of running in B6D2F1/J (F1 hybrid of C57BL/6J female by DBA/2J male). Mice were housed with or without a running wheel for 50 days (runner vs. sedentary). The first 10 days, they received daily injections of BrdU to label dividing cells. The last 10 days, mice were tested for performance on the Morris water maze and rotarod and then euthanized to measure neurogenesis, c-Fos induction from running and vascular density. In C57BL/6J, exercise increased neurogenesis, density of blood vessels in the dentate gyrus and striatum (but not whole hippocampus), and enhanced performance on the water maze and rotarod. In B6D2F1/J, exercise also increased hippocampal neurogenesis but not vascular density in the granular layer. Improvement on the water maze from exercise was marginal, and no gain was seen for rotarod, possibly because of a ceiling effect. Running increased the number of c-Fos positive neurons in the granular layer by fivefold, and level of running was strongly correlated with c-Fos within 90 min before euthanasia. In runners, approximately 3.3% (+/-0.008 S.E.) of BrdU-positive neurons in the middle of the granule layer displayed c-Fos when compared with 0.8% (+/-0.001) of BrdU-negative neurons. Results suggest that procognitive effects of exercise are associated with increased vascular density in the dentate gyrus and striatum in C57BL/6J mice, and that new neurons from exercise preferentially

  18. Preictal activity of subicular, CA1, and dentate gyrus principal neurons in the dorsal hippocampus before spontaneous seizures in a rat model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Satoshi; Toyoda, Izumi; Thamattoor, Ajoy K; Buckmaster, Paul S

    2014-12-10

    Previous studies suggest that spontaneous seizures in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy might be preceded by increased action potential firing of hippocampal neurons. Preictal activity is potentially important because it might provide new opportunities for predicting when a seizure is about to occur and insight into how spontaneous seizures are generated. We evaluated local field potentials and unit activity of single, putative excitatory neurons in the subiculum, CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus of the dorsal hippocampus in epileptic pilocarpine-treated rats as they experienced spontaneous seizures. Average action potential firing rates of neurons in the subiculum, CA1, and dentate gyrus, but not CA3, increased significantly and progressively beginning 2-4 min before locally recorded spontaneous seizures. In the subiculum, CA1, and dentate gyrus, but not CA3, 41-57% of neurons displayed increased preictal activity with significant consistency across multiple seizures. Much of the increased preictal firing of neurons in the subiculum and CA1 correlated with preictal theta activity, whereas preictal firing of neurons in the dentate gyrus was independent of theta. In addition, some CA1 and dentate gyrus neurons displayed reduced firing rates preictally. These results reveal that different hippocampal subregions exhibit differences in the extent and potential underlying mechanisms of preictal activity. The finding of robust and significantly consistent preictal activity of subicular, CA1, and dentate neurons in the dorsal hippocampus, despite the likelihood that many seizures initiated in other brain regions, suggests the existence of a broader neuronal network whose activity changes minutes before spontaneous seizures initiate. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3416671-17$15.00/0.

  19. Ontogeny of calbindin immunoreactivity in the human hippocampal formation with a special emphasis on granule cells of the dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahám, Hajnalka; Veszprémi, Béla; Kravják, András; Kovács, Krisztina; Gömöri, Eva; Seress, László

    2009-04-01

    Calbindin (CB) is a calcium-binding protein that is present in principal cells as well as in interneurons of the hippocampal formation of various species including humans. Studies with transgenic mice revealed that CB is essential for long-term potentiation and synaptic plasticity which are the cellular basis of learning and memory. In a previous study we have shown that CB expression in granule cells of the dentate gyrus correlates with the functional maturation of the hippocampal formation in the rat. In the present study we examined the ontogeny of CB using immunohistochemistry in the human hippocampal formation paying special attention to the granule cells of the dentate gyrus. As early as the 14(th) week of gestation (GW), CB was being expressed by pyramidal cells of CA1-3 regions in the deepest cell rows of the pyramidal layer towards the ventricular zone. Later, CB sequentially appears in more superficial cell rows. After midgestation, CB disappears from CA3 pyramidal neurons. Expression of CB by granule cells starts at the 22(nd)-23(rd) GW, first by the most superficial neurons of the ectal end of the dorsal blade. At the 24(th) GW, CB is expressed by granule cells of the crest and medial portion of the ventral blade whereas later the entire ventral blade revealed CB immunoreactivity. At term, and in the first few postnatal months, CB-immunoreaction is detected in granule cells of both blades except for those neurons in the deepest cell rows at the hilar border. At around 2-3 years of age, all granule cells of the entire cell layer are CB-immunoreactive. Axons of granule cells, the mossy fibers, start to express CB around the 30(th) GW in stratum lucidum of CA3a. With further development, CB is expressed in CA3b and c, as well as in the hilus. An adult-like pattern of CB-immunoreactivity could be observed at 11 years of age. Our results indicate that (i) CB is expressed by hippocampal pyramidal cells a few weeks before midgestation; (ii) similarly to

  20. Properties of doublecortin-(DCX-expressing cells in the piriform cortex compared to the neurogenic dentate gyrus of adult mice.

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    Friederike Klempin

    Full Text Available The piriform cortex receives input from the olfactory bulb and (via the entorhinal cortex sends efferents to the hippocampus, thereby connecting the two canonical neurogenic regions of the adult rodent brain. Doublecortin (DCX is a cytoskeleton-associated protein that is expressed transiently in the course of adult neurogenesis. Interestingly, the adult piriform cortex, which is usually considered non-neurogenic (even though some reports exist that state otherwise, also contains an abundant population of DCX-positive cells. We asked how similar these cells would be to DCX-positive cells in the course of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Using BAC-generated transgenic mice that express GFP under the DCX promoter, we studied DCX-expression and electrophysiological properties of DCX-positive cells in the mouse piriform cortex in comparison with the dentate gyrus. While one class of cells in the piriform cortex indeed showed features similar to newly generated immature granule neurons, the majority of DCX cells in the piriform cortex was mature and revealed large Na+ currents and multiple action potentials. Furthermore, when proliferative activity was assessed, we found that all DCX-expressing cells in the piriform cortex were strictly postmitotic, suggesting that no DCX-positive "neuroblasts" exist here as they do in the dentate gyrus. We conclude that DCX in the piriform cortex marks a unique population of postmitotic neurons with a subpopulation that retains immature characteristics associated with synaptic plasticity. DCX is thus, per se, no marker of neurogenesis but might be associated more broadly with plasticity.

  1. BDNF Depresses Excitability of Parvalbumin-Positive Interneurons through an M-Like Current in Rat Dentate Gyrus.

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    Jose Luis Nieto-Gonzalez

    Full Text Available In addition to their classical roles in neuronal growth, survival and differentiation, neurotrophins are also rapid regulators of excitability, synaptic transmission and activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. We have recently shown that mature BDNF (Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor, but not proBDNF, modulates the excitability of interneurons in dentate gyrus within minutes. Here, we used brain slice patch-clamp recordings to study the mechanisms through which BDNF modulates the firing of interneurons in rat dentate gyrus by binding to TrkB receptors. Bath application of BDNF (15 ng/ml under current-clamp decreased the firing frequency (by 80% and input resistance, blocking the delayed firing observed at near-threshold voltage ranges, with no changes in resting membrane potential or action potential waveform. Using TEA (tetraethylammonium, or XE991(a Kv7/KCNQ channel antagonist, the effect of BDNF was abolished, whereas application of retigabine (a Kv7/KCNQ channel opener mimicked the effect of BDNF, suggesting that the M-current could be implicated in the modulation of the firing. In voltage-clamp experiments, BDNF increased the M-like current amplitude with no change in holding current. This effect was again blocked by XE991 and mimicked by retigabine, the latter accompanied with a change in holding current. In agreement with the electrophysiology, parvalbumin-positive interneurons co-expressed TrkB receptors and Kv7.2/KCNQ2 channels. In conclusion, BDNF depresses the excitability of interneurons by activating an M-like current and possibly blocking Kv1 channels, thereby controlling interneuron resting membrane potential and excitability.

  2. BDNF Depresses Excitability of Parvalbumin-Positive Interneurons through an M-Like Current in Rat Dentate Gyrus.

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    Nieto-Gonzalez, Jose Luis; Jensen, Kimmo

    2013-01-01

    In addition to their classical roles in neuronal growth, survival and differentiation, neurotrophins are also rapid regulators of excitability, synaptic transmission and activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. We have recently shown that mature BDNF (Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor), but not proBDNF, modulates the excitability of interneurons in dentate gyrus within minutes. Here, we used brain slice patch-clamp recordings to study the mechanisms through which BDNF modulates the firing of interneurons in rat dentate gyrus by binding to TrkB receptors. Bath application of BDNF (15 ng/ml) under current-clamp decreased the firing frequency (by 80%) and input resistance, blocking the delayed firing observed at near-threshold voltage ranges, with no changes in resting membrane potential or action potential waveform. Using TEA (tetraethylammonium), or XE991(a Kv7/KCNQ channel antagonist), the effect of BDNF was abolished, whereas application of retigabine (a Kv7/KCNQ channel opener) mimicked the effect of BDNF, suggesting that the M-current could be implicated in the modulation of the firing. In voltage-clamp experiments, BDNF increased the M-like current amplitude with no change in holding current. This effect was again blocked by XE991 and mimicked by retigabine, the latter accompanied with a change in holding current. In agreement with the electrophysiology, parvalbumin-positive interneurons co-expressed TrkB receptors and Kv7.2/KCNQ2 channels. In conclusion, BDNF depresses the excitability of interneurons by activating an M-like current and possibly blocking Kv1 channels, thereby controlling interneuron resting membrane potential and excitability.

  3. Neuron and neuroblast numbers and cytogenesis in the dentate gyrus of aged APPswe/PS1dE9 transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Louise Ørum; Sivasaravanaparan, Mithula; Severino, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    the longitudinal changes in the number of doublecortin-expressing neuroblasts and number of granular neurons in the dentate gyrus of APPswe/PS1dE9 transgenic mice. Furthermore, we investigated the effect of long-term paroxetine treatment on the number of neuroblasts and granular neurons, hippocampal amyloidosis...

  4. A cell adhesion molecule mimetic, FGL peptide, induces alterations in synapse and dendritic spine structure in the dentate gyrus of aged rats: a three-dimensional ultrastructural study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popov, Victor I; Medvedev, Nikolay I; Kraev, Igor V

    2008-01-01

    100 serial ultrathin sections. FGL affected neither hippocampal volume nor spine or synaptic density in the middle molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. However, it increased the ratio of mushroom to thin spines, number of multivesicular bodies and also increased the frequency of appearance of coated...

  5. Effect of hydroalcoholic extract of Anethum graveolens leaves on the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in the epileptic mice: a histopathological and immunohistochemical study.

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    Golmohammadi, Rahim; Sabaghzadeh, Fatemeh; Mojadadi, Mohammad Shafi

    2016-01-01

    Anethum graveolens or Dill (local name: Shevid) belongs to the family of Apiaceae (Umbelliferae) and is used traditionally for the treatment of convulsion and diabetes in Iran. This study aimed to investigate the effect of hydroalcoholic extract of A. graveolens leaves on the histology of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in the epileptic mice kindled by Pentylenetetrazole (PTZ). In this experimental study, the epileptic BALB/c mice kindled by PTZ were randomly divided into four groups of 10 animals each. Three experimental groups received 250, 500 and 750 mg/kg/day of A. graveolens extract for 21 days. The control group received phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). After the treatment period, the mice were anesthetized, and their hippocampi were dissected for the histopathological analysis, and immunohistochemical analysis for caspase-3 activity. Histopathological examinations showed that the mean numbers of the healthy neuronal cells in the dentate gyrus of the mice received 500 mg/kg/day of A. graveolens extracts were significantly higher than those of the mice received 250 and 750 mg/kg/day of the extracts as well as the control group (P dentate gyrus were significantly lower than those of the two other test and the control groups. The findings of this study suggest that 500 mg/kg/day of the A. graveolens extract could have protective effect on the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in the epileptic mice.

  6. Role of the postnatal radial glial scaffold for the development of the dentate gyrus as revealed by Reelin signaling mutant mice

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    Brunne, Bianka; Franco, Santos; Bouché, Elisabeth; Herz, Joachim; Howell, Brian W.; Pahle, Jasmine; Müller, Ulrich; May, Petra; Frotscher, Michael; Bock, Hans H.

    2014-01-01

    During dentate gyrus development the early embryonic radial glial scaffold is replaced by a secondary glial scaffold around birth. In contrast to neocortical and early dentate gyrus radial glial cells these postnatal glial cells are severely altered with regard to position and morphology in reeler mice lacking the secreted protein Reelin. In this study we focus on the functional impact of these defects. Most radial glial cells throughout the nervous system serve as scaffolds for migrating neurons and precursor cells for both neurogenesis and gliogenesis. Precursor cell function has been demonstrated for secondary radial glial cells but the exact function of these late glial cells in granule cell migration and positioning is not clear. No data exist concerning the interplay between granule neurons and late radial glial cells during dentate gyrus development. Here we show that despite the severe morphological defects in the reeler dentate gyrus the precursor function of secondary radial glial cells is not impaired during development in reeler mice. In addition, selective ablation of Disabled-1, an intracellular adaptor protein essential for Reelin signaling, in neurons but not in glial cells allowed us to distinguish effects of Reelin signaling on radial glial cells from possible secondary effects based on defective granule cells positioning. PMID:23828756

  7. DEVELOPMENTAL LEAD (PB) EXPOSURE REDUCES THE ABILITY OF THE NNDA ANTAGONIST MK801 TO SUPPRESS LONG-TERM POTENTIATION (LTP) IN THE RAT DENTATE GYRUS, IN VIVO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic developmental lead (Pb) exposure increases the threshold and enhances decay of long-term potentiation (LTP) in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampal formation. MK-801 and other antagonists of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor subtype impair induction of LT...

  8. [Voluntary wheel running enhances cell proliferation and expression levels of BDNF, IGF1 and WNT4 in dentate gyrus of adult mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jia-Ling; Ma, Li; Ma, Lan; Tao, Ye-Zheng

    2014-10-25

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis plays important roles in learning, memory and mood regulation. External factors, such as physical exercise, have been found to modulate adult hippocampal neurogenesis. Voluntary running enhances cell proliferation in subgranular zone (SGZ) and increases the number of new born neurons in rodents, but underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we used BrdU assay to identify proliferating cells in 2-month-old C57BL/6 mice after 15 days of voluntary wheel running test. mRNA and protein levels for several neural factors in dentate gyrus, Ammon's horn, and cortex were also analyzed by RT-qPCR and Western blot assay after 15 days of voluntary wheel running. Our data show that voluntary wheel running for 15 days elevated the number of proliferation cells in dentate gyrus and significantly up-regulated the mRNA levels of Bdnf, Igf1 and Wnt4. The protein levels of BDNF and IGF1 in dentate gyrus were also increased after voluntary wheel running. These results indicate that the increase of adult hippocampal neurogenesis caused by voluntary wheel running for 15 days might be through up-regulating BDNF, IGF1 and WNT4 in dentate gyrus.

  9. Synergistic effects of sodium butyrate, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, on increase of neurogenesis induced by pyridoxine and increase of neural proliferation in the mouse dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Dae Young; Kim, Woosuk; Nam, Sung Min; Kim, Dae Won; Chung, Jin Young; Choi, Soo Young; Yoon, Yeo Sung; Won, Moo-Ho; Hwang, In Koo

    2011-10-01

    We previously observed that pyridoxine (vitamin B(6)) significantly increased cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation without any neuronal damage in the hippocampus. In this study, we investigated the effects of sodium butyrate, a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor which serves as an epigenetic regulator of gene expression, on pyridoxine-induced neural proliferation and neurogenesis induced by the increase of neural proliferation in the mouse dentate gyrus. Sodium butyrate (300 mg/kg, subcutaneously), pyridoxine (350 mg/kg, intraperitoneally), or combination with sodium butyrate were administered to 8-week-old mice twice a day and once a day, respectively, for 14 days. The administration of sodium butyrate significantly increased acetyl-histone H3 levels in the dentate gyrus. Sodium butyrate alone did not show the significant increase of cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus. But, pyridoxine alone significantly increased cell proliferation. Sodium butyrate in combination with pyridoxine robustly enhanced cell proliferation and neurogenesis induced by the increase of neural proliferation in the dentate gyrus, showing that sodium butyrate treatment distinctively enhanced development of neuroblast dendrites. These results indicate that an inhibition of HDAC synergistically promotes neurogenesis induced by a pyridoxine and increase of neural proliferation.

  10. An associativity requirement for locus coeruleus-induced long-term potentiation in the dentate gyrus of the urethane-anesthetized rat.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reid, A.T.; Harley, C.W.

    2010-01-01

    Norepinephrine has been hypothesized to provide a learning and memory signal. Norepinephrine long-term potentiation of perforant path input to the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus provides a model for norepinephrine initiated memory processes. However, in vitro, the pairing of perforant path stimula

  11. Effects of Rapamycin Treatment on Neurogenesis and Synaptic Reorganization in the Dentate Gyrus after Controlled Cortical Impact Injury in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Corwin R.; Boychuk, Jeffery A.; Smith, Bret N.

    2015-01-01

    Post-traumatic epilepsy (PTE) is one consequence of traumatic brain injury (TBI). A prominent cell signaling pathway activated in animal models of both TBI and epilepsy is the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Inhibition of mTOR with rapamycin has shown promise as a potential modulator of epileptogenesis in several animal models of epilepsy, but cellular mechanisms linking mTOR expression and epileptogenesis are unclear. In this study, the role of mTOR in modifying functional hippocampal circuit reorganization after focal TBI induced by controlled cortical impact (CCI) was investigated. Rapamycin (3 or 10 mg/kg), an inhibitor of mTOR signaling, was administered by intraperitoneal injection beginning on the day of injury and continued daily until tissue collection. Relative to controls, rapamycin treatment reduced dentate granule cell area in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the injury two weeks post-injury. Brain injury resulted in a significant increase in doublecortin immunolabeling in the dentate gyrus ipsilateral to the injury, indicating increased neurogenesis shortly after TBI. Rapamycin treatment prevented the increase in doublecortin labeling, with no overall effect on Fluoro-Jade B staining in the ipsilateral hemisphere, suggesting that rapamycin treatment reduced posttraumatic neurogenesis but did not prevent cell loss after injury. At later times post-injury (8–13 weeks), evidence of mossy fiber sprouting and increased recurrent excitation of dentate granule cells was detected, which were attenuated by rapamycin treatment. Rapamycin treatment also diminished seizure prevalence relative to vehicle-treated controls after TBI. Collectively, these results support a role for adult neurogenesis in PTE development and suggest that suppression of epileptogenesis by mTOR inhibition includes effects on post-injury neurogenesis. PMID:26640431

  12. Effects of rapamycin treatment after controlled cortical impact injury on neurogenesis and synaptic reorganization in the mouse dentate gyrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corwin R Butler

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Post-traumatic epilepsy (PTE is one consequence of traumatic brain injury (TBI. A prominent cell signaling pathway activated in animal models of both TBI and epilepsy is the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR. Inhibition of mTOR with rapamycin has shown promise as a potential modulator of epileptogenesis in several animal models of epilepsy, but cellular mechanisms linking mTOR expression and epileptogenesis are unclear. In this study, the role of mTOR in modifying functional hippocampal circuit reorganization after focal TBI induced by controlled cortical impact was investigated. Rapamycin (3 or 10 mg/kg, an inhibitor of mTOR signaling, was administered by intraperitoneal injection beginning on the day of injury and continued daily until tissue collection. Relative to controls, rapamycin treatment reduced dentate granule cell area in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the injury two weeks post-injury. Brain injury resulted in a significant increase in doublecortin immunolabeling in the dentate gyrus ipsilateral to the injury, indicating increased neurogenesis shortly after TBI. Rapamycin treatment prevented the increase in doublecortin labeling, with no overall effect on Fluoro-Jade B staining in the ipsilateral hemisphere, suggesting that rapamycin treatment reduced posttraumatic neurogenesis but did not prevent cell loss after injury. At later times post-injury (8-13 weeks, evidence of mossy fiber sprouting and increased recurrent excitation of dentate granule cells was detected, which were attenuated by rapamycin treatment. Rapamycin treatment also diminished seizure prevalence relative to vehicle-treated controls after TBI. Collectively, these results support a role for adult neurogenesis in PTE development and suggest that suppression of epileptogenesis by mTOR inhibition includes effects on post-injury neurogenesis.

  13. ProNGF Drives Localized and Cell Selective Parvalbumin Interneuron and Perineuronal Net Depletion in the Dentate Gyrus of Transgenic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasulo, Luisa; Brandi, Rossella; Arisi, Ivan; La Regina, Federico; Berretta, Nicola; Capsoni, Simona; D'Onofrio, Mara; Cattaneo, Antonino

    2017-01-01

    ProNGF, the precursor of mature Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), is the most abundant NGF form in the brain and increases markedly in the cortex in Alzheimer's Disease (AD), relative to mature NGF. A large body of evidence shows that the actions of ProNGF and mature NGF are often conflicting, depending on the receptors expressed in target cells. TgproNGF#3 mice, expressing furin-cleavage resistant proNGF in CNS neurons, directly reveal consequences of increased proNGF levels on brain homeostasis. Their phenotype clearly indicates that proNGF can be a driver of neurodegeneration, including severe learning and memory behavioral deficits, cholinergic deficits, and diffuse immunoreactivity for A-beta and A-beta-oligomers. In aged TgproNGF#3 mice spontaneous epileptic-like events are detected in entorhinal cortex-hippocampal slices, suggesting occurrence of excitatory/inhibitory (E/I) imbalance. In this paper, we investigate the molecular events linking increased proNGF levels to the epileptiform activity detected in hippocampal slices. The occurrence of spontaneous epileptiform discharges in the hippocampal network in TgproNGF#3 mice suggests an impaired inhibitory interneuron homeostasis. In the present study, we detect the onset of hippocampal epileptiform events at 1-month of age. Later, we observe a regional- and cellular-selective Parvalbumin interneuron and perineuronal net (PNN) depletion in the dentate gyrus (DG), but not in other hippocampal regions of TgproNGF#3 mice. These results demonstrate that, in the hippocampus, the DG is selectively vulnerable to altered proNGF/NGF signaling. Parvalbumin interneuron depletion is also observed in the amygdala, a region strongly connected to the hippocampus and likewise receiving cholinergic afferences. Transcriptome analysis of TgproNGF#3 hippocampus reveals a proNGF signature with broad down-regulation of transcription. The most affected mRNAs modulated at early times belong to synaptic transmission and plasticity and

  14. ProNGF Drives Localized and Cell Selective Parvalbumin Interneuron and Perineuronal Net Depletion in the Dentate Gyrus of Transgenic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasulo, Luisa; Brandi, Rossella; Arisi, Ivan; La Regina, Federico; Berretta, Nicola; Capsoni, Simona; D'Onofrio, Mara; Cattaneo, Antonino

    2017-01-01

    ProNGF, the precursor of mature Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), is the most abundant NGF form in the brain and increases markedly in the cortex in Alzheimer's Disease (AD), relative to mature NGF. A large body of evidence shows that the actions of ProNGF and mature NGF are often conflicting, depending on the receptors expressed in target cells. TgproNGF#3 mice, expressing furin-cleavage resistant proNGF in CNS neurons, directly reveal consequences of increased proNGF levels on brain homeostasis. Their phenotype clearly indicates that proNGF can be a driver of neurodegeneration, including severe learning and memory behavioral deficits, cholinergic deficits, and diffuse immunoreactivity for A-beta and A-beta-oligomers. In aged TgproNGF#3 mice spontaneous epileptic-like events are detected in entorhinal cortex-hippocampal slices, suggesting occurrence of excitatory/inhibitory (E/I) imbalance. In this paper, we investigate the molecular events linking increased proNGF levels to the epileptiform activity detected in hippocampal slices. The occurrence of spontaneous epileptiform discharges in the hippocampal network in TgproNGF#3 mice suggests an impaired inhibitory interneuron homeostasis. In the present study, we detect the onset of hippocampal epileptiform events at 1-month of age. Later, we observe a regional- and cellular-selective Parvalbumin interneuron and perineuronal net (PNN) depletion in the dentate gyrus (DG), but not in other hippocampal regions of TgproNGF#3 mice. These results demonstrate that, in the hippocampus, the DG is selectively vulnerable to altered proNGF/NGF signaling. Parvalbumin interneuron depletion is also observed in the amygdala, a region strongly connected to the hippocampus and likewise receiving cholinergic afferences. Transcriptome analysis of TgproNGF#3 hippocampus reveals a proNGF signature with broad down-regulation of transcription. The most affected mRNAs modulated at early times belong to synaptic transmission and plasticity and

  15. Seipin knockout in mice impairs stem cell proliferation and progenitor cell differentiation in the adult hippocampal dentate gyrus via reduced levels of PPARγ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoxi Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The seipin gene (BSCL2 was originally identified in humans as a loss-of-function gene associated with congenital generalized lipodystrophy type 2 (CGL2. Neuronal seipin-knockout (seipin-nKO mice display a depression-like phenotype with a reduced level of hippocampal peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ. The present study investigated the influence of seipin deficiency on adult neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG and the underlying mechanisms of the effects. We show that the proliferative capability of stem cells in seipin-nKO mice was substantially reduced compared to in wild-type (WT mice, and that this could be rescued by the PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone (rosi. In seipin-nKO mice, neuronal differentiation of progenitor cells was inhibited, with the enhancement of astrogliogenesis; both of these effects were recovered by rosi treatment during early stages of progenitor cell differentiation. In addition, rosi treatment could correct the decline in hippocampal ERK2 phosphorylation and cyclin A mRNA level in seipin-nKO mice. The MEK inhibitor U0126 abolished the rosi-rescued cell proliferation and cyclin A expression in seipin-nKO mice. In seipin-nKO mice, the hippocampal Wnt3 protein level was less than that in WT mice, and there was a reduction of neurogenin 1 (Neurog1 and neurogenic differentiation 1 (NeuroD1 mRNA, levels of which were corrected by rosi treatment. STAT3 phosphorylation (Tyr705 was enhanced in seipin-nKO mice, and was further elevated by rosi treatment. Finally, rosi treatment for 10 days could alleviate the depression-like phenotype in seipin-nKO mice, and this alleviation was blocked by the MEK inhibitor U0126. The results indicate that, by reducing PPARγ, seipin deficiency impairs proliferation and differentiation of neural stem and progenitor cells, respectively, in the adult DG, which might be responsible for the production of the depression-like phenotype in seipin-nKO mice.

  16. Melatonin and oestrogen treatments were able to improve neuroinflammation and apoptotic processes in dentate gyrus of old ovariectomized female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kireev, Roman A; Vara, Elena; Viña, Jose; Tresguerres, Jesus A F

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the outcomes of oestrogen and melatonin treatments following long-term ovarian hormone depletion on neuroinflammation and apoptotic processes in dentate gyrus of hippocampi. Forty-six female Wistar rats of 22 months of age were used. Twelve of them remained intact, and the other 34 were ovariectomized at 12 months of age. Ovariectomized animals were divided into three groups and treated for 10 weeks with oestrogens, melatonin or saline. All rats were killed by decapitation at 24 months of age, and dentate gyri were collected. A group of 2 month-old intact female rats was used as young control. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70) were analysed by ELISA. The expressions of TNFα, IL1β, GFAP, nNOS, iNOS, HO-1, NFκB, Bax, Bad, AIF, Bcl2 and SIRT1 genes were detected by real-time (RT)-PCR. Western blots were used to measure the protein expression of NFκB p65, NFκB p50/105, IκBα, IκBβ, p38 MAPK, MAP-2 and synapsin I. We have assessed the ability of 17β-oestradiol and melatonin administration to downregulate markers of neuroinflammation in the dentate gyrus of ovariectomized female rats. Results indicated that 17β-oestradiol and melatonin treatments were able to significantly decrease expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, iNOS and HO-1 in the hippocampus when compared to non-treated animals. A similar age- and long-term ovarian hormone depletion- related increase in GFAP was also attenuated after both melatonin and oestradiol treatments. In a similar way to oestradiol, melatonin decreased the activation of p38 MAPK and NFκB pathways. The treatments enhanced the levels of synaptic molecules synapsin I and MAP-2 and have been shown to modulate the pro-antiapoptotic ratio favouring the second and to increase SIRT1 expression. These findings support the potential therapeutic role of melatonin and oestradiol as protective anti-inflammatory agents for the central nervous system

  17. Withdrawal from Chronic Amphetamine Produces Persistent Anxiety-like Behavior but Temporally-Limited Reductions in Monoamines and Neurogenesis in the Adult Rat Dentate Gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Jeffrey L.; Renner, Kenneth J.; Forster, Gina L.

    2010-01-01

    Acute amphetamine administration activates monoaminergic pathways and increases systemic corticosterone, both of which influence anxiety states and adult dentate gyrus neurogenesis. Chronic amphetamine increases anxiety states in rats when measured at 24 hours and at 2 weeks of withdrawal. However, the effects of chronic amphetamine exposure and withdrawal on long term anxiety-like behavior and adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus are unknown. Adult male rats were administered amphetamine (2.5 mg/kg, ip.) daily for two weeks. Anxiety-like behaviors were increased markedly in amphetamine-treated rats following four weeks of withdrawal from amphetamine. Plasma corticosterone level was unaltered by amphetamine treatment or withdrawal. However, norepinephrine and serotonin concentrations were selectively reduced in the dentate gyrus 20 hours following amphetamine treatment. This effect did not persist through the four-week withdrawal period. In separate experiments, rats received bromodeoxyuridine to label cells in S-phase, prior to or immediately following amphetamine treatment. Newly generated cells were quantified to measure extent of progenitor cell proliferation and neurogenesis following treatment or withdrawal. Progenitor cell proliferation and neurogenesis were not significantly affected by amphetamine exposure when measured 20 hours following the last amphetamine treatment. However, neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus was reduced after four weeks of withdrawal when compared to saline-pretreated rats. Overall, our findings indicate that withdrawal from chronic amphetamine leads to persistent anxiety-like behavior which may be maintained by reduced neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus at this protracted withdrawal time point. However, neurogenesis is unaffected at earlier withdrawal time points where anxiety states emerge, suggesting different mechanisms may underlie the emergence of anxiety states during amphetamine withdrawal. PMID:20638943

  18. Activity-regulated gene expression in immature neurons in the dentate gyrus following re-exposure to a cocaine-paired environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Jeffrey L; Unterwald, Ellen M

    2015-03-01

    Intense craving for drug and relapse are observed in addicts who are exposed to environmental stimuli associated with drug-taking behavior even after long periods of abstinence. The hippocampus is a brain region known to be involved in contextual processing, taking place predominantly in the septal hippocampus, and emotional processing, taking place predominantly in the temporal hippocampus. Conditioned place preference is an animal model of context-conditioned reward. The dentate gyrus is a hippocampal sub-region particularly important for the acquisition of cocaine-induced place preference and is a site of continuous neurogenesis, which has been implicated in the vulnerability to drug-taking behavior. Therefore, these experiments explored the role of newly generated neurons in drug reward-context association by examining the activation, as determined by expression of the immediate early gene cfos, of young and mature granule cells in the septal and temporal dentate gyrus of adult rats that were re-exposed to a drug-paired environment following the development of cocaine place preference. The overall level of cfos expression was increased in both the septal and temporal dentate gyrus of animals that developed place preference and were re-exposed to the drug paired environment compared with re-exposure to a neutral environment. Overall level of neurogenesis, as detected by the S-phase marker 5'-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and the immature neuron marker doublecortin (DCX), was unaltered by cocaine conditioning. However, the number of activated new neurons (DCX + cfos) was greater in the temporal dentate gyrus of cocaine-conditioned rats re-exposed to the drug-paired environment as compared to those re-exposed to a neutral environment. Further understanding of the role of dentate gyrus neurogenesis on the conditioned effects of drugs of abuse may provide new insights into the role of this process in the expression of addictive behaviors. © 2014 Wiley

  19. Long-term administration of scopolamine interferes with nerve cell proliferation, differentiation and migration in adult mouse hippocampal dentate gyrus, but it does not induce cell death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing Chun Yan; Yun Lyul Lee; Il-Jun Kang; Moo-Ho Won; Joon Ha Park; Bai Hui Chen; Jeong-Hwi Cho; In Hye Kim; Ji Hyeon Ahn; Jae-Chul Lee; In Koo Hwang; Jun Hwi Cho

    2014-01-01

    Long-term administration of scopolamine, a muscarinic receptor antagonist, can inhibit the survival of newly generated cells, but its effect on the proliferation, differentiation and migration of nerve cells in the adult mouse hippocampal dentate gyrus remain poorly understood. In this study, we used immunohistochemistry and western blot methods to weekly detect the biological behaviors of nerve cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of adult mice that received intraperito-neal administration of scopolamine for 4 weeks. Expression of neuronal nuclear antigen (NeuN;a neuronal marker) and Fluoro-Jade B (a marker for the localization of neuronal degeneration) was also detected. After scopolamine treatment, mouse hippocampal neurons did not die, and Ki-67 (a marker for proliferating cells)-immunoreactive cells were reduced in number and reac hed the lowest level at 4 weeks. Doublecortin (DCX; a marker for newly generated neurons)-im-munoreactive cells were gradually shortened in length and reduced in number with time. After scopolamine treatment for 4 weeks, nearly all of the 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled newly generated cells were located in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus, but they did not migrate into the granule cell layer. Few mature BrdU/NeuN double-labeled cells were seen in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus. These ifndings suggest that long-term administration of scopolamine interferes with the proliferation, differentiation and migration of nerve cells in the adult mouse hippocampal dentate gyrus, but it does not induce cell death.

  20. Modulation of GABAA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission by Zn2+ at a dentate gyrus circuit

    OpenAIRE

    Grauert, A.

    2013-01-01

    Zinc (ionic form Zn2+) is a common trace element in the forebrain, and is especially enriched in the hippocampus, a brain structure important for learning and memory. A large amount of vesicular Zn2+ which is thought to be released upon presynaptic depolarisation is found at synapses formed by the axons of dentate granule cells (GCs), known as mossy fibres (MFs). Zn2+ inhibits NMDA and GABAA receptors (NMDAR and GABAAR) at mono-synaptic inputs between MFs and CA3 pyramidal neurons but its rol...

  1. Effect of topiramate on partial excitatory amino acids in hippocampal dentate gyrus of rats after alcohol withdrawal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qinghua Yang; Guang Wu; Haiying Jiang; Yuanzhe Jin; Songbiao Cui

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many researches have indicated that the imbalances of various amino acid transmitters and neurotransmitters in brain are involved in the formation of alcohol withdrawal, especially that glutamic acid is one of the important transmitters for alcohol tolerance in central nervous system.OBJECTIVE: To observe the changes of excitatory amino acids in hippocampal dentate gyrus in rats with long-term alcohol drinking after withdrawal under consciousness, and investigate the therapeutic effect of topiramate on alcohol withdrawal.DESIGN: A randomized control animal experiment.SETTING: Department of Neurology, Affiliated Hospital of Yanbian University.MATERIALS: Thirty male Wistar rats of 4 months old, weighing 300-350 g, were purchased from the Experimental Animal Department, Medical College of Yanbian University. Topiramate was produced by Swish Cilag Company, and the batch number was 02CS063.METHODS: The experiments were carried out in the Department of Physiology, Medical College of Yanbian University from August 2005 to February 2006. ① The rats were divided randomly into three groups: control group (n=10), alcohol group (n=10) and topiramate-treated group (n=10). Rats in the alcohol group and topiramate-treated group were given intragastric perfusion of 500 g/L alcohol (10 mL/kg), once a day for 4 weeks successively, and then those in the topiramate-treated group were treated with 80 mg/kg topiramate at 24 hours after the last perfusion of alcohol, once a day for 3 days successively. Rats in the control group were intragastricly given isovolume saline. ② The withdrawal symptoms were assessed at 6, 30, 48 and 72 hours after the last perfusion of alcohol by using the withdrawal rating scale set by Erden et al,which had four observational indexes of stereotyped behaviors, agitation, tail stiffness and abnormal posture,each index was scored by 5 points, the higher the score, the more obvious the symptoms. ③ The contents of aspartic acid and glutamic acid

  2. Dentate gyrus abnormalities in sudden unexplained death in infants: morphological marker of underlying brain vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, Hannah C; Cryan, Jane B; Haynes, Robin L; Paterson, David S; Haas, Elisabeth A; Mena, Othon J; Minter, Megan; Journey, Kelley W; Trachtenberg, Felicia L; Goldstein, Richard D; Armstrong, Dawna D

    2015-01-01

    Sudden unexplained death in infants, including the sudden infant death syndrome, is likely due to heterogeneous causes that involve different intrinsic vulnerabilities and/or environmental factors. Neuropathologic research focuses upon the role of brain regions, particularly the brainstem, that regulate or modulate autonomic and respiratory control during sleep or transitions to waking. The hippocampus is a key component of the forebrain-limbic network that modulates autonomic/respiratory control via brainstem connections, but its role in sudden infant death has received little attention. We tested the hypothesis that a well-established marker of hippocampal pathology in temporal lobe epilepsy-focal granule cell bilamination in the dentate, a variant of granule cell dispersion-is associated with sudden unexplained death in infants. In a blinded study of hippocampal morphology in 153 infants with sudden and unexpected death autopsied in the San Diego County medical examiner's office, deaths were classified as unexplained or explained based upon autopsy and scene investigation. Focal granule cell bilamination was present in 41.2% (47/114) of the unexplained group compared to 7.7% (3/39) of the explained (control) group (p infants with sudden unexplained death may represent a developmental vulnerability that leads to autonomic/respiratory instability or autonomic seizures, and sleep-related death when the infants are challenged with homeostatic stressors. Importantly, these lesions can be recognized in microscopic sections prepared in current forensic practice. Future research is needed to determine the relationship between hippocampal and previously reported brainstem pathology in sudden infant death.

  3. Electrophysiology and immunohistochemistry in the hippocampal ca1 and the dentate gyrus of rats chronically exposed to 1-bromopropane, a substitute for specific chlorofluorocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fueta, Y; Fukuda, T; Ishidao, T; Hori, H

    2004-01-01

    1-Bromopropane is a newly introduced substitute for specific chlorofluorocarbons whose production was prohibited because of depletion of ozone layers. In this study, we analyzed disinhibitory effects induced by repetitive inhalation of 1-bromopropane for 12 weeks in the hippocampal CA1 and the dentate gyrus. In addition, reversal of the disinhibitory effects was examined 4 weeks after 1-bromopropane inhalation ceased. Exposure rats were placed in a stainless steel inhalation chamber at a concentration of 700 ppm, while the control group was provided only room air in the same type of chamber. Paired-pulse inhibition of population spike was considerably decreased (P1-Bromopropane-induced disinhibition was further analyzed by immunohistochemical methods. There were no apparent morphological defects in either excitatory or inhibitory neuronal components, supporting the reversibility of physiological changes. In conclusion, chronic inhalation of 1-bromopropane induces a disinhibition in the CA1 and dentate gyrus that is reversible following cessation of exposure.

  4. Effects of Imipramine and Lithium on the Suppression of Cell Proliferation in the Dentate Gyrus of the Hippocampus in Adrenocorticotropic Hormone-treated Rats

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    Doi,Maho

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We examined the influence of chronic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH treatment on the number of Ki-67-positive cells in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in rats. ACTH treatment for 14 days decreased the number of such cells. The administration of imipramine or lithium alone for 14 days had no effect in saline-treated rats. The effect of ACTH was blocked by the administration of imipramine. Furthermore, the coadministration of imipramine and lithium for 14 days significantly increased the number of Ki-67-positive cells in both the saline and ACTH-treated rats. The coadministration of imipramine and lithium normalized the cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in rats treated with ACTH.

  5. Replacement of asymmetric synaptic profiles in the molecular layer of dentate gyrus following cycloheximide in the pilocarpine model in rats.

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    Simone eBittencourt

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Mossy fiber sprouting is among the best-studied forms of post-lesional synaptic plasticity and is regarded by many as contributory to seizures in both humans and animal models of epilepsy. It is not known whether mossy fiber sprouting increases the number of synapses in the molecular layer or merely replaces lost contacts. Using the pilocarpine model of status epilepticus to induce mossy fiber sprouting, and cycloheximide to block this sprouting, we evaluated at the ultrastructural level the number and type of asymmetric synaptic contacts in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. As expected, whereas pilocarpine-treated rats had dense silver grain deposits in the inner molecular layer (reflecting mossy fiber sprouting, pilocarpine+cycloheximide-treated animals did not differ from controls. Both groups of treated rats (Pilo group and CHX+Pilo group had reduced density of asymmetric synaptic profiles (putative excitatory synaptic contacts, which was greater for cycloheximide-treated animals. For both treated groups the loss of excitatory synaptic contacts was even greater in the outer molecular layer than in the best studied inner molecular layer (in which mossy fiber sprouting occurs. These results indicate that mossy fiber sprouting tends to replace lost synaptic contacts rather than increase the absolute number of contacts. We speculate that the overall result is more consistent with restored rather than with increased excitability.

  6. Mature BDNF, but not proBDNF, reduces excitability of fast-spiking interneurons in mouse dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Mai Marie; Nieto-Gonzalez, Jose Luis; Vardya, Irina; Vaegter, Christian Bjerggaard; Nykjaer, Anders; Jensen, Kimmo

    2009-10-07

    Mature BDNF and its precursor proBDNF may both be secreted to exert opposite effects on synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. However, it is unknown how proBDNF and mature BDNF affect the excitability of GABAergic interneurons and thereby regulate GABAergic inhibition. We made recordings of GABAergic spontaneous IPSCs (sIPSCs) in mouse dentate gyrus granule cells and found that chronic or acute BDNF reductions led to large increases in the sIPSC frequencies, which were TTX (tetrodotoxin) sensitive and therefore action-potential driven. Conversely, addition of mature BDNF, but not proBDNF, within minutes led to a decrease in the sIPSC frequency to 44%. Direct recordings from fast-spiking GABAergic interneurons revealed that mature BDNF reduced their excitability and depressed their action potential firing, whereas proBDNF had no effect. Using the TrkB inhibitor K-252a, or mice deficient for the common neurotrophin receptor p75(NTR), the regulation of GABAergic activity was shown specifically to be mediated by BDNF binding to the neurotrophin receptor TrkB. In agreement, immunohistochemistry demonstrated that TrkB, but not p75(NTR), was expressed in parvalbumin-positive interneurons. Our results suggest that mature BDNF decreases the excitability of GABAergic interneurons via activation of TrkB, while proBDNF does not impact on GABAergic activity. Thus, by affecting the firing of GABAergic interneurons, mature BDNF may play an important role in regulating network oscillations in the hippocampus.

  7. Reward memory relieves anxiety-related behavior through synaptic strengthening and protein kinase C in dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Zhuofan; Liu, Bei; Wang, Jin-Hui

    2016-04-01

    Anxiety disorders are presumably associated with negative memory. Psychological therapies are widely used to treat this mental deficit in human beings based on the view that positive memory competes with negative memory and relieves anxiety status. Cellular and molecular processes underlying psychological therapies remain elusive. Therefore, we have investigated its mechanisms based on a mouse model in which food reward at one open-arm of the elevated plus-maze was used for training mice to form reward memory and challenge the open arms. Mice with the reward training showed increased entries and stay time in reward open-arm versus neutral open-arm as well as in open-arms versus closed-arms. Accompanying with reward memory formation and anxiety relief, glutamatergic synaptic transmission in dentate gyrus in vivo and dendritic spines in granule cells became upregulated. This synaptic up-regulation was accompanied by the expression of more protein kinase C (PKC) in the dendritic spines. The inhibition of PKC by chelerythrine impaired the formation of reward memory, the relief of anxiety-related behavior and the up-regulation of glutamate synapses. Our results suggest that reward-induced positive memory relieves mouse anxiety-related behavior by strengthening synaptic efficacy and PKC in the hippocampus, which imply the underlying cellular and molecular processes involved in the beneficial effects of psychological therapies treating anxiety disorders.

  8. Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 as Predictor of Body Mass Index and Dentate Gyrus Neurogenesis: Neuroplasticity and the Metabolic Milieu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy D. Coplan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 regulates carbohydrate metabolism and promotes neurogenesis. We reported an inverse correlation between adult body mass and neurogenesis in nonhuman primates. Here we examine relationships between physiological levels of the neurotrophic incretin, plasma GLP-1 (pGLP-1, and body mass index (BMI in adolescence to adult neurogenesis and associations with a diabesity diathesis and infant stress. Morphometry, fasting pGLP-1, insulin resistance, and lipid profiles were measured in early adolescence in 10 stressed and 4 unstressed male bonnet macaques. As adults, dentate gyrus neurogenesis was assessed by doublecortin staining. High pGLP-1, low body weight, and low central adiposity, yet peripheral insulin resistance and high plasma lipids, during adolescence were associated with relatively high adult neurogenesis rates. High pGLP-1 also predicted low body weight with, paradoxically, insulin resistance and high plasma lipids. No rearing effects for neurogenesis rates were observed. We replicated an inverse relationship between BMI and neurogenesis. Adolescent pGLP-1 directly predicted adult neurogenesis. Two divergent processes relevant to human diabesity emerge—high BMI, low pGLP-1, and low neurogenesis and low BMI, high pGLP-1, high neurogenesis, insulin resistance, and lipid elevations. Diabesity markers putatively reflect high nutrient levels necessary for neurogenesis at the expense of peripheral tissues.

  9. Effects of luteolin on spatial memory, cell proliferation, and neuroblast differentiation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus in a scopolamine-induced amnesia model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Dae Young; Choi, Jung Hoon; Kim, Woosuk; Nam, Sung Min; Jung, Hyo Young; Kim, Jong Hwi; Won, Moo-Ho; Yoon, Yeo Sung; Hwang, In Koo

    2013-10-01

    Luteolin, a common flavonoid from many plants, has various pharmacological activities, including a memory-improving effect. In this study, we investigated the effects of luteolin on spatial memory, cell proliferation, and neuroblast differentiation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus in a rat model of scopolamine (SCO)-induced amnesia. Scopolamine was subcutaneously administered for 28 days via an Alzet minipump (44 mg/ml delivered at 2·5 μl/h) along with a daily intraperitoneal administration of vehicle (saline) 10 mg/kg luteolin or 5 mg/kg galantamine (GAL) (a control drug for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor) for 28 days. The administration of SCO significantly decreased the spatial alteration percentage in the Y-maze test compared to that in the vehicle (saline)-treated group. The administration of luteolin or GAL significantly improved the spatial alteration percentage compared to that in the SCO-treated group. Similarly, the administration of SCO significantly decreased the cell proliferation (Ki67-positive cells) and neuroblast differentiation (doubleocortin-positive cells) in the dentate gyrus. The administration of luteolin or GAL significantly mitigated the SCO-induced reduction of Ki67- and doublecortin-immunoreactive cells in the dentate gyrus. In addition, the administration of luteolin significantly decreased the lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde (MDA) levels) and increased the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and AChE levels in the hippocampal homogenates compared to the SCO-treated group. These results suggest that the luteolin treatment improves the SCO-induced reduction of cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the dentate gyrus. The mechanism underlying the amelioration of SCO-induced amnesia by luteolin may be associated with the increase in BDNF, acetylcholine, and the decrease in lipid peroxidation.

  10. Androgens increase survival of adult-born neurons in the dentate gyrus by an androgen receptor-dependent mechanism in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamson, D K; Wainwright, S R; Taylor, J R; Jones, B A; Watson, N V; Galea, L A M

    2013-09-01

    Gonadal steroids are potent regulators of adult neurogenesis. We previously reported that androgens, such as testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), but not estradiol, increased the survival of new neurons in the dentate gyrus of the male rat. These results suggest androgens regulate hippocampal neurogenesis via the androgen receptor (AR). To test this supposition, we examined the role of ARs in hippocampal neurogenesis using 2 different approaches. In experiment 1, we examined neurogenesis in male rats insensitive to androgens due to a naturally occurring mutation in the gene encoding the AR (termed testicular feminization mutation) compared with wild-type males. In experiment 2, we injected the AR antagonist, flutamide, into castrated male rats and compared neurogenesis levels in the dentate gyrus of DHT and oil-treated controls. In experiment 1, chronic T increased hippocampal neurogenesis in wild-type males but not in androgen-insensitive testicular feminization mutation males. In experiment 2, DHT increased hippocampal neurogenesis via cell survival, an effect that was blocked by concurrent treatment with flutamide. DHT, however, did not affect cell proliferation. Interestingly, cells expressing doublecortin, a marker of immature neurons, did not colabel with ARs in the dentate gyrus, but ARs were robustly expressed in other regions of the hippocampus. Together these studies provide complementary evidence that androgens regulate adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus via the AR but at a site other than the dentate gyrus. Understanding where in the brain androgens act to increase the survival of new neurons in the adult brain may have implications for neurodegenerative disorders.

  11. Effect of hydroalcoholic extract of Anethum graveolens leaves on the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in the epileptic mice: a histopathological and immunohistochemical study

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    Rahim Golmohammadi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Anethum graveolens or Dill (local name: Shevid belongs to the family of Apiaceae (Umbelliferae and is used traditionally for the treatment of convulsion and diabetes in Iran. This study aimed to investigate the effect of hydroalcoholic extract of A. graveolens leaves on the histology of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in the epileptic mice kindled by Pentylenetetrazole (PTZ. In this experimental study, the epileptic BALB/c mice kindled by PTZ were randomly divided into four groups of 10 animals each. Three experimental groups received 250, 500 and 750 mg/kg/day of A. graveolens extract for 21 days. The control group received phosphate-buffered saline (PBS. After the treatment period, the mice were anesthetized, and their hippocampi were dissected for the histopathological analysis, and immunohistochemical analysis for caspase-3 activity. Histopathological examinations showed that the mean numbers of the healthy neuronal cells in the dentate gyrus of the mice received 500 mg/kg/day of A. graveolens extracts were significantly higher than those of the mice received 250 and 750 mg/kg/day of the extracts as well as the control group (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001, respectively. In addition, the results of immunohistochemical analysis revealed that in mice treated with 500 mg/kg/day of A. graveolens; the numbers of caspase-3-positive cells in the dentate gyrus were significantly lower than those of the two other test and the control groups. The findings of this study suggest that 500 mg/kg/day of the A. graveolens extract could have protective effect on the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in the epileptic mice.

  12. Oestradiol Regulates Neuropeptide Y Release and Gene Coupling with the GABAergic and Glutamatergic Synapses in the Adult Female Rat Dentate Gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velíšková, J; Iacobas, D; Iacobas, S; Sidyelyeva, G; Chachua, T; Velíšek, L

    2015-12-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is an endogenous modulator of neuronal activity affecting both GABAergic and glutamatergic transmission. Previously, we found that oestradiol modifies the number of NPY immunoreactive neurones in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. In the present study, we investigated which oestrogen receptor type is responsible for these changes in the number of NPY-positive neurones. Furthermore, we determined the effects of oestrogen receptor activation on NPY release. Finally, we examined the contribution of oestrogen toward the remodelling of the GABAergic and glutamatergic gene networks in terms of coupling with Npy gene expression in ovariectomised rats. We found that activation of either oestrogen receptor type (ERα or ERβ) increases the number of NPY-immunopositive neurones and enhances NPY release in the dentate gyrus. We also found that, compared to oestrogen-lacking ovariectomised rats, oestrogen replacement increases the probability of synergistic/antagonistic coupling between the Npy and GABAergic synapse genes, whereas the glutamatergic synapse genes are less likely to be coupled with Npy under similar conditions. The data together suggest that oestrogens play a critical role in the regulation of NPY system activity and are also involved in the coupling/uncoupling of the Npy gene with the GABAergic and glutamatergic synapses in the female rat dentate gyrus. © 2015 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  13. Evaluation of the protective effects of tocotrienol-rich fraction from palm oil on the dentate gyrus following chronic restraint stress in rats

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    Saiful Bhari Talip

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to chronic restraint stress has been shown to cause a number of morphological changes in the hippocampal formation of rats. Tocotrienol, an isoform of vitamin E, exhibits numerous health benefits, different from those of tocopherol. Recent studies have demonstrated that tocotrienol prevents stress-induced changes in the gastric mucosa, thus indicating that it may also protect other organs such as the brain from the damaging effects of stress. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF extracted from palm oil on the dentate gyrus of rats following exposure to chronic restraint stress. Thirty-six male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into four groups: control, stress, tocotrienol and combination of stress and tocotrienol. Animals were stressed by restraining them for 5 hours every day for 21 consecutive days. TRF was administered via oral gavage at a dose of 200 mg/kg body weight. Our results showed that the plasma corticosterone level was significantly increased in response to stress, compared to the control. The results confirmed previous findings that chronic restraint stress suppresses cellular proliferation and reduces granule cell number in the dentate gyrus. However, TRF supplementation failed to prevent or minimize these stress-induced changes. Therefore, we conclude that TRF at the current dosage is not effective in preventing the morphological changes in the dentate gyrus induced by chronic restraint stress.

  14. Temporal and spacial relationships between PSA-NCAM-expressing, newly generated granule cells, and radial glia-like cells in the adult dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, T; Arai, Y

    1999-08-02

    The granule cell layer of the adult dentate gyrus possesses two characteristics of an immature nervous system. The first is that granule cells continue to be generated in the innermost region of the granule cell layer, and newly generated and developing granule cells in the adult express highly polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM). PSA-NCAM-expressing apical dendrites have dynamically unstable processes such as irregular shafts and many stick-like or fan-shaped fine processes. The second is that radial glia-like cells expressing glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) remain in a similar region of the granular layer. The numbers of PSA-NCAM-expressing granule cells and GFAP-expressing radial glia-like cells show a parallel age-dependent decrease during aging. Moreover, by using confocal laser scanning microscopy and immunoelectron microscopy, we demonstrated that PSA-NCAM-expressing dendrites and GFAP-expressing radial processes are partly in contact with each other, and occasionally the radial glial processes envelop the PSA-NCAM-positive dendritic processes. The temporal and spatial relationship between the two immature elements suggests that the processes of the radial glia-like cells are closely associated with the dendritic growth of the newly generated granule cells in the adult dentate gyrus and that these two immature features of neurons and glia in the dentate gyrus diminish with age.

  15. Removing entorhinal cortex input to the dentate gyrus does not impede low frequency oscillations, an EEG-biomarker of hippocampal epileptogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Martin; Kienzler-Norwood, Friederike; Bauer, Sebastian; Rosenow, Felix; Norwood, Braxton A.

    2016-01-01

    Following prolonged perforant pathway stimulation (PPS) in rats, a seizure-free “latent period” is observed that lasts around 3 weeks. During this time, aberrant neuronal activity occurs, which has been hypothesized to contribute to the generation of an “epileptic” network. This study was designed to 1) examine the pathological network activity that occurs in the dentate gyrus during the latent period, and 2) determine whether suppressing this activity by removing the main input to the dentate gyrus could stop or prolong epileptogenesis. Immediately following PPS, continuous video-EEG monitoring was used to record spontaneous neuronal activity and detect seizures. During the latent period, low frequency oscillations (LFOs), occurring at a rate of approximately 1 Hz, were detected in the dentate gyrus of all rats that developed epilepsy. LFO incidence was apparently random, but often decreased in the hour preceding a spontaneous seizure. Bilateral transection of the perforant pathway did not impact the incidence of hippocampal LFOs, the latency to epilepsy, or hippocampal neuropathology. Our main findings are: 1) LFOs are a reliable biomarker of hippocampal epileptogenesis, and 2) removing entorhinal cortex input to the hippocampus neither reduces the occurrence of LFOs nor has a demonstrable antiepileptogenic effect. PMID:27160925

  16. Effect of chloramine-T on long-term potentiation at synapses between perforant path and dentate gyrus in hippocampus of rats in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Hu, Zhuang-Li; Jiang, Bo; Ni, Lan; Jin, You; Chen, Jian-Guo; Wang, Fang

    2011-03-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), including superoxide, are generally considered as neurotoxic molecules whose effects can be alleviated by antioxidant enzymes. However, ROS also are known to be necessary components of the signal transduction cascades underlying normal synaptic plasticity. The oxidant chloramine-T (Ch-T), a specific oxidant to sulphur-containing residues, can oxidize methionine (Met) residues in proteins to alter protein function. To investigate the effect of Ch-T on the induction of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) in dentate gyrus (DG), in vivo electrophysiological recording was employed. It was found that intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of 0.1 μM Ch-T in 5 μL enhanced hippocampal LTP of rats slightly, whereas, 20 mM Ch-T in 5 μL greatly attenuated LTP. These effects can be reversed by pretreatment with 0.1 mM dithiothretol (DTT), a special thiol reductant. In addition, 0.1 μM Ch-T elevated LTP-induced increase in phosphorylation of Ca²+/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII) and neurogranin (Ng), whereas 2 μM and 20 mM Ch-T reduced LTP-induced increase in phosphorylation status of the two key proteins, especially for 20 mM Ch-T. Pretreatment with DTT significantly prevented these effects. Taken together, these findings demonstrated that Ch-T has concentration-dependent effects on the induction of hippocampal LTP in vivo. In brief, low concentration of Ch-T facilitated hippocampal LTP by enhancing LTP-induced increase in p-CaMKII and p-Ng compared to controls, whereas high concentration of Ch-T obviously attenuated LTP accompanied by a decrease in the phosphorylated proteins, and both of these effects can be prevented by DTT. These results indicate that Ch-T modulates hippocampal LTP through regulating phosphorylation status of CaMKII and Ng. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. The selective antagonism of P2X7 and P2Y1 receptors prevents synaptic failure and affects cell proliferation induced by oxygen and glucose deprivation in rat dentate gyrus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Maraula

    Full Text Available Purinergic P2X and P2Y receptors are broadly expressed on both neurons and glial cells in the central nervous system (CNS, including dentate gyrus (DG. The aim of this research was to determine the synaptic and proliferative response of the DG to severe oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD in acute rat hippocampal slices and to investigate the contribution of P2X7 and P2Y1 receptor antagonism to recovery of synaptic activity after OGD. Extracellular field excitatory post-synaptic potentials (fEPSPs in granule cells of the DG were recorded from rat hippocampal slices. Nine-min OGD elicited an irreversible loss of fEPSP and was invariably followed by the appearance of anoxic depolarization (AD. Application of MRS2179 (selective antagonist of P2Y1 receptor and BBG (selective antagonist of P2X7 receptor, before and during OGD, prevented AD appearance and allowed a significant recovery of neurotransmission after 9-min OGD. The effects of 9-min OGD on proliferation and maturation of cells localized in the subgranular zone (SGZ of slices prepared from rats treated with 5-Bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU were investigated. Slices were further incubated with an immature neuron marker, doublecortin (DCX. The number of BrdU+ cells in the SGZ was significantly decreased 6 hours after OGD. This effect was antagonized by BBG, but not by MRS2179. Twenty-four hours after 9-min OGD, the number of BrdU+ cells returned to control values and a significant increase of DCX immunofluorescence was observed. This phenomenon was still evident when BBG, but not MRS2179, was applied during OGD. Furthermore, the P2Y1 antagonist reduced the number of BrdU+ cells at this time. The data demonstrate that P2X7 and P2Y1 activation contributes to early damage induced by OGD in the DG. At later stages after the insult, P2Y1 receptors might play an additional and different role in promoting cell proliferation and maturation in the DG.

  18. Ectopic Expression of α6 and δ GABAA Receptor Subunits in Hilar Somatostatin Neurons Increases Tonic Inhibition and Alters Network Activity in the Dentate Gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xiaoping; Peng, Zechun; Zhang, Nianhui; Cetina, Yliana; Huang, Christine S; Wallner, Martin; Otis, Thomas S; Houser, Carolyn R

    2015-12-09

    The role of GABAA receptor (GABAAR)-mediated tonic inhibition in interneurons remains unclear and may vary among subgroups. Somatostatin (SOM) interneurons in the hilus of the dentate gyrus show negligible expression of nonsynaptic GABAAR subunits and very low tonic inhibition. To determine the effects of ectopic expression of tonic GABAAR subtypes in these neurons, Cre-dependent viral vectors were used to express GFP-tagged GABAAR subunits (α6 and δ) selectively in hilar SOM neurons in SOM-Cre mice. In single-transfected animals, immunohistochemistry demonstrated strong expression of either the α6 or δ subunit; in cotransfected animals, both subunits were consistently expressed in the same neurons. Electrophysiology revealed a robust increase of tonic current, with progressively larger increases following transfection of δ, α6, and α6/δ subunits, respectively, indicating formation of functional receptors in all conditions and likely coassembly of the subunits in the same receptor following cotransfection. An in vitro model of repetitive bursting was used to determine the effects of increased tonic inhibition in hilar SOM interneurons on circuit activity in the dentate gyrus. Upon cotransfection, the frequency of GABAAR-mediated bursting in granule cells was reduced, consistent with a reduction in synchronous firing among hilar SOM interneurons. Moreover, in vivo studies of Fos expression demonstrated reduced activation of α6/δ-cotransfected neurons following acute seizure induction by pentylenetetrazole. The findings demonstrate that increasing tonic inhibition in hilar SOM interneurons can alter dentate gyrus circuit activity during strong stimulation and suggest that tonic inhibition of interneurons could play a role in regulating excessive synchrony within the network. In contrast to many hippocampal interneurons, somatostatin (SOM) neurons in the hilus of the dentate gyrus have very low levels of nonsynaptic GABAARs and exhibit very little tonic

  19. Overexpression of the 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) in the hippocampal dentate gyrus produced anxiolytic and antidepressant-like behavioural effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Li-Ming; Jiang, Xiang-Yun; Sun, Shu-Zheng; Sun, Li-Jun; Guo, Ying; Gong, Jie; Zhang, You-Zhi; Wang, Heng-Lin; Li, Yun-Feng

    2017-10-01

    The 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) is a five transmembrane domain protein that plays a crucial role in neurosteroid (e.g., allopregnanolone) synthesis by promoting the transport of cholesterol to the inner mitochondrial membrane. This protein is predominantly expressed in steroid-synthesizing tissues, including the central and peripheral nervous system, affecting stress-related disorders such as anxiety and depression. Recent studies have focused on the hippocampal dentate gyrus, which is very important for involvement of anxiety and depression. However, the exact role that TSPO plays in the pathophysiology of anxiety and depression and the involvement of the hippocampal dentate gyrus in regulating these behavioural effects remain elusive. This study used the lentiviral vectors mediating TPSO overexpression to assess the effects of TPSO overexpression in the hippocampal dentate gyrus on anxiolytic and antidepressant-like behavioural effects in mice. The expression of TSPO and the concentration of allopregnanolone in hippocampus tissues (3 mm in diameter around the injection site on both sides) were measured by Western blot and ELISA, respectively. The results indicated that microinjection of the LV-TSPO resulted in a significant increase in TSPO expression and allopregnanolone concentration in the hippocampus. Moreover, TSPO overexpression of the mouse hippocampal dentate gyrus generated significant anxiolytic and antidepressant-like behavioural effects in a series of behavioural models. These effects were completely blocked by the TSPO antagonist PK11195 (3 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) and the 5α-reductase inhibitor finasteride (5 mg/kg,intraperitoneally). Meanwhile, the increased allopregnanolone was also reversed by PK11195 and finasteride. In addition, neither PK11195 nor finasteride had an effect on the expression of TSPO. Overall, our results are the first to suggest that the overexpression of TSPO in the hippocampal dentate gyrus produced anxiolytic

  20. Immunofluorescently labeling glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 coupled with confocal imaging for identifying GABAergic somata in the rat dentate gyrus-A comparison with labeling glutamic acid decarboxylase 67.

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    Wang, Xiaochen; Gao, Fei; Zhu, Jianchun; Guo, Enpu; Song, Xueying; Wang, Shuanglian; Zhan, Ren-Zhi

    2014-11-01

    As γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is synthesized by two isoforms of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), namely, GAD65 and GAD67, immunohistochemically targeting either isoform of GAD is theoretically useful for identifying GABAergic cell bodies. In practice, targeting GAD67 remains to be a popular choice. However, identifying GABAergic cell bodies with GAD67 immunoreactivity in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, especially in the hilus, is not without pitfalls. In the present study, we compared the characteristics of GAD65 immunoreactivity to GAD67 immunoreactivity in the rat dentate gyrus and examined perikaryal expression of GAD65 in four neurochemically prevalent subgroups of interneurons in the hilus. Experiments were done in normal adult Sprague-Dawley rats and GAD67-GFP knock-in mice. Horizontal hippocampal slices cut from the ventral portion of hippocampi were immunofluorescently stained and scanned using a confocal microscope. Immunoreactivity for both GAD67 and GAD65 was visible throughout the dentate gyrus. Perikaryal GAD67 immunoreactivity was denser but variable in terms of distribution pattern and intensity among cells whereas perikaryal GAD65 immunoreactivity displayed similar distribution pattern and staining intensity. Among different layers of the dentate gyrus, GAD67 immunoreactivity was densest in the hilus despite GAD65 immunoreactivity being more intense in the granule cell layer. Co-localization experiments showed that GAD65, but not GAD67, was expressed in all hilar calretinin (CR)-, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-, parvalbumin (PV)- or somatostatin (SOM)-positive somata. Labeling CR, nNOS, PV, and SOM in sections obtained from GAD67-GFP knock-in mice revealed that a large portion of SOM-positive cells had weak GFP expression. In addition, double labeling of GAD65/GABA and GAD67/GABA showed that nearly all of GABA-immunoreactive cells had perikaryal GAD65 expression whereas more than one-tenth of GABA-immunoreactive cells lacked perikaryal GAD

  1. Aquisição de uma tarefa temporal (DRL por ratos submetidos a lesão seletiva do giro denteado The acquisition of a temporal task (DRL by dentate gyrus-selective colchicine lesioned rats

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    José Lino Oliveira Bueno

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A lesão seletiva do giro denteado (DG reduz a eficiência do desempenho de ratos treinados pré-operatoriamente em um esquema de reforçamento diferencial de baixas taxas (DRL; embora os animais lesados sejam capazes de suprimir a resposta de pressão na barra por determinado intervalo de tempo após a resposta anterior, eles subestimam esse intervalo, resultando em um desempenho menos eficiente. Como os animais tinham recebido treinamento pré-operatório, não ficou claro se a lesão interfere na aquisição da discriminação temporal. Este estudo avaliou o efeito da lesão do DG na aquisição de uma tarefa de DRL-20 s. Ratos foram submetidos à neurocirurgia e então ao treino na tarefa de DRL-20 s. Os resultados mostraram que embora os animais lesados se beneficiem do treinamento na tarefa, sua aquisição não é tão eficiente quanto a exibida pelos animais controle. Os resultados sugerem ainda que a lesão do giro denteado interfere na acuidade da discriminação temporal.Previous studies have shown that dentate gyrus damage render rats less efficient than sham-operated controls in the performance of a differential reinforcement of low rates of responding (DRL-20 s task acquired prior to the lesion; even though the lesioned rats were able to postpone their responses after a previous bar press, they seem to underestimate time relative to sham-operated controls, which interferes with their performance. This study investigated the effects of multiplesite, intradentate, colchicine injections on the acquisition and performance of a DRL-20 s task in rats not exposed to preoperatory training, i.e., trained after the lesion. Results showed that the lesioned rats improved along repetitive training in the DRL-20 s task; however, relative to the sham-operated controls, their acquisition rate was slower and the level of proficiency achieved was poorer, indicating that damage to the dentate gyrus interferes with temporal discrimination.

  2. Actions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in slices from rats with spontaneous seizures and mossy fiber sprouting in the dentate gyrus.

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    Scharfman, H E; Goodman, J H; Sollas, A L

    1999-07-01

    This study examined the acute actions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the rat dentate gyrus after seizures, because previous studies have shown that BDNF has acute effects on dentate granule cell synaptic transmission, and other studies have demonstrated that BDNF expression increases in granule cells after seizures. Pilocarpine-treated rats were studied because they not only have seizures and increased BDNF expression in granule cells, but they also have reorganization of granule cell "mossy fiber" axons. This reorganization, referred to as "sprouting," involves collaterals that grow into novel areas, i.e., the inner molecular layer, where granule cell and interneuron dendrites are located. Thus, this animal model allowed us to address the effects of BDNF in the dentate gyrus after seizures, as well as the actions of BDNF on mossy fiber transmission after reorganization. In slices with sprouting, BDNF bath application enhanced responses recorded in the inner molecular layer to mossy fiber stimulation. Spontaneous bursts of granule cells occurred, and these were apparently generated at the site of the sprouted axon plexus. These effects were not accompanied by major changes in perforant path-evoked responses or paired-pulse inhibition, occurred only after prolonged (30-60 min) exposure to BDNF, and were blocked by K252a. The results suggest a preferential action of BDNF at mossy fiber synapses, even after substantial changes in the dentate gyrus network. Moreover, the results suggest that activation of trkB receptors could contribute to the hyperexcitability observed in animals with sprouting. Because human granule cells also express increased BDNF mRNA after seizures, and sprouting can occur in temporal lobe epileptics, the results may have implications for understanding temporal lobe epilepsy.

  3. Increasing CRTC1 function in the dentate gyrus during memory formation or reactivation increases memory strength without compromising memory quality.

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    Sekeres, Melanie J; Mercaldo, Valentina; Richards, Blake; Sargin, Derya; Mahadevan, Vivek; Woodin, Melanie A; Frankland, Paul W; Josselyn, Sheena A

    2012-12-01

    Memory stabilization following encoding (synaptic consolidation) or memory reactivation (reconsolidation) requires gene expression and protein synthesis (Dudai and Eisenberg, 2004; Tronson and Taylor, 2007; Nader and Einarsson, 2010; Alberini, 2011). Although consolidation and reconsolidation may be mediated by distinct molecular mechanisms (Lee et al., 2004), disrupting the function of the transcription factor CREB impairs both processes (Kida et al., 2002; Mamiya et al., 2009). Phosphorylation of CREB at Ser133 recruits CREB binding protein (CBP)/p300 coactivators to activate transcription (Chrivia et al., 1993; Parker et al., 1996). In addition to this well known mechanism, CREB regulated transcription coactivators (CRTCs), previously called transducers of regulated CREB (TORC) activity, stimulate CREB-mediated transcription, even in the absence of CREB phosphorylation. Recently, CRTC1 has been shown to undergo activity-dependent trafficking from synapses and dendrites to the nucleus in excitatory hippocampal neurons (Ch'ng et al., 2012). Despite being a powerful and specific coactivator of CREB, the role of CRTC in memory is virtually unexplored. To examine the effects of increasing CRTC levels, we used viral vectors to locally and acutely increase CRTC1 in the dorsal hippocampus dentate gyrus region of mice before training or memory reactivation in context fear conditioning. Overexpressing CRTC1 enhanced both memory consolidation and reconsolidation; CRTC1-mediated memory facilitation was context specific (did not generalize to nontrained context) and long lasting (observed after virally expressed CRTC1 dissipated). CREB overexpression produced strikingly similar effects. Therefore, increasing CRTC1 or CREB function is sufficient to enhance the strength of new, as well as established reactivated, memories without compromising memory quality.

  4. Neuroligin-1 regulates excitatory synaptic transmission, LTP and EPSP-spike coupling in the dentate gyrus in vivo.

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    Jedlicka, Peter; Vnencak, Matej; Krueger, Dilja D; Jungenitz, Tassilo; Brose, Nils; Schwarzacher, Stephan W

    2015-01-01

    Neuroligins are transmembrane cell adhesion proteins with a key role in the regulation of excitatory and inhibitory synapses. Based on previous in vitro and ex vivo studies, neuroligin-1 (NL1) has been suggested to play a selective role in the function of glutamatergic synapses. However, the role of NL1 has not yet been investigated in the brain of live animals. We studied the effects of NL1-deficiency on synaptic transmission in the hippocampal dentate gyrus using field potential recordings evoked by perforant path stimulation in urethane-anesthetized NL1 knockout (KO) mice. We report that in NL1 KOs the activation of glutamatergic perforant path granule cell inputs resulted in reduced synaptic responses. In addition, NL1 KOs displayed impairment in long-term potentiation. Furthermore, field EPSP-population spike (E-S) coupling was greater in NL1 KO than WT mice and paired-pulse inhibition was reduced, indicating a compensatory rise of excitability in NL1 KO granule cells. Consistent with changes in excitatory transmission, NL1 KOs showed a significant reduction in hippocampal synaptosomal expression levels of the AMPA receptor subunit GluA2 and NMDA receptor subunits GluN1, GluN2A and GluN2B. Taken together, we provide first evidence that NL1 is essential for normal excitatory transmission and long-term synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus of intact animals. Our data provide insights into synaptic and circuit mechanisms of neuropsychiatric abnormalities such as learning deficits and autism.

  5. Strain-dependent variations in spatial learning and in hippocampal synaptic plasticity in the dentate gyrus of freely behaving rats

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    Denise eManahan-Vaughan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal synaptic plasticity is believed to comprise the cellular basis for spatial learning. Strain-dependent differences in synaptic plasticity in the CA1 region have been reported. However, it is not known whether these differences extend to other synapses within the trisynaptic circuit, although there is evidence for morphological variations within that path. We investigated whether Wistar and Hooded Lister (HL rat strains express differences in synaptic plasticity in the dentate gyrus in vivo. We also explored whether they exhibit differences in the ability to engage in spatial learning in an 8-arm radial maze. Basal synaptic transmission was stable over a 24h period in both rat strains, and the input-output relationship of both strains was not significantly different. Paired-pulse analysis revealed significantly less paired-pulse facilitation in the Hooded Lister strain when pulses were given 40-100 msec apart. Low frequency stimulation at 1Hz evoked long-term depression (>24h in Wistar and short-term depression (<2h in HL rats; 200Hz stimulation induced long-term potentiation (>24h in Wistar, and a transient, significantly smaller potentiation (<1h in HL rats, suggesting that HL rats have higher thresholds for expression of persistent synaptic plasticity. Training for 10d in an 8-arm radial maze revealed that HL rats master the working memory task faster than Wistar rats, although both strains show an equivalent performance by the end of the trial period. HL rats also perform more efficiently in a double working and reference memory task. On the other hand, Wistar rats show better reference memory performance on the final (8-10 days of training. Wistar rats were less active and more anxious than HL rats.These data suggest that strain-dependent variations in hippocampal synaptic plasticity occur in different hippocampal synapses. A clear correlation with differences in spatial learning is not evident however.

  6. Satellite NG2 progenitor cells share common glutamatergic inputs with associated interneurons in the mouse dentate gyrus.

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    Mangin, Jean-Marie; Kunze, Albrecht; Chittajallu, Ramesh; Gallo, Vittorio

    2008-07-23

    Several studies have provided evidence that NG2-expressing (NG2(+)) progenitor cells are anatomically associated to neurons in gray matter areas. By analyzing the spatial distribution of NG2(+) cells in the hilus of the mouse dentate gyrus, we demonstrate that NG2(+) cells are indeed closely associated to interneurons. To define whether this anatomical proximity reflected a specific physiological interaction, we performed patch-clamp recordings on hilar NG2(+) cells and interneurons between 3 and 21 postnatal days. We first observed that hilar NG2(+) cells exhibit spontaneous glutamatergic EPSCs (sEPSCs) whose frequency and amplitude increase during the first 3 postnatal weeks. At the same time, the rise time and decay time of sEPSCs significantly decreased, suggesting that glutamatergic synapses in NG2(+) cells undergo a maturation process that is reminiscent of what has been reported in neurons during the same time period. We also observed that hilar interneurons and associated NG2(+) cells are similarly integrated into the local network, receiving excitatory inputs from both granule cells and CA3 pyramidal neurons. By performing pair recordings, we found that bursts of activity induced by GABAergic antagonists were strongly synchronized between both cell types and that the amplitude of these bursts was positively correlated. Finally, by applying carbachol to increase EPSC activity, we observed that closely apposed cells were more likely to exhibit synchronized EPSCs than cells separated by >200 microm. The finding that NG2(+) cells are sensing patterns of activity arising in closely associated neurons suggests that NG2(+) cell function is finely regulated by the local network.

  7. Despite strong behavioral disruption, Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol does not affect cell proliferation in the adult mouse dentate gyrus.

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    Kochman, Linda J; dos Santos, Angela Amancio; Fornal, Casimir A; Jacobs, Barry L

    2006-10-01

    Marijuana is a widely abused illicit drug known to cause significant cognitive impairments. Marijuana has been hypothesized to target neurons in the hippocampus because of the abundance of cannabinoid receptors present in this structure. While there is no clear evidence of neuropathology in vivo, suppression of brain mitogenesis, and ultimately neurogenesis, may provide a sensitive index of marijuana's more subtle effects on neural mechanisms subserving cognitive functions. We examined the effects of different doses and treatment regimens of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main active ingredient in marijuana, on cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus of adult male mice. Following drug treatment, the thymidine analog 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU; 200 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered two hours prior to sacrifice to assess cell proliferation, the first step in neurogenesis. Administration of THC produced dose-dependent catalepsy and suppression of motor activity. The number of BrdU-labeled cells was not significantly changed from vehicle control levels following either acute (1, 3, 10, 30 mg/kg, i.p.), sequential (two injections of 10 or 30 mg/kg, i.p., separated by 5 h), or chronic escalating (20 to 80 mg/kg, p.o.; for 3 weeks) drug administration. Furthermore, acute administration of the potent synthetic cannabinoid receptor agonist R-(+)-WIN 55,212-2 (WIN; 5 mg/kg, i.p.) also had no significant effect on cell proliferation. These findings provide no evidence for an effect of THC on hippocampal cell proliferation, even at doses producing gross behavioral intoxication. Whether marijuana or THC affects neurogenesis remains to be explored.

  8. Exposure to MnCl2 · 4H2O during development induces activation of microglial and perivascular macrophage populations in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of rats.

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    Abe, Hajime; Ohishi, Takumi; Nakane, Fumiyuki; Shiraki, Ayako; Tanaka, Takeshi; Yoshida, Toshinori; Shibutani, Makoto

    2015-05-01

    Developmental exposure to Mn caused Mn accumulation in the brain tissue and transient disruption of granule cell neurogenesis, targeting the late stage differentiation of progenitor cells in the subgranular zone of the hippocampal dentate gyrus of rats. Because neurogenesis is influenced by proinflammatory responses, this study was performed to determine whether Mn exposure causes microglial activation in the dentate hilus, a region anatomically close to the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus. Pregnant rats were treated with dietary MnCl2 · 4H2O at 32, 160 or 800 ppm from gestational day 10 to day 21 after delivery. An immunohistochemical analysis revealed increases in Iba1(+) microglia in the hilus on postnatal day 21 following exposure to MnCl2 · 4H2O in a dose-unrelated manner at 32 and at 800 ppm and an increase in CD163(+) macrophage at 800 ppm in the hilus. Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed increases in the mRNA levels of Il1α, Il6, Nos2 and Tnf after 800 ppm MnCl2 · 4H2O. These results suggest that activation of microglia and perivascular macrophages occurs in the hilus after developmental exposure to MnCl2 · 4H2O at 800 ppm, and probably involves the disruption of neurogenesis through the accumulation of Mn in the brain tissue. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. The effect of acute swim stress and training in the water maze on hippocampal synaptic activity as well as plasticity in the dentate gyrus of freely moving rats: revisiting swim-induced LTP reinforcement.

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    Tabassum, Heena; Frey, Julietta U

    2013-12-01

    Hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) is a cellular model of learning and memory. An early form of LTP (E-LTP) can be reinforced into its late form (L-LTP) by various behavioral interactions within a specific time window ("behavioral LTP-reinforcement"). Depending on the type and procedure used, various studies have shown that stress differentially affects synaptic plasticity. Under low stress, such as novelty detection or mild foot shocks, E-LTP can be transformed into L-LTP in the rat dentate gyrus (DG). A reinforcing effect of a 2-min swim, however, has only been shown in (Korz and Frey (2003) J Neurosci 23:7281-7287; Korz and Frey (2005) J Neurosci 25:7393-7400; Ahmed et al. (2006) J Neurosci 26:3951-3958; Sajikumar et al., (2007) J Physiol 584.2:389-400) so far. We have reinvestigated these studies using the same as well as an improved recording technique which allowed the recording of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSP) and the population spike amplitude (PSA) at their places of generation in freely moving rats. We show that acute swim stress led to a long-term depression (LTD) in baseline values of PSA and partially fEPSP. In contrast to earlier studies a LTP-reinforcement by swimming could never be reproduced. Our results indicate that 2-min swim stress influenced synaptic potentials as well as E-LTP negatively.

  10. Effects of bone morphogenetic protein-4 on spatial memory and cholinergic expression in the dentate gyrus after fornix-fimbria transection in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Liu; Yilong Xue; Jingkun Pan; Yazhuo Hu; Yuhong Gao; Yun Luo

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous experiments have confirmed bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) upregulate cholinergic expression in neurons isolated from the embryonic rat hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Therefore, BMPs could be useful for treating Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases. OBJECTIVE: BMP-4 was infused into the hippocampal dentate gyrus of fornix-fimbria transected rats to test the effects of BMP-4 on cholinergic expression in dentate gyrus neurons, and to observe changes in spatial memory behavior. DESIGN: A randomized controlled animal experiment. SETTING: Department of Neurosurgery and Laboratory for Cell Biology, Institute of Geriatrics, General Hospital of Chinese PLA.MATERIALS: Twenty-seven healthy adult male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats, weighing 250-300 g, were provided by the Laboratory Animal Center of the General Hospital of Chinese PLA. Reagents: BMP-4 (B-2680, Sigma Company) and choline acetyl transferase (ChAT) antibody (AB5042, Chemicon Company) were used in this study. Equipments: a rat stereotaxic instrument (type: SN-2N, Narushige Group, Japan) and Image-prog-plus image analysis software (Media Cybernetics company, USA) were used in this study. The protocol was carried out in accordance with ethical guidelines for the use and care of animals.METHODS: This experiment was performed in the Institute of Geriatrics, General Hospital of Chinese PLA between July 2004 and March 2005. Rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: Alzheimer's disease group (n = 7), normal control group (n = 5), BMP-4-Alzheimer's disease group (n = 8), and model group (n = 7). In the Alzheimer's disease group, the left hippocampal fornix-fimbria of rats was transected to mimic Alzheimer's disease symptoms. In the BMP-4-Alzheimer's disease group, 1 μL BMP-4 (10 mg/L) was perfused into the left dentate gyrus with a microinjector at 1 μL/min. In the model group, 1 μL saline was perfused into the same position by the same method. Twenty-eight days after injection

  11. Evidence for proteolytic cleavage of brevican by the ADAMTSs in the dentate gyrus after excitotoxic lesion of the mouse entorhinal cortex

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    Gottschall Paul E

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brevican is a member of the lectican family of aggregating extracellular matrix (ECM proteoglycans that bear chondroitin sulfate (CS chains. It is highly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS and is thought to stabilize synapses and inhibit neural plasticity and as such, neuritic or synaptic remodeling would be less likely to occur in regions with intact and abundant, lectican-containing, ECM complexes. Neural plasticity may occur more readily when these ECM complexes are broken down by endogenous proteases, the ADAMTSs (adisintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs, that selectively cleave the lecticans. The purpose of these experiments was to determine whether the production of brevican or the ADAMTS-cleaved fragments of brevican were altered after deafferentation and reinnervation of the dentate gyrus via entorhinal cortex lesion (ECL. Results In the C57Bl6J mouse, synaptic density in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus, as measured by synaptophysin levels in ELISA, was significantly attenuated 2 days (nearly 50% of contralateral and 7 days after lesion and returned to levels not different from the contralateral region at 30 days. Immunoreactive brevican in immunoblot was elevated 2 days after lesion, whereas there was a significant increase in the proteolytic product at 7, but not 30 days post-lesion. ADAMTS activity, estimated using the ratio of the specific ADAMTS-derived brevican fragment and intact brevican levels was increased at 7 days, but was not different from the contralateral side at 2 or 30 days after deafferentation. Conclusion These findings indicate that ADAMTS activity in the dentate outer molecular layer (OML is elevated during the initial synaptic reinnervation period (7 days after lesion. Therefore, proteolytic processing of brevican appears to be a significant extracellular event in the remodeling of the dentate after EC lesion, and may modulate the process of sprouting and

  12. Sodium butyrate, a histone deacetylase Inhibitor, ameliorates SIRT2-induced memory impairment, reduction of cell proliferation, and neuroblast differentiation in the dentate gyrus.

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    Yoo, Dae Young; Kim, Dae Won; Kim, Mi Jin; Choi, Jung Hoon; Jung, Hyo Young; Nam, Sung Min; Kim, Jong Whi; Yoon, Yeo Sung; Choi, Soo Young; Hwang, In Koo

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) play a key role in synaptic plasticity and learning and memory. Sirtuin 2 (SIRT2), a class III HDAC, is abundantly expressed in neurons and functions as a mitotic exit regulator in dividing cells. In this study, we investigated the role of SIRT2 in cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the mouse dentate gyrus. To facilitate the delivery of SIRT2 into neurons, we constructed a PEP-1-SIRT2 fusion protein. Mice were divided into three groups: vehicle (PEP-1), SIRT2, and SIRT2 with sodium butyrate (an HDAC inhibitor). PEP-1 or PEP-1-SIRT2 fusion protein was administered intraperitoneally to 7-week-old mice once a day for 3 weeks, and the mice were killed 2 h after the last administration. Sodium butyrate, an HDAC inhibitor, was subcutaneously administered in parallel with PEP-1-SIRT2 once a day for 3 weeks. The administration of PEP-1-SIRT2 alone significantly reduced the time spent exploring a new object in the novel object recognition test, whereas treatment with sodium butyrate increased the time spent exploring a new object. RESULTS of Ki67 and doublecortin immunohistochemistry revealed that the administration of PEP-1-SIRT2 significantly reduced cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation, respectively, in the dentate gyrus. However, the administration of sodium butyrate significantly ameliorated the SIRT2-induced reduction in cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation. This result suggests that histone acetylation and deacetylation are key factors modulating hippocampal functions such as memory formation, cell proliferation, and neuroblast differentiation in the dentate gyrus.

  13. Effects of prolyl-hydroxylase inhibition and chronic intermittent hypoxia on synaptic transmission and plasticity in the rat CA1 and dentate gyrus.

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    Wall, Audrey M; Corcoran, Alan E; O'Halloran, Ken D; O'Connor, John J

    2014-02-01

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) is an underlying component of obstructive sleep apnoea and has been shown to have deleterious and damaging effects on central neurons and to impair synaptic plasticity in the CA1 region of the rat hippocampus. CIH has previously been shown to impair synaptic plasticity and working memory. CIH is a potent inducer of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF), a key regulator in a cell's adaptation to hypoxia that plays an important role in the fate of neurons during ischemia. Levels of HIF-1α are regulated by the activity of a group of enzymes called HIF-prolyl 4-hydroxylases (PHDs) and these have become potential pharmacological targets for preconditioning against ischemia. However little is known about the effects of prolyl hydroxylase inhibition and CIH on synaptic transmission and plasticity in sub-regions of the hippocampus. Male Wistar rats were treated for 7-days with either saline, CIH or PHD inhibition (dimethyloxaloylglycine, DMOG; 50mg/kg, i.p.). At the end of treatment all three groups showed no change in synaptic excitability using paired pulse paradigms. However long-term potentiation (LTP) was impaired in the CA1 region of the hippocampus in both CIH and DMOG treated animals. LTP induced in the dentate gyrus was not significantly affected by either CIH or DMOG treatment. We also investigated the effect of 7-day CIH and DMOG treatment on the recovery of synaptic transmission following an acute 30min hypoxic insult. CIH treated animals showed an improved rate of recovery of synaptic transmission following re-oxygenation in both the CA1 and the dentate gyrus. These results suggest that LTP induction in the CA1 region is more sensitive to both CIH and DMOG treatments than the dentate gyrus. © 2013.

  14. Potassium conductances mediate bidirectional state-dependent modulation of action potential evoked dendritic calcium signals in dentate gyrus granule cells

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    János Brunner

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Backpropagating action potentials (bAPs and local calcium signals that they trigger are fundamental for dendritic functions. Here we addressed the question what extent the changes of local dendritic membrane properties can contribute to the shaping of the coupling between dendritic action potentials and the local calcium responses. Using a combination of in vitro electrophysiological and confocal imaging techniques we found that activation of dendritic GIRK channels via mGlu2 or GABAB receptors enhanced the bAP¬-triggered calcium signals in the dendrites of dentate gyrus granule cells (GCs. The enhancement of calcium signals was significant only in those dendritic regions, where these receptors are predominantly expressed. Similarly to GIRK channel activation, somatic hyperpolarization by DC current injection (from -64 mV to -77 mV, significantly increased bAP-associated calcium signals in the proximal dendrites. The hyperpolarization was associated with a decrease in the input resistance due to the rectification of the membrane potential of GCs. The effect of hyperpolarization on the calcium signals was maintained when T-type calcium currents were blocked but it decreased when GIRK channels were inhibited. Simultaneous dual somato-dendritic recordings from GCs showed that somatic hyperpolarization accelerated the repolarization phase of dendritic bAP in the proximal region whereas the rising phase and peak amplitude was not affected. We hypothesize that the larger driving force for calcium ions during the faster repolarization can contribute to the increasing in calcium signals. Employment of previously recorded dendritic bAP waveforms from hyperpolarized membrane potential as voltage command evoked larger calcium currents in nucleated patches compared to bAP waveform from the same recording at depolarized membrane potential. Furthermore, addition of native, high-voltage activated, inactivating potassium conductance by somatic dynamic clamp

  15. Diffusion tensor MRI shows progressive changes in the hippocampus and dentate gyrus after status epilepticus in rat - histological validation with Fourier-based analysis.

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    Salo, Raimo A; Miettinen, Tuukka; Laitinen, Teemu; Gröhn, Olli; Sierra, Alejandra

    2017-03-04

    Imaging markers for monitoring disease progression, recovery, and treatment efficacy are a major unmet need for many neurological diseases, including epilepsy. Recent evidence suggests that diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) provides high microstructural contrast even outside major white matter tracts. We hypothesized that in vivo DTI could detect progressive microstructural changes in the dentate gyrus and the hippocampal CA3bc in the rat brain after status epilepticus (SE). To test this hypothesis, we induced SE with systemic kainic acid or pilocarpine in adult male Wistar rats and subsequently scanned them using in vivo DTI at five time-points: prior to SE, and 10, 20, 34, and 79 days post SE. In order to tie the DTI findings to changes in the tissue microstructure, myelin- and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-stained sections from the same animals underwent Fourier analysis. We compared the Fourier analysis parameters, anisotropy index and angle of myelinated axons or astrocyte processes, to corresponding DTI parameters, fractional anisotropy (FA) and the orientation angle of the principal eigenvector. We found progressive detectable changes in DTI parameters in both the dentate gyrus (FA, axial diffusivity [D||], linear anisotropy [CL] and spherical anisotropy [CS], pmixed-effects model [LMEM]) and the CA3bc (FA, D||, CS, and angle, p<0.001, LMEM; CL and planar anisotropy [CP], p<0.01, LMEM) post SE. The Fourier analysis revealed that both myelinated axons and astrocyte processes played a role in the water diffusion anisotropy changes detected by DTI in individual portions of the dentate gyrus (suprapyramidal blade, mid-portion, and infrapyramidal blade). In the whole dentate gyrus, myelinated axons markedly contributed to the water diffusion changes. In CA3bc as well as in CA3b and CA3c, both myelinated axons and astrocyte processes contributed to water diffusion anisotropy and orientation. Our study revealed that DTI is a promising method for noninvasive

  16. Combined role of seizure-induced dendritic morphology alterations and spine loss in newborn granule cells with mossy fiber sprouting on the hyperexcitability of a computer model of the dentate gyrus.

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    Tejada, Julian; Garcia-Cairasco, Norberto; Roque, Antonio C

    2014-05-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy strongly affects hippocampal dentate gyrus granule cells morphology. These cells exhibit seizure-induced anatomical alterations including mossy fiber sprouting, changes in the apical and basal dendritic tree and suffer substantial dendritic spine loss. The effect of some of these changes on the hyperexcitability of the dentate gyrus has been widely studied. For example, mossy fiber sprouting increases the excitability of the circuit while dendritic spine loss may have the opposite effect. However, the effect of the interplay of these different morphological alterations on the hyperexcitability of the dentate gyrus is still unknown. Here we adapted an existing computational model of the dentate gyrus by replacing the reduced granule cell models with morphologically detailed models coming from three-dimensional reconstructions of mature cells. The model simulates a network with 10% of the mossy fiber sprouting observed in the pilocarpine (PILO) model of epilepsy. Different fractions of the mature granule cell models were replaced by morphologically reconstructed models of newborn dentate granule cells from animals with PILO-induced Status Epilepticus, which have apical dendritic alterations and spine loss, and control animals, which do not have these alterations. This complex arrangement of cells and processes allowed us to study the combined effect of mossy fiber sprouting, altered apical dendritic tree and dendritic spine loss in newborn granule cells on the excitability of the dentate gyrus model. Our simulations suggest that alterations in the apical dendritic tree and dendritic spine loss in newborn granule cells have opposing effects on the excitability of the dentate gyrus after Status Epilepticus. Apical dendritic alterations potentiate the increase of excitability provoked by mossy fiber sprouting while spine loss curtails this increase.

  17. Combined role of seizure-induced dendritic morphology alterations and spine loss in newborn granule cells with mossy fiber sprouting on the hyperexcitability of a computer model of the dentate gyrus.

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    Julian Tejada

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Temporal lobe epilepsy strongly affects hippocampal dentate gyrus granule cells morphology. These cells exhibit seizure-induced anatomical alterations including mossy fiber sprouting, changes in the apical and basal dendritic tree and suffer substantial dendritic spine loss. The effect of some of these changes on the hyperexcitability of the dentate gyrus has been widely studied. For example, mossy fiber sprouting increases the excitability of the circuit while dendritic spine loss may have the opposite effect. However, the effect of the interplay of these different morphological alterations on the hyperexcitability of the dentate gyrus is still unknown. Here we adapted an existing computational model of the dentate gyrus by replacing the reduced granule cell models with morphologically detailed models coming from three-dimensional reconstructions of mature cells. The model simulates a network with 10% of the mossy fiber sprouting observed in the pilocarpine (PILO model of epilepsy. Different fractions of the mature granule cell models were replaced by morphologically reconstructed models of newborn dentate granule cells from animals with PILO-induced Status Epilepticus, which have apical dendritic alterations and spine loss, and control animals, which do not have these alterations. This complex arrangement of cells and processes allowed us to study the combined effect of mossy fiber sprouting, altered apical dendritic tree and dendritic spine loss in newborn granule cells on the excitability of the dentate gyrus model. Our simulations suggest that alterations in the apical dendritic tree and dendritic spine loss in newborn granule cells have opposing effects on the excitability of the dentate gyrus after Status Epilepticus. Apical dendritic alterations potentiate the increase of excitability provoked by mossy fiber sprouting while spine loss curtails this increase.

  18. The effect of amygdala kindling on hippocampal neurogenesis coincides with decreased reelin and DISC1 expression in the adult dentate gyrus.

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    Fournier, N M; Andersen, D R; Botterill, J J; Sterner, E Y; Lussier, A L; Caruncho, H J; Kalynchuk, L E

    2010-05-01

    Temporal lobe seizures can induce the proliferation and abnormal migration of newly generated dentate granule cells, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms that govern these pathological events. Reelin and DISC1 (disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1) are proteins that play a regulatory role in the maturation and integration of new neurons in the developing and adult brain. In this study, we examined whether amygdala kindling results in aberrant neurogenesis and altered expression of reelin and DISC1 in the adult dentate gyrus. Using doublecortin immunohistochemistry, we found that short-term kindling (i.e., 30 electrical stimulations) significantly increased the number of immature neurons in the dentate subgranular zone (SGZ), whereas long-term kindling (i.e., 99 electrical stimulations) did not. However, doublecortin-labeled neurons in long-term kindled rats showed greater dendritic complexity than they did in short-term kindled or control rats. We also found that long-term kindling decreased the number of reelin-positive cells and decreased DISC1 expression in the dentate granule cell layer and subgranular zone. Interestingly, kindling-induced changes in reelin and DISC1 expression coincided with the appearance of ectopically located Prox1-labeled granule cells in the hilus. These effects occurred independently of alterations in granule cell layer length, dentate volume, or the number of hilar neurons. Taken together, these findings suggest a novel role for DISC1 in the pathophysiology of temporal lobe epilepsy and further suggest that changes in reelin and DISC1 expression may contribute to aberrant neurogenesis in the kindling model.

  19. Differential paired-pulse responses between the CA1 region and the dentate gyrus are related to altered CLC-2 immunoreactivity in the pilocarpine-induced rat epilepsy model.

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    Kwak, Sung-Eun; Kim, Ji-Eun; Kim, Duk-Soo; Won, Moo Ho; Lee, Hong Jin; Choi, Soo-Young; Kwon, Oh-Shin; Kim, Jin-Sang; Kang, Tae-Cheon

    2006-10-18

    The epileptic hippocampus shows differential paired-pulse responses between the dentate gyrus and the CA1 region. However, little data are available to explain this phenomenon. In the present study, we identified the relationship between regional differences of paired-pulse response and voltage gated Cl(-) channel 2 (CLC-2)/vesicular GABA transport (VGAT) expression in a pilocarpine-induced rat model. During epileptogenic periods, paired-pulse inhibitions in the dentate gyrus and the CA1 region were markedly reduced. After recurrent seizure onset, paired-pulse inhibition in the dentate gyrus was markedly enhanced, while that in the CA1 region more reduced. Unlike VGAT, CLC-2 immunoreactivity was markedly reduced in the hippocampus during epileptogenic periods and was re-enhanced only in the dentate gyrus after recurrent seizure onset. Linear regression analysis showed an inverse proportional relationship between alterations in CLC-2 immunoreactivity and changes in normalized population spike amplitude ratio within the CA1 region and the dentate gyrus. Therefore, our findings suggest that the regionally specific alterations in CLC-2 immunoreactivity after SE may determine the properties of paired-pulse responses in the hippocampus of the pilocarpine-induced rat epilepsy model.

  20. Differential roles of orexin receptors within the dentate gyrus in stress- and drug priming-induced reinstatement of conditioned place preference in rats.

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    Ebrahimian, Fereshte; Naghavi, Farzaneh Sadat; Yazdi, Fatemeh; Sadeghzadeh, Fatemeh; Taslimi, Zahra; Haghparast, Abbas

    2016-02-01

    Orexins are hypothalamic peptides involved in the modulation of the feeding, arousal, reward function, learning, and memory; nevertheless, the role of orexins in stress and relapse are largely unclear. Therefore, in the present study, the reinstatement model were used to examine the effects of intradentate gyrus (DG) administration of SB334867 as an orexin-1 receptor antagonist and TCS OX2 29, as an orexin-2 receptor antagonist on drug priming- and forced swim stress (FSS)-induced reinstatement of morphine. One-hundred and 44 adult male albino Wistar rats weighing 200 g-280 g were bilaterally implanted by cannulas into the DG. For induction of conditioned place preference (CPP), subcutaneous (sc) injection of morphine (5 mg/kg) was used daily during a 3-day conditioning phase. Then, the conditioning score (conditional stimulus [CS]) was calculated. After a 24 hr "off" period following achievement of extinction criterion, rats were tested for drug priming-induced reinstatement by priming dose of morphine (1 mg/kg, sc) and for FSS-induced reinstatement 10 min after FSS. In the next experiments, animals received different doses of intra-DG administration of SB334867 and TCS OX2 29 (3, 10, and 30 μg/0.5 μl 12% DMSO per side), bilaterally and were subsequently tested for morphine priming- and FSS-induced reinstatement. Our findings indicated that the FSS-induced the reinstatement of seeking behaviors. Furthermore, intra-DG administration of orexin-1 and orexin-2 receptor antagonists attenuated drug priming-induced reinstatement dose-dependently. However, they have trivial role in FSS-induced reinstatement. It is concluded that drug priming-induced reinstatement may be mediated, at least in part, by stimulation of orexin receptors in the DG.

  1. Redistribution of ionotropic glutamate receptors detected by laser microdissection of the rat dentate gyrus 48 h following LTP induction in vivo.

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    Jeremy T T Kennard

    Full Text Available The persistence and input specificity of long-term potentiation (LTP make it attractive as a mechanism of information storage. In its initial phase, both in vivo and in vitro studies have shown that LTP is associated with increased membrane localization of AMPA receptor subunits, but the molecular basis of LTP maintenance over the long-term is still unclear. We have previously shown that expression of AMPA and NMDA receptor subunits is elevated in whole homogenates prepared from dentate gyrus 48 h after LTP induction in vivo. In the present study, we utilized laser microdissection (LMD techniques to determine whether AMPA and NMDA receptor upregulation occurs specifically in the stimulated regions of the dentate gyrus dendritic arbor. Receptor proteins GluN1, GluA1 and GluA2, as well as postsynaptic density protein of 95 kDa and tubulin were detected by Western blot analysis in microdissected samples. Gradients of expression were observed for GluN1 and GluA2, decreasing from the inner to the outer zones of the molecular layer, and were independent of LTP. When induced at medial perforant path synapses, LTP was associated with an apparent specific redistribution of GluA1 and GluN1 to the middle molecular layer that contains these synapses. These data indicate that glutamate receptor proteins are delivered specifically to dendritic regions possessing LTP-expressing synapses, and that these changes are preserved for at least 48 h.

  2. Two-Stage Translational Control of Dentate Gyrus LTP Consolidation Is Mediated by Sustained BDNF-TrkB Signaling to MNK

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    Debabrata Panja

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available BDNF signaling contributes to protein-synthesis-dependent synaptic plasticity, but the dynamics of TrkB signaling and mechanisms of translation have not been defined. Here, we show that long-term potentiation (LTP consolidation in the dentate gyrus of live rodents requires sustained (hours BDNF-TrkB signaling. Surprisingly, this sustained activation maintains an otherwise labile signaling pathway from TrkB to MAP-kinase-interacting kinase (MNK. MNK activity promotes eIF4F translation initiation complex formation and protein synthesis in mechanistically distinct early and late stages. In early-stage translation, MNK triggers release of the CYFIP1/FMRP repressor complex from the 5′-mRNA cap. In late-stage translation, MNK regulates the canonical translational repressor 4E-BP2 in a synapse-compartment-specific manner. This late stage is coupled to MNK-dependent enhanced dendritic mRNA translation. We conclude that LTP consolidation in the dentate gyrus is mediated by sustained BDNF signaling to MNK and MNK-dependent regulation of translation in two functionally and mechanistically distinct stages.

  3. Neuronal apoptosis and synaptic density in the dentate gyrus of ischemic rats' response to chronic mild stress and the effects of Notch signaling.

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    Shaohua Wang

    Full Text Available Our previous research highlighted an inconsistency with Notch1 signaling-related compensatory neurogenesis after chronic mild stress (CMS in rodents suffering from cerebral ischemia, which continue to display post-stroke depressive symptoms. Here, we hypothesize that CMS aggrandized ischemia-related apoptosis injury and worsened synaptic integrity via gamma secretase-meditated Notch1 signaling. Adult rats were exposed to a CMS paradigm after left middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO. Open-field and sucrose consumption testing were employed to assess depression-like behavior. Gene expression of pro-apoptotic Bax, anti-apoptotic Bcl-2, and synaptic density-related synaptophysin were measured by western blotting and real-time PCR on Day 28 after MCAO surgery. CMS induced depressive behaviors in ischemic rats, which was accompanied by an elevation in Bax/bcl-2 ratio, TUNEL staining in neurons and reduced synaptophysin expression in the dentate gyrus. These collective effects were reversed by the gamma-secretase inhibitor DAPT (N-[N-(3,5-difluorophenacetyl-L-alanyl]-S-phenyl-glycine t-butyl ester. We found that post-stroke stressors made neurons in the dentate gyrus vulnerable to apoptosis, which supports a putative role for Notch signaling in neural integrity, potentially in newborn cells' synaptic deficit with regard to preexisting cells. These findings suggest that post-stroke depression therapeutically benefits from blocking gamma secretase mediated Notch signaling, and whether this signaling pathway could be a therapeutic target needs to be further investigated.

  4. Neurons in the hippocampal CA1 region, but not the dentate gyrus, are susceptible to oxidative stress in rats with streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes

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    Sang Gun Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the effects of streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes on antioxidant-like protein-1 immunoreactivity, protein carbonyl levels, and malondialdehyde formation, a marker for lipid peroxidation, in the hippocampus. For this study, streptozotocin (75 mg/kg was intraperitoneally injected into adult rats to induce type 1 diabetes. The three experimental parameters were determined at 2, 3, 4 weeks after streptozotocin treatment. Fasting blood glucose levels significantly increased by 20.7-21.9 mM after streptozotocin treatment. The number of antioxidant-like protein-1 immunoreactive neurons significantly decreased in the hippocampal CA1 region, but not the dentate gyrus, 3 weeks after streptozotocin treatment compared to the control group. Malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl levels, which are modified by oxidative stress, significantly increased with a peak at 3 weeks after malondialdehyde treatment, and then decreased 4 weeks after malondialdehyde treatment. These results suggest that neurons in the hippocampal CA1 region, but not the dentate gyrus, are susceptible to oxidative stress 3 weeks after malondialdehyde treatment.

  5. Growth-associated phosphoprotein expression is increased in the supragranular regions of the dentate gyrus following pilocarpine-induced seizures in rats.

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    Naffah-Mazzacoratti, M G; Funke, M G; Sanabria, E R; Cavalheiro, E A

    1999-01-01

    Neuroplasticity has been investigated considering the neuronal growth-associated phosphoprotein as a marker of neuronal adaptive capabilities. In the present work, studying the hippocampal reorganization observed in the epilepsy model induced by pilocarpine, we carried out quantitative western blotting associated with immunohistochemistry to determine the distribution of growth-associated phosphoprotein in the hippocampus of rats in acute, silent and chronic periods of this epilepsy model. The fibers and punctate elements from the inner molecular layer of the dentate gyrus were strongly immunostained in animals killed 5 h after status epilepticus, compared with the same region in control animals. Rats presenting partial seizures showed no alterations in the immunostaining pattern compared with saline-treated animals. The hippocampal dentate gyrus of animals during the seizure-free period and presenting spontaneous recurrent seizures was also characterized by strong growth-associated phosphoprotein immunostaining of fibers and punctate elements in the inner molecular layer, contrasting with the control group. As determined by western blotting analysis, growth-associated phosphoprotein levels increased following status epilepticus and remained elevated at the later time-points, both during the silent period and during the period of chronic recurring seizures. Pilocarpine-treated animals, which did not develop status epilepticus, showed no change in growth-associated phosphoprotein levels, indicating that status epilepticus is important to induce growth-associated phosphoprotein overexpression. The measurement of this overexpression could represent one of the early signals of hippocampal reorganization due to status epilepticus-induced damage.

  6. Fine processes of Nestin-GFP-positive radial glia-like stem cells in the adult dentate gyrus ensheathe local synapses and vasculature.

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    Moss, Jonathan; Gebara, Elias; Bushong, Eric A; Sánchez-Pascual, Irene; O'Laoi, Ruadhan; El M'Ghari, Imane; Kocher-Braissant, Jacqueline; Ellisman, Mark H; Toni, Nicolas

    2016-05-03

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis relies on the activation of neural stem cells in the dentate gyrus, their division, and differentiation of their progeny into mature granule neurons. The complex morphology of radial glia-like (RGL) stem cells suggests that these cells establish numerous contacts with the cellular components of the neurogenic niche that may play a crucial role in the regulation of RGL stem cell activity. However, the morphology of RGL stem cells remains poorly described. Here, we used light microscopy and electron microscopy to examine Nestin-GFP transgenic mice and provide a detailed ultrastructural reconstruction analysis of Nestin-GFP-positive RGL cells of the dentate gyrus. We show that their primary processes follow a tortuous path from the subgranular zone through the granule cell layer and ensheathe local synapses and vasculature in the inner molecular layer. They share the ensheathing of synapses and vasculature with astrocytic processes and adhere to the adjacent processes of astrocytes. This extensive interaction of processes with their local environment could allow them to be uniquely receptive to signals from local neurons, glia, and vasculature, which may regulate their fate.

  7. Synaptic plasticity and the analysis of the field-EPSP as well as the population spike using separate recording electrodes in the dentate gyrus in freely moving rats.

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    Frey, Sabine; Frey, Julietta U

    2009-10-30

    Commonly, synaptic plasticity events such as long-term potentiation (LTP) are investigated by using a stimulation electrode and a single, monopolar field recording electrode in the dentate gyrus in intact, freely moving rats. The recording electrode is mostly positioned in the granular cell layer, or the hilar region of the dentate gyrus, i.e. far away from the place of generation of monosynaptic postsynaptic excitatory potentials (EPSP). Since LTP is a synaptic phenomenon and field recordings far away from the activated synapses do not guarantee a specific interpretation of the overlaid, mixture of complex potentials of several different electrical fields it is often difficult or even impossible to interpret the data obtained by such a single recording electrode. Therefore, at least a separate or two recording electrodes should be used to record the EPSP as well as the spike, respectively, ideally at their places of generation. Here, we describe a method by implanting a chronic bipolar recording electrode which fulfils the above requirements by recording the field-EPSP as well as the population spike at their places of generation and describe the time course of LTP measured using this "double-recording" electrode. We show that different tetanization protocols resulted in EPSP- or population spike-LTP but only if the potentials were recorded by electrodes positioned within adequate places of potential generation. Interestingly, the commonly used recording in the hilus of a distinct part of a potential, mistakenly analyzed as an "EPSP" did not reveal any LTP.

  8. Cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the dentate gyrus of high-fat diet-fed mice are increased after rosiglitazone treatment.

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    Yoo, Dae Young; Kim, Woosuk; Kim, Dae Won; Nam, Sung Min; Jung, Hyo Young; Kim, Jong Whi; Lee, Choong Hyun; Choi, Jung Hoon; Won, Moo-Ho; Yoon, Yeo Sung; Hwang, In Koo

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we determined how rosiglitazone (RSG) differentially affected hippocampal neurogenesis in mice fed a low-fat diet (LFD) or high-fat diet (HFD; 60% fat). LFD and HFD were given to the mice for 8 weeks. Four weeks after initiating the LFD and HFD feeding, vehicle or RSG was administered orally once a day to both groups of mice. We measured cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus using Ki67 and doublecortin (DCX), respectively, as markers. In addition, we monitored the effects of RSG on the levels of DCX and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in hippocampal homogenates. At 8 weeks after the LFD feeding, the numbers of Ki67- and DCX-positive cells as well as hippocampal levels of DCX and BDNF were significantly decreased in the RSG-treated group compared to the vehicle-treated animals. In contrast, the numbers of Ki67- and DCX-positive cells along with hippocampal levels of DCX and BDNF in the HFD fed mice were significantly increased in the RSG-treated mice compared to the vehicle-treated group. Our data demonstrate that RSG can modulate the levels of BDNF, which could play a pivotal role in cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus.

  9. Neurons in the hippocampal CA1 region, but not the dentate gyrus, are susceptible to oxidative stress in rats with streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sang Gun Lee; In Koo Hwang; Seung Myung Moon; Dae Young Yoo; Hyo Young Jung; Sung Min Nam; Jong Whi Kim; Jung Hoon Choi; Sun Shin Yi; Moo-Ho Won; Yeo Sung Yoon

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes on antioxi-dant-like protein-1 immunoreactivity, protein carbonyl levels, and malondialdehyde formation, a marker for lipid peroxidation, in the hippocampus. For this study, streptozotocin (75 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally injected into adult rats to induce type 1 diabetes. The three experimental pa-rameters were determined at 2, 3, 4 weeks after streptozotocin treatment. Fasting blood glucose levels signiifcantly increased by 20.7–21.9 mM after streptozotocin treatment. The number of antioxidant-like protein-1 immunoreactive neurons signiifcantly decreased in the hippocampal CA1 region, but not the dentate gyrus, 3 weeks after streptozotocin treatment compared to the control group. Malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl levels, which are modiifed by oxidative stress, signiifcantly increased with a peak at 3 weeks after malondialdehyde treatment, and then decreased 4 weeks after malondialdehyde treatment. These results suggest that neurons in the hippocampal CA1 region, but not the dentate gyrus, are susceptible to oxidative stress 3 weeks after malondialdehyde treatment.

  10. The Coexpression of Reelin and Neuronal Nitric Oxide Synthase in a Subpopulation of Dentate Gyrus Neurons Is Downregulated in Heterozygous Reeler Mice

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    Raquel Romay-Tallón

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Reelin is an extracellular matrix protein expressed in several interneuron subtypes in the hippocampus and dentate gyrus. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS is also expressed by interneurons in these areas. We investigated whether reelin and nNOS are co-localized in the same population of hippocampal interneurons, and whether this colocalization is altered in the heterozygous reeler mouse. We found colocalization of nNOS in reelin-positive cells in the CA1 stratum radiatum and lacunosum moleculare, the CA3 stratum radiatum, and the dentate gyrus subgranular zone, molecular layer, and hilus. In heterozygous reeler mice, the colocalization of nNOS in reelin-positive cells was significantly decreased only in the subgranular zone and molecular layer. The coexpression of reelin and nNOS in several hippocampal regions suggests that reelin and nNOS may work synergistically to promote glutamatergic function, and the loss of this coexpression in heterozygous reeler mice may underlie some of the behavioral deficits observed in these animals.

  11. The coexpression of reelin and neuronal nitric oxide synthase in a subpopulation of dentate gyrus neurons is downregulated in heterozygous reeler mice.

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    Romay-Tallón, Raquel; Dopeso-Reyes, Iria G; Lussier, April L; Kalynchuk, Lisa E; Caruncho, Hector J

    2010-01-01

    Reelin is an extracellular matrix protein expressed in several interneuron subtypes in the hippocampus and dentate gyrus. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) is also expressed by interneurons in these areas. We investigated whether reelin and nNOS are co-localized in the same population of hippocampal interneurons, and whether this colocalization is altered in the heterozygous reeler mouse. We found colocalization of nNOS in reelin-positive cells in the CA1 stratum radiatum and lacunosum moleculare, the CA3 stratum radiatum, and the dentate gyrus subgranular zone, molecular layer, and hilus. In heterozygous reeler mice, the colocalization of nNOS in reelin-positive cells was significantly decreased only in the subgranular zone and molecular layer. The coexpression of reelin and nNOS in several hippocampal regions suggests that reelin and nNOS may work synergistically to promote glutamatergic function, and the loss of this coexpression in heterozygous reeler mice may underlie some of the behavioral deficits observed in these animals.

  12. Mifepristone prevents stress-induced apoptosis in newborn neurons and increases AMPA receptor expression in the dentate gyrus of C57/BL6 mice.

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    María Llorens-Martín

    Full Text Available Chronic stress produces sustained elevation of corticosteroid levels, which is why it is considered one of the most potent negative regulators of adult hippocampal neurogenesis (AHN. Several mood disorders are accompanied by elevated glucocorticoid levels and have been linked to alterations in AHN, such as major depression (MD. Nevertheless, the mechanism by which acute stress affects the maturation of neural precursors in the dentate gyrus is poorly understood. We analyzed the survival and differentiation of 1 to 8 week-old cells in the dentate gyrus of female C57/BL6 mice following exposure to an acute stressor (the Porsolt or forced swimming test. Furthermore, we evaluated the effects of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR antagonist mifepristone on the cell death induced by the Porsolt test. Forced swimming induced selective apoptotic cell death in 1 week-old cells, an effect that was abolished by pretreatment with mifepristone. Independent of its antagonism of GR, mifepristone also induced an increase in the percentage of 1 week-old cells that were AMPA(+. We propose that the induction of AMPA receptor expression in immature cells may mediate the neuroprotective effects of mifepristone, in line with the proposed antidepressant effects of AMPA receptor potentiators.

  13. Maternal Exposure to Valproic Acid Primarily Targets Interneurons Followed by Late Effects on Neurogenesis in the Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus in Rat Offspring.

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    Watanabe, Yousuke; Murakami, Tomoaki; Kawashima, Masashi; Hasegawa-Baba, Yasuko; Mizukami, Sayaka; Imatanaka, Nobuya; Akahori, Yumi; Yoshida, Toshinori; Shibutani, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is used to establish models of experimental autism. The present study investigated the developmental exposure effect of VPA on postnatal hippocampal neurogenesis in accordance with the exposure scheme of OECD Test Guideline 426 adopted for developmental neurotoxicity. Pregnant rats were administered drinking water containing 0, 667, or 2000 ppm VPA from gestational day 6 until day 21 post-delivery. In the subgranular zone (SGZ) and granule cell layer (GCL) of offspring, the number of granule cell lineage subpopulations remained unchanged upon weaning. However, in the hilus of the dentate gyrus, the number of reelin(+) interneurons decreased at ≥667 ppm, and the number of PVALB(+) or GAD67(+) interneurons decreased at 2000 ppm. Conversely, Reln and Gad1 transcript levels increased at 2000 ppm, but Pvalb and Grin2d decreased, in the dentate gyrus. At the adult stage, PCNA(+) proliferating SGZ cells, NeuN(+) postmitotic SGZ/GCL neurons, and ARC(+) or COX2(+) GCL neurons increased at ≥667 ppm. In the dentate hilus, decreases in GAD67(+) interneuron subpopulations and Grin2d transcript levels sustained at 2000 ppm. These results suggested that VPA primarily targets interneurons by developmental exposure, and this is followed by late effects on granule cell lineages, likely by influencing SGZ cell proliferation and synaptic plasticity. A reduced population of reelin(+) or PVALB(+) interneurons did not affect distribution of granule cell lineage subpopulations upon weaning. The late effect on neurogenesis, which resulted in increased GCL neurons, might be the result of a sustained decrease in GAD67(+) interneurons expressing NR2D encoded by Grin2d.

  14. The impact of chronic stress on neurogenesis in hippocampal dentate gyrus in rats%慢性应激对大鼠海马齿状回神经发生的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴萍

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the impact of chronic stress on proliferation and maturation of newborn nerve cells in hippocampal dentate gyrus in rats. Methods: The chronic stress rat models were established by chronic bondage method and evaluated their spatial learning and memory abilities by the Morris water maze. Furthermore, immunofluorescence staining and confocal microscopy were used to observe the changes of DCX-positive cell number and the length of dendrites in the DC region of dentate gyrus after chronic stress. Results: The escape latency in model group (48. 13 ±4. 7) second was significantly longer than that in control group (13. 64 ±3. 55) second. The number of platform crossing was significantly less in model group ( 1. 33 ±0. 09) than in the control group (2.75 ±0. 16) (both P<0.05). Compared with control group (37.89 ±9.4) .model group (37. 89 ±9.4) had significantly decreased DCX positive cell number in DC region in hippocampal denate gyrus. The total length of dendrites of DCX positive cells in DC region in hippocampal denate gyrus was significantly shorter in model group ( 168. 44 ±9. 46) μm than in control group (235. 67 ± 19. 57) μm ( both P < 0.05). Conclusion:Chronic stress could inhibit the proliferation and maturation of newborn nerve cells in rats, which might affect the learning and memory abilities of rats.%目的:探讨慢性应激对大鼠海马齿状回(DG)新生神经细胞增殖及成熟的影响.方法:用慢性束缚法制作大鼠慢性应激模型,利用Morris水迷宫试验对其进行空间学习记忆功能的评价,并通过免疫荧光染色及共聚焦显微镜成像技术观察慢性应激后海马DG区DCX阳性细胞的数量及树突长度的变化.结果:模型组大鼠在水迷宫实验中的逃避潜伏期为(48.13±4.7)s,明显长于对照组的(13.64±3.55)s;模型组大鼠在限定时间内穿越平台的次数为(1.33 ±0.09)次,明显少于对照组的(2.75±0.16)次,差异均有统计学意义(均P <0

  15. Effects of unpredictable chronic stress on behavior and brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in CA3 subfield and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in different aged rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ying; JI Yong-juan; JIANG Hong; LIU De-xiang; ZHANG Qian; FAN Shu-jian; PAN Fang

    2009-01-01

    Background Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a stress-responsive intercellular messenger modifying hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity. The interaction between stress and age in BDNF expression is currently not fully understood. This study was conducted to observe unpredictable stress effect on behavior and BDNF expression in CA3 subfield (CA3) and dentate gyrus of hippocampus in different aged rats. Methods Forty-eight Wistar rats of two different ages (2 months and 15 months) were randomly assigned to six groups: two control groups and four stress groups. The rats in the stress group received three weeks of unpredictable mild stress. The depression state and the stress level of the animals were determined by sucrose preference test and observation of exploratory behavior in an open field (OF) test. The expressions of BDNF in CA3 and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus were measured using immunohistochemistry. Results Age and stress had different effects on the behavior of different aged animals (age: F=6.173, P <0.05, stress: F=6.056, P <0.05). Stress was the main factor affecting sucrose preference (F=123.608, P <0.05). Decreased sucrose preference and suppressed behavior emerged directly following stress, lasting to at least the eighth day after stress in young animals (P <0.05). The older stress rats showed a lower sucrose preference than young stress rats (P <0.05). Older control rats behaved differently from the younger control animals in the OF test, spending more time in the central square (P <0.05), exhibiting fewer vertical movements (P <0.05) and less grooming (P <0.05). Following exposure to stress, older-aged rats showed no obvious changes in vertical movement and grooming. This indicates that aged rats were in an unexcited state before the stress period, and responded less to stressful stimuli than younger rats. There was significantly lower BDNF expression in the CA3 and dentate gyrus regions of the hippocampus following stress

  16. The effects of prolonged administration of norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors on long-term potentiation in dentate gyrus, and on tests of spatial and object recognition memory in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walling, Susan G; Milway, J Stephen; Ingram, Matthew; Lau, Catherine; Morrison, Gillian; Martin, Gerard M

    2016-02-01

    Phasic norepinephrine (NE) release events are involved in arousal, novelty detection and in plasticity processes underlying learning and memory in mammalian systems. Although the effects of phasic NE release events on plasticity and memory are prevalently documented, it is less understood what effects chronic NE reuptake inhibition and sustained increases in noradrenergic tone, might have on plasticity and cognitive processes in rodent models of learning and memory. This study investigates the effects of chronic NE reuptake inhibition on hippocampal plasticity and memory in rats. Rats were administered NE reuptake inhibitors (NRIs) desipramine (DMI; 0, 3, or 7.5mg/kg/day) or nortriptyline (NTP; 0, 10 or 20mg/kg/day) in drinking water. Long-term potentiation (LTP; 200 Hz) of the perforant path-dentate gyrus evoked potential was examined in urethane anesthetized rats after 30-32 days of DMI treatment. Short- (4-h) and long-term (24-h) spatial memory was tested in separate rats administered 0 or 7.5mg/kg/day DMI (25-30 days) using a two-trial spatial memory test. Additionally, the effects of chronically administered DMI and NTP were tested in rats using a two-trial, Object Recognition Test (ORT) at 2- and 24-h after 45 and 60 days of drug administration. Rats administered 3 or 7.5mg/kg/day DMI had attenuated LTP of the EPSP slope but not the population spike at the perforant path-dentate gyrus synapse. Short- and long-term memory for objects is differentially disrupted in rats after prolonged administration of DMI and NTP. Rats that were administered 7.5mg/kg/day DMI showed decreased memory for a two-trial spatial task when tested at 4-h. In the novel ORT, rats receiving 0 or 7.5mg/kg/day DMI showed a preference for the arm containing a Novel object when tested at both 2- and 24-h demonstrating both short- and long-term memory retention of the Familiar object. Rats that received either dose of NTP or 3mg/kg/day DMI showed impaired memory at 2-h, however this

  17. Excitotoxic median raphe lesions aggravate working memory storage performance deficits caused by scopolamine infusion into the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus in the inhibitory avoidance task in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babar E.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The interactions between the median raphe nucleus (MRN serotonergic system and the septohippocampal muscarinic cholinergic system in the modulation of immediate working memory storage performance were investigated. Rats with sham or ibotenic acid lesions of the MRN were bilaterally implanted with cannulae in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and tested in a light/dark step-through inhibitory avoidance task in which response latency to enter the dark compartment immediately after the shock served as a measure of immediate working memory storage. MRN lesion per se did not alter response latency. Post-training intrahippocampal scopolamine infusion (2 and 4 µg/side produced a more marked reduction in response latencies in the lesioned animals compared to the sham-lesioned rats. Results suggest that the immediate working memory storage performance is modulated by synergistic interactions between serotonergic projections of the MRN and the muscarinic cholinergic system of the hippocampus.

  18. Bumetanide promotes neural precursor cell regeneration and dendritic development in the hippocampal dentate gyrus in the chronic stage of cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang-shu Xu; Xuan Sun; Cheng-guang Song; Xiao-peng Mu; Wen-ping Ma; Xing-hu Zhang; Chuan-sheng Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Bumetanide has been shown to lessen cerebral edema and reduce the infarct area in the acute stage of cerebral ischemia. Few studies focus on the effects of bumetanide on neuroprotection and neurogenesis in the chronic stage of cerebral ischemia. We established a rat model of cerebral ischemia by injecting endothelin-1 in the left cortical motor area and left corpus striatum. Seven days later, bumeta-nide 200 µg/kg/day was injected into the lateral ventricle for 21 consecutive days with a mini-osmotic pump. Results demonstrated that the number of neuroblasts cells and the total length of dendrites increased, escape latency reduced, and the number of platform crossings increased in the rat hippocampal dentate gyrus in the chronic stage of cerebral ischemia. These ifndings suggest that bumetanide promoted neural precursor cell regeneration, dendritic development and the recovery of cognitive function, and protected brain tissue in the chronic stage of ischemia.

  19. Essential oils from two Allium species exert effects on cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the mouse dentate gyrus by modulating brain-derived neurotrophic factor and acetylcholinesterase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hyo Young; Lee, Kwon Young; Yoo, Dae Young; Kim, Jong Whi; Yoo, Miyoung; Lee, Sanghee; Yoo, Ki-Yeon; Yoon, Yeo Sung; Choi, Jung Hoon; Hwang, In Koo

    2016-11-03

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of oil products from two Allium species: Allium sativum (garlic) and Allium hookeri (Chinese chives) on cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the mouse dentate gyrus. Using corn oil as a vehicle, the essential oil from garlic (10 ml/kg), or Chinese chives (10 ml/kg) was administered orally to 9-week-old mice once a day for 3 weeks. One hour following the last treatment, a novel object recognition test was conducted and the animals were killed 2 h after the test. In comparison to the vehicle-treated group, garlic essential oil (GO) treatment resulted in significantly increased exploration time and discrimination index during the novel object recognition test, while Chinese chives essential oil (CO) reduced the exploration time and discrimination index in the same test. In addition, the number of Ki67-immunoreactive proliferating cells and doublecortin-immunoreactive neuroblasts significantly increased in the dentate gyrus of GO-treated animals. However, administration of CO significantly decreased cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation. Administration of GO significantly increased brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels and decreased acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in the hippocampal homogenates. In contrast, administration of CO decreased BDNF protein levels and had no significant effect on AChE activity, compared to that in the vehicle-treated group. These results suggest that GO significantly improves novel object recognition as well as increases cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation, by modulating hippocampal BDNF protein levels and AChE activity, while CO impairs novel object recognition and decreases cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation, by reducing BDNF protein levels in the hippocampus.

  20. Defective synaptic transmission and structure in the dentate gyrus and selective fear memory impairment in the Rsk2 mutant mouse model of Coffin-Lowry syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morice, Elise; Farley, Séverine; Poirier, Roseline; Dallerac, Glenn; Chagneau, Carine; Pannetier, Solange; Hanauer, André; Davis, Sabrina; Vaillend, Cyrille; Laroche, Serge

    2013-10-01

    The Coffin-Lowry syndrome (CLS) is a syndromic form of intellectual disability caused by loss-of-function of the RSK2 serine/threonine kinase encoded by the rsk2 gene. Rsk2 knockout mice, a murine model of CLS, exhibit spatial learning and memory impairments, yet the underlying neural mechanisms are unknown. In the current study, we examined the performance of Rsk2 knockout mice in cued, trace and contextual fear memory paradigms and identified selective deficits in the consolidation and reconsolidation of hippocampal-dependent fear memories as task difficulty and hippocampal demand increase. Electrophysiological, biochemical and electron microscopy analyses were carried out in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus to explore potential alterations in neuronal functions and structure. In vivo and in vitro electrophysiology revealed impaired synaptic transmission, decreased network excitability and reduced AMPA and NMDA conductance in Rsk2 knockout mice. In the absence of RSK2, standard measures of short-term and long-term potentiation (LTP) were normal, however LTP-induced CREB phosphorylation and expression of the transcription factors EGR1/ZIF268 were reduced and that of the scaffolding protein SHANK3 was blocked, indicating impaired activity-dependent gene regulation. At the structural level, the density of perforated and non-perforated synapses and of multiple spine boutons was not altered, however, a clear enlargement of spine neck width and post-synaptic densities indicates altered synapse ultrastructure. These findings show that RSK2 loss-of-function is associated in the dentate gyrus with multi-level alterations that encompass modifications of glutamate receptor channel properties, synaptic transmission, plasticity-associated gene expression and spine morphology, providing novel insights into the mechanisms contributing to cognitive impairments in CLS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Neurogliaform cells in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus as feed-forward γ-aminobutyric acidergic modulators of entorhinal-hippocampal interplay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Caren; Szabadics, János; Tamás, Gábor; Soltesz, Ivan

    2011-06-01

    Feed-forward inhibition from molecular layer interneurons onto granule cells (GCs) in the dentate gyrus is thought to have major effects regulating entorhinal-hippocampal interactions, but the precise identity, properties, and functional connectivity of the GABAergic cells in the molecular layer are not well understood. We used single and paired intracellular patch clamp recordings from post-hoc-identified cells in acute rat hippocampal slices and identified a subpopulation of molecular layer interneurons that expressed immunocytochemical markers present in members of the neurogliaform cell (NGFC) class. Single NGFCs displayed small dendritic trees, and their characteristically dense axonal arborizations covered significant portions of the outer and middle one-thirds of the molecular layer, with frequent axonal projections across the fissure into the CA1 and subicular regions. Typical NGFCs exhibited a late firing pattern with a ramp in membrane potential prior to firing action potentials, and single spikes in NGFCs evoked biphasic, prolonged GABA(A) and GABA(B) postsynaptic responses in GCs. In addition to providing dendritic GABAergic inputs to GCs, NGFCs also formed chemical synapses and gap junctions with various molecular layer interneurons, including other NGFCs. NGFCs received low-frequency spontaneous synaptic events, and stimulation of perforant path fibers revealed direct, facilitating synaptic inputs from the entorhinal cortex. Taken together, these results indicate that NGFCs form an integral part of the local molecular layer microcircuitry generating feed-forward inhibition and provide a direct GABAergic pathway linking the dentate gyrus to the CA1 and subicular regions through the hippocampal fissure.

  2. Effects of acute altered gravity during parabolic flight and/or vestibular loss on cell proliferation in the rat dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yiwen; Gliddon, Catherine M; Aitken, Phillip; Stiles, Lucy; Machado, Marie-Laure; Philoxene, Bruno; Denise, Pierre; Smith, Paul F; Besnard, Stephane

    2017-07-27

    Both parabolic flight, i.e. a condition of altered gravity, and loss of vestibular function, have been suggested to affect spatial learning and memory, which is known to be influenced by neurogenesis in the hippocampus. In this study we investigated whether short alternated micro- and hyper-gravity stimulations during parabolic flight and/or loss of vestibular function, would alter cell proliferation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of rats, by measuring the number of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-incorporated cells. Rats were randomly allocated to the following experimental groups: (1) sham transtympanic saline injection only (n=5); (2) bilateral vestibular deafferentation (BVD) by sodium arsanilate transtympanic injection only (n=5); (3) sham treatment and parabolic flight (n=5); (4) BVD and parabolic flight (n=6). Forty-two days following transtympanic injection, the animals were subjected to parabolic flight in an awake restrained condition after habituation. A modified Airbus A300 aircraft was flown on a parabolic path, creating 20s of 1.8G during both climbing and descending and 22s of 0G at the apex of each parabola. The no flight animals were subjected to the same housing for the same duration. Immediately after the parabolic flight or control ground condition, animals were injected with BrdU (300mg/kg, i.p). Twenty-four hs after BrdU injection, rats were sacrificed. BrdU immunolabelling was performed and the number of BrdU(+ve) cells in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus was quantified using a modified fractionator method. BVD caused a large and significant reduction in the number of BrdU-positive cells compared to sham animals (P≤0.0001); however, flight and all interactions were non-significant. These results indicate that BVD significantly decreased cell proliferation irrespective of the short exposure to altered/modified gravity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Neurotoxic Doses of Chronic Methamphetamine  Trigger Retrotransposition of the Identifier Element  in Rat Dorsal Dentate Gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moszczynska, Anna; Burghardt, Kyle J; Yu, Dongyue

    2017-03-06

    Short interspersed elements (SINEs) are typically silenced by DNA hypermethylation in somatic cells, but can retrotranspose in proliferating cells during adult neurogenesis. Hypomethylation caused by disease pathology or genotoxic stress leads to genomic instability of SINEs. The goal of the present investigation was to determine whether neurotoxic doses of binge or chronic methamphetamine (METH) trigger retrotransposition of the identifier (ID) element, a member of the rat SINE family, in the dentate gyrus genomic DNA. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with saline or high doses of binge or chronic METH and sacrificed at three different time points thereafter. DNA methylation analysis, immunohistochemistry and next-generation sequencing (NGS) were performed on the dorsal dentate gyrus samples. Binge METH triggered hypomethylation, while chronic METH triggered hypermethylation of the CpG-2 site. Both METH regimens were associated with increased intensities in poly(A)-binding protein 1 (PABP1, a SINE regulatory protein)-like immunohistochemical staining in the dentate gyrus. The amplification of several ID element sequences was significantly higher in the chronic METH group than in the control group a week after METH, and they mapped to genes coding for proteins regulating cell growth and proliferation, transcription, protein function as well as for a variety of transporters. The results suggest that chronic METH induces ID element retrotransposition in the dorsal dentate gyrus and may affect hippocampal neurogenesis.

  4. Rapid and long-term induction of effector immediate early genes (BDNF, Neuritin and Arc) in peri-infarct cortex and dentate gyrus after ischemic injury in rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rickhag, Karl Mattias; Teilum, Maria; Wieloch, Tadeusz

    2007-01-01

    the spatial and temporal activation pattern for these genes during the first 24 h of reperfusion following 2-h occlusion of the middle cerebral artery. Neuritin showed a persistent activation in frontal-cingulate cortex while Arc displayed a biphasic response. Also, in dentate gyrus, activation was observed...

  5. Neurotoxic Doses of Chronic Methamphetamine  Trigger Retrotransposition of the Identifier Element  in Rat Dorsal Dentate Gyrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Moszczynska

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Short interspersed elements (SINEs are typically silenced by DNA hypermethylation in somatic cells, but can retrotranspose in proliferating cells during adult neurogenesis. Hypomethylation caused by disease pathology or genotoxic stress leads to genomic instability of SINEs. The goal of the present investigation was to determine whether neurotoxic doses of binge or chronic methamphetamine (METH trigger retrotransposition of the identifier (ID element, a member of the rat SINE family, in the dentate gyrus genomic DNA. Adult male Sprague‐Dawley rats were treated with saline or high doses of binge or chronic METH and sacrificed at three different time points thereafter. DNA methylation analysis, immunohistochemistry and next‐generation sequencing (NGS were performed on the dorsal dentate gyrus samples. Binge METH triggered hypomethylation, while chronic METH triggered hypermethylation of the CpG‐2 site. Both METH regimens were associated with increased intensities in poly(A‐binding protein 1 (PABP1, a SINE regulatory protein‐like immunohistochemical staining in the dentate gyrus. The amplification of several ID element sequences was significantly higher in the chronic METH group than in the control group a week after METH, and they mapped to genes coding for proteins regulating cell growth and proliferation, transcription, protein function as well as for a variety of transporters. The results suggest that chronic METH induces ID element retrotransposition in the dorsal dentate gyrus and may affect hippocampal neurogenesis.

  6. Effects of lithium on the synaptic plasticity in dentate gyrus region of rat hippocampus%锂对大鼠海马齿状回区神经元突触可塑性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟桂生; 阮迪云; 葛少宇; 汪铭; 陈聚涛

    2002-01-01

    AIM To investigate the mechanism of the-rapeutic action of lithium with respect to long-term potentiation(LTP) elicited in dentate gyrus(DG) region of rat hippocampus. METHODS To use conventional extracellular recording technique in hippocampal slices in vitro. RESULTS Lithium was found to reversibly increase excitatory postsynaptic potentials in the DG region of rat hippocampus. Under control conditions, titanic stimulation (100 Hz, 1 s) of medial perforans pathway induced LTP. Acute treatment of low concentration lithium (2, 6 mmol*L-1) did not affect the LTP induced by titanic stimulation, while its higher concentration (10 mmol*L-1) inhibited the amplitude of LTP in the DG region of rat hippocampus. Furthermore, lithium treatment (10 mmol*L-1) decreased paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) measured at 50 ms inter-pulse interval while, at lower concentrations, lithium treatments (2, 6 mmol*L-1) did not affect PPF significantly. We also found that the effects of lithium (10 mmol*L-1) on PPF were different at different [Ca2+]o. CONCLUSIONLithium can inhibit the LTP magnitude in rat hippocampus probably through presynaptic mechanisms. These alterations of neurophysiological responses may be related to the therapeutic action of lithium salts in mania and depression as well as producing side effects of lithium chemotherapy.%目的从齿状回长时程增强效应(LTP)方面研究锂的治疗作用机理.方法细胞外记录离体海马脑片神经元兴奋性突触后电位(EPSP).结果锂可逆地增强EPSP的幅度.高频刺激 (100 Hz, 1 s)对照组大鼠海马穿通纤维,在海马齿状回(DG)区记录的EPSP幅度会持续增高,可以诱导出明显的突触后LTP.若用10 mmol*L-1锂处理大鼠海马脑片,则诱导的LTP幅度明显降低,但低浓度锂(2, 6 mmol*L-1)不影响LTP的幅度;10 mmol*L-1锂明显抑制海马脑片DG区的脉冲间隔(IPI)为50 ms的双脉冲易化效应(PPF),而低浓度锂(2, 6 mmol*L-1)处理则不影响PPF(IPI, 50 ms);在不

  7. Effects of Buyang Huanwu decoction on cell proliferation and differentiation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of aged rats following cerebral ischemia/reperfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianfeng Gao; Fenghua Lü; Changlian Zhu

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The mobilization of endogenous stem cells is an effective way to promote repair following ischemic brain damage. Buyang Huanwu decoction (BHD) can effectively improve cerebral blood flow and protect against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion damage.OBJECTIVE: To study the effects of BHD on cell proliferation and differentiation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of rats following cerebral infarction, to investigate the protective effects of BHD against cerebral infarction, and to analyze the dose-effect relationship.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: This randomized, controlled, animal study was performed at the Laboratory of Department of Physiology, Henan College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, China from June 2007 to February 2008.MATERIALS: A total of 36 male, Sprague Dawley rats, aged 20-21 months, were equally and randomly assigned to the following groups: sham operation, model control, and nimodipine, as well as high-dose, moderate-dose, and low-dose BHD. BHD was composed of milkvetch root, Chinese angelica, red peony root, earthworm, peach seed, safflower, and Szechwan Iovage rhizome, which were provided by the Outpatient Department, Henan College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, China.METHODS: The Chinese medicinal ingredients described above were decocted. The external carotid artery was ligated in rats from the sham operation group. Rat models of focal cerebral infarction were established by middle cerebral artery occlusion in the model control and nimodipine groups, as well as the high-dose, moderate-dose, and low-dose BHD groups. The drugs were administered by gavage 5 days, as well as 2 hours, prior to model induction. Rats in the nimodipine group were daily administered a 6 mg/kg nimodipine suspension by gavage. Rats in the high-dose, moderate-dose, and low-dose BHD groups were administered daily 26, 13, and 6.5 g/kg BHD, respectively. Rats in the sham operation and model control groups were treated with an equal volume of saline.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

  8. Overexpression of Mineralocorticoid Receptors in the Mouse Forebrain Partly Alleviates the Effects of Chronic Early Life Stress on Spatial Memory, Neurogenesis and Synaptic Function in the Dentate Gyrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Kanatsou

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Evidence from human studies suggests that high expression of brain mineralocorticoid receptors (MR may promote resilience against negative consequences of stress exposure, including childhood trauma. We examined, in mice, whether brain MR overexpression can alleviate the effects of chronic early life stress (ELS on contextual memory formation under low and high stress conditions, and neurogenesis and synaptic function of dentate gyrus granular cells. Male mice were exposed to ELS by housing the dam with limited nesting and bedding material from postnatal day (PND 2 to 9. We investigated the moderating role of MRs by using forebrain-specific transgenic MR overexpression (MR-tg mice. Low-stress contextual (i.e., object relocation memory formation was hampered by ELS in wildtype but not MR-tg mice. Anxiety like behavior and high-stress contextual (i.e., fear memory formation were unaffected by ELS and/or MR expression level. At the cellular level, an interaction effect was observed between ELS and MR overexpression on the number of doublecortin-positive cells, with a significant difference between the wildtype ELS and MR-tg ELS groups. No interaction was found regarding Ki-67 and BrdU staining. A significant interaction between ELS and MR expression was further observed with regard to mEPSCs and mIPSC frequency. The ratio of evoked EPSC/IPSC or NMDA/AMPA responses was unaffected. Overall, these results suggest that ELS affects contextual memory formation under low stress conditions as well as neurogenesis and synaptic transmission in dentate granule cells, an effect that can be alleviated by MR-overexpression.

  9. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor, phosphorylated cyclic AMP response element binding protein and neuropeptide Y decline as early as middle age in the dentate gyrus and CA1 and CA3 subfields of the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattiangady, Bharathi; Rao, Muddanna S; Shetty, Geetha A; Shetty, Ashok K

    2005-10-01

    The hippocampus is very susceptible to aging. Severely diminished dentate neurogenesis at middle age is one of the most conspicuous early changes in the aging hippocampus, which is likely linked to an early decline in the concentration of neurotrophic factors and signaling proteins that influence neurogenesis. We analyzed three proteins that are well-known to promote dentate neurogenesis and learning and memory function in the dentate gyrus and the hippocampal CA1 and CA3 subfields of young, middle-aged and aged F344 rats. These include the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), the transcription factor phosphorylated cyclic AMP response element binding protein (p-CREB) and the neuropeptide neuropeptide Y (NPY). The BDNF was analyzed via ELISA and BDNF immunohistochemistry, the p-CREB through densitometric analysis of p-CREB immunopositive cells, and the NPY via stereological counting of NPY-immunopositive interneurons. We provide new evidence that the BDNF concentration, the p-CREB immunoreactivity and the number of NPY immunopositive interneurons decline considerably by middle age in both dentate gyrus and CA1 and CA3 subfields of the hippocampus. However, both BDNF concentration and NPY immunopositive interneuron numbers exhibit no significant decrease between middle age and old age. In contrast, the p-CREB immunoreactivity diminishes further during this period, which is also associated with reduced BDNF immunoreaction within the soma of dentate granule cells and hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Collectively, these results suggest that severely dampened dentate neurogenesis observed at middle age is linked at least partially to reduced concentrations of BDNF, p-CREB and NPY, as each of these proteins is a positive regulator of dentate neurogenesis. Dramatically diminished CREB phosphorylation (and persistently reduced levels of BDNF and NPY) at old age may underlie the learning and memory impairments observed during senescence.

  10. Differential susceptibility to chronic social defeat stress relates to the number of Dnmt3a-immunoreactive neurons in the hippocampal dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammels, Caroline; Prickaerts, Jos; Kenis, Gunter; Vanmierlo, Tim; Fischer, Maximilian; Steinbusch, Harry W M; van Os, Jim; van den Hove, Daniel L A; Rutten, Bart P F

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme DNA methyltransferase 3a (Dnmt3a) is crucially involved in DNA methylation and recent studies have demonstrated that Dnmt3a is functionally involved in mediating and moderating the impact of environmental exposures on gene expression and behavior. Findings in rodents have suggested that DNA methylation is involved in regulating neuronal proliferation and differentiation. So far, it has been shown that chronic social defeat might influence neurogenesis, while susceptibility to social defeat stress is dependent on gene expression changes in the nucleus accumbens and the mesolimbic dopaminergic system. However, the role of Dnmt3a herein has not been fully characterized. Our earlier immunohistochemical work has revealed the existence of two types of Dnmt3a-immunoreactive cells in the mouse hippocampus, of which one represents a distinct type with intense Dnmt3a-immunoreactivity (Dnmt3a type II cells) co-localizing with a marker of recent proliferation. Based on this, we hypothesize that behavioral susceptibility to chronic social defeat stress is linked to (i) Dnmt3a protein levels in the nucleus accumbens and hippocampus, and (ii) to the density of Dnmt3a type II cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. While no differences were found in global levels of Dnmt3a protein expression in the nucleus accumbens and hippocampus, our stereological quantifications indicated a significantly increased density of Dnmt3a type II cells in the dentate gyrus of animals resilient to social defeat stress compared to susceptible and control animals. Further characterization of the Dnmt3a type II cells revealed that these cells were mostly doublecortin (25%) or NeuN (60%) immunopositive, thus defining them as immature and mature neurons. Moreover, negative associations between the density of Dnmt3a type II cells and indices of depressive-like behavior in the sucrose intake and forced swim test were found. These correlational data suggest that DNA methylation via Dnmt3a in the

  11. Protease-activated receptor-1 negatively regulates proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells derived from the hippocampal dentate gyrus of the adult mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Tanaka

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Thrombin-activated protease-activated receptor (PAR-1 regulates the proliferation of neural cells following brain injury. To elucidate the involvement of PAR-1 in the neurogenesis that occurs in the adult hippocampus, we examined whether PAR-1 regulated the proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs derived from the murine hippocampal dentate gyrus. NPC cultures expressed PAR-1 protein and mRNA encoding all subtypes of PAR. Direct exposure of the cells to thrombin dramatically attenuated the cell proliferation without causing cell damage. This thrombin-induced attenuation was almost completely abolished by the PAR antagonist RWJ 56110, as well as by dabigatran and 4-(2-aminoethylbenzenesulfonyl fluoride (AEBSF, which are selective and non-selective thrombin inhibitors, respectively. Expectedly, the PAR-1 agonist peptide (AP SFLLR-NH2 also attenuated the cell proliferation. The cell proliferation was not affected by the PAR-1 negative control peptide RLLFT-NH2, which is an inactive peptide for PAR-1. Independently, we determined the effect of in vivo treatment with AEBSF or AP on hippocampal neurogenesis in the adult mouse. The administration of AEBSF, but not that of AP, significantly increased the number of newly-generated cells in the hippocampal subgranular zone. These data suggest that PAR-1 negatively regulated adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus by inhibiting the proliferative activity of the NPCs.

  12. The role of topography in the transformation of spatiotemporal patterns by a large-scale, biologically realistic model of the rat dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Gene J; Hendrickson, Phillip J; Robinson, Brian S; Song, Dong; Berger, Theodore W

    2013-01-01

    A large-scale, biologically realistic, computational model of the rat hippocampus is being constructed to study the input-output transformation that the hippocampus performs. In the initial implementation, the layer II entorhinal cortex neurons, which provide the major input to the hippocampus, and the granule cells of the dentate gyrus, which receive the majority of the input, are modeled. In a previous work, the topography, or the wiring diagram, connecting these two populations had been derived and implemented. This paper explores the consequences of two features of the topography, the distribution of the axons and the size of the neurons' axon terminal fields. The topography converts streams of independently generated random Poisson trains into structured spatiotemporal patterns through spatiotemporal convergence achievable by overlapping axon terminal fields. Increasing the axon terminal field lengths allowed input to converge over larger regions of space resulting in granule activation across a greater area but did not increase the total activity as a function of time as the number of targets per input remained constant. Additional simulations demonstrated that the total distribution of spikes in space depends not on the distribution of the presynaptic axons but the distribution of the postsynaptic population. Analyzing spike counts emphasizes the importance of the postsynaptic distribution, but it ignores the fact that each individual input may be carrying unique information. Therefore, a metric should be created that relates and tracks individual inputs as they are propagated and integrated through hippocampus.

  13. Propylthiouracil (PTU)-induced hypothyroidism in the developing rat impairs synaptic transmission and plasticity in the dentate gyrus of the adult hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, M E; Paczkowski, C

    2003-10-10

    Reductions in thyroid hormone during critical periods of brain development can have devastating effects on neurological function that are permanent. Neurochemical, molecular and structural alterations in a variety of brain regions have been well documented, but little information is available on the consequences of developmental hypothyroidism on synaptic function. Developing rats were exposed to the thyrotoxicant, propylthiouracil (PTU: 0 or 15 ppm), through the drinking water of pregnant dams beginning on GD18 and extending throughout the lactational period. Male offspring were allowed to mature after termination of PTU exposure at weaning on PND21 and electrophyiological assessments of field potentials in the dentate gyrus were conducted under urethane anesthesia between 2 and 5 months of age. PTU dramatically reduced thyroid hormones on PND21 and produced deficits in body weight that persisted to adulthood. Synaptic transmission was impaired as evidenced by reductions in excitatory postsynaptic potential (EPSP) slope and population spike (PS) amplitudes at a range of stimulus intensities. Long-term potentiation of the EPSP slope was impaired at both modest and strong intensity trains, whereas a paradoxical increase in PS amplitude was observed in PTU-treated animals in response to high intensity trains. These data are the first to describe functional impairments in synaptic transmission and plasticity in situ as a result of PTU treatment and suggest that perturbations in synaptic function may contribute to learning deficits associated with developmental hypothyroidism.

  14. Physical exercise and environment exploration affect synaptogenesis in adult-generated neurons in the rat dentate gyrus: possible role of BDNF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrogini, P; Lattanzi, D; Ciuffoli, S; Betti, M; Fanelli, M; Cuppini, R

    2013-10-09

    A brief training in a pool maze, with or without cognitive tasks, modifies the synaptogenesis and maturation of newborn neurons in adult rat dentate gyrus. These types of trainings have many aspects, including physical activity and exploration. Therefore, to evaluate whether physical exercise and environment exploration are able to affect synapse formation and the maturation of adult-generated neurons, GFP-retrovirus infusion was performed on rats which, on the fourth day after injection, were housed under running conditions or allowed to explore an enriched environment briefly in the absence of exercise for the following three days. Afterward, at the end of the trainings, electrophysiological and morphological studies were conducted. Considering that neurotrophic factors increase after exercise or environment exploration, hippocampal BDNF levels and TrkB receptor activation were evaluated. In this study, we show that both spontaneous physical activity and enriched environment exploration induced synaptogenesis and T-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) currents in very immature neurons. Hippocampal BDNF levels and TrkB receptor activation were determined to be increasing following physical activity and exploration. A possible contribution of BDNF signaling in mediating the observed effects was supported by the use of 7-8-dihydroxyflavone, a selective TrkB agonist, and of ANA-12, an inhibitor of TrkB receptors.

  15. c-fos modulates brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA expression in mouse hippocampal CA3 and dentate gyrus neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Mei; Wu, Yongfei; Fan, Yunxia; Xu, Ming; Zhang, Jianhua

    2006-05-29

    Excess neuronal excitation by glutamate induces neuron cell death, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of acute brain injuries and neurodegenerative diseases. Our previous studies using a mouse with hippocampal c-fos gene deletion showed that c-fos regulates neuronal excitability and excitotoxicity. Moreover, a delayed induction of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein expression in response to kainic acid (KA) treatment was found in c-fos mutant mice compared to wildtype controls, suggesting that c-fos is important in the temporal control of BDNF induction. To further investigate mechanisms of in vivo regulation of c-fos on BDNF expression, we studied the expression of BDNF mRNA and its colocalization with c-Fos protein in the hippocampal formation in the presence and absence of KA. By in situ hybridization, we observed that the c-fos mutant and wildtype mice exhibited similar basal expression of BDNF in the absence of KA. In contrast, the KA-induced BDNF mRNA levels were significantly different in wildtype and c-fos mutant mice in CA3 and dentate gyrus regions. Our findings indicate that c-fos regulates expression of BDNF in distinct neuron populations of the hippocampal formation in vivo.

  16. Effects of pyridoxine on a high-fat diet-induced reduction of cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation depend on cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein in the mouse dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Dae Young; Kim, Woosuk; Yoo, Ki-Yeon; Nam, Sung Min; Chung, Jin Young; Yoon, Yeo Sung; Won, Moo-Ho; Hwang, In Koo

    2012-08-01

    In this study, we challenged pyridoxine to mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) and investigated the effects of pyridoxine on HFD-induced phenotypes such as blood glucose, reduction of cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the dentate gyrus using Ki67 and doublecortin (DCX), respectively. Mice were fed a commercially available low-fat diet (LFD) as control diet or HFD (60% fat) for 8 weeks. After 5 weeks of LFD or HFD treatment, 350 mg/kg pyridoxine was administered for 3 weeks. The administration of pyridoxine significantly decreased body weight in the HFD-treated group. In addition, there were no significant differences in hepatic histology and pancreatic insulin-immunoreactive (-ir) and glucagon-ir cells of the HFD-treated group after pyridoxine treatment. In the HFD-fed group, Ki67-positive nuclei and DCX-ir neuroblasts were significantly decreased in the dentate gyrus compared with those in the LFD-fed mice. However, the administration of pyridoxine significantly increased Ki67-positive nuclei and DCX-ir neuroblasts in the dentate gyrus in both LFD- and HFD-fed mice. In addition, the administration of pyridoxine significantly increased the protein levels of glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and the immunoreactivity of phosphorylated cyclic AMP response element binding protein (pCREB) compared with the vehicle-treated LFD- and HFD-fed mice. In contrast, the administration of pyridoxine significantly decreased HFD-induced malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in the hippocampus. These results showed that pyridoxine supplement reduced the HFD-induced reduction of cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the dentate gyrus via controlling the levels of GAD67, pCREB, BDNF, and MDA.

  17. 慢性镉中毒对小鼠海马齿状回结构的影响%Effect on hippocampal dentate gyrus structure of mice with chronic cadmium poisoning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱俊德; 余资江; 戈果; 刘鲜林; 常傲霜

    2011-01-01

    目的 观察慢性镉中毒对小鼠海马齿状回颗粒层细胞结构的影响.方法 将清洁级4~5月龄昆明种小鼠40只随机分为对照组与镉中毒组,每组20只,雌雄各半.适应性饲养1周后,镉中毒组采用皮下注射氯化镉(2mg/kg),每周2次,连续染毒3个月,对照组同时注射等体积生理盐水.连续喂养3个月后取大脑海马组织分别进行尼氏染色、胶质纤维酸性蛋白(GFAP)、神经元特异性烯醇酶(NSE)免疫组化染色和透射电镜观察.结果 光镜下,尼氏染色与免疫组化染色结果显示,对照组小鼠海马齿状回颗粒层神经元排列整齐、规则,结构完整,胞体较大,细胞轮廓清楚,胞核居中、核仁明显、胞浆尼氏体丰富,均匀分布于核周;胶质细胞分散在海马神经元之间,呈星形或梭形,体积小、核圆形或卵圆形;镉中毒组小鼠海马齿状回颗粒层神经元胞体变小、胞核固缩、胞浆减少,尼氏体明显减少或消失、着色浅,胶质细胞分散在海马神经元之间,体积增大;与对照组相比,镉中毒组海马齿状回颗粒层胶质细胞与NSE阳性神经元的数量增多(P<0.05).电镜下,对照组海马齿状回颗粒层神经元形态规则,胞膜清晰,细胞器丰富,结构完整;镉中毒组神经元胞体轻度水肿,核膜皱褶,核染色质皱缩,胞浆密度降低,细胞器减少,线粒体肿胀,部分透明成空泡.结论 慢性镉中毒可导致小鼠海马齿状回颗粒层神经元减少、星型胶质细胞增多,这些变化可能是镉的神经毒性作用之一.%Objective To observe the morphological changes in granule cell layer on astrocytes and neurons in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) of mice with chronic cadmium poisoning. Methods Forty Kunming mice (4--5 months old) of clean grade were randomly divided into two groups, 20 in each and half of females and males.The rats in cadmium-exposed group were injected subcutaneously with cadmium (CdCI2, 2.0 mg/kg, twice a week

  18. Is Arc mRNA Unique: A Search for mRNAs That Localize to the Distal Dendrites of Dentate Gyrus Granule Cells Following Neural Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A. de Solis

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available There have been several attempts to identify which RNAs are localized to dendrites; however, no study has determined which RNAs localize to the dendrites following the induction of synaptic activity. We sought to identify all RNA transcripts that localize to the distal dendrites of dentate gyrus granule cells following unilateral high frequency stimulation of the perforant pathway (pp-HFS using Sprague Dawley rats. We then utilized laser microdissection (LMD to very accurately dissect out the distal 2/3rds of the molecular layer (ML, which contains these dendrites, without contamination from the granule cell layer, 2 and 4 h post pp-HFS. Next, we purified and amplified RNA from the ML and performed an unbiased screen for 27,000 RNA transcripts using Affymetrix microarrays. We determined that Activity Regulated Cytoskeletal Protein (Arc/Arg3.1 mRNA, exhibited the greatest fold increase in the ML at both timepoints (2 and 4 h. In total, we identified 31 transcripts that increased their levels within the ML following pp-HFS across the two timepoints. Of particular interest is that one of these identified transcripts was an unprocessed micro-RNA (pri-miR132. Fluorescent in situ hybridization and qRT-PCR were used to confirm some of these candidate transcripts. Our data indicate Arc is a unique activity dependent gene, due to the magnitude that its activity dependent transcript localizes to the dendrites. Our study determined other activity dependent transcripts likely localize to the dendrites following neural activity, but do so with lower efficiency compared to Arc.

  19. An associativity requirement for locus coeruleus-induced long-term potentiation in the dentate gyrus of the urethane-anesthetized rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Andrew T; Harley, Carolyn W

    2010-01-01

    Norepinephrine has been hypothesized to provide a learning and memory signal. Norepinephrine long-term potentiation of perforant path input to the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus provides a model for norepinephrine initiated memory processes. However, in vitro, the pairing of perforant path stimulation and norepinephrine is not required for the occurrence of norepinephrine-dependent long-term potentiation. Since bath application of norepinephrine induces long-term changes in 2nd messenger signalling and differs in a number of ways from physiological norepinephrine release, the present study is an in vivo test of the associative requirement for the pairing of perforant path input with norepinephrine to induce long-term potentiation. Phasic activation of the locus coeruleus is provided by glutamate infusion into the locus coeruleus to initiate transient norepinephrine release in the hippocampus of urethane-anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats. Perforant path stimulation (0.067 Hz) was given throughout the experiment in the paired condition. In the unpaired condition perforant path stimulation was interrupted 10 min prior to locus coeruleus activation and resumed 10 min after locus coeruleus activation. Locus coeruleus-induced long-term potentiation of both EPSP slope and population spike only occurred in the pairing condition. This result argues that, in vivo, temporal proximity of locus coeruleus-associated norepinephrine release and perforant path stimulation are required to induce long-term plasticity. The associativity requirement for locus coeruleus activation and perforant path stimulation in vivo is consistent with the hypothesis that norepinephrine can initiate circuit changes supporting learning and memory.

  20. Effects of mild hypothermia on the expression of microtubule-associated protein 2 in neurons of the hippocampal dentate gyrus in a rat model of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian Yang; Feng Zheng; Jiami Wu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is widely accepted that mild hypothermia can protect against injury to cerebral ischemia/reperfusion.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effects of mild hypothermia on microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) expression in the hippocampal dentate gyrus in rats following cerebral ischemia/reperfusion. Also, to study neuronal uhrastructural changes in the dentate gyrus to investigate the mechanism of the protection against injury to cerebral ischemia/reperfusion conferred by mild hypothermia.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: This randomized grouping, neural cell morphology trial was performed at the Laboratory Animal Center of Yijishan Hospital between March and June 2007.MATERIALS: Eighty-five healthy male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly allocated to three groups: mild hyputhermia (n = 40), normothermia (n = 40), and sham-operated (n = 5).METHODS: Cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury was induced by the suture method in the mild hypothermia and normothermia groups, with a threading depth of 180.5 mm. In the sham-operated group, the suture was inserted 15 mm, with no vascular ligation, and was followed by reperfusion 2 hours later. In the sham-operated and normothermia groups, the rat rectal temperature was maintained at 36-37℃; in the mild hypothermia group, it was controlled at 32-33 ℃.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The hippocampal dentate gyrus was serially sectioned for hematoxylin-eosin staining and MAP2 immunohistochemistry. Ultrastructural changes and the MAP2 absorbance value of the hippocampal dentate gyrus were examined by transmission electron microscopy.RESULTS: The sham-operated group exhibited approximately normal ultrastmcture of neurons in the bilateral hippocampal dentate gyms. In the normothermia group, ischemic hippocampal dentate gyms neurons were found with markedly fewer normal mitochondria, greatly proliferated rough endoplasmic reticulum, and a swollen and dysmorphic Golgi. In the mild hypothermia group, at each corresponding time point, these

  1. Anticonvulsive evaluation of THIP in the murine pentylenetetrazole kindling model: lack of anticonvulsive effect of THIP despite functional δ-subunit-containing GABAA receptors in dentate gyrus granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, Charlotte; Boddum, Kim; von Schoubye, Nadia L; Kloppenburg, Alissa; Sønderskov, Kasper; Hansen, Suzanne L; Kristiansen, Uffe

    2017-08-01

    THIP (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol) is a GABAA receptor agonist with varying potencies and efficacies at γ-subunit-containing receptors. More importantly, THIP acts as a selective superagonist at δ-subunit-containing receptors (δ-GABAA Rs) at clinically relevant concentrations. Evaluation of THIP as a potential anticonvulsant has given contradictory results in different animal models and for this reason, we reevaluated the anticonvulsive properties of THIP in the murine pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) kindling model. As loss of δ-GABAA R in the dentate gyrus has been associated with several animal models of epilepsy, we first investigated the presence of functional δ-GABAA receptors. Both immunohistochemistry and Western blot data demonstrated that δ-GABAA R expression is not only present in the dentate gyrus, but also the expression level was enhanced in the early phase after PTZ kindling. Whole-cell patch-clamp studies in acute hippocampal brain slices revealed that THIP was indeed able to induce a tonic inhibition in dentate gyrus granule cells. However, THIP induced a tonic current of similar magnitude in the PTZ-kindled mice compared to saline-treated animals despite the observed upregulation of δ-GABAA Rs. Even in the demonstrated presence of functional δ-GABAA Rs, THIP (0.5-4 mg/kg) showed no anticonvulsive effect in the PTZ kindling model using a comprehensive in vivo evaluation of the anticonvulsive properties. © 2017 The Authors. Pharmacology Research & Perspectives published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd, British Pharmacological Society and American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  2. Short-term environmental enrichment, in the absence of exercise, improves memory, and increases NGF concentration, early neuronal survival, and synaptogenesis in the dentate gyrus in a time-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Amy M; McGarry, Niamh B; Kelly, Aine M

    2013-06-01

    Environmental manipulations can enhance neuroplasticity in the brain, with enrichment-induced cognitive improvements being linked to increased expression of growth factors, such as neurotrophins, and enhanced hippocampal neurogenesis. There is, however, a great deal of variation in environmental enrichment protocols used in the literature, making it difficult to assess the role of particular aspects of enrichment upon memory and the underlying associated mechanisms. This study sought to evaluate the efficacy of environmental enrichment, in the absence of exercise, as a cognitive enhancer and assess the role of Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), neurogenesis and synaptogenesis in this process. We report that rats housed in an enriched environment for 3 and 6 weeks (wk) displayed improved recognition memory, while rats enriched for 6 wk also displayed improved spatial and working memory. Neurochemical analyses revealed significant increases in NGF concentration and subgranular progenitor cell survival (as measured by BrdU+ nuclei) in the dentate gyrus of rats enriched for 6 wk, suggesting that these cellular changes may mediate the enrichment-induced memory improvements. Further analysis revealed a significant positive correlation between recognition task performance and BrdU+ nuclei. In addition, rats enriched for 6 wk showed a significant increase in expression of synaptophysin and synapsin I in the dentate gyrus, indicating that environmental enrichment can increase synaptogenesis. These data indicate a time-dependent cognitive-enhancing effect of environmental enrichment that is independent of physical activity. These data also support a role for increased concentration of NGF in dentate gyrus, synaptogenesis, and neurogenesis in mediating this effect.

  3. Toward a self-wired active reconstruction of the hippocampal trisynaptic loop: DG-CA3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory J. Brewer

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian hippocampus functions to encode and retrieve memories by transiently changing synaptic strengths, yet encoding in individual subregions for transmission between regions remains poorly understood. Toward the goal of better understanding the coding in the trisynaptic pathway from the dentate gyrus (DG to the CA3 and CA1, we report a novel microfabricated device that divides a micro-electrode array into two compartments of separate hippocampal network subregions connected by axons that grow through 3x10x400 μm tunnels. Gene expression by qPCR demonstrated selective enrichment of separate DG, CA3 and CA1 subregions. Reconnection of DG to CA3 altered burst dynamics associated with marked enrichment of GAD67 in DG and GFAP in CA3. Surprisingly, DG axon spike propagation was preferentially unidirectional to the CA3 region at 0.5 m/s with little reverse transmission. Therefore, select hippocampal subregions intrinsically self-wire in anatomically appropriate patterns and maintain their distinct subregion phenotype without external inputs

  4. Commissurally projecting inhibitory interneurons of the rat hippocampal dentate gyrus: a colocalization study of neuronal markers and the retrograde tracer Fluoro-gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappone, C A; Sloviter, R S

    2001-12-24

    Improved methods for detecting neuronal markers and the retrograde tracer Fluoro-Gold (FG) were used to identify commissurally projecting neurons of the rat hippocampus. In addition to the dentate hilar mossy cells and CA3 pyramidal cells shown previously to transport retrograde tracers after injection into the dorsal hippocampus, FG-positive interneurons of the dentate granule cell layer and hilus were detected in numbers greater than previously reported. FG labeling of interneurons was variable among animals, but was as high as 96% of hilar somatostatin-positive interneurons, 84% of parvalbumin-positive cells of the granule cell layer and hilus combined, and 33% of hilar calretinin-positive cells. By comparison, interneurons of the dentate molecular layer and all hippocampal subregions were conspicuously FG-negative. Whereas hilar mossy cells and CA3 pyramidal cells were FG-labeled throughout the longitudinal axis, FG-positive interneurons exhibited a relatively homotopic distribution. "Control" injections of FG into the neocortex, septum, and ventral hippocampus demonstrated that the homotopic labeling of dentate interneurons was injection site-specific, and that the CA1-CA3 interneurons unlabeled by contralateral hippocampal FG injection were nonetheless able to transport FG from the septum. These data suggest a hippocampal organizing principle according to which virtually all commissurally projecting hippocampal neurons share the property of being monosynaptic targets of dentate granule cells. Because granule cells innervate their exclusively ipsilateral target cells in a highly lamellar pattern, these results suggest that focal granule cell excitation may result in commissural inhibition of the corresponding "twin" granule cell lamella, thereby lateralizing and amplifying the influence of the initiating discharge.

  5. Expression of brain lipid binding protein in rat hippocampus dentate gyrus after traumatic brain injury%大鼠创伤性脑损伤后海马齿状回中脑脂结合蛋白的表达变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛伟峰; 金国华; 衣昕; 秦建兵; 田美玲

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the change of brain lipid binding protein( BLBP ) expression in hippocampus dentate gyrus( DG ) at different time points after traumatic brain injury ( TBI ). Methods Seventy-two rats were divided into the injured group, sham group and control group randomly, and then were subjected to a lateral fluid percussion injury ( FPI ). Western blotting was used to detect BLBP expression. Brains were sectioned for immunofluorescence staining of BLBP and Vimentin at the time points of 1, 3, 7, 14 days after TBI. Results The results of Western blotting showed that the BLBP expression was lower than that of control group at 1 day post injury( P < 0. 01 ) and reached the peak compared with the other groups at 7 days after injury( P < 0. 01 ), then descended at 14 days compared with control group after injury( P < 0. 01 ). The changes of BLBP and Vimentin double-label positive cells were consistent with the results of Western blotting. The BLBP and Vimentin double-label positive cells were found mainly at the subgranular zone of ipsilateral injured hippocampus DG, and most of them were radial glia like cells; BLBP and Vimentin double-labelled positive cells were found at the hilus of DG at 7days after injury, and most of them looked like reactive astrocytes. Conclusion The expression of BLBP in DG after TBI decreased firstly, then increased and reached peak at 7 days after injury, decreased dramatically again at last. The phenomenon may be associated with hippocampus neurogenesis and neural rehabilitation after TBI.%目的 观察大鼠创伤性脑损伤(TBI)后不同时间点海马结构齿状回中脑脂结合蛋白(BLBP)的表达变化.方法 将72只SD大鼠随机分为脑损伤组、假手术组和空白对照组,制备大鼠颅脑液压损伤模型,伤后1、3、7、14d分别行海马组织Western blotting和BLBP、波形蛋白(Vimentin)免疫荧光双标检测.结果 Western blotting结果显示,伤后1d BLBP蛋白含量相

  6. Seizure induces activation of multiple subtypes of neural progenitors and growth factors in hippocampus with neuronal maturation confined to dentate gyrus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Indulekha, Chandrasekharan L.; Sanalkumar, Rajendran [Neuro Stem Cell Biology Laboratory, Department of Neurobiology, Rajiv Gandhi Center for Biotechnology, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 695 014 (India); Thekkuveettil, Anoopkumar [Molecular Medicine, Biomedical Technology Wing, Sree Chitra Thirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala (India); James, Jackson, E-mail: jjames@rgcb.res.in [Neuro Stem Cell Biology Laboratory, Department of Neurobiology, Rajiv Gandhi Center for Biotechnology, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 695 014 (India)

    2010-03-19

    Adult hippocampal neurogenesis is altered in response to different physiological and pathological stimuli. GFAP{sup +ve}/nestin{sup +ve} radial glial like Type-1 progenitors are considered to be the resident stem cell population in adult hippocampus. During neurogenesis these Type-1 progenitors matures to GFAP{sup -ve}/nestin{sup +ve} Type-2 progenitors and then to Type-3 neuroblasts and finally differentiates into granule cell neurons. In our study, using pilocarpine-induced seizure model, we showed that seizure initiated activation of multiple progenitors in the entire hippocampal area such as DG, CA1 and CA3. Seizure induction resulted in activation of two subtypes of Type-1 progenitors, Type-1a (GFAP{sup +ve}/nestin{sup +ve}/BrdU{sup +ve}) and Type-1b (GFAP{sup +ve}/nestin{sup +ve}/BrdU{sup -ve}). We showed that majority of Type-1b progenitors were undergoing only a transition from a state of dormancy to activated form immediately after seizures rather than proliferating, whereas Type-1a showed maximum proliferation by 3 days post-seizure induction. Type-2 (GFAP{sup -ve}/nestin{sup +ve}/BrdU{sup +ve}) progenitors were few compared to Type-1. Type-3 (DCX{sup +ve}) progenitors showed increased expression of immature neurons only in DG region by 3 days after seizure induction indicating maturation of progenitors happens only in microenvironment of DG even though progenitors are activated in CA1 and CA3 regions of hippocampus. Also parallel increase in growth factors expression after seizure induction suggests that microenvironmental niche has a profound effect on stimulation of adult neural progenitors.

  7. Corneal kindled C57BL/6 mice exhibit saturated dentate gyrus long-term potentiation and associated memory deficits in the absence of overt neuron loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remigio, Gregory J; Loewen, Jaycie L; Heuston, Sage; Helgeson, Colin; White, H Steve; Wilcox, Karen S; West, Peter J

    2017-09-01

    Memory deficits have a significant impact on the quality of life of patients with epilepsy and currently no effective treatments exist to mitigate this comorbidity. While these cognitive comorbidities can be associated with varying degrees of hippocampal cell death and hippocampal sclerosis, more subtle changes in hippocampal physiology independent of cell loss may underlie memory dysfunction in many epilepsy patients. Accordingly, animal models of epilepsy or epileptic processes exhibiting memory deficits in the absence of cell loss could facilitate novel therapy discovery. Mouse corneal kindling is a cost-effective and non-invasive model of focal to bilateral tonic-clonic seizures that may exhibit memory deficits in the absence of cell loss. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that corneal kindled C57BL/6 mice exhibit spatial pattern processing and memory deficits in a task reliant on DG function and that these impairments would be concurrent with physiological remodeling of the DG as opposed to overt neuron loss. Following corneal kindling, C57BL/6 mice exhibited deficits in a DG-associated spatial memory test - the metric task. Compatible with this finding, we also discovered saturated, and subsequently impaired, LTP of excitatory synaptic transmission at the perforant path to DGC synapse. This saturation of LTP was consistent with evidence suggesting that perforant path to DGC synapses in kindled mice had previously experienced LTP-like changes to their synaptic weights: increased postsynaptic depolarizations in response to equivalent presynaptic input and significantly larger amplitude AMPA receptor mediated spontaneous EPSCs. Additionally, there was evidence for kindling-induced changes in the intrinsic excitability of DGCs: reduced threshold to population spikes under extracellular recording conditions and significantly increased membrane resistances observed in DGCs. Importantly, quantitative immunohistochemical analysis revealed hippocampal astrogliosis

  8. Expression of Caspase-3 in Dentate Gyrus of Adult Mice with Chronic Arsenic Poisoning%慢性砷中毒对小鼠齿状回caspase-3表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙宝飞; 康朝胜; 余资江; 李玉飞

    2011-01-01

    目的 观察慢性砷中毒对成年小鼠齿状回神经元的形态学影响,探讨慢性砷中毒对成年小鼠脑部的神经毒性机制.方法 选取健康成年昆明小鼠80只,雌雄各半,分为对照组、高、中、低剂量砷染毒组,每组20只,高、中、低剂量砷染毒组分别以As03的1/5、1/10、1/40 LD50(9、4.5、1.1 mg/kg)灌胃染毒,对照组以蒸馏水灌胃,连续3个月.利用免疫组织化学和蛋白印迹技术观察小鼠齿状回部位神经元半胱氨酸蛋白水解酶-3(caspase-3)蛋白的表达.结果 免疫组化染色显示,与正常对照组比较,砷染毒组小鼠齿状回caspase-3阳性细胞明显增多(P<0.01),阳性反应产物平均光密度增高(P<0.01),同时蛋白印迹结果显示随砷中毒剂量的增加,小鼠齿状回caspase-3蛋白含量随之增加(P<0.01),各剂量组雌雄间各数据差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 慢性砷中毒导致脑齿状回神经元细胞凋亡可能与齿状回细胞caspase-3增加有关,同时脑细胞caspase-3随砷浓度增加而增高.%Objective To investigate the effects of chronic arsenic exposure at different doses on dentate gyrus neurons in adult mice. Methods Eighty healthy adult Kunming mice, 20-22 g, were randomly divided into four groups: normal control group, low-dose group, moderate dose group and high dose group, 20 in each (10 males and 10 females in each group), each group was fed respectively with distilled water, 1/5 LD50, 1/10 LD50 and 1/40 LD50 As203 for 3 consecutive months, and adjusting the dose according to their weight changes. The content of arsenic in brain was determined. The expression of caspase-3 in dentate gyrus neurons was detected by western blotting and immunohistochemistry and analyzed by morphology methods. Results Compared with normal control group, groups of arsenic poisoning had been the main changes: caspase-3 immunohistochemical staining positive cells increased significantly (P0.05). Conclusion The obvious up

  9. Compact DG modules and Gorenstein DG algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    When the base connected cochain DG algebra is cohomologically bounded, it is proved that the difference between the amplitude of a compact DG module and that of the DG algebra is just the projective dimension of that module. This yields the unboundedness of the cohomology of non-trivial regular DG algebras. When A is a regular DG algebra such that H(A) is a Koszul graded algebra, H(A) is proved to have the finite global dimension. And we give an example to illustrate that the global dimension of H(A) may be infinite, if the condition that H(A) is Koszul is weakened to the condition that A is a Koszul DG algebra. For a general regular DG algebra A, we give some equivalent conditions for the Gorensteiness. For a finite connected DG algebra A, we prove that Dc(A) and Dc(Aop) admit Auslander-Reiten triangles if and only if A and Aop are Gorenstein DG algebras. When A is a non-trivial regular DG algebra such that H(A) is locally finite, Dc(A) does not admit Auslander-Reiten triangles. We turn to study the existence of Auslander-Reiten triangles in Dlbf(A) and Dlbf(Aop) instead, when A is a regular DG algebra.

  10. Blockade of NMDA receptor subtype NR2B prevents seizures but not apoptosis of dentate gyrus neurons in bacterial meningitis in infant rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Täuber Martin G

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excitotoxic neuronal injury by action of the glutamate receptors of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA subtype have been implicated in the pathogenesis of brain damage as a consequence of bacterial meningitis. The most potent and selective blocker of NMDA receptors containing the NR2B subunit is (R,S-alpha-(4-hydroxyphenyl-beta-methyl-4-(phenylmethyl-1-piperid inepropanol (RO 25-6981. Here we evaluated the effect of RO 25-6981 on hippocampal neuronal apoptosis in an infant rat model of meningitis due to Streptococcus pneumoniae. Animals were randomized for treatment with RO 25-6981 at a dosage of either 0.375 mg (15 mg/kg; n = 28 or 3.75 mg (150 mg/kg; n = 15 every 3 h or an equal volume of sterile saline (250 μl; n = 40 starting at 12 h after infection. Eighteen hours after infection, animals were assessed clinically and seizures were observed for a period of 2 h. At 24 h after infection animals were sacrificed and brains were examined for apoptotic injury to the dentate granule cell layer of the hippocampus. Results Treatment with RO 25-6981 had no effect on clinical scores, but the incidence of seizures was reduced (P Conclusions Treatment with a highly selective blocker of NMDA receptors containing the NR2B subunit failed to protect hippocampal neurons from injury in this model of pneumococcal meningitis, while it had some beneficial effect on the incidence of seizures.